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Sample records for contaminant-sediment interactions volume

  1. Solid-waste leach characteristics and contaminant-sediment interactions. Volume 1, Batch leach and adsorption tests and sediment characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Serne, R.J.; LeGore, V.L.; Cantrell, K.J.; Lindenmeier, C.W.; Campbell, J.A.; Amonette, J.E.; Conca, J.L.; Wood, M.I.

    1993-10-01

    The objectives of this report and subsequent volumes include describing progress on (1) development of conceptual-release models for Hanford Site defense solid-waste forms; (2) optimization of experimental methods to quantify the release from contaminants from solid wastes and their subsequent interactions with unsaturated sediments; and (3) creation of empirical data for use as provisional source term and retardation factors that become input parameters for performance assessment analyses for future Hanford disposal units and baseline risk assessments for inactive and existing disposal units.

  2. Solid waste leach characteristics and contaminant-sediment interactions Volume 2: Contaminant transport under unsaturated moisture contents

    SciTech Connect

    Lindenmeier, C.W.; Serne, R.J.; Conca, J.L.

    1995-09-01

    The objectives of this report and subsequent volumes include describing progress on (1) development and optimization of experimental methods to quantify the release of contaminants from solid wastes and their subsequent interactions with unsaturated sediments and (2) the creation of empirical data that become input parameters to performance assessment (PA) analyses for future Hanford Site disposal units and baseline risk assessments for inactive and existing solid waste disposal units. For this report, efforts focused on developing methodologies to evaluate contaminant transport in Trench 8 (W-5 Burial Ground) sediments under unsaturated (vadose zone) conditions. To accomplish this task, a series of flow-through column tests were run using standard saturated column systems, Wierenga unsaturated column systems (both commercial and modified), and the Unsaturated Flow Apparatus (UFA). The reactants investigated were {sup 85}Sr, {sup 236}U, and {sup 238}U as reactive tracers, and tritium as a non-reactive tracer. Results indicate that for moderately unsaturated conditions (volumetric water contents >50 % of saturation), the Wierenga system performed reasonably well such that long water residence times (50-147 h) were achieved, and reasonably good steady-state flow conditions were maintained. The major drawbacks in using this system for reactive tracer work included (1) the inability to achieve reproducible and constant moisture content below 50% of saturation, (2) the four to six month time required to complete a single test, and (3) the propensity for mechanical failure resulting from laboratory power outages during the prolonged testing period.

  3. Contaminated Sediment

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Contaminated sediments are a significant problem in the Great Lakes basin. Persistent high concentrations of contaminants in the bottom sediments of rivers and harbors pose risks to aquatic organisms, wildlife, and humans.

  4. INTERACTIONS AMONG PHOSPHATE AMENDMENTS, MICROBES AND URANIUM MOBILITY IN CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Knox, A

    2007-08-30

    The use of sequestering agents for the transformation of radionuclides in low concentrations in contaminated soils/sediments offers considerable potential for long-term environmental cleanup. This study evaluated the influence of four phosphate amendments and two microbial amendments on U availability. The synchrotron X-ray fluorescence mapping of the untreated U-contaminated sediment showed that U was closely associated with Mn. All tested phosphate amendments reduced aqueous U concentration more than 90%, likely due to formation of insoluble phosphate precipitates. The addition of A. piechaudii and P. putida alone were found to reduce U concentrations 63% and 31% respectively. Uranium sorption in phosphate treatments was significantly reduced in the presence of microbes. However, increased microbial activity in the treated sediment led to reduction of phosphate effectiveness. The average U concentration in 1 M MgCl{sub 2} extract from U amended sediment was 437 {micro}g/kg, but in the same sediment without microbes (autoclaved sediment), the extractable U concentration was only 103 {micro}g/kg. When the autoclaved amended sediment was treated with autoclaved biological apatite, U concentration in the 1 M MgCl{sub 2} extract was {approx}0 {micro}g/kg. Together these tests suggest that microbes may enhance U leaching and reduce phosphate amendment remedial effectiveness.

  5. Contaminated Sediment Core Profiling

    EPA Science Inventory

    Evaluating the environmental risk of sites containing contaminated sediments often poses major challenges due in part to the absence of detailed information available for a given location. Sediment core profiling is often utilized during preliminary environmental investigations ...

  6. Contaminated Sediment Core Profiling

    EPA Science Inventory

    Evaluating the environmental risk of sites containing contaminated sediments often poses major challenges due in part to the absence of detailed information available for a given location. Sediment core profiling is often utilized during preliminary environmental investigations ...

  7. Superfund: Contaminated Sediments

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Contaminated sediments are a significant environmental problem and contribute to the over 3,200 fish consumption advisories nationwide. The Superfund program cleans up sediment sites that present an unacceptable risk to human health or the environment.

  8. Interactive effects of cadmium and pyrene on contaminant removal from co-contaminated sediment planted with mangrove Kandelia obovata (S., L.) Yong seedlings.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenyun; Zhang, Xuefeng; Huang, Jing; Yan, Chongling; Zhang, Qiong; Lu, Haoliang; Liu, Jingchun

    2014-07-15

    The interactive effects of cadmium (Cd) and pyrene (Pyr) on contaminant removal from co-contaminated sediment planted with Kandelia obovata were investigated by a pot experiment. We found that dry weight of plant was significantly decreased under high level of Cd-Pyr combined stress. High Pyr caused the increase of Cd toxicity to K. obovata under high Cd stress because more Cd translocated to the plant tissues. Cd toxicity inhibited Pyr degradation in co-contaminated sediments and higher Pyr degradation was found in the rhizosphere than that in the non-rhizosphere sediment under high Cd treatment. The total number of microorganisms in sediments tended to decrease with increasing Cd under Cd-Pyr combined stress and more amount existed in the rhizosphere sediment. In conclusion, Cd and Pyr removal by K. obovata can influence interactions between these two pollutants in co-contaminated sediment. This suggests that this mangrove can effectively remedy sites co-contaminated with these two types of contamination. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. TOOLS FOR ASSESSING MONITORED NATURAL RECOVERY OF PCB-CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Management of contaminated sediments poses many challenges due to varied contaminants and volumes of sediments to manage. dredging, capping, and monitored natural recovery (MNR) are the primary approaches at this time for managing contaminated sediment risks. Understanding how we...

  10. TOOLS FOR ASSESSING MONITORED NATURAL RECOVERY OF PCB-CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Management of contaminated sediments poses many challenges due to varied contaminants and volumes of sediments to manage. dredging, capping, and monitored natural recovery (MNR) are the primary approaches at this time for managing contaminated sediment risks. Understanding how we...

  11. Quantifying the eroded volume of mercury-contaminated sediment using terrestrial laser scanning at Stocking Flat, Deer Creek, Nevada County, California, 2010–13

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Howle, James F.; Alpers, Charles N.; Bawden, Gerald W.; Bond, Sandra

    2016-07-28

    High-resolution ground-based light detection and ranging (lidar), also known as terrestrial laser scanning, was used to quantify the volume of mercury-contaminated sediment eroded from a stream cutbank at Stocking Flat along Deer Creek in the Sierra Nevada foothills, about 3 kilometers west of Nevada City, California. Terrestrial laser scanning was used to collect sub-centimeter, three-dimensional images of the complex cutbank surface, which could not be mapped non-destructively or in sufficient detail with traditional surveying techniques.The stream cutbank, which is approximately 50 meters long and 8 meters high, was surveyed on four occasions: December 1, 2010; January 20, 2011; May 12, 2011; and February 4, 2013. Volumetric changes were determined between the sequential, three-dimensional lidar surveys. Volume was calculated by two methods, and the average value is reported. Between the first and second surveys (December 1, 2010, to January 20, 2011), a volume of 143 plus or minus 15 cubic meters of sediment was eroded from the cutbank and mobilized by Deer Creek. Between the second and third surveys (January 20, 2011, to May 12, 2011), a volume of 207 plus or minus 24 cubic meters of sediment was eroded from the cutbank and mobilized by the stream. Total volumetric change during the winter and spring of 2010–11 was 350 plus or minus 28 cubic meters. Between the third and fourth surveys (May 12, 2011, to February 4, 2013), the differencing of the three-dimensional lidar data indicated that a volume of 18 plus or minus 10 cubic meters of sediment was eroded from the cutbank. The total volume of sediment eroded from the cutbank between the first and fourth surveys was 368 plus or minus 30 cubic meters.

  12. A PHYSICAL, CHEMICAL, AND BIOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT OF MONITORED NATURAL RECOVERY OF PCB-CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS IN LAKE HARTWELL, CLEMSON, NC

    EPA Science Inventory

    Management of contaminated sediments poses significant challenges due to varied contaminants and volumes of sediments to manage. Dredging, capping, and monitored natural recovery (MNR) are the primary approaches for managing the contaminated sediment risks. Understanding how eff...

  13. PHYSICAL, CHEMICAL AND BIOLOGICAL TOOLS FOR EVALUATING, MONITORED NATURAL RECOVERY OF PCB CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS IN LAKE HARTWELL, CLEMSON, SC

    EPA Science Inventory

    Management of contaminated sediments poses significant challenges due to varied contaminants and volumes of sediments to
    manage. Dredging, capping, and monitored natural recovery (MNR) are the primary approaches for managing the contaminated sediment risks.
    Understanding ho...

  14. A PHYSICAL, CHEMICAL, AND BIOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT OF MONITORED NATURAL RECOVERY OF PCB-CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS IN LAKE HARTWELL, CLEMSON, NC

    EPA Science Inventory

    Management of contaminated sediments poses significant challenges due to varied contaminants and volumes of sediments to manage. Dredging, capping, and monitored natural recovery (MNR) are the primary approaches for managing the contaminated sediment risks. Understanding how eff...

  15. PHYSICAL, CHEMICAL AND BIOLOGICAL TOOLS FOR EVALUATING, MONITORED NATURAL RECOVERY OF PCB CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS IN LAKE HARTWELL, CLEMSON, SC

    EPA Science Inventory

    Management of contaminated sediments poses significant challenges due to varied contaminants and volumes of sediments to
    manage. Dredging, capping, and monitored natural recovery (MNR) are the primary approaches for managing the contaminated sediment risks.
    Understanding ho...

  16. Remediation technologies for contaminated sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Swanson, L.M.

    1995-09-01

    Although soil and groundwater remediation has been conducted for many years, sediment remediation is still in its infancy. Regulatory agencies are now beginning to identify areas where contaminated sediments exist and evaluate their environmental impact. As these evaluations are completed, the projects must shift focus to how these sediments can be remediated. Also as the criteria for aquatic disposal of dredged sediments become more stringent, remediation technologies must be developed to address contaminated sediments generated by maintenance dredging.This report describes the various issues and possible technologies for sediment remediation.

  17. Beneficial Use Of Contaminated Sediment

    EPA Science Inventory

    The western portion of the Lake George Branch of the Indian Harbor Canal (IHC) is no longer used for commercial purposes, but contains petroleum contaminated sediments. The IHC is considered an important habitat for many animal species. Several future development projects have ...

  18. HANDBOOK: REMEDIATION OF CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Contaminated sediments may pose risks to both human and environmental health. Such sediments may be found in

    large sites, such as the harbors of industrialized ports. However, they are also frequently found in smaller sites, such as streams, lakes, bayous, and rivers. In r...

  19. Beneficial Use Of Contaminated Sediment

    EPA Science Inventory

    The western portion of the Lake George Branch of the Indian Harbor Canal (IHC) is no longer used for commercial purposes, but contains petroleum contaminated sediments. The IHC is considered an important habitat for many animal species. Several future development projects have ...

  20. HANDBOOK: REMEDIATION OF CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Contaminated sediments may pose risks to both human and environmental health. Such sediments may be found in

    large sites, such as the harbors of industrialized ports. However, they are also frequently found in smaller sites, such as streams, lakes, bayous, and rivers. In r...

  1. Superfund: Contaminated Sediments Technical Advisory Group (CSTAG)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Contaminated Sediments Technical Advisory Group provides advice to large, complex, or controversial contaminated sediment sites. On this page are the operating procedures, the list of CSTAG sites, and CSTAG recommendations on each site.

  2. A MULTI-ORD LAB AND REGIONAL ASSESSMENT OF MONITORED NATURAL RECOVERY OF PCB-CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS IN LAKE HARTWELL, CLEMSON, SC

    EPA Science Inventory

    Management of contaminated sediments poses many challenges due to varied contaminants and volumes of sediments to manage. Dredging, capping, and monitored natural recovery (MNR) are the primary approaches for managing the contaminated sediment risks. Understanding how well the ...

  3. A MULTI-ORD LAB AND REGIONAL ASSESSMENT OF MONITORED NATURAL RECOVERY OF PCB-CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS IN LAKE HARTWELL, CLEMSON, SC

    EPA Science Inventory

    Management of contaminated sediments poses many challenges due to varied contaminants and volumes of sediments to manage. Dredging, capping, and monitored natural recovery (MNR) are the primary approaches for managing the contaminated sediment risks. Understanding how well the ...

  4. Remediation technologies for oil-contaminated sediments.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Ashutosh; Liu, Yu

    2015-12-30

    Oil-contaminated sediments pose serious environmental hazards for both aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. Innovative and environmentally compatible technologies are urgently required to remove oil-contaminated sediments. In this paper, various physical, chemical and biological technologies are investigated for the remediation of oil-contaminated sediments such as flotation and washing, coal agglomeration, thermal desorption, ultrasonic desorption, bioremediation, chemical oxidation and extraction using ionic liquids. The basic principles of these technologies as well as their advantages and disadvantages for practical application have been discussed. A combination of two or more technologies is expected to provide an innovative solution that is economical, eco-friendly and adaptable.

  5. Occurrence, distribution, and volume of metals-contaminated sediment of selected streams draining the Tri-State Mining District, Missouri, Oklahoma, and Kansas, 2011–12

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, D. Charlie

    2016-12-14

    Lead and zinc were mined in the Tri-State Mining District (TSMD) of southwest Missouri, northeast Oklahoma, and southeast Kansas for more than 100 years. The effects of mining on the landscape are still evident, nearly 50 years after the last mine ceased operation. The legacies of mining are the mine waste and discharge of groundwater from underground mines. The mine-waste piles and underground mines are continuous sources of trace metals (primarily lead, zinc, and cadmium) to the streams that drain the TSMD. Many previous studies characterized the horizontal extent of mine-waste contamination in streams but little information exists on the depth of mine-waste contamination in these streams. Characterizing the vertical extent of contamination is difficult because of the large amount of coarse-grained material, ranging from coarse gravel to boulders, within channel sediment. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with U.S. Fish and Wildlife service, collected channel-sediment samples at depth for subsequent analyses that would allow attainment of the following goals: (1) determination of the relation between concentration and depth for lead, zinc and cadmium in channel sediments and flood-plain sediments, and (2) determination of the volume of gravel-bar sediment from the surface to the maximum depth with concentrations of these metals that exceeded sediment-quality guidelines. For the purpose of this report, volume of gravel-bar sediment is considered to be distributed in two forms, gravel bars and the wetted channel, and this study focused on gravel bars. Concentrations of lead, zinc, and cadmium in samples were compared to the consensus probable effects concentration (CPEC) and Tri-State Mining District specific probable effects concentration (TPEC) sediment-quality guidelines.During the study, more than 700 sediment samples were collected from borings at multiple sites, including gravel bars and flood plains, along Center Creek, Turkey Creek, Shoal Creek

  6. List of Contaminated Sediments Technical Advisory Group Sites

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Contaminated Sediments Technical Advisory Group provides advice to large, complex, or controversial contaminated sediment sites. On this page are the operating procedures, the list of CSTAG sites, and CSTAG recommendations on each site.

  7. Contaminated sediment dynamics in peatland headwaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuttleworth, Emma; Clay, Gareth; Evans, Martin; Hutchinson, Simon; Rothwell, James

    2016-04-01

    Peatlands are an important store of soil carbon, provide multiple ecosystem services, and when located in close proximity to urban and industrial areas, can also act as sinks of atmospherically deposited heavy metals. The near-surface layer of the blanket peats of the Peak District National Park, UK, is severely contaminated with high concentrations of anthropogenically derived, atmospherically deposited lead (Pb). These peats are severely degraded, and there is increasing concern that erosion is releasing considerable quantities of this legacy pollution into surface waters. Despite substantial research into Pb dynamics in peatlands formal description of the possible mechanisms of contaminated sediment mobilisation is limited. However, there is evidence to suggest that a substantial proportion of contaminated surface sediment may be redistributed elsewhere in the catchment. This study uses the Pb contamination stored near the peat's surface as a fingerprint to trace contaminated sediment dynamics and storage in three severely degraded headwater catchments. Erosion is exposing high concentrations of Pb on interfluve surfaces, and substantial amounts of reworked contaminated material are stored on other catchment surfaces (gully walls and floors). We propose a variety of mechanisms as controls of Pb release and storage on the different surfaces, including: (i) wind action on interfluves; (ii) the aspect of gully walls, and (iii) gully depth. Vegetation also plays an important role in retaining contaminated sediment on all surfaces.

  8. Ocean acidification increases the toxicity of contaminated sediments.

    PubMed

    Roberts, David A; Birchenough, Silvana N R; Lewis, Ceri; Sanders, Matthew B; Bolam, Thi; Sheahan, Dave

    2013-02-01

    Ocean acidification (OA) may alter the behaviour of sediment-bound metals, modifying their bioavailability and thus toxicity. We provide the first experimental test of this hypothesis with the amphipod Corophium volutator. Amphipods were exposed to two test sediments, one with relatively high metals concentrations (Σmetals 239 mg kg(-1) ) and a reference sediment with lower contamination (Σmetals 82 mg kg(-1) ) under conditions that mimic current and projected conditions of OA (390-1140 μatm pCO2 ). Survival and DNA damage was measured in the amphipods, whereas the flux of labile metals was measured in the sediment and water column (WC) using Diffusive Gradients in Thin-films. The contaminated sediments became more acutely toxic to C. volutator under elevated pCO2 (1140 μatm). There was also a 2.7-fold increase in DNA damage in amphipods exposed to the contaminated sediment at 750 μatm pCO2 , as well as increased DNA damage in organisms exposed to the reference sediment, but only at 1140 μatm pCO2 . The projected pCO2 concentrations increased the flux of nickel and zinc to labile states in the WC and pore water. However, the increase in metal flux at elevated pCO2 was equal between the reference and contaminated sediments or, occasionally, greater from reference sediments. Hence, the toxicological interaction between OA and contaminants could not be explained by e ffects of pH on metal speciation. We propose that the additive physiological effects of OA and contaminants will be more important than changes in metal speciation in determining the responses of benthos to contaminated sediments under OA. Our data demonstrate clear potential for near-future OA to increase the susceptibility of benthic ecosystems to contaminants. Environmental policy should consider contaminants within the context of changing environmental conditions. Specifically, sediment metals guidelines may need to be reevaluated to afford appropriate environmental protection under future

  9. Toxicity of contaminated sediments in dilution series with control sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, M.K.; Landrum, P.F.; Burton, G.A.; Klaine, S.J.; Crecelius, E.A.; Byl, T.D.; Gossiaux, Duane C.; Tsymbal, V.N.; Cleveland, L.; Ingersoll, Christopher G.; Sasson-Brickson, G.

    1993-01-01

    The use of dilutions has been the foundation of our approach for assessing contaminated water, and accordingly, it may be important to establish similar or parallel approaches for sediment dilutions. Test organism responses to dilution gradients can identify the degree of necessary sediment alteration to reduce the toxicity. Using whole sediment dilutions to represent the complex interactions of in situ sediments can identify the toxicity, but the selection of the appropriate diluent for the contaminated sediment may affect the results and conclusions drawn. Contaminated whole sediments were examined to evaluate the toxicity of dilutions of sediments with a diversity of test organisms. Dilutions of the contaminated sediments were prepared with differing diluents that varied in organic carbon content, particle size distribution, and volatile solids. Studies were conducted using four macroinvertebrates and a vascular, rooted plant. Responses by some test organisms followed a sigmoidal dose-response curve, but others followed a U-shaped curve. Initial dilutions reduced toxicity as expected, but further dilution resulted in an increase in toxicity. The type of diluent used was an important factor in assessing the sediment toxicity, because the control soil reduced toxicity more effectively than sand as a diluent of the same sediment. Using sediment chemical and physical characteristics as an indicator of sediment dilution may not be as useful as chemical analysis of contaminants, but warrants further investigation.

  10. Mercury-contaminated sediments affect amphipod feeding.

    PubMed

    Bundschuh, Mirco; Zubrod, Jochen P; Seitz, Frank; Newman, Michael C; Schulz, Ralf

    2011-04-01

    A 125-mile reach of the South River, Virginia, was contaminated with mercury during the first half of the 20th century. As increased concentrations of mercury have persisted, researchers have carefully studied its distribution in the river biota and estimated associated risks. The present study evaluated the influence of mercury on feeding rate and uptake by the amphipod Hyalella azteca. The test organisms were exposed for 7 days with leaf discs to reference and contaminated field sediment during the preliminary experiment and additionally to Sedimite (a commercial mercury-sequestering agent) amended sediments during the final experiment. The preliminary experiment demonstrated a decreased feeding rate (approximately 35%) of H. azteca in sediment from a contaminated site relative to sediment from a reference site. The test design of the final experiment took advantage of the knowledge gained in the preliminary experiment by increasing the number of replicates, which decreased the type II error rate. First, the results of the final experiment confirmed the results of the preliminary experiment by again demonstrating differences in the feeding rate of approximately 35% between reference and contaminated sediment. Second, the results indicated a lower feeding rate in reference sediment in the presence of Sedimite. Third, an opposite tendency, although not significant, was apparent for Sedimite-amended contaminated sediment. Thus, Sedimite appears to decrease sediment quality, whereas this conclusion is based on the feeding rate of H. azteca. However, Sedimite and its value as a mercury-sequestering agent requires further evaluation.

  11. Toxicity of lead-contaminated sediment to mallards

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heinz, G.H.; Hoffman, D.J.; Sileo, L.; Audet, D.J.; LeCaptain, L.J.

    1999-01-01

    Because consumption of lead-contaminated sediment has been suspected as the cause of waterfowl mortality in the Coeur d?Alene River basin in Idaho, we studied the bioavailability and toxicity of this sediment to mallards (Anas platyrhynchos). In experiment 1, one of 10 adult male mallards died when fed a pelleted commercial duck diet that contained 24% lead-contaminated sediment (with 3,400 μg/g lead in the sediment). Protoporphyrin levels in the blood increased as the percentage of lead-contaminated sediment in the diet increased. Birds fed 24% lead-contaminated sediment exhibited atrophy of the breast muscles, green staining of the feathers around the vent, viscous bile, green staining of the gizzard lining, and renal tubular intranuclear inclusion bodies. Mallards fed 24% lead-contaminated sediment had means of 6.1 μg/g of lead in the blood and 28 μg/g in the liver (wet-weight basis) and 1,660 μg/g in the feces (dry-weight basis). In experiment 2, we raised the dietary concentration of the lead-contaminated sediment to 48%, but only about 20% sediment was actually ingested due to food washing by the birds. Protoporphyrin levels were elevated in the lead-exposed birds, and all of the mallards fed 48% lead-contaminated sediment had renal tubular intranuclear inclusion bodies. The concentrations of lead in the liver were 9.1 μg/g for mallards fed 24% lead-contaminated sediment and 16 μg/g for mallards fed 48% lead-contaminated sediment. In experiment 3, four of five mallards died when fed a ground corn diet containing 24% lead-contaminated sediment (with 4,000 μg/g lead in this sample of sediment), but none died when the 24% lead-contaminated sediment was mixed into a nutritionally balanced commercial duck diet; estimated actual ingestion rates for sediment were 14% and 17% for the corn and commercial diets. Lead exposure caused elevations in protoporphyrin, and four of the five mallards fed 24% lead-contaminated sediment in a commercial diet and all five

  12. Toxicity of lead-contaminated sediment to mallards.

    PubMed

    Heinz, G H; Hoffman, D J; Sileo, L; Audet, D J; LeCaptain, L J

    1999-04-01

    Because consumption of lead-contaminated sediment has been suspected as the cause of waterfowl mortality in the Coeur d'Alene River basin in Idaho, we studied the bioavailability and toxicity of this sediment to mallards (Anas platyrhynchos). In experiment 1, one of 10 adult male mallards died when fed a pelleted commercial duck diet that contained 24% lead-contaminated sediment (with 3,400 microgram/g lead in the sediment). Protoporphyrin levels in the blood increased as the percentage of lead-contaminated sediment in the diet increased. Birds fed 24% lead-contaminated sediment exhibited atrophy of the breast muscles, green staining of the feathers around the vent, viscous bile, green staining of the gizzard lining, and renal tubular intranuclear inclusion bodies. Mallards fed 24% lead-contaminated sediment had means of 6.1 microgram/g of lead in the blood and 28 microgram/g in the liver (wet-weight basis) and 1,660 microgram/g in the feces (dry-weight basis). In experiment 2, we raised the dietary concentration of the lead-contaminated sediment to 48%, but only about 20% sediment was actually ingested due to food washing by the birds. Protoporphyrin levels were elevated in the lead-exposed birds, and all of the mallards fed 48% lead-contaminated sediment had renal tubular intranuclear inclusion bodies. The concentrations of lead in the liver were 9.1 microgram/g for mallards fed 24% lead-contaminated sediment and 16 microgram/g for mallards fed 48% lead-contaminated sediment. In experiment 3, four of five mallards died when fed a ground corn diet containing 24% lead-contaminated sediment (with 4,000 microgram/g lead in this sample of sediment), but none died when the 24% lead-contaminated sediment was mixed into a nutritionally balanced commercial duck diet; estimated actual ingestion rates for sediment were 14% and 17% for the corn and commercial diets. Lead exposure caused elevations in protoporphyrin, and four of the five mallards fed 24% lead-contaminated

  13. USING SPMDS TO ACCESS MANAGMENT STRATEGIES FOR PCB CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dredging, in-place treatment, capping and monitored natural recovery, used together or separately are the primary approaches for managing contaminated sediment risks. Understanding how well different approaches work in different environments is critical for choosing an appropria...

  14. USING SPMDS TO ASSESS MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES FOR PCB CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract: Dredging in-place treatment, capping and monitored natural recovery, used together or separately are the primary approaches for managing contaminated sediment risks. Understanding how well different approaches work in different environments is critical for choosing an...

  15. GEOELECTRICAL EVIDENCE OF MICROBIAL DEGRADATION OF DIESEL CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The alteration of physical properties by microbial activity in petroleum contaminated sediments was investigated using geophysical techniques in laboratory column experiments. Microbial population growth was determined by the Most Probable Number technique (MPN), community dynami...

  16. GEOELECTRICAL EVIDENCE OF MICROBIAL DEGRADATION OF DIESEL CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The alteration of physical properties by microbial activity in petroleum contaminated sediments was investigated using geophysical techniques in laboratory column experiments. Microbial population growth was determined by the Most Probable Number technique (MPN), community dynami...

  17. Contaminated sediment research task: SHC Task 3.61.3

    EPA Science Inventory

    A poster presentation for the SHC BOSC review will summarize the research efforts under Sustainable and Healthy Communities Research Program (SHC) in the Contaminated Sediment Task within the Contaminated Sites Project. For the Task, Problem Summary & Decision Context; Task O...

  18. Contaminated sediment research task: SHC Task 3.61.3

    EPA Science Inventory

    A poster presentation for the SHC BOSC review will summarize the research efforts under Sustainable and Healthy Communities Research Program (SHC) in the Contaminated Sediment Task within the Contaminated Sites Project. For the Task, Problem Summary & Decision Context; Task O...

  19. USING SPMDS TO ASSESS MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES FOR PCB CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract: Dredging in-place treatment, capping and monitored natural recovery, used together or separately are the primary approaches for managing contaminated sediment risks. Understanding how well different approaches work in different environments is critical for choosing an...

  20. USING SPMDS TO ACCESS MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES FOR PCB CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dredging, in-place treatment, capping and monitored natural recovery, used together or separately are the primary approaches for managing contaminated sediment risks. Understanding how well different approaches work in different environments is critical for choosing an appropria...

  1. USING SPMDS TO ACCESS MANAGMENT STRATEGIES FOR PCB CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dredging, in-place treatment, capping and monitored natural recovery, used together or separately are the primary approaches for managing contaminated sediment risks. Understanding how well different approaches work in different environments is critical for choosing an appropria...

  2. NHEERL CONTAMINATED SEDIMENT RESEARCH MULTI-YEAR IMPLEMENTATION PLAN (2005)

    EPA Science Inventory

    ORD has developed a multi-year plan (MYP) called the Contaminated Sites MYP to address the research needs of EPA's Office of Superfund Remediation and Technology Innovation (OSRTI). One of the long-term goals of the Contaminated Sites MYP relates to contaminated sediments, and t...

  3. NATIONAL CONFERENCE ON MANAGEMENT AND TREATMENT OF CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS: PROCEEDINGS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Conference on Management and Treatment of Contaminated Sediment was held in Cincinnati, OH, May 13 to 14, 1997. This technology transfer meeting was held for 213 professionals from various EPA divisions and other organizations, including Environment Canada, the U.S. ...

  4. NHEERL CONTAMINATED SEDIMENT RESEARCH MULTI-YEAR IMPLEMENTATION PLAN (2005)

    EPA Science Inventory

    ORD has developed a multi-year plan (MYP) called the Contaminated Sites MYP to address the research needs of EPA's Office of Superfund Remediation and Technology Innovation (OSRTI). One of the long-term goals of the Contaminated Sites MYP relates to contaminated sediments, and t...

  5. NATIONAL CONFERENCE ON MANAGEMENT AND TREATMENT OF CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS: PROCEEDINGS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Conference on Management and Treatment of Contaminated Sediment was held in Cincinnati, OH, May 13 to 14, 1997. This technology transfer meeting was held for 213 professionals from various EPA divisions and other organizations, including Environment Canada, the U.S. ...

  6. Innovative Capping Technology To Prevent The Migration of Toxic Chemicals From Contaminated Sediments

    EPA Science Inventory

    Capping is a common strategy for decreasing the risk associated with contaminated sediments in lakes and streams. Historically, caps have been designed to physically isolate contaminated sediments and prevent the transport of contaminants from sediments into the water above them...

  7. Innovative Capping Technology To Prevent The Migration of Toxic Chemicals From Contaminated Sediments

    EPA Science Inventory

    Capping is a common strategy for decreasing the risk associated with contaminated sediments in lakes and streams. Historically, caps have been designed to physically isolate contaminated sediments and prevent the transport of contaminants from sediments into the water above them...

  8. Mercury contaminated sediment sites—An evaluation of remedial options

    SciTech Connect

    Randall, Paul M.; Chattopadhyay, Sandip

    2013-08-15

    Mercury (Hg) is a naturally-occurring element that is ubiquitous in the aquatic environment. Though efforts have been made in recent years to decrease Hg emissions, historically-emitted Hg can be retained in the sediments of aquatic bodies where they may be slowly converted to methylmercury (MeHg). Consequently, Hg in historically-contaminated sediments can result in high levels of significant exposure for aquatic species, wildlife and human populations consuming fish. Even if source control of contaminated wastewater is achievable, it may take a very long time, perhaps decades, for Hg-contaminated aquatic systems to reach relatively safe Hg levels in both water and surface sediment naturally. It may take even longer if Hg is present at higher concentration levels in deep sediment. Hg contaminated sediment results from previous releases or ongoing contributions from sources that are difficult to identify. Due to human activities or physical, chemical, or biological processes (e.g. hydrodynamic flows, bioturbation, molecular diffusion, and chemical transformation), the buried Hg can be remobilized into the overlying water. Hg speciation in the water column and sediments critically affect the reactivity (i.e. conversion of inorganic Hg(II) to MeHg), transport, and its exposure to living organisms. Also, geochemical conditions affect the activity of methylating bacteria and its availability for methylation. This review paper discusses remedial considerations (e.g. key chemical factors in fate and transport of Hg, source characterization and control, environmental management procedures, remediation options, modeling tools) and includes practical case studies for cleaning up Hg-contaminated sediment sites. -- Highlights: ► Managing mercury-contaminated sediment sites are challenging to remediate. ► Remediation technologies are making a difference in managing these sites. ► Partitioning plays a dominant role in the distribution of mercury species. ► Mathematical

  9. Influence of sediment storage on downstream delivery of contaminated sediment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Malmon, D.V.; Reneau, S.L.; Dunne, T.; Katzman, D.; Drakos, P.G.

    2005-01-01

    Sediment storage in alluvial valleys can strongly modulate the downstream migration of sediment and associated contaminants through landscapes. Traditional methods for routing contaminated sediment through valleys focus on in-channel sediment transport but ignore the influence of sediment exchanges with temporary sediment storage reservoirs outside the channel, such as floodplains. In theory, probabilistic analysis of particle trajectories through valleys offers a useful strategy for quantifying the influence of sediment storage on the downstream movement of contaminated sediment. This paper describes a field application and test of this theory, using 137Cs as a sediment tracer over 45 years (1952-1997), downstream of a historical effluent outfall at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), New Mexico. The theory is parameterized using a sediment budget based on field data and an estimate of the 137Cs release history at the upstream boundary. The uncalibrated model reasonably replicates the approximate magnitude and spatial distribution of channel- and floodplain-stored 137Cs measured in an independent field study. Model runs quantify the role of sediment storage in the long-term migration of a pulse of contaminated sediment, quantify the downstream impact of upstream mitigation, and mathematically decompose the future 137Cs flux near the LANL property boundary to evaluate the relative contributions of various upstream contaminant sources. The fate of many sediment-bound contaminants is determined by the relative timescales of contaminant degradation and particle residence time in different types of sedimentary environments. The theory provides a viable approach for quantifying the long-term movement of contaminated sediment through valleys. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  10. Active capping technology: a new environmental remediation of contaminated sediment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chang; Zhu, Meng-Ying; Zeng, Guang-Ming; Yu, Zhi-Gang; Cui, Fang; Yang, Zhong-Zhu; Shen, Liu-Qing

    2016-03-01

    The management and treatment of contaminated sediment is a worldwide problem and poses major technical and economic challenges. Nowadays, various attempts have been committed to investigating a cost-effective way in contaminated sediment restoration. Among the remediation options, in situ capping turns out to be a less expensive, less disruptive, and more durable approach. However, by using the low adsorption capacity materials, traditional caps do not always fulfill the reduction of risks that can be destructive for human health, ecosystem, and even natural resources. Active caps, therefore, are designed to employ active materials (activated carbon, apatite, zeolite, organoclay, etc.) to strengthen their adsorption and degradation capacity. The active capping technology promises to be a permanent and cost-efficient solution to contaminated sediments. This paper provides a review on the types of active materials and the ways of these active materials employed in recent active capping studies. Cap design considerations including site-specific conditions, diffusion/advection, erosive forces, and active material selection that should be noticed in an eligible remediation project are also presented.

  11. Toxicity of lead-contaminated sediment to mute swans

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Day, D.D.; Beyer, W.N.; Hoffman, D.J.; Morton, Alexandra; Sileo, L.; Audet, D.J.; Ottinger, M.A.

    2003-01-01

    Most ecotoxicological risk assessments of wildlife emphasize contaminant exposure through ingestion of food and water. However, the role of incidental ingestion of sediment-bound contaminants has not been adequately appreciated in these assessments. This study evaluates the toxicological consequences of contamination of sediments with metals from hard-rock mining and smelting activities. Lead-contaminated sediments collected from the Coeur d'Alene River Basin in Idaho were combined with either a commercial avian maintenance diet or ground rice and fed to captive mute swans (Cygnus olor) for 6 weeks. Experimental treatments consisted of maintenance or rice diets containing 0, 12 (no rice group), or 24% highly contaminated (3,950 ug/g lead) sediment or 24% reference (9.7 ug/g lead) sediment. Although none of the swans died, the group fed a rice diet containing 24% lead-contaminated sediment were the most severely affected, experiencing a 24% decrease in mean body weight, including three birds that became emaciated. All birds in this treatment group had nephrosis; abnormally dark, viscous bile; and significant (p < 0.05) reductions in hematocrit and hemoglobin concentrations compared to their pretreatment levels. This group also had the greatest mean concentrations of lead in blood (3.2 ug/g), brain (2.2 ug/g), and liver (8.5 ug/g). These birds had significant (alpha = 0.05) increases in mean plasma alanine aminotransferase activity, cholesterol, and uric acid concentrations and decreased plasma triglyceride concentrations compared to all other treatment groups. After 14 days of exposure, mean protoporphyrin concentrations increased substantially, and mean delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase activity decreased by more than 95% in all groups fed diets containing highly contaminated sediments. All swans fed diets that contained 24% lead-contaminated sediment had renal acid-fast intranuclear inclusion bodies, which are diagnostic of lead poisoning in waterfowl. Body

  12. Toxicity of lead-contaminated sediment to mute swans.

    PubMed

    Day, D D; Beyer, W N; Hoffman, D J; Morton, A; Sileo, L; Audet, D J; Ottinger, M A

    2003-05-01

    Most ecotoxicological risk assessments of wildlife emphasize contaminant exposure through ingestion of food and water. However, the role of incidental ingestion of sediment-bound contaminants has not been adequately appreciated in these assessments. This study evaluates the toxicological consequences of contamination of sediments with metals from hard-rock mining and smelting activities. Lead-contaminated sediments collected from the Coeur d'Alene River Basin in Idaho were combined with either a commercial avian maintenance diet or ground rice and fed to captive mute swans (Cygnus olor) for 6 weeks. Experimental treatments consisted of maintenance or rice diets containing 0, 12 (no rice group), or 24% highly contaminated (3,950 microg/g lead) sediment or 24% reference (9.7 microg/g lead) sediment. Although none of the swans died, the group fed a rice diet containing 24% lead-contaminated sediment were the most severely affected, experiencing a 24% decrease in mean body weight, including three birds that became emaciated. All birds in this treatment group had nephrosis; abnormally dark, viscous bile; and significant (p contaminated sediments. All swans fed diets that contained 24% lead-contaminated sediment had renal acid-fast intranuclear inclusion bodies, which are diagnostic of lead

  13. Microscopic reactive diffusion of uranium in the contaminated sediments at Hanford, United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chongxuan; Zachara, John M.; Yantasee, Wassana; Majors, Paul D.; McKinley, James P.

    2006-12-01

    Microscopic and spectroscopic analyses of uranium-contaminated sediments from select locations at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford site have revealed that sorbed uranium (U) often exists as uranyl precipitates associated with intragrain fractures of granitic clasts. The release of U to contacting fluids appears to be controlled by intragrain ion diffusion coupled with the dissolution kinetics of the precipitates that exist in the form of Na-boltwoodite. Here we present a coupled microscopic reactive diffusion model for the contaminated sediment on the basis of experimental measurements of intragrain diffusivity in the granitic lithic fragments and the dissolution kinetics of synthetic Na-boltwoodite. Nuclear magnetic resonance, pulse gradient spin echo measurements showed that the intragrain fractures of the granitic clasts isolated from the sediment contained two domains with distinct diffusivities. The fast diffusion domain had an apparent tortuosity of 1.5, while that of the slow region was two orders of magnitude larger. A two-domain diffusion model was assembled and used to infer the geochemical conditions that led to intragrain uranyl precipitation during waste-sediment interaction. Rapid precipitation of Na-boltwoodite was simulated with an alkaline U-containing, high-carbonate tank waste solution that diffused into intragrain fractures, which originally contained Si-rich pore water in equilibrium with feldspar grains in the lithic fragments. The model was also used to simulate uranyl dissolution and release from contaminated sediment to recharge waters. With independently characterized parameters for Na-boltwoodite dissolution, the model simulations demonstrated that diffusion could significantly decrease the rates of intragrain uranyl mineral dissolution due to diffusion-induced local solubility limitation with respect to Na-boltwoodite.

  14. Sediment testing intermittent renewal system for the automated renewal of overlying water in toxicity tests with contaminated sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Benoit, D.A.; Phipps, G.L.; Ankley, G.T.

    1993-01-01

    A sediment testing intermittent renewal (STIR) system (stationary or portable) for invertebrate toxicity testing with contaminated sediments has been successfully developed and thoroughly tested at ERL-Duluth. Both the stationary and portable systems enable the maintenance of acceptable water quality (e.g. DO) through the capability of automatically renewing overlying water in sediment tests at rates ranging from 1 to 21 volume renewals/day. The STIR system not only significantly reduces the labor associated with renewal of overlying water but also affords a gentle exchange of water that results in virtually no sediment resuspension. Both systems can also be installed in a compact vented enclosure to permit safe testing of hazardous contaminated sediments. To date the STIR system has been used extensively for conducting 10-day bulk sediment tests with Chironomus tentans, Hyalella azteca and Lumbriculus variegatus.

  15. Possible developments for ex situ phytoremediation of contaminated sediments, in tropical and subtropical regions - Review.

    PubMed

    Pittarello, Marco; Busato, Jader Galba; Carletti, Paolo; Dobbss, Leonardo Barros

    2017-09-01

    The growing problem of remediation of contaminated sediments dredged from harbor channels needs to be resolved by a cost effective and sustainable technology. Phytoremediation, by ex situ remediation plants, seems to have the potential to replace traditional methods in case of moderately contaminated sediments. On the other side, the need to mix sediments with soil and/or sand to allow an easier establishment of most employed species causes an increase of the volume of the processed substrate up to 30%. Moreover the majority of phytoremediating species are natives of temperate climate belt. Mangroves, with a special focus on the genus Avicennia - a salt secreting species - should represent an effective alternative in terms of adaptation to salty, anoxic sediments and an opportunity to develop ex situ phytoremediation plants in tropical and subtropical regions. The use of humic acid to increase root development, cell antioxidant activity and the potential attenuation of the "heavy metals exclusion strategy" to increase phytoextraction potentials of mangroves will be reviewed. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Simulation of contaminated sediment transport in White Oak Creek basin

    SciTech Connect

    Bao, Y.; Clapp, R.B.; Brenkert, A.L.; Moore, T.D.; Fontaine, T.A.

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents a systematic approach to management of the contaminated sediments in the White Oak Creek watershed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The primary contaminant of concern is radioactive cesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs), which binds to soil and sediment particles. The key components in the approach include an intensive sampling and monitoring system for flood events; modeling of hydrological processes, sediment transport, and contaminant flux movement; and a decision framework with a detailed human health risk analysis. Emphasis is placed on modeling of watershed rainfall-runoff and contaminated sediment transport during flooding periods using the Hydrologic Simulation Program- Fortran (HSPF) model. Because a large number of parameters are required in HSPF modeling, the major effort in the modeling process is the calibration of model parameters to make simulation results and measured values agree as closely as possible. An optimization model incorporating the concepts of an expert system was developed to improve calibration results and efficiency. Over a five-year simulation period, the simulated flows match the observed values well. Simulated total amount of sediment loads at various locations during storms match with the observed values within a factor of 1.5. Simulated annual releases of {sup 137}Cs off-site locations match the data within a factor of 2 for the five-year period. The comprehensive modeling approach can provide a valuable tool for decision makers to quantitatively analyze sediment erosion, deposition, and transport; exposure risk related to radionuclides in contaminated sediment; and various management strategies.

  17. Contaminated sediment removal from a spent fuel storage canal

    SciTech Connect

    Geber, K R

    1993-01-01

    A leaking underground spent fuel transfer canal between a decommissioned reactor and a radiochemical separations building at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was found to contain RCRA-hazardous and radioactive sediment. Closure of the Part B RCRA permitted facility required the use of an underwater robotic vacuum and a filtration-containment system to separate and stabilize the contaminated sediment. This paper discusses the radiological controls established to maintain contamination and exposures As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) during the sediment removal.

  18. IN SITU REMEDIATION OF CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS - ACTIVE CAPPING TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    Knox, A.; Roberts, J.; Paller, M.; Reible, D.

    2010-09-02

    Active capping is a relatively new approach for treating contaminated sediments. It involves applying chemically reactive amendments to the sediment surface. The main role of active caps is to stabilize contaminants in contaminated sediments, lower the bioavailable pool of contaminants, and reduce the release of contaminants to the water column. Metals are common contaminants in many marine and fresh water environments as a result of industrial and military activities. The mobile, soluble forms of metals are generally considered toxic. Induced chemical precipitation of these metals can shift toxic metals from the aqueous phase to a solid, precipitated phase which is often less bioavailable. This approach can be achieved through application of sequestering agents such as rock phosphates, organoclays, zeolites, clay minerals, and biopolymers (e.g., chitosan) in active capping technology. Active capping holds great potential for a more permanent solution that avoids residual risks resulting from contaminant migration through the cap or breaching of the cap. In addition to identifying superior active capping agents, research is needed to optimize application techniques, application rates, and amendment combinations that maximize sequestration of contaminants. A selected set of active capping treatment technologies has been demonstrated at a few sites, including a field demonstration at the Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC. This demonstration has provided useful information on the effects of sequestering agents on metal immobilization, bioavailability, toxicity, and resistance to mechanical disturbance.

  19. Description of Contaminant Sediment-Water Interactions Using RECOVERY

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-01

    sediment on the overlying water (Boyer and Chapra 1989). The model was modified to make it more applicable to laboratory micro- cosm settings and short...R. A. 1980. Early Piarenesis. Princeton University Press, Princeton, NJ. Boyer, J. M., and Chapra , S. C. 1989. "A Mathematical Model to Predict the...Environ- mental Support Systems for the New England Division and US Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station. Chapra , S. C. 1982. "Long-Term Models of

  20. Mercury-contaminated sediment disposal work in Minamata Bay

    SciTech Connect

    Hirose, M.; Yamaguchi, A.

    1992-03-01

    To root out Minamata disease, which is representative of pollution-caused diseases, a large-scale sediment disposal work was conducted with special care to prevent the secondary pollution due to the work. The basic approach for disposal work consisted mainly of two kinds of ideas. One was to install boundary nets to prevent the mixing of contaminated fish in the Minamata Bay area and noncontaminated fish outside the Bay. The other was to dredge mercury contaminated sediment without disturbance and to confine it in the reclamation area, enclosed by highly watertight revetment. This work was commenced in 1977 and is going to be successfully completed in March of this year with the disposal of roughly 1.5 million cubic meters of sediment over a 2 million-square meter area.

  1. Contaminated sediments database for the Gulf of Maine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buchholtz ten Brink, M. R.; Manheim, F. T.; Mecray, E.L.; Hastings, M.E.; Currence, J.M.; Farrington, J.W.; Jones, S.H.; Larsen, P.F.; Tripp, B.W.; Wallace, G.T.; Ward, L.G.; Fredette, T.J.; Liebman, M.L.; Smith Leo, W.

    2002-01-01

    Bottom sediments in the Gulf of Maine and its estuaries have accumulated pollutants of many types, including metals and organic compounds of agricultural, industrial, and household derivation. Much analytical and descriptive data has been obtained on these sediments over the past decades, but only a small effort had been made, prior to this project, to compile and edit the published and unpublished data in forms suitable for a variety of users. The Contaminated Sediments Database for the Gulf of Maine provides a compilation and synthesis of existing data to help establish the environmental status of our coastal sediments and the transport paths and fate of contaminants in this region. This information, in turn, forms one of the essential bases for developing successful remediation and resource management policies.

  2. Bioleaching of multiple metals from contaminated sediment by moderate thermophiles.

    PubMed

    Gan, Min; Jie, Shiqi; Li, Mingming; Zhu, Jianyu; Liu, Xinxing

    2015-08-15

    A moderately thermophilic consortium was applied in bioleaching multiple metals from contaminated sediment. The consortium got higher acidification and metals soubilization efficiency than that of the pure strains. The synergistic effect of the thermophilic consortium accelerated substrates utilization. The utilization of substrate started with sulfur in the early stage, and then the pH declined, giving rise to making use of the pyrite. Community dynamic showed that A. caldus was the predominant bacteria during the whole bioleaching process while the abundance of S. thermotolerans increased together with pyrite utilization. Solubilization efficiency of Zn, Cu, Mn and Cd reached 98%, 94%, 95%, and 89% respectively, while As, Hg, Pb was only 45%, 34%, 22%. Logistic model was used to simulate the bioleaching process, whose fitting degree was higher than 90%. Correlation analysis revealed that metal leaching was mainly an acid solubilization process. Fraction analysis revealed that metals decreased in mobility and bioavailability. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Passive sampling methods for contaminated sediments: Risk assessment and management

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, Marc S; Chapman, Peter M; Allan, Ian J; Anderson, Kim A; Apitz, Sabine E; Beegan, Chris; Bridges, Todd S; Brown, Steve S; Cargill, John G; McCulloch, Megan C; Menzie, Charles A; Shine, James P; Parkerton, Thomas F

    2014-01-01

    This paper details how activity-based passive sampling methods (PSMs), which provide information on bioavailability in terms of freely dissolved contaminant concentrations (Cfree), can be used to better inform risk management decision making at multiple points in the process of assessing and managing contaminated sediment sites. PSMs can increase certainty in site investigation and management, because Cfree is a better predictor of bioavailability than total bulk sediment concentration (Ctotal) for 4 key endpoints included in conceptual site models (benthic organism toxicity, bioaccumulation, sediment flux, and water column exposures). The use of passive sampling devices (PSDs) presents challenges with respect to representative sampling for estimating average concentrations and other metrics relevant for exposure and risk assessment. These challenges can be addressed by designing studies that account for sources of variation associated with PSMs and considering appropriate spatial scales to meet study objectives. Possible applications of PSMs include: quantifying spatial and temporal trends in bioavailable contaminants, identifying and evaluating contaminant source contributions, calibrating site-specific models, and, improving weight-of-evidence based decision frameworks. PSM data can be used to assist in delineating sediment management zones based on likelihood of exposure effects, monitor remedy effectiveness, and, evaluate risk reduction after sediment treatment, disposal, or beneficial reuse after management actions. Examples are provided illustrating why PSMs and freely dissolved contaminant concentrations (Cfree) should be incorporated into contaminated sediment investigations and study designs to better focus on and understand contaminant bioavailability, more accurately estimate exposure to sediment-associated contaminants, and better inform risk management decisions. Research and communication needs for encouraging broader use are discussed. Integr

  4. Passive sampling methods for contaminated sediments: risk assessment and management.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Marc S; Chapman, Peter M; Allan, Ian J; Anderson, Kim A; Apitz, Sabine E; Beegan, Chris; Bridges, Todd S; Brown, Steve S; Cargill, John G; McCulloch, Megan C; Menzie, Charles A; Shine, James P; Parkerton, Thomas F

    2014-04-01

    This paper details how activity-based passive sampling methods (PSMs), which provide information on bioavailability in terms of freely dissolved contaminant concentrations (Cfree ), can be used to better inform risk management decision making at multiple points in the process of assessing and managing contaminated sediment sites. PSMs can increase certainty in site investigation and management, because Cfree is a better predictor of bioavailability than total bulk sediment concentration (Ctotal ) for 4 key endpoints included in conceptual site models (benthic organism toxicity, bioaccumulation, sediment flux, and water column exposures). The use of passive sampling devices (PSDs) presents challenges with respect to representative sampling for estimating average concentrations and other metrics relevant for exposure and risk assessment. These challenges can be addressed by designing studies that account for sources of variation associated with PSMs and considering appropriate spatial scales to meet study objectives. Possible applications of PSMs include: quantifying spatial and temporal trends in bioavailable contaminants, identifying and evaluating contaminant source contributions, calibrating site-specific models, and, improving weight-of-evidence based decision frameworks. PSM data can be used to assist in delineating sediment management zones based on likelihood of exposure effects, monitor remedy effectiveness, and, evaluate risk reduction after sediment treatment, disposal, or beneficial reuse after management actions. Examples are provided illustrating why PSMs and freely dissolved contaminant concentrations (Cfree ) should be incorporated into contaminated sediment investigations and study designs to better focus on and understand contaminant bioavailability, more accurately estimate exposure to sediment-associated contaminants, and better inform risk management decisions. Research and communication needs for encouraging broader use are discussed. © 2014

  5. Mapping and monitoring contaminated-sediment geometry and stability.

    PubMed

    Rukavina, N

    2001-02-05

    Environment Canada's National Water Research Institute (NWRI) conducts research on freshwater contaminated sediments, much of which is focused on designated areas of concern in the Great Lakes and their connecting channels. This paper reviews new acoustic and video equipment and procedures developed to map the geometry and stability of the sediments, and describes their applications. A RoxAnn acoustic seabed-classification system is used for mapping bottom-sediment types and locating the deposits of fine-grained sediments with which contaminants are associated. The system uses the acoustic properties of sediments to distinguish textural types ranging from mud to boulders, and displays the data as they are collected. The sediment thickness is measured with a weighted video-acoustic tripod which is lowered into the sediments to refusal, and which recorded penetration with a video camera or an echosounder transducer. The stability of the contaminated sediments was monitored with a bottom-mounted, high-precision echo sounder-digitizer, which logs changes in the position of the sediment-water interface produced by erosion or deposition. The same procedure can be used in capping or dredging projects to track bottom changes as they occur, or they can be measured by pre- and post-project mapping of bathymetry and morphology with sweep-sonar or side-scan sonar equipment. The new equipment and procedures have been successfully applied to a number of areas of concern in the Great Lakes basin. They provide a faster and more detailed characterization of sediment properties and geometry than was previously available, and have been particularly effective in optimizing sampling surveys and monitoring remediation projects.

  6. Modelling metallothionein induction in the liver of Sparus aurata exposed to metal-contaminated sediments.

    PubMed

    Costa, P M; Repolho, T; Caeiro, S; Diniz, M E; Moura, I; Costa, M H

    2008-09-01

    Metallothionein (MT) in the liver of gilthead seabreams (Sparus aurata L., 1758) exposed to Sado estuary (Portugal) sediments was quantified to assess the MT induction potential as a biomarker of sediment-based contamination by copper (Cu), cadmium (Cd), lead (Pb) and arsenic (As). Sediments were collected from two control sites and four sites with different levels of contamination. Sediment Cu, Cd, Pb, As, total organic matter (TOM) and fine fraction (FF) levels were determined. Generalized linear models (GLM) allowed integration of sediment parameters with liver Cu, Cd, Pb, As and MT concentrations. Although sediment metal levels were lower than expected, we relate MT with liver Cd and also with interactions between liver and sediment Cu and between liver Cu and TOM. We suggest integrating biomarkers and environmental parameters using statistical models such as GLM as a more sensitive and reliable technique for sediment risk assessment than traditional isolated biomarker approaches.

  7. Effects of enhanced bioturbation intensities on the toxicity assessment of legacy-contaminated sediments.

    PubMed

    Remaili, Timothy M; Simpson, Stuart L; Jolley, Dianne F

    2017-07-01

    Many benthic communities within estuarine ecosystems are highly degraded due to the close proximity of urban and industrial contamination sources. The maintenance of recolonised, healthy ecosystems following remediation is a challenge, and better techniques are required for monitoring their progressive recovery. Rates of ecosystem recovery are influenced by the changes in the concentrations and forms of contaminants, the sensitivity of recolonising organisms to bioavailable contaminants, and a range of abiotic and biotic factors influencing the exposure of organisms to the contamination. Here we investigate the influence of bioturbation by an active amphipod (Victoriopisa australiensis) on the bioavailability of metals and hydrocarbons in highly contaminated sediments. Changes in contaminant bioavailability were evaluated by assessing sublethal effects to a smaller cohabiting amphipod (Melita plumulosa). For predominantly metal-contaminated sediments, the presence of V. australiensis generally increased survival and reproduction of M. plumulosa when compared to treatments with only M. plumulosa present (from 42 to 93% survival and 3-61% reproduction). The decrease in toxic effects to M. plumulosa corresponded with lower dissolved copper and zinc concentrations in the overlying waters (14-9 μg Cu L(-1), and 14 to 6 μg Zn L(-1) for absence to presence of V. australiensis). For sediments contaminated with both hydrocarbons and metals, the increased bioturbation intensity by V. australiensis resulted in decreased reproduction of M. plumulosa, despite lower dissolved metal exposure, and indicated increased bioavailability of the hydrocarbon contaminants. Thus, the presence of a secondary active bioturbator can enhance or suppress toxicity to co-inhabiting organisms, and may depend on the contaminant class and form. The results highlight the need to consider both abiotic and biotic interactions when using laboratory studies to evaluate the ability of organisms

  8. Phytoremediation as a management option for contaminated sediments in tidal marshes, flood control areas and dredged sediment landfill sites.

    PubMed

    Bert, Valérie; Seuntjens, Piet; Dejonghe, Winnie; Lacherez, Sophie; Thuy, Hoang Thi Thanh; Vandecasteele, Bart

    2009-11-01

    affected by polluted sediments, and the processes affecting pollutant bioavailability in the sediments. Studies that combine contaminated sediment and phytoremediation are relatively recent and are increasing in number since few years. Several papers suggest including phytoremediation in a management scheme for contaminated dredged sediments and state that phytoremediation can contribute to the revaluation of land-disposed contaminated sediments. The status of sediments, i.e. reduced or oxidised, highly influences contaminant mobility, its (eco)toxicity and the success of phytoremediation. Studies are performed either on near-fresh sediment or on sediment-derived soil. Field studies show temporal negative effects on plant growth due to oxidation and subsequent ageing of contaminated sediments disposed on land. The review shows that a large variety of plants and trees are able to colonise or develop on contaminated dredged sediment in particular conditions or events (e.g. high level of organic matter, clay and moisture content, flooding, seasonal hydrological variations). Depending on the studies, trees, high-biomass crop species and graminaceous species could be used to degrade organic pollutants, to extract or to stabilise inorganic pollutants. Water content of sediment is a limiting factor for mycorrhizal development. In sediment, specific bacteria may enhance the mobilisation of inorganic contaminants whereas others may participate in their immobilisation. Bacteria are also able to degrade organic pollutants. Their actions may be increased in the presence of plants. Choice of plants is particularly crucial for phytoremediation success on contaminated sediments. Extremely few studies are long-term field-based studies. Short-term effects and resilience of ecosystems is observed in long-term studies, i.e. due to degradation and stabilisation of pollutants. Terrestrial ecosystems affected by polluted sediments range from riverine tidal marshes with several interacting

  9. Air emissions from exposed contaminated sediments and dredged material

    SciTech Connect

    Valsaraj, K.T.; Ravikrishna, R.; Reible, D.D.; Thibodeaux, L.J.; Choy, B.; Price, C.B.; Brannon, J.M.; Myers, T.E.; Yost, S.

    1999-01-01

    The sediment-to-air fluxes of two polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (phenanthrene and pyrene) and a heterocyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (dibenzofuran) from a laboratory-contaminated sediment and those of three polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (naphthalene, phenanthrene, and pyrene) from three field sediments were investigated in experimental microcosms. The flux was dependent on the sediment moisture content, air-filled porosity, and the relative humidity of the air flowing over the sediment surface. The mathematical model predictions of flux from the laboratory-spiked sediment agreed with observed values. The fluxes of compounds with higher hydrophobicity were more air-side resistance controlled. Conspicuous differences were observed between the fluxes from the laboratory-spiked and two of the three field sediments. Two field sediments showed dramatic increases in mass-transfer resistances with increasing exposure time and had significant fractions of oil and grease. The proposed mathematical model was inadequate for predicting the flux from the latter field sediments. Sediment reworking enhanced the fluxes from the field sediments due to exposure of fresh solids to the air. Variations in flux from the lab-spiked sediment as a result of change in air relative humidity were due to differences in retardation of chemicals on a dry or wet surface sediment. High moisture in the air over the dry sediment increased the competition for sorption sites between water and contaminant and increased the contaminant flux.

  10. Comparisons of PCBs dechlorination occurrences in various contaminated sediments.

    PubMed

    Chen, I M; Chang, F C; Hsu, M F; Wang, Y S

    2001-01-01

    A comparison was made of reductive dechlorination occurrences of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) by microorganisms collected from contaminated sediments including Er-Jen River (Tainan, Taiwan), Hudson River (Ft. Edward, NY), Silver Lake (Pittsfield, MA) and Puget Sound (Washington State). Comparisons was made in terms of chromatographic data (referring to the biological activity, including microbial availability) and thermodynamic data (demonstrating the selectivity of anaerobic microorganisms in the dechlorination of chlorinated compounds). Chromatographic data was established in terms of difference in relative retention time (delta ln RRT) and thermodynamic data was estimated as heat of reaction (delta H(r)0). Both were calculated and correlated to occurrences of dechlorination reactions. Observed dechlorination reactions for individually introducing PCB congener had delta ln RRT levels measured as >0.47 (Er-Jen River), >0.29 (Hudson River), >0.36 (Silver Lake) and >0.45 (Puget Sound, for Aroclor 1254 dechlorination). Critical of delta H(r)0 and delta ln RRT values showed that Hudson River and Silver Lake microorganisms were capable of dechlorinating PCBs through reactions with larger H(r)0 value (lower levels of released energy) and smaller delta ln RRT value compared with those found in Er-Jen River and Puget Sound sediments. Differences in the critical delta ln RRT values of these sediments may be due to differences in their levels of PCB contamination.

  11. Enhancement of metal bioleaching from contaminated sediment using silver ion.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shen-Yi; Lin, Jih-Gaw

    2009-01-30

    A silver-catalyzed bioleaching process was used to remove heavy metals from contaminated sediment in this study. The effects of silver concentration added on the performance of bioleaching process were investigated. High pH reduction rate was observed in the bioleaching process with silver ion. The silver ion added in the bioleaching process was incorporated into the lattice of the initial sulfide through a cationic interchange reaction. This resulted in the short lag phase and high metal solubilization in the bioleaching process. The maximum pH reduction rate and the ideal metal solubilization were obtained in the presence of 30 mg/L of silver ion. When the added silver ion was greater than 30 mg/L, the rates of pH reduction and metal solubilization gradually decreased. The solubilization efficiencies of heavy metals (Cu, Zn, Mn, Ni and Cr) were relatively high in the silver-enhanced bioleaching process, except Pb. No apparent effect of silver ion on the growth of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria was found in the bioleaching. These results indicate that the kinetics of metal solubilization can be enhanced by the addition of silver ion.

  12. DEVELOPING TOOLS FOR MONITORED NATURAL RECOVERY OF PCB-CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS AT LAKE HARTWELL, SC

    EPA Science Inventory

    Contaminated sediments pose a risk to human health and the environment . The management of this risk is currently limited practically to three technologies: dredging, capping, and natural recovery. Monitored natural recovery relies on the natural burial and removal mechanisms to...

  13. Selecting Performance Reference Compounds (PRCS)for Polyethylene Passive Samplers Deployed at Contaminated Sediment Sites

    EPA Science Inventory

    Use of equilibrium passive samplers for performing aquatic environmental monitoring at contaminated sediment sites, including Superfund sites, is becoming more common. However, a current challenge in passive sampling is determining when equilibrium is achieved between the sampl...

  14. EVALUATION OF BIOAEROSOL COMPONENTS, GENERATION FACTORS, AND AIRBORNE TRANSPORT ASSOCIATED WITH LIME TREATMENT OF CONTAMINATED SEDIMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lime treatment has been used in contaminated sediment management activities for many purposes such as dewatering, improvement of physical properties, and reducing contaminant mobility. Exothermic volatilization of volatile organic compounds from lime-treated sediment is well kno...

  15. EVALUATION OF BIOAEROSOL COMPONENTS, GENERATION FACTORS, AND AIRBORNE TRANSPORT ASSOCIATED WITH LIME TREATMENT OF CONTAMINATED SEDIMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lime treatment has been used in contaminated sediment management activities for many purposes such as dewatering, improvement of physical properties, and reducing contaminant mobility. Exothermic volatilization of volatile organic compounds from lime-treated sediment is well kno...

  16. Selecting Performance Reference Compounds (PRCS)for Polyethylene Passive Samplers Deployed at Contaminated Sediment Sites

    EPA Science Inventory

    Use of equilibrium passive samplers for performing aquatic environmental monitoring at contaminated sediment sites, including Superfund sites, is becoming more common. However, a current challenge in passive sampling is determining when equilibrium is achieved between the sampl...

  17. DEVELOPING TOOLS FOR MONITORED NATURAL RECOVERY OF PCB-CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS AT LAKE HARTWELL, SC

    EPA Science Inventory

    Contaminated sediments pose a risk to human health and the environment . The management of this risk is currently limited practically to three technologies: dredging, capping, and natural recovery. Monitored natural recovery relies on the natural burial and removal mechanisms to...

  18. RECOVERY, A Mathematical Model to Predict the Temporal Response of Surface Water to Contaminated Sediments.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-11-01

    Model to Predict the Temporal Response of Surface Water to Contaminated Sediments by Jean M. Boyer, Steven C. Chapra , University of Colorado Carlos E...Response of Surface Water to Contaminated Sediments by Jean M. Boyer, Steven C. Chapra University of Colorado Center for Advanced Decision Support for...Advanced Decision Support for Water and Environmental Systems (CADSWES), University of Colorado, Boulder, CO. Dr. Steven C. Chapra and Ms. Jean M. Boyer

  19. Developmental toxicity of lead-contaminated sediment to mallard ducklings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoffman, D.J.; Heinz, G.H.; Sileo, L.; Audet, D.J.; Campbell, J.K.; LeCaptain, L.J.

    2000-01-01

    Sediment ingestion has been identified as an important exposure route for toxicants in waterfowl. The toxicity of lead-contaminated sediment from the Coeur d'Alene River Basin (CDARB) in Idaho was examined on posthatching development of mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) ducklings for 6 weeks. Day-old ducklings received either untreated control diet, clean sediment (24%) supplemented control diet, CDARB sediment (3,449 ug/g lead) supplemented diets at 12% or 24%, or a positive control diet containing lead acetate equivalent to that found in 24% CDARB. The 12% CDARB diet resulted in a geometric mean blood lead concentration of 1.41 ppm (WW) with over 90% depression of red blood cell ALAD activity and over threefold elevation of free erythrocyte protoporphyrin concentration. The 24% CDARB diet resulted in blood lead of 2.56 ppm with over sixfold elevation of protoporphyrin and lower brain weight. In this group the liver lead concentration was 7.92 ppm (WW), and there was a 40% increase in hepatic reduced glutathione concentration. The kidney lead concentration in this group was 7.97 ppm, and acid-fast inclusion bodies were present in the kidneys of four of nine ducklings. The lead acetate positive control group was more adversely affected in most respects than the 24% CDARB group. With a less optimal diet (mixture of two thirds corn and one third standard diet), CDARB sediment was more toxic; blood lead levels were higher, body growth and liver biochemistry (TBARS) were more affected, and prevalence of acid-fast inclusion bodies increased. Lead from CDARB sediment accumulated more readily in duckling blood and liver than reported in goslings, but at given concentrations was generally less toxic to ducklings. Many of these effects are similar to ones reported in wild mallards and geese within the CDARB.

  20. Developmental toxicity of lead contaminated sediment to mallard ducks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoffman, D.J.; Heinz, G.H.; Sileo, L.; Audet, D.J.; Campbell, J.K.; LeCaptain, L.J.

    2000-01-01

    Sediment ingestion has been identified as an important exposure route for toxicants in waterfowl. The toxicity of lead-contaminated sediment from the Coeur d'Alene River Basin (CDARB) in Idaho was examined on posthatching development of mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) ducklings for 6 weeks. Day-old ducklings received either untreated control diet, clean sediment (24%) supplemented control diet, CDARB sediment (3,449 I?g/g lead) supplemented diets at 12% or 24%, or a positive control diet containing lead acetate equivalent to that found in 24% CDARB. The 12% CDARB diet resulted in a geometric mean blood lead concentration of 1.41 ppm (WW) with over 90% depression of red blood cell ALAD activity and over threefold elevation of free erythrocyte protoporphyrin concentration. The 24% CDARB diet resulted in blood lead of 2.56 ppm with over sixfold elevation of protoporphyrin and lower brain weight. In this group the liver lead concentration was 7.92 ppm (WW), and there was a 40% increase in hepatic reduced glutathione concentration. The kidney lead concentration in this group was 7.97 ppm, and acid-fast inclusion bodies were present in the kidneys of four of nine ducklings. The lead acetate positive control group was more adversely affected in most respects than the 24% CDARB group. With a less optimal diet (mixture of two thirds corn and one third standard diet), CDARB sediment was more toxic; blood lead levels were higher, body growth and liver biochemistry (TBARS) were more affected, and prevalence of acid-fast inclusion bodies increased. Lead from CDARB sediment accumulated more readily in duckling blood and liver than reported in goslings, but at given concentrations was generally less toxic to ducklings. Many of these effects are similar to ones reported in wild mallards and geese within the CDARB.

  1. Developmental toxicity of lead-contaminated sediment to mallard ducklings.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, D J; Heinz, G H; Sileo, L; Audet, D J; Campbell, J K; LeCaptain, L J

    2000-08-01

    Sediment ingestion has been identified as an important exposure route for toxicants in waterfowl. The toxicity of lead-contaminated sediment from the Coeur d'Alene River Basin (CDARB) in Idaho was examined on posthatching development of mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) ducklings for 6 weeks. Day-old ducklings received either untreated control diet, clean sediment (24%) supplemented control diet, CDARB sediment (3,449 microg/g lead) supplemented diets at 12% or 24%, or a positive control diet containing lead acetate equivalent to that found in 24% CDARB. The 12% CDARB diet resulted in a geometric mean blood lead concentration of 1.41 ppm (WW) with over 90% depression of red blood cell ALAD activity and over threefold elevation of free erythrocyte protoporphyrin concentration. The 24% CDARB diet resulted in blood lead of 2.56 ppm with over sixfold elevation of protoporphyrin and lower brain weight. In this group the liver lead concentration was 7.92 ppm (WW), and there was a 40% increase in hepatic reduced glutathione concentration. The kidney lead concentration in this group was 7.97 ppm, and acid-fast inclusion bodies were present in the kidneys of four of nine ducklings. The lead acetate positive control group was more adversely affected in most respects than the 24% CDARB group. With a less optimal diet (mixture of two thirds corn and one third standard diet), CDARB sediment was more toxic; blood lead levels were higher, body growth and liver biochemistry (TBARS) were more affected, and prevalence of acid-fast inclusion bodies increased. Lead from CDARB sediment accumulated more readily in duckling blood and liver than reported in goslings, but at given concentrations was generally less toxic to ducklings. Many of these effects are similar to ones reported in wild mallards and geese within the CDARB.

  2. Effects of lead-contaminated sediment on Rana sphenocephala tadpoles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sparling, D.W.; Krest, S.K.; Ortiz-Santaliestra, M.

    2006-01-01

    We exposed larval southern leopard frogs (Rana sphenocephala) to lead-contaminated sediments to determine the lethal and sublethal effects of this metal. Tadpoles were laboratory-raised from early free-swimming stage through metamorphosis at lead concentrations of 45, 75, 180, 540, 2360, 3940, 5520, and 7580 mg/kg dry weight in sediment. Corresponding pore water lead concentrations were 123, 227, 589, 1833, 8121, 13,579, 19,038, and 24,427 ug/L. Tadpoles exposed to lead concentrations in sediment of 3940 mg/kg or higher died within 2 to 5 days of exposure. At lower concentrations, mortality through metamorphosis ranged from 3.5% at 45 mg/kg lead to 37% at 2360 mg/kg lead in sediment. The LC50 value for lead in sediment was 3728 mg/kg (95% CI=1315 to 72,847 mg/kg), which corresponded to 12,539 ug/L lead in pore water (95% CI= 4000 to 35,200 ug/L). Early growth and development were depressed at 2,360 mg/kg lead in sediment (8100 ug/L in pore water) but differences were not evident by the time of metamorphosis. The most obvious effect of lead was its pronounced influence on skeletal development. Whereas tadpoles at 45 mg/kg lead in sediment did not display permanent abnormalities, skeletal malformations increased in frequency and severity at all higher lead concentrations. By 2360 mg/kg, 100% of surviving metamorphs displayed severe spinal problems, reduced femur and humerus lengths, deformed digits, and other bone malformations. Lead concentrations in tissues correlated positively with sediment and pore water concentrations.

  3. The value of information for managing contaminated sediments.

    PubMed

    Bates, Matthew E; Sparrevik, Magnus; de Lichy, Nicolas; Linkov, Igor

    2014-08-19

    Effective management of contaminated sediments is important for long-term human and environmental health, but site-management decisions are often made under high uncertainty and without the help of structured decision support tools. Potential trade-offs between remedial costs, environmental effects, human health risks, and societal benefits, as well as fundamental differences in stakeholder priorities, complicate decision making. Formal decision-analytic tools such as multicriteria decision analysis (MCDA) move beyond ad hoc decision support to quantitatively and holistically rank management alternatives and add transparency and replicability to the evaluation process. However, even the best decisions made under uncertainty may be found suboptimal in hindsight, once additional scientific, social, economic, or other details become known. Value of information (VoI) analysis extends MCDA by systematically evaluating the impact of uncertainty on a decision. VoI prioritizes future research in terms of expected decision relevance by helping decision makers estimate the likelihood that additional information will improve decision confidence or change their selection of a management plan. In this study, VoI analysis evaluates uncertainty, estimates decision confidence, and prioritizes research to inform selection of a sediment capping strategy for the dibenzo-p-dioxin and -furan contaminated Grenland fjord system in southern Norway. The VoI model extends stochastic MCDA to model decisions with and without simulated new information and compares decision confidence across scenarios with different degrees of remaining uncertainty. Results highlight opportunities for decision makers to benefit from additional information by anticipating the improved decision confidence (or lack thereof) expected from reducing uncertainties for each criterion or combination of criteria. This case study demonstrates the usefulness of VoI analysis for environmental decisions by predicting when

  4. Monitoring and modeling contaminated sediment transport in the White Oak Creek watershed. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Fontaine, T.A.

    1991-11-01

    Over the past 47 years, operations and waste disposal activities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory have resulted in the contamination of the White Oak Creek drainage system. The containments presenting the highest risk to human health and the environment are particle reactive and are associated with the soils and sediments in White Oak Creek. During floods, the erosion of these sediments results in the transport of contaminants out of the catchment into the Clinch River. A long-term strategy is required to monitor the movement of contaminated sediments and to predict the transport of these sediments that could occur during major floods. A monitoring program will provide the information required to (1) evaluate the existing off-site transport of contaminated sediments, (2) evaluate the need for short-term control measures, (3) set priorities for remediation of contaminated areas in White Oak Creek (4) verify the success of completed remedial actions intended to control the movement of contaminated sediments, and (5) develop a computer model to simulate the transport of contaminated sediments in White Oak Creek. A contaminant-transport model will be developed to (1) evaluate the potential for the off-site transport of contaminated sediments during major floods, (2) develop long term control measures and remediation solutions, (3) predict the impact of future land-use changes in White Oak Creek on the transport of contaminated sediment. This report contains a plan for the monitoring and modeling activities required to accomplish these objectives.

  5. Monitoring and modeling contaminated sediment transport in the White Oak Creek watershed

    SciTech Connect

    Fontaine, T.A.

    1991-11-01

    Over the past 47 years, operations and waste disposal activities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory have resulted in the contamination of the White Oak Creek drainage system. The containments presenting the highest risk to human health and the environment are particle reactive and are associated with the soils and sediments in White Oak Creek. During floods, the erosion of these sediments results in the transport of contaminants out of the catchment into the Clinch River. A long-term strategy is required to monitor the movement of contaminated sediments and to predict the transport of these sediments that could occur during major floods. A monitoring program will provide the information required to (1) evaluate the existing off-site transport of contaminated sediments, (2) evaluate the need for short-term control measures, (3) set priorities for remediation of contaminated areas in White Oak Creek (4) verify the success of completed remedial actions intended to control the movement of contaminated sediments, and (5) develop a computer model to simulate the transport of contaminated sediments in White Oak Creek. A contaminant-transport model will be developed to (1) evaluate the potential for the off-site transport of contaminated sediments during major floods, (2) develop long term control measures and remediation solutions, (3) predict the impact of future land-use changes in White Oak Creek on the transport of contaminated sediment. This report contains a plan for the monitoring and modeling activities required to accomplish these objectives.

  6. Bioaccumulation of zinc, lead, copper, and cadmium from contaminated sediments by native plant species and Acrida cinerea in South China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chang; Song, Na; Zeng, Guang-Ming; Jiang, Min; Zhang, Jia-Chao; Hu, Xin-Jiang; Chen, An-Wei; Zhen, Jia-Mei

    2014-03-01

    This research was conducted to search and identify spontaneously growing heavy metal-tolerant plant species that are potentially useful for phytoremediation in contaminated sediment. Five sites were selected for collection of plants growing on polluted shore (river bank) sediment of the Xiang River, China. The concentrations of Zn, Pb, Cu and Cd in plants, sediments, and grasshoppers were determined using flame atomic absorption spectrophotometer (AAS700, Perkin-Elmer, USA). Considering translocation factor and bioaccumulation factor, Rumex crispus (Polygonaceae), Rumex dentatus (Polygonaceae), and Lagopsis supina (Labiatae) could be potentially useful for phytostabilization of metals. R. crispus can be considered potentially useful for phytoextraction of Cd. In light of the biomagnification factors, grasshoppers are deconcentrators for Pb and Cd, microconcentrators for Zn and macroconcentrators for Cu to the plants, respectively. To the best of our knowledge, the present study is the first report on Zn, Pb, Cu and Cd accumulation in R. crispus and L. supina, providing a pioneer contribution to the very small volume of data available on the potential use of native plant species from contaminated sediments in phytostabilization and phytoremediation technologies.

  7. Passive sampling methods for contaminated sediments: scientific rationale supporting use of freely dissolved concentrations.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Philipp; Parkerton, Thomas F; Adams, Rachel G; Cargill, John G; Gan, Jay; Gouin, Todd; Gschwend, Philip M; Hawthorne, Steven B; Helm, Paul; Witt, Gesine; You, Jing; Escher, Beate I

    2014-04-01

    Passive sampling methods (PSMs) allow the quantification of the freely dissolved concentration (Cfree ) of an organic contaminant even in complex matrices such as sediments. Cfree is directly related to a contaminant's chemical activity, which drives spontaneous processes including diffusive uptake into benthic organisms and exchange with the overlying water column. Consequently, Cfree provides a more relevant dose metric than total sediment concentration. Recent developments in PSMs have significantly improved our ability to reliably measure even very low levels of Cfree . Application of PSMs in sediments is preferably conducted in the equilibrium regime, where freely dissolved concentrations in the sediment are well-linked to the measured concentration in the sampler via analyte-specific partition ratios. The equilibrium condition can then be assured by measuring a time series or a single time point using passive samplers with different surface to volume ratios. Sampling in the kinetic regime is also possible and generally involves the application of performance reference compounds for the calibration. Based on previous research on hydrophobic organic contaminants, it is concluded that Cfree allows a direct assessment of 1) contaminant exchange and equilibrium status between sediment and overlying water, 2) benthic bioaccumulation, and 3) potential toxicity to benthic organisms. Thus, the use of PSMs to measure Cfree provides an improved basis for the mechanistic understanding of fate and transport processes in sediments and has the potential to significantly improve risk assessment and management of contaminated sediments.

  8. Kinetics of Uranium(VI) Desorption from Contaminated Sediments: Effect of Geochemical Conditions and Model Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chongxuan; Shi, Zhenqing; Zachara, John M.

    2009-09-01

    Stirred-flow cell experiments were performed to investigate the kinetics of uranyl [U(VI)] desorption from a contaminated sediment collected from the Hanford 300 Area at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site, Washington. Three influent solutions of variable pH, Ca and carbonate concentrations that affected U(VI) aqueous and surface speciation were used under dynamic flow conditions to evaluate the effect of geochemical conditions on the rate of U(VI) desorption. The measured rate of U(VI) desorption varied with solution chemical composition that evolved as a result of thermodynamic and kinetic interactions between the influent solutions and sediment. The solution chemical composition that led to a lower equilibrium U(VI) sorption to the solid phase yielded a faster desorption rate. The experimental results were used to evaluate a multi-rate, surface complexation model (SCM) that has been proposed to describe U(VI) desorption kinetics in the Hanford sediment that contained complex sorbed U(VI) species in mass transfer limited domains. The model was modified and supplemented by including multi-rate, ion exchange reactions to describe the geochemical interactions between the solutions and sediment. With the same set of model parameters, the modified model reasonably well described the evolution of major ions and the rates of U(VI) desorption under variable geochemical and flow conditions, implying that the multi-rate SCM is an effective way to describe U(VI) desorption kinetics in subsurface sediments.

  9. Contaminated sediments: Lectures on environmental aspects of particle-associated chemicals in aquatic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Forstner, U.

    1989-01-01

    Sediments are increasingly recognized as both a carrier and a possible source of contaminants in aquatic systems. Since the early part of the century, limnological research on eutrophication problems and acidification indicated that particle-interactions can affect aquatic ecosystems. In contrast to the eutrophication and acidification problems, research on toxic chemicals has included sediment aspects from its beginning. In the lecture notes, following the description of priority pollutants related to sedimentary phases, four aspects were covered, which in an overlapping succession also reflect the development of knowledge in particle-associated pollutants during the past 25 years: the identification, surveillance, monitoring and control of sources and distribution of pollutants; the evaluation of solid/solution relations of contaminants in surface waters; the study of in-situ processes and mechanisms in pollutant transfer in various compartments of the aquatic ecosystems and, the assessment of the environmental impact of particle-bound contaminants. The last chapter focuses on dredged materials, including their disposal and the treatment of strongly contaminated sediments. Cases studies include the Niagara River/Lake Ontario pollution; solid speciation of metals in river sediments; the Rhine River; Puget Sound; Rotterdam Harbor; and the mobilization of cadmium from tidal river sediments.

  10. Characterization of heavy-metal-contaminated sediment by using unsupervised multivariate techniques and health risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yeuh-Bin; Liu, Chen-Wuing; Wang, Sheng-Wei

    2015-03-01

    This study characterized the sediment quality of the severely contaminated Erjen River in Taiwan by using multivariate analysis methods-including factor analysis (FA), self-organizing maps (SOMs), and positive matrix factorization (PMF)-and health risk assessment. The SOMs classified the dataset with similar heavy-metal-contaminated sediment into five groups. FA extracted three major factors-traditional electroplating and metal-surface processing factor, nontraditional heavy-metal-industry factor, and natural geological factor-which accounted for 80.8% of the variance. The SOMs and FA revealed the heavy-metal-contaminated-sediment hotspots in the middle and upper reaches of the major tributary in the dry season. The hazardous index value for health risk via ingestion was 0.302. PMF further qualified the source apportionment, indicating that traditional electroplating and metal-surface-processing industries comprised 47% of the health risk posed by heavy-metal-contaminated sediment. Contaminants discharged from traditional electroplating and metal-surface-processing industries in the middle and upper reaches of the major tributary must be eliminated first to improve the sediment quality in Erjen River. The proposed assessment framework for heavy-metal-contaminated sediment can be applied to contaminated-sediment river sites in other regions.

  11. Geoelectrical Evidence of Microbial Degradation of Diesel Contaminated Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werkema, D. D.; Atekwana, E. A.; Rossbach, S.; Sauck, W. A.

    2003-12-01

    The alteration of physical properties by microbial activity in petroleum contaminated sediments was investigated using geophysical techniques in laboratory column experiments. Microbial population growth was determined by the Most Probable Number technique (MPN), community dynamics were determined by the rDNA intergenic spacer analysis (RISA), microbial mineralization of diesel fuel was assessed using dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), enhanced mineral dissolution was determined by dissolved calcium, and the vertical geoelectrical profile was measured using DC resistivity (converted to conductivity). The columns simulated a saturation profile and contained sanitized, uniform sand with the following experimental treatments: diesel + microbes, diesel, microbes, and no treatment. After 16 months, two important conclusions were drawn. First, the relative increase in magnitude of the parameters measured was highest in the diesel + microbe column (showing at least 110% increase), lower in the diesel column and lowest (actually showing a decrease) in the column with no treatment. Further, the diesel + microbe column showed the greatest increase in oil degrading microbial populations (135%) compared to the column with no treatment, which showed no changes. Secondly, the depth at which the conductivity reached the maximum occurred within and slightly above the diesel layer (which represents a depth that was originally water wet). It was further observed that the relative change in bulk conductivity below the saturated zone is of a lower magnitude than above (<10%). These results suggest the diesel layer, and the zone slightly above, were the most biologically active. Additionally, the diesel + microbe column showed RISA fragments attributed to microbial succession typically observed in organic contaminant plumes. A simple Archie's Law analysis was used to estimate the pore water conductivities necessary to reproduce the bulk conductivity measured. This analysis shows that

  12. A decision framework for possible remediation of contaminated sediments in the River Kymijoki, Finland.

    PubMed

    Verta, Matti; Kiviranta, Hannu; Salo, Simo; Malve, Olli; Korhonen, Markku; Verkasalo, Pia K; Ruokojärvi, Päivi; Rossi, Esko; Hanski, Ari; Päätalo, Kare; Vartiainen, Terttu

    2009-01-01

    The paper describes the spatial contamination of the River Kymijoki, South-Eastern Finland, and the coastal region of the Gulf of Finland with PCDD/Fs and mercury. The findings of ecotoxicologial and human health studies are also reported, including environmental and human risk assessments. Sediments from the River Kymijoki, draining into the Gulf of Finland, have been heavily polluted by the pulp and paper industry and by chemical industries. A wood preservative, known as Ky-5, was manufactured in the upper reaches of the river between 1940 and 1984 causing severe pollution of river sediments with polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDD) and dibenzofurans (PCDF). Moreover, the sediments have been polluted with mercury (Hg) from chlor-alkali production and the use of Hg as a slimicide in pulp and paper manufacturing. An extensive sediment survey was conducted as well as sediment transport modeling, toxicity screening of sediment invertebrates, and a survey of contaminant bioaccumulation in invertebrates and fish. Studies on human exposure to PCDD/Fs and the possible effects on hypermineralization of teeth as well as an epidemiological study to reveal increased cancer risk were also conducted. An assessment of the ecological and human health risks with a null hypothesis (no remediation) was undertaken. The sediment survey revealed severe contamination of river and coastal sediments with PCDD/Fs and Hg. The total volume of contaminated sediments was estimated to reach 5x10(6) m3 and hot spots with extremely high concentrations (max 292,000 ng g(-1) or 1,060 ng I-TEQ g(-1) d.w.) were located immediately downstream from the pollution source (approximately 90,000 m3). Sediment contamination was accompanied by changes in benthic assemblages, but direct effects were masked by many factors. The fish showed only slightly elevated PCDD/F levels in muscle, but orders of magnitude higher in the liver compared with reference freshwater sites and the Baltic Sea. The

  13. A laboratory assay to assess avoidance of contaminated sediments by the freshwater oligochaete lumbriculus variegatus

    PubMed

    West; Ankley

    1998-07-01

    Responses of benthic organisms to contaminated sediments in the laboratory historically have been assessed as survival, growth, and reproduction. However, these responses do not include behavioral aspects of organisms, which also can influence species distribution and abundance in benthic communities. This study documents avoidance behavior of the freshwater oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus to contaminated sediments in the laboratory, utilizing a chamber specifically built to facilitate the measurement of this response. A number of field-collected sediments from sites with known contamination, several of which exhibited little or no toxicity in standard tests examining growth and/or survival, were evaluated. The oligochaetes exhibited marked avoidance to many of the sediments, indicating the potential utility of this assay in identifying effects of contaminated sediments on benthic community structure.

  14. Metal-contaminated Sediment Effects on Biofilm Communities: Impairment of Multiple Stream Ecosystem Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, G.; Costello, D.

    2012-12-01

    Photosynthetic biofilms are crucial drivers of many important stream ecosystem functions (e.g., primary and secondary production, N cycling), yet we have a limited understanding of how these critical communities respond to contaminated sediments. Divalent metals (e.g., Cu, Ni, Zn) are ubiquitous in urban streams and may be contributing to the decline in ecosystem function in urban waters. We exposed natural biofilm communities in five different streams to a common sediment amended with four concentrations of Ni and Cu. Contaminated sediments were placed into cups, covered with mesh disks for biofilm attachment, and secured to the streambed. After 6 weeks, biofilm-colonized disks were analyzed for net primary production (NPP), chlorophyll a, and metal content. Sediments below the biofilms were analyzed for total metals, acid volatile sulfide, and high-resolution vertical dissolved oxygen concentrations. Additional biofilm disks were separated from the sediment and fed to Lymnaea stagnalis to assess indirect effects of sediment metal on grazers. Among our five streams, we found variation in the biofilm response to metals with the most productive stream (Elm Creek) showing the strongest negative response to metal-contaminated sediment. Contaminated sediments in Elm Creek reduced biofilm growth, slowed primary production, and prevented penetration of oxygen into surface sediments. In the less productive streams, biofilms did not reduce NPP in the presence of sediment metal and there was still substantial penetration of oxygen into sediments; however, metals moved out of the sediment and accumulated in the biofilm. L. stagnalis exposed to metal-contaminated biofilms fed at a slower rate than those given clean biofilms. This study suggests that biofilms, and the biogeochemical cycles they drive, can potentially be impaired by contaminated sediment but the response is context dependent. Further, indirect dietary effects of contaminated sediment occur more widely than

  15. Passive sampling methods for contaminated sediments: Scientific rationale supporting use of freely dissolved concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Philipp; Parkerton, Thomas F; Adams, Rachel G; Cargill, John G; Gan, Jay; Gouin, Todd; Gschwend, Philip M; Hawthorne, Steven B; Helm, Paul; Witt, Gesine; You, Jing; Escher, Beate I

    2014-01-01

    Passive sampling methods (PSMs) allow the quantification of the freely dissolved concentration (Cfree) of an organic contaminant even in complex matrices such as sediments. Cfree is directly related to a contaminant's chemical activity, which drives spontaneous processes including diffusive uptake into benthic organisms and exchange with the overlying water column. Consequently, Cfree provides a more relevant dose metric than total sediment concentration. Recent developments in PSMs have significantly improved our ability to reliably measure even very low levels of Cfree. Application of PSMs in sediments is preferably conducted in the equilibrium regime, where freely dissolved concentrations in the sediment are well-linked to the measured concentration in the sampler via analyte-specific partition ratios. The equilibrium condition can then be assured by measuring a time series or a single time point using passive samplers with different surface to volume ratios. Sampling in the kinetic regime is also possible and generally involves the application of performance reference compounds for the calibration. Based on previous research on hydrophobic organic contaminants, it is concluded that Cfree allows a direct assessment of 1) contaminant exchange and equilibrium status between sediment and overlying water, 2) benthic bioaccumulation, and 3) potential toxicity to benthic organisms. Thus, the use of PSMs to measure Cfree provides an improved basis for the mechanistic understanding of fate and transport processes in sediments and has the potential to significantly improve risk assessment and management of contaminated sediments. Integr Environ Assess Manag 2014;10:197–209. © 2014 The Authors. Integrated Environmental Assessment and Management published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of SETAC. PMID:24288295

  16. Vol(2)velle: Printable Interactive Volume Visualization.

    PubMed

    Stoppel, Sergej; Bruckner, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Interaction is an indispensable aspect of data visualization. The presentation of volumetric data, in particular, often significantly benefits from interactive manipulation of parameters such as transfer functions, rendering styles, or clipping planes. However, when we want to create hardcopies of such visualizations, this essential aspect is lost. In this paper, we present a novel approach for creating hardcopies of volume visualizations which preserves a certain degree of interactivity. We present a method for automatically generating Volvelles, printable tangible wheel charts that can be manipulated to explore different parameter settings. Our interactive system allows the flexible mapping of arbitrary visualization parameters and supports advanced features such as linked views. The resulting designs can be easily reproduced using a standard printer and assembled within a few minutes.

  17. A COMPENDIUM OF CHEMICAL, PHYSICAL AND BIOLOGICAL METHODS FOR ASSESSING AND MONITORING THE REMEDIATION OF CONTAMINATED SEDIMENT SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Considering the many organizations which have published methods for monitoring contaminated sediments and the large number of documents on this subject, it can be a formidable task for a superfund project manager to find methods appropriate for his or her contaminated sediment si...

  18. A COMPENDIUM OF CHEMICAL, PHYSICAL AND BIOLOGICAL METHODS FOR ASSESSING AND MONITORING THE REMEDIATION OF CONTAMINATED SEDIMENT SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Considering the many organizations which have published methods for monitoring contaminated sediments and the large number of documents on this subject, it can be a formidable task for a superfund project manager to find methods appropriate for his or her contaminated sediment si...

  19. DETERMINATION OF RATES AND EXTENT OF DECHLORINATION IN PCB-CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS DURING MONITORED NATURAL RECOVERY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This "Sediment Issue" summarizes investigations carried out by the National Risk Management Research Laboratory (NRMRL) of U.S. EPA to evaluate the long-term recovery of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-contaminated sediments via reductive dechlorination. The magnitude, extent, an...

  20. DESORPTION KINETICS OF NEUTRAL HYDROPHOBIC ORGANIC COMPOUNDS FROM FIELD CONTAMINATED SEDIMENT. (R825513C024)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The chemical release rates from a field-contaminated sediment (Lake Charles, LA) using Tenax desorption were studied. Two dichlorobenzenes (m-, p-), hexachlorobutadiene, and hexachlorobenzene were investigated. Contrary to reports that sorption rates are inversel...

  1. Enhancing the bioremediation by harvesting electricity from the heavily contaminated sediments.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yonggang; Lu, Zijiang; Lin, Xunke; Xia, Chunyu; Sun, Guoping; Lian, Yingli; Xu, Meiying

    2015-03-01

    To test the long-term applicability of scaled-up sediment microbial fuel cells (SMFCs) in simultaneous bioremediation of toxic-contaminated sediments and power-supply for electronic devices, a 100 L SMFC inoculate with heavily contaminated sediments has been assembled and operated for over 2 years without external electron donor addition. The total organic chemical (TOC) degradation efficiency was 22.1% in the electricity generating SMFCs, which is significantly higher than that in the open-circuited SMFC (3.8%). The organic matters including contaminants in the contaminated sediments were sufficient for the electricity generation of SMFCs, even up to 8.5 years by the present SMFC theoretically. By using a power management system (PMS), the SMFC electricity could be harvested into batteries and used by commercial electronic devices. The results indicated that the SMFC-PMS system could be applied as a long-term and effective tool to simultaneously stimulate the bioremediation of the contaminated sediments and supply power for commercial devices.

  2. Green remediation and recycling of contaminated sediment by waste-incorporated stabilization/solidification.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Tsang, Daniel C W; Poon, Chi-Sun

    2015-03-01

    Navigational/environmental dredging of contaminated sediment conventionally requires contained marine disposal and continuous monitoring. This study proposed a green remediation approach to treat and recycle the contaminated sediment by means of stabilization/solidification enhanced by the addition of selected solid wastes. With an increasing amount of contaminated sediment (20-70%), the 28-d compressive strength of sediment blocks decreased from greater than 10MPa to slightly above 1MPa. For augmenting the cement hydration, coal fly ash was more effective than lime and ground seashells, especially at low sediment content. The microscopic and spectroscopic analyses showed varying amounts of hydration products (primarily calcium hydroxide and calcium silicate hydrate) in the presence of coal fly ash, signifying the influence of pozzolanic reaction. To facilitate the waste utilization, cullet from beverage glass bottles and bottom ashes from coal combustion and waste incineration were found suitable to substitute coarse aggregate at 33% replacement ratio, beyond which the compressive strength decreased accordingly. The mercury intrusion porosimetry analysis indicated that the increase in the total pore area and average pore diameter were linearly correlated with the decrease of compressive strength due to waste replacement. All the sediment blocks complied with the acceptance criteria for reuse in terms of metal leachability. These results suggest that, with an appropriate mixture design, contaminated sediment and waste materials are useful resources for producing non-load-bearing masonry units or fill materials for construction uses.

  3. Assessing diversity and phytoremediation potential of mangroves for copper contaminated sediments in Subic Bay, Philippines

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Toxic metal pollution of water and soil is a major environmental problem and most conventional remediation approaches may not provide adequate solutions. An alternative way of reducing copper (Cu) concentration from contaminated sediments is through phytoremediation. Presently, there are few researc...

  4. EVALUATION OF THE STATE-OF-THE-ART CONTAMINATED SEDIMENT TRANSPORT AND FATE MODELING SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Modeling approaches for evaluating the transport and fate of sediment and associated contaminants are briefly reviewed. The main emphasis is on: 1) the application of EFDC (Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code), the state-of-the-art contaminated sediment transport and fate public do...

  5. DETERMINATION OF RATES AND EXTENT OF DECHLORINATION IN PCB-CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS DURING MONITORED NATURAL RECOVERY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This "Sediment Issue" summarizes investigations carried out by the National Risk Management Research Laboratory (NRMRL) of U.S. EPA to evaluate the long-term recovery of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-contaminated sediments via reductive dechlorination. The magnitude, extent, an...

  6. Chemical and biological risk assessment of chronic exposure to PAH contaminated sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Means, J.; McMillin, D.; Kondapi, N.

    1995-12-31

    Chronically contaminated sediments represent a long-term source of mixtures of contaminants, exposing aquatic ecosystems to PAH through desorption and bioaccumulation. Chronic toxicity assessments must address potential of these bond contaminants. Environmental impacts and ecological health hazards of sediment-bound normal, alkylated and heterocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are functions of their entry into aquatic food webs and are controlled by both abiotic and biotic factors. Laboratory and field microcosm exposures of fish and invertebrates were conducted followed by assessments of effects using chemical analysis and biomarkers of potential genotoxic effects. Chemical analysis of accumulated residues of 62 individual PAH were conducted in oysters, Crassostrea virginica exposed to PAH contaminated sediments in the field. The rates and equilibrium bioaccumulation constants for each were determined. Fish were exposed to the same contaminated sediments in laboratory and field exposures. Measurements of ethoxy-resorufin-o-deethylase activity induction as well as alterations in the expression of the p53 tumor suppressor gene were performed on exposed fish liver samples. EROD activities were increased significantly relative to unexposed and laboratory/field control sediment-exposed fish, however, the responses of individuals were highly variable. Fundulus grandis or Gambusia affinis, exposed to contaminated sediments in the laboratory, revealed changes in the expression of the p53 tumor suppressor gene. The degree to which mutations within the gene occurred was assessed using PCR followed by measurement of single stranded DNA polymorphisms using gel electrophoresis chromatography.

  7. A TOXICITY ASSESSMENT APPROACH FOR THE EVALUATION OF IN-SITU BIOREMEDIATION OF PAH CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Freshwater and marine sediment toxicity test were used to measure baseline toxicity of sediment samples collected from New York/New Jersey Harbor (NY/NJH) and East River (ER) (PAH contaminated) sediments and to determine the effectiveness of the developed biotreatment strategies ...

  8. A TOXICITY ASSESSMENT APPROACH TO EVALUATING IN-SITU BIOREMEDIATION OF PAH CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Freshwater and marine sediment toxicity tests were used to measure baseline toxicity of sediment samples collected from New Jersey/New York Harbor (NJ/NY) (non-PAH- contaminated) sediment (ERC). Four freshwater toxicity tests were used: 1) amphipod (Hyalella azteca) mortality and...

  9. A TOXICITY ASSESSMENT APPROACH FOR THE EVALUATION OF IN-SITU BIOREMEDIATION OF PAH CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Freshwater and marine sediment toxicity test were used to measure baseline toxicity of sediment samples collected from New York/New Jersey Harbor (NY/NJH) and East River (ER) (PAH contaminated) sediments and to determine the effectiveness of the developed biotreatment strategies ...

  10. A TOXICITY ASSESSMENT APPROACH TO EVALUATING IN-SITU BIOREMEDIATION OF PAH CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Freshwater and marine sediment toxicity tests were used to measure baseline toxicity of sediment samples collected from New Jersey/New York Harbor (NJ/NY) (non-PAH- contaminated) sediment (ERC). Four freshwater toxicity tests were used: 1) amphipod (Hyalella azteca) mortality and...

  11. A mobile pool of contaminated sediment in the Penobscot Estuary, Maine, USA.

    PubMed

    Rockwell Geyer, W; Ralston, D K

    2017-08-31

    The natural recovery of estuaries from contamination is largely determined by the timescale over which contaminated sediment is exported or buried and replaced by cleaner sediment that enters from the watershed or the ocean. That timescale depends on the size of the "pool" of contaminated sediment that resides in the estuary. The larger the pool, the longer the recovery timescale for a given rate of sediment input. A field study was undertaken as part of a study of mercury contamination in the Penobscot estuary to assess the mechanisms affecting the transport and fate of contaminated sediment. Based on measurements of water properties, currents and sediment transport and seabed samples analyzed for sediment properties and contaminant concentrations, a "mobile pool" of contaminated sediment with relatively uniform geochemical characteristics along a 20-km reach of the estuary was identified. This pool of sediment is mobilized seasonally by resuspension and trapping processes associated with salinity fronts that vary in location with discharge conditions. Sediment is transported down-estuary during high discharge and up-estuary during low discharge, with seasonal, bi-directional transport of sediment in the estuary significantly exceeding the annual input of new sediment from the watershed. This continual, bi-directional transport leads to homogenization of the chemical properties of the mobile sediment, including contaminant concentrations. The large mass of mobile sediment relative to the input of sediment from the watershed helps explain the long recovery timescale of contaminants in the Penobscot estuary. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. EVALUATION OF THE STATE-OF-THE-ART CONTAMINATED SEDIMENT TRANSPORT AND FATE MODELING SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Modeling approaches for evaluating the transport and fate of sediment and associated contaminants are briefly reviewed. The main emphasis is on: 1) the application of EFDC (Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code), the state-of-the-art contaminated sediment transport and fate public do...

  13. Accelerating progress at contaminated sediment sites: moving from guidance to practice.

    PubMed

    Bridges, Todd S; Nadeau, Steven C; McCulloch, Megan C

    2012-04-01

    Contaminated sediments are a pervasive problem in the United States. Significant economic, ecological, and social issues are intertwined in addressing the nation's contaminated sediment problem. Managing contaminated sediments has become increasingly resource intensive, with some investigations costing tens of millions of dollars and the majority of remediation projects proceeding at a slow pace. At present, the approaches typically used to investigate, evaluate, and remediate contaminated sediment sites in the United States have largely fallen short of producing timely, risk-based, cost-effective, long-term solutions. With the purpose of identifying opportunities for accelerating progress at contaminated sediment sites, the US Army Corps of Engineers-Engineer Research and Development Center and the Sediment Management Work Group convened a workshop with experienced experts from government, industry, consulting, and academia. Workshop participants identified 5 actions that, if implemented, would accelerate the progress and increase the effectiveness of risk management at contaminated sediment sites. These actions included: 1) development of a detailed and explicit project vision and accompanying objectives, achievable short-term and long-term goals, and metrics of remedy success at the outset of a project, with refinement occurring as needed throughout the duration of the project; 2) strategic engagement of stakeholders in a more direct and meaningful process; 3) optimization of risk reduction, risk management processes, and remedy selection addressing 2 important elements: a) the deliberate use of early action remedies, where appropriate, to accelerate risk reduction; and b) the systematic and sequential development of a suite of actions applicable to the ultimate remedy, starting with monitored natural recovery and adding engineering actions as needed to satisfy the project's objectives; 4) an incentive process that encourages and rewards risk reduction; and 5

  14. Passive sampling methods for contaminated sediments: State of the science for organic contaminants

    PubMed Central

    Lydy, Michael J; Landrum, Peter F; Oen, Amy MP; Allinson, Mayumi; Smedes, Foppe; Harwood, Amanda D; Li, Huizhen; Maruya, Keith A; Liu, Jingfu

    2014-01-01

    This manuscript surveys the literature on passive sampler methods (PSMs) used in contaminated sediments to assess the chemical activity of organic contaminants. The chemical activity in turn dictates the reactivity and bioavailability of contaminants in sediment. Approaches to measure specific binding of compounds to sediment components, for example, amorphous carbon or specific types of reduced carbon, and the associated partition coefficients are difficult to determine, particularly for native sediment. Thus, the development of PSMs that represent the chemical activity of complex compound–sediment interactions, expressed as the freely dissolved contaminant concentration in porewater (Cfree), offer a better proxy for endpoints of concern, such as reactivity, bioaccumulation, and toxicity. Passive sampling methods have estimated Cfree using both kinetic and equilibrium operating modes and used various polymers as the sorbing phase, for example, polydimethylsiloxane, polyethylene, and polyoxymethylene in various configurations, such as sheets, coated fibers, or vials containing thin films. These PSMs have been applied in laboratory exposures and field deployments covering a variety of spatial and temporal scales. A wide range of calibration conditions exist in the literature to estimate Cfree, but consensus values have not been established. The most critical criteria are the partition coefficient between water and the polymer phase and the equilibrium status of the sampler. In addition, the PSM must not appreciably deplete Cfree in the porewater. Some of the future challenges include establishing a standard approach for PSM measurements, correcting for nonequilibrium conditions, establishing guidance for selection and implementation of PSMs, and translating and applying data collected by PSMs. Integr Environ Assess Manag 2014;10:167–178. © 2014 The Authors. Integrated Environmental Assessment and Management published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of

  15. Passive sampling methods for contaminated sediments: state of the science for organic contaminants.

    PubMed

    Lydy, Michael J; Landrum, Peter F; Oen, Amy Mp; Allinson, Mayumi; Smedes, Foppe; Harwood, Amanda D; Li, Huizhen; Maruya, Keith A; Liu, Jingfu

    2014-04-01

    This manuscript surveys the literature on passive sampler methods (PSMs) used in contaminated sediments to assess the chemical activity of organic contaminants. The chemical activity in turn dictates the reactivity and bioavailability of contaminants in sediment. Approaches to measure specific binding of compounds to sediment components, for example, amorphous carbon or specific types of reduced carbon, and the associated partition coefficients are difficult to determine, particularly for native sediment. Thus, the development of PSMs that represent the chemical activity of complex compound-sediment interactions, expressed as the freely dissolved contaminant concentration in porewater (Cfree ), offer a better proxy for endpoints of concern, such as reactivity, bioaccumulation, and toxicity. Passive sampling methods have estimated Cfree using both kinetic and equilibrium operating modes and used various polymers as the sorbing phase, for example, polydimethylsiloxane, polyethylene, and polyoxymethylene in various configurations, such as sheets, coated fibers, or vials containing thin films. These PSMs have been applied in laboratory exposures and field deployments covering a variety of spatial and temporal scales. A wide range of calibration conditions exist in the literature to estimate Cfree , but consensus values have not been established. The most critical criteria are the partition coefficient between water and the polymer phase and the equilibrium status of the sampler. In addition, the PSM must not appreciably deplete Cfree in the porewater. Some of the future challenges include establishing a standard approach for PSM measurements, correcting for nonequilibrium conditions, establishing guidance for selection and implementation of PSMs, and translating and applying data collected by PSMs. © 2014 The Authors. Integrated Environmental Assessment and Management published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of SETAC.

  16. Causes and ecological effects of resuspended contaminated sediments (RCS) in marine environments.

    PubMed

    Roberts, David A

    2012-04-01

    Sediments act as a net sink for anthropogenic contaminants in marine ecosystems and contaminated sediments may have a range of toxicological effects on benthic fauna and associated species. When resuspended, however, particulate-bound contaminants may be remobilised into the water column and become bioavailable to an additional assemblage of species. Such resuspension occurs through a range of natural and anthropogenic processes each of which may be thought of as pulsed disturbances resulting in pulsed exposures to contaminants. Thus, it is important to understand not only the toxicological responses of organisms to resuspended contaminated sediments (RCS), but also the frequency, magnitude and duration of sediment disturbance events. Such information is rarely collected together with toxicological data. Rather, the majority of published studies (>50% of the articles captured in this review) have taken the form of fixed-duration laboratory-based exposures with individual species. While this research has clearly demonstrated that resuspension of contaminated sediments can liberate sediment-bound contaminants leading to toxicity and bioaccumulation under controlled conditions, the potential for ecological effects in the field is often unclear. Monitoring studies suggest that recurrent natural disturbances such as tides and waves may cause the majority of contaminant release in many environments. However, various processes also act to limit the spatial and temporal scales across which contaminants are remobilised to the most toxic dissolved state. Various natural and anthropogenic disturbances of contaminated sediments have been linked to both community-level and sub-lethal responses in exposed populations of invertebrates and fish in the field. Together these findings suggest that resuspension of contaminated sediments is a frequently recurring ecological threat in contaminated marine habitats. Further consideration of how marine communities respond to temporally

  17. Geochemistry of Cd, Cr, and Zn in highly contaminated sediments and its influences on assimilation by marine bivalves.

    PubMed

    Fan, Wenhong; Wang, Wen-Xiong; Chen, Jingsheng

    2002-12-01

    We tested the controls of metal geochemistry in sediments collected from an extremely contaminated Chinese bay on metal assimilation by marine mussels and clams. Metal speciation in the contaminated sediments, quantified by the Tessier operational extraction method, was significantly dependent on metal concentrations in the sediments. The fractions of Cd in the easily exchangeable and carbonate phases increased, while the reducible and residue phases decreased with increasing Cd concentration. The majority (72-91%) of Cr was associated with the residue component with the remainder of Cr in the organic matter and reducible phases. Zn in carbonate phase increased, whereas in the organic matter and residue phases it decreased with increasing Zn concentration. The bioavailability of Cd, Cr, and Zn to marine green mussels (Perna viridis) and clams (Ruditapes philippinarum) was quantified using radiotracer spiked technique with concurrent measurements of speciation of spiked metals. There was a significant correlation between the Cd assimilation efficiency (AE) by both mussels and clams and Cd partitioning in the easily exchangeable and reducible phases. In contrast to previous studies, a negative correlation was found between the Cd AE and its total concentration in sediment, likely caused by the saturation of Cd binding sites in the gut or by its antagonistic interaction with a very high Zn concentration in these collected sediments. In contrast, there was no significant correlation between the AEs of Cr or Zn and any of their geochemical phases or their concentrations. The metal AEs were further quantified by experimentally manipulating different concentrations and ratios of acid volatile sulfide (AVS) and simultaneously extractable metals (SEM). There was no statistically significant relationship between the AEs of the three metals and the concentrations of AVS and SEM or [SEM-AVS]. Geochemical controls on metal assimilation from contaminated sediment are therefore

  18. Bacterial strains isolated from PCB-contaminated sediments and their use for bioaugmentation strategy in microcosms.

    PubMed

    Dudášová, Hana; Lukáčová, Lucia; Murínová, Slavomíra; Puškárová, Andrea; Pangallo, Domenico; Dercová, Katarína

    2014-04-01

    This study was focused on the characterization of 15 bacterial strains isolated from long-term PCB-contaminated sediment located at the Strážsky canal in eastern part of Slovakia, in the surroundings of a former PCB producer. PCB-degrading strains were isolated and identified as Microbacterium oleivorans, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Brevibacterium sp., Ochrobactrum anthropi, Pseudomonas mandelii, Rhodococcus sp., Achromobacter xylosoxidans, Stenotrophomonas sp., Ochrobactrum sp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Starkeya novella by the 16S rRNA gene sequence phylogenetic analysis. This study presents a newly isolated bacterial strain S. novella with PCB-degrading ability in liquid medium as well as in sediment. For A. xylosoxidans, the bphA gene was identified. The best growth ability in the presence of all sole carbon sources (biphenyl and PCBs vapor) was obtained for Ochrobactrum sp. and Rhodococcus sp. Uncultured Achromobacter sp. showed the highest potential for bioaugmentation of PCB-contaminated sediment.

  19. Capabilities of Seven Species of Aquatic Macrophytes for Phytoremediation of Pentachlorophenol Contaminated Sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Liangyuan; Guo, Weijie; Li, Qingyun; Li, Huan; Zhao, Weihua; Cao, Xiaohuan

    2017-01-01

    Sediments are regarded as the ultimate sink of pentachlorophenol(PCP) in aquatic environment, and capabilities of seven species of aquatic macrophytes for remediating PCP contaminated sediment were investigated. Seven species of aquatic macrophytes could significantly accelerate the degradation of PCP in sediments. Among all, canna indica L., Acorus calamus L. and Iris tectorum Maxim. can be used as efficient alternative plants for remediation of PCP contaminated sediment, which attained 98%, 92% and 88% of PCP removal in sediments, respectively. PCP was detected only in root tissues and the uptake was closely related to the root lipid contents of seven plants. The presence of seven aquatic macrophytes significantly increased microbial populations and the activities of dehydrogenase compared with control sediments, indicating that rhizosphere microorganism played important role in the remediation process. In conclusion, seven species of aquatic macrophytes may act as promising tools for the PCP phytoremediation in aquatic environment, especially Canna indica L., Acorus calamus L. and Iris tectorum Maxim.

  20. Fostering innovation in contaminated sediments management through multicriteria technology assessment and public participation.

    PubMed

    Seager, T P; Lambert, J H; Gardner, K H

    2007-08-01

    Management of contaminated sediments is problematic and costly. Several new technologies are under development that may in some cases reduce costs and environmental or ecological impacts. However, there are significant barriers to implementing new technologies, including the increased management complexity, the potential for introducing antagonistic or incommensurate objectives that are unfamiliar to stakeholders or regulators, and the difficulty of capturing private, commercial benefits from environmental improvements that may primarily benefit the public. This article identifies several innovative contaminated sediments technologies, discusses the difficulty of proving or quantifying the benefits of new technologies, and presents an agenda for research that would foster partnerships between scientific, government, and public communities of interest for the purpose of improving innovative technology assessment and environmental decision making.

  1. [Simulation and verification for model of phytoremediation on heavy metal contaminated sediment].

    PubMed

    Li, Hong-Xia; Lin, Wen-Bo; Li, Yu-Qing; Nie, Ying-Jin; Liu, Fan-Jia; Zhao, Xin-Hua

    2011-07-01

    In order to obtain dynamic changes of uptake and translocation and accumulation amounts of heavy metal lead in contaminated sediments in plants over time, the dynamic process of uptake and accumulation of lead in plants were simulated by system dynamics mechanism model of plant uptake to lead. Verification test was conducted based on simulation model after gain mass of data through planting maize in heavy metal contaminated sediment by greenhouse cultivation. The results indicate that the results of uptake and the accumulation of lead by maize in experiments are consistent with the conclusions of theoretical simulation model. It is proved that the dynamics mechanism model of plant uptake to lead is reasonable and effective.

  2. A pulse of endosulfan-contaminated sediment affects macroinvertebrates in artificial streams.

    PubMed

    Hose, Grant C; Lim, Richard P; Hyne, Ross V; Pablo, Fleur

    2002-01-01

    The toxicity of the organochlorine pesticide endosulfan to macroinvertebrate communities was tested using a system of 24 artificial streams. Macroinvertebrate communities in the streams were exposed to a range of endosulfan concentrations for a 12-h period and then monitored for 96 h. Endosulfan was prebound to fine river sediment and applied to the streams as a contaminated sediment slurry. This did not cause changes in the structure of benthic communities; however, significant changes (P<0.05) in the abundance of several macroinvertebrate taxa in drift were detected in the streams receiving the highest (6.14 microg/L) dose. Increased drift may have implications for recolonization processes in lowland rivers, and, as such, pulses of contaminated sediment are likely to result in significant effects on macroinvertebrate populations and communities. This study highlights the utility of artificial stream systems for detecting sublethal effects and the need for population and community-level endpoints to be included in such studies.

  3. The National Shipbuilding Research Program: Contaminated Sediment Management Guide for NSRP Shipyards. Appendix 5: Treatment Technologies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-10-22

    O’Brien, S. Title: Full-Scale Soils Washing Applications at CERCLA, RCRA. DOE Joumd: HazMat South Regional Conference, Orlando, Florida, USA Author...in south -central Ontario. Limitations: Cleansoils Thermal Desorber appropriate for hydrocarbon/VOC contaminated sediments if mechanical (or other...1950 South Batavia Avenue Geneva, IL USA 60134-3310 Notes VIs1l-r rY Literature References: Breakdown Time (days): Average Cost (USWonne

  4. Effects of contaminated sediment on fish and wildlife: review and annotated bibliography

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, L.A.

    1984-04-01

    A review and annotated bibliography of selected literature about the effects of contaminated sediment on the biota are presented. Pollution categories that are covered include heavy metals, hydrocarbons, synthetic organic compounds, and radionuclides. Under each category the following subjects are discussed where applicable: (1) availability to organisms, (2) biological effects, (3) types of plants and animals affected and during which life stages, if known, (4) bioaccumulation, (5) food web influences, and (6) major locations of known sediment contamination.

  5. Fish (Fundulus heteroclitus) populations with different exposure histories differ in tolerance of creosote-contaminated sediments.

    PubMed

    Ownby, David R; Newman, Michael C; Mulvey, Margaret; Vogelbein, Wolfgang K; Unger, Michael A; Arzayus, L Felipe

    2002-09-01

    Prior studies suggest that field-collected fish (Fundulus heteroclitus) from a creosote-contaminated Superfund site (Atlantic Wood Industries site, Elizabeth River, VA, USA) have enhanced tolerance to local, contaminated sediments. This study was designed to test whether other populations in the Elizabeth River at less contaminated sites also show similar tolerance and whether this tolerance is heritable. To test this, F. heteroclitus populations were sampled from four sites within the Elizabeth River with varying sediment polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) concentrations (3.9-264 ng PAH/g dry wt 10(3)) and one reference site in a nearby, uncontaminated estuary (York River, VA, USA; 0.27 ng PAH/g dry wt x 10(3)). Embryo assays were performed to quantify population differences in teratogenic effects during contaminated sediment exposure. Atlantic Wood sediment was mixed with reference sediment to achieve a range of sediment concentrations. Minimal differences were observed in teratogenic effects among fish taken from sites within the Elizabeth River; however, embryos of fish collected from a nearby, uncontaminated York River site and exposed to contaminated sediments had a significantly higher proportion of embryos with cardiac abnormalities than those from the Elizabeth River sites. Embryos from wild-caught and laboratory-reared Elizabeth River F. heteroclitus were simultaneously exposed to contaminated sediments, and no significant tolerance differences were found between embryos from fish taken directly from the field and those reared for a generation in the lab. Differences between fish populations from the two estuaries were larger than differences within the Elizabeth River, and these differences in tolerance were heritable.

  6. Mercury-contaminated sediments in the North Bay: A legacy of the Gold Rush

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jaffe, Bruce E.

    2001-01-01

    A legacy of the Gold Rush is mercury-contaminated sediments in the Bay. Miners used mercury to extract gold from tailings during the gold rush. A large amount of this mercury (some estimates are as great as 10,000 tons) was lost during extraction to the watershed during the gold rush era. This mercury-contaminated hydraulic mining debris made its way to the Bay.

  7. Contaminated sediments database for Long Island Sound and the New York Bight

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mecray, Ellen L.; Reid, Jamey M.; Hastings, Mary E.; Buchholtz ten Brink, Marilyn R.

    2003-01-01

    The Contaminated Sediments Database for Long Island Sound and the New York Bight provides a compilation of published and unpublished sediment texture and contaminant data. This report provides maps of several of the contaminants in the database as well as references and a section on using the data to assess the environmental status of these coastal areas. The database contains information collected between 1956-1997; providing an historical foundation for future contaminant studies in the region.

  8. Biotransformation and antioxidant enzymes of Lumbriculus variegates as biomarkers of contaminated sediment exposure.

    PubMed

    Contardo-Jara, Valeska; Wiegand, Claudia

    2008-02-01

    In this study the black worm Lumbriculus variegatus was tested for suitability as biomonitor for moderately contaminated sediments. The response capacity of the biotransformation system phase II enzyme glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and the oxidative defense enzyme catalase (CAT) to contaminated sediment and atrazine was investigated to establish them as sensitive biomarkers. To get an integrated view on the enzyme activity kinetics, increasing concentrations of the herbicide atrazine were applied to stimulate GST response, and relationship between enzyme activity and herbicide concentration was observed at various exposure durations. Furthermore, animals were exposed for up to 1 week to sediments of four typical urban river sections with high anthropogenic impact. L. variegatus was capable to accomplish the environmental stress and the selected enzymes showed elevation. Significant changes of GST (membrane-bound and soluble) were detected after at least 4 days of exposure to atrazine and contaminated sediments. Although CAT increase could be observed already after 1 day of exposure to sediments, an exposure time of one week is considerable for accurate interpretation of the enzymatic response. The clear enzymatic response of especially the membrane-bound GST indicated charges with organic lipophilic substances at all sampling sites.

  9. Coupled effects of hydrodynamics and biogeochemistry on Zn mobility and speciation in highly contaminated sediments.

    PubMed

    Xie, Minwei; Jarrett, Brooke A; Da Silva-Cadoux, Cécile; Fetters, Kyle J; Burton, G Allen; Gaillard, Jean-François; Packman, Aaron I

    2015-05-05

    Porewater transport and diagenetic reactions strongly regulate the mobility of metals in sediments. We executed a series of laboratory experiments in Gust chamber mesocosms to study the effects of hydrodynamics and biogeochemical transformations on the mobility and speciation of Zn in contaminated sediments from Lake DePue, IL. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) indicated that the oxidation of surficial sediments promoted the formation of more mobile Zn species. Bulk chemical measurements of porewater, overlying water, and sediment also suggested that this process liberated aqueous metals to porewater and facilitated Zn efflux to the overlying water. In addition, sediment resuspension events increased the release of aqueous metals to both surficial porewater and the overlying water column. XAS analysis indicated that resuspension increased dissolution of Zn-sequestering mineral phases. These results show that both steady slow porewater transport and rapid episodic resuspension are important to the release of metal from fine-grained, low-permeability contaminated sediments. Thus, information on metals speciation and mobility under time-varying overlying flow conditions is essential to understanding the long-term behavior of metals in contaminated sediments.

  10. Responses of juvenile southern flounder exposed to Deepwater Horizon oil-contaminated sediments.

    PubMed

    Brown-Peterson, Nancy J; Krasnec, Michelle O; Lay, Claire R; Morris, Jeffrey M; Griffitt, Robert J

    2016-09-27

    The Deepwater Horizon oil spill released millions of barrels of crude oil into the northern Gulf of Mexico, much of which remains associated with sediments and can have continuing impacts on biota. Juvenile southern flounder (Paralichthys lethostigma) were exposed for 28 d in the laboratory under controlled conditions to reference and Deepwater Horizon oil-contaminated sediments collected from coastal Louisiana to assess the impacts on an ecologically and commercially important benthic fish. The measured polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) concentrations in the sediments ranged from 0.25 mg/kg to 3940 mg/kg suite of 50 PAH analytes (tPAH50). Mortality increased with both concentration and duration of exposure. Exposed flounder length and weight was lower compared to controls after 28 d of exposure to the sediments with the highest PAH concentration, but condition factor was significantly higher in these fish compared with all other treatments. Histopathological analyses showed increased occurrence of gill abnormalities, including telangiectasis, epithelial proliferation, and fused lamellae in flounder exposed to sediments with the highest tPAH50 concentrations. In addition, hepatic vascular congestion and macrovesicular vacuolation were observed in flounder exposed to the more contaminated sediments. These data suggest that chronic exposure to field collected oil-contaminated sediments results in a variety of sublethal impacts to a benthic fish, with implications for long-term recovery from oil spills. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;9999:1-10. © 2016 SETAC.

  11. Toxicity of water-soluble fractions derived from whole creosote and creosote-contaminated sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Padma, T.V.; Hale, R.C.; Roberts, M.H. Jr.

    1998-08-01

    Creosote, a complex mixture of aromatic compounds (ACs), contaminates numerous sites in the USA and elsewhere. In addition to pollution of the water column directly after a creosote spill, contaminated sediments can continue to act as source of pollution for many years, because natural and anthropogenic perturbations may redissolve or resuspend sediment-associated contaminants. A 48-h static renewal assay compared survival of the bay mysid, Mysidopsis bahia, exposed to water-soluble fractions (WSFs) generated from two different sources: whole creosote and creosote-contaminated sediment. Sediment was obtained from a Super Fund site located on the Southern Branch of the Elizabeth River in Virginia, USA. Whole creosote, contaminated sediment, and WSFs derived from these source materials were characterized. Median lethal concentrations of WSFs generated from whole creosote and sediment (expressed as total identified ACs) were 180 {micro}g/L and 700 {micro}g/L, respectively. The creosote-derived WSF consisted of more than 70% low molecular weight nitrogen heterocyclics. These heterocyclics were below detectable limits in the sediment-generated WSF, suggesting that losses of these compounds had occurred via weathering. Nitrogen heterocyclics likely contributed to the acute toxicity of the whole creosote WSF.

  12. Passive sampling in contaminated sediment assessment: building consensus to improve decision making.

    PubMed

    Parkerton, Thomas F; Maruya, Keith A

    2014-04-01

    Contaminated sediments pose an ongoing, pervasive, global challenge to environmental managers, because sediments can reflect a legacy of pollution that can impair the beneficial uses of water bodies. A formidable challenge in assessing the risks of contaminated sediments has been the elucidation and measurement of contaminant bioavailability, expressed as the freely dissolved concentration (Cfree ) in interstitial water, which serves as a surrogate measure of the substances' chemical activity. Recent advances in passive sampling methods (PSMs) enable Cfree of sediment-associated contaminants to be quantified at trace levels, thereby overcoming current limitations of predictive models. As a result, PSMs afford the opportunity for a paradigm shift from traditional practice that can effectively reduce uncertainty in risk assessment and bolster confidence in the science used to support management of contaminated sediments. This paper provides a brief overview of the 5 subsequent papers in this series that review literature on PSM use in sediments for both organic and metal(loid) contaminants, outline the technical rationale for using PSMs as a preferred basis for risk assessment over conventional chemical analyses, describe practical considerations for and uncertainties associated with laboratory and field deployment of PSMs, discuss management application of PSMs, including illustrative case studies in which PSMs have been used in decision making, and highlight future research and communication needs. © 2013 SETAC.

  13. Remedy performance monitoring at contaminated sediment sites using profiling solid phase microextraction (SPME) polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) fibers.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Courtney; Lampert, David; Reible, Danny

    2014-03-01

    Passive sampling using polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) profilers was evaluated as a tool to assess the performance of in situ sediment remedies at three locations, Chattanooga Creek (Chattanooga, TN), Eagle Harbor (Bainbridge Island, WA) and Hunter's Point (San Francisco, CA). The remedy at the first two locations was capping over PAH contaminated sediments while at Hunter's Point, the assessment was part of an in situ treatment demonstration led by R. G. Luthy (Stanford University) using activated carbon mixed into PCB contaminated sediments. The implementation and results at these contaminated sediment sites were used to illustrate the utility and usefulness of the passive sampling approach. Two different approaches were employed to evaluate kinetics of uptake onto the sorbent fibers. At the capping sites, the passive sampling approach was employed to measure intermixing during cap placement, contamination migration into the cap post-placement and recontamination over time. At the in situ treatment demonstration site, reductions in porewater concentrations in treated versus untreated sediments were compared to measurements of bioaccumulation of PCBs in Neanthes arenaceodentata.

  14. Characterizing toxicity of metal-contaminated sediments from mining areas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Besser, John M.; Brumbaugh, William G.; Ingersoll, Christopher G.

    2015-01-01

    of acid-volatile sulfide (AVS), termed simultaneously-extracted metals (SEM), are widely used to estimate the ‘potentially-bioavailable’ fraction of metals that is not bound to sulfides (i.e., SEM-AVS). Metal concentrations in pore water are widely considered to be direct measures of metal bioavailability, and predictions of toxicity based on pore-water metal concentrations may be further improved by modeling interactions of metals with other pore-water constituents using Biotic Ligand Models. Data from sediment toxicity tests and metal analyses has provided the basis for development of sediment quality guidelines, which estimate thresholds for toxicity of metals in sediments. Empirical guidelines such as Probable Effects Concentrations or (PECs) are based on associations between sediment metal concentrations and occurrence of toxic effects in large datasets. PECs do not model bioavailable metals, but they can be used to estimate the toxicity of metal mixtures using by calculation of probable effect quotients (PEQ = sediment metal concentration/PEC). In contrast, mechanistic guidelines, such as Equilibrium Partitioning Sediment Benchmarks (ESBs) attempt to predict both bioavailability and mixture toxicity. Application of these simple bioavailability models requires more extensive chemical characterization of sediments or pore water, compared to empirical guidelines, but may provide more reliable estimates of metal toxicity across a wide range of sediment types.

  15. Lake-based magnetic mapping of contaminated sediment distribution, Hamilton Harbour, Lake Ontario, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozza, M. R.; Boyce, J. I.; Morris, W. A.

    2004-12-01

    The remediation of toxic sediment in harbours and urban waterways requires detailed mapping of contaminated sediment distribution and thickness. Conventional methods rely on interpolation of pollutant concentrations from widely spaced core samples but can lead to significant errors in estimating sediment distribution. An improved approach, as demonstrated by recent work in Hamilton Harbour in Lake Ontario, is to estimate pollutant levels from proxy measurements of sediment magnetic properties. Measurements from 40 core samples collected within the harbour show that the magnetic susceptibility of a contaminated upper layer of sediment is one to two orders of magnitude greater than in the underlying uncontaminated 'pre-colonial' sediments. The susceptibility contrast results from elevated levels of urban-source magnetic oxides and is sufficient to generate a total field anomaly (ca. 5-40 nT) that can be measured with a towed magnetometer. Systematic lake-based magnetic surveying (>500 line km) of the harbour using an Overhauser marine magnetometer identifies well-defined positive magnetic anomalies that coincide with mapped accumulations of contaminated sediments on the harbour bottom. Forward modelling of the anomalies shows that the magnetic response is consistent with a contaminated upper layer thickness of up to 5 m. Apparent susceptibility maps calculated from magnetic survey data show a close spatial correspondence with core-derived magnetic susceptibilities and provide a rapid means for classifying contaminated sediments. Detection of shallow magnetic anomalies is dependent upon a closely spaced survey grid (<75 m line spacing) and careful post-cruise processing to remove diurnal, regional and water-depth related variations in the magnetic field intensity.

  16. Phosphorus amendment reduces hematological effects of lead in mallards ingesting contaminated sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoffman, D.J.; Heinz, G.H.; Audet, D.J.

    2006-01-01

    Lead poisoning of waterfowl has been reported for decades in the Coeur d?Alene River Basin (CDARB) in Idaho as a result of the ingestion of lead-contaminated sediments. This study was conducted to determine whether the addition of phosphoric acid to sediments would reduce the bioavailability and toxicity of lead to mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) as related to adverse hematological effects and altered plasma chemistries. Mallards received diets containing 12% clean sediment (controls) or 12% sediment from three different CDARB sites containing 4520, 5390, or 6990 :g/g lead (dw) with or without phosphoric acid amendment. Blood lead concentrations were significantly higher in all CDARB treatment groups and ranged from geometric mean values of 5.0 ug/g for the first two sites to 6.2 ug/g for the third site. With amendments, all blood lead concentrations became 41% to 64% lower. Red blood cell ALAD activity was depressed by 90% or more with lead-contaminated sediment from all sites and did not differ with amended diets. Free erythrocyte protoporphyrin (FEP) concentrations were elevated by contaminated sediment from all sites. Amendment decreased the elevations in FEP by as much as 80%. Hematocrit values and hemoglobin concentrations were lower for all lead site sediments by as much as 30% for site 3. Plasma enzyme activities for ALT, CK, and LDH-L were elevated by as much as 2.2-fold, and plasma creatinine concentration was 1.7-fold higher for site 3 sediment. Amendments restored hematocrit, hemoglobin, and plasma enzyme activities so that they did not differ from controls. Although amendments of phosphorus substantially reduced the bioavailability of lead and alleviated many of the adverse hematological effects, lead concentrations in the blood of mallards fed the amended sediments were still above those believed to be harmful to waterfowl under the present conditions.

  17. Use of life cycle assessments to evaluate the environmental footprint of contaminated sediment remediation.

    PubMed

    Sparrevik, Magnus; Saloranta, Tuomo; Cornelissen, Gerard; Eek, Espen; Fet, Annik Magerholm; Breedveld, Gijs D; Linkov, Igor

    2011-05-15

    Ecological and human risks often drive the selection of remedial alternatives for contaminated sediments. Traditional human and ecological risk assessment (HERA) includes assessing risk for benthic organisms and aquatic fauna associated with exposure to contaminated sediments before and after remediation as well as risk for human exposure but does not consider the environmental footprint associated with implementing remedial alternatives. Assessment of environmental effects over the whole life cycle (i.e., Life Cycle Assessment, LCA) could complement HERA and help in selecting the most appropriate sediment management alternative. Even though LCA has been developed and applied in multiple environmental management cases, applications to contaminated sediments and marine ecosystems are in general less frequent. This paper implements LCA methodology for the case of the polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and -furans (PCDD/F)-contaminated Grenland fjord in Norway. LCA was applied to investigate the environmental footprint of different active and passive thin-layer capping alternatives as compared to natural recovery. The results showed that capping was preferable to natural recovery when analysis is limited to effects related to the site contamination. Incorporation of impacts related to the use of resources and energy during the implementation of a thin layer cap increase the environmental footprint by over 1 order of magnitude, making capping inferior to the natural recovery alternative. Use of biomass-derived activated carbon, where carbon dioxide is sequestered during the production process, reduces the overall environmental impact to that of natural recovery. The results from this study show that LCA may be a valuable tool for assessing the environmental footprint of sediment remediation projects and for sustainable sediment management.

  18. Resuspension of sediment, a new approach for remediation of contaminated sediment.

    PubMed

    Pourabadehei, Mehdi; Mulligan, Catherine N

    2016-06-01

    Natural events and anthropogenic activities are the reasons of undesirable resuspension of contaminated sediments in aquatic environment. Uncontrolled resuspension could remobilize weakly bound heavy metals into overlying water and pose a potential risk to aquatic ecosystem. Shallow harbours, with contaminated sediments are subjected to the risk of uncontrolled resuspension. Remediation of sediments in these areas cannot be performed by conventional in situ methods (e.g. capping with or without reactive amendment). Ex situ remediation also requires dredging of sediment, which could increase the risk of spreading contaminants. Alternatively, the resuspension technique was introduced to address these issues. The concept of the resuspension method is that finer sediments have a greater tendency to adsorb the contamination. Therefore, finer sediments, believed carry more concentration of contaminants, were targeted for removal from aquatic environment by a suspension mechanism in a confined water column. The objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of the resuspension technique as a new approach for remediation of contaminated sediment and a viable option to reduce the risk of remobilization of contaminants in harbours due to an undesirable resuspension event. Unlike the common in situ techniques, the resuspension method could successfully reduce the total concentration of contaminants in almost all samples below the probable effect level (PEL) with no significant change in the quality of overlying water. The results indicated that removal efficiency could be drastically enhanced for metals in sediment with a higher enrichment factor. Moreover, availability of metals (e.g. Cd and Pb) with a high concentration in labile fractions was higher in finer sediments with a high enrichment factor. Consequently, removal of contaminants from sediment through the resuspension method could reduce the risk of mobility and availability of metals under changing

  19. Predicting the accumulation of mercury-contaminated sediment on riverbanks—An analytical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizzuto, Jim

    2012-07-01

    Mercury was introduced into the South River, Virginia, as a result of industrial use from 1929 to 1950. To guide remediation, an analytical model is developed to predict the mercury inventory resulting from deposition of mercury-contaminated sediment on subhorizontal surfaces adjacent to the river channel from 1930 to 2007. Sediment cores and geomorphic data were obtained from 27 sites. Mercury inventories range from 0.00019 to 0.573 kg m-2. High mercury inventories are associated with frequent inundation by floodwaters, forested riparian vegetation, and (at only four sites) unusually high sediment accumulation. Over the 10 km study reach, mercury inventories do not vary with downstream distance. The frequency of inundation at each coring site is determined from hydrologic data and a streamtube stage-discharge model. Water levels are exponentially distributed. A simple parameterization represents the enhanced ability of forested vegetation to trap mercury-contaminated sediments compared to nonforest vegetation. The calibrated model explains 62% of the observed variation in mercury inventories; 15 of the 27 predicted values are within a factor of 1.8 of the observed values. Calibration indicates a mercury deposition rate during inundation of 0.040 kg m-2 yr-1 (95% C.I. 0.032-0.048), that forested areas accumulate mercury-contaminated sediment 3.05 (95% C.I. 2.43-3.67) times faster than nonforested areas, and that floodwaters deeper than 0.98 (95% C.I. 0.45-1.53) m do not accumulate suspended sediment or mercury. At four sites, floodplain accumulation of 0.8-1.2 m occurred over a period of 39 (95% C.I. 22-56) years, while sedimentation is negligible (mean: 0.1 m, median: 0.03 m) at other sites.

  20. Uptake pathway for Ag bioaccumulation in three benthic invertebrates exposed to contaminated sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yoo, H.; Lee, J.-S.; Lee, B.-G.; Lee, I.T.; Schlekat, C.E.; Koh, C.-H.; Luoma, S.N.

    2004-01-01

    We exposed 3 benthic invertebrates, the clam Macoma balthica, the polychaete Neanthes arenaceodentata and the amphipod Leptocheirus plumulosus, to Ag-contaminated sediments to evaluate the relative importance of various uptake routes (sediments, porewater or overlying water, and supplementary food) for Ag bioaccumulation. Silver bioaccumulation was evaluated at 4 levels of sediment Ag (0.1, 0,3, 1,2 and 3.3 ??mol Ag g-1) and 2 levels of acid-volatile sulfide (AVS), <0.5 or ???40 ??mol g-1, and compared among food treatments with or without Ag contamination, or with different food rations. L. plumulosus were incubated for 35 d in the Ag-contaminated sediments after 3 mo of Ag-sediment equilibration, and M. balthica and N. arenaceodentata for 19 d after 5 mo equilibration. Ag bioaccumulation in the 3 organisms was significantly correlated with 1N HCl-extractable Ag concentrations (Ag-SEM: simultaneously extracted Ag with AVS) in sediments. The Ag concentrations in porewater and overlying water were greatest in the sediments with least AVS, consistent with previous studies. Nevertheless, the amphipod and clam exposed to oxic sediments (<0.5 ??mol AVS g-1) accumulated amounts of Ag similar to those accumulated by organisms exposed to anoxic sediments (???40 ??mol AVS g-1), when Ag-SEM levels were comparable. The dissolved Ag source was important for bioaccumulation in the polychaete N. arenaceodentata. Amphipods fed Ag-contaminated food contained ???1.8-fold more tissue Ag concentrations than those fed uncontaminated food. As suggested in kinetic (DYMBAM) modeling studies, ingestion of contaminated sediments and food were the principle routes of Ag bioaccumulation by the benthic invertebrates during chronic exposure, but the relative importance of each uptake route differed among species.

  1. Histopathological effects of contaminated sediments on golden apple snail (Pomacea canaliculata, Lamarck 1822).

    PubMed

    Kruatrachue, M; Sumritdee, C; Pokethitiyook, P; Singhakaew, S

    2011-06-01

    Pomacea canaliculata were exposed experimentally to contaminated sediments from a tributary of the Mae Klong River, Thailand, for 3 months. The highest concentration of Cr, Zn and Fe accumulated in the digestive gland while the gill exhibited the highest concentration of Cu. In addition, histopathological changes (increased mucus vacuoles, loss of cilia, dilation of cells in the epithelial cells of digestive tract organs, and an increase in the number of dark granules in the digestive cells) were observed. The gill exhibited loss of cilia, wider hemolymph space, and degeneration of columnar epithelial cells.

  2. Induction of cytochrome p-450-ia1 in juvenile fish by creosote-contaminated sediment

    SciTech Connect

    Schoor, W.P.; Williams, D.E.; Takahashi, N.

    1991-01-01

    Intact sediment cores, including their surface layers, were used in simulated field exposure tests of juvenile guppies (Poecilia reticulata) to creosote-contaminated sediments. Mixed-function oxygenase activity was induced in the fish after 43 days of exposure to environmentally realistic, sublethal concentrations of creosote-related compounds. An average 50-fold induction in the cytochrome P-450-IA1 was found in the liver in the absence of any histopathological lesions. The possibility that a threshold level for proliferative liver changes was not reached is discussed in the light of the observed biochemical activation.

  3. Lake-based magnetic mapping of urban-sourced contaminated sediment, Lake Ontario, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyce, J. I.; Pozza, M. R.; Morris, W. A.

    2003-04-01

    The remediation of toxic sediments in harbours and urban waterways requires detailed mapping of contaminated sediment distribution and thickness. Conventional methods rely on interpolation of pollutant concentrations from widely spaced core samples but can lead to significant errors in estimating sediment distribution. An improved approach, as demonstrated by recent work in Hamilton Harbour in Lake Ontario, is to estimate pollutant levels from 'proxy' measurements of sediment magnetic properties. Measurements from 40 core samples collected within the harbour show that the magnetic susceptibility of a contaminated upper layer of sediment is one to two orders of magnitude greater than in the underlying uncontaminated 'pre-colonial' sediments. The susceptibility contrast results from elevated levels of urban-sourced magnetic oxides and is sufficient to generate a total field anomaly (ca. 5-40 nT) that can be measured with a towed magnetometer. Systematic lake-based magnetic surveying (> 500 line km) of the harbour using a towed Overhauser marine magnetometer clearly identifies a number of well defined magnetic anomalies that coincide with known accumulations of contaminated sediments on the harbour bottom. Apparent susceptibility maps calculated from total field data show a close spatial correspondence with core-derived susceptibility values and provide a means for identifying areas of urban impacted sediments. Detection of low amplitude magnetic anomalies is dependent upon a closely spaced survey grid (< 70 m line spacing) and careful post-cruise processing to remove diurnal, regional and water-depth related variations in the magnetic field intensity.

  4. Enhanced biodegradation of hydrocarbon-contaminated sediments using microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Morris, Jeffrey M; Jin, Song

    2012-04-30

    A sediment microbial fuel cell (MFC) was tested to determine if electron transfer from the anaerobic zone of contaminated sediments to the overlying aerobic water could facilitate an enhanced and aerobic equivalent degradation of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH). Results indicate that voltages as high as 190 mV (2162 mW/m(3)) were achieved in a sediment MFC with an anode buried in sediments containing TPH concentrations at approximately 16,000 mg kg(-1). Additionally, after approximately 66 days, the TPH degradation rates were 2% and 24% in the open-circuit control sediment MFC and active sediment MFC, respectively. Therefore, it appears that applying MFC technology to contaminated sediments enhances natural biodegradation by nearly 12 fold. Additionally, a novel sediment MFC was designed to provide a cost-effective method of passive oxidation or indirect aerobic degradation of contaminants in an otherwise anaerobic environment. In addition, the use of a wicking air cathode in this study maintained dissolved oxygen concentrations 1-2 mg l(-1) higher than submerged cathodes, demonstrating that this technology can be applied to environments with either aerobic or anaerobic overlying water and an anaerobic matrix, such as shallow lagoon, ponds, and marshes, and groundwater. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Monitoring nutrient impact on bacterial community composition during bioremediation of anoxic PAH-contaminated sediment.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myungsu; Bae, Seung Seob; Seol, Mijin; Lee, Jung-Hyun; Oh, Young-Sook

    2008-12-01

    Marine harbor sediments are frequently polluted with significant amount of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) some of which are naturally toxic, recalcitrant, mutagenic, and carcinogenic. To stimulate biodegradation of PAHs in PAH-contaminated sediments collected from near Gwangyang Bay, Korea, lactate was chosen as a supplementary carbonaceous substrate. Sediment packed into 600 ml air-tight jar was either under no treatment condition or lactate amended condition (1%, w/v). Microbial community composition was monitored by bacteria-specific and archaea-specific PCR-terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP), in addition to measuring the residual PAH concentration. Results showed that lactate amendment enhanced biodegradation rate of PAHs in the sediment by 4 to 8 times, and caused a significant shift in archaebacterial community in terms of structure and diversity with time. Phylogenetic analysis of 23 archaeal clones with distinctive RFLP patterns among 288 archaeal clones indicated that majority of the archaeal members were closest to unculturable environmental rDNA clones from hydrocarbon-contaminated and/or methanogenesis-bearing sediments. Lactate amendment led to the enrichment of some clones that were most closely related to PAH-degrading Methanosarcina species. These results suggest a possible contribution of methanogenic community to PAH degradation and give us more insights on how to effectively remediate PAH-contaminated sediments.

  6. Environmental magnetic methods for detecting and mapping contaminated sediments in lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyce, J. I.

    2009-05-01

    The remediation of contaminated sediments is an urgent environmental priority in the Great Lakes and requires detailed mapping of impacted sediment layer thickness, areal distribution and pollutant levels. Magnetic property measurements of sediment cores from two heavily polluted basins in Lake Ontario (Hamilton Harbour, Frenchman's Bay) show that concentrations of hydrocarbons (PAH) and a number of heavy metals (Pb, As, Ni, Cu, Cr, Zn, Cd, Fe) are strongly correlated with magnetic susceptibility. The magnetic susceptibility contrast between the contaminated sediment and underlying 'pre-colonial' sediments is sufficient to generate a total field anomaly (ca. 2-20 nT) that can be measured with a magnetometer towed above the lake bed. Systematic magnetic surveying (550 line km) of Hamilton Harbour using a towed marine magnetometer clearly identifies a number of well-defined magnetic anomalies that coincide with known accumulations of contaminated lake sediment. When calibrated against in-situ magnetic property measurements, the modeled apparent susceptibility from magnetic survey results can be used to classify the relative contaminant impact levels. The results demonstrate the potential of magnetic property measurements for rapid reconnaissance mapping of large areas of bottom contamination prior to detailed coring and sediment remediation.

  7. Short-term ecological risks of depositing contaminated sediment on arable soil.

    PubMed

    Peijnenburg, Willie; de Groot, Arthur; Jager, Tjalling; Posthuma, Leo

    2005-01-01

    Sediments act as sinks of suspended material from surface water. Dredging of regional waters and subsequent disposal of the sediment on soil may lead to contamination of the soil, in some cases resulting in exceedance of soil quality standards. Soil quality standards are based on total concentrations. Total levels, however, do not always give an indication of adverse effects in soil ecosystems. Instead, truly bioavailable concentrations should be used as indicators. In this study we aim to test a set of suited indicators. We carried out partition and accumulation assays with metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in soils and mixtures of soil and sediment, as well as a limited number of toxicity bioassays. We also investigated the rate of disappearance of PAHs from mixtures of sediments and soils. The experiments confirm that total levels indeed are not indicative of truly occurring toxic effects: mixing of highly contaminated sediments with soil hardly gave rise to either additional accumulation of metals and PAHs or excess toxicity. This indicates that the bioavailability of the metals and PAHs present in the sediment is limited. This general finding is confirmed by the low rate of disappearance of PAHs from the mixtures. It is concluded that inclusion of the aspects of bioavailability, mixture toxicity, and degradation, in the way described in this report, will solve the major limitations of the current methodology of classification of contaminated sediments.

  8. The effect of contaminated sediments on fecundity of the brown bullhead in three Lake Erie tributaries

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lesko, Lynn T.; Smith, Stephen B.; Blouin, Marc A.

    1996-01-01

    Female brown bullhead (Ameiurus nebulosus) were collected from three Lake Erie tributaries (Ohio) from 8 to 25 May 1989, to determine the effects of contaminated sediments on reproductive potentials. Fish obtained from the Black and Cuyahoga rivers, which contain sediments with elevated concentrations of metals, PCBs, and PAHs, were compared with fish collected in Mud Brook, a tributary of the Huron River, which was selected as our reference site. Fecundity, egg diameter, fish length and weight, and the presence of external abnormalities were recorded for each fish. Brown bullhead from the contaminated sites were larger then those from the reference site and fecundity was significantly (P < 0.05) different in all three river systems. Those from the most polluted river (Cuyahoga River) had the greatest number of eggs per individual female. The high frequency of external abnormalities observed on brown bullhead from the contaminated sites did not appear to have a detrimental influence on fecundity. These results suggest that fecundity of the brown bullhead was not adversely affected in ecosystems altered by the presence of contaminated sediments. Increased fecundity of the brown bullhead from impacted rivers may be the result of reduced competition for an abundant invertebrate food source and limited predation by other fish species whose numbers are largely depleted in these degraded systems.

  9. PAH repartitioning in field-contaminated sediment following removal of the labile chemical fraction.

    PubMed

    Birdwell, Justin E; Thibodeaux, Louis J

    2009-11-01

    The effect of removing the labile chemical fraction associated with sediment particles followed by internal chemical redistribution was examined in a field-contaminated sediment. Using data from desorption equilibrium (organic carbon-water partition coefficients, K(OC)) and kinetic (rate of release) experiments, estimates of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon biphasic partitioning and desorption rates for both the labile and nonlabile chemical fractions or organic matter compartments were obtained. Sediment K(OC) values increased between 50 and 150% after removal of the labile chemical fraction. Following depletion of the labile chemical fraction during desorption experiments, sediment was stored 30 and 90 days to allow for chemical redistribution between the labile and nonlabile compartments. The subsequent desorption data indicated repartitioning had occurred with the nonlabile chemical fraction recharging the labile compartment. The results provide evidence that chemical transfer between organic matter compartments, either through interparticle porewater or via direct intraparticle compartmental exchange, is a real phenomenon that occurs over relatively short times (weeks to months). This calls into question the idea that hydrophobic organic pollutants in the nonlabile chemical fraction are sequestered or less bioavailable over the long-term and has implications for water quality impacts during contaminated sediment resuspension events, risk assessment of polluted sites, and selection of sediment remediation strategies.

  10. Planning dredging services in contaminated sediments for balanced environmental and investment costs.

    PubMed

    Wasserman, Julio Cesar; Barros, Sérgio Ricardo; Lima, Gilson Brito Alves

    2013-05-30

    Dredging of contaminated sediments has shown to be a harmful activity for the environment, because a number of contaminants can be resuspended and become available to the organisms. Furthermore, dredged contaminated sediments may cause significant damages in the dumping site. In order to avoid the drawbacks of this activity, better techniques have to be developed and the present article presents a new procedure for the planning of dredging that reduces the environmental impacts by reducing the amount of dredged sediments and, at the same time, reduces costs. The new technique uses screening of contaminant concentrations in the sediments that are normally part of the environmental impact assessment for dredging activity. A detailed mapping of the contamination, layer by layer is carried out and the areas where the action levels are reached are outlined with polygons, establishing limits within which sediments have to be dredged with safe procedures. In the case presented, construction of a harbor in Sepetiba Bay, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, the safe procedure is cutter/suction dredging and pumping into a sub-aquatic confined disposal facility (CDF). A detailed evaluation of costs showed that if the whole layers of sediment were to be dumped into the CDF, the cost of the activity would be at least 63.82% more expensive than the proposed procedure, constituting an attractive advantage. Furthermore, as the size of the CDF is significantly smaller, less dredging is necessary, causing smaller environmental impact. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Impact of contaminated-sediment resuspension on phytoplankton in the Biguglia lagoon (Corsica, Mediterranean Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafabrie, Céline; Garrido, Marie; Leboulanger, Christophe; Cecchi, Philippe; Grégori, Gérald; Pasqualini, Vanina; Pringault, Olivier

    2013-09-01

    In shallow human-impacted systems, sediment resuspension events can result in pulsed exposures of pelagic organisms to multiple contaminants. Here, we examined the impact of the resuspension of contaminated sediment on phytoplankton in the Biguglia lagoon (Corsica, Mediterranean Sea), by conducting an in situ microcosm experiment over a 96-h period. Natural phytoplankton was exposed to elutriates prepared from a contaminated-sediment resuspension simulating process, and its functional and structural responses were compared with those of non-exposed phytoplankton. The elutriates displayed moderate multiple contamination by trace metals and PAHs. Our results show that elutriate exposure induced both functional and structural phytoplankton changes. Elutriates strongly stimulated phytoplankton growth after 24 h of exposure. They also enhanced phytoplankton photosynthetic performance during the first hours of exposure (up to 48 h), before reducing it toward the end of the experiment. Elutriates were also found to slightly stimulate Bacillariophyceae and conversely to slightly inhibit Dinophyceae in the short term. Additionally, they were found to stimulate phycocyanin-rich picocyanobacteria in the short term (8-48 h) before inhibiting it in the longer term (72-96 h), and to inhibit eukaryotic nanophytoplankton in the short term (8-48 h) before stimulating it in the longer term (72-96 h). Sediment resuspensions are thus likely to have significant effects on the global dynamics and functions of phytoplankton in contaminated coastal environments.

  12. Assessment of contaminated sediments with an indoor freshwater/sediment microcosm assay.

    PubMed

    Triffault-Bouchet, Gaëlle; Clément, Bernard; Blake, Gérard

    2005-09-01

    This study was conducted to assess the feasibility of using a 2-L, indoor microcosm assay to evaluate five contaminated sediments (A, B, C, D, and E). Toxic potential was deduced in the light of general contamination of sediments, pollutant partitioning in microcosms, and biological responses of species (Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata, Lemna minor, Daphnia magna, Hyalella azteca, Chironomus riparius): E > A > B > C > D. Sediments mainly were contaminated by metals (lead and zinc). Organic pollutant contents varied among the sediments. The major polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) compounds were pyrene, fluoranthene, and phenanthrene. Sediments A, B, and C highly stimulated duckweed growth (> 700%) and impaired daphnid (< 20%) and amphipod survival (< 30%). Sediment D had no significant effect on pelagic and benthic organisms. Finally, sediment E, the most toxic, limited duckweed growth (inhibition of 82%) and impaired daphnid survival (0% of survival). Amphipods were impaired dramatically by this sediment (0% of survival), in contrast with chironomids, for which no toxic effect was measured. The 2-L, indoor microcosm assay successfully was applied to the assessment of those five contaminated sediments. Sediments A, B, C, and E should not be deposited in gravel quarries, and new, more sensitive endpoint measurements should be developed.

  13. Elevated nitrate enriches microbial functional genes for potential bioremediation of complexly contaminated sediments

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Meiying; Zhang, Qin; Xia, Chunyu; Zhong, Yuming; Sun, Guoping; Guo, Jun; Yuan, Tong; Zhou, Jizhong; He, Zhili

    2014-01-01

    Nitrate is an important nutrient and electron acceptor for microorganisms, having a key role in nitrogen (N) cycling and electron transfer in anoxic sediments. High-nitrate inputs into sediments could have a significant effect on N cycling and its associated microbial processes. However, few studies have been focused on the effect of nitrate addition on the functional diversity, composition, structure and dynamics of sediment microbial communities in contaminated aquatic ecosystems with persistent organic pollutants (POPs). Here we analyzed sediment microbial communities from a field-scale in situ bioremediation site, a creek in Pearl River Delta containing a variety of contaminants including polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), before and after nitrate injection using a comprehensive functional gene array (GeoChip 4.0). Our results showed that the sediment microbial community functional composition and structure were markedly altered, and that functional genes involved in N-, carbon (C)-, sulfur (S)-and phosphorus (P)- cycling processes were highly enriched after nitrate injection, especially those microorganisms with diverse metabolic capabilities, leading to potential in situ bioremediation of the contaminated sediment, such as PBDE and PAH reduction/degradation. This study provides new insights into our understanding of sediment microbial community responses to nitrate addition, suggesting that indigenous microorganisms could be successfully stimulated for in situ bioremediation of POPs in contaminated sediments with nitrate addition. PMID:24671084

  14. Effects of organic carbon supply rates on mobility of previously bioreduced uranium in a contaminated sediment

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, J.; Tokunaga, T.K.; Kim, Y.; Brodie, E.; Daly, R.; Hazen, T.C.; Firestone, M.K.

    2008-05-15

    Bioreduction-based strategies for remediating uranium (U)-contaminated sediments face the challenge of maintaining the reduced status of U for long times. Because groundwater influxes continuously bring in oxidizing terminal electron acceptors (O{sub 2}, NO{sub 3}{sup -}), it is necessary to continue supplying organic carbon (OC) to maintain the reducing environment after U bioreduction is achieved. We tested the influence of OC supply rates on mobility of previously microbial reduced uranium U(IV) in contaminated sediments. We found that high degrees of U mobilization occurred when OC supply rates were high, and when the sediment still contained abundant Fe(III). Although 900 days with low levels of OC supply minimized U mobilization, the sediment redox potential increased with time as did extractable U(VI) fractions. Molecular analyses of total microbial activity demonstrated a positive correlation with OC supply and analyses of Geobacteraceae activity (RT-qPCR of 16S rRNA) indicated continued activity even when the effluent Fe(II) became undetectable. These data support our earlier hypothesis on the mechanism responsible for re-oxidation of microbial reduced U(IV) under reducing conditions; that microbial respiration caused increased (bi)carbonate concentrations and formation of stable uranyl carbonate complexes, thereby shifted U(IV)/U(VI) equilibrium to more reducing potentials. The data also suggested that low OC concentrations could not sustain the reducing condition of the sediment for much longer time.

  15. SMALL VOLUME SAMPLING & GC/MS ANALYSIS FOR PAH CONCENTRATIONS IN WATER ABOVE CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A procedure for measuring very low concentrations of potentially toxic petroleum residues in small water samples has been developed by EPA's Office of Research and Development. Many of these compounds, called Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons or PAHs, are included in EPA's list o...

  16. The Kπ Interaction in Finite Volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Dan; Cui, Er-Liang; Chen, Hua-Xing; Geng, Li-Sheng; Zhu, Li-Hua

    We calculate energy levels of the Kπ scattering in the K∗ channel in finite volume using chiral unitary theory. We use these energy levels to obtain the Kπ phase shifts and the K∗ meson properties. We also investigate their dependence on the pion mass and compare this with Lattice QCD calculations.

  17. International Conference on Contaminated Sediments - ContaSed 2015 8-13 March 2015, Monte Verità, Ascona, Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Chiaia-Hernandez, Aurea C; Giger, Walter

    2015-01-01

    About 80 participants from 22 countries from industry and academia gathered at the International Conference on Contaminated Sediments (ContaSed 2015) held at the Congressi Stefano Franscini (CSF), the conference center of ETH Zurich, located at Monte Verità, Ascona, Switzerland. ContaSed 2015 provided a platform for top experts as well as for junior researchers from different scientific disciplines to present recent results and novel approaches on the analysis, assessment and remediation of contaminated sediments. ContaSed 2015 served as a unique communication and discussion opportunity for environmental scientists with an emphasis on chemistry, sedimentology, ecotoxicology or remediation engineering.

  18. International Conference on Contaminated Sediments - ContaSed 2015 8-13 March 2015, Monte Verità, Ascona, Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Chiaia-Hernandez, Aurea C; Giger, Walter

    2015-08-19

    About 80 participants from 22 countries from industry and academia gathered at the International Conference on Contaminated Sediments (ContaSed 2015) held at the Congressi Stefano Franscini (CSF), the conference center of ETH Zurich, located at Monte Verità, Ascona, Switzerland. ContaSed 2015 provided a platform for top experts as well as for junior researchers from different scientific disciplines to present recent results and novel approaches on the analysis, assessment and remediation of contaminated sediments. ContaSed 2015 served as a unique communication and discussion opportunity for environmental scientists with an emphasis on chemistry, sedimentology, ecotoxicology or remediation engineering.

  19. Estimation of hydrocarbon biodegradation rates in gasoline-contaminated sediment from measured respiration rates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baker, R.J.; Baehr, A.L.; Lahvis, M.A.

    2000-01-01

    An open microcosm method for quantifying microbial respiration and estimating biodegradation rates of hydrocarbons in gasoline-contaminated sediment samples has been developed and validated. Stainless-steel bioreactors are filled with soil or sediment samples, and the vapor-phase composition (concentrations of oxygen (O2), nitrogen (N2), carbon dioxide (CO2), and selected hydrocarbons) is monitored over time. Replacement gas is added as the vapor sample is taken, and selection of the replacement gas composition facilitates real-time decision-making regarding environmental conditions within the bioreactor. This capability allows for maintenance of field conditions over time, which is not possible in closed microcosms. Reaction rates of CO2 and O2 are calculated from the vapor-phase composition time series. Rates of hydrocarbon biodegradation are either measured directly from the hydrocarbon mass balance, or estimated from CO2 and O2 reaction rates and assumed reaction stoichiometries. Open microcosm experiments using sediments spiked with toluene and p-xylene were conducted to validate the stoichiometric assumptions. Respiration rates calculated from O2 consumption and from CO2 production provide estimates of toluene and p- xylene degradation rates within about ??50% of measured values when complete mineralization stoichiometry is assumed. Measured values ranged from 851.1 to 965.1 g m-3 year-1 for toluene, and 407.2-942.3 g m-3 year-1 for p- xylene. Contaminated sediment samples from a gasoline-spill site were used in a second set of microcosm experiments. Here, reaction rates of O2 and CO2 were measured and used to estimate hydrocarbon respiration rates. Total hydrocarbon reaction rates ranged from 49.0 g m-3 year-1 in uncontaminated (background) to 1040.4 g m-3 year-1 for highly contaminated sediment, based on CO2 production data. These rate estimates were similar to those obtained independently from in situ CO2 vertical gradient and flux determinations at the

  20. Estimation of hydrocarbon biodegradation rates in gasoline-contaminated sediment from measured respiration rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Ronald J.; Baehr, Arthur L.; Lahvis, Matthew A.

    2000-01-01

    An open microcosm method for quantifying microbial respiration and estimating biodegradation rates of hydrocarbons in gasoline-contaminated sediment samples has been developed and validated. Stainless-steel bioreactors are filled with soil or sediment samples, and the vapor-phase composition (concentrations of oxygen (O 2), nitrogen (N 2), carbon dioxide (CO 2), and selected hydrocarbons) is monitored over time. Replacement gas is added as the vapor sample is taken, and selection of the replacement gas composition facilitates real-time decision-making regarding environmental conditions within the bioreactor. This capability allows for maintenance of field conditions over time, which is not possible in closed microcosms. Reaction rates of CO 2 and O 2 are calculated from the vapor-phase composition time series. Rates of hydrocarbon biodegradation are either measured directly from the hydrocarbon mass balance, or estimated from CO 2 and O 2 reaction rates and assumed reaction stoichiometries. Open microcosm experiments using sediments spiked with toluene and p-xylene were conducted to validate the stoichiometric assumptions. Respiration rates calculated from O 2 consumption and from CO 2 production provide estimates of toluene and p-xylene degradation rates within about ±50% of measured values when complete mineralization stoichiometry is assumed. Measured values ranged from 851.1 to 965.1 g m -3 year -1 for toluene, and 407.2-942.3 g m -3 year -1 for p-xylene. Contaminated sediment samples from a gasoline-spill site were used in a second set of microcosm experiments. Here, reaction rates of O 2 and CO 2 were measured and used to estimate hydrocarbon respiration rates. Total hydrocarbon reaction rates ranged from 49.0 g m -3 year -1 in uncontaminated (background) to 1040.4 g m -3 year -1 for highly contaminated sediment, based on CO 2 production data. These rate estimates were similar to those obtained independently from in situ CO 2 vertical gradient and flux

  1. A catchment-integrated approach to determine the importance of secondary sources of contaminated sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andres Lopez-Tarazon, Jose; Byrne, Patrick; Mullan, Donal; Smith, Hugh

    2015-04-01

    Water pollution has been identified as one of the most important environmental challenges of the early 21st Century. The Water Framework Directive (WFD) (2008/105/EC) explicitly recognises the risk to water resources posed by sediment-associated contaminants in European river basins. The potential impacts on water supply and the biodiversity of aquatic ecosystems from sediment and associated contaminants may be further exacerbated by climate change pressures on water resources, as highlighted in the 2009 EU White Paper "Adapting to climate change: Towards a European framework for action" (SEC(2009) 386, 387, 388). Despite these concerns, the role of floodplains and other storage areas as secondary sources of contaminated sediment (i.e. metals) in river basins affected by historic industrial or mining pollution has been largely overlooked. Thereby, besides the sediment which is transported by the river, secondary sources of contaminants represent a credible threat to achieving EU water quality targets set by the WFD. This project addresses this issue by developing a catchment-based approach looking at metal geochemistry from source to sink (i.e., from sediment generation at slopes, passing through sediment transported by the river system, to sediment deposition at the storage areas to the outlet) and develop a geochemical model to predict the chemical aspects of metals transport and transformation. This approach will allow us to quantify (i) the sediment fluxes and associated contaminants flowing through the river, (ii) the storage areas contributions to downstream contaminated sediment fluxes, (ii) the timescales for the storage and removal of contaminated sediment in the sinks, and (iv) the transformation and bioavailability of the pollutants (i.e. metals) along the basin. Both physical and chemical aspects of metal transport will be considered by looking at metal geochemistry, mobility and bioavailability, hence producing information on chemical metal transport

  2. Effect of oil-contaminated sediment on the longhorn sculpin (Myoxocephalus octodecemspinosus) following chronic exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, R.A. )

    1991-07-01

    One of the most common pollutants in coastal marine areas is petroleum that is discharged continually from bilges and tankers. Fish which inhabit the littoral zone are usually exposed to a variety of pollutants, including petroleum, that originate from urban and industrial waste. The longhorn sculpin, Myoxocephalus octodecemspinosus, is one of the fish species that inhabits littoral areas adjacent to wharves and fish-processing plants were it feeds on discarded offal. Discharged crude oil has been reported to contaminate and persist in sediment for long periods and is known to affect fish in a variety of ways. The present study was conducted to ascertain the effect of oil-contaminated sediment, following long-term exposure, on body weight, organs, tissues and parasitofauna of the sculpin and the potential use of its parasites as indicators of pollution.

  3. Toxicity of creosote water-soluble fractions generated from contaminated sediments to the bay mysid.

    PubMed

    Padma, T V; Hale, R C; Roberts, M H; Lipcius, R N

    1999-02-01

    Creosote, a globally used wood preservative, is a complex mixture consisting primarily of aromatic organic compounds (ACs). Creosote-derived ACs can persist for decades in aquatic sediments. Natural and anthropogenic activities may result in dissolution and resuspension of sediment-associated ACs. These processes were mimicked by generating a water-soluble fraction (WSF) from creosote-contaminated sediment (ERS) collected from a polluted site. The epibenthic mysid Mysidopsis bahia was exposed to five sublethal concentrations of WSF for 7 days. The WSF significantly decreased dry weight gain and proportion of gravid females (EC50=15 microgram/liter total identified ACs). Chemical analysis indicated that high-molecular-weight ACs (more than three aromatic rings) dominated the ERS, but were undetected in the WSF. Low-molecular-weight ACs (fewer than three aromatic rings) dominated the WSF. Compositional differences can thus result from fractionation processes and affect environmental fate and toxicity of the mixture.

  4. ACTIVE CAPPING TECHNOLOGY - NEW APPROACHES FOR IN SITU REMEDIATION OF CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Knox, A.; Paller, M.; Roberts, J.

    2012-02-13

    This study evaluated pilot-scale active caps composed of apatite, organoclay, biopolymers, and sand for the remediation of metal-contaminated sediments. The active caps were constructed in Steel Creek, at the Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina. Monitoring was conducted for 12 months. Effectiveness of the caps was based on an evaluation of contaminant bioavailability, resistance to erosion, and impacts on benthic organisms. Active caps lowered metal bioavailability in the sediment during the one-year test period. Biopolymers reduced sediment suspension during cap construction, increased the pool of carbon, and lowered the release of metals. This field validation showed that active caps can effectively treat contaminants by changing their speciation, and that caps can be constructed to include more than one type of amendment to achieve multiple goals.

  5. A Magnification Lens for Interactive Volume Visualization

    SciTech Connect

    LaMar, E; Hamann, B; Joy, K I

    2001-07-19

    Volume visualization of large data sets suffers from the same problem that many other visualization modalities suffer from: either one can visualize the entire data set and lose small details or visualize a small region and lose the context. In this paper, they present a magnification lens technique for volume visualization. While the notion of a magnification-lens is not new, and other techniques attempt to simulate the physical properties of a magnifying lens, their contribution is in developing a magnification lens that is fast, can be implemented using a fairly small software overhead, and has a natural, intuitive appearance. The issue with magnification lens is the border, or transition, region. The lens center and exterior have a constant zoom factor, and are simple to render. It is the border region that blends between the external and interior magnification, and has a non-constant magnification. They use the perspective-correct textures capability, available in most current graphics systems, to produce a lens with a tessellated border region that approximates linear compression with respect to the radius of the magnification lens. They discuss how a cubic border can mitigate the discontinuities resulting from the use of a linear function, without significant performance loss. They discuss various issues concerning development of a three-dimensional magnification lens.

  6. Nitrogen fertilizer improves boron phytoextraction by Brassica juncea grown in contaminated sediments and alleviates plant stress.

    PubMed

    Giansoldati, Virginia; Tassi, Eliana; Morelli, Elisabetta; Gabellieri, Edi; Pedron, Francesca; Barbafieri, Meri

    2012-06-01

    In this study we evaluated the effect of different fertilizer treatments on Brassica plants grown on boron-contaminated sediments. Experiments were conducted in the laboratory and on the lysimeter scale. At laboratory scale (microcosm), five different fertilizers were tested for a 35-d period. On the lysimeter scale, nitrogen fertilization was tested at three different doses and plants were allowed to grow until the end of the vegetative phase (70 d). Results showed that nitrogen application had effectively increased plant biomass production, while B uptake was not affected. Total B phytoextracted increased three-fold when the highest nitrogen dose was applied. Phytotoxicity on Brassica was evaluated by biochemical parameters. In plants grown in unfertilized B-contaminated sediments, the activity of antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD), ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and pyrogallol peroxidase (PPX) increased, whereas catalase (CAT) decreased with respect to control plants. Addition of N progressively mitigated the alteration of enzymatic activity, thus suggesting that N can aid in alleviating B-induced oxidative stress. SOD activity was restored to control levels just at the lowest N treatment, whereas the CAT inhibition was partially restored only at the highest one. N application also lowered the B-induced increase in APX and PPX activities. Increased glutathione reductase activity indicated the need to restore the oxidative balance of glutathione. Data also suggest a role of glutathione and phytochelatins in B defense mechanisms. Results suggest that the nitrogen fertilizer was effective in improving B phytoextraction by increasing Brassica biomass and by alleviating B-induced oxidative stress. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Biological responses of juvenile European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) exposed to contaminated sediments.

    PubMed

    De Domenico, Elena; Mauceri, Angela; Giordano, Daniela; Maisano, Maria; Giannetto, Alessia; Parrino, Vincenzo; Natalotto, Antonino; D'Agata, Alessia; Cappello, Tiziana; Fasulo, Salvatore

    2013-11-01

    Multiple anthropogenic activities present along coastal environments may affect the health status of aquatic ecosystems. In this study, specimens of European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) were exposed for 30 days to highly contaminated sediment collected from the industrial area between Augusta and Priolo (Syracuse, Italy), defined as the most mercury polluted site in the Mediterranean. The aim was to evaluate the responses of juvenile D. labrax to highly contaminated sediments, particularly enriched in Hg, in order to enhance the scarce knowledge on the potential compensatory mechanisms developed by organisms under severe stress conditions. Apoptotic and proliferative activities [cell turnover: Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA) and FAS Ligand (FasL)], onset of hypoxic condition [hypoxia: Hypoxia Inducibile Factor-1α (HIF-1α)], and changes in the neuroendocrine control mechanisms [neurotransmission: Tyrosine Hydroxylase (TH), Choline Acetyltransferase (ChAT), Acetylcholinesterase (AChE), 5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and 5-Hydroxytryptamine receptor 3 (5-HT3)] were investigated in sea bass gill tissues. In the specimens exposed to the polluted sediment, the occurrence of altered cell turnover may result in impaired gas exchange that leads to a condition of "functional hypoxia". Changes in neurotransmission pathways were also observed, suggesting a remodeling process as an adaptive response to increase the O2-carrying capacity and restore the normal physiological conditions of the gills. Overall, these findings demonstrated that although chronic exposure to heavy metal polluted sediments alters the functioning of both the nervous and endocrine systems, as well as plasticity of the gill epithelium, fish are able to trigger a series of physiological adjustments or adaptations interfering with specific neuroendocrine control mechanisms that enable their long-term survival.

  8. Using radiosilver and plutonium isotopes to trace the dispersion of contaminated sediment in Fukushima coastal catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evrard, O.; Ayrault, S.; Pointurier, F.; Onda, Y.; Laceby, J. P.; Lepage, H.; Chartin, C.; Cirella, M.; Pottin, A. C.; Hubert, A.; Lefèvre, I.

    2015-12-01

    The Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant (FDNPP) accident in March 2011 resulted in a 3000-km² radioactive pollution plume consisting predominantly of radiocesium (137Cs and 134Cs). This plume is drained by several rivers to the Pacific Ocean after flowing through less contaminated, but densely inhabited coastal plains. As the redistribution of radionuclide contaminated sediment could expose the local population to higher radiation rates, novel fingerprinting methods were developed to trace the downstream dispersion of contaminated sediment. First, the heterogeneous deposition of metastable silver-110 (110mAg) across these coastal catchments was used to investigate sediment migration. In particular, the 110mAg/137Cs activity ratio was measured in soils and river sediment demonstrating the occurrence of a seasonal cycle of soil erosion during typhoons and spring snowmelt in 2011 and 2012. However, due to the rapid decay of 110mAg (half-life of 250 days), alternative methods were required to continue tracking sediment from 2013 onwards. One promising method includes the analyses of plutonium isotopes to further understand sediment migration in the Fukushima region. For example, 241Pu/239Pu atom ratios measured in sediment collected in Fukushima coastal rivers shortly after the accident were shown to be significantly higher (0.0017 - 0.0884) than corresponding values attributed to the global fallout (0.00113 ± 0.00008). Additional analyses were conducted on sediment sampled in 2013 and 2014 after the start of decontamination works. These analyses show that the 241Pu/239Pu atom ratios decreased towards the global fallout values in rivers draining decontaminated paddy fields, demonstrating the effectiveness of remediation works.

  9. Sequential Leaching of Chromium Contaminated Sediments - A Study Characterizing Natural Attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musa, D.; Ding, M.; Beroff, S.; Rearick, M.; Perkins, G.; WoldeGabriel, G. W.; Ware, D.; Harris, R.; Kluk, E.; Katzman, D.; Reimus, P. W.; Heikoop, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Natural attenuation is an important process in slowing down the transport of hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI), an anthropogenic environmental contaminant, either by adsorption of Cr(VI) to sediments, or by reduction to nontoxic trivalent chromium, Cr(III). The capacity and mechanism of attenuation is explored in this sequential leaching study of different particle size fractions of chromium contaminated sediments and similar uncontaminated sediments from the regional aquifer near Los Alamos, New Mexico. Using this leaching protocol each sediment sample is split in two: one half is leached three times using a 0.1 M sodium bicarbonate/carbonate solution, while the second half is leached three times using a 0.01 M nitric acid, followed by two consecutively increasing magnitudes of nitric acid concentrations. Based on the amphoteric nature of chromium, alkaline leaching is used to establish the amount of Cr(VI) sorbed on the sediment, whereas acid leaching is used to establish the amount of Cr(III). The weak acid is predicted to release the attenuated anthropogenic Cr(III), without affecting Cr-bearing minerals. The sequential, stronger, acid is anticipated to leach Cr(III)-incorporated in the minerals. The efficiency and validation of the sequential leaching method is assessed by comparing the leaching behavior of bentonite and biotite samples, with and without loaded Cr(VI). A 97% chromium mass balance of leached Cr(VI)-loaded bentonite and biotite proves the viability of this method for further use on leaching contaminated sediments. By comparing contaminated and uncontaminated sediment leachate results, of chromium and other major and trace elements, the signature of anthropogenic chromium is determined. Further mineralogical characterization of the sediments provides a quantitative measure of the natural attenuation capacity for chromium. Understanding these results is pertinent in delineating the optimal procedure for the remediation of Cr(VI) in the regional aquifer

  10. Effects of lead-contaminated sediment and nutrition on mallard duckling behavior and growth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Douglas-Stroebel, E.; Brewer, G.L.; Hoffman, D.J.

    2005-01-01

    Sediment ingestion has become a recognized exposure route for toxicants in waterfowl. The effects of lead-contaminated sediment from the Coeur d?Alene River Basin (CDARB) in Idaho were evaluated on mallard (Anas platyryhnchos) duckling behavior and growth over a five-week period using time-activity budgets. Day-old ducklings received either a clean sediment (24%) supplemented control diet, CDARB sediment (3,449 ug/g lead) supplemented diets at 12% or 24%, or a positive control diet (24% clean sediment with equivalent lead acetate to the 24% CDARB diet). Ten different behaviors were monitored for time spent, including resting, standing, moving, drinking, dabbling, feeding, pecking, preening, bathing and swimming. Contaminated sediment (24% CDARB ) and lead acetate significantly decreased the proportion of time spent swimming. There were also problems with balance and mobility in the 24% CDARB and the lead acetate groups. With a less optimal diet (mixture of two thirds corn and one third standard diet) containing 24% clean sediment, nutrient level alone affected six different behaviors including feeding, pecking, swimming, preening, standing, and dabbling. Nutrient level also significantly decreased the growth rate and delayed the initial time of molt. When the corn diet contained CDARB sediment, the proportion of time spent bathing in the 24% CDARB group significantly decreased with marginal effects on resting and feeding. There were also instances of imbalance with 24% CDARB and corn diet, and duckling weights were significantly lower than in corn diet controls. The decreased time spent swimming or bathing, coupled with problems of balance and mobility, decreased growth, histopathological lesions and altered brain biochemistry (reported elsewhere) illustrate a potential threat to the survival of ducklings in the wild that are exposed to lead-containing sediments within the CDARB or elsewhere.

  11. Environmental Impact Of The Use Of Contaminated Sediments As Partial Replacement Of The Aggregate Used In Road Construction

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Indiana Harbor Canal (IHC) is a waterway extensively polluted with heavy metals and petroleum. Since there are limited disposal options for the petroleum-contaminated sediments (PCSs) of the canal, the environmental impact of IHC dewatered sediment when used as partial repla...

  12. Evaluation of a Sustainable Remediation Option: Beneficial Reuse of Petroleum-Contaminated Sediment as an Energy Source

    EPA Science Inventory

    The characteristics of petroleum-contaminated sediment (PCS) have been evaluated to assess whether the practice of its beneficial reuse as a sole or supplemental energy source is sustainable relative to other sediment remediation options such as monitored natural recovery (MNR), ...

  13. Evaluation of a Sustainable Remediation Option: Beneficial Reuse of Petroleum-Contaminated Sediment as an Energy Source

    EPA Science Inventory

    The characteristics of petroleum-contaminated sediment (PCS) have been evaluated to assess whether the practice of its beneficial reuse as a sole or supplemental energy source is sustainable relative to other sediment remediation options such as monitored natural recovery (MNR), ...

  14. Environmental Impact Of The Use Of Contaminated Sediments As Partial Replacement Of The Aggregate Used In Road Construction

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Indiana Harbor Canal (IHC) is a waterway extensively polluted with heavy metals and petroleum. Since there are limited disposal options for the petroleum-contaminated sediments (PCSs) of the canal, the environmental impact of IHC dewatered sediment when used as partial repla...

  15. Laboratory, Field, and Analytical Procedures for Using Passive Sampling in the Evaluation of Contaminated Sediments: User's Manual

    EPA Science Inventory

    Regardless of the remedial technology invoked to address contaminated sediments in the environment, there is a critical need to have tools for assessing the effectiveness of the remedy. In the past, these tools have included chemical and biomonitoring of the water column and sedi...

  16. Laboratory, Field, and Analytical Procedures for Using Passive Sampling in the Evaluation of Contaminated Sediments: User's Manual

    EPA Science Inventory

    Regardless of the remedial technology invoked to address contaminated sediments in the environment, there is a critical need to have tools for assessing the effectiveness of the remedy. In the past, these tools have included chemical and biomonitoring of the water column and sedi...

  17. Geoacoustic Physical Modeling: Volume-Roughness Interactions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-30

    important break by showing its relationship to the angle of repose , a fundamental feature of granular sediments (such as sands)[Ivakin, 2005...significant considering the fact that the slope of roughness at sub-cm scales at SAX99 site is large and can be close to both angle of repose and...roughness interactions and should be very pronounced at near- and sub-critical grazing angles . For example, the very first theoretical considerations

  18. Interactive Dynamic Volume Illumination with Refraction and Caustics.

    PubMed

    Magnus, Jens G; Bruckner, Stefan

    2017-08-29

    In recent years, significant progress has been made in developing high-quality interactive methods for realistic volume illumination. However, refraction - despite being an important aspect of light propagation in participating media - has so far only received little attention. In this paper, we present a novel approach for refractive volume illumination including caustics capable of interactive frame rates. By interleaving light and viewing ray propagation, our technique avoids memory-intensive storage of illumination information and does not require any precomputation. It is fully dynamic and all parameters such as light position and transfer function can be modified interactively without a performance penalty.

  19. Interactive Volume Rendering of Diffusion Tensor Data

    SciTech Connect

    Hlawitschka, Mario; Weber, Gunther; Anwander, Alfred; Carmichael, Owen; Hamann, Bernd; Scheuermann, Gerik

    2007-03-30

    As 3D volumetric images of the human body become an increasingly crucial source of information for the diagnosis and treatment of a broad variety of medical conditions, advanced techniques that allow clinicians to efficiently and clearly visualize volumetric images become increasingly important. Interaction has proven to be a key concept in analysis of medical images because static images of 3D data are prone to artifacts and misunderstanding of depth. Furthermore, fading out clinically irrelevant aspects of the image while preserving contextual anatomical landmarks helps medical doctors to focus on important parts of the images without becoming disoriented. Our goal was to develop a tool that unifies interactive manipulation and context preserving visualization of medical images with a special focus on diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) data. At each image voxel, DTI provides a 3 x 3 tensor whose entries represent the 3D statistical properties of water diffusion locally. Water motion that is preferential to specific spatial directions suggests structural organization of the underlying biological tissue; in particular, in the human brain, the naturally occuring diffusion of water in the axon portion of neurons is predominantly anisotropic along the longitudinal direction of the elongated, fiber-like axons [MMM+02]. This property has made DTI an emerging source of information about the structural integrity of axons and axonal connectivity between brain regions, both of which are thought to be disrupted in a broad range of medical disorders including multiple sclerosis, cerebrovascular disease, and autism [Mos02, FCI+01, JLH+99, BGKM+04, BJB+03].

  20. Evaluation of bioaerosol components, generation factors, and airborne transport associated with lime treatment of contaminated sediment.

    PubMed

    Barth, Edwin F; Reponen, Tiina; Succop, Paul

    2009-05-01

    Lime treatment has been used in contaminated sediment management activities for many purposes such as dewatering, improvement of physical properties, and reducing contaminant mobility. Exothermic volatilization of volatile organic compounds from lime-treated sediment is well known, but potential aerosolization of bioaerosol components has not been evaluated. A physical model of a contaminated sediment treatment and airborne transport process and an experimental protocol were developed to identify specific bioaerosol components (bacteria, fungi, cell structural components, and particles) that may be aerosolized and transported. Key reaction variables (amount of lime addition, rate of lime addition, mixing energy supplied) that may affect the aerosolization of bioaerosol components were evaluated. Lime treatment of a sediment contaminated with heavy metals, petroleum-based organics, and microorganisms increased the sediment pH and solids content. Lime treatment reduced the number of water-extractable bacteria and fungi in the sediment from approximately 10(6) colony-forming units (CFU) x mL(-1) to less than the detection limit of 10(3) CFU x mL(-1). This reduction was seen immediately for bacteria and within 21 days for fungi. Lime treatment immediately reduced the amount of endotoxin in the sediment, but the effects of lime treatment on beta-D-glucan could not be determined. The temperature of the treated sediment was linearly related to the amount of lime added within the range of 0-25%. Bacteria were aerosolized during the treatment trials, but there was no culturable evidence of aerosolization of fungi, most likely because of either their particular growth stage or relatively larger particle size that reduced their aerosolization potential and their collection into the impingers. Nonbiological particles, endotoxin, and beta-D-glucan were not detected in air samples during the treatment trials. The amount of lime added to the reaction beaker and the relative

  1. Influences of organic carbon supply rate on uranium bioreduction in initially oxidizing, contaminated sediment.

    PubMed

    Tokunaga, Tetsu K; Wan, Jiamin; Kim, Yongman; Daly, Rebecca A; Brodie, Eoin L; Hazen, Terry C; Herman, Don; Firestone, Mary K

    2008-12-01

    Remediation of uranium-contaminated sediments through in situ stimulation of bioreduction to insoluble UO2 is a potential treatment strategy under active investigation. Previously, we found that newly reduced U(IV) can be reoxidized under reducing conditions sustained by a continuous supply of organic carbon (OC) because of residual reactive Fe(III) and enhanced U(VI) solubilitythrough complexation with carbonate generated through OC oxidation. That finding motivated this investigation directed at identifying a range of OC supply rates that is optimal for establishing U bioreduction and immobilization in initially oxidizing sediments. The effects of OC supply rate, from 0 to 580 mmol of OC (kg of sediment)(-1) year(-1), and OC form (lactate and acetate) on U bioreduction were tested in flow-through columns containing U-contaminated sediments. An intermediate supply rate on the order of 150 mmol of OC (kg of sediment)(-1) year(-1) was determined to be most effective at immobilizing U. At lower OC supply rates, U bioreduction was not achieved, and U(VI) solubilitywas enhanced by complexation with carbonate (from OC oxidation). At the highest OC supply rate, the resulting highly carbonate-enriched solutions also supported elevated levels of U(VI), even though strongly reducing conditions were established. Lactate and acetate were found to have very similar geochemical impacts on effluent U concentrations (and other measured chemical species), when compared at equivalent OC supply rates. While the catalysts of U(VI) reduction to U(IV) are presumably bacteria, the composition of the bacterial community,the Fe-reducing community, and the sulfate-reducing community had no direct relationship with effluent U concentrations. The OC supply rate has competing effects of driving reduction of U(VI) to low-solubility U(IV) solids, as well as causing formation of highly soluble U(VI)-carbonato complexes. These offsetting influences will require careful control of OC supply rates

  2. Importance of dissolved neutral mercury sulfides for methyl mercury production in contaminated sediments.

    PubMed

    Drott, Andreas; Lambertsson, Lars; Björn, Erik; Skyllberg, Ulf

    2007-04-01

    Biotic transformation of inorganic mercury, Hg(II), to mono methyl mercury (MeHg) is proposed to be largely controlled by passive uptake of neutral Hg complexes by sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB). In this study, the chemical speciation of Hg(II) in seven locally contaminated sediments covering environments such as (i) brackish water, (ii) low-productivity freshwater, and, (iii) high-productivity freshwater was related to potential Hg methylation rates, determined by incubation at 23 degrees C for 48 h under N2(g), and to total MeHg concentrations in sediments. Pore water speciation was modeled considering Hg complexes with halides, organic thiols [Hg(SR)2(aq), associated to dissolved organic matter], monosulfides, and bisulfides. The sum of neutral mercury sulfides [Hg(SH)20(aq)] and [HgS0(aq)] was significantly, positively (p < 0.001, n = 20) correlated to the specific methylation rate constant (Km, day(-1)) at depths of 5-100 cm in two brackish water sediments. Total Hg, total mercury sulfides or Hg(SR)2(aq) in pore water gave no significant relationships with Km. In two subsets of freshwater sediments, neutral mercury sulfides were positively correlated to total Hg in pore water, and therefore, total Hg also gave significant relationships with Km. The sum of [Hg(SH)20(aq)] and [HgS0(aq)] was significantly, positively correlated to total sediment MeHg (microg kg-1) in brackish waters (p < 0.001, n = 23), in southern, high-productivity freshwaters (p < 0.001, n = 20), as well as in northern, low-productivity freshwater (p = 0.048, n = 6). The slopes (b, b') of the relationships Km (day-1) = a + b([Hg(SH)20(aq)] + [HgS0(aq)]) and MeHg (microg kg-1) = a' + b'([Hg(SH)20(aq)] + [HgS0(aq)]) showed an inverse relationship with the C/N ratio, supposedly reflecting differences in primary production and energy-rich organic matter availability among sites. We conclude that concentrations of neutral inorganic mercury sulfide species, together with the availability of energy

  3. Influences of Organic Carbon Supply Rate on Uranium Bioreduction in Initially Oxidizing, Contaminated Sediment

    SciTech Connect

    Tokunaga, Tetsu K.; Wan, Jiamin; Kim, Yongman; Daly, Rebecca A.; Brodie, Eoin L.; Hazen, Terry C.; Herman, Don; Firestone, Mary K.

    2008-06-10

    Remediation of uranium (U) contaminated sediments through in-situ stimulation of bioreduction to insoluble UO{sub 2} is a potential treatment strategy under active investigation. Previously, we found that newly reduced U(IV) can be reoxidized under reducing conditions sustained by a continuous supply of organic carbon (OC) because of residual reactive Fe(III) and enhanced U(VI) solubility through complexation with carbonate generated through OC oxidation. That finding motivated this investigation directed at identifying a range of OC supply rates that is optimal for establishing U bioreduction and immobilization in initially oxidizing sediments. The effects of OC supply rate, from 0 to 580 mmol OC (kg sediment){sup -1} year{sup -1}, and OC form (lactate and acetate) on U bioreduction were tested in flow-through columns containing U-contaminated sediments. An intermediate supply rate on the order of 150 mmol OC (kg sediment){sup -1} year{sup -1} was determined to be most effective at immobilizing U. At lower OC supply rates, U bioreduction was not achieved, and U(VI) solubility was enhanced by complexation with carbonate (from OC oxidation). At the highest OC supply rate, resulting highly carbonate-enriched solutions also supported elevated levels of U(VI), even though strongly reducing conditions were established. Lactate and acetate were found to have very similar geochemical impacts on effluent U concentrations (and other measured chemical species), when compared at equivalent OC supply rates. While the catalysts of U(VI) reduction to U(IV) are presumably bacteria, the composition of the bacterial community, the Fe reducing community, and the sulfate reducing community had no direct relationship with effluent U concentrations. The OC supply rate has competing effects of driving reduction of U(VI) to low solubility U(IV) solids, as well as causing formation of highly soluble U(VI)-carbonato complexes. These offsetting influences will require careful control of OC

  4. Flux Meter Assesses the Effects of Groundwater, Surface Water, and Contaminated Sediment Interactions on Ecosystems

    EPA Science Inventory

    The slow flow of water between groundwater (GW) and surface water (SW) is often referred to as seepage, or in scientific terms, advective flux. This slow flow at the GW/SW interface presents measurement difficulties. This project was conducted to develop a durable advective flux ...

  5. Flux Meter Assesses the Effects of Groundwater, Surface Water, and Contaminated Sediment Interactions on Ecosystems

    EPA Science Inventory

    The slow flow of water between groundwater (GW) and surface water (SW) is often referred to as seepage, or in scientific terms, advective flux. This slow flow at the GW/SW interface presents measurement difficulties. This project was conducted to develop a durable advective flux ...

  6. Metal-Macrofauna Interactions Determine Microbial Community Structure and Function in Copper Contaminated Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Mayor, Daniel J.; Gray, Nia B.; Elver-Evans, Joanna; Midwood, Andrew J.; Thornton, Barry

    2013-01-01

    Copper is essential for healthy cellular functioning, but this heavy metal quickly becomes toxic when supply exceeds demand. Marine sediments receive widespread and increasing levels of copper contamination from antifouling paints owing to the 2008 global ban of organotin-based products. The toxicity of copper will increase in the coming years as seawater pH decreases and temperature increases. We used a factorial mesocosm experiment to investigate how increasing sediment copper concentrations and the presence of a cosmopolitan bioturbating amphipod, Corophium volutator, affected a range of ecosystem functions in a soft sediment microbial community. The effects of copper on benthic nutrient release, bacterial biomass, microbial community structure and the isotopic composition of individual microbial membrane [phospholipid] fatty acids (PLFAs) all differed in the presence of C. volutator. Our data consistently demonstrate that copper contamination of global waterways will have pervasive effects on the metabolic functioning of benthic communities that cannot be predicted from copper concentrations alone; impacts will depend upon the resident macrofauna and their capacity for bioturbation. This finding poses a major challenge for those attempting to manage the impacts of copper contamination on ecosystem services, e.g. carbon and nutrient cycling, across different habitats. Our work also highlights the paucity of information on the processes that result in isotopic fractionation in natural marine microbial communities. We conclude that the assimilative capacity of benthic microbes will become progressively impaired as copper concentrations increase. These effects will, to an extent, be mitigated by the presence of bioturbating animals and possibly other processes that increase the influx of oxygenated seawater into the sediments. Our findings support the move towards an ecosystem approach for environmental management. PMID:23741430

  7. Metal-macrofauna interactions determine microbial community structure and function in copper contaminated sediments.

    PubMed

    Mayor, Daniel J; Gray, Nia B; Elver-Evans, Joanna; Midwood, Andrew J; Thornton, Barry

    2013-01-01

    Copper is essential for healthy cellular functioning, but this heavy metal quickly becomes toxic when supply exceeds demand. Marine sediments receive widespread and increasing levels of copper contamination from antifouling paints owing to the 2008 global ban of organotin-based products. The toxicity of copper will increase in the coming years as seawater pH decreases and temperature increases. We used a factorial mesocosm experiment to investigate how increasing sediment copper concentrations and the presence of a cosmopolitan bioturbating amphipod, Corophium volutator, affected a range of ecosystem functions in a soft sediment microbial community. The effects of copper on benthic nutrient release, bacterial biomass, microbial community structure and the isotopic composition of individual microbial membrane [phospholipid] fatty acids (PLFAs) all differed in the presence of C. volutator. Our data consistently demonstrate that copper contamination of global waterways will have pervasive effects on the metabolic functioning of benthic communities that cannot be predicted from copper concentrations alone; impacts will depend upon the resident macrofauna and their capacity for bioturbation. This finding poses a major challenge for those attempting to manage the impacts of copper contamination on ecosystem services, e.g. carbon and nutrient cycling, across different habitats. Our work also highlights the paucity of information on the processes that result in isotopic fractionation in natural marine microbial communities. We conclude that the assimilative capacity of benthic microbes will become progressively impaired as copper concentrations increase. These effects will, to an extent, be mitigated by the presence of bioturbating animals and possibly other processes that increase the influx of oxygenated seawater into the sediments. Our findings support the move towards an ecosystem approach for environmental management.

  8. IMP: Interactive mass properties program. Volume 1: Program description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, W. A.

    1976-01-01

    A method of computing a weights and center of gravity analysis of a flight vehicle using interactive graphical capabilities of the Adage 340 computer is described. The equations used to calculate area, volume, and mass properties are based on elemental surface characteristics. The input/output methods employ the graphic support of the Adage computer. Several interactive program options are available for analyzing the mass properties of a vehicle. These options are explained.

  9. Theoretical evaluation of dissolution and biochemical reduction of TNT for phytoremediation of contaminated sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voudrias, Evangelos A.; Assaf, Karim Shafe

    1996-07-01

    In this study the removal of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) in the subsurface was theoretically simulated using a steady-state one-dimensional form of the advection-dispersion-reaction (ADR) equation, also accounting for TNT dissolution. The system studied consists of equal-sized spherical TNT particles uniformly distributed in an anaerobic saturated sediment. Water is assumed to flow steadily and uniformly through the sediment. The TNT removal is accomplished by biochemical catalysts (enzymes) released by plants. A sensitivity analysis was performed by varying TNT particle diameter, soil TNT content, Darcy velocity and a first-order biochemical reduction rate constant, and studying their effect on the TNT aqueous-phase concentration and TNT removal rate from the exposure zone. With zero or low biochemical reduction rate constants, it was found that the rate of removal of TNT from the exposure zone improved with higher flushing rates. On the other hand, higher biochemical reduction rate constants resulted in significant reduction of the aqueous TNT concentration at all flushing rates and in higher TNT removal rates from the exposure zone. A biochemical reduction rate constant of 14.25 day -1 was measured for reduction of dissolved TNT by sediments containing biochemical catalysts under anaerobic conditions. A simulation using this rate constant suggested the feasibility of in situ phytoremediation of TNT-contaminated sediments.

  10. Identification and confirmation of ammonia toxicity in contaminated sediments using a modified toxicity identification evaluation approach

    SciTech Connect

    Sprang, P.A. Van; Janssen, C.R.

    1997-12-01

    Toxicity identification of sediment pore waters from four sites in the Upper Scheldt (Belgium) was assessed using a simplified and discriminative toxicity identification evaluation procedure. The samples from all locations exhibited acute toxicity toward the freshwater crustacean Thamnocephalus platyurus. Toxicity was removed or considerably reduced by the cation exchange resins and air stripping at pH 11. In addition, the toxicity of the pore waters was found to be highly pH dependent. Increased toxicity was observed at higher pH levels, whereas reduced toxicity was found at lower pH levels. Based on these results, ammonia was suggested as the main toxic agent. The presence of ammonia concentrations exceeding the 24-h median lethal concentration and comparison of the toxicity characterization profiles of the pore waters with those of the suspected toxicant supported this hypothesis. Furthermore, a significant positive correlation between the observed toxicity of the pore waters and the expected toxicity (due to the presence of the suspected toxicant) confirmed ammonia as the true toxic agent. Finally, the ratio between the expected ammonia toxicity and the observed toxicity from the characterization tests was approx. 1, meaning that all or most of the observed toxicity was caused by the presence of one toxicant (i.e., ammonia). The developed toxicity identification evaluation procedure is suggested as a useful tool for the identification and confirmation of toxicants in contaminated sediments.

  11. The microbial community structure in petroleum-contaminated sediments corresponds to geophysical signatures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allen, J.P.; Atekwana, E.A.; Duris, J.W.; Werkema, D.D.; Rossbach, S.

    2007-01-01

    The interdependence between geoelectrical signatures at underground petroleum plumes and the structures of subsurface microbial communities was investigated. For sediments contaminated with light non-aqueousphase liquids, anomalous high conductivity values have been observed. Vertical changes in the geoelectrical properties of the sediments were concomitant with significant changes in the microbial community structures as determined by the construction and evaluation of 16S rRNA gene libraries. DNA sequencing of clones from four 16S rRNA gene libraries from different depths of a contaminated field site and two libraries from an uncontaminated background site revealed spatial heterogeneity in the microbial community structures. Correspondence analysis showed that the presence of distinct microbial populations, including the various hydrocarbon-degrading, syntrophic, sulfate-reducing, and dissimilatory-iron-reducing populations, was a contributing factor to the elevated geoelectrical measurements. Thus, through their growth and metabolic activities, microbial populations that have adapted to the use of petroleum as a carbon source can strongly influence their geophysical surroundings. Since changes in the geophysical properties of contaminated sediments parallel changes in the microbial community compositions, it is suggested that geoelectrical measurements can be a cost-efficient tool to guide microbiological sampling for microbial ecology studies during the monitoring of natural or engineered bioremediation processes. Copyright ?? 2007, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  12. Investigation of the release of PAHs from artificially contaminated sediments using cyclolipopeptidic biosurfactants.

    PubMed

    Portet-Koltalo, F; Ammami, M T; Benamar, A; Wang, H; Le Derf, F; Duclairoir-Poc, C

    2013-10-15

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) can be preponderant in contaminated sediments and understanding how they are sorbed in the different mineral and organic fractions of the sediment is critical for effective removal strategies. For this purpose, a mixture of seven PAHs was studied at the sediment/water interface and sorption isotherms were obtained. The influence of various factors on the sorption behavior of PAHs was evaluated, such as the nature of minerals, pH, ionic strength and amount of organic matter. Afterwards, the release of PAHs from the sediment by surfactants was investigated. The effectiveness of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) was compared to natural biosurfactants, of cyclolipopeptidic type (amphisin and viscosin-like mixture), produced by two Pseudomonas fluorescens strains. The desorption of PAHs (from naphthalene to pyrene), from the highly retentive kaolinite fraction, could be favored by adding SDS or amphisin, but viscosin-like biosurfactants were only effective for 2-3 ring PAHs desorption (naphthalene to phenanthrene). Moreover, while SDS favors the release of all the target PAHs from a model sediment containing organic matter, the two biosurfactants tested were only effective to desorb the lowest molecular weight PAHs (naphthalene to fluorene).

  13. Associations between degraded benthic communities and contaminated sediments: Sabine Lake, Lake Pontchartrain, and Choctawhatchee Bay

    SciTech Connect

    Engle, V.D.; Summers, J.K.; Macauley, J.M.

    1994-12-31

    The Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program for Estuaries (EMAP-E) in the Gulf of Mexico supplements its base sampling effort each year with localized, intensive spatial sampling in selected large estuarine systems. By selecting random locations within 70 km{sup 2} hexagonal areas, individual estuaries were sampled using EMAP methods but at four times the density as base sampling. In 1992, 19 sites were sampled in Lake Pontchartrain, Louisiana. In 1 993, 18 sites were sampled in Sabine Lake, Texas and 12 sites were sampled in Choctawhatchee Bay, Florida. At all sites, sediment grabs were taken and analyzed for benthic species composition and abundance, for toxicity to Ampelisca, and for organic and inorganic sediment contaminants. An indicator of biotic integrity, the benthic index, was calculated to represent the status of benthic communities. A series of statistical techniques, such as stepwise regression analysis, were employed to determine whether the variation in the benthic index could be associated with variation in sediment contaminants, sediment toxicity, or levels of dissolved oxygen. Spatial distributions of these parameters were examined to determine the geographical co-occurrence of degraded benthic communities and environmental stressors. In Lake Pontchartrain, for example, 85% of the variation in the benthic index was associated with decreased levels of dissolved oxygen, and increased concentrations of PCBs, alkanes, copper, tin, and zinc in the sediments.

  14. Effects of sulfur forms on heavy metals bioleaching from contaminated sediments.

    PubMed

    Fang, D; Zhao, L; Zhou, L X; Shan, H X

    2009-06-01

    The use of recyclable forms of sulfur will exclude the risk of sediment reacidification and reduce the cost of bioleaching process. Three different forms of sulfur (namely sulfur powder, prills and pieces) were used to examine the utilization and recycle of sulfur, used as energy substrate for sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) in the bioleaching of heavy metal-contaminated sediments. The results showed that despite their relatively smaller surface areas, the efficiency of metal bioleaching with sulfur prills and pieces were comparable to that with sulfur powder. After 13 days of bioleaching, 71-74% of Zn, 58-62% of Cu, and 22-31% of Cr could be leached from the sediments, respectively. During bioleaching, most of the oxidizable and reducible forms of metals were transformed to acid soluble, posing a favorable condition for final metals removal. Sulfur recycling experiments showed that the recovered sulfur prills and pieces were as the same effective in pH reduction as fresh sulfur, revealing the feasibility of eventual reuse of the recycled sulfur in the bioleaching process. Further studies are required to testify the performance of these recyclable forms of sulfur in future large-scale bioleaching reactor.

  15. Scale-dependency of macroinvertebrate communities: responses to contaminated sediments within run-of-river dams.

    PubMed

    Colas, Fanny; Archaimbault, Virginie; Devin, Simon

    2011-03-01

    Due to their nutrient recycling function and their importance in food-webs, macroinvertebrates are essential for the functioning of aquatic ecosystems. These organisms also constitute an important component of biodiversity. Sediment evaluation and monitoring is an essential aspect of ecosystem monitoring since sediments represent an important component of aquatic habitats and are also a potential source of contamination. In this study, we focused on macroinvertebrate communities within run-of-river dams, that are prime areas for sediment and pollutant accumulation. Little is known about littoral macroinvertebrate communities within run-of-river dam or their response to sediment levels and pollution. We therefore aimed to evaluate the following aspects: the functional and structural composition of macroinvertebrate communities in run-of-river dams; the impact of pollutant accumulation on such communities, and the most efficient scales and tools needed for the biomonitoring of contaminated sediments in such environments. Two run-of-river dams located in the French alpine area were selected and three spatial scales were examined: transversal (banks and channel), transversal x longitudinal (banks/channel x tail/middle/dam) and patch scale (erosion, sedimentation and vegetation habitats). At the patch scale, we noted that the heterogeneity of littoral habitats provided many available niches that allow for the development of diversified macroinvertebrate communities. This implies highly variable responses to contamination. Once combined on a global 'banks' spatial scale, littoral habitats can highlight the effects of toxic disturbances.

  16. Effects on inorganic nitrogen compounds release of contaminated sediment treatment with in situ calcium nitrate injection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tongzhou; Yuan, Jiajia; Dong, Wenyi; Wu, Huacai; Wang, Hongjie

    2015-01-01

    Notable releases of nitrate, nitrite, and ammonia are often observed in contaminated sediment treatment works implementing in situ calcium nitrate injection. In order to provide extended information for making best decision of employing this in situ sediment remediation technology, in this study the releases of nitrate, nitrite, and ammonia from the sediment after the calcium nitrate addition operation was investigated in column setups designed to simulate the scenarios of a stagnant water (e.g., a pound or small lake) and a tidal-influenced water (e.g., a river mouth), respectively. Comparison with published aquatic toxicity data or authorized criteria was conducted to assess if there is any toxic effect that might be induced. Along with the vigorous N2 emission due to the denitrification reactions which occurred in the treated sediment, external loaded nitrate, intermediately produced nitrite, and indigenous ammonia in the sediment showed being mobilized and released out. Their promoted release and fast buildup in the overlying water to an excessive level probably cause toxic effects to sensitive freshwater living species. Among them, the potential ecological risk induced by the promoted sediment ammonia release is the greatest, and cautions shall be raised for applying the calcium nitrate injection in ammonia-rich sediments. The caused impacts shall be less violent in a tidal-influenced water body, and comparatively, the continuous and fast accumulation of the released inorganic nitrogen compounds in a stagnant water body might impose severer influences to the ecosystem until being further transferred to less harmful forms.

  17. The Microbial Community Structure in Petroleum-Contaminated Sediments Corresponds to Geophysical Signatures▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Jonathan P.; Atekwana, Estella A.; Atekwana, Eliot A.; Duris, Joseph W.; Werkema, D. Dale; Rossbach, Silvia

    2007-01-01

    The interdependence between geoelectrical signatures at underground petroleum plumes and the structures of subsurface microbial communities was investigated. For sediments contaminated with light non-aqueous-phase liquids, anomalous high conductivity values have been observed. Vertical changes in the geoelectrical properties of the sediments were concomitant with significant changes in the microbial community structures as determined by the construction and evaluation of 16S rRNA gene libraries. DNA sequencing of clones from four 16S rRNA gene libraries from different depths of a contaminated field site and two libraries from an uncontaminated background site revealed spatial heterogeneity in the microbial community structures. Correspondence analysis showed that the presence of distinct microbial populations, including the various hydrocarbon-degrading, syntrophic, sulfate-reducing, and dissimilatory-iron-reducing populations, was a contributing factor to the elevated geoelectrical measurements. Thus, through their growth and metabolic activities, microbial populations that have adapted to the use of petroleum as a carbon source can strongly influence their geophysical surroundings. Since changes in the geophysical properties of contaminated sediments parallel changes in the microbial community compositions, it is suggested that geoelectrical measurements can be a cost-efficient tool to guide microbiological sampling for microbial ecology studies during the monitoring of natural or engineered bioremediation processes. PMID:17351087

  18. Diffusive release of uranium from contaminated sediments into capillary fringe pore water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rod, Kenton A.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Flury, Markus; Pierce, Eric M.; Harsh, James B.

    2012-10-01

    Despite remediation efforts at the former nuclear weapons facility, leaching of uranium (U) from contaminated sediments to the ground water persists at the Hanford site 300 Area. Flooding of contaminated capillary fringe sediments due to seasonal changes in the Columbia River stage has been identified as a source for U supply to ground water. We investigated U release from Hanford capillary fringe sediments by packing sediments into reservoirs of centrifugal filter devices and saturating them with Columbia River water for 3 to 84 days at varying solution-to-solid ratios. After specified times, samples were centrifuged. Within the first three days, there was an initial rapid release of 6-9% of total U, independent of the solution-to-solid ratio. After 14 days of reaction, however, the experiments with the narrowest solution-to-solid ratios showed a decline in dissolved U concentrations. The removal of U from the solution phase was accompanied by removal of Ca and HCO3-. Geochemical modeling indicated that calcite could precipitate in the narrowest solution-to-solid ratio experiment. After the rapid initial release in the first three days for the wide solution-to-solid ratio experiments, there was sustained release of U into the pore water. This sustained release of U from the sediments had diffusion-limited kinetics.

  19. Diffusive release of uranium from contaminated sediments into capillary fringe pore water.

    PubMed

    Rod, Kenton A; Wellman, Dawn M; Flury, Markus; Pierce, Eric M; Harsh, James B

    2012-10-01

    Despite remediation efforts at the former nuclear weapons facility, leaching of uranium (U) from contaminated sediments to the ground water persists at the Hanford site 300 Area. Flooding of contaminated capillary fringe sediments due to seasonal changes in the Columbia River stage has been identified as a source for U supply to ground water. We investigated U release from Hanford capillary fringe sediments by packing sediments into reservoirs of centrifugal filter devices and saturating them with Columbia River water for 3 to 84days at varying solution-to-solid ratios. After specified times, samples were centrifuged. Within the first three days, there was an initial rapid release of 6-9% of total U, independent of the solution-to-solid ratio. After 14days of reaction, however, the experiments with the narrowest solution-to-solid ratios showed a decline in dissolved U concentrations. The removal of U from the solution phase was accompanied by removal of Ca and HCO(3)(-). Geochemical modeling indicated that calcite could precipitate in the narrowest solution-to-solid ratio experiment. After the rapid initial release in the first three days for the wide solution-to-solid ratio experiments, there was sustained release of U into the pore water. This sustained release of U from the sediments had diffusion-limited kinetics. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Mobilization of arsenic from contaminated sediment by anionic and nonionic surfactants.

    PubMed

    Liang, Chuan; Peng, Xianjia

    2017-06-01

    The increasing manufacture of surfactants and their wide application in industry, agriculture and household detergents have resulted in large amounts of surfactant residuals being discharged into water and distributed into sediment. Surfactants have the potential to enhance arsenic mobility, leading to risks to the environment and even human beings. In this study, batch and column experiments were conducted to investigate arsenic mobilization from contaminated sediment by the commercial anionic surfactants sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate (SDBS), sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), sodium laureth sulfate (AES) and nonionic surfactants phenyl-polyethylene glycol (Triton X-100) and polyethylene glycol sorbitan monooleate (Tween-80). The ability of surfactants to mobilize arsenic followed the order AES>SDBS>SDS≈Triton X-100>Tween 80. Arsenic mobilization by AES and Triton X-100 increased greatly with the increase of surfactant concentration and pH, while arsenic release by SDBS, SDS and Tween-80 slightly increased. The divalent ion Ca(2+) caused greater reduction of arsenic mobilization than Na(+). Sequential extraction experiments showed that the main fraction of arsenic mobilized was the specifically adsorbed fraction. Solid phase extraction showed that arsenate (As(V)) was the main species mobilized by surfactants, accounting for 65.05%-77.68% of the total mobilized arsenic. The mobilization of arsenic was positively correlated with the mobilization of iron species. The main fraction of mobilized arsenic was the dissolved fraction, accounting for 70% of total mobilized arsenic. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Role of indigenous microbiota from heavily contaminated sediments in the bioprecipitation of arsenic.

    PubMed

    Rios-Valenciana, Erika E; Briones-Gallardo, Roberto; Cházaro-Ruiz, Luis F; Martínez-Villegas, Nadia; Celis, Lourdes B

    2017-10-05

    High arsenic concentrations have been detected in alluvial aquifers of arid and semi-arid zones in Mexico. This work describes the potential of microbial arsenate reduction of the indigenous community present in sediments from an arsenic contaminated aquifer. Microcosms assays were conducted to evaluate arsenate and sulfate-reducing activities of the native microbiota. Two different sediments were used as inoculum in the assays amended with lactate (10mM) as electron donor and with sulfate and arsenate (10mM each) as electron acceptors. Sediments were distinguished by their concentration of total arsenic 238.3±4.1mg/kg or 2263.1±167.7mg/kg, which may be considered as highly contaminated sediments with arsenic. Microbial communities present in both sediments were able to carry out arsenate reduction, accomplished within 4days, with the corresponding formation of arsenite; sulfate reduction took place as well. Both reducing activities occurred without previous acclimation period or enrichment, even at potential inhibitory concentrations of arsenate as high as 750mg/L (10mM). The formation of a yellowish colloidal precipitate was evident when both reducing processes occurred in the microcosm, which contributed to remove between 52 and 90.9% of As(III) from the liquid phase by bioprecipitation of arsenic as arsenic sulfide. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Electrokinetic Treatment of Cr-, Cu-, and Zn-Contaminated Sediment: Cathode Modification

    PubMed Central

    Rajić, Ljiljana; Dalmacija, Božo; Perović, Svetlana Ugarčina; Krčmar, Dejan; Rončević, Srđan; Tomašević, Dragana

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Enhanced electrokinetic (EK) removal of Cr, Cu, and Zn from sediment by using original and modified integrated ion exchange (IIX™) cathodes was investigated. IIX cathode design and EK device process modifications were made to improve performance: separation of IIX cathode components (IIXS), combination of modified IIX cathode with pulsed electric field (IIXSP), and separation of IIX cathode components with addition of an anion exchange resin compartment (IIXA). After using the IIXSP, overall Cr, Cu, and Zn removal efficacies were significantly improved compared with the other treatments investigated. No improvements in overall Cr, Cu, and Zn removal efficacies were achieved by utilization of IIXA. Nevertheless, significant removal efficacies occurred at the anode region since distribution of the alkaline front was prevented. However, metal accumulation in the cathode region occurred. This was a consequence of metal cation complexation with Cl− released from the anion exchange resin that changed the direction of metal migration. Enhancing EK remediation of Cr-, Cu-, and Zn-contaminated sediment can be achieved by using a modified IIX cathode. PMID:24381480

  3. Electrokinetic Treatment of Cr-, Cu-, and Zn-Contaminated Sediment: Cathode Modification.

    PubMed

    Rajić, Ljiljana; Dalmacija, Božo; Perović, Svetlana Ugarčina; Krčmar, Dejan; Rončević, Srđan; Tomašević, Dragana

    2013-12-01

    Enhanced electrokinetic (EK) removal of Cr, Cu, and Zn from sediment by using original and modified integrated ion exchange (IIX™) cathodes was investigated. IIX cathode design and EK device process modifications were made to improve performance: separation of IIX cathode components (IIXS), combination of modified IIX cathode with pulsed electric field (IIXSP), and separation of IIX cathode components with addition of an anion exchange resin compartment (IIXA). After using the IIXSP, overall Cr, Cu, and Zn removal efficacies were significantly improved compared with the other treatments investigated. No improvements in overall Cr, Cu, and Zn removal efficacies were achieved by utilization of IIXA. Nevertheless, significant removal efficacies occurred at the anode region since distribution of the alkaline front was prevented. However, metal accumulation in the cathode region occurred. This was a consequence of metal cation complexation with Cl(-) released from the anion exchange resin that changed the direction of metal migration. Enhancing EK remediation of Cr-, Cu-, and Zn-contaminated sediment can be achieved by using a modified IIX cathode.

  4. TIE of a PAH-contaminated sediment using reproductive responses and EROD induction in rainbow trout

    SciTech Connect

    Brumley, C.M.; Kraak, G. van der; Munkittrick, K.R.

    1995-12-31

    PAH-contaminated sediments have been shown to cause a range of effects in fish. However, identifying the effective compounds can be time consuming and expensive. A toxicity identification evaluation (TIE) involves the analysis of mixtures by initially separating the mixture into toxic and non-toxic constituents. In this study, sediment was collected from Hamilton Harbor, Lake Ontario, and either extracted wet using methanol (MeOH) and dichloromethane (DCM), or freeze-dried and soxhlet extracted with MeOH and DCM. DCM extracts were solvent exchanged with dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO). Juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were exposed through the water to wet, freeze-dried, or extracted sediment, or to the MeOH or DMSO extracts for 4 days. Fish were analyzed for hepatic EROD activity, and plasma DMSO extracts, but was unaffected in fish exposed to extracted sediment. Estradiol levels were increased in fish exposed to the wet sediment, but not in fish exposed to the freeze-dried or extracted sediment, nor either of the solvent extracts. The response of testosterone to wet, freeze-dried and extracted sediment was inconsistent. Results indicate that both of the extraction methods efficiently removed from the sediment the compounds responsible for the effects on EROD activity and estradiol levels. However, neither method retained in the solvent extracts the compounds causing the increases in estradiol levels. Work continues to refine the freeze-drying and extraction methods; extracts will then be further fractionated using HPLC to identify the compounds of concern.

  5. Carbon sorbents and management of contaminated sediments: there are two sides to every story

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akkanen, Jarkko; Nybom, Inna; Abel, Sebastian

    2014-05-01

    Controlling the bioavailability of chemicals with different type of sorbents in contaminated sediments has been quickly developed to be a considerable choice for remediation. Especially in the case of neutral lipophilic organic chemicals, carbon based materials such as activated carbon has shown to be promising in reducing the exposure of benthic organisms. The efficiency to reduce contaminant bioavailability appears to be chemical congener, sorbent dose and type specific. Sediment characteristics play a role too. In addition to these beneficial effects, there are also secondary implications, which can be manifested in adverse effects in the sediment-dwelling organisms. Similarly with the capacity of sorbent to bind the target contaminants the magnitude of the secondary effects appears to be sediment, organism and sorbent specific. Thus, sorbent properties such as sorption capacity and particle size are important. In addition, less selective sediment feeders are more susceptible to these adverse effects and the effects are stronger in sediments being less suitable as habitat for the organisms. It has to be noted that in sediments that are acutely toxic the amendments can improve well-being of the organisms. The mechanisms of these adverse effects are still partly unclear, but there are indications that reduction of nutrient availability can be one. In addition, other mechanisms can be also discussed. Therefore, the usage of sorbents for remediation purposes requires case specific assessments for to evaluate both positive and negative effects, which is naturally that needs to be done regardless of the remediation method.

  6. Desorption of organochlorine pesticides from historically contaminated sediments into water-biofuel mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otero-Diaz, M.; Demond, A. H.

    2014-12-01

    Gasoline spills in surface waters generally volatilize due to their low miscibility and high volatility. However, biofuel blends may contain ethanol, a compound completely miscible in water. As hazardous components of gasoline are more soluble in ethanol than in water, the presence of ethanol increases the solubilization of these components, such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX), in surface water. Furthermore, many of these spills may occur in water bodies that have sediments that are historically contaminated with persistent organic contaminants such as organochlorine pesticides. High concentrations of ethanol in the water column, along with solubilized components of gasoline, may increase the desorption of organochlorine pesticides from the sediment. Thus spills of ethanol/gasoline fuel blends have the potential of increasing concentrations of hazardous compounds in rivers and lakes, resulting in increased risk for human and ecological exposure. Using UNIFAC to calculate activity coefficients, one can predict the enhancement of the solubility of pesticides in the aqueous phase as the ethanol fraction increases. Moreover, by predicting the solubility of pesticides in both the aqueous phase and an organic liquid phase, one can construct ternary phase diagrams that show the partitioning behavior of pesticides as a function of ethanol fraction. Such information is useful in estimating the amount of desorption from contaminated sediments that may occur in the presence of biofuel spills. In order to confirm the predicted values, experiments have been conducted to measure the impact of ethanol on the partitioning coefficients of pesticides.

  7. Evidencing the Impact of Coastal Contaminated Sediments on Mussels Through Pb Stable Isotopes Composition.

    PubMed

    Dang, Duc Huy; Schäfer, Jörg; Brach-Papa, Christophe; Lenoble, Véronique; Durrieu, Gaël; Dutruch, Lionel; Chiffoleau, Jean-Francois; Gonzalez, Jean-Louis; Blanc, Gérard; Mullot, Jean-Ulrich; Mounier, Stéphane; Garnier, Cédric

    2015-10-06

    Heavily contaminated sediments are a serious concern for ecosystem quality, especially in coastal areas, where vulnerability is high due to intense anthropogenic pressure. Surface sediments (54 stations), 50 cm interface cores (five specific stations), river particles, coal and bulk Pb plate from past French Navy activities, seawater and mussels were collected in Toulon Bay (NW Mediterranean Sea). Lead content and Pb stable isotope composition have evidenced the direct impact of sediment pollution stock on both the water column quality and the living organisms, through the specific Pb isotopic signature in these considered compartments. The history of pollution events including past and present contaminant dispersion in Toulon Bay were also demonstrated by historical records of Pb content and Pb isotope ratios in sediment profiles. The sediment resuspension events, as simulated by batch experiments, could be a major factor contributing to the high Pb mobility in the considered ecosystem. A survey of Pb concentrations in surface seawater at 40 stations has revealed poor seawater quality, affecting both the dissolved fraction and suspended particles and points to marina/harbors as additional diffuse sources of dissolved Pb.

  8. Performance of electroremediation in real contaminated sediments using a big cell, periodic voltage and innovative surfactants.

    PubMed

    Hahladakis, John N; Latsos, Antonis; Gidarakos, Evangelos

    2016-12-15

    The present work focused on evaluating the electrokinetic (EK) treatment of real contaminated sediments with toxic metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), using a big laboratory EK cell, periodic voltage and recently tested non-ionic surfactants. The results indicated that the "day on-night off" application mode of voltage, in conjunction with the selected solubilising agents, favoured the overall EK process. Arsenic, nickel and chromium exhibited the highest removal percentages, obtaining 83%, 67% and 63%, respectively, while zinc and lead attained 54% and 41% at the maximum. Furthermore, in the experiments where the non-ionic surfactants were introduced in the electrolyte chambers, there was a major uniformly removal of PAHs from the entire sediment across the EK cell, indicating the high solubilisation capacity of the enhancing agents. Essentially, transport and in some cases removal of PAHs (particularly from sections adjacent to the electrolyte compartments) also occurred in the unenhanced EK run, mainly due their negative charge, their potential weak bonds to the soil matrix and to the periodic application of voltage. Maximum removal was obtained by the use of Nonidet P40 where app. 1/3 (ca. 6498μg out of 20145μg) of the total initial amount of PAHs were removed from the cell.

  9. Relative sensitivity of five benthic invertebrate species to reference toxicants and resin-acid contaminated sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Hickey, C.W.; Martin, M.L.

    1995-08-01

    Five sediment-dwelling native New Zealand freshwater invertebrate species (amphipod, Chaetocorophium c.f. lucasi; clam, Sphaerium novaezelandiae; oligochaete, Lumbriculus variegatus; tanaid, Tanais standfordi; and the burrowing mayfly, Ichthybotus hudsoni) were assessed for their suitability for sediment toxicity testing by comparison of sensitivity to reference toxicants [phenol and pentachlorophenol (PCP)] and contaminated sediments. The 96-h EC50 values at 20 C showed a greater range in test sensitivity for phenol (30-fold range) from the most sensitive test, amphipod (8.1 mg/L), to the least sensitive one, clam (243 mg/L), compared with PCP (14-fold range), with amphipod the most sensitive test species (0.13 mg/L) and tanaid the least sensitive (1.8 mg/L). Clam reburial was a more sensitive end point than was lethality for phenol (by 20-fold) and PCP (by 2.4-fold). Four of the test species, excluding the tanaid, showed good 10-d survival in reference muds ({ge}87%) but lower survival in sand sediments ({ge}79%). Bleached kraft mill sediment containing high resin-acid concentrations (total 1,900 mg/kg dry weight) showed significant reductions in amphipod survival (15%), clam reburial (30%), and oligochaete survival (17%), and reproduction (49%). Amphipods, clams, and oligochaetes were the most promising species for sublethal test development.

  10. Passive sampling methods for contaminated sediments: Practical guidance for selection, calibration, and implementation

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Upal; Driscoll, Susan Kane; Burgess, Robert M; Jonker, Michiel To; Reible, Danny; Gobas, Frank; Choi, Yongju; Apitz, Sabine E; Maruya, Keith A; Gala, William R; Mortimer, Munro; Beegan, Chris

    2014-01-01

    This article provides practical guidance on the use of passive sampling methods (PSMs) that target the freely dissolved concentration (Cfree) for improved exposure assessment of hydrophobic organic chemicals in sediments. Primary considerations for selecting a PSM for a specific application include clear delineation of measurement goals for Cfree, whether laboratory-based “ex situ” and/or field-based “in situ” application is desired, and ultimately which PSM is best-suited to fulfill the measurement objectives. Guidelines for proper calibration and validation of PSMs, including use of provisional values for polymer–water partition coefficients, determination of equilibrium status, and confirmation of nondepletive measurement conditions are defined. A hypothetical example is described to illustrate how the measurement of Cfree afforded by PSMs reduces uncertainty in assessing narcotic toxicity for sediments contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The article concludes with a discussion of future research that will improve the quality and robustness of Cfree measurements using PSMs, providing a sound scientific basis to support risk assessment and contaminated sediment management decisions. Integr Environ Assess Manag 2014;10:210–223. © 2014 The Authors. Integrated Environmental Assessment and Management published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of SETAC. PMID:24288273

  11. Bioaccumulation of PAHs from creosote-contaminated sediment in a laboratory-exposed freshwater oligochaete, Lumbriculus variegatus.

    PubMed

    Hyötyläinen, Tarja; Oikari, Aimo

    2004-10-01

    The oligochaete, Lumbriculus variegatus, was used for a bioaccumulation assay in the creosote-contaminated sediment of Lake Jämsänvesi in a 28-day experiment. The PAH concentrations of the whole body tissue of worms, sediments and water samples were determinated by GC-MS. Chemical analyses showed that benzo(k)fluoranthene, anthracene and fluorene were the main PAH compounds present in the tissue of oligochaetes, just as in the sediment. The biota-sediment accumulation factors (BSAFs) of the individual PAHs varied from 1.2 to 5.7. It is concluded that oligochaetes have a marked ability to accumulate and retain PAHs from creosote-contaminated sediment.

  12. Part I: Integrated water quality management: river basin approach. Geochemical techniques on contaminated sediments--river basin view.

    PubMed

    Förstner, Ulrich

    2003-01-01

    The big flood in the upper Elbe River catchment area has revealed a wide spectrum of problems with contaminated sediments. So far, an effective strategy for managing contaminated sediments on a river basin scale is still missing and it seems that not much has been learned from the lessons received during the last decade. In the following overview, special emphasis is given to the utilization of geochemically-based techniques for sediment remediation, which can be applied in different parts of a river basin. The examples presented here are mostly from the Elbe River catchment area. In general, new technical problem solutions need a set of practical process knowledge that uses a wide range of simulation techniques, as well as models in different spatial and temporal scales. The evaluation of recent flood events clearly demonstrates the importance of chemical expertise in the decision-making process for the sustainable development in river basins.

  13. Measurement and Modeling of Ecosystem Risk and Recovery for In Situ Treatment of Contaminated Sediments. Phase 3

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-01

    FINAL REPORT – PHASE III Measurement and Modeling of Ecosystem Risk and Recovery for In Situ Treatment of Contaminated Sediments SERDP Project...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Measurement and Modeling of Ecosystem Risk and Recovery for In Sit T t t f C t i t d S di t 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W912HQ-10-C...of ecosystem recovery after AC sorbent amendment, assessment of secondary effects of AC on ecosystem health, development of mechanistic mass transfer

  14. Utilization of recycled charcoal as a thermal source and adsorbent for the treatment of PCDD/Fs contaminated sediment.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Long; Hou, Hong; Iwasaki, Kanae; Terada, Akihiko; Hosomi, Masaaki

    2012-07-30

    A novel heat treatment process in which charcoal was used as both a thermal source and an adsorbent was investigated as a low-cost method for removal of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) from solids. Three laboratory scale experiments involving various ratios of charcoal to contaminated sediment and air superficial velocities were performed. The results indicated that the total and toxic equivalency quantities (TEQ) concentrations of PCDD/Fs decreased significantly in the treated sediment of all runs with removal efficiencies greater than 96% and 90%, which resulted in residual concentrations below the Japanese standard limit of 0.15ng-TEQg(-1). The charcoal/contaminated sediment ratio and air superficial velocity were determinant factors controlling the PCDD/Fs concentrations and homologue profiles in effluent. As the air superficial velocity increased and charcoal/contaminated sediment ratio decreased, more PCDD/Fs were released from the sediment as fly ash, making them less likely to remain in the treated sediment. These phenomena were likely a result of the vapor pressure of PCDD/Fs, contact time with effluent gas and amount of PCDD/Fs adsorbed by charcoal. The developed process would promise an alternative to a conventional remediation process for PCDD/Fs contaminated solids.

  15. Using SPMDs To Assess Natural Recovery Of PCB-Contaminated Sediments In Lake Hartwell, SC: I. A Field Test Of New In-Situ Deployment Methods

    EPA Science Inventory

    Results from the field testing of some innovative sampling methods developed to evaluate risk management strategies for polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) contaminated sediments are presented. Semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) were combined with novel deployment methods to quan...

  16. Using SPMDs To Assess Natural Recovery Of PCB-Contaminated Sediments In Lake Hartwell, SC: I. A Field Test Of New In-Situ Deployment Methods

    EPA Science Inventory

    Results from the field testing of some innovative sampling methods developed to evaluate risk management strategies for polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) contaminated sediments are presented. Semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) were combined with novel deployment methods to quan...

  17. Mineral-Water Interface Processes Affecting Uranium Fate in Contaminated Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catalano, J. G.

    2011-12-01

    Widespread uranium contamination of soil, sediments, and groundwater systems has resulted from mining activities, nuclear weapon production, and energy generation. The fate and transport of uranium in such systems is strongly affected by geochemical processes occurring at mineral-water interfaces. I will present a summary of the mineral-water interface processes found to affect uranium fate in example contaminated sediments at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford sites and in related model systems. Processes occurring under oxic conditions will be the primary focus of this talk as under these conditions uranium is most mobile and thus presents the greatest hazard. Three dominant solid-phase uranium species are observed in contaminated soil and sediments at the Hanford site: uranyl silicates, uranyl phosphates, and uranyl adsorbed to clays and iron oxides. In deep sediments, uranyl silicates are found in microfractures in feldspar grains, likely because slow diffusion in such fractures maintains a high silicate activity. Such silicates are also found in waste-impacted shallow sediments and soil; waste fluids or evaporative processes may have generated the silicate activity needed to produce such phases. Uranyl phosphates are less abundant, occurring primarily in shallow sediments exposed to P-bearing waste fluids. However, remediation approaches under consideration may produce substantial quantities of uranyl phosphates in the future. Adsorbed uranyl is dispersed throughout contaminated soils and shallow sediments and likely has the greatest potential for remobilization. Analogue studies show that precipitation of uranyl phosphates is rapid when such phases are supersaturated and that both homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation may occur. Specific adsorption of uranyl to minerals is strongly affected by the presence of complexation anions. Carbonate suppresses uranyl adsorption but also forms uranyl-carbonate ternary surface complexes. At conditions below

  18. Osmium isotopes demonstrate distal transport of contaminated sediments in Chesapeake Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Helz, G.R.; Adelson, J.M.; Miller, C.V.; Cornwell, J.C.; Hill, J.M.; Horan, M.; Walker, R.J.

    2000-01-01

    Because the isotopic composition of anthropogenic Os is normally distinctive in comparison to continental crust and is precisely measurable, this platinum-group element is attractive as a tracer of transport pathways for contaminated sediments in estuaries. Evidence herein and elsewhere suggest that biomedical research institutions are the chief source of anthropogenic Os. In the Chesapeake Bay region, uncontaminated sediments bear a crustal 187Os/188Os signature of 0.73 ?? 0.10. Slightly higher 187Os/188Os ratios occur in Re-rich Coastal Plain deposits due to post- Miocene 187Re decay. The upper Susquehanna Basin yields sediments also with higher 187Os/188Os. Beginning in the late 1970s, this signal was overprinted by a low 187Os/188Os (anthropogenic) source in the lower Susquehanna Basin. In the vicinity of Baltimore, which is a major center of heavy industry as well as biomedical research, anthropogenic Os has been found only in sediments impacted by the principal wastewater treatment plant. Surprisingly, a mid-Bay site distant from anthropogenic sources contains the strongest anthropogenic Os signal in the data set, having received anthropogenic Os sporadically since the mid-20th Century. Transport of particles to this site overrode the northward flowing bottom currents. Finding anthropogenic Os at this site cautions that other particle-borne substances, including hazardous ones, could be dispersed broadly in this estuary.Because the isotopic composition of anthropogenic Os is normally distinctive in comparison to continental crust and is precisely measurable, this platinum-group element is attractive as a tracer of transport pathways for contaminated sediments in estuaries. Evidence herein and elsewhere suggest that biomedical research institutions are the chief source of anthropogenic Os. In the Chesapeake Bay region, uncontaminated sediments bear a crustal 187Os/188Os signature of 0.73 ?? 0.10. Slightly higher 187Os/188Os ratios occur in Re-rich Coastal

  19. Methods for Estimating Adsorbed Uranium(VI) and Distribution Coefficients of Contaminated Sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kohler, M.; Curtis, G.P.; Meece, D.E.; Davis, J.A.

    2004-01-01

    Assessing the quantity of U(VI) that participates in sorption/desorption processes in a contaminated aquifer is an important task when investigating U migration behavior. U-contaminated aquifer sediments were obtained from 16 different locations at a former U mill tailings site at Naturita, CO (U.S.A.) and were extracted with an artificial groundwater, a high pH sodium bicarbonate solution, hydroxylamine hydrochloride solution, and concentrated nitric acid. With an isotopic exchange method, both a KD value for the specific experimental conditions as well as the total exchangeable mass of U(VI) was determined. Except for one sample, KD values determined by isotopic exchange with U-contaminated sediments that were in equilibrium with atmospheric CO2 agreed within a factor of 2 with KD values predicted from a nonelectrostatic surface complexation model (NEM) developed from U(VI) adsorption experiments with uncontaminated sediments. The labile fraction of U(VI) and U extracted by the bicarbonate solution were highly correlated (r2 = 0.997), with a slope of 0.96 ?? 0.01. The proximity of the slope to one suggests that both methods likely access the same reservoir of U(VI) associated with the sediments. The results indicate that the bicarbonate extraction method is useful for estimating the mass of labile U(VI) in sediments that do not contain U(IV). In-situ KD values calculated from the measured labile U(VI) and the dissolved U(VI) in the Naturita alluvial aquifer agreed within a factor of 3 with in-situ K D values predicted with the NEM and groundwater chemistry at each well.

  20. Population Dynamics of Polychlorinated Biphenyl-Dechlorinating Microorganisms in Contaminated Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Kim, J.; Rhee, G.

    1997-01-01

    The growth dynamics of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-dechlorinating microorganisms were determined for the first time, along with those of sulfate reducers and methanogens, by using the most-probable-number technique. The time course of Aroclor 1248 dechlorination mirrored the growth of dechlorinators; dechlorination ensued when the dechlorinating population increased by 2 orders of magnitude from 2.5 x 10(sup5) to 4.6 x 10(sup7) cells g of sediment(sup-1), at a specific growth rate of 6.7 day(sup-1) between 2 and 6 weeks. During this period, PCB-dechlorinating microorganisms dechlorinated Aroclor 1248 at a rate of 3.9 x 10(sup-8) mol of Cl g of sediment(sup-1) day(sup-1), reducing the average number of Cl molecules per biphenyl from 3.9 to 2.8. The growth yield was 4.2 x 10(sup13) cells mol of Cl dechlorinated(sup-1). Once dechlorination reached a plateau, after 6 weeks, the number of dechlorinators began to decrease. On the other hand, dechlorinators inoculated into PCB-free sediments decreased over time from their initial level, suggesting that PCBs are required for their selective enrichment. The numbers of sulfate reducers and methanogens increased in both PCB-free and contaminated sediments, showing little difference between them. The maximum population size of sulfate reducers was about an order of magnitude higher than that of dechlorinators, whereas that of methanogens was slightly less. Unlike those of dechlorinators, however, numbers of both sulfate reducers and methanogens remained high even when dechlorination ceased. The results of this study imply that PCB concentrations may have to exceed a certain threshold to maintain the growth of PCB dechlorinators. PMID:16535594

  1. Donor-dependent Extent of Uranium Reduction for Bioremediation of Contaminated Sediment Microcosms

    SciTech Connect

    Madden, Andrew S.; Palumbo, Anthony V.; Ravel, Bruce; Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana A.; Phelps, Tommy J.; Schadt, Christopher W.; Brandt, Craig C.

    2009-03-16

    Bioremediation of uranium was investigated in microcosm experiments containing contaminated sediments from Oak Ridge, Tennessee to explore the importance of electron donor selection for uranium reduction rate and extent. In these experiments, all of the electron donors, including ethanol, glucose, methanol, and methanol with added humic acids, stimulated the reduction and immobilization of aqueous uranium by the indigenous microbial community. Uranium loss from solution began after the completion of nitrate reduction but essentially concurrent with sulfate reduction. When electron donor concentrations were normalized for their equivalent electron donor potential yield, the rates of uranium reduction were nearly equivalent for all treatments (0.55-0.95 {micro}mol L{sup -1} d{sup -1}). Uranium reduction with methanol proceeded after a 15-d longer lag time relative to that of ethanol or glucose. Significant differences were not found with the inclusion of humic acids. The extent of U reduction in sediment slurries measured by XANES at various time periods after the start of the experiment increased in the order of ethanol (5-7% reduced at 77 and 153 d), glucose (49% reduced at 53 d), and methanol (93% reduced at 90 d). The microbial diversity of ethanol- and methanol-amended microcosms in their late stage of U reduction was analyzed with 16S rRNA gene amplification. Members of the Geobacteraceae were found in all microcosms as well as other potential uranium-reducing organisms, such as Clostridium and Desulfosporosinus. The effectiveness of methanol relative to ethanol at reducing aqueous and sediment-hosted uranium suggests that bioremediation strategies that encourage fermentative poising of the subsurface to a lower redox potential may be more effective for long-term uranium immobilization as compared with selecting an electron donor that is efficiently metabolized by known uranium-reducing microorganisms.

  2. Donor-dependent Extent of Uranium Reduction for Bioremediation of Contaminated Sediment Microcosms

    SciTech Connect

    Palumbo, Anthony Vito; Ravel, Bruce; Phelps, Tommy Joe; Schadt, Christopher Warren; Brandt, Craig C

    2009-01-01

    Bioremediation of uranium was investigated in microcosm experiments containing contaminated sediments from Oak Ridge, Tennessee to explore the importance of electron donor selection for uranium reduction rate and extent. In these experiments, all of the electron donors, including ethanol, glucose, methanol, and methanol with added humic acids, stimulated the reduction and immobilization of aqueous uranium by the indigenous microbial community. Uranium loss from solution began after the completion of nitrate reduction but essentially concurrent with sulfate reduction. When electron donor concentrations were normalized for their equivalent electron donor potential yield, the rates of uranium reduction were nearly equivalent for all treatments (0.55-0.95 {micro}mol L{sup -1} d{sup -1}). Uranium reduction with methanol proceeded after a 15-d longer lag time relative to that of ethanol or glucose. Significant differences were not found with the inclusion of humic acids. The extent of U reduction in sediment slurries measured by XANES at various time periods after the start of the experiment increased in the order of ethanol (5-7% reduced at 77 and 153 d), glucose (49% reduced at 53 d), and methanol (93% reduced at 90 d). The microbial diversity of ethanol- and methanol-amended microcosms in their late stage of U reduction was analyzed with 16S rRNA gene amplification. Members of the Geobacteraceae were found in all microcosms as well as other potential uranium-reducing organisms, such as Clostridium and Desulfosporosinus. The effectiveness of methanol relative to ethanol at reducing aqueous and sediment-hosted uranium suggests that bioremediation strategies that encourage fermentative poising of the subsurface to a lower redox potential may be more effective for long-term uranium immobilization as compared with selecting an electron donor that is efficiently metabolized by known uranium-reducing microorganisms.

  3. Non-discriminating flash pyrolysis and thermochemolysis of heavily contaminated sediments from the Hamilton Harbor (Canada).

    PubMed

    Poerschmann, J; Parsi, Z; Gorecki, T

    2008-04-04

    Analytical pyrolysis of sediments contaminated with pollutants of medium to high molecular weights (up to approximately 500 Da) is very challenging when using conventional pyrolysis systems due to discrimination of high molecular weight analytes. In the framework of this contribution, non-discriminating pyrolysis and thermochemolysis using rapid heating in a Silcosteel capillary were applied to study organic pollutants in heavily contaminated sediments taken from the Hamilton Harbor. The novel pyrolysis approach, requiring very small amounts of sample, turned out to be very useful as a rapid screening method, e.g. for risk assessment studies, proving superior to commonly used solvent extraction. Main pollutants in the sediments under study included aromatic hydrocarbons, chiefly originating from coal tar and petroleum. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) beyond six-rings, including coronene and truxene, could be detected. Sequential tetramethyl ammonium hydroxide-induced thermochemolysis performed at 500 and 750 degrees C enabled the differentiation between organic pollutants sorbed onto the sediment matrix on the one hand, and structural moieties of the condensed polymeric humic sediment matrix along with bound residues on the other hand. Thermochemolysis at 500 degrees C removed sorbates quantitatively, leaving only bare polymeric humic matrix. Significant PAH source indicators provided evidence that the lipidic fraction sorbed onto the sediments originated from PAHs formed chiefly in coal combustion processes. The polymeric humic organic matter network of the less polluted sediment was mainly of petrogenic origin, whereas black carbon, kerogen, etc. contributed to the organic carbon of the heavily polluted sediment. Thermochemolysis at 500 degrees C was also used to study fatty acid profiles of the sediments. The fatty acid methyl ester patterns obtained for the two sites under study differed significantly, with strong indications that microbial attenuation

  4. Use of Isotope Dilution Method To Predict Bioavailability of Organic Pollutants in Historically Contaminated Sediments

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Many cases of severe environmental contamination arise from historical episodes, where recalcitrant contaminants have resided in the environment for a prolonged time, leading to potentially decreased bioavailability. Use of bioavailable concentrations over bulk chemical levels improves risk assessment and may play a critical role in determining the need for remediation or assessing the effectiveness of risk mitigation operations. In this study, we applied the principle of isotope dilution to quantify bioaccessibility of legacy contaminants DDT and PCBs in marine sediments from a Superfund site. After addition of 13C or deuterated analogues to a sediment sample, the isotope dilution reached a steady state within 24 h of mixing. At the steady state, the accessible fraction (E) derived by the isotope dilution method (IDM) ranged from 0.28 to 0.89 and was substantially smaller than 1 for most compounds, indicating reduced availability of the extensively aged residues. A strong linear relationship (R2 = 0.86) was found between E and the sum of rapid (Fr) and slow (Fs) desorption fractions determined by sequential Tenax desorption. The IDM-derived accessible concentration (Ce) was further shown to correlate closely with tissue residue in the marine benthic polychaete Neanthes arenaceodentata exposed in the same sediments. As shown in this study, the IDM approach involves only a few simple steps and may be readily adopted in laboratories equipped with mass spectrometers. This novel method is expected to be especially useful for historically contaminated sediments or soils, for which contaminant bioavailability may have changed significantly due to aging and other sequestration processes. PMID:24946234

  5. Bench-scale electrokinetic remediation for cesium-contaminated sediment at the Hanford Site, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Hun Bok; Yang, Jungseok; Um, Wooyong

    2015-05-01

    Electrokinetic (EK) remediation has been applied to extract various contaminants such as radionuclides, heavy metals, and organic compounds from contaminated sediment and soil using electric currents. We conducted a laboratory experiment to investigate the efficiency of EK remediation method for Hanford sediment (76% sand and 24% silt-clay) after artificial contamination with nonradioactive 133Cs (0.01 M CsNO3) as a surrogate for radioactive 137Cs. The initial 133Cs concentration in the bulk sediment was 668 mg kg-1, with a higher 133Cs concentration for the silt-clay fraction (867 mg kg-1) than for the sand fraction (83 mg kg-1). A significant removal of cationic 133Cs from the sediment occurred from the cathode side (-), whereas the removal was negligible from the anode side (+) during the EK remediation process for 68 days. Based on microwave-assisted total digestion, 312 mg kg-1 of 133Cs was removed from the bulk sediment, which corresponds to the removal efficiency of 47%. The EK method was significantly more efficient for the silt-clay fraction than for the sand fraction. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy-electron dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) analyses indicate that change in major crystalline mineral phases was insignificant during the EK remediation and the removal of 133Cs from the Hanford sediment by the EK method is attributed mainly to cation exchange with K in clay minerals. The experimental results suggest that the EK method can effectively remove radioactive Cs from the surface or subsurface sediment contaminated by radioactive materials in the Hanford Site, Washington, USA.

  6. Cellular responses and disease expression in oysters (Crassostrea virginica) exposed to suspended field contaminated sediments.

    PubMed

    Chu, Fu-Lin E; Volety, Aswani K; Hale, Robert C; Huang, Yongqin

    2002-02-01

    Exposure of oysters to water soluble fractions derived from field-contaminated sediments (FCS) containing predominantly lower molecular weight organic aromatic compounds, has been previously demonstrated to enhance pre-existing infections caused by the protozoan parasite, Perkinsus marinus (Dermo), and the prevalence of experimentally induced infections. To further explore the role of pollution on the onset and progression of disease, effects of suspended FCS from an estuarine creek in Virginia, USA, dominated by higher molecular weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) on cellular responses and Dermo disease expression in oysters (Crassostrea virginica) were examined. Sediments were collected from a PAH polluted estuarine creek in Virginia, USA. To test effects on cellular response, oysters from Maine were exposed daily to 0, 1.0, 1.5, or 2.0 g suspended FCS (corresponding to 0, 70.2, 105, or 140 microg PAHs, respectively) for 5, 10, 20, and 40 days. Hemocyte activities and plasma lipid, protein and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels were then measured. Exposure stimulated neutral red uptake, MTT reduction, and 3H-leucine incorporation in oyster hemocytes at various exposure times, but did not affect the plasma protein, lipid and LDH levels. To test effects on Dermo expression, oysters from a Dermo enzootic area, with an initial estimated infection prevalence of 39%, were exposed daily to 0, 1.0, 1.5, or 2.0 g suspended FCS (corresponding to 0, 75.0, 113, or 150 microg PAHs, respectively) for 30 days. Exposure enhanced disease expression in oysters. However, no significant change was noted in any measured cellular or humoral parameters.

  7. The Behavior of Mercury in Coal Combustion Residue-Contaminated Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gofstein, T.; Heyes, A.

    2014-12-01

    Coal combustion residues (CCRs), the products of coal combustion, contain high concentrations of heavy metals such as mercury. Recent structural failures of on-site containment ponds and leaching of CCRs has potentially endangered the health of adjacent water bodies. This study examines the influence of CCR enrichment of river sediments through the study of mercury, an abundant constituent of CCRs, and the concomitant production of methylmercury. We hypothesized that CCR contamination increases the exposure to mercury for aquatic life through leaching and resuspension mechanisms. Resuspension experiments were conducted using CCR-contaminated sediments from the Dan River and uncontaminated sediments enriched with 0%, 10%, and 30% CCRs in the laboratory. Sediments were sieved to obtain the silt-clay fraction, which was then resuspended in solution with a dispersant to obtain the separate silt and clay fractions and then analyzed for total mercury concentrations. We found that CCR particles and the mercury they contain are present primarily in the silt and clay fractions of sediment and there is a direct relationship between CCR concentrations and total mercury concentrations. These findings have implications for both the bioavailability of mercury to methylating bacteria, higher organisms prone to direct ingestion of fine particles, CCR spill event remediation, current industrial waste disposal practices, and further research required in this field. Our seven day incubations of river sediment cores enriched with CCRs did not increase methylmercury in porewater above controls, suggesting that there is no immediate risk of increased methylmercury bioaccumulation, however this does not necessarily reflect the long-term effects of CCRs on river ecology, which requires further research.

  8. Phosphorus amendment reduces bioavailability of lead to mallards ingesting contaminated sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heinz, G.H.; Hoffman, D.J.; Audet, D.J.

    2004-01-01

    Lead poisoning of waterfowl has been reported for decades in the Coeur d' Alene River Basin in Idaho as a result of the ingestion of lead-contaminated sediments. We conducted a study to determine whether the addition of phosphoric acid to sediments would reduce the bioavailability of lead to mallards (Anas platyrhynchos). When sediments were amended with 1 % phosphorus under laboratory conditions, and diets containing 12% amended sediment were fed to mallards, reductions in tissue lead were 43% in blood, 41 % in liver, and 59% in kidney with sediment containing about 4,520 ug/g lead on a dry-weight basis and 41, 30, and 57% with sediment containing about 6,990 ug/g lead. When sediments were treated with phosphorus and left to age for about 5 months in the field, reductions in lead were 56% in blood, 54% in liver, and 66% in kidney at one site with about 5,390 ug/g lead and 64, 57, and 77% at a second site with about 6,990 ug/g lead. In the field, the inability to mix the phosphoric acid uniformly and deeply enough into the sediment may have resulted in more than 1 % phosphorus being added to the sediment. Although both lab and field amendments of phosphorus substantially reduced the bioavailability of lead, lead concentrations in the tissues of mallards fed the amended sediments were still above those believed to be harmful to waterfowl. Based on earlier studies of sediment toxicity to waterfowl in the Coeur d' Alene River Basin, combined with the results of our amendment study, the addition of phosphoric acid as we used it might only significantly benefit waterfowl where sediments or soils contain less than 1,000-2,000 ug/g lead.

  9. Donor-dependent extent of uranium reduction for bioremediation of contaminated sediment microcosms.

    PubMed

    Madden, Andrew S; Palumbo, Anthony V; Ravel, Bruce; Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana A; Phelps, Tommy J; Schadt, Christopher W; Brandt, Craig C

    2009-01-01

    Bioremediation of uranium was investigated in microcosm experiments containing contaminated sediments from Oak Ridge, Tennessee to explore the importance of electron donor selection for uranium reduction rate and extent. In these experiments, all of the electron donors, including ethanol, glucose, methanol, and methanol with added humic acids, stimulated the reduction and immobilization of aqueous uranium by the indigenous microbial community. Uranium loss from solution began after the completion of nitrate reduction but essentially concurrent with sulfate reduction. When electron donor concentrations were normalized for their equivalent electron donor potential yield, the rates of uranium reduction were nearly equivalent for all treatments (0.55-0.95 micromol L(-1) d(-1)). Uranium reduction with methanol proceeded after a 15-d longer lag time relative to that of ethanol or glucose. Significant differences were not found with the inclusion of humic acids. The extent of U reduction in sediment slurries measured by XANES at various time periods after the start of the experiment increased in the order of ethanol (5-7% reduced at 77 and 153 d), glucose (49% reduced at 53 d), and methanol (93% reduced at 90 d). The microbial diversity of ethanol- and methanol-amended microcosms in their late stage of U reduction was analyzed with 16S rRNA gene amplification. Members of the Geobacteraceae were found in all microcosms as well as other potential uranium-reducing organisms, such as Clostridium and Desulfosporosinus. The effectiveness of methanol relative to ethanol at reducing aqueous and sediment-hosted uranium suggests that bioremediation strategies that encourage fermentative poising of the subsurface to a lower redox potential may be more effective for long-term uranium immobilization as compared with selecting an electron donor that is efficiently metabolized by known uranium-reducing microorganisms.

  10. Methods for estimating adsorbed uranium(VI) and distribution coefficients of contaminated sediments.

    PubMed

    Kohler, Matthias; Curtis, Gary P; Meece, David E; Davis, James A

    2004-01-01

    Assessing the quantity of U(VI) that participates in sorption/desorption processes in a contaminated aquifer is an important task when investigating U migration behavior. U-contaminated aquifer sediments were obtained from 16 different locations at a former U mill tailings site at Naturita, CO (U.S.A.) and were extracted with an artificial groundwater, a high pH sodium bicarbonate solution, hydroxylamine hydrochloride solution, and concentrated nitric acid. With an isotopic exchange method, both a KD value for the specific experimental conditions as well as the total exchangeable mass of U(VI) was determined. Except for one sample, KD values determined by isotopic exchange with U-contaminated sediments that were in equilibrium with atmospheric CO2 agreed within a factor of 2 with KD values predicted from a nonelectrostatic surface complexation model (NEM) developed from U(VI) adsorption experiments with uncontaminated sediments. The labile fraction of U(VI) and U extracted by the bicarbonate solution were highly correlated (r2 = 0.997), with a slope of 0.96 +/- 0.01. The proximity of the slope to one suggests that both methods likely access the same reservoir of U(VI) associated with the sediments. The results indicate that the bicarbonate extraction method is useful for estimating the mass of labile U(VI) in sediments that do not contain U(IV). In-situ KD values calculated from the measured labile U(VI) and the dissolved U(VI) in the Naturita alluvial aquifer agreed within a factor of 3 with in-situ KD values predicted with the NEM and groundwater chemistry at each well.

  11. Use of isotope dilution method to predict bioavailability of organic pollutants in historically contaminated sediments.

    PubMed

    Jia, Fang; Bao, Lian-Jun; Crago, Jordan; Schlenk, Daniel; Gan, Jay

    2014-07-15

    Many cases of severe environmental contamination arise from historical episodes, where recalcitrant contaminants have resided in the environment for a prolonged time, leading to potentially decreased bioavailability. Use of bioavailable concentrations over bulk chemical levels improves risk assessment and may play a critical role in determining the need for remediation or assessing the effectiveness of risk mitigation operations. In this study, we applied the principle of isotope dilution to quantify bioaccessibility of legacy contaminants DDT and PCBs in marine sediments from a Superfund site. After addition of 13C or deuterated analogues to a sediment sample, the isotope dilution reached a steady state within 24 h of mixing. At the steady state, the accessible fraction (E) derived by the isotope dilution method (IDM) ranged from 0.28 to 0.89 and was substantially smaller than 1 for most compounds, indicating reduced availability of the extensively aged residues. A strong linear relationship (R2=0.86) was found between E and the sum of rapid (Fr) and slow (Fs) desorption fractions determined by sequential Tenax desorption. The IDM-derived accessible concentration (Ce) was further shown to correlate closely with tissue residue in the marine benthic polychaete Neanthes arenaceodentata exposed in the same sediments. As shown in this study, the IDM approach involves only a few simple steps and may be readily adopted in laboratories equipped with mass spectrometers. This novel method is expected to be especially useful for historically contaminated sediments or soils, for which contaminant bioavailability may have changed significantly due to aging and other sequestration processes.

  12. Single versus combined exposure of Hyalella azteca to zinc contaminated sediment and food.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Lien T H; Muyssen, Brita T A; Janssen, Colin R

    2012-03-01

    The amphipod Hyalella azteca was exposed for 28 d to different combinations of Zn contaminated sediment and food. Sediment exposure (+clean food) resulted in increased Zn body burdens, increased mortality and decreased body mass when the molar concentrations of simultaneously extracted Zn were greater than the molar concentration of Acid Volatile Sulfide (SEM(Zn)-AVS>0), suggesting that dissolved Zn was a dominant route of exposure. No adverse effect was noted in the food exposure (+clean sediment), suggesting selective feeding or regulation. Combined exposure (sediment+food) significantly increased adverse effects in comparison with sediment exposure, indicating contribution of dietary Zn to toxicity and bioaccumulation. The observed enhanced toxicity also supports the assumption on the presence of an avoidance/selective feeding reaction of the amphipods in the single sediment or food exposures. During 14 d post-exposure in clean medium, the organisms from the same combined exposure history received two feeding regimes, i.e. clean food and Zn spiked food. Elevated Zn bioaccumulation and reduced reproduction were noted in amphipods that were offered Zn spiked food compared to the respective organisms that were fed clean food. This was explained by the failure of avoidance/selective feeding behavior in the absence of an alternative food source (sediment), forcing the amphipods to take up Zn while feeding. Increasing Zn body burdens rejected the assumption that Zn uptake from food was regulated by H. azteca. Our results show that the selective feeding behavior should be accounted for when assessing ecological effects of Zn or other contaminants, especially when contaminated food is a potential exposure route.

  13. Developmental toxicity of lead-contaminated sediment in Canada geese (Branta canadensis)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoffman, David J.; Heinz, Gary H.; Sileo, Louis; Audet, Daniel J.; Campbell, Juile K.; Obrecht, Holly H.

    2000-01-01

    Sediment ingestion has recently been identified as an important exposure route for toxicants in waterfowl. The effects of lead-contaminated sediment from the Coeur d'Alene River Basin (CDARB) in Idaho on posthatching development of Canada geese (Branta canadensis) were examined for 6 wk. Day-old goslings received either untreated control diet, clean sediment (48%) supplemented control diet, or CDARB sediment (3449 mug/g lead) supplemented diets at 12%, 24%, or 48%. The 12% CDARB diet resulted in a geometric mean blood lead concentration of 0.68 ppm (ww), with over 90% depression of red blood cell ALAD activity and over fourfold elevation of free erythrocyte protoporphyrin concentration. The 24% CDARB diet resulted in blood lead of 1.61 ppm with decreased hematocrit, hemoglobin, and plasma protein in addition to the effects just described. The 48% CDARB diet resulted in blood lead of 2.52 ppm with 22% mortality, decreased growth, and elevated plasma lactate dehydrogenase-L (LDH-L) activity. In this group the liver lead concentration was 6.57 ppm (ww), with twofold increases in hepatic lipid peroxidation (thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, TBARS) and in reduced glutathione concentration; associated effects included elevated glutathione reductase activity but lower protein-bound thiols concentration and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PDH) activity. The kidney lead concentration in this group was 14.93 ppm with subacute renal tubular nephrosis in one of the surviving goslings. Three other geese in this treatment group exhibited calcified areas of marrow, and one of these displayed severe chronic fibrosing pancreatitis. Lead from CDARB sediment accumulated less readily in gosling blood and tissues than reported in ducklings but at given concentrations was generally more toxic to goslings. Many of these effects were similar to those reported in wild geese and mallards within the Coeur d'Alene River Basin.

  14. Fish bioturbation of cadmium-contaminated sediments: Factors affecting Cd availability to Daphnia magna

    SciTech Connect

    Wall, S.B.; La Point, T.W.; Isely, J.J.

    1996-03-01

    Benthic fish bioturbation of contaminated sediments is thought to enhance exposure and, potentially, bioaccumulation into planktonic organisms. Exposures were conducted with cadmium-spiked sediment, 1.0 mg/kg nominal concentrations, and koi carp (Cyprinus carpio). Daphnia magna were placed in aquaria with and without fish for 6 d and Cd bioaccumulation was measured every 48 h. Koi carp bioturbation increased mean total suspended solids (TSS) in two trials from 0.001 mg/L to 44.4 mg/L and 19.2 mg/L to 762.4 mg/L. Mean aqueous Cd concentrations increased from1.4 {micro}g/L to 2.8 {micro}g/L, and from 1.6 {micro}g/L to 13.2 {micro}g/L. Cadmium binding capacity increased from 28.9 {micro}g/L to 169.8 {micro}g/L in with-fish treatments when compared to controls. However, Daphnia magna body burdens did not increase. Mean Cd residues of daphnids exposed with fish, 9.2 {micro}g/g, were not statistically different from without-fish exposures, 8.0 {micro}g/g. Body burdens slightly decreased in the first trial after the with-fish treatment, 9.4 {micro}g/g to 8.3 {micro}g/g. Fish size was partially correlated with TSS and aqueous Cd concentrations and TSS positively correlated with binding capacity. Because increased TSS in the with-fish treatment resulted in increased binding capacity, it is probable that cadmium bioavailability decreased. Although koi carp were capable of remobilizing Cd from sediment, Cd bioaccumulation into Daphnia magna was not significant.

  15. Interactive isosurface ray tracing of time-varying tetrahedral volumes.

    PubMed

    Wald, Ingo; Friedrich, Heiko; Knoll, Aaron; Hansen, Charles D

    2007-01-01

    We describe a system for interactively rendering isosurfaces of tetrahedral finite-element scalar fields using coherent ray tracing techniques on the CPU. By employing state-of-the art methods in polygonal ray tracing, namely aggressive packet/frustum traversal of a bounding volume hierarchy, we can accomodate large and time-varying unstructured data. In conjunction with this efficiency structure, we introduce a novel technique for intersecting ray packets with tetrahedral primitives. Ray tracing is flexible, allowing for dynamic changes in isovalue and time step, visualization of multiple isosurfaces, shadows, and depth-peeling transparency effects. The resulting system offers the intuitive simplicity of isosurfacing, guaranteed-correct visual results, and ultimately a scalable, dynamic and consistently interactive solution for visualizing unstructured volumes.

  16. Interactive multiscale tensor reconstruction for multiresolution volume visualization.

    PubMed

    Suter, Susanne K; Guitián, José A Iglesias; Marton, Fabio; Agus, Marco; Elsener, Andreas; Zollikofer, Christoph P E; Gopi, M; Gobbetti, Enrico; Pajarola, Renato

    2011-12-01

    Large scale and structurally complex volume datasets from high-resolution 3D imaging devices or computational simulations pose a number of technical challenges for interactive visual analysis. In this paper, we present the first integration of a multiscale volume representation based on tensor approximation within a GPU-accelerated out-of-core multiresolution rendering framework. Specific contributions include (a) a hierarchical brick-tensor decomposition approach for pre-processing large volume data, (b) a GPU accelerated tensor reconstruction implementation exploiting CUDA capabilities, and (c) an effective tensor-specific quantization strategy for reducing data transfer bandwidth and out-of-core memory footprint. Our multiscale representation allows for the extraction, analysis and display of structural features at variable spatial scales, while adaptive level-of-detail rendering methods make it possible to interactively explore large datasets within a constrained memory footprint. The quality and performance of our prototype system is evaluated on large structurally complex datasets, including gigabyte-sized micro-tomographic volumes.

  17. Measurements of arsenite and arsenate contained in mining river waters and leached from contaminated sediments by sequential hydride generation flow injection analysis.

    PubMed

    Hashem, Md Abul; Takaki, Mari; Jodai, Takuma; Toda, Kei

    2011-06-15

    In this work, a new analytical method for gasifiable compounds based on sequential hydride generation flow injection analysis (SHGFIA) was applied to water analysis and leaching investigation. For water analysis, it was confirmed that 1 μg L(-1) As(III) and As(V) were stable for a few days when EDTA was added in the sample waters. Dissolved As(III) and total arsenic (As(III)+As(V)) were converted to AsH(3) in neutral and acidic medium, respectively, to transfer to a miniature gas scrubber (100 μL in absorber volume). The collected arsenic was successively measured by flow analysis based on molybdenum blue chemistry. With this system, changes in As(III) and As(V) concentrations of water placed with arsenic-contaminated-sediment was monitored in near real time. From these data, kinetic analyses were carried out and kinetic constant was obtained from plot of ln{(C(∞)-C)/C(∞)} where C and C(∞) were leached arsenic concentration and its final concentration, respectively. It was found that rate of As(III) leaching was much faster than that of As(V) while As(V) leached more in amount compared to As(III). In this work, it was demonstrated that kinetic investigation is also one of the important application of flow analysis. The SHGFIA system showed excellent performance for leaching analysis of arsenic with discrimination of As(III) and As(V).

  18. Cd, Cu and Zn mobility in contaminated sediments from an infiltration basin colonized by wild plants: the case of Phalaris arundinacea and Typha latifolia.

    PubMed

    Saulais, M; Bedell, J P; Delolme, C

    2011-01-01

    Infiltration basins are shallow reservoirs in which stormwater is temporarily collected in order to reduce water volume in downstream networks. The settling of stormwater particles leads to a contaminated sediment layer. Wild plants can colonize these basins and can also play a role on the fate of heavy metals either directly by their uptake or indirectly by modification of physico-chemical characteristics of the sediment and therefore by modification of the mobility of heavy metals. The aim of this study, carried out in a vegetated infiltration basin, is to assess Cd, Cu and Zn mobility in two zones colonized by different species, Phalaris arundinacea and Typha latifolia. The study was carried out using three single chemical extractions: CaCl2 for the exchangeable phase, acetate buffer for the acido-soluble fraction and diethylenetriamine-pentaacetic acid (DTPA) for the fraction associated to the organic matter. Zn and Cd are mainly associated to carbonated and organic matter phases of the sediment. Moreover, acetate buffer-extractable Zn contents are strongly correlated to carbonates content in the sediment. DTPA-extractable Cu contents are strongly correlated with organic carbon sediment contents. We have also noted that extractable contents were significantly different between both zones whatever the metal.

  19. Binding strength-associated toxicity reduction by birnessite and hydroxyapatite in Pb and Cd contaminated sediments.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seungbae; An, Jinsung; Kim, Young-Jin; Nam, Kyoungphile

    2011-02-28

    In situ stabilization of sediment-bound heavy metals has been proposed as an alternative to ex situ treatment due to the concerns on ecosystem disturbance and remediation cost. The present study was conducted to test the performance of birnessite, hydroxyapatite, and zeolite as stabilizing agents for Pb and Cd in sediment. The heavy metal binding capacity and strength of the stabilizing agents were determined by analyzing Langmuir model parameters. The three agents showed the similar binding capacity (i.e., maximum monolayer sorption constant, K(a)) ranging from 1.13 to 3.62×10(5) mg/kg for Pb and 1.07 to 1.33×10(5) mg/kg for Cd. In contrast, binding strength (i.e., binding energy constant, b) of birnessite and hydroxyapatite was about one order higher than that of zeolite. This is further supported by five-step sequential extraction data: more than 99 and 70% of freshly spiked Pb and Cd were present as not-readily extractable fractions in birnessite and hydroxyapatite, respectively while the fractions were 17.9 and 14.1% in zeolite. Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) test was also conducted to verify the effectiveness of the heavy metal-stabilizing ability of birnessite and hydroxyapatite. Birnessite successfully retained both Pb and Cd against the leaching solution, satisfying the TCLP extract concentration limits (i.e., 5 and 1 mg/L, respectively). However, hydroxyapatite released about 223.7 mg/L of Cd into the solution, which greatly exceeded the limit. The toxicity test with Hyalella azteca showed that their survival rate increased by 92.5-100% when birnessite or hydroxyapatite was added to Pb- or Cd-spiked sediment as a stabilizing agent. Our data demonstrate the potential use of birnessite and hydroxyapatite as an effective in situ remediation means for heavy metal-contaminated sediment with minimal risk to the aquatic ecosystem. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Phosphorus amendment reduces hepatic and renal oxidative stress in mallards ingesting lead-contaminated sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoffman, D.J.; Heinz, G.H.; Audet, D.J.

    2006-01-01

    Lead poisoning of waterfowl has been reported for decades in the Coeur d'Alene River Basin (CDARB) in Idaho as a result of the ingestion of lead-contaminated sediments. This study was conducted to determine whether the addition of phosphoric acid to CDARB sediments would reduce the bioavailability and toxicity of lead to the liver and kidney of mallards (Anas platyrhynchos). Mallards received diets containing 12% clean sediment (controls) or 12% sediment from three different CDARB sites containing 4520, 5390, or 6990 ug/g lead (dry weight) with or without phosphoric acid amendment. Liver and kidney lead concentrations were significantly higher in all CDARB treatment groups and ranged from geometric mean values of 18.2 (liver) and 28.7 (kidney) for the first 2 sites to 22.5 (liver) and 45.6 (kidney) ug/g (wet weight) for the third site. With amendments all liver lead concentrations were reduced 36 to 55%, and all kidney lead concentrations were lowered 54 to 73%. Unamended CDARB sediment from the third site resulted in the following hepatic effects: over 1.6-fold elevation of liver glutathione (reduced form; GSH) concentration, higher GSH S-transferase and oxidized glutathione (GSSG) reductase activities, and lower protein-bound thiols (PBSH) concentration. Renal effects included higher kidney GSH concentrations for all CDARB sites, with over 2.1-fold higher for the third site. Resulting kidney GSSG to GSH ratios were lower at two sites. At the third site, gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT) activity was elevated, and lipid peroxidation as thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) was 1.7-fold greater. Amendment restored all hepatic variables as well as the renal variables TBARS and GGT so they did not differ from controls. Although amendments of phosphorus substantially reduced the bioavailability of lead and some of the adverse effects, lead concentrations in the tissues of mallards fed the amended sediments were still above those considered to be harmful to

  1. Characterization of U(VI) reduction in contaminated sediments with slow-degrading electron donor source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, W.; Watson, D. B.; Zhang, G.; Mehlhorn, T.; Lowe, K.; Earles, J.; Phillips, J.; Kelly, S. D.; Boyanov, M.; Kemner, K. M.; Schadt, C.; Criddle, C. S.; Jardine, P. M.; Brooks, S. C.

    2011-12-01

    In order to select sustainable, high efficiency and cost effective electron donor source, oleate and emulsified vegetable oil (EVO) were tested uranium (VI) reduction in comparison with ethanol in microcosms using uranium contaminated sediments and groundwater from the US DOE Oak Ridge Integrated Field Research Challenge (ORIFRC) site. The effect of initial sulfate concentration on U(VI) reduction was also tested. Both oleate and EVO were effective electron donor sources for U(VI) reduction. Accumulation of acetate as a major product and the removal of aqueous U(VI) were observed and were associated with sulfate reduction. Both oleate and EVO supported U(VI) reduction but at slower rates with a comparable but slightly lower extent of reduction than ethanol. X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) analysis confirmed reduction of U(VI) to U(IV). The extent of U(VI) reduction in solid phase was negatively influenced by aqueous calcium concentration. The majority of electrons of the three substrates were consumed by sulfate reduction, Fe(III) reduction, and methanogenesis. Initial U(VI) concentration in the aqueous phase increased with increased sulfate concentration (1 versus 5 mM), likely due to U(VI) desorption from the solid phase. At the higher initial sulfate concentration more U(VI) was reduced and fewer electrons were used in methanogenesis. Analysis of bacterial and archeal populations using 16S rRNA gene libraries showed a significant increase in Deltaproteobacteria after biostimulation. The microbial community structures developed with oleate and EVO were significantly distinct from those developed with ethanol. Bacteria similar to Desulforegula spp. was predominant for oleate and EVO degradation but were not observed in ethanol-amended microcosms. Known U(VI)-reducing bacteria in the microcosms amended with the three electron donor sources included iron(III) reducing Geobacter spp. but in lower abundances than sulfate-reducing Desulfovibrio spp. The

  2. Interactive volume reconstruction and measurement on the Grid.

    PubMed

    Germain-Renaud, C; Osorio, A; Texier, R

    2005-01-01

    To prove the advantages of integrating grid computing within medical image analysis software, and to discuss the technological, sociological and health care-related issues. Presentation of an instant volume reconstruction and measurement tool (PTM3D) used in clinical practice, including percutaneous nephrolithotomy examples; description of a parallel implementation of volume reconstruction, evaluation of this implementation on lung and body reconstruction, presentation of the technical limitations for clinical use and description and discussion of a prototype grid implementation. Volume reconstruction can broaden its medical scope and use by accessing high-performance computing systems; interactive exploration of medical images can co-exist with the usual batch workload of grid systems; the EGEE grid middleware offers some of the required core services; a fully adequate computing environment needs further evolution to integrate realtime constraints. Clinical experiments of a grid-enabled PTM3D become possible. Widespread adoption of grid technology in the medical images analysis field will benefit from this "early user" project. Convergences appear between two broadly different fields, high energy physics and medical image, towards the need of a smooth integration of the new resources offered by grid systems into the everyday tools of their respective end-users. It can be expected that the convergence will mature towards truly interactive grids, able to serve the needs of the medical community.

  3. Contaminated Sediment Management in Dam Removals and River Restoration Efforts: Critical Need for Research and Policy Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, J. E.

    2015-12-01

    Over 1,000 U.S. dams have been removed (1975-2015) for reasons including obsolescence, liability concerns, water quality upgrades, fisheries, or ecosystem enhancements. Contaminated sediment can significantly complicate the approval process, cost, and timeline of a dam removal, or stop it entirely. In a dam removal, reservoir sediment changes from a sink to a source of contaminants. Recently, the Sierra Club sued to stop the removal of a large dam in Ohio because of the potential impact of phosphate releases on toxic algal blooms in Lake Erie. Heavy metals, PCBs, PAHs, pesticides, and petroleum hydrocarbons can be present in reservoir sediments. In a non-dam removal scenario, reservoir management tools range from "no action" to dredging, dewatering and removal, or sediment capping. But it is not clear how these reservoir management techniques apply to dam removals. Case studies show typically >80% of the reservoir sediment is eventually eroded, precluding sediment capping as a containment option. However, the released contaminants are diluted by mixing with "clean" sediment and are transported to different physio-chemical environments which may immobilize or biodegrade the contaminants. Poorly understood options include phased drawdown/reseeding the former reservoir to contain sediments, diking contaminant "hot spots," and addressing contaminant stratigraphy (where historical use created "hot layers" in the reservoir sediment). Research and policy development needs include: (1) assessment methods based on synergistic effects of multiple contaminants being present; (2) ways to translate the pre-removal contaminant concentrations to post-removal health risks downstream; (3) evaluation of management practices for contaminant "hot spots" and "hot layers;" (4) tools to forecast the presence of contaminated sediment using easily accessible information; and (5) ways to limit liability risk for organizations participating in dam removals involving contaminated sediment.

  4. Selection of an appropriate management strategy for contaminated sediment: A case study at a shallow contaminated harbour in Quebec, Canada.

    PubMed

    Pourabadehei, Mehdi; Mulligan, Catherine N

    2016-12-01

    Harbours, as strategic places in tourism and transportation, are exposed to many sources of contamination. Assessing the quality of harbours sediment by guidelines and regulations does not reflect the actual level of contamination and the risk posed to aquatic ecosystems. Selection of an appropriate management technique for contaminated sediments in those strategic locations is crucial for the aquatic environment. The purpose of this study is to show that insufficient information, provided by sediment quality guidelines (SQGs) to identify the actual contaminants, could lead to a destructive or potentially ineffective decision for risk reduction in contaminated harbours. A comprehensive evaluation on physicochemical characteristics of sediment and water samples of a shallow harbour in St. Lawrence River was performed. Results of trace metal fractionation and risk assessment indicated that Cd and Pb were the contaminants that could pose a threat to aquatic ecosystem, although the SQG outcomes implied that Cu and Zn may cause an adverse effect on the benthic organisms. The results of multivariate statistical analysis demonstrated that the locations in the vicinity of the maintenance area contained the most contaminated sediment samples and require appropriate management. Antifouling paint particles and probably the runoff entering the harbour were the main sources of pollution. Among the diverse range of management strategies, the resuspension technique is suggested as a viable alternative in this specific case for shallow locations with contaminated sediments. A suitable management strategy could reduce the cost of remediation process by identifying the actual contaminated spots and also reduce the risk of remobilization of trace metals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Interactive Isogeometric Volume Visualization with Pixel-Accurate Geometry.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Franz G; Hjelmervik, Jon M

    2016-02-01

    A recent development, called isogeometric analysis, provides a unified approach for design, analysis and optimization of functional products in industry. Traditional volume rendering methods for inspecting the results from the numerical simulations cannot be applied directly to isogeometric models. We present a novel approach for interactive visualization of isogeometric analysis results, ensuring correct, i.e., pixel-accurate geometry of the volume including its bounding surfaces. The entire OpenGL pipeline is used in a multi-stage algorithm leveraging techniques from surface rendering, order-independent transparency, as well as theory and numerical methods for ordinary differential equations. We showcase the efficiency of our approach on different models relevant to industry, ranging from quality inspection of the parametrization of the geometry, to stress analysis in linear elasticity, to visualization of computational fluid dynamics results.

  6. Effect of biostimulation on the microbial community in PCB-contaminated sediments through periodic amendment of sediment with iron.

    PubMed

    Srinivasa Varadhan, A; Khodadoust, Amid P; Brenner, Richard C

    2011-10-01

    Reductive dehalogenation of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) by indigenous dehalorespiring microorganisms in contaminated sediments may be enhanced via biostimulation by supplying hydrogen generated through the anaerobic corrosion of elemental iron added to the sediment. In this study, the effect of periodic amendment of sediment with various dosages of iron on the microbial community present in sediment was investigated using phospholipid fatty acid analysis (PLFA) over a period of 18 months. Three PCB-contaminated sediments (two freshwater lake sediments and one marine sediment) were used. Signature biomarker analysis of the microbial community present in all three sediments revealed the enrichment of Dehalococcoides species, the population of which was sustained for a longer period of time when the sediment microcosms were amended with the lower dosage of iron (0.01 g iron per g dry sediment) every 6 months as compared to the blank system (without iron). Lower microbial stress levels were reported for the system periodically amended with 0.01 g of iron per g dry sediment every 6 months, thus reducing the competition from other hydrogen-utilizing microorganisms like methanogens, iron reducers, and sulfate reducers. The concentration of hydrogen in the system was found to be an important factor influencing the shift in microbial communities in all sediments with time. Periodic amendment of sediment with larger dosages of iron every 3 months resulted in the early prevalence of Geobacteraceae and sulfate-reducing bacteria followed by methanogens. An average pH of 8.4 (range of 8.2-8.6) and an average hydrogen concentration of 0.75% (range of 0.3-1.2%) observed between 6 and 15 months of the study were found to be conducive to sustaining the population of Dehalococcoides species in the three sediments amended with 0.01 g iron per g dry sediment. Biostimulation of indigenous PCB dechlorinators by the periodic amendment of contaminated sediments with low dosages of

  7. Fast global interactive volume segmentation with regional supervoxel descriptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luengo, Imanol; Basham, Mark; French, Andrew P.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we propose a novel approach towards fast multi-class volume segmentation that exploits supervoxels in order to reduce complexity, time and memory requirements. Current methods for biomedical image segmentation typically require either complex mathematical models with slow convergence, or expensive-to-calculate image features, which makes them non-feasible for large volumes with many objects (tens to hundreds) of different classes, as is typical in modern medical and biological datasets. Recently, graphical models such as Markov Random Fields (MRF) or Conditional Random Fields (CRF) are having a huge impact in different computer vision areas (e.g. image parsing, object detection, object recognition) as they provide global regularization for multiclass problems over an energy minimization framework. These models have yet to find impact in biomedical imaging due to complexities in training and slow inference in 3D images due to the very large number of voxels. Here, we define an interactive segmentation approach over a supervoxel space by first defining novel, robust and fast regional descriptors for supervoxels. Then, a hierarchical segmentation approach is adopted by training Contextual Extremely Random Forests in a user-defined label hierarchy where the classification output of the previous layer is used as additional features to train a new classifier to refine more detailed label information. This hierarchical model yields final class likelihoods for supervoxels which are finally refined by a MRF model for 3D segmentation. Results demonstrate the effectiveness on a challenging cryo-soft X-ray tomography dataset by segmenting cell areas with only a few user scribbles as the input for our algorithm. Further results demonstrate the effectiveness of our method to fully extract different organelles from the cell volume with another few seconds of user interaction.

  8. Development, evaluation, and application of sediment quality targets for assessing and managing contaminated sediments in Tampa Bay, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    MacDonald, D.D.; Carr, R.S.; Eckenrod, D.; Greening, H.; Grabe, S.; Ingersoll, C.G.; Janicki, S.; Janicki, T.; Lindskoog, R.A.; Long, E.R.; Pribble, R.; Sloane, G.; Smorong, D.E.

    2004-01-01

    Tampa Bay is a large, urban estuary that is located in west central Florida. Although water quality conditions represent an important concern in this estuary, information from numerous sources indicates that sediment contamination also has the potential to adversely affect aquatic organisms, aquatic-dependent wildlife, and human health. As such, protecting relatively uncontaminated areas of the bay from contamination and reducing the amount of toxic chemicals in contaminated sediments have been identified as high-priority sediment management objectives for Tampa Bay. To address concerns related to sediment contamination in the bay, an ecosystem-based framework for assessing and managing sediment quality conditions was developed that included identification of sediment quality issues and concerns, development of ecosystem goals and objectives, selection of ecosystem health indicators, establishment of metrics and targets for key indicators, and incorporation of key indicators, metrics, and targets into watershed management plans and decision-making processes. This paper describes the process that was used to select and evaluate numerical sediment quality targets (SQTs) for assessing and managing contaminated sediments. These SQTs included measures of sediment chemistry, whole-sediment and pore-water toxicity, and benthic invertebrate community structure. In addition, the paper describes how the SQTs were used to develop site-specific concentration-response models that describe how the frequency of adverse biological effects changes with increasing concentrations of chemicals of potential concern. Finally, a key application of the SQTs for defining sediment management areas is discussed.

  9. Resuspended contaminated sediments cause sublethal stress to oysters: A biomarker differentiates total suspended solids and contaminant effects.

    PubMed

    Edge, Katelyn J; Dafforn, Katherine A; Simpson, Stuart L; Ringwood, Amy H; Johnston, Emma L

    2015-06-01

    Resuspended contaminated sediments represent an important route of contaminant exposure for aquatic organisms. During resuspension events, filter-feeding organisms are exposed to contaminants, in both the dissolved form (at the gills) and the particulate form (in the digestive system). In addition, these organisms must manage the physical stress associated with an increase in total suspended solids (TSS). To date, few studies have experimentally compared the contributions to biological stress of contaminated and clean suspended solids. The authors mixed field-collected sediments (<63 μm) from clean and contaminated field sites to create 4 treatments of increasing metal concentrations. Sydney rock oysters were then exposed to sediment treatments at different TSS concentrations for 4 d, and cellular biomarkers (lysosomal membrane stability, lipid peroxidation, and glutathione) were measured to evaluate sublethal toxicity. Lysosomal membrane stability was the most sensitive biomarker for distinguishing effects from resuspended contaminated sediments, as increasing amounts of contaminated TSS increased lysosomal membrane destabilization. The authors' results illustrate the importance of considering contaminant exposures from resuspended sediments when assessing the toxicity of contaminants to aquatic organisms. © 2015 SETAC.

  10. Real-time X-ray absorption spectroscopy of uranium, iron, and manganese in contaminated sediments during bioreduction.

    PubMed

    Tokunag, Tetsu K; Wan, Jiamin; Kim, Yongman; Sutton, Steve R; Newville, Matthew; Lanzirotti, Antonio; Rao, William

    2008-04-15

    The oxidation status of uranium in sediments is important because the solubility of this toxic and radioactive element is much greater for U(VI) than for U(IV) species. Thus, redox manipulation to promote precipitation of UO2 is receiving interest as a method to remediate U-contaminated sediments. Presence of Fe and Mn oxides in sediments at much higher concentrations than U requires an understanding of their redox status as well. This study was conducted to determine changes in oxidation states of U, Fe, and Mn in U-contaminated sediments from Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Oxidation states of these elements were measured in real-time and nondestructively using X-ray absorption spectroscopy on sediment columns supplied with synthetic groundwater containing organic carbon (OC, 0, 3, 10, 30, and 100 mM OC as lactate) for over 400 days. In sediments supplied with OC > or = 30 mM, 80% of the U was reduced to U(IV), with transient reoxidation at about 150 days. Mn(III,IV) oxides were completely reduced to Mn(II) in sediments infused with OC > or = 3 mM. However, Fe remained largely unreduced in all sediment columns, showing that Fe(III) can persist as an electron acceptor in reducing sediments over long times. This result in combination with the complete reduction of all other potential electron acceptors supports the hypothesis that the reactive Fe(III) fraction was responsible for reoxidizing U(IV).

  11. The Pseudomonas community in metal-contaminated sediments as revealed by quantitative PCR: a link with metal bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Roosa, Stéphanie; Wauven, Corinne Vander; Billon, Gabriel; Matthijs, Sandra; Wattiez, Ruddy; Gillan, David C

    2014-10-01

    Pseudomonas bacteria are ubiquitous Gram-negative and aerobic microorganisms that are known to harbor metal resistance mechanisms such as efflux pumps and intracellular redox enzymes. Specific Pseudomonas bacteria have been quantified in some metal-contaminated environments, but the entire Pseudomonas population has been poorly investigated under these conditions, and the link with metal bioavailability was not previously examined. In the present study, quantitative PCR and cell cultivation were used to monitor and characterize the Pseudomonas population at 4 different sediment sites contaminated with various levels of metals. At the same time, total metals and metal bioavailability (as estimated using an HCl 1 m extraction) were measured. It was found that the total level of Pseudomonas, as determined by qPCR using two different genes (oprI and the 16S rRNA gene), was positively and significantly correlated with total and HCl-extractable Cu, Co, Ni, Pb and Zn, with high correlation coefficients (>0.8). Metal-contaminated sediments featured isolates of the Pseudomonas putida, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Pseudomonas lutea and Pseudomonas aeruginosa groups, with other bacterial genera such as Mycobacterium, Klebsiella and Methylobacterium. It is concluded that Pseudomonas bacteria do proliferate in metal-contaminated sediments, but are still part of a complex community.

  12. Modeling the effects and uncertainties of contaminated sediment remediation scenarios in a Norwegian fjord by Markov chain Monte Carlo simulation.

    PubMed

    Saloranta, Tuomo M; Armitage, James M; Haario, Heikki; Naes, Kristoffer; Cousins, Ian T; Barton, David N

    2008-01-01

    Multimedia environmental fate models are useful tools to investigate the long-term impacts of remediation measures designed to alleviate potential ecological and human health concerns in contaminated areas. Estimating and communicating the uncertainties associated with the model simulations is a critical task for demonstrating the transparency and reliability of the results. The Extended Fourier Amplitude Sensitivity Test(Extended FAST) method for sensitivity analysis and Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method for uncertainty analysis and model calibration have several advantages over methods typically applied for multimedia environmental fate models. Most importantly, the simulation results and their uncertainties can be anchored to the available observations and their uncertainties. We apply these techniques for simulating the historical fate of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) in the Grenland fjords, Norway, and for predicting the effects of different contaminated sediment remediation (capping) scenarios on the future levels of PCDD/Fs in cod and crab therein. The remediation scenario simulations show that a significant remediation effect can first be seen when significant portions of the contaminated sediment areas are cleaned up, and that increase in capping area leads to both earlier achievement of good fjord status and narrower uncertainty in the predicted timing for this.

  13. Real-time x-ray absorption spectroscopy of uranium, iron, and manganese in contaminated sediments during bioreduction

    SciTech Connect

    Tokunaga, Tetsu; Tokunaga, T.K.; Wan, J.; Kim, Y.; Sutton, S.R.; Newville, M.; Lanzirotti, A.; Rao, W.

    2008-01-15

    The oxidation status of uranium in sediments is important because the solubility of this toxic and radioactive element is much greater for U(VI) than for U(IV) species. Thus, redox manipulation to promote precipitation of UO{sub 2} is receiving interest as a method to remediate U-contaminated sediments. Presence of Fe and Mn oxides in sediments at much higher concentrations than U requires understanding of their redox status as well. This study was conducted to determine changes in oxidation states of U, Fe, and Mn in U-contaminated sediments from Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Oxidation states of these elements were measured in real-time and nondestructively using X-ray absorption spectroscopy, on sediment columns supplied with synthetic groundwater containing organic carbon (OC, 0, 3, 10, 30 and 100 mM OC as lactate) for over 400 days. In sediments supplied with OC {ge} 30 mM, 80% of the U was reduced to U(IV), with transient reoxidation at about 150 days. Mn(III,IV) oxides were completely reduced to Mn(II) in sediments infused with OC {ge} 3 mM. However, Fe remained largely unreduced in all sediment columns, showing that Fe(III) can persist as an electron acceptor in reducing sediments over long times. This result in combination with the complete reduction of all other potential electron acceptors supports the hypothesis that the reactive Fe(III) fraction was responsible for reoxidizing U(IV).

  14. Dispersion and Excluded Volume Interactions in Nematic Liquid Crystals.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poliks, Mark David

    1988-12-01

    The effectiveness of the potential of mean torque in accounting for solute orientation is explored. It is described by repulsive (excluded volume) and attractive forces (dispersion) and is tested using rigid, semi-flexible and flexible solutes dissolved in nematic phases. For rigid molecules (benzenes and anthracene) the attractive short range potential gave the best results. For anthracene the results indicated that the potential can discriminate between solute/solvent interactions. For wholly aliphatic solvents the excluded volume forces gave excellent agreement, as did the attractive forces for the aromatic solvents. For the semi-flexible molecule, biphenyl, quadrupole splittings were simulated using the internal torsion angle as a parameter. The values of this angle were predicted to vary systematically with temperature. Using crystallographic and idealized structural data as the starting points for the calculation, the structure of PAA in the nematic phase was estimated. Both the internal angle and the aromatic proton valence angles were determined. Flexible, "siamese-twin" liquid crystals having an internal per-deuterated spacer consisting of ten methylenes were studied. They differed only in the length of the aliphatic tails (5105, 101010). The quadrupole splittings of both twins dissolved in the nematic phase of BCH-S1131 were identical. Quantitative simulations of the splittings using standard RIS geometry and excluded volume forces were successful. In the bulk nematic phase the order parameter of 5105 was greater than 101010. The difference was interpreted as a dilution effect of the mesogenic cores by aliphatic tails. Simulations indicated the conformation of the spacer is highly extended. As parameterized the required strength of the mean field is a strong function of the molecular dimensions, suggesting that the current description still is incomplete.

  15. An experimental and modeling study of grain-scale uranium desorption from field-contaminated sediments and the potential influence of microporosity on mass-transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoliker, D.; Liu, C.; Kent, D. B.; Zachara, J. M.

    2012-12-01

    The aquifer below the 300-Area of the Hanford site (Richland, WA, USA) is plagued by a persistent plume of dissolved uranium (U(VI)) in excess of the Environmental Protection Agency drinking water maximum contamination level even after the removal of highly contaminated sediments. The aquifer sediments in the seasonally saturated lower vadose zone act as both a source and sink for uranium during stage changes in the nearby Columbia River. Diffusion limitation of uranium mass-transfer within these sediments has been cited as a potential cause of the plume's persistence. Equilibrium U(VI) sorption is a strong function of variable chemical conditions, especially carbonate, hydrogen, and uranyl ion activities. Field-contaminated sediments from the site require up to 1,000 hours to reach equilibrium in static batch reactors. Increases in U(VI) concentrations over longer time-scales result from changes in chemical conditions, which drive reactions with sediments that favor U(VI) desorption. Grain-scale U(VI) sorption/desorption rates are slow, likely owing to diffusion of U(VI) and other solutes through intra-granular pore domains. In order to improve understanding of the impact of intra-granular diffusion and chemical reactions controlling grain-scale U(VI) release, experiments were conducted on individual particle size fractions of a <8 mm composite of field-contaminated, lower vadose zone sediments. For each size fraction, equilibrium U(VI) sorption/desorption in static batch reactors was well-described by surface complexation models over a range of chemical conditions applicable to the field site. Desorption rates from individual size fractions in flow-through batch reactors, examined under a single set of constant chemical conditions with multiple stop-flow events, were similar for all size fractions <2 mm. Kinetic U(VI) desorption in flow-through batch reactors was modeled using a multi-rate surface complexation approach, where sorption/desorption rates were

  16. INNOVATIVE IN-SITU REMEDIATION OF CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS FOR SIMULTANEOUS CONTROL OF CONTAMINATION AND EROSION

    SciTech Connect

    Knox, A; Michael Paller, M; Danny D. Reible, D; Ioana G. Petrisor, I

    2007-11-28

    New technologies are needed that neutralize contaminant toxicity and control physical transport mechanisms that mobilize sediment contaminants. The last 12 months of this comprehensive project investigated the use of combinations of sequestering agents to develop in situ active sediment caps that stabilize mixtures of contaminants and act as a barrier to mechanical disturbance under a broad range of environmental conditions. Efforts focused on the selection of effective sequestering agents for use in active caps, the composition of active caps, and the effects of active cap components on contaminant bioavailability and retention. Results from this project showed that phosphate amendments, some organoclays, and the biopolymer, chitosan, were very effective at removing metals from both fresh and salt water. These amendments also exhibited high retention (80% or more) of most metals indicating reduced potential for remobilization to the water column. Experiments on metal speciation and retention in contaminated sediment showed that apatite and organoclay can immobilize a broad range of metals under both reduced and oxidized conditions. These studies were followed by sequential extractions to evaluate the bioavailability and retention of metals in treated sediments. Metal fractions recovered in early extraction steps are more likely to be bioavailable and were termed the Potentially Mobile Fraction (PMF). Less bioavailable fractions collected in later extraction steps were termed the Recalcitrant Factor (RF). Apatite and organoclay reduced the PMF and increased the RF for several elements, especially Pb, Zn, Ni, Cr, and Cd. Empirically determined partitioning coefficients and modeling studies were used to assess the retention of organic contaminants on selected sequestering agents. Organoclays exhibited exceptionally high sorption of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons as indicated by a comparison of K{sub d} values among 12 amendments. These results suggested that

  17. Metabolic and genomic analysis elucidates strain-level variation in Microbacterium spp. isolated from chromate contaminated sediment

    PubMed Central

    Henson, Michael W.; Santo Domingo, Jorge W.; Kourtev, Peter S.; Jensen, Roderick V.; Dunn, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] is a soluble carcinogen that has caused widespread contamination of soil and water in many industrial nations. Bacteria have the potential to aid remediation as certain strains can catalyze the reduction of Cr(VI) to insoluble and less toxic Cr(III). Here, we examine Cr(VI) reducing Microbacterium spp. (Cr-K1W, Cr-K20, Cr-K29, and Cr-K32) isolated from contaminated sediment (Seymore, Indiana) and show varying chromate responses despite the isolates’ phylogenetic similarity (i.e., identical 16S rRNA gene sequences). Detailed analysis identified differences based on genomic metabolic potential, growth and general metabolic capabilities, and capacity to resist and reduce Cr(VI). Taken together, the discrepancies between the isolates demonstrate the complexity inter-strain variation can have on microbial physiology and related biogeochemical processes. PMID:26587353

  18. Long-term effects of dredging operations program: Assessing bioaccumulation in aquatic organisms exposed to contaminated sediments. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, J.U.; McFarland, V.A.

    1991-07-01

    This paper synthesizes previous work on bioaccumulation to provide a working document for the environmental impact on the aquatic environment due to bioaccumulation of sediment contaminants resulting from dredging operations and dredged material placement. Emphasis is placed on explanation of basic concepts concerning, and factors influencing, sediment contaminant bioaccumulation and bioavailability. The paper presents several numerical methods for assessing bioaccumulation, including a simple method for estimating theoretical bioaccumulation potential (TBP) from sediment chemistry for neutral organic chemicals. Methods are also given for projecting contaminant concentrations in organism tissues when steady state is achieved, based on laboratory or field exposures to contaminated sediments. These assessments are presented in the context of the US Environmental Protection Agency's tiered testing approach for dredged material evaluation. The various numerical methods for bioaccumulation assessment are illustrated and compared using step-by-step example calculations with hypothetical and actual data.

  19. Contaminated sediments from tributaries of the Great Lakes: Chemical characterization and carcinogenic effects in medaka (Oryzias latipes)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Besser, John M.; Schmitt, Christopher J.; Harshbarger, John C.; Peterman, Paul H.; Lebo, Jon A.

    1991-01-01

    Sediments from four inshore industrial sites and a reference site in the Great Lakes were extracted with organic solvents to produce a crude extract, which was separated on alumina into two fractions: predominantly polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons; and predominantly nitrogencontaining polycyclic aromatic compounds. Crude extracts were redissolved in acetone and analyzed by gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The acetone-redissolved crude extracts from the four industrialized sites contained 5.6–313.3 μg total polycyclic aromatic compounds/g sediment and 3.0–36.4 μg other compounds/g sediment. In addition to the typical EPA priority pollutants, a substantial amount (228.7 μg/g sediment) of alkyl-polycyclic-aromatic compounds was detected in sediments from one of the industrialized sites. Extracts from the reference site contained 1.55 μg total polycyclic aromatic compounds/ g sediment. Medaka (Oryzias latipes) were exposed to multiple pulse doses of acetone-redissolved extracts and fractions. Medaka were also exposed to a known carcinogen, methylazoxymethanol acetate, to verify that chemicals produced tumors in the test fish. Acetone-redissolved extracts and fractions from contaminated sediments were toxic to medaka. Fin erosion and non-neoplastic liver abnormalities were more prevalent in medaka after exposure to acetoneredissolved extracts and fractions from contaminated sediments. Neoplasms previously associated with chemical exposure in wild fishes were induced in medaka exposed to acetone-redissolved extracts and fractions from two of the contaminated sites, but not from the reference site or controls. These findings further support the hypothesis that chemical contaminants in sediments are involved in epizootics of neoplasms in wild fishes at contaminated sites.

  20. Toxicokinetics of DNA adducts and biliary fluorescent aromatic compounds in fish exposed to PAC-contaminated sediments

    SciTech Connect

    French, B.; Reichert, W.L.; Hom, T.; Sanborn, H.R.; Stein, J.E.

    1995-12-31

    Exposure of fish to polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs) can be assessed by measuring fluorescent aromatic compounds (FACs) in bile or xenobiotic-DNA adducts in liver. Acute exposures in fish to model PACs or PAC contaminated sediment extracts have shown dose-responsive increases in levels of DNA adducts and biliary FACS. FAC levels have been shown to decline rapidly after exposure, whereas a substantial proportion of DNA adducts persist. However, the time and dose responses of these biomarkers with chronic exposure to sediment-associated PACs have not been examined in fish. In this study, the authors examined the effects of varying the PAC concentrations and length of exposure on levels of DNA adducts and biliary FACs in English sole (Pleuronectes vetulus) exposed for up to 5 weeks to reference sediment amended with PAC-contaminated sediment from Eagle Harbor, WA. DNA adduct levels increased linearly with both PAC concentration and length of exposure, while biliary FAC concentrations were responsive to PAC levels but had attained steady-state concentrations after 2 weeks of exposure. Further, levels of DNA adducts and biliary FACs in feral fish captured from Eagle Harbor were within the ranges of levels found in the laboratory-exposed fish. Comparison of the data from field and laboratory-exposed fish strengthened the finding that hepatic DNA adducts accumulated with chronic exposure. The results showing accumulation of hepatic DNA adducts in English sole during continuous exposure to PACs is consistent with previous studies showing a relatively low rate of DNA repair in fish.

  1. Endocrine effects of contaminated sediments on the freshwater snail Potamopyrgus antipodarum in vivo and in the cell bioassays in vitro.

    PubMed

    Mazurová, E; Hilscherová, K; Jálová, V; Köhler, H-R; Triebskorn, R; Giesy, J P; Bláha, L

    2008-09-17

    Lake Pilnok located in the black coal-mining region Ostrava-Karvina, Czech Republic, contains sediments highly contaminated with powdered waste coal. Moreover, population of the endangered species of narrow-clawed crayfish Pontastacus leptodactylus with high proportion of intersex individuals (18%) was observed at this site. These findings motivated our work that aimed to evaluate contamination, endocrine disruptive potency using in vitro assays and in vivo effects of contaminated sediments on reproduction of sediment-dwelling invertebrates. Chemical analyses revealed low concentrations of persistent chlorinated compounds and heavy metals but concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) were high (sum of 16 PAHs 10 microg/g dw). Organic extracts from sediments caused significant in vitro AhR-mediated activity in the bioassay with H4IIE-luc cells, estrogenicity in MVLN cells and anti-androgenicity in recombinant yeast assay, and these effects could be attributed to non-persistent compounds derived from the waste coal. We have also observed significant in vivo effects of the sediments in laboratory experiments with the Prosobranchian euryhaline mud snail Potamopyrgus antipodarum. Sediments from Lake Pilnok as well as organic extracts of the sediments (externally added to the control sediment) significantly affected fecundity during 8 weeks of exposure. The effects were stimulations of fecundity at lower concentrations at the beginning of the experiment followed by inhibitions of fecundity and general toxicity. Our study indicates presence of chemicals that affected endocrine balance in invertebrates, and emphasizes the need for integrated approaches combining in vitro and in vivo bioassays with identification of chemicals to elucidate ecotoxicogical impacts of contaminated sediment samples.

  2. An evaluation of the ability of chemical measurements to predict polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-contaminated sediment toxicity to Hyalella azteca.

    PubMed

    McDonough, Kathleen M; Azzolina, Nicholas A; Hawthorne, Steven B; Nakles, David V; Neuhauser, Edward F

    2010-07-01

    The present study examined the ability of three chemical estimation methods to predict toxicity and nontoxicity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) -contaminated sediment to the freshwater benthic amphipod Hyalella azteca for 192 sediment samples from 12 field sites. The first method used bulk sediment concentrations of 34 PAH compounds (PAH34), and fraction of total organic carbon, coupled with equilibrium partitioning theory to predict pore-water concentrations (KOC method). The second method used bulk sediment PAH34 concentrations and the fraction of anthropogenic (black carbon) and natural organic carbon coupled with literature-based black carbon-water and organic carbon-water partition coefficients to estimate pore-water concentrations (KOCKBC method). The final method directly measured pore-water concentrations (pore-water method). The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's hydrocarbon narcosis model was used to predict sediment toxicity for all three methods using the modeled or measured pore-water concentration as input. The KOC method was unable to predict nontoxicity (83% of nontoxic samples were predicted to be toxic). The KOCKBC method was not able to predict toxicity (57% of toxic samples were predicted to be nontoxic) and, therefore, was not protective of the environment. The pore-water method was able to predict toxicity (correctly predicted 100% of the toxic samples were toxic) and nontoxicity (correctly predicted 71% of the nontoxic samples were nontoxic). This analysis clearly shows that direct pore-water measurement is the most accurate chemical method currently available to estimate PAH-contaminated sediment toxicity to H. azteca.

  3. The behaviour of (137)Cs in the North Atlantic Ocean assessed from numerical modelling: Releases from nuclear fuel reprocessing factories, redissolution from contaminated sediments and leakage from dumped nuclear wastes.

    PubMed

    Periáñez, R; Suh, Kyung-Suk; Min, Byung-Il

    2016-12-15

    A Lagrangian model which simulates the dispersion of (137)Cs in the North Atlantic has been developed. The model includes water/sediment interactions. It has been tested comparing calculated and measured (137)Cs concentrations in water and sediments of the European Shelf resulting after the releases from the nuclear fuel reprocessing plants of Sellafield and La Hague. Some additional numerical experiments have been carried out. First, the redissolution of (137)Cs from contaminated sediments after the reduction in releases from the reprocessing plants has been studied. This allowed to calculate effective half-lives of (137)Cs in several sub-basins. Later, potential leakage of (137)Cs from dumped nuclear wastes in several locations of the Atlantic has been investigated. Even in worst-case scenarios, these leakages should not lead to any radiological implications.

  4. Note: Nonpolar solute partial molar volume response to attractive interactions with water.

    PubMed

    Williams, Steven M; Ashbaugh, Henry S

    2014-01-07

    The impact of attractive interactions on the partial molar volumes of methane-like solutes in water is characterized using molecular simulations. Attractions account for a significant 20% volume drop between a repulsive Weeks-Chandler-Andersen and full Lennard-Jones description of methane interactions. The response of the volume to interaction perturbations is characterized by linear fits to our simulations and a rigorous statistical thermodynamic expression for the derivative of the volume to increasing attractions. While a weak non-linear response is observed, an average effective slope accurately captures the volume decrease. This response, however, is anticipated to become more non-linear with increasing solute size.

  5. Note: Nonpolar solute partial molar volume response to attractive interactions with water

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Steven M.; Ashbaugh, Henry S.

    2014-01-07

    The impact of attractive interactions on the partial molar volumes of methane-like solutes in water is characterized using molecular simulations. Attractions account for a significant 20% volume drop between a repulsive Weeks-Chandler-Andersen and full Lennard-Jones description of methane interactions. The response of the volume to interaction perturbations is characterized by linear fits to our simulations and a rigorous statistical thermodynamic expression for the derivative of the volume to increasing attractions. While a weak non-linear response is observed, an average effective slope accurately captures the volume decrease. This response, however, is anticipated to become more non-linear with increasing solute size.

  6. Distinguishing Betwen Effects of Local Inputs (Contaminated Sediments, Point Sources) and Upstream Diffuse Nonpoint Source Input: Refinement of a Watershed Development Index for New England

    EPA Science Inventory

    Assessment tools are being developed to predict diffuse NPS effects from watershed development and distinguish these from local impacts (point sources, contaminated sediments). Using EMAP data from the New England Wadeable Stream Survey and two state datasets (CT, ME), we are de...

  7. Application of Biofilm Covered Activated Carbon Particles as a Microbial Inoculum Delivery System for Enhanced Bioaugmentation of PCBs in Contaminated Sediment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    organic surface with adsorbed microbial catalysts can then be used directly as inoculum in PCB contaminated sediments. This biofilm based...Applied & Environmental Microbiology 51: 761-768. Berkaw M, Sowers KR & May HD (1996) Anaerobic ortho dechlorination of polychlorinated biphenyls...examination of wastewater biofilm formation and structural components. Appl Environ Microbiol 45: 1921-1931. Fagervold SK, Watts JEM, May HD

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of Alkane-Degrading Acinetobacter venetianus JKSF02, Isolated from Contaminated Sediment of the San Jacinto River in Houston, Texas.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Rupa; Damania, Ashish

    2016-04-14

    Acinetobacter venetianusJKSF02 was isolated from contaminated sediment in eastern Houston, Texas along the San Jacinto River. This microorganism specializes in n-alkane degradation and is well suited for bioremediation of the petroleum hydrocarbon deposited throughout the region by shipping and industrial activity from the Houston Ship Channel. Copyright © 2016 Iyer and Damania.

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of Alkane-Degrading Acinetobacter venetianus JKSF02, Isolated from Contaminated Sediment of the San Jacinto River in Houston, Texas

    PubMed Central

    Damania, Ashish

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter venetianus JKSF02 was isolated from contaminated sediment in eastern Houston, Texas along the San Jacinto River. This microorganism specializes in n-alkane degradation and is well suited for bioremediation of the petroleum hydrocarbon deposited throughout the region by shipping and industrial activity from the Houston Ship Channel. PMID:27081144

  10. Distinguishing Betwen Effects of Local Inputs (Contaminated Sediments, Point Sources) and Upstream Diffuse Nonpoint Source Input: Refinement of a Watershed Development Index for New England

    EPA Science Inventory

    Assessment tools are being developed to predict diffuse NPS effects from watershed development and distinguish these from local impacts (point sources, contaminated sediments). Using EMAP data from the New England Wadeable Stream Survey and two state datasets (CT, ME), we are de...

  11. Survival, growth, and body residues of Hyalella azteca (Saussure) exposed to fipronil contaminated sediments from non-vegetated and vegetated microcosms

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We assessed chronic effects of fipronil and metabolite contaminated sediments from non-vegetated and Thallia dealbata vegetated wetland microcosms on Hyalella azteca during wet and dry exposures. Mean sediment concentrations (ng g-1) ranged from 0.72-1.26, 0.01-0.69, 0.07-0.23, and 0.49-7.87 for fip...

  12. Correlation between the results of sequential extraction and effectiveness of immobilization treatment of lead- and cadmium-contaminated sediment.

    PubMed

    Dalmacija, Milena B; Prica, Miljana D J; Dalmacija, Bozo D; Roncevic, Srdan D; Rajić, Ljiljana M

    2010-01-08

    The assessment of the quality of sediment from the Great Backi Canal (Serbia), based on the pseudo-total lead (Pb) and cadmium (Cd) content according to the corresponding Dutch standards and Canadian guidelines, showed its severe contamination with these two metals. A microwave-assisted BCR (Community Bureau of Reference of the Commission of the European Union) sequential extraction procedure was employed to assess their potential mobility and risk to the aquatic environment. Comparison of the results of sequential extraction and different criteria for sediment quality assessment has led to somewhat contradictory conclusions. Namely, while the results of sequential extraction showed that Cd comes under the high-risk category, Pb shows low risk to the environment, despite its high pseudo-total content. The contaminated sediment, irrespective of the different speciation of Pb and Cd, was subjected to the same immobilization, stabilization/solidification (S/S) treatments using kaolinite, montmorillonite, kaolinite-quicklime, montmorillonite-quicklime, fly ash, zeolite, or zeolite-fly ash combination. Semi-dynamic leaching tests were conducted for Pb- and Cd-contaminated sediment in order to assess the long-term leaching behavior of these metals. In order to simulate "worst case" leaching conditions, the semi-dynamic leaching test was modified using 0.014 M acetic acid (pH = 3.25) and humic acid solutions (20 mg TOC l-1) as leachants instead of deionized water. The effectiveness of S/S treatment was evaluated by determining diffusion coefficients (De) and leachability indices (LX). The standard toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) was applied to evaluate the extraction potential of Pb and Cd. A diffusion-based model was used to elucidate the controlling leaching mechanisms. Generally, the test results indicated that all applied S/S treatments were effective in immobilizing Pb and Cd, and the treated sediments may be considered acceptable for "controlled

  13. Determining the Desorption Kinetics of U(VI) from Contaminated Sediments Under Complex and Changing Solution Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hay, M. B.; Curtis, G. P.; Johnson, K. J.; Greskowiak, J.; Davis, J. A.

    2009-12-01

    Uranium(VI) transport in contaminated sediments is strongly controlled by the thermodynamics and kinetics of adsorption on mineral surfaces. Many studies on natural sediments and synthetic mineral phases have demonstrated the dependence of U(VI) sorption equilibrium on aqueous chemical conditions, with alkalinity, pH, ionic strength, and Ca concentration of particular importance in many natural systems. Desorption of U(VI) from contaminated sediments from DOE sites in Hanford, WA, Rifle, CO, and Naturita, CO also exhibits a significant kinetic limitation, with timescales of several weeks to months required to reach desorption equilibrium in some cases. This kinetic limitation is believed to be due to diffusion in intragranular pore space, which includes small fractures within grains and pores within clay aggregates and grain coatings. Development of appropriate reactive transport models that can be applied to predict the fate and transport of U(VI) in contaminated aquifers relies on accurately quantifying sorption equilibrium and kinetics at the grain scale, which vary from site to site based on sediment characteristics. This analysis typically involves laboratory batch- and column-scale adsorption/desorption experiments performed under a variety of chemical conditions to fully constrain surface complexation and kinetic models, requiring a constant set of chemical conditions over the duration of the experiment. In practice, however, this can be difficult in experiments aiming to quantify long-term kinetics (weeks to months time scale), due to slow ion exchange, mineral dissolution/precipitation, and redox processes. Long-term changes in solution conditions affect U(VI) sorption equilibrium, making it necessary to determine model parameters for U(VI) surface complexation, diffusion kinetics, and chemical weathering/ion exchange processes simultaneously from a given data set. We will present kinetic surface complexation model results obtained for size

  14. Field deployment of polyethylene devices to measure PCB concentrations in pore water of contaminated sediment.

    PubMed

    Tomaszewski, Jeanne E; Luthy, Richard G

    2008-08-15

    Sediment pore water concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in a contaminated mudflat in San Francisco Bay, CA were determined by field-deployed polyethylene devices (PEDs). Sequential sampling of PEDs deployed in the field showed large differences in uptake rates and time to equilibrium compared to PEDs mixed with field-collected sediment in the laboratory. We demonstrate a modeling approach that involves the use of impregnated performance reference compounds (PRCs) and interpretation of the data either by PCB molar volume adjustment or environmental adjustment factors to measure pore water concentrations of 118 PCB congeners. Both adjustment methods predicted comparable sampling rates, and PCB pore water concentrations estimated by use of the molar volume adjustment method were similar to values analytically measured in pore waters from the laboratory and field. The utility of PEDs for sampling pore water in the field was evaluated at a tidal mudflat amended with activated carbon to sequester PCBs. Pore water concentrations decreased up to 60% within 18 months after activated carbon amendment, as compared to a mechanical-mixed control plot Results of this study illustrate PEDs provide an inexpensive, in situ method to measure total PCB contamination in sediment pore water using a small set of PRCs.

  15. Developing Rapid and Cost-Effective Tools for Assessing Groundwater Impacts on Contaminated Sediments

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research developed quick and inexpensive methods that can be useful in characterizing the interaction of water and solids within the GW/SW transition zone to explain processes that occur during physical contact between groundwater and sediments. The research used self-conta...

  16. Developing Rapid and Cost-Effective Tools for Assessing Groundwater Impacts on Contaminated Sediments

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research developed quick and inexpensive methods that can be useful in characterizing the interaction of water and solids within the GW/SW transition zone to explain processes that occur during physical contact between groundwater and sediments. The research used self-conta...

  17. Dredging Operations Technical Support Program. Transformation, Fixation, and Mobilization of Arsenic and Antimony in Contaminated Sediments.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-01

    Waslenchuk (1979) felt that this complexation of As by organics prevents adsorptive interactions between dissolved As and active solid-phase organic and...conditions. It appears, however, that the reasons for increased water soluble As concentrations under anaerobic conditions are more complex than a simple...arsenite and organo -arsenicals is widely believed to be a detoxifying mechanism (Bottino et al., 1978; Andreae and Klumpp, 1979; Pilson, 1974

  18. Measuring and modeling reduction of DDT availability to the water column and mussels following activated carbon amendment of contaminated sediment.

    PubMed

    Tomaszewski, Jeanne E; McLeod, Pamela B; Luthy, Richard G

    2008-10-01

    A 28-day accumulation study demonstrated the use of mussel uptake, passive samplers, and biodynamic modeling to measure the reduction of dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) availability in the water column after the addition of activated carbon to contaminated sediment. Sediment collected from Lauritzen Channel, Richmond, California (16.5mg total DDT/kg) was mixed with either virgin activated carbon or a reactivated carbon for one month, after which a 28-day laboratory exposure study was completed. Mussels (Mytilus edulis) suspended above activated carbon-treated sediment accumulated significantly less total DDT in soft tissue, 91% and 84% for virgin and reactivated carbon, respectively, as compared to untreated sediment. Mussel tissue concentrations correlated to concentrations in semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) and polyethylene devices (PEDs) suspended over the same sediments. A biodynamic model that incorporated DDT water concentrations, either analytically measured or estimated from PED uptake, described mussel accumulation over time. Thus, passive samplers in combination with biodynamic modeling may provide an important screening tool for assessment of filter-feeding uptake and ecological risk to water-dwelling organisms exposed to aqueous phase hydrophobic organic contaminants.

  19. Effect of three kinds of surfactants and β-cyclodextrin on the phytoremediation of BDE-209 contaminated sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Liangyuan; Guo, Weijie; Zhao, Weihua; Long, Meng; Li, Huan

    2017-05-01

    Plant-accelerated removal of BDE-209 from sediment by aquatic macrophyte Scirpus validus Vahl in the presence of a cationic-surfactant (CTAB), an anionic-surfactant (SDS), a nonionic-surfactant (Tween 80) and β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) at the concentrations ranged from 300 mg/kg to 1000 mg/kg were investigated. Significantly negative effect were not observed for the growth of S. validus in terms of plant height and stem diatemeter, which indicated that it is preferable for CTAB, SDS, Tween 80 and β-cyclodextrin to be utilized as the BDE-209 phytoremediation amendment. Furthermore, CTAB, SDS and Tween 80 in the certain concentrations significantly enhanced the phytoremediation efficiencies and 11.78-19.33% of increase in BDE-209 removal rates was obtained. Significantly enhance of BDE-209 phytoremediation efficiency was not observed in the added β-CD concentration ranges. Results obtained from this study provided some insight with regard to the feasibility of phytoremediation for BDE-209 contaminated sediments with addition of suitable solubilizers, especially Tween 80.

  20. Effects of activated carbon ageing in three PCB contaminated sediments: Sorption efficiency and secondary effects on Lumbriculus variegatus.

    PubMed

    Nybom, Inna; Waissi-Leinonen, Greta; Mäenpää, Kimmo; Leppänen, Matti T; Kukkonen, Jussi V K; Werner, David; Akkanen, Jarkko

    2015-11-15

    The sorption efficiency and possible secondary effects of activated carbon (AC) (ø 63-200 μm) was studied with Lumbriculus variegatus in three PCB contaminated sediments applying long AC-sediment contact time (3 years). AC amendment efficiently reduced PCB bioavailability as determined with both, L. variegatus bioaccumulation test and passive samplers. However, dose related secondary effects of AC on egestion rate and biomass were observed (applied doses 0.25% and 2.5% sediment dry weight). The sorption capacity and secondary effects remained similar when the experiments were repeated after three years of AC-sediment contact time. Further, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) samples revealed morphological changes in the L. variegatus gut wall microvilli layer. Sediment properties affected both sorption efficiency and secondary effects, but 2.5% AC addition had significant effects regardless of the sediment. In, conclusion, AC is an efficient and stable sorbent to decrease the bioavailability of PCBs. However, sediment dwelling organisms, such as Oligochaete worms in this study, may be sensitive to the carbon amendments. The secondary effects and possible morphological changes in benthic organisms should not be overlooked as in many cases they form the basis of the aquatic food webs.

  1. Multicriteria decision analysis to assess options for managing contaminated sediments: Application to Southern Busan Harbor, South Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jongbum; Kim, Suk Hyun; Hong, Gi Hoon; Suedel, Burton C; Clarke, Joan

    2010-01-01

    Many years of untreated effluent discharge from residential areas, a shipyard, a marina, and a large fish market resulted in substantial contamination of bottom sediment in Southern Busan Harbor, South Korea. Contaminants in these sediments include heavy metals and organic compounds. Newly introduced regulations for ocean disposal of dredged material in South Korea pose significant challenges, because the previous practice of offshore disposal of contaminated dredged material was no longer possible after August 2008. The South Korean government has mandated that such sediments be assessed in a way that identifies the most appropriate dredged material management alternative, addressing environmental, social, and cost objectives. An approach using multicriteria decision analysis (MCDA) in combination with comparative risk assessment was used as a systematic and transparent framework for prioritizing several dredged sediment management alternatives. We illustrate how MCDA can recognize the multiple goals of contaminated sediment management. Values used in weighting decision criteria were derived from surveys of stakeholders who were sediment management professionals, business owners, or government decision makers. The results of the analysis showed that land reclamation was the preferred alternative among cement-lock, sediment washing, 3 contained aquatic disposal alternatives (one in combination with a hopper dredge), geotextile tubes, solidification, and land reclamation after solidification treatment. Land reclamation was the preferred alternative, which performed well across all MCDA objectives, because of the availability of a near-shore confined disposal facility within a reasonable distance from the dredging area.

  2. Cation exchange reactions controlling desorption of 90Sr 2+ from coarse-grained contaminated sediments at the Hanford site, Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinley, J. P.; Zachara, J. M.; Smith, S. C.; Liu, C.

    2007-01-01

    Nuclear waste that bore 90Sr 2+ was accidentally leaked into the vadose zone at the Hanford site, and was immobilized at relatively shallow depths in sediments containing little apparent clay or silt-sized components. Sr 2+, 90Sr 2+, Mg 2+, and Ca 2+ was desorbed and total inorganic carbon concentration was monitored during the equilibration of this sediment with varying concentrations of Na +, Ca 2+. A cation exchange model previously developed for similar sediments was applied to these results as a predictor of final solution compositions. The model included binary exchange reactions for the four operant cations and an equilibrium dissolution/precipitation reaction for calcite. The model successfully predicted the desorption data. The contaminated sediment was also examined using digital autoradiography, a sensitive tool for imaging the distribution of radioactivity. The exchanger phase containing 90Sr was found to consist of smectite formed from weathering of mesostasis glass in basaltic lithic fragments. These clasts are a significant component of Hanford formation sands. The relatively small but significant cation exchange capacity of these sediments was thus a consequence of reaction with physically sequestered clays in sediment that contained essentially no fine-grained material. The nature of this exchange component explained the relatively slow (scale of days) evolution of desorption solutions. The experimental and model results indicated that there is little risk of migration of 90Sr 2+ to the water table.

  3. Cation Exchange Reactions Controlling Desorption of 90Sr2+ From Coarse-Grained Contaminated Sediments at the Hanford Site, Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinley, J. P.; Zachara, J. M.; Smith, S. C.; Liu, C.

    2005-12-01

    Nuclear waste that bore 90Sr2+ was accidentally leaked into the vadose zone at the Hanford site, and was immobilized at relatively shallow depths in sediments containing little apparent clay or silt-sized components. We desorbed Sr2+, 90Sr2+, Mg2+, and Ca2+, and monitored total inorganic carbon concentration during the equilibration of this sediment with varying concentrations of Na+ and Ca2+. A cation exchange model previously developed for similar sediments was applied to these results as a predictor of final solution compositions. The model included binary exchange reactions for the four operant cations and an equilibrium dissolution/precipitation reaction for calcite. The model produced an excellent prediction for desorption data. We also examined the contaminated sediment using digital autoradiography, a sensitive tool for imaging the distribution of radioactivity. The exchanger phase containing 90Sr was found to consist of smectite formed from weathering of mesostasis glass in basaltic lithic fragments. These clasts are a significant component of Hanford formation sands. The relatively small but significant cation exchange capacity of these sediments was thus a consequence of reaction with physically sequestered clays in a sediment that contained essentially no fine-grained material. The nature of this exchange component explains the relatively slow (scale of days) evolution of desorption solutions. The experimental and model results indicate that there is little risk of migration of 90Sr2+ to the water table.

  4. Environmental impact of the use of contaminated sediments as partial replacement of the aggregate used in road construction.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Patricio X; Al-Abed, Souhail R; Barth, Edwin; Loftspring, Catherine; Voit, James; Clark, Patrick; Ioannides, Anastasios M

    2011-05-15

    The Indiana Harbor Canal (IHC) is a waterway extensively polluted with heavy metals and petroleum. Since there are limited disposal options for the petroleum-contaminated sediments (PCSs) of the canal, the environmental impact of IHC dewatered sediment when used as partial replacement of the aggregate used in hot mix asphalt (HMA) for road construction was investigated. In order to assess the long term migration of the target contaminants into the environment, the TCLP, SPLP, and a Constant pH leaching test were applied to a HMA mixture containing 10% of dewatered PCS, a conventional HMA, and the dewatered PCS. None of the heavy metals significantly leached from any of the tested materials in any of the conducted tests. Despite the presence of PAHs in the PCS, these were not found in any of the leachate samples. Finally, among the measured VOCs, only acetone and 2-butanone were found to leach from the asphalt mixtures and the sediment in the Constant pH experiment. It was concluded that it may be environmentally safe to replace the aggregates of the HMA used in road construction in the studied proportions with dewatered PCS based upon leaching levels as compared to TCLP regulated levels. This could be a viable, beneficial use option for the PCS, and therefore, for the canal remediation.

  5. Assessing the Effects of Bioturbation on Metal Bioavailability in Contaminated Sediments by Diffusive Gradients in Thin Films (DGT).

    PubMed

    Amato, Elvio D; Simpson, Stuart L; Remaili, Timothy M; Spadaro, David A; Jarolimek, Chad V; Jolley, Dianne F

    2016-03-15

    The burrowing and feeding activities of benthic organisms can alter metal speciation in sediments and affect an organisms' exposure to metals. Recently, the performance of the in situ technique of diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) for predicting metal bioavailability has been investigated in response to the increasing demand of considering contaminant bioavailability in sediment quality assessments. In this study, we test the ability of the DGT technique for predicting the metal bioavailability in clean and contaminated sediments that are being subjected to varying degrees of sediments disturbance: low bioturbation (bivalve Tellina deltoidalis alone) and high bioturbation (bivalve and actively burrowing amphipod, Victoriopisa australiensis). Significant release of DGT-labile Cd, Ni, Pb, and Zn, but lower Cu and Fe, occurred in the pore and overlying waters of sediments exposed to high bioturbation conditions, resulting in higher bioaccumulation of zinc in bivalves. Strong relationships were found between bioaccumulation of Pb and Zn and time-integrated DGT-metal fluxes, whereas poor relationships were obtained using total or dilute-acid extractable metal concentrations. This results demonstrate that DGT is a useful tool for assessing metal bioavailability in sediments and can provide useful predictions of metal bioavailable to benthic organisms in dynamic sediment environments.

  6. Determination and genotoxicity of high molecular mass polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons isolated from coal-tar-contaminated sediment

    SciTech Connect

    Marvin, C.H.; Lundrigan, J.A.; McCarry, B.E.; Bryant, D.W.

    1995-12-01

    A bioassay-directed chemical fractionation methodology was used to identify the principal mutagenic compounds in an organic solvent extract of coal-tar-contaminated sediment from Sydney Harbor, Nova Scotia. Biological assays with Salmonella typhimurium bacteria with the addition of oxidative metabolism indicated that the majority of the mutagenic activity observed in the sediment extract was associated with the higher molecular mass polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). A normal phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) technique was developed to separate the PAH-rich solvent extracts into fractions containing isomeric PAHs of a single benzologue class. These fractions were analyzed by probe mass spectrometry and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), and subjected to biological assays using strain YG1025 with the addition of oxidative metabolism (4% and 10% S9). Fractions containing compounds of molecular weights 252, 276, 278, and 302 amu exhibited mutagenic activities of 930 {+-} 125, 510 {+-} 100, 250 {+-} 40, and 370 {+-} 140 rev/mg sediment, respectively. The molecular weight 252 and 276 amu fractions were further analyzed using reversed-phase HPLC and GC-MS to identify the individual PAHs responsible for the observed biological activity. High molecular mass PAHs including benzo[a]pyrene, benzo[ghi]perylene, indeno[1,2,3-cd]pyrene, and compounds of molecular weight 302 amu were found to be responsible for the majority of the mutagenic activity displayed by this complex environmental mixture.

  7. Spider-mediated flux of PCBs from contaminated sediments to terrestrial ecosystems and potential risks to arachnivorous birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walters, D.M.; Mills, M.A.; Fritz, K.M.; Raikow, D.F.

    2010-01-01

    We investigated aquatic insect utilization and PCB exposure in riparian spiders at the Lake Hartwell Superfund site (Clemson, SC). We sampled sediments, adult chironomids, terrestrial insects, riparian spiders (Tetragnathidae, Araneidae, and Mecynogea lemniscata), and upland spiders (Araneidae) along a sediment contamination gradient. Stable isotopes (?13C, ? 15N) indicated that riparian spiders primarily consumed aquatic insects whereas upland spiders consumed terrestrial insects. PCBs in chironomids (mean 1240 ng/g among sites) were 2 orders of magnitude higher than terrestrial insects (15.2 ng/g), similar to differences between riparian (820?2012 ng/g) and upland spiders (30 ng/g). Riparian spider PCBs were positively correlated with sediment concentrations for all taxa (r2 = 0.44?0.87). We calculated spider-based wildlife values (WVs, the minimum spider PCB concentrations causing physiologically significant doses in consumers) to assess exposure risks for arachnivorous birds. Spider concentrations exceeded WVs for most birds at heavily contaminated sites and were ?14-fold higher for the most sensitive species (chickadee nestlings, Poecile spp.). Spiders are abundant and ubiquitous in riparian habitats, where they depend on aquatic insect prey. These traits, along with the high degree of spatial correlation between spider and sediment concentrations we observed, suggest that they are model indicator species for monitoring contaminated sediment sites and assessing risks associated with contaminant flux into terrestrial ecosystems. ?? This article not subject to U.S. Copyright. Published 2009 by the American Chemical Society.

  8. Removal and Re-use of Tar-contaminated Sediment by Freeze-dredging at a Coking Plant Luleå, Sweden.

    PubMed

    Rostmark, Susanne C; Colombo, Manuel; Knutsson, Sven; Öberg, Gunilla

      Submerged tar-contaminated sediment are generally very loose, which makes remediation challenging. We tested if a modified version of freeze-dredging could be used to remove and dewater such sediment in a canal down-stream a coking plant. PVC hoses carrying a heat medium were placed horizontally in the submerged sediment. Five days of freezing allowed straightforward removal of most of the sediment. Flat freeze cells were placed side by side in the canal to remove the rest. The freeze-thaw process increased the dry substance content from approximately 50 to 80%. Outdoors storage under rainy conditions did not re-wet the dried sediment. The material was successfully used as feed-stock in the coking plant, with the double cost-benefit of avoided transportation to deposit and reduced use of coal. The study demonstrates that freeze-dredging can facilitate removal, storage and beneficial re-use of submerged tar-contaminated sediment.

  9. Effects of Oil-Contaminated Sediments on Submerged Vegetation: An Experimental Assessment of Ruppia maritima.

    PubMed

    Martin, Charles W; Hollis, Lauris O; Turner, R Eugene

    2015-01-01

    Oil spills threaten the productivity of ecosystems through the degradation of coastal flora and the ecosystem services these plants provide. While lab and field investigations have quantified the response of numerous species of emergent vegetation to oil, the effects on submerged vegetation remain uncertain. Here, we discuss the implications of oil exposure for Ruppia maritima, one of the most common species of submerged vegetation found in the region affected by the recent Deepwater Horizon oil spill. We grew R. maritima in a range of manipulated sediment oil concentrations: 0, 0.26, 0.53, and 1.05 mL oil /L tank volume, and tracked changes in growth (wet weight and shoot density/length), reproductive activity (inflorescence and seed production), root characteristics (mass, length, diameter, and area), and uprooting force of plants. While no statistical differences were detected in growth, plants exhibited significant changes to reproductive output, root morphology, and uprooting force. We found significant reductions in inflorescences and fruiting bodies at higher oil concentrations. In addition, the roots growing in the high oil were shorter and wider. Plants in medium and high oil required less force to uproot. A second experiment was performed to separate the effects of root morphology and oiled sediment properties and indicated that there were also changes to sediment cohesion that contributed to a reduction in uprooting forces in medium and high oil. Given the importance of sexual reproduction for these plants, oil contamination may have substantial population-level effects. Moreover, areas containing buried oil may be more susceptible to high energy storm events due to the reduction in uprooting force of foundation species such as R. maritima.

  10. Effects of Oil-Contaminated Sediments on Submerged Vegetation: An Experimental Assessment of Ruppia maritima

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Charles W.; Hollis, Lauris O.; Turner, R. Eugene

    2015-01-01

    Oil spills threaten the productivity of ecosystems through the degradation of coastal flora and the ecosystem services these plants provide. While lab and field investigations have quantified the response of numerous species of emergent vegetation to oil, the effects on submerged vegetation remain uncertain. Here, we discuss the implications of oil exposure for Ruppia maritima, one of the most common species of submerged vegetation found in the region affected by the recent Deepwater Horizon oil spill. We grew R. maritima in a range of manipulated sediment oil concentrations: 0, 0.26, 0.53, and 1.05 mL oil /L tank volume, and tracked changes in growth (wet weight and shoot density/length), reproductive activity (inflorescence and seed production), root characteristics (mass, length, diameter, and area), and uprooting force of plants. While no statistical differences were detected in growth, plants exhibited significant changes to reproductive output, root morphology, and uprooting force. We found significant reductions in inflorescences and fruiting bodies at higher oil concentrations. In addition, the roots growing in the high oil were shorter and wider. Plants in medium and high oil required less force to uproot. A second experiment was performed to separate the effects of root morphology and oiled sediment properties and indicated that there were also changes to sediment cohesion that contributed to a reduction in uprooting forces in medium and high oil. Given the importance of sexual reproduction for these plants, oil contamination may have substantial population-level effects. Moreover, areas containing buried oil may be more susceptible to high energy storm events due to the reduction in uprooting force of foundation species such as R. maritima. PMID:26430971

  11. Composition, distribution, and hydrologic effects of contaminated sediments resulting from the discharge of gold milling wastes to Whitewood Creek at Lead and Deadwood, South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goddard, K.E.

    1989-01-01

    The Whitewood Creek-Belle Fourche-Cheyenne River stream system in western South Dakota has been extensively contaminated by the discharge to Whitewood Creek of about 100 million tons of mill tailings from gold-mining operations. The resulting contaminated sediments contain unusually large concentrations of arsenic, as much as 11,000 micrograms/g, derived from the mineral arsenopyrite, as well as potentially toxic constituents derived from the ore-body minerals or from the milling processes. Because of the anomalous arsenic concentrations associated with the contamination, arsenic was used as an indicator for a geochemically based, random, sediment-sampling program. Arsenic concentrations in shallow, contaminated sediments along the flood plains of the streams were from 1 to 3 orders of magnitude larger than arsenic concentrations in uncontaminated sediments in about 75% of the flood plains of Whitewood Creek and the Belle Fourche River. Appreciable surface-water contamination resulting from the contaminated sediments is confined to Whitewood Creek and a reach of the Belle Fourche River downstream from the mouth of Whitewood Creek. In Whitewood Creek , dissolved-arsenic concentrations vary from about 20 to 80 microgram/L during the year in response to variations in groundwater inflow and dilution, whereas total-recoverable-arsenic concentrations vary from about 20 to 8 ,000 micrograms/L during short periods in response to rapid changes in suspended-sediment concentration. Contamination of the alluvial aquifer along the stream system is limited to areas in direct contact with large deposits of contaminated sediments. Within the aquifer, arsenic concentrations are thought to be controlled by sorption-desorption on metallic hydroxides. (USGS)

  12. Insight into the long-term effect of mangrove species on removal of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) from BDE-47 contaminated sediments.

    PubMed

    Chen, Juan; Wang, Chao; Shen, Zhi-Jun; Gao, Gui-Feng; Zheng, Hai-Lei

    2017-01-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) have become ubiquitous environmental contaminants, particularly in mangrove wetlands. However, little is known about the long-term effect of mangrove plants on PBDE removal from contaminated sediments. A 12-month microcosm experiment was conducted to understand the effect of two mangrove species, namely Avicennia marina (Am) and Aegiceras corniculatum (Ac), on PBDE removal from the sediments spiked with 2000ngg(-1) dry weight of BDE-47, and to explore the microbial mechanism responsible for the planting-induced effects on BDE-47 removal. Results showed that planting of mangrove species, either Am or Ac, could accelerate BDE-47 removal from contaminated sediments during the 12months experiment, mainly through enhancing microbial degradation process. In particular, Am sediment had significantly higher BDE-47 degradation efficiency compared with Ac sediment, which may be mainly attributed to higher activities of urease and dehydrogenase, as well as higher 16S rRNA gene copies of total bacteria and organohalide-respiring bacteria (OHRB) in Am sediment. Moreover, planting could shift sediment bacterial community composition and selectively enrich some bacterial genera responsible for PBDE degradation. Such selective enrichment effect of Am on the potential PBDE-degrading bacteria differed distinctly from that of Ac. These results indicated that long-term planting of mangrove species, especially Am, could significantly promote BDE-47 removal from the contaminated sediments by enhancing microbial activity, increasing total bacterial and OHRB abundances and altering bacterial community composition.

  13. The use of coarse, separable, condensed-phase organic carbon particles to characterize desorption resistance of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in contaminated sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Chai, Y.Z.; Kochetkov, A.; Reible, D.D.

    2007-07-15

    Physical separations were employed to characterize the source of desorption-resistant behavior for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in laboratory- and field-contaminated sediments. Size and density separation of laboratory-contaminated sediments did not effectively separate the amorphous-phase (volatile) and condensed-phase (nonvolatile) organic carbon as measured by thermal oxidation at 375 {sup o}C. These separations also did not result in sediment fractions with significantly different desorption characteristics as measured by apparent partition coefficients. Coarse particles from a field-contaminated sediment from Utica Harbor (UH; Utica, NY, USA), however, could be directly separated into sandy fractions and organic fractions that were composed of woody organic matter, charcoal or charred vegetative matter, and coal-like and coal-cinder particles. Chemical analysis showed that coal-like (glassy, nonporous) and coal-cinder (porous, sintered) particles exhibited very high PAH concentrations and high apparent partition coefficients. These particles also exhibited significantly higher condensed-phase (nonvolatile) organic carbon contents as defined by thermal oxidation at 375{sup o}C. The apparent partition coefficients of PAHs in the coal-cinder particles were a good indication of the apparent partition coefficients in the desorption-resistant fraction of UH sediment, indicating that the coarse particles provided a reasonable characterization of the desorption-resistance phenomena in these sediments even though the coarse fractions represented less than 25% of the organic carbon in the whole sediment.

  14. Assessing organic contaminant fluxes from contaminated sediments following dam removal in an urbanized river.

    PubMed

    Cantwell, Mark G; Perron, Monique M; Sullivan, Julia C; Katz, David R; Burgess, Robert M; King, John

    2014-08-01

    In this study, methods and approaches were developed and tested to assess changes in contaminant fluxes resulting from dam removal in a riverine system. Sediment traps and passive samplers were deployed to measure particulate and dissolved polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in the water column prior to and following removal of a small, low-head dam in the Pawtuxet River, an urbanized river located in Cranston, RI, USA. During the study, concentrations of particulate and dissolved PAHs ranged from 21.5 to 103 μg/g and from 68 to 164 ng/L, respectively. Overall, temporal trends of PAHs showed no increases in either dissolved or particulate phases following removal of the dam. Dissolved concentrations of PCBs were very low, remaining below 1.72 ng/L at all sites. Particulate PCB concentrations across sites and time showed slightly greater variability, ranging from 80 to 469 ng/g, but with no indication that dam removal influenced any increases. Particulate PAHs and PCBs were sampled continuously at the site located below the dam and did not show sustained increases in concentration resulting from dam removal. The employment of passive sampling technology and sediment traps was highly effective in monitoring the concentrations and flux of contaminants moving through the river system. Variations in river flow had no effect on the concentration of contaminants in the dissolved or particulate phases, but did influence the flux rate of contaminants exiting the river. Overall, dam removal did not cause measurable sediment disturbance or increase the concentration or fluxes of dissolved or particulate PAHs and PCBs. This is due in large part to low volumes of impounded sediment residing above the dam and highly armored sediments in the river channel, which limited erosion. Results from this study will be used to improve methods and approaches that assess the short- and long-term impacts ecological restoration activities such as

  15. Compulsive sexual behavior: Prefrontal and limbic volume and interactions

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Casper; Morris, Laurel S.; Kvamme, Timo L.; Hall, Paula; Birchard, Thaddeus

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Compulsive sexual behaviors (CSB) are relatively common and associated with significant personal and social dysfunction. The underlying neurobiology is still poorly understood. The present study examines brain volumes and resting state functional connectivity in CSB compared with matched healthy volunteers (HV). Methods Structural MRI (MPRAGE) data were collected in 92 subjects (23 CSB males and 69 age‐matched male HV) and analyzed using voxel‐based morphometry. Resting state functional MRI data using multi‐echo planar sequence and independent components analysis (ME‐ICA) were collected in 68 subjects (23 CSB subjects and 45 age‐matched HV). Results CSB subjects showed greater left amygdala gray matter volumes (small volume corrected, Bonferroni adjusted P < 0.01) and reduced resting state functional connectivity between the left amygdala seed and bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (whole brain, cluster corrected FWE P < 0.05) compared with HV. Conclusions CSB is associated with elevated volumes in limbic regions relevant to motivational salience and emotion processing, and impaired functional connectivity between prefrontal control regulatory and limbic regions. Future studies should aim to assess longitudinal measures to investigate whether these findings are risk factors that predate the onset of the behaviors or are consequences of the behaviors. Hum Brain Mapp 38:1182–1190, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27787929

  16. Direct and indirect effects of copper-contaminated sediments on the functions of model freshwater ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Gardham, Stephanie; Chariton, Anthony A; Hose, Grant C

    2015-01-01

    Copper is acutely toxic to, and directly affects, primary producers and decomposers, which are key players in essential processes such as the nutrient cycle in freshwater ecosystems. Even though the indirect effects of metals (for example effects due to changes in species interactions) may be more common than direct effects, little is known about the indirect effects of copper on primary producers and decomposers. The effects of copper on phytoplankton, macrophytes, periphyton and organic matter decomposition in an outdoor lentic mesocosm facility were assessed, and links between the responses examined. Copper directly decreased macrophyte growth, subsurface organic matter decomposition, and the potential for high phytoplankton Chlorophyll a concentrations. However, periphyton cover and organic matter decomposition on the surface of the sediment were stimulated by the presence of copper. These latter responses were attributed to indirect effects, due to a reduction in grazing pressure from snails, particularly Physa acuta, in the higher copper-contaminated mesocosms. This permitted the growth of periphyton and other heterotrophs, ultimately increasing decomposition at the sediment surface. The present study demonstrates the pronounced influence indirect effects may have on ecological function, findings that may not be observed in traditional laboratory studies (which utilize single species or simplistic communities).

  17. Overview of the U.S. EPA/SERDP/ESTCP: Laboratory, Field, and Analytical Procedures for Using Passive Sampling in the Evaluation of Contaminated Sediments: User’s Manual

    EPA Science Inventory

    Passive sampling can be used for applications at contaminated sediment sites including performing assessments of contaminant bioavailability (i.e., freely dissolved concentration (Cfree)), conducting remedial investigations and feasibility studies, and assessing the potential for...

  18. Robot technology: Interaction with the environment. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Coiffet, P.

    1984-01-01

    This book explains the steps that need to be taken in the making of the advanced robot. The advanced robot is defined as the robot that senses and reacts to changes in its environment. It provides comprehensive survey and description of the problems posed by the detection of stress, tactile and proximetric detection, and artificial vision, all essential to the development and understanding of the adaptive robot. It also provides an excellent summary of techniques, practical and mathematical, needed to deal with them. This book provides an indispensible source of reference for both designers and users of robots. The contents are, introduction; characteristics of robots adaptable to environmental variations interaction to weight surrounding medium and workload, interactions involving physical contact between robot and environment; the detection of stress, interactions physical contact between robot and environment; tactile detection, remote interaction: proximity sensing, remote interaction, artificial vision, remote sensing: artificial vision-representation of visual information. Remote sensing: artificial vision.

  19. Visualization by proxy: a novel framework for deferred interaction with volume data.

    PubMed

    Tikhonova, Anna; Correa, Carlos D; Ma, Kwan-Liu

    2010-01-01

    Interactivity is key to exploration of volume data. Interactivity may be hindered due to many factors, e.g. large data size,high resolution or complexity of a data set, or an expensive rendering algorithm. We present a novel framework for visualizing volume data that enables interactive exploration using proxy images, without accessing the original 3D data. Data exploration using direct volume rendering requires multiple (often redundant) accesses to possibly large amounts of data. The notion of visualization by proxy relies on the ability to defer operations traditionally used for exploring 3D data to a more suitable intermediate representation for interaction--proxy images. Such operations include view changes, transfer function exploration, and relighting. While previous work has addressed specific interaction needs, we provide a complete solution that enables real-time interaction with large data sets and has low hardware and storage requirements.

  20. Evaluation of a sustainable remediation option: beneficial reuse of petroleum-contaminated sediment as an energy source.

    PubMed

    Sasivongpakdi, Adison; Lee, Joo-Youp; Bharadwaj, Hari; Keener, Tim C; Barth, Edwin F; Clark, Patrick J; Bujalski, Nicole M; Yeardley, Roger B

    2012-11-01

    The characteristics of petroleum-contaminated sediment (PCS) have been evaluated to assess whether the practice of its beneficial reuse as a sole or supplemental energy source is sustainable relative to other sediment remediation options such as monitored natural recovery (MNR), capping, or off-site disposal. Some of these remediation options for PCS are energy-intensive and/or require land utilization. The energy and compositional analysis results indicate a low carbon content (15-17%(wt)) and corresponding low energy values of 5,200 kJ/kg (2,200 Btu/lb) to 5,600 kJ/kg (2,400 Btu/lb). However, given other decision-making criteria, the sediment may contain enough value to be added as a supplemental fuel given that it is normally considered a waste product and is readily available. The thermogravimetric profiles obtained under both combustion and pyrolytic conditions showed that the sulfur contents were comparable to typical low sulfur bituminous or lignite coals found in the United States, and most of the volatiles could be vaporized below 750 degrees C. The heavy metal concentrations determined before and after combustion of the PCS indicated that further engineering controls may be required for mercury, arsenic, and lead. Due to the potential for reduction of public health and environmental threats, potential economic savings, and conservation of natural resources (petroleum and land), removal of PCS by dredging and beneficial reuse as a supplemental fuel clearly has merit to be considered as a sustainable remediation option.

  1. Fluorescent aromatic hydrocarbons in bile as a biomarker of exposure of brown bullheads (Ameiurus nebulosus) to contaminated sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Leadly, T.A.; Haffner, G.D.; Arcand-Hoy, L.D.; Metcalfe, C.D.

    1999-04-01

    Analysis of fluorescent aromatic compounds (FACs) in the bile of fish has been widely used as a biomarker of exposure to polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) contamination. However, bile FAC data for feral fish populations are typically highly variable, and in a few cases, elevation of FACs has not been observed in fish from contaminated areas. In this study, the bile FACs and hepatic ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase activity in brown bullheads (Ameiurus nebulosus) exposed in the laboratory to contaminated sediments from Hamilton Harbour, Ontario, Canada, increased by 173-fold within 72 h of initial exposure and rapidly declined thereafter. In bullheads caged in the contaminated Trenton Channel area of the Detroit River, bile FACs also increased rapidly within 4 d of initial exposure to mean levels >3,000 ng of benzo[a]pyrene equivalents per milliliter of bile. Surprisingly, there was no difference in the mean-levels of bile FACs in fish caged above the sediment versus fish caged in direct contact with the sediment, indicating that water may be the major vector for uptake of PAHs. The lower bile FACs in bullheads caged in other regions of the Detroit River were consistent with the lower concentrations of PAHs in the sediments from these areas. These data indicate that bile FAC levels are a biomarker of recent exposure to aromatic hydrocarbons in sediments. However, FAC data were highly variable even in these studies, in which fish were relatively homogenous in size, feeding status, and exposure history. Therefore, Even higher variability in bile FAC data are expected in biomarker studies as a result of differences in reproductive status, size, diet, and mobility of the fish.

  2. X-ray Spectroscopic Investigation of the Distribution and Speciation of Uranium in Contaminated Sediments From the DOE's Hanford Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catalano, J. G.; Zachara, J. M.; Heald, S. M.; Brown, G. E.

    2002-12-01

    Extensive uranium contamination of the subsurface at the Department of Energy's Hanford site has occurred through the leakage of significant quantities of high-level nuclear waste. Over 25 tons of uranium have been spilled into the vadose zone in the 200 and 300 Areas at the site, with sizable groundwater plumes present or developing. An understanding of the speciation and distribution of uranium in the vadose zone is needed to predict the future migration of uranium into groundwater. We have applied synchrotron-based x-ray spectroscopic techniques to characterize the speciation of uranium in contaminated sediments from under tank BX-102 in the 200 Area, and from disposals ponds and areas adjacent to waste storage areas in the 300 Area. X-ray fluorescence microprobe (μ-XRF) studies of BX-102 samples shows uranium distributed heterogeneously, occurring in discrete particles <5 mm in diameter. X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopic studies demonstrate that >95% of the uranium occurs as U(VI) in all samples. In the BX-102 samples, extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy suggests that the primary uranium species is an uranophane-group mineral, most likely boltwoodite. Two samples from the 300 area also contain uranium primarily as an uranophane-group mineral, whereas one sample contains a mixture of phases, and one appears to contain primarily adsorbed U(VI). These differences may reflect different waste sources and water exposures. These studies suggest that an uranophane-group mineral is the primary phase controlling the geochemistry of U at the Hanford site. X-ray microdiffraction studies of these samples will also be presented.

  3. Oceanisphaera aquimarina sp. nov., Isolated from Oil-Contaminated Sediment of Ocean Coastal Area from South Korea.

    PubMed

    Cho, Seonghyeon; Lee, Sang-Seob

    2016-11-01

    Strain S33(T) was isolated from oil-contaminated sediment of Tae-an coastal region of South Korea. Cells are aerobic, motile, Gram staining-negative, and coccoid shaped. Strain S33(T) grew optimally at the temperature of 25 °C (range of 4-40 °C), pH 6.0 (range of pH 6.0-10.0), and in the presence of 1 % (w/v) NaCl (range of 0-10 %). Ubiquinone-8 was the predominant respiratory quinone. C16:0, summed feature 3 (comprising C16:1ω7c/C16:1ω6c) and C18:1ω7c were the major fatty acids. The major polar lipids were phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, and diphosphatidylglycerol. Strain S33(T) showed the ability to degrade benzene, toluene, and ethylbenzene after 3 days incubation. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis showed that the strain S33(T) was most closely related to Oceanisphaera sediminis TW92(T) (97.3 %), Oceanisphaera profunda SM1222(T) (97.2 %), and Oceanisphaera ostreae T-w6(T) (97.1 %) and <97 % with other members of the genus Oceanisphaera. The genomic DNA G+C mol% content of strain S33(T) was 51.0 mol%. Based on distinct phenotypic, genotypic, and phylogenetic analysis, strain S33(T) was proposed to represent a novel species in the genus Oceanisphaera as Oceanisphaera aquimarina sp. nov. (= KEMB 1002-058(T) = JCM 30 794(T)).

  4. Toolset for assessment of natural recovery from legacy contaminated sediment: Case study of Pallanza Bay, Lake Maggiore, Italy.

    PubMed

    Lin, Diana; Cho, Yeo-Myoung; Oen, Amy; Eek, Espen; Tommerdahl, Jake P; Luthy, Richard G

    2017-09-15

    The aim of this study was to develop a toolset that can be used by site managers to assess and monitor natural attenuation processes in sediments contaminated with legacy hydrophobic organic contaminants. The toolset is composed of sediment traps to measure quality and deposition rate of incoming sediment under different hydrodynamic conditions, sediment cores to show trends in sediment bed concentrations over time, and passive samplers attached to a porewater probe frame to assess the mobility of buried contaminants and possible contaminant flux from sediment. These three tools were used together for the first time to assess the mobility of dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) contaminants in sediment in Pallanza Bay, Lake Maggiore, Italy. Depositing sediment and sediment cores were consistent in showing that DDT-contaminated sediment is undergoing burial by cleaner sediment. Elevated DDT concentrations from historical contamination seemed to be effectively buried and immobilized by ongoing deposition by cleaner sediment, because the positive flux from the elevated DDT concentration in the sediment porewater should not advance towards the sediment surface. The monitoring toolset introduced in this study enabled us to more effectively assess ongoing natural attenuation processes and provide more risk relevant data than traditional methods used in monitored natural recovery projects, such as bulk sediment concentrations from sediment cores. Our field assessment results suggest that incoming sediment from the Toce River have reduced DDT concentrations in the sediment compared to historic levels, and will continue to do so in locations where higher DDT concentrations are found within the bioactive layer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Recent advances in the use of estuarine meiobenthos to assess contaminated sediment effects in multi-species whole sediment microcosms

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, G.T.; Coull, B.C.; Schizas, N.V.; Donelan, T.L.

    1995-12-31

    Many marine meiobenthic taxa (i.e. invertebrates passing a 1-mm sieve but retaining on a 0.063 mm sieve) are ideal for ``whole-sediment`` and porewater bioassay of sedimented pollutants. Annual production of meiobenthos is 5--10 times that of the more commonly studied macrobenthos, and > 95% of all meiobenthos live in the oxic zone of muddy sediments at densities of 4--12 million per M{sup 2}. Most spend their entire lifecycles, burrowing freely and feeding on/within the sediment:porewater matrix, many taxa undergo 10--14 generations per year, most larval/juvenile stages are benthic, and many have easily quantifiable reproductive output. Furthermore, many meiobenthic taxa can be cultured indefinitely over multiple life-cycles within simple sediment microcosms consisting of sealed whole-sediment cores collected intact from intertidal mudflats. The authors describe several recent technical developments exploiting meiofaunal sediment culture for rapid contaminated sediment bioassays of toxicant effects on survival, reproduction and population growth of meiobenthic taxa in whole-sediment microcosms. Currently meiobenthic copepods, nematodes, foraminifers and polychaetes are being continuously cultured to study these parameters under exposure to model sediment-associated toxicants (e.g. cadmium). Bioassays are run for 21-d under flowing seawater. With this approach, fertile benthic copepods (e.g. Amphiascus tenuiremis) can be added to core microcosms to assess survival and growth of a fixed population cohort. All other meiobenthic taxa are enumerated relative to controls and evaluated for toxicant effects on higher order community-level endpoints. This approach exploits meiobenthos` high abundance and rapid reproductive rates to yield on a micro scale better endpoints than much larger sediment mesocosms targeted at macrofaunal endpoints.

  6. Biomarkers of effects of hypoxia and oil-shale contaminated sediments in laboratory-exposed gibel carp (Carassius auratus gibelio).

    PubMed

    Kreitsberg, Randel; Baršienė, Janina; Freiberg, Rene; Andreikėnaitė, Laura; Tammaru, Toomas; Rumvolt, Kateriina; Tuvikene, Arvo

    2013-12-01

    In North-East Estonia, considerable amounts of toxicants (e.g. polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), phenols, heavy metals) leach into water bodies through discharges from the oil-shale industry. In addition, natural and anthropogenic hypoxic events in water bodies affect the health of aquatic organisms. Here we report a study on the combined effects of contaminated sediment and hypoxia on the physiology of gibel carp (Carssius auratus gibelio). We conducted a laboratory exposure study that involved exposure to polluted sediments from oil-shale industries (River Purtse) and sediments from a relatively clean environment (River Selja), together with sediments spiked with PAHs. The oxygen content (saturation vs. hypoxia (< 2 mg/L)) was changed to reflect hypoxia. A multi-biomarker approach was chosen to enable the combined effects to be assessed comprehensively and integratively. We used HPLC to measure the PAH concentration in sediment and fish muscle, fixed wavelength fluorescence (FF) analyses to indicate the presence of PAH metabolites in fish bile, and nuclear abnormalities in erythrocytes as markers of geno- and cyto-toxicity; and we monitored the change in body condition and measured EROD activity to indicate CYP1A induction. High levels of PAH conjugates in fish bile were found in the group exposed to the Purtse River sediment under hypoxia. The results suggested that induction of the CYP1A gene was modulated by hypoxia as well as by heavy metals. We found a correlation between several erythrocyte abnormalities (8-shaped nuclei and blebbed nuclei) and PAH metabolite content in fish. In conclusion, a measurable effect of pollution from the oil-shale industry on fish health parameters was clear under different oxygen levels.

  7. CADDIS Volume 5. Causal Databases: Interactive Conceptual Diagrams (ICDs)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    In Interactive Conceptual Diagram (ICD) section of CADDIS allows users to create conceptual model diagrams, search a literature-based evidence database, and then attach that evidence to their diagrams.

  8. Space Operations Center, shuttle interaction study, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The implication of using the Shuttle with the SOC, including constraints that the Shuttle places upon the SOC design is studied. The considerations involved in the use of the Shuttle as a part of the SOC concept, and the constraints to the SOC imposed by the Shuttle in its interactions with the SOC, and on the design or technical solutions which allow satisfactory accomplishment of the interactions are identified.

  9. Imalytics Preclinical: Interactive Analysis of Biomedical Volume Data

    PubMed Central

    Gremse, Felix; Stärk, Marius; Ehling, Josef; Menzel, Jan Robert; Lammers, Twan; Kiessling, Fabian

    2016-01-01

    A software tool is presented for interactive segmentation of volumetric medical data sets. To allow interactive processing of large data sets, segmentation operations, and rendering are GPU-accelerated. Special adjustments are provided to overcome GPU-imposed constraints such as limited memory and host-device bandwidth. A general and efficient undo/redo mechanism is implemented using GPU-accelerated compression of the multiclass segmentation state. A broadly applicable set of interactive segmentation operations is provided which can be combined to solve the quantification task of many types of imaging studies. A fully GPU-accelerated ray casting method for multiclass segmentation rendering is implemented which is well-balanced with respect to delay, frame rate, worst-case memory consumption, scalability, and image quality. Performance of segmentation operations and rendering are measured using high-resolution example data sets showing that GPU-acceleration greatly improves the performance. Compared to a reference marching cubes implementation, the rendering was found to be superior with respect to rendering delay and worst-case memory consumption while providing sufficiently high frame rates for interactive visualization and comparable image quality. The fast interactive segmentation operations and the accurate rendering make our tool particularly suitable for efficient analysis of multimodal image data sets which arise in large amounts in preclinical imaging studies. PMID:26909109

  10. Interactive Videodisc Design and Production, Workshop Guide. Volume 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-12-01

    shop, instructors, and instructional developers . These can be allocated to a videodisc production, and their salaries, equipment, facilities, benefits ... developing similar programs. The W1orkshop Guide you are now using will be a great benefit , but it is important to gain some hands-on experience to...Interactive Videodisc Development . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Module 1: Analysis and Project Planning . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1 Analyze Needs, Goals

  11. Vortex/boundary-layer interactions: Data report, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutler, A. D.; Bradshaw, P.

    1987-01-01

    This report summarizes the work done under NASA Grant NAGw-581, Vortex/Boundary Layer Interactions. The experimental methods are discussed in detail and numerical results are presented, but are not fully interpreted. This report should be useful to anyone who wishes to make further use of the data (available on floppy disc or magnetic tape) for the development of turbulence models or the validation of predictive methods. Journal papers are in course of preparation.

  12. Vortex/boundary-layer interactions: Data report, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutler, A. D.; Bradshaw, P.

    1987-01-01

    This report summarizes the work done under NASA grant NAGw-581, Vortex/Boundary-Layer Interactions, to date. The experimental methods are discussed in detail and the results presented as a large number of figures, but are not fully interpreted. This report should be useful to anyone who wishes to make further use of the data (available on floppy disc or magnetic tape) for the development of turbulence models or the validation of predictive methods. Journal papers are in preparation.

  13. Interactions between surface discharges induced by volume discharges in a dielectric barrier discharge system

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Yenan; Dong, Lifang Zhao, Longhu; Wang, Yongjie; Pan, Yuyang; Li, Ben

    2014-10-15

    The interaction between micro-discharges involved in surface discharges (SDs) is studied in dielectric barrier discharge system. Instantaneous images taken by high speed cameras show that the SDs are induced by volume discharges (VDs). They cannot cross the midperpendicular of two neighbouring volume charges at low voltage while they stretch along it at high voltage, indicating that there is interaction between SDs. The differences of plasma parameters between SD and VD are studied by optical emission spectroscopy. The simulation of the electric fields of the wall charges accumulated by VD further confirms the existence of the interaction.

  14. Evidence of Chlorobenzene Natural Attenuation in Contaminated Sediments Using Compound Specific Isotope Analysis and High Resolution Pore Water Sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passeport, E.; Landis, R.; Lacrampe Couloume, G.; Lutz, E. J.; Mack, E. E.; West, K.; Sherwood Lollar, B.

    2014-12-01

    Contaminated sediments can represent a significant risk for ecosystems and hinder drinking water production if contaminants discharge to surface and ground water. Understanding of contaminant fate and the potential for natural attenuation can help protect aquatic resources. In this study, the fate of chlorobenzene (MCB) and benzene was investigated in a contaminated canal sediment field site located in New Jersey, USA. Compound Specific Isotope Analysis (CSIA) was applied to sediment pore water samples collected with a peeper at high spatial resolution (3 cm) across the sediment - surface water interface (SWI). Samples were collected at three locations in canal sediments, all of which exhibited reducing redox conditions. The largest concentrations were observed in the bottommost portions of the sediment profile, with concentrations ranging from 300 to 2000 µg/L for MCB, and 16 to 180 µg/L for benzene. Conversely, concentrations were below detection limit in the surface water and in the top 6 cm of the sediment. In the zones of highest MCB concentrations, the δ13C values were -26.4 (location C) and -21.9 ‰ (location F), and became progressively more enriched in 13C while concentrations decreased, reaching -23.9 (at 12 cm below the SWI, location C) and -18.4 ‰ (at 16.5 cm below SWI, location F). Benzene was only detected in the bottom 6 cm of the sediment profiles. Benzene δ13C values were -27 (bottommost, i.e., 24 cm deep) to -29.7 ‰ (18 cm deep), in location C. Such significant isotopic enrichments in 13C (2.5 to 3.5 ‰) correlated with MCB and benzene concentration decrease are suggestive of in situ biodegradation. In addition, benzene δ13C values were systematically more depleted in 13C than MCB, suggesting that benzene found in these zones was likely produced from MCB via reductive dechlorination. This study combined for the first time CSIA with high spatial sampling resolution in surface water sediments. This setup enabled not only detection of

  15. Implications of Glacier Volume Change for Ice-Ocean Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hood, E. W.; O'Neel, S.; Fellman, J.; Bidlack, A.; Arendt, A. A.; Arimitsu, M.; Spencer, R. G.

    2015-12-01

    Changes in climate are forcing complex glaciological responses that can be transmitted to downstream ecosystems via glacier runoff. Along the Gulf of Alaska, rates of glacier mass loss are among the highest measured on Earth. Changes in glacier volume in this region are altering the amount of glacier runoff delivered to the coastal ocean. Moreover, shifts in glacier extent are changing the location of the ice-ocean interface and, in cases where tidewater glaciers become grounded, fundamentally altering circulation in glacierized fjords. The runoff from glacier ecosystems is unique in terms of its physical and chemical properties when compared to runoff from non-glacial ecosystems. For example, the silt and chemical constituents in glacier discharge alter light penetration and the nutrient regime in near-shore marine ecosystems, which, in turn, influence levels of marine primary productivity. Future changes in the magnitude, timing, and location of glacier runoff have important implications for biogeochemical and ecological processes in glacially-dominated fjords and estuaries. This talk will highlight research from glacierized watersheds and fjords to synthesize what is known about the physical, chemical, and biological linkages that characterize icefield-ocean ecosystems along the Gulf of Alaska.

  16. Impact of APOE4-CSF Aβ interaction on hippocampal volume loss over 1 year in MCI

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, G.C.; Insel, P.S.; Tosun, D.; Schuff, N.; Truran-Sacrey, D.; Raptentsetsang, S.T.; Thompson, P.M.; Reiman, E.M.; Jack, C.R.; Fox, N.C.; Jagust, W.J.; Harvey, D.J.; Beckett, L.A.; Gamst, A.; Aisen, P.S.; Petersen, R.C.; Weiner, M.W.

    2011-01-01

    Background The majority of studies relating amyloid pathology with brain volumes have been cross-sectional. Apolipoprotein E4 (APOE4), a genetic risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease (AD), is also associated with hippocampal volume loss. No studies have considered the effects of amyloid pathology and APOE4 together on longitudinal volume loss. Methods We evaluated whether an abnormal level of cerebrospinal fluid beta-amyloid (CSF Aβ) and APOE4 carrier status were independently associated with greater hippocampal volume loss over 1 year. We then assessed whether APOE4 status and CSF Aβ acted synergistically, testing the significance of an interaction term in the regression analysis. We included 297 participants: 77 cognitively normal (NC), 144 with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and 76 with AD. Results An abnormal CSF Aβ level was found to be associated with greater hippocampal volume loss over 1 year in each group. APOE4 was associated with hippocampal volume loss only in the NC and MCI groups. APOE4 carriers with abnormal CSF Aβ in the MCI group acted synergistically to produce disproportionately greater volume loss than noncarriers. Conclusion Baseline CSF Aβ predicts progression of hippocampal volume loss. APOE4 carrier status amplifies the degree of neurodegeneration in MCI. Understanding the effect of interactions between genetic risk and amyloid pathology will be important in clinical trials and our understanding of the disease process. PMID:21889115

  17. Effects of bioaugmentation on sorption and desorption of benzene, 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene and naphthalene in freshly-spiked and historically-contaminated sediments.

    PubMed

    Li, YueHua; Chen, Liang; Liu, YuLong; Liu, Fei; Fallgren, Paul H; Jin, Song

    2016-11-01

    This work investigated the frequently observed "rebounds" of contaminants of concern in groundwater systems. Specifically, influences of bioaugmented microorganisms on the sorption and desorption of representative petroleum constituents [benzene, 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene and naphthalene (BTN)] were studied in freshly-spiked and historically-contaminated sediments. Capable microorganisms were enriched and supplemented to contaminated sediments to enhance biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons. In freshly-spiked sediments, when petroleum-degrading microorganisms were added, concentrations of dissolved petroleum constituents appeared to increase initially, and 12.4, 14.0 and 20.0 mg/kg of benzene, 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene and naphthalene, respectively desorbed from the sediments into the water phase. In the historically-contaminated sediments, the augmentation of petroleum-degrading microorganisms led to the desorption of 0.023-0.059, 0009-0.016, and 1.731-2.763 mg/L of previously sequestrated BTN into the water phase, and also triggered the desorption of 0.051-0.223, -0.133-2.630, and 2.324-1.200 mg/kg of previously sequestrated BTN as the methanol extraction quantity. The mechanisms of the enhanced desorption at the presence of microbes remain to be determined; however, we presumed that microbially produced constituents such as biosurfactants and cell mass could have attributed to the partition of petroleum compounds from the sediments. Findings from this study may partially explain "rebounds" of certain petroleum constituents into the groundwater during in situ bioremediation practice, although such immediate rebounds sometimes are weak, and the desorbed constituents can be eventually biodegraded under proper biogeochemical conditions.

  18. Effects of development mode, contaminated sediments, and maternal characteristics on growth and reproduction in the polychaetes Streblospio benedicti (Spionidae) and Capitella sp. I (Capitellidae)

    SciTech Connect

    Bridges, T.S.

    1992-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to examine the effects of contaminated sediments (sewage, blue-green algae and hydrocarbons) and maternal characteristics on reproduction, and offspring success in S. benedicti (lecithotrophic) and Capitella sp. I. For S. benedicti, contaminated sediments had a negative effect on growth and age and size at first reproduction. Per brood fecundity was positively related to female size and negatively related to female age. Treatments did not have an effect on reproductive output. Per offspring C and N investment increased with female age. This increase in per offspring investment resulted in enhanced survivorship and juvenile growth in offspring of older females. For Capitella sp. I, growth was increased, age at first reproduction was accelerated, and per brood fecundity was 3--4 [times] higher in the algae and sewage treatments. Treatments did not have an effect on reproductive output. Fecundity was positively related to female size. Per brood and per offspring C and N investment decreased with female age, but not in all treatments. The C:N ratio of offspring increased with female age. Offspring from mothers in the sewage treatment were larger two weeks after release. Offspring in size two weeks after release decreased with female age in the sewage treatment. Differences in the response of S. benedicti and Capitella sp. I to contaminated sediments may be due to differences in feeding behavior, digestive physiology, nutritional requirements and their sensitivity to hydrocarbons, metals and low oxygen concentrations. Differences in the effect of female age between the two species appear related to development and ecological differences in the two species.

  19. Toxicity of smelter slag-contaminated sediments from Upper Lake Roosevelt and associated metals to early life stage White Sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus Richardson, 1836)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Little, E.E.; Calfee, R.D.; Linder, G.

    2014-01-01

    The toxicity of five smelter slag-contaminated sediments from the upper Columbia River and metals associated with those slags (cadmium, copper, zinc) was evaluated in 96-h exposures of White Sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus Richardson, 1836) at 8 and 30 days post-hatch. Leachates prepared from slag-contaminated sediments were evaluated for toxicity. Leachates yielded a maximum aqueous copper concentration of 11.8 μg L−1 observed in sediment collected at Dead Man's Eddy (DME), the sampling site nearest the smelter. All leachates were nonlethal to sturgeon that were 8 day post-hatch (dph), but leachates from three of the five sediments were toxic to fish that were 30 dph, suggesting that the latter life stage is highly vulnerable to metals exposure. Fish maintained consistent and prolonged contact with sediments and did not avoid contaminated sediments when provided a choice between contaminated and uncontaminated sediments. White Sturgeon also failed to avoid aqueous copper (1.5–20 μg L−1). In water-only 96-h exposures of 35 dph sturgeon with the three metals, similar toxicity was observed during exposure to water spiked with copper alone and in combination with cadmium and zinc. Cadmium ranging from 3.2 to 41 μg L−1 or zinc ranging from 21 to 275 μg L−1 was not lethal, but induced adverse behavioral changes including a loss of equilibrium. These results suggest that metals associated with smelter slags may pose an increased exposure risk to early life stage sturgeon if fish occupy areas contaminated by slags.

  20. Early adversity and combat exposure interact to influence anterior cingulate cortex volume in combat veterans☆

    PubMed Central

    Woodward, Steven H.; Kuo, Janice R.; Schaer, Marie; Kaloupek, Danny G.; Eliez, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    Objective Childhood and combat trauma have been observed to interact to influence amygdala volume in a sample of U.S. military veterans with and without PTSD. This interaction was assessed in a second, functionally-related fear system component, the pregenual and dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, using the same sample and modeling approach. Method Anterior cingulate cortical tissues (gray + white matter) were manually-delineated in 1.5 T MR images in 87 U.S. military veterans of the Vietnam and Persian Gulf wars. Hierarchical multiple regression modeling was used to assess associations between anterior cingulate volume and the following predictors, trauma prior to age 13, combat exposure, the interaction of early trauma and combat exposure, and PTSD diagnosis. Results As previously observed in the amygdala, unique variance in anterior cingulate cortical volume was associated with both the diagnosis of PTSD and with the interaction of childhood and combat trauma. The pattern of the latter interaction indicated that veterans with childhood trauma exhibited a significant inverse linear relationship between combat trauma and anterior cingulate volume while those without childhood trauma did not. Such associations were not observed in hippocampal or total cerebral tissue volumes. Conclusions In the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, as in the amygdala, early trauma may confer excess sensitivity to later combat trauma. PMID:24179818

  1. Interactive volume rendering of thin thread structures within multivalued scientific data sets.

    PubMed

    Wenger, Andreas; Keefe, Daniel F; Zhang, Song; Laidlaw, David H

    2004-01-01

    We present a threads and halos representation for interactive volume rendering of vector-field structure and describe a number of additional components that combine to create effective visualizations of multivalued 3D scientific data. After filtering linear structures, such as flow lines, into a volume representation, we use a multilayer volume rendering approach to simultaneously display this derived volume along with other data values. We demonstrate the utility of threads and halos in clarifying depth relationships within dense renderings and we present results from two scientific applications: visualization of second-order tensor valued magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data and simulated 3D fluid flow data. In both application areas, the interactivity of the visualizations proved to be important to the domain scientists. Finally, we describe a PC-based implementation of our framework along with domain specific transfer functions, including an exploratory data culling tool, that enable fast data exploration.

  2. The associations of depression and hypertension with brain volumes: Independent or interactive?

    PubMed Central

    Meurs, Maaike; Groenewold, Nynke A.; Roest, Annelieke M.; van der Wee, Nic J.A.; Veltman, Dick J.; van Tol, Marie-José; de Jonge, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Independent studies on major depressive disorder (MDD) and hypertension, suggest overlapping abnormalities in brain regions associated with emotional and autonomic processing. However, the unique and interactive effects of MDD and hypertension have never been studied in a single sample. Brain volume in these areas may be an explanatory link in the comorbidity between MDD and hypertension. Voxel-based morphometry was used to test for main effects of MDD (N = 152) and hypertension (N = 82) and their interactions on gray and white matter volumes. Voxel-wise results are reported at p < .05 FWE corrected for the spatial extent of the whole brain and a-priori regions of interest (ROIs: hippocampus, anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and inferior frontal gyrus (IFG)). In addition, analyses on the extracted total volumes of our ROIs were performed. Interactive effects in the mid-cingulate cortex (MCC) (pFWE = .01), cerebellum (pFWE = .01) and in the ACC total ROI volume (p = .02) were found. MDD in the presence, but not in the absence of hypertension was associated with lower volumes in the ACC and MCC, and with a trend towards larger gray matter volume in the cerebellum. No associations with white matter volumes were observed. Results suggest that the combination of MDD and hypertension has a unique effect on brain volumes in areas implicated in the regulation of emotional and autonomic functions. Brain volume in these regulatory areas may be an explanatory link in the comorbidity between hypertension and MDD. PMID:26106530

  3. Flow interaction experiment. Volume 1: Aerothermal modeling, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikjooy, M.; Mongia, H. C.; Sullivan, J. P.; Murthy, S. N. B.

    1993-01-01

    An experimental and computational study is reported for the flow of a turbulent jet discharging into a rectangular enclosure. The experimental configurations consisting of primary jets only, annular jets only, and a combination of annular and primary jets are investigated to provide a better understanding of the flow field in an annular combustor. A laser Doppler velocimeter is used to measure mean velocity and Reynolds stress components. Major features of the flow field include recirculation, primary and annular jet interaction, and high turbulence. A significant result from this study is the effect the primary jets have on the flow field. The primary jets are seen to create statistically larger recirculation zones and higher turbulence levels. In addition, a technique called marker nephelometry is used to provide mean concentration values in the model combustor. Computations are performed using three levels of turbulence closures, namely k-epsilon model, algebraic second moment (ASM), and differential second moment (DSM) closure. Two different numerical schemes are applied. One is the lower-order power-law differencing scheme (PLDS) and the other is the higher-order flux-spline differencing scheme (FSDS). A comparison is made of the performance of these schemes. The numerical results are compared with experimental data. For the cases considered in this study, the FSDS is more accurate than the PLDS. For a prescribed accuracy, the flux-spline scheme requires a far fewer number of grid points. Thus, it has the potential for providing a numerical error-free solution, especially for three-dimensional flows, without requiring an excessively fine grid. Although qualitatively good comparison with data was obtained, the deficiencies regarding the modeled dissipation rate (epsilon) equation, pressure-strain correlation model, and the inlet epsilon profile and other critical closure issues need to be resolved before one can achieve the degree of accuracy required to

  4. Flow interaction experiment. Volume 2: Aerothermal modeling, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikjooy, M.; Mongia, H. C.; Sullivan, J. P.; Murthy, S. N. B.

    1993-01-01

    An experimental and computational study is reported for the flow of a turbulent jet discharging into a rectangular enclosure. The experimental configurations consisting of primary jets only, annular jets only, and a combination of annular and primary jets are investigated to provide a better understanding of the flow field in an annular combustor. A laser Doppler velocimeter is used to measure mean velocity and Reynolds stress components. Major features of the flow field include recirculation, primary and annular jet interaction, and high turbulence. A significant result from this study is the effect the primary jets have on the flow field. The primary jets are seen to create statistically larger recirculation zones and higher turbulence levels. In addition, a technique called marker nephelometry is used to provide mean concentration values in the model combustor. Computations are performed using three levels of turbulence closures, namely k-epsilon model, algebraic second moment (ASM), and differential second moment (DSM) closure. Two different numerical schemes are applied. One is the lower-order power-law differencing scheme (PLDS) and the other is the higher-order flux-spline differencing scheme (FSDS). A comparison is made of the performance of these schemes. The numerical results are compared with experimental data. For the cases considered in this study, the FSDS is more accurate than the PLDS. For a prescribed accuracy, the flux-spline scheme requires a far fewer number of grid points. Thus, it has the potential for providing a numerical error-free solution, especially for three-dimensional flows, without requiring an excessively fine grid. Although qualitatively good comparison with data was obtained, the deficiencies regarding the modeled dissipation rate (epsilon) equation, pressure-strain correlation model, and the inlet epsilon profile and other critical closure issues need to be resolved before one can achieve the degree of accuracy required to

  5. Toxicity and the fractional distribution of trace metals accumulated from contaminated sediments by the clam Scrobicularia plana exposed in the laboratory and the field.

    PubMed

    Kalman, J; Bonnail-Miguel, E; Smith, B D; Bury, N R; Rainbow, P S

    2015-02-15

    The relationship between the subcellular distribution of accumulated toxic metals into five operational fractions (subsequently combined into presumed detoxified and non-detoxified components) and toxicity in the clam Scrobicularia plana was investigated under different laboratory exposures. Clams were exposed to metal contaminated media (water and diet) and analysed for the partitioning of accumulated As, Cu and Zn into subcellular fractions. In general, metallothionein-like proteins, metal-rich granules and cellular debris in different proportions acted as main storage sites of accumulated metals in the clam soft tissues for these three metals. No significant differences were noted in the accumulation rates of As, Cu and Zn of groups of individuals with or without apparent signs of toxicity after up to 30 days of exposure to naturally contaminated sediment mixtures. There was, however, an increased proportional accumulation of Cu in the non-detoxified fraction with increased Cu accumulation rate in the clams, suggesting that the Cu uptake rate from contaminated sediments exceeded the combined rates of elimination and detoxification of Cu, with the subsequent likelihood for toxic effects in the clams.

  6. Effects of Amendments on Growth and Uptake of Cd and Zn by Wetland Plants, Typha angustifolia and Colocasia esculenta from Contaminated Sediments.

    PubMed

    Chayapan, P; Kruatrachue, M; Meetam, M; Pokethitiyook, P

    2015-01-01

    A pot study was conducted to compare the effects of amendments (CaHPO4 and cow manure) on growth and uptake of Cd and Zn from contaminated sediments by two wetland plant species, Typha angustifolia and Colocasia esculenta. Contaminated sediments (Cd 33.2 mg kg(-1) and Zn 363 mg kg(-1)) were collected from Mae Tao basin, Mae Sot district, Tak province, Thailand. The experiment consisted of 4 treatments: control (uncontaminated sediment), Cd/Zn, Cd/Zn + 5% CaHPO4, and Cd/Zn + 10% cow manure. Plants were grown for 3 months in the greenhouse. The addition of CaHPO4 resulted in the highest relative growth rate (RGR) and highest Cd accumulation in both T. angustifolia and C. esculenta while the lowest RGR was found in C. esculenta grown in the cow manure treatment. Both plant species had higher concentrations of metals (Cd, Zn) in their belowground parts. None of the amendments affected Zn accumulation. C. esculenta exhibited the highest uptake of both Cd and Zn. The results clearly demonstrated the phytoremediation potential of C. esculenta and the enhancement of this potential by CaHPO4 amendment.

  7. Instructional Systems Development Model for Interactive Videodisc Training Delivery Systems. Volume I: Hardware, Software and Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bunderson, C. Victor; And Others

    Developed for use by army authors, this report provides information to assist in the step-by-step production of interactive videodisc training delivery systems (VTDS). The first of three volumes describes the hardware and software for VTDS, as well as videodisc authoring and production systems (VAPS). The range of capabilities of consumer-model…

  8. Separation of preferential interaction and excluded volume effects on DNA duplex and hairpin stability

    PubMed Central

    Knowles, D. B.; LaCroix, Andrew S.; Deines, Nickolas F.; Shkel, Irina; Record, M. Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Small solutes affect protein and nucleic acid processes because of favorable or unfavorable chemical interactions of the solute with the biopolymer surface exposed or buried in the process. Large solutes also exclude volume and affect processes where biopolymer molecularity and/or shape changes. Here, we develop an analysis to separate and interpret or predict excluded volume and chemical effects of a flexible coil polymer on a process. We report a study of the concentration-dependent effects of the full series from monomeric to polymeric PEG on intramolecular hairpin and intermolecular duplex formation by 12-nucleotide DNA strands. We find that chemical effects of PEG on these processes increase in proportion to the product of the amount of DNA surface exposed on melting and the amount of PEG surface that is accessible to this DNA, and these effects are completely described by two interaction terms that quantify the interactions between this DNA surface and PEG end and interior groups. We find that excluded volume effects, once separated from these chemical effects, are quantitatively described by the analytical theory of Hermans, which predicts the excluded volume between a flexible polymer and a rigid molecule. From this analysis, we show that at constant concentration of PEG monomer, increasing PEG size increases the excluded volume effect but decreases the chemical interaction effect, because in a large PEG coil a smaller fraction of the monomers are accessible to the DNA. Volume exclusion by PEG has a much larger effect on intermolecular duplex formation than on intramolecular hairpin formation. PMID:21742980

  9. Protein stability in mixed solvents: a balance of contact interaction and excluded volume.

    PubMed

    Schellman, John A

    2003-07-01

    Changes in excluded volume and contact interaction with the surface of a protein have been suggested as mechanisms for the changes in stability induced by cosolvents. The aim of the present paper is to present an analysis that combines both effects in a quantitative manner. The result is that both processes are present in both stabilizing and destabilizing interactions and neither can be ignored. Excluded volume was estimated using accessible surface area calculations of the kind introduced by Lee and Richards. The change in excluded volume on unfolding, deltaX, is quite large. For example, deltaX for ribonuclease is 6.7 L in urea and approximately 16 L in sucrose. The latter number is greater than the molar volume of the protein. Direct interaction with the protein is represented as the solvent exchange mechanism, which differs from ordinary association theory because of the weakness of the interaction and the high concentrations of cosolvents. The balance between the two effects and their contribution to overall stability are most simply presented as bar diagrams as in Fig. 3. Our finding for five proteins is that excluded volume contributes to the stabilization of the native structure and that contact interaction contributes to destabilization. This is true for five proteins and four cosolvents including both denaturants and osmolytes. Whether a substance stabilizes a protein or destabilizes it depends on the relative size of these two contributions. The constant for the cosolvent contact with the protein is remarkably uniform for four of the proteins, indicating a similarity of groups exposed during unfolding. One protein, staphylococcus nuclease, is anomalous in almost all respects. In general, the strength of the interaction with guanidinium is about twice that of urea, which is about twice that of trimethylamine-N-oxide and sucrose. Arguments are presented for the use of volume fractions in equilibrium equations and the ignoring of activity coefficients of

  10. A description of chloride cell and kidney tubule alterations in the flatfish Solea senegalensis exposed to moderately contaminated sediments from the Sado estuary (Portugal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Pedro M.; Caeiro, Sandra; Diniz, Mário S.; Lobo, Jorge; Martins, Marta; Ferreira, Ana M.; Caetano, Miguel; Vale, Carlos; DelValls, T. Ángel; Costa, M. Helena

    2010-11-01

    The effects of sediment-bound contaminants on kidney and gill chloride cells were surveyed in juvenile Solea senegalensis exposed to fresh sediments collected from three distinct sites of the Sado Estuary (Portugal) in a 28-day laboratorial assay. Sediments were analyzed for metallic contaminants, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and organochlorines as well as for total organic matter, redox potential and fine fraction. The potential for causing adverse biological effects of each surveyed sediment was assessed by comparison of contaminant levels to available guidelines for coastal sediments, namely the Threshold Effects Level ( TEL) and the Probable Effects Level ( PEL). The Sediment Quality Guideline Quotient indices ( SQGQ) were calculated to compare the overall contamination levels of the three stations. A qualitative approach was employed to analyze the histo/cytopathological traits in gill chloride cells and body kidney of fish exposed to each tested sediment for 0, 14 and 28 days. The results showed that sediment contamination can be considered low to moderate and that the least contaminated sediment (from a reference site, with the lowest SQGQ) caused lesser changes in the surveyed organs. However, the most contaminated sediment (by both metallic and organic xenobiotics, with highest SQGQ) was neither responsible for the highest mortality nor for the most pronounced lesions. Exposure to the sediment presenting an intermediate SQGQ, essentially contaminated by organic compounds, caused the highest mortality (48%) and the most severe damage to kidneys, up to full renal necrosis. Chloride cell alterations were similar in fish exposed to the two most contaminated sediments and consisted of a pronounced cellular hypertrophy, likely involving fluid retention and loss of mitochondria. It can be concluded that sediment contamination considered to be low or moderate may be responsible for severe injury to cells and parenchyma involved in the maintenance of osmotic

  11. Interactions of glycine betaine with proteins: insights from volume and compressibility measurements.

    PubMed

    Shek, Yuen Lai; Chalikian, Tigran V

    2013-01-29

    We report the first application of volume and compressibility measurements to characterization of interactions between cosolvents (osmolytes) and globular proteins. Specifically, we measure the partial molar volumes and adiabatic compressibilities of cytochrome c, ribonuclease A, lysozyme, and ovalbumin in aqueous solutions of the stabilizing osmolyte glycine betaine (GB) at concentrations between 0 and 4 M. The fact that globular proteins do not undergo any conformational transitions in the presence of GB provides an opportunity to study the interactions of GB with proteins in their native states within the entire range of experimentally accessible GB concentrations. We analyze our resulting volumetric data within the framework of a statistical thermodynamic model in which each instance of GB interaction with a protein is viewed as a binding reaction that is accompanied by release of four water molecules. From this analysis, we calculate the association constants, k, as well as changes in volume, ΔV(0), and adiabatic compressibility, ΔK(S0), accompanying each GB-protein association event in an ideal solution. By comparing these parameters with similar characteristics determined for low-molecular weight analogues of proteins, we conclude that there are no significant cooperative effects involved in interactions of GB with any of the proteins studied in this work. We also evaluate the free energies of direct GB-protein interactions. The energetic properties of GB-protein association appear to scale with the size of the protein. For all proteins, the highly favorable change in free energy associated with direct protein-cosolvent interactions is nearly compensated by an unfavorable free energy of cavity formation (excluded volume effect), yielding a modestly unfavorable free energy for the transfer of a protein from water to a GB/water mixture.

  12. Coil–globule transition of a polymer involved in excluded-volume interactions with macromolecules

    SciTech Connect

    Odagiri, Kenta; Seki, Kazuhiko

    2015-10-07

    Polymers adopt extended coil and compact globule states according to the balance between entropy and interaction energies. The transition of a polymer between an extended coil state and compact globule state can be induced by changing thermodynamic force such as temperature to alter the energy/entropy balance. Previously, this transition was theoretically studied by taking into account the excluded-volume interaction between monomers of a polymer chain using the partition function. For binary mixtures of a long polymer and short polymers, the coil-globule transition can be induced by changing the concentration of the shorter polymers. Here, we investigate the transition caused by short polymers by generalizing the partition function of the long polymer to include the excluded-volume effect of short polymers. The coil-globule transition is studied as a function of the concentration of mixed polymers by systematically varying Flory’s χ-parameters. We show that the transition is caused by the interplay between the excluded-volume interaction and the dispersion state of short polymers in the solvent. We also reveal that the same results can be obtained by combining the mixing entropy and elastic energy if the volume of a long polymer is properly defined.

  13. Interactive dual-volume rendering visualization with real-time fusion and transfer function enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macready, Hugh; Kim, Jinman; Feng, David; Cai, Weidong

    2006-03-01

    Dual-modality imaging scanners combining functional PET and anatomical CT constitute a challenge in volumetric visualization that can be limited by the high computational demand and expense. This study aims at providing physicians with multi-dimensional visualization tools, in order to navigate and manipulate the data running on a consumer PC. We have maximized the utilization of pixel-shader architecture of the low-cost graphic hardware and the texture-based volume rendering to provide visualization tools with high degree of interactivity. All the software was developed using OpenGL and Silicon Graphics Inc. Volumizer, tested on a Pentium mobile CPU on a PC notebook with 64M graphic memory. We render the individual modalities separately, and performing real-time per-voxel fusion. We designed a novel "alpha-spike" transfer function to interactively identify structure of interest from volume rendering of PET/CT. This works by assigning a non-linear opacity to the voxels, thus, allowing the physician to selectively eliminate or reveal information from the PET/CT volumes. As the PET and CT are rendered independently, manipulations can be applied to individual volumes, for instance, the application of transfer function to CT to reveal the lung boundary while adjusting the fusion ration between the CT and PET to enhance the contrast of a tumour region, with the resultant manipulated data sets fused together in real-time as the adjustments are made. In addition to conventional navigation and manipulation tools, such as scaling, LUT, volume slicing, and others, our strategy permits efficient visualization of PET/CT volume rendering which can potentially aid in interpretation and diagnosis.

  14. Interactive stereoscopic full-color direct volume visualization for virtual reality applications in medicine.

    PubMed

    Góes, V P; Machado, L S; Cabral, M C; Leitão, R B; Lopes, R D; Zuffo, M K

    2001-01-01

    Only recently, advanced direct volume visualization techniques have been widely used due to the availability of low cost hardware accelerators; such techniques have a great potential of use for many applications of the virtual reality in medicine. We proposed and implemented a low cost system for interactive and stereoscopic 3D visualization of the full color visible human dataset. Potential use of the proposed system includes anatomical atlases and surgical simulators. A prototype of the proposed system is rendering full color volumes with 256 x 152 x 470 in real time (15-20 Hz) with stereoscopy.

  15. SSME LOX post flow analysis/fluid structure interaction. Volume 2: Fluid structure interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The progress made in resolving the computational issues associated with modeling high temperature and pressure viscous flows in advanced propulsion systems is documented. An overview of adaptive computational methods for various classes of fluid-structure interaction problems is presented. The key features associated with several approaches are outlined and the advantages/disadvantages of each are summarized. A mathematical formulation is presented for general fluid-structure interaction problems with a moving domain. The two adaptive approaches are discussed used in solving the benchmark problems. The first scheme is a user interactive scheme which is quite versatile and easy to implement but requires an excessive amount of monitoring by the operator and is computationally inefficient. The second method is a new, local remeshing method for handling a general class of fluid-structure interaction problems. This method couples many of the attractive features of other approaches into a computationally efficient and versatile method. The results obtained for two test cases are presented. Results from both the user interactive and local remeshing procedure are described. The current status of the project and future goals to be completed are summarized.

  16. Developmentally Sensitive Interaction Effects of Genes and the Social Environment on Total and Subcortical Brain Volumes

    PubMed Central

    Arias Vásquez, Alejandro; Franke, Barbara; Hoekstra, Pieter J.; Heslenfeld, Dirk J.; Oosterlaan, Jaap; Faraone, Stephen V.

    2016-01-01

    Smaller total brain and subcortical volumes have been linked to psychopathology including attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Identifying mechanisms underlying these alterations, therefore, is of great importance. We investigated the role of gene-environment interactions (GxE) in interindividual variability of total gray matter (GM), caudate, and putamen volumes. Brain volumes were derived from structural magnetic resonance imaging scans in participants with (N = 312) and without ADHD (N = 437) from N = 402 families (age M = 17.00, SD = 3.60). GxE effects between DAT1, 5-HTT, and DRD4 and social environments (maternal expressed warmth and criticism; positive and deviant peer affiliation) as well as the possible moderating effect of age were examined using linear mixed modeling. We also tested whether findings depended on ADHD severity. Deviant peer affiliation was associated with lower caudate volume. Participants with low deviant peer affiliations had larger total GM volumes with increasing age. Likewise, developmentally sensitive GxE effects were found on total GM and putamen volume. For total GM, differential age effects were found for DAT1 9-repeat and HTTLPR L/L genotypes, depending on the amount of positive peer affiliation. For putamen volume, DRD4 7-repeat carriers and DAT1 10/10 homozygotes showed opposite age relations depending on positive peer affiliation and maternal criticism, respectively. All results were independent of ADHD severity. The presence of differential age-dependent GxE effects might explain the diverse and sometimes opposing results of environmental and genetic effects on brain volumes observed so far. PMID:27218681

  17. Removal of PCDD/Fs from contaminated sediment and released effluent gas by charcoal in a proposed cost-effective thermal treatment process.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Long; Hou, Hong; Iwasaki, Kanae; Terada, Akihiko; Hosomi, Masaaki

    2013-11-01

    A novel cost-effective thermal treatment technology has been proposed for the removal of PCDD/Fs from contaminated sediment and released effluent gas using charcoal as both an adsorbent and a thermal source. When a reactor was used for thermal treatment, the PCDD/Fs removal efficiency exceeded 98% from the sediment at the three different air superficial velocities employed in this study. The total PCDD/F international toxic equivalent (I-TEQ) contents, both in the treated sediments and effluent gas, were below the Japanese emission standard limit. Analysis of the PCDD/F contents in different fractions showed that large quantities of PCDDs but not PCDFs were evaporated from the sediment and adsorbed in the moist sediment column. This difference was attributed to the formation of PCDDs from pentachlorophenol (PCP) during the cooling process following the thermal treatment process in the reactor. This proposed thermal process provides a promising alternative to the conventional methods.

  18. One spatial dimensional finite volume three-body interaction for a short-range potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Peng

    2017-03-01

    In this work, we use McGuire's model to describe scattering of three spinless identical particles in one spatial dimension; we first present analytic solutions of Faddeev's equation for scattering of three spinless particles in free space. The three particles interaction in finite volume is derived subsequently, and the quantization conditions by matching wave functions in free space and finite volume are presented in terms of two-body scattering phase shifts. The quantization conditions obtained in this work for the short-range interaction are Lüscher's formula-like and consistent with Yang's results [Phys. Rev. Lett. 19, 1312 (1967), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.19.1312].

  19. Impact of Interacting Functional Variants in COMT on Regional Gray Matter Volume in Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    Honea, Robyn; Verchinski, Beth A.; Pezawas, Lukas; Kolachana, Bhaskar S.; Callicott, Joseph H.; Mattay, Venkata S.; Weinberger, Daniel R.; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    Background Functional variants in the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene have been shown to impact cognitive function, cortical physiology and risk for schizophrenia. A recent study showed that previously reported effects of the functional val158met SNP (rs4680) on brain function are modified by other functional SNPs and haplotypes in the gene, though it was unknown if these effects are also seen in brain structure. Methods We used voxel-based morphometry to investigate the impact of multiple functional variants in COMT on gray matter volume in a large group of 151 healthy volunteers from the CBDB/NIMH Genetic Study of Schizophrenia. Results We found that the previously described rs4680 val risk variant affects hippocampal and dorsolateral prefrontal (DLPFC) gray matter volume. In addition, we found that this SNP interacts with a variant in the P2 promoter region (rs2097603) in predicting changes in hippocampal gray matter volume consistent with a nonlinear effect of extracellular dopamine. Conclusions We report evidence that interacting functional variants in COMT affect gray matter regional volume in hippocampus and DLPFC, providing further in vivo validation of the biological impact of complex genetic variation in COMT on neural systems relevant for the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and extending observations of nonlinear dependence of prefrontal neurons on extracellular dopamine to the domain of human brain structure. PMID:19071221

  20. Propulsion and airframe aerodynamic interactions of supersonic V/STOL configurations. Volume 4: Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zilz, D. E.; Wallace, H. W.; Hiley, P. E.

    1985-01-01

    A wind tunnel model of a supersonic V/STOL fighter configuration has been tested to measure the aerodynamic interaction effects which can result from geometrically close-coupled propulsion system/airframe components. The approach was to configure the model to represent two different test techniques. One was a conventional test technique composed of two test modes. In the Flow-Through mode, absolute configuration aerodynamics are measured, including inlet/airframe interactions. In the Jet-Effects mode, incremental nozzle/airframe interactions are measured. The other test technique is a propulsion simulator approach, where a sub-scale, externally powered engine is mounted in the model. This allows proper measurement of inlet/airframe and nozzle/airframe interactions simultaneously. This is Volume 4 of 4: Final Report- Summary.

  1. Sexually dimorphic brain volume interaction in college-aged binge drinkers

    PubMed Central

    Kvamme, Timo L.; Schmidt, Casper; Strelchuk, Daniela; Chang-Webb, Yee Chien; Baek, Kwangyeol; Voon, Valerie

    2015-01-01

    Background Binge consumption of alcohol is a major societal problem associated with important cognitive, physiological and neurotoxic consequences. Converging evidence highlights the need to assess binge drinking (BD) and its effects on the developing brain while taking into account gender differences. Here, we compared the brain volumetric differences between genders in college-aged binge drinkers and healthy volunteers. Method T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) images of 30 binge drinkers (18 males) and 46 matched healthy volunteers (23 males) were examined using voxel-based morphometry. The anatomical scans were covaried with Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) scores. Whole brain voxel-wise group comparisons were performed using a cluster extent threshold correction. Results Several large clusters qualified with group-by-gender interactions were observed in prefrontal, striatal and medial temporal areas, whereby BD females had more volume than non-BD females, while males showed the inverse pattern of decreased volume in BD males and increased volume in non-BD males. AUDIT scores negatively correlated with volume in the right superior frontal cortex and precentral gyrus. Conclusions These findings dovetail with previous studies reporting that a state effect of BD in college-aged drinkers and the severity of alcohol use are associated with volumetric alterations in the cortical and subcortical areas of the brain. Our study indicates that these widespread volumetric changes vary differentially by gender, suggesting either sexual dimorphic endophenotypic risk factors, or differential neurotoxic sensitivities for males and females. PMID:26900571

  2. Sexually dimorphic brain volume interaction in college-aged binge drinkers.

    PubMed

    Kvamme, Timo L; Schmidt, Casper; Strelchuk, Daniela; Chang-Webb, Yee Chien; Baek, Kwangyeol; Voon, Valerie

    2016-01-01

    Binge consumption of alcohol is a major societal problem associated with important cognitive, physiological and neurotoxic consequences. Converging evidence highlights the need to assess binge drinking (BD) and its effects on the developing brain while taking into account gender differences. Here, we compared the brain volumetric differences between genders in college-aged binge drinkers and healthy volunteers. T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) images of 30 binge drinkers (18 males) and 46 matched healthy volunteers (23 males) were examined using voxel-based morphometry. The anatomical scans were covaried with Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) scores. Whole brain voxel-wise group comparisons were performed using a cluster extent threshold correction. Several large clusters qualified with group-by-gender interactions were observed in prefrontal, striatal and medial temporal areas, whereby BD females had more volume than non-BD females, while males showed the inverse pattern of decreased volume in BD males and increased volume in non-BD males. AUDIT scores negatively correlated with volume in the right superior frontal cortex and precentral gyrus. These findings dovetail with previous studies reporting that a state effect of BD in college-aged drinkers and the severity of alcohol use are associated with volumetric alterations in the cortical and subcortical areas of the brain. Our study indicates that these widespread volumetric changes vary differentially by gender, suggesting either sexual dimorphic endophenotypic risk factors, or differential neurotoxic sensitivities for males and females.

  3. Strongly Interacting Matter in Magnetic Fields: A Guide to This Volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharzeev, Dmitri E.; Landsteiner, Karl; Schmitt, Andreas; Yee, Ho-Ung

    This is an introduction to the volume of Lecture Notes in Physics on "Strongly interacting matter in magnetic fields". The volume combines contributions written by a number of experts on different aspects of the problem. The response of QCD matter to intense magnetic fields has attracted a lot of interest recently. On the theoretical side, this interest stems from the possibility to explore the plethora of novel phenomena arising from the interplay of magnetic field with QCD dynamics. On the experimental side, the interest is motivated by the recent results on the behavior of quark-gluon plasma in a strong magnetic field created in relativistic heavy ion collisions at RHIC and LHC. The purpose of this introduction is to provide a brief overview and a guide to the individual contributions where these topics are covered in detail.

  4. Characterizing particle-scale equilibrium adsorption and kinetics of uranium(VI) desorption from U-contaminated sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stoliker, Deborah L.; Liu, Chongxuan; Kent, Douglas B.; Zachara, John M.

    2013-01-01

    Rates of U(VI) release from individual dry-sieved size fractions of a field-aggregated, field-contaminated composite sediment from the seasonally saturated lower vadose zone of the Hanford 300-Area were examined in flow-through reactors to maintain quasi-constant chemical conditions. The principal source of variability in equilibrium U(VI) adsorption properties of the various size fractions was the impact of variable chemistry on adsorption. This source of variability was represented using surface complexation models (SCMs) with different stoichiometric coefficients with respect to hydrogen ion and carbonate concentrations for the different size fractions. A reactive transport model incorporating equilibrium expressions for cation exchange and calcite dissolution, along with rate expressions for aerobic respiration and silica dissolution, described the temporal evolution of solute concentrations observed during the flow-through reactor experiments. Kinetic U(VI) desorption was well described using a multirate SCM with an assumed lognormal distribution for the mass-transfer rate coefficients. The estimated mean and standard deviation of the rate coefficients were the same for all <2 mm size fractions but differed for the 2–8 mm size fraction. Micropore volumes, assessed using t-plots to analyze N2 desorption data, were also the same for all dry-sieved <2 mm size fractions, indicating a link between micropore volumes and mass-transfer rate properties. Pore volumes for dry-sieved size fractions exceeded values for the corresponding wet-sieved fractions. We hypothesize that repeated field wetting and drying cycles lead to the formation of aggregates and/or coatings containing (micro)pore networks which provided an additional mass-transfer resistance over that associated with individual particles. The 2–8 mm fraction exhibited a larger average and standard deviation in the distribution of mass-transfer rate coefficients, possibly caused by the abundance of

  5. 5-HTTLPR, anxiety and gender interaction moderates right amygdala volume in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Cerasa, Antonio; Quattrone, Aldo; Piras, Fabrizio; Mangone, Graziella; Magariello, Angela; Fagioli, Sabrina; Girardi, Paolo; Muglia, Maria; Caltagirone, Carlo; Spalletta, Gianfranco

    2014-10-01

    Genetic variants within the serotonin transporter gene (5-HTTLPR) impact the neurobiology and risk for anxiety-related behaviours. There are also gender differences in the prevalence of anxiety-related behaviours. Although numerous studies have investigated the influence of 5-HTTLPR genotype on the neural systems involved in emotional regulation, none have investigated how these effects are modulated by gender and anxiety. We investigated this issue using two complementary region of interest-based structural neuroimaging approaches (voxel-based morphometry and Freesurfer) in 138 healthy individuals categorized into 'no anxiety' and 'subclinical anxiety' groups based on the Hamilton Rating Scale for Anxiety (HAM-A). Preliminarily, using anxiety as a continuous variable, we found a significant interaction effect of genotype by gender on anxiety. Females homozygous for the Short allele showed the highest HAM-A scores and males the lowest. In addition, a three-way significant interaction among genotype, gender and anxiety category was found for the right amygdala volume. Post hoc tests revealed that homozygous females carrying the Short variant with a subclinical anxiety condition had larger volume. The reported interaction effects demonstrate that gender strongly modulates the relationship between 5-HTTLPR genotype and subclinical expression of anxiety acting on amygdala, one region of the emotional neural network specifically involved in the anxiety-like behaviours.

  6. 5-HTTLPR, anxiety and gender interaction moderates right amygdala volume in healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Cerasa, Antonio; Quattrone, Aldo; Piras, Fabrizio; Mangone, Graziella; Magariello, Angela; Fagioli, Sabrina; Girardi, Paolo; Muglia, Maria; Caltagirone, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    Genetic variants within the serotonin transporter gene (5-HTTLPR) impact the neurobiology and risk for anxiety-related behaviours. There are also gender differences in the prevalence of anxiety-related behaviours. Although numerous studies have investigated the influence of 5-HTTLPR genotype on the neural systems involved in emotional regulation, none have investigated how these effects are modulated by gender and anxiety. We investigated this issue using two complementary region of interest-based structural neuroimaging approaches (voxel-based morphometry and Freesurfer) in 138 healthy individuals categorized into ‘no anxiety’ and ‘subclinical anxiety’ groups based on the Hamilton Rating Scale for Anxiety (HAM-A). Preliminarily, using anxiety as a continuous variable, we found a significant interaction effect of genotype by gender on anxiety. Females homozygous for the Short allele showed the highest HAM-A scores and males the lowest. In addition, a three-way significant interaction among genotype, gender and anxiety category was found for the right amygdala volume. Post hoc tests revealed that homozygous females carrying the Short variant with a subclinical anxiety condition had larger volume. The reported interaction effects demonstrate that gender strongly modulates the relationship between 5-HTTLPR genotype and subclinical expression of anxiety acting on amygdala, one region of the emotional neural network specifically involved in the anxiety-like behaviours. PMID:23986266

  7. Effect of hydrodynamic interaction on the free volume distribution of SGFR-PBT composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munirathnamma, L. M.; Ningaraju, S.; Kumar, K. V. Aneesh; Ravikumar, H. B.

    2016-05-01

    In order to explore the effect of short glass fiber (SGF) reinforcement on the mechanical properties of Polybutylene terephthalate (PBT), short glass fibers of different proportion (10 - 40 wt %) are reinforced into PBT matrix. The free volume distribution of SGFR-PBT composites derived from CONTIN-PALS2 program exhibits the narrow full width at half maximum (FWHM). This is attributed to the improved adhesion resulted by the hydrodynamic interaction between the polymeric chains of PBT matrix and SGF. The hydrodynamic interaction parameter (h) decreases as a function of SGF wt% and becomes more negative for 40 wt% SGFR-PBT composites suggest the generation of excess friction at the interface. This improves the adhesion between the polymeric chains of PBT matrix and SGF and hence the mechanical strength of the SGFR-PBT composites.

  8. Local Volume TiNy Titans: gaseous dwarf-dwarf interactions in the Local Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, Sarah; Besla, Gurtina; Putman, Mary E.; Lutz, Katharina A.; Fernández, Ximena; Stierwalt, Sabrina; Patton, David R.; Kim, Jinhyub; Kallivayalil, Nitya; Johnson, Kelsey; Sung, Eon-Chang

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we introduce the Local Volume TiNy Titans sample (LV-TNT), which is a part of a larger body of work on interacting dwarf galaxies: TNT . This LV-TNT sample consists of 10 dwarf galaxy pairs in the Local Universe (<30 Mpc from Milky Way), which span mass ratios of M*, 1/M*, 2 < 20, projected separations <100 kpc, and pair member masses of log(M*/M⊙) < 9.9. All 10 LV-TNT pairs have resolved synthesis maps of their neutral hydrogen, are located in a range of environments and captured at various interaction stages. This enables us to do a comparative study of the diffuse gas in dwarf-dwarf interactions and disentangle the gas lost due to interactions with haloes of massive galaxies, from the gas lost due to mutual interaction between the dwarfs. We find that the neutral gas is extended in the interacting pairs when compared to non-paired analogues, indicating that gas is tidally pre-processed. Additionally, we find that the environment can shape the H I distributions in the form of trailing tails and that the gas is not unbound and lost to the surroundings unless the dwarf pair is residing near a massive galaxy. We conclude that a nearby, massive host galaxy is what ultimately prevents the gas from being re-accreted. Dwarf-dwarf interactions thus represent an important part of the baryon cycle of low-mass galaxies, enabling the `parking' of gas at large distances to serve as a continual gas supply channel until accretion by a more massive host.

  9. Kinetic analysis and modeling of oleate and ethanol stimulated uranium (VI) bio-reduction in contaminated sediments under sulfate reduction conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Fan; Wu, Wei-min; Parker, Jack C.; Mehlhorn, Tonia L; Kelly, Shelly D; Kemner, Kenneth M; Zhang, Gengxin; Schadt, Christopher Warren; Brooks, Scott C; Criddle, Craig; Watson, David B; Jardine, Philip M

    2010-01-01

    Microcosm tests with uranium contaminated sediments were performed to explore the feasibility of using oleate as a slow-release electron donor for U(VI) reduction in comparison to ethanol. Oleate degradation proceeded more slowly than ethanol with acetate produced as an intermediate for both electron donors under a range of initial sulfate concentrations. A kinetic microbial reduction model was developed and implemented to describe and compare the reduction of sulfate and U(VI) with oleate or ethanol. The reaction path model considers detailed oleate/ethanol degradation and the production and consumption of intermediates, acetate and hydrogen. Although significant assumptions are made, the model tracked the major trend of sulfate and U(VI) reduction and describes the successive production and consumption of acetate, concurrent with microbial reduction of aqueous sulfate and U(VI) species. The model results imply that the overall rate of U(VI) bioreduction is influenced by both the degradation rate of organic substrates and consumption rate of intermediate products.

  10. Treatment of urban river contaminated sediment with ex situ advanced oxidation processes: technical feasibility, environmental discharges and cost-performance analysis.

    PubMed

    Yan, Dickson Y S; Liu, Tongzhou; Lo, Irene M C

    2015-01-01

    The technical feasibility, environmental discharges and cost-performance of urban river contaminated sediment treatment with ex situ advanced oxidation processes were evaluated for the purpose of achieving an ideal treatment goal (for marine disposal) and a cost-performance treatment goal (for beneficially reusing as a filling material). Sediment samples were collected from a river located in southern China. To achieve the ideal treatment goal, sequential treatments (Fenton's reaction+activated persulphate oxidation) were carried out. One-step Fenton's reaction was applied to achieve the cost-performance treatment goal. The resulting effluent was treated and discharged, and sludge generated in wastewater treatment was characterized. The resources input throughout the treatment processes were recorded for cost estimation. After the treatment designed for achieving the ideal treatment goal, most pollutants fulfilled the treatment goal except Pb, Cd, Hg and Ag, probably because these four metals were present mainly in stable fractions of the sediment. The cost-performance treatment goal was achieved in view of low pollutant contents in the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure leachate of treated sediment. The cost for achieving the cost-performance treatment goal is much less than that for achieving the ideal treatment goal. The major cost difference is attributed to chemical cost. Stringent sediment treatment goals based on existing standards would lead to massive chemical use, complex treatment and hence huge cost. A simpler treatment with fewer chemicals is adequate for sediment beneficially reused as a filling material, and is economically more advantageous than handling sediment for marine disposal.

  11. In-situ stabilization of Pb, Zn, Cu, Cd and Ni in the multi-contaminated sediments with ferrihydrite and apatite composite additives.

    PubMed

    Qian, Guangren; Chen, Wei; Lim, Teik Thye; Chui, Pengcheong

    2009-10-30

    Three additives were evaluated for their effectiveness in the attenuation of Pb2+, Zn2+, Cu2+, Cd2+, Ni2+ in contaminated sediments. Apatite, ferrihydrite and their composite were applied to the sediments. For the remediation, BCR, SEM/AVS and TCLP were adopted as the evaluating method and comparison of their results were used for the first time to test in-situ stabilization effect. The results showed that after 5 months composite treatment, more than 70% Pb2+, 40% Zn2+, 90% Cu2+, 50% Cd2+ and 80% Ni2+ was immobilized in oxidizable and residual phases, respectively. Compared to untreated sediment, Pb2+, Zn2+, Cu2+, Cd2+ in residual fraction increased 20%, 10%, 10%, 10% with composite treatment after 5 months, respectively. SigmaSEM/AVS ratio declined from 12.6 to 9.3, in addition, composite treatments reduced the leaching of Pb2+ and Zn2+ from 10.6 mg L(-1) and 42.5 mg L(-1) to 5.4 mg L(-1) and 24.1 mg L(-1) in the sediment by TCLP evaluation. Meanwhile, apatite and ferrihydrite composite additives lowered the bioavailability and toxicity of sediments as well. Ferrihydrite had a positive effect in controlling the bioavailability and toxicity of heavy metals because it effectively retarded the oxidation of AVS in sediment.

  12. Moving control volume analysis of compressible flow-structure interactions - An application to sustained vocal folds vibration in glottis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lucy; Yang, Jubiao; Krane, Michael

    2016-11-01

    The fundamental mechanism of a self-sustained vibration can be analyzed and explained using a moving control volume analysis. In contrast to the conventional "textbook" derivation of control volume analysis, this work shows the derivation of a moving control volume based the "first principles" of physics where the control volume changes its size and location with time. This generalized derivation is demonstrated in a framework for compressible flow-structure interactions where the structure moves and deforms in a compressible fluid medium, e.g. air, within a control volume. The moving control volume analysis helps explain self-sustained vibrations of structures in fluid. An application to the vocal folds vibration in glottis is studied, where the interaction between laryngeal airflow and vocal folds are successfully simulated using the modified Immersed Finite Element Method (mIFEM), a fully coupled approach to simulate fluid-structure interactions. Control volume equations are derived for compressible airflow in a moving control volume in the vicinity of the moving vocal folds. Utilization of mechanical energy is evaluated to understand how vocal folds vibration is self-sustained. We acknowledge the funding support of NIH 2R01DC005642-10A1.

  13. Real-time volume rendering visualization of dual-modality PET/CT images with interactive fuzzy thresholding segmentation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jinman; Cai, Weidong; Eberl, Stefan; Feng, Dagan

    2007-03-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) visualization has become an essential part for imaging applications, including image-guided surgery, radiotherapy planning, and computer-aided diagnosis. In the visualization of dual-modality positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET/CT), 3-D volume rendering is often limited to rendering of a single image volume and by high computational demand. Furthermore, incorporation of segmentation in volume rendering is usually restricted to visualizing the presegmented volumes of interest. In this paper, we investigated the integration of interactive segmentation into real-time volume rendering of dual-modality PET/CT images. We present and validate a fuzzy thresholding segmentation technique based on fuzzy cluster analysis, which allows interactive and real-time optimization of the segmentation results. This technique is then incorporated into a real-time multi-volume rendering of PET/CT images. Our method allows a real-time fusion and interchangeability of segmentation volume with PET or CT volumes, as well as the usual fusion of PET/CT volumes. Volume manipulations such as window level adjustments and lookup table can be applied to individual volumes, which are then fused together in real time as adjustments are made. We demonstrate the benefit of our method in integrating segmentation with volume rendering in its application to PET/CT images. Responsive frame rates are achieved by utilizing a texture-based volume rendering algorithm and the rapid transfer capability of the high-memory bandwidth available in low-cost graphic hardware.

  14. Trace metal fractionation as a mean to improve on the management of contaminated sediments from runoff water in infiltration basins.

    PubMed

    Al Husseini, Amelène El-Mufleh; Béchet, Béatrice; Gaudin, Anne; Ruban, Véronique

    2013-01-01

    The management of stormwater sediment is a key issue for local authorities due to the pollution load and significant tonnages. In view of reuse, for example for civil engineering, the environmental evaluation of these highly aggregated sediments requires the study of the fractionation and mobility of trace metals. The distribution of trace metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, Zn) and their level of lability in three French stormwater sediments was determined using sequential and kinetic extractions (EDTA reagent) associated with mineralogical analysis and scanning electron microscopy observations. Using microanalysis, new data were acquired on the evolution of aggregate state during extractions, and on its significant role in the retention of trace metals. Trace metals were, in particular, observed to be very stable in small aggregates (10-50 microm). Comparison of the two extraction methods revealed that EDTA extraction was not convenient for evaluating the stable fraction of Cr, Ni and Zn. Moreover, the results were relevant for basins presenting similar sources of trace metals, whatever the physicochemical conditions in basins. The results suggest that the management of stormwater sediments could be improved by a better knowledge of metal mobility, as chemical extractions could highlight the localization of the mobile fraction of trace metals. Treatment could be therefore avoided, or specific treatment could be applied to a reduced volume of sediments.

  15. Potential accumulation of contaminated sediments in a reservoir of a high-Andean watershed: Morphodynamic connections with geochemical processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreras, María. Teresa; Müllendorff, Daniel; Pastén, Pablo; Pizarro, Gonzalo E.; Paola, Chris; Escauriaza, Cristián.

    2015-05-01

    Rapid changes due to anthropic interventions in high-altitude environments, such as the Altiplano region in South America, require new approaches to understand the connections between physical and geochemical processes. Alterations of the water quality linked to the river morphology can affect the ecosystems and human development in the long term. The future construction of a reservoir in the Lluta River, located in northern Chile, will change the spatial distribution of arsenic-rich sediments, which can have significant effects on the lower parts of the watershed. In this investigation, we develop a coupled numerical model to predict and evaluate the interactions between morphodynamic changes in the Lluta reservoir, and conditions that can potentially desorb arsenic from the sediments. Assuming that contaminants are mobilized under anaerobic conditions, we calculate the oxygen concentration within the sediments to study the interactions of the delta progradation with the potential arsenic release. This work provides a framework for future studies aimed to analyze the complex connections between morphodynamics and water quality, when contaminant-rich sediments accumulate in a reservoir. The tool can also help to design effective risk management and remediation strategies in these extreme environments. This article was corrected on 15 JUNE 2015. See the end of the full text for details.

  16. Characterizing particle-scale equilibrium adsorption and kinetics of uranium(VI) desorption from U-contaminated sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Stoliker, Deborah L.; Liu, Chongxuan; Kent, Douglas B.; Zachara, John M.

    2013-02-12

    Rates of contaminant U(VI) release from individual size fractions of a composite sediment from the seasonally saturated lower vadose zone of the Hanford 300-Area were examined in flow-through batch reactors to maintain quasi-constant chemical conditions. Variability in equilibrium adsorption among the various size fractions was determined in static batch reactors and analyzed using the surface complexation modeling approach. The estimated stoichiometric coefficients of U(VI) surface complexation reactions with respect to pH and carbonate concentrations varied with size fractions. This source of variability significantly increased the uncertainty in U(VI) conditional equilibrium constants over that estimated from experimental errors alone. A minimum difference between conditional equilibrium constants was established in order to evaluate statistically significant differences between sediment adsorption properties. A set of equilibrium and kinetic expressions for cation exchange, calcite dissolution, aerobic respiration, and silica dissolution were incorporated in a reaction-rate model to describe the temporal evolution of solute concentrations observed during the flow-through batch experiments. Parameters in the reaction-rate model, calibrated using experimental data for select size fractions, predicted the changes in solute concentrations for the bulk, <2 mm, sediment sample. Kinetic U(VI) desorption was well described using a multi-rate surface complexation model with an assumed lognormal distribution for the rate constants. The estimated mean and standard deviation were the same for all < 2mm size fractions, but differed in the 2-8mm size fraction. Micropore volumes in the varied size fractions were also similar as assessed using t-plots to analyze N2 desorption data. These findings provide further support for the link between microporosity and particle-scale mass transfer rates controlling kinetic U(VI) adsorption/desorption and for the utility of N2 desorption

  17. How much sediment have we added to a floodplain? Preliminary results of using contaminated sediments to tease out enhanced deposition to a floodplain of the lower Meramec River, MO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, A.; Hanes, D. M.

    2016-12-01

    Lead mining began between 1742 and 1762 within the "Old Lead Belt" of southern Missouri, located within the Big River watershed, and was the largest producer of lead worldwide from 1869 to 1972 extracting millions of tons of ore and depositing the waste products directly into the Big River in some cases and storing them immediately adjacent to the stream in others. The addition of tons of sediment to the stream system via mining has resulted in massive slugs of sediment moving down the Big River. In addition to coarse grained waste products undocumented amounts of contaminated mud sized sediments were added to the Big River and allowed to deposit downstream. Elevated lead levels (> 100 ppm) are documented within mud drapes on floodplains of the lower Meramec River after recent overbank deposition following storm events, indicating that mud sized contaminated sediment is currently being supplied to the lower Meramec River, a tributary of the Mississippi River. We conducted coring on a floodplain 19 km downstream of the confluence of the Big River and Meramec River in order to document the amount of contaminated sediment that has been historically added to a single floodplain of the lower Meramec River. The sediment samples taken from the cores were analyzed with a combination of ICP-MS and pXRF to characterize the maximum depth of lead contamination and estimate the amount of enhanced deposition experienced on a single lower Meramec River floodplain. Preliminary results show that the top 60 cm of Castlewood State Park floodplain contain lead contaminated sediments as high as 334 ppm and the floodplain has levels of lead in excess of 1000 ppm at 4 m depth in locations, suggesting that up to 4 m of deposition has occurred at a lower Meramec River floodplain since the onset of lead mining within the "Old Lead Belt." Further work will result in better constraints for the timing of this contaminated sediment and the extent deposition along the lower Meramec River.

  18. Effect of excluded volume interactions on the interfacial properties of colloid-polymer mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortini, Andrea; Bolhuis, Peter G.; Dijkstra, Marjolein

    2008-01-01

    We report a numerical study of equilibrium phase diagrams and interfacial properties of bulk and confined colloid-polymer mixtures using grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations. Colloidal particles are treated as hard spheres, while the polymer chains are described as soft repulsive spheres. The polymer-polymer, colloid-polymer, and wall-polymer interactions are described by density-dependent potentials derived by Bolhuis and Louis [Macromolecules 35, 1860 (2002)]. We compared our results with those of the Asakura-Oosawa-Vrij model [J. Chem. Phys. 22, 1255 (1954); J. Polym Sci 33, 183 (1958); Pure Appl. Chem. 48, 471 (1976)] that treats the polymers as ideal particles. We find that the number of polymers needed to drive the demixing transition is larger for the interacting polymers, and that the gas-liquid interfacial tension is smaller. When the system is confined between two parallel hard plates, we find capillary condensation. Compared with the Asakura-Oosawa-Vrij model, we find that the excluded volume interactions between the polymers suppress the capillary condensation. In order to induce capillary condensation, smaller undersaturations and smaller plate separations are needed in comparison with ideal polymers.

  19. Changes of benthic bacteria and meiofauna assemblages during bio-treatments of anthracene-contaminated sediments from Bizerta lagoon (Tunisia).

    PubMed

    Ben Said, Olfa; Louati, Hela; Soltani, Amel; Preud'homme, Hugues; Cravo-Laureau, Cristiana; Got, Patrice; Pringault, Olivier; Aissa, Patricia; Duran, Robert

    2015-10-01

    Sediments from Bizerta lagoon were used in an experimental microcosm setup involving three scenarios for the bioremediation of anthracene-polluted sediments, namely bioaugmentation, biostimulation, and a combination of both bioaugmentation and biostimulation. In order to investigate the effect of the biotreatments on the benthic biosphere, 16S rRNA gene-based T-RFLP bacterial community structure and the abundance and diversity of the meiofauna were determined throughout the experiment period. Addition of fresh anthracene drastically reduced the benthic bacterial and meiofaunal abundances. The treatment combining biostimulation and bioaugmentation was most efficient in eliminating anthracene, resulting in a less toxic sedimentary environment, which restored meiofaunal abundance and diversity. Furthermore, canonical correspondence analysis showed that the biostimulation treatment promoted a bacterial community favorable to the development of nematodes while the treatment combining biostimulation and bioaugmentation resulted in a bacterial community that advantaged the development of the other meiofauna taxa (copepods, oligochaetes, polychaetes, and other) restoring thus the meiofaunal structure. The results highlight the importance to take into account the bacteria/meiofauna interactions during the implementation of bioremediation treatment.

  20. Processes influencing the transport and fate of contaminated sediments in the coastal ocean: Boston Harbor and Massachusetts Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bothner, Michael H.; Butman, Bradford

    2007-01-01

    Most of the major urban centers of the United States including Boston, New York, Washington, Chicago, New Orleans, Miami, Los Angeles, San Francisco, and Seattle—are on a coast (fig. 1.1). All of these cities discharge treated sewage effluent into adjacent waters. In 2000, 74 percent of the U.S. population lived within 200 kilometers (km) of the coast. Between 1980 and 2002, the population density in coastal communities increased approximately 4.5 times faster than in noncoastal areas of the U.S. (Perkins, 2004). More people generate larger volumes of wastes, increase the demands on wastewater treatment, expand the area of impervious land surfaces, and use more vehicles that contribute contaminants to street runoff. According to the National Coastal Condition Report II (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 2005a), on the basis of coastal habitat, water and sediment quality, benthic index, and fish tissue, the overall national coastal condition is only poor to fair and the overall coastal condition in the highly populated Northeast is poor. Scientific information helps managers to prioritize and regulate coastal-ocean uses that include recreation, commercial fishing, transportation, waste disposal, and critical habitat for marine organisms. These uses are often in conflict with each other and with environmental concerns. Developing a strategy for managing competing uses while maintaining sustainability of coastal resources requires scientific understanding of how the coastal ocean system behaves and how it responds to anthropogenic influences. This report provides a summary of a multidisciplinary research program designed to improve our understanding of the transport and fate of contaminants in Massachusetts coastal waters. Massachusetts Bay and Boston Harbor have been a focus of U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) research because they provide a diverse geographic setting for developing a scientific understanding of the geology, geochemistry, and oceanography of

  1. Separating Chemical and Excluded Volume Interactions of Polyethylene Glycols with Native Proteins: Comparison with PEG Effects on DNA Helix Formation

    PubMed Central

    Shkel, Irina A.; Knowles, Ben; Record, M. Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Small and large PEGs greatly increase chemical potentials of globular proteins (μ2), thereby favoring precipitation, crystallization, and protein-protein interactions that reduce water-accessible protein surface and/or protein-PEG excluded volume. To determine individual contributions of PEG-protein chemical and excluded volume interactions to μ2 as functions of PEG molality m3, we analyze published chemical potential increments μ23 = dμ2/dm3 quantifying unfavorable interactions of PEG (PEG200-PEG6000) with BSA and lysozyme. For both proteins, μ23 increases approximately linearly with the number of PEG residues (N3). A 1 molal increase in concentration of PEG -CH2OCH2- groups, for any chain-length PEG, increases μBSA by ~2.7 kcal/mol and μlysozyme by ~1.0 kcal/mol. These values are similar to predicted chemical interactions of PEG -CH2OCH2- groups with these protein components (BSA ~3.3 kcal/mol, lysozyme ~0.7 kcal/mol), dominated by unfavorable interactions with amide and carboxylate oxygens and counterions. While these chemical effects should be dominant for small PEGs, larger PEGS are expected to exhibit unfavorable excluded volume interactions and reduced chemical interactions because of shielding of PEG residues in PEG flexible coils. We deduce that these excluded volume and chemical shielding contributions largely compensate, explaining why the dependence of μ23 on N3 is similar for both small and large PEGs. PMID:25924886

  2. Heart-lung interaction: effect on regional lung air content and total heart volume.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, E A; Ritman, E L

    1987-01-01

    To study the interactions between and within the heart and lungs, end-diastolic (ED) and end-systolic (ES) volumes and intrathoracic location of the heart, and the regional air content, volume and geometry of the lungs, were measured from three-dimensional image data generated with the Dynamic Spatial Reconstructor (DSR). The DSR was used to scan the full thoracic extent of anesthetized dogs and sloths at selected transpulmonary pressures. The results show that the dependent to nondependent gradient of regional lung opacity (or conversely regional air content) in the supine animal was not present in the prone animals. While the rib cage and diaphragm of the dog deformed markedly, the shape of the sloth's rib cage and diaphragm remained essentially constant with change in body orientation. As a consequence of these findings, we deduce that the observed change in gradient of regional lung air content in both dog and sloth are in response to changes in the intrathoracic position of the heart which alter ventral lung geometry and not a response to changes in rib cage or diaphragm geometry. In a second series of studies we reconstructed the 3-D extent of the heart at ED and ES in supine anesthetized dogs and demonstrated that the total heart volume (THV) (i.e. contained by the pericardial sac) during sinus rhythm differs by less than 5% between ED and ES. The DSR image data show that this is achieved by the epicardial apex remaining essentially fixed and that the plane containing the atrio-ventricular valves moves like a plunger towards the apex in systole. When atrial fibrillation is present, the THV no longer remains constant and decreases during systole, presumably because of increased stiffness of the atrial myocardium. We conclude from the experimental results that the heart plays an important role in determining regional differences in alveolar expansion, and that by maintaining a constant THV, the heart minimizes energy expenditure which would be caused by moving

  3. Detailed requirements document for the Interactive Financial Management System (IFMS), volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodson, D. B.

    1975-01-01

    The detailed requirements for phase 1 (online fund control, subauthorization accounting, and accounts receivable functional capabilities) of the Interactive Financial Management System (IFMS) are described. This includes information on the following: systems requirements, performance requirements, test requirements, and production implementation. Most of the work is centered on systems requirements, and includes discussions on the following processes: resources authority, allotment, primary work authorization, reimbursable order acceptance, purchase request, obligation, cost accrual, cost distribution, disbursement, subauthorization performance, travel, accounts receivable, payroll, property, edit table maintenance, end-of-year, backup input. Other subjects covered include: external systems interfaces, general inquiries, general report requirements, communication requirements, and miscellaneous. Subjects covered under performance requirements include: response time, processing volumes, system reliability, and accuracy. Under test requirements come test data sources, general test approach, and acceptance criteria. Under production implementation come data base establishment, operational stages, and operational requirements.

  4. Exposure of the freshwater bivalve Hyridella australis to metal contaminated sediments in the field and laboratory microcosms: metal uptake and effects.

    PubMed

    Marasinghe Wadige, Chamani P M; Taylor, Anne M; Krikowa, Frank; Lintermans, Mark; Maher, William A

    2017-04-01

    Metal uptake and induced toxic effects on Hyridella australis were investigated by establishing 28 day exposure-dose-response relationships (EDR) of transplanted H. australis at four sites along a sediment metal contamination gradient in the mine affected Molonglo River, NSW. Laboratory exposure of this organism to the same sediments, collected from in situ sites, was run concurrently. Metal concentrations in whole organisms, individual tissues and sub-cellular tissue fractions were measured as organism metal dose. Total antioxidant capacity (TAOC), lipid peroxidation (MDA) and lysosomal membrane destabilisation (LMS) were measured as biological responses. H. australis accumulated significantly higher tissue zinc concentrations compared to the other metals. In situ organisms at the mine affected sites accumulated more metals than organisms in laboratory microcosms. Accumulated zinc, cadmium and the total metal concentrations in whole organism tissues reflected exposure-dose relationships. Sub-cellular analysis showed that most of the accumulated metals, both in the field and laboratory exposed organisms, were detoxified over 28 days exposure. Clear exposure and dose dependent responses of decreased TAOC and measurable increases in MDA and LMS with increased metal exposure and dose were evident in H. australis caged in the river. In contrast, a dose-response relationship was only evident for cadmium in laboratory exposed organisms. Organisms caged at mine affected sites showed stronger EDR relationships than those exposed in laboratory microcosms as they were exposed to additional sources of dissolved zinc and cadmium. Exposure in laboratory microcosms underestimated metal uptake and effects, thus assessment of metal contaminated sediments should be undertaken "in situ".

  5. Hazard ranking of contaminated sediments based on chemical analysis, laboratory toxicity tests, and benthic community composition: Prioritizing sites for remedial action

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wildhaber, Mark L.; Schmitt, Christopher J.

    1996-01-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) organized a research program to assess the extent of and possible methods for managing contaminated sediments. As part of this program, we developed a method by which multiple forms of information on sediment contamination (i.e., chemistry, laboratory toxicity, and benthic community composition) could be combined to rank the relative hazard to aquatic life of a series of sediment samples. The process that was developed incorporates chemistry and bioavailability into the ranking as toxic units in pore water based on U.S. EPA Ambient Water Quality Criteria (AWQC). Laboratory toxicity is incorporated into the ranking process as mean response relative to control response. Benthic community information is incorporated into the ranking process through the use of relative tolerance to pollution among benthic invertebrate taxa, from which the mean tolerance to pollution of the benthic community is calculated. The three resulting ranks are then averaged to produce a relative ranking of risk to aquatic life among sediment samples. Our results demonstrate that, as long as a moderate list of laboratory toxicity test results are included in the ranking process (i.e., tests from a fish, a zooplankter, a benthic invertebrate, a phytoplankter, and a microbe), the resultant rankings among samples does not significantly change with inclusion of more laboratory toxicity test results. Without any benthic community structure information, with only laboratory toxicity test results from Microtox,® and with only a short list of chemicals, relative ranking among sites changes drastically. Our results demonstrate the general utility of the ranking process as one way of assessing the relative hazard among many sites when resource limitations necessitate prioritization of sites for remediation.

  6. Cadmium, metal-binding proteins, and growth in bluegill (Lepomis macrochiruscontaminated sediments from the upper Mississippi River basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cope, W. Gregory; Wiener, James G.; Steingraeber, Mark T.; Atchison, Gary J.

    1994-01-01

    We exposed juvenile bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus) to ~1000 mg∙L−1 of continuously suspended river sediment in a 28-d test with six treatments (randomized block with one sediment-free control and five sediments ranging from 1.3 to 21.4 μg Cd∙g dry weight−1). Each treatment had three replicates, each with 25 fish. Growth was reduced by exposure to suspended sediment, probably due to physical effects of sediment on feeding and to toxicity in the treatment with the greatest concentrations of metals. Mean whole-body concentrations of cadmium (0.04–0.14 μg∙g wet weight−1) were correlated with cadmium concentration in filtered water (8–72 ng∙L−1), suspended sediment (0.61–16.8 μg∙L−1), and bulk sediment. The concentration of hepatic nonthionein cytosolic cadmium (cadmium not bound by metal-binding proteins, MBP) in fish exposed to the two most contaminated sediments exceeded that in controls. The mean concentration of hepatic MBP was correlated with cadmium concentration in filtered water, suspended sediment, bulk sediment, and whole fish. Whole-body cadmium concentration was the most sensitive indicator of cadmium exposure, with lowest observed effect concentrations of 1.9 μg Cd∙L−1 for suspended sediment and 13 ng Cd∙L−1 for filtered water. Sediment-associated cadmium was less available than waterborne cadmium for uptake by fish.

  7. The impact of increased oxygen conditions on metal-contaminated sediments part II: effects on metal accumulation and toxicity in aquatic invertebrates.

    PubMed

    De Jonge, M; Teuchies, J; Meire, P; Blust, R; Bervoets, L

    2012-06-15

    The present study evaluated the effect of increasing oxygen concentrations in overlying surface water on the accumulation and toxicity of sediment-bound metals in the aquatic invertebrates Lumbriculus variegatus, Asellus aquaticus and Daphnia magna. A 54 days experiment using three experimental treatments (90% O(2) in overlying surface water, 40% O(2) and a non-polluted control) was conducted. At 6 different time points (after 0, 2, 5, 12, 32 and 54 days) acid volatile sulfides (AVS), simultaneously extracted metals (SEM) and total organic carbon (TOC) were measured in the superficial sediment layer (0-1 cm). At each time point, accumulated metal levels as well as the available energy stores were measured in L. variegatus and A. aquaticus and each time D. magna was exposed to surface water in a 24 h toxicity test. Additionally metallothionein-like protein (MTLP) induction was quantified in L. variegatus. Oxygen induced changes in sediment AVS resulted in faster accumulation of metals from contaminated sediments in A. aquaticus, while no differences in toxicity in this species were observed. Ag, Cr, As and Co accumulation as well as toxicity in water exposed D. magna were clearly enhanced after 54 days, caused by oxidation of metal-sulfide complexes. Due to their feeding and burrowing behaviour, metal accumulation and toxicity in L. variegatus was not influenced by geochemical characteristics. Nevertheless, a rapid induction of MTLP was observed in both the 90% O(2) and the 40% O(2) treatment. The present study showed that elevated oxygen concentrations in overlying surface water can directly enhance metal accumulation and toxicity in aquatic invertebrates, however this is highly dependent on the organisms ecology and most dominant metal exposure route (water vs. sediment). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The broad-host-range plasmid pSFA231 isolated from petroleum-contaminated sediment represents a new member of the PromA plasmid family

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaobin; Top, Eva M.; Wang, Yafei; Brown, Celeste J.; Yao, Fei; Yang, Shan; Jiang, Yong; Li, Hui

    2015-01-01

    A self-transmissible broad-host-range (BHR) plasmid pSFA231 was isolated from petroleum-contaminated sediment in Shen-fu wastewater irrigation zone, China, using the triparental mating exogenous plasmid capture method. Based on its complete sequence the plasmid has a size of 41.5 kb and codes for 50 putative open reading frames (orfs), 29 of which represent genes involved in replication, partitioning and transfer functions of the plasmid. Phylogenetic analysis grouped pSFA231 into the newly defined PromA plasmid family, which currently includes five members. Further comparative genomic analysis shows that pSFA231 shares the common backbone regions with the other PromA plasmids, i.e., genes involved in replication, maintenance and control, and conjugative transfer. Nevertheless, phylogenetic divergence was found in specific gene products. We propose to divide the PromA group into two subgroups, PromA-α (pMRAD02, pSB102) and PromA-β (pMOL98, pIPO2T, pSFA231, pTer331), based on the splits network analysis of the RepA protein. Interestingly, a cluster of hypothetical orfs located between parA and traA of pSFA231 shows high similarity with the corresponding regions on pMOL98, pIPO2T, and pTer331, suggesting these hypothetical orfs may represent “essential” plasmid backbone genes for the PromA-β subgroup. Alternatively, they may also be accessory genes that were first acquired and then stayed as the plasmid diverged. Our study increases the available collection of complete genome sequences of BHR plasmids, and since pSFA231 is the only characterized PromA plasmid from China, our findings also enhance our understanding of the genetic diversity of this plasmid group in different parts of the world. PMID:25628616

  9. MAPK14 and CNR1 gene variant interactions: effects on brain volume deficits in schizophrenia patients with marijuana misuse

    PubMed Central

    Onwuameze, O. E.; Nam, K.W.; Epping, E. A.; Wassink, T. H.; Ziebell, S.; Andreasen, N. C.; Ho, B.-C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Adolescent marijuana use is associated with increased risk for schizophrenia. We previously reported that marijuana misuse in conjunction with specific cannabinoid receptor 1 (CNR1) genetic variants (rs12720071-Gallele carriers) contributed to white-matter (WM) brain volume deficits in schizophrenia patients. In this study, we assessed the influence of another cannabinoid-related gene, mitogen-activated protein kinase 14 (MAPK14), and potential MAPK14–CNR1 gene–gene interactions in conferring brain volume abnormalities among schizophrenia patients with marijuana abuse/dependence. MAPK14 encodes a member of the MAPK family involved in diverse cellular processes, including CNR1-induced apoptosis. Method We genotyped 235 schizophrenia patients on nine MAPK14 tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (tSNPs). Approximately one quarter of the sample had marijuana abuse or dependence. Differential effects of MAPK14 tSNPs on brain volumes across patients with versus without marijuana abuse/dependence were examined using ANCOVA. Results Of the MAPK14 tSNPs, only rs12199654 had significant genotype effects and genotype × marijuana misuse interaction effects on WM volumes. rs12199654-A homozygotes with marijuana abuse/dependence had significantly smaller total cerebral and lobar WM volumes. The effects of MAPK14 rs12199654 on WM volume deficits remained significant even after controlling for the CNR1 rs12720071 genotype. There were significant main effects of the MAPK14 CNR1 diplotype and diplotype × marijuana interaction on WM brain volumes, with both genetic variants having additive contributions to WM volume deficits only in patients with marijuana misuse. Conclusions Given that CNR1-induced apoptosis is preceded by increased MAPK phosphorylation, our study suggests that potential MAPK14–CNR1 gene–gene interactions may mediate brain morphometric features in schizophrenia patients with heavy marijuana use. PMID:22850347

  10. MAOA rs1137070 and heroin addiction interactively alter gray matter volume of the salience network

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yan; Liu, Linwen; Feng, Jiajia; Yue, Weihua; Lu, Lin; Fan, Yong; Shi, Jie

    2017-01-01

    The rs1137070 polymorphism of monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) is associated with alcoholism and smoking behavior. However, the association between rs1137070 and heroin addiction remains unclear. In this study, we examined the allelic distribution of rs1137070 in 1,035 heroin abusers and 2,553 healthy controls and investigated the interactive effects of rs1137070 and heroin addiction on gray matter volume (GMV) based on 78 heroin abusers and 79 healthy controls. The C allele frequency of rs1137070 was significantly higher in heroin abusers. Heroin addiction and the rs1137070 variant interactively altered measures of GMV in the anterior cingulate cortex, orbital frontal cortex, temporal pole, and insula, which were correlated with cognitive function. Heroin abusers with the C allele had lower measures of GMV in these regions than the healthy controls with the same allele, whereas those with the T allele displayed a different trend. The altered brain regions were connected with white matter tracts, yielding a structural network that partially overlapped with the salience network. These findings suggest that the low activity-related C allele of MAOA rs1137070 is associated with an increase in the sensitivity to heroin addiction and the damaging effects of heroin abuse on cognition and the salience network. PMID:28345608

  11. B_sπ -Bbar{K} interactions in finite volume and X(5568)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jun-Xu; Ren, Xiu-Lei; Geng, Li-Sheng

    2017-02-01

    The recent observation of X(5568) by the D0 Collaboration has aroused a lot of interest both theoretically and experimentally. In the present work, we first point out that X(5568) and D_{s0}^*(2317) cannot simultaneously be of molecular nature, from the perspective of heavy-quark symmetry and chiral symmetry, based on a previous study of the lattice QCD scattering lengths of DK and its coupled channels. Then we compute the discrete energy levels of the B_sπ and Bbar{K} system in finite volume using unitary chiral perturbation theory. The comparison with the latest lattice QCD simulation, which disfavors the existence of X(5568), supports our picture where the B_sπ and Bbar{K} interactions are weak and X(5568) cannot be a B_sπ and Bbar{K} molecular state. In addition, we show that the extended Weinberg compositeness condition also indicates that X(5568) cannot be a molecular state made from B_sπ and Bbar{K} interactions.

  12. Contaminated Sediment Remediation Reauthorization Act

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Sen. Levin, Carl [D-MI

    2009-04-30

    Senate - 04/20/2010 Placed on Senate Legislative Calendar under General Orders. Calendar No. 354. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  13. Interactive Effects of Chronic Cigarette Smoking and Age on Brain Volumes in Controls and Alcohol Dependent Individuals in Early Abstinence

    PubMed Central

    Durazzo, Timothy C.; Mon, Anderson; Pennington, David; Abé, Christoph; Gazdzinski, Stefan; Meyerhoff, Dieter J.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic alcohol use disorders (AUD) have been shown to interact with normal age-related volume loss to exacerbate brain atrophy with increasing age. However, chronic cigarette smoking, a highly comorbid condition in AUD, and its influence on age-related brain atrophy has not been evaluated. We performed 1.5T quantitative MRI in non-smoking controls (nsCON; n=54), smoking light drinking controls (sCON, n=34), and 1-week-abstinent, treatment-seeking non-smoking alcohol dependent individuals (nsALC, n=35) and smoking ALC (sALC, n=43), to evaluate the independent and interactive effects of alcohol dependence and chronic smoking on regional cortical and subcortical brain volumes, emphasizing the brain reward/executive oversight system (BREOS),. nsCON and sALC showed greater age-related volume losses than nsALC in the dorsal prefrontal cortex (DPFC), total cortical BREOS, superior parietal lobule and putamen. nsALC and sALC demonstrated smaller volumes than nsCON in most cortical ROIs. sCON had smaller volumes than nsCON in the DPFC, insula, inferior parietal lobule, temporal pole/parahippocampal region and all global cortical measures. nsALC and sALC had smaller volumes than sCON in the DPFC, superior temporal gyrus, inferior and superior parietal lobules, precuneus and all global cortical measures. Volume differences between nsALC and sALC were observed only in the putamen. Alcohol consumption measures were not related to volumes in any ROI for ALC; smoking severity measures were related to corpus callosum volume in sCON and sALC. The findings indicate that consideration of smoking status is necessary for a better understanding of the factors contributing to regional brain atrophy in AUD. PMID:22943795

  14. The effect of phytostabilization on Zn speciation in a dredged contaminated sediment using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray fluorescence, EXAFS spectroscopy, and principal components analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panfili, Frédéric; Manceau, Alain; Sarret, Géraldine; Spadini, Lorenzo; Kirpichtchikova, Tatiana; Bert, Valérie; Laboudigue, Agnès; Marcus, Matthew A.; Ahamdach, Noureddine; Libert, Marie-Françoise

    2005-05-01

    The maintenance of waterways generates large amounts of dredged sediments, which are deposited on adjacent land surfaces. These sediments are often rich in metal contaminants and present a risk to the local environment. Understanding how the metals are immobilized at the molecular level is critical for formulating effective metal containment strategies such as phytoremediation. In the present work, the mineralogical transformations of Zn-containing phases induced by two graminaceous plants (A grostis tenuis and Festuca rubra) in a contaminated sediment ([Zn] = 4700 mg kg -1, [P 2O 5] = 7000 mg kg -1, pH = 7.8), untreated or amended with hydroxylapatite (AP) or Thomas basic slag (TS), were investigated after two yr of pot experiment by scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy-dispersive spectrometry (SEM-EDS), synchrotron-based X-ray microfluorescence (μ-SXRF), and powder and laterally resolved extended X-ray absorption fine structure (μ-EXAFS) spectroscopy. The number and nature of Zn species were evaluated by principal component (PCA) and least-squares fitting (LSF) analysis of the entire set of μ-EXAFS spectra, which included up to 32 individual spectra from regions of interest varying in chemical composition. Seven Zn species were identified at the micrometer scale: sphalerite, gahnite, franklinite, Zn-containing ferrihydrite and phosphate, (Zn-Al)-hydrotalcite, and Zn-substituted kerolite-like trioctahedral phyllosilicate. Bulk fractions of each species were quantified by LSF of the powder EXAFS spectra to linear combinations of the identified Zn species spectra. In the untreated and unvegetated sediment, Zn was distributed as ˜50% (mole ratio of total Zn) sphalerite, ˜40% Zn-ferrihydrite, and ˜10 to 20% (Zn-Al)-hydrotalcite plus Zn-phyllosilicate. In unvegetated but amended sediments (AP and TS), ZnS and Zn-ferrihydrite each decreased by 10 to 20% and were replaced by Zn-phosphate (˜30˜40%). In the presence of plants, ZnS was almost completely

  15. The genome of Polaromonas naphthalenivorans strain CJ2, isolated from coal tar-contaminated sediment, reveals physiological and metabolic versatility and evolution through extensive horizontal gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Yagi, Jane M; Sims, David; Brettin, Thomas; Bruce, David; Madsen, Eugene L

    2009-09-01

    nitrogen fixation and grow on the aromatic compounds, biphenyl and benzoate, were experimentally verified. These new phenotypes and genotypes set the stage for gaining additional insights into the physiology and biochemistry contributing to strain CJ2's fitness in its native habitat, contaminated sediment.

  16. Regional gray matter volume and anxiety-related traits interact to predict somatic complaints in a non-clinical sample.

    PubMed

    Wei, Dongtao; Du, Xue; Li, Wenfu; Chen, Qunlin; Li, Haijiang; Hao, Xin; Zhang, Lei; Hitchman, Glenn; Zhang, Qinglin; Qiu, Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Somatic complaints can be important features of an individual's expression of anxiety. Anxiety-related traits are also risk factors for somatic symptoms. However, it is not known which neuroanatomical mechanisms may be responsible for this relationship. In this study, our first step was to use voxel-based morphometry (VBM) approaches to investigate the neuroanatomical basis underlying somatic complaints in a large sample of healthy subjects. We found a significant positive correlation between somatic complaints and parahippocampal gyrus (PHG) volume adjacent to the entorhinal cortex. Further analysis revealed that the interaction between PHG volume/entorhinal cortex and neuroticism-anxiety (N-Anx) predicted somatic complaints. Specifically, somatic complaints were associated with higher N-Anx for individuals with increased PHG volume. These findings suggest that increased PHG volume and higher trait anxiety can predict vulnerability to somatic complaints in the general population. © The Author (2014). Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Seismic design technology for breeder reactor structures. Volume 2. Special topics in soil/structure interaction analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, D.P.

    1983-04-01

    This volume is divided into six chapters: definition of seismic input ground motion, review of state-of-the-art procedures, analysis guidelines, rock/structure interaction analysis example, comparison of two- and three-dimensional analyses, and comparison of analyses using FLUSH and TRI/SAC Codes. (DLC)

  18. Bicarbonate-water interactions in the rat proximal convoluted tubule. An effect of volume flux on active proton secretion

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    The effect of volume absorption on bicarbonate absorption was examined in the in vivo perfused rat proximal convoluted tubule. Volume absorption was inhibited by isosmotic replacement of luminal NaCl with raffinose. In tubules perfused with 25 mM bicarbonate, as raffinose was increased from 0 to 55 to 63 mM, volume absorption decreased from 2.18 +/- 0.10 to 0.30 +/- 0.18 to -0.66 +/- 0.30 nl/mm X min, respectively, and bicarbonate absorption decreased from 131 +/- 5 to 106 +/- 8 to 91 +/- 13 pmol/mm X min, respectively. This bicarbonate-water interaction could not be attributed to dilutional changes in luminal or peritubular bulk phase bicarbonate concentrations. Inhibition of active proton secretion by acetazolamide abolished the effect of volume flow on bicarbonate absorption, which implies that the bicarbonate reflection coefficient is close to 1 and eliminates the possibility of solvent drag across the tight junction. When the luminal bicarbonate concentration was varied, the magnitude of the bicarbonate-water interaction increased with increasing luminal bicarbonate concentration. The largest interaction occurred at high luminal bicarbonate concentrations, where the rate of proton secretion has been previously shown to be independent of luminal bicarbonate concentration and pH. The results thus suggest that a peritubular and/or cellular compartment exists that limits bicarbonate diffusion, and where pH changes secondary to bicarbonate-water interactions (solute polarization) alter the rate of active proton secretion. PMID:6096481

  19. Separating chemical and excluded volume interactions of polyethylene glycols with native proteins: Comparison with PEG effects on DNA helix formation.

    PubMed

    Shkel, Irina A; Knowles, D B; Record, M Thomas

    2015-09-01

    Small and large PEGs greatly increase chemical potentials of globular proteins (μ2), thereby favoring precipitation, crystallization, and protein-protein interactions that reduce water-accessible protein surface and/or protein-PEG excluded volume. To determine individual contributions of PEG-protein chemical and excluded volume interactions to μ2 as functions of PEG molality m3 , we analyze published chemical potential increments μ23  = dμ2/dm3 quantifying unfavorable interactions of PEG (PEG200-PEG6000) with BSA and lysozyme. For both proteins, μ23 increases approximately linearly with the number of PEG residues (N3). A 1 molal increase in concentration of PEG -CH2 OCH2 - groups, for any chain-length PEG, increases μBSA by ∼2.7 kcal/mol and μlysozyme by ∼1.0 kcal/mol. These values are similar to predicted chemical interactions of PEG -CH2 OCH2 - groups with these protein components (BSA ∼3.3 kcal/mol, lysozyme ∼0.7 kcal/mol), dominated by unfavorable interactions with amide and carboxylate oxygens and counterions. While these chemical effects should be dominant for small PEGs, larger PEGS are expected to exhibit unfavorable excluded volume interactions and reduced chemical interactions because of shielding of PEG residues in PEG flexible coils. We deduce that these excluded volume and chemical shielding contributions largely compensate, explaining why the dependence of μ23 on N3 is similar for both small and large PEGs. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Independent and interactive effects of blood pressure and cardiac function on brain volume and white matter hyperintensities in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Alosco, Michael L; Brickman, Adam M; Spitznagel, Mary Beth; Griffith, Erica Y; Narkhede, Atul; Raz, Naftali; Cohen, Ronald; Sweet, Lawrence H; Hughes, Joel; Rosneck, Jim; Gunstad, John

    2013-01-01

    Reduced systemic perfusion and comorbid medical conditions are key contributors to adverse brain changes in heart failure (HF). Hypertension, the most common co-occurring condition in HF, accelerates brain atrophy in aging populations. However, the independent and interactive effects of blood pressure and systemic perfusion on brain structure in HF have yet to be investigated. Forty-eight older adults with HF underwent impedance cardiography to assess current systolic blood pressure status and cardiac index to quantify systemic perfusion. All participants underwent brain magnetic resonance imaging to quantify total brain, total and subcortical gray matter volume, and white matter hyperintensities (WMH) volume. Regression analyses adjusting for medical and demographic factors showed decreased cardiac index was associated with smaller subcortical gray matter volume (P < .01), and higher systolic blood pressure predicted reduced total gray matter volume (P = .03). The combination of higher blood pressure and lower cardiac index exacerbated WMH (P = .048). Higher blood pressure and systemic hypoperfusion are associated with smaller brain volume, and these factors interact to exacerbate WMH in HF. Prospective studies are needed to clarify the effects of blood pressure on the brain in HF, including the role of long-term blood pressure fluctuations. Copyright © 2013 American Society of Hypertension. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Independent and Interactive Effects of Blood Pressure and Cardiac Function on Brain Volume and White Matter Hyperintensities in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Alosco, Michael L.; Brickman, Adam M.; Spitznagel, Mary Beth; Griffith, Erica Y.; Narkhede, Atul; Raz, Naftali; Cohen, Ronald; Sweet, Lawrence H.; Hughes, Joel; Rosneck, Jim; Gunstad, John

    2013-01-01

    Background Reduced systemic perfusion and comorbid medical conditions are key contributors to adverse brain changes in heart failure (HF). Hypertension, the most common co-occurring condition in HF, accelerates brain atrophy in aging populations. However, the independent and interactive effects of blood pressure and systemic perfusion on brain structure in HF have yet to be investigated. Methods Forty-eight older adults with HF underwent impedance cardiography to assess current systolic blood pressure status, and cardiac index to quantify systemic perfusion. All participants underwent brain magnetic resonance imaging to quantify total brain, total and subcortical gray matter volume, and white matter hyperintensities (WMH) volume. Results Regression analyses adjusting for medical and demographic factors showed decreased cardiac index was associated with smaller subcortical gray matter volume (p < .01) and higher systolic blood pressure predicted reduced total gray matter volume (p = .03). The combination of higher blood pressure and lower cardiac index exacerbated WMH (p = .048). Conclusions Higher blood pressure and systemic hypoperfusion are associated with smaller brain volume and these factors interact to exacerbate WMH in HF. Prospective studies are needed to clarify the effects of blood pressure on the brain in HF, including the role of long-term blood pressure fluctuations. PMID:23735419

  2. Interaction of the endocrine system with inflammation: a function of energy and volume regulation.

    PubMed

    Straub, Rainer H

    2014-02-13

    During acute systemic infectious disease, precisely regulated release of energy-rich substrates (glucose, free fatty acids, and amino acids) and auxiliary elements such as calcium/phosphorus from storage sites (fat tissue, muscle, liver, and bone) are highly important because these factors are needed by an energy-consuming immune system in a situation with little or no food/water intake (sickness behavior). This positively selected program for short-lived infectious diseases is similarly applied during chronic inflammatory diseases. This review presents the interaction of hormones and inflammation by focusing on energy storage/expenditure and volume regulation. Energy storage hormones are represented by insulin (glucose/lipid storage and growth-related processes), insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) (muscle and bone growth), androgens (muscle and bone growth), vitamin D (bone growth), and osteocalcin (bone growth, support of insulin, and testosterone). Energy expenditure hormones are represented by cortisol (breakdown of liver glycogen/adipose tissue triglycerides/muscle protein, and gluconeogenesis; water retention), noradrenaline/adrenaline (breakdown of liver glycogen/adipose tissue triglycerides, and gluconeogenesis; water retention), growth hormone (glucogenic, lipolytic; has also growth-related aspects; water retention), thyroid gland hormones (increase metabolic effects of adrenaline/noradrenaline), and angiotensin II (induce insulin resistance and retain water). In chronic inflammatory diseases, a preponderance of energy expenditure pathways is switched on, leading to typical hormonal changes such as insulin/IGF-1 resistance, hypoandrogenemia, hypovitaminosis D, mild hypercortisolemia, and increased activity of the sympathetic nervous system and the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. Though necessary during acute inflammation in the context of systemic infection or trauma, these long-standing changes contribute to increased mortality in chronic

  3. Interaction of hyperthermia and heart rate on stroke volume during prolonged exercise.

    PubMed

    Trinity, Joel D; Pahnke, Matthew D; Lee, Joshua F; Coyle, Edward F

    2010-09-01

    People who become hyperthermic during exercise display large increases in heart rate (HR) and reductions in stroke volume (SV). It is not clear if the reduction in SV is due primarily to hyperthermia or if it is a secondary effect of an elevation in HR reducing ventricular filling. In the present study, the upward drift of HR during prolonged exercise was prevented by a very small dose of the β1-adrenoreceptor blocker (atenolol; βB), thus allowing SV to be compared at a given HR during normothermia and hyperthermia. Eleven men cycled for 60 min at 57% of peak O2 uptake after receiving placebo control (PL) or a low dose (0.2 mg/kg) of βB. Hyperthermia was induced by reducing heat dissipation during exercise. Four experimental conditions were studied: normothermia-PL, normothermia-βB, hyperthermia-PL, and hyperthermia-βB. Hyperthermia increased skin and core temperature by 4.3 degrees C and 0.8 degrees C (P<0.01), respectively. βB prevented HR elevation with hyperthermia: HR values were similar at minute 60 during normothermia-PL and hyperthermia-βB (155±11 and 154±13 beats/min, respectively, P=0.82). However, SV was increased by 7% during the final 20 min of exercise during hyperthermia-βB compared with normothermia-PL (treatment×time interaction, P=0.03). In conclusion, when matched for HR, mild hyperthermia increased SV during exercise. Furthermore, the reduction in SV throughout prolonged exercise under normothermic and mildly hyperthermic conditions appears to be due to the increase in HR.

  4. Interaction of the endocrine system with inflammation: a function of energy and volume regulation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    During acute systemic infectious disease, precisely regulated release of energy-rich substrates (glucose, free fatty acids, and amino acids) and auxiliary elements such as calcium/phosphorus from storage sites (fat tissue, muscle, liver, and bone) are highly important because these factors are needed by an energy-consuming immune system in a situation with little or no food/water intake (sickness behavior). This positively selected program for short-lived infectious diseases is similarly applied during chronic inflammatory diseases. This review presents the interaction of hormones and inflammation by focusing on energy storage/expenditure and volume regulation. Energy storage hormones are represented by insulin (glucose/lipid storage and growth-related processes), insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) (muscle and bone growth), androgens (muscle and bone growth), vitamin D (bone growth), and osteocalcin (bone growth, support of insulin, and testosterone). Energy expenditure hormones are represented by cortisol (breakdown of liver glycogen/adipose tissue triglycerides/muscle protein, and gluconeogenesis; water retention), noradrenaline/adrenaline (breakdown of liver glycogen/adipose tissue triglycerides, and gluconeogenesis; water retention), growth hormone (glucogenic, lipolytic; has also growth-related aspects; water retention), thyroid gland hormones (increase metabolic effects of adrenaline/noradrenaline), and angiotensin II (induce insulin resistance and retain water). In chronic inflammatory diseases, a preponderance of energy expenditure pathways is switched on, leading to typical hormonal changes such as insulin/IGF-1 resistance, hypoandrogenemia, hypovitaminosis D, mild hypercortisolemia, and increased activity of the sympathetic nervous system and the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. Though necessary during acute inflammation in the context of systemic infection or trauma, these long-standing changes contribute to increased mortality in chronic

  5. Image Data Processing System (IDAPS) user manual, S-056 experiment. Volume 1: System description. Volume 2: Batch IDAPS. Volume 3: Interactive IDAPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Image data processing system (IDAPS) developed to satisfy the image processing requirements of the Skylab S-056 experiment is described. The S-056 experiment was designed to obtain high-resolution photographs of the sun in the far ultraviolet, or soft X-ray, portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. Thirty-five thousand photographs were obtained by the three flights of the program; and, faced with such a massive volume of imagery, the designers of the experiment decided to develop a computer-based system which would reduce the image processing workload. The purpose of the IDAPS User Manual is to give the IDAPS user the necessary information and instructions to effectively utilize the system.

  6. High-volume image quality assessment systems: tuning performance with an interactive data visualization tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bresnahan, Patricia A.; Pukinskis, Madeleine; Wiggins, Michael

    1999-03-01

    Image quality assessment systems differ greatly with respect to the number and types of mags they need to evaluate, and their overall architectures. Managers of these systems, however, all need to be able to tune and evaluate system performance, requirements often overlooked or under-designed during project planning. Performance tuning tools allow users to define acceptable quality standards for image features and attributes by adjusting parameter settings. Performance analysis tools allow users to evaluate and/or predict how well a system performs in a given parameter state. While image assessment algorithms are becoming quite sophisticated, duplicating or surpassing the human decision making process in their speed and reliability, they often require a greater investment in 'training' or fine tuning of parameters in order to achieve optimum performance. This process may involve the analysis of hundreds or thousands of images, generating a large database of files and statistics that can be difficult to sort through and interpret. Compounding the difficulty is the fact that personnel charged with tuning and maintaining the production system may not have the statistical or analytical background required for the task. Meanwhile, hardware innovations have greatly increased the volume of images that can be handled in a given time frame, magnifying the consequences of running a production site with an inadequately tuned system. In this paper, some general requirements for a performance evaluation and tuning data visualization system are discussed. A custom engineered solution to the tuning and evaluation problem is then presented, developed within the context of a high volume image quality assessment, data entry, OCR, and image archival system. A key factor influencing the design of the system was the context-dependent definition of image quality, as perceived by a human interpreter. This led to the development of a five-level, hierarchical approach to image quality

  7. Propulsion and airframe aerodynamic interactions of supersonic V/STOL configurations. Volume 1: Wind tunnel test pressure data report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zilz, D. E.; Devereaux, P. A.

    1985-01-01

    A wind tunnel model of a supersonic V/STOL fighter configuration has been tested to measure the aerodynamic interaction effects which can result from geometrically close-coupled propulsion system/airframe components. The approach was to configure the model to represent two different test techniques. One was a conventional test technique composed of two test modes. In the Flow-Through mode, absolute configuration aerodynamics are measured, including inlet/airframe interactions. In the Jet-Effects mode, incremental nozzle/airframe interactions are measured. The other test technique is a propulsion simulator approach, where a sub-scale, externally powered engine is mounted in the model. This allows proper measurement of inlet/airframe and nozzle/airframe interactions simultaneously. This is Volume 1 of 2: Wind Tunnel Test Pressure Data Report.

  8. Interactive Volume Exploration of Petascale Microscopy Data Streams Using a Visualization-Driven Virtual Memory Approach.

    PubMed

    Hadwiger, M; Beyer, J; Jeong, Won-Ki; Pfister, H

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents the first volume visualization system that scales to petascale volumes imaged as a continuous stream of high-resolution electron microscopy images. Our architecture scales to dense, anisotropic petascale volumes because it: (1) decouples construction of the 3D multi-resolution representation required for visualization from data acquisition, and (2) decouples sample access time during ray-casting from the size of the multi-resolution hierarchy. Our system is designed around a scalable multi-resolution virtual memory architecture that handles missing data naturally, does not pre-compute any 3D multi-resolution representation such as an octree, and can accept a constant stream of 2D image tiles from the microscopes. A novelty of our system design is that it is visualization-driven: we restrict most computations to the visible volume data. Leveraging the virtual memory architecture, missing data are detected during volume ray-casting as cache misses, which are propagated backwards for on-demand out-of-core processing. 3D blocks of volume data are only constructed from 2D microscope image tiles when they have actually been accessed during ray-casting. We extensively evaluate our system design choices with respect to scalability and performance, compare to previous best-of-breed systems, and illustrate the effectiveness of our system for real microscopy data from neuroscience.

  9. Learning a Second Language through Interaction. Studies in Bilingualism, Volume 17.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Rod

    This book examines different theoretical perspectives on the role that interaction plays in second language acquisition. The principle perspectives are those provided by the Interaction Hypothesis, Socio-Cultural Theory, and the Levels of Processing Model. Interaction is defined broadly; it is seen as involving both intermental and intramental…

  10. Evaluation of some control-volume techniques for analysis of shock-boundary layer interactions in supersonic inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hingst, W. R.

    1975-01-01

    Various control-volume models used to analyze the shock boundary layer bleed interaction were investigated. The bleed assumptions of the models and their influence on the analytical solutions are discussed. The results of the analysis using these models are compared with experimental boundary-layer data taken in a supersonic inlet. The experimental Mach number upstream of the interaction was 1.66, and the oblique-shock pressure ratio was 1.33. The boundary layer data included bleed flow rates up to approximately 0.6 of the upstream boundary layer mass flow rate. The first model assumed the bleed was removed from the control volume with a momentum that was characterized by a pressure intermediate between the upstream and downstream pressures. The second model assumed the control volume was bounded by a streamline dividing the bleed and residual flows and eliminated the need to specify the momentum of the bleed flow. Comparison of the results using the models showed that specifying the bleed pressure in one model was equivalent to specifying the pressure along the dividing streamline in the other.

  11. Models for Excluded Volume Interaction between an Unfolded Protein and Rigid Macromolecular Cosolutes: Macromolecular Crowding and Protein Stability Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Minton, Allen P.

    2005-01-01

    Statistical-thermodynamic models for the excluded volume interaction between an unfolded polypeptide chain and a hard sphere or hard rod cosolute are presented, permitting estimation of the free energy of transfer of a polypeptide chain with fixed radius of gyration from a dilute (ideal) solution to a solution containing volume fraction φ of either cosolute. Also presented is a general thermodynamic description of the equilibrium between a unique native state and a manifold of unfolded or partially unfolded states of a protein distinguished by their respective radii of gyration. Together with results of a Monte Carlo calculation of the distribution of radii of gyration of four different unfolded proteins published by Goldenberg in 2003, these models are used to estimate the effect of intermolecular excluded volume upon an experimentally measurable apparent two-state constant for equilibrium between native and nonnative conformations of each of the four proteins, and upon the experimentally measurable root mean-square radius of gyration of the unfolded protein. Model calculations predict that addition of inert cosolutes at volume fractions exceeding 0.1 stabilizes the native state relative to unfolded states by an amount that increases strongly with φ and with the size of the native protein relative to the size of inert cosolute, and results in significant compaction of the manifold of unfolded states. Predicted effects are in qualitative and/or semiquantitative accord with the results of several published experimental studies. PMID:15596487

  12. Orbiter subsystem hardware/software interaction analysis. Volume 8: Forward reaction control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, D. D.

    1980-01-01

    The results of the orbiter hardware/software interaction analysis for the AFT reaction control system are presented. The interaction between hardware failure modes and software are examined in order to identify associated issues and risks. All orbiter subsystems and interfacing program elements which interact with the orbiter computer flight software are analyzed. The failure modes identified in the subsystem/element failure mode and effects analysis are discussed.

  13. Orbiter subsystem hardware/software interaction analysis. Volume 8: AFT reaction control system, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, D. D.

    1980-01-01

    The orbiter subsystems and interfacing program elements which interact with the orbiter computer flight software are analyzed. The failure modes identified in the subsystem/element failure mode and effects analysis are examined. Potential interaction with the software is examined through an evaluation of the software requirements. The analysis is restricted to flight software requirements and excludes utility/checkout software. The results of the hardware/software interaction analysis for the forward reaction control system are presented.

  14. Verbal Interaction and Development in Families with Adolescents. Advances in Applied Developmental Psychology, Volume 15.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hofer, Manfred, Ed.; Youniss, James, Ed.; Noack, Peter, Ed.

    Individuation theory is rooted in the belief that it is a major developmental task for adolescents to establish their identity while simultaneously maintaining a relationship with their parents. Building on the individuation paradigm, the researchers contributing to this edited volume zeroed in on discourse as a critical mechanism through which…

  15. Volume transmission and receptor-receptor interactions in heteroreceptor complexes: understanding the role of new concepts for brain communication.

    PubMed

    Fuxe, Kjell; Borroto-Escuela, Dasiel O

    2016-08-01

    The discovery of the central monoamine neurons not only demonstrated novel types of brain stem neurons forming global terminal networks all over the brain and the spinal cord, but also to a novel type of communication called volume transmission. It is a major mode of communication in the central nervous system that takes places in the extracellular fluid and the cerebral spinal fluid through diffusion and flow of molecules, like neurotransmitters and extracellular vesicles. The integration of synaptic and volume transmission takes place through allosteric receptor-receptor interactions in heteroreceptor complexes. These heterocomplexes represent major integrator centres in the plasma membrane and their protomers act as moonlighting proteins undergoing dynamic changes and their structure and function. In fact, we propose that the molecular bases of learning and memory can be based on the reorganization of multiples homo and heteroreceptor complexes into novel assembles in the post-junctional membranes of synapses.

  16. Volume transmission and receptor-receptor interactions in heteroreceptor complexes: understanding the role of new concepts for brain communication

    PubMed Central

    Fuxe, Kjell; Borroto-Escuela, Dasiel O.

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of the central monoamine neurons not only demonstrated novel types of brain stem neurons forming global terminal networks all over the brain and the spinal cord, but also to a novel type of communication called volume transmission. It is a major mode of communication in the central nervous system that takes places in the extracellular fluid and the cerebral spinal fluid through diffusion and flow of molecules, like neurotransmitters and extracellular vesicles. The integration of synaptic and volume transmission takes place through allosteric receptor-receptor interactions in heteroreceptor complexes. These heterocomplexes represent major integrator centres in the plasma membrane and their protomers act as moonlighting proteins undergoing dynamic changes and their structure and function. In fact, we propose that the molecular bases of learning and memory can be based on the reorganization of multiples homo and heteroreceptor complexes into novel assembles in the post-junctional membranes of synapses. PMID:27651759

  17. Atomic data for controlled fusion research. Volume III. Particle interactions with surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, E.W.

    1985-02-01

    This report provides a handbook of data concerning particle solid interactions that are relevant to plasma-wall interactions in fusion devices. Published data have been collected, assessed, and represented by a single functional relationship which is presented in both tabular and graphical form. Mechanisms reviewed here include sputtering, secondary electron emission, particle reflection, and trapping.

  18. Discourse as Social Interaction. Discourse Studies: A Multidisciplinary Introduction. Volume 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Dijk, Teun A., Ed.

    The collection of essays on discourse as a form of social interaction includes: "Discourse as Interaction in Society" (Teun A. van Dijk); "Discourse Pragmatics" (Shoshana Blum-Kulka); "Conversation Analysis: An Approach to the Study of Social Action as Sense Making Practices" (Anita Pomerantz, B. J. Fehr); "Institutional Dialogue" (Paul Drew,…

  19. Influence of lung volume on the interaction between cardiac output and cerebrovascular regulation during extreme apnoea.

    PubMed

    Stembridge, Mike; Hoiland, Ryan L; Bain, Anthony R; Barak, Otto F; Drvis, Ivan; MacLeod, David B; MacLeod, Douglas M; Madden, Dennis; Batinic, Tonci; O'Donoghue, Peter; Shave, Rob; Dujic, Zeljko; Ainslie, Philip N

    2017-10-01

    What is the central question of this study? Does the reduction in cardiac output observed during extreme voluntary apnoea, secondary to high lung volume, result in a reduction in cerebral blood flow, perfusion pressure and oxygen delivery in a group of elite free divers? What is the main finding and its importance? High lung volumes reduce cardiac output and ventricular filling during extreme apnoea, but changes in cerebral blood flow are observed only transiently during the early stages of apnoea. This reveals that whilst cardiac output is important in regulating cerebral haemodynamics, the role of mean arterial pressure in restoring cerebral perfusion pressure is of greater significance to the regulation of cerebral blood flow. We investigated the role of lung volume-induced changes in cardiac output (Q̇) on cerebrovascular regulation during prolonged apnoea. Fifteen elite apnoea divers (one female; 185 ± 7 cm, 82 ± 12 kg, 29 ± 7 years old) attended the laboratory on two separate occasions and completed maximal breath-holds at total lung capacity (TLC) and functional residual capacity (FRC) to elicit disparate cardiovascular responses. Mean arterial pressure (MAP), internal jugular venous pressure and arterial blood gases were measured via cannulation. Global cerebral blood flow was quantified by ultrasound and cardiac output was quantified by via photoplethysmography. At FRC, stroke volume and Q̇ did not change from baseline (P > 0.05). In contrast, during the TLC trial stroke volume and Q̇ were decreased until 80 and 40% of apnoea, respectively (P < 0.05). During the TLC trial, global cerebral blood flow was significantly lower at 20%, but subsequently increased so that cerebral oxygen delivery was comparable to that during the FRC trial. Internal jugular venous pressure was significantly higher throughout the TLC trial in comparison to FRC. The MAP increased progressively in both trials but to a greater extent at TLC, resulting in a

  20. Digraph Matrix Analysis for systems interactions at Indian Point Unit 3. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Alesso, H.P.; Altenbach, T.J.; Prassinos, P.G.; Lappa, D.A.; Kimura, C.Y.; Patenaude, C.J.; Sacks, I.J.; Ashmore, B.C.; Fromme, D.C.; Hershberger, M.V.

    1986-01-01

    This report documents the analysis of the Indian Point Plant, Unit 3 (IP-3) for adverse systems interactions using DMA. The primary objective of the study was to compare the effectiveness of DMA in finding systems interactions. To this end a parallel study was funded at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The results of this study and the BNL study will then be compared by NRC to the results of a similar study performed by the Power Authority of the State of New York. A secondary objective of this study was to determine systems interactions in selected combinations of safety systems at IP-3. 24 refs., 22 figs., 29 tabs.

  1. Risk-Based Remediation Approach for Cs-137 Contaminated Sediment/Soils at the Savannah River Site (SRS) Lower Three Runs Tail (U) - 13348 - SRNS-RP-2012-00546

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, Candice; Bergren, Christopher; Blas, Susan; Kupar, James

    2013-07-01

    .e., hunting, fishing, hiking etc.) and access from public property. Exposure of the adolescent trespasser to Cs-137 contaminated sediment/soil at concentrations greater than 23.7 pico curies per gram have been calculated to result in an unacceptable cancer risk (> 1 x 10{sup -4}). Comparing the characterization sampling results conducted in 2009 with the benchmark concentration of 23.7 pCi/g, identified elevated risk levels along three sampling areas in the Lower Three Runs tail portion. On January 5, 2012, it was agreed by the core team that a Removal Action in the Lower Three Runs tail was to be conducted for the identified soil/sediment locations in the three identified areas that exceed the 1 x 10{sup -4} risk (23.7 pCi/g) for the adolescent trespasser receptor. The addition of Land Use Controls following the Removal Action was appropriate to protect human health and the environment. A systematic screening matrix was initiated at the identified hot spots (i.e., sampling points with Cs-137 activities greater than 23.7 pCi/g) to identify the limits of the excavation area. Sediment/soil within the defined removal areas would be excavated to the depth necessary to achieve the cleanup goal and disposed of in a CERCLA Off-Site Rule approved disposal facility. It was agreed that this removal action would adequately reduce the volume of available Cs-137 in the Lower Three Runs tail and consequently residual activities of the Cs-137 would decay over time reducing the amount of Cs-137 available in the tail which would curtail risk. The Land Use Controls consist of installation of an additional seven miles of fencing at major road crossings, utility easements, and at areas that showed a higher probability of access. In addition, signs were placed along the entire SRS perimeter of the Lower Three Runs tail approximately every 200 feet. Sign posts included both a No Trespassing sign and a Contaminant Warning sign. The project initiated a subcontract for both the removal action and the

  2. Interactive high-quality visualization of color volume datasets using GPU-based refinements of segmentation data.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byeonghun; Kwon, Koojoo; Shin, Byeong-Seok

    2016-04-24

    Data sets containing colored anatomical images of the human body, such as Visible Human or Visible Korean, show realistic internal organ structures. However, imperfect segmentations of these color images, which are typically generated manually or semi-automatically, produces poor-quality rendering results. We propose an interactive high-quality visualization method using GPU-based refinements to aid in the study of anatomical structures. In order to represent the boundaries of a region-of-interest (ROI) smoothly, we apply Gaussian filtering to the opacity values of the color volume. Morphological grayscale erosion operations are performed to reduce the region size, which is expanded by Gaussian filtering. Pseudo-coloring and color blending are also applied to the color volume in order to give more informative rendering results. We implement these operations on GPUs to speed up the refinements. As a result, our method delivered high-quality result images with smooth boundaries and provided considerably faster refinements. The speed of these refinements is sufficient to be used with interactive renderings as the ROI changes, especially compared to CPU-based methods. Moreover, the pseudo-coloring methods used presented anatomical structures clearly.

  3. The excluded volume effect induced by poly(ethylene glycol) modulates the motility of actin filaments interacting with myosin.

    PubMed

    Munakata, Shinsuke; Hatori, Kuniyuki

    2013-11-01

    To examine the motility of actomyosin complexes in the presence of high concentrations of polymers, we investigated the effect of poly(ethylene glycol) on the sliding velocities of actin filaments and regulated thin filaments on myosin molecules in the presence of ATP. Increased concentrations and relative molecular masses of poly(ethylene glycol) decreased the sliding velocities of actin and regulated thin filaments. The decreased ratio of velocity in regulated thin filaments at - log[Ca(2+) ] of 4 was higher than that of actin filaments. Furthermore, in the absence of Ca(2+) , regulated thin filaments were moderately motile in the presence of poly(ethylene glycol). The excluded volume change (∆V), defined as the change in water volume surrounding actomyosin during the interactions, was estimated by determining the relationship between osmotic pressure exerted by poly(ethylene glycol) and the decreased ratio of the velocities in the presence and absence of poly(ethylene glycol). The ∆V increased up to 3.7 × 10(5) Å(3) as the Mr range of poly(ethylene glycol) was increased up to 20,000. Moreover, the ∆V for regulated thin filaments was approximately two-fold higher than that of actin filaments. This finding suggests that differences in the conformation of filaments according to whether troponin-tropomyosin complexes lie on actin filaments alter the ∆V during interactions of actomyosin complexes and influence motility. © 2013 FEBS.

  4. Coupled 2-dimensional cascade theory for noise an d unsteady aerodynamics of blade row interaction in turbofans. Volume 2: Documentation for computer code CUP2D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, Donald B.

    1994-01-01

    A two dimensional linear aeroacoustic theory for rotor/stator interaction with unsteady coupling was derived and explored in Volume 1 of this report. Computer program CUP2D has been written in FORTRAN embodying the theoretical equations. This volume (Volume 2) describes the structure of the code, installation and running, preparation of the input file, and interpretation of the output. A sample case is provided with printouts of the input and output. The source code is included with comments linking it closely to the theoretical equations in Volume 1.

  5. Interactive Videodisc: the "Why" and the "How." CALICO Monograph Volume 2, Spring 1991.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bush, Michael D.; And Others

    This monograph presents articles on interactive videodisc technology in language learning, ranging from the importance of a theoretical framework, the transition from theory to practice, getting started, design considerations, hypermedia, discovery environments, authoring software, workstation environments, and a look at the future of optical disc…

  6. Researching Online Foreign Language Interaction and Exchange: Theories, Methods and Challenges. Telecollaboration in Education. Volume 3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dooly, Melinda; O'Dowd, Robert

    2012-01-01

    This book provides an accessible introduction to some of the methods and theoretical approaches for investigating foreign language (FL) interaction and exchange in online environments. Research approaches which can be applied to Computer-Mediated Communication (CMC) are outlined, followed by discussion of the way in which tools and techniques for…

  7. The Interactions of Federal and Related State Education Programs. Volume II: State Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holland, Richard P., Ed.

    This collection of case studies of eight states--California, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Missouri, New Mexico, New York, Virginia, Wyoming--documents a 1981-82 investigation of federal and state administrative interactions across a select sample of federal education programs. To represent a wide spectrum of political, economic, and institutional…

  8. Researching Online Foreign Language Interaction and Exchange: Theories, Methods and Challenges. Telecollaboration in Education. Volume 3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dooly, Melinda; O'Dowd, Robert

    2012-01-01

    This book provides an accessible introduction to some of the methods and theoretical approaches for investigating foreign language (FL) interaction and exchange in online environments. Research approaches which can be applied to Computer-Mediated Communication (CMC) are outlined, followed by discussion of the way in which tools and techniques for…

  9. Interactive Videodisc: the "Why" and the "How." CALICO Monograph Volume 2, Spring 1991.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bush, Michael D.; And Others

    This monograph presents articles on interactive videodisc technology in language learning, ranging from the importance of a theoretical framework, the transition from theory to practice, getting started, design considerations, hypermedia, discovery environments, authoring software, workstation environments, and a look at the future of optical disc…

  10. Formation and Assembly-Disassembly Processes of ZnO Hexagonal Pyramids Driven by Dipolar and Excluded Volume Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Ming; Sun, Kai; Kotov, Nicholas A.

    2010-01-20

    ZnO hexagonal pyramids were obtained in hydrophilic media without any traditional stabilizers (capping agents). The absence of a thick organic shell reducing the anisotropy of nanoparticle (NP) interactions, oxide nature of the materials, and new geometry of the nanocrystals makes possible the observation of new self-organization phenomena. Several new features not present in the previous cases of NP self-organization were identified and discussed. The formation of ZnO pyramids involved recrystallization of larger amorphous NPs followed by the multistage disassembly of intermediate aggregates into individual virtually perfectly shaped nanocrystals. The evolution of NPs begins with crystallization of clustered plates within the original amorphous spherical colloids, and then agglomerated truncated pyramids are formed. These agglomerates further transform into chained pyramids, which eventually separate from each other. The crystallization and disassembly processes can be associated with the decrease of potential and anisotropy of the attractive force field around the crystallites represented in part by dipole moments. The reassembly of the pyramids can still be attained via engaging excluded volume interaction after adding similarly charged polymer. Overall, in this system, we see the first examples of (1) coupled crystallization and disassembly process; (2) induced assembly of nanoscale particles using excluded volume interactions, which were previously used only for aggregation of microscale colloids; and (3) nanoparticle assemblies with variable and experimentally verifiable relative orientation of dipoles including head-to-tail, tail-to-tail pairs, and antiparallel chains. Described assemblies of ZnO pyramids with collective behavior of individual building blocks as well as distinct and experimentally controlled stages of assembly and disassembly present a fundamentally interesting nanoparticle system with rich dynamic behavior.

  11. Formation and assembly-disassembly processes of ZnO hexagonal pyramids driven by dipolar and excluded volume interactions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ming; Sun, Kai; Kotov, Nicholas A

    2010-02-17

    ZnO hexagonal pyramids were obtained in hydrophilic media without any traditional stabilizers (capping agents). The absence of a thick organic shell reducing the anisotropy of nanoparticle (NP) interactions, oxide nature of the materials, and new geometry of the nanocrystals makes possible the observation of new self-organization phenomena. Several new features not present in the previous cases of NP self-organization were identified and discussed. The formation of ZnO pyramids involved recrystallization of larger amorphous NPs followed by the multistage disassembly of intermediate aggregates into individual virtually perfectly shaped nanocrystals. The evolution of NPs begins with crystallization of clustered plates within the original amorphous spherical colloids, and then agglomerated truncated pyramids are formed. These agglomerates further transform into chained pyramids, which eventually separate from each other. The crystallization and disassembly processes can be associated with the decrease of potential and anisotropy of the attractive force field around the crystallites represented in part by dipole moments. The reassembly of the pyramids can still be attained via engaging excluded volume interaction after adding similarly charged polymer. Overall, in this system, we see the first examples of (1) coupled crystallization and disassembly process; (2) induced assembly of nanoscale particles using excluded volume interactions, which were previously used only for aggregation of microscale colloids; and (3) nanoparticle assemblies with variable and experimentally verifiable relative orientation of dipoles including head-to-tail, tail-to-tail pairs, and antiparallel chains. Described assemblies of ZnO pyramids with collective behavior of individual building blocks as well as distinct and experimentally controlled stages of assembly and disassembly present a fundamentally interesting nanoparticle system with rich dynamic behavior.

  12. Phytoplankton-Environmental Interactions in Reservoirs. Volume II. Discussion of Workshop Papers and Open Literature.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-01

    euphotic zone includes surface water to a depth where light is reduced to a level that maximum photosynthesis is equivalent to respiration ... Photosynthesis (P) produces oxygen, and respiration (R) consumes oxygen. In pure water at equilibrium with the air, oxygen dissolves to a concen...dea, with DO or its relation to photosynthesis and respiration in detail, several addressed some of the interactive factors. Park and Collins

  13. Partial specific volume and solvent interactions of amphipol A8-35.

    PubMed

    Gohon, Yann; Pavlov, Georgy; Timmins, Peter; Tribet, Christophe; Popot, Jean-Luc; Ebel, Christine

    2004-11-15

    Amphipols are small amphiphilic polymers that can stabilize and keep soluble membrane proteins in aqueous solutions in the absence of detergent. A prerequisite to solution studies of membrane protein/amphipol complexes is the determination of the partial specific volume v2 and effective charge z of the polymer. The ratio (R) of the buoyant molar masses of particles in D2O and H2O solutions, obtained from sedimentation velocity (sH/sD method) and sedimentation equilibrium experiments, and their contrast match point (CMP), determined in small-angle neutron scattering experiments, depend on v2 and z. When z is known, v2 can be estimated from R with a good accuracy as long as v2 is close to 1. The effects of labile H/D exchange and of polyelectrolyte counter-ion dissociation in general cannot be neglected. The accuracy, advantages, and limits of the sH/sD method have been studied in details using model macromolecules (DNA, protein, and polysaccharide). The sH/sD method appears particularly advantageous for the study of heterogeneous samples. Measurements of density, sD/sH buoyant molar masses in H2O, D2O, and D2(18)O, and CMP of hydrogenated and partially deuterated A8-35, a polyacrylate-based amphipol containing 35 underivatized carboxylates per 100 monomers, led to a consistent description of its buoyancy and charge properties.

  14. A digital computer program for the dynamic interaction simulation of controls and structure (DISCOS), volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bodley, C. S.; Devers, A. D.; Park, A. C.; Frisch, H. P.

    1978-01-01

    A theoretical development and associated digital computer program system for the dynamic simulation and stability analysis of passive and actively controlled spacecraft are presented. The dynamic system (spacecraft) is modeled as an assembly of rigid and/or flexible bodies not necessarily in a topological tree configuration. The computer program system is used to investigate total system dynamic characteristics, including interaction effects between rigid and/or flexible bodies, control systems, and a wide range of environmental loadings. In addition, the program system is used for designing attitude control systems and for evaluating total dynamic system performance, including time domain response and frequency domain stability analyses.

  15. Main effects and interactions of cerebral hemispheres, gender, and age in the calculation of volumes and asymmetries of selected structures of episodic memory

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez-Carmona, Rocio; Garcia-Lazaro, Haydee Guadalupe; Dominguez-Corrales, Brenda; Aguilar-Castañeda, Erika; Roldan-Valadez, Ernesto

    2016-01-01

    Summary The aim of this study was to clarify the influence of anatomical (cerebral hemisphere) and demographic (age and gender) variables on the gray matter (GM) volumes and volumetric asymmetry indices (VAIs) of selected structures involved in episodic memory. A cross-sectional study was performed in 47 healthy volunteers. Neuropsychological evaluation revealed similar IQs across the sample. Using SPM-based software, brain segmentation, labeling and volume measurements of the hippocampus, amygdala, middle temporal gyrus and parahippocampal gyrus were performed in each cerebral hemisphere. A two-way between-groups multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA) was applied to GM volumes and VAIs. The main effects of gender and cerebral hemisphere on GM volumes were significant (p < .001), while there was no significant interaction effect between gender and cerebral hemisphere. VAI measurements showed a non-significant effect of gender, but a significant influence of age (p = .015). The linear model of interactions and main effects explained 33% of the variance influencing the GM volume quantification. While cerebral hemisphere and gender were found to affect the volumes of brain structures involved in episodic memory, the calculation of VAIs was affected only by age. A comprehensive understanding of the main effects and interaction effects of cerebral hemisphere, gender and age on the volumes and asymmetries of structures related to episodic memory might help neurologists, psychiatrists, geriatricians and other neuroscientists in the study of degenerative brain diseases. PMID:28072386

  16. Main effects and interactions of cerebral hemispheres, gender, and age in the calculation of volumes and asymmetries of selected structures of episodic memory.

    PubMed

    Ramirez-Carmona, Rocio; Garcia-Lazaro, Haydee Guadalupe; Dominguez-Corrales, Brenda; Aguilar-Castañeda, Erika; Roldan-Valadez, Ernesto

    The aim of this study was to clarify the influence of anatomical (cerebral hemisphere) and demographic (age and gender) variables on the gray matter (GM) volumes and volumetric asymmetry indices (VAIs) of selected structures involved in episodic memory. A cross-sectional study was performed in 47 healthy volunteers. Neuropsychological evaluation revealed similar IQs across the sample. Using SPM-based software, brain segmentation, labeling and volume measurements of the hippocampus, amygdala, middle temporal gyrus and parahippocampal gyrus were performed in each cerebral hemisphere. A two-way between-groups multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA) was applied to GM volumes and VAIs. The main effects of gender and cerebral hemisphere on GM volumes were significant (p < .001), while there was no significant interaction effect between gender and cerebral hemisphere. VAI measurements showed a nonsignificant effect of gender, but a significant influence of age (p = .015). The linear model of interactions and main effects explained 33% of the variance influencing the GM volume quantification. While cerebral hemisphere and gender were found to affect the volumes of brain structures involved in episodic memory, the calculation of VAIs was affected only by age. A comprehensive understanding of the main effects and interaction effects of cerebral hemisphere, gender and age on the volumes and asymmetries of structures related to episodic memory might help neurologists, psychiatrists, geriatricians and other neuroscientists in the study of degenerative brain diseases.

  17. Interaction of airborne and structureborne noise radiated by plates. Volume 1: Analytical study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgary, M. C.

    1986-01-01

    The interaction of airborne and structureborne noise radiated by aircraft materials was examined. The theory and results of several computer simulations of the noise radiated by thin, isotropic, rectangular aluminum plates due to fully coherent combined acoustic and vibrational inputs is presented. The most significant finding was the extremely large influence that the relative phase between inputs has on the combined noise radiation of the plates. Phase dependent effects manifest themselves as cross terms in both the dynamic and acoustic portions of the analysis. Computer simulations show that these cross terms can radically alter the combined sound power radiated by plates constructed of aircraft-type materials. The results suggest that airborne-structureborne interactive effects could be responsible for a significant portion of the overall noise radiated by aircraft-type structures in the low frequency regime. This implies that previous analytical and experimental studies may have neglected an important physical phenomenon in the analayses of the interior noise of propeller dirven aircraft.

  18. User's manual for rocket combustor interactive design (ROCCID) and analysis computer program. Volume 1: User's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muss, J. A.; Nguyen, T. V.; Johnson, C. W.

    1991-01-01

    The user's manual for the rocket combustor interactive design (ROCCID) computer program is presented. The program, written in Fortran 77, provides a standardized methodology using state of the art codes and procedures for the analysis of a liquid rocket engine combustor's steady state combustion performance and combustion stability. The ROCCID is currently capable of analyzing mixed element injector patterns containing impinging like doublet or unlike triplet, showerhead, shear coaxial, and swirl coaxial elements as long as only one element type exists in each injector core, baffle, or barrier zone. Real propellant properties of oxygen, hydrogen, methane, propane, and RP-1 are included in ROCCID. The properties of other propellants can easily be added. The analysis model in ROCCID can account for the influence of acoustic cavities, helmholtz resonators, and radial thrust chamber baffles on combustion stability. ROCCID also contains the logic to interactively create a combustor design which meets input performance and stability goals. A preliminary design results from the application of historical correlations to the input design requirements. The steady state performance and combustion stability of this design is evaluated using the analysis models, and ROCCID guides the user as to the design changes required to satisfy the user's performance and stability goals, including the design of stability aids. Output from ROCCID includes a formatted input file for the standardized JANNAF engine performance prediction procedure.

  19. Characteristics of the mixing volume model with the interactions among spatially distributed particles for Lagrangian simulations of turbulent mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Tomoaki; Nagata, Koji

    2016-11-01

    The mixing volume model (MVM), which is a mixing model for molecular diffusion in Lagrangian simulations of turbulent mixing problems, is proposed based on the interactions among spatially distributed particles in a finite volume. The mixing timescale in the MVM is derived by comparison between the model and the subgrid scale scalar variance equation. A-priori test of the MVM is conducted based on the direct numerical simulations of planar jets. The MVM is shown to predict well the mean effects of the molecular diffusion under various conditions. However, a predicted value of the molecular diffusion term is positively correlated to the exact value in the DNS only when the number of the mixing particles is larger than two. Furthermore, the MVM is tested in the hybrid implicit large-eddy-simulation/Lagrangian-particle-simulation (ILES/LPS). The ILES/LPS with the present mixing model predicts well the decay of the scalar variance in planar jets. This work was supported by JSPS KAKENHI Nos. 25289030 and 16K18013. The numerical simulations presented in this manuscript were carried out on the high performance computing system (NEC SX-ACE) in the Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology.

  20. MultiVIS: a web-based interactive remote visualization environment and navigable volume imagemap system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, Mike; Klein, G.; Hussaini, F.; Pescitelli, M.

    2000-05-01

    This work represents the convergent evolution of a number of technologies and research 'threads'. A project called MetaMAP, which developed early hypermedia imagemap technology, dates back to 1986. Work on creating a new paradigm for doing client-server visualization over the Internet began in 1992. Another major project began in 1993 to turn the Web into a platform for interactive applications. A project to develop multidimensional imagemap technology began in 1995. Finally, work on a scalable computational server architecture called 'Dark Iron' began in 1997. The MultiVIS project represents the intersection of these various research efforts to create a new kind of navigable knowledge space that leverages the advantages of each of its constituent technologies.

  1. Estimate interaction timing in a large volume HgI2 detector using cathode pulse waveforms

    PubMed Central

    Meng, L.J.; He, Z.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents experimental results on the timing resolution achieved with a 5 mm thick HgI2 detector. The timing information was derived based on the cathode pre-amplifier pulse waveform, measured using a digital oscilloscope. The times of interaction were estimated by fitting the measured pulse waveforms to pre-defined waveform models. With this approach, problems related to the conventional leading edge or constant fraction triggering, such as slow charge carrier mobility, pulse shape variation and depth-dependent detector response can be greatly reduced. As a result, we showed a 13 ns timing resolution measured using the 5 mm thick HgI2 detector and a BaF2 coincidence detector with 511 keV full energy events. In this paper, we discuss several waveform models and the results achieved using these models. PMID:28260824

  2. An interactive system for volume segmentation in computer-assisted surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunert, Tobias; Heimann, Tobias; Schroter, Andre; Schobinger, Max; Bottger, Thomas; Thorn, Matthias; Wolf, Ivo; Engelmann, Uwe; Meinzer, Hans-Peter

    2004-05-01

    Computer-assisted surgery aims at a decreased surgical risk and a reduced recovery time of patients. However, its use is still limited to complex cases because of the high effort. It is often caused by the extensive medical image analysis. Especially, image segmentation requires a lot of manual work. Surgeons and radiologists are suffering from usability problems of many workstations. In this work, we present a dedicated workplace for interactive segmentation integratd within the CHILI (tele-)radiology system. The software comes with a lot of improvements with respect to its graphical user interface, the segmentation process and the segmentatin methods. We point out important software requirements and give insight into the concepts which were implemented. Further examples and applications illustrate the software system.

  3. Interaction of a laminar flame with its self-generated flow during constant volume combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn-Rankin, D.; Sawyer, R.F.

    1985-02-01

    The formation of cusp shaped or ''tulip'' flames during closed tube flame propagation has been recorded by combustion researchers for nearly sixty years. Flame instability, pressure wave/flame interaction, and large scale circulation in the unburned gas have been suggested as explanations for the ''tulip'' flame phenomenon, but the cause of the ''tulip'' flame has not been conclusively determined. This work uses laser Doppler anemometer measurements of the flow field during flame propagation in a closed tube to describe the combustion generated flow and to support a fluid mechanical explanation for the ''tulip'' flame formation. The flame behaves as a fluid mechanical discontinuity which deflects the velocity of the gas passing through it. As the flame quenches at the side walls of the combustion vessel, the flow deflection generates a vortex in the burned gas. The vortex remains in the proximity of the flame and modifies the unburned gas field such that the flame propagates more quickly near the wall than at the center. The discrepancy in propagation rates leads to the ''tulip'' flame.

  4. Effects of food concentration, animal interactions, and water volume on survival, growth, and reproduction of daphnia magna under flow-through conditions

    SciTech Connect

    LeBlanc, G.A.; Schoenfeld, D.A.; Surpreant, D.C.

    1981-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effects of food concentration, animal interaction, and water volume on the survival, growth, and reproduction of Daphnia magna under flow-through conditions. A response surface design was used to determine the interactive, as well as the individual, effects of the three factors. The results indicated that there were no important interactive effects of the three factors on survival, growth, or reproduction of D. magna. Individual effects of the factors on reproduction were observed. Food concentration produced a linear trend, with increasing food concentration resulting in an increase in offspring production. The number of daphnids per container produced a quadratic trend, with the maximum offspring production occurring in vessels containing approximately 14 daphnids. Water volume produced a slight linear trend, with increasing water volume resulting in an increase in offspring production.

  5. Interaction between respiration and right versus left ventricular volumes at rest and during exercise: a real-time cardiac magnetic resonance study.

    PubMed

    Claessen, Guido; Claus, Piet; Delcroix, Marion; Bogaert, Jan; La Gerche, Andre; Heidbuchel, Hein

    2014-03-01

    Breathing-induced changes in intrathoracic pressures influence left ventricular (LV) and right ventricular (RV) volumes, the exact nature and extent of which have not previously been evaluated in humans. We sought to examine this "respiratory pump" using novel real-time cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging. Eight healthy subjects underwent serial multislice real-time CMR during normal breathing, breath holding, and the Valsalva maneuver. Subsequently, a separate cohort of nine subjects underwent real-time CMR at rest and during incremental exercise. LV and RV end-diastolic volume (EDV) and end-systolic volume (ESV) and diastolic and systolic eccentricity indexes were determined at peak inspiration and expiration. During normal breathing, inspiration resulted in an increase in RV volumes [RVEDV: +18 ± 8%, RVESV: +14 ± 12%, and RV stroke volume (SV): +21 ± 10%, P < 0.01] and an opposing decrease in LV volumes (P < 0.0001 for interaction). During end-inspiratory breath holding, RV SV decreased by 9 ± 10% (P = 0.046), whereas LV SV did not change. During the Valsalva maneuver, volumes decreased in both ventricles (RVEDV: -29 ± 11%, RVESV: -16 ± 14%, RV SV: -36 ± 14%, LVEDV: -22 ± 17%, and LV SV: -25 ± 17%, P < 0.01). The reciprocal effect of respiration on LV and RV volumes was maintained throughout exercise. The diastolic and systolic eccentricity indexes were greater during inspiration than during expiration, both at rest and during exercise (P < 0.0001 for both). In conclusion, ventricular volumes oscillate with respiratory phase such that RV and LV volumes are maximal at peak inspiration and expiration, respectively. Thus, interpretation of RV versus LV volumes requires careful definition of the exact respiratory time point for proper interpretation, both at rest and during exercise.

  6. Effects of interaction volume on X-ray line-scans across an ultrasonically consolidated aluminum/copper interface.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Jennifer E; Gillespie, John W; Advani, Suresh G

    2013-01-01

    Diffusion as a bonding mechanism for ultrasonic consolidation of metals is widely debated due to the short weld times and low processing temperatures. To quantify interdiffusion coefficients, X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (XEDS) line-scans were performed across an Al-Cu interface using the Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) with accelerating voltages ranging from 6 to 22 KeV in increments of 2 KeV and a step size of 0.05 microns. Higher accelerating voltages resulted in broader concentration profiles, indicating higher apparent interdiffusion coefficients when scanned at the same location of the same sample. This error due to the interaction volume interference was quantified using Monte Carlo simulations. It was found that an accelerating voltage of 22 KeV and diffusion distance less than 5 microns resulted in at least 50% error. Even at a smaller accelerating voltage of 6 KeV, the percent error in calculation of the interdiffusion coefficient for a diffusion distance of 0.5 microns is expected to be 15-20%. An approximate diffusion distance and apparent interdiffusion coefficient for ultrasonically consolidated Al-Cu were 0.503 microns and 0.013 um(2) /s, respectively. In this study, a methodology is presented that allows one to estimate the error in the calculation of an interdiffusion coefficient from the accelerating voltage used and the diffusion distance measured by the SEM XEDS at that accelerating voltage.

  7. [Mean platelet volume: interactions with platelet aggregation activity and glycoprotein IIb-IIIa and Ib expression levels].

    PubMed

    Khaspekova, S G; Ziuriaev, I T; Iakushkin, V V; Naĭmushin, Ia A; Sirotkina, O V; Zaĭtseva, N O; Ruda, M Ia; Mazurov, A V

    2014-01-01

    Increased mean platelet volume (MPV) is an independent risk factor of thrombotic events in patients with cardiovascular diseases. Interactions of MPV with platelet aggregation activity and contents of glycoprotein (GP) IIb-IIIa (alphaIIb/beta3 integrin, fibrinogen receptor) and GP Ib (von Willebrand factor receptor) were investigated in this study. Investigation was performed in a group of healthy volunteers (n = 38) and in a group of patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). In patients blood was collected at days 1, 3-5 and 8-12 after ACS development. As an antiaggregant therapy all patients received acetylsalicylic acid (ASA, inhibitor of thromboxane A2 synthesis) and most of them--clopidogrel (ADP receptor antagonist) with the exception of part of the patients (n = 44) at day 1 who had not taken clopidogrel before first blood collection. In volunteers platelet aggregation was stimulated by 1.25, 2.5, 5 and 20 M ADP, and in patients--by 5 and 20 M ADP. GP IIb-IIIa and GP Ib content on platelet surface was measured using 125I-labelled monoclonal antibodies. GP IIb-IIIa and GP Ib genetic polymorphisms were determined in ACS patients. In healthy donors significant correlations between MPV and aggregation levels were revealed at 1.25 and 2.5 M ADP (coefficients of correlation (r)--0.396 and 0.373, p < 0.05) and at 5 and 20 those interactions did not reach significant level (r--0.279 and 0.205, p > 0.05). Correlations between MPV and aggregation levels were observed at day 1 of ACS in a subgroup of patients who received ASA but had not started clopidogrel treatment (r--0.526, p < 0.01 and 0.368, p < 0.05 for 5 and 20 M ADP respectively). Interactions between these parameters were not registered upon combined treatment with ASA and clopidogrel. Strong direct correlations between MPV and GP IIb-IIIa and GP Ib contents were detected in healthy donors and ACS patients (at all time points) -r from 0.439 to 0.647 (p < or = 0.001 for all correlations). Genetic

  8. Evaluation of the phytotoxicity of contaminated sediments deposited "on soil": II. Impact of water draining from deposits on the development and physiological status of neighbouring plants at growth stage.

    PubMed

    Bedell, Jean-Philippe; Briant, Annelise; Delolme, Cécile; Lassabatère, Laurent; Perrodin, Yves

    2006-03-01

    As part of a study of the phytotoxic risk of spreading contaminated sediments "on soil", a laboratory experiment was carried out to assess the impact of water draining from sediments on peripheral vegetation. Drainage water was obtained in the laboratory by settling three sediments with different pollutants levels, and the supernatant solutions (respectively A1, B1, C1 drainage waters) were used as soaking water for maize (Zea maïs L.) and ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.). The physicochemical characteristics of the supernatant water, particularly metal contents, showed a pattern of contamination, with C1>A1>B1. The plants tested were grown on soil for 21 days, before being soaked for another 21-day period with drainage water (treatments) and distilled water (control). Biomass parameters (fresh weight, length, etc.), enzymatic activity [glutamine synthetase (GS), phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPc)] and Zn, Cu, Cd and Cr contents were measured on both the shoots and roots of each plant. Biomass parameters were stimulated by C1, not affected by A1 and decreased with B1 for maize, whereas they increased for ryegrass in all the treatments. Compared to the control, GS activity was stimulated by C1 in the shoots of both plants and inhibited by treatments B1 and C1 in maize roots. PEPc activity in ryegrass was 1.5-5 times higher with contaminated water treatment, while contrasting effects were observed in maize plants. Both plants showed greater accumulation of chromium and zinc than cadmium and copper. Treatment A1 was found to be less active on plant growth and have a lower impact on the physiological status (enzymatic activities) of both plants. Treatment C1 stimulated the growth and physiological status of the plants, especially in shoots, with higher metal accumulation values in both plants. Treatment B1 was found to show more variable effects on growth indices, enzymatic activity and metal accumulation according to plant species.

  9. Transcriptional responses in juvenile Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) after exposure to mercury-contaminated sediments obtained near the wreck of the German WW2 submarine U-864, and from Bergen Harbor, Western Norway.

    PubMed

    Olsvik, Pål A; Brattås, Marianne; Lie, Kai K; Goksøyr, Anders

    2011-04-01

    The main aim of the present work was to investigate the effects of mercury (Hg)-enriched sediments on fish. Sediments near the sunken German WW2 submarine U-864, which according to historical documents included 67 tons of metallic Hg in its cargo, are enriched of Hg leaking from the wreckage. Juvenile Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) were exposed to two field-collected polluted sediments (U-864: inorganic Hg and Bergen Harbor (Vågen): inorganic Hg, PCB and PAH) or two comparable reference sediments for 5 weeks in the laboratory, and transcriptional responses evaluated in gills and liver. Gills of fish exposed to the Hg-enriched sunken WW2 submarine U-864 sediment contained four fold higher Hg levels compared to the control fish. An increase in Hg content in liver in the U-864 fish was also observed. The transcriptional results showed that calreticulin, HSP70 and heme oxygenase mRNA were significantly up-regulated in gills in fish exposed to the Hg-enriched sediments, whereas calreticulin, heme oxygenase, transferrin and WAP65 were significantly up-regulated and glutathione peroxidase 4B and zona pellucida 3 were significantly down-regulated in liver tissue. In gills and liver of cod exposed to the mixed-contaminated Vågen sediment, CYP1A showed the highest induction. In conclusion, the experiment shows that sediment-bound Hg is available to the fish and affects the transcription of oxidative stress responsive enzymes, suggesting that the Hg-enriched sediments may negatively affect the local wildlife. Furthermore, the mixed contaminated sediments of Vågen affected similar responses in addition to Ah-receptor mediated responses reflecting exposure to PAHs and PCBs.

  10. Interaction between BDNF rs6265 met allele and low family cohesion is associated with smaller left hippocampal volume in pediatric bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Zeni, Cristian Patrick; Mwangi, Benson; Cao, Bo; Hasan, Khader M.; Walss-Bass, Consuelo; Zunta-Soares, Giovana; Soares, Jair C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Genetic and environmental factors are implicated in the onset and evolution of pediatric bipolar disorder, and may be associated to structural brain abnormalities. The aim of our study was to assess the impact of the interaction between the Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) rs6265 polymorphism and family functioning on hippocampal volumes of children and adolescents with bipolar disorder, and typically-developing controls. Methods We evaluated the family functioning cohesion subscale using the Family Environment Scale-Revised, genotyped the BDNF rs6265 polymorphism, and performed structural brain imaging in 29 children and adolescents with bipolar disorder, and 22 healthy controls. Results We did not find significant differences between patients with BD or controls in left or right hippocampus volume (p=0.44, and p=0.71, respectively). However, we detected a significant interaction between low scores on the cohesion subscale and the presence of the Met allele at BNDF on left hippocampal volume of patients with bipolar disorder (F=3.4, p=0.043). None of the factors independently (BDNF Val66Met, cohesion scores) was significantly associated with hippocampal volume differences. Limitations small sample size, cross-sectional study. Conclusions These results may lead to a better understanding of the impact of the interaction between genes and environment factors on brain structures associated to bipolar disorder and its manifestations. PMID:26432032

  11. COMT Val158Met × SLC6A4 5-HTTLPR interaction impacts on gray matter volume of regions supporting emotion processing

    PubMed Central

    El-Hage, Wissam; Monté, Gemma C.; Gohier, Benedicte; Tropeano, Maria; Phillips, Mary L.; Surguladze, Simon A.

    2014-01-01

    There have been several reports on the association between the Val158Met genetic polymorphism of the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene, as well as the serotonin transporter-linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR) of the serotonin transporter gene (SLC6A4), and frontolimbic region volumes, which have been suggested to underlie individual differences in emotion processing or susceptibility to emotional disorders. However, findings have been somewhat inconsistent. This study used diffeomorphic anatomic registration through exponentiated Lie algebra (DARTEL) whole-brain voxel-based morphometry to study the genetic effects of COMT Val158Met and SLC6A4 5-HTTLPR, as well as their interaction, on the regional gray matter volumes of a sample of 91 healthy volunteers. An interaction of COMT Val158Met × SLC6A4 5-HTTLPR genotypes with gray matter volume was found in bilateral parahippocampal gyrus, amygdala, hippocampus, vermis of cerebellum and right putamen/insula. In particular, the gray matter volume in these regions was smaller in individuals who were both COMT-Met and 5-HTTLPR-S carriers, or both COMT-Val and 5-HTTLPR-L homozygotes, as compared with individuals with intermediate combinations of alleles. The interaction of COMT Val158Met and SLC6A4 5-HTTLPR adds to the understanding of individual differences in emotion processing. PMID:23748501

  12. Modeling Aeolian Transport of Contaminated Sediments at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Technical Area 54, Area G: Sensitivities to Succession, Disturbance, and Future Climate

    SciTech Connect

    Whicker, Jeffrey J.; Kirchner, Thomas B.; Breshears, David D.; Field, Jason P.

    2012-03-27

    The Technical Area 54 (TA-54) Area G disposal facility is used for the disposal of radioactive waste at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 435.1 (DOE, 2001) requires that radioactive waste be managed in a manner that protects public health and safety and the environment. In compliance with that requirement, DOE field sites must prepare and maintain site-specific radiological performance assessments for facilities that receive waste after September 26, 1988. Sites are also required to conduct composite analyses for facilities that receive waste after this date; these analyses account for the cumulative impacts of all waste that has been (and will be) disposed of at the facilities and other sources of radioactive material that may interact with these facilities. LANL issued Revision 4 of the Area G performance assessment and composite analysis in 2008. In support of those analyses, vertical and horizontal sediment flux data were collected at two analog sites, each with different dominant vegetation characteristics, and used to estimate rates of vertical resuspension and wind erosion for Area G. The results of that investigation indicated that there was no net loss of soil at the disposal site due to wind erosion, and suggested minimal impacts of wind on the long-term performance of the facility. However, that study did not evaluate the potential for contaminant transport caused by the horizontal movement of soil particles over long time frames. Since that time, additional field data have been collected to estimate wind threshold velocities for initiating sediment transport due to saltation and rates of sediment transport once those thresholds are reached. Data such as these have been used in the development of the Vegetation Modified Transport (VMTran) model. This model is designed to estimate patterns and long-term rates of contaminant redistribution caused by winds at the site, taking into account the impacts of plant

  13. Changes in brain volume and cognition in a randomized trial of exercise and social interaction in a community-based sample of non-demented Chinese elders.

    PubMed

    Mortimer, James A; Ding, Ding; Borenstein, Amy R; DeCarli, Charles; Guo, Qihao; Wu, Yougui; Zhao, Qianhua; Chu, Shugang

    2012-01-01

    Physical exercise has been shown to increase brain volume and improve cognition in randomized trials of non-demented elderly. Although greater social engagement was found to reduce dementia risk in observational studies, randomized trials of social interventions have not been reported. A representative sample of 120 elderly from Shanghai, China was randomized to four groups (Tai Chi, Walking, Social Interaction, No Intervention) for 40 weeks. Two MRIs were obtained, one before the intervention period, the other after. A neuropsychological battery was administered at baseline, 20 weeks, and 40 weeks. Comparison of changes in brain volumes in intervention groups with the No Intervention group were assessed by t-tests. Time-intervention group interactions for neuropsychological measures were evaluated with repeated-measures mixed models. Compared to the No Intervention group, significant increases in brain volume were seen in the Tai Chi and Social Intervention groups (p < 0.05). Improvements also were observed in several neuropsychological measures in the Tai Chi group, including the Mattis Dementia Rating Scale score (p = 0.004), the Trailmaking Test A (p = 0.002) and B (p = 0.0002), the Auditory Verbal Learning Test (p = 0.009), and verbal fluency for animals (p = 0.01). The Social Interaction group showed improvement on some, but fewer neuropsychological indices. No differences were observed between the Walking and No Intervention groups. The findings differ from previous clinical trials in showing increases in brain volume and improvements in cognition with a largely non-aerobic exercise (Tai Chi). In addition, intellectual stimulation through social interaction was associated with increases in brain volume as well as with some cognitive improvements.

  14. Coronary Artery Calcium Volume and Density: Potential Interactions and Overall Predictive Value: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Criqui, Michael H; Knox, Jessica B; Denenberg, Julie O; Forbang, Nketi I; McClelland, Robyn L; Novotny, Thomas E; Sandfort, Veit; Waalen, Jill; Blaha, Michael J; Allison, Matthew A

    2017-08-01

    This study sought to determine the possibility of interactions between coronary artery calcium (CAC) volume or CAC density with each other, and with age, sex, ethnicity, the new atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) risk score, diabetes status, and renal function by estimated glomerular filtration rate, and, using differing CAC scores, to determine the improvement over the ASCVD risk score in risk prediction and reclassification. In MESA (Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis), CAC volume was positively and CAC density inversely associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) events. A total of 3,398 MESA participants free of clinical CVD but with prevalent CAC at baseline were followed for incident CVD events. During a median 11.0 years of follow-up, there were 390 CVD events, 264 of which were coronary heart disease (CHD). With each SD increase of ln CAC volume (1.62), risk of CHD increased 73% (p < 0.001) and risk of CVD increased 61% (p < 0.001). Conversely, each SD increase of CAC density (0.69) was associated with 28% lower risk of CHD (p < 0.001) and 25% lower risk of CVD (p < 0.001). CAC density was inversely associated with risk at all levels of CAC volume (i.e., no interaction was present). In multivariable Cox models, significant interactions were present for CAC volume with age and ASCVD risk score for both CHD and CVD, and CAC density with ASCVD risk score for CVD. Hazard ratios were generally stronger in the lower risk groups. Receiver-operating characteristic area under the curve and Net Reclassification Index analyses showed better prediction by CAC volume than by Agatston, and the addition of CAC density to CAC volume further significantly improved prediction. The inverse association between CAC density and incident CHD and CVD events is robust across strata of other CVD risk factors. Added to the ASCVD risk score, CAC volume and density provided the strongest prediction for CHD and CVD events, and the highest correct reclassification

  15. Passive Sampling Approaches for Contaminated Sediment Management

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-11-01

    Up Philip Gschwend Clamydomonas:  ave  C50 %water /Sol’y =  0.35  1 . Toxicity is related to chemical activity (Hutchinson et al. 1980) C50 %water...Public reporting burden for the collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions...information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. 1 . REPORT DATE NOV 2010 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2010 to 00

  16. Innovative Technologies for Dredging Contaminated Sediments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-09-01

    Watari 1983; Kaneko, Watari , and Aritomi 1984). Major features of the Refresher dredge include: a. Helical cutter. Cuts and guides material into the...by the Refresher No. 6 (Fuyo). The material dredged was primarily silt, in water depths ranging from 7 to 9 ft (Kaneko, Watari , and Aritomi 1984...Kaneko, Watari , and Aritomi (1984) reported the suspended solid con- centrations at this site to be about 1.5 times the turbidity measurement

  17. Monitored Natural Recovery at Contaminated Sediment Sites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    acres of the Twelve-Mile Creek arm of Lake Hartwell. The Sangamo-Weston Plant , situated on Town Creek, was responsible for PCB discharges from plant ...investigation. These sources might include discharges from industries or sewage treatment plants , spills, precipitation runoff, erosion of...historically released from an upstream coke plant . The Black River was listed as impaired based on several beneficial use impairments (BUIs

  18. Contaminated Sediments at Navy Facilities: Cleanup Alternatives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    catalyzed decomposition (destruction) • Electrokinetics (destruction) Biological Methods • Biopile /composting (destruction) • Slurry-phase bioreactors...incineration, vitrification, $110 to $1,350 • Sediment washing, $81 to $330 • Solidification/stabilization, $81 to $392 • Biopile /composting

  19. Interactive effects of chronic cigarette smoking and age on brain volumes in controls and alcohol-dependent individuals in early abstinence.

    PubMed

    Durazzo, Timothy C; Mon, Anderson; Pennington, David; Abé, Christoph; Gazdzinski, Stefan; Meyerhoff, Dieter J

    2014-01-01

    Chronic alcohol-use disorders (AUDs) have been shown to interact with normal age-related volume loss to exacerbate brain atrophy with increasing age. However, chronic cigarette smoking, a highly co-morbid condition in AUD and its influence on age-related brain atrophy have not been evaluated. We performed 1.5 T quantitative magnetic resonance imaging in non-smoking controls [non-smoking light drinking controls (nsCONs); n = 54], smoking light drinking controls (sCONs, n = 34), and one-week abstinent, treatment-seeking alcohol-dependent (ALC) non-smokers (nsALCs, n = 35) and smokers (sALCs, n = 43), to evaluate the independent and interactive effects of alcohol dependence and chronic smoking on regional cortical and subcortical brain volumes, emphasizing the brain reward/executive oversight system (BREOS). The nsCONs and sALCs showed greater age-related volume losses than the nsALCs in the dorsal prefrontal cortex (DPFC), total cortical BREOS, superior parietal lobule and putamen. The nsALCs and sALCs demonstrated smaller volumes than the nsCONs in most cortical region of interests (ROIs). The sCONs had smaller volumes than the nsCONs in the DPFC, insula, inferior parietal lobule, temporal pole/parahippocampal region and all global cortical measures. The nsALCs and sALCs had smaller volumes than the sCONs in the DPFC, superior temporal gyrus, inferior and superior parietal lobules, precuneus and all global cortical measures. Volume differences between the nsALCs and sALCs were observed only in the putamen. Alcohol consumption measures were not related to volumes in any ROI for ALC; smoking severity measures were related to corpus callosum volume in the sCONs and sALCs. The findings indicate that consideration of smoking status is necessary for a better understanding of the factors contributing to regional brain atrophy in AUD.

  20. Fast interactive real-time volume rendering of real-time three-dimensional echocardiography: an implementation for low-end computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saracino, G.; Greenberg, N. L.; Shiota, T.; Corsi, C.; Lamberti, C.; Thomas, J. D.

    2002-01-01

    Real-time three-dimensional echocardiography (RT3DE) is an innovative cardiac imaging modality. However, partly due to lack of user-friendly software, RT3DE has not been widely accepted as a clinical tool. The object of this study was to develop and implement a fast and interactive volume renderer of RT3DE datasets designed for a clinical environment where speed and simplicity are not secondary to accuracy. Thirty-six patients (20 regurgitation, 8 normal, 8 cardiomyopathy) were imaged using RT3DE. Using our newly developed software, all 3D data sets were rendered in real-time throughout the cardiac cycle and assessment of cardiac function and pathology was performed for each case. The real-time interactive volume visualization system is user friendly and instantly provides consistent and reliable 3D images without expensive workstations or dedicated hardware. We believe that this novel tool can be used clinically for dynamic visualization of cardiac anatomy.

  1. Fast interactive real-time volume rendering of real-time three-dimensional echocardiography: an implementation for low-end computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saracino, G.; Greenberg, N. L.; Shiota, T.; Corsi, C.; Lamberti, C.; Thomas, J. D.

    2002-01-01

    Real-time three-dimensional echocardiography (RT3DE) is an innovative cardiac imaging modality. However, partly due to lack of user-friendly software, RT3DE has not been widely accepted as a clinical tool. The object of this study was to develop and implement a fast and interactive volume renderer of RT3DE datasets designed for a clinical environment where speed and simplicity are not secondary to accuracy. Thirty-six patients (20 regurgitation, 8 normal, 8 cardiomyopathy) were imaged using RT3DE. Using our newly developed software, all 3D data sets were rendered in real-time throughout the cardiac cycle and assessment of cardiac function and pathology was performed for each case. The real-time interactive volume visualization system is user friendly and instantly provides consistent and reliable 3D images without expensive workstations or dedicated hardware. We believe that this novel tool can be used clinically for dynamic visualization of cardiac anatomy.

  2. Propulsion and airframe aerodynamic interactions of supersonic V/STOL configurations. Volume 2: Wind tunnel test force and moment data report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zilz, D. E.

    1985-01-01

    A wind tunnel model of a supersonic V/STOL fighter configuration has been tested to measure the aerodynamic interaction effects which can result from geometrically close-coupled propulsion system/airframe components. The approach was to configure the model to represent two different test techniques. One was a conventional test technique composed of two test modes. In the Flow-Through mode, absolute configuration aerodynamics are measured, including inlet/airframe interactions. In the Jet-Effects mode, incremental nozzle/airframe interactions are measured. The other test technique is a propulsion simulator approach, where a sub-scale, externally powered engine is mounted in the model. This allows proper measurement of inlet/airframe and nozzle/airframe interactions simultaneously. This is Volume 2 of 2: Wind Tunnel Test Force and Moment Data Report.

  3. Interactive 3D Analysis of Blood Vessel Trees and Collateral Vessel Volumes in Magnetic Resonance Angiograms in the Mouse Ischemic Hindlimb Model.

    PubMed

    Marks, Peter C; Preda, Marilena; Henderson, Terry; Liaw, Lucy; Lindner, Volkhard; Friesel, Robert E; Pinz, Ilka M

    2013-10-31

    The quantitative analysis of blood vessel volumes from magnetic resonance angiograms (MRA) or μCT images is difficult and time-consuming. This fact, when combined with a study that involves multiple scans of multiple subjects, can represent a significant portion of research time. In order to enhance analysis options and to provide an automated and fast analysis method, we developed a software plugin for the ImageJ and Fiji image processing frameworks that enables the quick and reproducible volume quantification of blood vessel segments. The novel plugin named Volume Calculator (VolCal), accepts any binary (thresholded) image and produces a three-dimensional schematic representation of the vasculature that can be directly manipulated by the investigator. Using MRAs of the mouse hindlimb ischemia model, we demonstrate quick and reproducible blood vessel volume calculations with 95 - 98% accuracy. In clinical settings this software may enhance image interpretation and the speed of data analysis and thus enhance intervention decisions for example in peripheral vascular disease or aneurysms. In summary, we provide a novel, fast and interactive quantification of blood vessel volumes for single blood vessels or sets of vessel segments with particular focus on collateral formation after an ischemic insult.

  4. Evaluation of reduced sediment volume procedures for acute toxicity tests using the estuarine amphipod Leptocheirus plumulosus.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Jacob K; Kennedy, Alan J; Farrar, J Daniel; Mount, David R; Steevens, Jeffery A

    2010-12-01

    The volume of sediment required to perform a sediment toxicity bioassay is a major driver of the overall cost associated with that bioassay. Sediment volume affects bioassay cost because of sediment collection, transportation, storage, and disposal costs as well as labor costs associated with organism recovery at the conclusion of the exposure. The objective of the current study was to evaluate reduced sediment volume versions of the standard U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) 10-d acute Leptocheirus plumulosus method that uses a beaker size of 1,000 ml and 20 organisms. The test design used evaluated the effects of beaker size (250 and 100 ml) and associated sediment volume (75 and 30 ml, respectively) as well as organism loading density (10 and 20 organisms) on test endpoint responsiveness relative to the standard 10-d test method. These comparisons were completed with three different types of contaminated sediments: a field-collected polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-contaminated sediment, a lead-spiked control sediment, and a control sediment spiked with mineral oil. Assessment criteria included test endpoint sensitivity, endpoint consistency, statistical power, water quality, and logistical assessments. Results indicate that the current U.S. EPA method is preferable to the reduced sediment volume methods we assessed, but that a 250-ml beaker/10 organism experimental design is of comparable utility and may be advantageous when reduced sediment volumes are desirable because of high contaminant (spiking studies) or sediment disposal costs. In addition, the results of the current study provide toxicity reference values for PAHs, lead, and an oil surrogate for petroleum hydrocarbons. Copyright © 2010 SETAC.

  5. Towards a mass and volume conserving interface reinitialization scheme for a diffuse interface methodology (for shock-particle interaction)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ju; Jackson, Thomas L.; Sridharan, Prashanth; Balachandar, S.

    2017-01-01

    Recent work using a diffuse interface numerical method for multiphase problems is found to have relatively poor conservation properties of the particles. A novel constrained interface reinitialization scheme is proposed and demonstrated to be effective in conserving particle mass and particle volume when appropriate.

  6. Human-computer interaction in radiotherapy target volume delineation: a prospective, multi-institutional comparison of user input devices.

    PubMed

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this study was the prospective comparison of objective and subjective effects of target volume region of interest (ROI) delineation using mouse-keyboard and pen-tablet user input devices (UIDs). The study was designed as a prospective test/retest sequence, with Wilcoxon signed rank test for matched-pair comparison. Twenty-one physician-observers contoured target volume ROIs on four standardized cases (representative of brain, prostate, lung, and head and neck malignancies) twice: once using QWERTY keyboard/scroll-wheel mouse UID and once with pen-tablet UID (DTX2100, Wacom Technology Corporation, Vancouver, WA, USA). Active task time, ROI manipulation task data, and subjective survey data were collected. One hundred twenty-nine target volume ROI sets were collected, with 62 paired pen-tablet/mouse-keyboard sessions. Active contouring time was reduced using the pen-tablet UID, with mean ± SD active contouring time of 26 ± 23 min, compared with 32 ± 25 with the mouse (p ≤ 0.01). Subjective estimation of time spent was also reduced from 31 ± 26 with mouse to 27 ± 22 min with the pen (p = 0.02). Task analysis showed ROI correction task reduction (p = 0.045) and decreased panning and scrolling tasks (p < 0.01) with the pen-tablet; drawing, window/level changes, and zoom commands were unchanged (p = n.s.) Volumetric analysis demonstrated no detectable differences in ROI volume nor intra- or inter-observer volumetric coverage. Fifty-two of 62 (84%) users preferred the tablet for each contouring task; 5 of 62 (8%) denoted no preference, and 5 of 62 (8%) chose the mouse interface. The pen-tablet UID reduced active contouring time and reduced correction of ROIs, without substantially altering ROI volume/coverage.

  7. Computationally efficient algorithms for incorporation of hydrodynamic and excluded volume interactions in Brownian dynamics simulations: A comparative study of the Krylov subspace and Chebyshev based techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saadat, Amir; Khomami, Bamin

    2014-05-01

    Excluded volume and hydrodynamic interactions play a central role in macromolecular dynamics under equilibrium and non-equilibrium settings. The high computational cost of incorporating the influence of hydrodynamic interaction in meso-scale simulation of polymer dynamics has motivated much research on development of high fidelity and cost efficient techniques. Among them, the Chebyshev polynomial based techniques and the Krylov subspace methods are most promising. To this end, in this study we have developed a series of semi-implicit predictor-corrector Brownian dynamics algorithms for bead-spring chain micromechanical model of polymers that utilizes either the Chebyshev or the Krylov framework. The efficiency and fidelity of these new algorithms in equilibrium (radius of gyration and diffusivity) and non-equilibrium conditions (transient planar extensional flow) are demonstrated with particular emphasis on the new enhancements of the Chebyshev polynomial and the Krylov subspace methods. In turn, the algorithm with the highest efficiency and fidelity, namely, the Krylov subspace method, is used to simulate dilute solutions of high molecular weight polystyrene in uniaxial extensional flow. Finally, it is demonstrated that the bead-spring Brownian dynamics simulation with appropriate inclusion of excluded volume and hydrodynamic interactions can quantitatively predict the observed extensional hardening of polystyrene dilute solutions over a broad molecular weight range.

  8. DISLOCATION BARRIER INTERACTIONS IN CUBIC CRYSTALS. VOLUME I. THE INTERACTION OF DISLOCATIONS IN ANISOTROPIC FACE-CENTERED CUBIC CRYSTALS. (STUDY OF THE THEORY OF FRACTURE PHENOMENA).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    cubic structure . Both long-range and short-range interactions have been considered in a series of fcc elements; the stability of each configuration resulting from a short-range attraction has been determined. The widths of the possible barriers in the various fcc elements have been computed, and the relative strength and importance of each barrier discussed. The most important barriers are those associated with the long-range interaction of two dislocations whose Burgers vectors are orthogonal. The Lomer-Cottrell barrier, although relatively weak, does exist in the

  9. Is the manifestation of the local dynamics in the spin-lattice NMR relaxation in dendrimers sensitive to excluded volume interactions?

    PubMed

    Shavykin, Oleg V; Neelov, Igor M; Darinskii, Anatolii A

    2016-09-21

    The effect of excluded volume (EV) interactions on the manifestation of the local dynamics in the spin-lattice NMR relaxation in dendrimers has been studied by using Brownian dynamics simulations. The study was motivated by the theory developed by Markelov et al., [J. Chem. Phys., 2014, 140, 244904] for a Gaussian dendrimer model without EV interactions. The theory connects the experimentally observed dependence of the spin-lattice relaxation rate 1/T(1)H on the location of NMR active groups with the restricted flexibility (semiflexibility) of dendrimers. Semiflexibility was introduced through the correlations between the orientations of different segments. However, these correlations exist even in flexible dendrimer models with EV interactions. We have simulated coarse-grained flexible and semiflexible dendrimer models with and without EV interactions. Every dendrimer segment consisted of two rigid bonds. Semiflexibility was introduced through a potential which restricts the fluctuations of angles between neighboring bonds but does not change orientational correlations in the EV model as compared to the flexible case. The frequency dependence of the reduced 1/T(1)H(ωH) for segments and bonds belonging to different dendrimer shells was calculated. It was shown that the main effect of EV interactions consists of a much stronger contribution of the overall dendrimer rotation to the dynamics of dendrimer segments as compared to phantom models. After the exclusion of this contribution the manifestation of internal dynamics in spin-lattice NMR relaxation appears to be practically insensitive to EV interactions. For the flexible models, the position ωmax of the peak of the modified 1/T(1)H(ωH) does not depend on the shell number. For semiflexible models, the maximum of 1/T(1)H(ωH) for internal segments or bonds shifts to lower frequencies as compared to outer ones. The dependence of ωmax on the number of dendrimer shells appears to be universal for segments and

  10. Competition between excluded-volume and electrostatic interactions for nanogel swelling: effects of the counterion valence and nanogel charge.

    PubMed

    Adroher-Benítez, Irene; Martín-Molina, Alberto; Ahualli, Silvia; Quesada-Pérez, Manuel; Odriozola, Gerardo; Moncho-Jordá, Arturo

    2017-03-01

    In this work the equilibrium distribution of ions around a thermo-responsive charged nanogel particle in an electrolyte aqueous suspension is explored using coarse-grained Monte Carlo computer simulations and the Ornstein-Zernike integral equation theory. We explicitly consider the ionic size in both methods and study the interplay between electrostatic and excluded-volume effects for swollen and shrunken nanogels, monovalent and trivalent counterions, and for two different nanogel charges. We find good quantitative agreement between the ionic density profiles obtained using both methods when the excluded repulsive force exerted by the cross-linked polymer network is taken into account. For the shrunken conformation, the electrostatic repulsion between the charged groups provokes a heterogeneous polymer density profile, leading to a nanogel structure with an internal low density hole surrounded by a dense corona. The results show that the excluded-volume repulsion strongly hinders the ion permeation for shrunken nanogels, where volume exclusion is able to significantly reduce the concentration of counterions in the more dense regions of the nanogel. In general, we demonstrate that the thermosensitive behaviour of nanogels, as well as their internal structure, is strongly influenced by the valence of the counterions and also by the charge of the particles. On the one hand, an increase of the counterion valence moves the swelling transition to lower temperatures, and induces a major structuring of the charged monomers into internal and external layers around the crown for shrunken nanogels. On the other hand, increasing the particle charge shifts the swelling curve to larger values of the effective radius of the nanogel.

  11. Gas-Grain Simulation Facility: Fundamental studies of particle formation and interactions. Volume 1: Executive summary and overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fogleman, Guy (Editor); Huntington, Judith L. (Editor); Schwartz, Deborah E. (Editor); Fonda, Mark L. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    An overview of the Gas-Grain Simulation Facility (GGSF) project and its current status is provided. The proceedings of the Gas-Grain Simulation Facility Experiments Workshop are recorded. The goal of the workshop was to define experiments for the GGSF--a small particle microgravity research facility. The workshop addressed the opportunity for performing, in Earth orbit, a wide variety of experiments that involve single small particles (grains) or clouds of particles. The first volume includes the executive summary, overview, scientific justification, history, and planned development of the Facility.

  12. Flow structure generated by perpendicular blade-vortex interaction and implications for helicopter noise prediction. Volume 1: Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wittmer, Kenneth S.; Devenport, William J.

    1996-01-01

    The perpendicular interaction of a streamwise vortex with an infinite span helicopter blade was modeled experimentally in incompressible flow. Three-component velocity and turbulence measurements were made using a sub-miniature four sensor hot-wire probe. Vortex core parameters (radius, peak tangential velocity, circulation, and centerline axial velocity deficit) were determined as functions of blade-vortex separation, streamwise position, blade angle of attack, vortex strength, and vortex size. The downstream development of the flow shows that the interaction of the vortex with the blade wake is the primary cause of the changes in the core parameters. The blade sheds negative vorticity into its wake as a result of the induced angle of attack generated by the passing vortex. Instability in the vortex core due to its interaction with this negative vorticity region appears to be the catalyst for the magnification of the size and intensity of the turbulent flowfield downstream of the interaction. In general, the core radius increases while peak tangential velocity decreases with the effect being greater for smaller separations. These effects are largely independent of blade angle of attack; and if these parameters are normalized on their undisturbed values, then the effects of the vortex strength appear much weaker. Two theoretical models were developed to aid in extending the results to other flow conditions. An empirical model was developed for core parameter prediction which has some rudimentary physical basis, implying usefulness beyond a simple curve fit. An inviscid flow model was also created to estimate the vorticity shed by the interaction blade, and to predict the early stages of its incorporation into the interacting vortex.

  13. Gas-Grain Simulation Facility: Fundamental studies of particle formation and interactions. Volume 2: Abstracts, candidate experiments and feasibility study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fogleman, Guy (Editor); Huntington, Judith L. (Editor); Schwartz, Deborah E. (Editor); Fonda, Mark L. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    An overview of the Gas-Grain Simulation Facility (GGSF) project and its current status is provided. The proceedings of the Gas-Grain Simulation Facility Experiments Workshop are recorded. The goal of the workshop was to define experiments for the GGSF--a small particle microgravity research facility. The workshop addressed the opportunity for performing, in Earth orbit, a wide variety of experiments that involve single small particles (grains) or clouds of particles. Twenty experiments from the fields of exobiology, planetary science, astrophysics, atmospheric science, biology, physics, and chemistry were described at the workshop and are outlined in Volume 2. Each experiment description included specific scientific objectives, an outline of the experimental procedure, and the anticipated GGSF performance requirements. Since these experiments represent the types of studies that will ultimately be proposed for the facility, they will be used to define the general science requirements of the GGSF. Also included in the second volume is a physics feasibility study and abstracts of example Gas-Grain Simulation Facility experiments and related experiments in progress.

  14. Self-consistent field theory of tethered polymers: One dimensional, three dimensional, strong stretching theories and the effects of excluded-volume-only interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Suo, Tongchuan Whitmore, Mark D.

    2014-11-28

    We examine end-tethered polymers in good solvents, using one- and three-dimensional self-consistent field theory, and strong stretching theories. We also discuss different tethering scenarios, namely, mobile tethers, fixed but random ones, and fixed but ordered ones, and the effects and important limitations of including only binary interactions (excluded volume terms). We find that there is a “mushroom” regime in which the layer thickness is independent of the tethering density, σ, for systems with ordered tethers, but we argue that there is no such plateau for mobile or disordered anchors, nor is there one in the 1D theory. In the other limit of brushes, all approaches predict that the layer thickness scales linearly with N. However, the σ{sup 1/3} scaling is a result of keeping only excluded volume interactions: when the full potential is included, the dependence is faster and more complicated than σ{sup 1/3}. In fact, there does not appear to be any regime in which the layer thickness scales in the combination Nσ{sup 1/3}. We also compare the results for two different solvents with each other, and with earlier Θ solvent results.

  15. An interaction of a NR3C1 polymorphism and antenatal solar activity impacts both hippocampus volume and neuroticism in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Montag, Christian; Eichner, Markus; Markett, Sebastian; Quesada, Carlos M; Schoene-Bake, Jan-Christoph; Melchers, Martin; Plieger, Thomas; Weber, Bernd; Reuter, Martin

    2013-01-01

    The investigation of the interaction of genes and environment in the context of mental health and personality yields important new insights for a better understanding of human nature. Both antenatal and postnatal environmental factors have been considered as potential modulators of genetic activity. Antenatally, especially smoking or alcohol drinking habits of the mother dramatically influence the health of the child during pregnancy and even later on in life. In the present study we would like to introduce a more "distant" factor that is not under the control of the becoming mother but that nevertheless plays a potential role for the health of the unborn child later on in adulthood. Here, we retrospectively investigate the influence of solar activity (while the child is still in the uterus of the becoming mother) on brain structure (with a focus on hippocampus and amygdala volume) and personality in adulthood. We observe an interaction of a genetic variant (rs41423247) of the glucocorticoid receptor gene (NR3C1) and solar activity in the first trimester after conception on both hippocampal volume and the personality trait neuroticism in adulthood in N = 254 participants. The NR3C1 gene is the focus of interest, because of its influence on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and negative emotionality. Carriers of the CC variant of rs41423247 grown in the womb under the influence of high sun radiation (high solar activity) show both the highest hippocampal volume in the left hemisphere and lowest neuroticism scores. The present findings should encourage researchers in psychology and psychiatry to include also environmental influences such as solar activity besides genetics to better understand the etiogenesis of psychiatric disorders.

  16. Soft interactions and volume exclusion by polymeric crowders can stabilize or destabilize transient structure in disordered proteins depending on polymer concentration.

    PubMed

    Rusinga, Farai I; Weis, David D

    2017-08-01

    The effects of macromolecular crowding on the transient structure of intrinsically disordered proteins is not well-understood. Crowding by biological molecules inside cells could modulate transient structure and alter IDP function. Volume exclusion theory and observations of structured proteins suggest that IDP transient structure would be stabilized by macromolecular crowding. Amide hydrogen exchange (HX) of IDPs in highly concentrated polymer solutions would provide valuable insights into IDP transient structure under crowded conditions. Here, we have used mass spectrometry to measure HX by a transiently helical random coil domain of the activator of thyroid and retinoid receptor (ACTR) in solutions containing 300 g L(-1) and 400 g L(-1) of Ficoll, a synthetic polysaccharide, using a recently-developed strong cation exchange-based cleanup method [Rusinga, et al., Anal Chem 2017;89:1275-1282]. Transiently helical regions of ACTR exchanged faster in 300 g L(-1) Ficoll than in dilute buffer. In contrast, one transient helix exchanged more slowly in 400 g L(-1) Ficoll. Nonspecific interactions destabilize ACTR helicity in 300 g L(-1) Ficoll because ACTR engages with the Ficoll polymer mesh. In contrast, 400 g L(-1) Ficoll is a semi-dilute solution where ACTR cannot engage the Ficoll mesh. At this higher concentration, volume exclusion stabilizes ACTR helicity because ACTR is compacted in interstitial spaces between Ficoll molecules. Our results suggest that the interplay between nonspecific interactions and volume exclusion in different cellular compartments could modulate IDP function by altering the stability of IDP transient structures. Proteins 2017; 85:1468-1479. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. An interaction of a NR3C1 polymorphism and antenatal solar activity impacts both hippocampus volume and neuroticism in adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Montag, Christian; Eichner, Markus; Markett, Sebastian; Quesada, Carlos M.; Schoene-Bake, Jan-Christoph; Melchers, Martin; Plieger, Thomas; Weber, Bernd; Reuter, Martin

    2013-01-01

    The investigation of the interaction of genes and environment in the context of mental health and personality yields important new insights for a better understanding of human nature. Both antenatal and postnatal environmental factors have been considered as potential modulators of genetic activity. Antenatally, especially smoking or alcohol drinking habits of the mother dramatically influence the health of the child during pregnancy and even later on in life. In the present study we would like to introduce a more “distant” factor that is not under the control of the becoming mother but that nevertheless plays a potential role for the health of the unborn child later on in adulthood. Here, we retrospectively investigate the influence of solar activity (while the child is still in the uterus of the becoming mother) on brain structure (with a focus on hippocampus and amygdala volume) and personality in adulthood. We observe an interaction of a genetic variant (rs41423247) of the glucocorticoid receptor gene (NR3C1) and solar activity in the first trimester after conception on both hippocampal volume and the personality trait neuroticism in adulthood in N = 254 participants. The NR3C1 gene is the focus of interest, because of its influence on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and negative emotionality. Carriers of the CC variant of rs41423247 grown in the womb under the influence of high sun radiation (high solar activity) show both the highest hippocampal volume in the left hemisphere and lowest neuroticism scores. The present findings should encourage researchers in psychology and psychiatry to include also environmental influences such as solar activity besides genetics to better understand the etiogenesis of psychiatric disorders. PMID:23761749

  18. SIGI: Field Test and Evaluation of a Computer-Based System of Interactive Guidance and Information. Volume II: Appendices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Warren; And Others

    The computer-based System of Interactive Guidance and Information (SIGI) was field tested and evaluated at five community colleges and one university. Developed by Educational Testing Service, SIGI assists students in the process of informed and rational career decision making. These appendices to the final evaluation report contain the manuals…

  19. Volume nanograting formation in laser-silica interaction as a result of the 1D plasma-resonance ionization instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gildenburg, V. B.; Pavlichenko, I. A.

    2016-08-01

    The initial stage of the small-scale ionization-induced instability developing inside the fused silica volume exposed to the femtosecond laser pulse is studied as a possible initial cause of the self-organized nanograting formation. We have calculated the spatial spectra of the instability with the electron-hole diffusion taken into account for the first time and have found that it results in the formation of some hybrid (diffusion-wave) 1D structure with the spatial period determined as the geometrical mean of the laser wavelength and characteristic diffusion length of the process considered. Near the threshold of the instability, this period occurs to be approximately equal to the laser half-wavelength in the silica, close to the one experimentally observed.

  20. Volume nanograting formation in laser-silica interaction as a result of the 1D plasma-resonance ionization instability

    SciTech Connect

    Gildenburg, V. B. Pavlichenko, I. A.

    2016-08-15

    The initial stage of the small-scale ionization-induced instability developing inside the fused silica volume exposed to the femtosecond laser pulse is studied as a possible initial cause of the self-organized nanograting formation. We have calculated the spatial spectra of the instability with the electron-hole diffusion taken into account for the first time and have found that it results in the formation of some hybrid (diffusion-wave) 1D structure with the spatial period determined as the geometrical mean of the laser wavelength and characteristic diffusion length of the process considered. Near the threshold of the instability, this period occurs to be approximately equal to the laser half-wavelength in the silica, close to the one experimentally observed.

  1. Wind turbine generator interaction with conventional diesel generators on Block Island, Rhode Island. Volume 2: Data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilreker, V. F.; Stiller, P. H.; Scott, G. W.; Kruse, V. J.; Smith, R. F.

    1984-01-01

    Assessing the performance of a MOD-OA horizontal axis wind turbine connected to an isolated diesel utility, a comprehensive data measurement program was conducted on the Block Island Power Company installation on Block Island, Rhode Island. The detailed results of that program focusing on three principal areas of (1) fuel displacement (savings), (2) dynamic interaction between the diesel utility and the wind turbine, (3) effects of three models of wind turbine reactive power control are presented. The approximate two month duration of the data acquisition program conducted in the winter months (February into April 1982) revealed performance during periods of highest wind energy penetration and hence severity of operation. Even under such conditions fuel savings were significant resulting in a fuel reduction of 6.7% while the MOD-OA was generating 10.7% of the total electrical energy. Also, electrical disturbance and interactive effects were of an acceptable level.

  2. A cut-cell finite volume – finite element coupling approach for fluid–structure interaction in compressible flow

    SciTech Connect

    Pasquariello, Vito; Hammerl, Georg; Örley, Felix; Hickel, Stefan; Danowski, Caroline; Popp, Alexander; Wall, Wolfgang A.; Adams, Nikolaus A.

    2016-02-15

    We present a loosely coupled approach for the solution of fluid–structure interaction problems between a compressible flow and a deformable structure. The method is based on staggered Dirichlet–Neumann partitioning. The interface motion in the Eulerian frame is accounted for by a conservative cut-cell Immersed Boundary method. The present approach enables sub-cell resolution by considering individual cut-elements within a single fluid cell, which guarantees an accurate representation of the time-varying solid interface. The cut-cell procedure inevitably leads to non-matching interfaces, demanding for a special treatment. A Mortar method is chosen in order to obtain a conservative and consistent load transfer. We validate our method by investigating two-dimensional test cases comprising a shock-loaded rigid cylinder and a deformable panel. Moreover, the aeroelastic instability of a thin plate structure is studied with a focus on the prediction of flutter onset. Finally, we propose a three-dimensional fluid–structure interaction test case of a flexible inflated thin shell interacting with a shock wave involving large and complex structural deformations.

  3. A cut-cell finite volume - finite element coupling approach for fluid-structure interaction in compressible flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasquariello, Vito; Hammerl, Georg; Örley, Felix; Hickel, Stefan; Danowski, Caroline; Popp, Alexander; Wall, Wolfgang A.; Adams, Nikolaus A.

    2016-02-01

    We present a loosely coupled approach for the solution of fluid-structure interaction problems between a compressible flow and a deformable structure. The method is based on staggered Dirichlet-Neumann partitioning. The interface motion in the Eulerian frame is accounted for by a conservative cut-cell Immersed Boundary method. The present approach enables sub-cell resolution by considering individual cut-elements within a single fluid cell, which guarantees an accurate representation of the time-varying solid interface. The cut-cell procedure inevitably leads to non-matching interfaces, demanding for a special treatment. A Mortar method is chosen in order to obtain a conservative and consistent load transfer. We validate our method by investigating two-dimensional test cases comprising a shock-loaded rigid cylinder and a deformable panel. Moreover, the aeroelastic instability of a thin plate structure is studied with a focus on the prediction of flutter onset. Finally, we propose a three-dimensional fluid-structure interaction test case of a flexible inflated thin shell interacting with a shock wave involving large and complex structural deformations.

  4. Magnetic fusion energy plasma interactive and high heat flux components. Volume I. Technical assessment of the critical issues and problem areas in the plasma materials interaction field

    SciTech Connect

    Conn, R.W.; Gauster, W.B.; Heifetz, D.; Marmar, E.; Wilson, K.L.

    1984-01-01

    A technical assessment of the critical issues and problem areas in the field of plasma materials interactions (PMI) in magnetic fusion devices shows these problems to be central for near-term experiments, for intermediate-range reactor devices including D-T burning physics experiments, and for long-term reactor machines. Critical technical issues are ones central to understanding and successful operation of existing and near-term experiments/reactors or devices of great importance for the long run, i.e., ones which will require an extensive, long-term development effort and thus should receive attention now. Four subgroups were formed to assess the critical PMI issues along four major lines: (1) PMI and plasma confinement physics experiments; (2) plasma-edge modelling and theory; (3) surface physics; and (4) materials technology for in-vessel components and the first wall. The report which follows is divided into four major sections, one for each of these topics.

  5. PNPLA3 gene-by-visceral adipose tissue volume interaction and the pathogenesis of fatty liver disease: The NHLBI Family Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Graff, M.; North, K.E.; Franceschini, N.; Reiner, A.P.; Feitosa, M.; Carr, J.J.; Gordon-Larsen, P.; Wojczynski, M. K.; Borecki, I.B.

    2012-01-01

    Background Fatty liver disease (FLD) is characterized by increased intrahepatic triglyceride content with or without inflammation and is associated with obesity, and features of the metabolic syndrome. Several recent GWAS have reported an association between SNP rs738409 in the PNPLA3 gene and FLD. Liver attenuation (Hounsfield Units, HU) by computed tomography is a non-invasive measure of liver fat, with lower values of HU indicating higher liver fat content. Clinically, a liver attenuation (LA) value of ≤ 40 HU indicates moderate-to-severe hepatic steatosis. Objective We investigated whether missense rs738409 PNPLA3 interacted with abdominal visceral adipose tissue volume (cm3) to reduce liver attenuation (i.e. increased liver fat) in 1,019 European American men and 1,238 European American women from the Family Heart Study. Methods We used linear regression to test the additive effect of genotype, abdominal visceral adipose tissue (VAT), and their multiplicative interaction on LA adjusted for age, BMI, HDL-cholesterol, insulin resistance, serum triglycerides, abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue, and alcohol intake. Results In men and women combined, the interaction between each copy of the rs738409 variant allele (MAF 0.23) and 100cm3/150mm slice VAT decreased LA by 2.68±0.35 HU (p < 0.01). The interaction of 100cm3 VAT and the variant allele was associated with a greater decrease in LA in women than men (−4.8±0.6 and −2.2±0.5 HU, respectively). Conclusions The interaction between genotype and VAT volume suggest key differences in the role of PNPLA3 genotype in conjunction with abdominal VAT in liver fat accrual. The stronger association of the PNPLA3 genotype and liver fat in women suggests that women may be more sensitive to liver fat accumulation in the setting of increased visceral fat, compared to men. The presence of the PNPLA3 variant genotype, particularly in the context of high visceral adipose tissue content may play an important role in FLD

  6. Experimental study of main rotor tip geometry and tail rotor interactions in hover. Volume 2: Run log and tabulated data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balch, D. T.; Lombardi, J.

    1985-01-01

    A model scale hover test was conducted in the Sikorsky Aircraft Model Rotor hover Facility to identify and quantify the impact of the tail rotor on the demonstrated advantages of advanced geometry tip configurations. The existence of mutual interference between hovering main rotor and a tail rotor was acknowledged in the test. The test was conducted using the Basic Model Test Rig and two scaled main rotor systems, one representing a 1/5.727 scale UH-60A BLACK HAWK and the others a 1/4.71 scale S-76. Eight alternate rotor tip configurations were tested, 3 on the BLACK HAWK rotor and 6 on the S-76 rotor. Four of these tips were then selected for testing in close proximity to an operating tail rotor (operating in both tractor and pusher modes) to determine if the performance advantages that could be obtained from the use of advanced geometry tips in a main rotor only environment would still exist in the more complex flow field involving a tail rotor. This volume contains the test run log and tabulated data.

  7. Wind turbine generator interaction with conventional diesel generators on Block Island, Rhode Island. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilreker, V. F.; Stiller, P. H.; Scott, G. W.; Kruse, V. J.; Smith, R. F.

    1984-01-01

    Primary results are summarized for a three-part study involving the effects of connecting a MOD-OA wind turbine generator to an isolated diesel power system. The MOD-OA installation considered was the third of four experimental nominal 200 kW wind turbines connected to various utilities under the Federal Wind Energy Program and was characterized by the highest wind energy penetration levels of four sites. The study analyses address: fuel displacement, dynamic interaction, and three modes of reactive power control. These analyses all have as their basis the results of the data acquisition program conducted on Block Island, Rhode Island.

  8. Making intelligent systems team players: Case studies and design issues. Volume 1: Human-computer interaction design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malin, Jane T.; Schreckenghost, Debra L.; Woods, David D.; Potter, Scott S.; Johannesen, Leila; Holloway, Matthew; Forbus, Kenneth D.

    1991-01-01

    Initial results are reported from a multi-year, interdisciplinary effort to provide guidance and assistance for designers of intelligent systems and their user interfaces. The objective is to achieve more effective human-computer interaction (HCI) for systems with real time fault management capabilities. Intelligent fault management systems within the NASA were evaluated for insight into the design of systems with complex HCI. Preliminary results include: (1) a description of real time fault management in aerospace domains; (2) recommendations and examples for improving intelligent systems design and user interface design; (3) identification of issues requiring further research; and (4) recommendations for a development methodology integrating HCI design into intelligent system design.

  9. Atmospheric Electricity Hazards Analytical Model Development and Application. Volume III. Electromagnetic Coupling Modeling of the Lightning/ Aircraft Interaction Event

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-06-01

    MODELING OF rHE LIGHTNING/AIRCRAFT INTERACTION EVENT i( II F. J. Eriksen SIT. H. Rudolph R . A. Perala Ott Electro Magnetic Applications, Inc. P.O. Box...distribution unlimited , . . DTIC I C . P R 3 19 82 .4 L- I FLIGHT DYNAMICS LABORATORY D •j AIR FORCE WRIGHT AERONAUTICAL LABORATORIES - _AIR FORCE...winga, specifcc.-.t-Los, or oth.br data aze used for a’?tý purpose 0,h(. r than in coniioction with a definitely relatod "jovyernient procurement operation

  10. Wind turbine generator interaction with conventional diesel generators on Block Island, Rhode Island. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilreker, V. F.; Stiller, P. H.; Scott, G. W.; Kruse, V. J.; Smith, R. F.

    1984-02-01

    Primary results are summarized for a three-part study involving the effects of connecting a MOD-OA wind turbine generator to an isolated diesel power system. The MOD-OA installation considered was the third of four experimental nominal 200 kW wind turbines connected to various utilities under the Federal Wind Energy Program and was characterized by the highest wind energy penetration levels of four sites. The study analyses address: fuel displacement, dynamic interaction, and three modes of reactive power control. These analyses all have as their basis the results of the data acquisition program conducted on Block Island, Rhode Island.

  11. User's manual for rocket combustor interactive design (ROCCID) and analysis computer program. Volume 2: Appendixes A-K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muss, J. A.; Nguyen, T. V.; Johnson, C. W.

    1991-01-01

    The appendices A-K to the user's manual for the rocket combustor interactive design (ROCCID) computer program are presented. This includes installation instructions, flow charts, subroutine model documentation, and sample output files. The ROCCID program, written in Fortran 77, provides a standardized methodology using state of the art codes and procedures for the analysis of a liquid rocket engine combustor's steady state combustion performance and combustion stability. The ROCCID is currently capable of analyzing mixed element injector patterns containing impinging like doublet or unlike triplet, showerhead, shear coaxial and swirl coaxial elements as long as only one element type exists in each injector core, baffle, or barrier zone. Real propellant properties of oxygen, hydrogen, methane, propane, and RP-1 are included in ROCCID. The properties of other propellants can be easily added. The analysis models in ROCCID can account for the influences of acoustic cavities, helmholtz resonators, and radial thrust chamber baffles on combustion stability. ROCCID also contains the logic to interactively create a combustor design which meets input performance and stability goals. A preliminary design results from the application of historical correlations to the input design requirements. The steady state performance and combustion stability of this design is evaluated using the analysis models, and ROCCID guides the user as to the design changes required to satisfy the user's performance and stability goals, including the design of stability aids. Output from ROCCID includes a formatted input file for the standardized JANNAF engine performance prediction procedure.

  12. Direct Numerical Simulation of Acoustic Waves Interacting with a Shock Wave in a Quasi-1D Convergent-Divergent Nozzle Using an Unstructured Finite Volume Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bui, Trong T.; Mankbadi, Reda R.

    1995-01-01

    Numerical simulation of a very small amplitude acoustic wave interacting with a shock wave in a quasi-1D convergent-divergent nozzle is performed using an unstructured finite volume algorithm with a piece-wise linear, least square reconstruction, Roe flux difference splitting, and second-order MacCormack time marching. First, the spatial accuracy of the algorithm is evaluated for steady flows with and without the normal shock by running the simulation with a sequence of successively finer meshes. Then the accuracy of the Roe flux difference splitting near the sonic transition point is examined for different reconstruction schemes. Finally, the unsteady numerical solutions with the acoustic perturbation are presented and compared with linear theory results.

  13. High order finite volume methods on wavelet-adapted grids with local time-stepping on multicore architectures for the simulation of shock-bubble interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hejazialhosseini, Babak; Rossinelli, Diego; Bergdorf, Michael; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2010-11-01

    We present a space-time adaptive solver for single- and multi-phase compressible flows that couples average interpolating wavelets with high-order finite volume schemes. The solver introduces the concept of wavelet blocks, handles large jumps in resolution and employs local time-stepping for efficient time integration. We demonstrate that the inherently sequential wavelet-based adaptivity can be implemented efficiently in multicore computer architectures using task-based parallelism and introducing the concept of wavelet blocks. We validate our computational method on a number of benchmark problems and we present simulations of shock-bubble interaction at different Mach numbers, demonstrating the accuracy and computational performance of the method.

  14. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop: The Approach to Equ