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Sample records for contaminant-sediment interactions volume

  1. Solid-waste leach characteristics and contaminant-sediment interactions. Volume 1, Batch leach and adsorption tests and sediment characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Serne, R.J.; LeGore, V.L.; Cantrell, K.J.; Lindenmeier, C.W.; Campbell, J.A.; Amonette, J.E.; Conca, J.L.; Wood, M.I.

    1993-10-01

    The objectives of this report and subsequent volumes include describing progress on (1) development of conceptual-release models for Hanford Site defense solid-waste forms; (2) optimization of experimental methods to quantify the release from contaminants from solid wastes and their subsequent interactions with unsaturated sediments; and (3) creation of empirical data for use as provisional source term and retardation factors that become input parameters for performance assessment analyses for future Hanford disposal units and baseline risk assessments for inactive and existing disposal units.

  2. Solid waste leach characteristics and contaminant-sediment interactions Volume 2: Contaminant transport under unsaturated moisture contents

    SciTech Connect

    Lindenmeier, C.W.; Serne, R.J.; Conca, J.L.

    1995-09-01

    The objectives of this report and subsequent volumes include describing progress on (1) development and optimization of experimental methods to quantify the release of contaminants from solid wastes and their subsequent interactions with unsaturated sediments and (2) the creation of empirical data that become input parameters to performance assessment (PA) analyses for future Hanford Site disposal units and baseline risk assessments for inactive and existing solid waste disposal units. For this report, efforts focused on developing methodologies to evaluate contaminant transport in Trench 8 (W-5 Burial Ground) sediments under unsaturated (vadose zone) conditions. To accomplish this task, a series of flow-through column tests were run using standard saturated column systems, Wierenga unsaturated column systems (both commercial and modified), and the Unsaturated Flow Apparatus (UFA). The reactants investigated were {sup 85}Sr, {sup 236}U, and {sup 238}U as reactive tracers, and tritium as a non-reactive tracer. Results indicate that for moderately unsaturated conditions (volumetric water contents >50 % of saturation), the Wierenga system performed reasonably well such that long water residence times (50-147 h) were achieved, and reasonably good steady-state flow conditions were maintained. The major drawbacks in using this system for reactive tracer work included (1) the inability to achieve reproducible and constant moisture content below 50% of saturation, (2) the four to six month time required to complete a single test, and (3) the propensity for mechanical failure resulting from laboratory power outages during the prolonged testing period.

  3. Remediation of Hylebos Waterway (Tacoma, WA): A common sense approach to determining contaminated sediment volumes

    SciTech Connect

    Fuglevand, P.; Revelas, G.; Striplin, B.; Striplin, P.

    1995-12-31

    Hylebos Waterway is a three mile long industrial waterway located in Commencement Bay, Washington. A CERCLA program RI/FS, conducted in the mid-1980`s, found that surface sediments (0--2 cm) were contaminated with chlorinated organics, PAHs, and metals. An ongoing pre-remedial design effort, initiated in 1993, is evaluating natural recovery and four sediment confinement options for sediments that exceed programmatic sediment quality objectives: confined aquatic disposal, near-shore disposal, upland disposal, and in-place capping. The first three confinement options require dredging of contaminated sediments which, in turn, requires accurate determination of the three dimensional distribution of contaminated sediments. To place a maximum depth boundary on the sediment sampling approach, isopach maps were created by contouring the difference between the deepest historic dredging depth and current depth along the entire waterway. These isopach maps revealed the pattern of post-industrial sediment deposition in the waterway. For example, in some areas, little or no sediment accumulation had occurred in the navigation channel. Conversely, significant accumulation had occurred along some channel edges and in near-shore areas as the result of deposition, bank sloughing and historic dredging/filling activities. The isopach maps were used to place a lower depth boundary on waterway-wide sediment contamination and to establish the maximum core sampling depth required to reach ``native`` sediments, i.e., those below the deepest historic dredging depth and believed to be uncontaminated. Subsequent geo-technical and chemical analyses of the core samples confirmed the accuracy of the isopach approach. The data generated from this sampling effort are being used to estimate the areas and volumes of subtidal sediments requiring remedial action.

  4. INTERACTIONS AMONG PHOSPHATE AMENDMENTS, MICROBES AND URANIUM MOBILITY IN CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Knox, A

    2007-08-30

    The use of sequestering agents for the transformation of radionuclides in low concentrations in contaminated soils/sediments offers considerable potential for long-term environmental cleanup. This study evaluated the influence of four phosphate amendments and two microbial amendments on U availability. The synchrotron X-ray fluorescence mapping of the untreated U-contaminated sediment showed that U was closely associated with Mn. All tested phosphate amendments reduced aqueous U concentration more than 90%, likely due to formation of insoluble phosphate precipitates. The addition of A. piechaudii and P. putida alone were found to reduce U concentrations 63% and 31% respectively. Uranium sorption in phosphate treatments was significantly reduced in the presence of microbes. However, increased microbial activity in the treated sediment led to reduction of phosphate effectiveness. The average U concentration in 1 M MgCl{sub 2} extract from U amended sediment was 437 {micro}g/kg, but in the same sediment without microbes (autoclaved sediment), the extractable U concentration was only 103 {micro}g/kg. When the autoclaved amended sediment was treated with autoclaved biological apatite, U concentration in the 1 M MgCl{sub 2} extract was {approx}0 {micro}g/kg. Together these tests suggest that microbes may enhance U leaching and reduce phosphate amendment remedial effectiveness.

  5. Contaminated Sediment Core Profiling

    EPA Science Inventory

    Evaluating the environmental risk of sites containing contaminated sediments often poses major challenges due in part to the absence of detailed information available for a given location. Sediment core profiling is often utilized during preliminary environmental investigations ...

  6. Reservoir and contaminated sediments impacts in high-Andean environments: Morphodynamic interactions with biogeochemical processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escauriaza, C. R.; Contreras, M. T.; Müllendorff, D. A.; Pasten, P.; Pizarro, G. E.

    2014-12-01

    Rapid changes due to anthropic interventions in high-altitude environments, such as the Altiplano region in South America, require new approaches to understand the connections between physical and biogeochemical processes. Alterations of the water quality linked to the river morphology can affect the ecosystems and human development in the long-term. The future construction of a reservoir in the Lluta river, located in northern Chile, will change the spatial distribution of arsenic-rich sediments, which can have significant effects on the lower parts of the watershed. In this investigation we develop a coupled numerical model to predict and evaluate the interactions between morphodynamic changes in the Lluta reservoir, and conditions that can potentially desorb arsenic from the sediments. Assuming that contaminants are mobilized under anaerobic conditions, we calculate the oxygen concentration within the sediments to study the interactions of the delta progradation with the potential arsenic release. This work provides a framework for future studies aimed to analyze the complex connections between morphodynamics and water quality, when contaminant-rich sediments accumulate in a reservoir. The tool can also help to design effective risk management and remediation strategies in these extreme environments. Research has been supported by Fondecyt grant 1130940 and CONICYT/FONDAP Grant 15110017

  7. Quantifying the eroded volume of mercury-contaminated sediment using terrestrial laser scanning at Stocking Flat, Deer Creek, Nevada County, California, 2010–13

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Howle, James F.; Alpers, Charles N.; Bawden, Gerald W.; Bond, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    High-resolution ground-based light detection and ranging (lidar), also known as terrestrial laser scanning, was used to quantify the volume of mercury-contaminated sediment eroded from a stream cutbank at Stocking Flat along Deer Creek in the Sierra Nevada foothills, about 3 kilometers west of Nevada City, California. Terrestrial laser scanning was used to collect sub-centimeter, three-dimensional images of the complex cutbank surface, which could not be mapped non-destructively or in sufficient detail with traditional surveying techniques.The stream cutbank, which is approximately 50 meters long and 8 meters high, was surveyed on four occasions: December 1, 2010; January 20, 2011; May 12, 2011; and February 4, 2013. Volumetric changes were determined between the sequential, three-dimensional lidar surveys. Volume was calculated by two methods, and the average value is reported. Between the first and second surveys (December 1, 2010, to January 20, 2011), a volume of 143 plus or minus 15 cubic meters of sediment was eroded from the cutbank and mobilized by Deer Creek. Between the second and third surveys (January 20, 2011, to May 12, 2011), a volume of 207 plus or minus 24 cubic meters of sediment was eroded from the cutbank and mobilized by the stream. Total volumetric change during the winter and spring of 2010–11 was 350 plus or minus 28 cubic meters. Between the third and fourth surveys (May 12, 2011, to February 4, 2013), the differencing of the three-dimensional lidar data indicated that a volume of 18 plus or minus 10 cubic meters of sediment was eroded from the cutbank. The total volume of sediment eroded from the cutbank between the first and fourth surveys was 368 plus or minus 30 cubic meters.

  8. Quantifying the eroded volume of mercury-contaminated sediment using terrestrial laser scanning at Stocking Flat, Deer Creek, Nevada County, California, 2010–13

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Howle, James F.; Alpers, Charles N.; Bawden, Gerald W.; Bond, Sandra

    2016-07-28

    High-resolution ground-based light detection and ranging (lidar), also known as terrestrial laser scanning, was used to quantify the volume of mercury-contaminated sediment eroded from a stream cutbank at Stocking Flat along Deer Creek in the Sierra Nevada foothills, about 3 kilometers west of Nevada City, California. Terrestrial laser scanning was used to collect sub-centimeter, three-dimensional images of the complex cutbank surface, which could not be mapped non-destructively or in sufficient detail with traditional surveying techniques.The stream cutbank, which is approximately 50 meters long and 8 meters high, was surveyed on four occasions: December 1, 2010; January 20, 2011; May 12, 2011; and February 4, 2013. Volumetric changes were determined between the sequential, three-dimensional lidar surveys. Volume was calculated by two methods, and the average value is reported. Between the first and second surveys (December 1, 2010, to January 20, 2011), a volume of 143 plus or minus 15 cubic meters of sediment was eroded from the cutbank and mobilized by Deer Creek. Between the second and third surveys (January 20, 2011, to May 12, 2011), a volume of 207 plus or minus 24 cubic meters of sediment was eroded from the cutbank and mobilized by the stream. Total volumetric change during the winter and spring of 2010–11 was 350 plus or minus 28 cubic meters. Between the third and fourth surveys (May 12, 2011, to February 4, 2013), the differencing of the three-dimensional lidar data indicated that a volume of 18 plus or minus 10 cubic meters of sediment was eroded from the cutbank. The total volume of sediment eroded from the cutbank between the first and fourth surveys was 368 plus or minus 30 cubic meters.

  9. TOOLS FOR ASSESSING MONITORED NATURAL RECOVERY OF PCB-CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Management of contaminated sediments poses many challenges due to varied contaminants and volumes of sediments to manage. dredging, capping, and monitored natural recovery (MNR) are the primary approaches at this time for managing contaminated sediment risks. Understanding how we...

  10. A PHYSICAL, CHEMICAL, AND BIOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT OF MONITORED NATURAL RECOVERY OF PCB-CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS IN LAKE HARTWELL, CLEMSON, NC

    EPA Science Inventory

    Management of contaminated sediments poses significant challenges due to varied contaminants and volumes of sediments to manage. Dredging, capping, and monitored natural recovery (MNR) are the primary approaches for managing the contaminated sediment risks. Understanding how eff...

  11. PHYSICAL, CHEMICAL AND BIOLOGICAL TOOLS FOR EVALUATING, MONITORED NATURAL RECOVERY OF PCB CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS IN LAKE HARTWELL, CLEMSON, SC

    EPA Science Inventory

    Management of contaminated sediments poses significant challenges due to varied contaminants and volumes of sediments to
    manage. Dredging, capping, and monitored natural recovery (MNR) are the primary approaches for managing the contaminated sediment risks.
    Understanding ho...

  12. Remediation technologies for contaminated sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Swanson, L.M.

    1995-09-01

    Although soil and groundwater remediation has been conducted for many years, sediment remediation is still in its infancy. Regulatory agencies are now beginning to identify areas where contaminated sediments exist and evaluate their environmental impact. As these evaluations are completed, the projects must shift focus to how these sediments can be remediated. Also as the criteria for aquatic disposal of dredged sediments become more stringent, remediation technologies must be developed to address contaminated sediments generated by maintenance dredging.This report describes the various issues and possible technologies for sediment remediation.

  13. HANDBOOK: REMEDIATION OF CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Contaminated sediments may pose risks to both human and environmental health. Such sediments may be found in

    large sites, such as the harbors of industrialized ports. However, they are also frequently found in smaller sites, such as streams, lakes, bayous, and rivers. In r...

  14. Beneficial Use Of Contaminated Sediment

    EPA Science Inventory

    The western portion of the Lake George Branch of the Indian Harbor Canal (IHC) is no longer used for commercial purposes, but contains petroleum contaminated sediments. The IHC is considered an important habitat for many animal species. Several future development projects have ...

  15. A MULTI-ORD LAB AND REGIONAL ASSESSMENT OF MONITORED NATURAL RECOVERY OF PCB-CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS IN LAKE HARTWELL, CLEMSON, SC

    EPA Science Inventory

    Management of contaminated sediments poses many challenges due to varied contaminants and volumes of sediments to manage. Dredging, capping, and monitored natural recovery (MNR) are the primary approaches for managing the contaminated sediment risks. Understanding how well the ...

  16. Remediation technologies for oil-contaminated sediments.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Ashutosh; Liu, Yu

    2015-12-30

    Oil-contaminated sediments pose serious environmental hazards for both aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. Innovative and environmentally compatible technologies are urgently required to remove oil-contaminated sediments. In this paper, various physical, chemical and biological technologies are investigated for the remediation of oil-contaminated sediments such as flotation and washing, coal agglomeration, thermal desorption, ultrasonic desorption, bioremediation, chemical oxidation and extraction using ionic liquids. The basic principles of these technologies as well as their advantages and disadvantages for practical application have been discussed. A combination of two or more technologies is expected to provide an innovative solution that is economical, eco-friendly and adaptable. PMID:26414316

  17. Remediation technologies for oil-contaminated sediments.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Ashutosh; Liu, Yu

    2015-12-30

    Oil-contaminated sediments pose serious environmental hazards for both aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. Innovative and environmentally compatible technologies are urgently required to remove oil-contaminated sediments. In this paper, various physical, chemical and biological technologies are investigated for the remediation of oil-contaminated sediments such as flotation and washing, coal agglomeration, thermal desorption, ultrasonic desorption, bioremediation, chemical oxidation and extraction using ionic liquids. The basic principles of these technologies as well as their advantages and disadvantages for practical application have been discussed. A combination of two or more technologies is expected to provide an innovative solution that is economical, eco-friendly and adaptable.

  18. Contaminated sediment dynamics in peatland headwaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuttleworth, Emma; Clay, Gareth; Evans, Martin; Hutchinson, Simon; Rothwell, James

    2016-04-01

    Peatlands are an important store of soil carbon, provide multiple ecosystem services, and when located in close proximity to urban and industrial areas, can also act as sinks of atmospherically deposited heavy metals. The near-surface layer of the blanket peats of the Peak District National Park, UK, is severely contaminated with high concentrations of anthropogenically derived, atmospherically deposited lead (Pb). These peats are severely degraded, and there is increasing concern that erosion is releasing considerable quantities of this legacy pollution into surface waters. Despite substantial research into Pb dynamics in peatlands formal description of the possible mechanisms of contaminated sediment mobilisation is limited. However, there is evidence to suggest that a substantial proportion of contaminated surface sediment may be redistributed elsewhere in the catchment. This study uses the Pb contamination stored near the peat's surface as a fingerprint to trace contaminated sediment dynamics and storage in three severely degraded headwater catchments. Erosion is exposing high concentrations of Pb on interfluve surfaces, and substantial amounts of reworked contaminated material are stored on other catchment surfaces (gully walls and floors). We propose a variety of mechanisms as controls of Pb release and storage on the different surfaces, including: (i) wind action on interfluves; (ii) the aspect of gully walls, and (iii) gully depth. Vegetation also plays an important role in retaining contaminated sediment on all surfaces.

  19. Ocean acidification increases the toxicity of contaminated sediments.

    PubMed

    Roberts, David A; Birchenough, Silvana N R; Lewis, Ceri; Sanders, Matthew B; Bolam, Thi; Sheahan, Dave

    2013-02-01

    Ocean acidification (OA) may alter the behaviour of sediment-bound metals, modifying their bioavailability and thus toxicity. We provide the first experimental test of this hypothesis with the amphipod Corophium volutator. Amphipods were exposed to two test sediments, one with relatively high metals concentrations (Σmetals 239 mg kg(-1) ) and a reference sediment with lower contamination (Σmetals 82 mg kg(-1) ) under conditions that mimic current and projected conditions of OA (390-1140 μatm pCO2 ). Survival and DNA damage was measured in the amphipods, whereas the flux of labile metals was measured in the sediment and water column (WC) using Diffusive Gradients in Thin-films. The contaminated sediments became more acutely toxic to C. volutator under elevated pCO2 (1140 μatm). There was also a 2.7-fold increase in DNA damage in amphipods exposed to the contaminated sediment at 750 μatm pCO2 , as well as increased DNA damage in organisms exposed to the reference sediment, but only at 1140 μatm pCO2 . The projected pCO2 concentrations increased the flux of nickel and zinc to labile states in the WC and pore water. However, the increase in metal flux at elevated pCO2 was equal between the reference and contaminated sediments or, occasionally, greater from reference sediments. Hence, the toxicological interaction between OA and contaminants could not be explained by e ffects of pH on metal speciation. We propose that the additive physiological effects of OA and contaminants will be more important than changes in metal speciation in determining the responses of benthos to contaminated sediments under OA. Our data demonstrate clear potential for near-future OA to increase the susceptibility of benthic ecosystems to contaminants. Environmental policy should consider contaminants within the context of changing environmental conditions. Specifically, sediment metals guidelines may need to be reevaluated to afford appropriate environmental protection under future

  20. Ecological benefits of contaminated sediment remediation.

    PubMed

    Zarull, Michael A; Hartig, John H; Krantzberg, Gail

    2002-01-01

    Contaminated sediment has been identified as a source of ecological impacts in marine and freshwater systems throughout the world, and the importance of the contaminated sediment management issue continues to increase in all industrialized countries. In many areas, dredging or removal of sediments contaminated with nutrients, metals, oxygen-demanding substances, and persistent toxic organic chemicals has been employed as a form of environmental remediation. In most situations, however, the documentation of the sediment problem has not been quantitatively coupled to ecological impairments. In addition, the lack of long-term, postactivity research and monitoring for most projects has impeded a better understanding of the ecological significance of sediment contamination. Establishing quantitatively the ecological significance of sediment-associated contamination in any area is a difficult time- and resource-consuming exercise. It is, however, absolutely essential that it be done. Such documentation will likely be used as the justification for remedial and rehabilitative action(s) and also as the rationale for proposing when intervention is necessary in one place but not another. Bounding the degree of ecological impact (at least semiquantitatively) provides for realistic expectations for improvement if sediment remediation is to be pursued. It should also provide essential information on linkages that could be used in rehabilitating other ecosystem components such as fish or wildlife habitat. The lack of information coupling contaminated sediment to specific ecological impairments has, in many instances, precluded a clear estimate of how much sediment requires action to be taken, why, and what improvements can be expected to existing impairment(s) over time. Also, it has likely resulted in either a delay in remedial action or abandonment of the option altogether. A clear understanding of ecological links not only provides adequate justification for a cleanup program

  1. Toxicity of lead-contaminated sediment to mallards

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heinz, G.H.; Hoffman, D.J.; Sileo, L.; Audet, D.J.; LeCaptain, L.J.

    1999-01-01

    Because consumption of lead-contaminated sediment has been suspected as the cause of waterfowl mortality in the Coeur d?Alene River basin in Idaho, we studied the bioavailability and toxicity of this sediment to mallards (Anas platyrhynchos). In experiment 1, one of 10 adult male mallards died when fed a pelleted commercial duck diet that contained 24% lead-contaminated sediment (with 3,400 μg/g lead in the sediment). Protoporphyrin levels in the blood increased as the percentage of lead-contaminated sediment in the diet increased. Birds fed 24% lead-contaminated sediment exhibited atrophy of the breast muscles, green staining of the feathers around the vent, viscous bile, green staining of the gizzard lining, and renal tubular intranuclear inclusion bodies. Mallards fed 24% lead-contaminated sediment had means of 6.1 μg/g of lead in the blood and 28 μg/g in the liver (wet-weight basis) and 1,660 μg/g in the feces (dry-weight basis). In experiment 2, we raised the dietary concentration of the lead-contaminated sediment to 48%, but only about 20% sediment was actually ingested due to food washing by the birds. Protoporphyrin levels were elevated in the lead-exposed birds, and all of the mallards fed 48% lead-contaminated sediment had renal tubular intranuclear inclusion bodies. The concentrations of lead in the liver were 9.1 μg/g for mallards fed 24% lead-contaminated sediment and 16 μg/g for mallards fed 48% lead-contaminated sediment. In experiment 3, four of five mallards died when fed a ground corn diet containing 24% lead-contaminated sediment (with 4,000 μg/g lead in this sample of sediment), but none died when the 24% lead-contaminated sediment was mixed into a nutritionally balanced commercial duck diet; estimated actual ingestion rates for sediment were 14% and 17% for the corn and commercial diets. Lead exposure caused elevations in protoporphyrin, and four of the five mallards fed 24% lead-contaminated sediment in a commercial diet and all five

  2. GEOELECTRICAL EVIDENCE OF MICROBIAL DEGRADATION OF DIESEL CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The alteration of physical properties by microbial activity in petroleum contaminated sediments was investigated using geophysical techniques in laboratory column experiments. Microbial population growth was determined by the Most Probable Number technique (MPN), community dynami...

  3. USING SPMDS TO ASSESS MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES FOR PCB CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract: Dredging in-place treatment, capping and monitored natural recovery, used together or separately are the primary approaches for managing contaminated sediment risks. Understanding how well different approaches work in different environments is critical for choosing an...

  4. USING SPMDS TO ACCESS MANAGMENT STRATEGIES FOR PCB CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dredging, in-place treatment, capping and monitored natural recovery, used together or separately are the primary approaches for managing contaminated sediment risks. Understanding how well different approaches work in different environments is critical for choosing an appropria...

  5. USING SPMDS TO ACCESS MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES FOR PCB CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dredging, in-place treatment, capping and monitored natural recovery, used together or separately are the primary approaches for managing contaminated sediment risks. Understanding how well different approaches work in different environments is critical for choosing an appropria...

  6. NATIONAL CONFERENCE ON MANAGEMENT AND TREATMENT OF CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS: PROCEEDINGS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Conference on Management and Treatment of Contaminated Sediment was held in Cincinnati, OH, May 13 to 14, 1997. This technology transfer meeting was held for 213 professionals from various EPA divisions and other organizations, including Environment Canada, the U.S. ...

  7. Mixture design and treatment methods for recycling contaminated sediment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Kwok, June S H; Tsang, Daniel C W; Poon, Chi-Sun

    2015-01-01

    Conventional marine disposal of contaminated sediment presents significant financial and environmental burden. This study aimed to recycle the contaminated sediment by assessing the roles and integration of binder formulation, sediment pretreatment, curing method, and waste inclusion in stabilization/solidification. The results demonstrated that the 28-d compressive strength of sediment blocks produced with coal fly ash and lime partially replacing cement at a binder-to-sediment ratio of 3:7 could be used as fill materials for construction. The X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that hydration products (calcium hydroxide) were difficult to form at high sediment content. Thermal pretreatment of sediment removed 90% of indigenous organic matter, significantly increased the compressive strength, and enabled reuse as non-load-bearing masonry units. Besides, 2-h CO2 curing accelerated early-stage carbonation inside the porous structure, sequestered 5.6% of CO2 (by weight) in the sediment blocks, and acquired strength comparable to 7-d curing. Thermogravimetric analysis indicated substantial weight loss corresponding to decomposition of poorly and well crystalline calcium carbonate. Moreover, partial replacement of contaminated sediment by various granular waste materials notably augmented the strength of sediment blocks. The metal leachability of sediment blocks was minimal and acceptable for reuse. These results suggest that contaminated sediment should be viewed as useful resources.

  8. NHEERL CONTAMINATED SEDIMENT RESEARCH MULTI-YEAR IMPLEMENTATION PLAN (2005)

    EPA Science Inventory

    ORD has developed a multi-year plan (MYP) called the Contaminated Sites MYP to address the research needs of EPA's Office of Superfund Remediation and Technology Innovation (OSRTI). One of the long-term goals of the Contaminated Sites MYP relates to contaminated sediments, and t...

  9. Mixture design and treatment methods for recycling contaminated sediment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Kwok, June S H; Tsang, Daniel C W; Poon, Chi-Sun

    2015-01-01

    Conventional marine disposal of contaminated sediment presents significant financial and environmental burden. This study aimed to recycle the contaminated sediment by assessing the roles and integration of binder formulation, sediment pretreatment, curing method, and waste inclusion in stabilization/solidification. The results demonstrated that the 28-d compressive strength of sediment blocks produced with coal fly ash and lime partially replacing cement at a binder-to-sediment ratio of 3:7 could be used as fill materials for construction. The X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that hydration products (calcium hydroxide) were difficult to form at high sediment content. Thermal pretreatment of sediment removed 90% of indigenous organic matter, significantly increased the compressive strength, and enabled reuse as non-load-bearing masonry units. Besides, 2-h CO2 curing accelerated early-stage carbonation inside the porous structure, sequestered 5.6% of CO2 (by weight) in the sediment blocks, and acquired strength comparable to 7-d curing. Thermogravimetric analysis indicated substantial weight loss corresponding to decomposition of poorly and well crystalline calcium carbonate. Moreover, partial replacement of contaminated sediment by various granular waste materials notably augmented the strength of sediment blocks. The metal leachability of sediment blocks was minimal and acceptable for reuse. These results suggest that contaminated sediment should be viewed as useful resources. PMID:25464304

  10. Innovative Capping Technology To Prevent The Migration of Toxic Chemicals From Contaminated Sediments

    EPA Science Inventory

    Capping is a common strategy for decreasing the risk associated with contaminated sediments in lakes and streams. Historically, caps have been designed to physically isolate contaminated sediments and prevent the transport of contaminants from sediments into the water above them...

  11. Mercury contaminated sediment sites—An evaluation of remedial options

    SciTech Connect

    Randall, Paul M.; Chattopadhyay, Sandip

    2013-08-15

    Mercury (Hg) is a naturally-occurring element that is ubiquitous in the aquatic environment. Though efforts have been made in recent years to decrease Hg emissions, historically-emitted Hg can be retained in the sediments of aquatic bodies where they may be slowly converted to methylmercury (MeHg). Consequently, Hg in historically-contaminated sediments can result in high levels of significant exposure for aquatic species, wildlife and human populations consuming fish. Even if source control of contaminated wastewater is achievable, it may take a very long time, perhaps decades, for Hg-contaminated aquatic systems to reach relatively safe Hg levels in both water and surface sediment naturally. It may take even longer if Hg is present at higher concentration levels in deep sediment. Hg contaminated sediment results from previous releases or ongoing contributions from sources that are difficult to identify. Due to human activities or physical, chemical, or biological processes (e.g. hydrodynamic flows, bioturbation, molecular diffusion, and chemical transformation), the buried Hg can be remobilized into the overlying water. Hg speciation in the water column and sediments critically affect the reactivity (i.e. conversion of inorganic Hg(II) to MeHg), transport, and its exposure to living organisms. Also, geochemical conditions affect the activity of methylating bacteria and its availability for methylation. This review paper discusses remedial considerations (e.g. key chemical factors in fate and transport of Hg, source characterization and control, environmental management procedures, remediation options, modeling tools) and includes practical case studies for cleaning up Hg-contaminated sediment sites. -- Highlights: ► Managing mercury-contaminated sediment sites are challenging to remediate. ► Remediation technologies are making a difference in managing these sites. ► Partitioning plays a dominant role in the distribution of mercury species. ► Mathematical

  12. Influence of sediment storage on downstream delivery of contaminated sediment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Malmon, D.V.; Reneau, S.L.; Dunne, T.; Katzman, D.; Drakos, P.G.

    2005-01-01

    Sediment storage in alluvial valleys can strongly modulate the downstream migration of sediment and associated contaminants through landscapes. Traditional methods for routing contaminated sediment through valleys focus on in-channel sediment transport but ignore the influence of sediment exchanges with temporary sediment storage reservoirs outside the channel, such as floodplains. In theory, probabilistic analysis of particle trajectories through valleys offers a useful strategy for quantifying the influence of sediment storage on the downstream movement of contaminated sediment. This paper describes a field application and test of this theory, using 137Cs as a sediment tracer over 45 years (1952-1997), downstream of a historical effluent outfall at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), New Mexico. The theory is parameterized using a sediment budget based on field data and an estimate of the 137Cs release history at the upstream boundary. The uncalibrated model reasonably replicates the approximate magnitude and spatial distribution of channel- and floodplain-stored 137Cs measured in an independent field study. Model runs quantify the role of sediment storage in the long-term migration of a pulse of contaminated sediment, quantify the downstream impact of upstream mitigation, and mathematically decompose the future 137Cs flux near the LANL property boundary to evaluate the relative contributions of various upstream contaminant sources. The fate of many sediment-bound contaminants is determined by the relative timescales of contaminant degradation and particle residence time in different types of sedimentary environments. The theory provides a viable approach for quantifying the long-term movement of contaminated sediment through valleys. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  13. Active capping technology: a new environmental remediation of contaminated sediment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chang; Zhu, Meng-Ying; Zeng, Guang-Ming; Yu, Zhi-Gang; Cui, Fang; Yang, Zhong-Zhu; Shen, Liu-Qing

    2016-03-01

    The management and treatment of contaminated sediment is a worldwide problem and poses major technical and economic challenges. Nowadays, various attempts have been committed to investigating a cost-effective way in contaminated sediment restoration. Among the remediation options, in situ capping turns out to be a less expensive, less disruptive, and more durable approach. However, by using the low adsorption capacity materials, traditional caps do not always fulfill the reduction of risks that can be destructive for human health, ecosystem, and even natural resources. Active caps, therefore, are designed to employ active materials (activated carbon, apatite, zeolite, organoclay, etc.) to strengthen their adsorption and degradation capacity. The active capping technology promises to be a permanent and cost-efficient solution to contaminated sediments. This paper provides a review on the types of active materials and the ways of these active materials employed in recent active capping studies. Cap design considerations including site-specific conditions, diffusion/advection, erosive forces, and active material selection that should be noticed in an eligible remediation project are also presented. PMID:26762937

  14. Active capping technology: a new environmental remediation of contaminated sediment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chang; Zhu, Meng-Ying; Zeng, Guang-Ming; Yu, Zhi-Gang; Cui, Fang; Yang, Zhong-Zhu; Shen, Liu-Qing

    2016-03-01

    The management and treatment of contaminated sediment is a worldwide problem and poses major technical and economic challenges. Nowadays, various attempts have been committed to investigating a cost-effective way in contaminated sediment restoration. Among the remediation options, in situ capping turns out to be a less expensive, less disruptive, and more durable approach. However, by using the low adsorption capacity materials, traditional caps do not always fulfill the reduction of risks that can be destructive for human health, ecosystem, and even natural resources. Active caps, therefore, are designed to employ active materials (activated carbon, apatite, zeolite, organoclay, etc.) to strengthen their adsorption and degradation capacity. The active capping technology promises to be a permanent and cost-efficient solution to contaminated sediments. This paper provides a review on the types of active materials and the ways of these active materials employed in recent active capping studies. Cap design considerations including site-specific conditions, diffusion/advection, erosive forces, and active material selection that should be noticed in an eligible remediation project are also presented.

  15. Toxicity of lead-contaminated sediment to mute swans

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Day, D.D.; Beyer, W.N.; Hoffman, D.J.; Morton, Alexandra; Sileo, L.; Audet, D.J.; Ottinger, M.A.

    2003-01-01

    Most ecotoxicological risk assessments of wildlife emphasize contaminant exposure through ingestion of food and water. However, the role of incidental ingestion of sediment-bound contaminants has not been adequately appreciated in these assessments. This study evaluates the toxicological consequences of contamination of sediments with metals from hard-rock mining and smelting activities. Lead-contaminated sediments collected from the Coeur d'Alene River Basin in Idaho were combined with either a commercial avian maintenance diet or ground rice and fed to captive mute swans (Cygnus olor) for 6 weeks. Experimental treatments consisted of maintenance or rice diets containing 0, 12 (no rice group), or 24% highly contaminated (3,950 ug/g lead) sediment or 24% reference (9.7 ug/g lead) sediment. Although none of the swans died, the group fed a rice diet containing 24% lead-contaminated sediment were the most severely affected, experiencing a 24% decrease in mean body weight, including three birds that became emaciated. All birds in this treatment group had nephrosis; abnormally dark, viscous bile; and significant (p < 0.05) reductions in hematocrit and hemoglobin concentrations compared to their pretreatment levels. This group also had the greatest mean concentrations of lead in blood (3.2 ug/g), brain (2.2 ug/g), and liver (8.5 ug/g). These birds had significant (alpha = 0.05) increases in mean plasma alanine aminotransferase activity, cholesterol, and uric acid concentrations and decreased plasma triglyceride concentrations compared to all other treatment groups. After 14 days of exposure, mean protoporphyrin concentrations increased substantially, and mean delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase activity decreased by more than 95% in all groups fed diets containing highly contaminated sediments. All swans fed diets that contained 24% lead-contaminated sediment had renal acid-fast intranuclear inclusion bodies, which are diagnostic of lead poisoning in waterfowl. Body

  16. Sediment testing intermittent renewal system for the automated renewal of overlying water in toxicity tests with contaminated sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Benoit, D.A.; Phipps, G.L.; Ankley, G.T.

    1993-01-01

    A sediment testing intermittent renewal (STIR) system (stationary or portable) for invertebrate toxicity testing with contaminated sediments has been successfully developed and thoroughly tested at ERL-Duluth. Both the stationary and portable systems enable the maintenance of acceptable water quality (e.g. DO) through the capability of automatically renewing overlying water in sediment tests at rates ranging from 1 to 21 volume renewals/day. The STIR system not only significantly reduces the labor associated with renewal of overlying water but also affords a gentle exchange of water that results in virtually no sediment resuspension. Both systems can also be installed in a compact vented enclosure to permit safe testing of hazardous contaminated sediments. To date the STIR system has been used extensively for conducting 10-day bulk sediment tests with Chironomus tentans, Hyalella azteca and Lumbriculus variegatus.

  17. Flow volumes for interactive vector field visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Max, N.; Becker, B.; Crawfis, R.

    1993-04-06

    Flow volumes are the volumetric equivalent of stream lines. They provide more information about the vector field being visualized than do stream lines or ribbons. Presented is an efficient method for producing flow volumes, composed of transparently rendered tetrahedra, for use in an interactive system. The problems of rendering, subdivision, sorting, rendering artifacts, and user interaction are dealt with.

  18. Simulation of contaminated sediment transport in White Oak Creek basin

    SciTech Connect

    Bao, Y.; Clapp, R.B.; Brenkert, A.L.; Moore, T.D.; Fontaine, T.A.

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents a systematic approach to management of the contaminated sediments in the White Oak Creek watershed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The primary contaminant of concern is radioactive cesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs), which binds to soil and sediment particles. The key components in the approach include an intensive sampling and monitoring system for flood events; modeling of hydrological processes, sediment transport, and contaminant flux movement; and a decision framework with a detailed human health risk analysis. Emphasis is placed on modeling of watershed rainfall-runoff and contaminated sediment transport during flooding periods using the Hydrologic Simulation Program- Fortran (HSPF) model. Because a large number of parameters are required in HSPF modeling, the major effort in the modeling process is the calibration of model parameters to make simulation results and measured values agree as closely as possible. An optimization model incorporating the concepts of an expert system was developed to improve calibration results and efficiency. Over a five-year simulation period, the simulated flows match the observed values well. Simulated total amount of sediment loads at various locations during storms match with the observed values within a factor of 1.5. Simulated annual releases of {sup 137}Cs off-site locations match the data within a factor of 2 for the five-year period. The comprehensive modeling approach can provide a valuable tool for decision makers to quantitatively analyze sediment erosion, deposition, and transport; exposure risk related to radionuclides in contaminated sediment; and various management strategies.

  19. Contaminated sediment removal from a spent fuel storage canal

    SciTech Connect

    Geber, K R

    1993-01-01

    A leaking underground spent fuel transfer canal between a decommissioned reactor and a radiochemical separations building at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was found to contain RCRA-hazardous and radioactive sediment. Closure of the Part B RCRA permitted facility required the use of an underwater robotic vacuum and a filtration-containment system to separate and stabilize the contaminated sediment. This paper discusses the radiological controls established to maintain contamination and exposures As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) during the sediment removal.

  20. IN SITU REMEDIATION OF CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS - ACTIVE CAPPING TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    Knox, A.; Roberts, J.; Paller, M.; Reible, D.

    2010-09-02

    Active capping is a relatively new approach for treating contaminated sediments. It involves applying chemically reactive amendments to the sediment surface. The main role of active caps is to stabilize contaminants in contaminated sediments, lower the bioavailable pool of contaminants, and reduce the release of contaminants to the water column. Metals are common contaminants in many marine and fresh water environments as a result of industrial and military activities. The mobile, soluble forms of metals are generally considered toxic. Induced chemical precipitation of these metals can shift toxic metals from the aqueous phase to a solid, precipitated phase which is often less bioavailable. This approach can be achieved through application of sequestering agents such as rock phosphates, organoclays, zeolites, clay minerals, and biopolymers (e.g., chitosan) in active capping technology. Active capping holds great potential for a more permanent solution that avoids residual risks resulting from contaminant migration through the cap or breaching of the cap. In addition to identifying superior active capping agents, research is needed to optimize application techniques, application rates, and amendment combinations that maximize sequestration of contaminants. A selected set of active capping treatment technologies has been demonstrated at a few sites, including a field demonstration at the Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC. This demonstration has provided useful information on the effects of sequestering agents on metal immobilization, bioavailability, toxicity, and resistance to mechanical disturbance.

  1. Bioleaching of multiple metals from contaminated sediment by moderate thermophiles.

    PubMed

    Gan, Min; Jie, Shiqi; Li, Mingming; Zhu, Jianyu; Liu, Xinxing

    2015-08-15

    A moderately thermophilic consortium was applied in bioleaching multiple metals from contaminated sediment. The consortium got higher acidification and metals soubilization efficiency than that of the pure strains. The synergistic effect of the thermophilic consortium accelerated substrates utilization. The utilization of substrate started with sulfur in the early stage, and then the pH declined, giving rise to making use of the pyrite. Community dynamic showed that A. caldus was the predominant bacteria during the whole bioleaching process while the abundance of S. thermotolerans increased together with pyrite utilization. Solubilization efficiency of Zn, Cu, Mn and Cd reached 98%, 94%, 95%, and 89% respectively, while As, Hg, Pb was only 45%, 34%, 22%. Logistic model was used to simulate the bioleaching process, whose fitting degree was higher than 90%. Correlation analysis revealed that metal leaching was mainly an acid solubilization process. Fraction analysis revealed that metals decreased in mobility and bioavailability.

  2. Contaminated sediments database for the Gulf of Maine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buchholtz ten Brink, M. R.; Manheim, F. T.; Mecray, E.L.; Hastings, M.E.; Currence, J.M.; Farrington, J.W.; Jones, S.H.; Larsen, P.F.; Tripp, B.W.; Wallace, G.T.; Ward, L.G.; Fredette, T.J.; Liebman, M.L.; Smith Leo, W.

    2002-01-01

    Bottom sediments in the Gulf of Maine and its estuaries have accumulated pollutants of many types, including metals and organic compounds of agricultural, industrial, and household derivation. Much analytical and descriptive data has been obtained on these sediments over the past decades, but only a small effort had been made, prior to this project, to compile and edit the published and unpublished data in forms suitable for a variety of users. The Contaminated Sediments Database for the Gulf of Maine provides a compilation and synthesis of existing data to help establish the environmental status of our coastal sediments and the transport paths and fate of contaminants in this region. This information, in turn, forms one of the essential bases for developing successful remediation and resource management policies.

  3. Passive sampling methods for contaminated sediments: risk assessment and management.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Marc S; Chapman, Peter M; Allan, Ian J; Anderson, Kim A; Apitz, Sabine E; Beegan, Chris; Bridges, Todd S; Brown, Steve S; Cargill, John G; McCulloch, Megan C; Menzie, Charles A; Shine, James P; Parkerton, Thomas F

    2014-04-01

    This paper details how activity-based passive sampling methods (PSMs), which provide information on bioavailability in terms of freely dissolved contaminant concentrations (Cfree ), can be used to better inform risk management decision making at multiple points in the process of assessing and managing contaminated sediment sites. PSMs can increase certainty in site investigation and management, because Cfree is a better predictor of bioavailability than total bulk sediment concentration (Ctotal ) for 4 key endpoints included in conceptual site models (benthic organism toxicity, bioaccumulation, sediment flux, and water column exposures). The use of passive sampling devices (PSDs) presents challenges with respect to representative sampling for estimating average concentrations and other metrics relevant for exposure and risk assessment. These challenges can be addressed by designing studies that account for sources of variation associated with PSMs and considering appropriate spatial scales to meet study objectives. Possible applications of PSMs include: quantifying spatial and temporal trends in bioavailable contaminants, identifying and evaluating contaminant source contributions, calibrating site-specific models, and, improving weight-of-evidence based decision frameworks. PSM data can be used to assist in delineating sediment management zones based on likelihood of exposure effects, monitor remedy effectiveness, and, evaluate risk reduction after sediment treatment, disposal, or beneficial reuse after management actions. Examples are provided illustrating why PSMs and freely dissolved contaminant concentrations (Cfree ) should be incorporated into contaminated sediment investigations and study designs to better focus on and understand contaminant bioavailability, more accurately estimate exposure to sediment-associated contaminants, and better inform risk management decisions. Research and communication needs for encouraging broader use are discussed. PMID

  4. Passive sampling methods for contaminated sediments: Risk assessment and management

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, Marc S; Chapman, Peter M; Allan, Ian J; Anderson, Kim A; Apitz, Sabine E; Beegan, Chris; Bridges, Todd S; Brown, Steve S; Cargill, John G; McCulloch, Megan C; Menzie, Charles A; Shine, James P; Parkerton, Thomas F

    2014-01-01

    This paper details how activity-based passive sampling methods (PSMs), which provide information on bioavailability in terms of freely dissolved contaminant concentrations (Cfree), can be used to better inform risk management decision making at multiple points in the process of assessing and managing contaminated sediment sites. PSMs can increase certainty in site investigation and management, because Cfree is a better predictor of bioavailability than total bulk sediment concentration (Ctotal) for 4 key endpoints included in conceptual site models (benthic organism toxicity, bioaccumulation, sediment flux, and water column exposures). The use of passive sampling devices (PSDs) presents challenges with respect to representative sampling for estimating average concentrations and other metrics relevant for exposure and risk assessment. These challenges can be addressed by designing studies that account for sources of variation associated with PSMs and considering appropriate spatial scales to meet study objectives. Possible applications of PSMs include: quantifying spatial and temporal trends in bioavailable contaminants, identifying and evaluating contaminant source contributions, calibrating site-specific models, and, improving weight-of-evidence based decision frameworks. PSM data can be used to assist in delineating sediment management zones based on likelihood of exposure effects, monitor remedy effectiveness, and, evaluate risk reduction after sediment treatment, disposal, or beneficial reuse after management actions. Examples are provided illustrating why PSMs and freely dissolved contaminant concentrations (Cfree) should be incorporated into contaminated sediment investigations and study designs to better focus on and understand contaminant bioavailability, more accurately estimate exposure to sediment-associated contaminants, and better inform risk management decisions. Research and communication needs for encouraging broader use are discussed. Integr

  5. Mapping and monitoring contaminated-sediment geometry and stability.

    PubMed

    Rukavina, N

    2001-02-01

    Environment Canada's National Water Research Institute (NWRI) conducts research on freshwater contaminated sediments, much of which is focused on designated areas of concern in the Great Lakes and their connecting channels. This paper reviews new acoustic and video equipment and procedures developed to map the geometry and stability of the sediments, and describes their applications. A RoxAnn acoustic seabed-classification system is used for mapping bottom-sediment types and locating the deposits of fine-grained sediments with which contaminants are associated. The system uses the acoustic properties of sediments to distinguish textural types ranging from mud to boulders, and displays the data as they are collected. The sediment thickness is measured with a weighted video-acoustic tripod which is lowered into the sediments to refusal, and which recorded penetration with a video camera or an echosounder transducer. The stability of the contaminated sediments was monitored with a bottom-mounted, high-precision echo sounder-digitizer, which logs changes in the position of the sediment-water interface produced by erosion or deposition. The same procedure can be used in capping or dredging projects to track bottom changes as they occur, or they can be measured by pre- and post-project mapping of bathymetry and morphology with sweep-sonar or side-scan sonar equipment. The new equipment and procedures have been successfully applied to a number of areas of concern in the Great Lakes basin. They provide a faster and more detailed characterization of sediment properties and geometry than was previously available, and have been particularly effective in optimizing sampling surveys and monitoring remediation projects. PMID:11258831

  6. Mapping and monitoring contaminated-sediment geometry and stability.

    PubMed

    Rukavina, N

    2001-02-01

    Environment Canada's National Water Research Institute (NWRI) conducts research on freshwater contaminated sediments, much of which is focused on designated areas of concern in the Great Lakes and their connecting channels. This paper reviews new acoustic and video equipment and procedures developed to map the geometry and stability of the sediments, and describes their applications. A RoxAnn acoustic seabed-classification system is used for mapping bottom-sediment types and locating the deposits of fine-grained sediments with which contaminants are associated. The system uses the acoustic properties of sediments to distinguish textural types ranging from mud to boulders, and displays the data as they are collected. The sediment thickness is measured with a weighted video-acoustic tripod which is lowered into the sediments to refusal, and which recorded penetration with a video camera or an echosounder transducer. The stability of the contaminated sediments was monitored with a bottom-mounted, high-precision echo sounder-digitizer, which logs changes in the position of the sediment-water interface produced by erosion or deposition. The same procedure can be used in capping or dredging projects to track bottom changes as they occur, or they can be measured by pre- and post-project mapping of bathymetry and morphology with sweep-sonar or side-scan sonar equipment. The new equipment and procedures have been successfully applied to a number of areas of concern in the Great Lakes basin. They provide a faster and more detailed characterization of sediment properties and geometry than was previously available, and have been particularly effective in optimizing sampling surveys and monitoring remediation projects.

  7. Passive sampling methods for contaminated sediments: risk assessment and management.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Marc S; Chapman, Peter M; Allan, Ian J; Anderson, Kim A; Apitz, Sabine E; Beegan, Chris; Bridges, Todd S; Brown, Steve S; Cargill, John G; McCulloch, Megan C; Menzie, Charles A; Shine, James P; Parkerton, Thomas F

    2014-04-01

    This paper details how activity-based passive sampling methods (PSMs), which provide information on bioavailability in terms of freely dissolved contaminant concentrations (Cfree ), can be used to better inform risk management decision making at multiple points in the process of assessing and managing contaminated sediment sites. PSMs can increase certainty in site investigation and management, because Cfree is a better predictor of bioavailability than total bulk sediment concentration (Ctotal ) for 4 key endpoints included in conceptual site models (benthic organism toxicity, bioaccumulation, sediment flux, and water column exposures). The use of passive sampling devices (PSDs) presents challenges with respect to representative sampling for estimating average concentrations and other metrics relevant for exposure and risk assessment. These challenges can be addressed by designing studies that account for sources of variation associated with PSMs and considering appropriate spatial scales to meet study objectives. Possible applications of PSMs include: quantifying spatial and temporal trends in bioavailable contaminants, identifying and evaluating contaminant source contributions, calibrating site-specific models, and, improving weight-of-evidence based decision frameworks. PSM data can be used to assist in delineating sediment management zones based on likelihood of exposure effects, monitor remedy effectiveness, and, evaluate risk reduction after sediment treatment, disposal, or beneficial reuse after management actions. Examples are provided illustrating why PSMs and freely dissolved contaminant concentrations (Cfree ) should be incorporated into contaminated sediment investigations and study designs to better focus on and understand contaminant bioavailability, more accurately estimate exposure to sediment-associated contaminants, and better inform risk management decisions. Research and communication needs for encouraging broader use are discussed.

  8. Uranium Phases in Contaminated Sediments Below Hanford's U Tank Farm

    SciTech Connect

    Um, Wooyong; Wang, Zheming; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Williams, Benjamin D.; Brown, Christopher F.; Dodge, Cleveland J.; FRANCIS, AROKIASAMY J.

    2009-06-11

    Macroscopic and spectroscopic investigations (XAFS, XRF and TRLIF) on Hanford contaminated vadose zone sediments from the U-tank farm showed that U(VI) exists as different surface phases as a function of depth below ground surface (bgs). Dominant U(VI) silicate precipitates (boltwoodite and uranophane) were present in shallow-depth sediments (15-16 m bgs). In the intermediate depth sediments (20-25 m bgs), adsorbed U(VI) phases dominated but small amounts of surface precipitates consisting of polynuclear U(VI) surface complex were also identified. The deep depth sediments (> 28 m bgs) showed no signs of contact with tank wastes containing Hanford-derived U(VI), but natural uranium solid phases were observed. Most of the U(VI) was preferentially associated with the silt and clay size fractions and showed strong correlation with Ca, especially for the precipitated U(VI) silicate phase in the shallow depth sediments. Because U(VI) silicate precipitates dominate the U(VI) phases in the shallow depth sediments, macroscopic (bi)carbonate leaching should result in U(VI) releases from both desorption and dissolution processes. Having several different U(VI) surface phases in the Hanford contaminated sediments indicates that the U(VI) release mechanism could be complicated and that detailed characterization of the sediments would be needed to estimate U(VI) fate and transport in vadose zone.

  9. Air emissions from exposed contaminated sediments and dredged material

    SciTech Connect

    Valsaraj, K.T.; Ravikrishna, R.; Reible, D.D.; Thibodeaux, L.J.; Choy, B.; Price, C.B.; Brannon, J.M.; Myers, T.E.; Yost, S.

    1999-01-01

    The sediment-to-air fluxes of two polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (phenanthrene and pyrene) and a heterocyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (dibenzofuran) from a laboratory-contaminated sediment and those of three polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (naphthalene, phenanthrene, and pyrene) from three field sediments were investigated in experimental microcosms. The flux was dependent on the sediment moisture content, air-filled porosity, and the relative humidity of the air flowing over the sediment surface. The mathematical model predictions of flux from the laboratory-spiked sediment agreed with observed values. The fluxes of compounds with higher hydrophobicity were more air-side resistance controlled. Conspicuous differences were observed between the fluxes from the laboratory-spiked and two of the three field sediments. Two field sediments showed dramatic increases in mass-transfer resistances with increasing exposure time and had significant fractions of oil and grease. The proposed mathematical model was inadequate for predicting the flux from the latter field sediments. Sediment reworking enhanced the fluxes from the field sediments due to exposure of fresh solids to the air. Variations in flux from the lab-spiked sediment as a result of change in air relative humidity were due to differences in retardation of chemicals on a dry or wet surface sediment. High moisture in the air over the dry sediment increased the competition for sorption sites between water and contaminant and increased the contaminant flux.

  10. DEVELOPING TOOLS FOR MONITORED NATURAL RECOVERY OF PCB-CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS AT LAKE HARTWELL, SC

    EPA Science Inventory

    Contaminated sediments pose a risk to human health and the environment . The management of this risk is currently limited practically to three technologies: dredging, capping, and natural recovery. Monitored natural recovery relies on the natural burial and removal mechanisms to...

  11. EVALUATION OF BIOAEROSOL COMPONENTS, GENERATION FACTORS, AND AIRBORNE TRANSPORT ASSOCIATED WITH LIME TREATMENT OF CONTAMINATED SEDIMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lime treatment has been used in contaminated sediment management activities for many purposes such as dewatering, improvement of physical properties, and reducing contaminant mobility. Exothermic volatilization of volatile organic compounds from lime-treated sediment is well kno...

  12. Selecting Performance Reference Compounds (PRCS)for Polyethylene Passive Samplers Deployed at Contaminated Sediment Sites

    EPA Science Inventory

    Use of equilibrium passive samplers for performing aquatic environmental monitoring at contaminated sediment sites, including Superfund sites, is becoming more common. However, a current challenge in passive sampling is determining when equilibrium is achieved between the sampl...

  13. Effects of lead-contaminated sediment on Rana sphenocephala tadpoles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sparling, D.W.; Krest, S.K.; Ortiz-Santaliestra, M.

    2006-01-01

    We exposed larval southern leopard frogs (Rana sphenocephala) to lead-contaminated sediments to determine the lethal and sublethal effects of this metal. Tadpoles were laboratory-raised from early free-swimming stage through metamorphosis at lead concentrations of 45, 75, 180, 540, 2360, 3940, 5520, and 7580 mg/kg dry weight in sediment. Corresponding pore water lead concentrations were 123, 227, 589, 1833, 8121, 13,579, 19,038, and 24,427 ug/L. Tadpoles exposed to lead concentrations in sediment of 3940 mg/kg or higher died within 2 to 5 days of exposure. At lower concentrations, mortality through metamorphosis ranged from 3.5% at 45 mg/kg lead to 37% at 2360 mg/kg lead in sediment. The LC50 value for lead in sediment was 3728 mg/kg (95% CI=1315 to 72,847 mg/kg), which corresponded to 12,539 ug/L lead in pore water (95% CI= 4000 to 35,200 ug/L). Early growth and development were depressed at 2,360 mg/kg lead in sediment (8100 ug/L in pore water) but differences were not evident by the time of metamorphosis. The most obvious effect of lead was its pronounced influence on skeletal development. Whereas tadpoles at 45 mg/kg lead in sediment did not display permanent abnormalities, skeletal malformations increased in frequency and severity at all higher lead concentrations. By 2360 mg/kg, 100% of surviving metamorphs displayed severe spinal problems, reduced femur and humerus lengths, deformed digits, and other bone malformations. Lead concentrations in tissues correlated positively with sediment and pore water concentrations.

  14. Developmental toxicity of lead-contaminated sediment to mallard ducklings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoffman, D.J.; Heinz, G.H.; Sileo, L.; Audet, D.J.; Campbell, J.K.; LeCaptain, L.J.

    2000-01-01

    Sediment ingestion has been identified as an important exposure route for toxicants in waterfowl. The toxicity of lead-contaminated sediment from the Coeur d'Alene River Basin (CDARB) in Idaho was examined on posthatching development of mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) ducklings for 6 weeks. Day-old ducklings received either untreated control diet, clean sediment (24%) supplemented control diet, CDARB sediment (3,449 ug/g lead) supplemented diets at 12% or 24%, or a positive control diet containing lead acetate equivalent to that found in 24% CDARB. The 12% CDARB diet resulted in a geometric mean blood lead concentration of 1.41 ppm (WW) with over 90% depression of red blood cell ALAD activity and over threefold elevation of free erythrocyte protoporphyrin concentration. The 24% CDARB diet resulted in blood lead of 2.56 ppm with over sixfold elevation of protoporphyrin and lower brain weight. In this group the liver lead concentration was 7.92 ppm (WW), and there was a 40% increase in hepatic reduced glutathione concentration. The kidney lead concentration in this group was 7.97 ppm, and acid-fast inclusion bodies were present in the kidneys of four of nine ducklings. The lead acetate positive control group was more adversely affected in most respects than the 24% CDARB group. With a less optimal diet (mixture of two thirds corn and one third standard diet), CDARB sediment was more toxic; blood lead levels were higher, body growth and liver biochemistry (TBARS) were more affected, and prevalence of acid-fast inclusion bodies increased. Lead from CDARB sediment accumulated more readily in duckling blood and liver than reported in goslings, but at given concentrations was generally less toxic to ducklings. Many of these effects are similar to ones reported in wild mallards and geese within the CDARB.

  15. Developmental toxicity of lead contaminated sediment to mallard ducks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoffman, D.J.; Heinz, G.H.; Sileo, L.; Audet, D.J.; Campbell, J.K.; LeCaptain, L.J.

    2000-01-01

    Sediment ingestion has been identified as an important exposure route for toxicants in waterfowl. The toxicity of lead-contaminated sediment from the Coeur d'Alene River Basin (CDARB) in Idaho was examined on posthatching development of mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) ducklings for 6 weeks. Day-old ducklings received either untreated control diet, clean sediment (24%) supplemented control diet, CDARB sediment (3,449 I?g/g lead) supplemented diets at 12% or 24%, or a positive control diet containing lead acetate equivalent to that found in 24% CDARB. The 12% CDARB diet resulted in a geometric mean blood lead concentration of 1.41 ppm (WW) with over 90% depression of red blood cell ALAD activity and over threefold elevation of free erythrocyte protoporphyrin concentration. The 24% CDARB diet resulted in blood lead of 2.56 ppm with over sixfold elevation of protoporphyrin and lower brain weight. In this group the liver lead concentration was 7.92 ppm (WW), and there was a 40% increase in hepatic reduced glutathione concentration. The kidney lead concentration in this group was 7.97 ppm, and acid-fast inclusion bodies were present in the kidneys of four of nine ducklings. The lead acetate positive control group was more adversely affected in most respects than the 24% CDARB group. With a less optimal diet (mixture of two thirds corn and one third standard diet), CDARB sediment was more toxic; blood lead levels were higher, body growth and liver biochemistry (TBARS) were more affected, and prevalence of acid-fast inclusion bodies increased. Lead from CDARB sediment accumulated more readily in duckling blood and liver than reported in goslings, but at given concentrations was generally less toxic to ducklings. Many of these effects are similar to ones reported in wild mallards and geese within the CDARB.

  16. Monitoring and modeling contaminated sediment transport in the White Oak Creek watershed

    SciTech Connect

    Fontaine, T.A.

    1991-11-01

    Over the past 47 years, operations and waste disposal activities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory have resulted in the contamination of the White Oak Creek drainage system. The containments presenting the highest risk to human health and the environment are particle reactive and are associated with the soils and sediments in White Oak Creek. During floods, the erosion of these sediments results in the transport of contaminants out of the catchment into the Clinch River. A long-term strategy is required to monitor the movement of contaminated sediments and to predict the transport of these sediments that could occur during major floods. A monitoring program will provide the information required to (1) evaluate the existing off-site transport of contaminated sediments, (2) evaluate the need for short-term control measures, (3) set priorities for remediation of contaminated areas in White Oak Creek (4) verify the success of completed remedial actions intended to control the movement of contaminated sediments, and (5) develop a computer model to simulate the transport of contaminated sediments in White Oak Creek. A contaminant-transport model will be developed to (1) evaluate the potential for the off-site transport of contaminated sediments during major floods, (2) develop long term control measures and remediation solutions, (3) predict the impact of future land-use changes in White Oak Creek on the transport of contaminated sediment. This report contains a plan for the monitoring and modeling activities required to accomplish these objectives.

  17. Inhibition Effect of Secondary Phosphate Mineral Precipitation on Uranium Release from Contaminated Sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Zhenqing; Liu, Chongxuan; Zachara, John M.; Wang, Zheming; Deng, Baolin

    2009-11-01

    The inhibitory effect of phosphate mineral precipitation on uranium release was evaluated using a U(VI)-contaminated sediment collected from the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford site. The sediment contained U(VI) that was associated with diffusion-limited intragrain regions within its mm-size granitic lithic fragments. The sediment was first treated to promote phosphate mineral precipitation in batch suspensions spiked with 1 and 50 mM aqueous phosphate, and calcium in a stoichiometric ratio of mineral hydroxyapatite. The phosphate-treated sediment was then leached to solubilize contaminant U(VI) in a column system using a synthetic groundwater that contained chemical components representative of Hanford groundwater. Phosphate treatment significantly decreased the extent of U(VI) release from the sediment. Within the experimental duration of about 200 pore volumes, the effluent U(VI) concentrations were consistently lower by over one and two orders of magnitude after the sediment was treated with 1 and 50 mM of phosphate, respectively. Measurements of solid phase U(VI) using various spectroscopes and chemical extraction of the sediment collectively indicated that the inhibition of U(VI) release from the sediment was caused by: 1) U(VI) adsorption to the secondary phosphate precipitates and 2) the transformation of initially present U(VI) mineral phases to less soluble forms.

  18. Accelerating progress at contaminated sediment sites: moving from guidance to practice.

    PubMed

    Bridges, Todd S; Nadeau, Steven C; McCulloch, Megan C

    2012-04-01

    Contaminated sediments are a pervasive problem in the United States. Significant economic, ecological, and social issues are intertwined in addressing the nation's contaminated sediment problem. Managing contaminated sediments has become increasingly resource intensive, with some investigations costing tens of millions of dollars and the majority of remediation projects proceeding at a slow pace. At present, the approaches typically used to investigate, evaluate, and remediate contaminated sediment sites in the United States have largely fallen short of producing timely, risk-based, cost-effective, long-term solutions. With the purpose of identifying opportunities for accelerating progress at contaminated sediment sites, the US Army Corps of Engineers-Engineer Research and Development Center and the Sediment Management Work Group convened a workshop with experienced experts from government, industry, consulting, and academia. Workshop participants identified 5 actions that, if implemented, would accelerate the progress and increase the effectiveness of risk management at contaminated sediment sites. These actions included: 1) development of a detailed and explicit project vision and accompanying objectives, achievable short-term and long-term goals, and metrics of remedy success at the outset of a project, with refinement occurring as needed throughout the duration of the project; 2) strategic engagement of stakeholders in a more direct and meaningful process; 3) optimization of risk reduction, risk management processes, and remedy selection addressing 2 important elements: a) the deliberate use of early action remedies, where appropriate, to accelerate risk reduction; and b) the systematic and sequential development of a suite of actions applicable to the ultimate remedy, starting with monitored natural recovery and adding engineering actions as needed to satisfy the project's objectives; 4) an incentive process that encourages and rewards risk reduction; and 5

  19. Contaminated sediments: Lectures on environmental aspects of particle-associated chemicals in aquatic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Forstner, U.

    1989-01-01

    Sediments are increasingly recognized as both a carrier and a possible source of contaminants in aquatic systems. Since the early part of the century, limnological research on eutrophication problems and acidification indicated that particle-interactions can affect aquatic ecosystems. In contrast to the eutrophication and acidification problems, research on toxic chemicals has included sediment aspects from its beginning. In the lecture notes, following the description of priority pollutants related to sedimentary phases, four aspects were covered, which in an overlapping succession also reflect the development of knowledge in particle-associated pollutants during the past 25 years: the identification, surveillance, monitoring and control of sources and distribution of pollutants; the evaluation of solid/solution relations of contaminants in surface waters; the study of in-situ processes and mechanisms in pollutant transfer in various compartments of the aquatic ecosystems and, the assessment of the environmental impact of particle-bound contaminants. The last chapter focuses on dredged materials, including their disposal and the treatment of strongly contaminated sediments. Cases studies include the Niagara River/Lake Ontario pollution; solid speciation of metals in river sediments; the Rhine River; Puget Sound; Rotterdam Harbor; and the mobilization of cadmium from tidal river sediments.

  20. Characterization of heavy-metal-contaminated sediment by using unsupervised multivariate techniques and health risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yeuh-Bin; Liu, Chen-Wuing; Wang, Sheng-Wei

    2015-03-01

    This study characterized the sediment quality of the severely contaminated Erjen River in Taiwan by using multivariate analysis methods-including factor analysis (FA), self-organizing maps (SOMs), and positive matrix factorization (PMF)-and health risk assessment. The SOMs classified the dataset with similar heavy-metal-contaminated sediment into five groups. FA extracted three major factors-traditional electroplating and metal-surface processing factor, nontraditional heavy-metal-industry factor, and natural geological factor-which accounted for 80.8% of the variance. The SOMs and FA revealed the heavy-metal-contaminated-sediment hotspots in the middle and upper reaches of the major tributary in the dry season. The hazardous index value for health risk via ingestion was 0.302. PMF further qualified the source apportionment, indicating that traditional electroplating and metal-surface-processing industries comprised 47% of the health risk posed by heavy-metal-contaminated sediment. Contaminants discharged from traditional electroplating and metal-surface-processing industries in the middle and upper reaches of the major tributary must be eliminated first to improve the sediment quality in Erjen River. The proposed assessment framework for heavy-metal-contaminated sediment can be applied to contaminated-sediment river sites in other regions.

  1. Metal-contaminated Sediment Effects on Biofilm Communities: Impairment of Multiple Stream Ecosystem Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, G.; Costello, D.

    2012-12-01

    Photosynthetic biofilms are crucial drivers of many important stream ecosystem functions (e.g., primary and secondary production, N cycling), yet we have a limited understanding of how these critical communities respond to contaminated sediments. Divalent metals (e.g., Cu, Ni, Zn) are ubiquitous in urban streams and may be contributing to the decline in ecosystem function in urban waters. We exposed natural biofilm communities in five different streams to a common sediment amended with four concentrations of Ni and Cu. Contaminated sediments were placed into cups, covered with mesh disks for biofilm attachment, and secured to the streambed. After 6 weeks, biofilm-colonized disks were analyzed for net primary production (NPP), chlorophyll a, and metal content. Sediments below the biofilms were analyzed for total metals, acid volatile sulfide, and high-resolution vertical dissolved oxygen concentrations. Additional biofilm disks were separated from the sediment and fed to Lymnaea stagnalis to assess indirect effects of sediment metal on grazers. Among our five streams, we found variation in the biofilm response to metals with the most productive stream (Elm Creek) showing the strongest negative response to metal-contaminated sediment. Contaminated sediments in Elm Creek reduced biofilm growth, slowed primary production, and prevented penetration of oxygen into surface sediments. In the less productive streams, biofilms did not reduce NPP in the presence of sediment metal and there was still substantial penetration of oxygen into sediments; however, metals moved out of the sediment and accumulated in the biofilm. L. stagnalis exposed to metal-contaminated biofilms fed at a slower rate than those given clean biofilms. This study suggests that biofilms, and the biogeochemical cycles they drive, can potentially be impaired by contaminated sediment but the response is context dependent. Further, indirect dietary effects of contaminated sediment occur more widely than

  2. Risk based management of contaminated sediments: consideration of spatial and temporal patterns in exposure modeling.

    PubMed

    Linkov, Igor; Burmistrov, Dmitriy; Cura, Jerome; Bridges, Todd S

    2002-01-15

    This paper addresses interactions among foraging behavior, habitat preferences, site characteristics, and spatial distribution of contaminants in developing PCB exposure estimates for winter flounder at a hypothetical open water dredged material disposal site in the coastal waters of New York and New Jersey (NY-NJ). The implications of these interactions for human health risk estimates for local recreational anglers who fish for and eat flounder are described. The models implemented in this study include a spatial submodel to account for spatial and temporal characteristics of fish exposures and a probabilistic adaptation of the Gobas bioaccumulation model that accounts for temporal variation in concentrations of hydrophobic contaminants in sediment and water. We estimated the geographic distribution of a winter flounder subpopulation offshore of NY-NJ based on species biology and its vulnerability to local recreational fishing, the foraging area of individual fish, and their migration patterns. We incorporated these parameters and an estimate of differential attraction to a management site into a spatially explicit model to assess the range of exposures within the population. The output of this modeling effort, flounder PCB tissue concentrations, provided exposure point concentrations for an estimate of human health risk through ingestion of locally caught flounder. The risks obtained for the spatially nonexplicit case are as much as 1 order of magnitude higher than those obtained with explicit consideration of spatial and temporal characteristics of winter flounder foraging and seasonal migration. This practice of "defaulting" to extremely conservative estimates for exposure parameters in the face of uncertainty ill serves the decision-making process for management of contaminated sediments in general and specifically for disposal of dredged materials. Consideration of realistic spatial and temporal scales in food chain models can help support sediment management

  3. A COMPENDIUM OF CHEMICAL, PHYSICAL AND BIOLOGICAL METHODS FOR ASSESSING AND MONITORING THE REMEDIATION OF CONTAMINATED SEDIMENT SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Considering the many organizations which have published methods for monitoring contaminated sediments and the large number of documents on this subject, it can be a formidable task for a superfund project manager to find methods appropriate for his or her contaminated sediment si...

  4. Enhancing the bioremediation by harvesting electricity from the heavily contaminated sediments.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yonggang; Lu, Zijiang; Lin, Xunke; Xia, Chunyu; Sun, Guoping; Lian, Yingli; Xu, Meiying

    2015-03-01

    To test the long-term applicability of scaled-up sediment microbial fuel cells (SMFCs) in simultaneous bioremediation of toxic-contaminated sediments and power-supply for electronic devices, a 100 L SMFC inoculate with heavily contaminated sediments has been assembled and operated for over 2 years without external electron donor addition. The total organic chemical (TOC) degradation efficiency was 22.1% in the electricity generating SMFCs, which is significantly higher than that in the open-circuited SMFC (3.8%). The organic matters including contaminants in the contaminated sediments were sufficient for the electricity generation of SMFCs, even up to 8.5 years by the present SMFC theoretically. By using a power management system (PMS), the SMFC electricity could be harvested into batteries and used by commercial electronic devices. The results indicated that the SMFC-PMS system could be applied as a long-term and effective tool to simultaneously stimulate the bioremediation of the contaminated sediments and supply power for commercial devices.

  5. EVALUATION OF THE STATE-OF-THE-ART CONTAMINATED SEDIMENT TRANSPORT AND FATE MODELING SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Modeling approaches for evaluating the transport and fate of sediment and associated contaminants are briefly reviewed. The main emphasis is on: 1) the application of EFDC (Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code), the state-of-the-art contaminated sediment transport and fate public do...

  6. A TOXICITY ASSESSMENT APPROACH TO EVALUATING IN-SITU BIOREMEDIATION OF PAH CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Freshwater and marine sediment toxicity tests were used to measure baseline toxicity of sediment samples collected from New Jersey/New York Harbor (NJ/NY) (non-PAH- contaminated) sediment (ERC). Four freshwater toxicity tests were used: 1) amphipod (Hyalella azteca) mortality and...

  7. Assessing diversity and phytoremediation potential of mangroves for copper contaminated sediments in Subic Bay, Philippines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Toxic metal pollution of water and soil is a major environmental problem and most conventional remediation approaches may not provide adequate solutions. An alternative way of reducing copper (Cu) concentration from contaminated sediments is through phytoremediation. Presently, there are few researc...

  8. DETERMINATION OF RATES AND EXTENT OF DECHLORINATION IN PCB-CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS DURING MONITORED NATURAL RECOVERY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This "Sediment Issue" summarizes investigations carried out by the National Risk Management Research Laboratory (NRMRL) of U.S. EPA to evaluate the long-term recovery of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-contaminated sediments via reductive dechlorination. The magnitude, extent, an...

  9. A TOXICITY ASSESSMENT APPROACH FOR THE EVALUATION OF IN-SITU BIOREMEDIATION OF PAH CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Freshwater and marine sediment toxicity test were used to measure baseline toxicity of sediment samples collected from New York/New Jersey Harbor (NY/NJH) and East River (ER) (PAH contaminated) sediments and to determine the effectiveness of the developed biotreatment strategies ...

  10. Green remediation and recycling of contaminated sediment by waste-incorporated stabilization/solidification.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Tsang, Daniel C W; Poon, Chi-Sun

    2015-03-01

    Navigational/environmental dredging of contaminated sediment conventionally requires contained marine disposal and continuous monitoring. This study proposed a green remediation approach to treat and recycle the contaminated sediment by means of stabilization/solidification enhanced by the addition of selected solid wastes. With an increasing amount of contaminated sediment (20-70%), the 28-d compressive strength of sediment blocks decreased from greater than 10MPa to slightly above 1MPa. For augmenting the cement hydration, coal fly ash was more effective than lime and ground seashells, especially at low sediment content. The microscopic and spectroscopic analyses showed varying amounts of hydration products (primarily calcium hydroxide and calcium silicate hydrate) in the presence of coal fly ash, signifying the influence of pozzolanic reaction. To facilitate the waste utilization, cullet from beverage glass bottles and bottom ashes from coal combustion and waste incineration were found suitable to substitute coarse aggregate at 33% replacement ratio, beyond which the compressive strength decreased accordingly. The mercury intrusion porosimetry analysis indicated that the increase in the total pore area and average pore diameter were linearly correlated with the decrease of compressive strength due to waste replacement. All the sediment blocks complied with the acceptance criteria for reuse in terms of metal leachability. These results suggest that, with an appropriate mixture design, contaminated sediment and waste materials are useful resources for producing non-load-bearing masonry units or fill materials for construction uses.

  11. WORKSHOP ON INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGIES FOR TREATMENT OF CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS - JUNE 13-14, 1990 - SUMMARY REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Workshop on Innovative Technologies for Treatment of Contaminated Sediments was held in Cincinnati, Ohio, on June 13-14, 1990. Its twofold purpose was 1) to provide interested individuals and organizations with current information on innovative treatment technologies for cont...

  12. Accelerating progress at contaminated sediment sites: moving from guidance to practice.

    PubMed

    Bridges, Todd S; Nadeau, Steven C; McCulloch, Megan C

    2012-04-01

    Contaminated sediments are a pervasive problem in the United States. Significant economic, ecological, and social issues are intertwined in addressing the nation's contaminated sediment problem. Managing contaminated sediments has become increasingly resource intensive, with some investigations costing tens of millions of dollars and the majority of remediation projects proceeding at a slow pace. At present, the approaches typically used to investigate, evaluate, and remediate contaminated sediment sites in the United States have largely fallen short of producing timely, risk-based, cost-effective, long-term solutions. With the purpose of identifying opportunities for accelerating progress at contaminated sediment sites, the US Army Corps of Engineers-Engineer Research and Development Center and the Sediment Management Work Group convened a workshop with experienced experts from government, industry, consulting, and academia. Workshop participants identified 5 actions that, if implemented, would accelerate the progress and increase the effectiveness of risk management at contaminated sediment sites. These actions included: 1) development of a detailed and explicit project vision and accompanying objectives, achievable short-term and long-term goals, and metrics of remedy success at the outset of a project, with refinement occurring as needed throughout the duration of the project; 2) strategic engagement of stakeholders in a more direct and meaningful process; 3) optimization of risk reduction, risk management processes, and remedy selection addressing 2 important elements: a) the deliberate use of early action remedies, where appropriate, to accelerate risk reduction; and b) the systematic and sequential development of a suite of actions applicable to the ultimate remedy, starting with monitored natural recovery and adding engineering actions as needed to satisfy the project's objectives; 4) an incentive process that encourages and rewards risk reduction; and 5

  13. Passive sampling methods for contaminated sediments: State of the science for organic contaminants

    PubMed Central

    Lydy, Michael J; Landrum, Peter F; Oen, Amy MP; Allinson, Mayumi; Smedes, Foppe; Harwood, Amanda D; Li, Huizhen; Maruya, Keith A; Liu, Jingfu

    2014-01-01

    This manuscript surveys the literature on passive sampler methods (PSMs) used in contaminated sediments to assess the chemical activity of organic contaminants. The chemical activity in turn dictates the reactivity and bioavailability of contaminants in sediment. Approaches to measure specific binding of compounds to sediment components, for example, amorphous carbon or specific types of reduced carbon, and the associated partition coefficients are difficult to determine, particularly for native sediment. Thus, the development of PSMs that represent the chemical activity of complex compound–sediment interactions, expressed as the freely dissolved contaminant concentration in porewater (Cfree), offer a better proxy for endpoints of concern, such as reactivity, bioaccumulation, and toxicity. Passive sampling methods have estimated Cfree using both kinetic and equilibrium operating modes and used various polymers as the sorbing phase, for example, polydimethylsiloxane, polyethylene, and polyoxymethylene in various configurations, such as sheets, coated fibers, or vials containing thin films. These PSMs have been applied in laboratory exposures and field deployments covering a variety of spatial and temporal scales. A wide range of calibration conditions exist in the literature to estimate Cfree, but consensus values have not been established. The most critical criteria are the partition coefficient between water and the polymer phase and the equilibrium status of the sampler. In addition, the PSM must not appreciably deplete Cfree in the porewater. Some of the future challenges include establishing a standard approach for PSM measurements, correcting for nonequilibrium conditions, establishing guidance for selection and implementation of PSMs, and translating and applying data collected by PSMs. Integr Environ Assess Manag 2014;10:167–178. © 2014 The Authors. Integrated Environmental Assessment and Management published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of

  14. Ecotoxicity of uranium to Tubifex tubifex worms (Annelida, Clitellata, Tubificidae) exposed to contaminated sediment.

    PubMed

    Lagauzère, Sandra; Terrail, Raphaële; Bonzom, Jean-Marc

    2009-02-01

    In freshwater ecosystems, sediments act as an accumulation compartment for metallic pollutants as uranium. However, they are also the habitats of numerous benthic macroinvertebrates that directly influence the structure and functioning of such environments. Consequently, these organisms could be affected by uranium. This laboratory study aimed to assess the ecotoxicity of uranium on Tubifex tubifex through 12-day exposure to contaminated sediment (0-5980 microg U g(-1) dry wt). At high concentrations (>599 microg U g(-1) dry wt), malformations were observed, and survival, biomass and burrowing activity were all reduced. This relative high resistance in polluted environments can be explained mainly by the implementation of several processes as autotomy, regeneration ability, increased production of mucus, a hormetic effect on biomass and a probable strategy for avoiding the contaminated sediment. This study represents the first assessment of uranium impact on T. tubifex at realistic concentrations in sediments near mining sites. PMID:18555526

  15. Contaminated sediments database for Long Island Sound and the New York Bight

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mecray, Ellen L.; Reid, Jamey M.; Hastings, Mary E.; Buchholtz ten Brink, Marilyn R.

    2003-01-01

    The Contaminated Sediments Database for Long Island Sound and the New York Bight provides a compilation of published and unpublished sediment texture and contaminant data. This report provides maps of several of the contaminants in the database as well as references and a section on using the data to assess the environmental status of these coastal areas. The database contains information collected between 1956-1997; providing an historical foundation for future contaminant studies in the region.

  16. Mercury-contaminated sediments in the North Bay: A legacy of the Gold Rush

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jaffe, Bruce E.

    2001-01-01

    A legacy of the Gold Rush is mercury-contaminated sediments in the Bay. Miners used mercury to extract gold from tailings during the gold rush. A large amount of this mercury (some estimates are as great as 10,000 tons) was lost during extraction to the watershed during the gold rush era. This mercury-contaminated hydraulic mining debris made its way to the Bay.

  17. Longshore transport modeling of the contaminated sediment in the Fukushima area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitamura, A.; Machida, M.; Itakura, M.; Yamada, S.

    2015-12-01

    The cesium-contaminated sediment in the Fukushima mountain area is expected to be transported by the river flow to the downstream region, and eventually to the ocean. The contaminated sediment discharged from the river to the ocean settles down to the seabed of the coastal area around the river mouth. Some part of the settled sediment is transported to the offshore region and the contamination of the coastal area is expected to decay gradually. Estimation of the environmental half-life of the contaminated sediment is important for the assessment of the safety of the edible fish in the Fukushima coastal area. Thus we need to calculate the sediment transport in the coastal area induced by various ocean phenomena, such as tidal current, river current, wave and wind-induced current. We have estimated the effect of several kinds of ocean phenomena on the coastal sediment transport, and found that the wind-induced current and the wave-induced suspension are the most dominant phenomena, while contributions from tidal current and the river flow is negligible.

  18. Passive sampling in contaminated sediment assessment: building consensus to improve decision making.

    PubMed

    Parkerton, Thomas F; Maruya, Keith A

    2014-04-01

    Contaminated sediments pose an ongoing, pervasive, global challenge to environmental managers, because sediments can reflect a legacy of pollution that can impair the beneficial uses of water bodies. A formidable challenge in assessing the risks of contaminated sediments has been the elucidation and measurement of contaminant bioavailability, expressed as the freely dissolved concentration (Cfree ) in interstitial water, which serves as a surrogate measure of the substances' chemical activity. Recent advances in passive sampling methods (PSMs) enable Cfree of sediment-associated contaminants to be quantified at trace levels, thereby overcoming current limitations of predictive models. As a result, PSMs afford the opportunity for a paradigm shift from traditional practice that can effectively reduce uncertainty in risk assessment and bolster confidence in the science used to support management of contaminated sediments. This paper provides a brief overview of the 5 subsequent papers in this series that review literature on PSM use in sediments for both organic and metal(loid) contaminants, outline the technical rationale for using PSMs as a preferred basis for risk assessment over conventional chemical analyses, describe practical considerations for and uncertainties associated with laboratory and field deployment of PSMs, discuss management application of PSMs, including illustrative case studies in which PSMs have been used in decision making, and highlight future research and communication needs. PMID:24142815

  19. A novel integrated active capping technique for the remediation of nitrobenzene-contaminated sediment.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hongwen; Xu, Xiaoyang; Gao, Guandao; Zhang, Zizhong; Yin, Peijie

    2010-10-15

    The objective of this study was to develop a novel integrated active capping system and to investigate its efficiency in the remediation of nitrobenzene-contaminated sediment. An integrated Fe(0)-sorbent-microorganism remediation system was proposed as an in situ active capping technique to remediate nitrobenzene-contaminated sediment. In this system, nitrobenzene was reduced to aniline by Fe(0), which has a much better biodegradability. The sorption capacity and structural properties of cinder was measured to examine its applicability as the sorbent and matrix for this integrated capping system. Indigenous microorganisms from Songhuajiang River sediment, which was contaminated by nitrobenzene and aniline in Chinese Petrochemical Explosion in Jilin, were acquired one month after the explosion and used in this active capping system to degrade nitrobenzene and its reduced product, aniline. A bench-scale remediation experiment was conducted on a mimicked nitrobenzene-contaminated sediment to investigate the efficiency of the integrated capping system and the synergistic effects of the combined components in the active capping system. The results show that this integrated active capping system can effectively block the release of target pollutants into the upper-layer water and remove the compounds from the environment.

  20. Multi-volume visualization for interactive therapy planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Liangshou; Amin, Viren R.; Ryken, Timothy; Long, Tao; Hagge, Mathew J.; Bryden, Mark

    2007-03-01

    During the past decade, various volume visualization techniques have been developed for different purposes, and many of them, such as direct volume rendering, maximum intensity projection and non-photorealistic rendering, have been implemented on consumer graphics hardware for real time visualization. However, effective multi-volume visualization, a way to establish the visual connections between two or more types of data, has not been adequately addressed even though it has wide applications in medical imaging and numerical simulation based on 3D physical model. In this paper, we aim to develop an effective GPU-based system for multi-volume visualization which is able to reveal both the connections and distinctions among multiple volume data. To address the main challenge for multi-volume visualization on how to establish the visual correspondences while maintaining the distinctive information among multiple volumes, a multi-level distinction mechanism is developed including 2D transfer function, mixed rendering modes, and volume clipping. Taking advantage of the fast hardware-supported processing capabilities, the system is implemented based on the GPU programming. Several advanced volume rendering techniques based on segmented volume are also implemented. The resulting visualization is a highly interactive image fusion system with high quality image and three-level volume distinction. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our system with a case study in which the heat effect on brain tumor, represented as a temperature volume resulting from high intensity focused ultrasound beam exposure over time, is visualized in the context of a MRI head volume.

  1. Characterizing toxicity of metal-contaminated sediments from mining areas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Besser, John M.; Brumbaugh, William G.; Ingersoll, Christopher G.

    2015-01-01

    of acid-volatile sulfide (AVS), termed simultaneously-extracted metals (SEM), are widely used to estimate the ‘potentially-bioavailable’ fraction of metals that is not bound to sulfides (i.e., SEM-AVS). Metal concentrations in pore water are widely considered to be direct measures of metal bioavailability, and predictions of toxicity based on pore-water metal concentrations may be further improved by modeling interactions of metals with other pore-water constituents using Biotic Ligand Models. Data from sediment toxicity tests and metal analyses has provided the basis for development of sediment quality guidelines, which estimate thresholds for toxicity of metals in sediments. Empirical guidelines such as Probable Effects Concentrations or (PECs) are based on associations between sediment metal concentrations and occurrence of toxic effects in large datasets. PECs do not model bioavailable metals, but they can be used to estimate the toxicity of metal mixtures using by calculation of probable effect quotients (PEQ = sediment metal concentration/PEC). In contrast, mechanistic guidelines, such as Equilibrium Partitioning Sediment Benchmarks (ESBs) attempt to predict both bioavailability and mixture toxicity. Application of these simple bioavailability models requires more extensive chemical characterization of sediments or pore water, compared to empirical guidelines, but may provide more reliable estimates of metal toxicity across a wide range of sediment types.

  2. Fluid-structure interaction -- 1996. PVP-Volume 337

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.Y.; Ma, D.C.; Shin, Y.W.; Kulak, R.F.; Chang, F.C.; Kaneko, S.; Brochard, D.; Moody, F.J.

    1996-12-01

    This special volume contains papers on various topics of interest to the pressure vessel and piping industries. These papers are presented in nine sessions covering three topics. The titles of these three sessions are: (1) fluid-structure interaction and structural mechanics; (2) sloshing and fluid-structure interaction; and (3) transient thermal hydraulics, heat transfer, and coupled vessel-piping structural response. Separate abstracts were prepared for most of the papers in this volume.

  3. A Magnification Lens for Interactive Volume Visualization

    SciTech Connect

    LaMar, E; Hamann, B; Joy, K I

    2001-07-19

    Volume visualization of large data sets suffers from the same problem that many other visualization modalities suffer from: either one can visualize the entire data set and lose small details or visualize a small region and lose the context. In this paper, they present a magnification lens technique for volume visualization. While the notion of a magnification-lens is not new, and other techniques attempt to simulate the physical properties of a magnifying lens, their contribution is in developing a magnification lens that is fast, can be implemented using a fairly small software overhead, and has a natural, intuitive appearance. The issue with magnification lens is the border, or transition, region. The lens center and exterior have a constant zoom factor, and are simple to render. It is the border region that blends between the external and interior magnification, and has a non-constant magnification. They use the perspective-correct textures capability, available in most current graphics systems, to produce a lens with a tessellated border region that approximates linear compression with respect to the radius of the magnification lens. They discuss how a cubic border can mitigate the discontinuities resulting from the use of a linear function, without significant performance loss. They discuss various issues concerning development of a three-dimensional magnification lens.

  4. Interactive Volume Rendering of Diffusion Tensor Data

    SciTech Connect

    Hlawitschka, Mario; Weber, Gunther; Anwander, Alfred; Carmichael, Owen; Hamann, Bernd; Scheuermann, Gerik

    2007-03-30

    As 3D volumetric images of the human body become an increasingly crucial source of information for the diagnosis and treatment of a broad variety of medical conditions, advanced techniques that allow clinicians to efficiently and clearly visualize volumetric images become increasingly important. Interaction has proven to be a key concept in analysis of medical images because static images of 3D data are prone to artifacts and misunderstanding of depth. Furthermore, fading out clinically irrelevant aspects of the image while preserving contextual anatomical landmarks helps medical doctors to focus on important parts of the images without becoming disoriented. Our goal was to develop a tool that unifies interactive manipulation and context preserving visualization of medical images with a special focus on diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) data. At each image voxel, DTI provides a 3 x 3 tensor whose entries represent the 3D statistical properties of water diffusion locally. Water motion that is preferential to specific spatial directions suggests structural organization of the underlying biological tissue; in particular, in the human brain, the naturally occuring diffusion of water in the axon portion of neurons is predominantly anisotropic along the longitudinal direction of the elongated, fiber-like axons [MMM+02]. This property has made DTI an emerging source of information about the structural integrity of axons and axonal connectivity between brain regions, both of which are thought to be disrupted in a broad range of medical disorders including multiple sclerosis, cerebrovascular disease, and autism [Mos02, FCI+01, JLH+99, BGKM+04, BJB+03].

  5. Resuspension of sediment, a new approach for remediation of contaminated sediment.

    PubMed

    Pourabadehei, Mehdi; Mulligan, Catherine N

    2016-06-01

    Natural events and anthropogenic activities are the reasons of undesirable resuspension of contaminated sediments in aquatic environment. Uncontrolled resuspension could remobilize weakly bound heavy metals into overlying water and pose a potential risk to aquatic ecosystem. Shallow harbours, with contaminated sediments are subjected to the risk of uncontrolled resuspension. Remediation of sediments in these areas cannot be performed by conventional in situ methods (e.g. capping with or without reactive amendment). Ex situ remediation also requires dredging of sediment, which could increase the risk of spreading contaminants. Alternatively, the resuspension technique was introduced to address these issues. The concept of the resuspension method is that finer sediments have a greater tendency to adsorb the contamination. Therefore, finer sediments, believed carry more concentration of contaminants, were targeted for removal from aquatic environment by a suspension mechanism in a confined water column. The objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of the resuspension technique as a new approach for remediation of contaminated sediment and a viable option to reduce the risk of remobilization of contaminants in harbours due to an undesirable resuspension event. Unlike the common in situ techniques, the resuspension method could successfully reduce the total concentration of contaminants in almost all samples below the probable effect level (PEL) with no significant change in the quality of overlying water. The results indicated that removal efficiency could be drastically enhanced for metals in sediment with a higher enrichment factor. Moreover, availability of metals (e.g. Cd and Pb) with a high concentration in labile fractions was higher in finer sediments with a high enrichment factor. Consequently, removal of contaminants from sediment through the resuspension method could reduce the risk of mobility and availability of metals under changing

  6. Use of life cycle assessments to evaluate the environmental footprint of contaminated sediment remediation.

    PubMed

    Sparrevik, Magnus; Saloranta, Tuomo; Cornelissen, Gerard; Eek, Espen; Fet, Annik Magerholm; Breedveld, Gijs D; Linkov, Igor

    2011-05-15

    Ecological and human risks often drive the selection of remedial alternatives for contaminated sediments. Traditional human and ecological risk assessment (HERA) includes assessing risk for benthic organisms and aquatic fauna associated with exposure to contaminated sediments before and after remediation as well as risk for human exposure but does not consider the environmental footprint associated with implementing remedial alternatives. Assessment of environmental effects over the whole life cycle (i.e., Life Cycle Assessment, LCA) could complement HERA and help in selecting the most appropriate sediment management alternative. Even though LCA has been developed and applied in multiple environmental management cases, applications to contaminated sediments and marine ecosystems are in general less frequent. This paper implements LCA methodology for the case of the polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and -furans (PCDD/F)-contaminated Grenland fjord in Norway. LCA was applied to investigate the environmental footprint of different active and passive thin-layer capping alternatives as compared to natural recovery. The results showed that capping was preferable to natural recovery when analysis is limited to effects related to the site contamination. Incorporation of impacts related to the use of resources and energy during the implementation of a thin layer cap increase the environmental footprint by over 1 order of magnitude, making capping inferior to the natural recovery alternative. Use of biomass-derived activated carbon, where carbon dioxide is sequestered during the production process, reduces the overall environmental impact to that of natural recovery. The results from this study show that LCA may be a valuable tool for assessing the environmental footprint of sediment remediation projects and for sustainable sediment management.

  7. Evaluation of factors affecting stakeholder risk perception of contaminated sediment disposal in Oslo harbor.

    PubMed

    Sparrevik, Magnus; Ellen, Gerald Jan; Duijn, Mike

    2011-01-01

    The management of environmental pollution has changed considerably since the growth of environmental awareness in the late 1960s. The general increased environmental concern and involvement of stakeholders in today's environmental issues may enhance the need to consider risk in a much broader social context rather than just as an estimate of ecological hazard. Risk perception and the constructs and images of risks held by stakeholders and society are important items to address in the management of environmental projects, including the management of contaminated sediments. Here we present a retrospective case study that evaluates factors affecting stakeholder risk perception of contaminated sediment disposal that occurred during a remediation project in Oslo harbor, Norway. The choice to dispose dredged contaminated sediments in a confined aquatic disposal (CAD) site rather than at a land disposal site has received a lot of societal attention, attracted large media coverage, and caused many public discussions. A mixed method approach is used to investigate how risk perceptive affective factors (PAF), socio-demographic aspects, and participatory aspects have influenced the various stakeholders' preferences for the two different disposal options. Risk perceptive factors such as transparency in the decision making process and controllability of the disposal options have been identified as important for risk perception. The results of the study also support the view that there is no sharp distinction in risk perception between experts and other parties and emphasizes the importance of addressing risk perceptive affective factors in similar environmental decision-making processes. Indeed, PAFs such as transparency, openness, and information are fundamental to address in sensitive environmental decisions, such as sediment disposal alternatives, in order to progress to more technical questions such as the controllability and safety.

  8. Uptake pathway for Ag bioaccumulation in three benthic invertebrates exposed to contaminated sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yoo, H.; Lee, J.-S.; Lee, B.-G.; Lee, I.T.; Schlekat, C.E.; Koh, C.-H.; Luoma, S.N.

    2004-01-01

    We exposed 3 benthic invertebrates, the clam Macoma balthica, the polychaete Neanthes arenaceodentata and the amphipod Leptocheirus plumulosus, to Ag-contaminated sediments to evaluate the relative importance of various uptake routes (sediments, porewater or overlying water, and supplementary food) for Ag bioaccumulation. Silver bioaccumulation was evaluated at 4 levels of sediment Ag (0.1, 0,3, 1,2 and 3.3 ??mol Ag g-1) and 2 levels of acid-volatile sulfide (AVS), <0.5 or ???40 ??mol g-1, and compared among food treatments with or without Ag contamination, or with different food rations. L. plumulosus were incubated for 35 d in the Ag-contaminated sediments after 3 mo of Ag-sediment equilibration, and M. balthica and N. arenaceodentata for 19 d after 5 mo equilibration. Ag bioaccumulation in the 3 organisms was significantly correlated with 1N HCl-extractable Ag concentrations (Ag-SEM: simultaneously extracted Ag with AVS) in sediments. The Ag concentrations in porewater and overlying water were greatest in the sediments with least AVS, consistent with previous studies. Nevertheless, the amphipod and clam exposed to oxic sediments (<0.5 ??mol AVS g-1) accumulated amounts of Ag similar to those accumulated by organisms exposed to anoxic sediments (???40 ??mol AVS g-1), when Ag-SEM levels were comparable. The dissolved Ag source was important for bioaccumulation in the polychaete N. arenaceodentata. Amphipods fed Ag-contaminated food contained ???1.8-fold more tissue Ag concentrations than those fed uncontaminated food. As suggested in kinetic (DYMBAM) modeling studies, ingestion of contaminated sediments and food were the principle routes of Ag bioaccumulation by the benthic invertebrates during chronic exposure, but the relative importance of each uptake route differed among species.

  9. Phosphorus amendment reduces hematological effects of lead in mallards ingesting contaminated sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoffman, D.J.; Heinz, G.H.; Audet, D.J.

    2006-01-01

    Lead poisoning of waterfowl has been reported for decades in the Coeur d?Alene River Basin (CDARB) in Idaho as a result of the ingestion of lead-contaminated sediments. This study was conducted to determine whether the addition of phosphoric acid to sediments would reduce the bioavailability and toxicity of lead to mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) as related to adverse hematological effects and altered plasma chemistries. Mallards received diets containing 12% clean sediment (controls) or 12% sediment from three different CDARB sites containing 4520, 5390, or 6990 :g/g lead (dw) with or without phosphoric acid amendment. Blood lead concentrations were significantly higher in all CDARB treatment groups and ranged from geometric mean values of 5.0 ug/g for the first two sites to 6.2 ug/g for the third site. With amendments, all blood lead concentrations became 41% to 64% lower. Red blood cell ALAD activity was depressed by 90% or more with lead-contaminated sediment from all sites and did not differ with amended diets. Free erythrocyte protoporphyrin (FEP) concentrations were elevated by contaminated sediment from all sites. Amendment decreased the elevations in FEP by as much as 80%. Hematocrit values and hemoglobin concentrations were lower for all lead site sediments by as much as 30% for site 3. Plasma enzyme activities for ALT, CK, and LDH-L were elevated by as much as 2.2-fold, and plasma creatinine concentration was 1.7-fold higher for site 3 sediment. Amendments restored hematocrit, hemoglobin, and plasma enzyme activities so that they did not differ from controls. Although amendments of phosphorus substantially reduced the bioavailability of lead and alleviated many of the adverse hematological effects, lead concentrations in the blood of mallards fed the amended sediments were still above those believed to be harmful to waterfowl under the present conditions.

  10. Hydrocarbon depuration and abiotic changes in artificially oil contaminated sediment in the subtidal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berge, John A.; Lichtenthaler, Rainer G.; Oreld, Frøydis

    1987-04-01

    North Sea crude oil was mixed with sediment in concentrations similar to those found in heavily polluted areas (10 000 and 18 000 ppm) and placed in experimental boxes in the subtidal. Experiments were performed in two Norwegian fjords, the eutrophicated Oslofjord (experimental period of 3 months) and the non-eutrophicated Raunefjord (13 months). Physical and chemical responses of the contaminated sediment were compared with similarly treated control sediment without oil. Depuration was investigated using gas and liquid chromatographic analyses for determination of total hydrocarbon content and selected single aromatic components. Biodegradation was followed using n-alkane/branched alkane ratios. No depuration or biodegradation of hydrocarbon, or pronounced changes in sediment nitrogen and carbon content were observed after exposure in the Oslofjord. In the Raunefjord the redox potential was reduced by 75-200 mV in the oil contaminated sediment after 9 and 13 months. In the control sediment nitrogen and carbon content were significantly reduced after 9 and 13 months but did not change in the oil contaminated sediment except at the sediment surface (0-1 cm). A significantly higher macrofaunal biomass was found in the control sediment after 9 and 13 months but not after 5 months. After 13 months of exposure in the Raunefjord 33% of the originally added oil remained in the sediment. The most soluble components such as naphthalene and methylnaphthalene were reduced by two orders of magnitude and less soluble components such as phenanthrene and methylphenanthrene by one order of magnitude. Reduction was most pronounced at the sediment surface. Biodegradation in the Raunefjord sediment was documented after an initial lag period of 4-9 months. It is suggested that lower bioturbation and resuspension rates are responsible for the reducing conditions and the conservation of carbon, nitrogen and particle size distribution in the oil contaminated sediment. Results found as a

  11. Nicer-slicer-dicer: an interactive volume visualization tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, Patrick J.

    1994-04-01

    Nicer-Slicer-Dicer (NSD) is a new, interactive tool for volume visualization. In addition to single scalar volumes, NSD can visualize multivariate and time series data. NSD achieves high rendering rates by compositing slice planes back-to-front while blending pixels through the use of alpha buffering hardware. This technique introduces some small artifacts, but it works remarkably well with large data sets where voxels represent small areas in image space. The plane compositing technique also allows one to generate an isosurface and volume rendering simultaneously by interleaving planes and isosurface polygons.

  12. Effects of organic carbon supply rates on mobility of previously bioreduced uranium in a contaminated sediment

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, J.; Tokunaga, T.K.; Kim, Y.; Brodie, E.; Daly, R.; Hazen, T.C.; Firestone, M.K.

    2008-05-15

    Bioreduction-based strategies for remediating uranium (U)-contaminated sediments face the challenge of maintaining the reduced status of U for long times. Because groundwater influxes continuously bring in oxidizing terminal electron acceptors (O{sub 2}, NO{sub 3}{sup -}), it is necessary to continue supplying organic carbon (OC) to maintain the reducing environment after U bioreduction is achieved. We tested the influence of OC supply rates on mobility of previously microbial reduced uranium U(IV) in contaminated sediments. We found that high degrees of U mobilization occurred when OC supply rates were high, and when the sediment still contained abundant Fe(III). Although 900 days with low levels of OC supply minimized U mobilization, the sediment redox potential increased with time as did extractable U(VI) fractions. Molecular analyses of total microbial activity demonstrated a positive correlation with OC supply and analyses of Geobacteraceae activity (RT-qPCR of 16S rRNA) indicated continued activity even when the effluent Fe(II) became undetectable. These data support our earlier hypothesis on the mechanism responsible for re-oxidation of microbial reduced U(IV) under reducing conditions; that microbial respiration caused increased (bi)carbonate concentrations and formation of stable uranyl carbonate complexes, thereby shifted U(IV)/U(VI) equilibrium to more reducing potentials. The data also suggested that low OC concentrations could not sustain the reducing condition of the sediment for much longer time.

  13. Desorption kinetics of polycylic aromatic hydrocarbons in coal fines and coal contaminated sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Shorten, C.V.

    1989-01-01

    Batch with fluid replacement (BFR) and time resolved leaching (TRL) methods were developed to determine the desorption kinetics of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in coal fines and coal contaminated sediments using various organic solvent/water mixtures. The two techniques were relatively comparable, with a given solvent, solid phase, and experimental time scale. TRL is the method of choice for short term (one day or less) experiments while BFR is better suited for long term desorption studies. Both phenanthrene and chrysene desorbed from coal contaminated sediments following first order kinetics. Predicted equilibrium concentrations ((C){sub eq}) and desorption rate constants (k{sub d}) were estimated using both one and two stage first order kinetic models. Acetone/water solvent mixtures induced desorption of greater amounts of phenanthrene than did more highly polar methanol/water mixtures, and desorption rate coefficients were higher in the acetone mixtures than they were in the methanol mixtures. As predicted by cosolvent theory and microscopic equilibrium, k{sub d} values increased (slightly) with increasing mole fraction cosolvent and (C){sub eq} values also increased (significantly) with increasing mole fraction cosolvent. Experimental design and period of observation of the desorption process appeared to be important in the consideration of observed desorption constants. Solids concentration in the BFR reactors was varied from 1000 to 100,000 mg/l. Total mas of both compounds released to the liquid phase increased significantly with increasing suspended solids concentrations, but relationship between rate constants and solids concentration were more complex.

  14. The effect of contaminated sediments on fecundity of the brown bullhead in three Lake Erie tributaries

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lesko, Lynn T.; Smith, Stephen B.; Blouin, Marc A.

    1996-01-01

    Female brown bullhead (Ameiurus nebulosus) were collected from three Lake Erie tributaries (Ohio) from 8 to 25 May 1989, to determine the effects of contaminated sediments on reproductive potentials. Fish obtained from the Black and Cuyahoga rivers, which contain sediments with elevated concentrations of metals, PCBs, and PAHs, were compared with fish collected in Mud Brook, a tributary of the Huron River, which was selected as our reference site. Fecundity, egg diameter, fish length and weight, and the presence of external abnormalities were recorded for each fish. Brown bullhead from the contaminated sites were larger then those from the reference site and fecundity was significantly (P < 0.05) different in all three river systems. Those from the most polluted river (Cuyahoga River) had the greatest number of eggs per individual female. The high frequency of external abnormalities observed on brown bullhead from the contaminated sites did not appear to have a detrimental influence on fecundity. These results suggest that fecundity of the brown bullhead was not adversely affected in ecosystems altered by the presence of contaminated sediments. Increased fecundity of the brown bullhead from impacted rivers may be the result of reduced competition for an abundant invertebrate food source and limited predation by other fish species whose numbers are largely depleted in these degraded systems.

  15. Enhanced biodegradation of hydrocarbon-contaminated sediments using microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Morris, Jeffrey M; Jin, Song

    2012-04-30

    A sediment microbial fuel cell (MFC) was tested to determine if electron transfer from the anaerobic zone of contaminated sediments to the overlying aerobic water could facilitate an enhanced and aerobic equivalent degradation of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH). Results indicate that voltages as high as 190 mV (2162 mW/m(3)) were achieved in a sediment MFC with an anode buried in sediments containing TPH concentrations at approximately 16,000 mg kg(-1). Additionally, after approximately 66 days, the TPH degradation rates were 2% and 24% in the open-circuit control sediment MFC and active sediment MFC, respectively. Therefore, it appears that applying MFC technology to contaminated sediments enhances natural biodegradation by nearly 12 fold. Additionally, a novel sediment MFC was designed to provide a cost-effective method of passive oxidation or indirect aerobic degradation of contaminants in an otherwise anaerobic environment. In addition, the use of a wicking air cathode in this study maintained dissolved oxygen concentrations 1-2 mg l(-1) higher than submerged cathodes, demonstrating that this technology can be applied to environments with either aerobic or anaerobic overlying water and an anaerobic matrix, such as shallow lagoon, ponds, and marshes, and groundwater.

  16. Microbial Transformation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Pristine and Petroleum-Contaminated Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Herbes, S. E.; Schwall, L. R.

    1978-01-01

    To determine rates of microbial transformation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in freshwater sediments, 14C-labeled PAH were incubated with samples from both pristine and petroleum-contaminated streams. Evolved 14CO2 was trapped in KOH, unaltered PAH and polar metabolic intermediate fractions were quantitated after sediment extraction and column chromatography, and bound cellular 14C was measured in sediment residues. Large fractions of 14C were incorporated into microbial cellular material; therefore, measurement of rates of 14CO2 evolution alone would seriously underestimate transformation rates of [14C]naphthalene and [14C]anthracene. PAH compound turnover times in petroleum-contaminated sediment increased from 7.1 h for naphthalene to 400 h for anthracene, 10,000 h for benz(a)anthracene, and more than 30,000 h for benz(a)pyrene. Turnover times in uncontaminated stream sediment were 10 to 400 times greater than in contaminated samples, while absolute rates of PAH transformation (micrograms of PAH per gram of sediment per hour) were 3,000 to 125,000 times greater in contaminated sediment. The data indicate that four- and five-ring PAH compounds, several of which are carcinogenic, may persist even in sediments that have received chronic PAH inputs and that support microbial populations capable of transforming two- and three-ring PAH compounds. PMID:16345270

  17. Behavior of PCDDs/PCDFs in remediation of PCBs-contaminated sediments by thermal desorption.

    PubMed

    Sato, Takeshi; Todoroki, Tomohiro; Shimoda, Kimiaki; Terada, Akihiko; Hosomi, Masaaki

    2010-06-01

    Thermal desorption is an effective method for removing volatile and semivolatile organic matter in contaminated solid remediation. Formation of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) in many polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) destruction processes has been reported, but the removal pathways are poorly understood. We therefore investigated the behaviors of PCBs and PCDDs/PCDFs in thermal desorption of PCBs-contaminated sediment and predicted the reaction pathways. Four thermal desorption experiments using PCB-contaminated sediments containing different doses of PCBs were carried out. In all the experiments, decomposition of 48-70% of PCBs was achieved, resulting in formation of PCDFs. Despite the PCBs decomposition levels, toxic equivalencies (TEQs) in the treated and volatilized samples were 2.8-6.3 times and 8.0-10.5 times as high as the TEQs in the initial samples, respectively, indicating increased toxicity after treatment. Further analysis revealed that PCDFs with higher numbers of chlorine atoms are likely to remain in the sediments than those of volatilized PCDFs; this is supported by the positive correlation between the vapor pressures of PCDFs and the ratios of volatilized PCDFs. PMID:20382407

  18. Use of stochastic multi-criteria decision analysis to support sustainable management of contaminated sediments.

    PubMed

    Sparrevik, Magnus; Barton, David N; Bates, Mathew E; Linkov, Igor

    2012-02-01

    Sustainable management of contaminated sediments requires careful prioritization of available resources and focuses on efforts to optimize decisions that consider environmental, economic, and societal aspects simultaneously. This may be achieved by combining different analytical approaches such as risk analysis (RA), life cycle analysis (LCA), multicriteria decision analysis (MCDA), and economic valuation methods. We propose the use of stochastic MCDA based on outranking algorithms to implement integrative sustainability strategies for sediment management. In this paper we use the method to select the best sediment management alternatives for the dibenzo-p-dioxin and -furan (PCDD/F) contaminated Grenland fjord in Norway. In the analysis, the benefits of health risk reductions and socio-economic benefits from removing seafood health advisories are evaluated against the detriments of remedial costs and life cycle environmental impacts. A value-plural based weighing of criteria is compared to criteria weights mimicking traditional cost-effectiveness (CEA) and cost-benefit (CBA) analyses. Capping highly contaminated areas in the inner or outer fjord is identified as the most preferable remediation alternative under all criteria schemes and the results are confirmed by a probabilistic sensitivity analysis. The proposed methodology can serve as a flexible framework for future decision support and can be a step toward more sustainable decision making for contaminated sediment management. It may be applicable to the broader field of ecosystem restoration for trade-off analysis between ecosystem services and restoration costs.

  19. Elevated nitrate enriches microbial functional genes for potential bioremediation of complexly contaminated sediments

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Meiying; Zhang, Qin; Xia, Chunyu; Zhong, Yuming; Sun, Guoping; Guo, Jun; Yuan, Tong; Zhou, Jizhong; He, Zhili

    2014-01-01

    Nitrate is an important nutrient and electron acceptor for microorganisms, having a key role in nitrogen (N) cycling and electron transfer in anoxic sediments. High-nitrate inputs into sediments could have a significant effect on N cycling and its associated microbial processes. However, few studies have been focused on the effect of nitrate addition on the functional diversity, composition, structure and dynamics of sediment microbial communities in contaminated aquatic ecosystems with persistent organic pollutants (POPs). Here we analyzed sediment microbial communities from a field-scale in situ bioremediation site, a creek in Pearl River Delta containing a variety of contaminants including polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), before and after nitrate injection using a comprehensive functional gene array (GeoChip 4.0). Our results showed that the sediment microbial community functional composition and structure were markedly altered, and that functional genes involved in N-, carbon (C)-, sulfur (S)-and phosphorus (P)- cycling processes were highly enriched after nitrate injection, especially those microorganisms with diverse metabolic capabilities, leading to potential in situ bioremediation of the contaminated sediment, such as PBDE and PAH reduction/degradation. This study provides new insights into our understanding of sediment microbial community responses to nitrate addition, suggesting that indigenous microorganisms could be successfully stimulated for in situ bioremediation of POPs in contaminated sediments with nitrate addition. PMID:24671084

  20. Bench-scale testing of selected remediation alternatives for contaminated sediments.

    PubMed

    Timberlake, D L; Garbaciak, S

    1995-01-01

    The Assessment and Remediation of Contaminated Sediments (ARCS) Program within the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Great Lakes National Program Office (GLNPO) contained a component for demonstrating and evaluating sediment remediation technologies. Toward this end, bench-scale tests of solvent extraction, thermal desorption, and wet air oxidation technologies were conducted. Contaminated sediments were tested from the Grand Calumet River, Indiana; Buffalo River, New York; Saginaw River, Michigan; and Ashtabula River, Ohio. The primary contaminants of concern in these sediments were polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The solvent extraction tests were conducted with sediments from the Grand Calumet, Buffalo, and Saginaw rivers. The thermal desorption studies were conducted with sediments from the Grand Calumet, Buffalo, and Ashtabula rivers. The wet air oxidation testing was performed with the Grand Calumet River sediment. Raw sediment contaminant concentrations ranged from 0.32-21.9 mg/kg dry mass for PCBs and 2.70-266 mg/kg dry mass for PAHs. PCB removal or destruction efficiencies ranged from approximately 6-99%. PAH removal or destruction efficiencies ranged from 65-99%. Mass balance closures ranged from 40-99% for solids; 59-139% for water; 29-3500% for oil; 16-129% for PCBs; and 69-3170% for PAHs.

  1. International Conference on Contaminated Sediments - ContaSed 2015 8-13 March 2015, Monte Verità, Ascona, Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Chiaia-Hernandez, Aurea C; Giger, Walter

    2015-01-01

    About 80 participants from 22 countries from industry and academia gathered at the International Conference on Contaminated Sediments (ContaSed 2015) held at the Congressi Stefano Franscini (CSF), the conference center of ETH Zurich, located at Monte Verità, Ascona, Switzerland. ContaSed 2015 provided a platform for top experts as well as for junior researchers from different scientific disciplines to present recent results and novel approaches on the analysis, assessment and remediation of contaminated sediments. ContaSed 2015 served as a unique communication and discussion opportunity for environmental scientists with an emphasis on chemistry, sedimentology, ecotoxicology or remediation engineering.

  2. International Conference on Contaminated Sediments - ContaSed 2015 8-13 March 2015, Monte Verità, Ascona, Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Chiaia-Hernandez, Aurea C; Giger, Walter

    2015-01-01

    About 80 participants from 22 countries from industry and academia gathered at the International Conference on Contaminated Sediments (ContaSed 2015) held at the Congressi Stefano Franscini (CSF), the conference center of ETH Zurich, located at Monte Verità, Ascona, Switzerland. ContaSed 2015 provided a platform for top experts as well as for junior researchers from different scientific disciplines to present recent results and novel approaches on the analysis, assessment and remediation of contaminated sediments. ContaSed 2015 served as a unique communication and discussion opportunity for environmental scientists with an emphasis on chemistry, sedimentology, ecotoxicology or remediation engineering. PMID:26507601

  3. Estimation of hydrocarbon biodegradation rates in gasoline-contaminated sediment from measured respiration rates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baker, R.J.; Baehr, A.L.; Lahvis, M.A.

    2000-01-01

    An open microcosm method for quantifying microbial respiration and estimating biodegradation rates of hydrocarbons in gasoline-contaminated sediment samples has been developed and validated. Stainless-steel bioreactors are filled with soil or sediment samples, and the vapor-phase composition (concentrations of oxygen (O2), nitrogen (N2), carbon dioxide (CO2), and selected hydrocarbons) is monitored over time. Replacement gas is added as the vapor sample is taken, and selection of the replacement gas composition facilitates real-time decision-making regarding environmental conditions within the bioreactor. This capability allows for maintenance of field conditions over time, which is not possible in closed microcosms. Reaction rates of CO2 and O2 are calculated from the vapor-phase composition time series. Rates of hydrocarbon biodegradation are either measured directly from the hydrocarbon mass balance, or estimated from CO2 and O2 reaction rates and assumed reaction stoichiometries. Open microcosm experiments using sediments spiked with toluene and p-xylene were conducted to validate the stoichiometric assumptions. Respiration rates calculated from O2 consumption and from CO2 production provide estimates of toluene and p- xylene degradation rates within about ??50% of measured values when complete mineralization stoichiometry is assumed. Measured values ranged from 851.1 to 965.1 g m-3 year-1 for toluene, and 407.2-942.3 g m-3 year-1 for p- xylene. Contaminated sediment samples from a gasoline-spill site were used in a second set of microcosm experiments. Here, reaction rates of O2 and CO2 were measured and used to estimate hydrocarbon respiration rates. Total hydrocarbon reaction rates ranged from 49.0 g m-3 year-1 in uncontaminated (background) to 1040.4 g m-3 year-1 for highly contaminated sediment, based on CO2 production data. These rate estimates were similar to those obtained independently from in situ CO2 vertical gradient and flux determinations at the

  4. A catchment-integrated approach to determine the importance of secondary sources of contaminated sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andres Lopez-Tarazon, Jose; Byrne, Patrick; Mullan, Donal; Smith, Hugh

    2015-04-01

    Water pollution has been identified as one of the most important environmental challenges of the early 21st Century. The Water Framework Directive (WFD) (2008/105/EC) explicitly recognises the risk to water resources posed by sediment-associated contaminants in European river basins. The potential impacts on water supply and the biodiversity of aquatic ecosystems from sediment and associated contaminants may be further exacerbated by climate change pressures on water resources, as highlighted in the 2009 EU White Paper "Adapting to climate change: Towards a European framework for action" (SEC(2009) 386, 387, 388). Despite these concerns, the role of floodplains and other storage areas as secondary sources of contaminated sediment (i.e. metals) in river basins affected by historic industrial or mining pollution has been largely overlooked. Thereby, besides the sediment which is transported by the river, secondary sources of contaminants represent a credible threat to achieving EU water quality targets set by the WFD. This project addresses this issue by developing a catchment-based approach looking at metal geochemistry from source to sink (i.e., from sediment generation at slopes, passing through sediment transported by the river system, to sediment deposition at the storage areas to the outlet) and develop a geochemical model to predict the chemical aspects of metals transport and transformation. This approach will allow us to quantify (i) the sediment fluxes and associated contaminants flowing through the river, (ii) the storage areas contributions to downstream contaminated sediment fluxes, (ii) the timescales for the storage and removal of contaminated sediment in the sinks, and (iv) the transformation and bioavailability of the pollutants (i.e. metals) along the basin. Both physical and chemical aspects of metal transport will be considered by looking at metal geochemistry, mobility and bioavailability, hence producing information on chemical metal transport

  5. ACTIVE CAPPING TECHNOLOGY - NEW APPROACHES FOR IN SITU REMEDIATION OF CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Knox, A.; Paller, M.; Roberts, J.

    2012-02-13

    This study evaluated pilot-scale active caps composed of apatite, organoclay, biopolymers, and sand for the remediation of metal-contaminated sediments. The active caps were constructed in Steel Creek, at the Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina. Monitoring was conducted for 12 months. Effectiveness of the caps was based on an evaluation of contaminant bioavailability, resistance to erosion, and impacts on benthic organisms. Active caps lowered metal bioavailability in the sediment during the one-year test period. Biopolymers reduced sediment suspension during cap construction, increased the pool of carbon, and lowered the release of metals. This field validation showed that active caps can effectively treat contaminants by changing their speciation, and that caps can be constructed to include more than one type of amendment to achieve multiple goals.

  6. Digestive proteases of the lugworm (Arenicola marina) inhibited by Cu from contaminated sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Z.; Mayer, L.M.

    1998-03-01

    The authors examined potential toxic effects of copper released from contaminated sediments during deposit feeding of the lugworm, Arenicola marina. Titration of Cu solution into gut fluids can result in decreases in protease activity if sufficient Cu is added. The effects of Cu on gut proteases were confirmed by incubation of gut fluids with Cu-contaminated harbor sediments. Monitoring of Cu titration into gut fluids shows that enzyme inhibition and quenching of gut protein fluorescence occur only when sufficient Cu has been added to allow inorganic Cu species to become abundant. This threshold level probably represents the exhaustion of strong binding sites that act as protection against enzyme inhibition. Thus, sediments contaminated with Cu may have inhibitory effects on digestive processes in lugworms.

  7. Nitrogen fertilizer improves boron phytoextraction by Brassica juncea grown in contaminated sediments and alleviates plant stress.

    PubMed

    Giansoldati, Virginia; Tassi, Eliana; Morelli, Elisabetta; Gabellieri, Edi; Pedron, Francesca; Barbafieri, Meri

    2012-06-01

    In this study we evaluated the effect of different fertilizer treatments on Brassica plants grown on boron-contaminated sediments. Experiments were conducted in the laboratory and on the lysimeter scale. At laboratory scale (microcosm), five different fertilizers were tested for a 35-d period. On the lysimeter scale, nitrogen fertilization was tested at three different doses and plants were allowed to grow until the end of the vegetative phase (70 d). Results showed that nitrogen application had effectively increased plant biomass production, while B uptake was not affected. Total B phytoextracted increased three-fold when the highest nitrogen dose was applied. Phytotoxicity on Brassica was evaluated by biochemical parameters. In plants grown in unfertilized B-contaminated sediments, the activity of antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD), ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and pyrogallol peroxidase (PPX) increased, whereas catalase (CAT) decreased with respect to control plants. Addition of N progressively mitigated the alteration of enzymatic activity, thus suggesting that N can aid in alleviating B-induced oxidative stress. SOD activity was restored to control levels just at the lowest N treatment, whereas the CAT inhibition was partially restored only at the highest one. N application also lowered the B-induced increase in APX and PPX activities. Increased glutathione reductase activity indicated the need to restore the oxidative balance of glutathione. Data also suggest a role of glutathione and phytochelatins in B defense mechanisms. Results suggest that the nitrogen fertilizer was effective in improving B phytoextraction by increasing Brassica biomass and by alleviating B-induced oxidative stress. PMID:22382070

  8. Effects of lead-contaminated sediment and nutrition on mallard duckling behavior and growth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Douglas-Stroebel, E.; Brewer, G.L.; Hoffman, D.J.

    2005-01-01

    Sediment ingestion has become a recognized exposure route for toxicants in waterfowl. The effects of lead-contaminated sediment from the Coeur d?Alene River Basin (CDARB) in Idaho were evaluated on mallard (Anas platyryhnchos) duckling behavior and growth over a five-week period using time-activity budgets. Day-old ducklings received either a clean sediment (24%) supplemented control diet, CDARB sediment (3,449 ug/g lead) supplemented diets at 12% or 24%, or a positive control diet (24% clean sediment with equivalent lead acetate to the 24% CDARB diet). Ten different behaviors were monitored for time spent, including resting, standing, moving, drinking, dabbling, feeding, pecking, preening, bathing and swimming. Contaminated sediment (24% CDARB ) and lead acetate significantly decreased the proportion of time spent swimming. There were also problems with balance and mobility in the 24% CDARB and the lead acetate groups. With a less optimal diet (mixture of two thirds corn and one third standard diet) containing 24% clean sediment, nutrient level alone affected six different behaviors including feeding, pecking, swimming, preening, standing, and dabbling. Nutrient level also significantly decreased the growth rate and delayed the initial time of molt. When the corn diet contained CDARB sediment, the proportion of time spent bathing in the 24% CDARB group significantly decreased with marginal effects on resting and feeding. There were also instances of imbalance with 24% CDARB and corn diet, and duckling weights were significantly lower than in corn diet controls. The decreased time spent swimming or bathing, coupled with problems of balance and mobility, decreased growth, histopathological lesions and altered brain biochemistry (reported elsewhere) illustrate a potential threat to the survival of ducklings in the wild that are exposed to lead-containing sediments within the CDARB or elsewhere.

  9. Using radiosilver and plutonium isotopes to trace the dispersion of contaminated sediment in Fukushima coastal catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evrard, O.; Ayrault, S.; Pointurier, F.; Onda, Y.; Laceby, J. P.; Lepage, H.; Chartin, C.; Cirella, M.; Pottin, A. C.; Hubert, A.; Lefèvre, I.

    2015-12-01

    The Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant (FDNPP) accident in March 2011 resulted in a 3000-km² radioactive pollution plume consisting predominantly of radiocesium (137Cs and 134Cs). This plume is drained by several rivers to the Pacific Ocean after flowing through less contaminated, but densely inhabited coastal plains. As the redistribution of radionuclide contaminated sediment could expose the local population to higher radiation rates, novel fingerprinting methods were developed to trace the downstream dispersion of contaminated sediment. First, the heterogeneous deposition of metastable silver-110 (110mAg) across these coastal catchments was used to investigate sediment migration. In particular, the 110mAg/137Cs activity ratio was measured in soils and river sediment demonstrating the occurrence of a seasonal cycle of soil erosion during typhoons and spring snowmelt in 2011 and 2012. However, due to the rapid decay of 110mAg (half-life of 250 days), alternative methods were required to continue tracking sediment from 2013 onwards. One promising method includes the analyses of plutonium isotopes to further understand sediment migration in the Fukushima region. For example, 241Pu/239Pu atom ratios measured in sediment collected in Fukushima coastal rivers shortly after the accident were shown to be significantly higher (0.0017 - 0.0884) than corresponding values attributed to the global fallout (0.00113 ± 0.00008). Additional analyses were conducted on sediment sampled in 2013 and 2014 after the start of decontamination works. These analyses show that the 241Pu/239Pu atom ratios decreased towards the global fallout values in rivers draining decontaminated paddy fields, demonstrating the effectiveness of remediation works.

  10. Sequential Leaching of Chromium Contaminated Sediments - A Study Characterizing Natural Attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musa, D.; Ding, M.; Beroff, S.; Rearick, M.; Perkins, G.; WoldeGabriel, G. W.; Ware, D.; Harris, R.; Kluk, E.; Katzman, D.; Reimus, P. W.; Heikoop, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Natural attenuation is an important process in slowing down the transport of hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI), an anthropogenic environmental contaminant, either by adsorption of Cr(VI) to sediments, or by reduction to nontoxic trivalent chromium, Cr(III). The capacity and mechanism of attenuation is explored in this sequential leaching study of different particle size fractions of chromium contaminated sediments and similar uncontaminated sediments from the regional aquifer near Los Alamos, New Mexico. Using this leaching protocol each sediment sample is split in two: one half is leached three times using a 0.1 M sodium bicarbonate/carbonate solution, while the second half is leached three times using a 0.01 M nitric acid, followed by two consecutively increasing magnitudes of nitric acid concentrations. Based on the amphoteric nature of chromium, alkaline leaching is used to establish the amount of Cr(VI) sorbed on the sediment, whereas acid leaching is used to establish the amount of Cr(III). The weak acid is predicted to release the attenuated anthropogenic Cr(III), without affecting Cr-bearing minerals. The sequential, stronger, acid is anticipated to leach Cr(III)-incorporated in the minerals. The efficiency and validation of the sequential leaching method is assessed by comparing the leaching behavior of bentonite and biotite samples, with and without loaded Cr(VI). A 97% chromium mass balance of leached Cr(VI)-loaded bentonite and biotite proves the viability of this method for further use on leaching contaminated sediments. By comparing contaminated and uncontaminated sediment leachate results, of chromium and other major and trace elements, the signature of anthropogenic chromium is determined. Further mineralogical characterization of the sediments provides a quantitative measure of the natural attenuation capacity for chromium. Understanding these results is pertinent in delineating the optimal procedure for the remediation of Cr(VI) in the regional aquifer

  11. Interactive isosurface ray tracing of time-varying tetrahedral volumes.

    PubMed

    Wald, Ingo; Friedrich, Heiko; Knoll, Aaron; Hansen, Charles D

    2007-01-01

    We describe a system for interactively rendering isosurfaces of tetrahedral finite-element scalar fields using coherent ray tracing techniques on the CPU. By employing state-of-the art methods in polygonal ray tracing, namely aggressive packet/frustum traversal of a bounding volume hierarchy, we can accomodate large and time-varying unstructured data. In conjunction with this efficiency structure, we introduce a novel technique for intersecting ray packets with tetrahedral primitives. Ray tracing is flexible, allowing for dynamic changes in isovalue and time step, visualization of multiple isosurfaces, shadows, and depth-peeling transparency effects. The resulting system offers the intuitive simplicity of isosurfacing, guaranteed-correct visual results, and ultimately a scalable, dynamic and consistently interactive solution for visualizing unstructured volumes.

  12. Interactive multiscale tensor reconstruction for multiresolution volume visualization.

    PubMed

    Suter, Susanne K; Guitián, José A Iglesias; Marton, Fabio; Agus, Marco; Elsener, Andreas; Zollikofer, Christoph P E; Gopi, M; Gobbetti, Enrico; Pajarola, Renato

    2011-12-01

    Large scale and structurally complex volume datasets from high-resolution 3D imaging devices or computational simulations pose a number of technical challenges for interactive visual analysis. In this paper, we present the first integration of a multiscale volume representation based on tensor approximation within a GPU-accelerated out-of-core multiresolution rendering framework. Specific contributions include (a) a hierarchical brick-tensor decomposition approach for pre-processing large volume data, (b) a GPU accelerated tensor reconstruction implementation exploiting CUDA capabilities, and (c) an effective tensor-specific quantization strategy for reducing data transfer bandwidth and out-of-core memory footprint. Our multiscale representation allows for the extraction, analysis and display of structural features at variable spatial scales, while adaptive level-of-detail rendering methods make it possible to interactively explore large datasets within a constrained memory footprint. The quality and performance of our prototype system is evaluated on large structurally complex datasets, including gigabyte-sized micro-tomographic volumes.

  13. Laboratory, Field, and Analytical Procedures for Using Passive Sampling in the Evaluation of Contaminated Sediments: User's Manual

    EPA Science Inventory

    Regardless of the remedial technology invoked to address contaminated sediments in the environment, there is a critical need to have tools for assessing the effectiveness of the remedy. In the past, these tools have included chemical and biomonitoring of the water column and sedi...

  14. Environmental Impact Of The Use Of Contaminated Sediments As Partial Replacement Of The Aggregate Used In Road Construction

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Indiana Harbor Canal (IHC) is a waterway extensively polluted with heavy metals and petroleum. Since there are limited disposal options for the petroleum-contaminated sediments (PCSs) of the canal, the environmental impact of IHC dewatered sediment when used as partial repla...

  15. Avoidance of contaminated sediments by an amphipod (Melita plumulosa), A harpacticoid copepod (Nitocra spinipes), and a snail (Phallomedusa solida).

    PubMed

    Ward, Daniel J; Simpson, Stuart L; Jolley, Dianne F

    2013-03-01

    The distribution of contaminants is seldom homogeneous in aquatic systems. In the present study, the avoidance response of Melita plumulosa, Nitocra spinipes, and Phallomedusa solida when exposed to contaminated sediments was investigated. Test vessels were designed to allow the congruent placement of two sediments and assessment of the movement of organisms between the sediments. When exposed to reference sediment, each species dispersed evenly between test chambers regardless of differences in sediment particle size. In the presence of contaminated sediment, the magnitude and rate of avoidance varied. Avoidance assays showed that test species avoided contaminated sediment as early as 6, 6, and 24 h following exposure for N. spinipes, P. solida, and M. plumulosa, respectively. The 48-h avoidance response of M. plumulosa for nine contaminated sediments of varying toxicity showed that avoidance was generally greater for sediments which elicited greater 10-d lethality to this species. The study demonstrated that each of these species has the ability to respond to chemical cues in the environment to inhabit sediment that provides the best opportunity for survival. The avoidance response for each species indicates the potential for developing rapid screening methods to assess sediment quality. Evidence suggests that avoidance was related to sediment toxicity and that static 10-d toxicity methods are likely to overestimate toxicity for species, which would avoid contamination in heterogeneous field settings.

  16. Evaluation of a Sustainable Remediation Option: Beneficial Reuse of Petroleum-Contaminated Sediment as an Energy Source

    EPA Science Inventory

    The characteristics of petroleum-contaminated sediment (PCS) have been evaluated to assess whether the practice of its beneficial reuse as a sole or supplemental energy source is sustainable relative to other sediment remediation options such as monitored natural recovery (MNR), ...

  17. Flux Meter Assesses the Effects of Groundwater, Surface Water, and Contaminated Sediment Interactions on Ecosystems

    EPA Science Inventory

    The slow flow of water between groundwater (GW) and surface water (SW) is often referred to as seepage, or in scientific terms, advective flux. This slow flow at the GW/SW interface presents measurement difficulties. This project was conducted to develop a durable advective flux ...

  18. Exposure Render: An Interactive Photo-Realistic Volume Rendering Framework

    PubMed Central

    Kroes, Thomas; Post, Frits H.; Botha, Charl P.

    2012-01-01

    The field of volume visualization has undergone rapid development during the past years, both due to advances in suitable computing hardware and due to the increasing availability of large volume datasets. Recent work has focused on increasing the visual realism in Direct Volume Rendering (DVR) by integrating a number of visually plausible but often effect-specific rendering techniques, for instance modeling of light occlusion and depth of field. Besides yielding more attractive renderings, especially the more realistic lighting has a positive effect on perceptual tasks. Although these new rendering techniques yield impressive results, they exhibit limitations in terms of their exibility and their performance. Monte Carlo ray tracing (MCRT), coupled with physically based light transport, is the de-facto standard for synthesizing highly realistic images in the graphics domain, although usually not from volumetric data. Due to the stochastic sampling of MCRT algorithms, numerous effects can be achieved in a relatively straight-forward fashion. For this reason, we have developed a practical framework that applies MCRT techniques also to direct volume rendering (DVR). With this work, we demonstrate that a host of realistic effects, including physically based lighting, can be simulated in a generic and flexible fashion, leading to interactive DVR with improved realism. In the hope that this improved approach to DVR will see more use in practice, we have made available our framework under a permissive open source license. PMID:22768292

  19. Exposure render: an interactive photo-realistic volume rendering framework.

    PubMed

    Kroes, Thomas; Post, Frits H; Botha, Charl P

    2012-01-01

    The field of volume visualization has undergone rapid development during the past years, both due to advances in suitable computing hardware and due to the increasing availability of large volume datasets. Recent work has focused on increasing the visual realism in Direct Volume Rendering (DVR) by integrating a number of visually plausible but often effect-specific rendering techniques, for instance modeling of light occlusion and depth of field. Besides yielding more attractive renderings, especially the more realistic lighting has a positive effect on perceptual tasks. Although these new rendering techniques yield impressive results, they exhibit limitations in terms of their exibility and their performance. Monte Carlo ray tracing (MCRT), coupled with physically based light transport, is the de-facto standard for synthesizing highly realistic images in the graphics domain, although usually not from volumetric data. Due to the stochastic sampling of MCRT algorithms, numerous effects can be achieved in a relatively straight-forward fashion. For this reason, we have developed a practical framework that applies MCRT techniques also to direct volume rendering (DVR). With this work, we demonstrate that a host of realistic effects, including physically based lighting, can be simulated in a generic and flexible fashion, leading to interactive DVR with improved realism. In the hope that this improved approach to DVR will see more use in practice, we have made available our framework under a permissive open source license.

  20. Interactive Isogeometric Volume Visualization with Pixel-Accurate Geometry.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Franz G; Hjelmervik, Jon M

    2016-02-01

    A recent development, called isogeometric analysis, provides a unified approach for design, analysis and optimization of functional products in industry. Traditional volume rendering methods for inspecting the results from the numerical simulations cannot be applied directly to isogeometric models. We present a novel approach for interactive visualization of isogeometric analysis results, ensuring correct, i.e., pixel-accurate geometry of the volume including its bounding surfaces. The entire OpenGL pipeline is used in a multi-stage algorithm leveraging techniques from surface rendering, order-independent transparency, as well as theory and numerical methods for ordinary differential equations. We showcase the efficiency of our approach on different models relevant to industry, ranging from quality inspection of the parametrization of the geometry, to stress analysis in linear elasticity, to visualization of computational fluid dynamics results. PMID:26731454

  1. Interactive Isogeometric Volume Visualization with Pixel-Accurate Geometry.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Franz G; Hjelmervik, Jon M

    2016-02-01

    A recent development, called isogeometric analysis, provides a unified approach for design, analysis and optimization of functional products in industry. Traditional volume rendering methods for inspecting the results from the numerical simulations cannot be applied directly to isogeometric models. We present a novel approach for interactive visualization of isogeometric analysis results, ensuring correct, i.e., pixel-accurate geometry of the volume including its bounding surfaces. The entire OpenGL pipeline is used in a multi-stage algorithm leveraging techniques from surface rendering, order-independent transparency, as well as theory and numerical methods for ordinary differential equations. We showcase the efficiency of our approach on different models relevant to industry, ranging from quality inspection of the parametrization of the geometry, to stress analysis in linear elasticity, to visualization of computational fluid dynamics results.

  2. Influences of Organic Carbon Supply Rate on Uranium Bioreduction in Initially Oxidizing, Contaminated Sediment

    SciTech Connect

    Tokunaga, Tetsu K.; Wan, Jiamin; Kim, Yongman; Daly, Rebecca A.; Brodie, Eoin L.; Hazen, Terry C.; Herman, Don; Firestone, Mary K.

    2008-06-10

    Remediation of uranium (U) contaminated sediments through in-situ stimulation of bioreduction to insoluble UO{sub 2} is a potential treatment strategy under active investigation. Previously, we found that newly reduced U(IV) can be reoxidized under reducing conditions sustained by a continuous supply of organic carbon (OC) because of residual reactive Fe(III) and enhanced U(VI) solubility through complexation with carbonate generated through OC oxidation. That finding motivated this investigation directed at identifying a range of OC supply rates that is optimal for establishing U bioreduction and immobilization in initially oxidizing sediments. The effects of OC supply rate, from 0 to 580 mmol OC (kg sediment){sup -1} year{sup -1}, and OC form (lactate and acetate) on U bioreduction were tested in flow-through columns containing U-contaminated sediments. An intermediate supply rate on the order of 150 mmol OC (kg sediment){sup -1} year{sup -1} was determined to be most effective at immobilizing U. At lower OC supply rates, U bioreduction was not achieved, and U(VI) solubility was enhanced by complexation with carbonate (from OC oxidation). At the highest OC supply rate, resulting highly carbonate-enriched solutions also supported elevated levels of U(VI), even though strongly reducing conditions were established. Lactate and acetate were found to have very similar geochemical impacts on effluent U concentrations (and other measured chemical species), when compared at equivalent OC supply rates. While the catalysts of U(VI) reduction to U(IV) are presumably bacteria, the composition of the bacterial community, the Fe reducing community, and the sulfate reducing community had no direct relationship with effluent U concentrations. The OC supply rate has competing effects of driving reduction of U(VI) to low solubility U(IV) solids, as well as causing formation of highly soluble U(VI)-carbonato complexes. These offsetting influences will require careful control of OC

  3. Emphatic, interactive volume rendering to support variance in user expertise.

    PubMed

    Stredney, Don; Ebert, David S; Svakhine, Nikolai; Bryan, Jason; Sessanna, Dennis; Wiet, Gregory J

    2005-01-01

    Various levels of representation, from abstract to schematic to realistic, have been exploited for millennia to facilitate the transfer of information from one individual to another. Learning complex information, such as that found in biomedicine, proves specifically problematic to many, and requires incremental, step-wise depictions of the information to clarify structural, functional, and procedural relationships.Emerging volume-rendering technique, such as non-photorealistic representation, coupled with advances in computational speeds, especially new graphical processing units, provide unique capabilities to explore the use of various levels of representation in interactive sessions. We have developed a system that produces images that simulate pictorial representations for both scientific and biomedical visualization. The system combines traditional and novel volume illustration techniques. We present examples from our efforts to distill representational techniques for both creative exploration and emphatic presentation for clarity. More specifically, we present our efforts to adapt these techniques for interactive simulation sessions being developed in a concurrent project for resident training in temporal bone dissection simulation. The goal of this effort is to evaluate the use of emphatic rendering to guide the user in an interactive session and to facilitate the learning of complex biomedical information, including structural, functional, and procedural information.

  4. Remote interactive direct volume rendering of AMR data

    SciTech Connect

    Kreylos, Oliver; Weber, Gunther H.; Bethel, E. Wes; Shalf, John M.; Hamann, Bernd; Joy, Kenneth I.

    2002-03-28

    We describe a framework for direct volume rendering of adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) data that operates directly on the hierarchical grid structure, without the need to resample data onto a single, uniform rectilinear grid. The framework can be used for a range of renderers optimized for particular hardware architectures: a hardware-assisted renderer for single-processor graphics workstations, and a massively parallel software-only renderer for supercomputers. It is also possible to use the framework for distributed rendering servers. By exploiting the multiresolution structure of AMR data, the hardware-assisted renderers can render large AMR data sets at interactive rates, even if the data is stored remotely.

  5. Evidencing the Impact of Coastal Contaminated Sediments on Mussels Through Pb Stable Isotopes Composition.

    PubMed

    Dang, Duc Huy; Schäfer, Jörg; Brach-Papa, Christophe; Lenoble, Véronique; Durrieu, Gaël; Dutruch, Lionel; Chiffoleau, Jean-Francois; Gonzalez, Jean-Louis; Blanc, Gérard; Mullot, Jean-Ulrich; Mounier, Stéphane; Garnier, Cédric

    2015-10-01

    Heavily contaminated sediments are a serious concern for ecosystem quality, especially in coastal areas, where vulnerability is high due to intense anthropogenic pressure. Surface sediments (54 stations), 50 cm interface cores (five specific stations), river particles, coal and bulk Pb plate from past French Navy activities, seawater and mussels were collected in Toulon Bay (NW Mediterranean Sea). Lead content and Pb stable isotope composition have evidenced the direct impact of sediment pollution stock on both the water column quality and the living organisms, through the specific Pb isotopic signature in these considered compartments. The history of pollution events including past and present contaminant dispersion in Toulon Bay were also demonstrated by historical records of Pb content and Pb isotope ratios in sediment profiles. The sediment resuspension events, as simulated by batch experiments, could be a major factor contributing to the high Pb mobility in the considered ecosystem. A survey of Pb concentrations in surface seawater at 40 stations has revealed poor seawater quality, affecting both the dissolved fraction and suspended particles and points to marina/harbors as additional diffuse sources of dissolved Pb.

  6. TIE of a PAH-contaminated sediment using reproductive responses and EROD induction in rainbow trout

    SciTech Connect

    Brumley, C.M.; Kraak, G. van der; Munkittrick, K.R.

    1995-12-31

    PAH-contaminated sediments have been shown to cause a range of effects in fish. However, identifying the effective compounds can be time consuming and expensive. A toxicity identification evaluation (TIE) involves the analysis of mixtures by initially separating the mixture into toxic and non-toxic constituents. In this study, sediment was collected from Hamilton Harbor, Lake Ontario, and either extracted wet using methanol (MeOH) and dichloromethane (DCM), or freeze-dried and soxhlet extracted with MeOH and DCM. DCM extracts were solvent exchanged with dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO). Juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were exposed through the water to wet, freeze-dried, or extracted sediment, or to the MeOH or DMSO extracts for 4 days. Fish were analyzed for hepatic EROD activity, and plasma DMSO extracts, but was unaffected in fish exposed to extracted sediment. Estradiol levels were increased in fish exposed to the wet sediment, but not in fish exposed to the freeze-dried or extracted sediment, nor either of the solvent extracts. The response of testosterone to wet, freeze-dried and extracted sediment was inconsistent. Results indicate that both of the extraction methods efficiently removed from the sediment the compounds responsible for the effects on EROD activity and estradiol levels. However, neither method retained in the solvent extracts the compounds causing the increases in estradiol levels. Work continues to refine the freeze-drying and extraction methods; extracts will then be further fractionated using HPLC to identify the compounds of concern.

  7. Relative sensitivity of five benthic invertebrate species to reference toxicants and resin-acid contaminated sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Hickey, C.W.; Martin, M.L.

    1995-08-01

    Five sediment-dwelling native New Zealand freshwater invertebrate species (amphipod, Chaetocorophium c.f. lucasi; clam, Sphaerium novaezelandiae; oligochaete, Lumbriculus variegatus; tanaid, Tanais standfordi; and the burrowing mayfly, Ichthybotus hudsoni) were assessed for their suitability for sediment toxicity testing by comparison of sensitivity to reference toxicants [phenol and pentachlorophenol (PCP)] and contaminated sediments. The 96-h EC50 values at 20 C showed a greater range in test sensitivity for phenol (30-fold range) from the most sensitive test, amphipod (8.1 mg/L), to the least sensitive one, clam (243 mg/L), compared with PCP (14-fold range), with amphipod the most sensitive test species (0.13 mg/L) and tanaid the least sensitive (1.8 mg/L). Clam reburial was a more sensitive end point than was lethality for phenol (by 20-fold) and PCP (by 2.4-fold). Four of the test species, excluding the tanaid, showed good 10-d survival in reference muds ({ge}87%) but lower survival in sand sediments ({ge}79%). Bleached kraft mill sediment containing high resin-acid concentrations (total 1,900 mg/kg dry weight) showed significant reductions in amphipod survival (15%), clam reburial (30%), and oligochaete survival (17%), and reproduction (49%). Amphipods, clams, and oligochaetes were the most promising species for sublethal test development.

  8. Chemical characterization and toxicological testing of windrow composts from explosives-contaminated sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Griest, W.H.; Tyndall, R.L.; Stewart, A.J.; Caton, J.E.; Vass, A.A.; Ho, C.H.; Caldwell, W.M. )

    1995-01-01

    Aerated and nonaerated windrow composts of explosives-contaminated sediments at the Umatilla Army Depot Activity (UMDA, Hermiston, OR) were characterized chemically and toxicologically as a function of composting time. The concentrations of explosives in organic solvent extracts of the composts and in the aqueous leachates of the composts, the bacterial mutagenicity of organic solvent extracts from the composts, and the toxicity of aqueous leachates from the composts to Ceriodaphnia dubia all declined rapidly with composting. The nonaerated windrow method of composting was slightly more efficient than was the aerated windrow method for reducing explosives concentrations in the composts and in their leachates. Extractable mutagenicity declined 99.7 and 97.9%, respectively, for strains TA-98 and TA-100 (without S-9 metabolic activation) in the nonaerated compost. The two types (aerated and nonaerated) of windrow composts had about the same level of efficiency in lowering leachable toxicity based on reductions in C. dubia survival and fecundity, respectively. Thus, windrow composting appeared to be at least as effective as static-pile and mechanically stirred composting evaluated previously. Windrow composting also appeared to be somewhat more effective for HMX transformation.

  9. Identification and confirmation of ammonia toxicity in contaminated sediments using a modified toxicity identification evaluation approach

    SciTech Connect

    Sprang, P.A. Van; Janssen, C.R.

    1997-12-01

    Toxicity identification of sediment pore waters from four sites in the Upper Scheldt (Belgium) was assessed using a simplified and discriminative toxicity identification evaluation procedure. The samples from all locations exhibited acute toxicity toward the freshwater crustacean Thamnocephalus platyurus. Toxicity was removed or considerably reduced by the cation exchange resins and air stripping at pH 11. In addition, the toxicity of the pore waters was found to be highly pH dependent. Increased toxicity was observed at higher pH levels, whereas reduced toxicity was found at lower pH levels. Based on these results, ammonia was suggested as the main toxic agent. The presence of ammonia concentrations exceeding the 24-h median lethal concentration and comparison of the toxicity characterization profiles of the pore waters with those of the suspected toxicant supported this hypothesis. Furthermore, a significant positive correlation between the observed toxicity of the pore waters and the expected toxicity (due to the presence of the suspected toxicant) confirmed ammonia as the true toxic agent. Finally, the ratio between the expected ammonia toxicity and the observed toxicity from the characterization tests was approx. 1, meaning that all or most of the observed toxicity was caused by the presence of one toxicant (i.e., ammonia). The developed toxicity identification evaluation procedure is suggested as a useful tool for the identification and confirmation of toxicants in contaminated sediments.

  10. The microbial community structure in petroleum-contaminated sediments corresponds to geophysical signatures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allen, J.P.; Atekwana, E.A.; Duris, J.W.; Werkema, D.D.; Rossbach, S.

    2007-01-01

    The interdependence between geoelectrical signatures at underground petroleum plumes and the structures of subsurface microbial communities was investigated. For sediments contaminated with light non-aqueousphase liquids, anomalous high conductivity values have been observed. Vertical changes in the geoelectrical properties of the sediments were concomitant with significant changes in the microbial community structures as determined by the construction and evaluation of 16S rRNA gene libraries. DNA sequencing of clones from four 16S rRNA gene libraries from different depths of a contaminated field site and two libraries from an uncontaminated background site revealed spatial heterogeneity in the microbial community structures. Correspondence analysis showed that the presence of distinct microbial populations, including the various hydrocarbon-degrading, syntrophic, sulfate-reducing, and dissimilatory-iron-reducing populations, was a contributing factor to the elevated geoelectrical measurements. Thus, through their growth and metabolic activities, microbial populations that have adapted to the use of petroleum as a carbon source can strongly influence their geophysical surroundings. Since changes in the geophysical properties of contaminated sediments parallel changes in the microbial community compositions, it is suggested that geoelectrical measurements can be a cost-efficient tool to guide microbiological sampling for microbial ecology studies during the monitoring of natural or engineered bioremediation processes. Copyright ?? 2007, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  11. Associations between degraded benthic communities and contaminated sediments: Sabine Lake, Lake Pontchartrain, and Choctawhatchee Bay

    SciTech Connect

    Engle, V.D.; Summers, J.K.; Macauley, J.M.

    1994-12-31

    The Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program for Estuaries (EMAP-E) in the Gulf of Mexico supplements its base sampling effort each year with localized, intensive spatial sampling in selected large estuarine systems. By selecting random locations within 70 km{sup 2} hexagonal areas, individual estuaries were sampled using EMAP methods but at four times the density as base sampling. In 1992, 19 sites were sampled in Lake Pontchartrain, Louisiana. In 1 993, 18 sites were sampled in Sabine Lake, Texas and 12 sites were sampled in Choctawhatchee Bay, Florida. At all sites, sediment grabs were taken and analyzed for benthic species composition and abundance, for toxicity to Ampelisca, and for organic and inorganic sediment contaminants. An indicator of biotic integrity, the benthic index, was calculated to represent the status of benthic communities. A series of statistical techniques, such as stepwise regression analysis, were employed to determine whether the variation in the benthic index could be associated with variation in sediment contaminants, sediment toxicity, or levels of dissolved oxygen. Spatial distributions of these parameters were examined to determine the geographical co-occurrence of degraded benthic communities and environmental stressors. In Lake Pontchartrain, for example, 85% of the variation in the benthic index was associated with decreased levels of dissolved oxygen, and increased concentrations of PCBs, alkanes, copper, tin, and zinc in the sediments.

  12. The fate of metal contaminated sediments in Foundry Cove, New York.

    PubMed

    Knutson, A B; Klerks, P L; Levinton, J S

    1987-01-01

    The distribution of heavy metal contaminated sediments in Foundry Cove, a freshwater embayment of the Hudson River, was examined twelve years after the discharging of wastes from a battery factory had ceased. Concentrations of Cd, Ni and Co were measured in surficial sediments (top 5 cm) and seven detailed depth profiles. Comparison with earlier surveys showed that metal levels of surficial sediments have been considerably reduced throughout the cove. Evidence suggests that this reduction may be largely due to burial rather than transport of metals out of the cove or a redistribution (via sediment resuspension and redeposition) within the cove. This is suggested by the presence of a peak in metal concentrations at a depth of several centimetres in depositional environments, a calculation showing the loss of waterborne cadmium to be much less than the amount of cadmium lost from the surficial sediment, and the absence of increased pollution in the cleaner parts of the cove. Despite improvement, metal levels remain extremely high, including a persistent 'hot-spot' with levels higher than 10 000 ppm Cd. PMID:15092747

  13. Electrokinetic Treatment of Cr-, Cu-, and Zn-Contaminated Sediment: Cathode Modification

    PubMed Central

    Rajić, Ljiljana; Dalmacija, Božo; Perović, Svetlana Ugarčina; Krčmar, Dejan; Rončević, Srđan; Tomašević, Dragana

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Enhanced electrokinetic (EK) removal of Cr, Cu, and Zn from sediment by using original and modified integrated ion exchange (IIX™) cathodes was investigated. IIX cathode design and EK device process modifications were made to improve performance: separation of IIX cathode components (IIXS), combination of modified IIX cathode with pulsed electric field (IIXSP), and separation of IIX cathode components with addition of an anion exchange resin compartment (IIXA). After using the IIXSP, overall Cr, Cu, and Zn removal efficacies were significantly improved compared with the other treatments investigated. No improvements in overall Cr, Cu, and Zn removal efficacies were achieved by utilization of IIXA. Nevertheless, significant removal efficacies occurred at the anode region since distribution of the alkaline front was prevented. However, metal accumulation in the cathode region occurred. This was a consequence of metal cation complexation with Cl− released from the anion exchange resin that changed the direction of metal migration. Enhancing EK remediation of Cr-, Cu-, and Zn-contaminated sediment can be achieved by using a modified IIX cathode. PMID:24381480

  14. Application of multicriteria decision analysis tools to two contaminated sediment case studies.

    PubMed

    Yatsalo, Boris I; Kiker, Gregory A; Kim, St Jongbum; Bridges, Todd S; Seager, Thomas P; Gardner, Kevin; Satterstrom, F Kyle; Linkov, Igor

    2007-04-01

    Environmental decision making is becoming increasingly more information intensive and complex. Our previous work shows that multicriteria decision analysis (MCDA) tools offer a scientifically sound decision analytical framework for environmental management, in general, and specifically for selecting optimal sediment management alternatives. Integration of MCDA into risk assessment and sediment management may require linkage of different models and software platforms whose results may lead to somewhat different conclusions. This paper illustrates the application of 3 different MCDA methods in 2 case studies involving contaminated sediment management. These case studies are based on real sediment management problems experienced by the US Army Corps of Engineers and other stakeholders in New York/New Jersey Harbor, USA, and the Cocheco River Superfund Site in New Hampshire, USA. Our analysis shows that application of 3 different MCDA tools points to similar management solutions no matter which tool is applied. MCDA tools and approaches were constructively used to elicit the strengths and weaknesses of each method when solving the problem. PMID:17477290

  15. Diffusive release of uranium from contaminated sediments into capillary fringe pore water

    SciTech Connect

    Rod, Kenton A.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Flury, Markus; Pierce, Eric M; Harsh, James B.

    2012-01-01

    Despite remediation efforts at the former nuclear weapons facility, leaching of uranium (U) from contaminated sediments to the ground water persists at the Hanford site 300 Area. Flooding of contaminated capillary fringe sediments due to seasonal changes in the Columbia River stage has been identified as a source for U supply to ground water. We investigated U release from Hanford capillary fringe sediments by packing sediments into reservoirs of centrifugal filter devices and saturated with Columbia River water for 3 to 84 days at varying solution-to-solid ratios. After specified times, samples were centrifuged. Within the first three days, there was an initial rapid release of 6-9% of total U, independent of the solution-to-solid ratio. After 14 days of reaction, however, the experiments with the narrowest solution-to-solid ratios showed a decline in dissolved U concentrations. The removal of U from the solution phase was accompanied by removal of Ca and HCO3-. Geochemical modeling indicated that calcite could precipitate in the narrowest solution-to-solid ratio experiment. After the rapid initial release in the first three days for the wide solution-to-solid ratio experiments, there was sustained release of U into the pore water. This sustained release of U from the sediments had diffusion-limited kinetics.

  16. Desorption of organochlorine pesticides from historically contaminated sediments into water-biofuel mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otero-Diaz, M.; Demond, A. H.

    2014-12-01

    Gasoline spills in surface waters generally volatilize due to their low miscibility and high volatility. However, biofuel blends may contain ethanol, a compound completely miscible in water. As hazardous components of gasoline are more soluble in ethanol than in water, the presence of ethanol increases the solubilization of these components, such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX), in surface water. Furthermore, many of these spills may occur in water bodies that have sediments that are historically contaminated with persistent organic contaminants such as organochlorine pesticides. High concentrations of ethanol in the water column, along with solubilized components of gasoline, may increase the desorption of organochlorine pesticides from the sediment. Thus spills of ethanol/gasoline fuel blends have the potential of increasing concentrations of hazardous compounds in rivers and lakes, resulting in increased risk for human and ecological exposure. Using UNIFAC to calculate activity coefficients, one can predict the enhancement of the solubility of pesticides in the aqueous phase as the ethanol fraction increases. Moreover, by predicting the solubility of pesticides in both the aqueous phase and an organic liquid phase, one can construct ternary phase diagrams that show the partitioning behavior of pesticides as a function of ethanol fraction. Such information is useful in estimating the amount of desorption from contaminated sediments that may occur in the presence of biofuel spills. In order to confirm the predicted values, experiments have been conducted to measure the impact of ethanol on the partitioning coefficients of pesticides.

  17. Passive sampling methods for contaminated sediments: Practical guidance for selection, calibration, and implementation

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Upal; Driscoll, Susan Kane; Burgess, Robert M; Jonker, Michiel To; Reible, Danny; Gobas, Frank; Choi, Yongju; Apitz, Sabine E; Maruya, Keith A; Gala, William R; Mortimer, Munro; Beegan, Chris

    2014-01-01

    This article provides practical guidance on the use of passive sampling methods (PSMs) that target the freely dissolved concentration (Cfree) for improved exposure assessment of hydrophobic organic chemicals in sediments. Primary considerations for selecting a PSM for a specific application include clear delineation of measurement goals for Cfree, whether laboratory-based “ex situ” and/or field-based “in situ” application is desired, and ultimately which PSM is best-suited to fulfill the measurement objectives. Guidelines for proper calibration and validation of PSMs, including use of provisional values for polymer–water partition coefficients, determination of equilibrium status, and confirmation of nondepletive measurement conditions are defined. A hypothetical example is described to illustrate how the measurement of Cfree afforded by PSMs reduces uncertainty in assessing narcotic toxicity for sediments contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The article concludes with a discussion of future research that will improve the quality and robustness of Cfree measurements using PSMs, providing a sound scientific basis to support risk assessment and contaminated sediment management decisions. Integr Environ Assess Manag 2014;10:210–223. © 2014 The Authors. Integrated Environmental Assessment and Management published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of SETAC. PMID:24288273

  18. Electrokinetic Treatment of Cr-, Cu-, and Zn-Contaminated Sediment: Cathode Modification.

    PubMed

    Rajić, Ljiljana; Dalmacija, Božo; Perović, Svetlana Ugarčina; Krčmar, Dejan; Rončević, Srđan; Tomašević, Dragana

    2013-12-01

    Enhanced electrokinetic (EK) removal of Cr, Cu, and Zn from sediment by using original and modified integrated ion exchange (IIX™) cathodes was investigated. IIX cathode design and EK device process modifications were made to improve performance: separation of IIX cathode components (IIXS), combination of modified IIX cathode with pulsed electric field (IIXSP), and separation of IIX cathode components with addition of an anion exchange resin compartment (IIXA). After using the IIXSP, overall Cr, Cu, and Zn removal efficacies were significantly improved compared with the other treatments investigated. No improvements in overall Cr, Cu, and Zn removal efficacies were achieved by utilization of IIXA. Nevertheless, significant removal efficacies occurred at the anode region since distribution of the alkaline front was prevented. However, metal accumulation in the cathode region occurred. This was a consequence of metal cation complexation with Cl(-) released from the anion exchange resin that changed the direction of metal migration. Enhancing EK remediation of Cr-, Cu-, and Zn-contaminated sediment can be achieved by using a modified IIX cathode. PMID:24381480

  19. Desorption and bioavailability of spiked pentabromo diphenyl ether and tetrachlorodibenzo(p)dioxin in contaminated sediments.

    PubMed

    Sormunen, Arto J; Leppänen, Matti T; Kukkonen, Jussi V K

    2009-05-01

    The relationship between desorption kinetics and bioavailability of sediment-associated 2,2',4,4,5' pentabromo diphenyl ether [(14)C] (BDE-99) and 2,3,7,8 tetrachlorodibenzo(p)dioxin [(3)H] (TCDD) was examined in the contaminated sediments. The desorption kinetics were measured in a sediment-water suspension using Tenax extraction, and bioaccumulation was examined by exposing Lumbriculus variegatus (Oligochaeta) to BDE-99 and TCDD spiked sediment in a 14-day kinetic study. Both chemicals had a high affinity to the finest particle size fraction (<20 microm) and the large, very slowly desorbing fraction (58-75%). The biota-sediment accumulation factors ranged between 1.9 and 4.4 for BDE-99 and between 1.4 and 2.8 for TCDD. The chemical outflux from the rapidly desorbing fraction and influx into organisms shows the connection between desorption and bioavailability. Despite this, normalization to the rapidly desorbing fraction was unable to reduce differences in bioavailability estimates between the chemicals. Thus, it is evident that chemical extraction in the mixed system (Tenax tubes) does not fully describe the bioavailable fraction that worms face in stagnant sediments in a similar way for all chemicals. However, when all desorbing domains were included in the calculation, the difference between the chemicals disappears. Desorbing fractions were also able to reduce variability in the biota-sediment accumulation factors between the tested sediments when organic carbon-based sediment chemical concentrations were modified by the desorbing fractions.

  20. Fast global interactive volume segmentation with regional supervoxel descriptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luengo, Imanol; Basham, Mark; French, Andrew P.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we propose a novel approach towards fast multi-class volume segmentation that exploits supervoxels in order to reduce complexity, time and memory requirements. Current methods for biomedical image segmentation typically require either complex mathematical models with slow convergence, or expensive-to-calculate image features, which makes them non-feasible for large volumes with many objects (tens to hundreds) of different classes, as is typical in modern medical and biological datasets. Recently, graphical models such as Markov Random Fields (MRF) or Conditional Random Fields (CRF) are having a huge impact in different computer vision areas (e.g. image parsing, object detection, object recognition) as they provide global regularization for multiclass problems over an energy minimization framework. These models have yet to find impact in biomedical imaging due to complexities in training and slow inference in 3D images due to the very large number of voxels. Here, we define an interactive segmentation approach over a supervoxel space by first defining novel, robust and fast regional descriptors for supervoxels. Then, a hierarchical segmentation approach is adopted by training Contextual Extremely Random Forests in a user-defined label hierarchy where the classification output of the previous layer is used as additional features to train a new classifier to refine more detailed label information. This hierarchical model yields final class likelihoods for supervoxels which are finally refined by a MRF model for 3D segmentation. Results demonstrate the effectiveness on a challenging cryo-soft X-ray tomography dataset by segmenting cell areas with only a few user scribbles as the input for our algorithm. Further results demonstrate the effectiveness of our method to fully extract different organelles from the cell volume with another few seconds of user interaction.

  1. Utilization of recycled charcoal as a thermal source and adsorbent for the treatment of PCDD/Fs contaminated sediment.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Long; Hou, Hong; Iwasaki, Kanae; Terada, Akihiko; Hosomi, Masaaki

    2012-07-30

    A novel heat treatment process in which charcoal was used as both a thermal source and an adsorbent was investigated as a low-cost method for removal of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) from solids. Three laboratory scale experiments involving various ratios of charcoal to contaminated sediment and air superficial velocities were performed. The results indicated that the total and toxic equivalency quantities (TEQ) concentrations of PCDD/Fs decreased significantly in the treated sediment of all runs with removal efficiencies greater than 96% and 90%, which resulted in residual concentrations below the Japanese standard limit of 0.15ng-TEQg(-1). The charcoal/contaminated sediment ratio and air superficial velocity were determinant factors controlling the PCDD/Fs concentrations and homologue profiles in effluent. As the air superficial velocity increased and charcoal/contaminated sediment ratio decreased, more PCDD/Fs were released from the sediment as fly ash, making them less likely to remain in the treated sediment. These phenomena were likely a result of the vapor pressure of PCDD/Fs, contact time with effluent gas and amount of PCDD/Fs adsorbed by charcoal. The developed process would promise an alternative to a conventional remediation process for PCDD/Fs contaminated solids.

  2. Utilization of recycled charcoal as a thermal source and adsorbent for the treatment of PCDD/Fs contaminated sediment.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Long; Hou, Hong; Iwasaki, Kanae; Terada, Akihiko; Hosomi, Masaaki

    2012-07-30

    A novel heat treatment process in which charcoal was used as both a thermal source and an adsorbent was investigated as a low-cost method for removal of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) from solids. Three laboratory scale experiments involving various ratios of charcoal to contaminated sediment and air superficial velocities were performed. The results indicated that the total and toxic equivalency quantities (TEQ) concentrations of PCDD/Fs decreased significantly in the treated sediment of all runs with removal efficiencies greater than 96% and 90%, which resulted in residual concentrations below the Japanese standard limit of 0.15ng-TEQg(-1). The charcoal/contaminated sediment ratio and air superficial velocity were determinant factors controlling the PCDD/Fs concentrations and homologue profiles in effluent. As the air superficial velocity increased and charcoal/contaminated sediment ratio decreased, more PCDD/Fs were released from the sediment as fly ash, making them less likely to remain in the treated sediment. These phenomena were likely a result of the vapor pressure of PCDD/Fs, contact time with effluent gas and amount of PCDD/Fs adsorbed by charcoal. The developed process would promise an alternative to a conventional remediation process for PCDD/Fs contaminated solids. PMID:22633545

  3. Using SPMDs To Assess Natural Recovery Of PCB-Contaminated Sediments In Lake Hartwell, SC: I. A Field Test Of New In-Situ Deployment Methods

    EPA Science Inventory

    Results from the field testing of some innovative sampling methods developed to evaluate risk management strategies for polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) contaminated sediments are presented. Semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) were combined with novel deployment methods to quan...

  4. Mineral-Water Interface Processes Affecting Uranium Fate in Contaminated Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catalano, J. G.

    2011-12-01

    Widespread uranium contamination of soil, sediments, and groundwater systems has resulted from mining activities, nuclear weapon production, and energy generation. The fate and transport of uranium in such systems is strongly affected by geochemical processes occurring at mineral-water interfaces. I will present a summary of the mineral-water interface processes found to affect uranium fate in example contaminated sediments at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford sites and in related model systems. Processes occurring under oxic conditions will be the primary focus of this talk as under these conditions uranium is most mobile and thus presents the greatest hazard. Three dominant solid-phase uranium species are observed in contaminated soil and sediments at the Hanford site: uranyl silicates, uranyl phosphates, and uranyl adsorbed to clays and iron oxides. In deep sediments, uranyl silicates are found in microfractures in feldspar grains, likely because slow diffusion in such fractures maintains a high silicate activity. Such silicates are also found in waste-impacted shallow sediments and soil; waste fluids or evaporative processes may have generated the silicate activity needed to produce such phases. Uranyl phosphates are less abundant, occurring primarily in shallow sediments exposed to P-bearing waste fluids. However, remediation approaches under consideration may produce substantial quantities of uranyl phosphates in the future. Adsorbed uranyl is dispersed throughout contaminated soils and shallow sediments and likely has the greatest potential for remobilization. Analogue studies show that precipitation of uranyl phosphates is rapid when such phases are supersaturated and that both homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation may occur. Specific adsorption of uranyl to minerals is strongly affected by the presence of complexation anions. Carbonate suppresses uranyl adsorption but also forms uranyl-carbonate ternary surface complexes. At conditions below

  5. Osmium isotopes demonstrate distal transport of contaminated sediments in Chesapeake Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Helz, G.R.; Adelson, J.M.; Miller, C.V.; Cornwell, J.C.; Hill, J.M.; Horan, M.; Walker, R.J.

    2000-01-01

    Because the isotopic composition of anthropogenic Os is normally distinctive in comparison to continental crust and is precisely measurable, this platinum-group element is attractive as a tracer of transport pathways for contaminated sediments in estuaries. Evidence herein and elsewhere suggest that biomedical research institutions are the chief source of anthropogenic Os. In the Chesapeake Bay region, uncontaminated sediments bear a crustal 187Os/188Os signature of 0.73 ?? 0.10. Slightly higher 187Os/188Os ratios occur in Re-rich Coastal Plain deposits due to post- Miocene 187Re decay. The upper Susquehanna Basin yields sediments also with higher 187Os/188Os. Beginning in the late 1970s, this signal was overprinted by a low 187Os/188Os (anthropogenic) source in the lower Susquehanna Basin. In the vicinity of Baltimore, which is a major center of heavy industry as well as biomedical research, anthropogenic Os has been found only in sediments impacted by the principal wastewater treatment plant. Surprisingly, a mid-Bay site distant from anthropogenic sources contains the strongest anthropogenic Os signal in the data set, having received anthropogenic Os sporadically since the mid-20th Century. Transport of particles to this site overrode the northward flowing bottom currents. Finding anthropogenic Os at this site cautions that other particle-borne substances, including hazardous ones, could be dispersed broadly in this estuary.Because the isotopic composition of anthropogenic Os is normally distinctive in comparison to continental crust and is precisely measurable, this platinum-group element is attractive as a tracer of transport pathways for contaminated sediments in estuaries. Evidence herein and elsewhere suggest that biomedical research institutions are the chief source of anthropogenic Os. In the Chesapeake Bay region, uncontaminated sediments bear a crustal 187Os/188Os signature of 0.73 ?? 0.10. Slightly higher 187Os/188Os ratios occur in Re-rich Coastal

  6. Use of chironomid deformities in field and laboratory assessments of contaminated sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Canfield, T.J.; Kemble, N.E.; Ingersoll, C.G.

    1995-12-31

    Benthic invertebrate samples were collected from 23 pools in the Upper Mississippi River (UMR), the Saint Croix River (SCR), Wisconsin, the Clark Fork River (CFR)/Milltown Reservoir (MR) Superfund Site, Montana, and three Great Lakes rivers classified as Areas of Concern (AOC). Contamination consisted of organic and inorganic contaminants at the UMR and AOC sites, and primarily heavy metals in the CFR/MR sites. Samples were collected with a ponar grab sampler from stations in Indiana Harbor, IN (n = 7), Buffalo River, NY (n = 10), Saginaw River, MI (1989 n = 7; 1990, n = 7), Upper Mississippi River (n = 24), Clark Fork River (n = 6), and Milltown Reservoir (n = 7). Compared to literature values for incidence of deformities in uncontaminated sediments, frequency of chironomid mouthpart deformities was significantly greater at most stations sampled from the AOC sites, with only a few stations sampled from the CFR/MR and UMR sites having significantly greater incidence of mouthpart deformities. Occurrence of mouthpart deformities ranged from 0 to 100% at stations from the AOC`S, 0 to 18% at CFR/MR stations, and 0 to 13% at UMR stations. Sediment contamination was generally lowest in UMR samples and highest in AOC samples. These data show organic contaminants may have a greater potential for causing teratogenic effects in chironomid mouthparts. Frequency of mouthpart deformities in Chironomus riparius laboratory exposures to contaminated sediments from all AOC and CFR sites were evaluated and analysis shows that frequency of mouthpart deformities from laboratory-exposed chironomids are generally lower than those found in field-collected samples. Additional analysis of chironomid laboratory cultures background deformity levels which must be addressed before laboratory evaluations can be used with reliability.

  7. Phosphorus amendment reduces bioavailability of lead to mallards ingesting contaminated sediments.

    PubMed

    Heinz, Gary H; Hoffman, David J; Audet, Daniel J

    2004-05-01

    Lead poisoning of waterfowl has been reported for decades in the Coeur d'Alene River Basin in Idaho as a result of the ingestion of lead-contaminated sediments. We conducted a study to determine whether the addition of phosphoric acid to sediments would reduce the bioavailability of lead to mallards (Anas platyrhynchos). When sediments were amended with 1% phosphorus under laboratory conditions, and diets containing 12% amended sediment were fed to mallards, reductions in tissue lead were 43% in blood, 41% in liver, and 59% in kidney with sediment containing about 4,520 microg/g lead on a dry-weight basis and 41, 30, and 57% with sediment containing about 6,990 microg/g lead. When sediments were treated with phosphorus and left to age for about 5 months in the field, reductions in lead were 56% in blood, 54% in liver, and 66% in kidney at one site with about 5,390 microg/g lead and 64, 57, and 77% at a second site with about 6,990 microg/g lead. In the field, the inability to mix the phosphoric acid uniformly and deeply enough into the sediment may have resulted in more than 1% phosphorus being added to the sediment. Although both lab and field amendments of phosphorus substantially reduced the bioavailability of lead, lead concentrations in the tissues of mallards fed the amended sediments were still above those believed to be harmful to waterfowl. Based on earlier studies of sediment toxicity to waterfowl in the Coeur d'Alene River Basin, combined with the results of our amendment study, the addition of phosphoric acid as we used it might only significantly benefit waterfowl where sediments or soils contain less than 1,000-2,000 microg/g lead.

  8. Bench-scale electrokinetic remediation for cesium-contaminated sediment at the Hanford Site, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Hun Bok; Yang, Jungseok; Um, Wooyong

    2015-05-01

    Electrokinetic (EK) remediation has been applied to extract various contaminants such as radionuclides, heavy metals, and organic compounds from contaminated sediment and soil using electric currents. We conducted a laboratory experiment to investigate the efficiency of EK remediation method for Hanford sediment (76% sand and 24% silt-clay) after artificial contamination with nonradioactive 133Cs (0.01 M CsNO3) as a surrogate for radioactive 137Cs. The initial 133Cs concentration in the bulk sediment was 668 mg kg-1, with a higher 133Cs concentration for the silt-clay fraction (867 mg kg-1) than for the sand fraction (83 mg kg-1). A significant removal of cationic 133Cs from the sediment occurred from the cathode side (-), whereas the removal was negligible from the anode side (+) during the EK remediation process for 68 days. Based on microwave-assisted total digestion, 312 mg kg-1 of 133Cs was removed from the bulk sediment, which corresponds to the removal efficiency of 47%. The EK method was significantly more efficient for the silt-clay fraction than for the sand fraction. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy-electron dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) analyses indicate that change in major crystalline mineral phases was insignificant during the EK remediation and the removal of 133Cs from the Hanford sediment by the EK method is attributed mainly to cation exchange with K in clay minerals. The experimental results suggest that the EK method can effectively remove radioactive Cs from the surface or subsurface sediment contaminated by radioactive materials in the Hanford Site, Washington, USA.

  9. Fish bioturbation of cadmium-contaminated sediments: Factors affecting Cd availability to Daphnia magna

    SciTech Connect

    Wall, S.B.; La Point, T.W.; Isely, J.J.

    1996-03-01

    Benthic fish bioturbation of contaminated sediments is thought to enhance exposure and, potentially, bioaccumulation into planktonic organisms. Exposures were conducted with cadmium-spiked sediment, 1.0 mg/kg nominal concentrations, and koi carp (Cyprinus carpio). Daphnia magna were placed in aquaria with and without fish for 6 d and Cd bioaccumulation was measured every 48 h. Koi carp bioturbation increased mean total suspended solids (TSS) in two trials from 0.001 mg/L to 44.4 mg/L and 19.2 mg/L to 762.4 mg/L. Mean aqueous Cd concentrations increased from1.4 {micro}g/L to 2.8 {micro}g/L, and from 1.6 {micro}g/L to 13.2 {micro}g/L. Cadmium binding capacity increased from 28.9 {micro}g/L to 169.8 {micro}g/L in with-fish treatments when compared to controls. However, Daphnia magna body burdens did not increase. Mean Cd residues of daphnids exposed with fish, 9.2 {micro}g/g, were not statistically different from without-fish exposures, 8.0 {micro}g/g. Body burdens slightly decreased in the first trial after the with-fish treatment, 9.4 {micro}g/g to 8.3 {micro}g/g. Fish size was partially correlated with TSS and aqueous Cd concentrations and TSS positively correlated with binding capacity. Because increased TSS in the with-fish treatment resulted in increased binding capacity, it is probable that cadmium bioavailability decreased. Although koi carp were capable of remobilizing Cd from sediment, Cd bioaccumulation into Daphnia magna was not significant.

  10. Phosphorus amendment reduces bioavailability of lead to mallards ingesting contaminated sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heinz, G.H.; Hoffman, D.J.; Audet, D.J.

    2004-01-01

    Lead poisoning of waterfowl has been reported for decades in the Coeur d' Alene River Basin in Idaho as a result of the ingestion of lead-contaminated sediments. We conducted a study to determine whether the addition of phosphoric acid to sediments would reduce the bioavailability of lead to mallards (Anas platyrhynchos). When sediments were amended with 1 % phosphorus under laboratory conditions, and diets containing 12% amended sediment were fed to mallards, reductions in tissue lead were 43% in blood, 41 % in liver, and 59% in kidney with sediment containing about 4,520 ug/g lead on a dry-weight basis and 41, 30, and 57% with sediment containing about 6,990 ug/g lead. When sediments were treated with phosphorus and left to age for about 5 months in the field, reductions in lead were 56% in blood, 54% in liver, and 66% in kidney at one site with about 5,390 ug/g lead and 64, 57, and 77% at a second site with about 6,990 ug/g lead. In the field, the inability to mix the phosphoric acid uniformly and deeply enough into the sediment may have resulted in more than 1 % phosphorus being added to the sediment. Although both lab and field amendments of phosphorus substantially reduced the bioavailability of lead, lead concentrations in the tissues of mallards fed the amended sediments were still above those believed to be harmful to waterfowl. Based on earlier studies of sediment toxicity to waterfowl in the Coeur d' Alene River Basin, combined with the results of our amendment study, the addition of phosphoric acid as we used it might only significantly benefit waterfowl where sediments or soils contain less than 1,000-2,000 ug/g lead.

  11. Developmental toxicity of lead-contaminated sediment in Canada geese (Branta canadensis)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoffman, David J.; Heinz, Gary H.; Sileo, Louis; Audet, Daniel J.; Campbell, Juile K.; Obrecht, Holly H.

    2000-01-01

    Sediment ingestion has recently been identified as an important exposure route for toxicants in waterfowl. The effects of lead-contaminated sediment from the Coeur d'Alene River Basin (CDARB) in Idaho on posthatching development of Canada geese (Branta canadensis) were examined for 6 wk. Day-old goslings received either untreated control diet, clean sediment (48%) supplemented control diet, or CDARB sediment (3449 mug/g lead) supplemented diets at 12%, 24%, or 48%. The 12% CDARB diet resulted in a geometric mean blood lead concentration of 0.68 ppm (ww), with over 90% depression of red blood cell ALAD activity and over fourfold elevation of free erythrocyte protoporphyrin concentration. The 24% CDARB diet resulted in blood lead of 1.61 ppm with decreased hematocrit, hemoglobin, and plasma protein in addition to the effects just described. The 48% CDARB diet resulted in blood lead of 2.52 ppm with 22% mortality, decreased growth, and elevated plasma lactate dehydrogenase-L (LDH-L) activity. In this group the liver lead concentration was 6.57 ppm (ww), with twofold increases in hepatic lipid peroxidation (thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, TBARS) and in reduced glutathione concentration; associated effects included elevated glutathione reductase activity but lower protein-bound thiols concentration and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PDH) activity. The kidney lead concentration in this group was 14.93 ppm with subacute renal tubular nephrosis in one of the surviving goslings. Three other geese in this treatment group exhibited calcified areas of marrow, and one of these displayed severe chronic fibrosing pancreatitis. Lead from CDARB sediment accumulated less readily in gosling blood and tissues than reported in ducklings but at given concentrations was generally more toxic to goslings. Many of these effects were similar to those reported in wild geese and mallards within the Coeur d'Alene River Basin.

  12. Uptake of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in salt marsh plants Spartina alterniflora grown in contaminated sediments.

    PubMed

    Watts, Alison Weatherly; Ballestero, Thomas P; Gardner, Kevin H

    2006-03-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) concentrations were measured in Spartina alterniflora plants grown in pots of contaminated sediment, plants grown in native sediment at a marsh contaminated with up to 900 microg/g total PAHs, and from plants grown in uncontaminated control sediment. The roots and leaves of the plants were separated, cleaned, and analyzed for PAHs. PAH compounds were detected at up to 43 microg/g dry weight in the root tissue of plants grown in pots of contaminated soil. PAH compounds were detected at up to 0.2 microg/g in the leaves of plants grown in pots of contaminated soil. Concentrations less than 0.004 microg/g were detected in the leaves of plants grown at a reference site. Root concentration factor (RCF) values ranged from 0.009 to 0.97 in the potted plants, and from 0.004 to 0.31 at the contaminated marsh site. Stem concentration factor (SCF) values ranged from 0.00004 to 0.03 in the potted plants and 0.0002 to 0.04 at the contaminated marsh. No correlation was found between the RCF value and PAH compound or chemical properties such as logKOW. SCF values were higher for the lighter PAHs in the potted plants, but not in the plants collected from the contaminated marsh. PAH concentrations in the roots of the potted plants are strongly correlated with soil concentrations, but there is less correlation for the roots grown in natural sediments. Additional plants were grown directly in PAH-contaminated water and analyzed for alkylated PAH homologs. No difference was found in leaf PAH concentrations between plants grown in contaminated water and control plants.

  13. Methods for Estimating Adsorbed Uranium(VI) and Distribution Coefficients of Contaminated Sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kohler, M.; Curtis, G.P.; Meece, D.E.; Davis, J.A.

    2004-01-01

    Assessing the quantity of U(VI) that participates in sorption/desorption processes in a contaminated aquifer is an important task when investigating U migration behavior. U-contaminated aquifer sediments were obtained from 16 different locations at a former U mill tailings site at Naturita, CO (U.S.A.) and were extracted with an artificial groundwater, a high pH sodium bicarbonate solution, hydroxylamine hydrochloride solution, and concentrated nitric acid. With an isotopic exchange method, both a KD value for the specific experimental conditions as well as the total exchangeable mass of U(VI) was determined. Except for one sample, KD values determined by isotopic exchange with U-contaminated sediments that were in equilibrium with atmospheric CO2 agreed within a factor of 2 with KD values predicted from a nonelectrostatic surface complexation model (NEM) developed from U(VI) adsorption experiments with uncontaminated sediments. The labile fraction of U(VI) and U extracted by the bicarbonate solution were highly correlated (r2 = 0.997), with a slope of 0.96 ?? 0.01. The proximity of the slope to one suggests that both methods likely access the same reservoir of U(VI) associated with the sediments. The results indicate that the bicarbonate extraction method is useful for estimating the mass of labile U(VI) in sediments that do not contain U(IV). In-situ KD values calculated from the measured labile U(VI) and the dissolved U(VI) in the Naturita alluvial aquifer agreed within a factor of 3 with in-situ K D values predicted with the NEM and groundwater chemistry at each well.

  14. Diffusive release of uranium from contaminated sediments into capillary fringe pore water

    SciTech Connect

    Rod, Kenton A.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Flury, Markus; Pierce, Eric M.; Harsh, James B.

    2012-10-01

    Despite remediation efforts at the former nuclear weapons facility at the Hanford site (Washington State), leaching of uranium (U) from contaminated sediments to the ground water persists at the Hanford 300 Area. Flooding of contaminated capillary fringe sediments due to seasonal changes in the Columbia River stage has been identified as a reason of continued U supply to ground water. We investigated the release of U from Hanford capillary fringe sediments to pore water. Contaminated Hanford sediments were packed into reservoirs of centrifugal filter devices and saturated with Columbia River water for 3 to 84 days at varying solution-to-solid ratios (1:3, 1:1, 5:1, 10:1, 25:1 mL:g). After specified times, samples were centrifuged to a gravimetric water content of 0.11 ± 0.06 g g-1. Within the first three days, there was an initial rapid release of 6-9% of total U from the sediments into the pore water, independent of the solution-to-solid ratio. After 14 days of reaction, however, the experiments with the narrowest solution-to-solid ratios (1:3 and 1:1 mL:g) showed a decline in dissolved U concentrations. The removal of U from the solution phase was accompanied by removal of Ca and HCO3-. Geochemist workbench simulations, conducted using measured solution concentrations from experiments, indicated that calcite could precipitate in the 1:3 solution-to-solid ratio experiment. After the rapid initial release in the first three days for the 5:1, 10:1, and 25:1 solution-to-solid ratio experiments, there was sustained release of U into the pore water. Up to 22% of total U was released on day 84 for the 25:1 solution-to-solid ratio reaction. This sustained release of U from the sediments had diffusion-limited kinetics.

  15. Donor-dependent Extent of Uranium Reduction for Bioremediation of Contaminated Sediment Microcosms

    SciTech Connect

    Madden, Andrew S.; Palumbo, Anthony V.; Ravel, Bruce; Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana A.; Phelps, Tommy J.; Schadt, Christopher W.; Brandt, Craig C.

    2009-03-16

    Bioremediation of uranium was investigated in microcosm experiments containing contaminated sediments from Oak Ridge, Tennessee to explore the importance of electron donor selection for uranium reduction rate and extent. In these experiments, all of the electron donors, including ethanol, glucose, methanol, and methanol with added humic acids, stimulated the reduction and immobilization of aqueous uranium by the indigenous microbial community. Uranium loss from solution began after the completion of nitrate reduction but essentially concurrent with sulfate reduction. When electron donor concentrations were normalized for their equivalent electron donor potential yield, the rates of uranium reduction were nearly equivalent for all treatments (0.55-0.95 {micro}mol L{sup -1} d{sup -1}). Uranium reduction with methanol proceeded after a 15-d longer lag time relative to that of ethanol or glucose. Significant differences were not found with the inclusion of humic acids. The extent of U reduction in sediment slurries measured by XANES at various time periods after the start of the experiment increased in the order of ethanol (5-7% reduced at 77 and 153 d), glucose (49% reduced at 53 d), and methanol (93% reduced at 90 d). The microbial diversity of ethanol- and methanol-amended microcosms in their late stage of U reduction was analyzed with 16S rRNA gene amplification. Members of the Geobacteraceae were found in all microcosms as well as other potential uranium-reducing organisms, such as Clostridium and Desulfosporosinus. The effectiveness of methanol relative to ethanol at reducing aqueous and sediment-hosted uranium suggests that bioremediation strategies that encourage fermentative poising of the subsurface to a lower redox potential may be more effective for long-term uranium immobilization as compared with selecting an electron donor that is efficiently metabolized by known uranium-reducing microorganisms.

  16. Donor-dependent Extent of Uranium Reduction for Bioremediation of Contaminated Sediment Microcosms

    SciTech Connect

    Palumbo, Anthony Vito; Ravel, Bruce; Phelps, Tommy Joe; Schadt, Christopher Warren; Brandt, Craig C

    2009-01-01

    Bioremediation of uranium was investigated in microcosm experiments containing contaminated sediments from Oak Ridge, Tennessee to explore the importance of electron donor selection for uranium reduction rate and extent. In these experiments, all of the electron donors, including ethanol, glucose, methanol, and methanol with added humic acids, stimulated the reduction and immobilization of aqueous uranium by the indigenous microbial community. Uranium loss from solution began after the completion of nitrate reduction but essentially concurrent with sulfate reduction. When electron donor concentrations were normalized for their equivalent electron donor potential yield, the rates of uranium reduction were nearly equivalent for all treatments (0.55-0.95 {micro}mol L{sup -1} d{sup -1}). Uranium reduction with methanol proceeded after a 15-d longer lag time relative to that of ethanol or glucose. Significant differences were not found with the inclusion of humic acids. The extent of U reduction in sediment slurries measured by XANES at various time periods after the start of the experiment increased in the order of ethanol (5-7% reduced at 77 and 153 d), glucose (49% reduced at 53 d), and methanol (93% reduced at 90 d). The microbial diversity of ethanol- and methanol-amended microcosms in their late stage of U reduction was analyzed with 16S rRNA gene amplification. Members of the Geobacteraceae were found in all microcosms as well as other potential uranium-reducing organisms, such as Clostridium and Desulfosporosinus. The effectiveness of methanol relative to ethanol at reducing aqueous and sediment-hosted uranium suggests that bioremediation strategies that encourage fermentative poising of the subsurface to a lower redox potential may be more effective for long-term uranium immobilization as compared with selecting an electron donor that is efficiently metabolized by known uranium-reducing microorganisms.

  17. The Behavior of Mercury in Coal Combustion Residue-Contaminated Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gofstein, T.; Heyes, A.

    2014-12-01

    Coal combustion residues (CCRs), the products of coal combustion, contain high concentrations of heavy metals such as mercury. Recent structural failures of on-site containment ponds and leaching of CCRs has potentially endangered the health of adjacent water bodies. This study examines the influence of CCR enrichment of river sediments through the study of mercury, an abundant constituent of CCRs, and the concomitant production of methylmercury. We hypothesized that CCR contamination increases the exposure to mercury for aquatic life through leaching and resuspension mechanisms. Resuspension experiments were conducted using CCR-contaminated sediments from the Dan River and uncontaminated sediments enriched with 0%, 10%, and 30% CCRs in the laboratory. Sediments were sieved to obtain the silt-clay fraction, which was then resuspended in solution with a dispersant to obtain the separate silt and clay fractions and then analyzed for total mercury concentrations. We found that CCR particles and the mercury they contain are present primarily in the silt and clay fractions of sediment and there is a direct relationship between CCR concentrations and total mercury concentrations. These findings have implications for both the bioavailability of mercury to methylating bacteria, higher organisms prone to direct ingestion of fine particles, CCR spill event remediation, current industrial waste disposal practices, and further research required in this field. Our seven day incubations of river sediment cores enriched with CCRs did not increase methylmercury in porewater above controls, suggesting that there is no immediate risk of increased methylmercury bioaccumulation, however this does not necessarily reflect the long-term effects of CCRs on river ecology, which requires further research.

  18. Interactions between volume and surface EM waves in layered structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ushioda, S.

    1984-01-01

    Using light scattering spectroscopy, the interaction of Surface Plasmon Polariton SPP in silver films on a glass substrate is with the incident radiation and with optical phonons of an external medium in contact with the film. The mean free path and the field strength of SPP are determined. The same SPP plays an important role in light emitting tunnel junctions (LETJ) in which an electrical current is converted into Volume Electromagnetic Wave VEW. The efficiency of light emission from LETJ through a prism coupler rather than through surface roughness is discussed. The coupling between phonon surface polaritons (PhSP) and optical guided waves (OGW) in thin films of GaP is also examined.

  19. Phosphorus amendment reduces hepatic and renal oxidative stress in mallards ingesting lead-contaminated sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoffman, D.J.; Heinz, G.H.; Audet, D.J.

    2006-01-01

    Lead poisoning of waterfowl has been reported for decades in the Coeur d'Alene River Basin (CDARB) in Idaho as a result of the ingestion of lead-contaminated sediments. This study was conducted to determine whether the addition of phosphoric acid to CDARB sediments would reduce the bioavailability and toxicity of lead to the liver and kidney of mallards (Anas platyrhynchos). Mallards received diets containing 12% clean sediment (controls) or 12% sediment from three different CDARB sites containing 4520, 5390, or 6990 ug/g lead (dry weight) with or without phosphoric acid amendment. Liver and kidney lead concentrations were significantly higher in all CDARB treatment groups and ranged from geometric mean values of 18.2 (liver) and 28.7 (kidney) for the first 2 sites to 22.5 (liver) and 45.6 (kidney) ug/g (wet weight) for the third site. With amendments all liver lead concentrations were reduced 36 to 55%, and all kidney lead concentrations were lowered 54 to 73%. Unamended CDARB sediment from the third site resulted in the following hepatic effects: over 1.6-fold elevation of liver glutathione (reduced form; GSH) concentration, higher GSH S-transferase and oxidized glutathione (GSSG) reductase activities, and lower protein-bound thiols (PBSH) concentration. Renal effects included higher kidney GSH concentrations for all CDARB sites, with over 2.1-fold higher for the third site. Resulting kidney GSSG to GSH ratios were lower at two sites. At the third site, gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT) activity was elevated, and lipid peroxidation as thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) was 1.7-fold greater. Amendment restored all hepatic variables as well as the renal variables TBARS and GGT so they did not differ from controls. Although amendments of phosphorus substantially reduced the bioavailability of lead and some of the adverse effects, lead concentrations in the tissues of mallards fed the amended sediments were still above those considered to be harmful to

  20. Characterization of U(VI) reduction in contaminated sediments with slow-degrading electron donor source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, W.; Watson, D. B.; Zhang, G.; Mehlhorn, T.; Lowe, K.; Earles, J.; Phillips, J.; Kelly, S. D.; Boyanov, M.; Kemner, K. M.; Schadt, C.; Criddle, C. S.; Jardine, P. M.; Brooks, S. C.

    2011-12-01

    In order to select sustainable, high efficiency and cost effective electron donor source, oleate and emulsified vegetable oil (EVO) were tested uranium (VI) reduction in comparison with ethanol in microcosms using uranium contaminated sediments and groundwater from the US DOE Oak Ridge Integrated Field Research Challenge (ORIFRC) site. The effect of initial sulfate concentration on U(VI) reduction was also tested. Both oleate and EVO were effective electron donor sources for U(VI) reduction. Accumulation of acetate as a major product and the removal of aqueous U(VI) were observed and were associated with sulfate reduction. Both oleate and EVO supported U(VI) reduction but at slower rates with a comparable but slightly lower extent of reduction than ethanol. X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) analysis confirmed reduction of U(VI) to U(IV). The extent of U(VI) reduction in solid phase was negatively influenced by aqueous calcium concentration. The majority of electrons of the three substrates were consumed by sulfate reduction, Fe(III) reduction, and methanogenesis. Initial U(VI) concentration in the aqueous phase increased with increased sulfate concentration (1 versus 5 mM), likely due to U(VI) desorption from the solid phase. At the higher initial sulfate concentration more U(VI) was reduced and fewer electrons were used in methanogenesis. Analysis of bacterial and archeal populations using 16S rRNA gene libraries showed a significant increase in Deltaproteobacteria after biostimulation. The microbial community structures developed with oleate and EVO were significantly distinct from those developed with ethanol. Bacteria similar to Desulforegula spp. was predominant for oleate and EVO degradation but were not observed in ethanol-amended microcosms. Known U(VI)-reducing bacteria in the microcosms amended with the three electron donor sources included iron(III) reducing Geobacter spp. but in lower abundances than sulfate-reducing Desulfovibrio spp. The

  1. Contaminated Sediment Management in Dam Removals and River Restoration Efforts: Critical Need for Research and Policy Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, J. E.

    2015-12-01

    Over 1,000 U.S. dams have been removed (1975-2015) for reasons including obsolescence, liability concerns, water quality upgrades, fisheries, or ecosystem enhancements. Contaminated sediment can significantly complicate the approval process, cost, and timeline of a dam removal, or stop it entirely. In a dam removal, reservoir sediment changes from a sink to a source of contaminants. Recently, the Sierra Club sued to stop the removal of a large dam in Ohio because of the potential impact of phosphate releases on toxic algal blooms in Lake Erie. Heavy metals, PCBs, PAHs, pesticides, and petroleum hydrocarbons can be present in reservoir sediments. In a non-dam removal scenario, reservoir management tools range from "no action" to dredging, dewatering and removal, or sediment capping. But it is not clear how these reservoir management techniques apply to dam removals. Case studies show typically >80% of the reservoir sediment is eventually eroded, precluding sediment capping as a containment option. However, the released contaminants are diluted by mixing with "clean" sediment and are transported to different physio-chemical environments which may immobilize or biodegrade the contaminants. Poorly understood options include phased drawdown/reseeding the former reservoir to contain sediments, diking contaminant "hot spots," and addressing contaminant stratigraphy (where historical use created "hot layers" in the reservoir sediment). Research and policy development needs include: (1) assessment methods based on synergistic effects of multiple contaminants being present; (2) ways to translate the pre-removal contaminant concentrations to post-removal health risks downstream; (3) evaluation of management practices for contaminant "hot spots" and "hot layers;" (4) tools to forecast the presence of contaminated sediment using easily accessible information; and (5) ways to limit liability risk for organizations participating in dam removals involving contaminated sediment.

  2. Effect of biostimulation on the microbial community in PCB-contaminated sediments through periodic amendment of sediment with iron.

    PubMed

    Srinivasa Varadhan, A; Khodadoust, Amid P; Brenner, Richard C

    2011-10-01

    Reductive dehalogenation of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) by indigenous dehalorespiring microorganisms in contaminated sediments may be enhanced via biostimulation by supplying hydrogen generated through the anaerobic corrosion of elemental iron added to the sediment. In this study, the effect of periodic amendment of sediment with various dosages of iron on the microbial community present in sediment was investigated using phospholipid fatty acid analysis (PLFA) over a period of 18 months. Three PCB-contaminated sediments (two freshwater lake sediments and one marine sediment) were used. Signature biomarker analysis of the microbial community present in all three sediments revealed the enrichment of Dehalococcoides species, the population of which was sustained for a longer period of time when the sediment microcosms were amended with the lower dosage of iron (0.01 g iron per g dry sediment) every 6 months as compared to the blank system (without iron). Lower microbial stress levels were reported for the system periodically amended with 0.01 g of iron per g dry sediment every 6 months, thus reducing the competition from other hydrogen-utilizing microorganisms like methanogens, iron reducers, and sulfate reducers. The concentration of hydrogen in the system was found to be an important factor influencing the shift in microbial communities in all sediments with time. Periodic amendment of sediment with larger dosages of iron every 3 months resulted in the early prevalence of Geobacteraceae and sulfate-reducing bacteria followed by methanogens. An average pH of 8.4 (range of 8.2-8.6) and an average hydrogen concentration of 0.75% (range of 0.3-1.2%) observed between 6 and 15 months of the study were found to be conducive to sustaining the population of Dehalococcoides species in the three sediments amended with 0.01 g iron per g dry sediment. Biostimulation of indigenous PCB dechlorinators by the periodic amendment of contaminated sediments with low dosages of

  3. Suppression of nonlinear optical signals in finite interaction volumes of bulk materials.

    PubMed

    Cattaneo, Stefano; Siltanen, Mikael; Xiang Wang, Fu; Kauranen, Martti

    2005-11-28

    We show that nonlinear optical signals generated by non-phase-matched interactions are strongly suppressed when the interaction volume is finite and localized deep inside the bulk of a homogeneous material, as opposed to the case where the interaction volume extends across a boundary of the material. The suppression in the bulk originates from destructive interference between the signals generated in the two regions where the interaction is gradually turned on and off and depends on the ratio of the coherence length to the characteristic length of the interaction volume.

  4. Real-time x-ray absorption spectroscopy of uranium, iron, and manganese in contaminated sediments during bioreduction

    SciTech Connect

    Tokunaga, Tetsu; Tokunaga, T.K.; Wan, J.; Kim, Y.; Sutton, S.R.; Newville, M.; Lanzirotti, A.; Rao, W.

    2008-01-15

    The oxidation status of uranium in sediments is important because the solubility of this toxic and radioactive element is much greater for U(VI) than for U(IV) species. Thus, redox manipulation to promote precipitation of UO{sub 2} is receiving interest as a method to remediate U-contaminated sediments. Presence of Fe and Mn oxides in sediments at much higher concentrations than U requires understanding of their redox status as well. This study was conducted to determine changes in oxidation states of U, Fe, and Mn in U-contaminated sediments from Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Oxidation states of these elements were measured in real-time and nondestructively using X-ray absorption spectroscopy, on sediment columns supplied with synthetic groundwater containing organic carbon (OC, 0, 3, 10, 30 and 100 mM OC as lactate) for over 400 days. In sediments supplied with OC {ge} 30 mM, 80% of the U was reduced to U(IV), with transient reoxidation at about 150 days. Mn(III,IV) oxides were completely reduced to Mn(II) in sediments infused with OC {ge} 3 mM. However, Fe remained largely unreduced in all sediment columns, showing that Fe(III) can persist as an electron acceptor in reducing sediments over long times. This result in combination with the complete reduction of all other potential electron acceptors supports the hypothesis that the reactive Fe(III) fraction was responsible for reoxidizing U(IV).

  5. Resuspended contaminated sediments cause sublethal stress to oysters: A biomarker differentiates total suspended solids and contaminant effects.

    PubMed

    Edge, Katelyn J; Dafforn, Katherine A; Simpson, Stuart L; Ringwood, Amy H; Johnston, Emma L

    2015-06-01

    Resuspended contaminated sediments represent an important route of contaminant exposure for aquatic organisms. During resuspension events, filter-feeding organisms are exposed to contaminants, in both the dissolved form (at the gills) and the particulate form (in the digestive system). In addition, these organisms must manage the physical stress associated with an increase in total suspended solids (TSS). To date, few studies have experimentally compared the contributions to biological stress of contaminated and clean suspended solids. The authors mixed field-collected sediments (<63 μm) from clean and contaminated field sites to create 4 treatments of increasing metal concentrations. Sydney rock oysters were then exposed to sediment treatments at different TSS concentrations for 4 d, and cellular biomarkers (lysosomal membrane stability, lipid peroxidation, and glutathione) were measured to evaluate sublethal toxicity. Lysosomal membrane stability was the most sensitive biomarker for distinguishing effects from resuspended contaminated sediments, as increasing amounts of contaminated TSS increased lysosomal membrane destabilization. The authors' results illustrate the importance of considering contaminant exposures from resuspended sediments when assessing the toxicity of contaminants to aquatic organisms.

  6. The role of biomarkers to assess oil-contaminated sediment quality using toxicity tests with clams and crabs.

    PubMed

    Morales-Caselles, Carmen; Martín-Díaz, María Laura; Riba, Inmaculada; Sarasquete, Carmen; Delvalls, Tomás Angel

    2008-06-01

    A 28-d bioassay was conducted with two invertebrate species with different feeding habits, the clam Ruditapes philippinarum and the shore crab Carcinus maenas. The purpose of the present study was to assess the quality of sediments affected by oil spills in different areas of the Spanish coast. The organisms were exposed to environmental samples of oil-contaminated sediments during four weeks and, after the experiment, a suite of biomarkers of exposure was measured: The phase one detoxification system was assessed by ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) activity; glutathione-S-transferase (GST) is a phase-two detoxification enzyme but also is implicated in oxidative stress events; glutathione peroxidase (GPX), glutathione reductase (GR), and the ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP) assay were analyzed to determine the antioxidant activity of the tissues. The biomarker results were correlated with the chemical compounds bound to sediments (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons [PAHs], polychlorinated biphenyls [PCBs], Zn, Cd, Pb, Cu, Ni, Co, V) and a principal component analysis was carried out with the purpose of linking all the variables and to detect those contaminated sediments potentially harmful to the biota. Results showed induction of biomarkers in both invertebrate species and significant differences (p < 0.05; p < 0.01) were established among sediments affected by different spills. The use of the selected biomarkers together with the sediment chemical analysis assesses the bioavailability of contaminants and has proven to be a suitable tool to monitor the environmental quality of sediments affected by oil spills. PMID:18198936

  7. Reduced growth of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) fed a live invertebrate diet pre-exposed to metal-contaminated sediments.

    PubMed

    Hansen, James A; Lipton, Joshua; Welsh, Paul G; Cacela, David; MacConnell, Beth

    2004-08-01

    Juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were fed live diets of Lumbriculus variegatus cultured in metal-contaminated sediments from the Clark Fork River Basin (MT, USA), an uncontaminated reference sediment, or an uncontaminated culture medium. Fish were tested in individual chambers; individual growth as well as the nutritional quality and caloric value of each trout's consumed diet were determined. Growth was measured following 14, 28, 42, 56, and 67 d of exposure. A subset of fish was sampled at 35 d for whole-body metals. Metals (whole body, digestive tract, and liver) and histology were measured at the end of the test. We observed significant growth inhibition in trout fed the contaminated diets; growth inhibition was associated with reductions in conversion of food energy to biomass rather than with reduced food intake. Growth inhibition was negatively correlated with As in trout tissue residues. Histological changes in contaminated treatments included hepatic necrosis and degenerative alterations in gallbladder. The present study provides evidence that metal-contaminated sediments can pose a hazard to trout health through a dietary exposure pathway. PMID:15352479

  8. Development, Evaluation, and Application of Sediment Quality Targets for Assessing and Managing Contaminated Sediments in Tampa Bay, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    MacDonald, D.D.; Carr, R.S.; Eckenrod, D.; Greening, H.; Grabe, S.; Ingersoll, C.G.; Janicki, S.; Janicki, T.; Lindskoog, R.A.; Long, E.R.; Pribble, R.; Sloane, G.; Smorong, D.E.

    2004-01-01

    Tampa Bay is a large, urban estuary that is located in west central Florida. Although water quality conditions represent an important concern in this estuary, information from numerous sources indicates that sediment contamination also has the potential to adversely affect aquatic organisms, aquatic-dependent wildlife, and human health. As such, protecting relatively uncontaminated areas of the bay from contamination and reducing the amount of toxic chemicals in contaminated sediments have been identified as high-priority sediment management objectives for Tampa Bay. To address concerns related to sediment contamination in the bay, an ecosystem-based framework for assessing and managing sediment quality conditions was developed that included identification of sediment quality issues and concerns, development of ecosystem goals and objectives, selection of ecosystem health indicators, establishment of metrics and targets for key indicators, and incorporation of key indicators, metrics, and targets into watershed management plans and decision-making processes. This paper describes the process that was used to select and evaluate numerical sediment quality targets (SQTs) for assessing and managing contaminated sediments. These SQTs included measures of sediment chemistry, whole-sediment and pore-water toxicity, and benthic invertebrate community structure. In addition, the paper describes how the SQTs were used to develop site-specific concentration-response models that describe how the frequency of adverse biological effects changes with increasing concentrations of chemicals of potential concern. Finally, a key application of the SQTs for defining sediment management areas is discussed.

  9. Liposome technology. Volume III: Targeted drug delivery and biological interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Gregoriadis, G.

    1984-01-01

    These three volumes cover liposome technology in pharmacology and medicine. Contributors emphasize methodology used in their own laboratories, and include a brief introduction, coverage of relevant literature, applications and critical evaluations for the methods they describe. In Volume III, the growing variety of techniques yielding targeted liposomes and approaches of studying liposomal behavior both in vitro and in vivo are discussed.

  10. INNOVATIVE IN-SITU REMEDIATION OF CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS FOR SIMULTANEOUS CONTROL OF CONTAMINATION AND EROSION

    SciTech Connect

    Knox, A; Michael Paller, M; Danny D. Reible, D; Ioana G. Petrisor, I

    2007-11-28

    New technologies are needed that neutralize contaminant toxicity and control physical transport mechanisms that mobilize sediment contaminants. The last 12 months of this comprehensive project investigated the use of combinations of sequestering agents to develop in situ active sediment caps that stabilize mixtures of contaminants and act as a barrier to mechanical disturbance under a broad range of environmental conditions. Efforts focused on the selection of effective sequestering agents for use in active caps, the composition of active caps, and the effects of active cap components on contaminant bioavailability and retention. Results from this project showed that phosphate amendments, some organoclays, and the biopolymer, chitosan, were very effective at removing metals from both fresh and salt water. These amendments also exhibited high retention (80% or more) of most metals indicating reduced potential for remobilization to the water column. Experiments on metal speciation and retention in contaminated sediment showed that apatite and organoclay can immobilize a broad range of metals under both reduced and oxidized conditions. These studies were followed by sequential extractions to evaluate the bioavailability and retention of metals in treated sediments. Metal fractions recovered in early extraction steps are more likely to be bioavailable and were termed the Potentially Mobile Fraction (PMF). Less bioavailable fractions collected in later extraction steps were termed the Recalcitrant Factor (RF). Apatite and organoclay reduced the PMF and increased the RF for several elements, especially Pb, Zn, Ni, Cr, and Cd. Empirically determined partitioning coefficients and modeling studies were used to assess the retention of organic contaminants on selected sequestering agents. Organoclays exhibited exceptionally high sorption of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons as indicated by a comparison of K{sub d} values among 12 amendments. These results suggested that

  11. An experimental and modeling study of grain-scale uranium desorption from field-contaminated sediments and the potential influence of microporosity on mass-transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoliker, D.; Liu, C.; Kent, D. B.; Zachara, J. M.

    2012-12-01

    The aquifer below the 300-Area of the Hanford site (Richland, WA, USA) is plagued by a persistent plume of dissolved uranium (U(VI)) in excess of the Environmental Protection Agency drinking water maximum contamination level even after the removal of highly contaminated sediments. The aquifer sediments in the seasonally saturated lower vadose zone act as both a source and sink for uranium during stage changes in the nearby Columbia River. Diffusion limitation of uranium mass-transfer within these sediments has been cited as a potential cause of the plume's persistence. Equilibrium U(VI) sorption is a strong function of variable chemical conditions, especially carbonate, hydrogen, and uranyl ion activities. Field-contaminated sediments from the site require up to 1,000 hours to reach equilibrium in static batch reactors. Increases in U(VI) concentrations over longer time-scales result from changes in chemical conditions, which drive reactions with sediments that favor U(VI) desorption. Grain-scale U(VI) sorption/desorption rates are slow, likely owing to diffusion of U(VI) and other solutes through intra-granular pore domains. In order to improve understanding of the impact of intra-granular diffusion and chemical reactions controlling grain-scale U(VI) release, experiments were conducted on individual particle size fractions of a <8 mm composite of field-contaminated, lower vadose zone sediments. For each size fraction, equilibrium U(VI) sorption/desorption in static batch reactors was well-described by surface complexation models over a range of chemical conditions applicable to the field site. Desorption rates from individual size fractions in flow-through batch reactors, examined under a single set of constant chemical conditions with multiple stop-flow events, were similar for all size fractions <2 mm. Kinetic U(VI) desorption in flow-through batch reactors was modeled using a multi-rate surface complexation approach, where sorption/desorption rates were

  12. Interactive volume rendering of multimodality 4D cardiac data with the use of consumer graphics hardware

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enders, Frank; Strengert, Magnus; Iserhardt-Bauer, Sabine; Aladl, Usaf E.; Slomka, Piotr J.

    2003-05-01

    Interactive multimodality 4D volume rendering of cardiac images is challenging due to several factors. Animated rendering of fused volumes with multiple lookup tables (LUT) and interactive adjustments of relative volume positions and orientations must be performed in real time. In addition it is difficult to visualize the myocardium separated from the surrounding tissue on some modalities, such as MRI. In this work we propose to use software techniques combined with hardware capabilities of modern consumer video cards for real-time visualization of time-varying multimodality fused cardiac volumes for diagnostic purposes.

  13. Metabolic and genomic analysis elucidates strain-level variation in Microbacterium spp. isolated from chromate contaminated sediment

    PubMed Central

    Henson, Michael W.; Santo Domingo, Jorge W.; Kourtev, Peter S.; Jensen, Roderick V.; Dunn, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] is a soluble carcinogen that has caused widespread contamination of soil and water in many industrial nations. Bacteria have the potential to aid remediation as certain strains can catalyze the reduction of Cr(VI) to insoluble and less toxic Cr(III). Here, we examine Cr(VI) reducing Microbacterium spp. (Cr-K1W, Cr-K20, Cr-K29, and Cr-K32) isolated from contaminated sediment (Seymore, Indiana) and show varying chromate responses despite the isolates’ phylogenetic similarity (i.e., identical 16S rRNA gene sequences). Detailed analysis identified differences based on genomic metabolic potential, growth and general metabolic capabilities, and capacity to resist and reduce Cr(VI). Taken together, the discrepancies between the isolates demonstrate the complexity inter-strain variation can have on microbial physiology and related biogeochemical processes. PMID:26587353

  14. Ecological effects of contaminated sediments following a decade of no industrial effluents emissions: the Sediment Quality Triad approach.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Marta Lobão; Rodrigues, Ana Maria; Quintino, Victor

    2014-10-15

    Sediments contaminated by industrial effluents a decade after the emissions were stopped were statistically compared to sediments from reference channels, using the Sediment Quality Triad approach. The metals and metalloid concentrations, mainly Hg and As, increased towards the upper part of a contaminated channel, where the industrial discharge was located. A bioaccumulation assay with Scrobicularia plana showed the highest bioaccumulation and mortality in the most contaminated sediments and bioaccumulation strongly correlated with the sediments metals and metalloid concentrations. The resident macroinvertebrate community also showed significant differences between the contaminated and reference channels, in the upper areas, where the community was most affected. All three elements of the quality triad rejected the null hypothesis and indicated that despite the emissions ceasing in 2004, sediments remain contaminated by high levels of metals and metalloid, leading to bioaccumulation and with severe community level consequences. PMID:25152187

  15. Chironomus tentans life-cycle test: Design and evaluation for use in assessing toxicity of contaminated sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Benoit, D.A.; Sibley, P.K.; Ankley, G.T.; Juenemann, J.L.

    1997-06-01

    The development and standardization of toxicity test methods for assessing toxicity of contaminated freshwater sediments has focused predominantly on short-term exposures and lethality. In many situations, however, toxicity is more likely to become manifest over long periods of time so there is need for standardized testing procedures by which sublethal sediment toxicity can be adequately assessed. In this study, the authors present and evaluate a new life cycle test, using the midge Chironomus tentans, which enables the assessment of sublethal toxicity of contaminated sediments. The test is initiated with newly hatched larvae and uses four effects-based endpoints to assess toxicity: survival, growth, emergence, and reproduction. Survival is determined at 20 d and at the end of the test by back-calculating through emergence data. Growth can be determined at 20 d, which corresponds to the 10-d endpoint in the 10-d C. tentans growth test initiated with 10-d-old larvae. From day 23 to the end of the test, emergence and reproduction are monitored daily. The number of eggs per female is determined for each egg mass, which is then incubated for 6 d to determine hatching success. Each treatment in the life cycle test is terminated separately after 7 consecutive days without emergence. The authors evaluated the life cycle test by following one generation of C. tentans in sediments collected from the upper Mississippi River. Survival of larvae exceeded 90% at 20 d. Of these larvae, between 60 and 70% successfully emerged; survivorship among pupae and adults exceeded 85%. Mean egg production ranged from 906 to 1,107 eggs per female. The test required 65 d to complete, including pretest preparation. These data show that the C. tentans life cycle test can be used to assess sublethal toxicity accurately in contaminated sediments and provides a suitable compliment to the standard C. tentans 10-d test.

  16. Distinguishing Betwen Effects of Local Inputs (Contaminated Sediments, Point Sources) and Upstream Diffuse Nonpoint Source Input: Refinement of a Watershed Development Index for New England

    EPA Science Inventory

    Assessment tools are being developed to predict diffuse NPS effects from watershed development and distinguish these from local impacts (point sources, contaminated sediments). Using EMAP data from the New England Wadeable Stream Survey and two state datasets (CT, ME), we are de...

  17. Space Operations Center, shuttle interaction study, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The implication of using the Shuttle with the SOC, including constraints that the Shuttle places upon the SOC design is studied. The considerations involved in the use of the Shuttle as a part of the SOC concept, and the constraints to the SOC imposed by the Shuttle in its interactions with the SOC, and on the design or technical solutions which allow satisfactory accomplishment of the interactions are identified.

  18. Imalytics Preclinical: Interactive Analysis of Biomedical Volume Data

    PubMed Central

    Gremse, Felix; Stärk, Marius; Ehling, Josef; Menzel, Jan Robert; Lammers, Twan; Kiessling, Fabian

    2016-01-01

    A software tool is presented for interactive segmentation of volumetric medical data sets. To allow interactive processing of large data sets, segmentation operations, and rendering are GPU-accelerated. Special adjustments are provided to overcome GPU-imposed constraints such as limited memory and host-device bandwidth. A general and efficient undo/redo mechanism is implemented using GPU-accelerated compression of the multiclass segmentation state. A broadly applicable set of interactive segmentation operations is provided which can be combined to solve the quantification task of many types of imaging studies. A fully GPU-accelerated ray casting method for multiclass segmentation rendering is implemented which is well-balanced with respect to delay, frame rate, worst-case memory consumption, scalability, and image quality. Performance of segmentation operations and rendering are measured using high-resolution example data sets showing that GPU-acceleration greatly improves the performance. Compared to a reference marching cubes implementation, the rendering was found to be superior with respect to rendering delay and worst-case memory consumption while providing sufficiently high frame rates for interactive visualization and comparable image quality. The fast interactive segmentation operations and the accurate rendering make our tool particularly suitable for efficient analysis of multimodal image data sets which arise in large amounts in preclinical imaging studies. PMID:26909109

  19. Interaction between Personnelmen and Enlisted Men: A Study. Volume 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Best, H. L.; Skinner, W. H.

    Dialogues or "scenarios" are presented of the interviews conducted with enlisted men, personnelmen (PNs), and officers to gather data for the study of face to face interactions between PNs and the men they serve. Enlisted men and PNs from a wide variety of settings were asked to relate favorable and unfavorable situations that involved their…

  20. Physics-based interactive volume manipulation for sharing surgical process.

    PubMed

    Nakao, Megumi; Minato, Kotaro

    2010-05-01

    This paper presents a new set of techniques by which surgeons can interactively manipulate patient-specific volumetric models for sharing surgical process. To handle physical interaction between the surgical tools and organs, we propose a simple surface-constraint-based manipulation algorithm to consistently simulate common surgical manipulations such as grasping, holding and retraction. Our computation model is capable of simulating soft-tissue deformation and incision in real time. We also present visualization techniques in order to rapidly visualize time-varying, volumetric information on the deformed image. This paper demonstrates the success of the proposed methods in enabling the simulation of surgical processes, and the ways in which this simulation facilitates preoperative planning and rehearsal.

  1. Vortex/boundary-layer interactions: Data report, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutler, A. D.; Bradshaw, P.

    1987-01-01

    This report summarizes the work done under NASA Grant NAGw-581, Vortex/Boundary Layer Interactions. The experimental methods are discussed in detail and numerical results are presented, but are not fully interpreted. This report should be useful to anyone who wishes to make further use of the data (available on floppy disc or magnetic tape) for the development of turbulence models or the validation of predictive methods. Journal papers are in course of preparation.

  2. Developing Rapid and Cost-Effective Tools for Assessing Groundwater Impacts on Contaminated Sediments

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research developed quick and inexpensive methods that can be useful in characterizing the interaction of water and solids within the GW/SW transition zone to explain processes that occur during physical contact between groundwater and sediments. The research used self-conta...

  3. Implications of Glacier Volume Change for Ice-Ocean Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hood, E. W.; O'Neel, S.; Fellman, J.; Bidlack, A.; Arendt, A. A.; Arimitsu, M.; Spencer, R. G.

    2015-12-01

    Changes in climate are forcing complex glaciological responses that can be transmitted to downstream ecosystems via glacier runoff. Along the Gulf of Alaska, rates of glacier mass loss are among the highest measured on Earth. Changes in glacier volume in this region are altering the amount of glacier runoff delivered to the coastal ocean. Moreover, shifts in glacier extent are changing the location of the ice-ocean interface and, in cases where tidewater glaciers become grounded, fundamentally altering circulation in glacierized fjords. The runoff from glacier ecosystems is unique in terms of its physical and chemical properties when compared to runoff from non-glacial ecosystems. For example, the silt and chemical constituents in glacier discharge alter light penetration and the nutrient regime in near-shore marine ecosystems, which, in turn, influence levels of marine primary productivity. Future changes in the magnitude, timing, and location of glacier runoff have important implications for biogeochemical and ecological processes in glacially-dominated fjords and estuaries. This talk will highlight research from glacierized watersheds and fjords to synthesize what is known about the physical, chemical, and biological linkages that characterize icefield-ocean ecosystems along the Gulf of Alaska.

  4. Interactions between surface discharges induced by volume discharges in a dielectric barrier discharge system

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Yenan; Dong, Lifang Zhao, Longhu; Wang, Yongjie; Pan, Yuyang; Li, Ben

    2014-10-15

    The interaction between micro-discharges involved in surface discharges (SDs) is studied in dielectric barrier discharge system. Instantaneous images taken by high speed cameras show that the SDs are induced by volume discharges (VDs). They cannot cross the midperpendicular of two neighbouring volume charges at low voltage while they stretch along it at high voltage, indicating that there is interaction between SDs. The differences of plasma parameters between SD and VD are studied by optical emission spectroscopy. The simulation of the electric fields of the wall charges accumulated by VD further confirms the existence of the interaction.

  5. Early adversity and combat exposure interact to influence anterior cingulate cortex volume in combat veterans☆

    PubMed Central

    Woodward, Steven H.; Kuo, Janice R.; Schaer, Marie; Kaloupek, Danny G.; Eliez, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    Objective Childhood and combat trauma have been observed to interact to influence amygdala volume in a sample of U.S. military veterans with and without PTSD. This interaction was assessed in a second, functionally-related fear system component, the pregenual and dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, using the same sample and modeling approach. Method Anterior cingulate cortical tissues (gray + white matter) were manually-delineated in 1.5 T MR images in 87 U.S. military veterans of the Vietnam and Persian Gulf wars. Hierarchical multiple regression modeling was used to assess associations between anterior cingulate volume and the following predictors, trauma prior to age 13, combat exposure, the interaction of early trauma and combat exposure, and PTSD diagnosis. Results As previously observed in the amygdala, unique variance in anterior cingulate cortical volume was associated with both the diagnosis of PTSD and with the interaction of childhood and combat trauma. The pattern of the latter interaction indicated that veterans with childhood trauma exhibited a significant inverse linear relationship between combat trauma and anterior cingulate volume while those without childhood trauma did not. Such associations were not observed in hippocampal or total cerebral tissue volumes. Conclusions In the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, as in the amygdala, early trauma may confer excess sensitivity to later combat trauma. PMID:24179818

  6. Assessing chironomid deformities in field- and laboratory-exposed organisms from organic- and metal-contaminated sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Canfield, T.J.; Kemble, N.E.; Ingersoll, C.G.

    1994-12-31

    Benthic invertebrate samples were collected from three Great Lakes harbors classified as Areas of concern (AOC) and from the Clark Fork River Superfund Site (CFR) in Montana. Contamination consists of organic and inorganic contaminants at the AOC sites and primarily heavy metal tailings and mining wastes in the CFR sites. Samples were collected with a ponar grab sampler from stations in Indiana Harbor, IN (1989, n = 7), the Buffalo River, NY (1989, n = 10), the Saginaw River, MI (1989, n = 7; 1990, n = 7), and the Clark Fork River (1991, n = 13). Compared to literature values for incidence of deformities in uncontaminated sediments, frequency of Chironomid mouthpart deformities was significantly greater at most stations sampled from the AOC sites. In contrast, only a few stations sampled from the CFR sites had significantly greater incidence of mouthpart deformities. Occurrence of mouthpart deformities ranged from 0 to 100% at the stations from the AOC`s and from 0 to 18% at the CFR stations. These mouthpart deformities in Chironomus riparius laboratory exposures to contaminated sediments from all AOC and CFR sites were evaluated and compared to frequencies found in field collected samples. Preliminary analysis indicates that frequency of mouthpart deformities from laboratory exposed chironomids are generally lower than those found in field collected samples.

  7. Potential use of acetylcholinesterase, glutathione-S-transferase and metallothionein for assessment of contaminated sediment in tropical chironomid, Chironomus javanus.

    PubMed

    Somparn, A; Iwai, C B; Noller, B

    2015-11-01

    Heavy metals and organophosphorus insecticide is known to act as disruptors for the enzyme system, leading to physiologic disorders. The present study was conducted to investigate the potential use of these enzymes as biomarkers in assessment of contaminated sediments on tropical chironomid species. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE), glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and metallothionein (MT) activity was measured in the fourth-instar chironomid larvae, Chironomus javanus, Kieffer, after either 48-hr or 96-hr exposure to organophosphorus insecticide, chlorpyrifos (0.01- 0.25 mg kg(-1)) or heavy metal cadmium (0.1-25 mg kg(-1)). Exposure to chlorpyrifos (0.01 mg kg(-1)) at 48 and 96 hr significantly of AChE activity (64.2%-85.9%) and induced GST activity (33.9-63.8%) when compared with control (P < 0.05). Moreover, exposure to cadmium (0.1 mg kg(-1)) at 48 and 96 hr also showed significant increas GST activity (11.7-40%) and MT level (9.0%-70.5%) when compared with control (P < 0.05). The results indicated the impact of enzyme activity on chlorpyrifos and cadmium contamination. Activity of AChE, GST and MT could serve as potential biomarkers for assessment and biomonitoring the effects of insecticide and heavy metal contamination in tropical aquatic ecosystems. PMID:26688973

  8. Modeling trade-off between PAH toxicity reduction and negative effects of sorbent amendments to contaminated sediments.

    PubMed

    Kupryianchyk, D; Rakowska, M I; Grotenhuis, J T C; Koelmans, A A

    2012-05-01

    Adding activated carbon (AC) to contaminated sediment has been suggested as an effective method for sediment remediation. AC binds chemicals such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), thus reducing the toxicity of the sediment. Negative effects of AC on benthic organisms have also been reported. Here, we present a conceptual model to quantify the trade-off, in terms of biomass changes, between the advantageous PAH toxicity reduction and the negative effects of AC on populations of benthic species. The model describes population growth, incorporates concentration-effect relationships for PAHs in the pore water and for AC, and uses an equilibrium sorption model to estimate PAH pore water concentrations as a function of AC dosage. We calibrated the model using bioassay data and analyzed it by calculating isoclines of zero population growth for two species. For the sediment evaluated here, the results show that AC may safely protect the benthic habitat against considerable sediment PAH concentrations as long as the AC dosage remains below 4%. PMID:22420612

  9. Spider-mediated flux of PCBs from contaminated sediments to terrestrial ecosystems and potential risks to arachnivorous birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walters, D.M.; Mills, M.A.; Fritz, K.M.; Raikow, D.F.

    2010-01-01

    We investigated aquatic insect utilization and PCB exposure in riparian spiders at the Lake Hartwell Superfund site (Clemson, SC). We sampled sediments, adult chironomids, terrestrial insects, riparian spiders (Tetragnathidae, Araneidae, and Mecynogea lemniscata), and upland spiders (Araneidae) along a sediment contamination gradient. Stable isotopes (?13C, ? 15N) indicated that riparian spiders primarily consumed aquatic insects whereas upland spiders consumed terrestrial insects. PCBs in chironomids (mean 1240 ng/g among sites) were 2 orders of magnitude higher than terrestrial insects (15.2 ng/g), similar to differences between riparian (820?2012 ng/g) and upland spiders (30 ng/g). Riparian spider PCBs were positively correlated with sediment concentrations for all taxa (r2 = 0.44?0.87). We calculated spider-based wildlife values (WVs, the minimum spider PCB concentrations causing physiologically significant doses in consumers) to assess exposure risks for arachnivorous birds. Spider concentrations exceeded WVs for most birds at heavily contaminated sites and were ?14-fold higher for the most sensitive species (chickadee nestlings, Poecile spp.). Spiders are abundant and ubiquitous in riparian habitats, where they depend on aquatic insect prey. These traits, along with the high degree of spatial correlation between spider and sediment concentrations we observed, suggest that they are model indicator species for monitoring contaminated sediment sites and assessing risks associated with contaminant flux into terrestrial ecosystems. ?? This article not subject to U.S. Copyright. Published 2009 by the American Chemical Society.

  10. Effects of acute exposure to fluoranthene-contaminated sediment on the survival and genetic variability of fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas)

    SciTech Connect

    Schlueter, M.A.; Guttman, S.I.; Duan, Y.; Oris, J.T.; Huang, X.; Burton, G.A.

    2000-04-01

    One-month-old fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) were exposed to fluoranthene-contaminated sediment during a 96-h exposure. Of the 909 minnows exposed to fluoranthene, 684 (75%) minnows died during the exposure. Horizontal starch-gel electrophoresis was used to determine genotypes at six variable enzyme loci ({beta}-GAL*, GPI-1*, GPI-2*, IDHP-1*, MDH-2*, and PGM*). Statistical analyses were used to evaluate the relationships between the genetic data and weight, length, and time to death (TTD) of fish using an accelerated failure time regression model (LIFEREG). The GPI-1*, MDH-2*, and PGM* loci were found to be significantly related to TTD. Multilocus heterozygosity was also related to TTD. Lower heterozygosity was related to a longer TTD and a greater chance of survival. Mean fish weight differed significantly among genotypes at each locus. This resulted in large differences between LIFEREG regression models that factored weight out and those models that die not separate weight from the genotypes or multilocus heterozygosity. The results of the study indicated that differential survival to fluoranthene was genetically related. The frequencies of several genotypes were significantly different in the survivors of the fluoranthene exposure compared with those in the initial population.

  11. Geochemical signature of contaminated sediment remobilization revealed by spatially resolved X-ray microanalysis of annual rings of Salix nigra.

    PubMed

    Punshon, Tracy; Bertsch, Paul M; Lanzirotti, Antonio; McLeod, Ken; Burger, Joanna

    2003-05-01

    An X-ray microprobe was used to determine the concentration and distribution of Ni, U, and other metals within annual rings of willows (Salix nigra L.) from a former de facto radiological settling basin (Steed Pond; SP) and a depositional environment downstream (Tims Branch; TB) on the Savannah River Site (SRS). Geochemical and historical information about both areas are well documented. Following spillway breaches at SP in 1984 and the early 1990s, TB is inundated with contaminated sediments during storms. Bulk elemental composition of tree cores was determined using ICP-OES. Synchrotron X-rayfluorescence (SXRF) analysis showed that the metal contents of SP and TB cores were an order of magnitude higher than those from a reference site. TB cores were enriched with Ni in 1984 and 1991, corresponding with SP spillway breaches (containing 790 mg kg(-1) Ni in 1991). Cores from SP exhibited an extremely high Ni peak in 1996, approximately 5000 mg kg(-1), even though contaminant levels at SP did not change. The geochemical signature of contaminants recorded in TB annual rings reflected the significant sediment remobilization events consistent with the detailed history of the site, and at concentrations relative to their proximity to the source term. However, physiological processes occurring within impacted trees strongly influence the chronological accuracy of dendroanalysis and must be investigated further.

  12. Flow interaction experiment. Volume 1: Aerothermal modeling, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikjooy, M.; Mongia, H. C.; Sullivan, J. P.; Murthy, S. N. B.

    1993-01-01

    An experimental and computational study is reported for the flow of a turbulent jet discharging into a rectangular enclosure. The experimental configurations consisting of primary jets only, annular jets only, and a combination of annular and primary jets are investigated to provide a better understanding of the flow field in an annular combustor. A laser Doppler velocimeter is used to measure mean velocity and Reynolds stress components. Major features of the flow field include recirculation, primary and annular jet interaction, and high turbulence. A significant result from this study is the effect the primary jets have on the flow field. The primary jets are seen to create statistically larger recirculation zones and higher turbulence levels. In addition, a technique called marker nephelometry is used to provide mean concentration values in the model combustor. Computations are performed using three levels of turbulence closures, namely k-epsilon model, algebraic second moment (ASM), and differential second moment (DSM) closure. Two different numerical schemes are applied. One is the lower-order power-law differencing scheme (PLDS) and the other is the higher-order flux-spline differencing scheme (FSDS). A comparison is made of the performance of these schemes. The numerical results are compared with experimental data. For the cases considered in this study, the FSDS is more accurate than the PLDS. For a prescribed accuracy, the flux-spline scheme requires a far fewer number of grid points. Thus, it has the potential for providing a numerical error-free solution, especially for three-dimensional flows, without requiring an excessively fine grid. Although qualitatively good comparison with data was obtained, the deficiencies regarding the modeled dissipation rate (epsilon) equation, pressure-strain correlation model, and the inlet epsilon profile and other critical closure issues need to be resolved before one can achieve the degree of accuracy required to

  13. Flow interaction experiment. Volume 2: Aerothermal modeling, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikjooy, M.; Mongia, H. C.; Sullivan, J. P.; Murthy, S. N. B.

    1993-01-01

    An experimental and computational study is reported for the flow of a turbulent jet discharging into a rectangular enclosure. The experimental configurations consisting of primary jets only, annular jets only, and a combination of annular and primary jets are investigated to provide a better understanding of the flow field in an annular combustor. A laser Doppler velocimeter is used to measure mean velocity and Reynolds stress components. Major features of the flow field include recirculation, primary and annular jet interaction, and high turbulence. A significant result from this study is the effect the primary jets have on the flow field. The primary jets are seen to create statistically larger recirculation zones and higher turbulence levels. In addition, a technique called marker nephelometry is used to provide mean concentration values in the model combustor. Computations are performed using three levels of turbulence closures, namely k-epsilon model, algebraic second moment (ASM), and differential second moment (DSM) closure. Two different numerical schemes are applied. One is the lower-order power-law differencing scheme (PLDS) and the other is the higher-order flux-spline differencing scheme (FSDS). A comparison is made of the performance of these schemes. The numerical results are compared with experimental data. For the cases considered in this study, the FSDS is more accurate than the PLDS. For a prescribed accuracy, the flux-spline scheme requires a far fewer number of grid points. Thus, it has the potential for providing a numerical error-free solution, especially for three-dimensional flows, without requiring an excessively fine grid. Although qualitatively good comparison with data was obtained, the deficiencies regarding the modeled dissipation rate (epsilon) equation, pressure-strain correlation model, and the inlet epsilon profile and other critical closure issues need to be resolved before one can achieve the degree of accuracy required to

  14. Effects of Oil-Contaminated Sediments on Submerged Vegetation: An Experimental Assessment of Ruppia maritima.

    PubMed

    Martin, Charles W; Hollis, Lauris O; Turner, R Eugene

    2015-01-01

    Oil spills threaten the productivity of ecosystems through the degradation of coastal flora and the ecosystem services these plants provide. While lab and field investigations have quantified the response of numerous species of emergent vegetation to oil, the effects on submerged vegetation remain uncertain. Here, we discuss the implications of oil exposure for Ruppia maritima, one of the most common species of submerged vegetation found in the region affected by the recent Deepwater Horizon oil spill. We grew R. maritima in a range of manipulated sediment oil concentrations: 0, 0.26, 0.53, and 1.05 mL oil /L tank volume, and tracked changes in growth (wet weight and shoot density/length), reproductive activity (inflorescence and seed production), root characteristics (mass, length, diameter, and area), and uprooting force of plants. While no statistical differences were detected in growth, plants exhibited significant changes to reproductive output, root morphology, and uprooting force. We found significant reductions in inflorescences and fruiting bodies at higher oil concentrations. In addition, the roots growing in the high oil were shorter and wider. Plants in medium and high oil required less force to uproot. A second experiment was performed to separate the effects of root morphology and oiled sediment properties and indicated that there were also changes to sediment cohesion that contributed to a reduction in uprooting forces in medium and high oil. Given the importance of sexual reproduction for these plants, oil contamination may have substantial population-level effects. Moreover, areas containing buried oil may be more susceptible to high energy storm events due to the reduction in uprooting force of foundation species such as R. maritima. PMID:26430971

  15. Effects of Oil-Contaminated Sediments on Submerged Vegetation: An Experimental Assessment of Ruppia maritima.

    PubMed

    Martin, Charles W; Hollis, Lauris O; Turner, R Eugene

    2015-01-01

    Oil spills threaten the productivity of ecosystems through the degradation of coastal flora and the ecosystem services these plants provide. While lab and field investigations have quantified the response of numerous species of emergent vegetation to oil, the effects on submerged vegetation remain uncertain. Here, we discuss the implications of oil exposure for Ruppia maritima, one of the most common species of submerged vegetation found in the region affected by the recent Deepwater Horizon oil spill. We grew R. maritima in a range of manipulated sediment oil concentrations: 0, 0.26, 0.53, and 1.05 mL oil /L tank volume, and tracked changes in growth (wet weight and shoot density/length), reproductive activity (inflorescence and seed production), root characteristics (mass, length, diameter, and area), and uprooting force of plants. While no statistical differences were detected in growth, plants exhibited significant changes to reproductive output, root morphology, and uprooting force. We found significant reductions in inflorescences and fruiting bodies at higher oil concentrations. In addition, the roots growing in the high oil were shorter and wider. Plants in medium and high oil required less force to uproot. A second experiment was performed to separate the effects of root morphology and oiled sediment properties and indicated that there were also changes to sediment cohesion that contributed to a reduction in uprooting forces in medium and high oil. Given the importance of sexual reproduction for these plants, oil contamination may have substantial population-level effects. Moreover, areas containing buried oil may be more susceptible to high energy storm events due to the reduction in uprooting force of foundation species such as R. maritima.

  16. Effects of Oil-Contaminated Sediments on Submerged Vegetation: An Experimental Assessment of Ruppia maritima

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Charles W.; Hollis, Lauris O.; Turner, R. Eugene

    2015-01-01

    Oil spills threaten the productivity of ecosystems through the degradation of coastal flora and the ecosystem services these plants provide. While lab and field investigations have quantified the response of numerous species of emergent vegetation to oil, the effects on submerged vegetation remain uncertain. Here, we discuss the implications of oil exposure for Ruppia maritima, one of the most common species of submerged vegetation found in the region affected by the recent Deepwater Horizon oil spill. We grew R. maritima in a range of manipulated sediment oil concentrations: 0, 0.26, 0.53, and 1.05 mL oil /L tank volume, and tracked changes in growth (wet weight and shoot density/length), reproductive activity (inflorescence and seed production), root characteristics (mass, length, diameter, and area), and uprooting force of plants. While no statistical differences were detected in growth, plants exhibited significant changes to reproductive output, root morphology, and uprooting force. We found significant reductions in inflorescences and fruiting bodies at higher oil concentrations. In addition, the roots growing in the high oil were shorter and wider. Plants in medium and high oil required less force to uproot. A second experiment was performed to separate the effects of root morphology and oiled sediment properties and indicated that there were also changes to sediment cohesion that contributed to a reduction in uprooting forces in medium and high oil. Given the importance of sexual reproduction for these plants, oil contamination may have substantial population-level effects. Moreover, areas containing buried oil may be more susceptible to high energy storm events due to the reduction in uprooting force of foundation species such as R. maritima. PMID:26430971

  17. Interactive slice WIM: navigating and interrogating volume data sets using a multisurface, multitouch VR interface.

    PubMed

    Coffey, Dane; Malbraaten, Nicholas; Le, Trung Bao; Borazjani, Iman; Sotiropoulos, Fotis; Erdman, Arthur G; Keefe, Daniel F

    2012-10-01

    We present Interactive Slice World-in-Miniature (WIM), a framework for navigating and interrogating volumetric data sets using an interface enabled by a virtual reality environment made of two display surfaces: an interactive multitouch table, and a stereoscopic display wall. The framework addresses two current challenges in immersive visualization: 1) providing an appropriate overview+detail style of visualization while navigating through volume data, and 2) supporting interactive querying and data exploration, i.e., interrogating volume data. The approach extends the WIM metaphor, simultaneously displaying a large-scale detailed data visualization and an interactive miniature. Leveraging the table+wall hardware, horizontal slices are projected (like a shadow) down onto the table surface, providing a useful 2D data overview to complement the 3D views as well as a data context for interpreting 2D multitouch gestures made on the table. In addition to enabling effective navigation through complex geometries, extensions to the core Slice WIM technique support interacting with a set of multiple slices that persist on the table even as the user navigates around a scene and annotating and measuring data via points, paths, and volumes specified using interactive slices. Applications of the interface to two volume data sets are presented, and design decisions, limitations, and user feedback are discussed.

  18. The associations of depression and hypertension with brain volumes: Independent or interactive?

    PubMed

    Meurs, Maaike; Groenewold, Nynke A; Roest, Annelieke M; van der Wee, Nic J A; Veltman, Dick J; van Tol, Marie-José; de Jonge, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Independent studies on major depressive disorder (MDD) and hypertension, suggest overlapping abnormalities in brain regions associated with emotional and autonomic processing. However, the unique and interactive effects of MDD and hypertension have never been studied in a single sample. Brain volume in these areas may be an explanatory link in the comorbidity between MDD and hypertension. Voxel-based morphometry was used to test for main effects of MDD (N = 152) and hypertension (N = 82) and their interactions on gray and white matter volumes. Voxel-wise results are reported at p < .05 FWE corrected for the spatial extent of the whole brain and a-priori regions of interest (ROIs: hippocampus, anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and inferior frontal gyrus (IFG)). In addition, analyses on the extracted total volumes of our ROIs were performed. Interactive effects in the mid-cingulate cortex (MCC) (p FWE = .01), cerebellum (p FWE = .01) and in the ACC total ROI volume (p = .02) were found. MDD in the presence, but not in the absence of hypertension was associated with lower volumes in the ACC and MCC, and with a trend towards larger gray matter volume in the cerebellum. No associations with white matter volumes were observed. Results suggest that the combination of MDD and hypertension has a unique effect on brain volumes in areas implicated in the regulation of emotional and autonomic functions. Brain volume in these regulatory areas may be an explanatory link in the comorbidity between hypertension and MDD. PMID:26106530

  19. The associations of depression and hypertension with brain volumes: Independent or interactive?

    PubMed Central

    Meurs, Maaike; Groenewold, Nynke A.; Roest, Annelieke M.; van der Wee, Nic J.A.; Veltman, Dick J.; van Tol, Marie-José; de Jonge, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Independent studies on major depressive disorder (MDD) and hypertension, suggest overlapping abnormalities in brain regions associated with emotional and autonomic processing. However, the unique and interactive effects of MDD and hypertension have never been studied in a single sample. Brain volume in these areas may be an explanatory link in the comorbidity between MDD and hypertension. Voxel-based morphometry was used to test for main effects of MDD (N = 152) and hypertension (N = 82) and their interactions on gray and white matter volumes. Voxel-wise results are reported at p < .05 FWE corrected for the spatial extent of the whole brain and a-priori regions of interest (ROIs: hippocampus, anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and inferior frontal gyrus (IFG)). In addition, analyses on the extracted total volumes of our ROIs were performed. Interactive effects in the mid-cingulate cortex (MCC) (pFWE = .01), cerebellum (pFWE = .01) and in the ACC total ROI volume (p = .02) were found. MDD in the presence, but not in the absence of hypertension was associated with lower volumes in the ACC and MCC, and with a trend towards larger gray matter volume in the cerebellum. No associations with white matter volumes were observed. Results suggest that the combination of MDD and hypertension has a unique effect on brain volumes in areas implicated in the regulation of emotional and autonomic functions. Brain volume in these regulatory areas may be an explanatory link in the comorbidity between hypertension and MDD. PMID:26106530

  20. Improved method for evaluating the dead volume and protein-protein interactions by self-interaction chromatography.

    PubMed

    Binabaji, Elaheh; Rao, Suma; Zydney, Andrew L

    2013-10-01

    Self-interaction chromatography (SIC) is a well-established method for studying protein-protein interactions. The second virial coefficient in SIC is evaluated directly from the measured retention coefficient for the protein using a column packed with resin on which the same protein has been immobilized on the pore surface. One of the challenges in determining the retention coefficient is the evaluation of the dead volume, which is the retention volume that would be measured for a noninteracting solute with the same effective size as the protein of interest. Previous studies of SIC have used a "dead column" packed with the same resin but without the immobilized protein to evaluate the dead volume, but this creates several experimental and theoretical challenges. We have developed a new approach using a dextran standard with effective size equal to that of the protein (as determined by size exclusion chromatography). The second virial coefficient was evaluated for a monoclonal antibody over a range of buffer conditions using this new approach. The data were in good agreement with independent measurements obtained by membrane osmometry under conditions dominated by repulsive interactions. The simplicity and accuracy of this method should facilitate the use of self-interaction chromatography for quantifying protein-protein interactions.

  1. Assessing organic contaminant fluxes from contaminated sediments following dam removal in an urbanized river.

    PubMed

    Cantwell, Mark G; Perron, Monique M; Sullivan, Julia C; Katz, David R; Burgess, Robert M; King, John

    2014-08-01

    In this study, methods and approaches were developed and tested to assess changes in contaminant fluxes resulting from dam removal in a riverine system. Sediment traps and passive samplers were deployed to measure particulate and dissolved polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in the water column prior to and following removal of a small, low-head dam in the Pawtuxet River, an urbanized river located in Cranston, RI, USA. During the study, concentrations of particulate and dissolved PAHs ranged from 21.5 to 103 μg/g and from 68 to 164 ng/L, respectively. Overall, temporal trends of PAHs showed no increases in either dissolved or particulate phases following removal of the dam. Dissolved concentrations of PCBs were very low, remaining below 1.72 ng/L at all sites. Particulate PCB concentrations across sites and time showed slightly greater variability, ranging from 80 to 469 ng/g, but with no indication that dam removal influenced any increases. Particulate PAHs and PCBs were sampled continuously at the site located below the dam and did not show sustained increases in concentration resulting from dam removal. The employment of passive sampling technology and sediment traps was highly effective in monitoring the concentrations and flux of contaminants moving through the river system. Variations in river flow had no effect on the concentration of contaminants in the dissolved or particulate phases, but did influence the flux rate of contaminants exiting the river. Overall, dam removal did not cause measurable sediment disturbance or increase the concentration or fluxes of dissolved or particulate PAHs and PCBs. This is due in large part to low volumes of impounded sediment residing above the dam and highly armored sediments in the river channel, which limited erosion. Results from this study will be used to improve methods and approaches that assess the short- and long-term impacts ecological restoration activities such as

  2. Composition, distribution, and hydrologic effects of contaminated sediments resulting from the discharge of gold milling wastes to Whitewood Creek at Lead and Deadwood, South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goddard, K.E.

    1989-01-01

    The Whitewood Creek-Belle Fourche-Cheyenne River stream system in western South Dakota has been extensively contaminated by the discharge to Whitewood Creek of about 100 million tons of mill tailings from gold-mining operations. The resulting contaminated sediments contain unusually large concentrations of arsenic, as much as 11,000 micrograms/g, derived from the mineral arsenopyrite, as well as potentially toxic constituents derived from the ore-body minerals or from the milling processes. Because of the anomalous arsenic concentrations associated with the contamination, arsenic was used as an indicator for a geochemically based, random, sediment-sampling program. Arsenic concentrations in shallow, contaminated sediments along the flood plains of the streams were from 1 to 3 orders of magnitude larger than arsenic concentrations in uncontaminated sediments in about 75% of the flood plains of Whitewood Creek and the Belle Fourche River. Appreciable surface-water contamination resulting from the contaminated sediments is confined to Whitewood Creek and a reach of the Belle Fourche River downstream from the mouth of Whitewood Creek. In Whitewood Creek , dissolved-arsenic concentrations vary from about 20 to 80 microgram/L during the year in response to variations in groundwater inflow and dilution, whereas total-recoverable-arsenic concentrations vary from about 20 to 8 ,000 micrograms/L during short periods in response to rapid changes in suspended-sediment concentration. Contamination of the alluvial aquifer along the stream system is limited to areas in direct contact with large deposits of contaminated sediments. Within the aquifer, arsenic concentrations are thought to be controlled by sorption-desorption on metallic hydroxides. (USGS)

  3. Direct and indirect effects of copper-contaminated sediments on the functions of model freshwater ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Gardham, Stephanie; Chariton, Anthony A; Hose, Grant C

    2015-01-01

    Copper is acutely toxic to, and directly affects, primary producers and decomposers, which are key players in essential processes such as the nutrient cycle in freshwater ecosystems. Even though the indirect effects of metals (for example effects due to changes in species interactions) may be more common than direct effects, little is known about the indirect effects of copper on primary producers and decomposers. The effects of copper on phytoplankton, macrophytes, periphyton and organic matter decomposition in an outdoor lentic mesocosm facility were assessed, and links between the responses examined. Copper directly decreased macrophyte growth, subsurface organic matter decomposition, and the potential for high phytoplankton Chlorophyll a concentrations. However, periphyton cover and organic matter decomposition on the surface of the sediment were stimulated by the presence of copper. These latter responses were attributed to indirect effects, due to a reduction in grazing pressure from snails, particularly Physa acuta, in the higher copper-contaminated mesocosms. This permitted the growth of periphyton and other heterotrophs, ultimately increasing decomposition at the sediment surface. The present study demonstrates the pronounced influence indirect effects may have on ecological function, findings that may not be observed in traditional laboratory studies (which utilize single species or simplistic communities).

  4. The use of coarse, separable, condensed-phase organic carbon particles to characterize desorption resistance of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in contaminated sediments.

    PubMed

    Chai, Yunzhou; Kochetkov, Alexander; Reible, Danny D

    2007-07-01

    Physical separations were employed to characterize the source of desorption-resistant behavior for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in laboratory- and field-contaminated sediments. Size and density separation of laboratory-contaminated sediments did not effectively separate the amorphous-phase (volatile) and condensed-phase (nonvolatile) organic carbon as measured by thermal oxidation at 375 degrees C. These separations also did not result in sediment fractions with significantly different desorption characteristics as measured by apparent partition coefficients. Coarse particles from a field-contaminated sediment from Utica Harbor (UH; Utica, NY, USA), however, could be directly separated into sandy fractions and organic fractions that were composed of woody organic matter, charcoal or charred vegetative matter, and coal-like and coal-cinder particles. Chemical analysis showed that coal-like (glassy, nonporous) and coal-cinder (porous, sintered) particles exhibited very high PAH concentrations and high apparent partition coefficients. These particles also exhibited significantly higher condensed-phase (nonvolatile) organic carbon contents as defined by thermal oxidation at 375 degrees C. The apparent partition coefficients of PAHs in the coal-cinder particles were a good indication of the apparent partition coefficients in the desorption-resistant fraction of UH sediment, indicating that the coarse particles provided a reasonable characterization of the desorption-resistance phenomena in these sediments even though the coarse fractions represented less than 25% of the organic carbon in the whole sediment.

  5. Benzo[a]pyrene bioavailability from pristine soil and contaminated sediment assessed using two in vitro models.

    PubMed

    Vasiluk, Luba; Pinto, Linda J; Walji, Zahra A; Tsang, Wing Shan; Gobas, Frank A P C; Eickhoff, Curtis; Moore, Margo M

    2007-03-01

    A major route of exposure to hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs), such as benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), is ingestion. Matrix-bound HOCs may become bioavailable after mobilization by the gastrointestinal fluids followed by sorption to the intestinal epithelium. The purpose of this research was to measure the bioavailability of [14C]-BaP bound to pristine soils or field-contaminated sediment using an in vitro model of gastrointestinal digestion followed by sorption to human enterocytes (Caco-2 cells) or to a surrogate membrane, ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) thin film. Although Caco-2 cells had a twofold higher lipid-normalized fugacity capacity than EVA, [14C]-BaP uptake by Caco-2 lipids and EVA thin film demonstrated a linear relationship within the range of BaP concentrations tested. These results suggest that EVA thin film is a good membrane surrogate for passive uptake of BaP. The in vitro system provided enough sensitivity to detect matrix effects on bioavailability; after 5 h, significantly lower concentrations of [14C]-BaP were sorbed into Caco-2 cells from soil containing a higher percentage of organic matter compared to soil with a lower percentage of organic matter. The [14C]-BaP desorption rate from Caco-2 lipids consistently was twofold higher than from EVA thin film for all matrices tested. The more rapid kinetics observed with Caco-2 cells probably were due to the greater surface area available for absorption/desorption in the cells. After 5 h, the uptake of BaP into Caco-2 lipid was similar in live and metabolically inert Caco-2 cells, suggesting that the primary route of BaP uptake is by passive diffusion. Moreover, the driving force for uptake is the fugacity gradient that exists between the gastrointestinal fluid and the membrane.

  6. Oceanisphaera aquimarina sp. nov., Isolated from Oil-Contaminated Sediment of Ocean Coastal Area from South Korea.

    PubMed

    Cho, Seonghyeon; Lee, Sang-Seob

    2016-11-01

    Strain S33(T) was isolated from oil-contaminated sediment of Tae-an coastal region of South Korea. Cells are aerobic, motile, Gram staining-negative, and coccoid shaped. Strain S33(T) grew optimally at the temperature of 25 °C (range of 4-40 °C), pH 6.0 (range of pH 6.0-10.0), and in the presence of 1 % (w/v) NaCl (range of 0-10 %). Ubiquinone-8 was the predominant respiratory quinone. C16:0, summed feature 3 (comprising C16:1ω7c/C16:1ω6c) and C18:1ω7c were the major fatty acids. The major polar lipids were phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, and diphosphatidylglycerol. Strain S33(T) showed the ability to degrade benzene, toluene, and ethylbenzene after 3 days incubation. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis showed that the strain S33(T) was most closely related to Oceanisphaera sediminis TW92(T) (97.3 %), Oceanisphaera profunda SM1222(T) (97.2 %), and Oceanisphaera ostreae T-w6(T) (97.1 %) and <97 % with other members of the genus Oceanisphaera. The genomic DNA G+C mol% content of strain S33(T) was 51.0 mol%. Based on distinct phenotypic, genotypic, and phylogenetic analysis, strain S33(T) was proposed to represent a novel species in the genus Oceanisphaera as Oceanisphaera aquimarina sp. nov. (= KEMB 1002-058(T) = JCM 30 794(T)).

  7. Recent advances in the use of estuarine meiobenthos to assess contaminated sediment effects in multi-species whole sediment microcosms

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, G.T.; Coull, B.C.; Schizas, N.V.; Donelan, T.L.

    1995-12-31

    Many marine meiobenthic taxa (i.e. invertebrates passing a 1-mm sieve but retaining on a 0.063 mm sieve) are ideal for ``whole-sediment`` and porewater bioassay of sedimented pollutants. Annual production of meiobenthos is 5--10 times that of the more commonly studied macrobenthos, and > 95% of all meiobenthos live in the oxic zone of muddy sediments at densities of 4--12 million per M{sup 2}. Most spend their entire lifecycles, burrowing freely and feeding on/within the sediment:porewater matrix, many taxa undergo 10--14 generations per year, most larval/juvenile stages are benthic, and many have easily quantifiable reproductive output. Furthermore, many meiobenthic taxa can be cultured indefinitely over multiple life-cycles within simple sediment microcosms consisting of sealed whole-sediment cores collected intact from intertidal mudflats. The authors describe several recent technical developments exploiting meiofaunal sediment culture for rapid contaminated sediment bioassays of toxicant effects on survival, reproduction and population growth of meiobenthic taxa in whole-sediment microcosms. Currently meiobenthic copepods, nematodes, foraminifers and polychaetes are being continuously cultured to study these parameters under exposure to model sediment-associated toxicants (e.g. cadmium). Bioassays are run for 21-d under flowing seawater. With this approach, fertile benthic copepods (e.g. Amphiascus tenuiremis) can be added to core microcosms to assess survival and growth of a fixed population cohort. All other meiobenthic taxa are enumerated relative to controls and evaluated for toxicant effects on higher order community-level endpoints. This approach exploits meiobenthos` high abundance and rapid reproductive rates to yield on a micro scale better endpoints than much larger sediment mesocosms targeted at macrofaunal endpoints.

  8. Evaluation of the role of black carbon in attenuating bioaccumulation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from field-contaminated sediments.

    PubMed

    Sundelin, Brita; Wiklund, Ann-Kristin Eriksson; Lithner, Göran; Gustafsson, Orjan

    2004-11-01

    The significance of black carbon (BC) for the bioavailability of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was examined by using historically contaminated intact sediment cores in laboratory exposure experiments with the deposit-feeding amphipod Monoporeia affinis. Log values of amphipod biota-sediment accumulation factors (BSAFs) were significantly related to log BC, whereas log BSAFs were related to log octanol-water partition coefficients only in background sediments containing less BC. In the background sediments, the BSAF for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was 1 to 2 for phenanthrene, with lower values for more hydrophobic PAHs, indicating an increase in nonequilibrium conditions with increasing PAH molecular size. For the near-equilibrated phenanthrene and fluoranthene, higher BSAFs were measured during exposure to background sediments, with BSAF decreasing to <0.1 in contaminated sediments in the Stockholm waterways. In situ caged mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) exhibited field BSAF values (relative to sediment-trap-collected suspended matter) for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) of 0.1 to 0.4, but for PAHs of similar hydrophobicity and molecular size, the field BSAFs were much lower and in the range 0.002 to 0.05. This PAH-PCB dichotomy is consistent with recently reported much stronger binding to diesel soot (a form of BC) for PAHs than for PCBs of equal hydrophobicities. Lower BSAFs for the near-equilibrated PAHs (phenanthrene and fluoranthene) in the urban sediments relative to the background sediments were consistent with the larger presence of BC in the urban sediments. This study provides the first linked BSAF-BC field data that supports a causal relationship between strong soot sorption and reduced bioavailability for PAHs. PMID:15559275

  9. Instructional Systems Development Model for Interactive Videodisc Training Delivery Systems. Volume I: Hardware, Software and Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bunderson, C. Victor; And Others

    Developed for use by army authors, this report provides information to assist in the step-by-step production of interactive videodisc training delivery systems (VTDS). The first of three volumes describes the hardware and software for VTDS, as well as videodisc authoring and production systems (VAPS). The range of capabilities of consumer-model…

  10. Protein stability in mixed solvents: a balance of contact interaction and excluded volume.

    PubMed

    Schellman, John A

    2003-07-01

    Changes in excluded volume and contact interaction with the surface of a protein have been suggested as mechanisms for the changes in stability induced by cosolvents. The aim of the present paper is to present an analysis that combines both effects in a quantitative manner. The result is that both processes are present in both stabilizing and destabilizing interactions and neither can be ignored. Excluded volume was estimated using accessible surface area calculations of the kind introduced by Lee and Richards. The change in excluded volume on unfolding, deltaX, is quite large. For example, deltaX for ribonuclease is 6.7 L in urea and approximately 16 L in sucrose. The latter number is greater than the molar volume of the protein. Direct interaction with the protein is represented as the solvent exchange mechanism, which differs from ordinary association theory because of the weakness of the interaction and the high concentrations of cosolvents. The balance between the two effects and their contribution to overall stability are most simply presented as bar diagrams as in Fig. 3. Our finding for five proteins is that excluded volume contributes to the stabilization of the native structure and that contact interaction contributes to destabilization. This is true for five proteins and four cosolvents including both denaturants and osmolytes. Whether a substance stabilizes a protein or destabilizes it depends on the relative size of these two contributions. The constant for the cosolvent contact with the protein is remarkably uniform for four of the proteins, indicating a similarity of groups exposed during unfolding. One protein, staphylococcus nuclease, is anomalous in almost all respects. In general, the strength of the interaction with guanidinium is about twice that of urea, which is about twice that of trimethylamine-N-oxide and sucrose. Arguments are presented for the use of volume fractions in equilibrium equations and the ignoring of activity coefficients of

  11. Separation of preferential interaction and excluded volume effects on DNA duplex and hairpin stability

    PubMed Central

    Knowles, D. B.; LaCroix, Andrew S.; Deines, Nickolas F.; Shkel, Irina; Record, M. Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Small solutes affect protein and nucleic acid processes because of favorable or unfavorable chemical interactions of the solute with the biopolymer surface exposed or buried in the process. Large solutes also exclude volume and affect processes where biopolymer molecularity and/or shape changes. Here, we develop an analysis to separate and interpret or predict excluded volume and chemical effects of a flexible coil polymer on a process. We report a study of the concentration-dependent effects of the full series from monomeric to polymeric PEG on intramolecular hairpin and intermolecular duplex formation by 12-nucleotide DNA strands. We find that chemical effects of PEG on these processes increase in proportion to the product of the amount of DNA surface exposed on melting and the amount of PEG surface that is accessible to this DNA, and these effects are completely described by two interaction terms that quantify the interactions between this DNA surface and PEG end and interior groups. We find that excluded volume effects, once separated from these chemical effects, are quantitatively described by the analytical theory of Hermans, which predicts the excluded volume between a flexible polymer and a rigid molecule. From this analysis, we show that at constant concentration of PEG monomer, increasing PEG size increases the excluded volume effect but decreases the chemical interaction effect, because in a large PEG coil a smaller fraction of the monomers are accessible to the DNA. Volume exclusion by PEG has a much larger effect on intermolecular duplex formation than on intramolecular hairpin formation. PMID:21742980

  12. Interactions of glycine betaine with proteins: insights from volume and compressibility measurements.

    PubMed

    Shek, Yuen Lai; Chalikian, Tigran V

    2013-01-29

    We report the first application of volume and compressibility measurements to characterization of interactions between cosolvents (osmolytes) and globular proteins. Specifically, we measure the partial molar volumes and adiabatic compressibilities of cytochrome c, ribonuclease A, lysozyme, and ovalbumin in aqueous solutions of the stabilizing osmolyte glycine betaine (GB) at concentrations between 0 and 4 M. The fact that globular proteins do not undergo any conformational transitions in the presence of GB provides an opportunity to study the interactions of GB with proteins in their native states within the entire range of experimentally accessible GB concentrations. We analyze our resulting volumetric data within the framework of a statistical thermodynamic model in which each instance of GB interaction with a protein is viewed as a binding reaction that is accompanied by release of four water molecules. From this analysis, we calculate the association constants, k, as well as changes in volume, ΔV(0), and adiabatic compressibility, ΔK(S0), accompanying each GB-protein association event in an ideal solution. By comparing these parameters with similar characteristics determined for low-molecular weight analogues of proteins, we conclude that there are no significant cooperative effects involved in interactions of GB with any of the proteins studied in this work. We also evaluate the free energies of direct GB-protein interactions. The energetic properties of GB-protein association appear to scale with the size of the protein. For all proteins, the highly favorable change in free energy associated with direct protein-cosolvent interactions is nearly compensated by an unfavorable free energy of cavity formation (excluded volume effect), yielding a modestly unfavorable free energy for the transfer of a protein from water to a GB/water mixture. PMID:23293944

  13. Coil–globule transition of a polymer involved in excluded-volume interactions with macromolecules

    SciTech Connect

    Odagiri, Kenta; Seki, Kazuhiko

    2015-10-07

    Polymers adopt extended coil and compact globule states according to the balance between entropy and interaction energies. The transition of a polymer between an extended coil state and compact globule state can be induced by changing thermodynamic force such as temperature to alter the energy/entropy balance. Previously, this transition was theoretically studied by taking into account the excluded-volume interaction between monomers of a polymer chain using the partition function. For binary mixtures of a long polymer and short polymers, the coil-globule transition can be induced by changing the concentration of the shorter polymers. Here, we investigate the transition caused by short polymers by generalizing the partition function of the long polymer to include the excluded-volume effect of short polymers. The coil-globule transition is studied as a function of the concentration of mixed polymers by systematically varying Flory’s χ-parameters. We show that the transition is caused by the interplay between the excluded-volume interaction and the dispersion state of short polymers in the solvent. We also reveal that the same results can be obtained by combining the mixing entropy and elastic energy if the volume of a long polymer is properly defined.

  14. Developmentally Sensitive Interaction Effects of Genes and the Social Environment on Total and Subcortical Brain Volumes.

    PubMed

    Richards, Jennifer S; Arias Vásquez, Alejandro; Franke, Barbara; Hoekstra, Pieter J; Heslenfeld, Dirk J; Oosterlaan, Jaap; Faraone, Stephen V; Buitelaar, Jan K; Hartman, Catharina A

    2016-01-01

    Smaller total brain and subcortical volumes have been linked to psychopathology including attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Identifying mechanisms underlying these alterations, therefore, is of great importance. We investigated the role of gene-environment interactions (GxE) in interindividual variability of total gray matter (GM), caudate, and putamen volumes. Brain volumes were derived from structural magnetic resonance imaging scans in participants with (N = 312) and without ADHD (N = 437) from N = 402 families (age M = 17.00, SD = 3.60). GxE effects between DAT1, 5-HTT, and DRD4 and social environments (maternal expressed warmth and criticism; positive and deviant peer affiliation) as well as the possible moderating effect of age were examined using linear mixed modeling. We also tested whether findings depended on ADHD severity. Deviant peer affiliation was associated with lower caudate volume. Participants with low deviant peer affiliations had larger total GM volumes with increasing age. Likewise, developmentally sensitive GxE effects were found on total GM and putamen volume. For total GM, differential age effects were found for DAT1 9-repeat and HTTLPR L/L genotypes, depending on the amount of positive peer affiliation. For putamen volume, DRD4 7-repeat carriers and DAT1 10/10 homozygotes showed opposite age relations depending on positive peer affiliation and maternal criticism, respectively. All results were independent of ADHD severity. The presence of differential age-dependent GxE effects might explain the diverse and sometimes opposing results of environmental and genetic effects on brain volumes observed so far. PMID:27218681

  15. Developmentally Sensitive Interaction Effects of Genes and the Social Environment on Total and Subcortical Brain Volumes

    PubMed Central

    Arias Vásquez, Alejandro; Franke, Barbara; Hoekstra, Pieter J.; Heslenfeld, Dirk J.; Oosterlaan, Jaap; Faraone, Stephen V.

    2016-01-01

    Smaller total brain and subcortical volumes have been linked to psychopathology including attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Identifying mechanisms underlying these alterations, therefore, is of great importance. We investigated the role of gene-environment interactions (GxE) in interindividual variability of total gray matter (GM), caudate, and putamen volumes. Brain volumes were derived from structural magnetic resonance imaging scans in participants with (N = 312) and without ADHD (N = 437) from N = 402 families (age M = 17.00, SD = 3.60). GxE effects between DAT1, 5-HTT, and DRD4 and social environments (maternal expressed warmth and criticism; positive and deviant peer affiliation) as well as the possible moderating effect of age were examined using linear mixed modeling. We also tested whether findings depended on ADHD severity. Deviant peer affiliation was associated with lower caudate volume. Participants with low deviant peer affiliations had larger total GM volumes with increasing age. Likewise, developmentally sensitive GxE effects were found on total GM and putamen volume. For total GM, differential age effects were found for DAT1 9-repeat and HTTLPR L/L genotypes, depending on the amount of positive peer affiliation. For putamen volume, DRD4 7-repeat carriers and DAT1 10/10 homozygotes showed opposite age relations depending on positive peer affiliation and maternal criticism, respectively. All results were independent of ADHD severity. The presence of differential age-dependent GxE effects might explain the diverse and sometimes opposing results of environmental and genetic effects on brain volumes observed so far. PMID:27218681

  16. Role of material loss and mode volume of plasmonic nanocavities for strong plasmon-exciton interactions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhong-Jian; Antosiewicz, Tomasz J; Shegai, Timur

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the role of material loss and mode volume of plasmonic nanostructures on strong plasmon-exciton coupling. We find that the field enhancement, and therefore loss, is not important for the magnitude of the Rabi splitting as such, but instead it is determined by the mode volume. Nevertheless, for reaching true strong coupling condition, that is, coupling greater than any dissipation, it is important to compromise losses. We also show that using such popular geometries as a dimer of two spheres or bow-tie nanoantennas, does not allow compressing the mode volume much in comparison to a single nanoparticle case, except for very narrow gaps, but rather it allows for efficient extraction of the mode out of the metal thus making it more accessible for excitons to interact with. Even more efficient mode extraction is achieved when high refractive index dielectric is placed in the gap. Our findings may find practical use for quantum plasmonics applications. PMID:27607644

  17. Role of material loss and mode volume of plasmonic nanocavities for strong plasmon-exciton interactions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhong-Jian; Antosiewicz, Tomasz J; Shegai, Timur

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the role of material loss and mode volume of plasmonic nanostructures on strong plasmon-exciton coupling. We find that the field enhancement, and therefore loss, is not important for the magnitude of the Rabi splitting as such, but instead it is determined by the mode volume. Nevertheless, for reaching true strong coupling condition, that is, coupling greater than any dissipation, it is important to compromise losses. We also show that using such popular geometries as a dimer of two spheres or bow-tie nanoantennas, does not allow compressing the mode volume much in comparison to a single nanoparticle case, except for very narrow gaps, but rather it allows for efficient extraction of the mode out of the metal thus making it more accessible for excitons to interact with. Even more efficient mode extraction is achieved when high refractive index dielectric is placed in the gap. Our findings may find practical use for quantum plasmonics applications.

  18. Effects of bioaugmentation on sorption and desorption of benzene, 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene and naphthalene in freshly-spiked and historically-contaminated sediments.

    PubMed

    Li, YueHua; Chen, Liang; Liu, YuLong; Liu, Fei; Fallgren, Paul H; Jin, Song

    2016-11-01

    This work investigated the frequently observed "rebounds" of contaminants of concern in groundwater systems. Specifically, influences of bioaugmented microorganisms on the sorption and desorption of representative petroleum constituents [benzene, 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene and naphthalene (BTN)] were studied in freshly-spiked and historically-contaminated sediments. Capable microorganisms were enriched and supplemented to contaminated sediments to enhance biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons. In freshly-spiked sediments, when petroleum-degrading microorganisms were added, concentrations of dissolved petroleum constituents appeared to increase initially, and 12.4, 14.0 and 20.0 mg/kg of benzene, 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene and naphthalene, respectively desorbed from the sediments into the water phase. In the historically-contaminated sediments, the augmentation of petroleum-degrading microorganisms led to the desorption of 0.023-0.059, 0009-0.016, and 1.731-2.763 mg/L of previously sequestrated BTN into the water phase, and also triggered the desorption of 0.051-0.223, -0.133-2.630, and 2.324-1.200 mg/kg of previously sequestrated BTN as the methanol extraction quantity. The mechanisms of the enhanced desorption at the presence of microbes remain to be determined; however, we presumed that microbially produced constituents such as biosurfactants and cell mass could have attributed to the partition of petroleum compounds from the sediments. Findings from this study may partially explain "rebounds" of certain petroleum constituents into the groundwater during in situ bioremediation practice, although such immediate rebounds sometimes are weak, and the desorbed constituents can be eventually biodegraded under proper biogeochemical conditions. PMID:27474910

  19. Effects of bioaugmentation on sorption and desorption of benzene, 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene and naphthalene in freshly-spiked and historically-contaminated sediments.

    PubMed

    Li, YueHua; Chen, Liang; Liu, YuLong; Liu, Fei; Fallgren, Paul H; Jin, Song

    2016-11-01

    This work investigated the frequently observed "rebounds" of contaminants of concern in groundwater systems. Specifically, influences of bioaugmented microorganisms on the sorption and desorption of representative petroleum constituents [benzene, 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene and naphthalene (BTN)] were studied in freshly-spiked and historically-contaminated sediments. Capable microorganisms were enriched and supplemented to contaminated sediments to enhance biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons. In freshly-spiked sediments, when petroleum-degrading microorganisms were added, concentrations of dissolved petroleum constituents appeared to increase initially, and 12.4, 14.0 and 20.0 mg/kg of benzene, 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene and naphthalene, respectively desorbed from the sediments into the water phase. In the historically-contaminated sediments, the augmentation of petroleum-degrading microorganisms led to the desorption of 0.023-0.059, 0009-0.016, and 1.731-2.763 mg/L of previously sequestrated BTN into the water phase, and also triggered the desorption of 0.051-0.223, -0.133-2.630, and 2.324-1.200 mg/kg of previously sequestrated BTN as the methanol extraction quantity. The mechanisms of the enhanced desorption at the presence of microbes remain to be determined; however, we presumed that microbially produced constituents such as biosurfactants and cell mass could have attributed to the partition of petroleum compounds from the sediments. Findings from this study may partially explain "rebounds" of certain petroleum constituents into the groundwater during in situ bioremediation practice, although such immediate rebounds sometimes are weak, and the desorbed constituents can be eventually biodegraded under proper biogeochemical conditions.

  20. Effects of development mode, contaminated sediments, and maternal characteristics on growth and reproduction in the polychaetes Streblospio benedicti (Spionidae) and Capitella sp. I (Capitellidae)

    SciTech Connect

    Bridges, T.S.

    1992-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to examine the effects of contaminated sediments (sewage, blue-green algae and hydrocarbons) and maternal characteristics on reproduction, and offspring success in S. benedicti (lecithotrophic) and Capitella sp. I. For S. benedicti, contaminated sediments had a negative effect on growth and age and size at first reproduction. Per brood fecundity was positively related to female size and negatively related to female age. Treatments did not have an effect on reproductive output. Per offspring C and N investment increased with female age. This increase in per offspring investment resulted in enhanced survivorship and juvenile growth in offspring of older females. For Capitella sp. I, growth was increased, age at first reproduction was accelerated, and per brood fecundity was 3--4 [times] higher in the algae and sewage treatments. Treatments did not have an effect on reproductive output. Fecundity was positively related to female size. Per brood and per offspring C and N investment decreased with female age, but not in all treatments. The C:N ratio of offspring increased with female age. Offspring from mothers in the sewage treatment were larger two weeks after release. Offspring in size two weeks after release decreased with female age in the sewage treatment. Differences in the response of S. benedicti and Capitella sp. I to contaminated sediments may be due to differences in feeding behavior, digestive physiology, nutritional requirements and their sensitivity to hydrocarbons, metals and low oxygen concentrations. Differences in the effect of female age between the two species appear related to development and ecological differences in the two species.

  1. Toxicity of smelter slag-contaminated sediments from Upper Lake Roosevelt and associated metals to early life stage White Sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus Richardson, 1836)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Little, E.E.; Calfee, R.D.; Linder, G.

    2014-01-01

    The toxicity of five smelter slag-contaminated sediments from the upper Columbia River and metals associated with those slags (cadmium, copper, zinc) was evaluated in 96-h exposures of White Sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus Richardson, 1836) at 8 and 30 days post-hatch. Leachates prepared from slag-contaminated sediments were evaluated for toxicity. Leachates yielded a maximum aqueous copper concentration of 11.8 μg L−1 observed in sediment collected at Dead Man's Eddy (DME), the sampling site nearest the smelter. All leachates were nonlethal to sturgeon that were 8 day post-hatch (dph), but leachates from three of the five sediments were toxic to fish that were 30 dph, suggesting that the latter life stage is highly vulnerable to metals exposure. Fish maintained consistent and prolonged contact with sediments and did not avoid contaminated sediments when provided a choice between contaminated and uncontaminated sediments. White Sturgeon also failed to avoid aqueous copper (1.5–20 μg L−1). In water-only 96-h exposures of 35 dph sturgeon with the three metals, similar toxicity was observed during exposure to water spiked with copper alone and in combination with cadmium and zinc. Cadmium ranging from 3.2 to 41 μg L−1 or zinc ranging from 21 to 275 μg L−1 was not lethal, but induced adverse behavioral changes including a loss of equilibrium. These results suggest that metals associated with smelter slags may pose an increased exposure risk to early life stage sturgeon if fish occupy areas contaminated by slags.

  2. Impact of Interacting Functional Variants in COMT on Regional Gray Matter Volume in Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    Honea, Robyn; Verchinski, Beth A.; Pezawas, Lukas; Kolachana, Bhaskar S.; Callicott, Joseph H.; Mattay, Venkata S.; Weinberger, Daniel R.; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    Background Functional variants in the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene have been shown to impact cognitive function, cortical physiology and risk for schizophrenia. A recent study showed that previously reported effects of the functional val158met SNP (rs4680) on brain function are modified by other functional SNPs and haplotypes in the gene, though it was unknown if these effects are also seen in brain structure. Methods We used voxel-based morphometry to investigate the impact of multiple functional variants in COMT on gray matter volume in a large group of 151 healthy volunteers from the CBDB/NIMH Genetic Study of Schizophrenia. Results We found that the previously described rs4680 val risk variant affects hippocampal and dorsolateral prefrontal (DLPFC) gray matter volume. In addition, we found that this SNP interacts with a variant in the P2 promoter region (rs2097603) in predicting changes in hippocampal gray matter volume consistent with a nonlinear effect of extracellular dopamine. Conclusions We report evidence that interacting functional variants in COMT affect gray matter regional volume in hippocampus and DLPFC, providing further in vivo validation of the biological impact of complex genetic variation in COMT on neural systems relevant for the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and extending observations of nonlinear dependence of prefrontal neurons on extracellular dopamine to the domain of human brain structure. PMID:19071221

  3. Fluid sloshing and fluid-structure interaction 1995. PVP-Volume 314

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, D.C.; Tani, J.; Brochard, D.; Fujita, K.

    1995-11-01

    In recognition of the importance of fluid sloshing and fluid-structure interaction, the 1995 Joint ASME/JSME Pressure Vessels and Piping Conference, held July 23--27 in Honolulu, Hawaii, has organized five technical sessions in various technical areas of fluid sloshing and fluid-structure interaction. This volume contains the twenty-one papers presented in the five sessions. The subjects cover sloshing suppression submerged components, flow-induced sloshing, waste storage tanks, spent fuel facilities, fluid-piping interaction, added mass, etc. This publication is a direct result of continuing interests and cooperation in the research and development concerning fluid sloshing and fluid-structure interaction between the American and Japanese Society of Mechanical Engineers. Papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the database.

  4. Fluid structure interaction solver coupled with volume of fluid method for two-phase flow simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerroni, D.; Fancellu, L.; Manservisi, S.; Menghini, F.

    2016-06-01

    In this work we propose to study the behavior of a solid elastic object that interacts with a multiphase flow. Fluid structure interaction and multiphase problems are of great interest in engineering and science because of many potential applications. The study of this interaction by coupling a fluid structure interaction (FSI) solver with a multiphase problem could open a large range of possibilities in the investigation of realistic problems. We use a FSI solver based on a monolithic approach, while the two-phase interface advection and reconstruction is computed in the framework of a Volume of Fluid method which is one of the more popular algorithms for two-phase flow problems. The coupling between the FSI and VOF algorithm is efficiently handled with the use of MEDMEM libraries implemented in the computational platform Salome. The numerical results of a dam break problem over a deformable solid are reported in order to show the robustness and stability of this numerical approach.

  5. Synergistic Interactions with a High Intraoperative Expander Fill Volume Increase the Risk for Mastectomy Flap Necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Khavanin, Nima; Jordan, Sumanas; Lovecchio, Francis; Fine, Neil A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Prosthetic-based breast reconstruction is performed with increasing frequency in the United States. Major mastectomy skin flap necrosis is a significant complication with outcomes ranging from poor aesthetic appearance to reconstructive failure. The present study aimed to explore the interactions between intraoperative fill and other risk factors on the incidence of flap necrosis in patients undergoing mastectomy with immediate expander/implant-based reconstruction. Methods A retrospective review of 966 consecutive patients (1,409 breasts) who underwent skin or nipple sparing mastectomy with immediate tissue expander reconstruction at a single institution was conducted. Age, body mass index, hypertension, smoking status, premastectomy and postmastectomy radiation, acellular dermal matrix use, and application of the tumescent mastectomy technique were analyzed as potential predictors of flap necrosis both independently and as synergistic variables with high intraoperative fill. The following three measures of interaction were calculated: relative excess risk due to interaction, attributable proportion of risk due to interaction, and synergy index (SI). Results Intraoperative tissue expander fill volume was high (≥66.7% of the maximum volume) in 40.9% (576 of 1,409 breasts) of cases. The unadjusted flap necrosis rate was greater in the high intraoperative fill cohort than in the low fill cohort (10.4% vs. 7.1%, p=0.027). Multivariate logistic regression did not identify high intraoperative fill volume as an independent risk factor for flap necrosis (odds ratio 1.442, 95% confidence interval 0.973-2.137, p=0.068). However, four risk factors were identified that interacted significantly with intraoperative fill volume, namely tumescence, age, hypertension, and obesity. The SI, or the departure from additive risks, was largest for tumescence (SI, 25.3), followed by hypertension (SI, 2.39), obesity (SI, 2.28), and age older than 50 years (SI, 1.17). Conclusion

  6. Electrostatic, elastic and hydration-dependent interactions in dermis influencing volume exclusion and macromolecular transport.

    PubMed

    Øien, Alf H; Wiig, Helge

    2016-07-01

    Interstitial exclusion refers to the limitation of space available for plasma proteins and other macromolecules based on collagen and negatively charged glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in the interstitial space. It is of particular importance to interstitial fluid and plasma volume regulation. Here we present a novel mechanical and mathematical model of the dynamic interactions of structural elements within the interstitium of the dermis at the microscopic level that may explain volume exclusion of charged and neutral macroparticles. At this level, the interstitium is considered to consist of elements called extracellular matrix (ECM) cells, again containing two main interacting structural components on a fluid background including anions and cations setting up osmotic forces: one smaller GAG component, having an intrinsic expansive electric force, and one bigger collagen component, having an intrinsic elastic force. Because of size differences, the GAG component interacts with a fraction of the collagen component only at normal hydration. This fraction, however, increases with rising hydration as a consequence of the modeled form of the interaction force between the GAGs and collagen. Collagen is locally displaced at variable degrees as hydration changes. Two models of GAGs are considered, having largely different geometries which demands different, but related, forms of GAG-collagen interaction forces. The effects of variable fixed charges on GAGs and of GAG density in tissue are evaluated taking into account observed volume exclusion properties of charged macromolecules as a function of tissue hydration. The presented models may improve our biophysical understanding of acting forces influencing tissue fluid dynamics. Such knowledge is significant when evaluating the transport of electrically charged and neutral macromolecules into and through the interstitium, and therefore to drug uptake and the therapeutic effects of macromolecular agents. PMID:27079466

  7. Effects of Amendments on Growth and Uptake of Cd and Zn by Wetland Plants, Typha angustifolia and Colocasia esculenta from Contaminated Sediments.

    PubMed

    Chayapan, P; Kruatrachue, M; Meetam, M; Pokethitiyook, P

    2015-01-01

    A pot study was conducted to compare the effects of amendments (CaHPO4 and cow manure) on growth and uptake of Cd and Zn from contaminated sediments by two wetland plant species, Typha angustifolia and Colocasia esculenta. Contaminated sediments (Cd 33.2 mg kg(-1) and Zn 363 mg kg(-1)) were collected from Mae Tao basin, Mae Sot district, Tak province, Thailand. The experiment consisted of 4 treatments: control (uncontaminated sediment), Cd/Zn, Cd/Zn + 5% CaHPO4, and Cd/Zn + 10% cow manure. Plants were grown for 3 months in the greenhouse. The addition of CaHPO4 resulted in the highest relative growth rate (RGR) and highest Cd accumulation in both T. angustifolia and C. esculenta while the lowest RGR was found in C. esculenta grown in the cow manure treatment. Both plant species had higher concentrations of metals (Cd, Zn) in their belowground parts. None of the amendments affected Zn accumulation. C. esculenta exhibited the highest uptake of both Cd and Zn. The results clearly demonstrated the phytoremediation potential of C. esculenta and the enhancement of this potential by CaHPO4 amendment.

  8. Effects of Amendments on Growth and Uptake of Cd and Zn by Wetland Plants, Typha angustifolia and Colocasia esculenta from Contaminated Sediments.

    PubMed

    Chayapan, P; Kruatrachue, M; Meetam, M; Pokethitiyook, P

    2015-01-01

    A pot study was conducted to compare the effects of amendments (CaHPO4 and cow manure) on growth and uptake of Cd and Zn from contaminated sediments by two wetland plant species, Typha angustifolia and Colocasia esculenta. Contaminated sediments (Cd 33.2 mg kg(-1) and Zn 363 mg kg(-1)) were collected from Mae Tao basin, Mae Sot district, Tak province, Thailand. The experiment consisted of 4 treatments: control (uncontaminated sediment), Cd/Zn, Cd/Zn + 5% CaHPO4, and Cd/Zn + 10% cow manure. Plants were grown for 3 months in the greenhouse. The addition of CaHPO4 resulted in the highest relative growth rate (RGR) and highest Cd accumulation in both T. angustifolia and C. esculenta while the lowest RGR was found in C. esculenta grown in the cow manure treatment. Both plant species had higher concentrations of metals (Cd, Zn) in their belowground parts. None of the amendments affected Zn accumulation. C. esculenta exhibited the highest uptake of both Cd and Zn. The results clearly demonstrated the phytoremediation potential of C. esculenta and the enhancement of this potential by CaHPO4 amendment. PMID:25831275

  9. Toxicity and the fractional distribution of trace metals accumulated from contaminated sediments by the clam Scrobicularia plana exposed in the laboratory and the field.

    PubMed

    Kalman, J; Bonnail-Miguel, E; Smith, B D; Bury, N R; Rainbow, P S

    2015-02-15

    The relationship between the subcellular distribution of accumulated toxic metals into five operational fractions (subsequently combined into presumed detoxified and non-detoxified components) and toxicity in the clam Scrobicularia plana was investigated under different laboratory exposures. Clams were exposed to metal contaminated media (water and diet) and analysed for the partitioning of accumulated As, Cu and Zn into subcellular fractions. In general, metallothionein-like proteins, metal-rich granules and cellular debris in different proportions acted as main storage sites of accumulated metals in the clam soft tissues for these three metals. No significant differences were noted in the accumulation rates of As, Cu and Zn of groups of individuals with or without apparent signs of toxicity after up to 30 days of exposure to naturally contaminated sediment mixtures. There was, however, an increased proportional accumulation of Cu in the non-detoxified fraction with increased Cu accumulation rate in the clams, suggesting that the Cu uptake rate from contaminated sediments exceeded the combined rates of elimination and detoxification of Cu, with the subsequent likelihood for toxic effects in the clams.

  10. Study on fluid-structure interaction in liquid oxygen feeding pipe systems using finite volume method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xin; Sun, Bing

    2011-10-01

    The fluid-structure interaction may occur in space launch vehicles, which would lead to bad performance of vehicles, damage equipments on vehicles, or even affect astronauts' health. In this paper, analysis on dynamic behavior of liquid oxygen (LOX) feeding pipe system in a large scale launch vehicle is performed, with the effect of fluid-structure interaction (FSI) taken into consideration. The pipe system is simplified as a planar FSI model with Poisson coupling and junction coupling. Numerical tests on pipes between the tank and the pump are solved by the finite volume method. Results show that restrictions weaken the interaction between axial and lateral vibrations. The reasonable results regarding frequencies and modes indicate that the FSI affects substantially the dynamic analysis, and thus highlight the usefulness of the proposed model. This study would provide a reference to the pipe test, as well as facilitate further studies on oscillation suppression.

  11. Sexually dimorphic brain volume interaction in college-aged binge drinkers

    PubMed Central

    Kvamme, Timo L.; Schmidt, Casper; Strelchuk, Daniela; Chang-Webb, Yee Chien; Baek, Kwangyeol; Voon, Valerie

    2015-01-01

    Background Binge consumption of alcohol is a major societal problem associated with important cognitive, physiological and neurotoxic consequences. Converging evidence highlights the need to assess binge drinking (BD) and its effects on the developing brain while taking into account gender differences. Here, we compared the brain volumetric differences between genders in college-aged binge drinkers and healthy volunteers. Method T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) images of 30 binge drinkers (18 males) and 46 matched healthy volunteers (23 males) were examined using voxel-based morphometry. The anatomical scans were covaried with Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) scores. Whole brain voxel-wise group comparisons were performed using a cluster extent threshold correction. Results Several large clusters qualified with group-by-gender interactions were observed in prefrontal, striatal and medial temporal areas, whereby BD females had more volume than non-BD females, while males showed the inverse pattern of decreased volume in BD males and increased volume in non-BD males. AUDIT scores negatively correlated with volume in the right superior frontal cortex and precentral gyrus. Conclusions These findings dovetail with previous studies reporting that a state effect of BD in college-aged drinkers and the severity of alcohol use are associated with volumetric alterations in the cortical and subcortical areas of the brain. Our study indicates that these widespread volumetric changes vary differentially by gender, suggesting either sexual dimorphic endophenotypic risk factors, or differential neurotoxic sensitivities for males and females. PMID:26900571

  12. 5-HTTLPR, anxiety and gender interaction moderates right amygdala volume in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Cerasa, Antonio; Quattrone, Aldo; Piras, Fabrizio; Mangone, Graziella; Magariello, Angela; Fagioli, Sabrina; Girardi, Paolo; Muglia, Maria; Caltagirone, Carlo; Spalletta, Gianfranco

    2014-10-01

    Genetic variants within the serotonin transporter gene (5-HTTLPR) impact the neurobiology and risk for anxiety-related behaviours. There are also gender differences in the prevalence of anxiety-related behaviours. Although numerous studies have investigated the influence of 5-HTTLPR genotype on the neural systems involved in emotional regulation, none have investigated how these effects are modulated by gender and anxiety. We investigated this issue using two complementary region of interest-based structural neuroimaging approaches (voxel-based morphometry and Freesurfer) in 138 healthy individuals categorized into 'no anxiety' and 'subclinical anxiety' groups based on the Hamilton Rating Scale for Anxiety (HAM-A). Preliminarily, using anxiety as a continuous variable, we found a significant interaction effect of genotype by gender on anxiety. Females homozygous for the Short allele showed the highest HAM-A scores and males the lowest. In addition, a three-way significant interaction among genotype, gender and anxiety category was found for the right amygdala volume. Post hoc tests revealed that homozygous females carrying the Short variant with a subclinical anxiety condition had larger volume. The reported interaction effects demonstrate that gender strongly modulates the relationship between 5-HTTLPR genotype and subclinical expression of anxiety acting on amygdala, one region of the emotional neural network specifically involved in the anxiety-like behaviours.

  13. 5-HTTLPR, anxiety and gender interaction moderates right amygdala volume in healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Cerasa, Antonio; Quattrone, Aldo; Piras, Fabrizio; Mangone, Graziella; Magariello, Angela; Fagioli, Sabrina; Girardi, Paolo; Muglia, Maria; Caltagirone, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    Genetic variants within the serotonin transporter gene (5-HTTLPR) impact the neurobiology and risk for anxiety-related behaviours. There are also gender differences in the prevalence of anxiety-related behaviours. Although numerous studies have investigated the influence of 5-HTTLPR genotype on the neural systems involved in emotional regulation, none have investigated how these effects are modulated by gender and anxiety. We investigated this issue using two complementary region of interest-based structural neuroimaging approaches (voxel-based morphometry and Freesurfer) in 138 healthy individuals categorized into ‘no anxiety’ and ‘subclinical anxiety’ groups based on the Hamilton Rating Scale for Anxiety (HAM-A). Preliminarily, using anxiety as a continuous variable, we found a significant interaction effect of genotype by gender on anxiety. Females homozygous for the Short allele showed the highest HAM-A scores and males the lowest. In addition, a three-way significant interaction among genotype, gender and anxiety category was found for the right amygdala volume. Post hoc tests revealed that homozygous females carrying the Short variant with a subclinical anxiety condition had larger volume. The reported interaction effects demonstrate that gender strongly modulates the relationship between 5-HTTLPR genotype and subclinical expression of anxiety acting on amygdala, one region of the emotional neural network specifically involved in the anxiety-like behaviours. PMID:23986266

  14. Effect of hydrodynamic interaction on the free volume distribution of SGFR-PBT composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munirathnamma, L. M.; Ningaraju, S.; Kumar, K. V. Aneesh; Ravikumar, H. B.

    2016-05-01

    In order to explore the effect of short glass fiber (SGF) reinforcement on the mechanical properties of Polybutylene terephthalate (PBT), short glass fibers of different proportion (10 - 40 wt %) are reinforced into PBT matrix. The free volume distribution of SGFR-PBT composites derived from CONTIN-PALS2 program exhibits the narrow full width at half maximum (FWHM). This is attributed to the improved adhesion resulted by the hydrodynamic interaction between the polymeric chains of PBT matrix and SGF. The hydrodynamic interaction parameter (h) decreases as a function of SGF wt% and becomes more negative for 40 wt% SGFR-PBT composites suggest the generation of excess friction at the interface. This improves the adhesion between the polymeric chains of PBT matrix and SGF and hence the mechanical strength of the SGFR-PBT composites.

  15. Local Volume TiNy Titans: gaseous dwarf-dwarf interactions in the Local Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, Sarah; Besla, Gurtina; Putman, Mary E.; Lutz, Katharina A.; Fernández, Ximena; Stierwalt, Sabrina; Patton, David R.; Kim, Jinhyub; Kallivayalil, Nitya; Johnson, Kelsey; Sung, Eon-Chang

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we introduce the Local Volume TiNy Titans sample (LV-TNT), which is a part of a larger body of work on interacting dwarf galaxies: TNT . This LV-TNT sample consists of 10 dwarf galaxy pairs in the Local Universe (<30 Mpc from Milky Way), which span mass ratios of M*, 1/M*, 2 < 20, projected separations <100 kpc, and pair member masses of log(M*/M⊙) < 9.9. All 10 LV-TNT pairs have resolved synthesis maps of their neutral hydrogen, are located in a range of environments and captured at various interaction stages. This enables us to do a comparative study of the diffuse gas in dwarf-dwarf interactions and disentangle the gas lost due to interactions with haloes of massive galaxies, from the gas lost due to mutual interaction between the dwarfs. We find that the neutral gas is extended in the interacting pairs when compared to non-paired analogues, indicating that gas is tidally pre-processed. Additionally, we find that the environment can shape the H I distributions in the form of trailing tails and that the gas is not unbound and lost to the surroundings unless the dwarf pair is residing near a massive galaxy. We conclude that a nearby, massive host galaxy is what ultimately prevents the gas from being re-accreted. Dwarf-dwarf interactions thus represent an important part of the baryon cycle of low-mass galaxies, enabling the `parking' of gas at large distances to serve as a continual gas supply channel until accretion by a more massive host.

  16. A description of chloride cell and kidney tubule alterations in the flatfish Solea senegalensis exposed to moderately contaminated sediments from the Sado estuary (Portugal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Pedro M.; Caeiro, Sandra; Diniz, Mário S.; Lobo, Jorge; Martins, Marta; Ferreira, Ana M.; Caetano, Miguel; Vale, Carlos; DelValls, T. Ángel; Costa, M. Helena

    2010-11-01

    The effects of sediment-bound contaminants on kidney and gill chloride cells were surveyed in juvenile Solea senegalensis exposed to fresh sediments collected from three distinct sites of the Sado Estuary (Portugal) in a 28-day laboratorial assay. Sediments were analyzed for metallic contaminants, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and organochlorines as well as for total organic matter, redox potential and fine fraction. The potential for causing adverse biological effects of each surveyed sediment was assessed by comparison of contaminant levels to available guidelines for coastal sediments, namely the Threshold Effects Level ( TEL) and the Probable Effects Level ( PEL). The Sediment Quality Guideline Quotient indices ( SQGQ) were calculated to compare the overall contamination levels of the three stations. A qualitative approach was employed to analyze the histo/cytopathological traits in gill chloride cells and body kidney of fish exposed to each tested sediment for 0, 14 and 28 days. The results showed that sediment contamination can be considered low to moderate and that the least contaminated sediment (from a reference site, with the lowest SQGQ) caused lesser changes in the surveyed organs. However, the most contaminated sediment (by both metallic and organic xenobiotics, with highest SQGQ) was neither responsible for the highest mortality nor for the most pronounced lesions. Exposure to the sediment presenting an intermediate SQGQ, essentially contaminated by organic compounds, caused the highest mortality (48%) and the most severe damage to kidneys, up to full renal necrosis. Chloride cell alterations were similar in fish exposed to the two most contaminated sediments and consisted of a pronounced cellular hypertrophy, likely involving fluid retention and loss of mitochondria. It can be concluded that sediment contamination considered to be low or moderate may be responsible for severe injury to cells and parenchyma involved in the maintenance of osmotic

  17. Stream-aquifer interactions: evaluation of depletion volume and residual effects from ground water pumping.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xunhong; Shu, Longcang

    2002-01-01

    Numerical modeling techniques were used to simulate stream-aquifer interactions from seasonal ground water pumping. We used stream-aquifer models in which a shallow stream penetrates the top of an aquifer that discharges ground water to the stream as base flow. Because of the pumping, the volume of base flow discharged to the stream was reduced, and as the pumping continued, infiltration from the stream to the aquifer was induced. Both base-flow reduction and stream infiltration contributed to total stream depletion. We analyzed the depletion rates and volumes of the reduced base flow and induced stream infiltration during pumping and postpumping periods. Our results suggested that for a shallow penetrating stream with a low streambed conductance, base-flow reduction accounts for a significant percentage of the total stream depletion. Its residual effects in postpumping can last very long and may continue into the next pumping season for areas where recharge is nominal. In contrast, the contribution of the induced stream infiltration to the total stream depletion is much smaller, and its effects often become negligible shortly after pumping was stopped. For areas where surface recharge replenishes the aquifer, the residual effects of base-flow reduction and thus its depletion volume will be significantly reduced. A stream of large conductance has a high hydraulic connection to the aquifer, but the relationship between stream conductance and stream depletion is not linear.

  18. Detailed requirements document for the Interactive Financial Management System (IFMS), volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodson, D. B.

    1975-01-01

    The detailed requirements for phase 1 (online fund control, subauthorization accounting, and accounts receivable functional capabilities) of the Interactive Financial Management System (IFMS) are described. This includes information on the following: systems requirements, performance requirements, test requirements, and production implementation. Most of the work is centered on systems requirements, and includes discussions on the following processes: resources authority, allotment, primary work authorization, reimbursable order acceptance, purchase request, obligation, cost accrual, cost distribution, disbursement, subauthorization performance, travel, accounts receivable, payroll, property, edit table maintenance, end-of-year, backup input. Other subjects covered include: external systems interfaces, general inquiries, general report requirements, communication requirements, and miscellaneous. Subjects covered under performance requirements include: response time, processing volumes, system reliability, and accuracy. Under test requirements come test data sources, general test approach, and acceptance criteria. Under production implementation come data base establishment, operational stages, and operational requirements.

  19. Characterizing particle-scale equilibrium adsorption and kinetics of uranium(VI) desorption from U-contaminated sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stoliker, Deborah L.; Liu, Chongxuan; Kent, Douglas B.; Zachara, John M.

    2013-01-01

    Rates of U(VI) release from individual dry-sieved size fractions of a field-aggregated, field-contaminated composite sediment from the seasonally saturated lower vadose zone of the Hanford 300-Area were examined in flow-through reactors to maintain quasi-constant chemical conditions. The principal source of variability in equilibrium U(VI) adsorption properties of the various size fractions was the impact of variable chemistry on adsorption. This source of variability was represented using surface complexation models (SCMs) with different stoichiometric coefficients with respect to hydrogen ion and carbonate concentrations for the different size fractions. A reactive transport model incorporating equilibrium expressions for cation exchange and calcite dissolution, along with rate expressions for aerobic respiration and silica dissolution, described the temporal evolution of solute concentrations observed during the flow-through reactor experiments. Kinetic U(VI) desorption was well described using a multirate SCM with an assumed lognormal distribution for the mass-transfer rate coefficients. The estimated mean and standard deviation of the rate coefficients were the same for all <2 mm size fractions but differed for the 2–8 mm size fraction. Micropore volumes, assessed using t-plots to analyze N2 desorption data, were also the same for all dry-sieved <2 mm size fractions, indicating a link between micropore volumes and mass-transfer rate properties. Pore volumes for dry-sieved size fractions exceeded values for the corresponding wet-sieved fractions. We hypothesize that repeated field wetting and drying cycles lead to the formation of aggregates and/or coatings containing (micro)pore networks which provided an additional mass-transfer resistance over that associated with individual particles. The 2–8 mm fraction exhibited a larger average and standard deviation in the distribution of mass-transfer rate coefficients, possibly caused by the abundance of

  20. Radio-frequency-driven dipole-dipole interactions in spatially separated volumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tauschinsky, Atreju; van Ditzhuijzen, C. S. E.; Noordam, L. D.; van den Heuvell, H. B. Van Linden

    2008-12-01

    Radio-frequency (rf) fields in the MHz range are used to induce resonant energy transfer between cold Rydberg atoms in spatially separated volumes. After laser preparation of the Rydberg atoms, dipole-dipole coupling excites the 49s atoms in one cylinder to the 49p state while the 41d atoms in the second cylinder are transferred down to the 42p state. The energy exchanged between the atoms in this process is 33GHz . An external rf field brings this energy transfer into resonance. The strength of the interaction has been investigated as a function of amplitude (0-1V/cm) and frequency (1-30MHz) of the rf field and as a function of a static-field offset. Multiphoton transitions up to fifth order as well as selection rules prohibiting the process at certain fields have been observed. The width of the resonances has been reduced compared to earlier results by switching off external magnetic fields of the magneto-optical trap, making sub-MHz spectroscopy possible. All features are well reproduced by theoretical calculations taking the strong ac Stark shift due to the rf field into account.

  1. Nonlinear dynamic fluid-structure interaction calculations with coupled finite element and finite volume programs

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, M.W.; Kashiwa, B.A.; Meier, R.W.; Bishop, S.

    1994-08-01

    Two- and three-dimensional fluid-structure interaction computer programs for the simulation of nonlinear dynamics were developed and applied to a number of problems. The programs were created by coupling Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian finite volume fluid dynamics programs with strictly Lagrangian finite element structural dynamics programs. The resulting coupled programs can use either fully explicit or implicit time integration. The implicit time integration is accomplished by iterations of the fluid dynamics pressure solver and the structural dynamics system solver. The coupled programs have been used to solve problems involving incompressible fluids, membrane and shell elements, compressible multiphase flows, explosions in both air and water, and large displacements. In this paper, we present the approach used for the coupling and describe test problems that verify the two-dimensional programs against an experiment and an analytical linear problem. The experiment involves an explosion underwater near an instrumented thin steel plate. The analytical linear problem is the vibration of an infinite cylinder surrounded by an incompressible fluid to a given radius.

  2. Nonlinear dynamic fluid-structure interaction calculations with coupled finite element and finite volume programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, M. W.; Kashiwa, B. A.; Meier, R. W.; Bishop, S.

    1994-07-01

    Two- and three-dimensional fluid-structure interaction computer programs for the simulation of nonlinear dynamics were developed and applied to a number of problems. The programs were created by coupling Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian finite volume fluid dynamics programs with strictly Lagrangian finite element structural dynamics programs. The resulting coupled programs can use either fully explicit or implicit time integration. The implicit time integration is accomplished by iterations of the fluid dynamics pressure solver and the structural dynamics system solver. The coupled programs have been used to solve problems involving incompressible fluids, membrane and shell elements, compressible multiphase flows, explosions in both air and water, and large displacements. In this paper, we present the approach used for the coupling and describe test problems that verify the two-dimensional programs against an experiment and an analytical linear problem. The experiment involves an explosion underwater near an instrumented thin steel plate. The analytical linear problem is the vibration of an infinite cylinder surrounded by an incompressible fluid to a given radius.

  3. Seismic design technology for breeder reactor structures. Volume 2. Special topics in soil/structure interaction analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, D.P.

    1983-04-01

    This volume is divided into six chapters: definition of seismic input ground motion, review of state-of-the-art procedures, analysis guidelines, rock/structure interaction analysis example, comparison of two- and three-dimensional analyses, and comparison of analyses using FLUSH and TRI/SAC Codes. (DLC)

  4. Cation exchange reactions controlling desorption of Sr-90(2+) from coarse-grained contaminated sediments at the Hanford site, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    McKinley, James P.; Zachara, John M.; Smith, Steven C.; Liu, Chongxuan

    2007-01-15

    Nuclear waste that bore 90Sr2+ was accidentally leaked into the vadose zone at the Hanford site, and was immobilized at relatively shallow depths in sediments containing little apparent clay or silt-sized components. Sr2+, 90Sr2+, Mg2+, and Ca2+ was desorbed and total inorganic carbon concentration was monitored during the equilibration of this sediment with varying concentrations of Na+, Ca2+. A cation exchange model previously developed for similar sediments was applied to these results as a predictor of final solution compositions. The model included binary exchange reactions for the four operant cations and an equilibrium dissolution/precipitation reaction for calcite. The model successfully predicted the desorption data. The contaminated sediment was also examined using digital autoradiography, a sensitive tool for imaging the distribution of radioactivity. The exchanger phase containing 90Sr was found to consist of smectite formed from weathering of mesostasis glass in basaltic lithic fragments. These clasts are a significant component of Hanford formation sands. The relatively small but significant cation exchange capacity of these sediments was thus a consequence of reaction with physically sequestered clays in sediment that contained essentially no fine-grained material. The nature of this exchange component explained the relatively slow (scale of days) evolution of desorption solutions. The experimental and model results indicated that there is little risk of migration of 90Sr2+ to the water table.

  5. Cadmium, metal-binding proteins, and growth in bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus) exposed to contaminated sediments from the upper Mississippi River basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cope, W.G.; Wiener, J.G.; Steingraeber, M.T.; Atchison, G.J.

    1994-01-01

    We exposed juvenile bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus) to ~1000 mg·L-1 of continuously suspended river sediment in a 28-d test with six treatments (randomized block with one sediment-free control and five sediments ranging from 1.3 to 21.4 μg Cd·g dry weight-1). Each treatment had three replicates, each with 25 fish. Growth was reduced by exposure to suspended sediment, probably due to physical effects of sediment on feeding and to toxicity in the treatment with the greatest concentrations of metals. Mean whole-body concentrations of cadmium (0.04–0.14 μg wet weight-1) were correlated with cadmium concentration in filtered water (8–72 ng·L-1), suspended sediment (0.61–16.8 μg·L-1), and bulk sediment. The concentration of hepatic nonthionein cytosolic cadmium (cadmium not bound by metal-binding proteins, MBP) in fish exposed to the two most contaminated sediments exceeded that in controls. The mean concentration of hepatic MBP was correlated with cadmium concentration in filtered water, suspended sediment, bulk sediment, and whole fish. Whole-body cadmium concentration was the most sensitive indicator of cadmium exposure, with lowest observed effect concentrations of 1.9 μg Cd·L-1 for suspended sediment and 13 ng Cd·L-1 for filtered water. Sediment-associated cadmium was less available than waterborne cadmium for uptake by fish.

  6. In-situ stabilization of Pb, Zn, Cu, Cd and Ni in the multi-contaminated sediments with ferrihydrite and apatite composite additives.

    PubMed

    Qian, Guangren; Chen, Wei; Lim, Teik Thye; Chui, Pengcheong

    2009-10-30

    Three additives were evaluated for their effectiveness in the attenuation of Pb2+, Zn2+, Cu2+, Cd2+, Ni2+ in contaminated sediments. Apatite, ferrihydrite and their composite were applied to the sediments. For the remediation, BCR, SEM/AVS and TCLP were adopted as the evaluating method and comparison of their results were used for the first time to test in-situ stabilization effect. The results showed that after 5 months composite treatment, more than 70% Pb2+, 40% Zn2+, 90% Cu2+, 50% Cd2+ and 80% Ni2+ was immobilized in oxidizable and residual phases, respectively. Compared to untreated sediment, Pb2+, Zn2+, Cu2+, Cd2+ in residual fraction increased 20%, 10%, 10%, 10% with composite treatment after 5 months, respectively. SigmaSEM/AVS ratio declined from 12.6 to 9.3, in addition, composite treatments reduced the leaching of Pb2+ and Zn2+ from 10.6 mg L(-1) and 42.5 mg L(-1) to 5.4 mg L(-1) and 24.1 mg L(-1) in the sediment by TCLP evaluation. Meanwhile, apatite and ferrihydrite composite additives lowered the bioavailability and toxicity of sediments as well. Ferrihydrite had a positive effect in controlling the bioavailability and toxicity of heavy metals because it effectively retarded the oxidation of AVS in sediment. PMID:19564075

  7. Trace metal fractionation as a mean to improve on the management of contaminated sediments from runoff water in infiltration basins.

    PubMed

    Al Husseini, Amelène El-Mufleh; Béchet, Béatrice; Gaudin, Anne; Ruban, Véronique

    2013-01-01

    The management of stormwater sediment is a key issue for local authorities due to the pollution load and significant tonnages. In view of reuse, for example for civil engineering, the environmental evaluation of these highly aggregated sediments requires the study of the fractionation and mobility of trace metals. The distribution of trace metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, Zn) and their level of lability in three French stormwater sediments was determined using sequential and kinetic extractions (EDTA reagent) associated with mineralogical analysis and scanning electron microscopy observations. Using microanalysis, new data were acquired on the evolution of aggregate state during extractions, and on its significant role in the retention of trace metals. Trace metals were, in particular, observed to be very stable in small aggregates (10-50 microm). Comparison of the two extraction methods revealed that EDTA extraction was not convenient for evaluating the stable fraction of Cr, Ni and Zn. Moreover, the results were relevant for basins presenting similar sources of trace metals, whatever the physicochemical conditions in basins. The results suggest that the management of stormwater sediments could be improved by a better knowledge of metal mobility, as chemical extractions could highlight the localization of the mobile fraction of trace metals. Treatment could be therefore avoided, or specific treatment could be applied to a reduced volume of sediments.

  8. Trace metal fractionation as a mean to improve on the management of contaminated sediments from runoff water in infiltration basins.

    PubMed

    Al Husseini, Amelène El-Mufleh; Béchet, Béatrice; Gaudin, Anne; Ruban, Véronique

    2013-01-01

    The management of stormwater sediment is a key issue for local authorities due to the pollution load and significant tonnages. In view of reuse, for example for civil engineering, the environmental evaluation of these highly aggregated sediments requires the study of the fractionation and mobility of trace metals. The distribution of trace metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, Zn) and their level of lability in three French stormwater sediments was determined using sequential and kinetic extractions (EDTA reagent) associated with mineralogical analysis and scanning electron microscopy observations. Using microanalysis, new data were acquired on the evolution of aggregate state during extractions, and on its significant role in the retention of trace metals. Trace metals were, in particular, observed to be very stable in small aggregates (10-50 microm). Comparison of the two extraction methods revealed that EDTA extraction was not convenient for evaluating the stable fraction of Cr, Ni and Zn. Moreover, the results were relevant for basins presenting similar sources of trace metals, whatever the physicochemical conditions in basins. The results suggest that the management of stormwater sediments could be improved by a better knowledge of metal mobility, as chemical extractions could highlight the localization of the mobile fraction of trace metals. Treatment could be therefore avoided, or specific treatment could be applied to a reduced volume of sediments. PMID:24191459

  9. Potential accumulation of contaminated sediments in a reservoir of a high-Andean watershed: Morphodynamic connections with geochemical processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreras, María. Teresa; Müllendorff, Daniel; Pastén, Pablo; Pizarro, Gonzalo E.; Paola, Chris; Escauriaza, Cristián.

    2015-05-01

    Rapid changes due to anthropic interventions in high-altitude environments, such as the Altiplano region in South America, require new approaches to understand the connections between physical and geochemical processes. Alterations of the water quality linked to the river morphology can affect the ecosystems and human development in the long term. The future construction of a reservoir in the Lluta River, located in northern Chile, will change the spatial distribution of arsenic-rich sediments, which can have significant effects on the lower parts of the watershed. In this investigation, we develop a coupled numerical model to predict and evaluate the interactions between morphodynamic changes in the Lluta reservoir, and conditions that can potentially desorb arsenic from the sediments. Assuming that contaminants are mobilized under anaerobic conditions, we calculate the oxygen concentration within the sediments to study the interactions of the delta progradation with the potential arsenic release. This work provides a framework for future studies aimed to analyze the complex connections between morphodynamics and water quality, when contaminant-rich sediments accumulate in a reservoir. The tool can also help to design effective risk management and remediation strategies in these extreme environments. This article was corrected on 15 JUNE 2015. See the end of the full text for details.

  10. Separating chemical and excluded volume interactions of polyethylene glycols with native proteins: Comparison with PEG effects on DNA helix formation.

    PubMed

    Shkel, Irina A; Knowles, D B; Record, M Thomas

    2015-09-01

    Small and large PEGs greatly increase chemical potentials of globular proteins (μ2), thereby favoring precipitation, crystallization, and protein-protein interactions that reduce water-accessible protein surface and/or protein-PEG excluded volume. To determine individual contributions of PEG-protein chemical and excluded volume interactions to μ2 as functions of PEG molality m3 , we analyze published chemical potential increments μ23  = dμ2/dm3 quantifying unfavorable interactions of PEG (PEG200-PEG6000) with BSA and lysozyme. For both proteins, μ23 increases approximately linearly with the number of PEG residues (N3). A 1 molal increase in concentration of PEG -CH2 OCH2 - groups, for any chain-length PEG, increases μBSA by ∼2.7 kcal/mol and μlysozyme by ∼1.0 kcal/mol. These values are similar to predicted chemical interactions of PEG -CH2 OCH2 - groups with these protein components (BSA ∼3.3 kcal/mol, lysozyme ∼0.7 kcal/mol), dominated by unfavorable interactions with amide and carboxylate oxygens and counterions. While these chemical effects should be dominant for small PEGs, larger PEGS are expected to exhibit unfavorable excluded volume interactions and reduced chemical interactions because of shielding of PEG residues in PEG flexible coils. We deduce that these excluded volume and chemical shielding contributions largely compensate, explaining why the dependence of μ23 on N3 is similar for both small and large PEGs. PMID:25924886

  11. Interactive Effects of Chronic Cigarette Smoking and Age on Hippocampal Volumes

    PubMed Central

    Durazzo, Timothy C.; Meyerhoff, Dieter J.; Nixon, Sara Jo

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous cross-sectional MRI studies with healthy, young-to-middle-aged adults reported no significant differences between smokers and non-smokers on total hippocampal volume. However, these studies did not specifically test for greater age-related volume loss in the total hippocampus or hippocampal subregions in smokers, and did they did not examine relationships between hippocampal and subfield volumes and episodic learning and memory performance. Methods Healthy, young-to-middle-aged (45 ± 12 years of age) smokers (n = 39) and non-smokers (n = 43) were compared on total hippocampal and subfield volumes derived from high-resolution 4 Tesla MRI, emphasizing testing for greater age-related volume losses in smokers. Associations between hippocampal volumes and measures of episodic learning and memory were examined. Results Smokers showed significantly smaller volumes, as well as greater volume loss with increasing age than non-smokers in the bilateral total hippocampus and multiple subfields. In smokers, greater pack-years were associated with smaller volumes of the total hippocampus, presubiculum, and subiculum. In the entire cohort, performance on measures of learning and memory was related to larger total hippocampal and several subfield volumes, predominately in the left hemisphere. Conclusions Chronic cigarette smoking in this young-to-middle aged cohort was associated with smaller total hippocampal and subfield volumes, which were was exacerbated by advancing age. Findings also indicated an adverse smoking dose/duration response (i.e., pack-years) with total hippocampal and select subfield volumes. These hippocampal volume abnormalities in smokers may be related to the deficiencies in episodic learning and memory in young-to-middle-aged smokers reported in previous studies. PMID:24051060

  12. Processes influencing the transport and fate of contaminated sediments in the coastal ocean: Boston Harbor and Massachusetts Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bothner, Michael H.; Butman, Bradford

    2007-01-01

    Most of the major urban centers of the United States including Boston, New York, Washington, Chicago, New Orleans, Miami, Los Angeles, San Francisco, and Seattle—are on a coast (fig. 1.1). All of these cities discharge treated sewage effluent into adjacent waters. In 2000, 74 percent of the U.S. population lived within 200 kilometers (km) of the coast. Between 1980 and 2002, the population density in coastal communities increased approximately 4.5 times faster than in noncoastal areas of the U.S. (Perkins, 2004). More people generate larger volumes of wastes, increase the demands on wastewater treatment, expand the area of impervious land surfaces, and use more vehicles that contribute contaminants to street runoff. According to the National Coastal Condition Report II (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 2005a), on the basis of coastal habitat, water and sediment quality, benthic index, and fish tissue, the overall national coastal condition is only poor to fair and the overall coastal condition in the highly populated Northeast is poor. Scientific information helps managers to prioritize and regulate coastal-ocean uses that include recreation, commercial fishing, transportation, waste disposal, and critical habitat for marine organisms. These uses are often in conflict with each other and with environmental concerns. Developing a strategy for managing competing uses while maintaining sustainability of coastal resources requires scientific understanding of how the coastal ocean system behaves and how it responds to anthropogenic influences. This report provides a summary of a multidisciplinary research program designed to improve our understanding of the transport and fate of contaminants in Massachusetts coastal waters. Massachusetts Bay and Boston Harbor have been a focus of U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) research because they provide a diverse geographic setting for developing a scientific understanding of the geology, geochemistry, and oceanography of

  13. Characterizing particle-scale equilibrium adsorption and kinetics of uranium(VI) desorption from U-contaminated sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Stoliker, Deborah L.; Liu, Chongxuan; Kent, Douglas B.; Zachara, John M.

    2013-02-12

    Rates of contaminant U(VI) release from individual size fractions of a composite sediment from the seasonally saturated lower vadose zone of the Hanford 300-Area were examined in flow-through batch reactors to maintain quasi-constant chemical conditions. Variability in equilibrium adsorption among the various size fractions was determined in static batch reactors and analyzed using the surface complexation modeling approach. The estimated stoichiometric coefficients of U(VI) surface complexation reactions with respect to pH and carbonate concentrations varied with size fractions. This source of variability significantly increased the uncertainty in U(VI) conditional equilibrium constants over that estimated from experimental errors alone. A minimum difference between conditional equilibrium constants was established in order to evaluate statistically significant differences between sediment adsorption properties. A set of equilibrium and kinetic expressions for cation exchange, calcite dissolution, aerobic respiration, and silica dissolution were incorporated in a reaction-rate model to describe the temporal evolution of solute concentrations observed during the flow-through batch experiments. Parameters in the reaction-rate model, calibrated using experimental data for select size fractions, predicted the changes in solute concentrations for the bulk, <2 mm, sediment sample. Kinetic U(VI) desorption was well described using a multi-rate surface complexation model with an assumed lognormal distribution for the rate constants. The estimated mean and standard deviation were the same for all < 2mm size fractions, but differed in the 2-8mm size fraction. Micropore volumes in the varied size fractions were also similar as assessed using t-plots to analyze N2 desorption data. These findings provide further support for the link between microporosity and particle-scale mass transfer rates controlling kinetic U(VI) adsorption/desorption and for the utility of N2 desorption

  14. Interactive 3D Visualization: An Important Element in Dealing with Increasing Data Volumes and Decreasing Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gee, L.; Reed, B.; Mayer, L.

    2002-12-01

    Recent years have seen remarkable advances in sonar technology, positioning capabilities, and computer processing power that have revolutionized the way we image the seafloor. The US Naval Oceanographic Office (NAVOCEANO) has updated its survey vessels and launches to the latest generation of technology and now possesses a tremendous ocean observing and mapping capability. However, the systems produce massive amounts of data that must be validated prior to inclusion in various bathymetry, hydrography, and imagery products. The key to meeting the challenge of the massive data volumes was to change the approach that required every data point be viewed. This was achieved with the replacement of the traditional line-by-line editing approach with an automated cleaning module, and an area-based editor. The approach includes a unique data structure that enables the direct access to the full resolution data from the area based view, including a direct interface to target files and imagery snippets from mosaic and full resolution imagery. The increased data volumes to be processed also offered tremendous opportunities in terms of visualization and analysis, and interactive 3D presentation of the complex multi-attribute data provided a natural complement to the area based processing. If properly geo-referenced and treated, the complex data sets can be presented in a natural and intuitive manner that allows the integration of multiple components each at their inherent level of resolution and without compromising the quantitative nature of the data. Artificial sun-illumination, shading, and 3-D rendering are used with digital bathymetric data to form natural looking and easily interpretable, yet quantitative, landscapes that allow the user to rapidly identify the data requiring further processing or analysis. Color can be used to represent depth or other parameters (like backscatter, quality factors or sediment properties), which can be draped over the DTM, or high resolution

  15. Image Data Processing System (IDAPS) user manual, S-056 experiment. Volume 1: System description. Volume 2: Batch IDAPS. Volume 3: Interactive IDAPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Image data processing system (IDAPS) developed to satisfy the image processing requirements of the Skylab S-056 experiment is described. The S-056 experiment was designed to obtain high-resolution photographs of the sun in the far ultraviolet, or soft X-ray, portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. Thirty-five thousand photographs were obtained by the three flights of the program; and, faced with such a massive volume of imagery, the designers of the experiment decided to develop a computer-based system which would reduce the image processing workload. The purpose of the IDAPS User Manual is to give the IDAPS user the necessary information and instructions to effectively utilize the system.

  16. Changes of benthic bacteria and meiofauna assemblages during bio-treatments of anthracene-contaminated sediments from Bizerta lagoon (Tunisia).

    PubMed

    Ben Said, Olfa; Louati, Hela; Soltani, Amel; Preud'homme, Hugues; Cravo-Laureau, Cristiana; Got, Patrice; Pringault, Olivier; Aissa, Patricia; Duran, Robert

    2015-10-01

    Sediments from Bizerta lagoon were used in an experimental microcosm setup involving three scenarios for the bioremediation of anthracene-polluted sediments, namely bioaugmentation, biostimulation, and a combination of both bioaugmentation and biostimulation. In order to investigate the effect of the biotreatments on the benthic biosphere, 16S rRNA gene-based T-RFLP bacterial community structure and the abundance and diversity of the meiofauna were determined throughout the experiment period. Addition of fresh anthracene drastically reduced the benthic bacterial and meiofaunal abundances. The treatment combining biostimulation and bioaugmentation was most efficient in eliminating anthracene, resulting in a less toxic sedimentary environment, which restored meiofaunal abundance and diversity. Furthermore, canonical correspondence analysis showed that the biostimulation treatment promoted a bacterial community favorable to the development of nematodes while the treatment combining biostimulation and bioaugmentation resulted in a bacterial community that advantaged the development of the other meiofauna taxa (copepods, oligochaetes, polychaetes, and other) restoring thus the meiofaunal structure. The results highlight the importance to take into account the bacteria/meiofauna interactions during the implementation of bioremediation treatment.

  17. Interaction of the endocrine system with inflammation: a function of energy and volume regulation.

    PubMed

    Straub, Rainer H

    2014-02-13

    During acute systemic infectious disease, precisely regulated release of energy-rich substrates (glucose, free fatty acids, and amino acids) and auxiliary elements such as calcium/phosphorus from storage sites (fat tissue, muscle, liver, and bone) are highly important because these factors are needed by an energy-consuming immune system in a situation with little or no food/water intake (sickness behavior). This positively selected program for short-lived infectious diseases is similarly applied during chronic inflammatory diseases. This review presents the interaction of hormones and inflammation by focusing on energy storage/expenditure and volume regulation. Energy storage hormones are represented by insulin (glucose/lipid storage and growth-related processes), insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) (muscle and bone growth), androgens (muscle and bone growth), vitamin D (bone growth), and osteocalcin (bone growth, support of insulin, and testosterone). Energy expenditure hormones are represented by cortisol (breakdown of liver glycogen/adipose tissue triglycerides/muscle protein, and gluconeogenesis; water retention), noradrenaline/adrenaline (breakdown of liver glycogen/adipose tissue triglycerides, and gluconeogenesis; water retention), growth hormone (glucogenic, lipolytic; has also growth-related aspects; water retention), thyroid gland hormones (increase metabolic effects of adrenaline/noradrenaline), and angiotensin II (induce insulin resistance and retain water). In chronic inflammatory diseases, a preponderance of energy expenditure pathways is switched on, leading to typical hormonal changes such as insulin/IGF-1 resistance, hypoandrogenemia, hypovitaminosis D, mild hypercortisolemia, and increased activity of the sympathetic nervous system and the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. Though necessary during acute inflammation in the context of systemic infection or trauma, these long-standing changes contribute to increased mortality in chronic

  18. Interaction of the endocrine system with inflammation: a function of energy and volume regulation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    During acute systemic infectious disease, precisely regulated release of energy-rich substrates (glucose, free fatty acids, and amino acids) and auxiliary elements such as calcium/phosphorus from storage sites (fat tissue, muscle, liver, and bone) are highly important because these factors are needed by an energy-consuming immune system in a situation with little or no food/water intake (sickness behavior). This positively selected program for short-lived infectious diseases is similarly applied during chronic inflammatory diseases. This review presents the interaction of hormones and inflammation by focusing on energy storage/expenditure and volume regulation. Energy storage hormones are represented by insulin (glucose/lipid storage and growth-related processes), insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) (muscle and bone growth), androgens (muscle and bone growth), vitamin D (bone growth), and osteocalcin (bone growth, support of insulin, and testosterone). Energy expenditure hormones are represented by cortisol (breakdown of liver glycogen/adipose tissue triglycerides/muscle protein, and gluconeogenesis; water retention), noradrenaline/adrenaline (breakdown of liver glycogen/adipose tissue triglycerides, and gluconeogenesis; water retention), growth hormone (glucogenic, lipolytic; has also growth-related aspects; water retention), thyroid gland hormones (increase metabolic effects of adrenaline/noradrenaline), and angiotensin II (induce insulin resistance and retain water). In chronic inflammatory diseases, a preponderance of energy expenditure pathways is switched on, leading to typical hormonal changes such as insulin/IGF-1 resistance, hypoandrogenemia, hypovitaminosis D, mild hypercortisolemia, and increased activity of the sympathetic nervous system and the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. Though necessary during acute inflammation in the context of systemic infection or trauma, these long-standing changes contribute to increased mortality in chronic

  19. Processes influencing the transport and fate of contaminated sediments in the coastal ocean: Boston Harbor and Massachusetts Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bothner, Michael H.; Butman, Bradford

    2007-01-01

    Most of the major urban centers of the United States including Boston, New York, Washington, Chicago, New Orleans, Miami, Los Angeles, San Francisco, and Seattle—are on a coast (fig. 1.1). All of these cities discharge treated sewage effluent into adjacent waters. In 2000, 74 percent of the U.S. population lived within 200 kilometers (km) of the coast. Between 1980 and 2002, the population density in coastal communities increased approximately 4.5 times faster than in noncoastal areas of the U.S. (Perkins, 2004). More people generate larger volumes of wastes, increase the demands on wastewater treatment, expand the area of impervious land surfaces, and use more vehicles that contribute contaminants to street runoff. According to the National Coastal Condition Report II (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 2005a), on the basis of coastal habitat, water and sediment quality, benthic index, and fish tissue, the overall national coastal condition is only poor to fair and the overall coastal condition in the highly populated Northeast is poor. Scientific information helps managers to prioritize and regulate coastal-ocean uses that include recreation, commercial fishing, transportation, waste disposal, and critical habitat for marine organisms. These uses are often in conflict with each other and with environmental concerns. Developing a strategy for managing competing uses while maintaining sustainability of coastal resources requires scientific understanding of how the coastal ocean system behaves and how it responds to anthropogenic influences. This report provides a summary of a multidisciplinary research program designed to improve our understanding of the transport and fate of contaminants in Massachusetts coastal waters. Massachusetts Bay and Boston Harbor have been a focus of U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) research because they provide a diverse geographic setting for developing a scientific understanding of the geology, geochemistry, and oceanography of

  20. Staff-Child Interactions: A Vygotskian Perspective. Accreditation and Beyond Series, Volume I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleer, Marilyn

    Taking a Vygotskian perspective, this monograph focuses on the quality of interaction between children and staff in Australian child care and education programs. Aspects of quality interaction are presented through examples of interaction and through personal stories of staff analyzing their interactional patterns through video and audiotapes.…

  1. The broad-host-range plasmid pSFA231 isolated from petroleum-contaminated sediment represents a new member of the PromA plasmid family

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaobin; Top, Eva M.; Wang, Yafei; Brown, Celeste J.; Yao, Fei; Yang, Shan; Jiang, Yong; Li, Hui

    2015-01-01

    A self-transmissible broad-host-range (BHR) plasmid pSFA231 was isolated from petroleum-contaminated sediment in Shen-fu wastewater irrigation zone, China, using the triparental mating exogenous plasmid capture method. Based on its complete sequence the plasmid has a size of 41.5 kb and codes for 50 putative open reading frames (orfs), 29 of which represent genes involved in replication, partitioning and transfer functions of the plasmid. Phylogenetic analysis grouped pSFA231 into the newly defined PromA plasmid family, which currently includes five members. Further comparative genomic analysis shows that pSFA231 shares the common backbone regions with the other PromA plasmids, i.e., genes involved in replication, maintenance and control, and conjugative transfer. Nevertheless, phylogenetic divergence was found in specific gene products. We propose to divide the PromA group into two subgroups, PromA-α (pMRAD02, pSB102) and PromA-β (pMOL98, pIPO2T, pSFA231, pTer331), based on the splits network analysis of the RepA protein. Interestingly, a cluster of hypothetical orfs located between parA and traA of pSFA231 shows high similarity with the corresponding regions on pMOL98, pIPO2T, and pTer331, suggesting these hypothetical orfs may represent “essential” plasmid backbone genes for the PromA-β subgroup. Alternatively, they may also be accessory genes that were first acquired and then stayed as the plasmid diverged. Our study increases the available collection of complete genome sequences of BHR plasmids, and since pSFA231 is the only characterized PromA plasmid from China, our findings also enhance our understanding of the genetic diversity of this plasmid group in different parts of the world. PMID:25628616

  2. The impact of increased oxygen conditions on metal-contaminated sediments part II: effects on metal accumulation and toxicity in aquatic invertebrates.

    PubMed

    De Jonge, M; Teuchies, J; Meire, P; Blust, R; Bervoets, L

    2012-06-15

    The present study evaluated the effect of increasing oxygen concentrations in overlying surface water on the accumulation and toxicity of sediment-bound metals in the aquatic invertebrates Lumbriculus variegatus, Asellus aquaticus and Daphnia magna. A 54 days experiment using three experimental treatments (90% O(2) in overlying surface water, 40% O(2) and a non-polluted control) was conducted. At 6 different time points (after 0, 2, 5, 12, 32 and 54 days) acid volatile sulfides (AVS), simultaneously extracted metals (SEM) and total organic carbon (TOC) were measured in the superficial sediment layer (0-1 cm). At each time point, accumulated metal levels as well as the available energy stores were measured in L. variegatus and A. aquaticus and each time D. magna was exposed to surface water in a 24 h toxicity test. Additionally metallothionein-like protein (MTLP) induction was quantified in L. variegatus. Oxygen induced changes in sediment AVS resulted in faster accumulation of metals from contaminated sediments in A. aquaticus, while no differences in toxicity in this species were observed. Ag, Cr, As and Co accumulation as well as toxicity in water exposed D. magna were clearly enhanced after 54 days, caused by oxidation of metal-sulfide complexes. Due to their feeding and burrowing behaviour, metal accumulation and toxicity in L. variegatus was not influenced by geochemical characteristics. Nevertheless, a rapid induction of MTLP was observed in both the 90% O(2) and the 40% O(2) treatment. The present study showed that elevated oxygen concentrations in overlying surface water can directly enhance metal accumulation and toxicity in aquatic invertebrates, however this is highly dependent on the organisms ecology and most dominant metal exposure route (water vs. sediment).

  3. Cadmium, metal-binding proteins, and growth in bluegill (Lepomis macrochiruscontaminated sediments from the upper Mississippi River basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cope, W. Gregory; Wiener, James G.; Steingraeber, Mark T.; Atchison, Gary J.

    1994-01-01

    We exposed juvenile bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus) to ~1000 mg∙L−1 of continuously suspended river sediment in a 28-d test with six treatments (randomized block with one sediment-free control and five sediments ranging from 1.3 to 21.4 μg Cd∙g dry weight−1). Each treatment had three replicates, each with 25 fish. Growth was reduced by exposure to suspended sediment, probably due to physical effects of sediment on feeding and to toxicity in the treatment with the greatest concentrations of metals. Mean whole-body concentrations of cadmium (0.04–0.14 μg∙g wet weight−1) were correlated with cadmium concentration in filtered water (8–72 ng∙L−1), suspended sediment (0.61–16.8 μg∙L−1), and bulk sediment. The concentration of hepatic nonthionein cytosolic cadmium (cadmium not bound by metal-binding proteins, MBP) in fish exposed to the two most contaminated sediments exceeded that in controls. The mean concentration of hepatic MBP was correlated with cadmium concentration in filtered water, suspended sediment, bulk sediment, and whole fish. Whole-body cadmium concentration was the most sensitive indicator of cadmium exposure, with lowest observed effect concentrations of 1.9 μg Cd∙L−1 for suspended sediment and 13 ng Cd∙L−1 for filtered water. Sediment-associated cadmium was less available than waterborne cadmium for uptake by fish.

  4. High-volume image quality assessment systems: tuning performance with an interactive data visualization tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bresnahan, Patricia A.; Pukinskis, Madeleine; Wiggins, Michael

    1999-03-01

    Image quality assessment systems differ greatly with respect to the number and types of mags they need to evaluate, and their overall architectures. Managers of these systems, however, all need to be able to tune and evaluate system performance, requirements often overlooked or under-designed during project planning. Performance tuning tools allow users to define acceptable quality standards for image features and attributes by adjusting parameter settings. Performance analysis tools allow users to evaluate and/or predict how well a system performs in a given parameter state. While image assessment algorithms are becoming quite sophisticated, duplicating or surpassing the human decision making process in their speed and reliability, they often require a greater investment in 'training' or fine tuning of parameters in order to achieve optimum performance. This process may involve the analysis of hundreds or thousands of images, generating a large database of files and statistics that can be difficult to sort through and interpret. Compounding the difficulty is the fact that personnel charged with tuning and maintaining the production system may not have the statistical or analytical background required for the task. Meanwhile, hardware innovations have greatly increased the volume of images that can be handled in a given time frame, magnifying the consequences of running a production site with an inadequately tuned system. In this paper, some general requirements for a performance evaluation and tuning data visualization system are discussed. A custom engineered solution to the tuning and evaluation problem is then presented, developed within the context of a high volume image quality assessment, data entry, OCR, and image archival system. A key factor influencing the design of the system was the context-dependent definition of image quality, as perceived by a human interpreter. This led to the development of a five-level, hierarchical approach to image quality

  5. Propulsion and airframe aerodynamic interactions of supersonic V/STOL configurations. Volume 1: Wind tunnel test pressure data report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zilz, D. E.; Devereaux, P. A.

    1985-01-01

    A wind tunnel model of a supersonic V/STOL fighter configuration has been tested to measure the aerodynamic interaction effects which can result from geometrically close-coupled propulsion system/airframe components. The approach was to configure the model to represent two different test techniques. One was a conventional test technique composed of two test modes. In the Flow-Through mode, absolute configuration aerodynamics are measured, including inlet/airframe interactions. In the Jet-Effects mode, incremental nozzle/airframe interactions are measured. The other test technique is a propulsion simulator approach, where a sub-scale, externally powered engine is mounted in the model. This allows proper measurement of inlet/airframe and nozzle/airframe interactions simultaneously. This is Volume 1 of 2: Wind Tunnel Test Pressure Data Report.

  6. Interactive Volume Exploration of Petascale Microscopy Data Streams Using a Visualization-Driven Virtual Memory Approach.

    PubMed

    Hadwiger, M; Beyer, J; Jeong, Won-Ki; Pfister, H

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents the first volume visualization system that scales to petascale volumes imaged as a continuous stream of high-resolution electron microscopy images. Our architecture scales to dense, anisotropic petascale volumes because it: (1) decouples construction of the 3D multi-resolution representation required for visualization from data acquisition, and (2) decouples sample access time during ray-casting from the size of the multi-resolution hierarchy. Our system is designed around a scalable multi-resolution virtual memory architecture that handles missing data naturally, does not pre-compute any 3D multi-resolution representation such as an octree, and can accept a constant stream of 2D image tiles from the microscopes. A novelty of our system design is that it is visualization-driven: we restrict most computations to the visible volume data. Leveraging the virtual memory architecture, missing data are detected during volume ray-casting as cache misses, which are propagated backwards for on-demand out-of-core processing. 3D blocks of volume data are only constructed from 2D microscope image tiles when they have actually been accessed during ray-casting. We extensively evaluate our system design choices with respect to scalability and performance, compare to previous best-of-breed systems, and illustrate the effectiveness of our system for real microscopy data from neuroscience.

  7. Risk-Based Remediation Approach for Cs-137 Contaminated Sediment/Soils at the Savannah River Site (SRS) Lower Three Runs Tail (U) - 13348 - SRNS-RP-2012-00546

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, Candice; Bergren, Christopher; Blas, Susan; Kupar, James

    2013-07-01

    .e., hunting, fishing, hiking etc.) and access from public property. Exposure of the adolescent trespasser to Cs-137 contaminated sediment/soil at concentrations greater than 23.7 pico curies per gram have been calculated to result in an unacceptable cancer risk (> 1 x 10{sup -4}). Comparing the characterization sampling results conducted in 2009 with the benchmark concentration of 23.7 pCi/g, identified elevated risk levels along three sampling areas in the Lower Three Runs tail portion. On January 5, 2012, it was agreed by the core team that a Removal Action in the Lower Three Runs tail was to be conducted for the identified soil/sediment locations in the three identified areas that exceed the 1 x 10{sup -4} risk (23.7 pCi/g) for the adolescent trespasser receptor. The addition of Land Use Controls following the Removal Action was appropriate to protect human health and the environment. A systematic screening matrix was initiated at the identified hot spots (i.e., sampling points with Cs-137 activities greater than 23.7 pCi/g) to identify the limits of the excavation area. Sediment/soil within the defined removal areas would be excavated to the depth necessary to achieve the cleanup goal and disposed of in a CERCLA Off-Site Rule approved disposal facility. It was agreed that this removal action would adequately reduce the volume of available Cs-137 in the Lower Three Runs tail and consequently residual activities of the Cs-137 would decay over time reducing the amount of Cs-137 available in the tail which would curtail risk. The Land Use Controls consist of installation of an additional seven miles of fencing at major road crossings, utility easements, and at areas that showed a higher probability of access. In addition, signs were placed along the entire SRS perimeter of the Lower Three Runs tail approximately every 200 feet. Sign posts included both a No Trespassing sign and a Contaminant Warning sign. The project initiated a subcontract for both the removal action and the

  8. Orbiter subsystem hardware/software interaction analysis. Volume 8: Forward reaction control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, D. D.

    1980-01-01

    The results of the orbiter hardware/software interaction analysis for the AFT reaction control system are presented. The interaction between hardware failure modes and software are examined in order to identify associated issues and risks. All orbiter subsystems and interfacing program elements which interact with the orbiter computer flight software are analyzed. The failure modes identified in the subsystem/element failure mode and effects analysis are discussed.

  9. Orbiter subsystem hardware/software interaction analysis. Volume 8: AFT reaction control system, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, D. D.

    1980-01-01

    The orbiter subsystems and interfacing program elements which interact with the orbiter computer flight software are analyzed. The failure modes identified in the subsystem/element failure mode and effects analysis are examined. Potential interaction with the software is examined through an evaluation of the software requirements. The analysis is restricted to flight software requirements and excludes utility/checkout software. The results of the hardware/software interaction analysis for the forward reaction control system are presented.

  10. Verbal Interaction and Development in Families with Adolescents. Advances in Applied Developmental Psychology, Volume 15.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hofer, Manfred, Ed.; Youniss, James, Ed.; Noack, Peter, Ed.

    Individuation theory is rooted in the belief that it is a major developmental task for adolescents to establish their identity while simultaneously maintaining a relationship with their parents. Building on the individuation paradigm, the researchers contributing to this edited volume zeroed in on discourse as a critical mechanism through which…

  11. Large-scale field study on thin-layer capping of marine PCDD/F-contaminated sediments in Grenlandfjords, Norway: physicochemical effects.

    PubMed

    Cornelissen, Gerard; Amstaetter, Katja; Hauge, Audun; Schaanning, Morten; Beylich, Bjørnar; Gunnarsson, Jonas S; Breedveld, Gijs D; Oen, Amy M P; Eek, Espen

    2012-11-01

    A large-scale field experiment on in situ thin-layer capping was carried out in the polychlorinated dibenzodioxin and dibenzofuran (PCDD/F) contaminated Grenlandsfjords, Norway. The main focus of the trial was to test the effectiveness of active caps (targeted thickness of 2.5 cm) consisting of powdered activated carbon (AC) mixed into locally dredged clean clay. Nonactive caps (targed thickness of 5 cm) consisting of clay without AC as well as crushed limestone were also tested. Fields with areas of 10,000 to 40,000 m(2) were established at 30 to 100 m water depth. Auxiliary shaken laboratory batch experiments showed that 2% of the applied powdered AC substantially reduced PCDD/F porewater concentrations, by >90% for tetra-, penta- and hexa-clorinated congeners to 60-70% for octachlorinated ones. In-situ AC profiles revealed that the AC was mixed into the sediment to 3 to 5 cm depth in 20 months. Only around 25% of the AC was found inside the pilot fields. Sediment-to-water PCDD/F fluxes measured by in situ diffusion chambers were significantly lower at the capped fields than at reference fields in the same fjord, reductions being largest for the limestone (50-90%) followed by clay (50-70%), and the AC + clay (60%). Also reductions in overlying aqueous PCDD/F concentrations measured by passive samplers were significant in most cases (20-40% reduction), probably because of the large size of the trial fields. The AC was less effective in the field than in the laboratory, probably due to prolonged sediment-to-AC mass transfer times for PCDD/Fs and field factors such as integrity of the cap, new deposition of contaminated sediment particles, and bioturbation. The present field data indicate that slightly thicker layers of limestone and dredged clay can show as good physicochemical effectiveness as thin caps of AC mixed with clay, at least for PCDD/Fs during the first two years after cap placement. PMID:23046183

  12. Volume transmission and receptor-receptor interactions in heteroreceptor complexes: understanding the role of new concepts for brain communication

    PubMed Central

    Fuxe, Kjell; Borroto-Escuela, Dasiel O.

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of the central monoamine neurons not only demonstrated novel types of brain stem neurons forming global terminal networks all over the brain and the spinal cord, but also to a novel type of communication called volume transmission. It is a major mode of communication in the central nervous system that takes places in the extracellular fluid and the cerebral spinal fluid through diffusion and flow of molecules, like neurotransmitters and extracellular vesicles. The integration of synaptic and volume transmission takes place through allosteric receptor-receptor interactions in heteroreceptor complexes. These heterocomplexes represent major integrator centres in the plasma membrane and their protomers act as moonlighting proteins undergoing dynamic changes and their structure and function. In fact, we propose that the molecular bases of learning and memory can be based on the reorganization of multiples homo and heteroreceptor complexes into novel assembles in the post-junctional membranes of synapses. PMID:27651759

  13. Volume transmission and receptor-receptor interactions in heteroreceptor complexes: understanding the role of new concepts for brain communication

    PubMed Central

    Fuxe, Kjell; Borroto-Escuela, Dasiel O.

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of the central monoamine neurons not only demonstrated novel types of brain stem neurons forming global terminal networks all over the brain and the spinal cord, but also to a novel type of communication called volume transmission. It is a major mode of communication in the central nervous system that takes places in the extracellular fluid and the cerebral spinal fluid through diffusion and flow of molecules, like neurotransmitters and extracellular vesicles. The integration of synaptic and volume transmission takes place through allosteric receptor-receptor interactions in heteroreceptor complexes. These heterocomplexes represent major integrator centres in the plasma membrane and their protomers act as moonlighting proteins undergoing dynamic changes and their structure and function. In fact, we propose that the molecular bases of learning and memory can be based on the reorganization of multiples homo and heteroreceptor complexes into novel assembles in the post-junctional membranes of synapses.

  14. Volume transmission and receptor-receptor interactions in heteroreceptor complexes: understanding the role of new concepts for brain communication.

    PubMed

    Fuxe, Kjell; Borroto-Escuela, Dasiel O

    2016-08-01

    The discovery of the central monoamine neurons not only demonstrated novel types of brain stem neurons forming global terminal networks all over the brain and the spinal cord, but also to a novel type of communication called volume transmission. It is a major mode of communication in the central nervous system that takes places in the extracellular fluid and the cerebral spinal fluid through diffusion and flow of molecules, like neurotransmitters and extracellular vesicles. The integration of synaptic and volume transmission takes place through allosteric receptor-receptor interactions in heteroreceptor complexes. These heterocomplexes represent major integrator centres in the plasma membrane and their protomers act as moonlighting proteins undergoing dynamic changes and their structure and function. In fact, we propose that the molecular bases of learning and memory can be based on the reorganization of multiples homo and heteroreceptor complexes into novel assembles in the post-junctional membranes of synapses.

  15. Volume transmission and receptor-receptor interactions in heteroreceptor complexes: understanding the role of new concepts for brain communication.

    PubMed

    Fuxe, Kjell; Borroto-Escuela, Dasiel O

    2016-08-01

    The discovery of the central monoamine neurons not only demonstrated novel types of brain stem neurons forming global terminal networks all over the brain and the spinal cord, but also to a novel type of communication called volume transmission. It is a major mode of communication in the central nervous system that takes places in the extracellular fluid and the cerebral spinal fluid through diffusion and flow of molecules, like neurotransmitters and extracellular vesicles. The integration of synaptic and volume transmission takes place through allosteric receptor-receptor interactions in heteroreceptor complexes. These heterocomplexes represent major integrator centres in the plasma membrane and their protomers act as moonlighting proteins undergoing dynamic changes and their structure and function. In fact, we propose that the molecular bases of learning and memory can be based on the reorganization of multiples homo and heteroreceptor complexes into novel assembles in the post-junctional membranes of synapses. PMID:27651759

  16. Interaction of airborne and structureborne noise radiated by plates. Volume 2: Experimental study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgary, M. C.

    1986-01-01

    The interaction of airborne and structureborne noise radiated by aircaraft materials was studied. The results corroborate the findings of an earlier analytical study by showing that the noise radiation of vibrating plates due to combined airborne and structureborne inputs possesses a stong synergistic nature. The large influence of the interaction between the airborne and structureborne inputs was hitherto ignored by researchers of aircraft interior noise problems.

  17. Integrated nuclear and conventional theater warfare simulation (INWARS) documentation. Part IV. User's manual component. Volume II. Combat interactions input. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Aldrich, J.R.; Gilmer, J.B.

    1980-02-08

    This is Volume II of the User's Manual Component of the Integrated Nuclear and Conventional Theater Warfare Simulation (INWARS) documentation. It presents the content and format of user inputs to the INWARS treatment of combat interactions.

  18. Interactive Videodisc: the "Why" and the "How." CALICO Monograph Volume 2, Spring 1991.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bush, Michael D.; And Others

    This monograph presents articles on interactive videodisc technology in language learning, ranging from the importance of a theoretical framework, the transition from theory to practice, getting started, design considerations, hypermedia, discovery environments, authoring software, workstation environments, and a look at the future of optical disc…

  19. The Interactions of Federal and Related State Education Programs. Volume II: State Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holland, Richard P., Ed.

    This collection of case studies of eight states--California, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Missouri, New Mexico, New York, Virginia, Wyoming--documents a 1981-82 investigation of federal and state administrative interactions across a select sample of federal education programs. To represent a wide spectrum of political, economic, and institutional…

  20. Researching Online Foreign Language Interaction and Exchange: Theories, Methods and Challenges. Telecollaboration in Education. Volume 3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dooly, Melinda; O'Dowd, Robert

    2012-01-01

    This book provides an accessible introduction to some of the methods and theoretical approaches for investigating foreign language (FL) interaction and exchange in online environments. Research approaches which can be applied to Computer-Mediated Communication (CMC) are outlined, followed by discussion of the way in which tools and techniques for…

  1. Installation-restoration program environmental technology development. Task Order 12. Field demonstration - composting of propellant-contaminated sediments at the Badger Army Ammunition Plant (BAAP). Final report, Jul 87-Mar 89

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, R.T.; Ziegenfuss, P.S.; Marks, P.J.

    1989-03-01

    A field-scale demonstration of composting propellants-contaminated sediment was conducted at the Badger Army Ammunition Plant (BAAP). Composting, as used at BAAP, is a treatment process in which organic-chemical contaminated soils or sediments are mixed with organic materials such as manure to enhance the role of microbial metabolism in degrading and stabilizing soil/sediment contaminants. Sediments contaminated with the propellant nitrocellulose (NC) were mixed with manure, alfalfa, livestock feed, and wood chips and composted in four static piles. Negative pressure aeration was used to maintain aerobiosis and remove excess heat. Experimental variables investigated during the study were temperature (mesophilic, 35 C vs. thermophilic, 55 C), sediment loading (19 to 32 weight percent), and NC loading. Small aliquots of compost (approximately 400 cu cm) were spiked with pure NC, placed in porous nylon bags and buried in compost piles. These bagged compost samples were used to determine if high levels of NC could be successfully composted. Thermophilic temperatures resulted in the highest percent reduction in NC concentration.

  2. Coupled 2-dimensional cascade theory for noise an d unsteady aerodynamics of blade row interaction in turbofans. Volume 2: Documentation for computer code CUP2D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, Donald B.

    1994-01-01

    A two dimensional linear aeroacoustic theory for rotor/stator interaction with unsteady coupling was derived and explored in Volume 1 of this report. Computer program CUP2D has been written in FORTRAN embodying the theoretical equations. This volume (Volume 2) describes the structure of the code, installation and running, preparation of the input file, and interpretation of the output. A sample case is provided with printouts of the input and output. The source code is included with comments linking it closely to the theoretical equations in Volume 1.

  3. Volume exclusion and soft interaction effects on protein stability under crowded conditions.

    PubMed

    Miklos, Andrew C; Li, Conggang; Sharaf, Naima G; Pielak, Gary J

    2010-08-24

    Most proteins function in nature under crowded conditions, and crowding can change protein properties. Quantification of crowding effects, however, is difficult because solutions containing hundreds of grams of macromolecules per liter often interfere with the observation of the protein being studied. Models for macromolecular crowding tend to focus on the steric effects of crowders, neglecting potential chemical interactions between the crowder and the test protein. Here, we report the first systematic, quantitative, residue-level study of crowding effects on the equilibrium stability of a globular protein. We used a system comprising poly(vinylpyrrolidone)s (PVPs) of varying molecular weights as crowding agents and chymotrypsin inhibitor 2 (CI2) as a small globular test protein. Stability was quantified with NMR-detected amide (1)H exchange. We analyzed the data in terms of hard particle exclusion, confinement, and soft interactions. For all crowded conditions, nearly every observed residue experiences a stabilizing effect. The exceptions are residues for which stabilities are unchanged. At a PVP concentration of 100 g/L, the data are consistent with theories of hard particle exclusion. At higher concentrations, the data are more consistent with confinement. The data show that the crowder also stabilizes the test protein by weakly binding its native state. We conclude that the role of native-state binding and other soft interactions needs to be seriously considered when applying both theory and experiment to studies of macromolecular crowding.

  4. Interactions between energy supply and transportation-related energy use, volume 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, T. J.; Ison, J. W.; Geinzer, J. C.

    1980-01-01

    The structure of ENTRANS and some of its policy analysis applications are described. ENTRANS is a computer simulator model of the interactions between energy supply and transportation related energy use. It includes a complete representation of the characteristics of transportation supply (public transit, carpooling, highways, and autos) and of households' travel related decisions (car type, travel mode, trip length, and frequency choices). The model is capable of analyzing a wide range of policies designed to change automobile fuel use. The results of several detailed policy analyses are described.

  5. A digital computer program for the dynamic interaction simulation of controls and structure (DISCOS), volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bodley, C. S.; Devers, A. D.; Park, A. C.; Frisch, H. P.

    1978-01-01

    A theoretical development and associated digital computer program system for the dynamic simulation and stability analysis of passive and actively controlled spacecraft are presented. The dynamic system (spacecraft) is modeled as an assembly of rigid and/or flexible bodies not necessarily in a topological tree configuration. The computer program system is used to investigate total system dynamic characteristics, including interaction effects between rigid and/or flexible bodies, control systems, and a wide range of environmental loadings. In addition, the program system is used for designing attitude control systems and for evaluating total dynamic system performance, including time domain response and frequency domain stability analyses.

  6. Novel Insights Into Interactions Between Mitochondria and Xanthine Oxidase in Acute Cardiac Volume Overload

    PubMed Central

    Gladden, James D; Zelickson, Blake R; Wei, Chih-Chang; Ulasova, Elena; Zheng, Junying; Ahmed, Mustafa I.; Chen, Yuanwen; Bamman, Marcas; Ballinger, Scott; Darley-Usmar, Victor; Dell’Italia, Louis J

    2012-01-01

    Xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) is increased in the left ventricle (LV) of humans with volume overload (VO) and mitochondrial inhibition of the respiratory chain occurs in animal models of VO. Since mitochondria are both a source and target of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, we hypothesized that activation of XOR and mitochondrial dysfunction are interdependent. To test this we used the aortocaval fistula (ACF) rat model of VO and a simulation of the stretch response in isolated adult cardiomyocytes with and without the inhibitor of XOR, allopurinol, or the mitochondrially targeted antioxidant MitoQ. XO activity was increased in cardiomyocytes from ACF vs. sham rats (24h) without an increase in XO protein. A two-fold increase in LV end-diastolic pressure/wall stress and a decrease in LV systolic elastance with ACF were improved with allopurinol (100 mg/kg) started at ACF induction. Subsarcolemmal state 3 mitochondrial respiration was significantly decreased in ACF and normalized by allopurinol. Cardiomyocytes subjected to 3 hour cyclical stretch resulted in an increase in XO activity and mitochondrial swelling, which was prevented by allopurinol or MitoQ pretreatment. These studies establish an early interplay between cardiomyocyte XO activation and bioenergetic dysfunction that may provide a new target that prevents progression to heart failure in VO. PMID:21925594

  7. User's manual for rocket combustor interactive design (ROCCID) and analysis computer program. Volume 1: User's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muss, J. A.; Nguyen, T. V.; Johnson, C. W.

    1991-01-01

    The user's manual for the rocket combustor interactive design (ROCCID) computer program is presented. The program, written in Fortran 77, provides a standardized methodology using state of the art codes and procedures for the analysis of a liquid rocket engine combustor's steady state combustion performance and combustion stability. The ROCCID is currently capable of analyzing mixed element injector patterns containing impinging like doublet or unlike triplet, showerhead, shear coaxial, and swirl coaxial elements as long as only one element type exists in each injector core, baffle, or barrier zone. Real propellant properties of oxygen, hydrogen, methane, propane, and RP-1 are included in ROCCID. The properties of other propellants can easily be added. The analysis model in ROCCID can account for the influence of acoustic cavities, helmholtz resonators, and radial thrust chamber baffles on combustion stability. ROCCID also contains the logic to interactively create a combustor design which meets input performance and stability goals. A preliminary design results from the application of historical correlations to the input design requirements. The steady state performance and combustion stability of this design is evaluated using the analysis models, and ROCCID guides the user as to the design changes required to satisfy the user's performance and stability goals, including the design of stability aids. Output from ROCCID includes a formatted input file for the standardized JANNAF engine performance prediction procedure.

  8. Interaction of airborne and structureborne noise radiated by plates. Volume 1: Analytical study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgary, M. C.

    1986-01-01

    The interaction of airborne and structureborne noise radiated by aircraft materials was examined. The theory and results of several computer simulations of the noise radiated by thin, isotropic, rectangular aluminum plates due to fully coherent combined acoustic and vibrational inputs is presented. The most significant finding was the extremely large influence that the relative phase between inputs has on the combined noise radiation of the plates. Phase dependent effects manifest themselves as cross terms in both the dynamic and acoustic portions of the analysis. Computer simulations show that these cross terms can radically alter the combined sound power radiated by plates constructed of aircraft-type materials. The results suggest that airborne-structureborne interactive effects could be responsible for a significant portion of the overall noise radiated by aircraft-type structures in the low frequency regime. This implies that previous analytical and experimental studies may have neglected an important physical phenomenon in the analayses of the interior noise of propeller dirven aircraft.

  9. An interactive system for volume segmentation in computer-assisted surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunert, Tobias; Heimann, Tobias; Schroter, Andre; Schobinger, Max; Bottger, Thomas; Thorn, Matthias; Wolf, Ivo; Engelmann, Uwe; Meinzer, Hans-Peter

    2004-05-01

    Computer-assisted surgery aims at a decreased surgical risk and a reduced recovery time of patients. However, its use is still limited to complex cases because of the high effort. It is often caused by the extensive medical image analysis. Especially, image segmentation requires a lot of manual work. Surgeons and radiologists are suffering from usability problems of many workstations. In this work, we present a dedicated workplace for interactive segmentation integratd within the CHILI (tele-)radiology system. The software comes with a lot of improvements with respect to its graphical user interface, the segmentation process and the segmentatin methods. We point out important software requirements and give insight into the concepts which were implemented. Further examples and applications illustrate the software system.

  10. Application of Molecular Interaction Volume Model for Phase Equilibrium of Sn-Based Binary System in Vacuum Distillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Lingxin; Yang, Bin; Xu, Baoqiang; Li, Yifu

    2014-09-01

    Based on the molecular interaction volume model (MIVM), the activities of components of Sn-Sb, Sb-Bi, Sn-Zn, Sn-Cu, and Sn-Ag alloys were predicted. The predicted values are in good agreement with the experimental data, which indicate that the MIVM is of better stability and reliability due to its good physical basis. A significant advantage of the MIVM lies in its ability to predict the thermodynamic properties of liquid alloys using only two parameters. The phase equilibria of Sn-Sb and Sn-Bi alloys were calculated based on the properties of pure components and the activity coefficients, which indicates that Sn-Sb and Sn-Bi alloys can be separated thoroughly by vacuum distillation. This study extends previous investigations and provides an effective and convenient model on which to base refining simulations for Sn-based alloys.

  11. Interaction of a laminar flame with its self-generated flow during constant volume combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn-Rankin, D.; Sawyer, R.F.

    1985-02-01

    The formation of cusp shaped or ''tulip'' flames during closed tube flame propagation has been recorded by combustion researchers for nearly sixty years. Flame instability, pressure wave/flame interaction, and large scale circulation in the unburned gas have been suggested as explanations for the ''tulip'' flame phenomenon, but the cause of the ''tulip'' flame has not been conclusively determined. This work uses laser Doppler anemometer measurements of the flow field during flame propagation in a closed tube to describe the combustion generated flow and to support a fluid mechanical explanation for the ''tulip'' flame formation. The flame behaves as a fluid mechanical discontinuity which deflects the velocity of the gas passing through it. As the flame quenches at the side walls of the combustion vessel, the flow deflection generates a vortex in the burned gas. The vortex remains in the proximity of the flame and modifies the unburned gas field such that the flame propagates more quickly near the wall than at the center. The discrepancy in propagation rates leads to the ''tulip'' flame.

  12. Effects of food concentration, animal interactions, and water volume on survival, growth, and reproduction of daphnia magna under flow-through conditions

    SciTech Connect

    LeBlanc, G.A.; Schoenfeld, D.A.; Surpreant, D.C.

    1981-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effects of food concentration, animal interaction, and water volume on the survival, growth, and reproduction of Daphnia magna under flow-through conditions. A response surface design was used to determine the interactive, as well as the individual, effects of the three factors. The results indicated that there were no important interactive effects of the three factors on survival, growth, or reproduction of D. magna. Individual effects of the factors on reproduction were observed. Food concentration produced a linear trend, with increasing food concentration resulting in an increase in offspring production. The number of daphnids per container produced a quadratic trend, with the maximum offspring production occurring in vessels containing approximately 14 daphnids. Water volume produced a slight linear trend, with increasing water volume resulting in an increase in offspring production.

  13. Interaction between respiration and right versus left ventricular volumes at rest and during exercise: a real-time cardiac magnetic resonance study.

    PubMed

    Claessen, Guido; Claus, Piet; Delcroix, Marion; Bogaert, Jan; La Gerche, Andre; Heidbuchel, Hein

    2014-03-01

    Breathing-induced changes in intrathoracic pressures influence left ventricular (LV) and right ventricular (RV) volumes, the exact nature and extent of which have not previously been evaluated in humans. We sought to examine this "respiratory pump" using novel real-time cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging. Eight healthy subjects underwent serial multislice real-time CMR during normal breathing, breath holding, and the Valsalva maneuver. Subsequently, a separate cohort of nine subjects underwent real-time CMR at rest and during incremental exercise. LV and RV end-diastolic volume (EDV) and end-systolic volume (ESV) and diastolic and systolic eccentricity indexes were determined at peak inspiration and expiration. During normal breathing, inspiration resulted in an increase in RV volumes [RVEDV: +18 ± 8%, RVESV: +14 ± 12%, and RV stroke volume (SV): +21 ± 10%, P < 0.01] and an opposing decrease in LV volumes (P < 0.0001 for interaction). During end-inspiratory breath holding, RV SV decreased by 9 ± 10% (P = 0.046), whereas LV SV did not change. During the Valsalva maneuver, volumes decreased in both ventricles (RVEDV: -29 ± 11%, RVESV: -16 ± 14%, RV SV: -36 ± 14%, LVEDV: -22 ± 17%, and LV SV: -25 ± 17%, P < 0.01). The reciprocal effect of respiration on LV and RV volumes was maintained throughout exercise. The diastolic and systolic eccentricity indexes were greater during inspiration than during expiration, both at rest and during exercise (P < 0.0001 for both). In conclusion, ventricular volumes oscillate with respiratory phase such that RV and LV volumes are maximal at peak inspiration and expiration, respectively. Thus, interpretation of RV versus LV volumes requires careful definition of the exact respiratory time point for proper interpretation, both at rest and during exercise.

  14. Branched conformational properties of macromolecules in close relation to chemical synthesis. II. Influence of excluded volume interactions.

    PubMed

    Burchard, Walther; Schweins, Ralf; Werner, Marcel

    2015-09-21

    The description of perturbed particle conformations needs as a prerequisite the algorithm of unperturbed chains which is outlined in Paper I [J. Chem. Phys. 143, 114906 (2015)]. The mean square segment length ⟨r(2)(n)⟩=b(2)n(2ν) with ν = 0.588 for linear chains in a good solvent is used as an approximation also for branched samples. The mean square radius of gyration is easily derived, but for the hydrodynamic, the segment distribution by Domb et al. [Proc. Phys. Soc., London 85, 624 (1965)] is required. Both radii can analytically be expressed by Gamma functions. For the angular dependence of scattered light, the Fourier transform of the Domb distribution for self-avoiding random walk is needed, which cannot be obtained as an analytical function and was derived by numerical integration. The summation over all segment length in the particle was performed with an analytic fit-curve for the Fourier transform and was carried out numerically. Results were derived (i) for uniform and polydisperse linear chains, (ii) or f-functional randomly branched polymers and their monodisperse fractions, (iii) for random A3B2 co-polymers, and (iv) for AB2 hyper-branched samples. The deviation of the Gaussian approximation with the variance of ⟨r(2)(n)⟩=b(2)n(2ν) slightly overestimates the excluded volume interaction but still remains a fairly good approximation for region of qR(g) < 10.

  15. Changes in brain volume and cognition in a randomized trial of exercise and social interaction in a community-based sample of non-demented Chinese elders.

    PubMed

    Mortimer, James A; Ding, Ding; Borenstein, Amy R; DeCarli, Charles; Guo, Qihao; Wu, Yougui; Zhao, Qianhua; Chu, Shugang

    2012-01-01

    Physical exercise has been shown to increase brain volume and improve cognition in randomized trials of non-demented elderly. Although greater social engagement was found to reduce dementia risk in observational studies, randomized trials of social interventions have not been reported. A representative sample of 120 elderly from Shanghai, China was randomized to four groups (Tai Chi, Walking, Social Interaction, No Intervention) for 40 weeks. Two MRIs were obtained, one before the intervention period, the other after. A neuropsychological battery was administered at baseline, 20 weeks, and 40 weeks. Comparison of changes in brain volumes in intervention groups with the No Intervention group were assessed by t-tests. Time-intervention group interactions for neuropsychological measures were evaluated with repeated-measures mixed models. Compared to the No Intervention group, significant increases in brain volume were seen in the Tai Chi and Social Intervention groups (p < 0.05). Improvements also were observed in several neuropsychological measures in the Tai Chi group, including the Mattis Dementia Rating Scale score (p = 0.004), the Trailmaking Test A (p = 0.002) and B (p = 0.0002), the Auditory Verbal Learning Test (p = 0.009), and verbal fluency for animals (p = 0.01). The Social Interaction group showed improvement on some, but fewer neuropsychological indices. No differences were observed between the Walking and No Intervention groups. The findings differ from previous clinical trials in showing increases in brain volume and improvements in cognition with a largely non-aerobic exercise (Tai Chi). In addition, intellectual stimulation through social interaction was associated with increases in brain volume as well as with some cognitive improvements.

  16. Fast interactive real-time volume rendering of real-time three-dimensional echocardiography: an implementation for low-end computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saracino, G.; Greenberg, N. L.; Shiota, T.; Corsi, C.; Lamberti, C.; Thomas, J. D.

    2002-01-01

    Real-time three-dimensional echocardiography (RT3DE) is an innovative cardiac imaging modality. However, partly due to lack of user-friendly software, RT3DE has not been widely accepted as a clinical tool. The object of this study was to develop and implement a fast and interactive volume renderer of RT3DE datasets designed for a clinical environment where speed and simplicity are not secondary to accuracy. Thirty-six patients (20 regurgitation, 8 normal, 8 cardiomyopathy) were imaged using RT3DE. Using our newly developed software, all 3D data sets were rendered in real-time throughout the cardiac cycle and assessment of cardiac function and pathology was performed for each case. The real-time interactive volume visualization system is user friendly and instantly provides consistent and reliable 3D images without expensive workstations or dedicated hardware. We believe that this novel tool can be used clinically for dynamic visualization of cardiac anatomy.

  17. Propulsion and airframe aerodynamic interactions of supersonic V/STOL configurations. Volume 2: Wind tunnel test force and moment data report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zilz, D. E.

    1985-01-01

    A wind tunnel model of a supersonic V/STOL fighter configuration has been tested to measure the aerodynamic interaction effects which can result from geometrically close-coupled propulsion system/airframe components. The approach was to configure the model to represent two different test techniques. One was a conventional test technique composed of two test modes. In the Flow-Through mode, absolute configuration aerodynamics are measured, including inlet/airframe interactions. In the Jet-Effects mode, incremental nozzle/airframe interactions are measured. The other test technique is a propulsion simulator approach, where a sub-scale, externally powered engine is mounted in the model. This allows proper measurement of inlet/airframe and nozzle/airframe interactions simultaneously. This is Volume 2 of 2: Wind Tunnel Test Force and Moment Data Report.

  18. Interactive 3D Analysis of Blood Vessel Trees and Collateral Vessel Volumes in Magnetic Resonance Angiograms in the Mouse Ischemic Hindlimb Model.

    PubMed

    Marks, Peter C; Preda, Marilena; Henderson, Terry; Liaw, Lucy; Lindner, Volkhard; Friesel, Robert E; Pinz, Ilka M

    2013-10-31

    The quantitative analysis of blood vessel volumes from magnetic resonance angiograms (MRA) or μCT images is difficult and time-consuming. This fact, when combined with a study that involves multiple scans of multiple subjects, can represent a significant portion of research time. In order to enhance analysis options and to provide an automated and fast analysis method, we developed a software plugin for the ImageJ and Fiji image processing frameworks that enables the quick and reproducible volume quantification of blood vessel segments. The novel plugin named Volume Calculator (VolCal), accepts any binary (thresholded) image and produces a three-dimensional schematic representation of the vasculature that can be directly manipulated by the investigator. Using MRAs of the mouse hindlimb ischemia model, we demonstrate quick and reproducible blood vessel volume calculations with 95 - 98% accuracy. In clinical settings this software may enhance image interpretation and the speed of data analysis and thus enhance intervention decisions for example in peripheral vascular disease or aneurysms. In summary, we provide a novel, fast and interactive quantification of blood vessel volumes for single blood vessels or sets of vessel segments with particular focus on collateral formation after an ischemic insult. PMID:24563682

  19. SIGI: Field Test and Evaluation of a Computer-Based System of Interactive Guidance and Information. Volume I: Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Warren; And Others

    The computer-based System of Interactive Guidance and Information (SIGI) was field tested and evaluated at five community colleges and one university. Developed by Educational Testing Service, SIGI assists students in the process of informed and rational career decision making. Interacting at a cathode-ray tube terminal with a computer, students…

  20. Modeling Aeolian Transport of Contaminated Sediments at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Technical Area 54, Area G: Sensitivities to Succession, Disturbance, and Future Climate

    SciTech Connect

    Whicker, Jeffrey J.; Kirchner, Thomas B.; Breshears, David D.; Field, Jason P.

    2012-03-27

    The Technical Area 54 (TA-54) Area G disposal facility is used for the disposal of radioactive waste at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 435.1 (DOE, 2001) requires that radioactive waste be managed in a manner that protects public health and safety and the environment. In compliance with that requirement, DOE field sites must prepare and maintain site-specific radiological performance assessments for facilities that receive waste after September 26, 1988. Sites are also required to conduct composite analyses for facilities that receive waste after this date; these analyses account for the cumulative impacts of all waste that has been (and will be) disposed of at the facilities and other sources of radioactive material that may interact with these facilities. LANL issued Revision 4 of the Area G performance assessment and composite analysis in 2008. In support of those analyses, vertical and horizontal sediment flux data were collected at two analog sites, each with different dominant vegetation characteristics, and used to estimate rates of vertical resuspension and wind erosion for Area G. The results of that investigation indicated that there was no net loss of soil at the disposal site due to wind erosion, and suggested minimal impacts of wind on the long-term performance of the facility. However, that study did not evaluate the potential for contaminant transport caused by the horizontal movement of soil particles over long time frames. Since that time, additional field data have been collected to estimate wind threshold velocities for initiating sediment transport due to saltation and rates of sediment transport once those thresholds are reached. Data such as these have been used in the development of the Vegetation Modified Transport (VMTran) model. This model is designed to estimate patterns and long-term rates of contaminant redistribution caused by winds at the site, taking into account the impacts of plant

  1. Quantification of the effects of volume conduction on the EEG/MEG connectivity estimates: an index of sensitivity to brain interactions.

    PubMed

    Khadem, Ali; Hossein-Zadeh, Gholam-Ali

    2014-10-01

    In the context of EEG/MEG, the term 'volume conduction (VC) effects' refers to the recording of an instantaneous linear mixture of multiple brain source activities by each EEG/MEG channel. VC effects may lead to the detection of spurious functional/effective couplings among EEG/MEG channels that are not caused by brain interactions. It is of importance to determine which detected couplings are indicators of brain interactions and which originate from the VC artefacts. In this paper, a quantitative framework is proposed to explore the origin of detected channel couplings by using two types of surrogate datasets. Also, a sensitivity index (called SI) is proposed to compare the power of different connectivity measures to discriminate between the brain interactions and the instantaneous linear mixing effects. We use seven different functional connectivity estimators to evaluate our method on simulation models and resting state EEG data. The error rate of the proposed framework for simulation data by using each of the connectivity estimators is less than 5.2%. Also, SI ranks these connectivity estimators according to their sensitivity to brain interactions in the presence of VC artefacts. As expected, the connectivity measures which are theoretically robust to VC artefacts yield high SI in simulation models and EEG data. In addition, for EEG data in the alpha frequency band the reproducible functional couplings which are indicators of brain interactions are in the back-front directions. This is consistent with the previous studies in this field.

  2. Gas-Grain Simulation Facility: Fundamental studies of particle formation and interactions. Volume 1: Executive summary and overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fogleman, Guy (Editor); Huntington, Judith L. (Editor); Schwartz, Deborah E. (Editor); Fonda, Mark L. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    An overview of the Gas-Grain Simulation Facility (GGSF) project and its current status is provided. The proceedings of the Gas-Grain Simulation Facility Experiments Workshop are recorded. The goal of the workshop was to define experiments for the GGSF--a small particle microgravity research facility. The workshop addressed the opportunity for performing, in Earth orbit, a wide variety of experiments that involve single small particles (grains) or clouds of particles. The first volume includes the executive summary, overview, scientific justification, history, and planned development of the Facility.

  3. Volume filling factors of the ISM phases in star forming galaxies. I. The role of the disk-halo interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Avillez, M. A.; Breitschwerdt, D.

    2004-10-01

    The role of matter circulation between the disk and halo in establishing the volume filling factors of the different ISM phases in the Galactic disk (|z|≤ 250 pc) is investigated, using a modified version of the three-dimensional supernova-driven ISM model of Avillez (\\cite{Avillez00}). We carried out adaptive mesh refinement simulations of the ISM with five supernova rates (in units of the Galactic value), σ/σGal=1, 2, 4, 8 and 16 (corresponding to starburst conditions) using three finer level resolutions of 2.5, 1.25 and 0.625 pc, allowing us to understand how resolution would affect the volumes of gas phases in pressure equilibrium. We find that the volume filling factors of the different ISM phases depend sensitively on the existence of a duty cycle between the disk and halo acting as a pressure release valve for the hot (T> 105.5 K) phase in the disk. The amount of cold gas (defined as the gas with T<103 K) picked up in the simulations varies from a value of 19% for σ/σGal=1 to ˜ 5% for σ/σGal =4 and ≤ 1% for higher SN rates. Background heating prevents the cold gas from immediate collapse and thus ensures the stability of the cold gas phase. The mean occupation fraction of the hot phase varies from about 17% for the Galactic SN rate to ˜ 28%, for σ/σGal=4, and to 44% for σ/σGal=16. Overall the filling factor of the hot gas does not increase much as we move towards higher SN rates, following a power law of < fv, hot> ∝ (σ/σGal)0.363. Such a modest dependence on the SN rate is a consequence of the evacuation of the hot phase into the halo through the duty cycle. This leads to volume filling factors of the hot phase considerably smaller than those predicted in the three-phase model of McKee & Ostriker (\\cite{McKee77}) even in the absence of magnetic fields.

  4. Is the manifestation of the local dynamics in the spin-lattice NMR relaxation in dendrimers sensitive to excluded volume interactions?

    PubMed

    Shavykin, Oleg V; Neelov, Igor M; Darinskii, Anatolii A

    2016-09-21

    The effect of excluded volume (EV) interactions on the manifestation of the local dynamics in the spin-lattice NMR relaxation in dendrimers has been studied by using Brownian dynamics simulations. The study was motivated by the theory developed by Markelov et al., [J. Chem. Phys., 2014, 140, 244904] for a Gaussian dendrimer model without EV interactions. The theory connects the experimentally observed dependence of the spin-lattice relaxation rate 1/T(1)H on the location of NMR active groups with the restricted flexibility (semiflexibility) of dendrimers. Semiflexibility was introduced through the correlations between the orientations of different segments. However, these correlations exist even in flexible dendrimer models with EV interactions. We have simulated coarse-grained flexible and semiflexible dendrimer models with and without EV interactions. Every dendrimer segment consisted of two rigid bonds. Semiflexibility was introduced through a potential which restricts the fluctuations of angles between neighboring bonds but does not change orientational correlations in the EV model as compared to the flexible case. The frequency dependence of the reduced 1/T(1)H(ωH) for segments and bonds belonging to different dendrimer shells was calculated. It was shown that the main effect of EV interactions consists of a much stronger contribution of the overall dendrimer rotation to the dynamics of dendrimer segments as compared to phantom models. After the exclusion of this contribution the manifestation of internal dynamics in spin-lattice NMR relaxation appears to be practically insensitive to EV interactions. For the flexible models, the position ωmax of the peak of the modified 1/T(1)H(ωH) does not depend on the shell number. For semiflexible models, the maximum of 1/T(1)H(ωH) for internal segments or bonds shifts to lower frequencies as compared to outer ones. The dependence of ωmax on the number of dendrimer shells appears to be universal for segments and

  5. Flow structure generated by perpendicular blade-vortex interaction and implications for helicopter noise prediction. Volume 1: Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wittmer, Kenneth S.; Devenport, William J.

    1996-01-01

    The perpendicular interaction of a streamwise vortex with an infinite span helicopter blade was modeled experimentally in incompressible flow. Three-component velocity and turbulence measurements were made using a sub-miniature four sensor hot-wire probe. Vortex core parameters (radius, peak tangential velocity, circulation, and centerline axial velocity deficit) were determined as functions of blade-vortex separation, streamwise position, blade angle of attack, vortex strength, and vortex size. The downstream development of the flow shows that the interaction of the vortex with the blade wake is the primary cause of the changes in the core parameters. The blade sheds negative vorticity into its wake as a result of the induced angle of attack generated by the passing vortex. Instability in the vortex core due to its interaction with this negative vorticity region appears to be the catalyst for the magnification of the size and intensity of the turbulent flowfield downstream of the interaction. In general, the core radius increases while peak tangential velocity decreases with the effect being greater for smaller separations. These effects are largely independent of blade angle of attack; and if these parameters are normalized on their undisturbed values, then the effects of the vortex strength appear much weaker. Two theoretical models were developed to aid in extending the results to other flow conditions. An empirical model was developed for core parameter prediction which has some rudimentary physical basis, implying usefulness beyond a simple curve fit. An inviscid flow model was also created to estimate the vorticity shed by the interaction blade, and to predict the early stages of its incorporation into the interacting vortex.

  6. Gas-Grain Simulation Facility: Fundamental studies of particle formation and interactions. Volume 2: Abstracts, candidate experiments and feasibility study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fogleman, Guy (Editor); Huntington, Judith L. (Editor); Schwartz, Deborah E. (Editor); Fonda, Mark L. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    An overview of the Gas-Grain Simulation Facility (GGSF) project and its current status is provided. The proceedings of the Gas-Grain Simulation Facility Experiments Workshop are recorded. The goal of the workshop was to define experiments for the GGSF--a small particle microgravity research facility. The workshop addressed the opportunity for performing, in Earth orbit, a wide variety of experiments that involve single small particles (grains) or clouds of particles. Twenty experiments from the fields of exobiology, planetary science, astrophysics, atmospheric science, biology, physics, and chemistry were described at the workshop and are outlined in Volume 2. Each experiment description included specific scientific objectives, an outline of the experimental procedure, and the anticipated GGSF performance requirements. Since these experiments represent the types of studies that will ultimately be proposed for the facility, they will be used to define the general science requirements of the GGSF. Also included in the second volume is a physics feasibility study and abstracts of example Gas-Grain Simulation Facility experiments and related experiments in progress.

  7. Effect of Alzheimer's Disease Risk Variant rs3824968 at SORL1 on Regional Gray Matter Volume and Age-Related Interaction in Adult Lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chu-Chung; Liu, Mu-En; Kao, Hung-Wen; Chou, Kun-Hsien; Yang, Albert C.; Wang, Ying-Hsiu; Chen, Tong-Ru; Tsai, Shih-Jen; Lin, Ching-Po

    2016-01-01

    Sortilin receptor 1 (SORL1) is involved in cellular trafficking of amyloid precursor protein and plays an essential role in amyloid-beta peptide generation in Alzheimer disease (AD). The major A allele in a SORL1 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), rs3824968, is associated with an increased AD risk. However, the role of SORL1 rs3824968 in the normal ageing process has rarely been examined in relation to brain structural morphology. This study investigated the association between SORL1 rs3824968 and grey matter (GM) volume in a nondemented Chinese population of 318 adults within a wide age range (21–92 years). Through voxel-based morphometry, we found that participants carrying SORL1 allele A exhibited significantly smaller GM volumes in the right posterior cingulate, left middle occipital, medial frontal, and superior temporal gyri. Considerable interaction between age and SORL1 suggested a detrimental and accelerated ageing effect of allele A on putamen. These findings provide evidence that SORL1 rs3824968 modulates regional GM volume and is associated with brain trajectory during the adult lifespan. PMID:26996954

  8. LOCA hydroloads calculations with multidimensional nonlinear fluid/structure interaction. Volume 3. Fluid/structure interaction studies using 3-D STEALTH/WHAMSE. Final report. [PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Santee, G.E. Jr.; Chang, F.H.; Mortensen, G.A.; Brockett, G.F.; Gross, M.B.; Belytschko, T.B.

    1982-11-01

    This report, the third in a series of reports for RP-1065, describes the final step in the stepwise approach for developing the three-dimensional, nonlinear, fluid-structure interaction methodology to assess the hydroloads on a large PWR during the subcooled portions of a hypothetical LOCA. The final step in the methodology implements enhancements and special modifications to the STEALTH 3D computer program and the WHAMSE 3D computer program. After describing the enhancements, the individual and the coupled computer programs are assessed by comparing calculational results with either analytical solutions or with experimental data. The coupled 3D STEALTH/WHAMSE computer program is then applied to the simulation of HDR Test V31.1 to further assess the program and to investigate the role that fluid-structure interaction plays in the hydrodynamic loading of reactor internals during subcooled blowdown.

  9. Self-consistent field theory of tethered polymers: One dimensional, three dimensional, strong stretching theories and the effects of excluded-volume-only interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Suo, Tongchuan Whitmore, Mark D.

    2014-11-28

    We examine end-tethered polymers in good solvents, using one- and three-dimensional self-consistent field theory, and strong stretching theories. We also discuss different tethering scenarios, namely, mobile tethers, fixed but random ones, and fixed but ordered ones, and the effects and important limitations of including only binary interactions (excluded volume terms). We find that there is a “mushroom” regime in which the layer thickness is independent of the tethering density, σ, for systems with ordered tethers, but we argue that there is no such plateau for mobile or disordered anchors, nor is there one in the 1D theory. In the other limit of brushes, all approaches predict that the layer thickness scales linearly with N. However, the σ{sup 1/3} scaling is a result of keeping only excluded volume interactions: when the full potential is included, the dependence is faster and more complicated than σ{sup 1/3}. In fact, there does not appear to be any regime in which the layer thickness scales in the combination Nσ{sup 1/3}. We also compare the results for two different solvents with each other, and with earlier Θ solvent results.

  10. An interaction of a NR3C1 polymorphism and antenatal solar activity impacts both hippocampus volume and neuroticism in adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Montag, Christian; Eichner, Markus; Markett, Sebastian; Quesada, Carlos M.; Schoene-Bake, Jan-Christoph; Melchers, Martin; Plieger, Thomas; Weber, Bernd; Reuter, Martin

    2013-01-01

    The investigation of the interaction of genes and environment in the context of mental health and personality yields important new insights for a better understanding of human nature. Both antenatal and postnatal environmental factors have been considered as potential modulators of genetic activity. Antenatally, especially smoking or alcohol drinking habits of the mother dramatically influence the health of the child during pregnancy and even later on in life. In the present study we would like to introduce a more “distant” factor that is not under the control of the becoming mother but that nevertheless plays a potential role for the health of the unborn child later on in adulthood. Here, we retrospectively investigate the influence of solar activity (while the child is still in the uterus of the becoming mother) on brain structure (with a focus on hippocampus and amygdala volume) and personality in adulthood. We observe an interaction of a genetic variant (rs41423247) of the glucocorticoid receptor gene (NR3C1) and solar activity in the first trimester after conception on both hippocampal volume and the personality trait neuroticism in adulthood in N = 254 participants. The NR3C1 gene is the focus of interest, because of its influence on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and negative emotionality. Carriers of the CC variant of rs41423247 grown in the womb under the influence of high sun radiation (high solar activity) show both the highest hippocampal volume in the left hemisphere and lowest neuroticism scores. The present findings should encourage researchers in psychology and psychiatry to include also environmental influences such as solar activity besides genetics to better understand the etiogenesis of psychiatric disorders. PMID:23761749

  11. Volume nanograting formation in laser-silica interaction as a result of the 1D plasma-resonance ionization instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gildenburg, V. B.; Pavlichenko, I. A.

    2016-08-01

    The initial stage of the small-scale ionization-induced instability developing inside the fused silica volume exposed to the femtosecond laser pulse is studied as a possible initial cause of the self-organized nanograting formation. We have calculated the spatial spectra of the instability with the electron-hole diffusion taken into account for the first time and have found that it results in the formation of some hybrid (diffusion-wave) 1D structure with the spatial period determined as the geometrical mean of the laser wavelength and characteristic diffusion length of the process considered. Near the threshold of the instability, this period occurs to be approximately equal to the laser half-wavelength in the silica, close to the one experimentally observed.

  12. Evaluation of reduced sediment volume procedures for acute toxicity tests using the estuarine amphipod Leptocheirus plumulosus.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Jacob K; Kennedy, Alan J; Farrar, J Daniel; Mount, David R; Steevens, Jeffery A

    2010-12-01

    The volume of sediment required to perform a sediment toxicity bioassay is a major driver of the overall cost associated with that bioassay. Sediment volume affects bioassay cost because of sediment collection, transportation, storage, and disposal costs as well as labor costs associated with organism recovery at the conclusion of the exposure. The objective of the current study was to evaluate reduced sediment volume versions of the standard U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) 10-d acute Leptocheirus plumulosus method that uses a beaker size of 1,000 ml and 20 organisms. The test design used evaluated the effects of beaker size (250 and 100 ml) and associated sediment volume (75 and 30 ml, respectively) as well as organism loading density (10 and 20 organisms) on test endpoint responsiveness relative to the standard 10-d test method. These comparisons were completed with three different types of contaminated sediments: a field-collected polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-contaminated sediment, a lead-spiked control sediment, and a control sediment spiked with mineral oil. Assessment criteria included test endpoint sensitivity, endpoint consistency, statistical power, water quality, and logistical assessments. Results indicate that the current U.S. EPA method is preferable to the reduced sediment volume methods we assessed, but that a 250-ml beaker/10 organism experimental design is of comparable utility and may be advantageous when reduced sediment volumes are desirable because of high contaminant (spiking studies) or sediment disposal costs. In addition, the results of the current study provide toxicity reference values for PAHs, lead, and an oil surrogate for petroleum hydrocarbons. PMID:20890914

  13. Wind turbine generator interaction with conventional diesel generators on Block Island, Rhode Island. Volume 2: Data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilreker, V. F.; Stiller, P. H.; Scott, G. W.; Kruse, V. J.; Smith, R. F.

    1984-01-01

    Assessing the performance of a MOD-OA horizontal axis wind turbine connected to an isolated diesel utility, a comprehensive data measurement program was conducted on the Block Island Power Company installation on Block Island, Rhode Island. The detailed results of that program focusing on three principal areas of (1) fuel displacement (savings), (2) dynamic interaction between the diesel utility and the wind turbine, (3) effects of three models of wind turbine reactive power control are presented. The approximate two month duration of the data acquisition program conducted in the winter months (February into April 1982) revealed performance during periods of highest wind energy penetration and hence severity of operation. Even under such conditions fuel savings were significant resulting in a fuel reduction of 6.7% while the MOD-OA was generating 10.7% of the total electrical energy. Also, electrical disturbance and interactive effects were of an acceptable level.

  14. A cut-cell finite volume - finite element coupling approach for fluid-structure interaction in compressible flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasquariello, Vito; Hammerl, Georg; Örley, Felix; Hickel, Stefan; Danowski, Caroline; Popp, Alexander; Wall, Wolfgang A.; Adams, Nikolaus A.

    2016-02-01

    We present a loosely coupled approach for the solution of fluid-structure interaction problems between a compressible flow and a deformable structure. The method is based on staggered Dirichlet-Neumann partitioning. The interface motion in the Eulerian frame is accounted for by a conservative cut-cell Immersed Boundary method. The present approach enables sub-cell resolution by considering individual cut-elements within a single fluid cell, which guarantees an accurate representation of the time-varying solid interface. The cut-cell procedure inevitably leads to non-matching interfaces, demanding for a special treatment. A Mortar method is chosen in order to obtain a conservative and consistent load transfer. We validate our method by investigating two-dimensional test cases comprising a shock-loaded rigid cylinder and a deformable panel. Moreover, the aeroelastic instability of a thin plate structure is studied with a focus on the prediction of flutter onset. Finally, we propose a three-dimensional fluid-structure interaction test case of a flexible inflated thin shell interacting with a shock wave involving large and complex structural deformations.

  15. Making intelligent systems team players: Case studies and design issues. Volume 1: Human-computer interaction design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malin, Jane T.; Schreckenghost, Debra L.; Woods, David D.; Potter, Scott S.; Johannesen, Leila; Holloway, Matthew; Forbus, Kenneth D.

    1991-01-01

    Initial results are reported from a multi-year, interdisciplinary effort to provide guidance and assistance for designers of intelligent systems and their user interfaces. The objective is to achieve more effective human-computer interaction (HCI) for systems with real time fault management capabilities. Intelligent fault management systems within the NASA were evaluated for insight into the design of systems with complex HCI. Preliminary results include: (1) a description of real time fault management in aerospace domains; (2) recommendations and examples for improving intelligent systems design and user interface design; (3) identification of issues requiring further research; and (4) recommendations for a development methodology integrating HCI design into intelligent system design.

  16. Wind turbine generator interaction with conventional diesel generators on Block Island, Rhode Island. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilreker, V. F.; Stiller, P. H.; Scott, G. W.; Kruse, V. J.; Smith, R. F.

    1984-01-01

    Primary results are summarized for a three-part study involving the effects of connecting a MOD-OA wind turbine generator to an isolated diesel power system. The MOD-OA installation considered was the third of four experimental nominal 200 kW wind turbines connected to various utilities under the Federal Wind Energy Program and was characterized by the highest wind energy penetration levels of four sites. The study analyses address: fuel displacement, dynamic interaction, and three modes of reactive power control. These analyses all have as their basis the results of the data acquisition program conducted on Block Island, Rhode Island.

  17. Experimental study of main rotor tip geometry and tail rotor interactions in hover. Volume 2: Run log and tabulated data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balch, D. T.; Lombardi, J.

    1985-01-01

    A model scale hover test was conducted in the Sikorsky Aircraft Model Rotor hover Facility to identify and quantify the impact of the tail rotor on the demonstrated advantages of advanced geometry tip configurations. The existence of mutual interference between hovering main rotor and a tail rotor was acknowledged in the test. The test was conducted using the Basic Model Test Rig and two scaled main rotor systems, one representing a 1/5.727 scale UH-60A BLACK HAWK and the others a 1/4.71 scale S-76. Eight alternate rotor tip configurations were tested, 3 on the BLACK HAWK rotor and 6 on the S-76 rotor. Four of these tips were then selected for testing in close proximity to an operating tail rotor (operating in both tractor and pusher modes) to determine if the performance advantages that could be obtained from the use of advanced geometry tips in a main rotor only environment would still exist in the more complex flow field involving a tail rotor. This volume contains the test run log and tabulated data.

  18. User's manual for rocket combustor interactive design (ROCCID) and analysis computer program. Volume 2: Appendixes A-K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muss, J. A.; Nguyen, T. V.; Johnson, C. W.

    1991-01-01

    The appendices A-K to the user's manual for the rocket combustor interactive design (ROCCID) computer program are presented. This includes installation instructions, flow charts, subroutine model documentation, and sample output files. The ROCCID program, written in Fortran 77, provides a standardized methodology using state of the art codes and procedures for the analysis of a liquid rocket engine combustor's steady state combustion performance and combustion stability. The ROCCID is currently capable of analyzing mixed element injector patterns containing impinging like doublet or unlike triplet, showerhead, shear coaxial and swirl coaxial elements as long as only one element type exists in each injector core, baffle, or barrier zone. Real propellant properties of oxygen, hydrogen, methane, propane, and RP-1 are included in ROCCID. The properties of other propellants can be easily added. The analysis models in ROCCID can account for the influences of acoustic cavities, helmholtz resonators, and radial thrust chamber baffles on combustion stability. ROCCID also contains the logic to interactively create a combustor design which meets input performance and stability goals. A preliminary design results from the application of historical correlations to the input design requirements. The steady state performance and combustion stability of this design is evaluated using the analysis models, and ROCCID guides the user as to the design changes required to satisfy the user's performance and stability goals, including the design of stability aids. Output from ROCCID includes a formatted input file for the standardized JANNAF engine performance prediction procedure.

  19. Direct Numerical Simulation of Acoustic Waves Interacting with a Shock Wave in a Quasi-1D Convergent-Divergent Nozzle Using an Unstructured Finite Volume Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bui, Trong T.; Mankbadi, Reda R.

    1995-01-01

    Numerical simulation of a very small amplitude acoustic wave interacting with a shock wave in a quasi-1D convergent-divergent nozzle is performed using an unstructured finite volume algorithm with a piece-wise linear, least square reconstruction, Roe flux difference splitting, and second-order MacCormack time marching. First, the spatial accuracy of the algorithm is evaluated for steady flows with and without the normal shock by running the simulation with a sequence of successively finer meshes. Then the accuracy of the Roe flux difference splitting near the sonic transition point is examined for different reconstruction schemes. Finally, the unsteady numerical solutions with the acoustic perturbation are presented and compared with linear theory results.

  20. Is the manifestation of the local dynamics in the spin-lattice NMR relaxation in dendrimers sensitive to excluded volume interactions?

    PubMed

    Shavykin, Oleg V; Neelov, Igor M; Darinskii, Anatolii A

    2016-09-21

    The effect of excluded volume (EV) interactions on the manifestation of the local dynamics in the spin-lattice NMR relaxation in dendrimers has been studied by using Brownian dynamics simulations. The study was motivated by the theory developed by Markelov et al., [J. Chem. Phys., 2014, 140, 244904] for a Gaussian dendrimer model without EV interactions. The theory connects the experimentally observed dependence of the spin-lattice relaxation rate 1/T(1)H on the location of NMR active groups with the restricted flexibility (semiflexibility) of dendrimers. Semiflexibility was introduced through the correlations between the orientations of different segments. However, these correlations exist even in flexible dendrimer models with EV interactions. We have simulated coarse-grained flexible and semiflexible dendrimer models with and without EV interactions. Every dendrimer segment consisted of two rigid bonds. Semiflexibility was introduced through a potential which restricts the fluctuations of angles between neighboring bonds but does not change orientational correlations in the EV model as compared to the flexible case. The frequency dependence of the reduced 1/T(1)H(ωH) for segments and bonds belonging to different dendrimer shells was calculated. It was shown that the main effect of EV interactions consists of a much stronger contribution of the overall dendrimer rotation to the dynamics of dendrimer segments as compared to phantom models. After the exclusion of this contribution the manifestation of internal dynamics in spin-lattice NMR relaxation appears to be practically insensitive to EV interactions. For the flexible models, the position ωmax of the peak of the modified 1/T(1)H(ωH) does not depend on the shell number. For semiflexible models, the maximum of 1/T(1)H(ωH) for internal segments or bonds shifts to lower frequencies as compared to outer ones. The dependence of ωmax on the number of dendrimer shells appears to be universal for segments and

  1. STEALTH: a Lagrange explicit finite-difference code for solid, structural, and thermohydraulic analysis. Volume 8B. STEALTH/WHAMSE: a 3-D fluid-structure interaction code

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-10-01

    STEALTH is a family of computer codes that can be used to calculate a variety of physical processes in which the dynamic behavior of a continuum is involved. The version of STEALTH described in this volume is designed for calculations of fluid-structure interaction. This version of the program consists of a hydrodynamic version of STEALTH which has been coupled to a finite-element code, WHAMSE. STEALTH computes the transient response of the fluid continuum, while WHAMSE computes the transient response of shell and beam structures under external fluid loadings. The coupling between STEALTH and WHAMSE is performed during each cycle or step of a calculation. Separate calculations of fluid response and structure response are avoided, thereby giving a more accurate model of the dynamic coupling between fluid and structure. This volume provides the theoretical background, the finite-difference equations, the finite-element equations, a discussion of several sample problems, a listing of the input decks for the sample problems, a programmer's manual and a description of the input records for the STEALTH/WHAMSE computer program.

  2. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop: The Approach to Equilibrium in Strongly Interacting Matter. Volume 118

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, J.; Venugopalan, R.; Berges, J.; Blaizot, J. -P.; Gelis, F.

    2014-04-09

    The RIKEN BNL Research Center (RBRC) was established in April 1997 at Brookhaven National Laboratory*. It is funded by the ''Rikagaku Kenkyusho'' (RIKEN, The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research) of Japan and the U. S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science. The RBRC is dedicated to the study of strong interactions, including spin physics, lattice QCD, and RHIC physics through the nurturing of a new generation of young physicists. The RBRC has theory, lattice gauge computing and experimental components. It is presently exploring the possibility of an astrophysics component being added to the program. The purpose of this Workshop is to critically review the recent progress on the theory and phenomenology of early time dynamics in relativistic heavy ion collisions from RHIC to LHC energies, to examine the various approaches on thermalization and existing issues, and to formulate new research efforts for the future. Topics slated to be covered include Experimental evidence for equilibration/isotropization, comparison of various approaches, dependence on the initial conditions and couplings, and turbulent cascades and Bose-Einstein condensation.

  3. Raman Line Imaging of Poly(ε-caprolactone)/Carbon Dioxide Solutions at High Pressures: A Combined Experimental and Computational Study for Interpreting Intermolecular Interactions and Free-Volume Effects.

    PubMed

    Pastore Carbone, Maria Giovanna; Musto, Pellegrino; Pannico, Marianna; Braeuer, Andreas; Scherillo, Giuseppe; Mensitieri, Giuseppe; Di Maio, Ernesto

    2016-09-01

    In the present study, a Raman line-imaging setup was employed to monitor in situ the CO2 sorption at elevated pressures (from 0.62 to 7.10 MPa) in molten PCL. The method allowed the quantitative measurement of gas concentration in both the time-resolved and the space-resolved modes. The combined experimental and theoretical approach allowed a molecular level characterization of the system. The dissolved CO2 was found to occupy a volume essentially coincident with its van der Waals volume and the estimated partial molar volume of the probe did not change with pressure. Lewis acid-Lewis base interactions with the PCL carbonyls was confirmed to be the main interaction mechanism. The geometry of the supramolecular complex and the preferential interaction site were controlled more by steric than electronic effects. On the basis of the indications emerging from Raman spectroscopy, an equation of state thermodynamic model for the PCL-CO2 system, based upon a compressible lattice fluid theory endowed with specific interactions, has been tailored to account for the interaction types detected spectroscopically. The predictions of the thermodynamic model in terms of molar volume of solution have been compared with available volumetric measurements while predictions for CO2 partial molar volume have been compared with the values estimated on the basis of Raman spectroscopy. PMID:27454947

  4. Coupled 2-dimensional cascade theory for noise and unsteady aerodynamics of blade row interaction in turbofans. Volume 1: Theory development and parametric studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, Donald B.

    1994-01-01

    Typical analytical models for interaction between rotor and stator in a turbofan analyze the effect of wakes from the rotor impinging on the stator, producing unsteady loading, and thereby generating noise. Reflection/transmission characteristics of the rotor are sometimes added in a separate calculation. In those models, there is a one-to-one relationship between wake harmonics and noise harmonics; that is, the BPF (blade passing frequency) wake harmonic causes only the BPF noise harmonic, etc. This report presents a more complete model in which flow tangency boundary conditions are satisfied on two cascades in relative motion for several harmonics simultaneously. By an extension of S.N. Smith's code for two dimensional flat plate cascades, the noise generation/frequency scattering/blade row reflection problem is solved in a single matrix inversion. It is found that the BPF harmonic excitation of the stator scatters considerable energy in the higher BPF harmonics due to relative motion between the blade rows. Furthermore, when swirl between the rotor and stator is modeled, a 'mode trapping' effect occurs which explains observations on fans operating at rotational speeds below BFP cuton: the BPF mode amplifies between blade rows by multiple reflections but cannot escape to the inlet and exit ducts. However, energy scattered into higher harmonics does propagate and dominates the spectrum at two and three times BPF. This report presents the complete derivation of the theory, comparison with a previous (more limited) coupled rotor/stator interaction theory due to Kaji and Okazaki, exploration of the mode trapping phenomenon, and parametric studies showing the effects of vane/blade ratio and rotor/stator interaction. For generality, the analysis applies to stages where the rotor is either upstream or downstream of the stator and to counter rotation stages. The theory has been coded in a FORTRAN program called CUP2D, documented in Volume 2 of this report. It is

  5. In vivo multispectral photoacoustic and photothermal flow cytometry with multicolor dyes: a potential for real-time assessment of circulation, dye-cell interaction, and blood volume

    PubMed Central

    Proskurnin, Mikhail A.; Zhidkova, Tatyana V.; Volkov, Dmitry S.; Sarimollaoglu, Mustafa; Galanzha, Ekaterina I.; Mock, Donald; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2011-01-01

    Recently, photoacoustic (PA) flow cytometry (PAFC) has been developed for in vivo detection of circulating tumor cells and bacteria targeted by nanoparticles. Here, we propose multispectral PAFC with multiple dyes having distinctive absorption spectra as multicolor PA contrast agents. As a first step of our proof-of-concept, we characterized high-speed PAFC capability to monitor the clearance of three dyes (ICG, MB, and TB) in an animal model in vivo and in real time. We observed strong dynamic PA signal fluctuations, which can be associated with interactions of dyes with circulating blood cells and plasma proteins. PAFC demonstrated enumeration of circulating red and white blood cells labeled with ICG and MB, respectively, and detection of rare dead cells uptaking TB directly in bloodstream. The possibility for accurate measurements of various dye concentrations including CV and BG were verified in vitro using complementary to PAFC photothermal (PT) technique and spectrophotometry under batch and flow conditions. We further analyze the potential of integrated PAFC/PT spectroscopy with multiple dyes for rapid and accurate measurements of circulating blood volume without a priori information on hemoglobin content, which is impossible with existing optical techniques. This is important in many medical conditions including surgery and trauma with extensive blood loss, rapid fluid administration, transfusion of red blood cells. The potential for developing a robust clinical PAFC prototype that is, safe for human, and its applications for studying the liver function are further highlighted. PMID:21905207

  6. Projection models for health-effects assessment in populations exposed to radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants. Volume III. SPAHR interactive package guide

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, J.J.

    1982-09-01

    The Simulation Package for the Analysis of Health Risk (SPAHR) is a computer software package based upon a demographic model for health risk projectons. The model extends several health risk projection models by making realistic assumptions about the population at risk, adn thus represents a distinct improvement over previous models. Complete documentation for use of SPAHR is contained in this five-volume publication. The demographic model in SPAHR estimates population response to environmental toxic exposures. Latency of response, changing dose level over time, competing risks from other causes of death, and population structure can be incorporated into SPAHR to project health risks. Risks are measured by morbid years, number of deaths, and loss of life expectancy. Comparisons of estimates of excess deaths demonstrate that previous health risk projection models may have underestimated excess deaths by a factor of from 2 to 10, depending on the pollutant and the exposure scenario. The software supporting the use of the demographic model is designed to be user oriented. Complex risk projections are made by responding to a series of prompts generated by the package. The flexibility and ease of use of SPAHR make it an important contribution to existing models and software packages. This manual outlines the use of the interactive capabilities of SPAHR. SPAHR is an integrated system of computer programs designed for simulating numerous health risk scenarios using the techniques of demographic modeling. This system of computer programs has been designed to be very flexible so as to allow the user to simulate a large variety of scenarios. It provides the user with an integrated package for projecting the impacts on human health of exposure to various hazards, particularly those resulting from the effluents related to energy production.

  7. The determination of acrylamide in environmental and drinking waters by large-volume injection - hydrophilic-interaction liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Backe, Will J; Yingling, Virginia; Johnson, Todd

    2014-03-21

    A simple and sensitive analytical method was developed to quantify levels of acrylamide in environmental and drinking waters. The analytical method consisted of solvent exchanging acrylamide from 2mL of water into 2mL of dichloromethane using acetonitrile as an intermediate. The sample was then directly analyzed by large-volume (750μL) injection - hydrophilic-interaction liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry. The method detection limit and reporting level were 2.4ng/L and 17ng/L of acrylamide, respectively. The recovery of acrylamide during solvent exchange was 95±2.8% and the matrix effects were 12±2.2% in river water. The use of atmospheric-pressure chemical ionization reduced matrix effects; however, it also reduced method sensitivity by a factor of 2.2 compared to electrospray ionization. Matrix effects were compensated for by the use of an isotopically-labeled internal standard and the method accuracy was 89±3.0% at 25ng/L of acrylamide and 102±2.6% at 250ng/L of acrylamide. The precision of the method was less than 6% relative standard deviation at both 25ng/L and 250ng/L of acrylamide. Samples from a sand-and-gravel mine and a drinking-water treatment plant were acquired to demonstrate the method. The concentrations of acrylamide at the sand-and-gravel mine were up to 280ng/L. In the drinking-water treatment plant, the concentration of acrylamide was approximately double in the finished drinking water when compared to other stages in the drinking-water treatment process. Disinfection or fluoridation may result in higher concentrations of acrylamide in finished drinking water; however, further research in this area is necessary. PMID:24582391

  8. The determination of acrylamide in environmental and drinking waters by large-volume injection - hydrophilic-interaction liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Backe, Will J; Yingling, Virginia; Johnson, Todd

    2014-03-21

    A simple and sensitive analytical method was developed to quantify levels of acrylamide in environmental and drinking waters. The analytical method consisted of solvent exchanging acrylamide from 2mL of water into 2mL of dichloromethane using acetonitrile as an intermediate. The sample was then directly analyzed by large-volume (750μL) injection - hydrophilic-interaction liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry. The method detection limit and reporting level were 2.4ng/L and 17ng/L of acrylamide, respectively. The recovery of acrylamide during solvent exchange was 95±2.8% and the matrix effects were 12±2.2% in river water. The use of atmospheric-pressure chemical ionization reduced matrix effects; however, it also reduced method sensitivity by a factor of 2.2 compared to electrospray ionization. Matrix effects were compensated for by the use of an isotopically-labeled internal standard and the method accuracy was 89±3.0% at 25ng/L of acrylamide and 102±2.6% at 250ng/L of acrylamide. The precision of the method was less than 6% relative standard deviation at both 25ng/L and 250ng/L of acrylamide. Samples from a sand-and-gravel mine and a drinking-water treatment plant were acquired to demonstrate the method. The concentrations of acrylamide at the sand-and-gravel mine were up to 280ng/L. In the drinking-water treatment plant, the concentration of acrylamide was approximately double in the finished drinking water when compared to other stages in the drinking-water treatment process. Disinfection or fluoridation may result in higher concentrations of acrylamide in finished drinking water; however, further research in this area is necessary.

  9. Volume rendering for neurosurgical planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noordmans, Herke J.; Rutten, G. J. M.; Willems, Peter W. A.; van Veelen, C. W. M.; van Rijen, P. C.; Viergever, Max A.

    2001-01-01

    A volume rendering library is presented to interactively analyze volume data from modalities like CT, MR, PET, SPECT< and fMRI for the planning of nuerosurgical procedures. Current applications are logging of Penfield procedures, fMRI visualization, blood vessel visualization and interactive localization of EEG electrodes implanted in the subdural space of a patient with epilepsy.

  10. Use of hydrocyclone and flotation column for reducing the volume of contaminated dredged material.

    PubMed

    Park, K H; Lee, J H; Bae, B H; Kim, Y H; Choung, Y K

    2006-01-01

    As sediment contamination problems have recently been raised in Korea, the need for technologies to clean contaminants in sediments has increased. Although the recalcitrant organic matters and heavy metals in the contaminated sediments are of primary concern, large amounts of sediment makes the removal of the contaminants in them more difficult. In this study, the performance of hydrocyclone and flotation column was tested to reduce the volume of contaminated dredged materials (CDMs) prior to treating recalcitrant matters, such as various organic chemicals and heavy metals, in an integrated treatment system. When hydrocyclone was operated with 10% (w/v) solids concentration of the feed slurry, the total solids of upflow products were 4 to 7% (w/v) when the inlet pressure was changed from 1.0 to 2.0 kg/cm2. The volume reduction ratio of CDMs by hydrocyclone was approximately 90% (v/v). When the upflow products in hydrocyclone was then spiked with automobile transmission oil and fed to the flotation colum to see the performance of the column flotation on the volume reduction and the TPH removal, 44% of the TPHs in feed were removed at the tails and the volume reduction ratio of CDMs by column flotation was 18% at 200 L/min of wash water. The flotation column could be proposed as a potential preliminary treatment process of CDMs prior to subsequent biological treatments.

  11. LOCA hydroloads calculations with multidimensional nonlinear fluid/structure interaction. Volume 2: STEALTH 2D/WHAMSE 2D single-phse fluid and elastic structure studies. Final report. [PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, F.H.; Santee, G.E. Jr.; Mortensen, G.A.; Brockett, G.F.; Gross, M.B.; Silling, S.A.; Belytschko, T.

    1981-03-01

    This report, the second in a series of reports for RP-1065, describes the second step in the stepwise approach for developing the three-dimensional, nonlinear, fluid/structure interaction methodology to assess the hydroloads on a large PWR during the subcooled portions of a hypothetical LOCA. The second step in the methodology considers enhancements and special modifications to the 2D STEALTH-HYDRO computer program and the 2D WHAMSE computer program. The 2D STEALTH-HYDRO enhancements consist of a fluid-fluid coupling control-volume model and an orifice control-volume model. The enhancements to 2D WHAMSE include elimination of the implicit integration routines, material models, and structural elements not required for the hydroloads application. In addition the logic for coupling the 2D STEALTH-HYDRO computer program to the 2D WHAMSE computer program is discussed.

  12. LOCA hydroloads calculations with multidimensional nonlinear fluid/structure interaction. Volume 1: STEALTH 1D single-phase fluid studies. Final report. [PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Santee, G.E. Jr.; Mortensen, G.A.; Caraher, D.L.

    1980-04-01

    This report, which is the first in a series of reports for RP-1065, describes the first step in the stepwise approach for developing the methodology to assess the hydroloads on a large PWR during the subcooled portions of a hypothetical LOCA. The first step in the methodology considers enhancements and special modifications to the 1D STEALTH computer code in order that acoustic phenomena in piping and vessel networks may be simulated. The resulting code is termed 1D STEALTH-HYDRO. The 1D STEALTH-HYDRO enhancements consist of three control volume models to simulate area changes, orifices, and tees in piping networks. The theory of the control volume models is described.

  13. Monitoring and Modelling of Soil-Plant Interactions: the Joint Use of ERT, Sap Flow and Eddy Covariance to Define the Volume of Orange Tree Active Root Zones.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassiani, G.; Boaga, J.; Vanella, D.; Perri, M. T.; Consoli, S.

    2014-12-01

    Mass and energy exchanges between soil, plants and atmosphere are key factors controlling a number of environmental processes involving hydrology, biota and climate. The understanding of these exchanges also play a critical role for practical purposes such as precision agriculture. In this contribution we present a methodology based on coupling innovative data collection and models. In particular we propose the use of hydro-geophysical monitoring via 4D Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) in conjunction with measurements of plant transpiration via sap flow and evapotranspiration from Eddy Correlation (EC). This abundance of data are to be fed in spatially distributed soil models in order to comprehend the distribution of active roots. We conducted experiments in an orange orchard in Eastern Sicily (Italy). We installed a 3D electrical tomography apparatus consisting of 4 instrumented micro boreholes placed at the corners of a square (about 1.3 m in side) surrounding an orange tree. During the monitoring, we collected repeated ERT and TDR soil moisture measurements, soil water sampling, sap flow measurements from the orange tree and EC data. Irrigation, precipitation, sap flow and ET data are available for a long period of time allowing knowledge of the long term forcing conditions on the system. This wealth of information was used to calibrate a 1D Richards' equation model representing the dynamics of the volume monitored via 3D ERT. Information on the soil hydraulic properties was collected from laboratory experiments as well as by time-lapse ERT monitoring of irrigation a few months after the main experiment, when the orange tree had been cut. The results of the calibrated modeling exercise allow the quantification of the soil volume interested by root water uptake. This volume is much smaller (an area less than 2 square meters, 40 cm thick) than generally believed and assumed in the design of classical drip irrigation schemes.

  14. DUMAND Summer Workshop, University of California, La Jolla, Calif., July 24-September 2, 1978, Proceedings. Volume 2 - UHE interactions, neutrino astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, A.

    1979-01-01

    The volume covers categories on inelastic neutrino scattering and the W-boson, and other ultra-high-energy processes, on pulsars, quasars and galactic nuclei, as well as other point sources and constants from gamma ray astronomy. Individual subjects include weak intermediate vector bosons and DUMAND, the Monte Carlo simulation of inelastic neutrino scattering in DUMAND, and Higgs boson production by very high-energy neutrinos. The observability of the neutrino flux from the inner region of the galactic disk, the diffuse fluxes of high-energy neutrinos, as well as the significance of gamma ray observations for neutrino astronomy are also among the topics covered.

  15. DNA damage caused by organic extracts of contaminated sediment, crude, and weathered oil and their fractions recovered up to 5 years after the 2007 Hebei Spirit oil spill off Korea.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Hae Jin; Lee, Hyo Jin; Hong, Seongjin; Khim, Jong Seong; Shim, Won Joon; Kim, Gi Beum

    2015-06-15

    We examined the degree of DNA damage caused by three fractions (F1, aliphatic hydrocarbons; F2, aromatic hydrocarbons; and F3, polar compounds) of the organic extract of sediments taken from Taean, Korea, following the Hebei Spirit oil spill. DNA damage was measured using the comet assay with blood cells of the striped beakfish (Oplegnathus fasciatus). DNA damage was also examined for fractions of crude oil (Iranian Heavy Crude Oil, IHC), weathered oil and six subfractions (F2.1-F2.6). The greatest DNA damage was found from the Sinduri dune region and DNA damage decreased to 40% weathered oil in F2 fraction compared with crude oil. The DNA damage of the sum of fractions was found higher than the organic extracts of sediments, suggesting antagonistic interactions between the genotoxic compounds. This study confirmed the persistence of potential genotoxicity in sediments of the severely affected regions as long as 5 years after the oil spill.

  16. Development of an Interactive Shoreline Management Tool for the Lower Wood River Valley, Oregon - Phase I: Stage-Volume and Stage-Area Relations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haluska, Tana L.; Snyder, Daniel T.

    2007-01-01

    This report presents the parcel and inundation area geographic information system (GIS) layers for various surface-water stages. It also presents data tables containing the water stage, inundation area, and water volume relations developed from analysis of detailed land surface elevation derived from Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data recently collected for the Wood River Valley at the northern margin of Agency Lake in Klamath County, Oregon. Former shoreline wetlands that have been cut off from Upper Klamath and Agency Lakes by dikes might in the future be reconnected to Upper Klamath and Agency Lakes by breaching the dikes. Issues of interest associated with restoring wetlands in this way include the area that will be inundated, the volume of water that may be stored, the change in wetland habitat, and the variation in these characteristics as surface-water stage is changed. Products from this analysis can assist water managers in assessing the effect of breaching dikes and changing surface-water stage. The study area is in the approximate former northern margins of Upper Klamath and Agency Lakes in the Wood River Valley.

  17. High-resolution x-ray imaging of Kα volume radiation induced by high-intensity laser pulse interaction with a copper target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galtier, E.; Moinard, A.; Khattak, F. Y.; Renner, O.; Robert, T.; Santos, J. J.; Beaucourt, C.; Angelo, P.; Tikhonchuk, V.; Rosmej, F. B.

    2012-10-01

    In a proof of principle experiment using the LULI 100-TW laser facility ELFIE, we have demonstrated high spectral and spatial resolution of Kα volume radiation induced by energetic electrons generated by irradiating solid Cu targets with visible (0.53 µm) 350 fs laser pulses. Employing an x-ray spectrometer equipped with the spherically bent crystal of quartz (502) and with an image plate, single shot Cu-Kα radiation was recorded in first-order reflection allowing for a geometrical mapping of the emission induced by hot electrons with a spatial resolution down to 30 µm. The simultaneously achieved high spectral resolution permitted the identification of asymmetries in the Kα1-group emission profile. Data from the shot in which a part of the laser beam was incident at grazing angle to the target surface show a signature of enhanced lateral transport of energetic electrons.

  18. Quantum volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabov, V. A.

    2015-08-01

    Quantum systems in a mechanical embedding, the breathing mode of a small particles, optomechanical system, etc. are far not the full list of examples in which the volume exhibits quantum behavior. Traditional consideration suggests strain in small systems as a result of a collective movement of particles, rather than the dynamics of the volume as an independent variable. The aim of this work is to show that some problem here might be essentially simplified by introducing periodic boundary conditions. At this case, the volume is considered as the independent dynamical variable driven by the internal pressure. For this purpose, the concept of quantum volume based on Schrödinger’s equation in 𝕋3 manifold is proposed. It is used to explore several 1D model systems: An ensemble of free particles under external pressure, quantum manometer and a quantum breathing mode. In particular, the influence of the pressure of free particle on quantum oscillator is determined. It is shown also that correction to the spectrum of the breathing mode due to internal degrees of freedom is determined by the off-diagonal matrix elements of the quantum stress. The new treatment not using the “force” theorem is proposed for the quantum stress tensor. In the general case of flexible quantum 3D dynamics, quantum deformations of different type might be introduced similarly to monopole mode.

  19. Comparison between finite volume and lattice-Boltzmann method simulations of gas-fluidised beds: bed expansion and particle-fluid interaction force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Third, J. R.; Chen, Y.; Müller, C. R.

    2016-07-01

    Lattice-Boltzmann method (LBM) simulations of a gas-fluidised bed have been performed. In contrast to the current state-of-the-art coupled computational fluid dynamics-discrete element method (CFD-DEM) simulations, the LBM does not require a closure relationship for the particle-fluid interaction force. Instead, the particle-fluid interaction can be calculated directly from the detailed flow profile around the particles. Here a comparison is performed between CFD-DEM and LBM simulations of a small fluidised bed. Simulations are performed for two different values of the superficial gas velocity and it is found that the LBM predicts a larger bed expansion for both flowrates. Furthermore the particle-fluid interaction force obtained for LBM simulations is compared to the force which would be predicted by a CFD-DEM model under the same conditions. On average the force predicted by the CFD-DEM closure relationship is found to be significantly smaller than the force obtained from the LBM.

  20. Exchange interactions and Curie temperatures in Cr-based alloys in the zinc blende structure: Volume- and composition-dependence from first-principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, S. K.; Kudrnovský, J.

    2010-02-01

    We present calculations of the exchange interactions and Curie temperatures in Cr-based pnictides and chalcogenides of the form CrX , with X=As , Sb, S, Se, and Te, and the mixed alloys CrAs50X50 , with X=Sb , S, Se, and Te. The calculations are performed for zinc blende structure for 12 values of the lattice parameter between 5.44 and 6.62Å , appropriate for some typical II-VI and III-V semiconducting substrates. Electronic structure is calculated via the linear muffin-tin-orbitals (LMTOs) method in the atomic sphere approximation (ASA) using empty spheres to optimize ASA-related errors. Whenever necessary, the results have been verified using the full-potential version of the method, FP-LMTO. The disorder effect in the As-sublattice for CrAs50X50 (X=Sb,S,Se,Te) alloys is taken into account via the coherent-potential approximation. Exchange interactions are calculated using the linear-response method for the ferromagnetic (FM) reference states of the alloys as well as the disordered local moments (DLM) states. These results are then used to estimate the Curie temperature from the low- and high-temperature sides of the ferromagnetic-paramagnetic transition. Estimates of the Curie temperature are provided based on the mean field and the more accurate random-phase approximations. Dominant antiferromagnetic exchange interactions for some low values of the lattice parameter for the FM reference states in CrS, CrSe, and CrTe prompted us to look for antiferromagnetic (AFM) configurations for these systems with energies lower than the corresponding FM and DLM values. Results for a limited number of such AFM calculations are discussed, identifying the AFM[111] state as a likely candidate for the ground state for these cases.

  1. Kauai endangered seabird study. Volume 1: Interactions of Dark-Rumped Petrels and Newell`s Shearwaters with utility structures on Kauai, Hawaii. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, B.A.; Day, R.H.

    1995-12-01

    Declining populations of two endangered species of seabirds on Kauai, Hawaii--the Dark-Rumped Petrel and Newell`s Shearwater--have been the emphasis of a three-year research program to determine the causes of bird mortality and fallout and to recommend preventive measures. This study refined scientific understanding of the timing of bird movements, enabling future biologists to sample rates of avian traffic more efficiently and perhaps better identify the times when it would be most beneficial to reduce outdoor lighting, which has been linked to fallout. The study also identified three specific areas where collisions would be most beneficial. A sampling site was established in the highlands along a transmission line that runs from the south shore to the north shore through the interior and in proximity to several shearwater colonies. This site has provided a much clearer picture of Procellariiform behavior and collision mortality rates in the coastal areas. Volume 2 of this report describes the ecology of the Dark-Rumped Petrel and Newell`s Shearwater on the island of Kauai.

  2. Chemical interactions in isolated coal-fired power plant plumes: conversion of sulfur dioxide to sulfate aerosols. Volume II. Data supplement

    SciTech Connect

    Meagher, J.F.; Bailey, E.M.; Stockburger, L. III

    1981-03-01

    The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) has conducted several field experiments to examine the chemical interactions in isolated coal-fired power plant plumes, Particularly the conversion of sulfur dioxide (SO/sub 2/) to sulfate (SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/) aerosols. Six field studies have been conducted at three TVA power plants - Cumberland, paradise, and Colbert Steam Plants - each of which has a different boiler configuration. Studies were conducted during all seasons of the year. Samples were usually collected between sunrise and noon; however, at Cumberland and Paradise Steam Plants, samples were also collected in the afternoon and after sunset. The effect of several meteorological parameters on the conversion rate was investigated from the results of these studies. During one study at Cumberland Steam Plant, samples were taken during periods of reduced and normal electrostatic precipitator (ESP) operation; results from this study were used to investigate the effect of particle loading in the plume on the conversion rate.

  3. STEALTH - a Lagrange explicit finite-difference code for solid, structural, and thermohydraulic analysis. Volume 8A: STEALTH/WHAMSE - a 2-D fluid-structure interaction code. Computer code manual

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, M.B.

    1984-10-01

    STEALTH is a family of computer codes that can be used to calculate a variety of physical processes in which the dynamic behavior of a continuum is involved. The version of STEALTH described in this volume is designed for calculations of fluid-structure interaction. This version of the program consists of a hydrodynamic version of STEALTH which has been coupled to a finite-element code, WHAMSE. STEALTH computes the transient response of the fluid continuum, while WHAMSE computes the transient response of shell and beam structures under external fluid loadings. The coupling between STEALTH and WHAMSE is performed during each cycle or step of a calculation. Separate calculations of fluid response and structural response are avoided, thereby giving a more accurate model of the dynamic coupling between fluid and structure. This volume provides the theoretical background, the finite-difference equations, the finite-element equations, a discussion of several sample problems, a listing of the input decks for the sample problems, a programmer's manual and a description of the input records for the STEALTH/WHAMSE computer program.

  4. Magnetic fusion energy plasma interactive and high heat flux components. Volume III. Strategy for international collaborations in the areas of plasma materials interactions and high heat flux materials and components development

    SciTech Connect

    Gauster, W.B.; Bauer, W.; Roberto, J.B.; Post, D.E.

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of this summary is to assess opportunities for such collaborations in the specific areas of Plasma Materials Interaction and High Heat Flux Materials and Components Development, and to aid in developing a strategy to take advantage of them. After some general discussion of international collaborations, we summarize key technical issues and the US programs to address them. Then follows a summary of present collaborations and potential opportunities in foreign laboratories.

  5. 3-D patterns and volumes of decompression melting fueled by asthenospheric flow: comparison and interaction of shear-driven upwelling with small-scale convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballmer, M. D.; Conrad, C. P.; Harmon, N.; Bianco, T. A.; Smith, E. I.

    2011-12-01

    asthenospheric shear and convective instability modulate the geometry of rheological heterogeneity. For decompression melting from these mechanisms, we present model predictions for volumes, patterns and source composition of intraplate volcanism in time and space. Timescales of volcanism are smaller for cases dominated by SDU and BMI and alignment with plate-motion is stronger for cases dominated by SSC and BMI. Our predictions are compared to the geologic record of continental and oceanic intraplate volcanism in the western US and the South Pacific. We further constrain our models by comparing model predictions for the mantle source of melting, and e.g. the geoid-to-topography ratio to geochemical and geophysical observables. Our results shed light on the origin of continental and oceanic intraplate volcanism, identify the relevant dynamic regimes for both these settings, and address the make-up and dynamics of the Earth's mantle.

  6. Nuclear instruments and methods in physics research. Section B - beam interactions with materials and atoms. Inelastic ion-surface collisions, volume 100, numbers 2, 3

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, A.V.; Tolk, N.H.; Norlander, P.

    1995-06-01

    The Tenth International Workshop on Inelastic Surface Collisions took place August 8 to 12, 1994 at the Grand Targhee Ski Summer Resort, Wyoming (USA), a mountain retreat located near the Wyoming-Idaho border, just west of the Grand Teton National Park. It was chaired by Alan V. Barnes, Peter Norlander, and Norman H. Tolk. This extraordinarily beautiful and isolated setting contributed significantly to bring together most of the leading workers in the field, as well as many workers in related fields. Consequently, the conference covered experimental and theoretical research on various aspects of inelastic particle-surface interactions and related topics, including inelastic particle scattering from surfaces, sputtering, electronically-induced desorption, laser-induced desorption, secondary particle emission, collision-induced surface chemistry, and collision-induced defect formation. The meeting provided an informal workshop atmosphere with ample time for discussions. Some contributions selected among the submitted abstracts were presented orally. The remaining contributions were presented in poster sessions. There were no parallel sessions. The workshop was attended by approximately 90 scientists. The program included 9 invited lectures and 28 oral presentations of selected abstracts.

  7. Do aquatic insects avoid cadmium-contaminated sediments?

    SciTech Connect

    Hare, L.; Shooner, F.

    1995-06-01

    The long-term colonization of profundal lake sediments having a range of spiked cadmium (Cd) concentrations (0.007 to 2.7 {mu}mol/g dry wt.) was measured in the field. Population densities of two of the most abundant colonizing insects (the chironomids Procladius [Holotanypus] sp., and Sergentia coracina) were unrelated to the Cd gradient, even though both taxa accumulated Cd in direct relation to its concentration in sediment Cd gradient Cd gradient. Cadmium concentrations in Chironomus (salinarius gp.) sp. larvae also responded positively to the sediment Cd gradient and ranged from 0.2 to 50 {mu}g/g. In contrast with the two other taxa, the abundance of Chironomus (salinarius gp.) sp. was the result of a behavioral or a toxic response, larvae of the three chironomid taxa were given a choice between field-control and Cd-spiked sediments in the laboratory. None of the taxa avoided the Cd-spiked sediments, suggesting that the lower abundance of Chironomus (salinarius gp.) sp. at high Cd concentrations in the field was due to Cd toxicity and not to avoidance of the Cd-rich sediments.

  8. Study of abyssal seafloor isolation of contaminated sediments concluded

    SciTech Connect

    Valent, P.

    1998-12-31

    Recognizing the rapidly decreasing availability of disposal sites on land, in 1993 Congress directed the Department of Defense to assess the technical and scientific feasibility of isolating contaminated dredged material on the abyssal seafloor. The Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) conducted and managed the assessment, which was funded during its first year by the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program and in the following two years by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency. NRL carried out the projects in collaboration with participants from academic institutions and industrial organizations. The seafloor isolation concept is an attractive management option for contaminated dredged material because, if abyssal isolation is feasible and environmentally sound, air, land, or water supplies would not be contaminated. The participants concluded that it is technically and environmentally feasible. In ports where shipping costs are high, abyssal seafloor isolation is a cost-competitive strategy. They also outlined the architecture of a system to monitor conditions at the site and to detect and measure possible leaks of contaminated material.

  9. COPING WITH CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS AND SOILS IN THE URBAN ENVIRONMENT.

    SciTech Connect

    JONES,K.W.; VAN DER LELIE,D.; MCGUIGAN,M.; ET AL.

    2004-05-25

    Soils and sediments contaminated with toxic organic and inorganic compounds harmful to the environment and to human health are common in the urban environment. We report here on aspects of a program being carried out in the New York/New Jersey Port region to develop methods for processing dredged material from the Port to make products that are safe for introduction to commercial markets. We discuss some of the results of the program in Computational Environmental Science, Laboratory Environmental Science, and Applied Environmental Science and indicate some possible directions for future work. Overall, the program elements integrate the scientific and engineering aspects with regulatory, commercial, urban planning, local governments, and community group interests. Well-developed connections between these components are critical to the ultimate success of efforts to cope with the problems caused by contaminated urban soils and sediments.

  10. Regulating contaminated sediments in aquatic environments: A hydrologic perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcus, W. Andrew

    1989-11-01

    A number of state and federal agencies are presently attempting to develop management strategies for contaminated aquatic sediments. Until now, research and debate on sediment guidelines and regulations has focused almost exclusively on biological and chemical techniques for determining when sediments pose an environmental risk. Hydrologic factors must also be considered, however, if these biochemically based techniques for establishing sediment quality standards are to be feasible. Hydrologic issues that need to be addressed include how to define the boundaries of the aquatic environment, the scope of sediment regulations in ephemeral waters, regulations and sampling procedures in heterogeneous sediments, and timing of samples for monitoring and enforcement purposes

  11. Resolving the unresolved complex mixture in petroleum-contaminated sediments.

    PubMed

    Frysinger, Glenn S; Gaines, Richard B; Xu, Li; Reddy, Christopher M

    2003-04-15

    Comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC x GC) was used to investigate the chemical composition of the unresolved complex mixture (UCM) of hydrocarbons in petroleum-contaminated marine sediments. The UCM hydrocarbons were extracted and separated with silica and silver-impregnated silica gel chromatography to yield four fractions (branched alkanes and cycloalkanes, monoaromatics, naphthalenes, and multi-ring PAHs) prior to GC x GC analysis. GC x GC separations used a poly-(dimethylsiloxane) stationary phase for volatility selectivity on the first dimension and a 14% cyanopropylphenyl polysiloxane phase for polarity selectivity on the second dimension to fully resolve monoaromatic, naphthalene, and multi-ring PAH compounds from the UCM. A chiral gamma-cyclodextrin phase was used for shape selectivity on the second GC x GC dimension to resolve individual branched alkanes and cycloalkanes in the saturates fraction of the UCM. The ability of GC x GC to resolve thousands of individual chemical components from the UCM will facilitate an understanding of the sources, weathering, and toxicity of UCM hydrocarbons.

  12. TOXICITY IDENTIFICATION EVALUATION (TIE) RESULTS FOR METAL CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Identification of contaminants in sediment is necessary for sound management decisions on sediment disposal, remediation, determination of ecological risk, and source identification. We have been developing sediment toxicity identification evaluation (TIE) techniques that allow ...

  13. Mercury Contaminated Sediment Sites: A Review Of Remedial Solutions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mercury (Hg) can accumulate in sediment from point and non-point sources, depending on a number of physical, chemical, biological, geological and anthropogenic environmental processes. It is believed that the associated Hg contamination in aquatic systems can be decreased by imp...

  14. PILOT LAND TREATMENT OF PAH-CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hazardous dredged sediments are typically placed in confined disposal facilities (CDFs) which are designed to dewater and contain but not treat sediments. Since navigational dredging in the U.S. is quickly filling many CDFs, these facilities have little available capacity for ne...

  15. Mercury Contaminated Sediment Sites- An Evaluation of Remedial Options

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mercury (Hg) is a naturally-occurring element that is ubiquitous in the aquatic environment. Though efforts have been made in recent years to decrease Hg emissions, historically-emitted Hg can be retained in the sediments of aquatic bodies where they may be slowly converted to m...

  16. Test system for exposing fish to resuspended, contaminated sediment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cope, W.G.; Wiener, J.G.; Steingraeber, M.T.

    1996-01-01

    We describe a new test system for exposing fish to resuspended sediments and associated contaminants. Test sediments were resuspended by revolving test chambers on rotating shafts driven by an electric motor. The timing, speed, and duration of test-chamber revolution were controlled by a rheostat and electronic timer. Each chamber held 45 litres of water and accommodated about 49 g of test fish. The system described had three water baths, each holding six test chambers. We illustrate the performance of this system with results from a 28-day test in which juvenile bluegills Lepomis macrochirus were exposed to resuspended, riverine sediments differing in texture and cadmium content. The test had one sediment-free control and five sediment treatments, with three replicates (chambers) per treatment and 25 fish per replicate. Two-thirds (30 litres) of the test water and sediment in each chamber was renewed weekly. The mean concentration of total suspended solids (TSS) did not vary among treatments; the grand-mean TSS in the five sediment treatments was 975 mg litre-1, similar to the target TSS of 1000 mg litre-1. At the end of the test, an average of 50% of the introduced cadmium was associated with the suspended sediment compartment, whereas the filtered (0.45 μm) water contained 0.4% and bluegills 1.8% of the cadmium.

  17. Cluster analysis of contaminated sediment data: nodal analysis.

    PubMed

    Hartwell, S Ian; Claflin, Larry W

    2005-07-01

    The objective of the present study was to explore the use of multivariate statistical methods as a means to discern relationships between contaminants and biological and/or toxicological effects in a representative data set from the National Status and Trends (NS&T) Program. Data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, NS&T Program's Bioeffects Survey of Delaware Bay, USA, were examined using various univariate and multivariate statistical techniques, including cluster analysis. Each approach identified consistent patterns and relationships between the three types of triad data. The analyses also identified factors that bias the interpretation of the data, primarily the presence of rare and unique species and the dependence of species distributions on physical parameters. Sites and species were clustered with the unweighted pair-group method using arithmetic averages clustering with the Jaccard coefficient that clustered species and sites into mutually consistent groupings. Pearson product moment correlation coefficients, normalized for salinity, also were clustered. The most informative analysis, termed nodal analysis, was the intersection of species cluster analysis with site cluster analysis. This technique produced a visual representation of species association patterns among site clusters. Site characteristics, such as salinity and grain size, not contaminant concentrations, appeared to be the primary factors determining species distributions. This suggests the sediment-quality triad needs to use physical parameters as a distinct leg from chemical concentrations to improve sediment-quality assessments in large bodies of water. Because the Delaware Bay system has confounded gradients of contaminants and physical parameters, analyses were repeated with data from northern Chesapeake Bay, USA, with similar results. PMID:16050601

  18. GEOCHEMICAL FACTORS GOVERNING METHYL MERCURY PRODUCTION IN MERCURY CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bench scale experiments were conducted to improve our understanding of aquatic mercury transformation processes (biotic and abiotic), specifically those factors which govern the production of methyl mercury (MeHg) in sedimentary environments. The greatest cause for concern regar...

  19. Hydrocarbon Bioaccumulation from contaminated sediment by a deposit feeding polychaete

    SciTech Connect

    Weston, D.P. )

    1990-01-09

    This study examined the role of sediment organic carbon content in aromatic hydrocarbon bioaccumulation and assessed the importance of two routes of hydrocarbon uptake: (1) uptake of the dissolved contaminant fraction from interstitial or overlying water; and (2) uptake of the particulate contaminant fraction from ingested sediments. The lugworm, Abarenicola pacifica, was exposed to three sediments contaminated with [[sup 3]H] benzo(a)pyrene (BaP). By manipulating the organic content of these sediments it was possible to establish three treatments with similar BaP concentrations in the interstitial water, but differing in the amount of BaP in the bulk sediment. BaP bioaccumulation over the first few days of exposure was correlated with feeding rate, implicating ingested sediments as a source of implicating ingested sediments as a source of BaP. The greatest body burden, however, was attained in those individuals held in sediments with the lowest organic carbon content and the lowest BaP concentration. Body burden at steady state was not correlated with either BaP concentrations in bulk sediment (dry weight or organic normalized basis) or the interstitial water. Increased organic matter decreased BaP bioavailability in a non-linear fashion. Bioaccumulation factors relative to water and organic content were relatively constant between 1 and 2% organic carbon in the sediment, but these same accumulation factors substantially underestimated body burden if applied to sandy sediments with little (0.3%) organic carbon.

  20. Quantification of thorium and uranium sorption to contaminated sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, D.I.

    2000-08-01

    Desorption tests using a sequential extraction method were used to characterize and quantify thorium and uranium sorption to contaminated wetland sediments collected from the Savannah River Site located in South Carolina. In situ distribution coefficients, or Kd values (Kd equal to Csolid/Cliquid), were determined. A problem associated with determining desorption Kd values is that it is difficult to identify Csolid, because by definition it must comprise only the fraction that is reversibly (and linearly) sorbed. A series of selective and sequential extractions was used to determine desorption Kd values. Thorium Kd values ranged from 115 to 2255 mL/g. Uranium Kd values ranged from 170 to 6493 mL/g. Compared to sorption Kd values, these desorption Kd values were appreciably greater because they captured the ``aging'' process of the radionuclides with the sediment, making the radionuclide more refractory. Compared to nonsite-specific data, these in situ Kd values improved accuracy, were more defensible, reduced uncertainty, and removed unnecessary conservatism for subsequent transport and risk calculations. Additional tests were conducted to provide geochemical information relevant for selecting appropriate remediation technologies for the contaminated site. Thorium and U were associated with labile fractions and were not concentrated with the smaller sediment particles. These findings suggest that phytoremediation or heap leaching, and not soil washing, are viable remediation approaches for this site.

  1. Strategic Plan. Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to present the strategic plan and associated organizational structure that the National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI) will utilize to achieve the defined mission and objectives provided by NASA. Much of the information regarding the background and establishment of the NSBRI by NASA has been provided in other documentation and will not be repeated in this Strategic Plan. This Strategic Plan is presented in two volumes. Volume I (this volume) begins with an Introduction (Section 2) that provides the Institute's NASA-defined mission and objectives, and the organizational structure adopted to implement these through three Strategic Programs: Countermeasure Research; Education, Training and Outreach; and Cooperative Research and Development. These programs are described in Sections 3 to 5. Each program is presented in a similar way, using four subsections: Goals and Objectives; Current Strategies; Gaps and Modifications; and Resource Requirements. Section 6 provides the administrative infrastructure and total budget required to implement the Strategic Programs and assures that they form a single cohesive plan. This plan will ensure continued success of the Institute for the next five years. Volume II of the Strategic Plan provides an in-depth analysis of the current and future strategic programs of the 12 current NSBRI teams, including their goals, objectives, mutual interactions and schedules.

  2. Assessing Effects and interactions among key variables affecting the growth of mixotrophic microalgae: pH, inoculum volume, and growth medium composition.

    PubMed

    Ale, M T; Pinelo, M; Meyer, A S

    2014-01-01

    A 2(3) + 3 full factorial experimental design was used to evaluate growth rate and biomass productivity of four selected, high-biomass-yielding microalgae species,namely, Chlorella vulgaris (CV), Scenedesmus acutus (SA), Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (CR), and Chlamydomonas debaryana (CD), in mixtures of growth medium (MWC) and wastewater at different proportions (from 20 to 50% of MWC) and at different pH (from 7 to 9). Multilinear regression analysis of the biomass productivity data showed that for SA and CD the biomass productivity was independent of the proportion of medium (MWC), while the growth of CV and CR slowed down in mixtures with high proportions of wastewater. However, the biomass productivity of SA was dependent on pH, while the growth of the other microalgae was independent of pH (7-9). When evaluating the influence of pH and proportion of medium, CD appeared most robust among the algae species, despite its lower biomass productivity. All the four species reduced 80-90% of the nitrate [Formula: see text] and 60-70% of the ammonia [Formula: see text] initially present in the wastewater:medium mixture, although the extent of the reduction was dependent on the initial [Formula: see text] ratio. Both SA and CV reduced ∼20-25% of the chemical oxygen demand (COD) contained in the wastewater. This study shows the remarkable influence of certain variables that are often ignored in the search for optimal conditions of microalgal growth and also reveals the importance of considering interactions among growth variables in potential applications at large scale, particularly in the field of bioremediation. PMID:24274013

  3. Magnetic Fusion Energy Plasma Interactive and High Heat Flux Components: Volume 5, Technical assessment of critical issues in the steady state operation of fusion confinement devices

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    Critical issues for the steady state operation of plasma confinement devices exist in both the physics and technology fields of fusion research. Due to the wide range and number of these issues, this technical assessment has focused on the crucial issues associated with the plasma physics and the plasma interactive components. The document provides information on the problem areas that affect the design and operation of a steady state ETR or ITER type confinement device. It discusses both tokamaks and alternative concepts, and provides a survey of existing and planned confinement machines and laboratory facilities that can address the identified issues. A universal definition of steady state operation is difficult to obtain. From a physics point of view, steady state is generally achieved when the time derivatives approach zero and the operation time greatly exceeds the characteristic time constants of the device. Steady state operation for materials depends on whether thermal stress, creep, fatigue, radiation damage, or power removal are being discussed. For erosion issues, the fluence and availability of the machine for continuous operation are important, assuming that transient events such as disruptions do not limit the component lifetimes. The panel suggests, in general terms, that steady state requires plasma operation from 100 to 1000 seconds and an availability of more than a few percent, which is similar to the expectations for an ETR type device. The assessment of critical issues for steady state operation is divided into four sections: physics issues; technology issues; issues in alternative concepts; and devices and laboratory facilities that can address these problems.

  4. Speaking Volumes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Douglas; Frey, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    Students love to talk. So do teachers. When there's a balance in the classroom between student and teacher discourse, good things happen. When students assume increased responsibility for discussions, when they interact with a wide range of peers on diverse topics and supply evidence for their thinking, great things happen. Noted educators…

  5. Comparisons of Sediment Test Volumes for Freshwater Solid Phase Sediment Toxicity Tests

    EPA Science Inventory

    Laboratory tests with benthic macroinvertebrates are commonly used to assess the potential toxicity of contaminated sediments, and detailed standard test procedures have been developed for various species. For freshwater, two benthic organisms, Hyalella azteca and Chironomus dil...

  6. Characterization of the intragranular water regime within subsurface sediments: Pore volume, surface area, and mass transfer limitations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hay, M.B.; Stoliker, D.L.; Davis, J.A.; Zachara, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Although "intragranular" pore space within grain aggregates, grain fractures, and mineral surface coatings may contain a relatively small fraction of the total porosity within a porous medium, it often contains a significant fraction of the reactive surface area, and can thus strongly affect the transport of sorbing solutes. In this work, we demonstrate a batch experiment procedure using tritiated water as a high-resolution diffusive tracer to characterize the intragranular pore space. The method was tested using uranium-contaminated sediments from the vadose and capillary fringe zones beneath the former 300A process ponds at the Hanford site (Washington). Sediments were contacted with tracers in artificial groundwater, followed by a replacement of bulk solution with tracer-free groundwater and the monitoring of tracer release. From these data, intragranular pore volumes were calculated and mass transfer rates were quantified using a multirate first-order mass transfer model. Tritium-hydrogen exchange on surface hydroxyls was accounted for by conducting additional tracer experiments on sediment that was vacuum dried after reaction. The complementary ("wet" and "dry") techniques allowed for the simultaneous determination of intragranular porosity and surface area using tritium. The Hanford 300A samples exhibited intragranular pore volumes of ???1% of the solid volume and intragranular surface areas of ???20%-35% of the total surface area. Analogous experiments using bromide ion as a tracer yielded very different results, suggesting very little penetration of bromide into the intragranular porosity. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  7. Characterization of the intragranular water regime within subsurface sediments: pore volume, surface area, and mass transfer limitations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hay, Michael B.; Stoliker, Deborah L.; Davis, James A.; Zachara, John M.

    2011-01-01

    Although "intragranular" pore space within grain aggregates, grain fractures, and mineral surface coatings may contain a relatively small fraction of the total porosity within a porous medium, it often contains a significant fraction of the reactive surface area, and can thus strongly affect the transport of sorbing solutes. In this work, we demonstrate a batch experiment procedure using tritiated water as a high-resolution diffusive tracer to characterize the intragranular pore space. The method was tested using uranium-contaminated sediments from the vadose and capillary fringe zones beneath the former 300A process ponds at the Hanford site (Washington). Sediments were contacted with tracers in artificial groundwater, followed by a replacement of bulk solution with tracer-free groundwater and the monitoring of tracer release. From these data, intragranular pore volumes were calculated and mass transfer rates were quantified using a multirate first-order mass transfer model. Tritium-hydrogen exchange on surface hydroxyls was accounted for by conducting additional tracer experiments on sediment that was vacuum dried after reaction. The complementary ("wet" and "dry") techniques allowed for the simultaneous determination of intragranular porosity and surface area using tritium. The Hanford 300A samples exhibited intragranular pore volumes of ~1% of the solid volume and intragranular surface areas of ~20%–35% of the total surface area. Analogous experiments using bromide ion as a tracer yielded very different results, suggesting very little penetration of bromide into the intragranular porosity.

  8. Characterization of the intragranular water regime within subsurface sediments: Pore volume, surface area, and mass transfer limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hay, Michael B.; Stoliker, Deborah L.; Davis, James A.; Zachara, John M.

    2011-10-01

    Although "intragranular" pore space within grain aggregates, grain fractures, and mineral surface coatings may contain a relatively small fraction of the total porosity within a porous medium, it often contains a significant fraction of the reactive surface area, and can thus strongly affect the transport of sorbing solutes. In this work, we demonstrate a batch experiment procedure using tritiated water as a high-resolution diffusive tracer to characterize the intragranular pore space. The method was tested using uranium-contaminated sediments from the vadose and capillary fringe zones beneath the former 300A process ponds at the Hanford site (Washington). Sediments were contacted with tracers in artificial groundwater, followed by a replacement of bulk solution with tracer-free groundwater and the monitoring of tracer release. From these data, intragranular pore volumes were calculated and mass transfer rates were quantified using a multirate first-order mass transfer model. Tritium-hydrogen exchange on surface hydroxyls was accounted for by conducting additional tracer experiments on sediment that was vacuum dried after reaction. The complementary ("wet" and "dry") techniques allowed for the simultaneous determination of intragranular porosity and surface area using tritium. The Hanford 300A samples exhibited intragranular pore volumes of ˜1% of the solid volume and intragranular surface areas of ˜20%-35% of the total surface area. Analogous experiments using bromide ion as a tracer yielded very different results, suggesting very little penetration of bromide into the intragranular porosity.

  9. Sparse PDF Volumes for Consistent Multi-Resolution Volume Rendering

    PubMed Central

    Sicat, Ronell; Krüger, Jens; Möller, Torsten; Hadwiger, Markus

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a new multi-resolution volume representation called sparse pdf volumes, which enables consistent multi-resolution volume rendering based on probability density functions (pdfs) of voxel neighborhoods. These pdfs are defined in the 4D domain jointly comprising the 3D volume and its 1D intensity range. Crucially, the computation of sparse pdf volumes exploits data coherence in 4D, resulting in a sparse representation with surprisingly low storage requirements. At run time, we dynamically apply transfer functions to the pdfs using simple and fast convolutions. Whereas standard low-pass filtering and down-sampling incur visible differences between resolution levels, the use of pdfs facilitates consistent results independent of the resolution level used. We describe the efficient out-of-core computation of large-scale sparse pdf volumes, using a novel iterative simplification procedure of a mixture of 4D Gaussians. Finally, our data structure is optimized to facilitate interactive multi-resolution volume rendering on GPUs. PMID:26146475

  10. Transparent volume imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wixson, Steve E.

    1990-07-01

    Transparent Volume Imaging began with the stereo xray in 1895 and ended for most investigators when radiation safety concerns eliminated the second view. Today, similiar images can be generated by the computer without safety hazards providing improved perception and new means of image quantification. A volumetric workstation is under development based on an operational prototype. The workstation consists of multiple symbolic and numeric processors, binocular stereo color display generator with large image memory and liquid crystal shutter, voice input and output, a 3D pointer that uses projection lenses so that structures in 3 space can be touched directly, 3D hard copy using vectograph and lenticular printing, and presentation facilities using stereo 35mm slide and stereo video tape projection. Volumetric software includes a volume window manager, Mayo Clinic's Analyze program and our Digital Stereo Microscope (DSM) algorithms. The DSM uses stereo xray-like projections, rapidly oscillating motion and focal depth cues such that detail can be studied in the spatial context of the entire set of data. Focal depth cues are generated with a lens and apeture algorithm that generates a plane of sharp focus, and multiple stereo pairs each with a different plane of sharp focus are generated and stored in the large memory for interactive selection using a physical or symbolic depth selector. More recent work is studying non-linear focussing. Psychophysical studies are underway to understand how people perce ive images on a volumetric display and how accurately 3 dimensional structures can be quantitated from these displays.

  11. Basic Communication Course Annual. Volume 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newburger, Craig, Ed.

    This volume of an annual collection presents 14 essays relating to instruction in the basic communication course. Essays in the collection are "Using Interactive Video Instruction to Enhance Public Speaking Instruction" (Michael W. Cronin and William R. Kennan); "Interactive Video Instruction for Teaching Organizational Techniques in Public…

  12. Handbook of Parenting. Volume 4: Applied and Practical Parenting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bornstein, Marc H., Ed.

    Concerned with problems, compromises, and challenges of parenting, this volume, the fourth of four volumes on parenting specifically deals with applied issues and practical considerations in parenting. The volume consists of 18 chapters as follows: (1) "Maternal Deprivation" (Michael Rutter); (2) "Marital Interaction and Parenting" (Kathryn P.…

  13. High-volume centers.

    PubMed

    Vespa, P; Diringer, Michael N

    2011-09-01

    Outcome from trauma, surgery, and a variety of other medical conditions has been shown to be positively affected by providing treatment at facilities experiencing a high volume of patients with those conditions. An electronic literature search was made to identify English-language articles available through March 2011, addressing the effect of patient treatment volume on outcome for patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage. Limited data were identified, with 16 citations included in the current review. Over 60% of hospitals fall into the lowest case-volume quartile. Outcome is influenced by patient volume, with better outcome occurring in high-volume centers treating >60 cases per year. Patients treated at low-volume hospitals are less likely to experience definitive treatment. Furthermore, transfer to high-volume centers may be inadequately arranged. Several factors may influence the better outcome at high-volume centers, including the availability of neurointensivists and interventional neuroradiologists. PMID:21792754

  14. Navajo History. Volume 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yazzie, Ethelou, Ed.

    This volume, an account of the prerecorded history of the Navajos, is the first of a series of two volumes. (Volume 2 will take up recorded history.) From the knowledge of verbal literature supplied by Navajos themselves, this composite was completed to help alleviate the lack of materials on Navajo culture. Consensus, the authors point out, was…

  15. Variable volume maser techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhardt, V. S.

    1977-01-01

    The frequency stability of hydrogen masers in variable volume storage bulbs is discussed in terms of wall shift. Variable volume devices discussed include: Brenner flexible bulb, Debely device, and the concertina hydrogen maser. A flexible cone variable volume element outside the cavity is described.

  16. Interactions between salt marsh plants and Cu nanoparticles - Effects on metal uptake and phytoremediation processes.

    PubMed

    Andreotti, Federico; Mucha, Ana Paula; Caetano, Cátia; Rodrigues, Paula; Rocha Gomes, Carlos; Almeida, C Marisa R

    2015-10-01

    The increased use of metallic nanoparticles (NPs) raises the probability of finding NPs in the environment. A lot of information exists already regarding interactions between plants and metals, but information regarding interactions between metallic NPs and plants, including salt marsh plants, is still lacking. This work aimed to study interactions between CuO NPs and the salt marsh plants Halimione portulacoides and Phragmites australis. In addition, the potential of these plants for phytoremediation of Cu NPs was evaluated. Plants were exposed for 8 days to sediment elutriate solution doped either with CuO or with ionic Cu. Afterwards, total metal concentrations were determined in plant tissues. Both plants accumulated Cu in their roots, but this accumulation was 4 to 10 times lower when the metal was added in NP form. For P. australis, metal translocation occurred when the metal was added either in ionic or in NP form, but for H. portulacoides no metal translocation was observed when NPs were added to the medium. Therefore, interactions between plants and NPs differ with the plant species. These facts should be taken in consideration when applying these plants for phytoremediation of contaminated sediments in estuaries, as the environmental management of these very important ecological areas can be affected.

  17. Intramolecular relaxation of flexible dendrimers with excluded volume.

    PubMed

    Rai, Gobind Ji; Kumar, Amit; Biswas, Parbati

    2014-07-21

    The mechanical and dielectric relaxation moduli of dendrimers with the excluded volume interactions are theoretically investigated within the framework of Rouse-Zimm theory. The excluded volume interactions in dendrimers are expressed in terms of the effective co-volume between nearest non-bonded monomers, modeled through the delta function pseudopotential. These short range interactions play a decisive role in determining the mechanical moduli of dendrimers. The characteristic feature of excluded volume effect in the mechanical moduli is typically revealed in the intermediate frequency regime, where dendrimers with varied strengths of excluded volume interactions display power-law scaling relations with frequency. The value of the power-law scaling exponents for the mechanical moduli exactly matches with the earlier results for dendrimers in good solvent conditions. The mechanical moduli are dominated by the smaller eigenvalues in the low frequency region corresponding to the collective modes with smaller relaxation rates, which increase with the corresponding increase of the excluded volume interactions. The local modes are practically independent of excluded volume. A cross-over between the loss and storage moduli is observed at the intermediate frequency regime. The position of this cross-over shifts towards the low frequency region with the decrease in the strength of the excluded volume, which resembles the behavior of dendrimers with the variation of temperature as reported in an earlier experimental work. The structure of dendrimers show a conspicuous change as a function of the effective co-volume between the nearest non-bonded monomers. The real part of dielectric relaxation moduli remains unchanged by varying excluded volume parameters, while its imaginary part varies with the change in strength of excluded volumes for the entire range of frequency except in the high frequency regime. A comparison with the model semiflexible dendrimers show that in such

  18. Intramolecular relaxation of flexible dendrimers with excluded volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Gobind Ji; Kumar, Amit; Biswas, Parbati

    2014-07-01

    The mechanical and dielectric relaxation moduli of dendrimers with the excluded volume interactions are theoretically investigated within the framework of Rouse-Zimm theory. The excluded volume interactions in dendrimers are expressed in terms of the effective co-volume between nearest non-bonded monomers, modeled through the delta function pseudopotential. These short range interactions play a decisive role in determining the mechanical moduli of dendrimers. The characteristic feature of excluded volume effect in the mechanical moduli is typically revealed in the intermediate frequency regime, where dendrimers with varied strengths of excluded volume interactions display power-law scaling relations with frequency. The value of the power-law scaling exponents for the mechanical moduli exactly matches with the earlier results for dendrimers in good solvent conditions. The mechanical moduli are dominated by the smaller eigenvalues in the low frequency region corresponding to the collective modes with smaller relaxation rates, which increase with the corresponding increase of the excluded volume interactions. The local modes are practically independent of excluded volume. A cross-over between the loss and storage moduli is observed at the intermediate frequency regime. The position of this cross-over shifts towards the low frequency region with the decrease in the strength of the excluded volume, which resembles the behavior of dendrimers with the variation of temperature as reported in an earlier experimental work. The structure of dendrimers show a conspicuous change as a function of the effective co-volume between the nearest non-bonded monomers. The real part of dielectric relaxation moduli remains unchanged by varying excluded volume parameters, while its imaginary part varies with the change in strength of excluded volumes for the entire range of frequency except in the high frequency regime. A comparison with the model semiflexible dendrimers show that in such

  19. Automatic volume calibration system

    SciTech Connect

    Gates, A.J.; Aaron, C.C.

    1985-05-06

    The Automatic Volume Calibration System presently consists of three independent volume-measurement subsystems and can possibly be expanded to five subsystems. When completed, the system will manually or automatically perform the sequence of valve-control and data-acquisition operations required to measure given volumes. An LSI-11 minicomputer controls the vacuum and pressure sources and controls solenoid control valves to open and close various volumes. The input data are obtained from numerous displacement, temperature, and pressure sensors read by the LSI-11. The LSI-11 calculates the unknown volume from the data acquired during the sequence of valve operations. The results, based on the Ideal Gas Law, also provide information for feedback and control. This paper describes the volume calibration system, its subsystems, and the integration of the various instrumentation used in the system's design and development. 11 refs., 13 figs., 4 tabs.

  20. Front Matter: Volume 8454

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SPIE, Proceedings of

    2012-05-01

    This PDF file contains the front matter associated with SPIE Proceedings Volume 8454, including the Title Page, Copyright information, Table of Contents, Introduction, and Conference Committee listing.

  1. Precision volume measurement system.

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Erin E.; Shugard, Andrew D.

    2004-11-01

    A new precision volume measurement system based on a Kansas City Plant (KCP) design was built to support the volume measurement needs of the Gas Transfer Systems (GTS) department at Sandia National Labs (SNL) in California. An engineering study was undertaken to verify or refute KCP's claims of 0.5% accuracy. The study assesses the accuracy and precision of the system. The system uses the ideal gas law and precise pressure measurements (of low-pressure helium) in a temperature and computer controlled environment to ratio a known volume to an unknown volume.

  2. Electroweak interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Haidt, D.; Pietschmann, H

    1988-01-01

    This volume aims at a consistent presentation of the relevant experimental data in the theoretical context of Quantum Flavor Dynamics (QFD). QFD stems from research in the last 15 years and describes successfully all phenomena of so-called electroweak interactions. This allows for a natural and efficient ordering of the vast body of data resulting from many different types of experiments. After an outline of the theoretical foundations, several chapters deal with the three sectors of QFD, i.e. fermions, gauge bosons and Higgs bosons as far as their properties (quantum numbers, lifetime etc.) are concerned. The largest chapter examines the structure of the electromagnetic, the weak neutral and the weak charged currents. Best values for the basic parameters of QFD are suggested, and open questions and new directions are discussed.

  3. Astronautic Structures Manual, Volume 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    This document (Volumes I, II, and III) presents a compilation of industry-wide methods in aerospace strength analysis that can be carried out by hand, that are general enough in scope to cover most structures encountered, and that are sophisticated enough to give accurate estimates of the actual strength expected. It provides analysis techniques for the elastic and inelastic stress ranges. It serves not only as a catalog of methods not usually available, but also as a reference source for the background of the methods themselves. An overview of the manual is as follows: Section A is a general introduction of methods used and includes sections on loads, combined stresses, and interaction curves; Section B is devoted to methods of strength analysis; Section C is devoted to the topic of structural stability; Section D is on thermal stresses; Section E is on fatigue and fracture mechanics; Section F is on composites; Section G is on rotating machinery; and Section H is on statistics. These three volumes supersede Volumes I and II, NASA TM X-60041 and NASA TM X-60042, respectively.

  4. The effects of inlet turbulence and rotor/stator interactions on the aerodynamics and heat transfer of a large-scale rotating turbine model. Volume 2: Heat transfer data tabulation. 15 percent axial spacing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dring, R. P.; Blair, M. F.; Joslyn, H. D.

    1986-01-01

    A combined experimental and analytical program was conducted to examine the effects of inlet turbulence on airfoil heat transfer. The experimental portion of the study was conducted in a large-scale (approx 5X engine), ambient temperature, rotating turbine model configured in both single stage and stage-and-a-half arrangements. Heat transfer measurements were obtained using low-conductivity airfoils with miniature thermcouples welded to a thin, electrically heated surface skin. Heat transfer data were acquired for various combinations of low or high inlet turbulence intensity, flow coefficient, first-stator/rotor axial spacing, Reynolds number and relative circumferential position of the first and second stators. Aerodynamic measurements obtained as part of the program include distributions of the mean and fluctuating velocities at the turbine inlet and, for each airfoil row, midspan airfoil surface pressures and circumferential distributions of the downstream steady state pressures and fluctuating velocities. Analytical results include airfoil heat transfer predictions produced using existing 2-D boundary layer computation schemes and an examination of solutions of the unsteady boundary layer equations. The results are reported in four separate volumes, of which this is Volume 2: Heat Transfer Data Tabulation; 15 Percent Axial Spacing.

  5. Monitoring and modelling of soil-plant interactions: the joint use of ERT, sap flow and Eddy Covariance data to characterize the volume of an orange tree root zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassiani, G.; Boaga, J.; Vanella, D.; Perri, M. T.; Consoli, S.

    2014-12-01

    Mass and energy exchanges between soil, plants and atmosphere control a number of key environmental processes involving hydrology, biota and climate. The understanding of these exchanges also play a critical role for practical purposes e.g. in precision agriculture. In this paper we present a methodology based on coupling innovative data collection and models in order to obtain quantitative estimates of the key parameters of such complex flow system. In particular we propose the use of hydro-geophysical monitoring via 4-D Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) in conjunction with measurements of plant transpiration via sap flow and evapotranspiration from Eddy Covariance (EC). This abundance of data is fed to a spatially distributed soil model in order to characterize the distribution of active roots. We conducted experiments in an orange orchard in Eastern Sicily (Italy), characterized by the typical Mediterranean semi-arid climate. The subsoil dynamics, particularly influenced by irrigation and root uptake, were characterized mainly by the ERT setup, consisting of 48 buried electrodes on 4 instrumented micro boreholes (about 1.2 m deep) placed at the corners of a square (about 1.3 m in side) surrounding the orange tree, plus 24 mini-electrodes on the surface spaced 0.1 m on a square grid. During the monitoring, we collected repeated ERT and TDR soil moisture measurements, soil water samples, sap flow measurements from the orange tree and EC data. We conducted a laboratory calibration of the soil electrical properties as a function of moisture content and pore water electrical conductivity. Irrigation, precipitation, sap flow and ET data are available allowing knowledge of the system's long term forcing conditions on the system. This information was used to calibrate a 1-D Richards' equation model representing the dynamics of the volume monitored via 3-D ERT. Information on the soil hydraulic properties was collected from laboratory and field experiments. The

  6. Monitoring and modelling of soil-plant interactions: the joint use of ERT, sap flow and eddy covariance data to characterize the volume of an orange tree root zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassiani, G.; Boaga, J.; Vanella, D.; Perri, M. T.; Consoli, S.

    2015-05-01

    Mass and energy exchanges between soil, plants and atmosphere control a number of key environmental processes involving hydrology, biota and climate. The understanding of these exchanges also play a critical role for practical purposes e.g. in precision agriculture. In this paper we present a methodology based on coupling innovative data collection and models in order to obtain quantitative estimates of the key parameters of such complex flow system. In particular we propose the use of hydro-geophysical monitoring via "time-lapse" electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) in conjunction with measurements of plant transpiration via sap flow and evapotranspiration (ET) from eddy covariance (EC). This abundance of data is fed to spatially distributed soil models in order to characterize the distribution of active roots. We conducted experiments in an orange orchard in eastern Sicily (Italy), characterized by the typical Mediterranean semi-arid climate. The subsoil dynamics, particularly influenced by irrigation and root uptake, were characterized mainly by the ERT set-up, consisting of 48 buried electrodes on 4 instrumented micro-boreholes (about 1.2 m deep) placed at the corners of a square (with about 1.3 m long sides) surrounding the orange tree, plus 24 mini-electrodes on the surface spaced 0.1 m on a square grid. During the monitoring, we collected repeated ERT and time domain reflectometry (TDR) soil moisture measurements, soil water sampling, sap flow measurements from the orange tree and EC data. We conducted a laboratory calibration of the soil electrical properties as a function of moisture content and porewater electrical conductivity. Irrigation, precipitation, sap flow and ET data are available allowing for knowledge of the system's long-term forcing conditions on the system. This information was used to calibrate a 1-D Richards' equation model representing the dynamics of the volume monitored via 3-D ERT. Information on the soil hydraulic properties was

  7. The effects of inlet turbulence and rotor/stator interactions on the aerodynamics and heat transfer of a large-scale rotating turbine model. Volume 3: Heat transfer data tabulation 65 percent axial spacing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dring, R. P.; Blair, M. F.; Joslyn, H. D.

    1986-01-01

    This is Volume 3 - Heat Transfer Data Tabulation (65 percent Axial Spacing) of a combined experimental and analytical program which was conducted to examine the effects of inlet turbulence on airfoil heat transfer. The experimental portion of the study was conducted in a large-scale (approximately 5X engine), ambient temperature, rotating turbine model configured in both single stage and stage-and-a-half arrangements. Heat transfer measurements were obtained using low-conductivity airfoils with miniature thermocouples welded to a thin, electrically heated surface skin. Heat transfer data were acquired for various combinations of low or high inlet turbulence intensity, flow coefficient, first-stator/rotor axial spacing, Reynolds number and relative circumferential position of the first and second stators.

  8. Stereometric body volume measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herron, R. E.

    1975-01-01

    The following studies are reported: (1) effects of extended space flight on body form of Skylab astronauts using biostereometrics; (2) comparison of body volume determinations using hydrostatic weighing and biostereometrics; and (3) training of technicians in biostereometric principles and procedures.

  9. Free volume under shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiti, Moumita; Vinutha, H. A.; Sastry, Srikanth; Heussinger, Claus

    2015-10-01

    Using an athermal quasistatic simulation protocol, we study the distribution of free volumes in sheared hard-particle packings close to, but below, the random-close packing threshold. We show that under shear, and independent of volume fraction, the free volumes develop features similar to close-packed systems — particles self-organize in a manner as to mimick the isotropically jammed state. We compare athermally sheared packings with thermalized packings and show that thermalization leads to an erasure of these structural features. The temporal evolution in particular the opening-up and the closing of free-volume patches is associated with the single-particle dynamics, showing a crossover from ballistic to diffusive behavior.

  10. Free volume under shear.

    PubMed

    Maiti, Moumita; Vinutha, H A; Sastry, Srikanth; Heussinger, Claus

    2015-10-14

    Using an athermal quasistatic simulation protocol, we study the distribution of free volumes in sheared hard-particle packings close to, but below, the random-close packing threshold. We show that under shear, and independent of volume fraction, the free volumes develop features similar to close-packed systems - particles self-organize in a manner as to mimick the isotropically jammed state. We compare athermally sheared packings with thermalized packings and show that thermalization leads to an erasure of these structural features. The temporal evolution in particular the opening-up and the closing of free-volume patches is associated with the single-particle dynamics, showing a crossover from ballistic to diffusive behavior.

  11. Environmental chemistry: Volume A

    SciTech Connect

    Yen, T.F.

    1999-08-01

    This is an extensive introduction to environmental chemistry for engineering and chemical professionals. The contents of Volume A include a brief review of basic chemistry prior to coverage of litho, atmo, hydro, pedo, and biospheres.

  12. Nineteenth International Cosmic Ray Conference. OG Sessions, Volume 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, F. C. (Compiler)

    1985-01-01

    Papers submitted for presentation at the 19th International Cosmic Ray Conference are compiled. This volume addresses cosmic ray sources and acceleration, interstellar propagation and nuclear interactions, and detection techniques and instrumentation.

  13. Geomagnetism. Volume I

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    The latest attempt to summarise the wealth of knowledge now available on geomagnetic phenomena has resulted in this multi-volume treatise, with contributions and reviews from many scientists. The first volume in the series contains a thorough review of all existing information on measuring the Earth's magnetic field, both on land and at sea, and includes a comparative analysis of the techniques available for this purpose.

  14. Precision volume measuring system

    SciTech Connect

    Klevgard, P.A.

    1984-11-01

    An engineering study was undertaken to calibrate and certify a precision volume measurement system that uses the ideal gas law and precise pressure measurements (of low-pressure helium) to ratio a known to an unknown volume. The constant-temperature, computer-controlled system was tested for thermodynamic instabilities, for precision (0.01%), and for bias (0.01%). Ratio scaling was used to optimize the quartz crystal pressure transducer calibration.

  15. Workpapers: Teaching English as a Second Language, Volume V.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Univ., Los Angeles.

    This is the fifth volume of work papers on the teaching of English as a second language. The topics are varied and cover a large area of related subjects. The titles in this volume include: "The Interaction of Dialect and Style in Urban American English,""Trends in English Abroad,""Some Thoughts on Bilingual Education for Mexican American Children…

  16. Assessment and Remediation of Contaminated Sediments (ARCS) program. Estimating contaminant losses from components of remediation alternatives for contaminated sediments. Report for March 1991-April 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, T.E.; Averette, D.E.; Olin, T.J.; Palermo, M.R.; Reible, D.D.

    1996-03-01

    Industrial and municipal point-source discharges and nonpoint source pollution from agricultural and urban areas over many years have contaminated bottom sediments in the rivers, harbors, and nearshore areas of the Great Lakes. Areas in the Great Lakes that remain seriously impaired have been designated as areas of concern (AOCs) under the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) 1988).

  17. Presentation: Assessing Remedy Effectiveness of Contaminated Sediments using Brown Bullheads and Benthic macroinvertebrates to contaminated sediments in the Ashtabula River before, during and after dredging

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Ashtabula River in Northeastern, Ohio has been designated by the International Joint Commission as a Great Lakes Area of Concern (www.epa.gov/glnpo/aoc), based on the listing of six beneficial use impairments (out of 14 possible) in the lower two miles of the river. In 2007, ...

  18. Volume MLS ray casting.

    PubMed

    Ledergerber, Christian; Guennebaud, Gaël; Meyer, Miriah; Bächer, Moritz; Pfister, Hanspeter

    2008-01-01

    The method of Moving Least Squares (MLS) is a popular framework for reconstructing continuous functions from scattered data due to its rich mathematical properties and well-understood theoretical foundations. This paper applies MLS to volume rendering, providing a unified mathematical framework for ray casting of scalar data stored over regular as well as irregular grids. We use the MLS reconstruction to render smooth isosurfaces and to compute accurate derivatives for high-quality shading effects. We also present a novel, adaptive preintegration scheme to improve the efficiency of the ray casting algorithm by reducing the overall number of function evaluations, and an efficient implementation of our framework exploiting modern graphics hardware. The resulting system enables high-quality volume integration and shaded isosurface rendering for regular and irregular volume data.

  19. Aperiodic Volume Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerke, Tim D.

    Presented in this thesis is an investigation into aperiodic volume optical devices. The three main topics of research and discussion are the aperiodic volume optical devices that we call computer-generated volume holograms (CGVH), defects within periodic 3D photonic crystals, and non-periodic, but ordered 3D quasicrystals. The first of these devices, CGVHs, are designed and investigated numerically and experimentally. We study the performance of multi-layered amplitude computer-generated volume holograms in terms of efficiency and angular/frequency selectivity. Simulation results show that such aperiodic devices can increase diffraction efficiency relative to periodic amplitude volume holograms while maintaining angular and wavelength selectivity. CGVHs are also designed as voxelated volumes using a new projection optimization algorithm. They are investigated using a volumetric diffraction simulation and a standard 3D beam propagation technique as well as experimentally. Both simulation and experiment verify that the structures function according to their design. These represent the first diffractive structures that have the capacity for generating arbitrary transmission and reflection wave fronts and that provide the ability for multiplexing arbitrary functionality given different illumination conditions. Also investigated and discussed in this thesis are 3D photonic crystals and quasicrystals. We demonstrate that these devices can be fabricated using a femtosecond laser direct writing system that is particularly appropriate for fabrication of such arbitrary 3D structures. We also show that these devices can provide 3D partial bandgaps which could become complete bandgaps if fabricated using high index materials or by coating lower index materials with high index metals. Our fabrication method is particularly suited to the fabrication of engineered defects within the periodic or quasi-periodic systems. We demonstrate the potential for fabricating defects within

  20. Time varying, multivariate volume data reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Ahrens, James P; Fout, Nathaniel; Ma, Kwan - Liu

    2010-01-01

    Large-scale supercomputing is revolutionizing the way science is conducted. A growing challenge, however, is understanding the massive quantities of data produced by large-scale simulations. The data, typically time-varying, multivariate, and volumetric, can occupy from hundreds of gigabytes to several terabytes of storage space. Transferring and processing volume data of such sizes is prohibitively expensive and resource intensive. Although it may not be possible to entirely alleviate these problems, data compression should be considered as part of a viable solution, especially when the primary means of data analysis is volume rendering. In this paper we present our study of multivariate compression, which exploits correlations among related variables, for volume rendering. Two configurations for multidimensional compression based on vector quantization are examined. We emphasize quality reconstruction and interactive rendering, which leads us to a solution using graphics hardware to perform on-the-fly decompression during rendering. In this paper we present a solution which addresses the need for data reduction in large supercomputing environments where data resulting from simulations occupies tremendous amounts of storage. Our solution employs a lossy encoding scheme to acrueve data reduction with several options in terms of rate-distortion behavior. We focus on encoding of multiple variables together, with optional compression in space and time. The compressed volumes can be rendered directly with commodity graphics cards at interactive frame rates and rendering quality similar to that of static volume renderers. Compression results using a multivariate time-varying data set indicate that encoding multiple variables results in acceptable performance in the case of spatial and temporal encoding as compared to independent compression of variables. The relative performance of spatial vs. temporal compression is data dependent, although temporal compression has the

  1. Deafness Annual, Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norris, Arthur G., Ed.

    Presented is the second of two volumes on deafness which contains 12 papers and a review of programs or grants sponsored by the federal government and other groups. Larry Stewart identifies the deaf in "A Truly Silent Minority". In the "Seven-Faces of Deafness", G. Loyd tells what deafness means to seven people. E. Mindel maintains that parents…

  2. Children's Literature. Volume 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Francelia, Ed.; Brockman, Bennett A., Ed.

    This volume applies critical literary standards to the field of children's literature in a long-range effort to improve its quality and teaching. Contributors and editors represent international scholarship in all of the humanities, as well as in the specific area of children's literature. Articles span topics from European children's literature…

  3. Liter - Metric Volume.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sisk, Diane

    This autoinstructional program, developed as part of a general science course, is offered for students in the middle schools. Mathematics of fractions and decimals is considered to be prerequisite knowledge. The behavioral objectives are directed toward mastery of determining volumes of solid objects using the water displacement method as well as…

  4. Introduction to the Volume.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emihovich, Catherine; Schroder, Barbara; Panofsky, Carolyn P.

    1999-01-01

    Introduces a volume that examines the issue of critical thinking and whether or not it is culturally specific, discussing recent research on the subject. The papers focus on critical thinking and culture, historical consciousness and critical thinking, critical thinking as cultural-historical practice, culture and the development of critical…

  5. Volunteer Voice. Volume IX.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Volunteer Voice, 1992

    1992-01-01

    This document consists of the three volume IX issues of "Volunteer Voice," a newsletter of the Tacoma Community House Training Project. The first issue consists of one teacher's personal account of English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) teaching and includes the following: an annotated list of ESL text books, a list of activities resources,…

  6. Volume measuring system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oele, J. S.

    1975-01-01

    Chamber is designed to be airtight; it includes face mask for person to breathe outside air so that he does not disturb chamber environment. Chamber includes piston to vary air volume inside. Also included are two microphone transducers which record pressure information inside chamber.

  7. Leadership Abstracts, Volume 10.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milliron, Mark D., Ed.

    1997-01-01

    The abstracts in this series provide brief discussions of issues related to leadership, administration, professional development, technology, and education in community colleges. Volume 10 for 1997 contains the following 12 abstracts: (1) "On Community College Renewal" (Nathan L. Hodges and Mark D. Milliron); (2) "The Community College Niche in a…

  8. Coulomb interactions and fermion condensation

    SciTech Connect

    Capstick, S.; Cutkosky, R.E.; Joensen, M.A. ); Wang, K.C. )

    1990-08-15

    The influence of the Coulomb interaction in states containing massless and flavorless fermion-antifermion pairs is studied, using a continuum formulation within the finite volume {ital S}{sup 3}. Several different forms for the Coulomb interaction are examined, including confining potentials as well as nonconfining potentials. The calculations show that if the interaction is strong enough, the Coulomb interaction leads to condensation of pairs, and that this condensation has a chiral character. The condensation does not depend on whether the interaction is confining. It is found that simplified variational approximations are not accurate enough for an adequate description of the states.

  9. Seismic engineering -- 1996. PVP-volume 340

    SciTech Connect

    Saleem, M.A.; Aggarwal, M.C.

    1996-12-01

    The 37 papers in this volume have been arranged under the following topical sections: advanced methods in seismic engineering (7 papers); high level dynamic response of piping systems (5); equipment seismic qualification (6); soil structure interaction (3); advanced seismic technology in Asian countries (8); developments in seismic codes and standards (8); and a panel discussion on the review of current issues by the Special Working Group on seismic rules. Papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  10. Variable volume calibration apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Hallman, R.L. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    An apparatus is provided for determining the volume of a closed chamber. The apparatus includes a body having a cylindrical cavity therein including a threaded rear portion and a closed front end, and a piston having a threaded portion which mates with threaded rear portion of the cavity and which reciprocates in the cavity. A gas-impermeable seal, which is carried by the piston in one embodiment, forms a closed chamber in the front end of the cavity. A linear-movement indicator, attached to the rear end of the piston, measures the reciprocating movement of the piston in the cavity, while a pressure sensing device, connected to the front end of the cavity, determines the pressure in the closed system. In use, a vessel, having a volume enclosing experimental materials, is also connected to the front end of the cavity, and pressure and piston movement measurements are made which enable calculation of a volume change in the vessels. The design and operation of this instrument are presented. 7 figs.

  11. Apodized Volume Bragg Gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokhov, Sergiy

    2015-03-01

    Reflective and transmissive volume Bragg grating (VBGs) are widely used in high power laser applications because of their large operational aperture and robustness. They are fabricated in photosensitive material through holographic recording of uniform interference pattern of two overlapping coherent waves obtained by splitting a flat-top shaped laser beam. The following thermal treatment produces permanent refractive index modulation (RIM). Reflective VBGs have fringes parallel to operational anti-reflective coated surfaces and they demonstrate narrow reflection bandwidth. Transmissive VBGs are cut with fringes perpendicular to surfaces and they are characterized by narrow angular selectivity. Uniform RIM causes secondary lobes in corresponding reflection and transmission spectra due to sharp boundary conditions for volume Bragg diffraction. We propose to create apodization of RIM by recording two interference patterns with slightly different parameters in the same volume which would create slow varying moire envelope of amplitude of RIM. Cutting the specimen at zeros of moire envelope with one sine semi-period thickness will produce VBGs apodized at sides which will reduce parasitic secondary lobes in spectra. In reflection geometry, two patterns of the same orientation with slightly different periods are required for apodization along Bragg wave vector. In transmission case, recording of the same interference patterns with small mutual rotation angle provides apodization in direction perpendicular to Bragg wave vector. Modeling results show significant improvement in selective properties of VBGs with such moire apodization.

  12. Results of test MA22 in the NASA/LaRC 31-inch CFHT on an 0.010-scale model (32-0) of the space shuttle configuration 3 to determine RCS jet flow field interaction, volume 1. [wind tunnel tests for interactions of aerodynamic heating on jet flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanipe, D. B.

    1976-01-01

    A wind tunnel test was conducted in the Langley Research Center 31-inch Continuous Flow Hypersonic Wind Tunnel from May 6, 1975 through June 3, 1975. The primary objectives of this test were the following: (1) to study the ability of the wind tunnel to repeat, on a run-to-run basis, data taken for identical configurations to determine if errors in repeatability could have a significant effect on jet interaction data, (2) to determine the effect of aerodynamic heating of the scale model on jet interaction, (3) to investigate the effects of elevon and body flap deflections on jet interaction, (4) to determine if the effects from jets fired separately along different axes can be added to equal the effects of the jets fired simultaneously (super position effects), (5) to study multiple jet effects, and (6) to investigate area ratio effects, i.e., the effect on jet interaction measurements of using wind tunnel nozzles with different area ratios in the same location. The model used in the test was a .010-scale model of the Space Shuttle Orbiter Configuration 3. The test was conducted at Mach 10.3 and a dynamic pressure of 150 psf. RCS chamber pressure was varied to simulate free flight dynamic pressures of 5, 7.5, 10, and 20 psf.

  13. Region-enhanced volume visualization and navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Michael G.; Nikolov, Stavri G.

    2000-04-01

    A rendering technique is presented that generates integrated intensity projection images for volumetric data with visual enhancement of the data within a region-of-interest. Animated displays result form moving this region through the data volume, either interactively or following a trajectory generated from the data itself. Enhancement is provided by applying a radially symmetric weighting function to each point within the data set based upon its position relative to the center of the region-of-interest and the viewpoint. The resultant integrated value is scaled using the cumulative weighting applied along the projection vector to set the displayed pixel intensity. By bounding the region- of-interest and maintaining unity weighing outside this volume, the rendering process may be decomposed into base and supplemental components. Both may be generated off-line. Alternately, interactive data exploration may be performed using either a pre-processed base projection or, to provide more flexibility, real-time generation of both components. In addition, rendered images may be comprised of base and supplemental components obtained from heterogeneous data volumes, the difference arising either due to processing of a single-modality data ste or by the use of registered multi-modality dat sets. Images are presented showing application of this technique to medical volumetric data sets obtained from MR, CT and ultrasound scanning. PC based software implementation on current hardware allows rendering rates that support interactive exploration of 2563 voxel data sets. Automatic path generation uses segmentation to isolate relevant structures followed by skeletonization to reduce these volumes to path segments. Linking these segments presents a number of problems if the resultant path is to be both efficient and traversed without distracting jumps or other artifacts. The use of back-tracking and the movement tempo are currently being investigate. Future research directions

  14. Size dependence of cavity volume: a molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Patel, Nisha; Dubins, David N; Pomès, Régis; Chalikian, Tigran V

    2012-02-01

    Partial molar volume, V°, has been used as a tool to sample solute hydration for decades. The efficacy of volumetric investigations of hydration depends on our ability to reliably discriminate between the cavity, V(C), and interaction, V(I), contributions to the partial molar volume. The cavity volume, V(C), consists of the intrinsic volume, V(M), of a solute molecule and the thermal volume, V(T), with the latter representing the volume of the effective void created around the solute. In this work, we use molecular dynamics simulations in conjunction with the Kirkwood-Buff theory to compute the partial molar volumes for organic solutes of varying sizes in water. We perform our computations using the Lennard-Jones and Coulombic pair potentials as well as truncated potentials which contain only the Lennard-Jones but not the Coulombic contribution. The partial molar volume computed with the Lennard-Jones potentials in the absence of the Coulombic term nearly coincides with the cavity volume, V(C). We determine the thermal volume, V(T), for each compound by subtracting its van der Waals volume, V(W), from V(C). Finally, we apply the spherical approximation of solute geometry to evaluate the thickness of the thermal volume, δ. Our results reveal an increase in the thickness of thermal volume, δ, with an increase in the size of the solute. This finding may be related to dewetting of large nonpolar solutes and the concomitant increase in the compressibility of water of hydration. PMID:22133917

  15. Environmental Report 1996, Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Harrach, R.J.

    1996-01-01

    This is Volume 2 of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s (LLNL`s) annual Environmental Report 1996, prepared for the US Department of Energy. Volume 2 supports Volume 1 summary data and is essentially a detailed data report that provides individual data points, where applicable. Volume 2 includes information on monitoring of air, air effluents, sewerable water, surface water, ground water, soil and sediment, vegetation and foodstuff, environmental radiation, and quality assurance.

  16. REFLECTION AND REFRACTION, VOLUME 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    KLAUS, DAVID J.; AND OTHERS

    THIS VOLUME 2 OF A TWO-VOLUME SET PROVIDES AUTOINSTRUCTION IN PHYSICS. THE UNITS COVERED IN THIS VOLUME ARE (1) REFLECTION OF LIGHT, (2) PHOTOMETRY, (3) POLARIZATION, (4) REFRACTION OF LIGHT, (5) SNELL'S LAW, (6) LENSES, FOCUS, AND FOCAL POINTS, (7) IMAGE FORMATION, AND (8) ABERRATIONS, THE EYE, AND MAGNIFICATION. THE INTRODUCTION AND UNITS ON…

  17. Calculus Students' Understanding of Volume

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorko, Allison; Speer, Natasha M.

    2013-01-01

    Researchers have documented difficulties that elementary school students have in understanding volume. Despite its importance in higher mathematics, we know little about college students' understanding of volume. This study investigated calculus students' understanding of volume. Clinical interview transcripts and written responses to volume…

  18. New volume and inverse volume operators for loop quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jinsong; Ma, Yongge

    2016-08-01

    A new alternative volume operator is constructed for loop quantum gravity by using the so-called cotriad operators as building blocks. It is shown that the new volume operator shares the same qualitative properties with the standard volume operator. Moreover, a new alternative inverse volume operator is also constructed in the light of the construction of the alternative volume operator, which is possessed of the same qualitative properties as those of the alternative volume operator. The new inverse volume operator can be employed to construct the Hamiltonian operator of matter fields, which may lead to an anomaly-free on-shell quantum constraint algebra without any special restriction on the regularization procedure for gravity coupled to matter fields.

  19. Correlations among brain gray matter volumes, age, gender, and hemisphere in healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Taki, Yasuyuki; Thyreau, Benjamin; Kinomura, Shigeo; Sato, Kazunori; Goto, Ryoi; Kawashima, Ryuta; Fukuda, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    To determine the relationship between age and gray matter structure and how interactions between gender and hemisphere impact this relationship, we examined correlations between global or regional gray matter volume and age, including interactions of gender and hemisphere, using a general linear model with voxel-based and region-of-interest analyses. Brain magnetic resonance images were collected from 1460 healthy individuals aged 20-69 years; the images were linearly normalized and segmented and restored to native space for analysis of global gray matter volume. Linearly normalized images were then non-linearly normalized and smoothed for analysis of regional gray matter volume. Analysis of global gray matter volume revealed a significant negative correlation between gray matter ratio (gray matter volume divided by intracranial volume) and age in both genders, and a significant interaction effect of age × gender on the gray matter ratio. In analyzing regional gray matter volume, the gray matter volume of all regions showed significant main effects of age, and most regions, with the exception of several including the inferior parietal lobule, showed a significant age × gender interaction. Additionally, the inferior temporal gyrus showed a significant age × gender × hemisphere interaction. No regional volumes showed significant age × hemisphere interactions. Our study may contribute to clarifying the mechanism(s) of normal brain aging in each brain region.

  20. Hypertools in image and volume visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Bossart, P.L.

    1996-06-17

    This paper describes our experience in image and volume visualization at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. After an introduction on visualization issues, we present a new software approach to the analysis and visualization of images and volumes. The efficiency of the visualization process is improved by letting the user combine small and reusable applications by the means of a machine-independent interpreted language such as Tcl/Tk. These hypertools can communicate with each other over a network, which has a direct impact on the design of graphical interfaces. We first describe the implementation of a flexible gray-scale image widget that can handle large data sets, provides complete control of the color palette and allows for manual and semi-interactive segmentation. This visualization tool can be embedded in a data-flow image processing environment to assess the quality of acquisition, preprocessing and filtering of raw data. This approach combines the simplicity of visual programming with the power of a high-level interpreted language. We show how hypertools can be used in surface and volume rendering and how they increase the interaction efficiency by performing complex or tedious tasks automatically. One biomedical application is presented.

  1. Postmenopausal hormone therapy, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and brain volumes

    PubMed Central

    Brinton, Roberta Diaz; Manson, JoAnn E.; Yaffe, Kristine; Hugenschmidt, Christina; Vaughan, Leslie; Craft, Suzanne; Edwards, Beatrice J.; Casanova, Ramon; Masaki, Kamal; Resnick, Susan M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To examine whether the effect of postmenopausal hormone therapy (HT) on brain volumes in women aged 65–79 years differs depending on type 2 diabetes status during postintervention follow-up of a randomized controlled clinical trial. Methods: The Women's Health Initiative randomized clinical trials assigned women to HT (0.625 mg/day conjugated equine estrogens with or without 2.5 mg/day medroxyprogesterone acetate) or placebo for an average of 5.6 years. A total of 1,402 trial participants underwent brain MRI 2.4 years after the trials; these were repeated in 699 women 4.7 years later. General linear models were used to assess the interaction between diabetes status and HT assignment on brain volumes. Results: Women with diabetes at baseline or during follow-up who had been assigned to HT compared to placebo had mean decrement in total brain volume of −18.6 mL (95% confidence interval [CI] −29.6, −7.6). For women without diabetes, this mean decrement was −0.4 (95% CI −3.8, 3.0) (interaction p = 0.002). This interaction was evident for total gray matter (p < 0.001) and hippocampal (p = 0.006) volumes. It was not evident for changes in brain volumes over follow-up or for ischemic lesion volumes and was not influenced by diabetes duration or oral medications. Conclusions: For women aged 65 years or older who are at increased risk for brain atrophy due to type 2 diabetes, prescription of postmenopausal HT is associated with lower gray matter (total and hippocampal) volumes. Interactions with diabetes and insulin resistance may explain divergent findings on how estrogen influences brain volume among older women. PMID:26163429

  2. Environmental report 1995. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Harrach, R.J.; Failor, R.A.; Gallegos, G.M.

    1996-09-01

    This is Volume 2 of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s (LLNL`s) annual Environmental Report 1995. This volume is intended to support summary data from Volume 1 and is essentially a detailed data report that provides additional data points, where applicable. Some summary data are also included in Volume 2, and more detailed accounts are given of sample collection and analytical methods. Volume 2 includes information in eight chapters on monitoring of air, air effluent, sewage, surface water, ground water, soil and sediment, vegetation and foodstuff, and environmental radiation, as well as three chapters on ground water protection, compliance self-monitoring and quality assurance.

  3. Fluid Volume Overload and Congestion in Heart Failure: Time to Reconsider Pathophysiology and How Volume Is Assessed.

    PubMed

    Miller, Wayne L

    2016-08-01

    Volume regulation, assessment, and management remain basic issues in patients with heart failure. The discussion presented here is directed at opening a reassessment of the pathophysiology of congestion in congestive heart failure and the methods by which we determine volume overload status. Peer-reviewed historical and contemporary literatures are reviewed. Volume overload and fluid congestion remain primary issues for patients with chronic heart failure. The pathophysiology is complex, and the simple concept of intravascular fluid accumulation is not adequate. The dynamics of interstitial and intravascular fluid compartment interactions and fluid redistribution from venous splanchnic beds to central pulmonary circulation need to be taken into account in strategies of volume management. Clinical bedside evaluations and right heart hemodynamic assessments can alert clinicians of changes in volume status, but only the quantitative measurement of total blood volume can help identify the heterogeneity in plasma volume and red blood cell mass that are features of volume overload in patients with chronic heart failure and help guide individualized, appropriate therapy-not all volume overload is the same.

  4. Space Operations Center, shuttle interaction study, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The feasibility of the shuttle remote manipulator system (SRMS)-aided space operations center (SOC)/orbiter berthing was evaluated to determine: (1) whether the initial rates between the SOC and the orbiter can be removed by the arm; (2) what is the best strategy to be used; (3) whether the post-capture and maneuvering loads are within the capability of the SRMS; (4) can the SOC berthing port be brought in the immediate proximity of the orbiter berthing port; and (5) what is the best way to remove the residual relative motions. Various notational conventions are established and various important locations on the orbiter and SOC structures are defined. Reference frames are defined together with the mass properties of both the SOC and the orbiter.

  5. Volume Visualizing High-Resolution Turbulence Computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clyne, John; Scheitlin, Tim; Weiss, Jeffrey B.

    Using several volume-visualization packages including a new package we developed called Volsh, we investigate a 25-Gbyte dataset from a 2563 computation of decaying quasi-geostrophic turbulence. We compare surface fitting and direct volume rendering approaches, as well as a number of techniques for producing feature-revealing spatial cues. We also study the pros and cons of using batch and interactive tools for visualizing the data and discuss the relative merits of using each approach. We find that each tool has its own advantages and disadvantages, and a combination of tools is most effective at exploring large four-dimensional scalar datasets. The resulting visualizations show several new phenomena in the dynamics of coherent vortices.

  6. Dynamic interactions in neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Arbib, M.A. ); Amari, S. )

    1989-01-01

    The study of neural networks is enjoying a great renaissance, both in computational neuroscience, the development of information processing models of living brains, and in neural computing, the use of neurally inspired concepts in the construction of intelligent machines. This volume presents models and data on the dynamic interactions occurring in the brain, and exhibits the dynamic interactions between research in computational neuroscience and in neural computing. The authors present current research, future trends and open problems.

  7. Variable-volume turbocharger

    SciTech Connect

    Nakazawa, N.; Matsura, Y.; Takemoto, T.; Kohketsu, S.

    1988-01-19

    A variable-volume turbocharger device is described comprising a turbine housing having at least first and second exhaust gas passages divided by a partition wall provided in the housing. The first exhaust gas passage has a large flow characteristic and the second exhaust gas passage has a small flow characteristic. A first valve means operable to open and shut the first exhaust gas passage, and a second valve means operative to open and shut the second exhaust gas passage independently from the first valve means, each of the valve means having a valve member which cooperates with a valve seat to open and shut the corresponding exhaust gas passage, the valve members being arranged so as to open toward the upstream side of the flowing direction of exhaust gas with respect to the valve seats.

  8. Soot Volume Fraction Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenberg, Paul S.; Ku, Jerry C.

    1994-01-01

    A new technique is described for the full-field determination of soot volume fractions via laser extinction measurements. This technique differs from previously reported point-wise methods in that a two-dimensional array (i.e., image) of data is acquired simultaneously. In this fashion, the net data rate is increased, allowing the study of time-dependent phenomena and the investigation of spatial and temporal correlations. A telecentric imaging configuration is employed to provide depth-invariant magnification and to permit the specification of the collection angle for scattered light. To improve the threshold measurement sensitivity, a method is employed to suppress undesirable coherent imaging effects. A discussion of the tomographic inversion process is provided, including the results obtained from numerical simulation. Results obtained with this method from an ethylene diffusion flame are shown to be in close agreement with those previously obtained by sequential point-wise interrogation.

  9. A practical approach to spectral volume rendering.

    PubMed

    Bergner, Steven; Möller, Torsten; Tory, Melanie; Drew, Mark S

    2005-01-01

    To make a spectral representation of color practicable for volume rendering, a new low-dimensional subspace method is used to act as the carrier of spectral information. With that model, spectral light material interaction can be integrated into existing volume rendering methods at almost no penalty. In addition, slow rendering methods can profit from the new technique of postillumination-generating spectral images in real-time for arbitrary light spectra under a fixed viewpoint. Thus, the capability of spectral rendering to create distinct impressions of a scene under different lighting conditions is established as a method of real-time interaction. Although we use an achromatic opacity in our rendering, we show how spectral rendering permits different data set features to be emphasized or hidden as long as they have not been entirely obscured. The use of postillumination is an order of magnitude faster than changing the transfer function and repeating the projection step. To put the user in control of the spectral visualization, we devise a new widget, a "light-dial," for interactively changing the illumination and include a usability study of this new light space exploration tool. Applied to spectral transfer functions, different lights bring out or hide specific qualities of the data. In conjunction with postillumination, this provides a new means for preparing data for visualization and forms a new degree of freedom for guided exploration of volumetric data sets.

  10. Lead poisoning of waterfowl by contaminated sediment in the Coeur D'Alene River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sileo, L.; Creekmore, L.H.; Audet, D.J.; Snyder, M.R.; Meteyer, C.U.; Franson, J.C.; Locke, L.N.; Smith, M.R.; Finley, D.L.

    2001-01-01

    The Coeur d'Alene River basin in Idaho has been contaminated by mine tailings that have impaired the health of wildlife since the early 1900s. In other parts of the world, virtually all lead poisoning of waterfowl is caused by the ingestion of manmade lead artifacts, primarily spent lead shotshell pellets or, occasionally, fishing sinkers. However, in the Coeur d'Alene River basin in Idaho, nonartifactual lead poisoning was the ultimate cause of death of most of 219 (77%) of 285 waterfowl carcasses that had been found sick or dead from 1992 through 1997. The majority of these 219 waterfowl (172 tundra swans [Cygnus columbianus], 33 Canada geese [Branta canadensis], and 14 other species) were poisoned by ingesting river sediment that was contaminated with lead. The next most common cause of death (20 instances, 7%) was lead poisoning accompanied by ingested shotshell pellets. The remaining 46 waterfowl succumbed to trauma, infectious diseases (aspergillosis, avian cholera, tuberculosis), or miscellaneous problems, or the cause of death was not determined.

  11. Passive Sampling Methods for Contaminated Sediments: Practical Guidance for Selection, Calibration, and Implementation

    EPA Science Inventory

    This article provides practical guidance on the use of passive sampling methods(PSMs) that target the freely dissolved concentration (Cfree) for improved exposure assessment of hydrophobic organic chemicals in sediments. Primary considerations for selecting a PSM for a specific a...

  12. An evaluation of the toxicity of contaminated sediments from Waukegan Harbor, Illinois, following remediation.

    PubMed

    Kemble, N E; Hardesty, D G; Ingersoll, C G; Johnson, B T; Dwyer, F J; MacDonald, D D

    2000-11-01

    Waukegan Harbor in Illinois was designated as a Great Lakes Area of Concern due to high concentrations of sediment-associated polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). The objective of this study was to evaluate the toxicity of 20 sediment samples collected after remediation (primarily dredging) of Waukegan Harbor for PCBs. A 42-day whole sediment toxicity test with the amphipod Hyalella azteca (28-day sediment exposure followed by a 14-day reproductive phase) and sediment toxicity tests with Microtox(R) were conducted to evaluate sediments from Waukegan Harbor. Endpoints measured were survival, growth, and reproduction (amphipods) and luminescent light emission (bacteria). Survival of amphipods was significantly reduced in 6 of the 20 sediment samples relative to the control. Growth of amphipods (either length or weight) was significantly reduced relative to the control in all samples. However, reproduction of amphipods identified only two samples as toxic relative to the control. The Microtox basic test, conducted with organic extracts of sediments identified only one site as toxic. In contrast, the Microtox solid-phase test identified about 50% of the samples as toxic. A significant negative correlation was observed between reproduction and the concentration of three polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) normalized to total organic carbon. Sediment chemistry and toxicity data were evaluated using sediment quality guidelines (consensus-based probable effect concentrations, PECs). Results of these analyses indicate that sediment samples from Waukegan Harbor were toxic to H. azteca contaminated at similar contaminant concentrations as sediment samples that were toxic to H. azteca from other areas of the United States. The relationship between PECs and the observed toxicity was not as strong for the Microtox test. The results of this study indicate that the first phase of sediment remediation in Waukegan Harbor successfully lowered concentrations of PCBs at the site. Though the sediments were generally not lethal, there were still sublethal effects of contaminants in sediments at this site observed on amphipods in long-term exposures (associated with elevated concentrations of metals, PCBs, and PAHs). PMID:11031305

  13. In-Situ Survival Mechanisms of U and Tc Reducing Bacteria in Contaminated Sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Krumholz, Lee R.

    2005-06-01

    Desulfovibrio desulfuricans G20 and Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 are model subsurface organisms for studying genes involving in situ radionuclide transformation and sediment survival. Our research objective for this project has been to develop a signature-tagged mutagenesis (STM) procedure and use it to identify mutants in genes of these subsurface bacteria involved in sediment survival and radionuclide reduction. The mutant genes identified in these studies allow us for the first time to describe at the genetic level microbial processes that are actually being used by environmental bacteria while growing in their natural ecosystems. Identification of these genes revealed facets of microbial physiology and ecology that are not accessible through laboratory studies. Ultimately, this information may be used to optimize bioremediation or other engineered microbial processes. Furthermore, the identification of a mutant in a gene conferring multidrug resistance in strain MR-1 shows that this widespread mechanism of antibiotic resistance, likely has its origins as a mechanism of bacterial defense against naturally occurring toxins. Studies with D. desulfuricans G20: The STM procedure first involved generating a library of 5760 G20 mutants and screening for potential non-survivors in subsurface sediment microcosms. After two rounds of screening, a total of 117 mutants were confirmed to be true non-survivors. 97 transposon insertion regions have been sequenced to date. Upon further analysis of these mutants, we classified the sediment survival genes into COG functional categories. STM mutant insertions were located in genes encoding proteins related to metabolism (33%), cellular processes (42%), and information storage and processing (17%). We also noted 8% of STM mutants identified had insertions in genes for hypothetical proteins or unknown functions. Interestingly, at least 64 of these genes encode cytoplasmic proteins, 46 encode inner membrane proteins, and only 7 encode periplasmic space and outer membrane associated proteins. Through blast search analysis, we also showed that 81 out of 94 proteins shown to be important in sediment survival have homologs in D. vulgaris, 70 have homologs in Geobacter metallireducens, and 69 have homologs in Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA. Some interesting proteins include ribonucleotide reductase and chemotaxis related proteins. Ribonucleotide reductase catalyzes the reductive synthesis of deoxyribonucleotides from their corresponding ribonucleotides, providing the precursors necessary for DNA synthesis. Two ribonucleotide reductase genes (nrdE, nrdD) were found to be essential for G20 survival in the sediment, but not essential for growth in the lactate-sulfate medium. Bacterial methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins (MCP) respond to changes in the concentration of attractants and repellents in the environment.

  14. A tiered assessment framework to evaluate human health risk of contaminated sediment.

    PubMed

    Greenfield, Ben K; Melwani, Aroon R; Bay, Steven M

    2015-07-01

    For sediment contaminated with bioaccumulative pollutants (e.g., PCBs and organochorine pesticides), human consumption of seafood that contain bioaccumulated sediment-derived contaminants is a well-established exposure pathway. Historically, regulation and management of this bioaccumulation pathway has focused on site-specific risk assessment. The state of California (United States) is supporting the development of a consistent and quantitative sediment assessment framework to aid in interpreting a narrative objective to protect human health. The conceptual basis of this framework focuses on 2 key questions: 1) do observed pollutant concentrations in seafood from a given site pose unacceptable health risks to human consumers? and 2) is sediment contamination at a site a significant contributor to seafood contamination? The first question is evaluated by interpreting seafood tissue concentrations at the site, based on health risk calculations. The second question is evaluated by interpreting site-specific sediment chemistry data using a food web bioaccumulation model. The assessment framework includes 3 tiers (screening assessment, site assessment, and refined site assessment), which enables the assessment to match variations in data availability, site complexity, and study objectives. The second and third tiers use a stochastic simulation approach, incorporating information on variability and uncertainty of key parameters, such as seafood contaminant concentration and consumption rate by humans. The framework incorporates site-specific values for sensitive parameters and statewide values for difficult to obtain or less sensitive parameters. The proposed approach advances risk assessment policy by incorporating local data into a consistent region-wide problem formulation, applying best available science in a streamlined fashion. PMID:25641876

  15. BIODEGRADATION OF SEDIMENT-BOUND PAHS IN FIELD-CONTAMINATED SEDIMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) has been reported to occur under aerobic, sulfate reducing, and denitrifying conditions. PAHs present in contaminated sites, however, are known for their persistence. Most published studies were conducted in systems wh...

  16. A Feasibility Study On Pd/Mg Application In Historically Contaminated Sediments And PCB Spiked Substrates

    EPA Science Inventory

    A vast majority of literature on bimetals deals with aqueous contaminants, very little being on organics strongly adsorbed on sediments and hence very challenging to remediate. Having previously reported materials, mechanistic and parametric aspects of PCB dechlorination with Pd...

  17. EVALUATION OF A FLUOROMETRIC SCREENING METHOD FOR PREDICTING TOTAL PAH CONCENTRATIONS IN CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A flurorometric screening method was used to estimate total polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon concentrations in sediments collected from the St. Louis River Area of Concern in northeastern Minnesota. Sediments were collected as part of a Regional Environmental Monitoring and Asses...

  18. Rhizodegradation potential and tolerance of Avicennia marina (Forsk.) Vierh in phenanthrene and pyrene contaminated sediments.

    PubMed

    Jia, Hui; Wang, He; Lu, Haoliang; Jiang, Shan; Dai, Minyue; Liu, Jingchun; Yan, Chongling

    2016-09-15

    A pot experiment was conducted to investigate the dissipation of phenanthrene and pyrene in spiked sediments with presence of Avicennia marina (Forsk.) Vierh. The rhizosphere environment was set up using a self-design nylon rhizo-bag which divided the sediment into the rhizosphere and non-rhizosphere. Results showed that the dissipation of phenanthrene and pyrene were significantly enhanced in the rhizosphere compared with non-rhizosphere sediments. Plant roots promoted dissipation significantly greater than the contribution of direct plant uptake and accumulation of phenanthrene and pyrene. The activities of antioxidant and detoxification enzymes in roots and leaves significantly increased against oxidative stress with increasing PAH concentrations. Furthermore, a significant relationship (R(2)>0.91) between dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations and the residual of PAHs in rhizosphere and non-rhizosphere sediments was observed after 120days planting. Results indicated that rhizome mediation with A. marina is a useful approach to promote the depletion of PAHs in contaminated mangrove sediments. PMID:27373941

  19. A tiered assessment framework to evaluate human health risk of contaminated sediment.

    PubMed

    Greenfield, Ben K; Melwani, Aroon R; Bay, Steven M

    2015-07-01

    For sediment contaminated with bioaccumulative pollutants (e.g., PCBs and organochorine pesticides), human consumption of seafood that contain bioaccumulated sediment-derived contaminants is a well-established exposure pathway. Historically, regulation and management of this bioaccumulation pathway has focused on site-specific risk assessment. The state of California (United States) is supporting the development of a consistent and quantitative sediment assessment framework to aid in interpreting a narrative objective to protect human health. The conceptual basis of this framework focuses on 2 key questions: 1) do observed pollutant concentrations in seafood from a given site pose unacceptable health risks to human consumers? and 2) is sediment contamination at a site a significant contributor to seafood contamination? The first question is evaluated by interpreting seafood tissue concentrations at the site, based on health risk calculations. The second question is evaluated by interpreting site-specific sediment chemistry data using a food web bioaccumulation model. The assessment framework includes 3 tiers (screening assessment, site assessment, and refined site assessment), which enables the assessment to match variations in data availability, site complexity, and study objectives. The second and third tiers use a stochastic simulation approach, incorporating information on variability and uncertainty of key parameters, such as seafood contaminant concentration and consumption rate by humans. The framework incorporates site-specific values for sensitive parameters and statewide values for difficult to obtain or less sensitive parameters. The proposed approach advances risk assessment policy by incorporating local data into a consistent region-wide problem formulation, applying best available science in a streamlined fashion.

  20. An evaluation of the toxicity of contaminated sediments from Waukegan Harbor, Illinois, following remediation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kemble, N.E.; Hardesty, D.G.; Ingersoll, C.G.; Johnson, B.T.; Dwyer, F.J.; MacDonald, D.D.

    2000-01-01

    Waukegan Harbor in Illinois was designated as a Great Lakes Area of Concern due to high concentrations of sediment-associated polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). The objective of this study was to evaluate the toxicity of 20 sediment samples collected after remediation (primarily dredging) of Waukegan Harbor for PCBs. A 42-day whole sediment toxicity test with the amphipod Hyalella azteca (28-day sediment exposure followed by a 14-day reproductive phase) and sediment toxicity tests with Microtox® were conducted to evaluate sediments from Waukegan Harbor. Endpoints measured were survival, growth, and reproduction (amphipods) and luminescent light emission (bacteria). Survival of amphipods was significantly reduced in 6 of the 20 sediment samples relative to the control. Growth of amphipods (either length or weight) was significantly reduced relative to the control in all samples. However, reproduction of amphipods identified only two samples as toxic relative to the control. The Microtox basic test, conducted with organic extracts of sediments identified only one site as toxic. In contrast, the Microtox solid-phase test identified about 50% of the samples as toxic. A significant negative correlation was observed between reproduction and the concentration of three polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) normalized to total organic carbon. Sediment chemistry and toxicity data were evaluated using sediment quality guidelines (consensus-based probable effect concentrations, PECs). Results of these analyses indicate that sediment samples from Waukegan Harbor were toxic to H. azteca contaminated at similar contaminant concentrations as sediment samples that were toxic to H. azteca from other areas of the United States. The relationship between PECs and the observed toxicity was not as strong for the Microtox test. The results of this study indicate that the first phase of sediment remediation in Waukegan Harbor successfully lowered concentrations of PCBs at the site. Though the sediments were generally not lethal, there were still sublethal effects of contaminants in sediments at this site observed on amphipods in long-term exposures (associated with elevated concentrations of metals, PCBs, and PAHs).

  1. Vadose zone microbial community structure and activity in metal/radionuclide contaminated sediments. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Balkwill, David L.

    2002-08-17

    This final technical report describes the research carried out during the final two months of the no-cost extension ending 11/14/01. The primary goals of the project were (1) to determine the potential for transformation of Cr(VI) (oxidized, mobile) to Cr(III) (reduced, immobile) under unsaturated conditions as a function of different levels and combinations of (a) chromium, (b) nitrate (co-disposed with Cr), and (c) molasses (inexpensive bioremediation substrate), and (2) to determine population structure and activity in experimental treatments by characterization of the microbial community by signature biomarker analysis and by RT-PCR and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and 16S ribosomal RNA genes. It was determined early in the one-year no-cost extension period that the T-RFLP approach was problematic in regard to providing information on the identities of microorganisms in the samples examined. As a result, it could not provide the detailed information on microbial community structure that was needed to assess the effects of treatments with chromium, nitrate, and/or molasses. Therefore, we decided to obtain the desired information by amplifying (using TR-PCR, with the same primers used for T-RFLP) and cloning 16S rRNA gene sequences from the same RNA extracts that were used for T-RFLP analysis. We also decided to use a restriction enzyme digest procedure (fingerprinting procedure) to place the clones into types. The primary focus of the research carried out during this report period was twofold: (a) to complete the sequencing of the clones, and (b) to analyze the clone sequences phylogenetically in order to determine the relatedness of the bacteria detected in the samples to each other and to previously described genera and species.

  2. Bioavailability of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from a historically contaminated sediment core

    SciTech Connect

    Harkey, G.A.; Van Hoof, P.L.; Landrum, P.F.

    1995-09-01

    To determine changes in bioavailability of selected polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) with sediment aging, Lumbriculus variegatus were exposed for 4 weeks to sediment core sections taken from a contaminated lake. Core depths included surficial (0 to 4 cm), 4- to 8-, 12- to 16-, 28- to 32-, and 44- to 48-cm sections deposited for approximately 1899 to 1993, and were known to be historically contaminated with PAHs. Bioaccumulation was maximal at the 12- to 16-cm depth (circa 1967) where sediment PAH concentrations were greatest. Accumulation was generally below detection limits in the 0- to 4-cm depths, even though sediment concentrations of some compounds were comparable to those at the 12- to 16-cm depth where accumulation was great enough to generate accurate kinetics curves. Accumulation peaked at about 96 h, then declined over the remainder of the study for the lower-molecular-weight PAHs. For most higher-molecular-weight PAHs, accumulation peaked at about 2 weeks, then declined only slightly after 4 weeks. The differential bioavailability observed between surficial and at-depth core sections raises questions concerning the adequacy of results generated from toxicity and bioaccumulation tests routinely conducted surficial sediments.

  3. Mercury isotope signatures in contaminated sediments as a tracer for local industrial pollution sources.

    PubMed

    Wiederhold, Jan G; Skyllberg, Ulf; Drott, Andreas; Jiskra, Martin; Jonsson, Sofi; Björn, Erik; Bourdon, Bernard; Kretzschmar, Ruben

    2015-01-01

    Mass-dependent fractionation (MDF) and mass-independent fractionation (MIF) may cause characteristic isotope signatures of different mercury (Hg) sources and help understand transformation processes at contaminated sites. Here, we present Hg isotope data of sediments collected near industrial pollution sources in Sweden contaminated with elemental liquid Hg (mainly chlor-alkali industry) or phenyl-Hg (paper industry). The sediments exhibited a wide range of total Hg concentrations from 0.86 to 99 μg g(-1), consisting dominantly of organically-bound Hg and smaller amounts of sulfide-bound Hg. The three phenyl-Hg sites showed very similar Hg isotope signatures (MDF δ(202)Hg: -0.2‰ to -0.5‰; MIF Δ(199)Hg: -0.05‰ to -0.10‰). In contrast, the four sites contaminated with elemental Hg displayed much greater variations (δ(202)Hg: -2.1‰ to 0.6‰; Δ(199)Hg: -0.19‰ to 0.03‰) but with distinct ranges for the different sites. Sequential extractions revealed that sulfide-bound Hg was in some samples up to 1‰ heavier in δ(202)Hg than organically-bound Hg. The selectivity of the sequential extraction was tested on standard materials prepared with enriched Hg isotopes, which also allowed assessing isotope exchange between different Hg pools. Our results demonstrate that different industrial pollution sources can be distinguished on the basis of Hg isotope signatures, which may additionally record fractionation processes between different Hg pools in the sediments.

  4. Genotype and toxicity relationships among Hyalella azteca: II. Acute exposure to fluoranthene-contaminated sediment

    SciTech Connect

    Duan, Y.; Guttman, S.I.; Oris, J.T.; Huang, X.; Burton, G.A.

    2000-05-01

    This study examined the genotypic responses of Hyalella azteca to the toxicity of sediment contaminated by the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) fluoranthene. The authors monitored the time to death for 696 H. azteca exposed to ultraviolet light and sediment spiked with fluoranthene. The survival distribution functions within the genotypes at each of these variable allozyme loci (acid phosphatase [ACP*], glucose-6-phosphate isomerase [GPI*], and phosphoglucomutase [PGM*]) were compared using a long-rank test. Results showed significant differences among SDFs at all three loci. No association of heterozygosity with time to death was observed. The homozygote ACP*-CC was associated with decreased survivorship compared with ACP*-AA, ACP*-BB, and ACP*-AB. However, GPI*-AA was associated with increased survivorship compared with GPI*-BB, GPI*-CC, and GPI*-BC. Significant differences in resistance also were observed for PGM*-BB versus either PGM*-AC or PGM*-BC. These results indicate that differential resistance to PAH phototoxicity was genetically related, producing significant alteration in the frequencies of several genotypes in the population.

  5. Long-term autonomous resistivity monitoring of oil-contaminated sediments from the Deepwater Horizon spill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heenan, J. W.; Slater, L. D.; Ntarlagiannis, D.; Atekwana, E. A.; Ross, C.; Nolan, J. T.; Atekwana, E. A.; Werkema, D. D.; Fathepure, B.

    2012-12-01

    We conducted a long-term electrical resistivity survey at Grand Terre 1 (GT1) Island off the coast of Louisiana, a site contaminated with crude oil associated with the April 2010 BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Electrical resistivity has proven sensitivity to biogeochemical processes associated with the biodegradation of hydrocarbons in the subsurface. However, most of these studies have been in freshwater environments and for aged spills. The BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill therefore provided an unprecedented opportunity to capture the early time biogeophysical signals resulting from the physical, chemical and microbial transformation of crude oil in highly saline environments. We used a multi-channel resistivity system powered by solar panels to obtain continuous measurements twice a day on both a surface array and two shallow borehole arrays. This system operated for approximately 1.5 years and provided a unique long-term dataset of resistivity changes. Temperature and specific conductance values for the shallow groundwater were continuously logged. . Resistivity changes likely associated with biodegradation processes were then isolated from these environmental factors by modeling. In addition, groundwater was sampled for geochemical analyses from wells installed at the study site and soil samples were collected for microbial analyses at several locations, including both contaminated and uncontaminated locations. Microcosms were set up to determine the biodegradation potential of indigenous populations, and microbial diversity analysis was used to determine microbial community composition. Surface and borehole resistivity arrays revealed an initial resistive anomaly co-located with the known contamination. Pixel time series analysis of an inverted time sequence of resistivity sections highlighted differing responses between contaminated and uncontaminated locations. The contaminated locations exhibit persistent resistivity decreases over time, whereas areas outside of the contaminated location exhibit relatively uniform resistivity or show clear evidence of seasonal effect. Temperature-corrected resistivity changes show no direct correlation with pore fluid specific conductance changes, suggesting that specific conductance changes (e.g. due to tides) have little influence on imaged resistivity structure. Microbial data suggest that resistivity changes within the contaminated location resulted from biodegradation, showing the presence of native populations capable of degrading aromatic hydrocarbons at salinities ranging from 6 to 15 % NaCl within the contaminated location. Aqueous geochemical measurements performed on samples from the site further indicate that at depth intervals coincident with the resistivity anomaly, marked increases in the concentration of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) were observed suggesting biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbon although other DIC generating processes such as organic matter degradation coupled to sulfate and iron reduction were also prominent. This experiment demonstrates the potential viability of long-term autonomous electrical monitoring as a means of decreasing the frequency of more costly and invasive chemical analysis of natural attenuation.

  6. Pyrolysis GC-MS and NMR studies of humics in contaminated sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Higashi, R.M.; Fan, T.W.M.; Lane, A.N.

    1994-12-31

    Sediment ``humics`` play a major role in sorption and chemical reactions of organic and metal pollutants, as well as of nutrients, detritus, and other naturally-occurring chemicals. Not surprisingly, the chemical structure of humics is very important in this regard. The problem is, humics are among the most complex and least-understood substances in the world. This is because the primary structure is heterologous, unlike most other macromolecules which are polymeric; thus, researchers could not obtain coherent structures to identify with properties. However, recent advances in NMR spectroscopy and pyrolysis GC-MS have enabled researchers to begin relating primary and higher order structural motifs germane to the chemistry of the refractory humics. The authors have explored various means of sediment extraction for humics analysis by these techniques, including direct analysis of unextracted sediments. Marine sediments from near produced water discharges, salt marshes, and dredge material were surveyed. The study has revealed interpretive pitfalls, depending on the method of humic extraction. These difficulties are expected since the approach is at its infancy, but the overall approach is clearly useful in probing the humic structure profile of marine sediments.

  7. EPA'S FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF INNOVATIVE CAPPING TECHNOLOGIES FOR THE RISK MANAGEMENT OF CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Research on capping technologies is directed at assessing the effectiveness of innovative capping materials, factors that control contaminant release at the sediment-water interface, installation of cap, resuspension mechanism, and gas ebullition. U.S. EPA's Land Remediation and ...

  8. Arsenic Mobilization from Contaminated Sediments: A Full-scale Experiment in Progress

    SciTech Connect

    O'Day, P A; Campbell, K; Dixit, S; Hering, J G

    2004-02-03

    The mobilization of arsenic was examined in a system where the deposition of iron and arsenic have been substantially modified by large-scale manipulations. This engineering practice was designed to decrease arsenic concentrations in water supplied to the City of Los Angeles. Accomplishing this objective, however, has resulted in significant accumulation of arsenic and iron in the sediments of a reservoir on the Los Angeles Aqueduct. Arsenic and iron are released into the porewater at depth in the sediment, consistent with reductive dissolution of iron(III) oxyhydroxides. Factors influencing the possible re-sorption of arsenic onto residual iron(III) oxyhydroxides solids have been examined. Reduction of As(V) to As(III) alone cannot account for arsenic mobilization since arsenic occurs in the solid phase as As(III) well above the depth at which it is released into the porewater. Competition from other porewater constituents could suppress re-sorption of arsenic released by reductive dissolution.

  9. STABLE CHLORINE ISOTOPIC COMPOSITIONS OF AROCLORS AND ARCLOR-CONTAMINATED SEDIMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    An exploratory investigation was conducted to evaluate if stable chlorine isotopic ratios of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) could be useful in studying the processes that determine their transport and fate in the environment. First, we determined the variability of 37Cl in the...

  10. Remediation of benzo(a)pyrene in contaminated sediments using peroxy-acid.

    PubMed

    N'Guessan, Adeola L; Levitt, Jeffrey S; Nyman, Marianne C

    2004-06-01

    Release of benzo(a)pyrene is of an environmental concern due to its toxic nature. To elucidate the degradation of benzo(a)pyrene in lake sediments an advanced oxidation process (AOP) employing peroxy-acids as oxidizing agents was investigated. The sediments used in this study were collected from Lake Macatawa (Holland, MI) throughout the eastern basin and ranged in composition from sandy to silty-clay. Laboratory experiments were made by exposing spiked sediment samples to a 1:1:1 v/v/v mixture of hydrogen peroxide/acetic acid/deionized (DI) water solution. Analytical measurements were performed using gas chromatography equipped with a flame ionization detector. From the AOP experiments, transformation of benzo(a)pyrene was observed in both sediment types over a period of 24-h. The disappearance of the parent compound seemed more rapid with the use of propionic acid than with acetic acid, a behavior that is not yet well understood. The organic acid, DI water, and hydrogen peroxide controls did not demonstrate applicable degradation, suggesting that the disappearance of the parent compound was related to the peroxy-acid process.

  11. Identification of Reprocessed Depleted Uranium in Contaminated Sediments From Cs-137 Activity Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnason, J. G.; Bopp, R. F.

    2006-05-01

    Measurements of U series isotopes and fission products can be used to distinguish the relative contributions of natural and anthropogenic sources in U-contaminated sites. Anthropogenic sources include enriched uranium, depleted uranium (DU) byproduct from ore enrichment, and DU byproduct from spent fuel reprocessing. From 1958 to 1984 the National Lead industries plant in Colonie, New York, USA, emitted more than four metric tons of uranium as microscopic uranium oxide aerosols within a 1 km radius of the plant. Previous studies of a 3-m-long sediment core from Patroon Reservoir, located 1 km downstream of the plant, indicate that between 1.8 and 1.0 m depth, U concentrations are more than 100 times natural background and consist of 25 to 95 percent depleted uranium based on alpha spectroscopy. We measured 18 samples by gamma spectroscopy to better constrain the chronology of the core. Cesium-137 shows two activity peaks, one at approximately 2.0 m and another, broader peak between 1.5 and 1.0 m depth. The lower peak corresponds to the global fallout maximum of the mid 1960's and indicates a 5.5-6 cm/yr sedimentation rate that is consistent with the excess Pb-210 profile. In contrast, the upper Cs-137 peak corresponds to the interval containing DU, and suggests that there is a DU component derived from spent nuclear fuel. This hypothesis is consistent with a published report of U-236 detected in DU particles collected in air filters 15 km away at the Knolls Atomic Power Lab during the time of plant operation. It can be further tested through high resolution isotopic measurements of U-236 in the sediments themselves. Depleted uranium derived from spent fuel and containing U-236 will have higher total activity than DU derived from U ore and, as a result, could represent a greater hazard in the environment.

  12. Effects of lead-contaminated sediment and nutrition on mallard duckling brain growth and biochemistry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Douglas-Stroebel, E.; Hoffman, D.J.; Brewer, G.L.; Sileo, L.

    2004-01-01

    Day-old mallard (Anas platyryhnchos) ducklings received either a clean sediment (24%) supplemented control diet, Coeur d'Alene River Basin, Idaho (CDARB) sediment (3449 ug/g lead) supplemented diets at 12% or 24%, or a positive control diet (24% clean sediment with equivalent lead acetate to the 24% CDARB diet) for 6 weeks. The 12% CDARB diet resulted in a geometric mean concentration of 396 ppb (WW) brain lead with decreased brain protein and ATP concentrations but increased oxidized glutathione (GSSG) relative to the control diet. The 24% CDARB diet resulted in a concentration of 485 ppb brain lead with lower brain weight and ATP concentration than controls but higher concentrations of reduced glutathione (GSH) and calcium. Lead acetate accumulated twice as well as CDARB derived lead and resulted in histopathological lesions of the brain. With a combination of a suboptimal diet and 24% CDARB, brain lead concentration was higher (594 ppb) than with 24% CDARB in the standard diet, histopathological lesions became apparent and GSH was higher than suboptimal diet controls.

  13. Effects of lead-contaminated sediment and nutrition on mallard duckling brain growth and biochemistry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Douglas-Stroebel, E.; Hoffman, D.J.; Brewer, G.L.; Sileo, L.

    2004-01-01

    Day-old mallard (Anas platyryhnchos) ducklings received either a clean sediment (24%) supplemented control diet, Coeur d'Alene River Basin, Idaho (CDARB) sediment (3449 I?g/g lead) supplemented diets at 12% or 24%, or a positive control diet (24% clean sediment with equivalent lead acetate to the 24% CDARB diet) for 6 weeks. The 12% CDARB diet resulted in a geometric mean concentration of 396 ppb (WW) brain lead with decreased brain protein and ATP concentrations but increased oxidized glutathione (GSSG) relative to the control diet. The 24% CDARB diet resulted in a concentration of 485 ppb brain lead with lower brain weight and ATP concentration than controls but higher concentrations of reduced glutathione (GSH) and calcium. Lead acetate accumulated twice as well as CDARB derived lead and resulted in histopathological lesions of the brain. With a combination of a suboptimal diet and 24% CDARB, brain lead concentration was higher (594 ppb) than with 24% CDARB in the standard diet, histopathological lesions became apparent and GSH was higher than suboptimal diet controls.

  14. Assessing Organic Contaminant Fluxes from Contaminated Sediments Following Dam Removal in an Urbanized River

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study, methods and approaches were developed and tested to assess changes in contaminant fluxes resulting from dam removal in a riverine system. Sediment traps and passive samplers were deployed to measure particulate and dissolved PAHs and PCBs in the water column prior...

  15. Assessing the risk of metal mixtures in contaminated sediments on Chironomus riparius based on cytosolic accumulation.

    PubMed

    Péry, Alexandre R R; Geffard, Alain; Conrad, Arnaud; Mons, Raphaël; Garric, Jeanne

    2008-11-01

    Sediments usually contain mixtures of trace metals introduced via natural geochemical processes and anthropogenic activities. Kinetics and effects of these metals are strongly dependent both on the composition of the mixture and on the physico-chemical characteristics of the sediment. Relating effects to metal concentration may consequently be advised. However, total accumulation may be a poor predictor of metal toxicity for Chironomus riparius exposed to contaminated field sediments. As an alternative, we proposed to relate effects on Chironomus growth with cytosolic metal accumulation, measured in larvae after a short exposure period. Dose-response relationships were derived for zinc, copper, and cadmium through single-metal exposure data analysed with toxicokinetics and toxicodynamics models. They permitted, on the basis of cytosolic accumulation measures, to predict successfully the effects of mixtures of cadmium, zinc, and copper on the growth of larvae exposed to spiked sediments, as well as to field sediments in which zinc and copper were assumed to be predominant. PMID:18514899

  16. SEDIMENT TOXICITY EVALUATION OF EXTRACTS OF ORGANIC CHEMICALS FROM CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS: EVALUATION OF AN EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Most solid-phase sediment TIE techniques for organic chemicals have been focused on the addition of sorbents, such as the carbonaceous resin, Ambersorb 1500. While these sorbents have shown some promise for indicating when non-polar organic chemicals may be contributing to toxici...

  17. Chronic effects of contaminated sediment on Daphnia magna and Chironomus tentans (journal version)

    SciTech Connect

    Nebeker, A.V.; Onjukka, S.T.; Cairns, M.A.

    1988-01-01

    Chronic tests were conducted with Daphnia magna (cladoceran) and Chironomus tentans (midge) to determine their usefulness as test organisms for chronic sediment assays, and to estimate the potential long-term impact of contaminated freshwater sediments and contaminated Superfund-site soils on freshwater invertebrates. These two species were used successfully in acute sediment tests and were shown to be useful in chronic tests in water.

  18. Chronic effects of contaminated sediment on Daphnia magna and Chironomus tentans

    SciTech Connect

    Nebeker, A.V.; Onjukka, S.T.; Cairns, M.A.

    1988-10-01

    Chronic tests were conducted with Daphnia magna (cladoceran) and Chironomus tentans (midge) to determine their usefulness as test organisms for chronic sediment assays, and to estimate the potential long-term impact of contaminated freshwater sediments and contaminated Superfund site soils on freshwater invertebrates. These two species have been used successfully in acute sediment tests, and have been shown to be useful in chronic tests in water--only bioassays.

  19. Differences in oxidative stress between young Canada geese and mallards exposed to lead-contaminated sediment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mateo, R.; Hoffman, D.J.

    2001-01-01

    Lead (Pb) exposure causes an increase in tissue lipid peroxides and variation in glutathione (GSH) concentration, which can be related to peroxidative damage of cell membranes in Pb poisoned animals. Species and individual variation in sensitivity to Pb poisoning among animals may be due to differential resistance to oxidative stress. We compared the effects of oxidative stress caused by Pb exposure (1.7, 414 and 828 ig/g of diet) for the first six weeks in growing young of two species of waterfowl, Canada geese (Branta canadensis) and mallards (Anas platyrhynchos), with the first species being possibly more sensitive to Pb poisoning based on previous field and laboratory observations. Blood and liver Pb concentrations increased more in mallards than in geese; this may be explained on the basis of body weight, being 3.2 times higher in geese, and hepatic metabolism where GSH-S-transferase activity is 2.9 fold higher in geese and presumably has a role in the binding of Pb to GSH and subsequent biliary excretion. In contrast, mallards showed higher hepatic levels of GSH and activities of GSH peroxidase (GPX) and GSH reductase (GR). Although both species showed an increase in hepatic GSH concentration with Pb exposure, the increase of lipid peroxidation with Pb exposure was more significant in geese. Within treatment groups, hepatic GSH concentrations were inversely related to liver Pb concentration in both species, which may correspond to the role of GSH in Pb excretion. Hepatic GSH was also inversely related to hepatic lipid peroxidation, but only in mallards and in agreement with the differences observed in GPX and GR activities. The lower resistance to lipid peroxidation of Canada geese may explain why birds of this species found dead in the field by Pb shot ingestion often have a lower number of shot in the gizzard and lower liver Pb concentrations than mallards.

  20. Ecological-evaluation of organotin-contaminated sediment. Final report, March-June 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Salazar, M.H.; Salazar, S.M.

    1985-07-01

    A standard dredged material bioassay was conducted with high levels of organotins to assess the toxicity and bioavailability of organotins associated with sediment and to determine if this sediment would qualify for ocean disposal. This study concluded that high levels of organotins in sediments do not a priori indicate a significant adverse impact on the marine environment after ocean disposal. The sediment tested would qualify for ocean disposal under the present guidelines administered by the Environmental Protection Agency and the Army Corps of Engineers. Particulate-phase tests were conducted with Acanthomysis sculpta (mysid), Citharichthys stigmaeus (flatfish), and Acartia tonsa (copepod). Solid-phase tests were conducted with A. sculpta, Macoma nasuta (clam), and Neanthes arenaceodentata (polychaete worm). The bioassay also included an estimate of the potential for bioaccumulation of cadmium, chromium, copper, mercury, silver, pesticides, PCBs, petroleum hydrocarbons, and organotins. Survival was high in all particulate-phase and solid-phase tests.

  1. Incremental ecological exposure risks from contaminated sediments in an urban estuarine river.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, David F; Iannuzzi, Timothy J

    2005-11-01

    Estuaries in urban regions present unique environmental management challenges. Ecosystems in urban estuaries are typically impacted by habitat loss and degradation, watershed modification, and nonpoint and point sources of many chemicals. Restoring such systems requires an understanding of the relative contribution of various stressors to overall ecological conditions and an understanding of shifting patterns of stress over time. In this article, we present the results of a multiparameter environmental assessment of a quintessential urbanized waterway: the lower Passaic River in the vicinity of Newark, New Jersey, USA. To provide the foundation for effective management decision making, we quantified baseline conditions (habitat losses and degradation), chemical concentrations in sediment and biota relative to published toxic effect levels, direct toxicity of sediments to benthic organisms, and food-web mediated risks to fish-eating birds. Habitat losses have been severe (greater than 85% of wetlands, nearly 100% of the total length of tidal and nontidal tributaries, and 100% of natural shoreline habitat have been lost), resulting in substantial habitat constraints on biota. Despite this, biological communities are present in the lower Passaic. In general, concentrations of toxic chemicals in surface sediments have fallen with time, and natural recovery processes are proceeding. Chemical concentrations remain high enough to impair survival of amphipods, but not amphipod growth or polychaete growth or survival as measured in laboratory bioassays using field-collected sediment. Fish and blue crab body burdens of some metals, PCBs, and the pesticide, DDT, are at concentrations sufficiently high to exceed toxicity thresholds. The resident fish-eating bird--the belted kingfisher--is at exposure risk from some metals, PCBs, and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzo furans (PCDD/Fs). Migratory waders--the herons and egrets--are not at risk from chemical exposure. These complex findings suggest that restoring the lower Passaic River to ecological health is a correspondingly complex task. Habitat constraints must be eased for biotic components of the ecosystem, and chemical effects must be reduced for those organisms that are present. Only a coordinated, multidisciplinary restoration program will succeed in this challenging environment. PMID:16639904

  2. Modeling active capping efficacy. 1. Metal and organometal contaminated sediment remediation.

    PubMed

    Viana, Priscilla Z; Yin, Ke; Rockne, Karl J

    2008-12-01

    Cd, Cr, Pb, Ag, As, Ba, Hg, CH3Hg, and CN transport through sand, granular activated carbon (GAC), organoclay, shredded tires, and apatite caps was modeled by deterministic and Monte Carlo methods. Time to 10% breakthrough, 30 and 100 yr cumulative release were metrics of effectiveness. Effective caps prevented above-cap concentrations from exceeding USEPA acute criteria at 100 yr assuming below-cap concentrations at solubility. Sand caps performed best under diffusion due to the greater diffusive path length. Apatite had the best advective performance for Cd, Cr, and Pb. Organoclay performed best for Ag, As, Ba, CH3Hg, and CN. Organoclay and apatite were equally effective for Hg. Monte Carlo analysis was used to determine output sensitivity. Sand was effective under diffusion for Cr within the 50% confidence interval (CI), for Cd and Pb (75% CI), and for As, Hg, and CH3Hg (95% CI). Under diffusion and advection, apatite was effective for Cd, Pb, and Hg (75% CI) and organoclay was effective for Hg and CH3Hg (50% CI). GAC and shredded tires performed relatively poorly. Although no single cap is a panacea, apatite and organoclay have the broadest range of effectiveness. Cap performance is most sensitive to the partitioning coefficient and hydraulic conductivity, indicating the importance of accurate site-specific measurement for these parameters. PMID:19192819

  3. Assessing Changes to Organic Contaminant Fluxes from Contaminated Sediments Following Dam Removal in an Urbanized River

    EPA Science Inventory

    Restoration of rivers and their associated ecosystems is a growing priority for government agencies (e.g., NOAA, USDA), as well as conservation organizations. Dam removal is a major component of many restoration projects credited with reintroducing fish species, improving water ...

  4. Dissimilatory Sb(V) reduction by microorganisms isolated from Sb-contaminated sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dovick, M. A.; Kulp, T. R.

    2013-12-01

    Mining and smelting are major sources of trace metal contamination in freshwater systems. Arsenic (As) is a common contaminant derived from certain mining operations and is a known toxic metalloid and carcinogen. Antimony (Sb) is listed as a pollutant of priority interest by the EPA and is presumed to share similar geochemical and toxicological properties with arsenic. Both elements can occur in four different oxidation states (V, III, 0, and -III) under naturally occurring conditions. In aqueous solutions As(V) and Sb(V) predominate in oxygenated surface waters whereas As(III) and Sb(III) are stable in anoxic settings. Numerous studies have examined microbiological redox pathways that utilize As(V) as a terminal electron acceptor for anaerobic respiration, however there have been few studies on microbial mechanisms that may affect the biogeochemical cycling of Sb in the environment. Here we report bacterial reduction of Sb(V) to Sb(III) in anoxic enrichment cultures and bacterial isolates grown from sediment collected from an Sb contaminated pond at a mine tailings site in Idaho (total pond water Sb concentration = 235.2 +/- 136.3 ug/L). Anaerobic sediment microcosms (40 mL) were established in artificial freshwater mineral salt medium, amended with millimolar concentrations of Sb(V), acetate or lactate, and incubated at 27°C for several days. Antimony(V), lactate, and acetate concentrations were monitored during incubation by High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) and Ion Chromatography (IC). Live sediment microcosms reduced millimolar amendments of Sb(V) to Sb(III) coupled to the oxidation of acetate and lactate, while no activity occurred in killed controls. Enrichment cultures were established by serially diluting Sb(V)-reducing microcosms in mineral salt medium with Sb(V) and acetate, and a Sb(V)-reducing bacterial strain was isolated by plating on anaerobic agar plates amended with millimolar Sb(V) and acetate. Direct cell counting demonstrated that this isolate exhibited Sb(V)-dependent heterotrophic growth. These results suggest that the endogenous microbial community from this Sb-contaminated site includes anaerobic microorganisms capable of obtaining energy for growth by oxidizing heterotrophic electron donors using Sb(V) as the terminal electron acceptor. Ongoing work includes identification of the isolated organism using 16S rDNA phylogenetic markers as well as an inventory of known functional genes (e.g., arrA) within this isolate that may more typically encode for As(V)-reduction. These results elucidate the potentially significant role of microbiological transformations in controlling the speciation of Sb in the environment, and may help to identify potential bioremediation strategies for Sb contaminated waters.

  5. Lead poisoning of waterfowl by contaminated sediment in the Coeur d'Alene River.

    PubMed

    Sileo, L; Creekmore, L H; Audet, D J; Snyder, M R; Meteyer, C U; Franson, J C; Locke, L N; Smith, M R; Finley, D L

    2001-10-01

    The Coeur d'Alene River basin in Idaho has been contaminated by mine tailings that have impaired the health of wildlife since the early 1900s. In other parts of the world, virtually all lead poisoning of waterfowl is caused by the ingestion of manmade lead artifacts, primarily spent lead shotshell pellets or, occasionally, fishing sinkers. However, in the Coeur d'Alene River basin in Idaho, nonartifactual lead poisoning was the ultimate cause of death of most of 219 (77%) of 285 waterfowl carcasses that had been found sick or dead from 1992 through 1997. The majority of these 219 waterfowl (172 tundra swans [Cygnus columbianus], 33 Canada geese [Branta canadensis], and 14 other species) were poisoned by ingesting river sediment that was contaminated with lead. The next most common cause of death (20 instances, 7%) was lead poisoning accompanied by ingested shotshell pellets. The remaining 46 waterfowl succumbed to trauma, infectious diseases (aspergillosis, avian cholera, tuberculosis), or miscellaneous problems, or the cause of death was not determined.

  6. The aquatic vascular plant Ruppia maritima as an indicator organisms for contaminated sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Tagliabue, M.D.; Thursby, G.B.; Walker, H.A.; Johnston, R.K.

    1994-12-31

    An ongoing estuarine ecological risk assessment case study for the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard in the Great Bay (Kittery, ME, Portsmouth, NH) has been the catalyst for continued methods development with a rooted aquatic plant for a sediment toxicity test. A test using the aquatic vascular plant Ruppia maritima would be similar in it`s utility to the Algal (Champia parvula) Reproduction Test, an accepted, short term test (US EPA Short term Methods for Estimating the Chronic Toxicity of Effluents and Receiving Waters to Marine and Estuarine Organisms). Laboratory studies were conducted to evaluate effects of lead, the primary site contaminant on R. maritima in the Great Bay. Morphology and life cycle of R. maritima are similar to that of the aquatic vascular plant Zostra marina which comprises up to 46% of the Great Bay habitat (Short 1992). R. maritima`s reduced size makes it a practical laboratory organism and Ruppia`s effects may offer useful insights into potential effects on Zostra or other aquatic vascular plants. Presently rooted vascular plants are not found in the site of concern (Clark Cove). This can be contributed to either of two factors; the physical parameters of the site, i.e., a depositional zone or the chemical parameters, i.e., metals contamination, specifically lead. Exposure of bedded and nonbedded plants occurred over a four day and ten day period using lead sulfate. Concentrations for bedded exposures were as follows, 0.3, 0.5, 0.8, 1.0 simultaneously extracted metal/acid volatile sulfide (SEM/AVS) molar ratios, and 0.1, 1.0, 10.0 and 100.0mg/l Pb for water only exposures. Some reduction in cumulative leaf growth was observed in the site samples as well as the spiked samples as compared to site controls. Results of this study and associated research which focuses on the further development of the Ruppia test methods will be presented.

  7. The aquatic vascular plant Ruppia maritima as an indicator organism for contaminated sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Tagliabue, M.D.; Thursby, G.B.; Walker, H.A.; Johnston, R.K.

    1995-12-31

    An ongoing estuarine ecological risk assessment case study for the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard in the Great Bay Estuary (New Hampshire, Maine) was the catalyst to continue development a rooted aquatic plant sediment toxicity test. Laboratory studies were conducted to evaluate effects of lead, the primary site contaminant on R. maritima in the Great Bay. Although the aquatic vascular plant Zostra marina comprises up to 46% of the Great Bay subtidal habitat, R. maritima`s much smaller size makes it a more practical laboratory organism. Effects on Ruppia may offer useful insights into potential effects on Zostra or other aquatic vascular plants. Presently rooted vascular plants are not found in Clark Cove located adjacent to a landfill disposal site on the shipyard. The absence of rooted vegetation can be contributed to, physical parameters of the site (turbidity, grain size, texture) or chemical parameters (heavy metal/Pb contamination, redox potential). Exposure of bedded and nonbedded plants occurred over a four day and ten day period using lead sulfate. Concentrations for bedded exposures were as follows, 0.3, 0.5, 0.8, 1.0 simultaneously extracted metal/acid volatile sulfide (SEM/AVS) molar ratios, and 0.1, 1.0, 10.0 and 100.0mg/l Pb for water only exposures. Reduction in cumulative leaf growth was observed for the Clark Cove sediments as well as the spiked sediments as compared to reference sediments.

  8. Effects of contaminated sediments on a backwater restoration project in the Mississippi River Delta

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Success of any aquatic restoration project is based on the assumptions that physical features can be manipulated in such a way as to improve habitat, water quality or both. An additional assumption is that there is nothing inherent about the site that would prevent the target community from exploit...

  9. Biomarkers for redox-active genotoxins in contaminated sediments: A mechanistic approach

    SciTech Connect

    Eufemia, N.A.; Beaty, B.B.; Reichert, P.; Watson, D.E.; Burns, T.A.

    1993-04-01

    Feral brown bullhead catfish and environmental sediments were collected from three sites in the Niagara River system in northern New York state. The sites were Black Creek, a relatively uncontaminated reference site; the Love Canal-102nd Street dump site which was principally contaminated with chlorinated hydrocarbons (CHs) and chlorinated pesticides; and a site in the Buffalo River which was principally contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). A variety of putative biomarkers of genotoxicity and/or oxidative stress were measured in hepatic tissues of these fish. The results indicate that metabolic indices of benthic animals can successfully be used as biomarkers of exposure to environmental contaminants, especially when a suite of responses is evaluated, and that strong associations between specific responses and classes of chemicals suggest that a further refinement of this approach is feasible.

  10. IN-SITU STRATEGIES FOR THE SEQUESTRATION OF ZINC IN CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The application of in-situ remediation strategies for the sequestration of zinc is being studied as an alternative to the traditional method of excavation and containment. The site of study is the Indian Head Naval Warfare Center (IHNWC) located adjacent to Mattawoman Creek in Ch...

  11. TELEOST FISH (Solea solea): A NOVEL MODEL FOR ECOTOXICOLOGICAL ASSAY OF CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS

    PubMed Central

    Ribecco, C; Hardiman, G; Sásik, R; Vittori, S; Carnevali, O

    2012-01-01

    Chemical analysis of sediment is not indicative of the downstream biological effects on aquatic organisms. In this study, the biological effects of sediment were examined using: Teleost fish, (Solea solea), Artemia and rotifers. Although chemicals levels were below the limits permissible by Italian law, S. solea juveniles exposed to sediment (0.3% w/v) for 96 hours, revealed significant induction in the expression levels of HSP70, ERα, TRα, RXRα, PPARα, β, CYP4501A1 and CYP3A mRNAs, suggesting the utility of this species as a novel biosensor. The bio-toxicity of the sediment was further validated by exposing Artemia and rotifers to concentrations of elutriate (derived from the sediment) from 10 to 100 % v/v (with a 50% mortality rate). These results suggest that sediment defined as moderately contaminated, solely on the basis of the chemical profile, may in fact cause harmful effects to aquatic organisms. This study highlights the need for biological approaches in the establishment of sediment toxicity levels. PMID:22217502

  12. Bioremediation of Trichloroethylene-Contaminated Sediments Augmented with a Dehalococcoides Consortia

    SciTech Connect

    McKinsey, P.C.

    2003-02-20

    At the Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken, SC there are a number of sites contaminated with Chlorinated Ethenes (CE) due to past disposal practices. Sediments from two CE contaminated SRS locations were evaluated for trichloroethylene (TCE) biodegradation through anaerobic laboratory microcosms. The testing included addition of amendments and bioaugmentation of sediments. The anaerobic microcosms were first amended with substrates including acetate, lactate, molasses, soybean oil, methanol, sulfate, yeast extract, Regenesis HRC(R), and MEAL (methanol, ethanol, acetate, lactate mixture). Microcosms were analyzed after biostimulation for 9 months and no significant TCE biodegradation was observed. At 10 months, additional TCE, fresh amendments, and a mixed culture containing Dehalococcoides ethenogenes were added to active microcosms. A significant decrease in TCE concentrations and an increase in biodegradation products cis-dichloroethylene (cDCE) and vinyl chloride (VC) were noted within 2 weeks of bioaugmentation. Microcosms amended with lactate and sulfate showed complete transformation of TCE (3 ppm) to ethene within 40 days after bioaugmentation. Microcosms amended with other substrates - soybean oil, acetate, yeast extract, and methanol - also show enhanced biodegradation of TCE to ethene. Microcosms amended with molasses and Regenesis HRC showed limited TCE transformation. No TCE transformation was seen in killed control microcosms. On the basis of these successful results, plans are underway for field-scale in-situ deployment of biostimulation/bioaugmentation at SRS.

  13. Phytoremediation of Mercury- and Methyl Mercury-Contaminated Sediments by Water Hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Phytoremediation has the potential for implementation at Hg- (Hg) and methylHg (MeHg)-contaminated sites. Water hyacinths (Eichhornia crassipes) were investigated for their ability to assimilate Hg and MeHg into plant biomass, in both aquatic and sediment-associated forms...

  14. Bench-Scale Investigation Of Mercury Phytoremediation By Water Hyacinths (Eichhornia crassipes) In Heavily Contaminated Sediments

    EPA Science Inventory

    Phytoremediation has the potential to be implemented at mercury (Hg) and methylmercury (MeHg) contaminated sites. Water hyacinths (Eichhornia crassipes) were investigated for their ability to assimilate Hg and MeHg into plant biomass, in both aquatic and sediment-associat...

  15. Phytoremediation Of Mercury And Methylmercury Contaminated Sediments By Water Hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Phytoremediation has potential to be implemented at mercury (Hg) and methylmercury (MeHg) contaminated sites. Water hyacinths (Eichhornia crassipes) were investigated for their ability to assimilate Hg and MeHg into plant biomass, in both aquatic and sediment-associated f...

  16. Isolation and Characterization of Four Gram-Positive Nickel-Tolerant Microorganisms from Contaminated Sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Van Nostrand, J. D.; Khijniak, T. V.; Gentry, T. J.; Novak, M. T.; Sowder, A. G.; Zhou, J. Z.; Bertsch, P. M.; Morris, P. J.

    2007-01-01

    Microbial communities from riparian sediments contaminated with high levels of Ni and U were examined for metal-tolerant microorganisms. Isolation of four aerobic Ni-tolerant, Gram-positive heterotrophic bacteria indicated selection pressure from Ni. These isolates were identified as Arthrobacter oxydans NR-1, Streptomyces galbus NR-2, Streptomyces aureofaciens NR-3, and Kitasatospora cystarginea NR-4 based on partial 16S rDNA sequences. A functional gene microarray containing gene probes for functions associated with biogeochemical cycling, metal homeostasis, and organic contaminant degradation showed little overlap among the four isolates. Fifteen of the genes were detected in all four isolates with only two of these related to metal resistance, specifically to tellurium. Each of the four isolates also displayed resistance to at least one of six antibiotics tested, with resistance to kanamycin, gentamycin, and ciprofloxacin observed in at least two of the isolates. Further characterization of S. aureofaciens NR-3 and K. cystarginea NR-4 demonstrated that both isolates expressed Ni tolerance constitutively. In addition, both were able to grow in higher concentrations of Ni at pH 6 as compared with pH 7 (42.6 and 8.5 mM Ni at pH 6 and 7, respectively). Tolerance to Cd, Co, and Zn was also examined in these two isolates; a similar pH-dependent metal tolerance was observed when grown with Co and Zn. Neither isolate was tolerant to Cd. These findings suggest that Ni is exerting a selection pressure at this site for metal-resistant actinomycetes.

  17. Diffusive Release of Uranium from Contaminated Sediments into Capillary Fringe Pore Water

    SciTech Connect

    Rod, Kenton A.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Flury, Markus; Pierce, Eric M.; Harsh, James B.

    2012-09-13

    We investigated the dynamics of U release between pore water fractions, during river stage changes from two contaminated capillary fringe sediments. Samples were from 7.0 m and 7.6 m below ground surface (bgs) in the Hanford 300 area. Sediments were packed into columns and saturated with Hanford groundwater for three to 84 days. After specified times, > 48 µm radius (calculated) sediment pores were drained, followed by draining pores to 15 µm radius. U release in the first two weeks was similar between sediments and pore sizes with a range of 4.4 to 5.6 µM U in the 14 day sample. The 7.0 m bgs sediment U declined in the larger pores to 0.22 µM at day 84, whereas the small pores released U to 6.7 µM at day 84. The 7.6 m bgs sediment released 1.4 µM on day 84, in the large pores, but continuously released U from the smaller pores (13.2 uM on day 84). The continuous release of U has resulted in a diffusion gradient from the smaller to larger pores. The observed differences in U pore-water concentrations between the two sediment samples were attributed to co-precipitation of U with carbonates. A mineral phase in the sediments was also identified as an U-carbonate species, similar to rutherfordine [UO2(CO3)].

  18. Alternative Approaches for Screening Contaminated Sediments and Soils for PCDD/PCDF

    EPA Science Inventory

    Generating analytical data for polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDD/PCDF) using the traditional high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) analysis method, EPA Method 1613B, is time-consuming and expensive. Consequently, alternative methods to ...

  19. Tracing the dispersion of contaminated sediment with plutonium isotope measurements in coastal catchments of Fukushima Prefecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evrard, Olivier; Pointurier, Fabien; Onda, Yuichi; Chartin, Caroline; Hubert, Amélie; Lepage, Hugo; Pottin, Anne-Claire; Lefèvre, Irène; Bonté, Philippe; Laceby, J. Patrick; Ayrault, Sophie

    2015-04-01

    The Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident led to important releases of radionuclides into the environment, and trace levels of plutonium (Pu) were detected in northeastern Japan. However, measurement of Pu isotopic atom and activity ratios is required to differentiate between the contributions of global nuclear test fallout and FDNPP emissions. In this study, we measured Pu isotopic ratios in recently deposited sediments along rivers draining the most contaminated part of the inland radioactive plume. To this end, we carried out a thorough chemical purification and concentration of Pu from sediment samples (5 g dry material) and precise isotopic measurements using a double-focusing sector field ICP-MS. Results showed that the entire range of measured Pu isotopes (i.e., 239Pu, 240Pu, 241Pu, and 242Pu) were detected in all samples, although in extremely low concentrations. The 241Pu/239Pu atom ratios measured in sediment deposits (0.0017-0.0884) were significantly higher than the corresponding values attributed to the global fallout (0.00113±0.00008 on average in the Northern Hemisphere between 31°-71°N). The results indicated the presence of Pu from FDNPP, in slight excess compared to the Pu background from global fallout, representing up to ca. 60% of Pu in the analyzed samples. These results demonstrate that this radionuclide has been transported relatively long distances (45 km) from FDNPP and deposited in rivers representing a potential source of Pu to the ocean.

  20. Environmental Whole-Genome Amplification to Access Microbial Diversity in Contaminated Sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Abulencia, C.B.; Wyborski, D.L.; Garcia, J.; Podar, M.; Chen, W.; Chang, S.H.; Chang, H.W.; Watson, D.; Brodie,E.I.; Hazen, T.C.; Keller, M.

    2005-12-10

    Low-biomass samples from nitrate and heavy metal contaminated soils yield DNA amounts that have limited use for direct, native analysis and screening. Multiple displacement amplification (MDA) using ?29 DNA polymerase was used to amplify whole genomes from environmental, contaminated, subsurface sediments. By first amplifying the genomic DNA (gDNA), biodiversity analysis and gDNA library construction of microbes found in contaminated soils were made possible. The MDA method was validated by analyzing amplified genome coverage from approximately five Escherichia coli cells, resulting in 99.2 percent genome coverage. The method was further validated by confirming overall representative species coverage and also an amplification bias when amplifying from a mix of eight known bacterial strains. We extracted DNA from samples with extremely low cell densities from a U.S. Department of Energy contaminated site. After amplification, small subunit rRNA analysis revealed relatively even distribution of species across several major phyla. Clone libraries were constructed from the amplified gDNA, and a small subset of clones was used for shotgun sequencing. BLAST analysis of the library clone sequences showed that 64.9 percent of the sequences had significant similarities to known proteins, and ''clusters of orthologous groups'' (COG) analysis revealed that more than half of the sequences from each library contained sequence similarity to known proteins. The libraries can be readily screened for native genes or any target of interest. Whole-genome amplification of metagenomic DNA from very minute microbial sources, while introducing an amplification bias, will allow access to genomic information that was not previously accessible.

  1. Toxicity assessment of peptaibols and contaminated sediments on Crassostrea gigas embryos.

    PubMed

    Poirier, Laurence; Quiniou, Françoise; Ruiz, Nicolas; Montagu, Monique; Amiard, Jean-Claude; Pouchus, Yves François

    2007-08-01

    Peptaibols are known membrane-modifying peptides that were recently detected in marine sediments and mussels collected from a shellfish farming area (Fier d'Ars, Atlantic coast, France). In this investigation, embryotoxicity bioassays with oysters (Crassostrea gigas) were performed to assess acute toxicity of alamethicin and different groups of peptaibols produced by a Trichoderma longibrachiatum strain isolated from marine environment. C. gigas embryos appeared very sensitive to all the metabolites examined with higher toxic effects for long-sequence peptides (EC50 ranging from 10 to 64 nM). D-shaped larvae with mantle abnormality were particularly noticed when peptaibol concentrations increased. Disturbances of embryogenesis were also observed following exposure to organic and aqueous extract of sediments from Fier d'Ars (EC50=42.4 and 6.6 g L(-1) dry weight, respectively). Although peptaibol concentrations measured in these sediments could explain only a part of the toxic effects observed, this study suggests that these mycotoxins can induce larval abnormalities in a population of exposed animals at environmentally realistic concentrations. Their detection in coastal areas devoted to bivalve culture should be taken into account.

  2. NATURAL RECOVERY OF PCB - CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS IN A FRESH WATER LAKE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract: An ongoing study of natural recovery of sediments contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), sponsored by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), is being pursued at the Sangamo-Weston/Twelvemile Creek/Lake Hartwell Superfund Site (i.e., the Lake Hart...

  3. CHARACTERIZATION AND FATE OF PAH-CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS AT THE WYCKOFF/EAGLE HARBOR SUPERFUND SITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Eagle Harbor is a shallow marine embayment of Bainbridge Island, WA and formerly the site of the Wyckoff wood-treatment facility. The facility became operational in the early 1900s and used large quantities of creosote in its wood-treating processes. Creosote percolated through t...

  4. Characterization and FATE of PAH-contaminated sediments at the Wyckoff/Eagle Harbor Superfund Site.

    PubMed

    Brenner, Richard C; Magar, Victor S; Ickes, Jennifer A; Abbott, James E; Stout, Scott A; Crecelius, Eric A; Bingler, Linda S

    2002-06-15

    Eagle Harbor, a shallow marine embayment of Bainbridge Island, WA approximately 10 miles west of Seattle, WA), was formerly the site of the Wyckoff wood-treatment facility. The facility used large quantities of creosote in its wood-treating processes from the early 1900s to 1988. Historical creosote seepage into the harbor resulted in substantial accumulation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) contamination in the harbor sediments over time. This investigation focused on the distribution and fate of the PAH-contaminated harbor sediments. Analyses of 10 sediment cores using total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) fingerprinting, the distribution of 50 PAH analytes, and sediment age dating revealed the contributions of three distinct sources of PAHs to sediment contamination in the harbor during various periods over the past 100 years; namely, creosote, urban runoff, and natural background. Surface sediments (upper 20-30 cm) in the cores closestto the Wyckoff wood-treatment facility and southeast of an existing cap were dominated by urban runoff and weathered creosote; the deeper sediments (> 30 cm) were heavily contaminated with relatively unweathered creosote and some pure-phase creosote. Cores located the furthest from the area of contamination, in the center of the harbor, were dominated by urban runoff, showed no signs of creosote contamination, and had much lower PAH and TPH concentrations than those adjacent to the facility. In the four cores in the center of the Harbor, farthest from the former Wyckoff facility, PAH concentrations increased significantly (p < 0.01) with proximity to the northern shore of the harbor, which is more heavily developed than the southern shore and is where all automobile traffic enters and exits the island through the Bainbridge Island ferry terminal. Deeper portions of these cores were contaminated primarily with natural background PAHs, likely representing preurbanization sediments. Sedimentation rates ranged from 0.54 to 1.10 gm/ cm2 in the four cores located in the middle of the harbor, and for the single nearshore core that could be used to calculate sedimentation rates. Recognition that urban runoff has been a fairly consistent and ongoing source of PAHs to the harbor's sediments for the past 50-70 years may influence future sediment management decisions for this site with respect to long-term monitoring of surface sediments to assess cap performance. The results provided information on the ability of Eagle Harbor sediments to recover under natural conditions, identified the occurrence of creosote-derived PAH weathering in off-cap surface sediments, and distinguished between these distinct PAH sources in the harbor (creosote, urban runoff, and natural background).

  5. CONTAMINATED SEDIMENT TESTING WITH THE BIVALVE, MULINA LATERALIS: CULTURE REFINEMENT FOR ORGANISM AVAILABILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Availability of test species for estuarine benthic assessment is limited; therefore, a method was developed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for using the dwarf surf clam (Mulinia lateralis) to identify adverse biological effects of bulk estuarine sediments. A multilab...

  6. CONTAMINATED SEDIMENT TESTING WITH THE BIVLVE, MULINIA LATERLALIS: CULTURE REFINEMENT FOR ORGANISM AVAILABILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Availability of test species for estuarine benthic assessment is limited; therefore, a method was developed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for utilizing the dwarf surf clam, Mulinia lateralis, to identify adverse biological effects of bulk estuarine sediments. A mult...

  7. Influence of acid volatile sulfides and metal concentrations on metal partitioning in contaminated sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, J.-S.; Lee, B.-G.; Luoma, S.N.; Choi, H.J.; Koh, C.-H.; Brown, C.L.

    2000-01-01

    The influence of acid volatile sulfide (AVS) on the partitioning of Cd, Ni, and Zn in porewater (PW) and sediment as reactive metals (SEM, simultaneously extracted metals) was investigated in laboratory microcosms. Two spiking procedures were compared, and the effects of vertical geochemical gradients and infaunal activity were evaluated. Sediments were spiked with a Cd-Ni-Zn mixture (0.06, 3, 7.5 ??mol/g, respectively) containing four levels of AVS (0.5, 7.5, 15, 35 ??mol/g). The results were compared to sediments spiked with four levels of Cd-Ni-Zn mixtures at one AVS concentration (7.5 ??mol/g). A vertical redox gradient was generated in each treatment by an 18-d incubation with an oxidized water column. [AVS] in the surface sediments decreased by 65-95% due to oxidation during incubation; initial [AVS] was maintained at 0.5-7.5 cm depth. PW metal concentrations were correlated with [SEM - AVS] among all data. But PW metal concentrations were variable, causing the distribution coefficient, Kd(pw) (the ratio of [SEM] to PW metal concentrations) to vary by 2-3 orders of magnitude at a given [SEM - AVS]. One reason for the variability was that vertical profiles in PW metal concentrations appeared to be influenced by diffusion as well as [SEM - AVS]. The presence of animals appeared to enhance the diffusion of at least Zn. The generalization that PW metal concentrations are controlled by [SEM - AVS] is subject to some important qualifications if vertical gradients are complicated, metal concentrations vary, or equilibration times differ.The influence of acid volatile sulfide (AVS) on the partitioning of Cd, Ni, and Zn in porewater (PW) and sediment as reactive metals (SEM, simultaneously extracted metals) was investigated in laboratory microcosms. Two spiking procedures were compared, and the effects of vertical geochemical gradients and infaunal activity were evaluated. Sediments were spiked with a Cd-Ni-Zn mixture (0.06, 3, 7.5 ??mol/g, respectively) containing four levels of AVS (0.5, 7.5, 15, 35 ??mol/g). The results were compared to sediments spiked with four levels of Cd-Ni-Zn mixtures at one AVS concentration (7.5 ??mol/g). A vertical redox gradient was generated in each treatment by an 18-d incubation with an oxidized water column. [AVS] in the surface sediments decreased by 65-95% due to oxidation during incubation; initial [AVS] was maintained at 0.5-7.5 cm depth. PW metal concentrations were correlated with [SEM - AVS] among all data. But PW metal concentrations were variable, causing the distribution coefficient, Kdpw (the ratio of [SEM] to PW metal concentrations) to vary by 2-3 orders of magnitude at a given [SEM - AVS]. One reason for the variability was that vertical profiles in PW metal concentrations appeared to be influenced by diffusion as well as [SEM - AVS]. The presence of animals appeared to enhance the diffusion of at least Zn. The generalization that PW metal concentrations are controlled by [SEM - AVS] is subject to some important qualifications if vertical gradients are complicated, metal concentrations vary, or equilibration times differ.

  8. Evidence of crustal contamination, sediment, and fluid components in the campanian volcanic rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paone, A.

    2004-01-01

    The Campanian Volcanic Subprovince is part of the classic western potassic volcanic province of the Italian Peninsula. The Campanian volcanic products show the effects of shallow assimilation and fractional crystallisation, and the contribution of regional crustal sources (e.g., Hercynian basement-Calabrian crust). The Roccamonfina, Campi Flegrei, and Ventotene volcanic rocks are characterised by wide isotopic and geochemical variations. Such variations appear to reflect both AFC processes and chemical heterogeneity in the upper mantle that may be linked to subduction processes. Mixing curves (Th/Ce-, Ba/K- and Eu/Eu*-143Nd/144Nd) linking sediments and mantle end-members account for the variations in the Campanian Subprovince volcanic rocks with a sediment contribution of 2-10%. The upper mantle sources for the low- and high-K rocks at Roccamonfina have been constrained on the basis of a multi-element normalised diagram. The two sources require different amounts of sediment in the mantle wedge (LK???2% versus HK???10%) and a fluid component probably from altered ocean crust to explain the fluid mobile elements. Low-K Roccamonfina rocks are geochemically similar to those from Campi Flegrei, Ventotene, and Somma-Vesuvius, suggesting a similar proportion of sediment in their upper mantle source regions. ?? 2004 B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Studies on bioremediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-contaminated sediments: bioavailability, biodegradability, and toxicity issues.

    PubMed

    Tabak, Henry H; Lazorchak, James M; Lei, Li; Khodadoust, Amid P; Antia, Jimmy E; Bagchi, Rajesh; Suidan, Makram T

    2003-03-01

    The widespread contamination by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) has created a need for cost-effective bioremediation processes. This research studied a chronically PAH-contaminated estuarine sediment from the East River (ER; NY, USA) characterized by high concentrations of PAHs (approximately 4-190 ppm), sulfide, and metals and a marine sediment from New York/ New Jersey Harbor (NY/NJH; USA) with only trace quantities of PAHs (0.1-0.6 ppm). The focus was to examine the relationship between bioavailability of PAHs and their biological removal in a slurry system. Freshwater and marine sediment toxicity tests were conducted to measure baseline toxicity of both sediments to amphipods, aquatic worms, fathead and sheepshead minnow larvae, and a vascular plant; to determine the cause of toxicity; and to evaluate the effectiveness of the biotreatment strategies in reducing toxicity. Results showed the ER sediment was acutely toxic to all freshwater and marine organisms tested and that the toxicity was mainly caused by sulfide, PAHs, and metals present in the sediment. In spite of the high toxicity, most of the PAH compounds showed significant degradation in the aerobic sediment/water slurry system if the initial high oxygen demand due to the high sulfide content of the sediment was overcome. The removal of PAHs by biodegradation was closely related to their desorbed amount in 90% isopropanol solution during 24 h of contact, while the desorption of model PAH compounds from freshly spiked NY/NJH sediment did not describe the bioavailability of PAHs in the East River sediment well. The research improves our understanding of bioavailability as a controlling factor in bioremediation of PAHs and the potential of aerobic biodegradation for PAH removal and ecotoxicity reduction. PMID:12627632

  10. Anaerobic U(IV) Bio-oxidation and the Resultant Remobilization of Uranium in Contaminated Sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Coates, John D.

    2005-06-01

    A proposed strategy for the remediation of uranium (U) contaminated sites is based on immobilizing U by reducing the oxidized soluble U, U(VI), to form a reduced insoluble end product, U(IV). Due to the use of nitric acid in the processing of nuclear fuels, nitrate is often a co-contaminant found in many of the environments contaminated with uranium. Recent studies indicate that nitrate inhibits U(VI) reduction in sediment slurries. However, the mechanism responsible for the apparent inhibition of U(VI) reduction is unknown, i.e. preferential utilization of nitrate as an electron acceptor, direct biological oxidation of U(IV) coupled to nitrate reduction, and/or abiotic oxidation by intermediates of nitrate reduction. Recent studies indicates that direct biological oxidation of U(IV) coupled to nitrate reduction may exist in situ, however, to date no organisms have been identified that can grow by this metabolism. In an effort to evaluate the potential for nitrate-dependent bio-oxidation of U(IV) in anaerobic sedimentary environments, we have initiated the enumeration of nitrate-dependent U(IV) oxidizing bacteria. Sediments, soils, and groundwater from uranium (U) contaminated sites, including subsurface sediments from the NABIR Field Research Center (FRC), as well as uncontaminated sites, including subsurface sediments from the NABIR FRC and Longhorn Army Ammunition Plant, Texas, lake sediments, and agricultural field soil, sites served as the inoculum source. Enumeration of the nitrate-dependent U(IV) oxidizing microbial population in sedimentary environments by most probable number technique have revealed sedimentary microbial populations ranging from 9.3 x 101 - 2.4 x 103 cells (g sediment)-1 in both contaminated and uncontaminated sites. Interestingly uncontaminated subsurface sediments (NABIR FRC Background core FB618 and Longhorn Texas Core BH2-18) both harbored the most numerous nitrate-dependent U(IV) oxidizing population 2.4 x 103 cells (g sediment)-1. The nitrate-dependent U(IV) oxidizing microbial population in groundwaters is less numerous ranging from 0 cells mL-1 (Well FW300, Uncontaminated Background NABIR FRC) to 4.3 x 102 cells mL-1 (Well TPB16, Contaminated Area 2 NABIR FRC). The presence of nitrate-dependent U(IV) oxidizing bacteria supports our hypothesis that bacteria capable of anaerobic U(IV) oxidation are ubiquitous and indigenous to sedimentary and groundwater environments.

  11. A TOXICITY ASSESSMENT APPROACH FOR EVALUATION OF IN-SITU BIOREMEDIATION OF PAH CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) represent a group of organic contaminants known for their prevalence and persistence in petroleum-impacted environment such as groundwater, soils and sediments. Many high molecular weight PAHs are suspected carcinogens and the existence of...

  12. Metal-contaminated sediments in a semi-closed basin: Implications for recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monterroso, P.; Pato, P.; Pereira, M. E.; Millward, G. E.; Vale, C.; Duarte, A.

    2007-01-01

    Sediment cores, collected from a contaminated zone in the Ria de Aveiro (Portugal), were sectioned, under nitrogen, and centrifuged to remove the pore waters. The sediment characteristics, including acid volatile sulphide (AVS) concentrations, were determined, together with total and available metals (Fe, Mn, Cd, Cu, Pb, Zn) and the total dissolved metals in the pore waters. Peak concentrations in total metals of the sediments were observed at various depths in the core as a result of time-dependent, industrial discharges. The fraction of total metal released by a mixture of hydroxylamine hydrochloride and acetic acid (HAA) ranged from 24% for Cu to 74% for Zn and enzymatic digestion by proteinase K released <10% of total metal. The pore waters had elevated dissolved metal concentrations concomitant with the peaks in total and available metal and with a maximum in AVS concentration. Equilibrium calculations indicated that the major dissolved phase species was MHS 2-, with minor quantities of M(HS) 2. The diffusive fluxes for sediment-water exchange of the metals were insignificant, the mobility of the metals being hindered by sulphide formation. Thus, the metals are likely to remain trapped in these sediments, thereby delaying recovery from contamination.

  13. WORKSHOP ON INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGIES FOR TREATMENT OF CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS - JUNE 13-14, 1990 - SUMMARY REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Risk Reduction Engineering Laboratory (RREL) developed and organized this workshop at the request of the EPA Office of Water Regulations and Standards (OWRS). Its two-fold purpose was 1) to provide interested individuals and orga...

  14. SCREENING PLANT SPECIES FOR GROWTH ON WEATHERED, PETROLEUM HYDROCARBON-CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS. (R825413)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  15. Passive sampling methods for contaminated sediments: State of the science for metals

    PubMed Central

    Peijnenburg, Willie JGM; Teasdale, Peter R; Reible, Danny; Mondon, Julie; Bennett, William W; Campbell, Peter GC

    2014-01-01

    “Dissolved” concentrations of contaminants in sediment porewater (Cfree) provide a more relevant exposure metric for risk assessment than do total concentrations. Passive sampling methods (PSMs) for estimating Cfree offer the potential for cost-efficient and accurate in situ characterization of Cfree for inorganic sediment contaminants. In contrast to the PSMs validated and applied for organic contaminants, the various passive sampling devices developed for metals, metalloids, and some nonmetals (collectively termed “metals”) have been exploited to a limited extent, despite recognized advantages that include low detection limits, detection of time-averaged trends, high spatial resolution, information about dissolved metal speciation, and the ability to capture episodic events and cyclic changes that may be missed by occasional grab sampling. We summarize the PSM approaches for assessing metal toxicity to, and bioaccumulation by, sediment-dwelling biota, including the recognized advantages and limitations of each approach, the need for standardization, and further work needed to facilitate broader acceptance and application of PSM-derived information by decision makers. Integr Environ Assess Manag 2014;10:179–196. © 2014 The Authors. Integrated Environmental Assessment and Management published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of SETAC. Key Points Passive sampling methods (PSMs) offer the potential for cost-efficient and accurate in situ characterization of the dissolved concentrations for inorganic sediment contaminants. PSMs are useful for evaluating the geochemical behavior of metals in surficial sediments, including determination of fluxes across the sediment-water interface, and post-depositional changes in metal speciation. Few studies have tried to link PSM responses in sediments to metal uptake and toxicity responses in benthic organisms. There is a clear need for further studies. Future PSMs could be designed to mimic saturable kinetics, which would fill the gap between the kinetic and the equilibrium regime samplers currently used, and may improve prediction of metals accumulation by benthic organisms. PMID:24470168

  16. Does bioleaching represent a biotechnological strategy for remediation of contaminated sediments?

    PubMed

    Fonti, Viviana; Dell'Anno, Antonio; Beolchini, Francesca

    2016-09-01

    Bioleaching is a consolidated biotechnology in the mining industry and in bio-hydrometallurgy, where microorganisms mediate the solubilisation of metals and semi-metals from mineral ores and concentrates. Bioleaching also has the potential for ex-situ/on-site remediation of aquatic sediments that are contaminated with metals, which represent a key environmental issue of global concern. By eliminating or reducing (semi-)metal contamination of aquatic sediments, bioleaching may represent an environmentally friendly and low-cost strategy for management of contaminated dredged sediments. Nevertheless, the efficiency of bioleaching in this context is greatly influenced by several abiotic and biotic factors. These factors need to be carefully taken into account before selecting bioleaching as a suitable remediation strategy. Here we review the application of bioleaching for sediment bioremediation, and provide a critical view of the main factors that affect its performance. We also discuss future research needs to improve bioleaching strategies for contaminated aquatic sediments, in view of large-scale applications. PMID:27139303

  17. ASSESSING THE BIOAVAILABILITY OF PAHS IN FIELD-CONTAMINATED SEDIMENT USING XAD-2 ASSISTED DESORPTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the bioremediation of soils/sediments contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) it is imperative to determine the fraction of the PAHs that is amenable to remediation. For example, what fraction of the PAHs is available to the indigenous microorganisms, i.e. bi...

  18. Multispecies toxicity assessment of compost produced in bioremediation of an explosives-contaminated sediment

    SciTech Connect

    Gunderson, C.A.; Napolitano, G.E.; Wicker, L.F.; Richmond, J.E.; Stewart, A.J.; Kostuk, J.M.; Gibbs, M.H.

    1997-12-01

    A multispecies terrestrial test system was used to assess the environmental effectiveness of composting for bioremediation of explosives-contaminated soils. The assessment involved comparing biological responses, from the individual to the community level, in remediated and reference composts. A 6-month greenhouse study incorporated two soil invertebrate species, three plant species and an associated symbiont, and the naturally occurring complement of soil microorganisms. Measured parameters included growth and reproduction of earthworms and isopods; soil mote diversity; soil lipid class composition as an indicator of soil microbial community structure; plant growth, photosynthesis, and reproduction; and root nodulation and symbiotic N{sub 2} fixation. Additional short-term toxicity tests of seed germination and earthworm survival were performed to supplement the mesocosm data. Compost prepared from the explosives-contaminated soil inhibited several aspects of plant growth and physiology, but few adverse effects on soil invertebrates were detected. An initial lag in earthworm and isopod reproduction occurred in the reference compost, reflecting some inherent compost differences not associated with contamination, and highlighting the importance and the difficulty of finding appropriate reference soils for assessing hazardous waste sites or remediation technologies. Nonetheless, the results from this study suggested some nonlethal effects from the contaminated-soil compost, primarily to plants. The mesocosm methodology used in this study can bridge the gap between traditional short-term toxicity testing and longer term field assessments, and provide information on ecological effects by explicitly including measurements of multiple species across several levels of ecological organization.

  19. Environmental Whole-Genome Amplification To Access Microbial Populations in Contaminated Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Abulencia, Carl B.; Wyborski, Denise L.; Garcia, Joseph A.; Podar, Mircea; Chen, Wenqiong; Chang, Sherman H.; Chang, Hwai W.; Watson, David; Brodie, Eoin L.; Hazen, Terry C.; Keller, Martin

    2006-01-01

    Low-biomass samples from nitrate and heavy metal contaminated soils yield DNA amounts that have limited use for direct, native analysis and screening. Multiple displacement amplification (MDA) using φ29 DNA polymerase was used to amplify whole genomes from environmental, contaminated, subsurface sediments. By first amplifying the genomic DNA (gDNA), biodiversity analysis and gDNA library construction of microbes found in contaminated soils were made possible. The MDA method was validated by analyzing amplified genome coverage from approximately five Escherichia coli cells, resulting in 99.2% genome coverage. The method was further validated by confirming overall representative species coverage and also an amplification bias when amplifying from a mix of eight known bacterial strains. We extracted DNA from samples with extremely low cell densities from a U.S. Department of Energy contaminated site. After amplification, small-subunit rRNA analysis revealed relatively even distribution of species across several major phyla. Clone libraries were constructed from the amplified gDNA, and a small subset of clones was used for shotgun sequencing. BLAST analysis of the library clone sequences showed that 64.9% of the sequences had significant similarities to known proteins, and “clusters of orthologous groups” (COG) analysis revealed that more than half of the sequences from each library contained sequence similarity to known proteins. The libraries can be readily screened for native genes or any target of interest. Whole-genome amplification of metagenomic DNA from very minute microbial sources, while introducing an amplification bias, will allow access to genomic information that was not previously accessible. PMID:16672469

  20. Microbial Communities in Contaminated Sediments, Associated with Bioremediation of Uranium to Submicromolar Levels▿

    PubMed Central

    Cardenas, Erick; Wu, Wei-Min; Leigh, Mary Beth; Carley, Jack; Carroll, Sue; Gentry, Terry; Luo, Jian; Watson, David; Gu, Baohua; Ginder-Vogel, Matthew; Kitanidis, Peter K.; Jardine, Philip M.; Zhou, Jizhong; Crid