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Sample records for contempt kangaroos persistently

  1. Familiarity Breeds Contempt: Kangaroos Persistently Avoid Areas with Experimentally Deployed Dingo Scents

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, Michael H.; Blumstein, Daniel T.

    2010-01-01

    Background Whether or not animals habituate to repeated exposure to predator scents may depend upon whether there are predators associated with the cues. Understanding the contexts of habituation is theoretically important and has profound implication for the application of predator-based herbivore deterrents. We repeatedly exposed a mixed mob of macropod marsupials to olfactory scents (urine, feces) from a sympatric predator (Canis lupus dingo), along with a control (water). If these predator cues were alarming, we expected that over time, some red kangaroos (Macropus rufous), western grey kangaroos (Macropus fuliginosus) and agile wallabies (Macropus agilis) would elect to not participate in cafeteria trials because the scents provided information about the riskiness of the area. Methodology/Principal Findings We evaluated the effects of urine and feces independently and expected that urine would elicit a stronger reaction because it contains a broader class of infochemicals (pheromones, kairomones). Finally, we scored non-invasive indicators (flight and alarm stomps) to determine whether fear or altered palatability was responsible for the response. Repeated exposure reduced macropodid foraging on food associated with 40 ml of dingo urine, X = 986.75±3.97 g food remained as compared to the tap water control, X = 209.0±107.0 g (P<0.001). Macropodids fled more when encountering a urine treatment, X = 4.50±2.08 flights, as compared to the control, X = 0 flights (P<0.001). There was no difference in effect between urine or feces treatments (P>0.5). Macropodids did not habituate to repeated exposure to predator scents, rather they avoided the entire experimental area after 10 days of trials (R2 = 83.8; P<0.001). Conclusions/Significance Responses to urine and feces were indistinguishable; both elicited fear-based responses and deterred foraging. Despite repeated exposure to predator-related cues in the absence of a predator, macropodids

  2. Familiarity breeds contempt: kangaroos persistently avoid areas with experimentally deployed dingo scents.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Michael H; Blumstein, Daniel T

    2010-05-05

    Whether or not animals habituate to repeated exposure to predator scents may depend upon whether there are predators associated with the cues. Understanding the contexts of habituation is theoretically important and has profound implication for the application of predator-based herbivore deterrents. We repeatedly exposed a mixed mob of macropod marsupials to olfactory scents (urine, feces) from a sympatric predator (Canis lupus dingo), along with a control (water). If these predator cues were alarming, we expected that over time, some red kangaroos (Macropus rufous), western grey kangaroos (Macropus fuliginosus) and agile wallabies (Macropus agilis) would elect to not participate in cafeteria trials because the scents provided information about the riskiness of the area. We evaluated the effects of urine and feces independently and expected that urine would elicit a stronger reaction because it contains a broader class of infochemicals (pheromones, kairomones). Finally, we scored non-invasive indicators (flight and alarm stomps) to determine whether fear or altered palatability was responsible for the response. Repeated exposure reduced macropodid foraging on food associated with 40 ml of dingo urine, X = 986.75+/-3.97 g food remained as compared to the tap water control, X = 209.0+/-107.0 g (P<0.001). Macropodids fled more when encountering a urine treatment, X = 4.50+/-2.08 flights, as compared to the control, X = 0 flights (P<0.001). There was no difference in effect between urine or feces treatments (P>0.5). Macropodids did not habituate to repeated exposure to predator scents, rather they avoided the entire experimental area after 10 days of trials (R(2) = 83.8; P<0.001). Responses to urine and feces were indistinguishable; both elicited fear-based responses and deterred foraging. Despite repeated exposure to predator-related cues in the absence of a predator, macropodids persistently avoided an area of highly palatable food. Area avoidance is consistent with

  3. Explanations for Contempt Expressed Towards Old People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxwell, Eleanor Krassen; Maxwell, Robert J.

    The issue of contempt expressed towards the aged was examined from a cross-cultural perspective. Eight reasons for expressions of contempt emerged from a study of 95 societies drawn from the Standard Cross-Cultural Sample, and were treated as independent variables, with the overall level of contempt as the dependent variable, in a application of…

  4. 28 CFR 522.11 - Civil contempt commitments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Civil contempt commitments. 522.11..., CLASSIFICATION, AND TRANSFER ADMISSION TO INSTITUTION Civil Contempt of Court Commitments § 522.11 Civil contempt commitments. Inmates can come into Bureau custody for civil contempt commitments in two ways: (a) The...

  5. 28 CFR 522.11 - Civil contempt commitments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Civil contempt commitments. 522.11..., CLASSIFICATION, AND TRANSFER ADMISSION TO INSTITUTION Civil Contempt of Court Commitments § 522.11 Civil contempt commitments. Inmates can come into Bureau custody for civil contempt commitments in two ways: (a) The...

  6. The relationship among expressions, labels, and descriptions of contempt.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, David; Ekman, Paul

    2004-10-01

    This article reports 4 studies that demonstrate that the contempt expression is reliably associated with situations that elicit contempt and that the inability to label the contempt expression reflects a problem with its label or concept and not with the relationship between its expression and emotion. In Study I, the labeling of contempt in fixed-choice judgment tasks did not occur because of a process of elimination. In Studies 2 and 3, the contempt expression was associated with situations that elicit contempt, but participants did not label the situations in an open-ended response. In Study 3, participants also more reliably labeled the contempt expression with situations rather than with labels and did not generate contempt situations from labels. In Study 4, participants reported using, hearing, and reading about contempt the least among 7 emotions tested. (c) 2004 APA, all rights reserved

  7. Kangaroos in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borst, Richard

    1989-01-01

    Describes a kangaroo simulation which can be adapted for use with radio tracking activities for other animals. Outlines procedures and information to help implement the activity. Provides a map of Australia, calculations, and sample kangaroo movement data. (RT)

  8. Kangaroos in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borst, Richard

    1989-01-01

    Describes a kangaroo simulation which can be adapted for use with radio tracking activities for other animals. Outlines procedures and information to help implement the activity. Provides a map of Australia, calculations, and sample kangaroo movement data. (RT)

  9. Kangaroo mother care.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Sarah

    2012-05-01

    Kangaroo mother care is a safe, simple method to care for low birth weight infants. This article looks at its origins, what is involved in kangaroo mother care and reviews the evidence for improved outcomes resulting from its implementation.

  10. The kangaroo genome

    PubMed Central

    Wakefield, Matthew J.; Graves, Jennifer A. Marshall

    2003-01-01

    The kangaroo genome is a rich and unique resource for comparative genomics. Marsupial genetics and cytology have made significant contributions to the understanding of gene function and evolution, and increasing the availability of kangaroo DNA sequence information would provide these benefits on a genomic scale. Here we summarize the contributions from cytogenetic and genetic studies of marsupials, describe the genomic resources currently available and those being developed, and explore the benefits of a kangaroo genome project. PMID:12612602

  11. 44 CFR 5.61 - Contempt for noncompliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Contempt for noncompliance. 5.61 Section 5.61 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT... Contempt for noncompliance. In the event of noncompliance by FEMA with an order of a district court...

  12. 25 CFR 11.912 - Contempt of court.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Contempt of court. 11.912 Section 11.912 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAW AND ORDER COURTS OF INDIAN OFFENSES AND LAW AND ORDER CODE Children's Court § 11.912 Contempt of court. Any willful disobedience or interference with...

  13. Congress’s Contempt Power: Law, History, Practice, and Procedure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-07-24

    subcommittee of a contempt citation against an executive branch official. 200 Mr. Quinn was directed by President Clinton to assert a “protective claim of...Superfund dispute, contempt citations have been voted against White House Counsel John M. Quinn (1996) and Attorney General Janet Reno (1998). In every...instance, save for John M. Quinn ,200 a claim of executive privilege was asserted, and in each instance there was either full or substantial compliance

  14. Dispositional Contempt: A First Look at the Contemptuous Person.

    PubMed

    Schriber, Roberta A; Chung, Joanne M; Sorensen, Katherine S; Robins, Richard W

    2016-06-09

    Contempt is a powerful emotion. Marriages fail (Gottman, 1994), coworkers are shamed (Melwani & Barsade, 2011), terrorism is tended toward (Tausch et al., 2011). Despite its importance, contempt has not been investigated at the level of personality. The present research examines how our contemptuous reactions can be conceptualized and measured as a stable individual-difference variable with a range of theoretically predicted correlates. First, we introduce a measure of dispositional contempt, the tendency to look down on, distance, and derogate others who violate our standards. We then unpack the dynamics of dispositional contempt. Across 6 studies using self-report and emotion elicitation in student and MTurk samples (Ns = 165 to 1,368), we examined its (a) nomological network, (b) personality and behavioral correlates, and (c) implications for relationship functioning. Dispositional contempt was distinguished from tendencies toward related emotions and was most associated with dispositional envy, anger, and hubristic pride. Somewhat paradoxically, dispositional contempt was related to being cold and "superior," with associations found with narcissism, other-oriented perfectionism, and various antisocial tendencies (e.g., Disagreeableness, Machiavellianism, racism), but it was also related to being self-deprecating and emotionally fragile, with associations found with low self-esteem, insecure attachment, and feeling that others impose perfectionistic standards on oneself. Dispositional contempt predicted contemptuous reactions to eliciting film clips, particularly when targets showed low competence/power. Finally, perceiving one's romantic partner as dispositionally contemptuous was associated with lower commitment and satisfaction. Taken together, results give a first look at the contemptuous person and provide a new organizing framework for understanding contempt. (PsycINFO Database Record

  15. The Relation Between Contempt, Anger, and Intimate Partner Violence: A Dyadic Approach.

    PubMed

    Sommer, Johannah; Iyican, Susan; Babcock, Julia

    2016-08-19

    Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a persistent problem in our society, and there is strong evidence for the existence of bidirectional violence in heterosexual romantic relationships. Couples' research has long focused on conflict and distressed communication patterns as a source of relationship distress and eventual dissolution. In addition to relationship dissatisfaction, dysfunctional communication also appears to be associated with elevated risk of IPV. In fact, one study found that communication difficulties were one of the most frequently self-reported motivations for committing partner violence in a sample of both males and females arrested for IPV. The current study sought to explore the association between the expression of distressed communication (contempt and anger) during a laboratory conflict discussion and reports of IPV perpetration using a dyadic data analysis method, the Actor Partner Interdependence Model, in a large ethnically diverse sample of heterosexual couples. We found that negative communication in the form of contempt was not only associated with one's own physical assault perpetration, but it was also associated with physical assault perpetration of the other partner. In contrast, anger was only associated with one's own physical assault perpetration. Therefore, our results highlight the potential efficacy of treatments for IPV that target negative communication patterns and affect. © The Author(s) 2016.

  16. Bothriocroton concolor (Acari: Ixodidae) on the Kangaroo Island kangaroo: a new host-parasite relationship.

    PubMed

    Oorebeek, M; Rismiller, P

    2007-09-01

    In 2006, we examined Kangaroo Island kangaroos, Macropusfuliginosusfuliginosus, for ticks. We collected three tick species: Ixodes hirsti Hassall, Hemaphysalis bancrofti Nuttall & Warburton, and Bothriocroton concolor (Neumann). Surprisingly, the specimens included eight females and one nymph of B. concolor, which had previously been considered strictly host specific to the echidna (Tachyglossus sp.). This is the first record of B. concolor on the Kangaroo Island kangaroo.

  17. United Mine Workers V. Bagwell: New restrictions on severe civil contempt fines

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    In Bagwell II, the Supreme Court was asked to determine whether the trial court should have applied certain procedural protections, in effect limiting that court`s ability to impose millions of dollars in contempt sanctions. The Court found that the $52 million in fines levied against the United Mine Workers of America (UMWA) for violations of a Virginia Circuit Court`s order were {open_quotes}serious{close_quotes} enough to entitle the UMWA to the safeguards of a criminal jury trial. Bagwell Ii may be a step toward change. The Supreme Court acknowledged that its lack of guidance has resulted in an unrestrained use of the contempt power by lower courts. However, the Court refused to abandon the criminal/civil distinction created in Gompers, as some in favor of reform have suggested. Thus, the confusion over what constitutes a criminal contempt sanction as opposed to a civil contempt sanction continues. Bagwell II does appear to create a new catagory of indirect contempt. This catagory of contempt requires a level of procedural protection similar to those required in criminal contempt. The Court distinguishes these contempt from other civil contempt by considering the complexity of both the contemptuous conduct and the court order. As Justice Scalia noted in his concurring opinion, changes in use and form of court orders have made the traditional civil/criminal distinction an inadequate basis for attaching procedural rights.

  18. Kangaroo Network. Annual Report, 1983.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seumahu, E. Steve

    This extensive report describes activities of the PEACESAT AUSTRALIA Project (the Kangaroo Network) which parallels, on the Australian continent, the endeavors of PEACESAT (Pacific Educational and Communication Experiment by SATellite), and other Pacific Basin ATS-1 networks. An executive summary reviews the development of the project and its…

  19. Kangaroo Network. Annual Report, 1983.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seumahu, E. Steve

    This extensive report describes activities of the PEACESAT AUSTRALIA Project (the Kangaroo Network) which parallels, on the Australian continent, the endeavors of PEACESAT (Pacific Educational and Communication Experiment by SATellite), and other Pacific Basin ATS-1 networks. An executive summary reviews the development of the project and its…

  20. Peters anomaly in a red kangaroo (Macropus rufus).

    PubMed

    Suedmeyer, Wm Kirk; Pearce, Jacqueline; Persky, Meredith; Houck, Marlys L

    2014-09-01

    A 10-mo-old female red kangaroo (Macropus rufus) presented with a unilateral congenital corneal opacity OD. Complete ophthalmic examination revealed a shallow anterior chamber and a focal area of corneal edema with multiple persistent pupillary membranes extending from the iris colarette to the corneal endothelium adjacent to the edematous area of cornea. High-resolution B-scan ultrasound of the anterior segment showed an area consistent with thinning of Descemet's membrane in the area of corneal edema. Ophthalmic examination and ultrasound findings are consistent with a diagnosis of Peters anomaly, a form of anterior segment dysgenesis. An electroretinogram performed on the affected animal did not reveal any specific abnormalities. Karyotype analyses revealed a normal diploid number (2n = 20, -XX), with an abnormal pericentric inversion in the second largest chromosomal pair. The kangaroo exhibits mild compensated vision deficits in the affected eye. The maternal and paternal adult pairing has been discontinued in an effort to prevent future offspring anomalies.

  1. Sex Differences in Neural Activation to Facial Expressions Denoting Contempt and Disgust

    PubMed Central

    Aleman, André; Swart, Marte

    2008-01-01

    The facial expression of contempt has been regarded to communicate feelings of moral superiority. Contempt is an emotion that is closely related to disgust, but in contrast to disgust, contempt is inherently interpersonal and hierarchical. The aim of this study was twofold. First, to investigate the hypothesis of preferential amygdala responses to contempt expressions versus disgust. Second, to investigate whether, at a neural level, men would respond stronger to biological signals of interpersonal superiority (e.g., contempt) than women. We performed an experiment using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), in which participants watched facial expressions of contempt and disgust in addition to neutral expressions. The faces were presented as distractors in an oddball task in which participants had to react to one target face. Facial expressions of contempt and disgust activated a network of brain regions, including prefrontal areas (superior, middle and medial prefrontal gyrus), anterior cingulate, insula, amygdala, parietal cortex, fusiform gyrus, occipital cortex, putamen and thalamus. Contemptuous faces did not elicit stronger amygdala activation than did disgusted expressions. To limit the number of statistical comparisons, we confined our analyses of sex differences to the frontal and temporal lobes. Men displayed stronger brain activation than women to facial expressions of contempt in the medial frontal gyrus, inferior frontal gyrus, and superior temporal gyrus. Conversely, women showed stronger neural responses than men to facial expressions of disgust. In addition, the effect of stimulus sex differed for men versus women. Specifically, women showed stronger responses to male contemptuous faces (as compared to female expressions), in the insula and middle frontal gyrus. Contempt has been conceptualized as signaling perceived moral violations of social hierarchy, whereas disgust would signal violations of physical purity. Thus, our results suggest a

  2. How Does a Hopping Kangaroo Breathe?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giuliodori, Mauricio J.; Lujan, Heidi L.; Janbaih, Hussein; DiCarlo, Stephen E.

    2010-01-01

    We developed a model to demonstrate how a hopping kangaroo breathes. Interestingly, a kangaroo uses less energy to breathe while hopping than while standing still. This occurs, in part, because rather than using muscle power to move air into and out of the lungs, air is pulled into (inspiration) and pushed out of (expiration) the lungs as the…

  3. How Does a Hopping Kangaroo Breathe?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giuliodori, Mauricio J.; Lujan, Heidi L.; Janbaih, Hussein; DiCarlo, Stephen E.

    2010-01-01

    We developed a model to demonstrate how a hopping kangaroo breathes. Interestingly, a kangaroo uses less energy to breathe while hopping than while standing still. This occurs, in part, because rather than using muscle power to move air into and out of the lungs, air is pulled into (inspiration) and pushed out of (expiration) the lungs as the…

  4. Kangaroo rats revisited: re-evaluating a classic case of desert survival.

    PubMed

    Tracy, Randall L; Walsberg, Glenn E

    2002-12-01

    Kangaroo rats are the archetypical organisms for mammalian survival in North American deserts, yet there are contradictions in the data surrounding their physiology and ecology. The traditional view has been that these nocturnal rodents have little tolerance to high temperatures (e.g., >30°C), reside in cool, humid burrows to escape the heat of the day, and nearly exclusively rely on a dry, carbohydrate-rich diet from which they metabolically derive most of their water supply. To test this view, we measured the microclimates, activity, and diet of Merriam's kangaroo rats (Dipodomys merriami) from a xeric location within the center of the Sonoran Desert. We arrive at the following conclusions: 1. Burrows are much hotter during the summer than previously appreciated. For over 100 days of the year, soil temperatures exceed 30°C at depths to 2 m. For over 50 days, temperatures exceed 35°C at depths to 1.5 m. These high temperatures at such depths preclude kangaroo rats from locating to cool temperatures (e.g., <30°C) by burrowing. 2. Kangaroo rats remain in shallow burrows (<1 m) at relatively high ambient temperatures (>35°C) throughout the daytime during the summer instead of residing deep within the soil. This finding supports recent laboratory experiments that show kangaroo rats have much higher thermal tolerances than previously realized. 3. Kangaroo rats do not restrict their activity to the coolest periods of the night, but are active immediately following sundown, during the hottest time of the night. 4. Burrows are not persistently humid, but can be quite dry. 5. Insects and succulent vegetation constitute a significant portion of a kangaroo rat's diet and may be key to their survival in the hot desert environment.

  5. How does a hopping kangaroo breathe?

    PubMed

    Giuliodori, Mauricio J; Lujan, Heidi L; Janbaih, Hussein; DiCarlo, Stephen E

    2010-12-01

    We developed a model to demonstrate how a hopping kangaroo breathes. Interestingly, a kangaroo uses less energy to breathe while hopping than while standing still. This occurs, in part, because rather than using muscle power to move air into and out of the lungs, air is pulled into (inspiration) and pushed out of (expiration) the lungs as the abdominal organs "flop" within the kangaroo's body. Specifically, as the kangaroo hops upward, the abdominal organs lag behind, and the insertion of the diaphragm is pulled toward its origin, flattening the dome and increasing the vertical dimension of the thoracic cavity (the thoracic cavity and lungs enlarge). Increasing the volume of the thoracic cavity reduces alveolar pressure below atmospheric pressure (barometric pressure), and air moves into the alveoli by bulk flow. In contrast, the impact of the organs against the diaphragm at each landing causes expiration. Specifically, upon landing, the abdominal organs flop into the diaphragm, causing it to return to its dome shape and decreasing the vertical dimension of the thoracic cavity. This compresses the alveolar gas volume and elevates alveolar pressure above barometric pressure, so air is expelled. To demonstrate this phenomenon, the plunger of a syringe model of the respiratory system was inserted through a compression spring. Holding the syringe and pressing the plunger firmly against a hard surface expels air from the lungs (the balloon within the syringe deflates) and compresses the spring. This models the kangaroo landing after a hop forward. Subsequently, the compression spring provides the energy for the "kangaroo" to "hop" forward upon the release of the syringe, and air enters the lungs (the balloon within the syringe inflates). The model accurately reflects how a hopping kangaroo breathes. A model was chosen to demonstrate this phenomenon because models engage and inspire students as well as significantly enhance student understanding.

  6. A Brief History of Kangaroos (and Lesser Mammals).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooke, Bernard N.

    1999-01-01

    Describes a new hypothesis regarding the origin of bulungamayine kangaroos. Suggests that this group of Oglio-Miocene kangaroos independently evolved adaptations for herbivory and are likely to be ancestral to modern and recently extinct plant-eating kangaroos. (Contains 17 references.) (Author/WRM)

  7. A Brief History of Kangaroos (and Lesser Mammals).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooke, Bernard N.

    1999-01-01

    Describes a new hypothesis regarding the origin of bulungamayine kangaroos. Suggests that this group of Oglio-Miocene kangaroos independently evolved adaptations for herbivory and are likely to be ancestral to modern and recently extinct plant-eating kangaroos. (Contains 17 references.) (Author/WRM)

  8. Phylogeography of Eastern Grey Kangaroos, Macropus giganteus, Suggests a Mesic Refugium in Eastern Australia

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Phylogeographic studies around the world have identified refugia where fauna were able to persist during unsuitable climatic periods, particularly during times of glaciation. In Australia the effects of Pleistocene climate oscillations on rainforest taxa have been well studied but less is known about the effects on mesic-habitat fauna, such as the eastern grey kangaroo (Macropus giganteus). The eastern grey kangaroo is a large mammal that is common and widespread throughout eastern Australia, preferring dry mesic habitat, rather than rainforest. As pollen evidence suggests that the central-eastern part of Australia (southeast Queensland and northern New South Wales) experienced cycles of expansion in mesic habitat with contraction in rainforests, and vice versa during glacial and interglacial periods, respectively, we hypothesise that the distribution of the eastern grey kangaroo was affected by these climate oscillations and may have contracted to mesic habitat refugia. From 375 mitochondrial DNA control region sequences from across the distribution of eastern grey kangaroos we obtained 108 unique haplotypes. Phylogenetic analysis identified two clades in Queensland, one of which is newly identified and restricted to a small coastal region in southern Queensland north of Brisbane, known as the Sunshine Coast. The relatively limited geographic range of this genetically isolated clade suggests the possibility of a mesic habitat refugium forming during rainforest expansion during wetter climate cycles. Other potential, although less likely, reasons for the genetic isolation of the highly distinct clade include geographic barriers, separate northward expansions, and strong local adaptation. PMID:26024370

  9. Kangaroo Mother Care--a review.

    PubMed

    Hall, D; Kirsten, G

    2008-04-01

    Kangaroo Mother Care is a simple and beneficial intervention for the care of low birth weight infants. Although initially conceived for use in developing countries with limited resources, its use has expanded worldwide as clinicians, administrators and parents become familiar with the psychological, physiological, clinical and cost benefits associated with the practice. A recently documented benefit has specific relevance to blood transfusion medicine.

  10. Effect of the kangaroo position on the electromyographic activity of preterm children: a follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background One of the components of the Kangaroo Method (KM) is the adoption of the Kangaroo Position. The skin-to-skin contact and the vertical position the child adopts when in this position may provide sensorial, vestibular and postural stimuli for the newborn. The Kangaroo Position may encourage vestibular stimuli and a flexed posture of the limbs, suggesting the hypothesis that the Kangaroo Position may have an impact on flexor muscle tone. The effect of these stimuli on the motor features of the newborn has not been the subject of much investigation. No study has yet been conducted to determine whether the Kangaroo Position may progressively increase electromyographic activity or whether this increase persists until term-equivalent age. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the Kangaroo Position on the electromyographic activity of preterm children. Method A follow-up study was carried out between July and November 2011 at the Instituto de Medicina Integral Prof. Fernando Figueira (IMIP), Recife-Brazil, using a sample of 30 preterm children. Surface Eletromyography (SEMG) was used to investigate the muscle activity of biceps brachii. The electromyographic readings were taken immediately before (0 h) and after 24 h, 48 h, 72 h, 96 h of application of the Kangaroo Position as well as at the term equivalent age in each baby. Electromyographic activity was analyzed using the Root Mean Square (RMS) and the mean values of the times were analyzed by way of analysis of variance for repeated measures and the Tukey test. Results Electromyographic activity of the biceps brachii varied and increased over the whole 96h period (RMS:0 h = 36.5 and 96 h = 52.9) (F(5.174) = 27.56; p < 0.001) and remained constant thereafter (RMS: term-equivalent age = 54.2). The correlations between the corrected age and the values for electromyographic activity did not show any statistical significance. Conclusion The Kangaroo Position leads to a growing

  11. Effect of the kangaroo position on the electromyographic activity of preterm children: a follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Diniz, Kaísa Trovão; Cabral-Filho, José Eulálio; Miranda, Rafael Moura; Souza Lima, Geisy Maria; Vasconcelos, Danilo de Almeida

    2013-05-16

    One of the components of the Kangaroo Method (KM) is the adoption of the Kangaroo Position. The skin-to-skin contact and the vertical position the child adopts when in this position may provide sensorial, vestibular and postural stimuli for the newborn. The Kangaroo Position may encourage vestibular stimuli and a flexed posture of the limbs, suggesting the hypothesis that the Kangaroo Position may have an impact on flexor muscle tone. The effect of these stimuli on the motor features of the newborn has not been the subject of much investigation. No study has yet been conducted to determine whether the Kangaroo Position may progressively increase electromyographic activity or whether this increase persists until term-equivalent age. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the Kangaroo Position on the electromyographic activity of preterm children. A follow-up study was carried out between July and November 2011 at the Instituto de Medicina Integral Prof. Fernando Figueira (IMIP), Recife-Brazil, using a sample of 30 preterm children. Surface Eletromyography (SEMG) was used to investigate the muscle activity of biceps brachii. The electromyographic readings were taken immediately before (0 h) and after 24 h, 48 h, 72 h, 96 h of application of the Kangaroo Position as well as at the term equivalent age in each baby. Electromyographic activity was analyzed using the Root Mean Square (RMS) and the mean values of the times were analyzed by way of analysis of variance for repeated measures and the Tukey test. Electromyographic activity of the biceps brachii varied and increased over the whole 96h period (RMS:0 h = 36.5 and 96 h = 52.9) (F(5.174) = 27.56; p < 0.001) and remained constant thereafter (RMS: term-equivalent age = 54.2). The correlations between the corrected age and the values for electromyographic activity did not show any statistical significance. The Kangaroo Position leads to a growing increase in the electromyographic

  12. Persistence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, John W.

    1998-11-01

    Eudora Welty, the famous writer, was once asked what should be done by society or government to encourage young writers. Her response, which surprised the questioner, and me when I heard it, was "Nothing". Welty contended that a person who was really a writer would be persistent enough to overcome whatever obstacles were in the way, needing no interference or support from others.

  13. Evidence utilization project: implementation of kangaroo care at neonatal ICU.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Su He; Yip, Wai Kin; Lim, Priscilla Fong Chien; Goh, Micki Zhen Yi

    2014-06-01

    Kangaroo care is no longer performed for the initial purpose of maintaining a small baby's body temperature in the developed countries where there are now sufficient medical equipments to keep babies warm. The objectives of kangaroo care in advanced neonatal ICUs have changed to provide benefits such as bonding and attachment, physiologic stability of newborn babies, successful breastfeeding and positive effects on infant development. Kangaroo care is not new to many neonatal nurses, but not every neonatal center is routinely practicing kangaroo care in Singapore. Inadequate nurses' knowledge and lack of guidelines on kangaroo care hinder its practice. The aim of this project was to implement kangaroo care in very low birth weight babies in a systematic and structured approach. The team followed Larrabee's The Model For Evidence-Based Practice Change, used the available evidence on kangaroo care to develop guideline that was specific and suitable for the local setting. The team organized kangaroo care road shows for nurses and parents to create and enhance awareness. Evaluation of the project was done through two audits. The audit tool consisted of correct baby positioning and nursing documentation, with a sample size of 30 episodes. The ages of the babies audited were from 24 to 34 weeks of gestation with their weight ranging from 850 to 1500 g. The compliance rate for correct baby positioning during kangaroo care was 100% for both audits. The compliance rate for nursing documentation improved from 93% in the first post-implementation audit to 96.7% in the second post-implementation audit. The systematic and structured approach in kangaroo care implementation has created awareness among nurses and led to improvements in their knowledge and practices of kangaroo care. The implementation process of kangaroo care has also aided in training the ward Evidence-Based Nursing Unit team members to engage in critical thinking, which ultimately benefited the babies and

  14. Intermittent kangaroo mother care: a NICU protocol.

    PubMed

    Davanzo, Riccardo; Brovedani, Pierpaolo; Travan, Laura; Kennedy, Jacqueline; Crocetta, Anna; Sanesi, Cecilia; Strajn, Tamara; De Cunto, Angela

    2013-08-01

    The practice of kangaroo mother care (KMC) is steadily increasing in high-tech settings due to its proven benefits for both infants and parents. In spite of that, clear guidelines about how to implement this method of care are lacking, and as a consequence, some restrictions are applied in many neonatal intensive care units (NICUs), preventing its practice. Based on recommendations from the Expert Group of the International Network on Kangaroo Mother Care, we developed a hospital protocol in the neonatal unit of the Institute for Maternal and Child Health in Trieste, Italy, a level 3 unit, aimed to facilitate and promote KMC implementation in high-tech settings. Our guideline is therefore proposed, based both on current scientific literature and on practical considerations and experience. Future adjustments and improvements would be considered based on increasing clinical KMC use and further knowledge.

  15. Kangaroo mother care: a systematic review of barriers and enablers

    PubMed Central

    Labar, Amy S; Wall, Stephen; Atun, Rifat

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To investigate factors influencing the adoption of kangaroo mother care in different contexts. Methods We searched PubMed, Embase, Scopus, Web of Science and the World Health Organization’s regional databases, for studies on “kangaroo mother care” or “kangaroo care” or “skin-to-skin care” from 1 January 1960 to 19 August 2015, without language restrictions. We included programmatic reports and hand-searched references of published reviews and articles. Two independent reviewers screened articles and extracted data on carers, health system characteristics and contextual factors. We developed a conceptual model to analyse the integration of kangaroo mother care in health systems. Findings We screened 2875 studies and included 112 studies that contained qualitative data on implementation. Kangaroo mother care was applied in different ways in different contexts. The studies show that there are several barriers to implementing kangaroo mother care, including the need for time, social support, medical care and family acceptance. Barriers within health systems included organization, financing and service delivery. In the broad context, cultural norms influenced perceptions and the success of adoption. Conclusion Kangaroo mother care is a complex intervention that is behaviour driven and includes multiple elements. Success of implementation requires high user engagement and stakeholder involvement. Future research includes designing and testing models of specific interventions to improve uptake. PMID:26908962

  16. Kangaroo mother care: a systematic review of barriers and enablers.

    PubMed

    Chan, Grace J; Labar, Amy S; Wall, Stephen; Atun, Rifat

    2016-02-01

    To investigate factors influencing the adoption of kangaroo mother care in different contexts. We searched PubMed, Embase, Scopus, Web of Science and the World Health Organization's regional databases, for studies on "kangaroo mother care" or "kangaroo care" or "skin-to-skin care" from 1 January 1960 to 19 August 2015, without language restrictions. We included programmatic reports and hand-searched references of published reviews and articles. Two independent reviewers screened articles and extracted data on carers, health system characteristics and contextual factors. We developed a conceptual model to analyse the integration of kangaroo mother care in health systems. We screened 2875 studies and included 112 studies that contained qualitative data on implementation. Kangaroo mother care was applied in different ways in different contexts. The studies show that there are several barriers to implementing kangaroo mother care, including the need for time, social support, medical care and family acceptance. Barriers within health systems included organization, financing and service delivery. In the broad context, cultural norms influenced perceptions and the success of adoption. Kangaroo mother care is a complex intervention that is behaviour driven and includes multiple elements. Success of implementation requires high user engagement and stakeholder involvement. Future research includes designing and testing models of specific interventions to improve uptake.

  17. Seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii in wild kangaroos using an ELISA

    PubMed Central

    Parameswaran, N.; O'Handley, RM.; Grigg, ME.; Fenwick, SG.; Thompson, RCA.

    2009-01-01

    Infection with Toxoplasma gondii is a significant problem in Australian marsupials, and can lead to devastating disease and predispose animals to predation. T. gondii infection in kangaroos is also of public health significance due to the kangaroo meat trade. A moderate seroprevalence of T. gondii was observed in a study of western grey kangaroos located in the Perth metropolitan area in Western Australia. Of 219 kangaroos tested, 15.5% (95%CI: 10.7-20.3) were positive for T. gondii antibodies using an ELISA developed to detect T. gondii IgG in macropod marsupials. When compared with the commercially available MAT (modified agglutination test), the ELISA developed was in absolute agreement and yielded a κ coefficient of 1.00. Of 18 kangaroos tested for the presence of T. gondii DNA by PCR, the 9 ELISA positive kangaroos tested PCR positive and the 9 ELISA negative kangaroos tested PCR negative indicating the ELISA protocol was both highly specific and sensitive and correlated 100% with the more labour intensive PCR assay. PMID:19567231

  18. HYPOALDOSTERONISM IN A MATSCHIE'S TREE KANGAROO (DENDROLAGUS MATSCHIEI).

    PubMed

    Whoriskey, Sophie T; Bartlett, Susan L; Baitchman, Eric

    2016-06-01

    A 20-yr-old female Matschie's tree kangaroo (Dendrolagus matschiei) was diagnosed with hypoaldosteronism, a rare condition in which the body fails to produce normal amounts of the mineralocorticoid aldosterone. Aldosterone plays a key role in body salt homeostasis, increasing sodium reabsorption and promoting excretion of potassium. Hypoaldosteronism resulted in decreased appetite, lethargy, and weight loss in conjunction with hyponatremia, hyperkalemia, and hypercalcemia in this tree kangaroo. The animal was successfully managed with mineralocorticoid replacement using desoxycorticosterone pivalate. To the authors' knowledge this is the first report of hypoaldosteronism in a tree kangaroo and one of the few reports in the veterinary literature in any species.

  19. The motilin gene evolved a new function in kangaroo rats and kangaroo mice (Dipodomyinae).

    PubMed

    He, Jing; Zhou, Taicheng; Irwin, David M; Shen, Yongyi; Zhang, Yaping

    2012-10-01

    The motilin receptor gene was lost in the ancestral lineage of rodents. Subsequently, the gene encoding its ligand, motilin, has experienced different evolutionary fates. Previous genomic analyses had shown that the motilin gene (MLN) became a pseudogene independently in the lineages leading to the guinea pig and the common ancestor of the mouse and rat, yet an intact, and thus potentially functional, open reading frame for the MLN was preserved in the Dipodomys ordii genome. As only a single MLN haplotype from D. ordii was available, and this sequence is from a low coverage draft genome, it is possible that the intact MLN found in the draft kangaroo rat genome is an artifact, or represents an intermediate in the process of becoming a pseudogene. In order to establish whether an intact MLN is retained in kangaroo rats despite the loss of its specific receptor, and to investigate the evolutionary mechanisms underlying the retention of this gene sequence, we isolated MLN sequences from species that represent the diversity of the Dipodomyinae [the monophyletic Dipodomyinae subfamily consists of two genera: Dipodomys (kangaroo rats) and Microdipodops (kangaroo mice)]. The results demonstrate that the MLN sequence is well conserved in Dipodomyinae, and it codes for a predicted motilin peptide sequence possessing a conserved N-terminal pharmacophore and the potential to be processed and secreted as a hormone. The observations that the MLN evolved as a functional gene during the radiation of the Dipodomyinae, species that have lost their original motilin receptor, suggest that the MLN has undergone a lineage-specific physiological adaptation to a new function.

  20. [Budget impact of using the Kangaroo Method in neonatal care].

    PubMed

    Entringer, Aline Piovezan; Pinto, Márcia Teixeira; Magluta, Cynthia; Gomes, Maria Auxiliadora de Sousa Mendes

    2013-10-01

    To estimate the budget impact of using the Kangaroo Method in a municipal health care network. An analytical decision model was developed to simulate the costs of the Kangaroo Method and Neonatal Intermediate Care Unit in Rio de Janeiro, RJ, in 2011. The reference population was clinically stable newborns, who may receive either of the two types of care. The budget impact for a hypothetical cohort of 1,000 eligible newborns was estimated for one year. The proportion of eligible infants receiving the two type of care was obtained through data collection in hospitals included in the study. The probabilities of events and resource consumption of health care in the period were incorporated into the model. A scenario analysis was developed to reflect the adoption of the Kangaroo Method on a greater or smaller scale. The use of the second and third stage of Kangaroo Method means a cost reduction of R$ 1,085,379.64 (16.0%) in a year if all eligible infants were assisted in Kangaroo Method. The Kangaroo Method options costs less than the Neonatal Intermediate Care Unit. The analysis of the budget impact of this method on the public health care system showed significant savings in the year long period analyzed.

  1. Nonverbal contention and contempt in U.K. parliamentary oversight hearings on fiscal and monetary policy.

    PubMed

    Schonhardt-Bailey, Cheryl

    2017-01-01

    In parliamentary committee oversight hearings on fiscal policy, monetary policy, and financial stability, where verbal deliberation is the focus, nonverbal communication may be crucial in the acceptance or rejection of arguments proffered by policymakers. Systematic qualitative coding of these hearings in the 2010-15 U.K. Parliament finds the following: (1) facial expressions, particularly in the form of anger and contempt, are more prevalent in fiscal policy hearings, where backbench parliamentarians hold frontbench parliamentarians to account, than in monetary policy or financial stability hearings, where the witnesses being held to account are unelected policy experts; (2) comparing committees across chambers, hearings in the House of Lords committee yield more reassuring facial expressions relative to hearings in the House of Commons committee, suggesting a more relaxed and less adversarial context in the former; and (3) central bank witnesses appearing before both the Lords and Commons committees tend toward expressions of appeasement, suggesting a willingness to defer to Parliament.

  2. The Impact of Kangaroo Care on Premature Infant Weight Gain.

    PubMed

    Evereklian, Melvina; Posmontier, Bobbie

    Preterm births occur among 11.4% of all live infant births. Without steady weight gain, premature infants may experience lengthy hospitalizations, neurodevelopmental deficits and hospital readmissions, which can increase the financial burden on the health care system and their families. The total U.S. health-related costs linked to preterm infant deliveries are estimated at $4.33 billion. Kangaroo care is a feasible practice that can improve preterm infant weight gain. However, this intervention is utilized less often throughout the U.S. due to numerous barriers including a lack of consistent protocols, inadequate knowledge, and decreased level of confidence in demonstrating the proper kangarooing technique. An integrative review was conducted to evaluate the impact of kangaroo care on premature infant weight gain in order to educate nurses about its efficacy among preterm infants. A literature search was conducted using CINAHL, PubMed, Cochrane Reviews, ClinicalKey and Google Scholar. Large volume searches were restricted using appropriate filters and limiters. Most of the evaluated studies determined that weight gain was greater among the kangarooing premature infants. Kangaroo care is a low-tech low-cost modality that can facilitate improved preterm infant weight gain even in low-resource settings. Despite its current efficacy, kangaroo care is not widely utilized due to several barriers including an absence of standardized protocols and a lack of knowledge about its benefits. Kangaroo care can become a widespread formalized practice after nurses and parents learn about the technique and its numerous benefits for premature infants, including its association with improved weight gain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Gastric trichobezoar in a banner-tailed kangaroo rat (Dipodomys spectabilis).

    PubMed

    Suckow, M A; Terril-Robb, L A; Grigdesby, C F

    1996-10-01

    A male, wild-caught kangaroo rat developed anorexia and wasting. The animal was euthanized and a gastric trichobezoar found at necropsy. The paucity of information regarding the clinical medicine of this species is a hindrance to those charged with the care of kangaroo rats. Gastric trichobezoar should be considered as a differential diagnosis in cases of anorexia in kangaroo rats.

  4. Masticatory muscles of the great-gray kangaroo (Macropus giganteus).

    PubMed

    Tomo, Soichiro; Tomo, Ikuko; Townsend, Grant C; Hirata, Kazuaki

    2007-04-01

    The great-gray kangaroo (Macropus giganteus) belongs to the Diprotodontia suborder (herbivorous marsupials of Australia) of the order of marsupials. We dissected the masticatory muscles in the great-gray kangaroo and classified them based on their innervation. Three (two male and one female) adult great-gray kangaroos (M. giganteus), fixed with 10% formalin, were examined. The masseter muscle of the great-gray kangaroo was classified into four layers (superficial layers 1, 2, 3, and a deep layer), all innervated by masseteric nerves. Layer 1 of the masseter muscle was well developed and the deep layer inserted into the masseteric canal. The zygomaticomandibular muscle, which belongs to both the masseter and temporalis muscles, was innervated by both the masseteric nerve and posterior deep temporal nerve, and the temporalis muscle was innervated by the anterior and posterior deep temporal nerves. The medial pterygoid muscle, which was innervated by the medial pterygoid nerve, was divided into superficial and deep portions. The lateral pterygoid muscle was divided into superior and inferior heads by the buccal nerve. We propose that the relationship of the masticatory muscles in the kangaroo has evolved by passive anterior invasion of the deep layer of the masseter by the medial pterygoid muscle via the masseteric canal, associated with the development of an anteroposterior mode of mastication.

  5. Kangaroo Care Education Effects on Nurses' Knowledge and Skills Confidence.

    PubMed

    Almutairi, Wedad Matar; Ludington-Hoe, Susan M

    2016-11-01

    Less than 20% of the 996 NICUs in the United States routinely practice kangaroo care, due in part to the inadequate knowledge and skills confidence of nurses. Continuing education improves knowledge and skills acquisition, but the effects of a kangaroo care certification course on nurses' knowledge and skills confidence are unknown. A pretest-posttest quasi-experiment was conducted. The Kangaroo Care Knowledge and Skills Confidence Tool was administered to 68 RNs at a 2.5-day course about kangaroo care evidence and skills. Measures of central tendency, dispersion, and paired t tests were conducted on 57 questionnaires. The nurses' characteristics were varied. The mean posttest Knowledge score (M = 88.54, SD = 6.13) was significantly higher than the pretest score (M = 78.7, SD = 8.30), t [54] = -9.1, p = .000), as was the posttest Skills Confidence score (pretest M = 32.06, SD = 3.49; posttest M = 26.80, SD = 5.22), t [53] = -8.459, p = .000). The nurses' knowledge and skills confidence of kangaroo care improved following continuing education, suggesting a need for continuing education in this area. J Contin Educ Nurs. 2016;47(11):518-524. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  6. Spatial memory in the desert kangaroo rat (Dipodomys deserti).

    PubMed

    Langley, C M

    1994-03-01

    Desert kangaroo rats (Dipodomys deserti) forage for seed distributed in patches in the desert environment and may remember patch locations. In Experiment 1, 7 desert kangaroo rats that had discovered the location of a plastic token in 1 box accurately dug for a token hidden in the same location in a 2nd identical box. Results of Experiment 2 indicated that the rats primarily remembered the spatial location of the token within the box in relation to extramaze objects and the walls of the experimental box. Female rats also remembered the chip's location in relation to objects inside the box, but males did not. Experiment 3 demonstrated that the rats' ability to locate the buried token did not depend on detection of the odor of the token. In the discussion I propose that spatial memory in kangaroo rats may have evolved as a result of an overall change in the ontogeny of the species rather than as a specialized adaptation for foraging efficiency.

  7. Morphology of the lingual papillae in the eastern grey kangaroo.

    PubMed

    Emura, Shoichi

    2016-01-01

    We examined the dorsal lingual surface of an adult eastern grey kangaroo (Macropus gigantues) by scanning electron microscopy. The filiform papillae on the lingual apex and anterior body consisted of a main papilla and secondary papillae. The connective tissue core of the filiform papillae on the lingual apex had several processes. The filiform papillae on the lingual posterior body were thread-like in shape. The connective tissue core of the filiform papillae on the lingual posterior body consisted of many slender processes. The fungiform papillae were round in shape. Three vallate papillae with the apex of the triangle directed posteriorly consisted of a groove and pad. Several conical papillae derived from the posterolateral margin of the tongue where foliate papillae have been shown to be distributed in many other animal species. The surface structure of the tongue in the eastern grey kangaroo resembles that of the red kangaroo.

  8. Barrier Crossing and Transport Activated by Kangaroo Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostur, M.; Luczka, J.

    1999-01-01

    We study barrier crossing of Brownian particles in a bistable symmetric potential and transport of Brownian particles in spatially periodic structures, driven by both kangaroo fluctuations and thermal equilibrium noise of zero mean values. We consider exponentially and algebraically correlated kangaroo fluctuations. Starting with the full Newton--Langevin equation for the Brownian particle and by introducing scaling as well as dimensionless variables, we show that the equation is very well approximated by overdamped dynamics in which inertial effects can be neglected. We analyze properties of selected macroscopic characteristics of the system such as the mean first passage time (MFPT) of particles from one minimum of the bistable potential to the other and mean stationary velocity of particles moving in a spatially periodic potential. In dependence upon statistics of kangaroo fluctuations and temperature of the system, macroscopic characteristics exhibit distinctive non-monotonic behavior. Accordingly, there exist optimal statistics of fluctuations optimizing macroscopic characteristics.

  9. The effects of alcohol on the recognition of facial expressions and microexpressions of emotion: enhanced recognition of disgust and contempt.

    PubMed

    Felisberti, Fatima; Terry, Philip

    2015-09-01

    The study compared alcohol's effects on the recognition of briefly displayed facial expressions of emotion (so-called microexpressions) with expressions presented for a longer period. Using a repeated-measures design, we tested 18 participants three times (counterbalanced), after (i) a placebo drink, (ii) a low-to-moderate dose of alcohol (0.17 g/kg women; 0.20 g/kg men) and (iii) a moderate-to-high dose of alcohol (0.52 g/kg women; 0.60 g/kg men). On each session, participants were presented with stimuli representing six emotions (happiness, sadness, anger, fear, disgust and contempt) overlaid on a generic avatar in a six-alternative forced-choice paradigm. A neutral expression (1 s) preceded and followed a target expression presented for 200 ms (microexpressions) or 400 ms. Participants mouse clicked the correct answer. The recognition of disgust was significantly better after the high dose of alcohol than after the low dose or placebo drinks at both durations of stimulus presentation. A similar profile of effects was found for the recognition of contempt. There were no effects on response latencies. Alcohol can increase sensitivity to expressions of disgust and contempt. Such effects are not dependent on stimulus duration up to 400 ms and may reflect contextual modulation of alcohol's effects on emotion recognition. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. The Story behind "Quest for the Tree Kangaroo"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Terrell A.; Ward, Barbara A.

    2007-01-01

    The National Council of Teachers of English awarded the coveted nonfiction prize to "Quest for the Tree Kangaroo: An Expedition to the Cloud Forest of New Guinea." Written by Sy Montgomery, with photographs by Nic Bishop, the book was further honored as a Robert F. Sibert Informational Book Medal Honor recipient by the Association for…

  11. The Story behind "Quest for the Tree Kangaroo"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Terrell A.; Ward, Barbara A.

    2007-01-01

    The National Council of Teachers of English awarded the coveted nonfiction prize to "Quest for the Tree Kangaroo: An Expedition to the Cloud Forest of New Guinea." Written by Sy Montgomery, with photographs by Nic Bishop, the book was further honored as a Robert F. Sibert Informational Book Medal Honor recipient by the Association for…

  12. [Kangaroo Mother Care and conventional care: a review of literature].

    PubMed

    Bulfone, Giampiera; Nazzi, Elisa; Tenore, Alfred

    2011-01-01

    Low birth weight is one of the major health problems throughout the world. All such neonates can benefit from an effective and efficient human care model - Kangaroo Mother Care. A review of the literature was performed to compare the short and long-term outcome of Kangaroo Mother Care to those of conventional care (incubator). Short-term outcome considered heart and breathing frequency, percutaneous oxygen saturation , transcutaneous oxygen pressure , body temperature, sleep-wake cycles, stress and pain. Long-term outcome considered mortality, somatic, psycho-motor and cognitive development, the incidence of infections and duration of hospitalization. Studies including pre-term neonates were also included. 19 of the 80 studies corresponded to the study criteria and demonstrated that Kangaroo Mother Care is important because it reduces pain and infections, shortens hospitalization, favors breast-feeding: in comparison to neonates treated conventionally, this method results in an earlier and better cognitive and motor development . Concerning body temperature, there were no differences with respect to traditional care. The literature shows that the Kangaroo Mother Care method can be a useful "adjunctive" strategy although further studies are necessary to clarify aspects such as heart and breathing rate and oxygen saturation that appear contradictory.

  13. Features of Heart Rate Variability Capture Regulatory Changes During Kangaroo Care in Preterm Infants.

    PubMed

    Kommers, Deedee R; Joshi, Rohan; van Pul, Carola; Atallah, Louis; Feijs, Loe; Oei, Guid; Bambang Oetomo, Sidarto; Andriessen, Peter

    2017-03-01

    To determine whether heart rate variability (HRV) can serve as a surrogate measure to track regulatory changes during kangaroo care, a period of parental coregulation distinct from regulation within the incubator. Nurses annotated the starting and ending times of kangaroo care for 3 months. The pre-kangaroo care, during-kangaroo care, and post-kangaroo care data were retrieved in infants with at least 10 accurately annotated kangaroo care sessions. Eight HRV features (5 in the time domain and 3 in the frequency domain) were used to visually and statistically compare the pre-kangaroo care and during-kangaroo care periods. Two of these features, capturing the percentage of heart rate decelerations and the extent of heart rate decelerations, were newly developed for preterm infants. A total of 191 kangaroo care sessions were investigated in 11 preterm infants. Despite clinically irrelevant changes in vital signs, 6 of the 8 HRV features (SD of normal-to-normal intervals, root mean square of the SD, percentage of consecutive normal-to-normal intervals that differ by >50 ms, SD of heart rate decelerations, high-frequency power, and low-frequency/high-frequency ratio) showed a visible and statistically significant difference (P <.01) between stable periods of kangaroo care and pre-kangaroo care. HRV was reduced during kangaroo care owing to a decrease in the extent of transient heart rate decelerations. HRV-based features may be clinically useful for capturing the dynamic changes in autonomic regulation in response to kangaroo care and other changes in environment and state. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Kangaroo vs. porcine aortic valves: calcification potential after glutaraldehyde fixation.

    PubMed

    Narine, K; Chéry, Cyrille C; Goetghebeur, Els; Forsyth, R; Claeys, E; Cornelissen, Maria; Moens, L; Van Nooten, G

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the calcification potential of kangaroo and porcine aortic valves after glutaraldehyde fixation at both low (0.6%) and high (2.0%) concentrations of glutaraldehyde in the rat subcutaneous model. To our knowledge this is the first report comparing the time-related, progressive calcification of these two species in the rat subcutaneous model. Twenty-two Sprague-Dawley rats were each implanted with two aortic valve leaflets (porcine and kangaroo) after fixation in 0.6% glutaraldehyde and two aortic valve leaflets (porcine and kangaroo) after fixation in 2% glutaraldehyde respectively. Animals were sacrificed after 24 h and thereafter weekly for up to 10 weeks after implantation. Calcium content was determined using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry and confirmed histologically. Mean calcium content per milligram of tissue (dry weight) treated with 0.6 and 2% glutaraldehyde was 116.2 and 110.4 microg/mg tissue for kangaroo and 95.0 and 106.8 microg/mg tissue for porcine valves. Calcium content increased significantly over time (8.8 microg/mg tissue per week) and was not significantly different between groups. Regression analysis of calcification over time showed no significant difference in calcification of valves treated with 0.6 or 2% glutaraldehyde within and between the two species. Using the subcutaneous model, we did not detect a difference in calcification potential between kangaroo and porcine aortic valves treated with either high or low concentrations of glutaraldehyde. Copyright 2005 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Locomotion energetics and gait characteristics of a rat-kangaroo, Bettongia penicillata, have some kangaroo-like features.

    PubMed

    Webster, K N; Dawson, T J

    2003-09-01

    The locomotory characteristics of kangaroos and wallabies are unusual, with both energetic costs and gait parameters differing from those of quadrupedal running mammals. The kangaroos and wallabies have an evolutionary history of only around 5 million years; their closest relatives, the rat-kangaroos, have a fossil record of more than 26 million years. We examined the locomotory characteristics of a rat-kangaroo, Bettongia penicillata. Locomotory energetics and gait parameters were obtained from animals exercising on a motorised treadmill at speeds from 0.6 m s(-1) to 6.2 m s(-1). Aerobic metabolic costs increased as hopping speed increased, but were significantly different from the costs for a running quadruped; at the fastest speed, the cost of hopping was 50% of the cost of running. Therefore B. penicillata can travel much faster than quadrupedal runners at similar levels of aerobic output. The maximum aerobic output of B. penicillata was 17 times its basal metabolism. Increases in speed during hopping were achieved through increases in stride length, with stride frequency remaining constant. We suggest that these unusual locomotory characteristics are a conservative feature among the hopping marsupials, with an evolutionary history of 20-30 million years.

  16. Reproductive strategies of the kangaroo leech, Marsupiobdella africana (Glossiphoniidae)

    PubMed Central

    Kruger, Natasha; Du Preez, Louis

    2015-01-01

    The Kangaroo Leech, Marsupiobdella africana, is a hermaphroditic organism, with insemination taking place by the planting of a spermatophore on another leech. Spermatophores are mostly planted on the anterior of the recipient leech, but not always. Several spermatophores may be planted by different leeches on a single recipient. The spermatophore consists of two side by side lobes. Within minutes from planting of the spermatophore, the contents are squeezed out and into the body of the recipient. Sperm are believed to find the way to the ova by following chemical cues. Kangaroo Leeches display advanced parental care by transferring fertilized eggs from the reproductive opening to a brood pouch on the ventral side. Fully developed leeches may copulate after detaching from the amphibian host Xenopus laevis, or from the Cape River Crab Potamonautes perlatus with which it maintains a phoretic association. PMID:25830114

  17. Kangaroo rat bone compared to white rat bone after short-term disuse and exercise

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muths, E.; Reichman, O. J.

    1996-01-01

    Kangaroo rats (Dipodomys ordii) were used to study the effects of confinement on mechanical properties of bone with a long range objective of proposing an alternative to the white rat model for the study of disuse osteoporosis. Kangaroo rats exhibit bipedal locomotion, which subjects their limbs to substantial accelerative forces in addition to the normal stress of weight bearing. We subjected groups of kangaroo rats and white rats (Rattus norvegicus) to one of two confinement treatments or to an exercise regime; animals were exercised at a rate calculated to replicate their (respective) daily exercise patterns. White laboratory rats were used as the comparison because they are currently the accepted model used in the study of disuse osteoporosis. After 6 weeks of treatment, rats were killed and the long bones of their hind limbs were tested mechanically and examined for histomorphometric changes. We found that kangaroo rats held in confinement had less ash content in their hind limbs than exercised kangaroo rats. In general, treated kangaroo rats showed morphometric and mechanical bone deterioration compared to controls and exercised kangaroo rats appeared to have slightly “stronger” bones than confined animals. White rats exhibited no significant differences between treatments. These preliminary results suggest that kangaroo rats may be an effective model in the study of disuse osteoporosis.

  18. Kangaroo rat bone compared to white rat bone after short-term disuse and exercise.

    PubMed

    Muths, E; Reichman, O J

    1996-08-01

    Kangaroo rats (Dipodomys ordii) were used to study the effects of confinement on mechanical properties of bone with a long range objective of proposing an alternative to the white rat model for the study of disuse osteoporosis. Kangaroo rats exhibit bipedal locomotion, which subjects their limbs to substantial accelerative forces in addition to the normal stress of weight bearing. We subjected groups of kangaroo rats and white rats (Rattus norvegicus) to one of two confinement treatments or to an exercise regime; animals were exercised at a rate calculated to replicate their (respective) daily exercise patterns. White laboratory rats were used as the comparison because they are currently the accepted model used in the study of disuse osteoporosis. After 6 weeks of treatment, rats were killed and the long bones of their hind limbs were tested mechanically and examined for histomorphometric changes. We found that kangaroo rats held in confinement had less ash content in their hind limbs than exercised kangaroo rats. In general, treated kangaroo rats showed morphometric and mechanical bone deterioration compared to controls and exercised kangaroo rats appeared to have slightly "stronger" bones than confined animals. White rats exhibited no significant differences between treatments. These preliminary results suggest that kangaroo rats may be an effective model in the study of disuse osteoporosis.

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in a red kangaroo (Macropus rufus) with otitis.

    PubMed

    Okeson, Danelle M; Coke, Rob L; Kochunov, Peter; Davis, M Duff

    2008-12-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed on an adult, male Red kangaroo (Macropus rufus) with a history of nonspecific neurologic signs and acute discharge from the left ear. MRI revealed findings consistent with otitis and possible osteomyelitis of the temporal and mastoid bones. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of otitis and MRI findings in a kangaroo.

  20. What is kangaroo mother care? Systematic review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Grace J; Valsangkar, Bina; Kajeepeta, Sandhya; Boundy, Ellen O; Wall, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Background Kangaroo mother care (KMC), often defined as skin–to–skin contact between a mother and her newborn, frequent or exclusive breastfeeding, and early discharge from the hospital has been effective in reducing the risk of mortality among preterm and low birth weight infants. Research studies and program implementation of KMC have used various definitions. Objectives To describe the current definitions of KMC in various settings, analyze the presence or absence of KMC components in each definition, and present a core definition of KMC based on common components that are present in KMC literature. Methods We conducted a systematic review and searched PubMed, Embase, Scopus, Web of Science, and the World Health Organization Regional Databases for studies with key words “kangaroo mother care”, “kangaroo care” or “skin to skin care” from 1 January 1960 to 24 April 2014. Two independent reviewers screened articles and abstracted data. Findings We screened 1035 articles and reports; 299 contained data on KMC and neonatal outcomes or qualitative information on KMC implementation. Eighty–eight of the studies (29%) did not define KMC. Two hundred and eleven studies (71%) included skin–to–skin contact (SSC) in their KMC definition, 49 (16%) included exclusive or nearly exclusive breastfeeding, 22 (7%) included early discharge criteria, and 36 (12%) included follow–up after discharge. One hundred and sixty–seven studies (56%) described the duration of SSC. Conclusions There exists significant heterogeneity in the definition of KMC. A large number of studies did not report definitions of KMC. Skin–to–skin contact is the core component of KMC, whereas components such as breastfeeding, early discharge, and follow–up care are context specific. To implement KMC effectively development of a global standardized definition of KMC is needed. PMID:27231546

  1. Lens growth and protein changes in the eastern grey kangaroo

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Development in marsupials takes place predominantly ex utero while the young is attached to a nipple in the mother’s pouch, very different from that in other species. This study was undertaken to examine whether this affects lens growth and the production of lens proteins in kangaroos. Methods Fresh lenses were obtained at official culls from eastern gray kangaroos (Macropus giganteus). Wet weights were recorded for all and protein contents were determined for one lens from each animal. Dry weights, after fixation were obtained for 20 lenses. Ages were determined using both molar progression and total lens protein content. Lenses were divided into concentric layers by controlled dissolution using phosphate buffered saline. Samples were taken for determination of protein contents and dry weights, which were then used to determine the age of the layer removed. Soluble crystallin distributions were determined by fractionation of the centrifuged extracts using HPLC-GPC and the polypeptide contents of both soluble and insoluble proteins were assessed by SDS–PAGE. Results Lens growth is continuous from birth throughout adulthood and the increases in wet weight and fixed dry weight can be described with a single logistic growth functions for the whole life span. Three major crystallin classes, α-, β-, and γ-crystallins, were identified in the immature pouch-young animals aged around 60 days after birth. Adult lenses contain, in addition, the taxon-specific μ-crystallin. The proportions of these vary with the age of the lens tissue due to age related insolubilization as well as changes in the synthesis patterns. During early lactation (birth to 190 days), the α-, β-, and γ-crystallins represent 25, 53, and 20% of the total protein, respectively. After the pouch-young first releases the nipple (190 days), there is a rapid decrease in the production of γ-crystallins to around 5% of the total and a corresponding increase in μ-crystallin, from 0.5% to 15

  2. Lens growth and protein changes in the eastern grey kangaroo.

    PubMed

    Augusteyn, Robert C

    2011-01-01

    Development in marsupials takes place predominantly ex utero while the young is attached to a nipple in the mother's pouch, very different from that in other species. This study was undertaken to examine whether this affects lens growth and the production of lens proteins in kangaroos. Fresh lenses were obtained at official culls from eastern gray kangaroos (Macropus giganteus). Wet weights were recorded for all and protein contents were determined for one lens from each animal. Dry weights, after fixation were obtained for 20 lenses. Ages were determined using both molar progression and total lens protein content. Lenses were divided into concentric layers by controlled dissolution using phosphate buffered saline. Samples were taken for determination of protein contents and dry weights, which were then used to determine the age of the layer removed. Soluble crystallin distributions were determined by fractionation of the centrifuged extracts using HPLC-GPC and the polypeptide contents of both soluble and insoluble proteins were assessed by SDS-PAGE. Lens growth is continuous from birth throughout adulthood and the increases in wet weight and fixed dry weight can be described with a single logistic growth functions for the whole life span. Three major crystallin classes, α-, β-, and γ-crystallins, were identified in the immature pouch-young animals aged around 60 days after birth. Adult lenses contain, in addition, the taxon-specific μ-crystallin. The proportions of these vary with the age of the lens tissue due to age related insolubilization as well as changes in the synthesis patterns. During early lactation (birth to 190 days), the α-, β-, and γ-crystallins represent 25, 53, and 20% of the total protein, respectively. After the pouch-young first releases the nipple (190 days), there is a rapid decrease in the production of γ-crystallins to around 5% of the total and a corresponding increase in μ-crystallin, from 0.5% to 15%. These changes were complete

  3. Overcoming the barriers to using kangaroo care in neonatal settings.

    PubMed

    Penn, Sarah

    2015-06-01

    Skin-to-skin contact, or kangaroo care (KC), has benefits for babies and parents, improving clinical outcomes, temperature control, breastfeeding rates and child-parent bonding; it reduces morbidity and mortality. Barriers to KC for neonates may include a lack of training for nurses, lack of time, maternal or child physical or mental ill health, and inappropriate settings. With education and helpful management, neonatal nurses can advocate for KC for all babies. Parents may need information and encouragement to begin with. Therefore, nurses can improve the experiences of their patients and, in the long run, free time to perform clinical procedures.

  4. Implications of kangaroo care for growth and development in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Dodd, Virginia L

    2005-01-01

    To review research on kangaroo care with implications for growth and development in preterm infants. Nursing, medical, and child development research literature was searched through PubMed through 2003 using the search terms kangaroo Care, skin-to-skin, growth/development, and premature infants. Randomized controlled trials, pretest-posttest designs, and other comparative studies of kangaroo care were reviewed. Reports exploring parent perspectives were examined for attachment and parent-infant interaction findings. Theory and research regarding growth in preterm infants were explored. Research on topics of kangaroo care, skin-to-skin contact, preterm infant growth, preterm infant weight gain, and failure to thrive was evaluated. Research on kangaroo care reports physiologic safety for preterm infants and increased attachment for parents. Attachment promotes nurturing behaviors that support growth and development. Weight gain as a benefit of kangaroo care remains in question. Kangaroo care is safe for preterm infants and may have important benefits for growth and development. Suggestions are made for future research on effects of KC on preterm infants.

  5. Mechanisms for the keystone status of kangaroo rats: graminivory rather than granivory?

    PubMed

    Kerley, Graham I H; Whitford, Walter G; Kay, Fenton R

    1997-07-01

    Graminivory by kangaroo rats (Dipodomys spp.) was investigated as a potential mechanism for the keystone role of these rodents in the dynamics of desert grasslands. Experiments confirmed that Ord's kangaroo rats (Dipodomys ordii) cut and consumed a large proportion of the tillers of three Chihuahuan Desert tussock-forming grass species. Field observations indicated that the characteristically cut grass tillers were absent from all-rodent and medium-sized kangaroo rat exclosures, but were frequent in large-sized kangaroo rat and rabbit exclosures, indicating that the medium-sized kangaroo rats (D. ordii, D. merriami) were responsible for grass cutting. Tiller waste as a percentage of peak standing crop ranged from 7% in grassland habitats to 0.7% in Flourensia cernua shrubland. Of the 13 species of perennial, tussock-forming grasses measured, only one, Muhlenbergia porteri, had no tillers cut by kangaroo rats. This study demonstrates that the keystone role of kangaroo rats in Chihuahuan Desert grassland ecosystems is probably the result of their graminivory.

  6. Purification, amino acid sequence and characterisation of kangaroo IGF-I.

    PubMed

    Yandell, C A; Francis, G L; Wheldrake, J F; Upton, Z

    1998-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and IGF-II have been purified to homogeneity from kangaroo (Macropus fuliginosus) serum, thus this represents the first report of the purification, sequencing and characterisation of marsupial IGFs. N-Terminal protein sequencing reveals that there are six amino acid differences between kangaroo and human IGF-I. Kangaroo IGF-II has been partially sequenced and no differences were found between human and kangaroo IGF-II in the 53 residues identified. Thus the IGFs appear to be remarkably structurally conserved during mammalian radiation. In addition, in vitro characterisation of kangaroo IGF-I demonstrated that the functional properties of human, kangaroo and chicken IGF-I are very similar. In an assay measuring the ability of the proteins to stimulate protein synthesis in rat L6 myoblasts, all IGF-I proteins were found to be equally potent. The ability of all three proteins to compete for binding with radiolabelled human IGF-I to type-1 IGF receptors in L6 myoblasts and in Sminthopsis crassicaudata transformed lung fibroblasts, a marsupial cell line, was comparable. Furthermore, kangaroo and human IGF-I react equally in a human IGF-I RIA using a human reference standard, radiolabelled human IGF-I and a polyclonal antibody raised against recombinant human IGF-I. This study indicates that not only is the primary structure of eutherian and metatherian IGF-I conserved, but also the proteins appear to be functionally similar.

  7. Thermoregulation in juvenile red kangaroos (Macropus rufus) after pouch exit: higher metabolism and evaporative water requirements.

    PubMed

    Munn, A J; Dawson, T J

    2001-01-01

    The population dynamics of red kangaroos (Macropus rufus) in the Australian arid zone is tightly linked with environmental factors, which partly operate via the survival of juvenile animals. A crucial stage is the young-at-foot (YAF) stage when kangaroos permanently exit the pouch. We have examined the thermal biology of YAF red kangaroos during ages from permanent pouch exit until weaning. Over a wide range of environmental temperatures (ambient temperature [T(a)] -5 degrees to 45 degrees C), YAF red kangaroos had a mass-specific metabolism that was generally twice that of adults, considerably higher than would be expected for an adult marsupial of their body size. The total energy requirements of YAF red kangaroos were 60%-70% of those of adult females, which were three times their size. Over the same range in T(a), YAF red kangaroos also had total evaporative water losses equal to those of adult females. At the highest T(a) (45 degrees C), differences were noted in patterns of dry heat loss (dry conductance) between YAF red kangaroos and adult females, which may partially explain the relatively high levels of evaporative cooling by YAF. By weaning age, young kangaroos showed little change in their basal energy and water requirements (at T(a) 25 degrees C) but did show reduced mass-specific costs in terms of energy and water use at extremes of T(a) (-5 degrees and 45 degrees C, respectively). In their arid environment, typified by unpredictable rainfall and extremes of T(a), young red kangaroos may need to remain close to water points, which, in turn, may restrict their ability to find the high-quality forage needed to meet their high energy demands.

  8. The phylogenetic position of the musky rat-kangaroo and the evolution of bipedal hopping in kangaroos (Macropodidae: Diprotodontia).

    PubMed

    Burk, A; Westerman, M; Springer, M

    1998-09-01

    Kangaroos and their relatives (family Macropodidae) are divided into the subfamilies Macropodinae (kangaroos, wallabies, pademelons) and Potoroinae (rat-kangaroos, potoroos, bettongs). The musky rat-kangaroo, Hypsiprymnodon moschatus, is traditionally allied with other potoroines, based primarily on the basis of osteological characters and aspects of the female reproductive system. Unlike other macropodids, however, which are capable of bipedal hopping, Hypsiprymnodon is a quadrupedal bounder and lacks several derived features of the pes and tarsus that are presumably adaptations for bipedal hopping. Other derived features, such as a complex stomach, loss of P2 with the eruption of P3, and reduction of litter size to one, are also lacking in Hypsiprymnodon but occur in all other macropodids. Thus, available evidence suggests that Hypsiprymnodon either is part of a monophyletic Potoroinae or is a sister taxon to other living macropodids. To test these hypotheses, we sequenced 1,170 bp base pairs of the mitochondrial genome for 16 macropodids. Maximum parsimony, minimum evolution, maximum likelihood, and quartet puzzling all support the hypothesis that macropodines and potoroines are united to the exclusion of Hypsiprymnodon. This hypothesis implies that characters such as bipedal hopping evolved only once in macropodid evolution. Aside from Hypsiprymnodon, the remaining macropodids separate into the traditional Macropodinae and Potoroinae. Macropodines further separate into two clades: one containing the New Guinean forest wallabies Dorcopsis and Dorcopsulus, and one consisting of the genera Macropus, Setonix, Thylogale, Onychogalea, Wallabia, Dendrolagus, Peradorcas, and Lagorchestes. Among potoroines, there is moderate support for the association of Bettongia and Aepyprymnus to the exclusion of Potorous. Divergence times were estimated by using 12S ribosomal RNA transversions. At the base of the macropodid radiation, Hypsiprymnodon diverged from other macropodids

  9. Adoption in Eastern Grey Kangaroos: A Consequence of Misdirected Care?

    PubMed Central

    King, Wendy J.; Forsyth, David M.; Coulson, Graeme; Festa-Bianchet, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Adoption is rare in animals and is usually attributed to kin selection. In a 6-year study of eastern grey kangaroos (Macropus giganteus), 11 of 326 juveniles were adopted. We detected eight adoptions by observing behavioural associations and nursing between marked mothers and young and three more by analysing the relatedness of mothers and young using microsatellite DNA. Four adoptions involved reciprocal switches and three were by mothers whose own pouch young were known to subsequently disappear. Adoptive mothers were not closely related to each other or to adoptees but adoptive mothers and young associated as closely as did biological pairs, as measured by half-weight indices. Switch mothers did not associate closely. Maternal age and body condition did not influence the likelihood of adoption but females were more likely to adopt in years with high densities of females with large pouch young. Adoption did not improve juvenile survival. We conclude that adoptions in this wild population were potentially costly and likely caused by misdirected care, suggesting that eastern grey kangaroos may have poorly developed mother-offspring recognition mechanisms. PMID:25970624

  10. Adoption in eastern grey kangaroos: a consequence of misdirected care?

    PubMed

    King, Wendy J; Forsyth, David M; Coulson, Graeme; Festa-Bianchet, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Adoption is rare in animals and is usually attributed to kin selection. In a 6-year study of eastern grey kangaroos (Macropus giganteus), 11 of 326 juveniles were adopted. We detected eight adoptions by observing behavioural associations and nursing between marked mothers and young and three more by analysing the relatedness of mothers and young using microsatellite DNA. Four adoptions involved reciprocal switches and three were by mothers whose own pouch young were known to subsequently disappear. Adoptive mothers were not closely related to each other or to adoptees but adoptive mothers and young associated as closely as did biological pairs, as measured by half-weight indices. Switch mothers did not associate closely. Maternal age and body condition did not influence the likelihood of adoption but females were more likely to adopt in years with high densities of females with large pouch young. Adoption did not improve juvenile survival. We conclude that adoptions in this wild population were potentially costly and likely caused by misdirected care, suggesting that eastern grey kangaroos may have poorly developed mother-offspring recognition mechanisms.

  11. Seismic communication between the burrows of kangaroo rats, Dipodomys spectabilis.

    PubMed

    Randall, J A; Lewis, E R

    1997-11-01

    Banner-tailed kangaroo rats, Dipodomys spectabilis, footdrum to produce substrate-borne and airborne acoustic energy. Previous studies show that they communicate territorial ownership via airborne footdrumming signals. The research reported here used simulated footdrum patterns generated by an artificial 'thumper' to address the question of whether kangaroo rats communicate through seismic components of these acoustic signals. With microphones suspended in sealed burrows, we found that airborne sounds were attenuated by approximately 40 dB as they passed through the burrow wall into the burrow chamber. The substrate-borne vibrations from the thumper yielded sound approximately 40 dB greater in peak amplitude than the attenuated airborne sound. Thus, 99.9% of the peak power of the thumper was transmitted directly through the substrate into the burrow. The rats in sealed burrows timed their responses to playbacks of footdrums from the thumper and a loudspeaker so they did not initiate a drumming sequence during either the seismic or airborne signals. When these signals were masked by loud noise, the rats continued to drum to the seismic signal but drummed randomly during the airborne playback. These results suggest that the sealed burrow provides a quiet place in which D. spectabilis can listen for substrate-borne communications from conspecifics.

  12. Kangaroo rats change temperature when investigating rattlesnake predators.

    PubMed

    Schraft, Hannes A; Clark, Rulon W

    2017-05-01

    Predator presence causes acute stress in mammals. A prey animal's stress response increases its chance of survival during life-threatening situations through adaptive changes in behavior and physiology. Some components of the physiological stress response can lead to changes in body surface temperatures. Body temperature changes in prey could provide information about prey state to predators that sense heat, such as pit vipers. We determined whether wild rodents undergo a stress-induced change in body surface temperature upon detecting and investigating rattlesnake predators. We staged encounters between free-ranging Merriam's kangaroo rats (Dipodomys merriami) and tethered Mojave rattlesnakes (Crotalus scutulatus) at baited feeding stations, and recorded interactions with a thermal-imaging camera. Kangaroo rats showed a significant change in maximum head temperature, snout temperature, and hind leg temperature during interactions with rattlesnakes. This supports the hypothesis that presence of a predator induces body temperature changes in prey animals. If changes in prey heat signature are detectable by heat-sensitive rattlesnakes, rattlesnakes could use this information to evaluate prey vigilance or arousal before striking; however, more detailed information on the sensory ecology of the pit organ under field conditions is needed to evaluate this possibility. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Inferring Kangaroo Phylogeny from Incongruent Nuclear and Mitochondrial Genes

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Matthew J.; Haouchar, Dalal; Pratt, Renae C.; Gibb, Gillian C.; Bunce, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The marsupial genus Macropus includes three subgenera, the familiar large grazing kangaroos and wallaroos of M. (Macropus) and M. (Osphranter), as well as the smaller mixed grazing/browsing wallabies of M. (Notamacropus). A recent study of five concatenated nuclear genes recommended subsuming the predominantly browsing Wallabia bicolor (swamp wallaby) into Macropus. To further examine this proposal we sequenced partial mitochondrial genomes for kangaroos and wallabies. These sequences strongly favour the morphological placement of W. bicolor as sister to Macropus, although place M. irma (black-gloved wallaby) within M. (Osphranter) rather than as expected, with M. (Notamacropus). Species tree estimation from separately analysed mitochondrial and nuclear genes favours retaining Macropus and Wallabia as separate genera. A simulation study finds that incomplete lineage sorting among nuclear genes is a plausible explanation for incongruence with the mitochondrial placement of W. bicolor, while mitochondrial introgression from a wallaroo into M. irma is the deepest such event identified in marsupials. Similar such coalescent simulations for interpreting gene tree conflicts will increase in both relevance and statistical power as species-level phylogenetics enters the genomic age. Ecological considerations in turn, hint at a role for selection in accelerating the fixation of introgressed or incompletely sorted loci. More generally the inclusion of the mitochondrial sequences substantially enhanced phylogenetic resolution. However, we caution that the evolutionary dynamics that enhance mitochondria as speciation indicators in the presence of incomplete lineage sorting may also render them especially susceptible to introgression. PMID:23451266

  14. Inferring kangaroo phylogeny from incongruent nuclear and mitochondrial genes.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Matthew J; Haouchar, Dalal; Pratt, Renae C; Gibb, Gillian C; Bunce, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The marsupial genus Macropus includes three subgenera, the familiar large grazing kangaroos and wallaroos of M. (Macropus) and M. (Osphranter), as well as the smaller mixed grazing/browsing wallabies of M. (Notamacropus). A recent study of five concatenated nuclear genes recommended subsuming the predominantly browsing Wallabia bicolor (swamp wallaby) into Macropus. To further examine this proposal we sequenced partial mitochondrial genomes for kangaroos and wallabies. These sequences strongly favour the morphological placement of W. bicolor as sister to Macropus, although place M. irma (black-gloved wallaby) within M. (Osphranter) rather than as expected, with M. (Notamacropus). Species tree estimation from separately analysed mitochondrial and nuclear genes favours retaining Macropus and Wallabia as separate genera. A simulation study finds that incomplete lineage sorting among nuclear genes is a plausible explanation for incongruence with the mitochondrial placement of W. bicolor, while mitochondrial introgression from a wallaroo into M. irma is the deepest such event identified in marsupials. Similar such coalescent simulations for interpreting gene tree conflicts will increase in both relevance and statistical power as species-level phylogenetics enters the genomic age. Ecological considerations in turn, hint at a role for selection in accelerating the fixation of introgressed or incompletely sorted loci. More generally the inclusion of the mitochondrial sequences substantially enhanced phylogenetic resolution. However, we caution that the evolutionary dynamics that enhance mitochondria as speciation indicators in the presence of incomplete lineage sorting may also render them especially susceptible to introgression.

  15. Selected diagnostic ophthalmic tests in the red kangaroo (Macropus rufus).

    PubMed

    Takle, Ginger L; Suedmeyer, W Kirk; Hunkeler, Amy

    2010-06-01

    The following tests were performed on a total of 20 eyes: Schirmer tear test, intraocular pressure (IOP), assessment of conjunctival flora, and pupillary diameter with application of topical tropicamide in 10 healthy captive red kangaroos (Macropus rufus) under manual restraint. The mean Schirmer tear test value was 22.6 +/- 6.07 mm/min. The mean intraocular pressure was 17.45 +/- 7.23 mm Hg. Values did not differ between eyes or gender for either test, but significant differences were identified for IOP values according to age. The most common bacteria isolated from the conjunctival fornix were Staphylococcus epidermidis (54.5%) and Corynebacterium sp. (18.2%). The mean onset of mydriasis after instillation of 1% tropicamide ophthalmic solution was 16.7 +/- 3.34 min and the mean duration of effect was 17.6 +/- 8.26 hr. The data obtained in this investigation will aid veterinary ophthalmologists and zoo veterinarians to diagnose ocular diseases in the red kangaroo accurately.

  16. Beaded-chain collars: A new method to radiotag kangaroo rats for short-term studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harker, M.B.; Rathbun, G.B.; Langtimm, C.A.

    1999-01-01

    To study burrow use by small mammals, we needed to develop a simple, non-invasive radiotag for the endangered giant kangaroo rat (Dipodomys ingens). We designed and tested a radiocollar made of beaded-chain on 4 captive Heermann's kangaroo rats (D. heermanii). Attachment of the collar required no anesthesia, the collar was easily fitted in 1-2 minutes, and it caused minimal stress to the animals. Once the collar design and attachment technique were perfected on the surrogate animals, we fitted radiocollars on 48 giant kangaroo rats for about 15 days. Upon recapture, 12 animals showed some minor fur or skin abrasion on the neck. Overall, the attachment performed as expected and proved to be a reliable method to radiotrack kangaroo rats during our short-term field study.

  17. Successful management of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in a Matschie's tree kangaroo (Dendrolagus matschiei).

    PubMed

    Fredholm, Daniel V; Jones, Ashley E; Hall, Natalie H; Russell, Kathleen; Heard, Darryl J

    2015-03-01

    A 3-yr-old, intact male Matschie's tree kangaroo (Dendrolagus matschiei) was examined for a 1-wk history of intermittent lethargy and tachypnea. An echocardiogram revealed concentric hypertrophy of the left ventricular free wall and interventricular septum. These findings were compared to measurements from healthy Matschie's tree kangaroos, supporting a diagnosis of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. At the time of publication, the patient has been managed for over 11.5 yr, using a combination of enalapril, furosemide, diltiazem, and diet modifications. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy should be considered as a differential diagnosis in tree kangaroos exhibiting signs of cardiovascular or respiratory distress. This case represents the first report of antemortem diagnosis and successful management of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in a Matschie's tree kangaroo.

  18. Locomotion in extinct giant kangaroos: were sthenurines hop-less monsters?

    PubMed

    Janis, Christine M; Buttrill, Karalyn; Figueirido, Borja

    2014-01-01

    Sthenurine kangaroos (Marsupialia, Diprotodontia, Macropodoidea) were an extinct subfamily within the family Macropodidae (kangaroos and rat-kangaroos). These "short-faced browsers" first appeared in the middle Miocene, and radiated in the Plio-Pleistocene into a diversity of mostly large-bodied forms, more robust than extant forms in their build. The largest (Procoptodon goliah) had an estimated body mass of 240 kg, almost three times the size of the largest living kangaroos, and there is speculation whether a kangaroo of this size would be biomechanically capable of hopping locomotion. Previously described aspects of sthenurine anatomy (specialized forelimbs, rigid lumbar spine) would limit their ability to perform the characteristic kangaroo pentapedal walking (using the tail as a fifth limb), an essential gait at slower speeds as slow hopping is energetically unfeasible. Analysis of limb bone measurements of sthenurines in comparison with extant macropodoids shows a number of anatomical differences, especially in the large species. The scaling of long bone robusticity indicates that sthenurines are following the "normal" allometric trend for macropodoids, while the large extant kangaroos are relatively gracile. Other morphological differences are indicative of adaptations for a novel type of locomotor behavior in sthenurines: they lacked many specialized features for rapid hopping, and they also had anatomy indicative of supporting their body with an upright trunk (e.g., dorsally tipped ischiae), and of supporting their weight on one leg at a time (e.g., larger hips and knees, stabilized ankle joint). We propose that sthenurines adopted a bipedal striding gait (a gait occasionally observed in extant tree-kangaroos): in the smaller and earlier forms, this gait may have been employed as an alternative to pentapedal locomotion at slower speeds, while in the larger Pleistocene forms this gait may have enabled them to evolve to body sizes where hopping was no longer

  19. Locomotion in Extinct Giant Kangaroos: Were Sthenurines Hop-Less Monsters?

    PubMed Central

    Janis, Christine M.; Buttrill, Karalyn; Figueirido, Borja

    2014-01-01

    Sthenurine kangaroos (Marsupialia, Diprotodontia, Macropodoidea) were an extinct subfamily within the family Macropodidae (kangaroos and rat-kangaroos). These “short-faced browsers” first appeared in the middle Miocene, and radiated in the Plio-Pleistocene into a diversity of mostly large-bodied forms, more robust than extant forms in their build. The largest (Procoptodon goliah) had an estimated body mass of 240 kg, almost three times the size of the largest living kangaroos, and there is speculation whether a kangaroo of this size would be biomechanically capable of hopping locomotion. Previously described aspects of sthenurine anatomy (specialized forelimbs, rigid lumbar spine) would limit their ability to perform the characteristic kangaroo pentapedal walking (using the tail as a fifth limb), an essential gait at slower speeds as slow hopping is energetically unfeasible. Analysis of limb bone measurements of sthenurines in comparison with extant macropodoids shows a number of anatomical differences, especially in the large species. The scaling of long bone robusticity indicates that sthenurines are following the “normal” allometric trend for macropodoids, while the large extant kangaroos are relatively gracile. Other morphological differences are indicative of adaptations for a novel type of locomotor behavior in sthenurines: they lacked many specialized features for rapid hopping, and they also had anatomy indicative of supporting their body with an upright trunk (e.g., dorsally tipped ischiae), and of supporting their weight on one leg at a time (e.g., larger hips and knees, stabilized ankle joint). We propose that sthenurines adopted a bipedal striding gait (a gait occasionally observed in extant tree-kangaroos): in the smaller and earlier forms, this gait may have been employed as an alternative to pentapedal locomotion at slower speeds, while in the larger Pleistocene forms this gait may have enabled them to evolve to body sizes where hopping was

  20. Electroretinography in the western gray kangaroo (Macropus fuliginosus).

    PubMed

    Labelle, Amber L; Hamor, Ralph E; Narfström, Kristina; Breaux, Carrie B

    2010-09-01

    To perform electroretinography on normal anesthetized western gray kangaroos (Macropus fuliginosus). Animals studied  Six captive western gray kangaroos. The kangaroos were anesthetized using a combination of ketamine and medetomidine via a remote drug delivery system, then were maintained on isoflurane after endotracheal intubation and reversal of the medetomidine with atipamazole. After a minimum of 20 min of dark adaptation, electroretinograms were obtained using a handheld electroretinography (ERG) machine using a single flash protocol at three light intensities: 10 mcd.s/m(2), 3000 mcd.s/m(2), 10 000 mcd.s/m(2). At 10 mcd.s/m(2) the mean b-wave amplitude and implicit time was 102.0 μV (SD ± 41.3 and 95% CI 68.9-135.1) and 78.4 ms (SD ± 8.3 and 95% CI 71.8-85.0). At 3000 mcd.s/m(2) the mean a-wave amplitude and implicit time was 69.9 μV (SD ± 20.5 and 95% CI 53.5-86.3) and 17.6 ms (SD ± 1.5 and 95% CI 16.4-18.8) and the mean b-wave amplitude and implicit time was 175.4 μV (SD ± 35.9 and 95% CI 146.7-204.1) and 74.1 ms (SD ± 3.5 and 95% CI 71.2-76.9). At 10 000 mcd.s/m(2) the mean a-wave amplitude and implicit time was 89.1 μV (SD ± 27.1 and 95% CI 67.5-110.8) and 16.8 ms (SD ± 1.0 and 95% CI 16.0-17.0) and the mean b-wave amplitude and implicit time was 203.7 μV (SD ± 41.4 and 95% CI 170.6-236.8) and 75.4 ms (SD ± 3.3 and 95% CI 72.8-78.1). Electroretinography outside of the typical clinical setting is feasible using a portable ERG system and allows for quick analysis of retinal function in exotic species.

  1. Nurses' adherence to the Kangaroo Care Method: support for nursing care management1

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Laura Johanson; Leite, Josete Luzia; Scochi, Carmen Gracinda Silvan; da Silva, Leila Rangel; da Silva, Thiago Privado

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: construct an explanatory theoretical model about nurses' adherence to the Kangaroo Care Method at the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, based on the meanings and interactions for care management. METHOD: qualitative research, based on the reference framework of the Grounded Theory. Eight nurses were interviewed at a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit in the city of Rio de Janeiro. The comparative analysis of the data comprised the phases of open, axial and selective coding. A theoretical conditional-causal model was constructed. RESULTS: four main categories emerged that composed the analytic paradigm: Giving one's best to the Kangaroo Method; Working with the complexity of the Kangaroo Method; Finding (de)motivation to apply the Kangaroo Method; and Facing the challenges for the adherence to and application of the Kangaroo Method. CONCLUSIONS: the central phenomenon revealed that each nurse and team professional has a role of multiplying values and practices that may or may not be constructive, potentially influencing the (dis)continuity of the Kangaroo Method at the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. The findings can be used to outline management strategies that go beyond the courses and training and guarantee the strengthening of the care model. PMID:26155013

  2. Evaluation of the neonatal outcomes of the kangaroo mother method in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Lamy Filho, Fernando; Silva, Antônio Augusto Moura da; Lamy, Zeni Carvalho; Gomes, Maria Auxiliadora Sousa Mendes; Moreira, Maria Elizabeth Lopes

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the results of the kangaroo mother method in Brazil. A prospective cohort study comparing 16 units that have or do not have the second phase of the kangaroo mother method: eight were national centers of excellence for the kangaroo mother method (study group) and eight were part of the Brazilian Neonatal Research Network (control group). A total of 985 newborn infants with birth weights of 500 to 1,749 g were enrolled. Multivariate analyses employed multiple linear regression and Poisson regression with robust adjustment. The adjusted analysis (controlled for birth weight, gestational age, Score for Neonatal Acute Physiology Perinatal Extension II, Neonatal Therapeutic Intervention Scoring System, and maternal age and educational level) demonstrated that mean length of hospital stay (p = 0.14) and intercurrent clinical conditions in the intermediate or kangaroo unit were equal for both groups. Weight (p = 0.012), length (p = 0.039) and head circumference (p = 0.006) at 36 weeks' corrected gestational age were all lower at the kangaroo units. The kangaroo units exhibited superior performance in relation to exclusive breastfeeding at discharge (69.2 vs. 23.8%, p = 0.022). The evidence suggests that the humanization strategy adopted by the Brazilian Ministry of Health is a safe alternative to conventional treatment and a good strategy for promoting breastfeeding.

  3. Evaluation of kangaroo pericardium as an alternative substitute for reconstructive cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Neethling, W M L; Cooper, S; Van Den Heever, J J; Hough, J; Hodge, A J

    2002-06-01

    Bioprosthetic materials (human, bovine and porcine) are used in various cardio-thoracic repair and replacement procedures because of excellent performance and low thrombogenicity. These bioprosthetic substitutes fail due to degeneration and calcification. This study examines the morphology, tensile properties and calcification potential of kangaroo pericardium in vitro and in vivo. Bovine (control tissue) and kangaroo pericardium, fixed in 0.625% buffered glutaraldehyde, were examined by light and scanning electron microscopy. A standard method was used for biaxial testing. Pericardial strips (10 x 5 mm) were implanted subcutaneously into male Wistar rats and retrieved after 4, 6 and 8 weeks and examined by Von Kossa's stain technique and atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Histology revealed serosa and fibrosa cell layers in both tissues. Electron microscopy showed a densely arranged collagen matrix in kangaroo pericardium. Kangaroo pericardium calcified significantly less than bovine pericardium at 4 weeks (0.80+/-0.28 versus 21.60+/-4.80 microg/mg) at 6 weeks (0.48+/-0.08 versus 32.80+/-14.4 microg/mg) and at 8 weeks (2.40+/-1.20 versus 30.40+/-17.20 microg/mg), respectively. Kangaroo pericardium has a densely arranged collagen matrix with a higher extensibility and significantly lower calcification potential. Therefore, kangaroo pericardium could be used as an alternative substitute in cardiac surgery because of its low calcification potential.

  4. Merriam's kangaroo rats (Dipodomys merriami) voluntarily select temperatures that conserve energy rather than water.

    PubMed

    Banta, Marilyn R

    2003-01-01

    Desert endotherms such as Merriam's kangaroo rat (Dipodomys merriami) use both behavioral and physiological means to conserve energy and water. The energy and water needs of kangaroo rats are affected by their thermal environment. Animals that choose temperatures within their thermoneutral zone (TNZ) minimize energy expenditure but may impair water balance because the ratio of water loss to water gain is high. At temperatures below the TNZ, water balance may be improved because animals generate more oxidative water and reduce evaporative water loss; however, they must also increase energy expenditure to maintain a normal body temperature. Hence, it is not possible for kangaroo rats to choose thermal environments that simultaneously minimize energy expenditure and increase water conservation. I used a thermal gradient to test whether water stress, energy stress, simultaneous water and energy stress, or no water/energy stress affected the thermal environment selected by D. merriami. During the night (i.e., active phase), animals in all four treatments chose temperatures near the bottom of their TNZ. During the day (i.e., inactive phase), animals in all four treatments settled at temperatures near the top of their TNZ. Thus, kangaroo rats chose thermal environments that minimized energy requirements, not water requirements. Because kangaroo rats have evolved high water use efficiency, energy conservation may be more important than water conservation to the fitness of extant kangaroo rats.

  5. Glutaraldehyde-fixed kangaroo aortic wall tissue: histology, crosslink stability and calcification potential.

    PubMed

    Neethling, W M L; Hodge, A J; Glancy, R

    2003-07-15

    Stentless aortic heart valve substitutes, manufactured from biological tissues, are fixed with glutaraldehyde to cross-link collagen, reduce antigenicity, and sterilize the tissue. Despite improved cross linking, reduced antigenicity, and various anticalcification measures, the aortic wall tissue present in these prostheses tends to calcify. The aim of this study was to assess the morphology, collagen cross-link stability, and calcification potential of glutaraldehyde-preserved kangaroo aortic wall tissue as opposed to porcine aortic wall tissue. Porcine and kangaroo aortic wall tissues were fixed in 0.625% buffered glutaraldehyde. Histology and cross-link stability were examined. Calcification potential was determined in the subcutaneous rat model. Kangaroo aortic wall tissue was significantly (p < 0.01) less calcified than porcine aortic wall tissue (26.67 +/- 6.53 versus 41.959 +/- 2.75 microg/mg tissue) at 8 weeks. In conclusion, the histological differences between kangaroo and porcine aortic wall tissue correlate well with the reduced calcification potential of kangaroo aortic wall tissue. The reduced calcification potential could result in improved long-term durability of stentless kangaroo heart valves as bioprostheses. Copyright 2003 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater 66B: 356-363, 2003

  6. State of the art and recommendations. Kangaroo mother care: application in a high-tech environment.

    PubMed

    Nyqvist, K H; Anderson, G C; Bergman, N; Cattaneo, A; Charpak, N; Davanzo, R; Ewald, U; Ludington-Hoe, S; Mendoza, S; Pallás-Allonso, C; Peláez, J G; Sizun, J; Widström, A-M

    2010-06-01

    Since Kangaroo Mother Care (KMC) was developed in Colombia in the 1970s, two trends in clinical application emerged. In low income settings, the original KMC model is implemented. This consists of continuous (24 h/day, 7 days/week) and prolonged mother/parent-infant skin-to-skin contact; early discharge with the infant in the kangaroo position; (ideally) exclusive breastfeeding; and, adequate follow-up. In affluent settings, intermittent KMC with sessions of one or a few hours skin-to-skin contact for a limited period is common. As a result of the increasing evidence of the benefits of KMC for both infants and families in all intensive care settings, KMC in a high-tech environment was chosen as the topic for the first European Conference on KMC, and the clinical implementation of the KMC model in all types of settings was discussed at the 7th International Workshop on KMC. Kangaroo Mother Care protocols in high-tech Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICU) should specify criteria for initiation, kangaroo position, transfer to/from KMC, transport in kangaroo position, kangaroo nutrition, parents' role, modification of the NICU environment, performance of care in KMC, and KMC in case of infant instability. Implementation of the original KMC method, with continuous skin-to-skin contact whenever possible, is recommended for application in high-tech environments, although scientific evaluation should continue.

  7. The effect of kangaroo care on neurodevelopmental outcomes in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Head, Lauren M

    2014-01-01

    Preterm birth is associated with long-term deficits in executive functioning and cognitive performance. As advances in neonatal care enable more preterm infants to survive, development of strategies to address high rates of neurodevelopmental disabilities and poor academic achievement in preterm infants are crucial. Evidence suggests that infants' brains are plastic in nature and, therefore, can be shaped by the environment. Kangaroo care has become popularized as a means of modifying the stress of the NICU environment. However, few studies have examined whether kangaroo care affects neurodevelopmental outcomes in preterm infants. This review examined available literature that investigated the effect of kangaroo care on cognition in preterm infants. Current evidence suggests that short-term benefits of kangaroo care are associated with improved neurodevelopment. However, few studies have examined the long-term impact of kangaroo care on cognitive outcomes in preterm infants. To address neurological disparities in children born preterm, research using kangaroo care as a strategy to improve neurodevelopment in preterm infants is warranted.

  8. Nurses' adherence to the Kangaroo Care Method: support for nursing care management.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Laura Johanson; Leite, Josete Luzia; Scochi, Carmen Gracinda Silvan; da Silva, Leila Rangel; da Silva, Thiago Privado

    2015-01-01

    construct an explanatory theoretical model about nurses' adherence to the Kangaroo Care Method at the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, based on the meanings and interactions for care management. qualitative research, based on the reference framework of the Grounded Theory. Eight nurses were interviewed at a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit in the city of Rio de Janeiro. The comparative analysis of the data comprised the phases of open, axial and selective coding. A theoretical conditional-causal model was constructed. four main categories emerged that composed the analytic paradigm: Giving one's best to the Kangaroo Method; Working with the complexity of the Kangaroo Method; Finding (de)motivation to apply the Kangaroo Method; and Facing the challenges for the adherence to and application of the Kangaroo Method. the central phenomenon revealed that each nurse and team professional has a role of multiplying values and practices that may or may not be constructive, potentially influencing the (dis)continuity of the Kangaroo Method at the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. The findings can be used to outline management strategies that go beyond the courses and training and guarantee the strengthening of the care model.

  9. [Humane care for low-weight newborns (kangaroo mother method): mother's perceptions].

    PubMed

    Neves, Priscila Nicoletti; Ravelli, Ana Paula Xavier; Lemos, Juliana Regina Dias

    2010-03-01

    Breastfeeding is one of the key practices which promote health, being associated with a reduction of diseases and mortality in childhood. Thus, from the course conclusive work, the present article was structured, which aimed to recognize the perceptions of mothers in the face of the use of the mother kangaroo method. With a qualitative, descriptive and field approach, it was held at the Philanthropic Hospital of Ponta Grossa, Paraná, Brazil, by the months of August to October 2006, in which six mothers were included in the kangaroo mother method during the admission of the baby. For the gathering, semi-structured interviews were made and data were analyzed by the content analysis. This article analyzed two categories, maternal experience with the mother kangaroo method, with the subcategories: mother kangaroo method and maternal breastfeeding and experiences at the kangaroo practice; and knowing the kangaroo method. As a conclusion, nursing plays an essential role in the insertion of the family to the method, from the provided cares.

  10. Considerations for implementation of a neonatal kangaroo care protocol.

    PubMed

    DiMenna, Lisa

    2006-01-01

    Kangaroo care (KC) is skin-to-skin contact between an infant and parent, where the infant is usually held chest-to-chest in an upright prone position. It is a very simple, beneficial developmental intervention for both baby and parent, as demonstrated in the literature, but many parents and health care professionals are not aware of KC, its benefits, or how to perform it. The purpose of this article is (1) to inform health care professionals about the research literature on KC and its benefits and (2) to develop a list of evidence-based KC guidelines for the use of all infants and their parents. Increased knowledge of and education on KC for healthcare providers should lead to increased, routine use of this beneficial intervention.

  11. Virtopsy in a red kangaroo with oral osteomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ki-Ja; Sasaki, Motoki; Miyauchi, Aki; Kishimoto, Miori; Shimizu, Junichiro; Iwasaki, Toshiroh; Miyake, Yoh-Ichi; Yamada, Kazutaka

    2011-03-01

    This report describes the use of computed tomography (CT) in a nondomestic species. Postmortem CT was performed on a red kangaroo (Macropus rufus) and a diagnosis of oral osteomyelitis was made. CT examination revealed bony remodeling of the right mandible, an intraosseous lesion of the right temporal bone, muscle necrosis around the right mandible, and the absence of the right, first, upper molar tooth. Cardiac and intrahepatic gas and a distended intestine due to postmortem gas accumulation were also seen. All the lesions identified with CT were also identified by conventional necropsy, except the cardiac and intrahepatic gases. Virtopsy may be a useful procedure for the noninvasive identification of cause of death and as a guide for necropsy in animals.

  12. Boundary-layer turbulence as a kangaroo process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekker, H.; de Leeuw, G.; Maassen van den Brink, A.

    1995-09-01

    A nonlocal mixing-length theory of turbulence transport by finite size eddies is developed by means of a novel evaluation of the Reynolds stress. The analysis involves the contruct of a sample path space and a stochastic closure hypothesis. The simplifying property of exhange (strong eddies) is satisfied by an analytical sampling rate model. A nonlinear scaling relation maps the path space onto the semi-infinite boundary layer. The underlying near-wall behavior of fluctuating velocities perfectly agrees with recent direct numerical simulations. The resulting integro-differential equation for the mixing of scalar densities represents fully developed boundary-layer turbulence as a nondiffusive (Kubo-Anderson or kangaroo) type of stochastic process. The model involves a scaling exponent ɛ (with ɛ-->∞ in the diffusion limit). For the (partly analytical) solution for the mean velocity profile, excellent agreement with the experimental data yields ɛ~=0.58.

  13. Calcium carbonate obstructive urolithiasis in a red kangaroo (Macropus rufus).

    PubMed

    Lindemann, Dana M; Gamble, Kathryn C; Corner, Sarah

    2013-03-01

    A 6-yr-old male red kangaroo (Macropus rufus) presented for a history of inappetance, abnormal behavior, and unconfirmed elimination for 6 hr prior to presentation. Based on abdominal ultrasound, abdominocentesis, and cystocentesis, a presumptive diagnosis of urinary tract obstruction with uroabdomen and hydronephrosis was reached. Abdominal radiographs did not assist in reaching an antemortem diagnosis. Postmortem examination confirmed a urinary bladder rupture secondary to urethral obstruction by a single urethrolith. Bilateral hydronephrosis and hydroureter were identified and determined to be a result of bilateral ureteroliths. Urolith analysis revealed a composition of 100% calcium carbonate. A dietary analysis was performed, implicating an increased Ca:P ratio from a food preparation miscommunication as a contributing factor. Appropriate husbandry changes were made, and mob surveillance procedures were performed, which resolved the urolithiasis risk for the remaining five animals.

  14. Kangaroo care for the preterm infant and family.

    PubMed

    Jefferies, Ann L

    2012-03-01

    Kangaroo care (KC) is the practice of skin-to-skin contact between infant and parent. In developing countries, KC for low-birthweight infants has been shown to reduce mortality, severe illness, infection and length of hospital stay. KC is also beneficial for preterm infants in high-income countries. Cardiorespiratory and temperature stability, sleep organization and duration of quiet sleep, neurodevelopmental outcomes, breastfeeding and modulation of pain responses appear to be improved for preterm infants who have received KC during their hospital stay. No detrimental effects on physiological stability have been demonstrated for infants as young as 26 weeks' gestational age, including those on assisted ventilation. Mothers show enhanced attachment behaviours and describe an increased sense of their role as a mother. The practice of KC should be encouraged in nurseries that care for preterm infants. Information is available to assist in developing guidelines and protocols.

  15. Spatial requirements of free-ranging Huon tree kangaroos, Dendrolagus matschiei (Macropodidae), in upper montane forest.

    PubMed

    Porolak, Gabriel; Dabek, Lisa; Krockenberger, Andrew K

    2014-01-01

    Tree kangaroos (Macropodidae, Dendrolagus) are some of Australasia's least known mammals. However, there is sufficient evidence of population decline and local extinctions that all New Guinea tree kangaroos are considered threatened. Understanding spatial requirements is important in conservation and management. Expectations from studies of Australian tree kangaroos and other rainforest macropodids suggest that tree kangaroos should have small discrete home ranges with the potential for high population densities, but there are no published estimates of spatial requirements of any New Guinea tree kangaroo species. Home ranges of 15 Huon tree kangaroos, Dendrolagus matschiei, were measured in upper montane forest on the Huon Peninsula, Papua New Guinea. The home range area was an average of 139.6±26.5 ha (100% MCP; n = 15) or 81.8±28.3 ha (90% harmonic mean; n = 15), and did not differ between males and females. Home ranges of D. matschiei were 40-100 times larger than those of Australian tree kangaroos or other rainforest macropods, possibly due to the impact of hunting reducing density, or low productivity of their high altitude habitat. Huon tree kangaroos had cores of activity within their range at 45% (20.9±4.1 ha) and 70% (36.6±7.5 ha) harmonic mean isopleths, with little overlap (4.8±2.9%; n = 15 pairs) between neighbouring females at the 45% isopleth, but, unlike the Australian species, extensive overlap between females (20.8±5.5%; n = 15 pairs) at the complete range (90% harmonic mean). Males overlapped each other and females to a greater extent than did pairs of females. From core areas and overlap, the density of female D. matschiei was one per 19.4 ha. Understanding the cause of this low density is crucial in gaining greater understanding of variations in density of tree kangaroos across the landscape. We consider the potential role of habitat fragmentation, productivity and hunting pressure in limiting tree kangaroo density in New

  16. Spatial Requirements of Free-Ranging Huon Tree Kangaroos, Dendrolagus matschiei (Macropodidae), in Upper Montane Forest

    PubMed Central

    Porolak, Gabriel; Dabek, Lisa; Krockenberger, Andrew K.

    2014-01-01

    Tree kangaroos (Macropodidae, Dendrolagus) are some of Australasia's least known mammals. However, there is sufficient evidence of population decline and local extinctions that all New Guinea tree kangaroos are considered threatened. Understanding spatial requirements is important in conservation and management. Expectations from studies of Australian tree kangaroos and other rainforest macropodids suggest that tree kangaroos should have small discrete home ranges with the potential for high population densities, but there are no published estimates of spatial requirements of any New Guinea tree kangaroo species. Home ranges of 15 Huon tree kangaroos, Dendrolagus matschiei, were measured in upper montane forest on the Huon Peninsula, Papua New Guinea. The home range area was an average of 139.6±26.5 ha (100% MCP; n = 15) or 81.8±28.3 ha (90% harmonic mean; n = 15), and did not differ between males and females. Home ranges of D. matschiei were 40–100 times larger than those of Australian tree kangaroos or other rainforest macropods, possibly due to the impact of hunting reducing density, or low productivity of their high altitude habitat. Huon tree kangaroos had cores of activity within their range at 45% (20.9±4.1 ha) and 70% (36.6±7.5 ha) harmonic mean isopleths, with little overlap (4.8±2.9%; n = 15 pairs) between neighbouring females at the 45% isopleth, but, unlike the Australian species, extensive overlap between females (20.8±5.5%; n = 15 pairs) at the complete range (90% harmonic mean). Males overlapped each other and females to a greater extent than did pairs of females. From core areas and overlap, the density of female D. matschiei was one per 19.4 ha. Understanding the cause of this low density is crucial in gaining greater understanding of variations in density of tree kangaroos across the landscape. We consider the potential role of habitat fragmentation, productivity and hunting pressure in limiting tree kangaroo density in New

  17. Positive interactions between desert granivores: localized facilitation of harvester ants by kangaroo rats.

    PubMed

    Edelman, Andrew J

    2012-01-01

    Facilitation, when one species enhances the environment or performance of another species, can be highly localized in space. While facilitation in plant communities has been intensely studied, the role of facilitation in shaping animal communities is less well understood. In the Chihuahuan Desert, both kangaroo rats and harvester ants depend on the abundant seeds of annual plants. Kangaroo rats, however, are hypothesized to facilitate harvester ants through soil disturbance and selective seed predation rather than competing with them. I used a spatially explicit approach to examine whether a positive or negative interaction exists between banner-tailed kangaroo rat (Dipodomys spectabilis) mounds and rough harvester ant (Pogonomyrmex rugosus) colonies. The presence of a scale-dependent interaction between mounds and colonies was tested by comparing fitted spatial point process models with and without interspecific effects. Also, the effect of proximity to a mound on colony mortality and spatial patterns of surviving colonies was examined. The spatial pattern of kangaroo rat mounds and harvester ant colonies was consistent with a positive interspecific interaction at small scales (<10 m). Mortality risk of vulnerable, recently founded harvester ant colonies was lower when located close to a kangaroo rat mound and proximity to a mound partly predicted the spatial pattern of surviving colonies. My findings support localized facilitation of harvester ants by kangaroo rats, likely mediated through ecosystem engineering and foraging effects on plant cover and composition. The scale-dependent effect of kangaroo rats on abiotic and biotic factors appears to result in greater founding and survivorship of young colonies near mounds. These results suggest that soil disturbance and foraging by rodents can have subtle impacts on the distribution and demography of other species.

  18. Electromyographic activity of preterm newborns in the kangaroo position: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Rafael Moura; Cabral Filho, José Eulálio; Diniz, Kaísa Trovão; Souza Lima, Geisy Maria; Vasconcelos, Danilo de Almeida

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare the electromyographic activity of preterm newborns placed in the kangaroo position with the activity of newborns not placed in this position. Design A cohort study. Setting A Kangaroo Unit sector and a Nursery sector in a secondary and tertiary care at a mother-child hospital in Recife, Brazil. Participants Preterm infants of gestational age 27–34 weeks (n=38) and term infants (n=39). Primary and secondary outcome measures Surface electromyography was used to investigate muscle activity in the brachial biceps at rest. 3 groups were designed: (1) preterm newborns in the kangaroo position (PT-KAN), where the newborn remains in a vertical position, lying face down, with limbs flexed, dressed in light clothes, maintaining skin-to-skin contact with the adult's thorax. Her electromyographic activity was recorded at 0 h (immediately before starting this position), and then at 48 h after the beginning of the position (but newborns were kept in the kangaroo position for 8–12 h per day) and at term equivalent age (40±1 weeks); (2) preterm newborns not in the kangaroo position (PT-NKAN), in which measurements were made at 0 h and 48 h; and (3) term newborns (T), in which measurements were made at 24 h of chronological age. Results The Root Mean Square (RMS) values showed significant differences among groups (F(5,108)=56.69; p<0.001). The multiple comparisons showed that RMS was greater at 48 h compared to 0 h in the preterm group in the kangaroo position, but not in the group not submitted in the kangaroo position. The RMS in the term equivalent aged group in the kangaroo position was also greater when compared with those in the term group. Conclusions The kangaroo position increases electromyographic activity in the brachial biceps of preterm newborns and those who have reached the age equivalent to term. PMID:25351598

  19. Electromyographic activity of preterm newborns in the kangaroo position: a cohort study.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Rafael Moura; Cabral Filho, José Eulálio; Diniz, Kaísa Trovão; Souza Lima, Geisy Maria; Vasconcelos, Danilo de Almeida

    2014-10-28

    To compare the electromyographic activity of preterm newborns placed in the kangaroo position with the activity of newborns not placed in this position. A cohort study. A Kangaroo Unit sector and a Nursery sector in a secondary and tertiary care at a mother-child hospital in Recife, Brazil. Preterm infants of gestational age 27-34 weeks (n=38) and term infants (n=39). Surface electromyography was used to investigate muscle activity in the brachial biceps at rest. 3 groups were designed: (1) preterm newborns in the kangaroo position (PT-KAN), where the newborn remains in a vertical position, lying face down, with limbs flexed, dressed in light clothes, maintaining skin-to-skin contact with the adult's thorax. Her electromyographic activity was recorded at 0 h (immediately before starting this position), and then at 48 h after the beginning of the position (but newborns were kept in the kangaroo position for 8-12 h per day) and at term equivalent age (40±1 weeks); (2) preterm newborns not in the kangaroo position (PT-NKAN), in which measurements were made at 0 h and 48 h; and (3) term newborns (T), in which measurements were made at 24 h of chronological age. The Root Mean Square (RMS) values showed significant differences among groups (F(5,108)=56.69; p<0.001). The multiple comparisons showed that RMS was greater at 48 h compared to 0 h in the preterm group in the kangaroo position, but not in the group not submitted in the kangaroo position. The RMS in the term equivalent aged group in the kangaroo position was also greater when compared with those in the term group. The kangaroo position increases electromyographic activity in the brachial biceps of preterm newborns and those who have reached the age equivalent to term. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  20. Botfly (Diptera:Oestridae) parasitism of Ord's kangaroo rats (Dipodomys ordii) at Suffield National Wildlife Area, Alberta, Canada.

    PubMed

    Gummer, D L; Forbes, M R; Bender, D J; Barclay, R M

    1997-08-01

    During field study of Ord's kangaroo rat (Dipodomys ordii) at Suffield National Wildlife Area, Alberta, Canada, a high prevalence of parasitism by botfly (Diptera: Oestridae) larvae was observed. Botflies have not previously been documented as parasites of kangaroo rats. Botfly parasitism could have a significant impact on the growth, survival, and reproduction of Ord's kangaroo rat, which is considered a vulnerable species in Canada. Therefore, it is important to investigate how botfly parasitism varies with season and with gender or age of host. In 1995, 525 individual kangaroo rats were caught by nightlighting and live trapping for a total of 952 capture records. Upon capture, each kangaroo rat was ear-tagged and thoroughly examined for parasites and wounds. Third-instar botfly (Cuterebra polita) larvae were observed in kangaroo rats between 16 June and 23 August. Prevalence was 34% based on 454 kangaroo rats sampled during that time, whereas the mean intensity was 2.3 larvae per infested host (n = 156, range = 1-11). In contrast to some other studies of botfly parasitism of rodents, there were no gender or age biases in either prevalence or intensity of infestation. The index of dispersion was 2.8, indicating that the parasites were aggregated in hosts. Botfly parasitism could be an important factor affecting northern populations of kangaroo rats; future investigations into the potential effects of botfly larvae on host fitness are warranted.

  1. Food caching and differential cache pilferage: a field study of coexistence of sympatric kangaroo rats and pocket mice.

    PubMed

    Leaver, Lisa A; Daly, Martin

    2001-08-01

    Ecologists studying sympatric heteromyid rodents have sought evidence for species differences in primary foraging abilities and preferences and/or behavioural responses to predation risk in order to explain coexistence. The present field study was conducted to test the hypothesis that another factor may be involved, namely differences in caching patterns, which may result in differences in vulnerability to pilferage. We examined differences between kangaroo rats (Dipodomys merriami) and pocket mice (Chaetodipus spp.) in foraging, caching and pilferage behaviour. Specifically, we examined interactions at food patches, differential food caching patterns, and differential vulnerability to cache pilferage. Observations conducted at artificial seed patches showed that kangaroo rats dominated access to the patches by arriving and foraging first and by chasing pocket mice away. Individually provisioned pocket mice stored most seeds in underground burrows (larder hoarding), whereas kangaroo rats predominantly cached seeds in small, spatially dispersed caches in shallow pits in the surface of the sand (scatter hoarding). Pocket mice pilfered from each other as well as from the kangaroo rats, but the kangaroo rats rarely pilfered, and the only instance was from another kangaroo rat. Kangaroo rats and pocket mice were both vulnerable to cache pilferage. The results suggest that coexistence of kangaroo rats and pocket mice may be facilitated by a trade-off between primary harvest ability and the ability to exploit a resource that has been processed by another species, namely pilferage ability.

  2. Decreasing methane yield with increasing food intake keeps daily methane emissions constant in two foregut fermenting marsupials, the western grey kangaroo and red kangaroo.

    PubMed

    Vendl, Catharina; Clauss, Marcus; Stewart, Mathew; Leggett, Keith; Hummel, Jürgen; Kreuzer, Michael; Munn, Adam

    2015-11-01

    Fundamental differences in methane (CH4) production between macropods (kangaroos) and ruminants have been suggested and linked to differences in the composition of the forestomach microbiome. Using six western grey kangaroos (Macropus fuliginosus) and four red kangaroos (Macropus rufus), we measured daily absolute CH4 production in vivo as well as CH4 yield (CH4 per unit of intake of dry matter, gross energy or digestible fibre) by open-circuit respirometry. Two food intake levels were tested using a chopped lucerne hay (alfalfa) diet. Body mass-specific absolute CH4 production resembled values previously reported in wallabies and non-ruminant herbivores such as horses, and did not differ with food intake level, although there was no concomitant proportionate decrease in fibre digestibility with higher food intake. In contrast, CH4 yield decreased with increasing intake, and was intermediate between values reported for ruminants and non-ruminant herbivores. These results correspond to those in ruminants and other non-ruminant species where increased intake (and hence a shorter digesta retention in the gut) leads to a lower CH4 yield. We hypothesize that rather than harbouring a fundamentally different microbiome in their foregut, the microbiome of macropods is in a particular metabolic state more tuned towards growth (i.e. biomass production) rather than CH4 production. This is due to the short digesta retention time in macropods and the known distinct 'digesta washing' in the gut of macropods, where fluids move faster than particles and hence most likely wash out microbes from the forestomach. Although our data suggest that kangaroos only produce about 27% of the body mass-specific volume of CH4 of ruminants, it remains to be modelled with species-specific growth rates and production conditions whether or not significantly lower CH4 amounts are emitted per kg of meat in kangaroo than in beef or mutton production. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  3. Draft De Novo Transcriptome of the Rat Kangaroo Potorous tridactylus as a Tool for Cell Biology

    PubMed Central

    Udy, Dylan B.; Voorhies, Mark; Chan, Patricia P.; Lowe, Todd M.; Dumont, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    The rat kangaroo (long-nosed potoroo, Potorous tridactylus) is a marsupial native to Australia. Cultured rat kangaroo kidney epithelial cells (PtK) are commonly used to study cell biological processes. These mammalian cells are large, adherent, and flat, and contain large and few chromosomes—and are thus ideal for imaging intra-cellular dynamics such as those of mitosis. Despite this, neither the rat kangaroo genome nor transcriptome have been sequenced, creating a challenge for probing the molecular basis of these cellular dynamics. Here, we present the sequencing, assembly and annotation of the draft rat kangaroo de novo transcriptome. We sequenced 679 million reads that mapped to 347,323 Trinity transcripts and 20,079 Unigenes. We present statistics emerging from transcriptome-wide analyses, and analyses suggesting that the transcriptome covers full-length sequences of most genes, many with multiple isoforms. We also validate our findings with a proof-of-concept gene knockdown experiment. We expect that this high quality transcriptome will make rat kangaroo cells a more tractable system for linking molecular-scale function and cellular-scale dynamics. PMID:26252667

  4. Kangaroo versus porcine aortic valve tissue--valve geometry morphology, tensile strength and calcification potential.

    PubMed

    Neethling, W M; Papadimitriou, J M; Swarts, E; Hodge, A J

    2000-06-01

    Valve related factors and patient related factors are responsible for calcification of valvular bioprostheses. Recent studies showed different donor and recipient species have different influences on the total calcification rate of bioprostheses. This study was performed to evaluate and compare Kangaroo aortic valve leaflets with porcine aortic valve leaflets. Experimental design. Prospective study. Setting. Cardio-thoracic experimental research of a university department. Glutaraldehyde-fixed Kangaroo and porcine valve leaflets were evaluated in vitro according to valve geometry (internal diameter and leaflet thickness), morphology (light and electron microscopy) and tensile strength. In vivo evaluation consisted of implantation in a rat model for 8 weeks, Von Kossa stain for calcium and atomic absorption spectrophotometry for total extractable calcium content. Kangaroo valves indicated a smaller internal valve diameter as well as a thinner valve leaflet (p<0.01, ANOVA) at corresponding body weight, less proteoglycan spicules in the fibrosa, increased elasticity (p<0.05) and low calcification potential (p<0.01, confidence interval 95%). Kangaroo aortic valve leaflets have different valvular qualities compared to porcine valve tissue. Kangaroo valve leaflets are significantly superior to porcine valve leaflets as far as calcification is concerned. These results are encouraging and suggest further in vivo evaluation in a larger animal model before clinical application can be considered.

  5. Draft De Novo Transcriptome of the Rat Kangaroo Potorous tridactylus as a Tool for Cell Biology.

    PubMed

    Udy, Dylan B; Voorhies, Mark; Chan, Patricia P; Lowe, Todd M; Dumont, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    The rat kangaroo (long-nosed potoroo, Potorous tridactylus) is a marsupial native to Australia. Cultured rat kangaroo kidney epithelial cells (PtK) are commonly used to study cell biological processes. These mammalian cells are large, adherent, and flat, and contain large and few chromosomes-and are thus ideal for imaging intra-cellular dynamics such as those of mitosis. Despite this, neither the rat kangaroo genome nor transcriptome have been sequenced, creating a challenge for probing the molecular basis of these cellular dynamics. Here, we present the sequencing, assembly and annotation of the draft rat kangaroo de novo transcriptome. We sequenced 679 million reads that mapped to 347,323 Trinity transcripts and 20,079 Unigenes. We present statistics emerging from transcriptome-wide analyses, and analyses suggesting that the transcriptome covers full-length sequences of most genes, many with multiple isoforms. We also validate our findings with a proof-of-concept gene knockdown experiment. We expect that this high quality transcriptome will make rat kangaroo cells a more tractable system for linking molecular-scale function and cellular-scale dynamics.

  6. Effects of kangaroo rat exclusion on vegetation structure and plant species diversity in the Chihuahuan Desert.

    PubMed

    Heske, Edward J; Brown, James H; Guo, Qinfeng

    1993-10-01

    Long-term (1977-90) experimental exclusion of three species of kangaroo rats from study plots in the Chihuahuan Desert resulted in significant increases in abundance of a tall annual grass (Aristida adscensionis) and a perennial bunch grass (Eragrostis lehmanniana). This change in the vegetative cover affected use of these plots by several other rodent species and by foraging birds. The mechanism producing this change probably involves a combination of decreased soil disturbance and reduced predation on large-sized seeds when kangaroo rats are absent. Species diversity of summer annual dicots was greater on plots where kangaroo rats were present, as predicted by keystone predator models. However, it is not clear whether this was caused directly by activities of the kangaroo rats or indirectly as a consequence of the increase in grass cover. No experimental effect on species diversity of winter annual dicots was detected. Our study site was located in a natural transition between desert scrub and grassland, where abiotic conditions and the effects of organisms may be particularly influential in determining the structure and composition of vegetation. Under these conditions kangaroo rats have a dramatic effect on plant cover and species composition.

  7. Natural space-use patterns and hippocampal size in kangaroo rats.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, L F; Spencer, W D

    1994-01-01

    The size of the hippocampus, a forebrain structure that processes spatial information, correlates with the need to relocate food caches by passerine birds and with sex-specific patterns of space use in microtine rodents. The influences on hippocampal anatomy of sexual selection within species, and natural selection between species, have not yet been studied in concert, however. Here we report that natural space-use patterns predict hippocampal size within and between two species of kangaroo rats (Dipodomys). Differences in foraging behavior suggest that Merriam's kangaroo rats (D. merriami) require better spatial abilities than bannertail kangaroo rats (D. spectabilis). Sex-specific differences in mating strategy suggest that males of both species require more spatial ability than females. As predicted, hippocampal size (relative to brain size) is larger in Merriam's than in bannertail kangaroo rats, and males have larger hippocampi than females in both species. Males of a third species (D. ordii) also have smaller hippocampi than Merriam's kangaroo rat males, despite being similar to Merriam's in brain and body size. These results suggest that both natural and sexual selection affect the relative size and perhaps function of mammalian hippocampi. They also reassert that measures of functional subunits of the brain reveal more about brain evolution than measures of total brain size.

  8. Diagnosis and treatment of mesenteric volvulus in a red kangaroo (Macropus rufus).

    PubMed

    Knafo, S Emmanuelle; Rosenblatt, Alana J; Morrisey, James K; Flanders, James A; Thompson, Margret S; Knapp-Hoch, Heather M

    2014-04-01

    An 8-year-old male red kangaroo (Macropus rufus) was evaluated with a 2-week history of vomiting and anorexia. Four days prior, the patient became refractory to medical management. The kangaroo was admitted for diagnostic testing and treatment including whole body CT, blood work, and emergency laparotomy. CT findings of a severely enlarged stomach, splenic displacement, and a whirl sign were indicative of mesenteric volvulus with gastric dilatation-volvulus (GDV). Contrast enhancement of abdominal viscera suggested intact arterial blood supply; however, compression of the caudal vena cava and portal vein indicated venous obstruction. Results of preoperative blood work suggested biliary stasis without evidence of inflammation. Additionally, a tooth root abscess was diagnosed on the basis of results of CT. Exploratory laparotomy confirmed the diagnosis of mesenteric volvulus and GDV. The volvuli were corrected by clockwise derotation, and a gastropexy was performed. Tissue samples were obtained from the spleen and liver for evaluation. The kangaroo recovered from surgery, and the abscessed tooth was extracted 6 days later. Eight days after initial evaluation, the kangaroo was discharged. In the present report, the CT whirl sign was used to diagnose volvulus of the abdominal viscera, which suggests that this diagnostic indicator has utility in veterinary patients. Mesenteric volvulus with GDV was successfully treated in a nondomestic species. The tooth root abscess, a common condition in macropods, may explain the historic episodes of anorexia reported by the owner and may have contributed to the development of mesenteric volvulus and GDV in this kangaroo.

  9. Observation of a novel Babesia spp. in Eastern Grey Kangaroos (Macropus giganteus) in Australia

    PubMed Central

    Dawood, Kaiser E.; Morgan, Jess A.T.; Busfield, Frances; Srivastava, Mukesh; Fletcher, Taryn I.; Sambono, Jacqueline; Jackson, Louise A.; Venus, Bronwyn; Philbey, Adrian W.; Lew-Tabor, Ala E.

    2012-01-01

    The roles and epidemiological features of tick-borne protozoans are not well elicited in wildlife. Babesia spp. are documented in many domestic animals, including cattle, horses, pigs, dogs and cats. Three cases affecting eastern grey kangaroos are described. The kangaroos exhibited neurological signs, depression and marked anaemia, and microscopic examination of blood smears revealed intraerythrocytic piroplasms. One to seven intraerythrocytic spherical, oval, pyriform and irregularly-shaped parasites consistent with Babesia spp. were seen in the blood smears and the percentage of infected erythrocytes was estimated to be approximately 7% in each case. Data suggest that the tick vector for this kangaroo Babesia sp. is a Haemaphysalis species. For Case 2, ultrastructural examination of the erythrocytes of the renal capillaries showed parasites resembling Babesia spp. and 18 of 33 erythrocytes were infected. DNA sequencing of the amplified 18S rDNA confirmed that the observed intraerythrocytic piroplasms belong to the genus Babesia. The phylogenetic position of this new kangaroo Babesia sp. (de novo Babesia macropus), as a sister species to the new Australian woylie Babesia sp., suggests a close affinity to the described Afro–Eurasian species Babesia orientalis and Babesia occultans suggesting perhaps a common ancestor for the Babesia in kangaroos. PMID:24533316

  10. Multi-proxy monitoring approaches at Kangaroo Island, South Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, Bronwyn; Drysdale, Russell; Tyler, Jonathan; Goodwin, Ian

    2017-04-01

    Interpretations of geochemical signals preserved in young speleothems are greatly enhanced by comprehensive cave-site monitoring. In the light of this, a cave monitoring project is being conducted concurrently with the development of a new palaeoclimate record from Kelly Hill Cave (Kangaroo Island, South Australia). The site is strategically located because it is situated between longer-lived monitoring sites in southeastern and southwestern Australia, as well as being climatically 'upstream' from major population and agricultural centres. This study aims to understand possible controls on speleothem δ18O in Kelly Hill Cave through i. identification of local and regional δ18O drivers in precipitation; and ii. preservation and modification of climatic signals within the epikarst as indicated by dripwater δ18O. These aims are achieved through analysis of a five-year daily rainfall (amount and δ18O) dataset in conjunction with in-cave drip monitoring. Drivers of precipitation δ18O were identified through linear regression between δ18O values and local meteorological variables, air-parcel back trajectories, and synoptic-typing. Synoptically driven moisture sources were identified through the use of NCEP/NCAR climate reanalysis sea-level pressure, precipitable moisture, and outgoing longwave radiation data in order to trace moisture sources and travel mechanisms from surrounding ocean basins. Local controls on δ18O at Kelly Hill Cave are consistent with published interpretations of southern Australia sites, with oxygen isotopes primarily controlled by rainfall amount on both daily and monthly time scales. Back-trajectory analysis also supports previous observations that the Southern Ocean is the major source for moisture-bearing cold-front systems. However, synoptic typing of daily rainfall δ18O and amount extremes reveals a previously unreported tropical connection and moisture source. This tropical connection appears to be strongest in summer and autumn, but

  11. Prevalence of cutaneous evaporation in Merriam's kangaroo rat and its adaptive variation at the subspecific level.

    PubMed

    Tracy, R L; Walsberg, G E

    2000-02-01

    Previous estimates suggested that ventilatory evaporation constitutes the major source of water loss in kangaroo rats (Dipodomys spp.). We quantified rates of water loss in Merriam's kangaroo rat (Dipodomys merriami) and demonstrate the degree to which acclimation to a particular thermal and hydric environment plays a role in the intraspecific variation in water loss evident in this species. We draw the following conclusions: (1) that water loss varies intraspecifically in Merriam's kangaroo rat, in association with habitats of contrasting aridity and temperature; (2) that animals from more xeric locations have lower water loss rates than those from more mesic sites; (3) that most water loss is cutaneous, with ventilatory evaporative water loss contributing, at most, only 44% to total evaporative water loss; and (4) that intraspecific differences in rates of water loss are not acclimatory, but fixed. After acclimating under the same conditions, xeric-site animals still show a 33% lower rate of evaporative water loss than mesic-site animals.

  12. Cache decision making: the effects of competition on cache decisions in Merriam's kangaroo rat (Dipodomys merriami).

    PubMed

    Preston, Stephanie D; Jacobs, Lucia F

    2005-05-01

    Caching food is an economic, decision-making process that requires animals to take many factors into account, including the risk of pilferage. However, little is known about how food-storing animals determine the risk of pilferage. In this study, the authors examined the effect of a dominant competitor species on the caching and behavior of Merriam's kangaroo rat (Dipodomys merriami). The authors found that, as with conspecific competitors, kangaroo rats did not alter caching in response to the mere presence of a heterospecific competitor, but moved caches to an unpreferred area when the competitor's presence was paired with pilferage. These data suggest that Merriam's kangaroo rat assesses pilfer risk from actual pilferage by a competitor and adaptively alters cache strategy to minimize future risk. 2005 APA, all rights reserved

  13. Chihuahuan Desert kangaroo rats: nonlinear effects of population dynamics, competition, and rainfall.

    PubMed

    Lima, Mauricio; Ernest, S K Morgan; Brown, James H; Belgrano, Andrea; Stenseth, Nils C

    2008-09-01

    Using long-term data on two kangaroo rats in the Chihuahuan Desert of North America, we fitted logistic models including the exogenous effects of seasonal rainfall patterns. Our aim was to test the effects of intraspecific interactions and seasonal rainfall in explaining and predicting the numerical fluctuations of these two kangaroo rats. We found that logistic models fit both data sets quite well; Dipodomys merriami showed lower maximum per capita growth rates than Dipodomys ordii, and in both cases logistic models were nonlinear. Summer rainfall appears to be the most important exogenous effect for both rodent populations; models including this variable were able to predict independent data better than models including winter rainfall. D. merriami was also negatively affected by another kangaroo rat (Dipodomys spectabilis), consistent with previous experimental evidence. We hypothesized that summer rainfall influences the carrying capacity of the environment by affecting seed availability and the intensity of intraspecific competition.

  14. Physical mechanisms underlying the strain-rate-dependent mechanical behavior of kangaroo shoulder cartilage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thibbotuwawa, Namal; Oloyede, Adekunle; Li, Tong; Singh, Sanjleena; Senadeera, Wijitha; Gu, YuanTong

    2015-09-01

    Due to anatomical and biomechanical similarities to human shoulder, kangaroo was chosen as a model to study shoulder cartilage. Comprehensive enzymatic degradation and indentation tests were applied on kangaroo shoulder cartilage to study mechanisms underlying its strain-rate-dependent mechanical behavior. We report that superficial collagen plays a more significant role than proteoglycans in facilitating strain-rate-dependent behavior of the kangaroo shoulder cartilage. By comparing the mechanical properties of degraded and normal cartilages, it was noted that proteoglycan and collagen degradation significantly compromised strain-rate-dependent mechanical behavior of the cartilage. Superficial collagen contributed equally to the tissue behavior at all strain-rates. This is different to the studies reported on knee cartilage and confirms the importance of superficial collagen on shoulder cartilage mechanical behavior. A porohyperelastic numerical model also indicated that collagen disruption would lead to faster damage of the shoulder cartilage than when proteoglycans are depleted.

  15. Gammaherpesvirus infection in a free-ranging eastern grey kangaroo (Macropus giganteus).

    PubMed

    Wilcox, R S; Vaz, P; Ficorilli, N P; Whiteley, P L; Wilks, C R; Devlin, J M

    2011-01-01

    A gammaherpesvirus was detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in ocular, nasal and oropharyngeal swab samples collected from an adult free-ranging male eastern grey kangaroo (Macropus giganteus) with clinical signs of severe respiratory disease. This is the first time a gammaherpesvirus has been detected in a free-ranging macropod in Australia. The nucleotide sequence of a conserved region of the DNA polymerase gene of the detected virus showed a high degree of identity to a gammaherpesvirus recently detected in a zoological collection of eastern grey kangaroos in North America. The detection of this gammaherpesvirus in a free-ranging, native eastern grey kangaroo provides evidence that this species is a natural host. © 2011 The Authors. Australian Veterinary Journal © 2011 Australian Veterinary Association.

  16. Effects of Kangaroo Care on Neonatal Pain in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Seo, Young Sun; Lee, Joohyun; Ahn, Hye Young

    2016-06-01

    Blood sampling for a newborn screening test is necessary for all neonates in South Korea. During the heel stick, an appropriate intervention should be implemented to reduce neonatal pain. This study was conducted to identify the effectiveness of kangaroo care (KC), skin contact with the mother, on pain relief during the neonatal heel stick. Twenty-six neonates undergoing KC and 30 control neonates at a university hospital participated in this study. Physiological responses of neonates, including heart rate, oxygen saturation, duration of crying and Premature Infant Pain Profile (PIPP) scores were measured and compared before, during and 1 min and 2 min after heel sticks. The heart rate of KC neonates was lower at both 1 and 2 min after sampling than those of the control group. Also, PIPP scores of KC neonates were significantly lower both during and after sampling. The duration of crying for KC neonates was around 10% of the duration of the control group. In conclusion, KC might be an effective intervention in a full-term nursery for neonatal pain management.

  17. Kangaroo mother care may help oral growth and development in premature infants.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Feng; Liu, Shoutao

    2012-08-01

    Premature infants have a shorter prenatal development period and are prone to many serious medical problems during neonatal period. This may impact the development of oral tissues, as manifested by enamel hypoplasia, palatal distortion, malocclusion, or delay in tooth eruption and maturation. Kangaroo mother care (KMC) is a standardized and protocol-based care system for premature infants, based on skin-to-skin contact between the infant and their mother. Kangaroo mother care has been demonstrated to greatly improve the nurturing of premature infants and comparatively reduce the risk factors of oral defects. We hypothesize that KMC also facilitates oral growth and development in premature infants.

  18. Bilateral lens luxation and intracapsular lens extractions in a Matshchie's tree kangaroo.

    PubMed

    McLean, Nancy Johnstone; Zimmerman, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    An adult, female, captive, Matshchie's tree kangaroo was diagnosed with an anterior lens luxation in the right eye and a lens subluxation in the left eye. Both eyes were treated surgically with intracapsular lens extractions. A 360° rhegmatogenous retinal detachment was diagnosed 6 months postoperatively in the left eye. Aphakic vision was maintained in the right eye 9 months postoperatively. Based on family history and the lack of antecedent ocular disease, the lens luxations were presumed to be inherited and veterinarians should be aware of this condition within the captive tree kangaroo population. © 2014 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  19. Kangaroo Mother Care, home environment and father involvement in the first year of life: a randomized controlled study.

    PubMed

    Tessier, R; Charpak, N; Giron, M; Cristo, M; de Calume, Z F; Ruiz-Peláez, J G

    2009-09-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that Kangaroo Mother Care creates a climate in the family, which enhances infants' performance on the developmental quotient scale. The largest social security hospital in Colombia with a neonatal intensive care unit. At 12 months of corrected age, 194 families in the Kangaroo Mother Care group and 144 families in the Traditional Care group were available for analysis. Infants were kept 24 h/day in an upright position, in skin-to-skin contact until it was no longer tolerated by the infants. Babies in the Traditional Care were kept in incubators on the Minimal Care Unit until they satisfied the usual discharge criteria. The Home Observation for Measurement of the Environment (HOME), Father Involvement and Developmental Quotient (Griffiths) scores. 1) Kangaroo mothers created a more stimulating context and a better caregiving environment than mothers in the Traditional Care group; 2) this environment was positively correlated to father involvement and 3) the family environment of male infants was most improved by Kangaroo Mother Care. Kangaroo Mother Care has a positive impact on home environment. The results also suggest, first, that both parents should be involved as direct caregivers in the Kangaroo Mother Care procedure and secondly, that this intervention should be directed more specifically at infants who are more at risk at birth. The Kangaroo Mother Care intervention could be an excellent means to ensure parents' mature involvement in the future of their children.

  20. An investigation of the topography of the lymphatic system of the grey kangaroo (Macropus giganteus). 1. The superficial lymphatic system.

    PubMed Central

    Hopwood, P R

    1988-01-01

    The superficial lymphatic system of the grey kangaroo, Macropus giganteus is described. The description is based on dissections of 130 eastern grey kangaroos. The most significant difference found between the superficial lymphatic drainage pattern of kangaroos and that of the domestic species was the existence of large inguino-axillary lymphatic trunks in the kangaroo. Thus in the kangaroo, instead of lymph passing from the inguinal lymphocentre to the lumbar lymphatic trunks as is the situation in the domestic animals, lymph passes from the inguinal lymphocentre to the axillary lymphocentre. Apart from the lymph draining from the head and ventral neck (which passes to the superficial cervical lymphocentre) and lymph which may pass from the superficial lymphatic vessels to deeper lymphatic vessels, all the superficial lymphatic drainage of the kangaroo passes through the axillary lymphocentre. From the viewpoint of the meat inspection of the carcasses of kangaroos taken as game meat animals, pathology of the axillary lymphocentre may reflect disease in a much wider range of body regions than it would in a domestic animal. PMID:3198478

  1. Investigation of the microbial metabolism of carbon dioxide and hydrogen in the kangaroo foregut by stable isotope probing

    PubMed Central

    Godwin, Scott; Kang, Alicia; Gulino, Lisa-Maree; Manefield, Mike; Gutierrez-Zamora, Maria-Luisa; Kienzle, Marco; Ouwerkerk, Diane; Dawson, Kerri; Klieve, Athol V

    2014-01-01

    Kangaroos ferment forage material in an enlarged forestomach analogous to the rumen, but in contrast to ruminants, they produce little or no methane. The objective of this study was to identify the dominant organisms and pathways involved in hydrogenotrophy in the kangaroo forestomach, with the broader aim of understanding how these processes are able to predominate over methanogenesis. Stable isotope analysis of fermentation end products and RNA stable isotope probing (RNA-SIP) were used to investigate the organisms and biochemical pathways involved in the metabolism of hydrogen and carbon dioxide in the kangaroo forestomach. Our results clearly demonstrate that the activity of bacterial reductive acetogens is a key factor in the reduced methane output of kangaroos. In in vitro fermentations, the microbial community of the kangaroo foregut produced very little methane, but produced a significantly greater proportion of acetate derived from carbon dioxide than the microbial community of the bovine rumen. A bacterial operational taxonomic unit closely related to the known reductive acetogen Blautia coccoides was found to be associated with carbon dioxide and hydrogen metabolism in the kangaroo foregut. Other bacterial taxa including members of the genera Prevotella, Oscillibacter and Streptococcus that have not previously been reported as containing hydrogenotrophic organisms were also significantly associated with metabolism of hydrogen and carbon dioxide in the kangaroo forestomach. PMID:24621520

  2. Investigation of the microbial metabolism of carbon dioxide and hydrogen in the kangaroo foregut by stable isotope probing.

    PubMed

    Godwin, Scott; Kang, Alicia; Gulino, Lisa-Maree; Manefield, Mike; Gutierrez-Zamora, Maria-Luisa; Kienzle, Marco; Ouwerkerk, Diane; Dawson, Kerri; Klieve, Athol V

    2014-09-01

    Kangaroos ferment forage material in an enlarged forestomach analogous to the rumen, but in contrast to ruminants, they produce little or no methane. The objective of this study was to identify the dominant organisms and pathways involved in hydrogenotrophy in the kangaroo forestomach, with the broader aim of understanding how these processes are able to predominate over methanogenesis. Stable isotope analysis of fermentation end products and RNA stable isotope probing (RNA-SIP) were used to investigate the organisms and biochemical pathways involved in the metabolism of hydrogen and carbon dioxide in the kangaroo forestomach. Our results clearly demonstrate that the activity of bacterial reductive acetogens is a key factor in the reduced methane output of kangaroos. In in vitro fermentations, the microbial community of the kangaroo foregut produced very little methane, but produced a significantly greater proportion of acetate derived from carbon dioxide than the microbial community of the bovine rumen. A bacterial operational taxonomic unit closely related to the known reductive acetogen Blautia coccoides was found to be associated with carbon dioxide and hydrogen metabolism in the kangaroo foregut. Other bacterial taxa including members of the genera Prevotella, Oscillibacter and Streptococcus that have not previously been reported as containing hydrogenotrophic organisms were also significantly associated with metabolism of hydrogen and carbon dioxide in the kangaroo forestomach.

  3. Kangaroo Mother Care and Neonatal Outcomes: A Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Dastjerdi, Roya; Spiegelman, Donna; Fawzi, Wafaie W.; Missmer, Stacey A.; Lieberman, Ellice; Kajeepeta, Sandhya; Wall, Stephen; Chan, Grace J.

    2016-01-01

    CONTEXT: Kangaroo mother care (KMC) is an intervention aimed at improving outcomes among preterm and low birth weight newborns. OBJECTIVE: Conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis estimating the association between KMC and neonatal outcomes. DATA SOURCES: PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, Scopus, African Index Medicus (AIM), Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Information System (LILACS), Index Medicus for the Eastern Mediterranean Region (IMEMR), Index Medicus for the South-East Asian Region (IMSEAR), and Western Pacific Region Index Medicus (WPRIM). STUDY SELECTION: We included randomized trials and observational studies through April 2014 examining the relationship between KMC and neonatal outcomes among infants of any birth weight or gestational age. Studies with <10 participants, lack of a comparison group without KMC, and those not reporting a quantitative association were excluded. DATA EXTRACTION: Two reviewers extracted data on study design, risk of bias, KMC intervention, neonatal outcomes, relative risk (RR) or mean difference measures. RESULTS: 1035 studies were screened; 124 met inclusion criteria. Among LBW newborns, KMC compared to conventional care was associated with 36% lower mortality(RR 0.64; 95% [CI] 0.46, 0.89). KMC decreased risk of neonatal sepsis (RR 0.53, 95% CI 0.34, 0.83), hypothermia (RR 0.22; 95% CI 0.12, 0.41), hypoglycemia (RR 0.12; 95% CI 0.05, 0.32), and hospital readmission (RR 0.42; 95% CI 0.23, 0.76) and increased exclusive breastfeeding (RR 1.50; 95% CI 1.26, 1.78). Newborns receiving KMC had lower mean respiratory rate and pain measures, and higher oxygen saturation, temperature, and head circumference growth. LIMITATIONS: Lack of data on KMC limited the ability to assess dose-response. CONCLUSIONS: Interventions to scale up KMC implementation are warranted. PMID:26702029

  4. Modeling interpopulation dispersal by banner-tailed kangaroo rats

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Skvarla, J.L.; Nichols, J.D.; Hines, J.E.; Waser, P.M.

    2004-01-01

    Many metapopulation models assume rules of population connectivity that are implicitly based on what we know about within-population dispersal, but especially for vertebrates, few data exist to assess whether interpopulation dispersal is just within-population dispersal "scaled up." We extended existing multi-stratum mark-release-recapture models to incorporate the robust design, allowing us to compare patterns of within- and between-population movement in the banner-tailed kangaroo rat (Dipodomys spectabilis). Movement was rare among eight populations separated by only a few hundred meters: seven years of twice-annual sampling captured >1200 individuals but only 26 interpopulation dispersers. We developed a program that implemented models with parameters for capture, survival, and interpopulation movement probability and that evaluated competing hypotheses in a model selection framework. We evaluated variants of the island, stepping-stone, and isolation-by-distance models of interpopulation movement, incorporating effects of age, season, and habitat (short or tall grass). For both sexes, QAICc values clearly favored isolation-by-distance models, or models combining the effects of isolation by distance and habitat. Models with probability of dispersal expressed as linear-logistic functions of distance and as negative exponentials of distance fit the data equally well. Interpopulation movement probabilities were similar among sexes (perhaps slightly biased toward females), greater for juveniles than adults (especially for females), and greater before than during the breeding season (especially for females). These patterns resemble those previously described for within-population dispersal in this species, which we interpret as indicating that the same processes initiate both within- and between-population dispersal.

  5. [Assessing the impact of kangaroo care on preterm infant stress].

    PubMed

    Collados-Gómez, Laura; Aragonés-Corral, Belén; Contreras-Olivares, Inmaculada; García-Feced, Elena; Vila-Piqueras, Maria Encarnación

    2011-01-01

    To assess the efficacy of Kangaroo Care (KC) in decreasing stress in newborns of 29-34 weeks' post-menstrual age (PMA). Quasi-experimental pre-post without control group analytical study conducted in the Gregorio Marañón University Hospital Neonatal Unit. The inclusion criteria were: infants 29 to 34 weeks' PMA, in an incubator, did not have neurological pathology, were not post-surgical, and with a Spanish-speaking mother and/or father. The sample size was fifty-one premature infants. The study variables selected were: clinical variables (additional oxygen and pathology), socio-demographical variables (PMA, KC duration) and the outcome variable, premature infant stress, which consisted of two variables: the physiological stress signal and the behavioural stress response. The variables were collected at three different times: basal stress, during KC and after KC completion, making a comparison analysis between the basal stress and after KC. The response rate was 100%, without registering any loss. The stress variables that changed after the intervention (statistically significant) were: irregular breathing, trunk arching or hyperextension, very open fingers, contraction of the face muscles, apnea, irritability and exaggerated and sustained extension of arms and legs. O(2) saturation was 94.73%±3.05% before KC and 95.92%±2.97% after the intervention. The heart rate (HR) ranged from 158.14±17.48 bpm (beats per minute) before the KC to 151.47±4.47 bpm after it. KC is related to the decrease in the occurrence of neonatal variables of stress, helping to organize motor and physiological systems to achieve a state of tranquility. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  6. Knowledge and awareness about benefits of Kangaroo Mother Care.

    PubMed

    Muddu, Gopi Krishna; Boju, Sangeetha Lakshmi; Chodavarapu, Ravikumar

    2013-10-01

    To determine mothers' prior knowledge of Kangaroo Mother Care (KMC) and awareness about benefits of KMC for preterm babies. Mothers of a consecutive sample of 46 preterm babies, eligible for KMC admitted to a teaching hospital, from June through August 2009, were studied to determine the attitude and knowledge about KMC. A structured questionnaire was prepared. Mothers were asked questions to determine their baseline knowledge about KMC. Then each mother was explained about KMC and instructed to do KMC. After one hour of KMC, mothers were asked questions again to know their feelings and difficulties regarding KMC and feasibility of breast feeding during KMC. Most of the mothers could understand what was explained to them (97.8 %; 95 % CI 88.5-99.9 %) in a single session. Positive feelings like closeness to baby (93.5 %) and sense of goodness (97.8 %) were noted amongst mothers. Though statistically not significant, the proportion of mothers who felt it impracticable to give breast feeding while doing KMC was considerable (39.1 %; 95 % CI 25.1-54.6 %) compared to those who felt no difficulty in breast feeding (60.9 %; 95 % CI 45.4-74.9 %). Practicable duration of KMC is 1, 2 and 12 h as felt by 52 %, 19.6 % and 6.5 % of mothers respectively. All the mothers expressed their willingness to continue KMC at home. Mothers can understand and implement KMC with simple and clear oral instructions in local language. Positive feelings arise in mothers even with 1 h of KMC. KMC of 24 h is not practicable to almost all of the mothers. There is a need for special emphasis on breast feeding the child while doing the KMC.

  7. A Test of Kangaroo Care on Preterm Infant Breastfeeding

    PubMed Central

    Tully, Kristin P.; Holditch-Davis, Diane; White-Traut, Rosemary C.; David, Richard; O’Shea, T. Michael; Geraldo, Victoria

    2015-01-01

    Objective To test the effects of kangaroo care (KC) on breastfeeding outcomes in preterm infants compared to two control groups and to explore whether maternal-infant characteristics and the mother’s choice to use KC were related to breastfeeding measures. Design Secondary analysis of a multisite, stratified, and randomized 3-arm trial. The treatment groups used KC, auditory-tactile-visual-vestibular (ATVV) intervention, or preterm infant care information. Setting Neonatal intensive care units from 4 hospitals in the United States from 2006–2011. Participants Racially diverse mothers (N=231) and their preterm infants born weighing < 1750 grams. Methods Mothers and their infants were enrolled once the infants were no longer critically ill, weighed at least 1000 grams, and could be safely held outside of the incubator by parents. Participants were instructed by study nurses; those allocated to either KC or ATVV were asked to engage in these interactions for a minimum of 3 times a week in the hospital and at home until 2 months adjusted age. Results Feeding at the breast during hospitalization, the duration of post-discharge breastfeeding, and breastfeeding exclusivity after hospital discharge did not differ statistically among the treatment groups. Regardless of group assignment, married, older, and more educated women were more likely to feed at the breast during hospitalization. Mothers who practiced KC, regardless of randomly allocated group, were more likely to provide their milk than those who did not practice KC. Breastfeeding duration was greatest among more educated women. Conclusion As implemented in this study, assignment to KC did not appear to influence the measured breastfeeding outcomes. PMID:26815798

  8. Diatexite Deformation and Magma Extraction on Kangaroo Island, South Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasalova, P.; Weinberg, R. F.; Ward, L.; Fanning, C. M.

    2012-12-01

    Migmatite terranes are structurally complex. We have investigated the relationships between deformation and magma extraction in migmatites formed during the Delamerian orogeny on Kangaroo Island. Several phases of deformation occurred in the presence of melt (D1-D4) and we describe how magma segregation, accumulation and extraction changes with deformation style. During an early upright folding event (D2), magma was channelled towards the hinge of antiforms. Funnel-shaped networks of leucosomes form a root that link towards a central axial planar channel, marking the main magma extraction paths. Extraction was associated with limb collapse, and antiformal hinge disruption. During a later deformation phase (D4), diatexites were sheared so that schollen were disaggregated into smaller blocks and schlieren, and deformed into asymmetric, sigmoidal shapes. Foliations in the magmatic matrix and schollen asymmetry indicate dextral shearing. During flow, magma accumulated in shear planes, indicating a dilational component during shearing (transtension) and on strain shadows of schollen. As deformation waned (post-D4), magma extraction from these diatexites gave rise to steeply dipping, funnel-shaped channels, similar to those developed during folding. The funnel-shape networks are interpreted as magma extraction networks and indicate magma flow direction. Structures developed during this phase are comparable with those developed during dewatering of soft sediments. The magmatic rocks from migmatites formed early, during folding, and formed late after deformation waned were dated. Both have two monazite (U-Pb, SHRIMP) age groups of ~490Ma and ~505-520Ma. The older sample has a well-defined peak at 505-510Ma and trails into the younger ages. The younger sample has the opposite, with few old spots and a well-defined young peak at ~490Ma. The age range indicates the duration of anatexis, and well-defined peaks are interpreted to mark the age of individual magma batch

  9. Bone fluoride concentrations of eastern grey kangaroos (Macropus giganteus) resident near an aluminium smelter in south-eastern Australia.

    PubMed

    Hufschmid, J; Beveridge, I; Coulson, G; Gould, J

    2011-08-01

    Lesions of skeletal and dental fluorosis have been described recently in eastern grey kangaroos (Macropus giganteus). The present study further examined the epidemiology of skeletal fluorosis in this species. Bone fluoride concentrations were obtained from a range of skeletal sites of animals from a high (Portland Aluminium) and a low (Cape Bridgewater) fluoride environment in Victoria, Australia. Age, but not sex, affected the mean bone fluoride concentration of kangaroos. For a given age, bone fluoride concentrations were significantly higher in kangaroos from Portland than Cape Bridgewater. Concentrations varied between skeletal sites examined, with samples containing cancellous bone having higher fluoride concentrations than those containing only cortical bone.

  10. Species-specific footdrumming in kangaroo rats: Dipodomys ingens, D. deserti, D. spectabilis

    PubMed

    Randall

    1997-11-01

    Footdrumming was compared in three allopatric species of kangaroo rat, Dipodomysfrom three habitats. Analysis of footdrumming recordings revealed species-specific patterns of drumming ranging from single thumps to individual footdrumming signatures. The desert kangaroo rat, D. desertidrums single thumps spaced 0.25-0.30 s apart that are sometimes introduced with a short footroll. The giant kangaroo rat, D. ingensdrums long footrolls that can average over 100 drums at 18 drums/s. The banner-tailed kangaroo rat, D. spectabilisdrums three to 38 footdrums in a footroll combined into sequences of two to 12 footrolls at a rate of 17 drums/s. In playback tests, all three species stood in alert postures and entered the burrow in response to footdrumming of their own and the other species. The rats also responded in species-specific ways. Dipodomys spectabilisdrummed to its own species' footdrumming, but not to playbacks of the single drums of D. desertiInstead of footdrumming to playbacks of its own species, D. deserti approached the speaker more frequently than did either of the other two species. Dipodomys ingens footdrummed equally to all footdrumming playbacks. The species' differences reflect differences in social tolerance and spacing. Dipodomys deserti rarely engages in footdrumming exchanges and chases visitors from the burrow. Dipodomys spectabilis engages in frequent footdrumming exchanges and some chases, and D. ingens seems to tolerate close neighbours and footdrums periodically.Copyright 1997 The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour1997The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour

  11. To kill a kangaroo: understanding the decision to pursue high-risk/high-gain resources

    PubMed Central

    Jones, James Holland; Bird, Rebecca Bliege; Bird, Douglas W.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we attempt to understand hunter–gatherer foraging decisions about prey that vary in both the mean and variance of energy return using an expected utility framework. We show that for skewed distributions of energetic returns, the standard linear variance discounting (LVD) model for risk-sensitive foraging can produce quite misleading results. In addition to creating difficulties for the LVD model, the skewed distributions characteristic of hunting returns create challenges for estimating probability distribution functions required for expected utility. We present a solution using a two-component finite mixture model for foraging returns. We then use detailed foraging returns data based on focal follows of individual hunters in Western Australia hunting for high-risk/high-gain (hill kangaroo) and relatively low-risk/low-gain (sand monitor) prey. Using probability densities for the two resources estimated from the mixture models, combined with theoretically sensible utility curves characterized by diminishing marginal utility for the highest returns, we find that the expected utility of the sand monitors greatly exceeds that of kangaroos despite the fact that the mean energy return for kangaroos is nearly twice as large as that for sand monitors. We conclude that the decision to hunt hill kangaroos does not arise simply as part of an energetic utility-maximization strategy and that additional social, political or symbolic benefits must accrue to hunters of this highly variable prey. PMID:23884091

  12. Extended anaesthesia and nasotracheal intubation of a red kangaroo (Macropus rufus).

    PubMed

    Bauquier, S H; Golder, F J

    2010-11-01

    Anaesthesia requires maintenance of a patent airway. Nasotracheal intubation of a red kangaroo (Macropus rufus) was performed when the inability to open the animal’s mouth prevented orotracheal intubation. Nasotracheal intubation was easy to perform, secured the airway and permitted delivery of supplemental oxygen, isoflurane and intermittent positive pressure ventilation.

  13. Molecular detection of hybridization between sympatric kangaroo species in south-eastern Australia.

    PubMed

    Neaves, L E; Zenger, K R; Cooper, D W; Eldridge, M D B

    2010-05-01

    Introgressive hybridization has traditionally been regarded as rare in many vertebrate groups, including mammals. Despite a propensity to hybridize in captivity, introgression has rarely been reported between wild sympatric macropodid marsupials. Here we investigate sympatric populations of western (Macropus fuliginosus) and eastern (Macropus giganteus) grey kangaroos through 12 autosomal microsatellite loci and 626 bp of the hypervariable mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region. M. fuliginosus and M. giganteus within the region of sympatry corresponded, both genetically and morphologically, to their respective species elsewhere in their distributions. Of the 223 grey kangaroos examined, 7.6% displayed evidence of introgression, although no F1 hybrids were detected. In contrast to captive studies, there was no evidence for unidirectional hybridization in sympatric grey kangaroos. However, a higher portion of M. giganteus backcrosses existed within the sample compared with M. fuliginosus. Hybridization in grey kangaroos is reflective of occasional breakdowns in species boundaries, occurring throughout the region and potentially associated with variable conditions and dramatic reductions in densities. Such rare hybridization events allow populations to incorporate novel diversity while still retaining species integrity.

  14. Microsatellite marker development and Mendelian analysis in the Matschie's tree kangaroo (Dendrolagus matschiei).

    PubMed

    McGreevy, Thomas J; Dabek, Lisa; Husband, Thomas P

    2010-01-01

    Matschie's tree kangaroo (Dendrolagus matschiei) is an endangered arboreal macropodid endemic to the Huon Peninsula, Papua New Guinea (PNG). We developed 5 microsatellite markers for D. matschiei, which are the first markers developed for Dendrolagus. We screened 17 additional markers that were developed for other marsupial taxa and identified 3 that were polymorphic in D. matschiei. We estimated allelic and genetic diversity with the set of 8 markers by analyzing 22 D. matschiei from Wasaunon on the Huon Peninsula, PNG. The number of alleles ranged from 2 to 9 and expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.440 to 0.794. We tested for null alleles and Mendelian inheritance by analyzing 19 pairs of D. matschiei parents and offspring from Association of Zoos and Aquariums institutions. Null alleles were not detected and Mendelian inheritance was followed for all 8 markers. We also evaluated the reliability of using the markers to amplify DNA extracted from D. matschiei fecal samples and the ability of the markers to amplify DNA samples from Goodfellow's tree kangaroo (Dendrolagus goodfellowi ssp.), Doria's tree kangaroo (Dendrolagus dorianus ssp.), and Grizzled tree kangaroo (Dendrolagus inustus ssp.). Microsatellite markers can be used to inform management decisions to conserve D. matschiei in captivity and the wild.

  15. To kill a kangaroo: understanding the decision to pursue high-risk/high-gain resources.

    PubMed

    Jones, James Holland; Bird, Rebecca Bliege; Bird, Douglas W

    2013-09-22

    In this paper, we attempt to understand hunter-gatherer foraging decisions about prey that vary in both the mean and variance of energy return using an expected utility framework. We show that for skewed distributions of energetic returns, the standard linear variance discounting (LVD) model for risk-sensitive foraging can produce quite misleading results. In addition to creating difficulties for the LVD model, the skewed distributions characteristic of hunting returns create challenges for estimating probability distribution functions required for expected utility. We present a solution using a two-component finite mixture model for foraging returns. We then use detailed foraging returns data based on focal follows of individual hunters in Western Australia hunting for high-risk/high-gain (hill kangaroo) and relatively low-risk/low-gain (sand monitor) prey. Using probability densities for the two resources estimated from the mixture models, combined with theoretically sensible utility curves characterized by diminishing marginal utility for the highest returns, we find that the expected utility of the sand monitors greatly exceeds that of kangaroos despite the fact that the mean energy return for kangaroos is nearly twice as large as that for sand monitors. We conclude that the decision to hunt hill kangaroos does not arise simply as part of an energetic utility-maximization strategy and that additional social, political or symbolic benefits must accrue to hunters of this highly variable prey.

  16. Recent Amplification of the Kangaroo Endogenous Retrovirus, KERV, Limited to the Centromere▿

    PubMed Central

    Ferreri, Gianni C.; Brown, Judith D.; Obergfell, Craig; Jue, Nathaniel; Finn, Caitlin E.; O'Neill, Michael J.; O'Neill, Rachel J.

    2011-01-01

    Mammalian retrotransposons, transposable elements that are processed through an RNA intermediate, are categorized as short interspersed elements (SINEs), long interspersed elements (LINEs), and long terminal repeat (LTR) retroelements, which include endogenous retroviruses. The ability of transposable elements to autonomously amplify led to their initial characterization as selfish or junk DNA; however, it is now known that they may acquire specific cellular functions in a genome and are implicated in host defense mechanisms as well as in genome evolution. Interactions between classes of transposable elements may exert a markedly different and potentially more significant effect on a genome than interactions between members of a single class of transposable elements. We examined the genomic structure and evolution of the kangaroo endogenous retrovirus (KERV) in the marsupial genus Macropus. The complete proviral structure of the kangaroo endogenous retrovirus, phylogenetic relationship among relative retroviruses, and expression of this virus in both Macropus rufogriseus and M. eugenii are presented for the first time. In addition, we show the relative copy number and distribution of the kangaroo endogenous retrovirus in the Macropus genus. Our data indicate that amplification of the kangaroo endogenous retrovirus occurred in a lineage-specific fashion, is restricted to the centromeres, and is not correlated with LINE depletion. Finally, analysis of KERV long terminal repeat sequences using massively parallel sequencing indicates that the recent amplification in M. rufogriseus is likely due to duplications and concerted evolution rather than a high number of independent insertion events. PMID:21389136

  17. Recent amplification of the kangaroo endogenous retrovirus, KERV, limited to the centromere.

    PubMed

    Ferreri, Gianni C; Brown, Judith D; Obergfell, Craig; Jue, Nathaniel; Finn, Caitlin E; O'Neill, Michael J; O'Neill, Rachel J

    2011-05-01

    Mammalian retrotransposons, transposable elements that are processed through an RNA intermediate, are categorized as short interspersed elements (SINEs), long interspersed elements (LINEs), and long terminal repeat (LTR) retroelements, which include endogenous retroviruses. The ability of transposable elements to autonomously amplify led to their initial characterization as selfish or junk DNA; however, it is now known that they may acquire specific cellular functions in a genome and are implicated in host defense mechanisms as well as in genome evolution. Interactions between classes of transposable elements may exert a markedly different and potentially more significant effect on a genome than interactions between members of a single class of transposable elements. We examined the genomic structure and evolution of the kangaroo endogenous retrovirus (KERV) in the marsupial genus Macropus. The complete proviral structure of the kangaroo endogenous retrovirus, phylogenetic relationship among relative retroviruses, and expression of this virus in both Macropus rufogriseus and M. eugenii are presented for the first time. In addition, we show the relative copy number and distribution of the kangaroo endogenous retrovirus in the Macropus genus. Our data indicate that amplification of the kangaroo endogenous retrovirus occurred in a lineage-specific fashion, is restricted to the centromeres, and is not correlated with LINE depletion. Finally, analysis of KERV long terminal repeat sequences using massively parallel sequencing indicates that the recent amplification in M. rufogriseus is likely due to duplications and concerted evolution rather than a high number of independent insertion events.

  18. Cryopreservation of kangaroo spermatozoa using alternative approaches that reduce cytotoxic exposure to glycerol.

    PubMed

    McClean, Rhett; Zee, Yeng Peng; Holt, William V; Johnston, Stephen D

    2008-12-01

    Alternative techniques for the cryopreservation of kangaroo spermatozoa that reduced or eliminated the need for glycerol were investigated including; (1) freezing spermatozoa with 20% glycerol in pre-packaged 0.25 mL Cassou straws to enable rapid dilution of the glycerol post-thaw, (2) investigating the efficacy of 20% (v/v) dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO) and dimethylacetamide (DMA-10%, 15% and 20% v/v) as cryoprotectants and (3) vitrification of spermatozoa with or without cryoprotectant (20% v/v glycerol, 20% v/v DMSO and 20% v/v DMA). Immediate in-straw post-thaw dilution of 20% glycerol and cryopreservation of spermatozoa in 20% DMSO produced no significant improvement in post-thaw viability of kangaroo spermatozoa. Spermatozoa frozen in 20% DMA showed post-thaw motility and plasma membrane integrity of 12.7+/-1.9% and 22.7+/-5.4%, respectively, while kangaroo spermatozoa frozen by ultra-rapid freezing techniques showed no evidence of post-thaw viability. The use of 10-20% DMA represents a modest but significant improvement in the development of a sperm cryopreservation procedure for kangaroos.

  19. Experimental manipulation reveals few subclinical impacts of a parasite community in juvenile kangaroos

    PubMed Central

    Cripps, Jemma; Beveridge, Ian; Ploeg, Richard; Coulson, Graeme

    2014-01-01

    Large mammalian herbivores are commonly infected with gastrointestinal helminths. In many host species, these helminths cause clinical disease and may trigger conspicuous mortality events. However, they may also have subclinical impacts, reducing fitness as well as causing complex changes to host growth patterns and body condition. Theoretically, juveniles should experience significantly greater costs from parasites, being immunologically naive and undergoing a significant growth phase. The aims of our study were to quantify the subclinical effects of helminths in juvenile eastern grey kangaroos (Macropus giganteus), which commonly harbour large burdens of gastrointestinal nematodes and are susceptible to associated mass mortality during cold, wet conditions. We conducted a field experiment on a population of free-ranging kangaroos, removing nematodes from one group of juveniles using an anthelmintic treatment. We then compared growth parameters (body condition and growth rates) and haematological parameters of this group with an age-matched, parasitised (untreated) control group. Treated juvenile kangaroos had significantly higher levels of plasma protein (albumin) but, contrary to our predictions, showed negligible changes in all the other parameters measured. Our results suggest that juvenile kangaroos are largely unaffected by their gastrointestinal helminth burdens, and may be able to compensate for the costs of parasites. PMID:25161906

  20. Influence of small-scale disturbances by kangaroo rats on Chihuahuan Desert ants

    Treesearch

    R. L. Schooley; B. T. Bestelmeyer; J. F. Kelly

    2000-01-01

    Banner-tailed kangaroo rats (Dipodomys spectabilis) are prominent ecosystem engineers that build large mounds that influence the spatial structuring of fungi, plants, and some ground-dwelling animals. Ants are diverse and functionally important components of arid ecosystems; some species are also ecosystem engineers. We investigated the effects of...

  1. Hopping Down the Main Street: Eastern Grey Kangaroos at Home in an Urban Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Coulson, Graeme; Cripps, Jemma K.; Wilson, Michelle E.

    2014-01-01

    Simple Summary Eastern Grey Kangaroos (Macropus giganteus) occur throughout the seaside town of Anglesea in southern Victoria, Australia. We have tagged about half of these kangaroos in a longitudinal study of population dynamics and behavior. A golf course forms the nucleus of this population. Females live on and around the golf course, but males roam across the town in autumn and winter, living in bush reserves, empty blocks and back yards. Most females breed every year, but over half of their young disappear. Vehicles are the major cause of adult deaths, killing a much higher proportion of males than females. Abstract Most urban mammals are small. However, one of the largest marsupials, the Eastern Grey Kangaroo Macropus giganteus, occurs in some urban areas. In 2007, we embarked on a longitudinal study of this species in the seaside town of Anglesea in southern Victoria, Australia. We have captured and tagged 360 individuals to date, fitting each adult with a collar displaying its name. We have monitored survival, reproduction and movements by resighting, recapture and radio-tracking, augmented by citizen science reports of collared individuals. Kangaroos occurred throughout the town, but the golf course formed the nucleus of this urban population. The course supported a high density of kangaroos (2–5/ha), and approximately half of them were tagged. Total counts of kangaroos on the golf course were highest in summer, at the peak of the mating season, and lowest in winter, when many males but not females left the course. Almost all tagged adult females were sedentary, using only part of the golf course and adjacent native vegetation and residential blocks. In contrast, during the non-mating season (autumn and winter), many tagged adult males ranged widely across the town in a mix of native vegetation remnants, recreation reserves, vacant blocks, commercial properties and residential gardens. Annual fecundity of tagged females was generally high (≥70%), but

  2. A continent-wide analysis of the shade requirements of red and western grey kangaroos.

    PubMed

    Roberts, J A; Coulson, G; Munn, A J; Kearney, M R

    2016-01-01

    Foraging time may be constrained by a suite of phenomena including weather, which can restrict a species' activity and energy intake. This is recognized as pivotal for many species whose distributions are known to correlate with climate, including kangaroos, although such impacts are rarely quantified. We explore how differences in shade seeking, a thermoregulatory behavior, of 2 closely-related kangaroo species, Macropus rufus (red kangaroos) and M. fuliginosus (western grey kangaroos), might reflect differences in their distributions across Australia. We observed foraging and shade-seeking behavior in the field and, together with local weather observations, calculated threshold radiant temperatures (based on solar and infrared radiant heat loads) over which the kangaroos retreated to shade. We apply these calculated tolerance thresholds to hourly microclimatic estimates derived from daily-gridded weather data to predict activity constraints across the Australian continent over a 10-year period. M. fuliginosus spent more time than M. rufus in the shade (7.6 ± 0.7 h versus 6.4 ± 0.9 h) and more time foraging (11.8 ± 0.5 h vs. 10.0 ± 0.6 h), although total time resting was equivalent (∼8.2 h). M. rufus tolerated 19°C higher radiant temperatures than M. fuliginosus (89°C versus 70°C radiant temperature). Across Australia, we predicted M. fuliginosus to be more restricted to shade than M. rufus, with higher absolute shade requirements farther north. These results corroborate previous findings that M. rufus is more adept at dealing with heat than M. fuliginosus and indicate that M. rufus is less dependent on shade on a continental scale.

  3. Architecture of kangaroo rat inner medulla: segmentation of descending thin limb of Henle's loop

    PubMed Central

    Urity, Vinoo B.; Issaian, Tadeh; Braun, Eldon J.; Dantzler, William H.

    2012-01-01

    We hypothesize that the inner medulla of the kangaroo rat Dipodomys merriami, a desert rodent that concentrates its urine to more than 6,000 mosmol/kgH2O water, provides unique examples of architectural features necessary for production of highly concentrated urine. To investigate this architecture, inner medullary nephron segments in the initial 3,000 μm below the outer medulla were assessed with digital reconstructions from physical tissue sections. Descending thin limbs of Henle (DTLs), ascending thin limbs of Henle (ATLs), and collecting ducts (CDs) were identified by immunofluorescence using antibodies that label segment-specific proteins associated with transepithelial water flux (aquaporin 1 and 2, AQP1 and AQP2) and chloride flux (the chloride channel ClC-K1); all tubules and vessels were labeled with wheat germ agglutinin. In the outer 3,000 μm of the inner medulla, AQP1-positive DTLs lie at the periphery of groups of CDs. ATLs lie inside and outside the groups of CDs. Immunohistochemistry and reconstructions of loops that form their bends in the outer 3,000 μm of the inner medulla show that, relative to loop length, the AQP1-positive segment of the kangaroo rat is significantly longer than that of the Munich-Wistar rat. The length of ClC-K1 expression in the prebend region at the terminal end of the descending side of the loop in kangaroo rat is about 50% shorter than that of the Munich-Wistar rat. Tubular fluid of the kangaroo rat DTL may approach osmotic equilibrium with interstitial fluid by water reabsorption along a relatively longer tubule length, compared with Munich-Wistar rat. A relatively shorter-length prebend segment may promote a steeper reabsorptive driving force at the loop bend. These structural features predict functionality that is potentially significant in the production of a high urine osmolality in the kangaroo rat. PMID:22237592

  4. Kangaroo care by fathers and mothers: comparison of physiological and stress responses in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Srinath, B K; Shah, J; Kumar, P; Shah, P S

    2016-05-01

    To compare physiological and biochemical responses in stable preterm neonates and their parents following kangaroo mother care (KMC) and kangaroo father care (KFC). We conducted a prospective cross-over design study of stable preterm neonates of <35 weeks gestation in a tertiary Neonatal Unit in Toronto. All neonates received KMC and KFC for 1 h on consecutive days in a random order. Heart rate, temperature, blood pressure, oxygen saturation and salivary cortisol in infants before and after kangaroo care and heart rate, temperature and salivary cortisol in parents before and after kangaroo care were measured. Pairwise comparisons of changes in these measures were analyzed. Twenty-six sets of neonates and their parents were studied for physiological parameters, of which 19 had adequate samples for salivary cortisol assessment. The infants had a mean birth weight of 1096 g (s.d.=217) and a mean postmenstrual age at study of 32 weeks (s.d.=2). There were no significant differences in the changes in mean heart rate (P=0.51), temperature (P=0.37), oxygen saturation (P=0.50), systolic blood pressure (P=0.32), mean blood pressure (0.10) and salivary cortisol (P=0.50) before and after KMC or KFC in the neonates. The changes in mean heart rate (P=0.62), temperature (P=0.28) and salivary cortisol (P=0.59) before and after kangaroo care were similar between mothers and fathers. No significant differences in physiological and stress responses were identified following KMC or KFC in preterm neonates. KFC may be as safe and as effective as KMC.

  5. Preterm newborns at Kangaroo Mother Care: a cohort follow-up from birth to six months

    PubMed Central

    Menezes, Maria Alexsandra da S.; Garcia, Daniela Cavalcante; de Melo, Enaldo Vieira; Cipolotti, Rosana

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate clinical outcomes, growth and exclusive breastfeeding rates in premature infants assisted by Kangaroo Mother Care at birth, at discharge and at six months of life. METHODS: Prospective study of a premature infants cohort assisted by Kangaroo Mother Care in a tertiary public maternity in Northeast Brazil with birth weight ≤1750g and with clinical conditions for Kangaroo care. RESULTS: The sample was composed by 137 premature infants, being 62.8% female, with average birth weight of 1365±283g, average gestational age of 32±3 weeks and 26.2% were adequate for gestational age. They have been admitted in the Kangaroo Ward with a median of 13 days of life, weighing 1430±167g and, at this time, 57.7% were classified as small for corrected gestational age. They were discharged with 36.8±21.8 days of chronological age, weighing 1780±165g and 67.9% were small for corrected gestational age. At six months of life (n=76), they had an average weight of 5954±971g, and 68.4% presented corrected weight for gestational age between percentiles 15 and 85 of the World Health Organization (WHO) weight curve. Exclusive breastfeeding rate at discharge was 56.2% and, at six months of life, 14.4%. CONCLUSIONS: In the studied sample, almost two thirds of the children assisted by Kangaroo Mother Care were, at six months of life, between percentiles 15 and 85 of the WHO weight curves. The frequency of exclusive breastfeeding at six months was low. PMID:25119747

  6. Architecture of kangaroo rat inner medulla: segmentation of descending thin limb of Henle's loop.

    PubMed

    Urity, Vinoo B; Issaian, Tadeh; Braun, Eldon J; Dantzler, William H; Pannabecker, Thomas L

    2012-03-15

    We hypothesize that the inner medulla of the kangaroo rat Dipodomys merriami, a desert rodent that concentrates its urine to more than 6,000 mosmol/kgH(2)O water, provides unique examples of architectural features necessary for production of highly concentrated urine. To investigate this architecture, inner medullary nephron segments in the initial 3,000 μm below the outer medulla were assessed with digital reconstructions from physical tissue sections. Descending thin limbs of Henle (DTLs), ascending thin limbs of Henle (ATLs), and collecting ducts (CDs) were identified by immunofluorescence using antibodies that label segment-specific proteins associated with transepithelial water flux (aquaporin 1 and 2, AQP1 and AQP2) and chloride flux (the chloride channel ClC-K1); all tubules and vessels were labeled with wheat germ agglutinin. In the outer 3,000 μm of the inner medulla, AQP1-positive DTLs lie at the periphery of groups of CDs. ATLs lie inside and outside the groups of CDs. Immunohistochemistry and reconstructions of loops that form their bends in the outer 3,000 μm of the inner medulla show that, relative to loop length, the AQP1-positive segment of the kangaroo rat is significantly longer than that of the Munich-Wistar rat. The length of ClC-K1 expression in the prebend region at the terminal end of the descending side of the loop in kangaroo rat is about 50% shorter than that of the Munich-Wistar rat. Tubular fluid of the kangaroo rat DTL may approach osmotic equilibrium with interstitial fluid by water reabsorption along a relatively longer tubule length, compared with Munich-Wistar rat. A relatively shorter-length prebend segment may promote a steeper reabsorptive driving force at the loop bend. These structural features predict functionality that is potentially significant in the production of a high urine osmolality in the kangaroo rat.

  7. Scaling of left ventricle cardiomyocyte ultrastructure across development in the kangaroo Macropus fuliginosus.

    PubMed

    Snelling, Edward P; Taggart, David A; Maloney, Shane K; Farrell, Anthony P; Leigh, Christopher M; Waterhouse, Lyn; Williams, Ruth; Seymour, Roger S

    2015-06-01

    The heart and left ventricle of the marsupial western grey kangaroo Macropus fuliginosus exhibit biphasic allometric growth, whereby a negative shift in the trajectory of cardiac growth occurs at pouch exit. In this study, we used transmission electron microscopy to examine the scaling of left ventricle cardiomyocyte ultrastructure across development in the western grey kangaroo over a 190-fold body mass range (0.355-67.5 kg). The volume-density (%) of myofibrils, mitochondria, sarcoplasmic reticuli and T-tubules increase significantly during in-pouch growth, such that the absolute volume (ml) of these organelles scales with body mass (Mb; kg) with steep hyperallometry: 1.41Mb (1.38), 0.64Mb (1.29), 0.066Mb (1.45) and 0.035Mb (1.87), respectively. Maturation of the left ventricle ultrastructure coincides with pouch vacation, as organelle volume-densities scale independent of body mass across post-pouch development, such that absolute organelle volumes scale in parallel and with relatively shallow hypoallometry: 4.65Mb (0.79), 1.75Mb (0.77), 0.21Mb (0.79) and 0.35Mb (0.79), respectively. The steep hyperallometry of organelle volumes and volume-densities across in-pouch growth is consistent with the improved contractile performance of isolated cardiac muscle during fetal development in placental mammals, and is probably critical in augmenting cardiac output to levels necessary for endothermy and independent locomotion in the young kangaroo as it prepares for pouch exit. The shallow hypoallometry of organelle volumes during post-pouch growth suggests a decrease in relative cardiac requirements as body mass increases in free-roaming kangaroos, which is possibly because the energy required for hopping is independent of speed, and the capacity for energy storage during hopping could increase as the kangaroo grows. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  8. Functional morphology of the forelimb of living and extinct tree-kangaroos (Marsupialia: Macropodidae).

    PubMed

    Warburton, Natalie M; Harvey, Kathryn J; Prideaux, Gavin J; O'Shea, James E

    2011-10-01

    Tree-kangaroos are a unique group of arboreal marsupials that evolved from terrestrial ancestors. The recent discovery of well-preserved specimens of extinct tree-kangaroo species (genus Bohra) within Pleistocene cave deposits of south-central Australia provides a unique opportunity to examine adaptive evolution of tree-kangaroos. Here, we provide the first detailed description of the functional anatomy of the forelimb, a central component of the locomotor complex, in the extant Dendrolagus lumholtzi, and compare its structure and function with representatives of other extant marsupial families. Several features were interpreted as adaptations for coping with a discontinuous, uneven and three-dimensional arboreal substrate through enhanced muscular strength and dexterity for propulsion, grasping, and gripping with the forelimbs. The forelimb musculoskeletal anatomy of Dendrolagus differed from terrestrial kangaroos in the following principal ways: a stronger emphasis on the development of muscles groups responsible for adduction, grasping, and gripping; the enlargement of muscles that retract the humerus; and modified shape of the scapula and bony articulations of the forelimb bones to allow improved mobility. Many of these attributes are convergent with other arboreal marsupials. Tree-kangaroos, however, still retain the characteristic bauplan of their terrestrial ancestors, particularly with regard to skeletal morphology, and the muscular anatomy of the forelimb highlights a basic conservatism within the group. In many instances, the skeletal remains of Bohra have similar features to Dendrolagus that suggest adaptations to an arboreal habit. Despite the irony of their retrieval from deposits of the Nullarbor "Treeless" Plain, forelimb morphology clearly shows that the species of Bohra were well adapted to an arboreal habitat. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. A continent-wide analysis of the shade requirements of red and western grey kangaroos

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, J. A.; Coulson, G.; Munn, A. J.; Kearney, M. R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Foraging time may be constrained by a suite of phenomena including weather, which can restrict a species' activity and energy intake. This is recognized as pivotal for many species whose distributions are known to correlate with climate, including kangaroos, although such impacts are rarely quantified. We explore how differences in shade seeking, a thermoregulatory behavior, of 2 closely-related kangaroo species, Macropus rufus (red kangaroos) and M. fuliginosus (western grey kangaroos), might reflect differences in their distributions across Australia. We observed foraging and shade-seeking behavior in the field and, together with local weather observations, calculated threshold radiant temperatures (based on solar and infrared radiant heat loads) over which the kangaroos retreated to shade. We apply these calculated tolerance thresholds to hourly microclimatic estimates derived from daily-gridded weather data to predict activity constraints across the Australian continent over a 10-year period. M. fuliginosus spent more time than M. rufus in the shade (7.6 ± 0.7 h versus 6.4 ± 0.9 h) and more time foraging (11.8 ± 0.5 h vs. 10.0 ± 0.6 h), although total time resting was equivalent (∼8.2 h). M. rufus tolerated 19°C higher radiant temperatures than M. fuliginosus (89°C versus 70°C radiant temperature). Across Australia, we predicted M. fuliginosus to be more restricted to shade than M. rufus, with higher absolute shade requirements farther north. These results corroborate previous findings that M. rufus is more adept at dealing with heat than M. fuliginosus and indicate that M. rufus is less dependent on shade on a continental scale. PMID:27857963

  10. Trial of Repeated Analgesia with Kangaroo Mother Care (TRAKC Trial)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Skin-to-skin contact (SSC) between mother and infant, commonly referred to as Kangaroo Mother Care (KMC), is recommended as an intervention for procedural pain. Evidence demonstrates its consistent efficacy in reducing pain for a single painful procedure. The purpose of this study is to examine the sustained efficacy of KMC, provided during all routine painful procedures for the duration of Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) hospitalization, in diminishing behavioral pain response in preterm neonates. The efficacy of KMC alone will be compared to standard care of 24% oral sucrose, as well as the combination of KMC and 24% oral sucrose. Methods/design Infants admitted to the NICU who are less than 36 6/7 weeks gestational age (according to early ultrasound), that are stable enough to be held in KMC, will be considered eligible (N = 258). Using a single-blinded randomized parallel group design, participants will be assigned to one of three possible interventions: 1) KMC, 2) combined KMC and sucrose, and 3) sucrose alone, when they undergo any routine painful procedure (heel lance, venipuncture, intravenous, oro/nasogastric insertion). The primary outcome is infant’s pain intensity, which will be assessed using the Premature Infant Pain Profile (PIPP). The secondary outcome will be maturity of neurobehavioral functioning, as measured by the Neurobehavioral Assessment of the Preterm Infant (NAPI). Gestational age, cumulative exposure to KMC provided during non-pain contexts, and maternal cortisol levels will be considered in the analysis. Clinical feasibility will be accounted for from nurse and maternal questionnaires. Discussion This will be the first study to examine the repeated use of KMC for managing procedural pain in preterm neonates. It is also the first to compare KMC to sucrose, or the interventions in combination, across time. Based on the theoretical framework of the brain opioid theory of attachment, it is expected that KMC will be a

  11. Diatexite Deformation and Magma Extraction on Kangaroo Island, South Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasalova, Pavlina; Weinberg, Roberto; Ward, Lindsay; Fanning, Mark

    2013-04-01

    Migmatite terranes are structurally complex because of strong rheological contrast between layers with different melt contents and because of magma migration leading to volume changes. Migmatite deformation is intimately linked with magma extraction and the origin of granitoids. We investigate here the relationships between an evolving deformation and magma extraction in migmatites formed during the ca. 500Ma Delamerian orogeny, exposed on Kangaroo Island, South Australia. Here, several phases of deformation occurred in the presence of melt. During an early upright, non-cylindrical folding event, magma was channeled towards the hinge zones of antiforms. Funnel-shaped networks of leucosomes form a root zone that link up towards a central axial planar channel, forming the main magma extraction paths during folding. Extraction was associated with fold limb collapse, and antiformal hinge disruption by magma accumulation and transfer. During a later deformation phase, melt-rich diatexites were deformed, and schollen were disaggregated into smaller blocks and schlieren, and deformed into asymmetric, sigmoidal shapes indicative of dextral shearing flow. During flow, magma accumulated preferentially along shear planes, indicating a dilatational component during shearing (transtension) and in strain shadows of schollen. As deformation waned, magma extraction from these diatexites gave rise to N-trending, steeply dipping, funnel-shaped channels not associated to any deformational feature. The funnel-shape of these structures indicates the direction of magma flow. Structures developed during this phase are comparable with those formed during dewatering of soft sediments. Despite a high degree of complexity, magma migration and extraction features record distinct responses to the evolving deformation which can be used to understand deformation, and nature and direction of melt extraction. The oldest and youngest magmatic rocks from migmatites were dated (U-Pb monazite, SHRIMP

  12. Implementing facility-based kangaroo mother care services: lessons from a multi-country study in Africa

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Some countries have undertaken programs that included scaling up kangaroo mother care. The aim of this study was to systematically evaluate the implementation status of facility-based kangaroo mother care services in four African countries: Malawi, Mali, Rwanda and Uganda. Methods A cross-sectional, mixed-method research design was used. Stakeholders provided background information at national meetings and in individual interviews. Facilities were assessed by means of a standardized tool previously applied in other settings, employing semi-structured key-informant interviews and observations in 39 health care facilities in the four countries. Each facility received a score out of a total of 30 according to six stages of implementation progress. Results Across the four countries 95 per cent of health facilities assessed demonstrated some evidence of kangaroo mother care practice. Institutions that fared better had a longer history of kangaroo mother care implementation or had been developed as centres of excellence or had strong leaders championing the implementation process. Variation existed in the quality of implementation between facilities and across countries. Important factors identified in implementation are: training and orientation; supportive supervision; integrating kangaroo mother care into quality improvement; continuity of care; high-level buy in and support for kangaroo mother care implementation; and client-oriented care. Conclusion The integration of kangaroo mother care into routine newborn care services should be part of all maternal and newborn care initiatives and packages. Engaging ministries of health and other implementing partners from the outset may promote buy in and assist with the mobilization of resources for scaling up kangaroo mother care services. Mechanisms for monitoring these services should be integrated into existing health management information systems. PMID:25001366

  13. Molecular characterization and multi-locus genotypes of Enterocytozoon bieneusi from captive red kangaroos (Macropus Rfus) in Jiangsu province, China.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Zhijun; Tian, Yinan; Song, Yuan; Deng, Lei; Li, Junxian; Ren, Zhihua; Ma, Xiaoping; Gu, Xiaobin; He, Changliang; Geng, Yi; Peng, Guangneng

    2017-01-01

    Enterocytozoon bieneusi is the most common pathogen of microsporidian species infecting humans worldwide. Although E. bieneusi has been found in a variety of animal hosts, information on the presence of E. bieneusi in captive kangaroos in China is limited. The present study was aimed at determining the occurrence and genetic diversity of E. bieneusi in captive kangaroos. A total of 61 fecal specimens (38 from red kangaroos and 23 from grey kangaroos) were collected from Nanjing Hongshan Forest Zoo and Hongshan Kangaroo Breeding Research Base, Jiangsu province, China. Using the nested PCR amplification ITS gene of rRNA of E. bieneusi, totally 23.0% (14/61) of tested samples were PCR-positive with three genotypes (i.e. one known genotype, CHK1, and two novel genotypes, CSK1 and CSK2). Multi-locus sequence typing using three microsatellites (MS1, MS3, and MS7) and one minisatellite (MS4) revealed one, five, two, and one types at these four loci, respectively. In phylogenetic analysis, the two genotypes, CHK1 and CSK1, were clustered into a new group of unknown zoonotic potential, and the novel genotype CSK2 was clustered into a separate clade with PtEb and PtEbIX. To date, this is the first report on the presence of E. bieneusi in captive red kangaroos in Jiangsu province, China. Furthermore, a high degree of genetic diversity was observed in the E. bieneusi genotype and seven MLGs (MLG1-7) were found in red kangaroos. Our findings suggest that infected kangaroo may act as potential reservoirs of E. bieneusi and be source to transmit infections to other animal.

  14. Implementing facility-based kangaroo mother care services: lessons from a multi-country study in Africa.

    PubMed

    Bergh, Anne-Marie; Kerber, Kate; Abwao, Stella; de-Graft Johnson, Joseph; Aliganyira, Patrick; Davy, Karen; Gamache, Nathalie; Kante, Modibo; Ligowe, Reuben; Luhanga, Richard; Mukarugwiro, Béata; Ngabo, Fidèle; Rawlins, Barbara; Sayinzoga, Felix; Sengendo, Naamala Hanifah; Sylla, Mariam; Taylor, Rachel; van Rooyen, Elise; Zoungrana, Jeremie

    2014-07-08

    Some countries have undertaken programs that included scaling up kangaroo mother care. The aim of this study was to systematically evaluate the implementation status of facility-based kangaroo mother care services in four African countries: Malawi, Mali, Rwanda and Uganda. A cross-sectional, mixed-method research design was used. Stakeholders provided background information at national meetings and in individual interviews. Facilities were assessed by means of a standardized tool previously applied in other settings, employing semi-structured key-informant interviews and observations in 39 health care facilities in the four countries. Each facility received a score out of a total of 30 according to six stages of implementation progress. Across the four countries 95 per cent of health facilities assessed demonstrated some evidence of kangaroo mother care practice. Institutions that fared better had a longer history of kangaroo mother care implementation or had been developed as centres of excellence or had strong leaders championing the implementation process. Variation existed in the quality of implementation between facilities and across countries. Important factors identified in implementation are: training and orientation; supportive supervision; integrating kangaroo mother care into quality improvement; continuity of care; high-level buy in and support for kangaroo mother care implementation; and client-oriented care. The integration of kangaroo mother care into routine newborn care services should be part of all maternal and newborn care initiatives and packages. Engaging ministries of health and other implementing partners from the outset may promote buy in and assist with the mobilization of resources for scaling up kangaroo mother care services. Mechanisms for monitoring these services should be integrated into existing health management information systems.

  15. Health assessment of free-ranging and captive Matschie's tree kangaroos (Dendrolagus matschiei) in Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Travis, Erika K; Watson, Patricia; Dabek, Lisa

    2012-03-01

    Medical evaluations were performed on free-ranging and captive Matschie's tree kangaroos (Dendrolagus matschiei) in Papua New Guinea. The health assessment included physical examination, morphometrics, cloacal swab; and blood, hair, and feces collection. Radio-collars were placed on free-ranging tree kangaroos to determine home range and forest habitat use. The free-ranging tree kangaroos were lightly anesthetized with tiletamine/zolazepam for the data collection. A total of nine free-ranging and seven captive tree kangaroos were evaluated; medical samples were collected from six and five animals, respectively. Results of physical examination, anesthetic monitoring, serum vitamin, mineral, trace nutrient, and electrolytes, whole blood heavy metal analysis, mycobacterial screening, and fecal examinations are presented. Free-ranging tree kangaroos had significantly lower values for beta carotene, copper, selenium, molybdenum, lead, and arsenic and significantly higher values for vitamin E than captive individuals. Cloacal swabs were all negative for Mycobacterium avium via polymerase chain reaction. Some free-ranging and captive individuals had positive coprologic exams revealing Eimeria spp. oocysts and strongyle spp. type ova. These are the first medical and anesthetic data published on Matschie's tree kangaroos from Papua New Guinea.

  16. Commentary: Understanding the origins of anger, contempt, and disgust in public health policy disputes: applying moral psychology to harm reduction debates.

    PubMed

    Alderman, Jess; Dollar, Katherine M; Kozlowski, Lynn T

    2010-04-01

    Scientific disputes about public health issues can become emotional battlefields marked by strong emotions like anger, contempt, and disgust. Contemporary work in moral psychology demonstrates that each of these emotions is a reaction to a specific type of moral violation. Applying this work to harm reduction debates, specifically the use of smokeless tobacco to reduce harm from tobacco use, we attempt to explain why some public health disputes have been so heated. Public health ethics tend to emphasize social justice concerns to the exclusion of other moral perspectives that value scientific authority, professional loyalty, and bodily purity. An awareness of their different emotional reactions and underlying moral motivations might help public health professionals better understand each others' viewpoints, ultimately leading to more productive dialogue.

  17. Persistent Persister Misperceptions

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jun-Seob; Wood, Thomas K.

    2016-01-01

    Persister cells survive antibiotic treatment due to their lack of metabolism, rather than through genetic change, as shown via four seminal experiments conducted by the discoverers of the phenotype (Hobby et al., 1942; Bigger, 1944). Unfortunately, over seven decades of persister cell research, the literature has been populated by misperceptions that do not withstand scrutiny. This opinion piece examines some of those misunderstandings in the literature with the hope that by shining some light on these inaccuracies, the field may be advanced and subsequent manuscripts may be reviewed more critically. PMID:28082974

  18. Water use and the thermoregulatory behaviour of kangaroos in arid regions: insights into the colonisation of arid rangelands in Australia by the Eastern Grey Kangaroo (Macropus giganteus).

    PubMed

    Dawson, Terence J; McTavish, Kirsten J; Munn, Adam J; Holloway, Joanne

    2006-01-01

    The Eastern Grey Kangaroo (Macropus giganteus) occurs mostly in the wetter regions of eastern Australia. However, in the past 30-40 years it has moved into more arid regions (rainfall < 250 mm), thus increasing its overlap zone with the xeric adapted Red Kangaroo (Macropus rufus). An increased access to water (supplied for domestic stock) may explain this range extension, but changes in the availability of preferred feed could also be involved. The water use, drinking patterns and thermoregulatory behaviour of these two species of kangaroo have been examined in a semi-free range study, during summer at an arid rangeland site. Foraging was largely nocturnal in both species and during the day they behaved to reduce heat loads. This was especially so for M. giganteus, which showed greater shade seeking. However, it still used more water (72 +/- 2.6 mL kg(-1) day(-1), mean +/- SE) than M. rufus (56 +/- 7.6 mL kg(-1) day(-1)) and drank twice as frequently. Although M. giganteus produced a less concentrated urine (1422 +/- 36 mosmol kg(-1)) than M. rufus (1843 +/- 28 mosmol kg(-1)), kidney physiology did not explain all of the differences in water metabolism between the species. Water from the feed and faecal water retention also appear to be involved. Broadly, a better access to reliable water and the utilisation of mesic microhabitats has enabled M. giganteus to make inroads into the changing rangelands of eastern Australia. However, changes in the vegetation, due to stock grazing, have also favoured M. giganteus, which is a grass eating specialist.

  19. Effect of repeated Kangaroo Mother Care on repeated procedural pain in preterm infants: A randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Gao, Haixia; Xu, Guihua; Gao, Honglian; Dong, Rongzhi; Fu, Hongjie; Wang, Danwen; Zhang, Heng; Zhang, Hua

    2015-07-01

    Preterm infants' repeated exposure to painful procedures may lead to negative consequences. Thus, non-pharmacological pain management is essential due to medication side effects. Kangaroo Mother Care, which aims at offering human care to neonates, has been established for the treatment of a single painful procedure, but the effectiveness of Kangaroo Mother Care across repeated painful procedures is unknown. To test the effectiveness of repeated Kangaroo Mother Care on repeated heel-stick pain in preterm neonates. Randomized controlled trial. Level III Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at a large teaching hospital in northeast China. Preterm infants (gestational age less than 37 weeks) (n=80) were recruited and randomly assigned using a random table format to either an incubator group (n=40) or Kangaroo Mother Care group (n=40). Pain assessments were carried out during four routine heel stick procedures. For the first heel stick, preterm infants in each group received no intervention (routinely stayed in incubator). During the next three heel sticks, the infants in Kangaroo Mother Care group received heel sticks during Kangaroo Mother Care, while infants in the incubator group received heel sticks in incubator. The procedure of each heel stick included 3 phases: baseline, blood collection and recovery. Crying, grimacing and heart rate in response to pain were evaluated at each phase across four heel sticks by three trained independent observers who were blinded to the purpose of the study. Data were analyzed by analysis of variance (ANOVA), with repeated measures at different evaluation phases of heel stick. 75 preterm infants completed the protocol. Between-group comparison revealed that preterm infants' heart rate was significantly lower, and the duration of crying and facial grimacing were both significantly shorter in the Kangaroo Mother Care group (n=38) than the incubator group (n=37) from the blood collection phase to recovery phase during repeated heel sticks. No

  20. Divergence in sink contributions to population persistence.

    PubMed

    Heinrichs, Julie A; Lawler, Joshua J; Schumaker, Nathan H; Wilsey, Chad B; Bender, Darren J

    2015-12-01

    Population sinks present unique conservation challenges. The loss of individuals in sinks can compromise persistence; but conversely, sinks can improve viability by improving connectivity and facilitating the recolonization of vacant sources. To assess the contribution of sinks to regional population persistence of declining populations, we simulated source-sink dynamics for 3 very different endangered species: Black-capped Vireos (Vireo atricapilla) at Fort Hood, Texas, Ord's kangaroo rats (Dipodomys ordii) in Alberta, and Northern Spotted Owls (Strix occidentalis caurina) in the northwestern United States. We used empirical data from these case studies to parameterize spatially explicit individual-based models. We then used the models to quantify population abundance and persistence with and without long-term sinks. The contributions of sink habitats varied widely. Sinks were detrimental, particularly when they functioned as strong sinks with few emigrants in declining populations (e.g., Alberta's Ord's kangaroo rat) and benign in robust populations (e.g., Black-capped Vireos) when Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater) parasitism was controlled. Sinks, including ecological traps, were also crucial in delaying declines when there were few sources (e.g., in Black-capped Vireo populations with no Cowbird control). Sink contributions were also nuanced. For example, sinks that supported large, variable populations were subject to greater extinction risk (e.g., Northern Spotted Owls). In each of our case studies, new context-dependent sinks emerged, underscoring the dynamic nature of sources and sinks and the need for frequent re-assessment. Our results imply that management actions based on assumptions that sink habitats are generally harmful or helpful risk undermining conservation efforts for declining populations. © 2015 Society for Conservation Biology.

  1. Somatic Expression and Autosomal Inheritance of Phosphoglycerate Kinase B in Kangaroos

    PubMed Central

    Vandeberg, J. L.; Cooper, D. W.; Sharman, G. B.; Poole, W. E.

    1980-01-01

    The PGK-B isozyme, currently known as PGK-2 in the mouse nomenclature, is the predominant PGK isozyme in mammalian sperm. In many species it is detectable only in sperm, in spermatogenic testes and in epididymides containing sperm. In this paper, we provide evidence that some kangaroo species express low PGK-B activity in somatic tissues, in addition to high activity in testes. Three kangaroo species, M. rufogriseus, M. robustus and M. giganteus, exhibit polymorphism of PGK-B. Breeding data support the hypothesis of autosomal co-dominant inheritance, as is the case in mice. Population data for the three polymorphisms are discussed. PGK-B is not detectable in somatic tissues or spermatogenic testis extracts of monotreme mammals, birds or lizards; it is probably restricted to therian mammals. PMID:7203002

  2. The complete mitochondrial genome of the Dipodomys ordii (Ord's kangaroo rat).

    PubMed

    Chen, Dayang; Zhang, Kai; Liu, Sheng; Chen, Fang

    2016-11-01

    Ord's kangaroo rat is a kangaroo rat native to western North America. In this study, we first reported the complete mitochondrial genome of Dipodomys ordii that the first has the complete mitochondrial genome in the genus of Heteromyidae. The mitogenome is a circular molecule of 16 257 bp in length, containing 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNAs, 22 transfer RNAs and a putative displacement loop region. All protein-coding genes started with a traditional ATN codon and terminated with the mitochondria stop codon (TAA/TAG/AGA) or a single T base. The gene order and composition of mitogenome was similar to that of most other Sciurognathi species and its GC content was 36.73%. Thirteen protein-coding genes of D. ordii together with eight other closely species were used to construct the species phylogenetic tree for verification of the accuracy of new determined mitogenome sequences.

  3. Wheel running of kangaroo rats, Dipodomys merriami, as related to food deprivation and body composition.

    PubMed

    Dill, D B; Soholt, L F; Morris, J D

    1978-01-01

    Kangaroo rats deprived of food ran themselves to death in 48 h in wheel cages. Despite the loss of 14.5% of body weight the ratio of water to protein was the same after the run as it was in control rats. Metabolic measurements at rest and in the running wheel and weight loss in the 48-h run were used to estimate fuels used and water expended. Two-thirds of the initial amount of fat and 9% of the protein were metabolized. The terminal mean percentage of body fat was about twice that observed in rats trapped in the spring of 1967, when seed production was low: death in the 48-h run could not have been due to depletion of body fat alone. The powerful activity drive seen in hungary kangaroo rats presumably is intensified in dry years when food is scarce and may deplete their reserves enough to result in death from starvation.

  4. The complete mitochondrial genome of the eastern grey kangaroo (Macropus giganteus).

    PubMed

    Dodt, William G; McComish, Bennet J; Nilsson, Maria A; Gibb, Gillian C; Penny, David; Phillips, Matthew J

    2016-01-01

    We present the complete mitochondrial genome (accession number: LK995454) of an iconic Australian species, the eastern grey kangaroo (Macropus giganteus). The mitogenomic organization is consistent with other marsupials, encoding 13 protein-coding genes, 22 tRNA genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes, an origin of light strand replication and a control region or D-loop. No repetitive sequences were detected in the control region. The M. giganteus mitogenome exemplifies a combination of tRNA gene order and structural peculiarities that appear to be unique to marsupials. We present a maximum likelihood phylogeny based on complete mitochondrial protein and RNA coding sequences that confirms the phylogenetic position of the grey kangaroo among macropodids.

  5. Cryptosporidium cuniculus--new records in human and kangaroo in Australia.

    PubMed

    Koehler, Anson V; Whipp, Margaret J; Haydon, Shane R; Gasser, Robin B

    2014-10-30

    To date, Cryptosporidium cuniculus has been found exclusively in rabbits and humans. The present study provides the first published molecular evidence for C. cuniculus in an Australian human patient as well as a kangaroo. Using PCR-based sequencing of regions in the actin, 60 kDa glycoprotein (gp60) and small subunit of ribosomal RNA (SSU) genes, we identified a new and unique C. cuniculus genotype (akin to VbA25) from a human, and C. cuniculus genotype VbA26 from an Eastern grey kangaroo (Macropus giganteus) in Australia. The characterisation of these genotypes raises questions as to their potential to infect humans and/or other animals in Australia, given that C. cuniculus has been reported to cause cryptosporidiosis outbreaks in Europe.

  6. Late pleistocene Australian marsupial DNA clarifies the affinities of extinct megafaunal kangaroos and wallabies.

    PubMed

    Llamas, Bastien; Brotherton, Paul; Mitchell, Kieren J; Templeton, Jennifer E L; Thomson, Vicki A; Metcalf, Jessica L; Armstrong, Kyle N; Kasper, Marta; Richards, Stephen M; Camens, Aaron B; Lee, Michael S Y; Cooper, Alan

    2015-03-01

    Understanding the evolution of Australia's extinct marsupial megafauna has been hindered by a relatively incomplete fossil record and convergent or highly specialized morphology, which confound phylogenetic analyses. Further, the harsh Australian climate and early date of most megafaunal extinctions (39-52 ka) means that the vast majority of fossil remains are unsuitable for ancient DNA analyses. Here, we apply cross-species DNA capture to fossils from relatively high latitude, high altitude caves in Tasmania. Using low-stringency hybridization and high-throughput sequencing, we were able to retrieve mitochondrial sequences from two extinct megafaunal macropodid species. The two specimens, Simosthenurus occidentalis (giant short-faced kangaroo) and Protemnodon anak (giant wallaby), have been radiocarbon dated to 46-50 and 40-45 ka, respectively. This is significantly older than any Australian fossil that has previously yielded DNA sequence information. Processing the raw sequence data from these samples posed a bioinformatic challenge due to the poor preservation of DNA. We explored several approaches in order to maximize the signal-to-noise ratio in retained sequencing reads. Our findings demonstrate the critical importance of adopting stringent processing criteria when distant outgroups are used as references for mapping highly fragmented DNA. Based on the most stringent nucleotide data sets (879 bp for S. occidentalis and 2,383 bp for P. anak), total-evidence phylogenetic analyses confirm that macropodids consist of three primary lineages: Sthenurines such as Simosthenurus (extinct short-faced kangaroos), the macropodines (all other wallabies and kangaroos), and the enigmatic living banded hare-wallaby Lagostrophus fasciatus (Lagostrophinae). Protemnodon emerges as a close relative of Macropus (large living kangaroos), a position not supported by recent morphological phylogenetic analyses. © The Authors 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of

  7. The kangaroo cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate receptor binds insulin-like growth factor II with low affinity.

    PubMed

    Yandell, C A; Dunbar, A J; Wheldrake, J F; Upton, Z

    1999-09-17

    The mammalian cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate receptor (CI-MPR) binds mannose 6-phosphate-bearing glycoproteins and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-II. However, the CI-MPR from the opossum has been reported to bind bovine IGF-II with low affinity (Dahms, N. M., Brzycki-Wessell, M. A., Ramanujam, K. S., and Seetharam, B. (1993) Endocrinology 133, 440-446). This may reflect the use of a heterologous ligand, or it may represent the intrinsic binding affinity of this receptor. To examine the binding of IGF-II to a marsupial CI-MPR in a homologous system, we have previously purified kangaroo IGF-II (Yandell, C. A., Francis, G. L., Wheldrake, J. F., and Upton, Z. (1998) J. Endocrinol. 156, 195-204), and we now report the purification and characterization of the CI-MPR from kangaroo liver. The interaction of the kangaroo CI-MPR with IGF-II has been examined by ligand blotting, radioreceptor assay, and real-time biomolecular interaction analysis. Using both a heterologous and homologous approach, we have demonstrated that the kangaroo CI-MPR has a lower binding affinity for IGF-II than its eutherian (placental mammal) counterparts. Furthermore, real-time biomolecular interaction analysis revealed that the kangaroo CI-MPR has a higher affinity for kangaroo IGF-II than for human IGF-II. The cDNA sequence of the kangaroo CI-MPR indicates that there is considerable divergence in the area corresponding to the IGF-II binding site of the eutherian receptor. Thus, the acquisition of a high-affinity binding site for regulating IGF-II appears to be a recent event specific to the eutherian lineage.

  8. Thoracic spine morphology of a pseudo-biped animal model (kangaroo) and comparisons with human and quadruped animals.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, Sriram; Peters, James R; Robinson, Lucy F; Singh, Anita; Kent, Richard W

    2016-12-01

    Based on the structural anatomy, loading condition and range of motion (ROM), no quadruped animal has been shown to accurately mimic the structure and biomechanical function of the human spine. The objective of this study is to quantify the thoracic vertebrae geometry of the kangaroo, and compare with adult human, pig, sheep, and deer. The thoracic vertebrae (T1-T12) from whole body CT scans of ten juvenile kangaroos (ages 11-14 months) were digitally reconstructed and geometric dimensions of the vertebral bodies, endplates, pedicles, spinal canal, processes, facets and intervertebral discs were recorded. Similar data available in the literature on the adult human, pig, sheep, and deer were compared to the kangaroo. A non-parametric trend analysis was performed. Thoracic vertebral dimensions of the juvenile kangaroo were found to be generally smaller than those of the adult human and quadruped animals. The most significant (p < 0.001) correlations (Rho) found between the human and kangaroo were in vertebrae and endplate dimensions (0.951 ≤ Rho ≤ 0.963), pedicles (0.851 ≤ Rho ≤ 0.951), and inter-facet heights (0.891 ≤ Rho ≤ 0.967). The deer displayed the least similar trends across vertebral levels. Similarities in thoracic spine vertebral geometry, particularly of the vertebrae, pedicles and facets may render the kangaroo a more clinically relevant human surrogate for testing spinal implants. The pseudo-biped kangaroo may also be a more suitable model for the human thoracic spine for simulating spine deformities, based on previously published similarities in biomechanical loading, posture and ROM.

  9. Anthelmintic Treatment Does Not Change Foraging Strategies of Female Eastern Grey Kangaroos, Macropus giganteus

    PubMed Central

    Cripps, Jemma K.; Martin, Jennifer K.; Coulson, Graeme

    2016-01-01

    Large mammalian herbivores are commonly infected with gastrointestinal helminths. Heavily parasitised hosts are likely to have increased nutritional requirements and would be predicted to increase their food intake to compensate for costs of being parasitised, but experimental tests of the impacts of these parasites on the foraging efficiency of hosts are lacking, particularly in free-ranging wildlife. We conducted a field experiment on a population of free-ranging eastern grey kangaroos (Macropus giganteus) to test this prediction, removing nematodes from one group of adult females using an anthelmintic treatment. We then carried out observations before and following treatment to assess the influence of parasites on foraging behaviour. Contrary to our predictions, the manipulation of parasite burdens did not result in changes in any of the key foraging variables we measured. Our results suggest that despite carrying large burdens of gastrointestinal parasites, the foraging strategy of female kangaroos is likely be driven by factors unrelated to parasitism, and that kangaroos in high nutritional environments may be able acquire sufficient nutrients to offset the costs of parasitism. We conclude that the drivers of forage intake likely differ between domesticated and free-ranging herbivores, and that free-ranging hosts are likely more resilient to parasitism. PMID:26784582

  10. Effects of bannertail kangaroo rat mounds on small-scale plant community structure.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qinfeng

    1996-04-01

    The effects of bannertail kangaroo rat (Dipodomys spectabilis) mounds and associated soil-surface disturbance on plant species composition and diversity in the Chihuahuan Desert were examined with multivariate analysis. Kangaroo rat mounds created disturbance gaps and contributed to local species diversity by creating microhabitats that supported unique plant communities. These microhabitats supported populations of species that were relatively rare in surrounding areas. The diversity observed at the whole habitat level resulted from (1) local spatial heterogeneity, because the mounds offered microenvironments with distinctive nutrient, water, and light conditions; and (2) local patterning of disturbance, because the digging and traffic of the kangaroo rats maintained high levels of soil disturbance at and near the mounds. At a finer scale, species diversity was highest in the area immediately adjacent to active and inactive mounds, and was lower on both the highly disturbed soil of the mounds and in the relatively undisturbed area between mounds. Lowest species diversity occurred on inactive mounds. Annual plant biomass was much greater on mounds than in inter-mound areas. The results support the predictions that intermediate levels of disturbance and small-scale environmental heterogeneity contribute to supporting high species diversity.

  11. Partitioning the effects of an ecosystem engineer: kangaroo rats control community structure via multiple pathways.

    PubMed

    Prugh, Laura R; Brashares, Justin S

    2012-05-01

    1. Ecosystem engineers impact communities by altering habitat conditions, but they can also have strong effects through consumptive, competitive and other non-engineering pathways. 2. Engineering effects can lead to fundamentally different community dynamics than non-engineering effects, but the relative strengths of these interactions are seldom quantified. 3. We combined structural equation modelling and exclosure experiments to partition the effects of a keystone engineer, the giant kangaroo rat (Dipodomys ingens), on plants, invertebrates and vertebrates in a semi-arid California grassland. 4. We separated the effects of burrow creation from kangaroo rat density and found that kangaroo rats increased the diversity and abundance of other species via both engineering and non-engineering pathways. 5. Engineering was the primary factor structuring plant and small mammal communities, whereas non-engineering effects structured invertebrate communities and increased lizard abundance. 6. These results highlight the importance of the non-engineering effects of ecosystem engineers and shed new light on the multiple pathways by which strong-interactors shape communities. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Animal Ecology © 2011 British Ecological Society.

  12. Use of “Kangaroo Care” to Alleviate the Intensity of Vaccination Pain in Newborns

    PubMed Central

    Saeidi, Reza; Asnaashari, Zahra; Amirnejad, Mohtaram; Esmaeili, Habibollah; Robatsangi, Mahboobe Gholami

    2011-01-01

    Objective It has been demonstrated that newborns feel pain completely. Thus, they should be treated with this in mind. Recent research showed that non-pharmacological interventions such as “Kangaroo Care” may be useful for decreasing pain in newborns. We tried to determine the effect of kangaroo care on the pain intensity of vaccination in healthy newborns. Methods This study was a randomized case-control clinical trial. Subjects were 60 healthy full-term newborns delivered in a general Hospital, in Iran, from March to July 2006. They were randomly assigned to case and control groups. The case group received 30 minutes skin to skin contact, whereas infants in the control group were put, wrapped in a blanket, aside the mothers. Behavioral changes of newborns were evaluated and observed 2 minutes before, during, and 3 minutes after the intervention. All procedures were filmed. An assistant who was blinded to the study, scored behavior changes using Neonatal/Infant Pain Scale. Heart rate and oxygen saturation levels as displayed on the pulse monitor and duration of crying were recorded using a stopwatch. Findings Mean pain intensity during the intervention v was significantly lower in the case group (P<0.006). Mean pain intensity 3 minutes after intervention was also significantly lower in the case group (P<0.021). Mean duration of crying was significantly lower in case group as well (P<0.001). Conclusion Kangaroo care may be used to decrease pain intensity in newborns undergoing painful procedures. PMID:23056772

  13. Extinction implications of a chenopod browse diet for a giant Pleistocene kangaroo.

    PubMed

    Prideaux, Gavin J; Ayliffe, Linda K; DeSantis, Larisa R G; Schubert, Blaine W; Murray, Peter F; Gagan, Michael K; Cerling, Thure E

    2009-07-14

    Kangaroos are the world's most diverse group of herbivorous marsupials. Following late-Miocene intensification of aridity and seasonality, they radiated across Australia, becoming the continent's ecological equivalents of the artiodactyl ungulates elsewhere. Their diversity peaked during the Pleistocene, but by approximately 45,000 years ago, 90% of larger kangaroos were extinct, along with a range of other giant species. Resolving whether climate change or human arrival was the principal extinction cause remains highly contentious. Here we combine craniodental morphology, stable-isotopic, and dental microwear data to reveal that the largest-ever kangaroo, Procoptodon goliah, was a chenopod browse specialist, which may have had a preference for Atriplex (saltbushes), one of a few dicots using the C(4) photosynthetic pathway. Furthermore, oxygen isotope signatures of P. goliah tooth enamel show that it drank more in low-rainfall areas than its grazing contemporaries, similar to modern saltbush feeders. Saltbushes and chenopod shrublands in general are poorly flammable, so landscape burning by humans is unlikely to have caused a reduction in fodder driving the species to extinction. Aridity is discounted as a primary cause because P. goliah evolved in response to increased aridity and disappeared during an interval wetter than many it survived earlier. Hunting by humans, who were also bound to water, may have been a more decisive factor in the extinction of this giant marsupial.

  14. A Reproductive Management Program for an Urban Population of Eastern Grey Kangaroos (Macropus giganteus)

    PubMed Central

    Tribe, Andrew; Hanger, Jon; McDonald, Ian J.; Loader, Jo; Nottidge, Ben J.; McKee, Jeff J.; Phillips, Clive J. C.

    2014-01-01

    Simple Summary We designed a programme to control free-ranging kangaroos on a Queensland golf course, using contraceptive implants in females and vasectomisation or testicle removal in males. This reduced the numbers of pouch young to about one half of pre-intervention levels and controlled the population over a 2–4 year period. However, the necessary darting caused a mortality rate of 5–10% of captured animals, mainly due to complications before and after anaesthesia. It is concluded that population control is possible but careful management of kangaroos around the time of anaesthesia induction and recovery is important in such programmes to minimise losses. Abstract Traditionally, culling has been the expedient, most common, and in many cases, the only tool used to control free-ranging kangaroo populations. We applied a reproductive control program to a population of eastern grey kangaroos confined to a golf course in South East Queensland. The program aimed to reduce fecundity sufficiently for the population to decrease over time so that overgrazing of the fairways and the frequency of human–animal conflict situations were minimised. In 2003, 92% of the female kangaroos above 5 kg bodyweight were implanted with the GnRH agonist deslorelin after darting with a dissociative anaesthetic. In 2007, 86% of the females above 5 kg were implanted with deslorelin and also 87% of the males above 5 kg were sterilised by either orchidectomy or vasectomy. In 2005, 2008 and 2009, the population was censused to assess the effect of each treatment. The 2003 deslorelin program resulted in effective zero population growth for approximately 2.5 years. The combined deslorelin–surgery program in 2007 reduced the birth rate from 0.3 to 0.06%/year for 16 months, resulting in a 27% population reduction by November 2009. The results were consistent with implants conferring contraception to 100% of implanted females for at least 12 months. The iatrogenic mortality rates for each

  15. Weight-Gain Velocity in Newborn Infants Managed with the Kangaroo Method and Associated Variables.

    PubMed

    Nobre, Raquel Guimarães; de Azevedo, Daniela Vasconcelos; de Almeida, Paulo César; de Almeida, Nádia Maria Girão Saraiva; Feitosa, Francisco Edson de Lucena

    2017-01-01

    Objectives The Kangaroo method helps promote maternal breastfeeding and adequate growth of low birthweight preterm infants. The objective of this study was to analyze the association between weight-gain velocity during use of the Kangaroo method and maternal and infant variables. Methods A nested cross-sectional study in a cohort of newborn infants managed using the Kangaroo method was carried out at a reference center for the method in Brazil. Data on low birthweight and preterm infants managed using the Kangaroo Method (n = 78) and on their respective mothers (n = 70) was collected between January and July 2014. Maternal and infant variables were associated and correlated with weight-gain velocity (g/kg/day) at each phase of the method (p < 0.05). Results Mean weight-gain velocity increased from 0.12 ± 11.11 g/kg/day in the first phase to 13.47 ± 4.84 g/kg/day in the third phase (p < 0.001), and percentage of adequate weight increased at phase 3 (p < 0.001). Birthweight was inversely correlated with weight-gain velocity at phases 1 and 2 of the Kangaroo method. Birthweight of under 1500 g was associated with a lower likelihood of inadequate weight-gain velocity of the newborn at phase 1 (OR = 0.1; 95 % CI 0.01-0.78; p = 0.012). In phase 3, maternal age was directly correlated with weight-gain velocity. Conclusions Weight-gain velocity was associated with maternal (age) and infant (gestational age at birth, birthweight, weight for gestational age at birth, length of hospital stay and five-minute Apgar score) variables. Knowledge of the factors influencing weight-gain velocity and its behavior at each phase of the method can help guide conduct toward potentializing factors that promote adequate weight-gain.

  16. The effect of cryoprotectant on kangaroo sperm ultrastructure and mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    McClean, Rhett; Holt, William V; Zee, Yeng Peng; Lisle, Allan; Johnston, Stephen D

    2008-12-01

    This study examined the effect of cryoprotectants (20% DMSO, a 10% DMSO/10% glycerol mixture, 20% glycerol and 1M sucrose solution) on kangaroo sperm structure and function, along with the effect of varying concentrations of glycerol on sperm mitochondrial function. Eastern grey kangaroo cauda epididymidal spermatozoa were incubated for 10 min at 35 degrees C in each cryoprotectant and the plasma membrane integrity (PMI) and motility assessed using light microscopy. The same samples were fixed for TEM and the ultrastructural integrity of the spermatozoa examined. To investigate the effect of glycerol on the kangaroo sperm mitochondrial function, epididymidal spermatozoa were incubated with JC-1 in Tris-citrate media at 35 degrees C for 20 min in a range of glycerol concentrations (0%, 5%, 10%, 15% and 20%) and the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and plasma membrane integrity determined. As expected, incubation of spermatozoa in 20% glycerol for 10 min resulted in a significant reduction in motility, PMI and ultrastructural integrity. Interestingly, incubation in 20% DMSO resulted in no significant reduction in motility or PMI but a significant loss of structural integrity when compared to the control spermatozoa (0% cryoprotectant). However, 20% DMSO was overall less damaging to sperm ultrastructure than glycerol, a combination of 10% glycerol and 10% DMSO, and sucrose. While all glycerol concentrations had an adverse effect on mitochondrial function, the statistical models presented for the relationship between MMP and glycerol predicted that spermatozoa, when added to 20% glycerol, would lose half of their initial MMP immediately at 35 degrees C and MMP would halve after 19.4 min at 4 degrees C. Models for the relationship between PMI and glycerol predicted that spermatozoa would lose half of their initial PMI after 1.8 min at 35 degrees C and PMI would halve after 21.1 min at 4 degrees C. These results suggest that if glycerol is to be used as a

  17. Derivation of soil screening thresholds to protect chisel-toothed kangaroo rat from uranium mine waste in northern Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hinck, Jo E.; Linder, Greg L.; Otton, James K.; Finger, Susan E.; Little, Edward E.; Tillitt, Donald E.

    2013-01-01

    Chemical data from soil and weathered waste material samples collected from five uranium mines north of the Grand Canyon (three reclaimed, one mined but not reclaimed, and one never mined) were used in a screening-level risk analysis for the Arizona chisel-toothed kangaroo rat (Dipodomys microps leucotis); risks from radiation exposure were not evaluated. Dietary toxicity reference values were used to estimate soil-screening thresholds presenting risk to kangaroo rats. Sensitivity analyses indicated that body weight critically affected outcomes of exposed-dose calculations; juvenile kangaroo rats were more sensitive to the inorganic constituent toxicities than adult kangaroo rats. Species-specific soil-screening thresholds were derived for arsenic (137 mg/kg), cadmium (16 mg/kg), copper (1,461 mg/kg), lead (1,143 mg/kg), nickel (771 mg/kg), thallium (1.3 mg/kg), uranium (1,513 mg/kg), and zinc (731 mg/kg) using toxicity reference values that incorporate expected chronic field exposures. Inorganic contaminants in soils within and near the mine areas generally posed minimal risk to kangaroo rats. Most exceedances of soil thresholds were for arsenic and thallium and were associated with weathered mine wastes.

  18. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE USE OF KANGAROO POSITION ON PRETERM BABIES AND MOTHER-CHILD INTERACTION UPON DISCHARGE.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Cynthia Ribeiro do Nascimento; Campos, Luís Gustavo; Lucena, Aline Moreira; Pereira, Janser Moura; Costa, Patrícia Rodrigues da; Lima, Flávia Aparecida Felipe de; Azevedo, Vivian Mara Gonçalves de Oliveira

    2017-01-01

    To analyze the influence of the Kangaroo Position duration in the initial interactions between mothers and preterm infants. This is an exploratory prospective observational study that analyzed the mother-infant interaction during breastfeeding, before hospital discharge. All eligible newborns, with a gestational age of 28-32 weeks and a birth weight of 1,000-1,800 g from June 11 to September 31, 2014 were included. The films of the interaction were evaluated by the "Mother-Baby Interaction Protocol 0-6 months" tool. The duration of the Kangaroo Position during all the hospitalization period was correlated with the interaction between mother and preterm infant. The longer the dyad spent time in the Kangaroo Position, the more the newborns made physical contact attempts with their mothers during breastfeeding (r=0.37; p=0.03); and the longer the time in the Kangaroo Position, the less the mothers talked to their children (r=-0.47; p=0.006). Longer periods in the Kangaroo Position stimulates the initial exchanges of contact between preterm infant with his mother, which suggests a higher alert status of the newborn and a better availability for interactions with the mother during breastfeeding.

  19. Characterization of the estrous cycle and assessment of reproductive status in Matschie's tree kangaroo (Dendrolagus matschiei) with fecal progestin profiles.

    PubMed

    North, Lindsay A; Harder, John D

    2008-03-01

    The population of Matschie's tree kangaroos (Dendrolagus matschiei) held in North American zoos has declined to critically low numbers, and information on the reproductive biology of tree kangaroos is limited. The objectives of this study were to (1) characterize the temporal features of the estrous cycle through the measurement of fecal progesterone metabolite (i.e., progestin) concentrations and (2) determine the reproductive status of female tree kangaroos in the captive population of North America through the identification of estrous cyclicity. Fecal pellets and observations of estrous behaviors were collected from 16 captive female tree kangaroos. Fecal pellets were sampled and extracted with methanol, and progestin concentrations were quantified using a radioimmunoassay (RIA) for progesterone and its metabolites. A progestin profile was obtained for each female by plotting fecal progestin concentrations for every third day over a 120-day period. Profiles for 12 of 16 females showed evidence of estrous cyclicity (P<0.01). The mean length of the estrous cycle was estimated at 58.9+/-2.4 days (n=11). Progestin concentrations were low during the first 15-20 days of the luteal phase and remained elevated above baseline only during the last 30.2+/-3.2 days of the luteal phase, which averaged 46.6+/-2.5 days in duration. The progestin profile observed in the estrous cycle of Matschie's tree kangaroos in this study is very similar to that seen in the non-pregnant cycle of several other species in the family Macropodidae.

  20. The Kangaroo Program at a Brazilian maternity hospital: the preterm/low-weight babies' health-care under examination.

    PubMed

    Véras, Renata Meira; Traverso-Yépez, Martha

    2011-03-01

    The Kangaroo Program, originally developed in Colombia, was adopted as a public policy by the Brazilian Unified Health System (SUS) in 2000, in an effort to improve maternal and infant health in the country. This article aims to examine the Kangaroo Program as it is practiced and carried out at a maternity hospital in the northeastern Brazilian region. Through an institutional ethnographic approach, research demonstrates that the Kangaroo Program has been effective in saving lives and improving some of the infants' health outcomes. However, research also demonstrates that: (i) the socioeconomic profile of mothers in the Kangaroo Program, (ii) conflicting relationships between healthcare workers and users, and (iii) lack of socioeconomic and emotional support are impairing the adequate implementation of the program. Due to the low literacy level of most of these mothers, institutional power is used as a form of social control to keep mothers uninformed about the possibility of leaving the maternity wards. In a two-tier health system, this controlling behavior is part of existing social inequities, as the Kangaroo Program is a choice in the private health system but tends to be mandatory at SUS maternity hospitals across Brazil.

  1. Latin American Clinical Epidemiology Network Series - Paper 9: The Kangaroo Mother Care Method: from scientific evidence generated in Colombia to worldwide practice.

    PubMed

    Charpak, Nathalie; Ruiz, Juan Gabriel

    2017-06-01

    Kangaroo Mother Care (KMC) is a human-based care intervention devised to complement neonatal care for low birth weight and premature infants. Kangaroo position (skin-to-skin contact on the mother's chest) offers thermal regulation, physiological stability, appropriate stimulation, and enhances bonding and breastfeeding. Kangaroo nutrition is based on breastfeeding, and kangaroo discharge policy relies on family empowerment and early discharge in kangaroo position with close ambulatory follow-up. We describe how the evidence has been developed and how it has been put into practice by means of direct preterm infants care and dissemination of the method, including training of KMC excellence centers in many countries not only in Latin America but worldwide. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Study comparing "Kangaroo Ward Care" with "Intermediate Intensive Care" for improving the growth outcome and cost effectiveness: randomized control trial.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Deepak; Murki, Srinivas; Oleti, Tejo Pratap

    2017-08-02

    The aim of this study was to compare growth outcome and cost effectiveness of "Kangaroo ward care" (KWC) with "Intermediate intensive care" (IIC) in stable infants with birth weight 1000 g to <1100 g. In this secondary analysis, we included 79 infants, with birth weight 1000 g to <1100 g. Thirty-eight were randomized to KWC and 41 to IIC group once the infant reached a weight of 1150 g. Infants in the KWC group were shifted to Kangaroo ward immediately after randomization and in the IIC group received IIC care till they attained a weight of 1250 g before shifting to Kangaroo Ward. After shifting to Kangaroo ward, infants in the IIC group received equivalent care to KWC group infants. There was significant better weight gain post-randomization during hospital stay and better length gain till 40 weeks of gestational age in intervention arm. There was reduction of post-randomization hospital stay by 2 d in the KWC group. The infants in the KWC group were shifted 6 d earlier to Kangaroo ward from IIC when compared with the IIC group. The cost-effective analysis that used "top-down" and "bottom-up" accounting method showed significant reduction of hospital and parents expenditure in the KWC group (p < .001) with saving of 570 USD per patient in the KWC group. Early shifting of infants to Kangaroo ward with birth weight 1000 g to <1100 g leads to better growth and is cost effective (CTRI/2014/05/004625). Clinical trial registry of India CTRI/2014/05/004625.

  3. Kangaroo IGF-II is structurally and functionally similar to the human [Ser29]-IGF-II variant.

    PubMed

    Yandell, C A; Francis, G L; Wheldrake, J F; Upton, Z

    1999-06-01

    Kangaroo IGF-II has been purified from western grey kangaroo (Macropus fuliginosus) serum and characterised in a number of in vitro assays. In addition, the complete cDNA sequence of mature IGF-II has been obtained by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. Comparison of the kangaroo IGF-II cDNA sequence with known IGF-II sequences from other species revealed that it is very similar to the human variant, [Ser29]-hIGF-II. Both the variant and kangaroo IGF-II contain an insert of nine nucleotides that encode the amino acids Leu-Pro-Gly at the junction of the B and C domains of the mature protein. The deduced kangaroo IGF-II protein sequence also contains three other amino acid changes that are not observed in human IGF-II. These amino acid differences share similarities with the changes described in many of the IGF-IIs reported for non-mammalian species. Characterisation of human IGF-II, kangaroo IGF-II, chicken IGF-II and [Ser29]-hIGF-II in a number of in vitro assays revealed that all four proteins are functionally very similar. No significant differences were observed in the ability of the IGF-IIs to bind to the bovine IGF-II/cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate receptor or to stimulate protein synthesis in rat L6 myoblasts. However, differences were observed in their abilities to bind to IGF-binding proteins (IGFBPs) present in human serum. Kangaroo, chicken and [Ser29]-hIGF-II had lower apparent affinities for human IGFBPs than did human IGF-II. Thus, it appears that the major circulating form of IGF-II in the kangaroo and a minor form of IGF-II found in human serum are structurally and functionally very similar. This suggests that the splice site that generates both the variant and major form of human IGF-II must have evolved after the divergence of marsupials from placental mammals.

  4. Spatial dynamics of the bacterial community structure in the gastrointestinal tract of red kangaroo (Macropus rufus).

    PubMed

    Li, Meirong; Jin, Wei; Li, Yuanfei; Zhao, Lingling; Cheng, Yanfen; Zhu, Weiyun

    2016-06-01

    The quantification and community of bacteria in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract (stomach, jejunum, ileum, cecum, colon and rectum) of red kangaroos (Macropus rufus) were examined by using real-time PCR and paired-end Illumina sequencing. The quantification of bacteria showed that the number of bacteria in jejunum and rectum was significantly lower than that in colon and cecum (P < 0.05). A total of 1,872,590 sequences was remained after quality-filtering and 50,948 OTUs were identified at the 97 % similarity level. The dominant phyla in the GI tract of red kangaroos were identified as Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes. At the level of genus, the samples from different parts of GI tract clustered into three groups: stomach, small intestine (jejunum and ileum) and large intestine (cecum and rectum). Prevotella (29.81 %) was the most dominant genus in the stomach and significantly (P < 0.05) higher than that in other parts of GI tract. In the small intestine, Bifidobacterium (33.04, 12.14 %) and Streptococcus (22.90, 19.16 %) were dominant genera. Unclassified Ruminococcaceae was the most dominant family in large intestine and the total relative abundance of unclassified bacteria was above 50 %. In identified genera, Dorea was the most important variable to discriminate large intestine and it was significantly higher in cecum than in stomach, small intestine and colon (P < 0.05). Bifidobacterium (21.89 %) was the only dominant genus in colon. Future work on culture in vitro and genome sequencing of those unidentified bacteria might give us insight into the function of these microorganisms in the GI tract. In addition, the comparison of the bacterial community in the foregut of kangaroos and other herbivores and the rumen might give us insight into the mechanism of fiber degradation and help us exploit approaches to improve the feed efficiency and subsequently, reduce the methane emission from herbivores.

  5. Molecular phylogenetics of the Diprotodontia (kangaroos, wombats, koala, possums, and allies).

    PubMed

    Osborne, M J; Christidis, L; Norman, J A

    2002-11-01

    Mitochondrial ND2 sequences were used to investigate the phylogenetic relationships amongst 31 diprotodontid marsupials (kangaroos, wombats, koala, possums, and allies). ND2 sequences were analyzed separately and in conjunction with available 12S rDNA sequences for 22 diprotodontid taxa. Phylogenetic analyses consistently identified monophyly for the Burramyoidea, Phalangeroidea, Petauroidea, Tarsipedoidea, Macropodoidea, and the Vombatiformes. Like previous molecular and morphological studies, relationships between the super-families were less well resolved. Inconsistency between taxonomic rank and genetic distance was identified amongst the diprotodontids.

  6. The physics of articulated toys—a jumping and rotating kangaroo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güémez, J.; Fiolhais, M.

    2014-07-01

    We describe the physics of an articulated toy with an internal source of energy provided by a spiral spring. The toy is a funny low cost kangaroo which jumps and rotates. The study consists of mechanical and thermodynamical analyses that make use of the Newton and centre of mass equations, the rotational equations and the first law of thermodynamics. This amazing toy provides a nice demonstrative example of how new physics insights can be brought about when links with thermodynamics are established in the study of mechanical systems.

  7. Plasma endotoxin activity in kangaroos with oral necrobacillosis (lumpy jaw disease) using an automated handheld testing system.

    PubMed

    Sotohira, Yukari; Suzuki, Kazuyuki; Sasaki, Haruka; Sano, Tadashi; Tsuchiya, Masakazu; Suzuki, Yohko; Shimamori, Toshio; Tsukano, Kenji; Sato, Ayano; Yokota, Hiroshi; Asakawa, Mitsuhiko

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the reliability and effectiveness of directly determining endotoxin activity in plasma samples from kangaroos with lumpy jaw disease (LJD, n=15) and healthy controls (n=12). Prior to the present study, the ability of the commercially available automated handheld portable test system (PTS(TM)) to detect endotoxin activity in kangaroo plasma was compared with that of the traditional LAL-kinetic turbidimetric (KT) assay. Plasma samples, which were obtained from endotoxin-challenged cattle, were diluted 1:20 in endotoxin-free water and heated to 80°C for 10 min. The performance of the PTS(TM) was not significantly different from that of the traditional LAL-based assay. The data obtained using PTS(TM) correlated with those using KT (r(2)=0.963, P<0.001). These findings indicated that the PTS(TM) is applicable as a simplified system to assess endotoxin activity in macropods. In the present study, we demonstrated the diagnostic value of plasma endotoxin activity in kangaroos with systemic inflammation caused by oral necrobacillosis and identified plasma endotoxin activity as a sensitive marker of systemic inflammation in kangaroos with LJD. Based on ROC curves, we proposed a diagnostic cut-off point for endotoxin activity of >0.22 EU/ml for the identification of LJD. Our results indicate that the assessment of plasma endotoxin activity is a promising diagnostic tool for determining the outcome of LJD in captive macropods.

  8. The Differentiated Impact of Kangaroo Class Programmes in Quebec Primary Schools: Examining Behavioural Improvements in Relation to Student Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavoie, Christine; Couture, Caroline; Bégin, Jean-Yves; Massé, Line

    2017-01-01

    Inspired by Nurture Groups, Kangaroo Class (KC) programmes have been gradually expanding in francophone schools throughout the Canadian Province of Quebec. These classes are designed for primary students with social, emotional and behavioural difficulties (SEBDs) and aim to provide children with a nurturing and predictable environment. To date, KC…

  9. kangaroo, a mobile element from Volvox carteri, is a member of a newly recognized third class of retrotransposons.

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Leonard; Bouckaert, Kristine; Yeh, Fay; Kirk, David L

    2002-01-01

    Retrotransposons play an important role in the evolution of genomic structure and function. Here we report on the characterization of a novel retrotransposon called kangaroo from the multicellular green alga, Volvox carteri. kangaroo elements are highly mobile and their expression is developmentally regulated. They probably integrate via double-stranded, closed-circle DNA intermediates through the action of an encoded recombinase related to the lambda-site-specific integrase. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that kangaroo elements are closely related to other unorthodox retrotransposons including PAT (from a nematode), DIRS-1 (from Dictyostelium), and DrDIRS1 (from zebrafish). PAT and kangaroo both contain split direct repeat (SDR) termini, and here we show that DIRS-1 and DrDIRS1 elements contain terminal features structurally related to SDRs. Thus, these mobile elements appear to define a third class of retrotransposons (the DIRS1 group) that are unified by common structural features, genes, and integration mechanisms, all of which differ from those of LTR and conventional non-LTR retrotransposons. PMID:12524337

  10. Purification of a marsupial insulin: amino-acid sequence of insulin from the eastern grey kangaroo Macropus giganteus.

    PubMed

    Treacy, G B; Shaw, D C; Griffiths, M E; Jeffrey, P D

    1989-03-24

    Insulin has been purified from kangaroo pancreas by acidic ethanol extraction, diethyl ether precipitation and gel filtration. The amino-acid sequence of this, the first marsupial insulin to be studied, is reported. It differs from human insulin by only four amino-acid substitutions, all in regions of the molecule previously known to be variable. However, it should be noted that one of these, asparagine for threonine at A8, has not been reported before. Computer comparisons of all 43 insulin sequences reported to date with kangaroo insulin show it to be most closely related to a group of mammalian insulins (dog, pig, cow, human) known to be of high biological potency. The measurement of blood glucose lowering in the rabbit by kangaroo insulin is consistent with this conclusion. Comparisons of amino-acid sequences of other proteins with their kangaroo counterparts show a greater difference, in line with the time of divergence of marsupials. The limited differences observed in insulin and cytochrome c suggest that their structures need to be closely conserved in order to maintain function.

  11. How does the ecological foraging behavior of desert kangaroo rats (Dipodomys deserti) relate to their behavior on radial mazes?

    PubMed

    Timberlake, William; Hoffman, Cynthia M

    2002-11-01

    Experiment 1 showed that laboratory-reared desert kangaroo rats, like domestic Norway rats, efficiently search for food on a radial arm maze (RAM) by avoiding revisiting arms within a trial. By placing an RAM on the floor so the animals could approach food from any direction, Experiment 2 tested whether efficient search by kangaroo rats was based on tactics of distance minimizing, central-place foraging, trail following, or meandering. In contrast to the dominant trail-following tactic of domestic Norway rats (Hoffman, Timberlake, Leffel, & Gont, 1999), kangaroo rats tended to distance minimize, whether maze arms were present or not. Experiment 3 indicated that kangaroo rats treated a floor configuration of eight food cups as two patches of four, based on beeline travel between patches and meandering within them. We conclude that similar performance in an elevated RAM by different species can be based on different tactics, and we suggest that a laboratory apparatus can be used to cast light on niche-related mechanisms.

  12. Brain thermal inertia, but no evidence for selective brain cooling, in free-ranging western grey kangaroos (Macropus fuliginosus).

    PubMed

    Maloney, Shane K; Fuller, Andrea; Meyer, Leith C R; Kamerman, Peter R; Mitchell, Graham; Mitchell, Duncan

    2009-04-01

    Marsupials reportedly can implement selective brain cooling despite lacking a carotid rete. We measured brain (hypothalamic) and carotid arterial blood temperatures every 5 min for 5, 17, and 63 days in spring in three free-living western grey kangaroos. Body temperature was highest during the night, and decreased rapidly early in the morning, reaching a nadir at 10:00. The highest body temperatures recorded occurred sporadically in the afternoon, presumably associated with exercise. Hypothalamic temperature consistently exceeded arterial blood temperature, by an average 0.3 degrees C, except during these afternoon events when hypothalamic temperature lagged behind, and was occasionally lower than, the simultaneous arterial blood temperature. The reversal in temperatures resulted from the thermal inertia of the brain; changes in the brain to arterial blood temperature difference were related to the rate of change of arterial blood temperature on both heating and cooling (P < 0.001 for all three kangaroos). We conclude that these data are not evidence for active selective brain cooling in kangaroos. The effect of thermal inertia on brain temperature is larger than might be expected in the grey kangaroo, a discrepancy that we speculate derives from the unique vascular anatomy of the marsupial brain.

  13. Kangaroo Mother Care: A review of mothers׳'experiences at Bwaila hospital and Zomba Central hospital (Malawi).

    PubMed

    Chisenga, Jayne Z; Chalanda, Marcia; Ngwale, Mathews

    2015-02-01

    Kangaroo Mother Care is an intervention that can help reduce neonatal mortality rate in Malawi but it has not been rolled out to all health facilities. Understanding the mothers׳ experience would help strategise when scaling-up this intervention. to review experiences of mothers Kangaroo Mother Care at two hospitals of Bwaila and Zomba. quantitative, descriptive using open interviews. two central hospitals in Malawi. 113 mothers that were in the Kangaroo Mother Care unit and those that had come for follow-up two weeks after discharge before the study took place. mothers had high level of knowledge about the significant benefits of Kangaroo Mother Care but 84% were not aware of the services prior to their hospitalisation. 18.6% (n=19) were not counselled prior to KMC practice. Mothers preferred KMC to incubator care. There were factors affecting compliance and continuation of KMC, which were lack of support, culture, lack of assistance with skin-to-skin contact, multiple roles of the mother and stigma. mothers had a positive attitude towards KMC once fully aware of its benefits. there is need for awareness campaigns on KMC services, provision of counselling, support and assistance which can help motivate mothers and their families to comply with the guidelines of KMC services. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Circulating levels of prolactin and progesterone in a wild population of red kangaroos (Macropus rufus) Marsupialia: Macropodidae

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muths, E.; Hinds, L. A.

    1996-01-01

    Circulating progesterone and prolactin levels were measured in shot and live-caught wild red kangaroos using radioimmunoassays validated for the red kangaroo. The objective of the study was to correlate hormone profiles with reproductive status and determine if red kangaroos follow the general pattern elucidated for other macropodids. During Phase 2a lactation (<70 days) plasma progesterone concentrations were <189 pg/ml (n= 41). This value increased to >600 pg/ml (n= 32) during the transition to Phase 3 lactation (181 to 235 days) when the quiescent corpus luteum and embryo were reactivated. Progesterone concentrations then decreased to <300 pg/ml (n= 29) during dual lactation when females were suckling a neonate and a young at foot. Concentrations of prolactin during Phase 2a were <6 ng/ml (n= 17). Coincident with the period of reactivation of the diapausing blastocyst (181 to 235 days), plasma prolactin concentrations increased to 15 ng/ml (n= 32), then decreased and remained low through the subsequent stage of dual lactation. These results indicate that progesterone and prolactin profiles in wild red kangaroos follow patterns found previously in other macropodid species, the tammar and Bennett's wallabies.

  15. [Cost analysis of hospital care for newborns at risk: comparison of an Intermediate Neonatal Care Unit and a Kangaroo Unit].

    PubMed

    Entringer, Aline Piovezan; Gomes, Maria Auxiliadora de Sousa Mendes; Pinto, Márcia; Caetano, Rosângela; Magluta, Cynthia; Lamy, Zeni Carvalho

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the direct costs of implementation of the Kangaroo Method and an Intermediate Neonatal Care Unit, from the perspective of the Brazilian Unified National Health System (SUS) in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Newborns were eligible for inclusion if they were clinically stable and were able to receive care in those two modalities. A decision tree model was developed that incorporated baseline variables and costs into a hypothetical cohort of 1,000 newborns, according to the literature and expert opinions. Daily cost was BR$343.53 for the second stage of the Kangaroo Unit and BR$394.22 for the Intermediate Neonatal Care Unit. The total cost for the hypothetical cohort was BR$5,710,281.66 for the second and third stages of the Kangaroo Unit and R$7,119,865.61 for the Intermediate Neonatal Care Unit. The Intermediate Neonatal Care Unit cost 25% more than the Kangaroo Unit. The study can contribute to decision-making in health, in addition to providing support for studies related to economic evaluation in neonatal health.

  16. Dominance, body size and internal relatedness influence male reproductive success in eastern grey kangaroos (Macropus giganteus).

    PubMed

    Miller, Emily J; Eldridge, Mark D B; Cooper, Desmond W; Herbert, Catherine A

    2010-01-01

    Knowledge of the determinants of reproductive success is essential for understanding the adaptive significance of particular traits. The present study examined whether particular behavioural, morphological, physiological or genetic traits were correlated with male dominance and reproductive success using three semi-free-ranging captive populations (n = 98) of the eastern grey kangaroo (Macropus giganteus). The morphological traits measured included bodyweight, head, forearm, tail, pes and leg length, forearm and bicep circumference, and testis size. Blood samples were collected to determine serum testosterone concentrations. All individuals were typed for 10 microsatellite loci and paternity determined for each pouch young. To determine the influence of relatedness and genetic diversity on male reproductive success, internal relatedness, standardised heterozygosity and mean d(2) were calculated. Dominant males sired a significantly higher proportion of offspring than smaller, lower-ranked males and had higher testosterone concentrations. Males that sired offspring were significantly heavier and had larger body size. Sires were significantly more heterozygous and genetically dissimilar to breeding females than non-sires. Despite the wealth of knowledge on the social organisation of kangaroos, this is the first study to assign parentage and male reproductive success using molecular evidence.

  17. Does Daily Kangaroo Care Provide Sustained Pain and Stress Relief in Preterm Infants?

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Anita J.; Yates, Charlotte C.; Williams, D. Keith; Chang, Jason Y.; Hall, Richard Whit

    2014-01-01

    Objectives 1. Determine whether stress in preterm infants, measured with salivary cortisol, decreases after five days of Kangaroo Care (KC) compared to five days of Standard Care (SC). 2. To determine whether kangaroo care provides sustainable pain relief beyond the period of skin-to-skin holding. Study Design Preterm infants (n=38) born at 27-30 weeks gestational age were randomized to either the KC or the SC group and received the allocated intervention starting on day of life (DOL) five and continuing for five days. Salivary cortisol was collected on DOL five and again on DOL ten. Differences were analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA and t tests. Pain during nasal suctioning over five days was assessed using the Premature Infant Pain Profile (PIPP). Result 1. Adequate saliva samples for salivary cortisol were collected for 13 KC infants and 11 SC infants. There was no main effect of group (p=0.49), but there was a significant main effect of age (DOL five versus DOL ten), with salivary cortisol levels decreasing in both groups (p=0.02). 2. Pain scores for both groups (n=38) indicted mild to moderate pain during suctioning, with no significant difference in pain scores between groups. Conclusion 1. KC did not affect salivary cortisol levels in preterm neonates, but levels in both the KC and SC groups decreased over time from DOL five to ten. Salivary cortisol may vary with age of infant. 2. Infants experience pain during routine suctioning and may require pain management. PMID:24246458

  18. Kangaroo (skin-to-skin) care with a preterm infant before, during, and after mechanical ventilation.

    PubMed

    Swinth, Joan Y; Anderson, Gene Cranston; Hadeed, Anthony J

    2003-01-01

    Using kangaroo care (KC) with unstable and/or ventilated infants remains controversial. In this article, potential advantages for ventilated infants and their mothers are discussed. The 33-week-gestation infant in this case study presented with mild respiratory distress at birth, requiring supplemental oxygen at hour 2. With no improvement by hour 18, KC was also begun, first for 1.25 hours and then, 2 hours later, for 3.5 hours. The infant was intubated at hour 45 for increasing respiratory distress, and KC resumed 24 hours later for 1 hour and 3 hours after that for an additional 3 hours. Extubation occurred at hour 90. Kangaroo care resumed 2 hours later for periods of 1.5, 1.5, and 1 hour over the next 8 hours, 2.5 hours more later that day (day 5, the last day of data collection). Thereafter, KC was done intermittently until discharge on day 9. Total KC times for pre-vent, vent, and immediate post-vent periods were 4.75, 4, and 6.5 hours, respectively. The data from this study suggest that KC may assist in, rather than retard, recovery from respiratory distress. KC may also foster maternal relaxation and minimize maternal stress.

  19. [Effect of laminin on structural karyotype variability of kangaroo rat kidney cell lines].

    PubMed

    Polianskaia, G G; Goriachaia, T S; Pinaev, G P

    2003-01-01

    The structural karyotypic variability has been investigated in the "markerless" epithelial-like Rat kangaroo kidney cell lines NBL-3-17 and NBL-3-11 on cultivation on a laminin-2/4 coated surface. In cell line NBL-3-17, cultivated on the laminin-coated surface for 2, 4 and 12 days, and in cell line NBL-3-11, cultivated on the laminin-coated surface for 2 and 4 days, there is a significant increase in the frequency of chromosomal aberrations, both chromosomal breaks and dicentrics (telomeric associations). Different sensitivity of individual chromosomes to inducing chromosomal breaks was observed in addition to a preferential involvement of some chromosomes in dicentric formation. Structural instability of chromosomes at cultivation on laminin demonstrates nonspecific reaction of the "markerless" cell lines to unfavourable factors of the environment. We discuss possible reasons of differences in the character of karyotypic variability between a cell line of the Indian muntjac skin fibroblasts and epithelial-like Rat kangaroo kidney cell lines cultivated on laminin.

  20. Kangaroo rats exhibit spongiform degeneration of the central auditory system similar to that found in gerbils.

    PubMed

    McGinn, M D; Faddis, B T

    1997-02-01

    Kangaroo rats develop spongiform degeneration of the central auditory system similar to that seen in the gerbil. Light microscopic and transmission electron microscopic study of the cochlear nucleus and auditory nerve root (ANR) of Dipodomys deserti and D. merriami show that spongiform lesions develop in dendrites and oligodendrocytes of the cochlear nucleus and in oligodendrocytes of the ANR that are morphologically indistinguishable from those extensively described in the Mongolian gerbil, Meriones unguiculatus. As in Mongolian gerbils, the spongiform degeneration in Dipodomys were much more numerous in animals continually exposed to modest levels of low-frequency noise (< 75 dB SPL). The kangaroo rats with extensive spongiform degeneration also show slightly, but significantly, elevated auditory brainstem evoked response (ABR) thresholds to low-frequency stimuli, a result also found in Mongolian gerbils. These results suggest that the elevated ABR thresholds may be the result of spongiform degeneration. Because low-frequency noise-induced spongiform degeneration has now been shown in the cochlear nucleus of animals from separate families of Rodentia (Heteromyidae and Muridae), the possibility should be investigated that similar noise-induced degenerative changes occur in the central auditory system of other mammals with good low-frequency hearing.

  1. Studies on the in vitro cultivation of ciliate protozoa from the kangaroo forestomach.

    PubMed

    Dehority, Burk A; Wright, André-Denis G

    2014-08-01

    The methods used for culturing rumen protozoa were found to be unsatisfactory for growth of ciliate protozoa from the kangaroo forestomach. Based on published measurements of physical parameters in the marsupial forestomach, several modifications were incorporated into the procedure, i.e., an increase in % hydrogen in the gas phase, adjustment of initial pH of the medium to 6.9-7.0 range, feed only forage as a substrate and incubate at a lower temperature (33-36 °C). Only incubation at the lower temperature increased survival time of the kangaroo protozoa. Two species of Bitricha were still viable after 28 d in culture. Cultures had to be terminated at that time. One of the species differed considerably in size and shape from previously described species and based on 18S rRNA data, may represent a new species of Bitricha. The second species, present in low numbers was identified as Bitricha oblata. In a separate trial, Macropodinium yalanbense survived for 11 d, at which time these cultures also had to be terminated. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  2. Seasonal variation in kangaroo tooth enamel oxygen and carbon isotopes in southern Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brookman, Tom H.; Ambrose, Stanley H.

    2012-09-01

    Serial sampling of tooth enamel growth increments for carbon and oxygen isotopic analyses of Macropus (kangaroo) teeth was performed to assess the potential for reconstructing paleoseasonality. The carbon isotope composition of tooth enamel apatite carbonate reflects the proportional intake of C3 and C4 vegetation. The oxygen isotopic composition of enamel reflects that of ingested and metabolic water. Tooth enamel forms sequentially from the tip of the crown to the base, so dietary and environmental changes during the tooth's formation can be detected. δ13C and δ18O values were determined for a series of enamel samples drilled from the 3rd and 4th molars of kangaroos that were collected along a 900 km north-south transect in southern Australia. The serial sampling method did not yield pronounced seasonal isotopic variation patterns in Macropus enamel. The full extent of dietary isotopic variation may be obscured by attenuation of the isotopic signal during enamel mineralisation. Brachydont (low-crowned) Macropus teeth may be less sensitive to seasonal variation in isotopic composition due to time-averaging during mineralisation. However, geographic variations observed suggest that there may be potential for tracking latitudinal shifts in vegetation zones and seasonal environmental patterns in response to climate change.

  3. Unilateral failure of development of mandibular premolars and molars in an Eastern Grey kangaroo (Macropus giganteus) and its effects on molar progression.

    PubMed

    Barber, D; Campbell, J; Davey, J; Luke, T; Agren, E; Beveridge, I

    2008-01-01

    An adult male Eastern Grey kangaroo from a wildlife reserve near Melbourne was submitted for necropsy examination and was discovered to have abnormal dentition. There was no evidence that any premolars or molars had ever been present on the right mandible, whilst the incisors were normal. The age of the kangaroo was estimated to be 1 year 9 months using the right maxillary molars and 2 years 4 months old using the contralateral side, presumably due to the asymmetry of the dental arcades. 'Lumpy jaw', a common periodontal disease of kangaroos, from which Bacteroides sp was cultured, was present on the base of the vertical ramus of the left mandible. Complete unilateral absence of premolar and molar teeth in the mandible of a kangaroo has not been described. This condition affected molar progression in both sets of maxillary molars.

  4. Energy, water and space use by free-living red kangaroos Macropus rufus and domestic sheep Ovis aries in an Australian rangeland.

    PubMed

    Munn, A J; Dawson, T J; McLeod, S R; Dennis, T; Maloney, S K

    2013-08-01

    We used doubly labelled water to measure field metabolic rates (FMR) and water turnover rates (WTR) in one of Australia's largest native herbivores, the red kangaroo (Macropus rufus) and one of Australia's dominant livestock species, the wool-breed Merino sheep, under free-living conditions in a typical Australian rangeland. Also, we used GPS technology to examine animal space use, along with the comparisons of urine concentration, diet, diet digestibility, and subsequent grazing pressures. We found smaller space-use patterns than previously reported for kangaroos, which were between 14 and 25 % those of sheep. The FMR of a 25-kg kangaroo was 30 % that of a 45-kg sheep, while WTR was 15 % and both were associated with smaller travel distances, lower salt intakes, and higher urine concentration in kangaroos than sheep. After accounting for differences in dry matter digestibility of food eaten by kangaroos (51 %) and sheep (58 %), the relative grazing pressure of a standard (mature, non-reproductive) 25-kg kangaroo was 35 % that of a 45-kg sheep. Even for animals of the same body mass (35 kg), the relative grazing pressure of the kangaroo was estimated to be only 44 % that of the sheep. After accounting for the energetic costs of wool growth by sheep, the FMRs of our sheep and kangaroos were 2-3 times their expected BMRs, which is typical for mammalian FMR:BMRs generally. Notably, data collected from our free-living animals were practically identical to those from animals confined to a semi-natural enclosure (collected in an earlier study under comparable environmental conditions), supporting the idea that FMRs are relatively constrained within species.

  5. Populations at risk: conservation genetics of kangaroo mice (Microdipodops) of the Great Basin Desert.

    PubMed

    Andersen, John J; Portnoy, David S; Hafner, John C; Light, Jessica E

    2013-08-01

    The Great Basin Desert of western North America has experienced frequent habitat alterations due to a complex biogeographic history and recent anthropogenic impacts, with the more recent alterations likely resulting in the decline of native fauna and flora. Dark (Microdipodops megacephalus) and pallid (M. pallidus) kangaroo mice are ecological specialists found within the Great Basin Desert and are potentially ideal organisms for assessing ecosystem health and inferring the biogeographic history of this vulnerable region. Herein, newly acquired nuclear-encoded microsatellite loci were utilized to assess patterns of variation within and among spatially discrete groups of kangaroo mice and to evaluate gene flow, demographic trends, and genetic integrity. Results confirm that there are at least three genetically distinct units within M. megacephalus and two such units within M. pallidus. The three units of M. megacephalus appear to have different demographic histories, with effectively no gene flow among them since their divergence. Similarly, the two units of M. pallidus also appear to have experienced different demographic histories, with effectively no gene exchange. Contemporary effective population sizes of all groups within Microdipodops appear to be low (<500), suggesting that each genetic lineage may have difficulty coping with changing environmental pressures and hence may be at risk of extirpation. Results of this study indicate that each Microdipodops group should be recognized, and therefore managed, as a separate unit in an effort to conserve these highly specialized taxa that contribute to the diversity of the Great Basin Desert ecosystem. The Great Basin Desert of western North America has experienced frequent habitat alterations due to a complex biogeographic history and recent anthropogenic impacts, with the more recent alterations likely resulting in the decline of native fauna and flora. Herein, newly acquired nuclear-encoded microsatellite

  6. Populations at risk: conservation genetics of kangaroo mice (Microdipodops) of the Great Basin Desert

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, John J; Portnoy, David S; Hafner, John C; Light, Jessica E

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The Great Basin Desert of western North America has experienced frequent habitat alterations due to a complex biogeographic history and recent anthropogenic impacts, with the more recent alterations likely resulting in the decline of native fauna and flora. Dark (Microdipodops megacephalus) and pallid (M. pallidus) kangaroo mice are ecological specialists found within the Great Basin Desert and are potentially ideal organisms for assessing ecosystem health and inferring the biogeographic history of this vulnerable region. Herein, newly acquired nuclear-encoded microsatellite loci were utilized to assess patterns of variation within and among spatially discrete groups of kangaroo mice and to evaluate gene flow, demographic trends, and genetic integrity. Results confirm that there are at least three genetically distinct units within M. megacephalus and two such units within M. pallidus. The three units of M. megacephalus appear to have different demographic histories, with effectively no gene flow among them since their divergence. Similarly, the two units of M. pallidus also appear to have experienced different demographic histories, with effectively no gene exchange. Contemporary effective population sizes of all groups within Microdipodops appear to be low (<500), suggesting that each genetic lineage may have difficulty coping with changing environmental pressures and hence may be at risk of extirpation. Results of this study indicate that each Microdipodops group should be recognized, and therefore managed, as a separate unit in an effort to conserve these highly specialized taxa that contribute to the diversity of the Great Basin Desert ecosystem. The Great Basin Desert of western North America has experienced frequent habitat alterations due to a complex biogeographic history and recent anthropogenic impacts, with the more recent alterations likely resulting in the decline of native fauna and flora. Herein, newly acquired nuclear

  7. Sources of carbon isotope variation in kangaroo bone collagen and tooth enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Brett P.; Bowman, David M. J. S.; Gagan, Michael K.

    2007-08-01

    The stable carbon isotopic composition (expressed as δ 13C) of herbivore remains is commonly used to reconstruct past changes in the relative abundance of C 4 versus C 3 grass biomass (C 4 relative abundance). However, the strength of the relationship between herbivore δ 13C and C 4 relative abundance in extant ecosystems has not been thoroughly examined. We determined sources of variation in δ 13C of bone collagen and tooth enamel of kangaroos ( Macropus spp.) collected throughout Australia by measuring δ 13C of bone collagen (779 individuals) and tooth enamel (694 individuals). An index of seasonal water availability, i.e. the distribution of rainfall in the C 4 versus C 3 growing seasons, was used as a proxy for C 4 relative abundance, and this variable explained a large proportion of the variation in both collagen δ 13C (68%) and enamel δ 13C (68%). These figures increased to 78% and 77%, respectively, when differences between kangaroo species were accounted for. Vegetation characteristics, such as woodiness and the presence of an open forest canopy, had no effect on collagen or enamel δ 13C. While there was no relationship between collagen δ 13C and kangaroo age at death, tooth enamel produced later in life, following weaning, was enriched in 13C by 3.5‰ relative to enamel produced prior to weaning. From the observed relationships between seasonal water availability and collagen and enamel δ 13C, enrichment factors ( ɛ∗) for collagen-diet and enamel-diet (post-weaning) were estimated to be 5.2‰ ± 0.5 (95% CI) and 11.7‰ ± 0.6 (95% CI), respectively. The findings of this study confirm that at a continental scale, collagen and enamel δ 13C of a group of large herbivores closely reflect C 4 relative abundance. This validates a fundamental assumption underpinning the use of isotopic analysis of herbivore remains to reconstruct changes in C 4 relative abundance.

  8. Maternal kangaroo (skin-to-skin) care in the NICU beginning 4 hours postbirth.

    PubMed

    Moran, M; Radzyminski, S G; Higgins, K R; Dowling, D A; Miller, M J; Anderson, G C

    1999-01-01

    Kangaroo care (KC) for preterm infants is becoming well known in the United States. Typically, KC is given by mothers in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) beginning days or weeks postbirth. This case report documents KC beginning at 4.5 hours postbirth with a healthy mother whose 32-week, 1,953 gram infant required initial care in the NICU. The nurse's role in supporting this care is described. Both parents experienced KC with their son and were soon convinced of the exceptional benefits he received. The infant was transferred to intermediate care on Day 2, regained his birth weight by Day 12, was discharged home on Day 21. He was breast-feeding exclusively at 40 weeks corrected age, and had Bayley mental and motor development scores within normal limits at 6 months corrected age.

  9. Cryptosporidium fayeri n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Cryptosporidiidae) from the Red Kangaroo (Macropus rufus).

    PubMed

    Ryan, Una M; Power, Michelle; Xiao, Lihua

    2008-01-01

    The morphology and infectivity of the oocysts of a new species of Cryptosporidium from the faeces of the red kangaroo (Macropus rufus) are described. Oocysts are structurally indistinguishable from those of Cryptosporidium parvum. Oocysts of the new species are passed fully sporulated, lack sporocysts, and measure 4.5-5.1 microm (mean=4.9) x 3.8-5.0 microm (mean=4.3 microm) with a length to width ratio 1.02:1.18 (mean 1.14) (n=50). Oocysts were not infectious for neonate ARC Swiss mice. Multi-locus analysis of numerous unlinked loci demonstrated this species to be distinct (90.64%-97.88% similarity) from C. parvum. Based on biological and molecular data, this Cryptosporidium infecting marsupials is proposed to be a new species Cryptosporidium fayeri n. sp.

  10. [Social representations on breastfeeding according to preterm infants' mothers in Kangaroo Care].

    PubMed

    Javorski, Marly; Caetano, Laise Conceição; Vasconcelos, Maria Gorete Lucena de; Leite, Adriana Moraes; Scochi, Carmen Gracinda Silvan

    2004-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the social representations on premature infants' breastfeeding at a Kangaroo Care Unit, from the perspective of mothers who are breastfeeding and describe the conflicts and contradictions they experience in this context. A qualitative approach was adopted, using the first stage of enunciation analysis in the light of social representations theory to identify the meanings assigned to breastfeeding. We found the following representations: healthy babies are breastfed, mother's milk provides protection and preserves the premature child's life, breastfeeding is the complement of motherhood and breastfeeding a premature infant is a hard and exhausting experience. The conflicts resulted from the assimilation of technical contents and discourse, late sucking and representations on breastfeeding.

  11. Kangaroo care compared to incubators in maintaining body warmth in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Ludington-Hoe, S M; Nguyen, N; Swinth, J Y; Satyshur, R D

    2000-07-01

    Many preterm infants cared for in incubators do not experience Kangaroo Care (KC), skin-to-skin contact with their mothers, due to fear of body heat loss when being held outside the incubator. A randomized clinical trial of 16 KC and 13 control infants using a pretest-test-posttest design of three consecutive interfeeding intervals of 2.5 to 3.0 h duration each was conducted over 1 day. Infant abdominal and toe temperatures were measured in and out of the incubator; maternal breast temperature was measured during KC. Repeated measures ANOVA showed no change in abdominal temperature across all periods and between groups. Toe temperatures were significantly higher during KC than incubator periods, and maternal breast temperature met each infant's neutral thermal zone requirements within 5 min of onset of KC. Preterm infants similar to those studied here will maintain body warmth with up to 3 h of KC.

  12. Morphology of the lingual papillae in the brush-tailed rat kangaroo.

    PubMed

    Emura, Shoichi; Okumura, Toshihiko; Chen, Huayue

    2014-01-01

    We examined the dorsal lingual surface of an adult brush-tailed rat kangaroo (Bettongia penicillata) by scanning electron microscopy. The filiform and fungiform papillae on the lingual apex and body consisted of a main papilla and secondary papillae. The connective tissue core of the filiform papillae on the lingual apex was cylindrical in shape with a crushed top. The connective tissue core of the filiform papillae on the lingual body had one large and several small processes. The fungiform papillae were round in shape. The connective tissue core of the fungiform papillae had several depressions on its top. The surface of the vallate papillae was rough and the papillae were surrounded by a groove and a pad. Several long conical papillae derived from the posterolateral margin of the tongue where foliate papillae have been shown to be distributed in many other animal species. The long conical papillae were very similar to those of the koala and opossum.

  13. Ultraviolet-induced cell death is independent of DNA replication in rat kangaroo cells.

    PubMed

    Miyaji, E N; Menck, C F

    1995-05-01

    Rat kangaroo (Potorous tridactylus) cells have an efficient repair system for photoreactivation of lethal lesions induced by 254 nm UV. However, this ability is lost with increasing time after UV, being completely ineffective after 24 h. Critical events leading to UV-induced cell death must occur within this period of time. DNA synthesis was inhibited by the DNA polymerase inhibitor aphidicolin and the loss of the capability to photorepair lethal lesions was maintained as for replicating cells. Similar data were obtained in synchronized cells UV irradiated immediately before S phase. Under the same conditions, the ability to remove cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers by photoreactivation in these cells remained unchanged 24 h after irradiation. These data indicate that the critical events responsible for UV-induced cell death occur in the absence of DNA replication.

  14. Patterns of heterochromatin replication and condensation correlate in rat kangaroo PtK2 cells.

    PubMed

    Goitein, R; Hirschberg, J; Marcus, M; Sperling, K

    1984-01-01

    Chromosome replication in mammalian cells in an ordered phenomenon. This is true also for the condensation in G2 of the heterochromatic chromosomal regions in mouse cells. The generality of this phenomenon and its mechanism are not known, nor is it known whether the order of condensation of the heterochromatic chromosomal segments in G2 reflects the order of replication or is independent of it. We determined the order of replication during the S phase and of condensation in G2 of the short heterochromatic chromosomal regions in the rat kangaroo cell line PtK2. The kinetics of condensation of these regions in G2 was studied in cells treated with Hoechst 33258. Their order of replication was established with the use of a sensitive technique based on the treatment of living cells with 5-bromodeoxyuridine and Hoechst 33258. Our results show that these regions exhibit a similar pattern of replication in S and condensation in G2.

  15. Plasma cholinesterase activity of rats, western grey kangaroos, alpacas, sheep, cattle, and horses.

    PubMed

    Mayberry, Chris; Mawson, Peter; Maloney, Shane K

    2015-01-01

    Plasma cholinesterase activity levels of various species may be of interest to toxicologists or pathologists working with chemicals that interfere with the activity of plasma cholinesterase. We used a pH titration method to measure the plasma cholinesterase activity of six mammalian species. Plasma cholinesterase activity varied up to 50-fold between species: sheep (88 ± 45 nM acetylcholine degraded per ml of test plasma per minute), cattle (94 ± 35), western grey kangaroos (126 ± 92), alpaca (364 ± 70), rats (390 ± 118) and horses (4539 ± 721). We present a simple, effective technique for the assay of plasma cholinesterase activity levels from a range of species. Although labour-intensive, it requires only basic laboratory equipment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Progress in the implementation of kangaroo mother care in 10 hospitals in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Bergh, Anne-Marie; Rogers-Bloch, Quail; Pratomo, Hadi; Uhudiyah, Uut; Sidi, Ieda Poernomo Sigit; Rustina, Yeni; Suradi, Rulina; Gipson, Reginald

    2012-10-01

    Kangaroo mother care (KMC) is an effective and safe method of caring for low-birthweight infants. This article describes the results of a health systems strengthening intervention in KMC involving 10 hospitals in Java, Indonesia. Implementation progress was measured with an instrument scoring hospitals out of 100. Hospital scores ranged from 28 to 85, with a mean score of 62.1. One hospital had not reached the level of 'evidence of practice'; five hospitals had reached the expected level of 'evidence of practice' and two hospitals already scored on the level of 'evidence of routine and integration'. The two training hospitals were on the border of 'evidence of sustainable practice'. The implementation of KMC is a long-term process that requires dedication and support for a number of years. Some items in the progress-monitoring tool could be used to set standards for KMC that hospitals must meet for accreditation purposes.

  17. Taking kangaroo mother care forward in South Africa: The role of district clinical specialist teams.

    PubMed

    Feucht, Ute Dagmar; van Rooyen, Elise; Skhosana, Rinah; Bergh, Anne-Marie

    2015-11-20

    The global agenda for improved neonatal care includes the scale-up of kangaroo mother care (KMC) services. The establishment of district clinical specialist teams (DCSTs) in South Africa (SA) provides an excellent opportunity to enhance neonatal care at district level and ensure translation of policies, including the requirement for KMC implementation, into everyday clinical practice. Tshwane District in Gauteng Province, SA, has been experiencing an increasing strain on obstetric and neonatal services at central, tertiary and regional hospitals in recent years as a result of growing population numbers and rapid up-referral of patients, with limited down-referral of low-risk patients to district-level services. We describe a successful multidisciplinary quality improvement initiative under the leadership of the Tshwane DCST, in conjunction with experienced local KMC implementers, aimed at expanding the district's KMC services. The project subsequently served as a platform for improvement of other areas of neonatal care by means of a systematic approach.

  18. Experimental manipulation of female reproduction demonstrates its fitness costs in kangaroos.

    PubMed

    Gélin, Uriel; Wilson, Michelle E; Coulson, Graeme; Festa-Bianchet, Marco

    2015-01-01

    When resources are scarce, female mammals should face a trade-off between lactation and other life-history traits such as growth, survival and subsequent reproduction. Kangaroos are ideal to test predictions about reproductive costs because they may simultaneously lactate and carry a young, and have indeterminate growth and a long breeding season. An earlier study in three of our five study populations prevented female eastern grey kangaroos (Macropus giganteus) from reproducing during one reproductive season by either inserting contraceptive implants or removing very small pouch young. We explored how individual and environmental variables affect the costs of reproduction over time, combining this experimental reduction of reproductive effort with multi-year monitoring of 270 marked females. Experimental manipulation should control for individual heterogeneity, revealing the costs of reproduction and their likely sources. We also examined the fitness consequences of reproductive effort and offspring sex among unmanipulated individuals to test whether sex allocation strategies affected trade-offs. Costs of reproduction included longer inter-birth intervals and lower probability of producing a young that survived to 7 months in the subsequent reproductive event. Weaning success, however, did not differ significantly between manipulated and control females. By reducing reproductive effort, manipulation appeared to increase individual condition and subsequent reproductive success. Effects of offspring sex upon subsequent reproductive success varied according to year and study population. Mothers of sons were generally more likely to have a young that survived to 7 months, compared to mothers of daughters. The fitness costs of reproduction arise from constraints in both acquisition and allocation of resources. To meet these costs, females delay subsequent parturition and may manipulate offspring sex. Reproductive tactics thus vary according to the amount of resource

  19. Parasitic nematode communities of the red kangaroo, Macropus rufus: richness and structuring in captive systems.

    PubMed

    Lott, M J; Hose, G C; Power, M L

    2015-08-01

    Captive management practices have the potential to drastically alter pre-existing host-parasite relationships. This can have profound implications for the health and productivity of threatened species in captivity, even in the absence of clinical symptoms of disease. Maximising the success of captive breeding programmes requires a detailed knowledge of anthropogenic influences on the structure of parasite assemblages in captive systems. In this study, we employed two high-throughput molecular techniques to characterise the parasitic nematode (suborder Strongylida) communities of the red kangaroo, Macropus rufus, across seven captive sites. The first was terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis of a region of rDNA encompassing the internal transcribed spacers 1 (ITS1), the 5.8S rRNA gene and the internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2). The second was Illumina MiSeq next-generation sequencing of the ITS2 region. The prevalence, intensity of infection, taxonomic composition and comparative structure of strongylid nematode assemblages was assessed at each location. Prevalence (P = <0.001) and mean infection intensity (df = 6, F = 17.494, P = <0.001) differed significantly between the seven captive sites. Significant levels of parasite community structure were observed (ANOSIM, P = 0.01), with most of the variation being distributed within, rather than between, captive sites. The range of nematode taxa that occurred in captive red kangaroos appeared to differ from that of wild conspecifics, with representatives of the genus Cloacina, a dominant nematode parasite of the macropodid forestomach, being detected at only two of the seven study sites. This study also provides the first evidence for the presence of the genus Trichostrongylus in a macropodid marsupial. Our results demonstrate that contemporary species management practices may exert a profound influence on the structure of parasite communities in captive systems.

  20. Stochastic demography and population dynamics in the red kangaroo Macropus rufus.

    PubMed

    Jonzén, Niclas; Pople, Tony; Knape, Jonas; Sköld, Martin

    2010-01-01

    1. Many organisms inhabit strongly fluctuating environments but their demography and population dynamics are often analysed using deterministic models and elasticity analysis, where elasticity is defined as the proportional change in population growth rate caused by a proportional change in a vital rate. Deterministic analyses may not necessarily be informative because large variation in a vital rate with a small deterministic elasticity may affect the population growth rate more than a small change in a less variable vital rate having high deterministic elasticity. 2. We analyse a stochastic environment model of the red kangaroo (Macropus rufus), a species inhabiting an environment characterized by unpredictable and highly variable rainfall, and calculate the elasticity of the stochastic growth rate with respect to the mean and variability in vital rates. 3. Juvenile survival is the most variable vital rate but a proportional change in the mean adult survival rate has a much stronger effect on the stochastic growth rate. 4. Even if changes in average rainfall have a larger impact on population growth rate, increased variability in rainfall may still be important also in long-lived species. The elasticity with respect to the standard deviation of rainfall is comparable to the mean elasticities of all vital rates but the survival in age class 3 because increased variation in rainfall affects both the mean and variability of vital rates. 5. Red kangaroos are harvested and, under the current rainfall pattern, an annual harvest fraction of c. 20% would yield a stochastic growth rate about unity. However, if average rainfall drops by more than c. 10%, any level of harvesting may be unsustainable, emphasizing the need for integrating climate change predictions in population management and increase our understanding of how environmental stochasticity translates into population growth rate.

  1. Biphasic Allometry of Cardiac Growth in the Developing Kangaroo Macropus fuliginosus.

    PubMed

    Snelling, Edward P; Taggart, David A; Maloney, Shane K; Farrell, Anthony P; Seymour, Roger S

    2015-01-01

    Interspecific studies of adult mammals show that heart mass (M(h), g) increases in direct proportion to body mass (M(b), kg), such that M(h) ∝ M(b)(1.00). However, intraspecific studies on heart mass in mammals at different stages of development reveal considerable variation between species, M(h) ∝ M(b)(0.70-1.00). Part of this variation may arise as a result of the narrow body size range of growing placental mammals, from birth to adulthood. Marsupial mammals are born relatively small and offer an opportunity to examine the ontogeny of heart mass over a much broader body size range. Data from 29 western grey kangaroos Macropus fuliginosus spanning 800-fold in body mass (0.084-67.5 kg) reveal the exponent for heart mass decreases significantly when the joey leaves the pouch (ca. 5-6 kg body mass). In the pouch, the heart mass of joeys scales with hyperallometry, M(h(in-pouch)) = 6.39 M(b)(1.10 ± 0.05), whereas in free-roaming juveniles and adults, heart mass scales with hypoallometry, M(h(postpouch)) = 14.2 Mb(0.77 ± 0.08). Measurements of heart height, width, and depth support this finding. The relatively steep heart growth allometry during in-pouch development is consistent with the increase in relative cardiac demands as joeys develop endothermy and the capacity for hopping locomotion. Once out of the pouch, the exponent decreases sharply, possibly because the energy required for hopping is independent of speed, and the efficiency of energy storage during hopping increases as the kangaroo grows. The right:left ventricular mass ratios (0.30-0.35) do not change over the body mass range and are similar to those of other mammals, reflecting the principle of Laplace for the heart.

  2. [Persistent diarrhea

    PubMed

    Andrade, J A; Moreira, C; Fagundes Neto, U

    2000-07-01

    INTRODUCTION: Persistent diarrhea has high impact on infantile morbidity and mortality rates in developing countries. Several studies have shown that 3 to 20% of acute diarrheal episodes in children under 5 years of age become persistent. DEFINITION: Persistent diarrhea is defined as an episode that lasts more than 14 days. ETIOLOGY: The most important agents isolated in persistent diarrhea are: Enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), Salmonella, Enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC), Klebisiella and Cryptosporidium. CLINICAL ASPECTS: In general, the clinical characteristics of patients with persistent diarrhea do not change with the pathogenic agent. Persistent diarrhea seems to represent the final result of a several insults a infant suffers that predisposes to a more severe episode of diarrhea due to a combination of host factors and high rates of enviromental contamination. Therefore, efforts should be made to promptly treat all episodes of diarrhea with apropriate follow-up. THERAPY: The aim of the treatment is to restore hydroelectrolytic deficits and to replace losses until the diarrheal ceases. It is possible in the majority of the cases, using oral rehydration therapy and erly an appropriate type of diet. PREVENTION: It is imperative that management strategies also focus on preventive aspects. The most effective diarrheal prevention strategy in young infants worldwide is promotion of exclusive breast feeding.

  3. Fleas (Siphonaptera) infesting giant kangaroo rats (Dipodomys ingens) on the Elkhorn and Carrizo Plains, San Luis Obispo County, California.

    PubMed

    Tabor, S P; Williams, D F; Germano, D J; Thomas, R E

    1993-01-01

    The giant kangaroo rat, Dipodomys ingens (Merriam), has a limited distribution in the San Joaquin Valley, CA. Because of reductions in its geographic range, largely resulting from humans, the species was listed as an endangered species in 1980 by the California Fish and Game Commission. As part of a study of the community ecology of southern California endangered species, including D. ingens, we were able to make flea collections from the rats when they were trapped and marked for population studies. All but one of the fleas collected from the D. ingens in this study were Hoplopsyllus anomalus, a flea normally associated with ground squirrels (Sciuridae). It has been suggested that giant kangaroo rats fill the ground squirrel niche within their range. Our data indicate that this role includes a normal association with Hoplopsyllus anomalus.

  4. Mother–offspring distances reflect sex differences in fine-scale genetic structure of eastern grey kangaroos

    PubMed Central

    King, Wendy J; Garant, Dany; Festa-Bianchet, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Natal dispersal affects life history and population biology and causes gene flow. In mammals, dispersal is usually male-biased so that females tend to be philopatric and surrounded by matrilineal kin, which may lead to preferential associations among female kin. Here we combine genetic analyses and behavioral observations to investigate spatial genetic structure and sex-biased dispersal patterns in a high-density population of mammals showing fission–fusion group dynamics. We studied eastern grey kangaroos (Macropus giganteus) over 2 years at Wilsons Promontory National Park, Australia, and found weak fine-scale genetic structure among adult females in both years but no structure among adult males. Immature male kangaroos moved away from their mothers at 18–25 months of age, while immature females remained near their mothers until older. A higher proportion of male (34%) than female (6%) subadults and young adults were observed to disperse, although median distances of detected dispersals were similar for both sexes. Adult females had overlapping ranges that were far wider than the maximum extent of spatial genetic structure found. Female kangaroos, although weakly philopatric, mostly encounter nonrelatives in fission–fusion groups at high density, and therefore kinship is unlikely to strongly affect sociality. PMID:26045958

  5. Bringing compassion to the ethical dilemma in killing kangaroos for conservation: comment on "Conservation through sustainable use" by Rob Irvine.

    PubMed

    Ramp, Daniel

    2013-06-01

    Ethical debate on the killing of kangaroos has polarised conservation and animal welfare science, yet at the heart of these scientific disciplines is the unifying aim of reducing harm to non-human animals. This aim provides the foundation for common ground, culminating in the development of compassionate conservation principles that seek to provide mechanisms for achieving both conservation and welfare goals. However, environmental decision-making is not devoid of human interests, and conservation strategies are commonly employed that suit entrenched positions and commercial gain, rather than valuing the needs of the non-human animals in need of protection. The case study on the wild kangaroo harvest presents just such a dilemma, whereby a conservation strategy is put forward that can only be rationalised by ignoring difficulties in the potential for realising conservation benefits and the considerable welfare cost to kangaroos. Rather than an open debate on the ethics of killing game over livestock, in this response I argue that efforts to bring transparency and objectivity to the public debate have to date been obfuscated by those seeking to maintain entrenched interests. Only by putting aside these interests will debate about the exploitation of wildlife result in humane, compassionate, and substantive conservation benefits.

  6. The effects of thyroxine on metabolism and water balance in a desert-dwelling rodent, Merriam's kangaroo rat (Dipodomys merriami).

    PubMed

    Banta, Marilyn R; Holcombe, Dale W

    2002-01-01

    Desert-dwelling mammals such as Merriam's kangaroo rat (Dipodomys merriani) need to conserve both energy and water to survive desert conditions characterized by aridity and low productivity. The thyroid hormone thyroxine increases both basal metabolic rate and urinary water loss in mammals. Increases in basal metabolism and urinary water loss are likely to be detrimental to D. merriami, therefore the regulation of this hormone may be important. To examine the effects of thyroxine in this species, we implanted adult kangaroo rats with pellets designed to release specific doses of thyroxine at a constant rate for 90 days or a placebo pellet. We measured plasma thyroxine concentration, basal metabolic rate, food consumption, urine concentration and water loss in all implanted animals. Thyroxine implants significantly increased both plasma thyroxine and basal metabolic rate in a relatively dose-dependent manner. In response to thyroxine. kangaroo rats increased food consumption only slightly, but this small increase was sufficient to compensate for their elevated metabolic rates. Neither urine concentration nor water loss varied among treatment groups. Thyroxine increased energy expenditure but not water loss in this species.

  7. Interspecies diversity of the occludin sequence: cDNA cloning of human, mouse, dog, and rat-kangaroo homologues.

    PubMed

    Ando-Akatsuka, Y; Saitou, M; Hirase, T; Kishi, M; Sakakibara, A; Itoh, M; Yonemura, S; Furuse, M; Tsukita, S

    1996-04-01

    Occludin has been identified from chick liver as a novel integral membrane protein localizing at tight junctions (Furuse, M., T. Hirase, M. Itoh, A. Nagafuchi, S. Yonemura, Sa. Tsukita, and Sh. Tsukita. 1993. J. Cell Biol. 123:1777-1788). To analyze and modulate the functions of tight junctions, it would be advantageous to know the mammalian homologues of occludin and their genes. Here we describe the nucleotide sequences of full length cDNAs encoding occludin of rat-kangaroo (potoroo), human, mouse, and dog. Rat-kangaroo occludin cDNA was prepared from RNA isolated from PtK2 cell culture, using a mAb against chicken occludin, whereas the others were amplified by polymerase chain reaction based on the sequence found around the human neuronal apoptosis inhibitory protein gene. The amino acid sequences of the three mammalian (human, murine, and canine) occludins were very closely related to each other (approximately 90% identity), whereas they diverged considerably from those of chicken and rat-kangaroo (approximately 50% identity). Implications of these data and novel experimental options in cell biological research are discussed.

  8. A survey of the microbiological quality of kangaroo carcasses processed for human consumption in two processing plants in Queensland, Australia.

    PubMed

    Eglezos, Sofroni; Huang, Bixing; Stuttard, Ed

    2007-05-01

    An investigation of the microbiological quality of kangaroo carcasses at two Queensland processing plants was carried out. A total of 836 whole muscle samples were taken, 801 from plant A and 35 from plant B. Samples were analyzed for aerobic bacteria, Escherichia coli, and Salmonella. The mean adjusted aerobic plate count (APC) was 2.8 log CFU/g, and counts at the 90th, 95th, and 99th percentiles were 4.2, 4.9, and 6.4 log CFU/g, respectively. The maximum number of bacteria recovered was 6.5 log CFU/g. E. coli was detected in 13.9% of samples, for which the adjusted mean was 0.7 log CFU/g, and counts at the 90th, 95th, and 99th percentiles were 1.4, 2.0, and 3.0 log CFU/g, respectively. Salmonella was detected in 0.84% of samples. There was no significant relationship (P < 0.05) between season and APC or E. coli count. There was a significant relationship (P < 0.001) between Salmonella prevalence and summer. The microbiological quality of Queensland kangaroo carcasses is similar to that obtained during other excision-based studies of kangaroo, wild boar, and beef carcasses.

  9. Semibiotic Persistence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prothmann, C.; Zauner, K.-P.

    From observation, we find four different strategies to successfully enable structures to persist over extended periods of time. If functionally relevant features are very large compared to the changes that can be effectuated by entropy, the functional structure itself has a high enough probability to erode only slowly over time. If the functionally relevant features are protected from environmental influence by sacrificial layers that absorb the impinging of the environment, deterioration can be avoided or slowed. Loss of functionality can be delayed, even for complex systems, by keeping alternate options for all required components available. Biological systems also apply information processing to actively counter the impact of entropy by mechanisms such as self-repair. The latter strategy increases the overall persistence of living systems and enables them to maintain a highly complex functional organisation during their lifetime and over generations. In contrast to the other strategies, information processing has only low material overhead. While at present engineered technology is far from achieving the self-repair of evolved systems, the semibiotic combination of biological components with conventionally engineered systems may open a path to long-term persistence of functional devices in harsh environments. We review nature's strategies for persistence, and consider early steps taken in the laboratory to import such capabilities into engineered architectures.

  10. Radionuclide transport from soil to air, native vegetation, kangaroo rats and grazing cattle on the Nevada test site.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, R O; Shinn, J H; Essington, E H; Tamura, T; Romney, E M; Moor, K S; O'Farrell, T P

    1988-12-01

    Between 1970 and 1986 the Nevada Applied Ecology Group (NAEG), U.S. Department of Energy, conducted environmental radionuclide studies at weapons-testing sites on or adjacent to the Nevada Test Site. In this paper, NAEG studies conducted at two nuclear (fission) sites (NS201, NS219) and two nonnuclear (nonfission) sites (Area 13 [Project 57] and Clean Slate 2) are reviewed, synthesized and compared regarding (1) soil particle-size distribution and physical-chemical characteristics of 239 + 240Pu-bearing radioactive particles, (2) 239 + 240Pu resuspension rates and (3) transuranic and fission-product radionuclide transfers from soil to native vegetation, kangaroo rats and grazing cattle. The data indicate that transuranic radionuclides were transferred more readily on the average from soil to air, the external surfaces of native vegetation and to tissues of kangaroo rats at Area 13 than at NS201 or NS219. The 239 + 240Pu resuspension factor for undisturbed soil at Area 13 was three to four orders-of-magnitude larger than at NS201 and NS219, the geometric mean (GM) vegetation-over-soil 239 + 240Pu concentration ratio was from ten to 100 times larger than at NS201, and the GM GI-over-soil, carcass-over-soil and pelt-over-soil 239 + 240Pu ratios for kangaroo rats were about ten times larger than at NS201. These results are consistent with the finding that Area 13, compared with NS201 or NS219, has a higher percentage of radioactivity associated with smaller soil particles and a larger percentage of resuspendable and respirable soil. However, the resuspension factor increased by a factor of 27 at NS201 when the surface soil was disturbed, and by a factor of 12 at NS219 following a wildfire. The average (GM) concentration of 239 + 240Pu for the GI (and contents) of Area 13 kangaroo rats and for the rumen contents of beef cattle that grazed Area 13 were very similar (400 vs. 440 Bq kg-1 dry wt, respectively) although the variability between individuals was very large. The

  11. Derivation of soil-screening thresholds to protect the chisel-toothed kangaroo rat from uranium mine waste in northern Arizona.

    PubMed

    Hinck, Jo Ellen; Linder, Greg; Otton, James K; Finger, Susan E; Little, Edward; Tillitt, Donald E

    2013-08-01

    Chemical data from soil and weathered waste material samples collected from five uranium mines north of the Grand Canyon (three reclaimed, one mined but not reclaimed, and one never mined) were used in a screening-level risk analysis for the Arizona chisel-toothed kangaroo rat (Dipodomys microps leucotis); risks from radiation exposure were not evaluated. Dietary toxicity reference values were used to estimate soil-screening thresholds presenting risk to kangaroo rats. Sensitivity analyses indicated that body weight critically affected outcomes of exposed-dose calculations; juvenile kangaroo rats were more sensitive to the inorganic constituent toxicities than adult kangaroo rats. Species-specific soil-screening thresholds were derived for arsenic (137 mg/kg), cadmium (16 mg/kg), copper (1,461 mg/kg), lead (1,143 mg/kg), nickel (771 mg/kg), thallium (1.3 mg/kg), uranium (1,513 mg/kg), and zinc (731 mg/kg) using toxicity reference values that incorporate expected chronic field exposures. Inorganic contaminants in soils within and near the mine areas generally posed minimal risk to kangaroo rats. Most exceedances of soil thresholds were for arsenic and thallium and were associated with weathered mine wastes.

  12. Serologic-based investigation of leptospirosis in a population of free-ranging eastern grey kangaroos (Macropus giganteus) indicating the presence of Leptospira weilii serovar Topaz.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Michael W; Smythe, Lee; Dohnt, Michael; Symonds, Meegan; Slack, Andrew

    2010-04-01

    Eastern grey kangaroos (Macropus giganteus) are one of the most abundant large macropodids sharing the landscape with humans. Despite this, little is known about the prevalence of Leptospira carriage within this species and the role that they may partake in the transmission of this disease in Australia. The sera of 87 free-ranging eastern grey kangaroos, captured in the Warragamba Catchment Area, Sydney, Australia, from June 2004 to November 2006, were screened against a reference panel of 22 Leptospira serovars using the microscopic agglutination test (MAT). Leptospiral antibodies were detected in 47% (41 of 87) of serum samples collected. Leptospira weilii Topaz, a newly emergent serovar in Australia, was detected in all seropositive kangaroos (41 of 41; 100%). The sex and tail-fat body condition index of kangaroos appeared to have no significant effect on the exposure to the disease. This serologic-based study is the first reported for L. weilii serovar Topaz in New South Wales, to our knowledge, having previously been isolated only in humans and two other animal species (bovine and long-nosed bandicoot [Perameles nasuta]) in Western Australia and Queensland. The potential role of eastern grey kangaroos in the maintenance and zoonotic spread of the disease to livestock and humans is discussed.

  13. Single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis of genetic variation in Labiostrongylus longispicularis from kangaroos.

    PubMed

    Huby-Chilton, F; Beveridge, I; Gasser, R B; Chilton, N B

    2001-06-01

    Single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis was employed to screen for sequence heterogeneity in the second internal transcribed spacer (ITS-2) of ribosomal (r) DNA of Labiostrongylus longispicularis, a parasitic strongylid nematode occuring in some species of kangaroo in different geographical regions of Australia. The results showed that most of the nematodes screened had different SSCP profiles, which were subsequently shown to correspond to polymorphisms and/or an indel in the ITS-2 sequence. These variable sites related mainly to unpaired regions of the predicted secondary structure of the precursor rRNA molecule. SSCP profiles could be used to distinguish L. longispicularis in Macropus robustus robustus (New South Wales) from L. longispicularis in Macropus robustus erubescens and Macropus rufus (South Australia). This difference corresponded to a transversional change in the ITS-2 sequence at alignment position 82. The study demonstrated clearly the effectiveness of SSCP analysis for future large-scale population genetic studies of L. longispicularis in order to test the hypothesis that L. longispicularis from different geographical regions represents multiple sibling species.

  14. Functional morphology of the hindleg in two kangaroos Macropus giganteus and Aepyprymnus rufescens.

    PubMed

    Lodder, M A

    1991-01-01

    In this study the structures in the hindleg of the kangaroo which are potentially available for jumping were examined. Specimens of two species, Macropus giganteus and Aepyprymnus rufescens, were examined and are described and compared. The basic pattern of the jump of the two species is similar. This is reflected anatomically by the fact that in both species the extensors of the hip, knee and ankle as a percentage of the total weight of the hindleg are greater than the flexors of the same joints. An additional similarity is that the biceps femoris and adductor magnus have the greatest share in the weight of the hip extensors. Furthermore the estimated total force of the hip, knee and ankle extensors and total moment of the hip and ankle extensors are always greater than the flexors of the same joints. However, the percentage of the hip and knee extensors, the absolute forces and moments of both the extensors and flexors and the range of movement especially of the hip and knee are always greater in M. giganteus than in A. rufescens. As well as these differences, the long tibia and the position of the knee in view of the hip may be important factors for the longer jump achieved by M. giganteus. In comparison A. rufescens has a anatomical construction which seems to be a compromise between walking and jumping.

  15. Speed cameras, section control, and kangaroo jumps-a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Høye, Alena

    2014-12-01

    A meta-analysis was conducted of the effects of speed cameras and section control (point-to-point speed cameras) on crashes. 63 effect estimates from 15 speed camera studies and five effect estimates from four section control studies were included in the analysis. Speed cameras were found to reduce total crash numbers by about 20%. The effect declines with increasing distance from the camera location. Fatal crashes were found to be reduced by 51%, this result may however be affected by regression to the mean (RTM). Section control was found to have a greater crash reducing effect than speed cameras (-30% for total crash numbers and -56% for KSI crashes). There is no indication that these results (except the one for the effect of speed cameras on fatal crashes) are affected by regression to the mean, publication bias or outlier bias. The results indicate that kangaroo driving (braking and accelerating) occurs, but no adverse effects on speed or crashes were found. Crash migration, i.e., an increase of crash numbers on other roads due to rerouting of traffic, may occur in some cases at speed cameras, but the results do not indicate that such effects are common. Both speed cameras and section control were found to achieve considerable speed reductions and the crash effects that were found in meta-analysis are of a similar size or greater than one might expect based on the effects on speed.

  16. Maternal singing during kangaroo care led to autonomic stability in preterm infants and reduced maternal anxiety.

    PubMed

    Arnon, Shmuel; Diamant, Chagit; Bauer, Sofia; Regev, Rivka; Sirota, Gisela; Litmanovitz, Ita

    2014-10-01

    Kangaroo care (KC) and maternal singing benefit preterm infants, and we investigated whether combining these benefitted infants and mothers. A prospective randomised, within-subject, crossover, repeated-measures study design was used, with participants acting as their own controls. We evaluated the heart rate variability (HRV) of stable preterm infants receiving KC, with and without maternal singing. This included low frequency (LF), high frequency (HF) and the LF/HF ratio during baseline (10 min), singing or quiet phases (20 min) and recovery (10 min). Physiological parameters, maternal anxiety and the infants' behavioural state were measured. We included 86 stable preterm infants, with a postmenstrual age of 32-36 weeks. A significant change in LF and HF, and lower LF/HF ratio, was observed during KC with maternal singing during the intervention and recovery phases, compared with just KC and baseline (all p-values <0.05). Maternal anxiety was lower during singing than just KC (p = 0.04). No differences in the infants' behavioural states or physiological parameters were found, with or without singing. Maternal singing during KC reduces maternal anxiety and leads to autonomic stability in stable preterm infants. This effect is not detected in behavioural state or physiological parameters commonly used to monitor preterm infants. ©2014 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Ord's kangaroo rats living in floodplain habitats: Factors contributing to habitat attraction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, M.S.; Wilson, K.R.; Andersen, D.C.

    2003-01-01

    High densities of an aridland granivore, Ord's kangaroo rat (Dipodomys ordii), have been documented in floodplain habitats along the Yampa River in northwestern Colorado. Despite a high probability of inundation and attendant high mortality during the spring flood period, the habitat is consistently recolonized. To understand factors that potentially make riparian habitats attractive to D. ordii, we compared density and spatial pattern of seeds, density of a competitor (western harvester ant, Pogonomyrmex occidentalis), and digging energetics within floodplain habitats and between floodplain and adjacent upland habitats. Seed density within the floodplain was greatest in the topographically high (rarely flooded) floodplain and lowest immediately after a spring flood in the topographically low (frequently flooded) floodplain. Seed densities in adjacent upland habitat that never floods were higher than the lowest floodplain habitat. In the low floodplain prior to flooding, seeds had a clumped spatial pattern, which D. ordii is adept at exploiting; after spring flooding, a more random pattern resulted. Populations of the western harvester ant were low in the floodplain relative to the upland. Digging by D. ordii was energetically less expensive in floodplain areas than in upland areas. Despite the potential for mortality due to annual spring flooding, the combination of less competition from harvester ants and lower energetic costs of digging might promote the use of floodplain habitat by D. ordii.

  18. Short spell kangaroo mother care and its differential physiological influence in subgroups of preterm babies.

    PubMed

    Boju, Sangeetha Lakshmi; Gopi Krishna, Muddu; Uppala, Rajani; Chodavarapu, Praneeta; Chodavarapu, Ravikumar

    2012-06-01

    In routine practice, 4-6 h of kangaroo mother care (KMC) is adopted. Many mothers feel the duration impracticable. In 86 preterm babies, pre and post 1 h KMC changes in heart rate (HR), respiratory rate (RR), axillary temperature and SpO(2) are measured, in each baby. Postnatal age at the time of the study is 7.7 ± 5.2 days. Significant changes observed are decrease in mean HR by 3 bpm, RR by 3 min(-1) and increase in mean axillary temperature by 0.4 F and SpO(2) by 1.1%. In SGA babies, post KMC decrease in mean HR by 5 bpm, increase in mean axillary temperature by 0.6 F and SpO(2) by 2.1% are significant. In female babies, post KMC decrease in mean RR by 6 min(-1) and increase mean axillary temperature by 0.3 F and SpO(2) by 1.5% are significant. We conclude that preterm babies are benefited by 1 h KMC. SGA and female preterm babies showed different and greater response.

  19. The effect of kangaroo mother care on mental health of mothers with low birth weight infants

    PubMed Central

    Badiee, Zohreh; Faramarzi, Salar; MiriZadeh, Tahereh

    2014-01-01

    Background: The mothers of premature infants are at risk of psychological stress because of separation from their infants. One of the methods influencing the maternal mental health in the postpartum period is kangaroo mother care (KMC). This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of KMC of low birth weight infants on their maternal mental health. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted in the Department of Pediatrics of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran. Premature infants were randomly allocated into two groups. The control group received standard caring in the incubator. In the experimental group, caring with three sessions of 60 min KMC daily for 1 week was practiced. Mental health scores of the mothers were evaluated by using the 28-item General Health Questionnaire. Statistical analysis was performed by the analysis of covariance using SPSS. Results: The scores of 50 infant-mother pairs were analyzed totally (25 in KMC group and 25 in standard care group). Results of covariance analysis showed the positive effects of KMC on the rate of maternal mental health scores. There were statistically significant differences between the mean scores of the experimental group and control subjects in the posttest period (P < 0.001). Conclusion: KMC for low birth weight infants is a safe way to improve maternal mental health. Therefore, it is suggested as a useful method that can be recommended for improving the mental health of mothers. PMID:25371871

  20. Effects of Daily Kangaroo Care on Cardiorespiratory Parameters in Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Anita J.; Yates, Charlotte; Williams, Keith; Hall, Richard W

    2014-01-01

    Background/aims Kangaroo care (KC) has possible benefits for promoting physiological stability and positive developmental outcomes in preterm infants. The purpose of this study was to compare bradycardia and desaturation events in preterm infants in standard incubator care (SC) versus KC. Methods Thirty-eight infants 27 to 30 weeks gestational age were randomly assigned to 2 hours of KC daily between days of life (DOL) 5 to 10 or to continuous SC. Infants were monitored for bradycardia (heart rate <80) or oxygen desaturation (<80%). Analysis of hourly events was based on three sets of data: SC group 24 hours daily, KC group during incubator time 22 hours daily, and KC group during holding time 2 hours daily. Results The KC group had fewer bradycardia events per hour while being held compared to time spent in an incubator (p=0.048). The KC group also had significantly fewer oxygen desaturation events while being held than while in the incubator (p=0.017) and significantly fewer desaturation events than infants in standard care (p=0.02). Conclusion KC reduces bradycardia and oxygen desaturation events in preterm infants, providing physiological stability and possible benefits for neurodevelopmental outcomes. PMID:24246597

  1. [Effect of very early kangaroo care on extrauterine temperature adaptation in newborn infants with hypothermia problems].

    PubMed

    Huang, Ya-Yi; Huang, Ching-Yi; Lin, Shiu-Mei; Wu, Shu-Chuan

    2006-08-01

    Increased morbidity and mortality has been associated with neonates admitted with body temperatures below 36 degrees C. We employed an experimental design in a randomized control trial to compare the effectiveness of using early kangaroo care (KC) for extrauterine temperature adaptation against that of using radiant warmers. Trial subjects included 78 consecutive cesarean newborn infants with hypothermia problems. The KC group received skin-to-skin contact with their mothers in the post-operative room, while infants in the control group received routine care under radiant warmers. The mean temperature of the KC group was slightly higher than that of the control group (36.29 degrees C vs. 36.22 degrees C, p = .044). After four hours, 97.43% of KC group infants had reached normal body temperatures, compared with 82.05% in the radiant warmer group. Results demonstrate the positive effects of KC for extrauterine temperature adaptation in hypothermia infants. In the course of evidence-based practice, KC could be incorporated into the standard care regimen in order to improve hypothermia care.

  2. Family-level relationships among the Australasian marsupial "herbivores" (Diprotodontia: Koala, wombats, kangaroos and possums).

    PubMed

    Phillips, Matthew J; Pratt, Renae C

    2008-02-01

    The marsupial order Diprotodontia includes 10 extant families, which occupy all terrestrial habitats across Australia and New Guinea and have evolved remarkable dietary and locomotory diversity. Despite considerable attention, the interrelations of these families have for the most part remained elusive. In this study, we separately model mitochondrial RNA and protein-coding sequences in addition to nuclear protein-coding sequences to provide near-complete resolution of diprotodontian family-level phylogeny. We show that alternative topologies inferred in some previous studies are likely to be artifactual, resulting from branch-length and compositional biases. Subordinal groupings resolved herein include Vombatiformes (wombats and koala) and Phalangerida, which in turn comprises Petauroidea (petaurid gliders and striped, feathertail, ringtail and honey possums) and a clade whose plesiomorphic members possess blade-like premolars (phalangerid possums, kangaroos and their allies and most likely, pygmy possums). The topology resolved reveals ecological niche structuring among diprotodontians that has likely been maintained for more than 40 million years.

  3. Kangaroo Care in a Neonatal Context: Parents’ Experiences of Information and Communication of Nurse-Parents

    PubMed Central

    Lemmen, Desirée; Fristedt, Petra; Lundqvist, Anita

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Kangaroo Care (KC) is an evidence-based nursing practice with many benefits for infants and parents. The purpose of this study was to describe parents’ experience of information and communication mediated by staff nurses before and during KC at neonatal wards. Methodology and Participants: A qualitative study with semi-structured interviews was performed. The sample consisted of 20 parents. Results: The results show that the information and communication were experienced as both optimal and suboptimal including following categories: initially conflicting emotions in relation to KC, participation and confidence in KC is evolving, strengthening preparation and context is decisive as well as parental sense and caution. The overall theme was that good preparation will contribute to a positive experience of KC. Conclusion: The conclusion is that most of the parents had positive experiences of KC. The information and communication from the staff nurses encouraged and motivated the parents to practice KC, in a sense that it was a natural way to get to know the infant, when the staff nurses were well versed in the method and coherent and supportive. Conflicting emotions emerged when staff nurses practised KC as a routine without deeper knowledge and skills of the method and its advantages as well as without sensitivity to parents’ vulnerable situation. PMID:23802029

  4. A flow cytometric study of chromosomes from rat kangaroo and Chinese hamster cells.

    PubMed

    Stöhr, M; Hutter, K J; Frank, M; Futterman, G; Goerttler, K

    1980-01-01

    Chromosomes from rat kangaroo (PTK) and chinese hamster (CHV 79) cells have been prepared for quantitative flow-cytometric analysis. The preparation time was otimized down to 30 (PTK) and 40 min (CHV 79). DAPI was used as a AT-sensitive fluorescent dye to stain for monoparameter DNA measurements. Simultaneous two-parameter DNA-protein analysis was carried out with DAPI and SR 101 (as a general protein fluorochrome) in combination. The karyotype of the PTK cells with 13 (14) chromosomes was separated into 10DNA peaks. The X-chromosome bearing the nucleolus organizer region generates a distinct peak. The karyotype of the CHV 79 cells with 22 chromosomes was separated inot 15 peaks. The DNA profile obtained indicates a geometric grading of the chromosomal amount of AT components in teh karyotype of this particular cell line. The simultaneous DNA-protein analysis performed show enough sensitivity of the instrument utilizing hihg power UV excitation illumination to discriminate the two color emission consisting of blue (DAPI) and red (SR 101) fluorescence. Color overlapping could be completely avoided. Additionally, the quality (number, location, and resolution of peaks) of the DNA distribution was not influences by the simultaneous application of a second fluorescent stain. Fluorescence activated electronic sorting applied on chromosomal fluorescence distributions providing purified fractions of chromosomes for subsequent biochemical and biological determinations is discussed.

  5. [Characteristics of quantitative karyotypic variability in cell line of kidney from rat kangaroo (Potorous tridactylis)].

    PubMed

    Polianskaia, G G; Samokish, V A

    1999-01-01

    The numerical regulations of karyotypic variability in cell line of rat kangaroo kidney, NBL-3-11, has been investigated. These regulations are similar with ones found for cell lines of the Indian muntjac skin fibroblasts (M, MT, M2). In particular the balanced karyotypic structure of cell population in vitro is determined by correlations of the structural variants of the karyotype (SVK). These correlations depend on the following regulations 1) nonrandom character of cell distribution according to the number of chromosomal deviations from MSVK; 2) specific character of deviations of each chromosome from MSVK; 3) presence of significant connections between separate chromosomes with simultaneous numeral deviations some differences in the character of significant connections between the individual chromosomes. These connections have either single directed character, mainly (+) direction, or differently directed one by deviations of each chromosome mainly in one direction in cell line NBL-3-11. At the same time single directed character of simultaneous deviations is observed in cell lines of the Indian muntjac skin fibroblasts (M, MT, M2) either in (+) or (-) direction. Represented results confirm and extend considerably the known ideas of the regulations of karyotypic variability in cell populations in vitro.

  6. Influence of small-scale disturbances by kangaroo rats on Chihuahuan Desert ants.

    PubMed

    Schooley, R L; Bestelmeyer, B T; Kelly, J F

    2000-10-01

    Banner-tailed kangaroo rats (Dipodomys spectabilis) are prominent ecosystem engineers that build large mounds that influence the spatial structuring of fungi, plants, and some ground-dwelling animals. Ants are diverse and functionally important components of arid ecosystems; some species are also ecosystem engineers. We investigated the effects of patch disturbances created by D. spectabilis mounds on ant assemblages in a Chihuahuan Desert grassland in southern New Mexico by using pitfall traps in a paired design (mound vs. matrix). Although the disturbances did not alter species richness or harbor unique ant communities relative to the matrix, they did alter species composition; the abundances of 6 of 26 species were affected. The disturbances might also act to disrupt spatial patterning of ants caused by other environmental gradients. In contrast to previous investigations of larger-scale disturbances, we detected no effects of the disturbances on ants at the functional-group level. Whether ant communities respond to disturbance at a functional-group or within-functional-group level may depend on the size and intensity of the disturbance. Useful functional-group schemes also may be scale-dependent, however, or species may respond idiosyncratically. Interactions between disturbance-generating mammals and ants may produce a nested spatial structure of patches.

  7. Behavioural syndromes in Merriam's kangaroo rats (Dipodomys merriami): a test of competing hypotheses.

    PubMed

    Dochtermann, Ned A; Jenkins, Stephen H

    2007-09-22

    Behavioural syndromes, correlations of behaviours conceptually analogous to personalities, have been a topic of recent attention due to their potential to explain trade-offs in behavioural responses, apparently maladaptive behaviour and limits to plasticity. Using Merriam's kangaroo rats (Dipodomys merriami), we assessed the explanatory power and generality of hypothesized syndrome structures derived from the literature and the natural history of the species. Several aspects of functionally distinct behavioural responses of D. merriami were quantified. Syndrome structures were compared using structural equation modelling and model selection procedures. A domain-general behavioural syndrome incorporating cross-functional relationships between measures of boldness, agonistic behaviour, flexibility and food hoarding best explained the data. This pattern suggests that D. merriami behaviours should not be viewed as discrete elements but as components of a multivariate landscape. Our results support arguments that a lack of independence between behaviours may be a general aspect of behavioural phenotypes and suggest that the ability of D. merriami's behaviour to respond to selection may be constrained by underlying connections.

  8. Vasoconstrictors alter oxygen, lactate, and glycerol metabolism in the perfused hindlimb of a rat kangaroo.

    PubMed

    Ye, J M; Edwards, S J; Rose, R W; Rattigan, S; Clark, M G; Colquhoun, E Q

    1995-05-01

    The Tasmanian bettong (Bettongia gaimardi) is a small marsupial rat kangaroo without detectable brown adipose tissue (BAT). The hindlimb was perfused with constant flow at 25 degrees C after cannulation under anesthesia of the femoral artery and vein to one hindlimb. Norepinephrine (NE, 25 nM-2.5 microM) and vasopressin (VP, 10 nM-0.1 microM) each increased perfusion pressure, oxygen consumption (VO2), and lactate and glycerol efflux of the perfused hindlimb. NE-mediated increases in VO2 and the efflux of lactate and glycerol were unaffected by propranolol (10 microM) but were completely blocked by the further addition of phentolamine (10 microM). In contrast, serotonin (5-HT; 0.1-2.5 microM) inhibited VO2 and inhibited lactate efflux. The changes induced by NE, VP, and 5-HT were all rapidly reversed by nitroprusside. These results suggest that resting thermogenesis in bettong hindlimb can be differentially controlled by the vasculature, which may also contribute to the induced VO2. This vascular control of skeletal muscle VO2 appears widespread in homeotherm evolution.

  9. Enhanced kangaroo mother care for heel lance in preterm neonates: a crossover trial.

    PubMed

    Johnston, C C; Filion, F; Campbell-Yeo, M; Goulet, C; Bell, L; McNaughton, K; Byron, J

    2009-01-01

    To test if enhancing maternal skin-to-skin contact, or kangaroo mother care (KMC) by adding rocking, singing and sucking is more efficacious than simple KMC for procedural pain in preterm neonates. Preterm neonates (n=90) between 32 0/7 and 36 0/7 weeks' gestational age participated in a single-blind randomized crossover design. The infant was held in KMC with the addition of rocking, singing and sucking or the infant was held in KMC without additional stimulation. The Premature Infant Pain Profile was the primary outcome with time to recover as the secondary outcome. A repeated-measures analysis of covariance was employed for analyses. There were no significant differences in any of the 30 s time periods over the 2 min of blood sampling nor in time to return to baseline. Compared to historical controls of the same age in incubator, the pain scores were lower and comparable to other studies of KMC. There were site differences related to lower scores with the use of sucrose in one site and higher scores in younger, sicker infants in another site. The sensorial stimulations from skin-to-skin contact that include tactile, olfactory sensations from the mother are sufficient to decrease pain response in premature neonates. Other studies showing that rocking, sucking and music were efficacious were independent of skin-to-skin contact, which, when used alone has been shown to be effective as reported across studies.

  10. The effect of formal, neonatal communication-intervention training on mothers in kangaroo care

    PubMed Central

    van Rooyen, Elise

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background Due to low-birth-weight, preterm birth, HIV and/or AIDS and poverty-related factors, South Africa presents with an increased prevalence of infants at risk of language delay. A Kangaroo Mother Care (KMC) unit offers unique opportunities for training. Aim The aim of the present study was to determine if formal, neonatal communication-intervention training had an effect on mothers’ knowledge and communication interaction with their high-risk infants. Methods Three groups of mothers participated: Group 1 was trained whilst practicing KMC; Group 2 was not trained but practiced KMC; and Group 3 was also not trained but practiced sporadic KMC. Ten mothers per group were matched for age, education level and birth order of their infants. The individual training was based on graded sensory stimulation and responsive mother-infant communication interaction, which emphasised talking and singing by the mother. Results Significant differences were found in mother-infant communication interaction between all three groups, which indicated a positive effect on Group 1 with training. Group 2, KMC without training, also had a positive effect on interaction. However, Group 1 mothers with training demonstrated better knowledge of their infants and were more responsive during interaction than the other two groups. Conclusion The present study suggests that neonatal communication-intervention training adds value to a KMC programme. PMID:26245414

  11. The Effects of Kangaroo Care in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit on the Physiological Functions of Preterm Infants, Maternal-Infant Attachment, and Maternal Stress.

    PubMed

    Cho, Eun-Sook; Kim, Shin-Jeong; Kwon, Myung Soon; Cho, Haeryun; Kim, Eun Hye; Jun, Eun Mi; Lee, Sunhee

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to identify the effects of kangaroo care on the physiological functions of preterm infants, maternal-infant attachment, and maternal stress. For this study, a quasi-experiment design was used with a nonequivalent control group, and a pre- and post-test. Data were collected from preterm infants with corrected gestational ages of ≥33weeks who were hospitalized between May and October 2011. Twenty infants were assigned to the experimental group and 20 to the control group. As an intervention, kangaroo care was provided in 30-min sessions conducted thrice a week for a total of 10 times. The collected data were analyzed by using the t test, repeated-measures ANOVA, and the ANCOVA test. After kangaroo care, the respiration rate significantly differed between the two groups (F=5.701, p=.020). The experimental group had higher maternal-infant attachment scores (F=25.881, p<.001) and lower maternal stress scores (F=47.320, p<.001) than the control group after the test. In other words, kangaroo care showed significantly positive effects on stabilizing infant physiological functions such as respiration rate, increasing maternal-infant attachment, and reducing maternal stress. This study suggests that kangaroo care can be used to promote emotional bonding and support between mothers and their babies, and to stabilize the physiological functions of premature babies. Kangaroo care may be one of the most effective nursing interventions in the neonatal intensive care unit for the care of preterm infants and their mothers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Biological assessment of the effects of petroleum production activities, Naval Petroleum Reserves in California, on the endangered giant kangaroo rat, Dipodomys ingens

    SciTech Connect

    O'Farrell, T.P.; Kato, T.T.

    1987-09-01

    This Biological Assessment evaluates the potential adverse effects that production activities conducted on the Naval Petroleum Reserveys in California may have on the endangered giant kangaroo rat (Dipodomys ingens). DOE concluded that the direct, indirect, and cumulative effects of the proposed activities will not jeopardize the continued existence of the species because results of surveys indicated that giant kangaroo rat burrow systems and habitat was initiated; a habitat restoration program was developed and implemented; and administrative policies to reduce vehicle speeds, contain oil and waste water spills, restrict off-road vehicle travel, and to regulate public access, livestock grazing, and agricultural activities were maintained. 33 refs., 3 figs.

  13. Successful transfer of a Goodfellow's tree kangaroo (Dendrolagus goodfellowi) pouch young to a yellow-footed rock wallaby (Petrogale xanthopus) surrogate.

    PubMed

    McLelland, David J; Fielder, Kate; Males, Gayl; Langley, Nathan; Schultz, David

    2015-01-01

    A 47-day-old orphaned Goodfellow's tree kangaroo (Dendrolagus goodfellowi) joey was successfully cross-fostered onto a yellow-footed rock wallaby (Petrogale xanthopus). The joey was subsequently taken for hand-rearing at age 5 months. This is the first report of the cross-fostering technique, well-established in other macropods, being applied to a Dendrolagus sp. This technique can be considered as a viable option to raise young orphaned tree kangaroos, and as a tool to accelerate breeding in captive breeding programs of Dendrolagus spp. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Parental involvement and kangaroo care in European neonatal intensive care units: a policy survey in eight countries.

    PubMed

    Pallás-Alonso, Carmen R; Losacco, Valentina; Maraschini, Alice; Greisen, Gorm; Pierrat, Veronique; Warren, Inga; Haumont, Dominique; Westrup, Björn; Smit, Bert J; Sizun, Jacques; Cuttini, Marina

    2012-09-01

    To compare, in a large representative sample of European neonatal intensive care units, the policies and practices regarding parental involvement and holding babies in the kangaroo care position as well as differences in the tasks mothers and fathers are allowed to carry out. Prospective multicenter survey. Neonatal intensive care units in eight European countries (Belgium, Denmark, France, Italy, The Netherlands, Spain, Sweden, and the United Kingdom). Patients were not involved in this study. None. A structured questionnaire was mailed to 362 units (response rate 78%); only units with ≥50 very-low-birth-weight annual admissions were considered for this study. Facilities for parents such as reclining chairs near the babies' cots, beds, and a dedicated room were common, but less so in Italy and Spain. All units in Sweden, Denmark, the United Kingdom, and Belgium reported encouraging parental participation in the care of the babies, whereas policies were more restrictive in Italy (80% of units), France (73%), and Spain (41%). Holding babies in the kangaroo care position was widespread. However, in the United Kingdom, France, Italy, and Spain, many units applied restrictions regarding its frequency (sometimes or on parents request only, rather than routinely), method (conventional rather than skin-to-skin), and clinical conditions (especially mechanical ventilation and presence of umbilical lines) that would prevent its practice. In these countries, fathers were routinely offered kangaroo care less frequently than mothers (p < .001) and less often it was skin-to-skin (p < .0001). This study showed that, although the majority of units in all countries reported a policy of encouraging both parents to take part in the care of their babies, the intensity and ways of involvement as well as the role played by mothers and fathers varied within and between countries.

  15. Kangaroo tooth enamel oxygen and carbon isotope variation on a latitudinal transect in southern Australia: implications for palaeoenvironmental reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Brookman, Tom H; Ambrose, Stanley H

    2013-02-01

    Tooth enamel apatite carbonate carbon and oxygen isotope ratios of modern kangaroos (Macropus spp.) collected on a 900-km latitudinal transect spanning a C(3)-C(4) transition zone were analysed to create a reference set for palaeoenvironmental reconstruction in southern Australia. The carbon isotope composition of enamel carbonate reflects the proportional intake of C(3) and C(4) vegetation, and its oxygen isotope composition reflects that of ingested water. Tooth enamel forms incrementally, recording dietary and environmental changes during mineralisation. Analyses show only weak correlations between climate records and latitudinal changes in δ(13)C and δ(18)O. No species achieved the δ(13)C values (~-1.0 ‰) expected for 100 % C(4) grazing diets; kangaroos at low latitudes that are classified as feeding primarily on C(4) grasses (grazers) have δ(13)C of up to -3.5 ‰. In these areas, δ(13)C below -12 ‰ suggests a 100 % C(3) grass and/or leafy plant (browse) diet while animals from higher latitude have lower δ(13)C. Animals from semi-arid areas have δ(18)O of 34-40 ‰, while grazers from temperate areas have lower values (~28-30 ‰). Three patterns with implications for palaeoenvironmental reconstruction emerge: (1) all species in semi-arid areas regularly browse to supplement limited grass resources; (2) all species within an environmental zone have similar carbon and oxygen isotope compositions, meaning data from different kangaroo species can be pooled for palaeoenvironmental investigations; (3) relatively small regional environmental differences can be distinguished when δ(13)C and δ(18)O data are used together. These data demonstrate that diet-isotope and climate-isotope relationships should be evaluated in modern ecosystems before application to the regional fossil record.

  16. Radionuclide transport from soil to air, native vegetation, kangaroo rats and grazing cattle on the Nevada test site

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, R.O.; Shinn, J.H.; Essington, E.H.; Tamura, T.; Romney, E.M.; Moor, K.S.; O'Farrell, T.P.

    1988-12-01

    Between 1970 and 1986 the Nevada Applied Ecology Group (NAEG), U.S. Department of Energy, conducted environmental radionuclide studies at weapons-testing sites on or adjacent to the Nevada Test Site. In this paper, NAEG studies conducted at two nuclear (fission) sites (NS201, NS219) and two nonnuclear (nonfission) sites (Area 13 (Project 57) and Clean Slate 2) are reviewed, synthesized and compared regarding (1) soil particle-size distribution and physical-chemical characteristics of 239 + 240Pu-bearing radioactive particles, (2) 239 + 240Pu resuspension rates and (3) transuranic and fission-product radionuclide transfers from soil to native vegetation, kangaroo rats and grazing cattle. The data indicate that transuranic radionuclides were transferred more readily on the average from soil to air, the external surfaces of native vegetation and to tissues of kangaroo rats at Area 13 than at NS201 or NS219. The 239 + 240Pu resuspension factor for undisturbed soil at Area 13 was three to four orders-of-magnitude larger than at NS201 and NS219, the geometric mean (GM) vegetation-over-soil 239 + 240Pu concentration ratio was from ten to 100 times larger than at NS201, and the GM GI-over-soil, carcass-over-soil and pelt-over-soil 239 + 240Pu ratios for kangaroo rats were about ten times larger than at NS201. These results are consistent with the finding that Area 13, compared with NS201 or NS219, has a higher percentage of radioactivity associated with smaller soil particles and a larger percentage of resuspendable and respirable soil. However, the resuspension factor increased by a factor of 27 at NS201 when the surface soil was disturbed, and by a factor of 12 at NS219 following a wildfire.

  17. The effect of kangaroo mother care on the duration of phototherapy of infants re-admitted for neonatal jaundice.

    PubMed

    Samra, Nashwa M; El Taweel, Amal; Cadwell, Karin

    2012-08-01

    We investigated the effect of kangaroo mother care (KMC) on the duration of phototherapy of jaundiced neonates. Fifty Egyptian newborns hospitalized for jaundice were investigated through a prospective observational study to determine whether intermittent KMC would reduce the duration of phototherapy required. The babies who received KMC recovered earlier from jaundice and needed a shorter duration of phototherapy than the control group (68.14 ± 24.32 hour versus 100.86 ± 42.26 hour, p = 0.004). KMC may be an effective intervention to reduce the duration of phototherapy needed when jaundiced babies are hospitalized.

  18. Effect of intermittent kangaroo mother care on weight gain of low birth weight neonates with delayed weight gain.

    PubMed

    Samra, Nashwa M; Taweel, Amal El; Cadwell, Karin

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate intermittent Kangaroo Mother Care (KMC) with additional opportunities to breastfeed on weight gain of low birth weight (LBW) neonates with delayed weight gain. 40 LBW neonates were followed to see whether KMC with additional opportunities to breastfeed improved weight gain. In the KMC group, the mean age of regaining birth weight was significantly less (15.68 vs. 24.56 days) and the average daily weight gain was significantly higher (22.09 vs. 10.39 g, p < .001) than controls. KMC with additional opportunities to breastfeed was found to be an effective intervention for LBWs with delayed weight gain and should be considered to be an effective strategy.

  19. Phylogeography of the dark kangaroo mouse, Microdipodops megacephalus: cryptic lineages and dispersal routes in North America's Great Basin.

    PubMed

    Hafner, John C; Upham, Nathan S

    2011-06-01

    AIM: The rodent genus Microdipodops (kangaroo mice) includes two sand-obligate endemics of the Great Basin Desert: M. megacephalus and M. pallidus. The dark kangaroo mouse, M. megacephalus, is distributed throughout the Great Basin and our principal aims were to formulate phylogenetic hypotheses for this taxon and make phylogeographical comparisons with its congener. LOCATION: The Great Basin Desert of western North America. METHODS: DNA sequence data from three mitochondrial genes were examined from 186 individuals of M. megacephalus, representing 47 general localities. Phylogenetic inference was used to analyse the sequence data. Directional analysis of phylogeographical patterns was used to examine haplotype sharing patterns and recover routes of gene exchange. Haplotype-area curves were constructed to evaluate the relationship between genetic variation and distributional island size for M. megacephalus and M. pallidus. RESULTS: Microdipodops megacephalus is a rare desert rodent (trapping success was 2.67%). Temporal comparison of trapping data shows that kangaroo mice are becoming less abundant in the study area. The distribution has changed slightly since the 1930s but many northern populations now appear to be small, fragmented, or locally extinct. Four principal phylogroups (the Idaho isolate and the western, central and eastern clades) are evident; mean sequence divergence between phylogroups for cytochrome b is c. 8%. Data from haplotype sharing show two trends: a north-south trend and a web-shaped trend. Analyses of haplotype-area curves reveal significant positive relationships. MAIN CONCLUSIONS: The four phylogroups of M. megacephalus appear to represent morphologically cryptic species; in comparison, a companion study revealed two cryptic lineages in M. pallidus. Estimated divergence times of the principal clades of M. megacephalus (c. 2-4 Ma) indicate that these kangaroo mice were Pleistocene invaders into the Great Basin coincident with the formation

  20. Phylogeography of the dark kangaroo mouse, Microdipodops megacephalus: cryptic lineages and dispersal routes in North America's Great Basin

    PubMed Central

    Hafner, John C; Upham, Nathan S

    2011-01-01

    Aim The rodent genus Microdipodops (kangaroo mice) includes two sand-obligate endemics of the Great Basin Desert: M. megacephalus and M. pallidus. The dark kangaroo mouse, M. megacephalus, is distributed throughout the Great Basin and our principal aims were to formulate phylogenetic hypotheses for this taxon and make phylogeographical comparisons with its congener. Location The Great Basin Desert of western North America. Methods DNA sequence data from three mitochondrial genes were examined from 186 individuals of M. megacephalus, representing 47 general localities. Phylogenetic inference was used to analyse the sequence data. Directional analysis of phylogeographical patterns was used to examine haplotype sharing patterns and recover routes of gene exchange. Haplotype–area curves were constructed to evaluate the relationship between genetic variation and distributional island size for M. megacephalus and M. pallidus. Results Microdipodops megacephalus is a rare desert rodent (trapping success was 2.67%). Temporal comparison of trapping data shows that kangaroo mice are becoming less abundant in the study area. The distribution has changed slightly since the 1930s but many northern populations now appear to be small, fragmented, or locally extinct. Four principal phylogroups (the Idaho isolate and the western, central and eastern clades) are evident; mean sequence divergence between phylogroups for cytochrome b is c. 8%. Data from haplotype sharing show two trends: a north–south trend and a web-shaped trend. Analyses of haplotype–area curves reveal significant positive relationships. Main conclusions The four phylogroups of M. megacephalus appear to represent morphologically cryptic species; in comparison, a companion study revealed two cryptic lineages in M. pallidus. Estimated divergence times of the principal clades of M. megacephalus (c. 2–4 Ma) indicate that these kangaroo mice were Pleistocene invaders into the Great Basin coincident with the

  1. Polycyclic hydrocarbon biomarkers confirm selective incorporation of petroleum in kangaroo rat liver samples near oil well blowout site

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, I.; Lu, Shan-tan; Lee, Ru-po; Warrick, G.

    1996-12-31

    In June 1994, a well blowout occurred at an oil field in the western, part of the San Joaquin Valley, resulting in deposition of crude oil south of the well. Some light oil spray was found up to 13.6 km from the well, but the most heavily affected area was within 0.8 km of the site. Because the location contains habitats for several threatened and endangered species, an evaluation of damages to natural resources was initiated soon after the well was capped. As part of the assessment of damages to wildlife, an investigation was conducted to determine whether kangaroo rats had ingested crude oil hydrocarbons from the spill.

  2. Design of a breathing mattress based on the respiratory movement of kangaroo mother care for the development of neonates.

    PubMed

    Schets, M W M; Chen, W; Bambang Oetomo, S

    2015-01-01

    Kangaroo mother care (KMC) benefits the development of neonates. This paper focuses on the design and implementing the extension of KMC for infants at Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICU). A breathing mattress is proposed to comfort infants and stimulate them to breathe regularly by mimicking the movement of the parent's chest during KMC. The incubator mattress simulates the breathing of the parent's chest with embedded electronics and pneumatic technology for mattress motion actuating systems. The stakeholders, including the child, parents and NICU staff, were directly involved during the concept development, prototyping and evaluation.

  3. Kangaroo mother care to reduce morbidity and mortality in low birthweight infants.

    PubMed

    Conde-Agudelo, Agustin; Díaz-Rossello, José L

    2014-04-22

    Kangaroo mother care (KMC), originally defined as skin-to-skin contact between a mother and her newborn, frequent and exclusive or nearly exclusive breastfeeding, and early discharge from hospital, has been proposed as an alternative to conventional neonatal care for low birthweight (LBW) infants. To determine whether there is evidence to support the use of KMC in LBW infants as an alternative to conventional neonatal care. The standard search strategy of the Cochrane Neonatal Group was used. This included searches in MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS, POPLINE, CINAHL databases (all from inception to March 31, 2014) and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library, Issue 3, 2014) In addition, we searched the web page of the Kangaroo Foundation, conference and symposia proceedings on KMC, and Google scholar. Randomized controlled trials comparing KMC versus conventional neonatal care, or early onset KMC (starting within 24 hours after birth) versus late onset KMC (starting after 24 hours after birth) in LBW infants. Data collection and analysis were performed according to the methods of the Cochrane Neonatal Review Group. Eighteen studies, including 2751 infants, fulfilled inclusion criteria. Sixteen studies evaluated KMC in LBW infants after stabilization, one evaluated KMC in LBW infants before stabilization, and one compared early onset KMC with late onset KMC in relatively stable LBW infants. Thirteen studies evaluated intermittent KMC and five evaluated continuous KMC. At discharge or 40-41 weeks' postmenstrual age, KMC was associated with a reduction in the risk of mortality (typical risk ratio (RR) 0.60, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.39 to 0.92; eight trials, 1736 infants), nosocomial infection/sepsis (typical RR 0.45, 95% CI 0.27 to 0.76), hypothermia (typical RR 0.34, 95% CI 0.17 to 0.67), and length of hospital stay (typical mean difference 2.2 days, 95% CI 0.6 to 3.7). At latest follow up, KMC was associated with a decreased risk of

  4. Maternal mood and concordant maternal and infant salivary cortisol during heel lance while in kangaroo care.

    PubMed

    Castral, T C; Warnock, F; Dos Santos, C B; Daré, M F; Moreira, A C; Antonini, S R R; Scochi, C G S

    2015-03-01

    Maternal kangaroo care (MKC) is a naturalistic intervention that alleviates neonatal pain, and mothers are assumed to play a stress regulatory role in MKC. Yet, no MKC infant pain study has examined relationship between maternal and infant stress reactivity concurrently, or whether post-partum depression and/or anxiety (PPDA) alters maternal and neonatal stress response and the regulatory effects of MKC. To examine the concordance of salivary cortisol reactivity between 42 mothers and their stable preterm infants during routine infant heel lance (HL) while in MKC and to compare salivary cortisol between groups of mothers with and without PPDA and their infants. Maternal and infant salivary cortisol samples were collected pre-HL and 20 min post-HL with two additional maternal samples at night and in the morning. Mothers and infants were allocated to with PPDA versus without PPDA study groups on the basis of maternal post-natal mental health assessment scores. Higher mothers' cortisol pre-HL was weakly associated with higher infants' salivary cortisol in response to the HL procedure. Maternal depression and/or anxiety were not associated with infants' cortisol. During HL, both groups of mothers and infants showed no change in salivary cortisol. Concordance between mother and infant salivary cortisol supports the maternal stress regulatory role in MKC. MKC may have stress regulatory benefits for mothers and their preterm infants during HL independent of PPDA. Future MKC studies that target mothers with altered mood will help to build on these findings. © 2014 European Pain Federation - EFIC®

  5. Interactions among social monitoring, anti-predator vigilance and group size in eastern grey kangaroos

    PubMed Central

    Favreau, François-René; Goldizen, Anne W.; Pays, Olivier

    2010-01-01

    Group size is known to affect both the amount of time that prey animals spend in vigilance and the degree to which the vigilance of group members is synchronized. However, the variation in group-size effects reported in the literature is not yet understood. Prey animals exhibit vigilance both to protect themselves against predators and to monitor other group members, and both forms of vigilance presumably influence group-size effects on vigilance. However, our understanding of the patterns of individual investment underlying the time sharing between anti-predator and social vigilance is still limited. We studied patterns of variation in individual vigilance and the synchronization of vigilance with group size in a wild population of eastern grey kangaroos (Macropus giganteus) subject to predation, in particular focusing on peripheral females because we expected that they would exhibit both social and anti-predator vigilance. There was no global effect of group size on individual vigilance. The lack of group-size effect was the result of two compensating effects. The proportion of time individuals spent looking at other group members increased, whereas the proportion of time they spent scanning the environment decreased with group size; as a result, overall vigilance levels did not change with group size. Moreover, a degree of synchrony of vigilance occurred within groups and that degree increased with the proportion of vigilance time peripheral females spent in anti-predator vigilance. Our results highlight the crucial roles of both social and anti-predator components of vigilance in the understanding of the relationship between group size and vigilance, as well as in the synchronization of vigilance among group members. PMID:20219737

  6. Investigating Differences in Vigilance Tactic Use within and between the Sexes in Eastern Grey Kangaroos

    PubMed Central

    Rieucau, Guillaume; Blanchard, Pierrick; Martin, Julien G. A.; Favreau, François-René; Goldizen, Anne W.; Pays, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    Aggregation is thought to enhance an animal’s security through effective predator detection and the dilution of risk. A decline in individual vigilance as group size increases is commonly reported in the literature and called the group size effect. However, to date, most of the research has only been directed toward examining whether this effect occurs at the population level. Few studies have explored the specific contributions of predator detection and risk dilution and the basis of individual differences in the use of vigilance tactics. We tested whether male and female (non-reproductive or with young) eastern grey kangaroos (Macropus giganteus) adopted different vigilance tactics when in mixed-sex groups and varied in their reliance on predator detection and/or risk dilution as group size changed. This species exhibits pronounced sexual dimorphism with females being much smaller than males, making them differentially vulnerable toward predators. We combined field observations with vigilance models describing the effects of detection and dilution on scanning rates as group size increased. We found that females with and without juveniles relied on predator detection and risk dilution, but the latter adjusted their vigilance to the proportion of females with juveniles within their group. Two models appeared to equally support the data for males suggesting that males, similarly to females, relied on predator detection and risk dilution but may also have adjusted their vigilance according to the proportion of mothers within their group. Differential vulnerability may cause sex differences in vigilance tactic use in this species. The presence of males within a group that do not, or only partially, contribute to predator detection and are less at risk may cause additional security costs to females. Our results call for reexamination of the classical view of the safety advantages of grouping to provide a more detailed functional interpretation of gregariousness. PMID

  7. Randomized controlled trial of music during kangaroo care on maternal state anxiety and preterm infants' responses.

    PubMed

    Lai, Hui-Ling; Chen, Chia-Jung; Peng, Tai-Chu; Chang, Fwu-Mei; Hsieh, Mei-Lin; Huang, Hsiao-Yen; Chang, Shu-Chuan

    2006-02-01

    The purpose of this randomized controlled trial was to investigate the influences of music during kangaroo care (KC) on maternal anxiety and preterm infants' responses. There are no experimental studies that explore the influences of combination of music and KC on psychophysiological responses in mother-infant dyads. Purposive sampling was used to recruit 30 hospitalized preterm infants body weight 1500 gm and over, gestational age 37 weeks and lower from two NICUs. Mother-infant dyads were randomly assigned to the treatment and the control group using permuted block randomization stratified on gender. There were 15 mother-infant dyads in each group. Subjects in the treatment dyads listened to their choice of a lullaby music during KC for 60 min/section/day for three consecutive days. Control dyads received routine incubator care. Using a repeated measures design with a pretest and three posttests, the responses of treatment dyads including maternal anxiety and infants' physiologic responses (heart rate, respiratory rate, and O2 saturation) as well as behavioural state were measured. The results revealed that there were no significant differences between the two groups on infants' physiologic responses and the values were all in the normal range. However, infants in the treatment group had more occurrence of quiet sleep states and less crying (p<0.05-0.01). Music during KC also resulted in significantly lower maternal anxiety in the treatment group (p<0.01). Maternal state anxiety improved daily, indicating a cumulative dose effect. The findings provide evidence for the use of music during KC as an empirically-based intervention for bahavioural state stability and maternal anxiety in mother-infant dyads.

  8. Adaptations for leaf eating in the great basin kangaroo rat, Dipodomys microps.

    PubMed

    Kenagy, G J

    1973-12-01

    Dipodomys microps forages in saltbush (Atriplex confertifolia), gathering the leaves into its external check pouches and returning them to the burrow to be cached or eaten. The leaves are available throughout the year and contain 50-80% water. D. microps can survive on these leaves in the laboratory without other food or water, but it is unusual among kangaroo rats in that it quickly succumbs when placed on a diet of air-dried seeds without water or succulent plant material. Its mean urine concentration on the seed diet was 2827 mOsm/l, which is lower than any previously reported for the genus. On the other hand, D. merriami, which occurs with D. microps and is well known as a seed specialist, cannot survive on the saltbush leaves, although it is capable of living on a seed diet without water or green vegetation. D. microps is behaviorally and morphologically specialized for exploiting the unusual leaves of A. confertifolia. The leaves are higher in electrolyte content than the leaves of most plants; but the electrolytes, which are most highly concentrated on the leaf surfaces, apparently serve in the maintenance of water balance in the leaves. D. microps does not usually consume saltbush leaves in toto, but rather uses its unique, chisel-shaped lower incisors to shave off the outer tissue from both sides of the leaf, and then consumes the inner tissue. Sodium concentration with respect to water in the eaten tissue was only 3% that of the discarded shavings, and the specialized photosynthetic parenchyma which is eaten is high in starch content.The highly divergent dietary habits of D. microps should serve to minimize competition with its granivorous congeners. Some of the present limits to the geographic distribution of D. microps are a reflection of its reliance on the leaves of perennial shrubs throughout the year; but where its does occur, D. microps should be independent of the unpredictable availability of ephemeral annuals.

  9. Evaluation of retinopathy of prematurity screening in reverse Kangaroo Mother Care: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Padhi, T R; Sareen, D; Pradhan, L; Jalali, S; Sutar, S; Das, T; Modi, R R; Behera, U C

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) screening practice in reverse Kangaroo Mother Care (R-KMC) with respect to stress and pain to the infant. Methods In a pilot study we evaluated ROP screening practice in R-KMC in 20 babies at risk of ROP. The R-KMC differed from the conventional KMC with respect to the baby position where the baby lay supine on mother's chest. With the mother lying supine and the baby in R-KMC position, screening examinations were done with indirect ophthalmoscope. The outcome measures included stress (quantified by pulse, respiration, and oxygen saturation) and pain to the baby by observing facial expression (eye squeezing, crying, and brow bulge). The heart rate, respiratory rate, and SpO2 (%) were compared before and immediately after the procedure using paired t-test. Result Mean (±SD) gestational age and birth weight were 30.8±2.3 weeks and 1362.5±253.9 g, respectively. During examination in R- KMC position 8 babies (40%) were completely relaxed (no eye squeezing and crying), 10 (50%) were partially relaxed (no brow bulge) and 2 babies (10%) were not relaxed. A change in heart and respiration rate both by 10 per minute was recorded in 12 (60%) and 10 (50%) babies, respectively. Five babies (25%) had reduction in blood oxygen concentration below 92%. The majority of the mothers (19 of 20) were relaxed. Conclusion ROP screening in R-KMC can be a baby friendly screening practice with respect to stress and pain to the infant and needs further evaluation in a larger cohort. PMID:25613847

  10. Effect of Kangaroo Mother Care on Vital Physiological Parameters of The Low Birth Weight Newborn

    PubMed Central

    Bera, Alpanamayi; Ghosh, Jagabandhu; Singh, Arun Kumarendu; Hazra, Avijit; Som, Tapas; Munian, Dinesh

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Low birth weight (LBW; <2500 g), which is often associated with preterm birth, is a common problem in India. Both are recognized risk factors for neonatal mortality. Kangaroo mother care (KMC) is a non-conventional, low-cost method for newborn care based upon intimate skin-to-skin contact between mother and baby. Our objective was to assess physiological state of LBW babies before and after KMC in a teaching hospital setting. Materials and Methods: Study cohort comprised in-born LBW babies and their mothers - 300 mother-baby pairs were selected through purposive sampling. Initially, KMC was started for 1 hour duration (at a stretch) on first day and then increased by 1 hour each day for next 2 days. Axillary temperature, respiration rate (RR/ min), heart rate (HR/ min), and oxygen saturation (SpO2) were assessed for 3 consecutive days, immediately before and after KMC. Results: Data from 265 mother-baby pairs were analyzed. Improvements occurred in all 4 recorded physiological parameters during the KMC sessions. Mean temperature rose by about 0.4°C, RR by 3 per minute, HR by 5 bpm, and SpO2 by 5% following KMC sessions. Although modest, these changes were statistically significant on all 3 days. Individual abnormalities (e.g. hypothermia, bradycardia, tachycardia, low SpO2) were often corrected during the KMC sessions. Conclusions: Babies receiving KMC showed modest but statistically significant improvement in vital physiological parameters on all 3 days. Thus, without using special equipment, the KMC strategy can offer improved care to LBW babies. These findings support wider implementation of this strategy. PMID:25364150

  11. Histological properties and biological significance of pouch in red kangaroo, Macropus rufus.

    PubMed

    Kubota, K; Shimizu, T; Shibanai, S; Nagae, K; Nagata, S

    1989-01-01

    2 embryos, 4 youngs, 4 older youngs and the pouch of 2 mothers of the red kangaroos were examined. The results obtained are as follows: 1. The initial muscle spindles are already observed light microscopically in the vertebral, dorsal neck and forelimb muscles of the newborn baby and a little bit later in the masticatory muscles of the young of 68 mm in craniorump length and 28 g in body weight. 2. In the skin with less hair lining the inner surface of the pouch, abundant apocrine large sweat glands are observed, especially surrounding the basal region of the nipple and in the pleat formation of the skin. 3. The lactiferous mammary gland is enlarged, the lobules being divided by the interlobular muscle fiber tissue and enwrapped by the muscular capsule. The milk is squirted automatically by the muscle fiber contraction from the gland to the nipple, to which the baby attaches itself. 4. The musculature of the pouch wall is developed to form the sphincter muscle in the pouch orifice. The sphincter muscle plays an important role in conditioning the optimum temperature for the naked baby inside the pouch. 5. The apocrine perfume plays an important role in guiding the baby on the journey to the pouch after birth and the apocrine products also in maintaining the optimum humidity of the pouch to accomodate the baby. 6. During the long period of stay in the pouch, the masticatory and locomotive systems and their neuromuscular mechanism related to the herbivorous mastication become fully established and then the young leaves the pouch to feed on the animal's proper diet.

  12. The mood variation in mothers of preterm infants in Kangaroo mother care and conventional incubator care.

    PubMed

    de Macedo, Elizeu Coutinho; Cruvinel, Fernando; Lukasova, Katerina; D'Antino, Maria Eloisa Famá

    2007-10-01

    Preterm babies are more prone to develop disorders and so require immediate intensive care. In the conventional neonatal intensive care, the baby is kept in the incubator, separated from the mother. Some actions have been taken in order to make this mother-child separation less traumatic. One of these actions is the Kangaroo mother care (KMC) characterized by skin-to-skin contact between a mother and her newborn. The objective of this study was to compare the mood variation of mothers enrolled in the KMC program to those in the conventional incubator care. In one general hospital in Sao Paulo, Brazil, 90 mothers were evaluated before and after contact with the baby in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. The participants were divided into three groups: 30 mothers of term newborns (TG), 30 mothers of preterm infants included in KMC program (PGK) and 30 preterms with incubator placement (PGI). The Brazilian version of the Visual Analogue Mood Scale (VAMS) was used for the assessment before and after the infant's visit. Results showed that TG mothers reported fewer occurrences of depressive states than PGK and PGI mothers. A significant mood variation was observed for PGK and PGI after the infant's visit. PGK mothers reported feeling calmer, stronger, well-coordinated, energetic, contented, tranquil, quick-witted, relaxed, proficient, happy, friendly and clear-headed. The only variation showed by PGI mothers was an increase in feeling clumsy. This study shows a positive effect of the KMC on the mood variation of preterm mothers and points to the need of a more humane experience during the incubator care.

  13. A survey to detect the presence of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis in Kangaroo Island macropods.

    PubMed

    Cleland, P C; Lehmann, D R; Phillips, P H; Cousins, D V; Reddacliff, L A; Whittington, R J

    2010-10-26

    The aim of this study was to determine whether Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (M. a. paratuberculosis) infection was present in macropods grazing with infected sheep on Kangaroo Island in 2001-2002, and to assess the likely role of such infection in the epidemiology of ovine paratuberculosis. Ileum and associated lymphatics from 482 macropods were examined using radiometric culture followed by PCR for IS900 and restriction endonuclease analysis (REA) for species identification, and isolates were strain typed using PCR for IS1311 and REA. Ileum and mesenteric lymph nodes from animals with positive tissue cultures or gross lesions suggestive of paratuberculosis were examined histologically. Faeces from a total of 840 animals were cultured in pools of 20, and individual faecal cultures were done from tissue culture positive animals, from those with microscopic lesions, and from selected animals with gross lesions. Eight animals (1.7%) yielded positive tissue cultures, and all isolates were the sheep (S) strain. Two animals that were tissue culture positive also had histopathological evidence of paratuberculosis. Twelve culture negative animals had microscopic lesions consistent with mycobacterial infection, and M. genavense was identified by PCR from a paraffin block from one of these animals. All faecal cultures were negative. These results indicate that a small proportion of macropods can become infected with M. a. paratuberculosis when grazing with infected sheep. However, excretion of large numbers of viable organisms is rare in macropods, and it is unlikely that macropods provide a wildlife reservoir of infection that would seriously compromise control efforts for paratuberculosis in sheep. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Barriers and enablers of kangaroo mother care practice: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Seidman, Gabriel; Unnikrishnan, Shalini; Kenny, Emma; Myslinski, Scott; Cairns-Smith, Sarah; Mulligan, Brian; Engmann, Cyril

    2015-01-01

    Kangaroo mother care (KMC) is an evidence-based approach to reducing mortality and morbidity in preterm infants. Although KMC is a key intervention package in newborn health initiatives, there is limited systematic information available on the barriers to KMC practice that mothers and other stakeholders face while practicing KMC. This systematic review sought to identify the most frequently reported barriers to KMC practice for mothers, fathers, and health practitioners, as well as the most frequently reported enablers to practice for mothers. We searched nine electronic databases and relevant reference lists for publications reporting barriers or enablers to KMC practice. We identified 1,264 unique publications, of which 103 were included based on pre-specified criteria. Publications were scanned for all barriers / enablers. Each publication was also categorized based on its approach to identification of barriers / enablers, and more weight was assigned to publications which had systematically sought to understand factors influencing KMC practice. Four of the top five ranked barriers to KMC practice for mothers were resource-related: "Issues with the facility environment / resources," "negative impressions of staff attitudes or interactions with staff," "lack of help with KMC practice or other obligations," and "low awareness of KMC / infant health." Considering only publications from low- and middle-income countries, "pain / fatigue" was ranked higher than when considering all publications. Top enablers to practice were included "mother-infant attachment" and "support from family, friends, and other mentors." Our findings suggest that mother can understand and enjoy KMC, and it has benefits for mothers, infants, and families. However, continuous KMC may be physically and emotionally difficult, and often requires support from family members, health practitioners, or other mothers. These findings can serve as a starting point for researchers and program

  15. A nested PCR for the ssrRNA gene detects Trypanosoma binneyi in the platypus and Trypanosoma sp. in wombats and kangaroos in Australia.

    PubMed

    Noyes, H A; Stevens, J R; Teixeira, M; Phelan, J; Holz, P

    1999-02-01

    Trypanosome infections in their natural hosts are frequently difficult to detect by microscopy, and culture methods are unreliable and not suitable for all species of Trypanosoma. A nested PCR strategy for detecting and identifying Trypanosoma species, suitable for detecting both known and unknown trypanosomes, is presented. Thirty-two blood samples from 23 species of Australian birds and mammals were screened by a nested PCR for the presence of Trypanosoma sp. ssrRNA. Three infections were detected, one in an eastern grey kangaroo (Macropus giganteus), one in a common wombat (Vombatus ursinus) and one in a platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus). The kangaroo and wombat are new host records for Trypanosoma sp.; the platypus parasite was Trypanosoma hinneyi. The three parasites could be distinguished by restriction fragment length polymorphisms of the amplified fragment of the ssrRNA gene. The kangaroo and wombat parasites were also isolated in a semi-solid blood agar medium. The culture forms of the kangaroo trypanosome had an expanded flagellar sheath in which structures similar to hemidesmosomes were detected by EM. The nested PCR was at least as sensitive as culture, and analysis of the PCR products gave parasite-specific fingerprints. Therefore this method could be suitable for rapidly screening host animals for the presence of trypanosomes and identifying the infecting strain.

  16. To compare growth outcomes and cost-effectiveness of "Kangaroo ward care" with "intermediate intensive care" in stable extremely low birth weight infants: randomized control trial.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Deepak; Murki, Srinivas; Pratap, Oleti Tejo

    2017-07-01

    To compare growth outcome and cost-effectiveness of "Kangaroo ward care" (KWC) with "Intermediate intensive care" (IIC) in stable extremely low birth weight (ELBW) infants. This is secondary analysis of the study and we analyzed 62 ELBW infants, 33 were randomized to KWC and 29 to IIC once the infant reached a weight of 1150 g. Infants in the KWC group were shifted to the Kangaroo ward immediately after randomization and in the IIC group received IIC care till they attain a weight of 1250 g before shifting to Kangaroo ward. The gain in weight (g/day), length (cm/week), and head circumference (cm/week) were comparable between the two groups. The mean weight, length, and head circumference were comparable at term gestational age. The infants in KWC group were shifted five days earlier to Kangaroo ward when compared to IIC group. The cost-effective analysis using "top-down" and "bottom-up" accounting method showed that there was significant reduction of hospital and parents expenditure in KWC group (p < 0.001) with approximate saving of 452 USD for each patient in the KWC group. Early shifting of ELBW infants for KWC is very efficacious and cost-effective intervention when compared to IIC. (CTRI/2014/05/004625).

  17. Changing patterns of meat consumption and greenhouse gas emissions in Australia: Will kangaroo meat make a difference?

    PubMed Central

    Ratnasiri, Shyama; Bandara, Jayatilleke

    2017-01-01

    The Australian per capita consumption of ruminant meat such as beef and lamb has declined over the last two decades. Over the same period, however, per capita consumption of non-ruminant meat such as chicken and pork has continued to increase. Furthermore, it is now observed that the human consumption of kangaroo meat is on the rise. This study investigates the implications of these changes in meat consumption patterns on Green House Gases (GHGs) emission mitigation in Australia using a Vector Auto Regression (VAR) forecasting approach. Our results suggest that the increase will continue in non-ruminant meat consumption and this will not only offset the decline in ruminant meat consumption, but will also raise the overall per capita meat consumption by approximately 1% annually. The per capita GHGs emissions will likely decrease by approximately 2.3% per annum, due to the inclusion of non-ruminant meat in Australian diets. The GHGs emissions can further be reduced if the average Australian consumer partially replaces ruminant meat with kangaroo meat. PMID:28196141

  18. Changing patterns of meat consumption and greenhouse gas emissions in Australia: Will kangaroo meat make a difference?

    PubMed

    Ratnasiri, Shyama; Bandara, Jayatilleke

    2017-01-01

    The Australian per capita consumption of ruminant meat such as beef and lamb has declined over the last two decades. Over the same period, however, per capita consumption of non-ruminant meat such as chicken and pork has continued to increase. Furthermore, it is now observed that the human consumption of kangaroo meat is on the rise. This study investigates the implications of these changes in meat consumption patterns on Green House Gases (GHGs) emission mitigation in Australia using a Vector Auto Regression (VAR) forecasting approach. Our results suggest that the increase will continue in non-ruminant meat consumption and this will not only offset the decline in ruminant meat consumption, but will also raise the overall per capita meat consumption by approximately 1% annually. The per capita GHGs emissions will likely decrease by approximately 2.3% per annum, due to the inclusion of non-ruminant meat in Australian diets. The GHGs emissions can further be reduced if the average Australian consumer partially replaces ruminant meat with kangaroo meat.

  19. Low-frequency distortion product otoacoustic emissions in two species of kangaroo rats: implications for auditory sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Shaffer, L A; Long, G R

    2004-01-01

    Low-frequency distortion-product otoacoustic emissions were measured in two species of kangaroo rats to test the prediction that a large footdrumming species (e.g., Dipodomys spectabilis) would have greater distortion-product otoacoustic emission amplitude than a small non-footdrumming species (e.g., Dipodomys merriami), indicating better hearing sensitivity at low frequencies. Equal-level (65 dB SPL) stimulus tones ( f(1), f(2)), presented over a ( f(1)) range of 200-1000 Hz, were used to evoke the 2 f(1)- f(2) distortion-product otoacoustic emission. Mean 2 f(1)- f(2) levels for D. merriami showed good correspondence to previously published audiograms for that species. Mean 2 f(1)- f(2) levels and 95% confidence intervals indicated species differences below 400 Hz, supporting the theory that low-frequency hearing sensitivity is better in large kangaroo rat species. These results suggest that the size-related divergence in footdrumming behavior may be related to differential auditory sensitivity.

  20. Helping small babies survive: an evaluation of facility-based Kangaroo Mother Care implementation progress in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Aliganyira, Patrick; Kerber, Kate; Davy, Karen; Gamache, Nathalie; Sengendo, Namaala Hanifah; Bergh, Anne-Marie

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Prematurity is the leading cause of newborn death in Uganda, accounting for 38% of the nation's 39,000 annual newborn deaths. Kangaroo mother care is a high-impact; cost-effective intervention that has been prioritized in policy in Uganda but implementation has been limited. Methods A standardised, cross-sectional, mixed-method evaluation design was used, employing semi-structured key-informant interviews and observations in 11 health care facilities implementing kangaroo mother care in Uganda. Results The facilities visited scored between 8.28 and 21.72 out of the possible 30 points with a median score of 14.71. Two of the 3 highest scoring hospitals were private, not-for-profit hospitals whereas the second highest scoring hospital was a central teaching hospital. Facilities with KMC services are not equally distributed throughout the country. Only 4 regions (Central 1, Central 2, East-Central and Southwest) plus the City of Kampala were identified as having facilities providing KMC services. Conclusion KMC services are not instituted with consistent levels of quality and are often dependent on private partner support. With increasing attention globally and in country, Uganda is in a unique position to accelerate access to and quality of health services for small babies across the country. PMID:25667699

  1. Isolation and characterization of a novel herpesvirus from a free-ranging eastern grey kangaroo (Macropus giganteus).

    PubMed

    Vaz, Paola Karinna; Motha, Julian; McCowan, Christina; Ficorilli, Nino; Whiteley, Pam Lizette; Wilks, Colin Reginald; Hartley, Carol Anne; Gilkerson, James Rudkin; Browning, Glenn Francis; Devlin, Joanne Maree

    2013-01-01

    We isolated a macropodid herpesvirus from a free-ranging eastern grey kangaroo (Macropus giganteous) displaying clinical signs of respiratory disease and possibly neurologic disease. Sequence analysis of the herpesvirus glycoprotein G (gG) and glycoprotein B (gB) genes revealed that the virus was an alphaherpesvirus most closely related to macropodid herpesvirus 2 (MaHV-2) with 82.7% gG and 94.6% gB amino acid sequence identity. Serologic analyses showed similar cross-neutralization patterns to those of MaHV-2. The two viruses had different growth characteristics in cell culture. Most notably, this virus formed significantly larger plaques and extensive syncytia when compared with MaHV-2. No syncytia were observed for MaHV-2. Restriction endonuclease analysis of whole viral genomes demonstrated distinct restriction endonuclease cleavage patterns for all three macropodid herpesviruses. These studies suggest that a distinct macropodid alphaherpesvirus may be capable of infecting and causing disease in eastern grey kangaroos.

  2. Hind limb scaling of kangaroos and wallabies (superfamily Macropodoidea): implications for hopping performance, safety factor and elastic savings

    PubMed Central

    McGowan, C P; Skinner, J; Biewener, A A

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine hind limb scaling of the musculoskeletal system in the Macropodoidea, the superfamily containing wallabies and kangaroos, to re-examine the effect of size on the locomotor mechanics and physiology of marsupial hopping. Morphometric musculoskeletal analyses were conducted of 15 species and skeletal specimens of 21 species spanning a size range from 0.8 to 80 kg that included representatives of 12 of the 16 extant genera of macropodoids. We found that unlike other groups, macropodoids are able to match force demands associated with increasing body size primarily through a combination of positive allometry in muscle area and muscle moment arms. Isometric scaling of primary hind limb bones suggests, however, that larger species experience relatively greater bone stresses. Muscle to tendon area ratios of the ankle extensors scale with strong positive allometry, indicating that peak tendon stresses also increase with increasing body size but to a lesser degree than previously reported. Consistent with previous morphological and experimental studies, large macropodoids are therefore better suited for elastic strain energy recovery but operate at lower safety factors, which likely poses an upper limit to body size. Scaling patterns for extant macropodoids suggest that extinct giant kangaroos (∼250 kg) were likely limited in locomotor capacity. PMID:18086129

  3. Aerobic characteristics of red kangaroo skeletal muscles: is a high aerobic capacity matched by muscle mitochondrial and capillary morphology as in placental mammals?

    PubMed

    Dawson, Terence J; Mifsud, Brock; Raad, Matthew C; Webster, Koa N

    2004-07-01

    Marsupials and placentals together comprise the Theria, the advanced mammals, but they have had long independent evolutionary histories, with the last common ancestor occurring more than 125 million years ago. Although in the past the marsupials were considered to be metabolically 'primitive', the red kangaroo Macropus rufus has been reported to have an aerobic capacity (VO2max) comparable to that of the most 'athletic' of placentals such as dogs. However, kangaroos travel at moderate speeds with lower relative cost than quadrupedal placentals. Given the long independent evolution of the two therian groups, and their unusual locomotor energetics, do kangaroos achieve their high aerobic capacity using the same structural and functional mechanisms used by (athletic) placentals? Red kangaroo skeletal muscle morphometry matched closely the general aerobic characteristics of placental mammals. The relationship between total mitochondrial volume in skeletal muscle and VO2max during exercise was identical to that in quadrupedal placentals, and differed from that in bipedal humans. As for placentals generally, red kangaroo mitochondrial oxygen consumption at VO2max was 4.7 ml O2 min(-1) ml(-1) of mitochondria. Also, the inner mitochondrial membrane densities were 35.8 +/- 0.7 m2 ml(-1) of mitochondria, which is the same as for placental mammals, and the same pattern of similarity was seen for capillary densities and volumes. The overall data for kangaroos was equivalent to that seen in athletic placentals such as dogs and pronghorns. Total skeletal muscle mass was high, being around 50% of body mass, and was concentrated around the pelvis and lower back. The majority of the muscles sampled had relatively high mitochondrial volume densities, in the range 8.8-10.6% in the major locomotor muscles. Again, capillary densities and capillary blood volumes followed the pattern seen for mitochondria. Our results indicate that the red kangaroo, despite its locomotion and extreme

  4. A micro case study of the legal and administrative arrangements for river health in the Kangaroo River (NSW).

    PubMed

    Mooney, C; Farrier, D

    2002-01-01

    Kangaroo Valley is a drinking water supply catchment for Kangaroo Valley village, parts of the Southern Highlands and Sydney. It is also a popular recreation area both for swimming and canoeing. Land use has traditionally been dominated by dairy farming but there has been significant and continuing development of land for hobby farms and rural residential subdivision. Dairy industry restructuring has affected the viability of some farms in the Valley and created additional pressure for subdivision. River health is a function of flows, water quality, riparian vegetation, geomorphology and aquatic habitat and riverine biota. River flows in the Kangaroo River are affected by water extraction and storage for urban water supply and extraction by commercial irrigators and riparian land holders which have a significant impact at low flows. Current water quality often does not meet ANZECC Guidelines for primary contact and recreation and the river is a poor source of raw drinking water. Key sources of contaminants are wastewater runoff from agriculture, and poorly performing on-site sewage management systems. Riparian vegetation, which is critical to the maintenance of in-stream ecosystems suffers from uncontrolled stock access and weed infestation. The management of land use and resulting diffuse pollution sources is critical to the long term health of the river. The Healthy Rivers Commission of New South Wales Independent Inquiry into the Shoalhaven River System Final Report July, 1999 found that the longer term protection of the health of the Kangaroo River is contingent upon achievement of patterns of land use that have regard to land capability and also to the capability of the river to withstand the impacts of inappropriate or poorly managed land uses. This micro case study of Kangaroo Valley examines the complex legal and administrative arrangements with particular reference to the management of diffuse pollution for river health. In the past, diffuse pollution has

  5. Close to me: enhancing kangaroo care practice for NICU staff and parents.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Liza; Morrill, Allison; Russell, Rebecca B; Gooding, Judith S; Miller, Laura; Berns, Scott D

    2014-12-01

    The benefits of kangaroo care (KC) are well supported by previously published studies, yet KC is offered inconsistently and faces obstacles in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). The March of Dimes designed Close to Me to facilitate and increase KC in NICUs. The program incorporates KC education for nurses and parents, as well as awareness and comfort components. The purpose of this study was to assess whether Close to Me increased favorable attitudes toward KC among nurses and parents, and changed nurse and parent behaviors to implement KC earlier, more often and for longer duration. This study took place in 5 NICUs with 48 nurse participants and 101 parent participants. It used a pre-/postprogram implementation design for nurses and a nonequivalent comparison versus intervention group design for parents. Nurses and parents were surveyed on knowledge, attitudes, perceived behavioral control, and behavior. Comparisons were made pre- and postprogram implementation for nurses and between intervention and comparison groups for parents. Nurse focus groups were conducted pre- and postimplementation and analyzed using a constant comparative analysis method. Parents recorded care behaviors and satisfaction in journals, which were analyzed similarly. After the Close to Me intervention, nurses reported more positive attitudes toward KC (P = .04), increased transfer of ventilated babies from incubators to parents (P = .01), and more parents requesting KC. Parents who received Close to Me had greater knowledge about KC (P = .03) compared with those who did not. With the Close to Me intervention, all babies born at less than 28 weeks' gestation had KC by the age of 12 days, whereas without the intervention, some did not have KC until the age of 31 days (P < .05). March of Dimes Close to Me improved knowledge and behavior regarding KC in NICUs. By offering KC education to parents, providing KC awareness and comfort components, and providing information and encouragement on

  6. Long Term Outcomes of Kangaroo Mother Care in Very Low Birth Weight Infants

    PubMed Central

    Eklare, Deepak; Mohammad, Haseeb

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Kangaroo Mother Care (KMC) has been gaining acceptance as an effective alternative to incubator based Conventional Medical Care (CMC) in preterm or Low Birth Weight (LBW) infants especially in resource scarce developing countries. Aim To report and analyse the long-term effects of KMC for relatively stable Very Low Birth Weight (VLBW) infants on nutritional indicators and feeding conditions at 6–12 months of corrected age. Materials and Methods This randomized controlled trial was done at a Level III Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) of a teaching institution in southern India. One hundred and forty neonates with birth weight <1500gm were enrolled. Inborn singleton, VLBW (birth weight <1500gm) infants, tolerating spoon feeds of 150mL/kg/day and haemodynamically stable (not on oxygen or respiratory support, no apnea for 72 hours, not on any intravenous fluids) were eligible. Infants with major malformation were excluded. Babies were randomized to KMC group or CMC group. At 6 to 12 months corrected age, the assessment included the measurement of growth parameters in terms of malnutrition, wasting, stunting and having small head. Feeding information was collected in relation to duration of exclusive or partial breastfeeding (months of chronological age and of corrected age), the age (chronological age and corrected age) at which weaning diet was started and the type of weaning diet. Comparisons between study groups for primary outcomes and secondary outcomes were performed with Odds Ratio (OR) calculator using Medcalc online statistical software. Results A total of 91 infants were followed at 6–12 months of corrected age. There was no difference between two groups in the incidence of malnutrition, wasting, stunting and having small head (47.7% vs 31.9%, p-0.13), (34.1% vs. 31.9%, p-0.83), (22.7% vs 12.8%, p-0.22) and (18.2% vs.31.9%, p-0.14). Although KMC group babies had better head growth and lesser weight and length compared to the CMC group, it

  7. Kangaroo mother care: a multi-country analysis of health system bottlenecks and potential solutions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Preterm birth is now the leading cause of under-five child deaths worldwide with one million direct deaths plus approximately another million where preterm is a risk factor for neonatal deaths due to other causes. There is strong evidence that kangaroo mother care (KMC) reduces mortality among babies with birth weight <2000 g (mostly preterm). KMC involves continuous skin-to-skin contact, breastfeeding support, and promotion of early hospital discharge with follow-up. The World Health Organization has endorsed KMC for stabilised newborns in health facilities in both high-income and low-resource settings. The objectives of this paper are to: (1) use a 12-country analysis to explore health system bottlenecks affecting the scale-up of KMC; (2) propose solutions to the most significant bottlenecks; and (3) outline priority actions for scale-up. Methods The bottleneck analysis tool was applied in 12 countries in Africa and Asia as part of the Every Newborn Action Plan process. Country workshops involved technical experts to complete the survey tool, which is designed to synthesise and grade health system "bottlenecks", factors that hinder the scale-up, of maternal-newborn intervention packages. We used quantitative and qualitative methods to analyse the bottleneck data, combined with literature review, to present priority bottlenecks and actions relevant to different health system building blocks for KMC. Results Marked differences were found in the perceived severity of health system bottlenecks between Asian and African countries, with the former reporting more significant or very major bottlenecks for KMC with respect to all the health system building blocks. Community ownership and health financing bottlenecks were significant or very major bottlenecks for KMC in both low and high mortality contexts, particularly in South Asia. Significant bottlenecks were also reported for leadership and governance and health workforce building blocks. Conclusions There

  8. Effect of Kangaroo Mother Care on physical growth, breastfeeding and its acceptability.

    PubMed

    Gathwala, Geeta; Singh, Bir; Singh, Jagjit

    2010-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether the implementation of Kangaroo Mother Care (KMC) to low birth weight infants would improve physical growth, breastfeeding and its acceptability. A randomized controlled trial was performed over 16 months in which 110 neonates were randomized into a KMC group and a control group using a random number table. The KMC group was subjected to KMC for at least 6 h per day. The babies also received KMC after moving from the neonatal intensive care unit and at home. The control group received standard care (incubator or open care system). Weight, length and occipitofrontal circumference (OFC) were measured weekly for three months. The acceptability of KMC by mothers and nursing staff was assessed on day 7 after the start of KMC using a questionnaire incorporating the Likert scale. Breastfeeding rates were calculated based on history at end of three months. The mean gestational age was 35.48 ± 1.20 weeks in the KMC group and 35.04 ± 1.09 weeks in the control group (P > 0.05). KMC was initiated at a mean age of 1.72 ± 0.45 days and the duration of KMC was 9.74 ± 1.48 h/day. The mean birth weight was 1.69 ± 0.11 kg in the KMC group compared to 1.69 ± 0.12 kg in the control group (P > 0.05). The mean weight gain in gm/day in the KMC group was 21.92 ± 1.44 compared to 18.61 ± 1.28 in the control group (P < 0.05). The mean length gain in cm/week was 1.03 ± 0.5 in the KMC group compared to 0.74 ± 0.05 in the control group (P < 0.05). The mean OFC gain in cm/week was 0.59 ± 0.04 in the KMC group compared to 0.47 ± 0.03 in the control group (P < 0.05). The exclusive breast-feeding rate at end of three months was 88% in the KMC group compared to 72% in the control group (P < 0.05). KMC improved physical growth, breastfeeding rates and was well accepted by both mothers and nursing staff.

  9. Kangaroo mother care diminishes pain from heel lance in very preterm neonates: A crossover trial

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, C Celeste; Filion, Francoise; Campbell-Yeo, Marsha; Goulet, Celine; Bell, Linda; McNaughton, Kathryn; Byron, Jasmine; Aita, Marilyn; Finley, G Allen; Walker, Claire-Dominique

    2008-01-01

    Background Skin-to-skin contact, or kangaroo mother care (KMC) has been shown to be efficacious in diminishing pain response to heel lance in full term and moderately preterm neonates. The purpose of this study was to determine if KMC would also be efficacious in very preterm neonates. Methods Preterm neonates (n = 61) between 28 0/7 and 31 6/7 weeks gestational age in three Level III NICU's in Canada comprised the sample. A single-blind randomized crossover design was employed. In the experimental condition, the infant was held in KMC for 15 minutes prior to and throughout heel lance procedure. In the control condition, the infant was in prone position swaddled in a blanket in the incubator. The primary outcome was the Premature Infant Pain Profile (PIPP), which is comprised of three facial actions, maximum heart rate, minimum oxygen saturation levels from baseline in 30-second blocks from heel lance. The secondary outcome was time to recover, defined as heart rate return to baseline. Continuous video, heart rate and oxygen saturation monitoring were recorded with event markers during the procedure and were subsequently analyzed. Repeated measures analysis-of-variance was employed to generate results. Results PIPP scores at 90 seconds post lance were significantly lower in the KMC condition (8.871 (95%CI 7.852–9.889) versus 10.677 (95%CI 9.563–11.792) p < .001) and non-significant mean differences ranging from 1.2 to1.8. favoring KMC condition at 30, 60 and 120 seconds. Time to recovery was significantly shorter, by a minute(123 seconds (95%CI 103–142) versus 193 seconds (95%CI 158–227). Facial actions were highly significantly lower across all points in time reaching a two-fold difference by 120 seconds post-lance and heart rate was significantly lower across the first 90 seconds in the KMC condition. Conclusion Very preterm neonates appear to have endogenous mechanisms elicited through skin-to-skin maternal contact that decrease pain response, but not as

  10. Kangaroo mother care: a multi-country analysis of health system bottlenecks and potential solutions.

    PubMed

    Vesel, Linda; Bergh, Anne-Marie; Kerber, Kate J; Valsangkar, Bina; Mazia, Goldy; Moxon, Sarah G; Blencowe, Hannah; Darmstadt, Gary L; de Graft Johnson, Joseph; Dickson, Kim E; Ruiz Peláez, Juan; von Xylander, Severin; Lawn, Joy E

    2015-01-01

    Preterm birth is now the leading cause of under-five child deaths worldwide with one million direct deaths plus approximately another million where preterm is a risk factor for neonatal deaths due to other causes. There is strong evidence that kangaroo mother care (KMC) reduces mortality among babies with birth weight <2000 g (mostly preterm). KMC involves continuous skin-to-skin contact, breastfeeding support, and promotion of early hospital discharge with follow-up. The World Health Organization has endorsed KMC for stabilised newborns in health facilities in both high-income and low-resource settings. The objectives of this paper are to: (1) use a 12-country analysis to explore health system bottlenecks affecting the scale-up of KMC; (2) propose solutions to the most significant bottlenecks; and (3) outline priority actions for scale-up. The bottleneck analysis tool was applied in 12 countries in Africa and Asia as part of the Every Newborn Action Plan process. Country workshops involved technical experts to complete the survey tool, which is designed to synthesise and grade health system "bottlenecks", factors that hinder the scale-up, of maternal-newborn intervention packages. We used quantitative and qualitative methods to analyse the bottleneck data, combined with literature review, to present priority bottlenecks and actions relevant to different health system building blocks for KMC. Marked differences were found in the perceived severity of health system bottlenecks between Asian and African countries, with the former reporting more significant or very major bottlenecks for KMC with respect to all the health system building blocks. Community ownership and health financing bottlenecks were significant or very major bottlenecks for KMC in both low and high mortality contexts, particularly in South Asia. Significant bottlenecks were also reported for leadership and governance and health workforce building blocks. There are at least a dozen countries

  11. [Effect of laminin on numerical karyotype variability of kangaroo rat kidney cell lines].

    PubMed

    Polianskaia, G G; Goriachaia, T S; Mikhaĭlova, N A; Pinaev, G P

    2003-01-01

    The numerical karyotypic variability has been investigated in "markerless" epithelial-like Rat kangaroo kidney cell lines NBL-3-11 and NBL-3-17 on cultivation on a laminin-2/4 coated surface. In cell line NBL-3-17, cultivated on the laminin-coated surface for 2, 4 and 12 days, the character of numerical karyotypic variability has changed. In 2 days the general character of cell distribution for the chromosome number did not change, but the frequency of cells with modal number of chromosomes decreases significantly, while that of cells with lower chromosome number show a tendency to increase. At a prolongation of cultivation time to 4 and 12 days, the numerical karyotypic heterogeneity in cell population increases due to a significant change in the general character of cell distribution for the chromosome number, which is caused by a significant decrease in the frequency of cells with the modal number of chromosomes, and by an increase in the frequency of cells with lower chromosome number. The analysis of distribution of individual chromosomes showed that the number of types of additional structural variants of the karyotype (SVK) increases significantly on cultivation on laminin for 2-12 days. In cell line NBL-3-11, cultivated on the laminin-coated surface for 2 and 4 days, the character of numerical karyotypic variability did not change compared to control variants. Possible reasons of the observed changes of numerical karyotypic variability in cell line NBL-3-17 is discussed. The reason of differences in the character of numerical karyotypic variability between cell lines NBL-3-11 and NBL-3-17 possibly consists in the change of gene expression, namely in a dose of certain functioning genes. The polymerase chain reaction with arbitrary primers revealed no differences between DNA patterns of cell lines NBL-3-17 and NBL-3-11. This can reflect a similarity in the primary DNA structure of both cell lines. Hence, these lines differ only in the number of homologous

  12. [The influence of immobilized fibronectin on karyotypic variability of two rat kangaroo kidney cell lines].

    PubMed

    Polianskaia, G G; Goriachaia, T S; Pinaev, G P

    2007-01-01

    The numerical and structural karyotypic variability has been investigated in "markerless" Rat kangaroo kidney cell lines NBL-3-17 and NBL-3-11 when cultivating on a fibronectin-coated surface. In cell line NBL-3-17, cultivated on the fibronectin-coated surface for 1, 2, 4 and 8 days, the character of cell distribution for the chromosome number has changed. These changes involve a significant decrease in frequency of cells with modal number of chromosomes, and an increase in frequency of cells with lower chromosomal number. Many new additional structural variants of the karyotype (SVK) appear. The observed alterations seem to be due preference adhesion of cells with lower chromosome number, disturbances of mitotic apparatus and selection of SVK, which are more adopted to changes in culture conditions. Detachment of cells from the fibronectin-coated surface, followed by 5 days cultivation on a hydrophilic surface restored control distribution. In cell line NBL-3-11, cultivated on the fibronectin-coated surface for 1, 2, 4 and 8 days, the character of numerical karyotypic variability did not change compared to control variants. In cell line NBL-3-17 the frequency of chromosomal aberrations under cultivation on the fibronectin-coated surface for 1, 2, 4 and 8 days did not change relative to control variants. In cell line NBL-3-11 the frequency of chromosomal aberrations under the same conditions significantly increases, mainly at the expence of chromosomal, chromatid breaks and dicentrics (telomeric association) relative to control variants. We discuss possible reasons of differences in the character of numerical and structural karyotypic variability between cell lines NBL-3-17 (hypotriploid) and NBL-3-11 (hypodiploid) under cultivation on fibronectin. The reasons of the observed interline karyotypic differences possibly consist in peculiarity of karyotypic structure of cell line NBL-3-11 and in the change of gene expression, namely in a dose of certain functioning

  13. Kangaroo mother care to reduce morbidity and mortality in low birthweight infants.

    PubMed

    Conde-Agudelo, Agustin; Díaz-Rossello, José L

    2016-08-23

    Kangaroo mother care (KMC), originally defined as skin-to-skin contact between a mother and her newborn, frequent and exclusive or nearly exclusive breastfeeding, and early discharge from hospital, has been proposed as an alternative to conventional neonatal care for low birthweight (LBW) infants. To determine whether evidence is available to support the use of KMC in LBW infants as an alternative to conventional neonatal care before or after the initial period of stabilization with conventional care, and to assess beneficial and adverse effects. We used the standard search strategy of the Cochrane Neonatal Review Group. This included searches in CENTRAL (Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials; 2016, Issue 6), MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL (Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature), LILACS (Latin American and Caribbean Health Science Information database), and POPLINE (Population Information Online) databases (all from inception to June 30, 2016), as well as the WHO (World Health Organization) Trial Registration Data Set (up to June 30, 2016). In addition, we searched the web page of the Kangaroo Foundation, conference and symposia proceedings on KMC, and Google Scholar. Randomized controlled trials comparing KMC versus conventional neonatal care, or early-onset KMC versus late-onset KMC, in LBW infants. Data collection and analysis were performed according to the methods of the Cochrane Neonatal Review Group. Twenty-one studies, including 3042 infants, fulfilled inclusion criteria. Nineteen studies evaluated KMC in LBW infants after stabilization, one evaluated KMC in LBW infants before stabilization, and one compared early-onset KMC with late-onset KMC in relatively stable LBW infants. Sixteen studies evaluated intermittent KMC, and five evaluated continuous KMC. KMC versus conventional neonatal care: At discharge or 40 to 41 weeks' postmenstrual age, KMC was associated with a statistically significant reduction in the risk of mortality (risk

  14. Kangaroo supported diagonal flexion positioning: New insights into skin-to-skin contact for communication between mothers and very preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Buil, A; Carchon, I; Apter, G; Laborne, F X; Granier, M; Devouche, E

    2016-09-01

    Skin-to-skin contact shows benefits in the relationship developed between a mother and her premature infant. In the skin-to-skin session, face-to-face exchanges are impossible in vertical infant positioning. We therefore undertook an observational, prospective, single-center study using kangaroo "supported diagonal flexion" (SDF) positioning. The first aim was to evaluate the safety of kangaroo SDF positioning compared to the usual vertical positioning. The second aim was to evaluate SDF positioning on early communication between the mother and her infant and to improve their well-being. Fifteen mothers and their very premature infants (birth 26<32 weeks' gestation) were assigned to one of the two kangaroo positioning modes, either the current vertical positioning (n=7) or SDF positioning (n=8). Physiological variables and critical events were recorded before, during, and after ten successive skin-to-skin contact sessions. The first and last sessions were videotaped to allow later behavioral measurements. Mothers' risk for depression and feelings about the way they experienced communication with their infant were assessed through questionnaires. In terms of the infant's physiology, no negative effects were associated with SDF positioning in comparison with the usual vertical positioning. SDF positioning led to fewer disorganized gestures, negative vocalizations, and drowsiness, in favor of more deep sleep. SDF led to more mother-infant eye-to-eye contact as well as maternal vocalizations, smiles, and caressing, although these differences did not reach significance. The score for the risk of postnatal depression decreased significantly between the first and the last session in the SDF group, whereas it did not change in the vertical positioning group. These results support the idea that the kangaroo SDF positioning technique is physiologically safe, has obvious immediate benefits on mothers' infant-directed communicative behaviors, and respects the baby's naturally

  15. Effect of Intermittent Kangaroo Mother Care on Weight Gain of Low Birth Weight Neonates With Delayed Weight Gain

    PubMed Central

    Samra, Nashwa M.; Taweel, Amal El; Cadwell, Karin

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate intermittent Kangaroo Mother Care (KMC) with additional opportunities to breastfeed on weight gain of low birth weight (LBW) neonates with delayed weight gain. Methods: 40 LBW neonates were followed to see whether KMC with additional opportunities to breastfeed improved weight gain. Results: In the KMC group, the mean age of regaining birth weight was significantly less (15.68 vs. 24.56 days) and the average daily weight gain was significantly higher (22.09 vs. 10.39 g, p < .001) than controls. Conclusion: KMC with additional opportunities to breastfeed was found to be an effective intervention for LBWs with delayed weight gain and should be considered to be an effective strategy. PMID:24868132

  16. Kangaroo care on premature infant growth and maternal attachment and post-partum depression in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Hye Young; Lee, Joohyun; Shin, Hwa-Jin

    2010-10-01

    After births, premature infants need a high level of medical treatments for their survivals in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). This separation deprives mothers of the chance to initiate an attachment process. Kangaroo care (KC) can be one of the ways to reunite mothers and their infants in the NICU and improve health outcomes. This study was conducted to investigate the effects of KC on both premature infants and their mothers. Ten sessions of 60-min KC for 3 weeks were practiced at a level III NICU at E university hospital. Infants' body weight, height and head circumference (HC), maternal attachment and depression were measured. As a result, premature infants in KC showed higher in their height and bigger in their HC than infants in control. Maternal attachment scores were higher among the KC mothers. The results supported the beneficial effects of KC on Korean premature infants and their mothers.

  17. Genetic evaluation of the Association of Zoos and Aquariums Matschie's tree kangaroo (Dendrolagus matschiei) captive breeding program.

    PubMed

    McGreevy, Thomas J; Dabek, Lisa; Husband, Thomas P

    2011-01-01

    Matschie's tree kangaroo (Dendrolagus matschiei) is an endangered species that has been bred in captivity since the 1970s. In 1992, the Tree Kangaroo Species Survival Plan(®) (TKSSP) was established to coordinate the captive management of Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA) D. matschiei. The TKSSP makes annual breeding recommendations primarily based on the mean kinship (MK) strategy. Captive breeding programs often use the MK strategy to preserve genetic diversity in small populations-to avoid the negative consequences of inbreeding and retain their adaptive potential. The ability of a captive breeding program to retain the population's genetic diversity over time can be evaluated by comparing the genetic diversity of the captive population to wild populations. We analyzed DNA extracted from blood and fecal samples from AZA (n = 71), captive (n = 28), and wild (n = 22) D. matschiei using eight microsatellite markers and sequenced the partial mitochondrial DNA control region gene. AZA D. matschiei had a similar expected heterozygosity (H(e) = 0.595 ± 0.184) compared with wild D. matschiei (H(e) = 0.628 ± 0.143), but they had different allelic frequencies (F(ST) = 0.126; P < 0.001). AZA D. matschiei haplotype diversity was almost two times lower than wild D. matschiei Ĥ = 0.740 ± 0.063. These data will assist management of AZA D. matschiei and serve as a baseline for AZA and wild D. matschiei genetic diversity values that could be used to monitor future changes in their genetic diversity. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Recent demographic bottlenecks are not accompanied by a genetic signature in banner-tailed kangaroo rats (Dipodomys spectabilis).

    PubMed

    Busch, Joseph D; Waser, Peter M; Dewoody, J Andrew

    2007-06-01

    Single-sample methods of bottleneck detection are now routine analyses in studies of wild populations and conservation genetics. Three common approaches to bottleneck detection are the heterozygosity excess, mode-shift, and M-ratio tests. Empirical groundtruthing of these methods is difficult, but their performances are critical for the accurate reconstruction of population demography. We use two banner-tailed kangaroo rat (Dipodomys spectabilis) populations from southeastern Arizona (USA) that are known to have experienced recent demographic reductions to search for genetic bottleneck signals with eight microsatellite loci. Over eight total sample-years, neither population showed a genetic bottleneck signature. M-ratios in both populations were large, stable, and never fell below a critical significance value (Mc). The mode shift test did not detect any distortion of allele frequencies, and tests of heterozygosity excess were not significant in postbottleneck samples when we used standard microsatellite mutation models. The genetic effects of bottlenecks like those experienced by our study populations should be strongly influenced by rates of mutation and migration. We used genetic parentage data to estimate a relatively high mutation rate in D. spectabilis (0.0081 mutants/generation/locus), but mutation alone is unlikely to explain the temporal distribution of rare alleles that we observed. Migration (gene flow) is a more likely explanation, despite prior mark-recapture analysis that estimated very low rates of interpopulation dispersal. We interpret our kangaroo rat data in light of the broader literature and conclude that in natural populations connected by dispersal, demographic bottlenecks may prove difficult to detect using molecular genetic data.

  19. Characterization of expressed class II MHC sequences in the banner-tailed kangaroo rat (Dipodomys spectabilis) reveals multiple DRB loci.

    PubMed

    Busch, Joseph D; Waser, Peter M; DeWoody, J Andrew

    2008-11-01

    Genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) are exceptionally polymorphic due to the combined effects of natural and sexual selection. Most research in wild populations has focused on the second exon of a single class II locus (DRB), but complete gene sequences can provide an illuminating backdrop for studies of intragenic selection, recombination, and organization. To this end, we characterized class II loci in the banner-tailed kangaroo rat (Dipodomys spectabilis). Seven DRB-like sequences (provisionally named MhcDisp-DRB*01 through *07) were isolated from spleen cDNA and most likely comprise > or =5 loci; this multiformity is quite unlike the situation in muroid rodents such as Mus, Rattus, and Peromyscus. In silico translation revealed the presence of important structural residues for glycosylation sites, salt bonds, and CD4+ T-cell recognition. Amino-acid distances varied widely among the seven sequences (2-34%). Nuclear DNA sequences from the Disp-DRB*07 locus (approximately 10 kb) revealed a conventional exon/intron structure as well as a number of microsatellites and short interspersed nuclear elements (B4, Alu, and IDL-Geo subfamilies). Rates of nucleotide substitution at Disp-DRB*07 are similar in both exons and introns (pi = 0.015 and 0.012, respectively), which suggests relaxed selection and may indicate that this locus is an expressed pseudogene. Finally, we performed BLASTn searches against Dipodomys ordii genomic sequences (unassembled reads) and find 90-97% nucleotide similarity between the two kangaroo rat species. Collectively, these data suggest that class II diversity in heteromyid rodents is based on polylocism and departs from the muroid architecture.

  20. Distribution of the endangered giant kangaroo rat, Dipodomys ingens, on the Naval Petroleum Reserves, Kern County, California

    SciTech Connect

    O'Farrell, T.P.; Mathews, N.E.; Kato, T.T.; McCue, P.M.; McManus, J.S.; Sauls, M.L.

    1987-07-01

    Field surveys were conducted to determine the distribution and relative abundance of burrow systems of the endangered giant kangaroo rat, Dipodomys ingens, on the US Department of Energy's Naval Petroleum Reserves (NPR-1, NPR-2) in Kern County, California. A total of 1080 burrow systems were observed on 30 sections of NPR-1, 22 sections of NPR-2, and six adjoining sections. Most burrow systems were found in clusters on deep sandy loams in Buena Vista Valley, but isolated burrows were found in similar soils on the upper slopes or crests of ridges in 30 other sections of the reserves. Burrow systems had an average of 3.3 horizontal entrances measuring 2.7 in. high and 3.4 in. wide, and an average of 1.4 vertical entrances 2.0 in. in diameter. In the valleys burrows occurred in a density of 28.2 per acre; had an average slope angle of 4.3/sup 0/; were within 3.3 yd of a perennial shrub, usually a cheese-bush, Hymenoclea salsola; had a predominantly southern aspect; and were grazed by sheep, but were remote from petroleum production activities. In the uplands burrows occurred in a density of 0.1 per acre; had an average slope angle of 6.4/sup 0/; were within 5.1 yd of a perennial shrub, usually a desert saltbush, Atriplex polycarpa; had no particular aspect; and were not grazed by sheep, but were close to petroleum production activities. Since 1980, preconstruction surveys have helped conserve giant kangaroo rat burrows that may have been inadvertently threatened by construction projects on the reserves.

  1. Chemical characterization of acidic oligosaccharides in milk of the red kangaroo (Macropus rufus).

    PubMed

    Anraku, Tatsuro; Fukuda, Kenji; Saito, Tadao; Messer, Michael; Urashima, Tadasu

    2012-04-01

    In the milk of marsupials, oligosaccharides usually predominate over lactose during early to mid lactation. Studies have shown that tammar wallaby milk contains a major series of neutral galactosyllactose oligosaccharides ranging in size from tri- to at least octasaccharides, as well as β(1-6) linked N-acetylglucosamine-containing oligosaccharides as a minor series. In this study, acidic oligosaccharides were purified from red kangaroo milk and characterized by (1)H-nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry, to be as follows: Neu5Ac(α2-3)Gal(β1-4)Glc (3'-SL), Neu5Ac(α2-3)Gal(β1-3)Gal(β1-4)Glc (sialyl 3'-galactosyllactose), Neu5Ac(α2-3)Gal(β1-3)Gal(β1-3)Gal(β1-4)Glc, Neu5Ac(α2-3)Gal(β1-3)Gal(β1-3)Gal(β1-3)Gal(β1-4)Glc, Neu5Ac(α2-3)Gal(β1-3)[Gal(β1-4)GlcNAc(β1-6)]Gal(β1-4)Glc (sialyl lacto-N-novopentaose a), Gal(β1-3)[Neu5Ac(α2-6)Gal(β1-4)GlcNAc(β1-6)]Gal(β1-4)Glc (sialyl lacto-N-novopentaose b), Neu5Ac(α2-3)Gal(β1-3)Gal(β1-3)[Gal(β1-4)GlcNAc(β1-6)]Gal(β1-4)Glc, Gal(β1-3)(-3-O-sulfate)Gal(β1-3)Gal(β1-4)Glc, Gal(β1-3)(-3-O-sulfate)Gal(β1-3)Gal(β1-3)Gal(β1-4)Glc, Gal(β1-3)(-3-O-sulfate)Gal(β1-3)Gal(β1-3)Gal(β1-3)Gal(β1-4)Glc, Gal(β1-3)(-3-O-sulfate)Gal(β1-3)[Gal(β1-4)GlcNAc(β1-6)]Gal(β1-4)Glc, Gal(β1-3)(-3-O-sulfate)Gal(β1-3)Gal(β1-3)[Gal(β1-4)GlcNAc(β1-6)]Gal(β1-4)Glc. These acidic oligosaccharides were shown to be sialylated or sulfated in the non-reducing ends to the major linear and the minor branched series of neutral oligosaccharides of tammar wallaby milk.

  2. Genetic microsurgery by laser: establishment of a clonal population of rat kangaroo cells (PTK2) with a directed deficiency in a chromosomal nucleolar organizer.

    PubMed

    Berns, M W; Chong, L K; Hammer-Wilson, M; Miller, K; Siemens, A

    1979-06-21

    An ultraviolet laser beam was focused to a submicron spot on one of the nucleolar organizer regions of mitotic chromosomes of rat kangaroo cells in tissue culture. The daughter cells were isolated and cloned into a viable population that maintained the directed nucleolar deficiency. It is concluded that the laser can be used to delete preselected genetic regions and the genetic deletion is maintained as a heritable deficiency in subsequent daughter cells.

  3. Microstructural and Compositional Features of the Fibrous and Hyaline Cartilage on the Medial Tibial Plateau Imply a Unique Role for the Hopping Locomotion of Kangaroo

    PubMed Central

    He, Bo; Wu, Jian Ping; Xu, Jiake; Day, Robert E.; Kirk, Thomas Brett

    2013-01-01

    Hopping provides efficient and energy saving locomotion for kangaroos, but it results in great forces in the knee joints. A previous study has suggested that a unique fibrous cartilage in the central region of the tibial cartilage could serve to decrease the peak stresses generated within kangaroo tibiofemoral joints. However, the influences of the microstructure, composition and mechanical properties of the central fibrous and peripheral hyaline cartilage on the function of the knee joints are still to be defined. The present study showed that the fibrous cartilage was thicker and had a lower chondrocyte density than the hyaline cartilage. Despite having a higher PG content in the middle and deep zones, the fibrous cartilage had an inferior compressive strength compared to the peripheral hyaline cartilage. The fibrous cartilage had a complex three dimensional collagen meshwork with collagen bundles parallel to the surface in the superficial zone, and with collagen bundles both parallel and perpendicular to the surface in the middle and deep zones. The collagen in the hyaline cartilage displayed a typical Benninghoff structure, with collagen fibres parallel to the surface in the superficial zone and collagen fibres perpendicular to the surface in the deep zone. Elastin fibres were found throughout the entire tissue depth of the fibrous cartilage and displayed a similar alignment to the adjacent collagen bundles. In comparison, the elastin fibres in the hyaline cartilage were confined within the superficial zone. This study examined for the first time the fibrillary structure, PG content and compressive properties of the central fibrous cartilage pad and peripheral hyaline cartilage within the kangaroo medial tibial plateau. It provided insights into the microstructure and composition of the fibrous and peripheral hyaline cartilage in relation to the unique mechanical properties of the tissues to provide for the normal activities of kangaroos. PMID:24058543

  4. Microstructural and compositional features of the fibrous and hyaline cartilage on the medial tibial plateau imply a unique role for the hopping locomotion of kangaroo.

    PubMed

    He, Bo; Wu, Jian Ping; Xu, Jiake; Day, Robert E; Kirk, Thomas Brett

    2013-01-01

    Hopping provides efficient and energy saving locomotion for kangaroos, but it results in great forces in the knee joints. A previous study has suggested that a unique fibrous cartilage in the central region of the tibial cartilage could serve to decrease the peak stresses generated within kangaroo tibiofemoral joints. However, the influences of the microstructure, composition and mechanical properties of the central fibrous and peripheral hyaline cartilage on the function of the knee joints are still to be defined. The present study showed that the fibrous cartilage was thicker and had a lower chondrocyte density than the hyaline cartilage. Despite having a higher PG content in the middle and deep zones, the fibrous cartilage had an inferior compressive strength compared to the peripheral hyaline cartilage. The fibrous cartilage had a complex three dimensional collagen meshwork with collagen bundles parallel to the surface in the superficial zone, and with collagen bundles both parallel and perpendicular to the surface in the middle and deep zones. The collagen in the hyaline cartilage displayed a typical Benninghoff structure, with collagen fibres parallel to the surface in the superficial zone and collagen fibres perpendicular to the surface in the deep zone. Elastin fibres were found throughout the entire tissue depth of the fibrous cartilage and displayed a similar alignment to the adjacent collagen bundles. In comparison, the elastin fibres in the hyaline cartilage were confined within the superficial zone. This study examined for the first time the fibrillary structure, PG content and compressive properties of the central fibrous cartilage pad and peripheral hyaline cartilage within the kangaroo medial tibial plateau. It provided insights into the microstructure and composition of the fibrous and peripheral hyaline cartilage in relation to the unique mechanical properties of the tissues to provide for the normal activities of kangaroos.

  5. Minimum daily core body temperature in western grey kangaroos decreases as summer advances: a seasonal pattern, or a direct response to water, heat or energy supply?

    PubMed

    Maloney, Shane K; Fuller, Andrea; Meyer, Leith C R; Kamerman, Peter R; Mitchell, Graham; Mitchell, Duncan

    2011-06-01

    Using implanted temperature loggers, we measured core body temperature in nine western grey kangaroos every 5 min for 24 to 98 days in spring and summer. Body temperature was highest at night and decreased rapidly early in the morning, reaching a nadir at 10:00 h, after ambient temperature and solar radiation had begun to increase. On hotter days, the minimum morning body temperature was lower than on cooler days, decreasing from a mean of 36.2°C in the spring to 34.0°C in the summer. This effect correlated better with the time of the year than with proximate thermal stressors, suggesting that either season itself or some factor correlated with season, such as food availability, caused the change. Water saving has been proposed as a selective advantage of heterothermy in other large mammals, but in kangaroos the water savings would have been small and not required in a reserve with permanent standing water. We calculate that the lower core temperature could provide energy savings of nearly 7%. It is likely that the heterothermy that we observed on hot days results either from decreased energy intake during the dry season or from a seasonal pattern entrained in the kangaroos that presumably has been selected for because of decreased energy availability during the dry season.

  6. The economic benefits of increasing kangaroo skin-to-skin care and breastfeeding in neonatal units: analysis of a pragmatic intervention in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Lowson, Karin; Offer, Clare; Watson, Julie; McGuire, Bill; Renfrew, Mary J

    2015-01-01

    A number of significant recent research studies have used techniques of economic modelling to demonstrate the potential benefits of increasing breastfeeding rates in the UK overall, and specifically in neonatal care. This paper complements this growing body of evidence by presenting an economic analysis of data from an actual intervention, the 'Getting It Right From the Start' programme, which took place in the north of the UK during 2011-12, with the aim of increasing breastfeeding and kangaroo skin-to-skin care rates in neonatal units. 'Getting It Right from the Start' was a pragmatic, multifaceted programme of change delivered under the auspices of the regional Health Innovation and Education Cluster, of which 17 were established in the UK in 2010. It engaged with 18 neonatal units in two Neonatal Networks with the aim of increasing kangaroo skin-to-skin care and breastfeeding rates. As part of the evaluation of the programme, we conducted an economic study comparing the overall costs and benefits of the intervention. Overall, the economic analysis demonstrated that for every £1 invested in the intervention to increase kangaroo skin-to-skin care and breastfeeding rates, between £4.00 and £13.82 of benefit was generated. This was spread across different healthcare settings and the timescale for the realisation of benefits will vary. The increases in kangaroo skin-to-skin care generated the greatest cost savings, with potential cost savings ranging between £668,000 (minimum cost assumptions) to more than £2 m (maximum cost assumptions). Increases in breastfeeding associated with the project generated between £68,486 and £582,432. The majority of the cost savings generated were associated with reductions in cases of gastroenteritis and necrotising enterocolitis. This was one of the first economic evaluations of an actual intervention to increase breastfeeding and kangaroo skin-to-skin care in neonatal units. It complements the existing economic models by

  7. Phylogeography of the pallid kangaroo mouse, Microdipodops pallidus: a sand-obligate endemic of the Great Basin, western North America

    PubMed Central

    Hafner, John C; Upham, Nathan S; Reddington, Emily; Torres, Candice W

    2008-01-01

    Aim Kangaroo mice, genus Microdipodops Merriam, are endemic to the Great Basin and include two species: M. pallidus Merriam and M. megacephalus Merriam. The pallid kangaroo mouse, M. pallidus, is a sand-obligate desert rodent. Our principal intent is to identify its current geographical distribution and to formulate a phylogeographical hypothesis for this taxon. In addition, we test for orientation patterns in haplotype sharing for evidence of past episodes of movement and gene flow. Location The Great Basin Desert region of western North America, especially the sandy habitats of the Lahontan Trough and those in south-central Nevada. Methods Mitochondrial DNA sequence data from portions of three genes (16S ribosomal RNA, cytochrome b, and transfer RNA for glutamic acid) were obtained from 98 individuals of M. pallidus representing 27 general localities sampled throughout its geographical range. Molecular sequence data were analysed using neighbour-joining, maximum-parsimony, maximum-likelihood and Bayesian methods of phylogenetic inference. Directional analysis of phylogeographical patterns, a novel method, was used to examine angular measurements of haplotype sharing between pairs of localities to detect and quantify historical events pertaining to movement patterns and gene flow. Results Collecting activities showed that M. pallidus is a rather rare rodent (mean trapping success was 2.88%), and its distribution has changed little from that determined three-quarters of a century ago. Two principal phylogroups, distributed as eastern and western moieties, are evident from the phylogenetic analyses (mean sequence divergence for cytochrome b is c. 8%). The western clade shows little phylogenetic structure and seems to represent a large polytomy. In the eastern clade, however, three subgroups are recognized. Nine of the 42 unique composite haplotypes are present at two or more localities and are used for the orientation analyses. Axial data from haplotype sharing

  8. Persistent depressive disorder

    MedlinePlus

    Persistent depressive disorder (PDD) is a chronic (ongoing) type of depression in which a person's moods are regularly low. ... are not as severe as with major depression . Persistent depressive disorder used to be called dysthymia.

  9. Kangaroo mother care in the neonatal intensive care unit: staff attitudes and beliefs and opportunities for parents.

    PubMed

    Strand, H; Blomqvist, Y T; Gradin, M; Nyqvist, K H

    2014-04-01

    To compare attitudes towards Kangaroo mother care (KMC) among staff in two high-tech neonatal intensive care units, which provided parents with different opportunities to get involved in their infants' care. Questionnaires were completed by healthcare staff in Unit A, which provided parents with unrestricted access so that they could provide continuous KMC, and Unit B, where parents could only practice KMC intermittently. Unit A staff were more positive about the benefits and use of KMC, including its use in unstable infants, and rated their knowledge and practical skills more highly than staff in the other unit. Unit B staff also appreciated the method, but expressed more hesitation in using it with unstable infants. In particular, they stressed the need to adapt the physical environment of the NICU to enable parents to stay with their infants and practice the method. Staff working in the NICU that gave parents unrestricted access were more positive about KMC than staff in the NICU that offered limited opportunities for parents to stay with their children. This finding suggests that it is important to eliminate unjustifiable obstacles to the presence of parents in the NICU, so that they can provide KMC. ©2013 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Maternal and Neonatal Nurse Perceived Value of Kangaroo Mother Care and Maternal Care Partnership in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Hendricks-Muñoz, Karen D.; Li, Yihong; Kim, Yang S.; Prendergast, Carol C.; Mayers, Roslyn; Louie, Moi

    2015-01-01

    Background Kangaroo Mother Care (KMC) enhances infant and maternal well-being and requires maternal-care partnerships (MCP) for implementation. Objective To examine maternal and neonatal nurse provider perspectives on the value of KMC and MCP. Study Design Prospective cohort design of neonatal nurses and mothers of preterm infants self-report anonymous questionnaire. Analyses of categorical independent variables and continuous variables were calculated. Results In all, 82.3% of nurses (42) and 100% (143) of mothers participated in the survey. compared with 18% of nurses, 63% of mothers believed “KMC should be provided daily” and 90% of mothers compared with 40% of nurses strongly believed “mothers should be partners in care.” In addition, 61% of nonwhite mothers identified that “KMC was not something they were told they could do for their infant” compared with 39% of white mothers. Nonwhite and foreign-born nurses were 2.8 and 3.1 times more likely to encourage MCP and KMC. Conclusion Mothers held strong positive perceptions of KMC and MCP value compared with nurses. Nonwhite mothers perceived they received less education and access to KMC. Barriers to KMC and MCP exist among nurses, though less in nonwhite, foreign-born, and/or nurses with their own children, identifying important provider educational opportunities to improve maternal KMC access in the NICU. PMID:23359231

  11. Secretion of whey acidic protein and cystatin is down regulated at mid-lactation in the red kangaroo (Macropus rufus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nicholas, K.R.; Fisher, J.A.; Muths, E.; Trott, J.; Janssens, P.A.; Reich, C.; Shaw, D.C.

    2001-01-01

    Milk collected from the red kangaroo (Macropus rufus) between day 100 and 260 of lactation showed major changes in milk composition at around day 200 of lactation, the time at which the pouch young begins to temporarily exit the pouch and eat herbage. The carbohydrate content of milk declined abruptly at this time and although there was only a small increase in total protein content, SDS PAGE analysis of milk revealed asynchrony in the secretory pattern of individual proteins. The levels of ??-lactalbumin, ??-lactoglobulin, serum albumin and transferrin remain unchanged during lactation. In contrast, the protease inhibitor cystatin, and the putative protease inhibitor whey acidic protein (WAP) first appeared in milk at elevated concentrations after approximately 150 days of lactation and then ceased to be secreted at approximately 200 days. In addition, a major whey protein, late lactation protein, was first detected in milk around the time whey acidic protein and cystatin cease to be secreted and was present at least until day 260 of lactation. The co-ordinated, but asynchronous secretion of putative protease inhibitors in milk may have several roles during lactation including tissue remodelling in the mammary gland and protecting specific proteins in milk required for physiological development of the dependent young. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science Inc.

  12. The intermediate-sized filaments in rat kangaroo PtK2 cells. II. Structure and composition of isolated filaments.

    PubMed

    Franke, W W; Schmid, E; Osborn, M; Weber, K

    1978-08-01

    When cultured cells of the rat kangaroo cell line PtK2 grown on plastic or glass surfaces are lysed and extracted with combinations of low and high salt buffers and the non-ionic detergent Triton X-100 cytoskeletal preparations are obtained that show an enrichment of 6 to 11 nm thick filaments. The arrays of these filaments have been examined by various light and electron microscopic techniques, including ultrathin sectioning, whole mount transmission electron microscopy, negative staining, and indirect immunofluorescence microscopy. In addition, 6 to 11 nm filaments isolated from these cells with similar extraction procedures and with centrifugation techniques have been examined by electron microscopy. The arrays of these isolated intermediate-sized filaments, their ultrastructure and their specific decoration by certain antibodies present in normal rabbit sera as well as by guinea pig antibodies against purified bovine prekeratin is demonstrated. When preparations enriched in these intermediate-sized filaments are examined by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis a corresponding enrichment of three polypeptide bands with apparent molecular weights of about 45 000, 52 000 and 58 000 (the latter component sometimes appears split into two bands) is observed, besides some residual actin and a few high molecular weight bands. The morphology of the isolated filaments, their immunological reaction with antibodies decorating prekeratin-containing structures, and the sizes of their constitutive polypeptides suggest that these filaments are closely related to prekeratin-containing filaments observed in a variety of epithelial cells.

  13. The Effects of Kangaroo Mother Care and Swaddling on Venipuncture Pain in Premature Neonates: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Dezhdar, Shahin; Jahanpour, Faezeh; Firouz Bakht, Saeedeh; Ostovar, Afshin

    2016-01-01

    Background Hospitalized premature babies often undergo various painful procedures. Kangaroo mother care (KMC) and swaddling are two pain reduction methods. Objectives This study was undertaken to compare the effects of swaddling and KMC on pain during venous sampling in premature neonates. Patients and Methods This study was performed as a randomized clinical trial on 90 premature neonates. The neonates were divided into three groups using a random allocation block. The three groups were group A (swaddling), group B (KMC), and group C (control). In all three groups, the heart rate and arterial oxygen saturation were measured and recorded in time intervals of 30 seconds before, during, and 30, 60, 90, and 120 seconds after blood sampling. The neonate’s face was video recorded and assessed using the premature infant pain profile (PIPP) at time intervals of 30 seconds. The data was analyzed using the t-test, chi-square test, Repeated Measure analysis of variance (ANOVA), Kruskal-Wallis, Post-hoc, and Bonferroni test. Results The findings revealed that pain was reduced to a great extent in the swaddling and KMC methods compared to the control group. However, there was no significant difference between KMC and swaddling (P ≥ 0.05). Conclusions The results of this study indicate that there is no meaningful difference between swaddling and KMC on physiological indexes and pain in neonates. Therefore, the swaddling method may be a good substitute for KMC. PMID:27274399

  14. Histology and immunohistochemistry of the gut-associated lymphoid tissue of the eastern grey kangaroo, Macropus giganteus.

    PubMed

    Old, J M; Deane, E M

    2001-12-01

    Mesenteric lymph nodes and gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT) from juvenile eastern grey kangaroos were investigated. The mesenteric nodes had a similar structure to that described for eutherian mammals. They contained distinct regions of medulla and cortex, with prominent follicles and germinal centres. Gut associated lymphoid tissue consisted of areas of submucosal follicles. These varied from areas of densely packed lymphocytes with darkly staining, prominent coronas to areas with no defined follicles. The distribution of T cells in these tissues was documented by use of species-crossreactive antibodies to the surface markers CD3 and CD5; B cells were identified by antibodies to CD79b. Within the lymph nodes T cells were located mainly in the paracortex and cortex, with limited numbers observed in the follicles; B cells were located on the marginal zone of the follicles. In GALT, T cells were located in the peripheral regions of the germinal centres of secondary follicles, while B cells were abundant in primary follicles. These observations are consistent with those made in a range of other marsupials (metatherian) and eutherian mammals and are indicative of the capacity to respond to antigens entering via the mouth.

  15. Kangaroo care and behavioral and physiologic pain responses in very-low-birth-weight twins: a case study.

    PubMed

    Cong, Xiaomei; Cusson, Regina M; Hussain, Naveed; Zhang, Di; Kelly, Sharon P

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this case study was to describe pain responses in three study conditions: longer (30 minutes) kangaroo care (KC) before and throughout heel stick (KC30), shorter (15 minutes) KC before and throughout heel stick (KC15), and incubator care throughout heel stick (IC) in 28-week gestational age twins. Pain responses were measured by crying time, Preterm Infant Pain Profile (PIPP), and heart rate variability indexes, including low-frequency power (LF, representing sympathetic activity), high-frequency power (HF, parasympathetic activity), and LF/HF ratio (sympathetic-parasympathetic balance). Both twins cried more and had higher PIPP pain scores and tachycardia during heel stick in the IC condition. Infant B had an incident of apnea and tachycardia by the end of the heel stick and a bradycardia episode during recovery in the IC condition. The twins had lower LF/HF ratios (better autonomic nervous system balance) during recovery in both longer and shorter KC conditions compared with the IC condition. Infant B had difficulty returning to LF/HF ratio baseline level after the painful procedure in the IC condition. These data suggest that both longer and shorter KC before and throughout painful procedures can be helpful in reducing behavioral and physiologic pain responses in preterm infants.

  16. The Newborn Individualized Developmental Care and Assessment Program (NIDCAP) with Kangaroo Mother Care (KMC): Comprehensive Care for Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Als, Heidelise; McAnulty, Gloria B.

    2014-01-01

    State-of-the-art Newborn Intensive Care Units (NICUs), instrumental in the survival of high-risk and ever-earlier-born preterm infants, often have costly human repercussions. The developmental sequelae of newborn intensive care are largely misunderstood. Developed countries eager to export their technologies must also transfer the knowledge-base that encompasses all high-risk and preterm infants’ personhood as well as the neuro-essential importance of their parents. Without such understanding, the best medical care, while assuring survival jeopardizes infants’ long-term potential and deprives parents of their critical role. Exchanging the womb for the NICU environment at a time of rapid brain growth compromises preterm infants’ early development, which results in long-term physical and mental health problems and developmental disabilities. The Newborn Individualized Developmental Care and Assessment Program (NIDCAP) aims to prevent the iatrogenic sequelae of intensive care and to maintain the intimate connection between parent and infant, one expression of which is Kangaroo Mother Care. NIDCAP embeds the infant in the natural parent niche, avoids over-stimulation, stress, pain, and isolation while it supports self-regulation, competence, and goal orientation. Research demonstrates that NIDCAP improves brain development, functional competence, health, and life quality. It is cost effective, humane, and ethical, and promises to become the standard for all NICU care. PMID:25473384

  17. Secretion of whey acidic protein and cystatin is down regulated at mid-lactation in the red kangaroo (Macropus rufus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nicholas, K.R.; Fisher, J.A.; Muths, E.; Trott, J.; Janssens, P.A.; Reich, C.; Shaw, D.C.

    2001-01-01

    Milk collected from the red kangaroo (Macropus rufus) between day 100 and 260 of lactation showed major changes in milk composition at around day 200 of lactation, the time at which the pouch young begins to temporarily exit the pouch and eat herbage. The carbohydrate content of milk declined abruptly at this time and although there was only a small increase in total protein content, SDS PAGE analysis of milk revealed asynchrony in the secretory pattern of individual proteins. The levels of α-lactalbumin, β-lactoglobulin, serum albumin and transferrin remain unchanged during lactation. In contrast, the protease inhibitor cystatin, and the putative protease inhibitor whey acidic protein (WAP) first appeared in milk at elevated concentrations after approximately 150 days of lactation and then ceased to be secreted at approximately 200 days. In addition, a major whey protein, late lactation protein, was first detected in milk around the time whey acidic protein and cystatin cease to be secreted and was present at least until day 260 of lactation. The co-ordinated, but asynchronous secretion of putative protease inhibitors in milk may have several roles during lactation including tissue remodelling in the mammary gland and protecting specific proteins in milk required for physiological development of the dependent young.

  18. Maternal presence and rearing condition affect responses to a live predator in kangaroo rats (Dipodomys heermanni arenae).

    PubMed

    Yoerg, S I; Shier, D M

    1997-12-01

    Experiment 1 compared the responses of wild-caught adult and captive-born adult and juvenile kangaroo rats (Dipodomys heermanni arenae) to a live snake. Wild-caught adult rats were less active and monitored the snake more than during a control condition; captive-born juvenile rats did not behave differently during snake and control tests. Snake-naive adult rats behaved more like the wild-caught adult rats, but not on all measures. In Experiment 2, pups were tested at 25 and 50 days of age in 4 conditions: no-snake control, alone with the snake, with a sibling and the snake, and with the mother and the snake. Pups did not behave differently during control and snake tests, but during tests with the mother, pups faced the snake less and followed the mother. Younger pups were more often near the mother than a sibling and followed the mother more when the snake was present. Development of defensive behavior may depend on both predator experience and maternal influence.

  19. Unique features of spermiogenesis in the Musky Rat-kangaroo: reflection of a basal lineage or a distinct fertilization process?

    PubMed

    Lloyd, Shan; Carrick, Frank; Hall, Les

    2008-03-01

    Previous research has found the mature spermatozoon of the Musky Rat-kangaroo to share many characteristics with other macopodoids, some phalangeroids and even the dasyurids. While there have been several studies published on the ultrastructure of the mature marsupial spermatozoon, there are only a few detailed studies on marsupial spermatogenesis. Furthermore, there have been no studies undertaken which combine the staging of the epithelial cell cycle with transmission electron microscopy to describe the ultrastructural changes in the developing spermatozoon during these stages. Such studies have the potential to be used in determining the required time taken for certain components of the spermatozoa to develop. During this study, eight stages of the seminiferous epithelium were observed and the ultrastructure of spermatogenesis was divided into nine phases. Maturational processes in the epididymides are also described. Among the features reported are: the formation of a unique acrosomal granule different from those reported in any other marsupial, the absence of contraction of the nuclear ring, a conspicuous acrosomal compaction process despite the almost 100% coverage of the dorsal nuclear surface and the retention of late spermatids within the seminiferous tubules until the early spermatids have developed to the nuclear protrusion phase.

  20. Hosts of the exotic ornate kangaroo tick, Amblyomma triguttatum triguttatum Koch, on southern Yorke Peninsula, South Australia.

    PubMed

    Waudby, Helen P; Petit, Sophie; Dixon, Bruce; Andrews, Ross H

    2007-10-01

    Amblyomma triguttatum triguttatum is assumed to be endemic to south-western Western Australia (including Barrow Island), Queensland (excluding Cape York Peninsula), and New South Wales, south to Dubbo and Barham. The species has been recorded on a range of mammalian hosts including macropods and domestic animals. In Queensland, A. triguttatum triguttatum is implicated in the epidemiology of Q fever. In 2000, the species was detected on southern Yorke Peninsula in South Australia. We aimed to identify A. triguttatum triguttatum's hosts through trapping, sampling of carcasses, and opportunistic capture of vertebrates on Yorke Peninsula. A. triguttatum triguttatum was removed from black rats (Rattus rattus), wild rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus), western grey kangaroos (Macropus fuliginosus), Tammar wallabies (M. eugenii eugenii), domesticated cats and dogs, and humans. Before this study, A. triguttatum triguttatum had not been found on black rats or rabbits in the wild. This research has implications for the management of wildlife, livestock, and visitors on Yorke Peninsula. The potential for A. triguttatum triguttatum to spread to other areas of Yorke Peninsula and South Australia is considerable, as visitors (tourists) to southern Yorke Peninsula report the presence of ticks both on themselves and among camping equipment on arriving home.

  1. Unique features of spermiogenesis in the Musky Rat-kangaroo: reflection of a basal lineage or a distinct fertilization process?

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, Shan; Carrick, Frank; Hall, Les

    2008-01-01

    Previous research has found the mature spermatozoon of the Musky Rat-kangaroo to share many characteristics with other macopodoids, some phalangeroids and even the dasyurids. While there have been several studies published on the ultrastructure of the mature marsupial spermatozoon, there are only a few detailed studies on marsupial spermatogenesis. Furthermore, there have been no studies undertaken which combine the staging of the epithelial cell cycle with transmission electron microscopy to describe the ultrastructural changes in the developing spermatozoon during these stages. Such studies have the potential to be used in determining the required time taken for certain components of the spermatozoa to develop. During this study, eight stages of the seminiferous epithelium were observed and the ultrastructure of spermatogenesis was divided into nine phases. Maturational processes in the epididymides are also described. Among the features reported are: the formation of a unique acrosomal granule different from those reported in any other marsupial, the absence of contraction of the nuclear ring, a conspicuous acrosomal compaction process despite the almost 100% coverage of the dorsal nuclear surface and the retention of late spermatids within the seminiferous tubules until the early spermatids have developed to the nuclear protrusion phase. PMID:18304206

  2. Infection with Toxoplasma gondii in a red kangaroo (Macropus rufus) and a Patagonian mara (Dolichotis patagonum) in captivity.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Ayala, Nataly; Hidalgo-Hermoso, Ezequiel; Cabello-Araya, Constanza; Carvallo-Chaigneau, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasmosis is an infectious, zoonotic and parasitic disease, caused by Toxoplasma gondii. In this manucript, two cases of infection with T. gondii in captive animals from a zoological park in the central region of Chile are described. One case was a red kangaroo (Macropus rufus), which is highly susceptible to the infection, and the other was a Patagonian mara (Dolichotis patagonum), a rodent in which there is no previous report of the infection. Both animals had myocarditis, with the presence of intralesional tachizoites and cysts suggestive of infection with T. gondii. This infection was confirmed by immunohistochemistry in both animals. The origin of the infection is unknown, but it is likely that free ranging domestic felines were associated with the dissemination of the parasites. This highlights the importance of controlling the domestic animal populations in zoological parks. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that T. gondii infection is described in a Patagonian mara, adding a new host for this infectious agent.

  3. Marsupial and monotreme serum immunoglobulin binding by proteins A, G and L and anti-kangaroo antibody.

    PubMed

    Vaz, Paola K; Hartley, Carol A; Browning, Glenn F; Devlin, Joanne M

    2015-12-01

    Serological studies are often conducted to examine exposure to infectious agents in wildlife populations. However, specific immunological reagents for wildlife species are seldom available and can limit the study of infectious diseases in these animals. This study examined the ability of four commercially available immunoglobulin-binding reagents to bind serum immunoglobulins from 17 species within the Marsupialia and Monotremata. Serum samples were assessed for binding, using immunoblots and ELISAs (Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays), to three microbially-derived proteins - staphylococcal protein A, streptococcal protein G and peptostreptococcal protein L. Additionally, an anti-kangaroo antibody was included for comparison. The inter- and intra-familial binding patterns of the reagents to serum immunoglobulins varied and evolutionary distance between animal species was not an accurate predictor of the ability of reagents to bind immunoglobulins. Results from this study can be used to inform the selection of appropriate immunological reagents in future serological studies in these clades. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Boundary-layer turbulence modeling and vorticity dynamics: I. A kangaroo-process mixing model of boundary-layer turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekker, H.; de Leeuw, G.; van den Brink, A. Maassen

    A nonlocal turbulence transport theory is presented by means of a novel analysis of the Reynolds stress, inter alia involving the construct of a sample path space and a stochastic hypothesis. An analytical sampling rate model (satisfying exchange) and a nonlinear scaling relation (mapping the path space onto the boundary layer) lead to an integro-differential equation for the mixing of scalar densities, which represents fully-developed boundary-layer turbulence as a nondiffusive (Kubo-Anderson or kangaroo) type stochastic process. The underlying near-wall behavior (i.e. for y +→0) of fluctuating velocities fully agrees with recent direct numerical simulations. The model involves a scaling exponent ɛ, with ɛ→∞ in the diffusion limit. For the (partly analytical) solution for the mean velocity profile, excellent agreement with the experimental data yields ɛ≈0.58. The significance of ɛ as a turbulence Cantor set dimension (in the logarithmic profile region, i.e. for y +→∞) is discussed.

  5. A new species of the basal "kangaroo" Balbaroo and a re-evaluation of stem macropodiform interrelationships.

    PubMed

    Black, Karen H; Travouillon, Kenny J; Den Boer, Wendy; Kear, Benjamin P; Cooke, Bernard N; Archer, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Exceptionally well-preserved skulls and postcranial elements of a new species of the plesiomorphic stem macropodiform Balbaroo have been recovered from middle Miocene freshwater limestone deposits in the Riversleigh World Heritage Area of northwestern Queensland, Australia. This constitutes the richest intraspecific sample for any currently known basal "kangaroo", and, along with additional material referred to Balbaroo fangaroo, provides new insights into structural variability within the most prolific archaic macropodiform clade--Balbaridae. Qualitative and metric evaluations of taxonomic boundaries demonstrate that the previously distinct species Nambaroo bullockensis is a junior synonym of B. camfieldensis. Furthermore, coupled Maximum Parsimony and Bayesian phylogenetic analyses reveal that our new Balbaroo remains represent the most derived member of the Balbaroo lineage, and are closely related to the middle Miocene B. camfieldensis, which like most named balbarid species is identifiable only from isolated jaws. The postcranial elements of Balbaroo concur with earlier finds of the stratigraphically oldest balbarid skeleton, Nambaroo gillespieae, and suggest that quadrupedal progression was a primary gait mode as opposed to bipedal saltation. All Balbaroo spp. have low-crowned bilophodont molars, which are typical for browsing herbivores inhabiting the densely forested environments envisaged for middle Miocene northeastern Australia.

  6. Rey-Martinez Kangaroo Mother Program: an alternative way of caring for low birth weight infants? One year mortality in a two cohort study.

    PubMed

    Charpak, N; Ruiz-Peláez, J G; Charpak, Y

    1994-12-01

    To assess the effectiveness and safety of the Kangaroo mother intervention (KMI). Observational, analytic, prospective (two cohorts) study. Two large tertiary care obstetric hospitals, one offering "traditional" care and the other KMI. Newborn infants with birth weights < or = 2000 g, who survive the neonatal period and are eligible for an in-patient minimal care unit (MCU) (having overcome major adaptation problems to extra uterine life). "Kangaroo infants" (KI) were discharged as soon as they were eligible for MCU, regardless of weight or gestational age. Infants were kept 24 hours a day in an upright position, in skin-to-skin contact and firmly attached to the mother's chest until the KMI was not tolerated anymore. Control babies (from the other facility) were kept in incubators at the MCU until they satisfied usual discharge criteria for the control hospital. Both groups were followed periodically up to the age of 1 year. Three hundred thirty-two eligible infants were recruited, 162 at the Kangaroo hospital and 170 at the control hospital. KI came from a much lower socio-economic class and were more ill before eligibility. Relative risk of death was higher for KI (RR 1.9), although this figure was reversed after adjusting for weight at birth and gestational age (RR 0.5). KI grew less in the first 3 months and had a higher proportion of developmental delay at 1 year, and a multivariate analysis failed to control for the large baseline differences in socioeconomic levels and babies' health status between the two cohorts. In spite of major baseline differences between studied cohorts, the survival of LBW infants in Bogotá is similar between the KMI and the "traditional care". Questions remain about quality of life, especially regarding weight gain and neurodevelopment, that may be answered by a Randomized Controlled Trial.

  7. Microstructural analysis of collagen and elastin fibres in the kangaroo articular cartilage reveals a structural divergence depending on its local mechanical environment.

    PubMed

    He, B; Wu, J P; Chim, S M; Xu, J; Kirk, T B

    2013-01-01

    To assess the microstructure of the collagen and elastin fibres in articular cartilage under different natural mechanical loading conditions and determine the relationship between the microstructure of collagen and its mechanical environment. Articular cartilage specimens were collected from the load bearing regions of the medial femoral condyle and the medial distal humerus of adult kangaroos. The microstructure of collagen and elastin fibres of these specimens was studied using laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) and the orientation and texture features of the collagen were analysed using ImageJ. A zonal arrangement of collagen was found in kangaroo articular cartilage: the collagen fibres aligned parallel to the surface in the superficial zone and ran perpendicular in the deep zone. Compared with the distal humerus, the collagen in the femoral condyle was less isotropic and more clearly oriented, especially in the superficial and deep zones. The collagen in the femoral condyle was highly heterogeneous, less linear and more complex. Elastin fibres were found mainly in the superficial zone of the articular cartilage of both femoral condyle and distal humerus. The present study demonstrates that the collagen structure and texture of kangaroo articular cartilage is joint-dependent. This finding emphasizes the effects of loading on collagen development and suggests that articular cartilage with high biochemical and biomechanical qualities could be achieved by optimizing joint loading, which may benefit cartilage tissue engineering and prevention of joint injury. The existence of elastin fibres in articular cartilage could have important functional implications. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The high aerobic capacity of a small, marsupial rat-kangaroo (Bettongia penicillata) is matched by the mitochondrial and capillary morphology of its skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Webster, Koa N; Dawson, Terence J

    2012-09-15

    We examined the structure-function relationships that underlie the aerobic capacities of marsupial mammals that hop. Marsupials have relatively low basal metabolic rates (BMR) and historically were seen as 'low energy' mammals. However, the red kangaroo, Macropus rufus (family Macropodidae), has aerobic capacities equivalent to athletic placentals. It has an extreme aerobic scope (fAS) and its large locomotor muscles feature high mitochondrial and capillary volumes. M. rufus belongs to a modern group of kangaroos and its high fAS is not general for marsupials. However, other hopping marsupials may have elevated aerobic capacities. Bettongia penicillata, a rat-kangaroo (family Potoroidae), is a small (1 kg), active hopper whose fAS is somewhat elevated. We examined the oxygen delivery system in its muscles to ascertain links with hopping. An elevated fAS of 23 provided a relatively high maximal aerobic oxygen consumption ( ) in B. penicillata; associated with this is a skeletal muscle mass of 44% of body mass. Ten muscles were sampled to estimate the total mitochondrial and capillary volume of the locomotor muscles. Values in B. penicillata were similar to those in M. rufus and in athletic placentals. This small hopper had high muscle mitochondrial volume densities (7.1-11.9%) and both a large total capillary volume (6 ml kg(-1) body mass) and total capillary erythrocyte volume (3.2 ml kg(-1)). Apparently, a considerable aerobic capacity is required to achieve the benefits of the extended stride in fast hopping. Of note, the ratio of to total muscle mitochondrial volume in B. penicillata was 4.9 ml O(2) min(-1) ml(-1). Similar values occur in M. rufus and also placental mammals generally, not only athletic species. If such relationships occur in other marsupials, a fundamental structure-function relationship for oxygen delivery to muscles likely originated with or before the earliest mammals.

  9. Elevated surface temperature depresses survival of banner-tailed kangaroo rats: will climate change cook a desert icon?

    PubMed

    Moses, Martin R; Frey, Jennifer K; Roemer, Gary W

    2012-01-01

    Modest increases in global temperature have been implicated in causing population extirpations and range shifts in taxa inhabiting colder environs and in ectotherms whose thermoregulation is more closely tied to environmental conditions. Many arid-adapted endotherms already experience conditions at their physiological limits, so it is conceivable that they could be similarly affected by warming temperatures. We explored how climatic variables might influence the apparent survival of the banner-tailed kangaroo rat (Dipodomys spectabilis), a rodent endemic to the Chihuahuan Desert of North America and renowned for its behavioral and physiological adaptations to arid environments. Relative variable weight, strength of variable relationships, and other criteria indicated that summer, diurnal land surface temperature (SD_LST) was the primary environmental driver of apparent survival in these arid-adapted rodents. Higher temperatures had a negative effect on apparent survival, which ranged from 0.15 (SE = 0.04) for subadults to 0.50 (SE = 0.07) for adults. Elevated SD_LST may negatively influence survival through multiple pathways, including increased water loss and energy expenditure that could lead to chronic stress and/or hyperthermia that could cause direct mortality. Land surface temperatures are predicted to increase by as much 6.5°C by 2099, reducing apparent survival of adults to ~0.15 in some regions of the species' range, possibly causing a shift in their distribution. The relationship between SD_LST and survival suggests a mechanism whereby physiological tolerances are exceeded resulting in a reduction to individual fitness that may ultimately cause a shift in the species' range over time.

  10. Genome sequence of an Australian kangaroo, Macropus eugenii, provides insight into the evolution of mammalian reproduction and development

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background We present the genome sequence of the tammar wallaby, Macropus eugenii, which is a member of the kangaroo family and the first representative of the iconic hopping mammals that symbolize Australia to be sequenced. The tammar has many unusual biological characteristics, including the longest period of embryonic diapause of any mammal, extremely synchronized seasonal breeding and prolonged and sophisticated lactation within a well-defined pouch. Like other marsupials, it gives birth to highly altricial young, and has a small number of very large chromosomes, making it a valuable model for genomics, reproduction and development. Results The genome has been sequenced to 2 × coverage using Sanger sequencing, enhanced with additional next generation sequencing and the integration of extensive physical and linkage maps to build the genome assembly. We also sequenced the tammar transcriptome across many tissues and developmental time points. Our analyses of these data shed light on mammalian reproduction, development and genome evolution: there is innovation in reproductive and lactational genes, rapid evolution of germ cell genes, and incomplete, locus-specific X inactivation. We also observe novel retrotransposons and a highly rearranged major histocompatibility complex, with many class I genes located outside the complex. Novel microRNAs in the tammar HOX clusters uncover new potential mammalian HOX regulatory elements. Conclusions Analyses of these resources enhance our understanding of marsupial gene evolution, identify marsupial-specific conserved non-coding elements and critical genes across a range of biological systems, including reproduction, development and immunity, and provide new insight into marsupial and mammalian biology and genome evolution. PMID:21854559

  11. A neonatal nurse training program in kangaroo mother care (KMC) decreases barriers to KMC utilization in the NICU.

    PubMed

    Hendricks-Munoz, Karen D; Mayers, Roslyn M

    2014-11-01

    This study assessed the impact of a nurse simulation training program on perception of kangaroo mother care (KMC) value and transfer skill competency. An 8-item Likert scale skill survey tool and a 24-item Likert developmental care survey tool were used in a prospective cohort study to analyze perceptions of 30 neonatal nurses who underwent a comprehensive KMC simulation-based training program. Competency skills were evaluated pretraining and tracked by direct observation for 6 months posttraining. Pre- and postsurvey data were analyzed and KMC utilization for preterm infants born at ≤ 34 weeks' gestation was determined. Nurses' competency in infant transfer improved, especially in infants receiving nasal continuous positive airway pressure or ventilator support, from 30 to 93% or 10 to 50%, respectively, p < 0.0001. Neonatal nurses' perceived KMC value increased from 50 to 100%, p < 0.001, and parent KMC utilization increased from 26.5 to 85.9%, p < 0.0001. Nurses' support for parental visitation improved from 38 to 73%, p < 0.001; discussion of KMC with parents on the 1st day increased from 5 to 45%, p < 0.001; and initial day of KMC provision improved from 18.0 ± 2.7 to 5.6 ± 1.2 days, p < 0.001. A comprehensive simulation-based KMC education program improved nurses' perception of KMC value, their competency and comfort in infant transfer for KMC care, and successfully promoted KMC parent utilization for the preterm infant in the neonatal intensive care unit. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  12. The intermediate-sized filaments in rat kangaroo PtK2 cells. I. Morphology in situ.

    PubMed

    Franke, W W; Grund, C; Osborn, M; Weber, K

    1978-08-01

    The system of the intermediate-sized filaments (IF) of rat kangaroo PtK2 cells which can be specifically demonstrated by immunofluorescence microscopy using certain rabbit autoantibodies and guinea pig antibodies against bovine hoof prekeratin has been studied by electron microscopy. The characteristic ornamental, curved arrays of this system are shown after fixation in situ in both thin sections and whole-cell-preparations to represent bundles of 6 to 11 nm thick filaments extending through the whole cytoplasm, although in some cells they appear to be enriched in the perinuclear region. While many individual IF are recognized in the cytoplasm the tendency of such filaments to aggregate laterally into bundles is one of their prominent features. Among such bundle formations one form that consists of tightly packed IF cemented together in a dense osmiophilic matrix is especially conspicious. The appearance and mode of arrangement of the IF is not significantly altered in cells treated with colcemid and/or cytochalasin B. Spatial relationships of IF with microfilament-containing cables and microtubules as well as with membranous structures are also described. IF are heterogeneous in width and reveal an unstained, apparently hollow core, indicative of a tubular organization. Many IF show small, sometimes periodically arranged lateral projections which seem to be involved in IF cross-linking. Associations with polyribosomes are common. The changes in the IF system during mitosis have also been examined. The structural details of the IF as well as their possible role as cytoskeletal elements involved in the control of cell shape and cytoplasmic architecture are discussed in relation to data on various intermediate-sized filaments from other cell types. The close similarity of the IF of PtK2 cells to aggregates of prekeratin filaments is emphasized. It is suggested that PtK2 cells represent an epithelial cell line growing in a state of balanced semi-keratinization.

  13. Genome sequence of an Australian kangaroo, Macropus eugenii, provides insight into the evolution of mammalian reproduction and development.

    PubMed

    Renfree, Marilyn B; Papenfuss, Anthony T; Deakin, Janine E; Lindsay, James; Heider, Thomas; Belov, Katherine; Rens, Willem; Waters, Paul D; Pharo, Elizabeth A; Shaw, Geoff; Wong, Emily S W; Lefèvre, Christophe M; Nicholas, Kevin R; Kuroki, Yoko; Wakefield, Matthew J; Zenger, Kyall R; Wang, Chenwei; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm; Nicholas, Frank W; Hickford, Danielle; Yu, Hongshi; Short, Kirsty R; Siddle, Hannah V; Frankenberg, Stephen R; Chew, Keng Yih; Menzies, Brandon R; Stringer, Jessica M; Suzuki, Shunsuke; Hore, Timothy A; Delbridge, Margaret L; Patel, Hardip R; Mohammadi, Amir; Schneider, Nanette Y; Hu, Yanqiu; O'Hara, William; Al Nadaf, Shafagh; Wu, Chen; Feng, Zhi-Ping; Cocks, Benjamin G; Wang, Jianghui; Flicek, Paul; Searle, Stephen M J; Fairley, Susan; Beal, Kathryn; Herrero, Javier; Carone, Dawn M; Suzuki, Yutaka; Sugano, Sumio; Toyoda, Atsushi; Sakaki, Yoshiyuki; Kondo, Shinji; Nishida, Yuichiro; Tatsumoto, Shoji; Mandiou, Ion; Hsu, Arthur; McColl, Kaighin A; Lansdell, Benjamin; Weinstock, George; Kuczek, Elizabeth; McGrath, Annette; Wilson, Peter; Men, Artem; Hazar-Rethinam, Mehlika; Hall, Allison; Davis, John; Wood, David; Williams, Sarah; Sundaravadanam, Yogi; Muzny, Donna M; Jhangiani, Shalini N; Lewis, Lora R; Morgan, Margaret B; Okwuonu, Geoffrey O; Ruiz, San Juana; Santibanez, Jireh; Nazareth, Lynne; Cree, Andrew; Fowler, Gerald; Kovar, Christie L; Dinh, Huyen H; Joshi, Vandita; Jing, Chyn; Lara, Fremiet; Thornton, Rebecca; Chen, Lei; Deng, Jixin; Liu, Yue; Shen, Joshua Y; Song, Xing-Zhi; Edson, Janette; Troon, Carmen; Thomas, Daniel; Stephens, Amber; Yapa, Lankesha; Levchenko, Tanya; Gibbs, Richard A; Cooper, Desmond W; Speed, Terence P; Fujiyama, Asao; Graves, Jennifer A M; O'Neill, Rachel J; Pask, Andrew J; Forrest, Susan M; Worley, Kim C

    2011-08-29

    We present the genome sequence of the tammar wallaby, Macropus eugenii, which is a member of the kangaroo family and the first representative of the iconic hopping mammals that symbolize Australia to be sequenced. The tammar has many unusual biological characteristics, including the longest period of embryonic diapause of any mammal, extremely synchronized seasonal breeding and prolonged and sophisticated lactation within a well-defined pouch. Like other marsupials, it gives birth to highly altricial young, and has a small number of very large chromosomes, making it a valuable model for genomics, reproduction and development. The genome has been sequenced to 2 × coverage using Sanger sequencing, enhanced with additional next generation sequencing and the integration of extensive physical and linkage maps to build the genome assembly. We also sequenced the tammar transcriptome across many tissues and developmental time points. Our analyses of these data shed light on mammalian reproduction, development and genome evolution: there is innovation in reproductive and lactational genes, rapid evolution of germ cell genes, and incomplete, locus-specific X inactivation. We also observe novel retrotransposons and a highly rearranged major histocompatibility complex, with many class I genes located outside the complex. Novel microRNAs in the tammar HOX clusters uncover new potential mammalian HOX regulatory elements. Analyses of these resources enhance our understanding of marsupial gene evolution, identify marsupial-specific conserved non-coding elements and critical genes across a range of biological systems, including reproduction, development and immunity, and provide new insight into marsupial and mammalian biology and genome evolution.

  14. A sedge plant as the source of Kangaroo Island propolis rich in prenylated p-coumarate ester and stilbenes.

    PubMed

    Duke, Colin C; Tran, Van H; Duke, Rujee K; Abu-Mellal, Abdallah; Plunkett, George T; King, Douglas I; Hamid, Kaiser; Wilson, Karen L; Barrett, Russell L; Bruhl, Jeremy J

    2017-02-01

    Propolis samples from Kangaroo Island, South Australia, were investigated for chemical constituents using high-field nuclear magnetic resonance spectral profiling. A type of propolis was found containing a high proportion of prenylated hydroxystilbenes. Subsequently, the botanical origin of this type of propolis was identified using a beehive propolis depletion method and analysis of flora. Ligurian honey bees, Apis mellifera ligustica Spinola, were found to produce propolis from resin exuded by the Australian native sedge plant Lepidosperma sp. Montebello (Cyperaceae). The plants, commonly known as sword sedge, were found to have resin that matched with the propolis samples identified as the most abundant propolis type on the island containing C- and O-prenylated tetrahydroxystilbenes (pTHOS) in addition to a small amount of prenylated p-coumarate. The isolation of five pTHOS not previously characterized are reported: (E)-4-(3-methyl-2-buten-1-yl)-3,4',5-trihydroxy-3'-methoxystilbene, (E)-2,4-bis(3-methyl-2-buten-1-yl)-3,3',4',5-tetrahydroxystilbene, (E)-2-(3-methyl-2-buten-1-yl)-3-(3-methyl-2-butenyloxy)-3',4',5-trihydroxystilbene, (E)-2,6-bis(3-methyl-2-buten-1-yl)-3,3',5,5'-tetrahydroxystilbene and (E)-2,6-bis(3-methyl-2-buten-1-yl)-3,4',5-trihydroxy-3'-methoxystilbene. A National Cancer Institute 60 human cell line anticancer screen of three of these compounds showed growth inhibitory activity. The large Australasian genus Lepidosperma is identified as a valuable resource for the isolation of substances with medicinal potential. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. Newborn care practices in rural Bangladesh: Implications for the adaptation of kangaroo mother care for community-based interventions.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Erin C; Callaghan-Koru, Jennifer A; Al Mahmud, Abdullah; Shah, Rashed; Farzin, Azadeh; Cristofalo, Elizabeth A; Akhter, Sadika; Baqui, Abdullah H

    2014-12-01

    Bangladesh has one of the world's highest rates of low birth weight along with prevalent traditional care practices that leave newborns highly vulnerable to hypothermia, infection, and early death. We conducted formative research to explore existing newborn care practices in rural Bangladesh with an emphasis on thermal protection, and to identify potential facilitators, barriers, and recommendations for the community level delivery of kangaroo mother care (CKMC). Forty in-depth interviews and 14 focus group discussions were conducted between September and December 2012. Participants included pregnant women and mothers, husbands, maternal and paternal grandmothers, traditional birth attendants, village doctors, traditional healers, pharmacy men, religious leaders, community leaders, and formal healthcare providers. Audio recordings were transcribed and translated into English, and the textual data were analyzed using the Framework Approach. We find that harmful newborn care practices, such as delayed wrapping and early initiation of bathing, are changing as more biomedical advice from formal healthcare providers is reaching the community through word-of-mouth and television campaigns. While the goal of CKMC was relatively easily understood and accepted by many of the participants, logistical and to a lesser extent ideological barriers exist that may keep the practice from being adopted easily. Women feel a sense of inevitable responsibility for household duties despite the desire to provide the best care for their new babies. Our findings showed that participants appreciated CKMC as an appropriate treatment method for ill babies, but were less accepting of it as a protective method of caring for seemingly healthy newborns during the first few days of life. Participants highlighted the necessity of receiving help from family members and witnessing other women performing CKMC with positive outcomes if they are to adopt the behavior themselves. Focusing intervention

  16. A priori and a posteriori approaches for finding genes of evolutionary interest in non-model species: osmoregulatory genes in the kidney transcriptome of the desert rodent Dipodomys spectabilis (banner-tailed kangaroo rat).

    PubMed

    Marra, Nicholas J; Eo, Soo Hyung; Hale, Matthew C; Waser, Peter M; DeWoody, J Andrew

    2012-12-01

    One common goal in evolutionary biology is the identification of genes underlying adaptive traits of evolutionary interest. Recently next-generation sequencing techniques have greatly facilitated such evolutionary studies in species otherwise depauperate of genomic resources. Kangaroo rats (Dipodomys sp.) serve as exemplars of adaptation in that they inhabit extremely arid environments, yet require no drinking water because of ultra-efficient kidney function and osmoregulation. As a basis for identifying water conservation genes in kangaroo rats, we conducted a priori bioinformatics searches in model rodents (Mus musculus and Rattus norvegicus) to identify candidate genes with known or suspected osmoregulatory function. We then obtained 446,758 reads via 454 pyrosequencing to characterize genes expressed in the kidney of banner-tailed kangaroo rats (Dipodomys spectabilis). We also determined candidates a posteriori by identifying genes that were overexpressed in the kidney. The kangaroo rat sequences revealed nine different a priori candidate genes predicted from our Mus and Rattus searches, as well as 32 a posteriori candidate genes that were overexpressed in kidney. Mutations in two of these genes, Slc12a1 and Slc12a3, cause human renal diseases that result in the inability to concentrate urine. These genes are likely key determinants of physiological water conservation in desert rodents. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. A retrospective study of Babesia macropus associated with morbidity and mortality in eastern grey kangaroos (Macropus giganteus) and agile wallabies (Macropus agilis).

    PubMed

    Donahoe, Shannon L; Peacock, Christopher S; Choo, Ace Y L; Cook, Roger W; O'Donoghue, Peter; Crameri, Sandra; Vogelnest, Larry; Gordon, Anita N; Scott, Jenni L; Rose, Karrie

    2015-08-01

    This is a retrospective study of 38 cases of infection by Babesia macropus, associated with a syndrome of anaemia and debility in hand-reared or free-ranging juvenile eastern grey kangaroos (Macropus giganteus) from coastal New South Wales and south-eastern Queensland between 1995 and 2013. Infection with B. macropus is recorded for the first time in agile wallabies (Macropus agilis) from far north Queensland. Animals in which B. macropus infection was considered to be the primary cause of morbidity had marked anaemia, lethargy and neurological signs, and often died. In these cases, parasitised erythrocytes were few or undetectable in peripheral blood samples but were sequestered in large numbers within small vessels of visceral organs, particularly in the kidney and brain, associated with distinctive clusters of extraerythrocytic organisms. Initial identification of this piroplasm in peripheral blood smears and in tissue impression smears and histological sections was confirmed using transmission electron microscopy and molecular analysis. Samples of kidney, brain or blood were tested using PCR and DNA sequencing of the 18S ribosomal RNA and heat shock protein 70 gene using primers specific for piroplasms. The piroplasm detected in these samples had 100% sequence identity in the 18S rRNA region with the recently described Babesia macropus in two eastern grey kangaroos from New South Wales and Queensland, and a high degree of similarity to an unnamed Babesia sp. recently detected in three woylies (Bettongia penicillata ogilbyi) in Western Australia.

  18. A retrospective study of Babesia macropus associated with morbidity and mortality in eastern grey kangaroos (Macropus giganteus) and agile wallabies (Macropus agilis)

    PubMed Central

    Donahoe, Shannon L.; Peacock, Christopher S.; Choo, Ace Y.L.; Cook, Roger W.; O'Donoghue, Peter; Crameri, Sandra; Vogelnest, Larry; Gordon, Anita N.; Scott, Jenni L.; Rose, Karrie

    2015-01-01

    This is a retrospective study of 38 cases of infection by Babesia macropus, associated with a syndrome of anaemia and debility in hand-reared or free-ranging juvenile eastern grey kangaroos (Macropus giganteus) from coastal New South Wales and south-eastern Queensland between 1995 and 2013. Infection with B. macropus is recorded for the first time in agile wallabies (Macropus agilis) from far north Queensland. Animals in which B. macropus infection was considered to be the primary cause of morbidity had marked anaemia, lethargy and neurological signs, and often died. In these cases, parasitised erythrocytes were few or undetectable in peripheral blood samples but were sequestered in large numbers within small vessels of visceral organs, particularly in the kidney and brain, associated with distinctive clusters of extraerythrocytic organisms. Initial identification of this piroplasm in peripheral blood smears and in tissue impression smears and histological sections was confirmed using transmission electron microscopy and molecular analysis. Samples of kidney, brain or blood were tested using PCR and DNA sequencing of the 18S ribosomal RNA and heat shock protein 70 gene using primers specific for piroplasms. The piroplasm detected in these samples had 100% sequence identity in the 18S rRNA region with the recently described Babesia macropus in two eastern grey kangaroos from New South Wales and Queensland, and a high degree of similarity to an unnamed Babesia sp. recently detected in three woylies (Bettongia penicillata ogilbyi) in Western Australia. PMID:26106576

  19. Reconstructing temporal variation of fluoride uptake in eastern grey kangaroos (Macropus giganteus) from a high-fluoride area by analysis of fluoride distribution in dentine.

    PubMed

    Kierdorf, Horst; Rhede, Dieter; Death, Clare; Hufschmid, Jasmin; Kierdorf, Uwe

    2016-04-01

    Trace element profiling in the incrementally formed dentine of mammalian teeth can be applied to reconstruct temporal variation of incorporation of these elements into the tissue. Using an electron microprobe, this study analysed fluoride distribution in dentine of first and third mandibular molars of free-ranging eastern grey kangaroos inhabiting a high-fluoride area, to assess temporal variation in fluoride uptake of the animals. Fluoride content in the early-formed dentine of first molars was significantly lower than in the late-formed dentine of these teeth, and was also lower than in both, the early and the late-formed dentine of third molars. As early dentine formation in M1 takes place prior to weaning, this finding indicates a lower dentinal fluoride uptake during the pre-weaning compared to the post-weaning period. This is hypothetically attributed to the action of a partial barrier to fluoride transfer from blood to milk in lactating females and a low bioavailability of fluoride ingested together with milk. Another factor contributing to lower plasma fluoride levels in juveniles compared to adults is the rapid clearance of fluoride from blood plasma in the former due to their intense skeletal growth. The combined action of these mechanisms is considered to explain why in kangaroos from high-fluoride areas, the (early-formed) first molars are not affected by dental fluorosis while the (later-formed) third and fourth molars regularly exhibit marked to severe fluorotic lesions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Thorough assessment of DNA preservation from fossil bone and sediments excavated from a late Pleistocene-Holocene cave deposit on Kangaroo Island, South Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haouchar, Dalal; Haile, James; McDowell, Matthew C.; Murray, Dáithí C.; White, Nicole E.; Allcock, Richard J. N.; Phillips, Matthew J.; Prideaux, Gavin J.; Bunce, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Fossils and sediments preserved in caves are an excellent source of information for investigating impacts of past environmental changes on biodiversity. Until recently studies have relied on morphology-based palaeontological approaches, but recent advances in molecular analytical methods offer excellent potential for extracting a greater array of biological information from these sites. This study presents a thorough assessment of DNA preservation from late Pleistocene-Holocene vertebrate fossils and sediments from Kelly Hill Cave Kangaroo Island, South Australia. Using a combination of extraction techniques and sequencing technologies, ancient DNA was characterised from over 70 bones and 20 sediment samples from 15 stratigraphic layers ranging in age from >20 ka to ˜6.8 ka. A combination of primers targeting marsupial and placental mammals, reptiles and two universal plant primers were used to reveal genetic biodiversity for comparison with the mainland and with the morphological fossil record for Kelly Hill Cave. We demonstrate that Kelly Hill Cave has excellent long-term DNA preservation, back to at least 20 ka. This contrasts with the majority of Australian cave sites thus far explored for ancient DNA preservation, and highlights the great promise Kangaroo Island caves hold for yielding the hitherto-elusive DNA of extinct Australian Pleistocene species.

  1. Persistent heap Management library

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-17

    PERM is a C library for persistent heap management and is intended for use with a dynamic-memory allocator (e.g. malloc, free). The PERM memory allocator replaces the standard C dynamic memory allocation functions with compatible versions that provide persistent memory to application programs. Memory allocated with the PERM allocatory will persist between program invocations after a call to a checkpoint function. This function essentially saves the state of the heap and registered global variables to a file which may reside in flash memory or other node local storage. A few other functions are also provided by the library to manage checkpoint files. Global variables in an application can be marked persistent and be included in a checkpoint by using a compiler attribute defined as PERM. The PERM checkpoint methof is not dependent on the programming model ans works with distributed memory or shared memory programs.

  2. Unusually persistent complainants.

    PubMed

    Lester, Grant; Wilson, Beth; Griffin, Lynn; Mullen, Paul E

    2004-04-01

    Querulous paranoia may have disappeared from the psychiatric literature, but is it flourishing in modern complaints organisations and the courts? To investigate the unusually persistent complainants who lay waste to their own lives and place inordinate demands and stress on complaints organisations. Complaints officers completed questionnaires on both unusually persistent complainants and matched controls. Persistent complainants (distinguished by their pursuit of vindication and retribution) consumed time and resources and resorted to both direct and veiled threats. Attempts to distinguish these people from a control group on the basis of the manner in which their claims were initially managed failed. Persistent complainants' pursuit of vindication and retribution fits badly with complaints systems established to deliver reparation and compensation. These complainants damaged the financial and social fabric of their own lives and frightened those dealing with their claims. The study suggests methods of early detection and alternative management strategies.

  3. Glyphosate persistence in seawater.

    PubMed

    Mercurio, Philip; Flores, Florita; Mueller, Jochen F; Carter, Steve; Negri, Andrew P

    2014-08-30

    Glyphosate is one of the most widely applied herbicides globally but its persistence in seawater has not been reported. Here we quantify the biodegradation of glyphosate using standard "simulation" flask tests with native bacterial populations and coastal seawater from the Great Barrier Reef. The half-life for glyphosate at 25 °C in low-light was 47 days, extending to 267 days in the dark at 25 °C and 315 days in the dark at 31 °C, which is the longest persistence reported for this herbicide. AMPA, the microbial transformation product of glyphosate, was detected under all conditions, confirming that degradation was mediated by the native microbial community. This study demonstrates glyphosate is moderately persistent in the marine water under low light conditions and is highly persistent in the dark. Little degradation would be expected during flood plumes in the tropics, which could potentially deliver dissolved and sediment-bound glyphosate far from shore.

  4. Thermal implications of interactions between insulation, solar reflectance, and fur structure in the summer coats of diverse species of kangaroo.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Terence J; Maloney, Shane K

    2017-04-01

    Not all of the solar radiation that impinges on a mammalian coat is absorbed and converted into thermal energy at the coat surface. Some is reflected back to the environment, while another portion is reflected further into the coat where it is absorbed and manifested as heat at differing levels. Substantial insulation in a coat limits the thermal impact at the skin of solar radiation, irrespective where in the coat it is absorbed. In coats with low insulation, the zone where solar radiation is absorbed may govern the consequent heat load on the skin (HL-SR). Thin summer furs of four species of kangaroo from differing climatic zones were used to determine how variation in insulation and in coat spectral and structural characteristics influence the HL-SR. Coat depth, structure, and solar reflectance varied between body regions, as well as between species. The modulation of solar radiation and resultant heat flows in these coats were measured at low (1 m s(-1)) and high (6 m s(-1)) wind speeds by mounting them on a heat flux transducer/temperature-controlled plate apparatus in a wind tunnel. A lamp with a spectrum similar to solar radiation was used as a proxy for the sun. We established that coat insulation was largely determined by coat depth at natural fur lie, despite large variations in fibre density, fibre diameter, and fur mass. Higher wind speed decreased coat insulation, but depth still determined the overall level. A multiple regression analysis that included coat depth (insulation), fibre diameter, fibre density, and solar reflectance was used to determine the best predictors of HL-SR. Only depth and reflectance had significant impacts and both factors had negative weights, so, as either insulation or reflectance increased, HL-SR declined, the larger impact coming from coat reflectance. This reverses the pattern observed in deep coats where insulation dominates over effects of reflectance. Across all coats, as insulation declined, reflectance increased

  5. Geographic patterns of genetic differentiation within the restricted range of the endangered Stephens' kangaroo rat Dipodomys stephensi.

    PubMed

    Metcalf, A E; Nunney, L; Hyman, B C

    2001-06-01

    Using mtDNA variation in the kangaroo rat Dipodomys stephensi, we found no support for the hypothesis that a species with an historically restricted range will exhibit low levels of genetic polymorphism and little genetic structure. Dipodomys stephensi has long been restricted to a few interior coastal valleys in southern California encompassing an area of approximately 70 x 40 km; however, we found high levels of genetic variation over much of its range and significant genetic structure both within and between regions. We also found evidence for a recent range expansion. Dipodomys stephensi is a federally endangered species that is separated from D. panamintinus, its presumed sister taxon, by a mountain range to the north. We assessed genetic variation by sequencing 645 bases of the mitochondrial d-loop from 61 individuals sampled from 16 locations across the species range and rooted their relationship using two D. panamintinus individuals. Despite its limited geographic range, the level of mtDNA variation in D. stephensi is comparable to that of other rodents, including that of the more widely distributed D. panamintinus. This variation revealed significant regional differentiation. The northern, central, and southern regions of the range differ in both the level and the distribution of genetic variation. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the center of the range contains the most diversity of lineages, including the most basal. In this region and in the north, most haplotypes were found at only a single location (25/29), or at a pair of nearby locations (3/29). In addition, related haplotypes clustered geographically. These results are consistent with long-term demographic stability characterized by limited dispersal and high local effective population size. Further support for this conclusion is the finding of unique diversity in two northern peripheral populations, Norco and Potrero Creek (PC). However, in sharp contrast, one haplotype (CC) was found at five

  6. Perception and practice of Kangaroo Mother Care after discharge from hospital in Kumasi, Ghana: A longitudinal study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The practice of Kangaroo Mother Care (KMC) is life saving in babies weighing less than 2000 g. Little is known about mothers' continued unsupervised practice after discharge from hospitals. This study aimed to evaluate its in-hospital and continued practice in the community among mothers of low birth weight (LBW) infants discharged from two hospitals in Kumasi, Ghana. Methods A longitudinal study of 202 mothers and their inpatient LBW neonates was conducted from November 2009 to May 2010. Mothers were interviewed at recruitment to ascertain their knowledge of KMC, and then oriented on its practice. After discharge, the mothers reported at weekly intervals for four follow up visits where data about their perceptions, attitudes and practices of KMC were recorded. A repeated measure logistic regression analysis was done to assess variability in the binary responses at the various reviews visits. Results At recruitment 23 (11.4%, 95%CI: 7.4 to 16.6%) mothers knew about KMC. At discharge 95.5% were willing to continue KMC at home with 93.1% willing to practice at night. 95.5% thought KMC was beneficial to them and 96.0% beneficial to their babies. 98.0% would recommend KMC to other mothers with 71.8% willing to practice KMC outdoors. At first follow up visit 99.5% (181) were still practicing either intermittent or continuous KMC. This proportion did not change significantly over the four weeks (OR: 1.4, 95%CI: 0.6 to 3.3, p-value: 0.333). Over the four weeks, increasingly more mothers practiced KMC at night (OR: 1.7, 95%CI: 1.2 to 2.6, p = 0.005), outside their homes (OR: 2.4, 95%CI: 1.7 to 3.3, p < 0.001) and received spousal help (OR: 1.6, 95%CI: 1.1 to 2.4, p = 0.007). Household chores and potentially negative community perceptions of KMC did not affect its practice with odds of 0.8 (95%CI: 0.5 to 1.2, p = 0.282) and 1.0 (95%CI: 0.6 to 1.7, p = 0.934) respectively. During the follow-up period the neonates gained 23.7 sg (95%CI: 22.6 g to 24.7 g) per day

  7. Persistent luminescence nanothermometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín Rodríguez, Emma; López-Peña, Gabriel; Montes, Eduardo; Lifante, Ginés; García Solé, José; Jaque, Daniel; Diaz-Torres, Luis Armando; Salas, Pedro

    2017-08-01

    Persistent phosphorescence nanoparticles emitting in the red and near-infrared spectral regions are strongly demanded as contrast nanoprobes for autofluorescence free bioimaging and biosensing. In this work, we have developed Sr4Al14O25:Eu2+, Cr3+, Nd3+ nanopowders that produce persistent red phosphorescence peaking at 694 nm generated by Cr3+ ions. This emission displays temperature sensitivity in the physiological temperature range (20-60 °C), which makes these nanoparticles potentially useful as fluorescence (contactless) nanothermometers operating without requiring optical excitation. Nd3+ ions, which act as shallow electron traps for the red Cr3+ persistent emission, also display infrared emission bands, extending the fluorescence imaging capability to the second biological window. This unique combination of properties makes these nanoparticles multifunctional luminescent probes with great potential applications in nanomedicine.

  8. Visual persistence and cinema?

    PubMed

    Galifret, Yves

    2006-01-01

    In Faraday and Plateau's days, both apparent motion and the fusion of intermittent lights, two phenomena that are hardly connected, were explained by retinal persistence. The works of Exner and of the 'Gestalt' psychologists, as well as the modern works on 'sampled' motion and smooth motion, disregarded retinal persistence. One tried, originally, to measure this persistence using intermittent stimulation, but under the pressure of practical concern, what was established in 1902 was the logarithmic relation between fusion frequency and the intensity of the stimulation. One had to wait until the 1950s for the use of harmonic analysis to finally allow a renewal in which many problems that, for decades, had only given rise to discussions that led nowhere and to groundless assertions, were correctly stated and easily solved.

  9. Metabolic Perspectives on Persistence

    PubMed Central

    Hartman, Travis E.; Wang, Zhe; Jansen, Robert S.; Gardete, Susana; Rhee, Kyu Y.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Accumulating evidence has left little doubt about the importance of persistence or metabolism in the biology and chemotherapy of tuberculosis. However, knowledge of the intersection between these two factors has begun to emerge only recently. Here, we provide a focused review of metabolic characteristics associated with M. tuberculosis persistence. We focus on metabolism because it is the biochemical foundation of all physiologic processes and a distinguishing hallmark of M. tuberculosis’s physiology and pathogenicity. In addition, it serves as the chemical interface between host and pathogen. However, existing knowledge derives largely from physiologic contexts in which replication is the primary biochemical objective. The goal of this review is to reframe existing knowledge of M. tuberculosis metabolism in the context of persistence where quiescence is often a key distinguishing characteristic. Such a perspective may help guide ongoing efforts to develop more efficient cures and inform on novel strategies to break the cycle of transmission sustaining the pandemic. PMID:28155811

  10. Persistence and financial markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, S.

    2007-09-01

    The persistence phenomenon is studied in a financial context by using a novel mapping of the time evolution of the values of shares in a portfolio onto Ising spins. The method is applied to historical data from the London Financial Times Stock Exchange 100 index (FTSE 100) over an arbitrarily chosen period. By following the time dependence of the spins, we find evidence for a power law decay of the proportion of shares that remain either above or below their ‘starting’ values. As a result, we estimate a persistence exponent for the underlying financial market to be ≈0.5. Preliminary results from computer simulations on persistence in the economic dynamics of a toy model appear to reproduce the behaviour observed in real markets.

  11. Persistence in financial markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, S.; Buckley, P.

    2006-03-01

    Persistence is studied in a financial context by mapping the time evolution of the values of the shares quoted on the London Financial Times Stock Exchange 100 index (FTSE 100) onto Ising spins. By following the time dependence of the spins, we find evidence for power law decay of the proportion of shares that remain either above or below their 'starting' values. As a result, we estimate a persistence exponent for the underlying financial market to be θf˜0.5.

  12. Cytochrome P450 CYP3A in marsupials: cloning and identification of the first CYP3A subfamily member, isoform 3A70 from Eastern gray kangaroo (Macropus giganteus).

    PubMed

    El-Merhibi, Adaweyah; Ngo, Suong N T; Marchant, Ceilidh L; Height, Tamara A; Stupans, Ieva; McKinnon, Ross A

    2012-09-15

    Australian marsupials are unique fauna that have evolved and adapted to unique environments and thus it is likely that their detoxification systems differ considerably from those of well-studied eutherian mammals. Knowledge of these processes in marsupials is therefore vital to understanding the consequences of exposure to xenobiotics. Cytochromes P450 (CYPs) are critically important in the oxidative metabolism of a diverse array of both xenobiotics and endogenous substrates. In this study we have cloned and characterized CYP3A70, the first identified member of the CYP3A gene subfamily from Eastern gray kangaroo (Macropus giganteus). A 1665 base pair kangaroo hepatic CYP3A complete cDNA, designated CYP3A70, was cloned by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction approaches, which encodes a protein of 506 amino acids. The CYP3A70 cDNA shares approximately 71% nucleotide and 65% amino acid sequence homology to human CYP3A4 and displays high sequence similarity to other published mammalian CYP3As from human, monkey, cow, pig, dog, rat, rabbit, mouse, hamster, and guinea pig. Transfection of the CYP3A70 cDNAs into 293T cells resulted in stable cell lines expressing a CYP3A immuno-reactive protein that was recognized by a goat anti-human CYP3A4 polyclonal antibody. The anti-human CYP3A4 antibody also detected immunoreactive proteins in liver microsomes from all test marsupials, including the kangaroo, koala, wallaby, and wombat, with multiple CYP3A immunoreactive bands observed in kangaroo and wallaby tissues. Relatively, very low CYP catalytic activity was detected for the kangaroo CYP3A70 cDNA-expressed proteins (19.6 relative luminescent units/μg protein), which may be due to low protein expression levels. Collectively, this study provides primary molecular data regarding the Eastern kangaroo hepatic CYP3A70 gene and enables further functional analyses of CYP3A enzymes in marsupials. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Developmental and Post-Eruptive Defects in Molar Enamel of Free-Ranging Eastern Grey Kangaroos (Macropus giganteus) Exposed to High Environmental Levels of Fluoride

    PubMed Central

    Kierdorf, Uwe; Death, Clare; Hufschmid, Jasmin; Witzel, Carsten; Kierdorf, Horst

    2016-01-01

    Dental fluorosis has recently been diagnosed in wild marsupials inhabiting a high-fluoride area in Victoria, Australia. Information on the histopathology of fluorotic marsupial enamel has thus far not been available. This study analyzed the developmental and post-eruptive defects in fluorotic molar enamel of eastern grey kangaroos (Macropus giganteus) from the same high-fluoride area using light microscopy and backscattered electron imaging in the scanning electron microscope. The fluorotic enamel exhibited a brownish to blackish discolouration due to post-eruptive infiltration of stains from the oral cavity and was less resistant to wear than normally mineralized enamel of kangaroos from low-fluoride areas. Developmental defects of enamel included enamel hypoplasia and a pronounced hypomineralization of the outer (sub-surface) enamel underneath a thin rim of well-mineralized surface enamel. While the hypoplastic defects denote a disturbance of ameloblast function during the secretory stage of amelogenesis, the hypomineralization is attributed to an impairment of enamel maturation. In addition to hypoplastic defects, the fluorotic molars also exhibited numerous post-eruptive enamel defects due to the flaking-off of portions of the outer, hypomineralized enamel layer during mastication. The macroscopic and histopathological lesions in fluorotic enamel of M. giganteus match those previously described for placental mammals. It is therefore concluded that there exist no principal differences in the pathogenic mechanisms of dental fluorosis between marsupial and placental mammals. The regular occurrence of hypomineralized, opaque outer enamel in the teeth of M. giganteus and other macropodids must be considered in the differential diagnosis of dental fluorosis in these species. PMID:26895178

  14. Developmental and Post-Eruptive Defects in Molar Enamel of Free-Ranging Eastern Grey Kangaroos (Macropus giganteus) Exposed to High Environmental Levels of Fluoride.

    PubMed

    Kierdorf, Uwe; Death, Clare; Hufschmid, Jasmin; Witzel, Carsten; Kierdorf, Horst

    2016-01-01

    Dental fluorosis has recently been diagnosed in wild marsupials inhabiting a high-fluoride area in Victoria, Australia. Information on the histopathology of fluorotic marsupial enamel has thus far not been available. This study analyzed the developmental and post-eruptive defects in fluorotic molar enamel of eastern grey kangaroos (Macropus giganteus) from the same high-fluoride area using light microscopy and backscattered electron imaging in the scanning electron microscope. The fluorotic enamel exhibited a brownish to blackish discolouration due to post-eruptive infiltration of stains from the oral cavity and was less resistant to wear than normally mineralized enamel of kangaroos from low-fluoride areas. Developmental defects of enamel included enamel hypoplasia and a pronounced hypomineralization of the outer (sub-surface) enamel underneath a thin rim of well-mineralized surface enamel. While the hypoplastic defects denote a disturbance of ameloblast function during the secretory stage of amelogenesis, the hypomineralization is attributed to an impairment of enamel maturation. In addition to hypoplastic defects, the fluorotic molars also exhibited numerous post-eruptive enamel defects due to the flaking-off of portions of the outer, hypomineralized enamel layer during mastication. The macroscopic and histopathological lesions in fluorotic enamel of M. giganteus match those previously described for placental mammals. It is therefore concluded that there exist no principal differences in the pathogenic mechanisms of dental fluorosis between marsupial and placental mammals. The regular occurrence of hypomineralized, opaque outer enamel in the teeth of M. giganteus and other macropodids must be considered in the differential diagnosis of dental fluorosis in these species.

  15. Investigation of the mechanical behavior of kangaroo humeral head cartilage tissue by a porohyperelastic model based on the strain-rate-dependent permeability.

    PubMed

    Thibbotuwawa, Namal; Oloyede, Adekunle; Senadeera, Wijitha; Li, Tong; Gu, YuanTong

    2015-11-01

    Solid-interstitial fluid interaction, which depends on tissue permeability, is significant to the strain-rate-dependent mechanical behavior of humeral head (shoulder) cartilage. Due to anatomical and biomechanical similarities to that of the human shoulder, kangaroos present a suitable animal model. Therefore, indentation experiments were conducted on kangaroo shoulder cartilage tissues from low (10(-4)/s) to moderately high (10(-2)/s) strain-rates. A porohyperelastic model was developed based on the experimental characterization; and a permeability function that takes into account the effect of strain-rate on permeability (strain-rate-dependent permeability) was introduced into the model to investigate the effect of rate-dependent fluid flow on tissue response. The prediction of the model with the strain-rate-dependent permeability was compared with those of the models using constant permeability and strain-dependent permeability. Compared to the model with constant permeability, the models with strain-dependent and strain-rate-dependent permeability were able to better capture the experimental variation at all strain-rates (p < 0.05). Significant differences were not identified between models with strain-dependent and strain-rate-dependent permeability at strain-rate of 5 × 10(-3)/s (p = 0.179). However, at strain-rate of 10(-2)/s, the model with strain-rate-dependent permeability was significantly better at capturing the experimental results (p < 0.005). The findings thus revealed the significance of rate-dependent fluid flow on tissue behavior at large strain-rates, which provides insights into the mechanical deformation mechanisms of cartilage tissues. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Polycyclic hydrocarbon biomarkers confirm selective incorporation of petroleum in soil and kangaroo rat liver samples near an oil well blowout site in the western San Joaquin Valley, California

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, I.; Lu, S.T.; Lee, R.P.; Warrick, G.

    1996-05-01

    Following an accidental oil well blow out at an oil field in the western part of the San Joaquin Valley, soil samples and specimens of Heermann`s kangaroo rats (Dipodomys heermanni) were collected from two oil-impacted areas and one control area. Fingerprinting by GC-MS and quantitative evaluation of metabolized petroleum hydrocarbons was performed on oil, soil extracts, and rat livers. A liver from a domestically raised rabbit was used as an experimental control. The results show that there is no significant incorporation of PAHs or low molecular weight n-alkanes (C{sub 13}--C{sub 25}) into the liver tissues. The C{sub 25}--C{sub 35} n-alkane range for all soil samples, kangaroo rat livers, and rabbit liver, is dominated by a high abundance of C{sub 27}, C{sub 29}, C{sub 31}, and C{sub 33} hydrocarbons typical of epicuticular plant waxes. In all liver tissue samples, squalene, the cholesterol precursor, is the dominant hydrocarbon. Although evidence is lacking for metabolism of PAHs and paraffinic petroleum hydrocarbons, very strong evidence is available for incorporation of a set of polycyclic hydrocarbons (biomarkers) belonging to the terpane, sterane, and monoaromatic and triaromatic sterane families, identified by ion monitoring at 191, 217, 253, and 231 m/z, respectively. Because these hydrocarbons are not known to exist in the biosphere, but are only synthesized during oil- and coal-forming processes, their presence in the liver samples constitutes proof for crude oil incorporation into tissues. This conclusion is further substantiated by the selective incorporation of only the 20S enantiomer of C{sub 28} and C{sub 29} steranes and aromatic steranes into the livers, with the exclusion of the 20R enantiomer. The results from the study conclusively demonstrate that polycyclic hydrocarbon biomarkers provide excellent indices for proof of petroleum exposure and metabolism in some terrestrial herbivores.

  17. Passage marker excretion in red kangaroo (Macropus rufus), collared peccary (Pecari tajacu) and colobine monkeys (Colobus angolensis, C. polykomos, Trachypithecus johnii).

    PubMed

    Schwarm, Angela; Ortmann, Sylvia; Wolf, Christian; Streich, W Jürgen; Clauss, Marcus

    2009-11-01

    Ruminants are characterized by an efficient particle-sorting mechanism in the forestomach (FRST) followed by selective rechewing of large food particles. For the nonruminating foregut fermenter pygmy hippo it was demonstrated that large particles are excreted as fast as, or faster than, the small particles. The same has been suggested for other nonruminating foregut fermenters. We determined the mean retention time of fluids and different-sized particles in six red kangaroos (Macropus rufus), seven collared peccaries (Pecari tajacu) and three colobine monkeys (Colobus angolensis, C. polykomos, Trachypithecus johnii). We fed Co-EDTA as fluid and mordanted fiber as particle markers (Cr, Ce). Mean (+ or - SD) total tract retention time for fluids, small and large particles was 14 + or - 2, 29 + or - 10 and 30 + or - 9 hr in red kangaroos, 26 + or - 2, 34 + or - 5 and 32 + or - 3 hr in collared peccaries and 57 + or - 17, 55 + or - 19 and 54 + or - 19 hr in colobine monkeys, respectively. Large and small particles were excreted simultaneously in all species. There was no difference in the excretion of fluids and particles in the colobine monkeys, in contrast to the other foregut fermenters. In the nonprimate, nonruminant foregut fermenters, the difference in the excretion of fluids and small particles decreases with increasing food intake. On the contrary, ruminants keep this differential excretion constant at different intake levels. This may be a prerequisite for the sorting of particles in their FRST and enable them to achieve higher food intake rates. The functional significance of differential excretion of fluids and particles from the FRST requires further investigations.

  18. Retention and Persistence Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanford, Timothy R.

    Two studies are combined with an introductory section: one is "Persistence to Graduation for Freshmen Entering the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 1967-75," by Timothy Sanford, and the second is "Freshman, Transfer, Professional, Masters, and Doctoral Student Retention at the University of North Carolina at Chapel…

  19. A Very Persistent Mistake

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClelland, J. A. G.

    2011-01-01

    Articulated bodies with an internal energy source require to be coupled to an external mass in order to accelerate themselves but the typical text book assertion that the net force is provided by the external mass is not correct. Arguments are presented demonstrating that the assertion is incorrect and reasons are suggested for the persistence of…

  20. A Very Persistent Mistake

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClelland, J. A. G.

    2011-01-01

    Articulated bodies with an internal energy source require to be coupled to an external mass in order to accelerate themselves but the typical text book assertion that the net force is provided by the external mass is not correct. Arguments are presented demonstrating that the assertion is incorrect and reasons are suggested for the persistence of…

  1. The Persistence of PCBs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyle, Robert H.; Highland, Joseph H.

    1979-01-01

    PCB's are one of the most persistent chemicals ever introduced into the environment by man. From very early in their history of manufacture PCB's were suspected of being hazardous to health, but public awareness of the hazard was slow in coming. (RE)

  2. Persistence to Graduate Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ethington, Corinna A.; Smart, John C.

    1986-01-01

    A study is reported of the relationship of family education and income, high school grades, academic and social self-confidence, undergraduate institutional selectivity and size, academic and social integration, overall college satisfaction, bachelor's degree attainment, and financial aid on students' persistence to graduate school. (MSE)

  3. Persistent cultural systems.

    PubMed

    Spicer, E H

    1971-11-19

    I have indicated here some features of a kind of entity which I have called a cultural identity system, and I have focused on a variety of this general type-the persistent system. In general terms it is best described as a system of beliefs and sentiments concerning historical events. I suggest using the term "a people" for the human beings who, at any given time, hold beliefs of this kind. These are phenomena with which we have been long familiar, but they have not been systematically studied by any but a few investigators. I have emphasized that a persistent system is a cumulative cultural phenomenon, an open-ended system that defines a course of action for the people believing in it. Such peoples are able to maintain continuity in their experience and their conception of themselves in a wide variety of sociocultural environments. I hold that certain kinds of identifiable conditions give rise to this type of cultural system. These may best be summarized as an oppositional process involving the interactions of individuals in the environment of a state or a similar large-scale organization. The oppositional process frequently produces intense collective consciousness and a high degree of internal solidarity. This is accompanied by a motivation for individuals to continue the kind of experience that is "stored" in the identity system in symbolic form. The persistent identity system is more stable as a cultural structure than are large-scale political organizations. When large-scale states disintegrate, they often appear to decompose into cultural systems of the persistent type. Large-scale organizations also give rise to the kind of environment that can result in the formation of new persistent systems. It is possible that, while being formed, states depend for their impetus on the accumulated energy of persistent peoples. A proposition for consideration is that states tend to dissipate the energy of peoples after transforming that energy into state

  4. The effect of kangaroo ward care in comparison with "intermediate intensive care" on the growth velocity in preterm infant with birth weight <1100 g: randomized control trial.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Deepak; Murki, Srinivas; Pratap, Oleti Tejo

    2016-10-01

    Kangaroo mother care (KMC) reduces neonatal mortality, neonatal sepsis and improves growth outcome in preterm infants. In this study, we compared the efficacy of "baby care in kangaroo ward (KWC)" with "baby care in intermediate intensive care (IIC)" in stable preterm infants (birth weight <1100 g) for improving the growth velocity till term corrected age. One hundred and forty-one infants were randomized to KWC (n = 71) or IIC (n = 70) once the infant reached a weight of 1150 g. Infants in the KWC group were shifted to the KWC immediately after randomization and those in the IIC group were given care in the IIC till they attained a weight of 1250 g and then shifted to the KWC. The average weight gains as well as weight, length, and head circumference at term corrected age were comparable in both the groups. There was significant reduction in IIC stay post randomization and increase in weight gain before discharge in the KWC group. There was a significant increase in incidence of apnea in the IIC group. Early KWC is equally efficacious as IIC in improving the growth outcomes of stable preterm (birth weight <1100 g) infants at term gestational age. Clinical trial registry of India CTRI/2014/05/004625 WHAT IS KNOWN: • Kangaroo mother care (KMC) reduces neonatal mortality, neonatal sepsis and improves growth outcome in VLBW infants. What is new: • Baby care by mother can be given safely in kangaroo ward from a weight of 1150 g in stable preterm infants without any adverse effects.

  5. Optimization and Persistence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-09-01

    and production costs are amplified by first-time applica- tion of high technology , security, and lim- ited production quantities. Alternate can...stred spendmg levels, average fleet age, average " technological advantage" of the fleet, and so forth. (The persistent features we discuss have all...a precise concept when dealing with nonmonetary units, such as technological advantage, but all elastic penalties are usually adjusted by the same

  6. Persistent interface fluid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Richard S; Fine, I Howard; Packer, Mark

    2008-08-01

    We present an unusual case of persistent interface fluid that would not resolve despite normal intraocular pressure and corneal endothelial replacement with Descemet-stripping endothelial keratoplasty. Dissection, elevation, and repositioning of the laser in situ keratomileusis flap were required to resolve the interface fluid. Circumferential corneal graft-host margin scar formation acting as a mechanical strut may have been the cause of the intractable interface fluid.

  7. Persistent Security, Then Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-01

    already been purchased, quite literally, with blood, sweat , and tears. Persistent security is the sufficient condition for stability operations and, in...outposts. 72 July-August 2010  MILITARY REVIEW to the coalition or drinking three cups of tea with a fence-sitting tribal leader turned his tribe to...largest bases demonstrate that there are still ideologically driven men who are willing to fight to the death. Building retaining walls and drinking cups

  8. Persistent benign pleural effusion.

    PubMed

    Porcel, J M

    In this narrative review we describe the main aetiologies, clinical characteristics and treatment for patients with benign pleural effusion that characteristically persists over time: chylothorax and cholesterol effusions, nonexpansible lung, rheumatoid pleural effusion, tuberculous empyema, benign asbestos pleural effusion and yellow nail syndrome. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  9. Persistent occiput posterior.

    PubMed

    Barth, William H

    2015-03-01

    Persistent occiput posterior (OP) is associated with increased rates of maternal and newborn morbidity. Its diagnosis by physical examination is challenging but is improved with bedside ultrasonography. Occiput posterior discovered in the active phase or early second stage of labor usually resolves spontaneously. When it does not, prophylactic manual rotation may decrease persistent OP and its associated complications. When delivery is indicated for arrest of descent in the setting of persistent OP, a pragmatic approach is suggested. Suspected fetal macrosomia, a biparietal diameter above the pelvic inlet or a maternal pelvis with android features should prompt cesarean delivery. Nonrotational operative vaginal delivery is appropriate when the maternal pelvis has a narrow anterior segment but ample room posteriorly, like with anthropoid features. When all other conditions are met and the fetal head arrests in an OP position in a patient with gynecoid pelvic features and ample room anteriorly, options include cesarean delivery, nonrotational operative vaginal delivery, and rotational procedures, either manual or with the use of rotational forceps. Recent literature suggests that maternal and fetal outcomes with rotational forceps are better than those reported in older series. Although not without significant challenges, a role remains for teaching and practicing selected rotational forceps operations in contemporary obstetrics.

  10. Learning's "Weak" Link to Persistence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolniak, Gregory C.; Mayhew, Matthew J.; Engberg, Mark E.

    2012-01-01

    This study advances the understanding of college persistence by examining five dimensions of student learning in relation to second-year persistence. Two of the five dimensions of learning were found to be significant predictors of persistence, and each was moderated by social integration. (Contains 5 tables and 1 figure.)

  11. To compare cost effectiveness of 'Kangaroo Ward Care' with 'Intermediate intensive care' in stable very low birth weight infants (birth weight < 1100 grams): a randomized control trial.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Deepak; Murki, Srinivas; Oleti, Tejo Pratap

    2016-07-13

    To compare cost effectiveness of 'Kangaroo Ward Care' with 'Intermediate Intensive Care' in stable very low birth weight infants (birth weight < 1100 g). This is the secondary analysis of the study in which we have analysed the cost effectiveness of 'Kangaroo ward care' (KWC) with 'Intermediate Intensive Care' (IIC). In this randomized control trial 141 infants (less than 1100 g and ≤ 32 weeks at birth) were enrolled, 71 were randomized to KWC group and 70 to IIC group, once the infant reached a weight of 1150 g. Infants randomized to KWC group were shifted to the Kangaroo ward immediately after randomization. Infants randomized to IIC group were shifted to the Kangaroo ward once the infant reached 1250 g. Cost incurred by the patient in both the groups from the time of randomization to hospital discharge was calculated. The hospital costs were determined by "top-down" accounting methods and out of pocket expenditure of parents from standard "bottom-up" cost-accounting methods. There was significant reduction in neonatal charges in KWC group post-randomization {41591.9 ± 21712.8 INR vs 75388.8 ± 25532.2 INR; p < 0.001}). The separate "top-down" and "bottom-up" cost analysis showed that there was significant reduction of hospital and parents expenditure in KWC group when compared to IIC group (p < 0.001). There was significant saving of around 33800 INR (USD) in the KWC group for each patient. Initiating early shifting to Kangaroo ward is cost effective intervention and have huge monetary implication in resource poor countries. (CTRI/2014/05/004625, retrospectively registered, Registered on: 26/05/2014). Clinical trial registry of India CTRI/2014/05/004625 ( http://ctri.nic.in/Clinicaltrials/showallp.php?mid1=7640&EncHid=&userName=CTRI/2014/05/004625 ) Registered on: 26/05/2014. Date of enrolment of the first participant to the trial: 13/11/2013.

  12. Persistence of airline accidents.

    PubMed

    Barros, Carlos Pestana; Faria, Joao Ricardo; Gil-Alana, Luis Alberiko

    2010-10-01

    This paper expands on air travel accident research by examining the relationship between air travel accidents and airline traffic or volume in the period from 1927-2006. The theoretical model is based on a representative airline company that aims to maximise its profits, and it utilises a fractional integration approach in order to determine whether there is a persistent pattern over time with respect to air accidents and air traffic. Furthermore, the paper analyses how airline accidents are related to traffic using a fractional cointegration approach. It finds that airline accidents are persistent and that a (non-stationary) fractional cointegration relationship exists between total airline accidents and airline passengers, airline miles and airline revenues, with shocks that affect the long-run equilibrium disappearing in the very long term. Moreover, this relation is negative, which might be due to the fact that air travel is becoming safer and there is greater competition in the airline industry. Policy implications are derived for countering accident events, based on competition and regulation. © 2010 The Author(s). Journal compilation © Overseas Development Institute, 2010.

  13. Diabetes medication persistence, different medications have different persistence rates.

    PubMed

    Shani, Michal; Lustman, Alex; Vinker, Shlomo

    2017-08-01

    To assess the persistence of diabetic patients to oral medications. The study included all type 2 diabetic patients over 40 years, members of one District of Clalit Health Services Israel, who were diagnosed with diabetes mellitus before 2008 and who filled at least one prescription per year during 2008-2010, for the following medications: metformin, glibenclamide, acarbose, statins, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI) and angiotensin II receptor antagonists (ARBs). Purchase of at least 9 monthly prescriptions during 2009 was considered "good medication persistence". We compared HbA1c and LDL levels, according to medication persistence, for each medication; and cross persistence rates between medications. 21,357 patients were included. Average age was 67.0±11.0years, 48.9% were men, and 35.8% were from low SES. Good medication persistence rates for ARBs were 78.8%, ACEI 69.0%, statins 66.6%, acarbose 67.8%, metformin 58.6%, and glibenclamide 55.3%. Good persistence to any of the medications tested was associated with a higher rate of good persistence to other medications. Patients who took more medications had better persistence rates. Different oral medications used by diabetic patients have different persistence rates. Good persistence for any one medication is an indicator of good persistence to other medications. Investment in enhancing medication persistence in persons with diabetes may improve persistence to other medications, as well as improve glycemic control. Copyright © 2017 Primary Care Diabetes Europe. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Bacterial persistence by RNA endonucleases

    PubMed Central

    Maisonneuve, Etienne; Shakespeare, Lana J.; Jørgensen, Mikkel Girke; Gerdes, Kenn

    2011-01-01

    Bacteria form persisters, individual cells that are highly tolerant to different types of antibiotics. Persister cells are genetically identical to nontolerant kin but have entered a dormant state in which they are recalcitrant to the killing activity of the antibiotics. The molecular mechanisms underlying bacterial persistence are unknown. Here, we show that the ubiquitous Lon (Long Form Filament) protease and mRNA endonucleases (mRNases) encoded by toxin-antitoxin (TA) loci are required for persistence in Escherichia coli. Successive deletion of the 10 mRNase-encoding TA loci of E. coli progressively reduced the level of persisters, showing that persistence is a phenotype common to TA loci. In all cases tested, the antitoxins, which control the activities of the mRNases, are Lon substrates. Consistently, cells lacking lon generated a highly reduced level of persisters. Moreover, Lon overproduction dramatically increased the levels of persisters in wild-type cells but not in cells lacking the 10 mRNases. These results support a simple model according to which mRNases encoded by TA loci are activated in a small fraction of growing cells by Lon-mediated degradation of the antitoxins. Activation of the mRNases, in turn, inhibits global cellular translation, and thereby induces dormancy and persistence. Many pathogenic bacteria known to enter dormant states have a plethora of TA genes. Therefore, in the future, the discoveries described here may lead to a mechanistic understanding of the persistence phenomenon in pathogenic bacteria. PMID:21788497

  15. Caliber-Persistent Artery

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Sabrina Araújo Pinho; Ruiz, Marcelo Martinson; Kaba, Shajadi Pardo; Florezi, Giovanna Piacenza; Lemos Júnior, Celso Augusto; Witzel, Andréa Lusvarghi

    2015-01-01

    Caliber-persistent artery (CPLA) of the lip is a common vascular anomaly in which a main arterial branch extends to the surface of the mucous tissue with no reduction in its diameter. It usually manifests as pulsatile papule, is easily misdiagnosed, and is observed more frequently among older people, suggesting that its development may involve a degenerative process associated with aging; CPLA is also characterized by the loss of tone of the adjacent supporting connective tissue. Although the diagnosis is clinical, high-resolution Doppler ultrasound is a useful noninvasive tool for evaluating the lesion. This report describes the case of a 58-year-old male patient who complained of a lesion of the lower lip with bleeding and recurrent ulceration. The patient was successfully treated in our hospital after a diagnosis of CPLA and is currently undergoing a clinical outpatient follow-up with no complaints. PMID:26448884

  16. New daily persistent headache.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Alok

    2012-08-01

    New daily persistent headache (NDPH) is a chronic headache developing in a person who does not have a past history of headaches. The headache begins acutely and reaches its peak within 3 days. It is important to exclude secondary causes, particularly headaches due to alterations in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure and volume. A significant proportion of NDPH sufferers may have intractable headaches that are refractory to treatment. The condition is best viewed as a syndrome rather than a diagnosis. The headache can mimic chronic migraine and chronic tension-type headache, and it is also important to exclude secondary causes, particularly headaches due to alterations in CSF pressure and volume. A large proportion of NDPH sufferers have migrainous features to their headache and should be managed with treatments used for treating migraine. A small group of NDPH sufferers may have intractable headaches that are refractory to treatment.

  17. Persistent Genital Arousal Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Aswath, Manju; Pandit, Lakshmi V.; Kashyap, Karthik; Ramnath, Raguram

    2016-01-01

    Persistent genital arousal disorder (PGAD) is a phenomenon, in which afflicted women experience spontaneous genital arousal, unresolved by orgasms and triggered by sexual or nonsexual stimuli, eliciting stress. The current case is a 40-year-old female who experienced such orgasms for about a month. Physical examination, investigations, and psychological testing were noncontributory. Carbamazepine (600 mg) was discontinued due to a lack of response. She improved significantly with supportive therapy. Various neuropsychological conditions, pelvic pathology, medications, etc., have been associated with this disorder. Pharmacologic strategies have included the use of antidepressants, antipsychotics, mood stabilizers, and analgesics. Validation, psycho-education, identifying triggers, distraction techniques, and pelvic massage have been tried. Living with PGAD is very demanding. There is a lack of understanding of the problem, shame, and hesitation to seek help. The syndrome has been recently described, and understanding is still evolving. PMID:27570347

  18. Persistent Genital Arousal Disorder.

    PubMed

    Aswath, Manju; Pandit, Lakshmi V; Kashyap, Karthik; Ramnath, Raguram

    2016-01-01

    Persistent genital arousal disorder (PGAD) is a phenomenon, in which afflicted women experience spontaneous genital arousal, unresolved by orgasms and triggered by sexual or nonsexual stimuli, eliciting stress. The current case is a 40-year-old female who experienced such orgasms for about a month. Physical examination, investigations, and psychological testing were noncontributory. Carbamazepine (600 mg) was discontinued due to a lack of response. She improved significantly with supportive therapy. Various neuropsychological conditions, pelvic pathology, medications, etc., have been associated with this disorder. Pharmacologic strategies have included the use of antidepressants, antipsychotics, mood stabilizers, and analgesics. Validation, psycho-education, identifying triggers, distraction techniques, and pelvic massage have been tried. Living with PGAD is very demanding. There is a lack of understanding of the problem, shame, and hesitation to seek help. The syndrome has been recently described, and understanding is still evolving.

  19. Persistent Temporal Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilley, David; Ramachandran, Umakishore

    Distributed continuous live stream analysis applications are increasingly common. Video-based surveillance, emergency response, disaster recovery, and critical infrastructure protection are all examples of such applications. They are characterized by a variety of high- and low-bandwidth streams as well as a need for analyzing both live and archived streams. We present a system called Persistent Temporal Streams (PTS) that supports a higher-level, domain-targeted programming abstraction for such applications. PTS provides a simple but expressive stream abstraction encompassing transport, manipulation and storage of streaming data. In this paper, we present a system architecture for implementing PTS. We provide an experimental evaluation which shows the system-level primitives can be implemented in a lightweight and high-performance manner, and an application-based evaluation designed to show that a representative high-bandwidth stream analysis application can be implemented relatively simply and with good performance.

  20. Integration of genotoxicity and population genetic analyses in kangaroo rats (Dipodomys merriami) exposed to radionuclide contamination at the Nevada Test Site, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Theodorakis, Christopher W.; Bickham, John W.; Lamb, Trip; Medica, Philip A.; Lyne, T. Barrett

    2001-01-01

    We examined effects of radionuclide exposure at two atomic blast sites on kangaroo rats (Dipodomys merriami) at the Nevada Test Site, Nevada, USA, using genotoxicity and population genetic analyses. We assessed chromosome damage by micronucleus and flow cytometric assays and genetic variation by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analyses. The RAPD analysis showed no population structure, but mtDNA exhibited differentiation among and within populations. Genotoxicity effects were not observed when all individuals were analyzed. However, individuals with mtDNA haplotypes unique to the contaminated sites had greater chromosomal damage than contaminated-site individuals with haplotypes shared with reference sites. When interpopulation comparisons used individuals with unique haplotypes, one contaminated site had greater levels of chromosome damage than one or both of the reference sites. We hypothesize that shared-haplotype individuals are potential migrants and that unique-haplotype individuals are potential long-term residents. A parsimony approach was used to estimate the minimum number of migration events necessary to explain the haplotype distributions on a phylogenetic tree. The observed predominance of migration events into the contaminated sites supported our migration hypothesis. We conclude the atomic blast sites are ecological sinks and that immigration masks the genotoxic effects of radiation on the resident populations.

  1. Rattlesnakes are extremely fast and variable when striking at kangaroo rats in nature: Three-dimensional high-speed kinematics at night

    PubMed Central

    Higham, Timothy E.; Clark, Rulon W.; Collins, Clint E.; Whitford, Malachi D.; Freymiller, Grace A.

    2017-01-01

    Predation plays a central role in the lives of most organisms. Predators must find and subdue prey to survive and reproduce, whereas prey must avoid predators to do the same. The resultant antagonistic coevolution often leads to extreme adaptations in both parties. Few examples capture the imagination like a rapid strike from a venomous snake. However, almost nothing is known about strike performance of viperid snakes under natural conditions. We obtained high-speed (500 fps) three-dimensional video in the field (at night using infrared lights) of Mohave rattlesnakes (Crotalus scutulatus) attempting to capture Merriam’s kangaroo rats (Dipodomys merriami). Strikes occurred from a range of distances (4.6 to 20.6 cm), and rattlesnake performance was highly variable. Missed capture attempts resulted from both rapid escape maneuvers and poor strike accuracy. Maximum velocity and acceleration of some rattlesnake strikes fell within the range of reported laboratory values, but some far exceeded most observations. Thus, quantifying rapid predator-prey interactions in the wild will propel our understanding of animal performance. PMID:28084400

  2. Effect of kangaroo mother care on growth and development of low birthweight babies up to 12 months of age: a controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Bera, Alpanamayi; Ghosh, Jagabandhu; Singh, Arun K; Hazra, Avijit; Mukherjee, Suchandra; Mukherjee, Ranajit

    2014-06-01

    Kangaroo mother care (KMC) is a nonconventional low-cost method of newborn care. Our aim was to assess the effect of sustained KMC on the growth and development of low birthweight Indian babies up to the age of 12 months. We enrolled 500 mother and baby pairs, in groups of five, in a parallel group controlled clinical trial. The three infants with the lowest birthweight in each group received KMC, while the other two received conventional care. All babies were exclusively breastfed for 6 months. Babies in the intervention group were provided KMC until the infant was 40 weeks of corrected gestation or weighed 2500 g. Weight, length and head, chest and arm circumferences were evaluated at birth and at the corrected ages of 0, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months. Development was assessed using the Developmental Assessment Scales for Indian Infants (DASII) at 12 months. The KMC babies rapidly achieved physical growth parameters similar to the control babies at 40 weeks of corrected age. But after that, they surpassed them, despite being smaller at birth. DASII motor and mental development quotients were also significantly better for KMC babies. The infants in the KMC group showed better physical growth and development than the conventional control group. ©2014 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Comparative Effect of Massage Therapy versus Kangaroo Mother Care on Body Weight and Length of Hospital Stay in Low Birth Weight Preterm Infants.

    PubMed

    Rangey, Priya Singh; Sheth, Megha

    2014-01-01

    Background. Massage therapy (MT) and kangaroo mother care (KMC) are both effective in increasing the weight and reducing length of hospital stay in low birth weight preterm infants but they have not been compared. Aim. Comparison of effectiveness of MT and KMC on body weight and length of hospital stay in low birth weight preterm (LBWPT) infants. Method. 30 LBWPT infants using convenience sampling from Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, V.S. hospital, were randomly divided into 2 equal groups. Group 1 received MT and Group 2 received KMC for 15 minutes, thrice daily for 5 days. Medically stable babies with gestational age < 37 weeks and birth weight < 2500 g were included. Those on ventilators and with congenital, orthopedic, or genetic abnormality were excluded. Outcome measures, body weight and length of hospital stay, were taken before intervention day 1 and after intervention day 5. Level of significance was 5%. Result. Data was analyzed using SPSS16. Both MT and KMC were found to be effective in improving body weight (P = 0.001, P = 0.001). Both were found to be equally effective for improving body weight (P = 0.328) and reducing length of hospital stay (P = 0.868). Conclusion. MT and KMC were found to be equally effective in improving body weight and reducing length of hospital stay. Limitation. Long term follow-up was not taken.

  4. Effect of kangaroo mother care vs expressed breast milk administration on pain associated with removal of adhesive tape in very low birth weight neonates: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Nanavati, Ruchi N; Balan, Rajiv; Kabra, Nandkishor S

    2013-11-08

    To compare the pain relief effect of Kangaroo Mother Care (KMC) and Expressed Breast Milk (EBM) on the pain associated with adhesive tape removal in very low birth weight (VLBW) neonates. Randomized Controlled Trial. Neonatal intensive care unit of a tertiary care teaching hospital. 15 VLBW neonates who needed adhesive tape removal for the first part and 50 VLBW neonates needing adhesive tape removal for the second part. In first stage of the study, we studied whether adhesive tape removal in VLBW neonates was painful. In the second stage, eligible VLBW neonates were randomised to compare the efficacy of KMC and EBM in reducing the pain during the procedure of adhesive tape removal. Premature Infant Pain Profile (PIPP) Score, heart rate, oxygen saturation. There was significant increase in pain associated with the removal of adhesive tape (Mean pre-procedure PIPP score 3.47 ± 0.74; post-procedure mean PIPP score 12.13 ± 2.59; P<0.0001). The post intervention mean PIPP pain score was not significantly different between the KMC and EBM groups (P= 0.62). Removal of adhesive tape is a painful procedure for VLBW neonates. There was no difference between KMC and EBM in relieving pain associated with adhesive tape removal.

  5. Integration of genotoxicity and population genetic analyses in kangaroo rats (Dipodomys merriami) exposed to radionuclide contamination at the Nevada Test Site, USA.

    PubMed

    Theodorakis, C W; Bickham, J W; Lamb, T; Medica, P A; Lyne, T B

    2001-02-01

    We examined effects of radionuclide exposure at two atomic blast sites on kangaroo rats (Dipodomys merriami) at the Nevada Test Site, Nevada, USA, using genotoxicity and population genetic analyses. We assessed chromosome damage by micronucleus and flow cytometric assays and genetic variation by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analyses. The RAPD analysis showed no population structure, but mtDNA exhibited differentiation among and within populations. Genotoxicity effects were not observed when all individuals were analyzed. However, individuals with mtDNA haplotypes unique to the contaminated sites had greater chromosomal damage than contaminated-site individuals with haplotypes shared with reference sites. When interpopulation comparisons used individuals with unique haplotypes, one contaminated site had greater levels of chromosome damage than one or both of the reference sites. We hypothesize that shared-haplotype individuals are potential migrants and that unique-haplotye individuals are potential long-term residents. A parsimony approach was used to estimate the minimum number of migration events necessary to explain the haplotype distributions on a phylogenetic tree. The observed predominance of migration events into the contaminated sites supported our migration hypothesis. We conclude the atomic blast sites are ecological sinks and that immigration masks the genotoxic effects of radiation on the resident populations.

  6. Rattlesnakes are extremely fast and variable when striking at kangaroo rats in nature: Three-dimensional high-speed kinematics at night.

    PubMed

    Higham, Timothy E; Clark, Rulon W; Collins, Clint E; Whitford, Malachi D; Freymiller, Grace A

    2017-01-13

    Predation plays a central role in the lives of most organisms. Predators must find and subdue prey to survive and reproduce, whereas prey must avoid predators to do the same. The resultant antagonistic coevolution often leads to extreme adaptations in both parties. Few examples capture the imagination like a rapid strike from a venomous snake. However, almost nothing is known about strike performance of viperid snakes under natural conditions. We obtained high-speed (500 fps) three-dimensional video in the field (at night using infrared lights) of Mohave rattlesnakes (Crotalus scutulatus) attempting to capture Merriam's kangaroo rats (Dipodomys merriami). Strikes occurred from a range of distances (4.6 to 20.6 cm), and rattlesnake performance was highly variable. Missed capture attempts resulted from both rapid escape maneuvers and poor strike accuracy. Maximum velocity and acceleration of some rattlesnake strikes fell within the range of reported laboratory values, but some far exceeded most observations. Thus, quantifying rapid predator-prey interactions in the wild will propel our understanding of animal performance.

  7. Genetic diversity in captive and wild Matschie's tree kangaroo (Dendrolagus matschiei) from Huon Peninsula, Papua New Guinea, based on mtDNA control region sequences.

    PubMed

    McGreevy, Thomas J; Dabek, Lisa; Gomez-Chiarri, Marta; Husband, Thomas P

    2009-05-01

    The Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA) Matschie's tree kangaroo (Dendrolagus matschiei) population is at a critical point for assessing long-term viability. This population, established from 19 genetically uncharacterized D. matschiei, has endured a founder effect because only four individuals contributed the majority of offspring. The highly variable mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region was sequenced for five of the female-founders by examining extant representatives of their maternal lineage and compared with wild (n = 13) and captive (n = 18) D. matschiei from Papua New Guinea (PNG). AZA female-founder D. matschiei control region haplotype diversity was low, compared with captive D. matschiei held in PNG. AZA D. matschiei have only two control region haplotypes because four out of five AZA female-founder D. matschiei had an identical sequence. Both AZA haplotypes were identified among the 17 wild and captive D. matschiei haplotypes from PNG. Genomic DNA extracted from wild D. matschiei fecal samples was a reliable source of mtDNA that could be used for a larger scale study. We recommend a nuclear DNA genetic analysis to more fully characterize AZA D. matschiei genetic diversity and to assist their Species Survival Plan((R)). An improved understanding of D. matschiei genetics will contribute substantially to the conservation of these unique animals both in captivity and the wild.

  8. Epigenetic regulation of persistent pain

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Guang; Ren, Ke; Dubner, Ronald

    2014-01-01

    Persistent or chronic pain is tightly associated with various environmental changes and linked to abnormal gene expression within cells processing nociceptive signaling. Epigenetic regulation governs gene expression in response to environmental cues. Recent animal model and clinical studies indicate that epigenetic regulation plays an important role in the development/maintenance of persistent pain and, possibly the transition of acute pain to chronic pain, thus shedding light in a direction for development of new therapeutics for persistent pain. PMID:24948399

  9. Learning To Persist-Persisting To Learn. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Bessie C.

    This guide to improving student persistence is the first part of a four-part series addressing the essential characteristics of effective instruction that have a positive impact on the academic achievement of Black and Hispanic students. Persistence is learned behavior, and lower-class students are more likely than middle-class students to observe…

  10. Management of persistent vaginitis.

    PubMed

    Nyirjesy, Paul

    2014-12-01

    With vaginitis remaining a common condition that leads women to seek care, it is not surprising that some women develop chronic vulvovaginal problems that are difficult to diagnose and treat. With a differential diagnosis that encompasses vulvar disorders and infectious and noninfectious causes of vaginitis, accurate diagnosis is the cornerstone of choosing effective therapy. Evaluation should include a symptom-specific history, careful vulvar and vaginal examination, and office-based tests (vaginal pH, amine test, saline and 10% potassium hydroxide microscopy). Ancillary tests, especially yeast culture with speciation, are frequently crucial to obtaining a correct diagnosis. A heavy but normal physiologic discharge can be determined by excluding other causes. With vulvovaginal candidiasis, differentiating between Candida albicans and non-albicans Candida infection has important treatment ramifications. Most patients with C albicans infections can be successfully treated with maintenance antifungal therapy, usually with fluconazole. Although many non-albicans Candida, particularly Candida glabrata, may at times be innocent bystanders, vaginal boric acid therapy is an effective first choice for many true non-albicans Candida infections. Recurrent bacterial vaginosis, a difficult therapeutic challenge, can often be controlled with maintenance therapy. Multiple options, especially high-dose tinidazole, have been used for metronidazole-resistant trichomoniasis. With the aging of the U.S. population, atrophic vaginitis and desquamative inflammatory vaginitis, both associated with hypoestrogenism, are encountered frequently in women with persistent vaginitis.

  11. Isolated persistent hypermethioninemia.

    PubMed Central

    Mudd, S H; Levy, H L; Tangerman, A; Boujet, C; Buist, N; Davidson-Mundt, A; Hudgins, L; Oyanagi, K; Nagao, M; Wilson, W G

    1995-01-01

    New information has been obtained on 30 patients with isolated persistent hypermethioninemia, most of them previously unreported. Biopsies to confirm the presumptive diagnosis of partially deficient activity of ATP: L-methionine S-adenosyltransferase (MAT; E.C.2.5.1.6) in liver were not performed on most of these patients. However, none showed the clinical findings or the extreme elevations of serum folate previously described in other patients with isolated hypermethioninemia considered not to have hepatic MAT deficiency. Patients ascertained on biochemical grounds had no neurological abnormalities, and 27/30 had IQs or Bayley development-index scores within normal limits or were judged to have normal mental development. Methionine transamination metabolites accumulated abnormally only when plasma methionine concentrations exceeded 300-350 microM and did so more markedly after 0.9 years of age. Data were obtained on urinary organic acids as well as plasma creatinine concentrations. Patterns of inheritance of isolated hypermethioninemia were variable. Considerations as to the optimal management of this group of patients are discussed. PMID:7573050

  12. Multidimensional persistence in biomolecular data.

    PubMed

    Xia, Kelin; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2015-07-30

    Persistent homology has emerged as a popular technique for the topological simplification of big data, including biomolecular data. Multidimensional persistence bears considerable promise to bridge the gap between geometry and topology. However, its practical and robust construction has been a challenge. We introduce two families of multidimensional persistence, namely pseudomultidimensional persistence and multiscale multidimensional persistence. The former is generated via the repeated applications of persistent homology filtration to high-dimensional data, such as results from molecular dynamics or partial differential equations. The latter is constructed via isotropic and anisotropic scales that create new simiplicial complexes and associated topological spaces. The utility, robustness, and efficiency of the proposed topological methods are demonstrated via protein folding, protein flexibility analysis, the topological denoising of cryoelectron microscopy data, and the scale dependence of nanoparticles. Topological transition between partial folded and unfolded proteins has been observed in multidimensional persistence. The separation between noise topological signatures and molecular topological fingerprints is achieved by the Laplace-Beltrami flow. The multiscale multidimensional persistent homology reveals relative local features in Betti-0 invariants and the relatively global characteristics of Betti-1 and Betti-2 invariants. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Multidimensional persistence in biomolecular data

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Kelin; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Persistent homology has emerged as a popular technique for the topological simplification of big data, including biomolecular data. Multidimensional persistence bears considerable promise to bridge the gap between geometry and topology. However, its practical and robust construction has been a challenge. We introduce two families of multidimensional persistence, namely pseudo-multidimensional persistence and multiscale multidimensional persistence. The former is generated via the repeated applications of persistent homology filtration to high dimensional data, such as results from molecular dynamics or partial differential equations. The latter is constructed via isotropic and anisotropic scales that create new simiplicial complexes and associated topological spaces. The utility, robustness and efficiency of the proposed topological methods are demonstrated via protein folding, protein flexibility analysis, the topological denoising of cryo-electron microscopy data, and the scale dependence of nano particles. Topological transition between partial folded and unfolded proteins has been observed in multidimensional persistence. The separation between noise topological signatures and molecular topological fingerprints is achieved by the Laplace-Beltrami flow. The multiscale multidimensional persistent homology reveals relative local features in Betti-0 invariants and the relatively global characteristics of Betti-1 and Betti-2 invariants. PMID:26032339

  14. Radiological Contaminant Persistence and Decontamination ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Report The objective of this study was to use the Pipe Decontamination Experimental Design Protocol (PDEDP) to evaluate the persistence of cesium, cobalt, and strontium on concrete and polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and explore possible decontamination approaches. The PDEDP is an approach for evaluating the persistence characteristics of contaminants on drinking water pipe materials and various decontamination approaches.

  15. Metabolic aspects of bacterial persisters

    PubMed Central

    Prax, Marcel; Bertram, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    Persister cells form a multi-drug tolerant subpopulation within an isogenic culture of bacteria that are genetically susceptible to antibiotics. Studies with different Gram negative and Gram positive bacteria have identified a large number of genes associated with the persister state. In contrast, the revelation of persister metabolism has only been addressed recently. We here summarize metabolic aspects of persisters, which includes an overview about the bifunctional role of selected carbohydrates as both triggers for the exit from the drug tolerant state and metabolites which persisters feed on. Also alarmones as indicators for starvation have been shown to influence persister levels via different signaling cascades involving the activation of toxin-antitoxin systems and other regulatory factors. Finally, recent data obtained by 13C-isotopolog profiling demonstrated an active amino acid anabolism in Staphylococcus aureus cultures challenged with high drug concentrations. Understanding the metabolism of persister cells poses challenges but also paves the way for the development of anti-persister compounds. PMID:25374846

  16. Persistence. Snapshot Report, Fall 2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Student Clearinghouse, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Today's college student is not your '60s drop-out. In 2010, college students tended to stay enrolled (i.e., persist), even if it was in a different school, according to the National Student Clearinghouse Research Center. For a student enrolled in the fall, persistence is defined as either continued enrollment during the next term after the fall or…

  17. Persistent Criminality and Career Length

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haapanen, Rudy; Britton, Lee; Croisdale, Tim

    2007-01-01

    This study is an examination of persistent offending and its implications for the understanding and investigation of desistance and career length. Persistence, especially as it is operationalized using official measures, is characterized as fundamentally a measure of resistance to formal social control: continued crime in the face of increasingly…

  18. Persistence, resistance, resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsadka, Maayan

    form of musical consumption and experience. The three pieces draw lines connecting different aspects of persistence, resistance, and resonance.

  19. Energy landscapes and persistent minima

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, Joanne M.; Wales, David J.; Mazauric, Dorian; Cazals, Frédéric

    2016-02-07

    We consider a coarse-graining of high-dimensional potential energy landscapes based upon persistences, which correspond to lowest barrier heights to lower-energy minima. Persistences can be calculated efficiently for local minima in kinetic transition networks that are based on stationary points of the prevailing energy landscape. The networks studied here represent peptides, proteins, nucleic acids, an atomic cluster, and a glassy system. Minima with high persistence values are likely to represent some form of alternative structural morphology, which, if appreciably populated at the prevailing temperature, could compete with the global minimum (defined as infinitely persistent). Threshold values on persistences (and in some cases equilibrium occupation probabilities) have therefore been used in this work to select subsets of minima, which were then analysed to see how well they can represent features of the full network. Simplified disconnectivity graphs showing only the selected minima can convey the funnelling (including any multiple-funnel) characteristics of the corresponding full graphs. The effect of the choice of persistence threshold on the reduced disconnectivity graphs was considered for a system with a hierarchical, glassy landscape. Sets of persistent minima were also found to be useful in comparing networks for the same system sampled under different conditions, using minimum oriented spanning forests.

  20. Real-time image-guided nasogastric feeding tube placement: A case series using Kangaroo with IRIS Technology in an ICU.

    PubMed

    Mizzi, Anna; Cozzi, Silvano; Beretta, Luigi; Greco, Massimiliano; Braga, Marco

    2017-05-01

    Pulmonary misplacement during the blind insertion of enteral feeding tubes is frequent, particularly in ventilated and neurologically impaired patients. This is probably the first clinical study using the Kangaroo Feeding Tube with IRIS technology (IRIS) which incorporates a camera designed to provide anatomic landmark visualization during insertion. The study aim was to evaluate IRIS performance during bedside gastric placement. This is the first prospective study to collect data on the use of IRIS. Twenty consecutive unconscious patients requiring enteral nutrition were recruited at a single center. IRIS placement was considered complete when a clear image of the gastric mucosa appeared. Correct placement was confirmed using a contrast-enhanced abdominal X-ray. To evaluate the device performance over time, the camera was activated every other day up to 17 d postplacement. In 7 (35%) patients, the trachea was initially visualized, requiring a second placement attempt with the same tube. The IRIS camera allowed recognition of the gastric mucosa in 18 (90%) patients. The esophagogastric junction was identified in one patient, while in a second patient the quality of visualization was poor. Contrast-enhanced X-ray confirmed the gastric placement of IRIS in all patients. IRIS allowed identification of gastric mucosa in 14 (70%) patients 3 d after placement. Performance progressively declined with time (P = 0.006, chi-square for trend). IRIS placement could have spared X-ray confirmation in almost all patients and prevented misplacement into the airway in about one third. Visualization quality needs to be improved, particularly after the first week. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Randomized Controlled Trial on Effect of Intermittent Early Versus Late Kangaroo Mother Care on Human Milk Feeding in Low-Birth-Weight Neonates.

    PubMed

    Jayaraman, Dhaarani; Mukhopadhyay, Kanya; Bhalla, Anil Kumar; Dhaliwal, Lakhbir Kaur

    2017-08-01

    Breastfeeding at discharge among sick low-birth-weight (LBW) infants is low despite counseling and intervention like kangaroo mother care (KMC). Research aim: The aim was to study the effects of early initiation of KMC on exclusive human milk feeding, growth, mortality, and morbidities in LBW neonates compared with late initiation of KMC during the hospital stay and postdischarge. A randomized controlled trial was conducted in level 2 and 3 areas of a tertiary care neonatal unit over 15 months. Inborn neonates weighing 1 to 1.8 kg and hemodynamically stable were randomized to receive either early KMC, initiated within the first 4 days of life, or late KMC (off respiratory support and intravenous fluids). Follow-up was until 1 month postdischarge. Outcomes were proportion of infants achieving exclusive human milk feeding and direct breastfeeding, growth, mortality and morbidities during hospital stay, and postdischarge feeding and KMC practices until 1 month. The early KMC group ( n = 80) achieved significantly higher exclusive human milk feeding (86% vs. 45%, p < .001) and direct breastfeeding (49% vs. 30%, p = .021) in hospital and almost exclusive human milk feeding (73% vs. 36%, p < .001) until 1 month postdischarge than the late KMC group ( n = 80). The incidence of apnea (11.9% vs. 20%, p = .027) and recurrent apnea requiring ventilation (8.8% vs. 15%, p = .02) were significantly reduced in the early KMC group. There was no significant difference in mortality, morbidities, and growth during the hospital stay and postdischarge. Early KMC significantly increased exclusive human milk feeding and direct breastfeeding in LBW infants.

  2. Kangaroo mother method: randomised controlled trial of an alternative method of care for stabilised low-birthweight infants. Maternidad Isidro Ayora Study Team.

    PubMed

    Sloan, N L; Camacho, L W; Rojas, E P; Stern, C

    1994-09-17

    Because resources for care of low-birthweight (LBW) infants in developing countries are scarce, the Kangaroo mother method (KMM) was developed. The infant is kept upright in skin-to-skin contact with the mother's breast. Previous studies reported several benefits with the KMM but interpretation of their findings is limited by small size and design weaknesses. We have done a longitudinal, randomised, controlled trial at the Isidro Ayora Maternity Hospital in Quito, Ecuador. Infants with LBW (< 2000 g) who satisfied out-of-risk criteria of tolerance of food and weight stabilisation were randomly assigned to KMM and control (standard incubator care) groups (n = 128 and 147, respectively). During 6 months of follow-up the KMM group had a significantly lower rate than the control group of serious illness (lower-respiratory-tract disorders, apnoea, aspiration, pneumonia, septicaemia, general infections; 7 [5%] vs 27 [18%], p < 0.002), although differences between the groups in less severe morbidity were not significant. There was no significant difference in growth or in the proportion of women breastfeeding, perhaps because the proportion breastfeeding was high in both groups owing to strong promotion. Mortality was the same in both groups; most deaths occurred during the stabilisation period before randomisation. KMM mothers made more unscheduled clinic visits than control mothers but their infants had fewer re-admissions and so the cost of care was lower with the KMM. Since the eligibility criteria excluded nearly 50% of LBW infants from the study, the KMM is not universally applicable to these infants. The benefits might be greater in populations where breastfeeding is not so common.

  3. [MOLECULAR ASPECTS OF BRUCELLA PERSISTENCE].

    PubMed

    Kulakov Yu K

    2016-01-01

    Brucellosis is a dangerous zoonotic disease of animals and humans caused by bacteria of the genus Brucella, which are able to survive, multiply, and persist in host cells. The review is devoted to the Brucella species persistence connected to the molecular mechanisms of escape from innate and adaptive immunity of the host and active interaction of effector proteins of the type IV secretion system with the host's signaling pathways. Understanding of the molecular mechanisms used by Brucella for the intracellular persistence in the host organism can allow us to develop new and effective means for the prevention and treatment of chronic brucellosis infection.

  4. Prenatal diagnosis of persistent cloaca.

    PubMed

    Suzumori, Nobuhiro; Obayashi, Shintaro; Hattori, Yukio; Kaneko, Saori; Suzuki, Yoshikatsu; Sugiura-Ogasawara, Mayumi

    2009-09-01

    We report four cases of persistent cloaca diagnosed at 32-33 weeks of gestation. In cases of persistent cloaca, serial prenatal ultrasonography shows transient fetal ascites, enlarged cystic structures arising from the fetal pelvis. Our four cases of persistent cloaca were diagnosed prenatally. Persistent cloaca should be considered in any female fetus presenting with hydronephrosis and a large cystic lesion arising from the pelvis as assessed by ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging. Neither pulmonary hypoplasia nor severe oligohydramnios were found in any of our four cases, and they each had a good prognosis. Prenatal diagnosis allows time for parental counseling and delivery planning at a tertiary care center for neonatal intensive care and pediatric surgery.

  5. Immunomodulation by Persistent Organic Pollutants

    EPA Science Inventory

    Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) are widely distnbuted in the environment, are resistant to degradation, and increase in concentration (biomagnify) in the food chain. Concentrations in apical predators may be tens to hundreds of times greater than concentrations in their pref...

  6. Immunomodulation by Persistent Organic Pollutants

    EPA Science Inventory

    Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) are widely distnbuted in the environment, are resistant to degradation, and increase in concentration (biomagnify) in the food chain. Concentrations in apical predators may be tens to hundreds of times greater than concentrations in their pref...

  7. Object-oriented Persistent Homology.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bao; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2016-01-15

    Persistent homology provides a new approach for the topological simplification of big data via measuring the life time of intrinsic topological features in a filtration process and has found its success in scientific and engineering applications. However, such a success is essentially limited to qualitative data classification and analysis. Indeed, persistent homology has rarely been employed for quantitative modeling and prediction. Additionally, the present persistent homology is a passive tool, rather than a proactive technique, for classification and analysis. In this work, we outline a general protocol to construct object-oriented persistent homology methods. By means of differential geometry theory of surfaces, we construct an objective functional, namely, a surface free energy defined on the data of interest. The minimization of the objective functional leads to a Laplace-Beltrami operator which generates a multiscale representation of the initial data and offers an objective oriented filtration process. The resulting differential geometry based object-oriented persistent homology is able to preserve desirable geometric features in the evolutionary filtration and enhances the corresponding topological persistence. The cubical complex based homology algorithm is employed in the present work to be compatible with the Cartesian representation of the Laplace-Beltrami flow. The proposed Laplace-Beltrami flow based persistent homology method is extensively validated. The consistence between Laplace-Beltrami flow based filtration and Euclidean distance based filtration is confirmed on the Vietoris-Rips complex for a large amount of numerical tests. The convergence and reliability of the present Laplace-Beltrami flow based cubical complex filtration approach are analyzed over various spatial and temporal mesh sizes. The Laplace-Beltrami flow based persistent homology approach is utilized to study the intrinsic topology of proteins and fullerene molecules. Based on a

  8. Object-oriented Persistent Homology

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bao; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Persistent homology provides a new approach for the topological simplification of big data via measuring the life time of intrinsic topological features in a filtration process and has found its success in scientific and engineering applications. However, such a success is essentially limited to qualitative data classification and analysis. Indeed, persistent homology has rarely been employed for quantitative modeling and prediction. Additionally, the present persistent homology is a passive tool, rather than a proactive technique, for classification and analysis. In this work, we outline a general protocol to construct object-oriented persistent homology methods. By means of differential geometry theory of surfaces, we construct an objective functional, namely, a surface free energy defined on the data of interest. The minimization of the objective functional leads to a Laplace-Beltrami operator which generates a multiscale representation of the initial data and offers an objective oriented filtration process. The resulting differential geometry based object-oriented persistent homology is able to preserve desirable geometric features in the evolutionary filtration and enhances the corresponding topological persistence. The cubical complex based homology algorithm is employed in the present work to be compatible with the Cartesian representation of the Laplace-Beltrami flow. The proposed Laplace-Beltrami flow based persistent homology method is extensively validated. The consistence between Laplace-Beltrami flow based filtration and Euclidean distance based filtration is confirmed on the Vietoris-Rips complex for a large amount of numerical tests. The convergence and reliability of the present Laplace-Beltrami flow based cubical complex filtration approach are analyzed over various spatial and temporal mesh sizes. The Laplace-Beltrami flow based persistent homology approach is utilized to study the intrinsic topology of proteins and fullerene molecules. Based on a

  9. Object-oriented persistent homology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bao; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Persistent homology provides a new approach for the topological simplification of big data via measuring the life time of intrinsic topological features in a filtration process and has found its success in scientific and engineering applications. However, such a success is essentially limited to qualitative data classification and analysis. Indeed, persistent homology has rarely been employed for quantitative modeling and prediction. Additionally, the present persistent homology is a passive tool, rather than a proactive technique, for classification and analysis. In this work, we outline a general protocol to construct object-oriented persistent homology methods. By means of differential geometry theory of surfaces, we construct an objective functional, namely, a surface free energy defined on the data of interest. The minimization of the objective functional leads to a Laplace-Beltrami operator which generates a multiscale representation of the initial data and offers an objective oriented filtration process. The resulting differential geometry based object-oriented persistent homology is able to preserve desirable geometric features in the evolutionary filtration and enhances the corresponding topological persistence. The cubical complex based homology algorithm is employed in the present work to be compatible with the Cartesian representation of the Laplace-Beltrami flow. The proposed Laplace-Beltrami flow based persistent homology method is extensively validated. The consistence between Laplace-Beltrami flow based filtration and Euclidean distance based filtration is confirmed on the Vietoris-Rips complex for a large amount of numerical tests. The convergence and reliability of the present Laplace-Beltrami flow based cubical complex filtration approach are analyzed over various spatial and temporal mesh sizes. The Laplace-Beltrami flow based persistent homology approach is utilized to study the intrinsic topology of proteins and fullerene molecules. Based on a

  10. Risk factors for persistent diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    Shahid, N S; Sack, D A; Rahman, M; Alam, A N; Rahman, N

    1988-10-22

    With a systematically sampled population of children aged under 5 attending this centre for diarrhoeal disease research during 1983-5 a retrospective analysis of persistent diarrhoea (defined as greater than 14 days' duration) was performed to identify the possible risk factors for this syndrome. Of the 4155 children included in the analysis, 410 (10%) gave a history of persistent diarrhoea. A comparison with children with acute diarrhoea matched for age showed that 11 factors were correlated with persistent diarrhoea, and strongly associated factors were stools with blood or mucus, or both, lower respiratory tract infection, malnutrition, vitamin A deficiency, and antibiotic use before presentation. The peak age was 2 years, and there was no sex difference. Deaths occurred more often in the group with persistent diarrhoea. Although Shigella spp, Campylobacter jejuni, and Giardia lamblia were frequently identified, their rates of isolation were not significantly higher among patients with persistent diarrhoea. No seasonal variation was observed in the rates of persistent diarrhoea. Although the introduction of family food to the diet was associated with higher rates, this factor was difficult to separate from the age dependent risks.

  11. Risk factors for persistent diarrhoea.

    PubMed Central

    Shahid, N. S.; Sack, D. A.; Rahman, M.; Alam, A. N.; Rahman, N.

    1988-01-01

    With a systematically sampled population of children aged under 5 attending this centre for diarrhoeal disease research during 1983-5 a retrospective analysis of persistent diarrhoea (defined as greater than 14 days' duration) was performed to identify the possible risk factors for this syndrome. Of the 4155 children included in the analysis, 410 (10%) gave a history of persistent diarrhoea. A comparison with children with acute diarrhoea matched for age showed that 11 factors were correlated with persistent diarrhoea, and strongly associated factors were stools with blood or mucus, or both, lower respiratory tract infection, malnutrition, vitamin A deficiency, and antibiotic use before presentation. The peak age was 2 years, and there was no sex difference. Deaths occurred more often in the group with persistent diarrhoea. Although Shigella spp, Campylobacter jejuni, and Giardia lamblia were frequently identified, their rates of isolation were not significantly higher among patients with persistent diarrhoea. No seasonal variation was observed in the rates of persistent diarrhoea. Although the introduction of family food to the diet was associated with higher rates, this factor was difficult to separate from the age dependent risks. PMID:3142603

  12. Persistent Diarrhea: A Clinical Review.

    PubMed

    DuPont, Herbert L

    2016-06-28

    Diarrheal disease is commonly encountered in clinical practice. Persistent diarrhea (≥14 days) can be caused by pathogens that differ from those commonly seen in acute illness; proper etiologic diagnosis is important for appropriate therapeutic management. This review provides an overview of the epidemiology, etiology, diagnosis, and management of persistent diarrhea caused by infectious agents in immunocompetent individuals worldwide. Much of the data on persistent diarrhea comes from studies of residents in or expatriates of developing countries and travelers to these regions where follow-up studies have been performed. Persistent diarrhea occurs in approximately 3% of individuals traveling to developing countries. Schistosoma mansoni (and rarely Schistosoma haematobium) intestinal infection is also not very common and is found only in endemic areas. The microbiologic causes of protracted diarrhea include detectable parasitic (eg, Giardia, Cryptosporidium) and bacterial (eg, enteroaggregative Escherichia coli, Shigella) pathogens. Available diagnostic tests include culture-dependent for bacterial pathogens and culture-independent methods for bacterial, viral, and protozoal infections (eg, polymerase chain reaction [PCR]), including multiplex PCR, as well as and microscopy for protozoal infections. Antimicrobial therapy can be given empirically to patients returning from the undeveloped to the developed world. Otherwise, antibiotics should be given based on the results of laboratory testing. Persistent diarrhea is a poorly recognized syndrome in all populations that requires proper assessment and diagnosis to ensure that affected individuals receive the treatment needed to experience improvement of clinical symptoms.

  13. Is a woolen cap effective in maintaining normothermia in low-birth-weight infants during kangaroo mother care? Study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Trevisanuto, Daniele; Putoto, Giovanni; Pizzol, Damiano; Serena, Tiziana; Manenti, Fabio; Varano, Silvia; Urso, Eleonora; Massavon, William; Tsegaye, Ademe; Wingi, Oliver; Onapa, Emanuel; Segafredo, Giulia; Cavallin, Francesco

    2016-05-26

    Neonatal hypothermia is an important challenge associated with morbidity and mortality. Preventing neonatal hypothermia is important in high-resource countries, but is of fundamental importance in low-resource settings where supportive care is limited. Kangaroo mother care (KMC) is a low-cost intervention that, whenever possible, is strongly recommended for temperature maintenance. During KMC, the World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines recommend the use of a cap/hat, but its effect on temperature control during KMC remains to be established. In the hospitals participating in the projects of the non-governmental organization CUAMM, KMC represents a standard of care, but the heads of the babies often remain uncovered due to local habits or to the unavailability of a cap. The aim of the present study will be to assess the effectiveness and safety of using a woolen cap in maintaining normothermia in low-birth-weight infants (LBWI) during KMC. This is a multicenter (three hospitals), multicountry (three countries), prospective, unblinded, randomized controlled trial of KMC treatment with and without a woolen cap in LBWI. After obtaining parental consent, all infants with a birth weight below 2500 g and who are candidates for KMC, based on the clinical decision of the attending physician, will be assigned to the KMC with a woolen cap group or to the KMC without a woolen cap group in a 1:1 ratio according to a computer-generated, randomized sequence. The duration of the study will be until the patient's discharge, with a maximum treatment duration of 7 days. The primary outcome measure will be whether the infants' temperatures remain within the normal range (36.5-37.5 °C) in the course of KMC during the intervention. In all participants, axillary temperature will be measured with a digital thermometer four times per day. In addition, maternal and room temperature will be recorded. Secondary outcome measures will be: episodes of apnea; sepsis; mortality before

  14. Energy Savings Lifetimes and Persistence

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, Ian M.; Schiller, Steven R.; Todd, Annika; Billingsley, Megan A.; Goldman, Charles A.; Schwartz, Lisa C.

    2016-02-01

    This technical brief explains the concepts of energy savings lifetimes and savings persistence and discusses how program administrators use these factors to calculate savings for efficiency measures, programs and portfolios. Savings lifetime is the length of time that one or more energy efficiency measures or activities save energy, and savings persistence is the change in savings throughout the functional life of a given efficiency measure or activity. Savings lifetimes are essential for assessing the lifecycle benefits and cost effectiveness of efficiency activities and for forecasting loads in resource planning. The brief also provides estimates of savings lifetimes derived from a national collection of costs and savings for electric efficiency programs and portfolios.

  15. Josephson persistent-current qubit

    PubMed

    Mooij; Orlando; Levitov; Tian; van der Wal CH; Lloyd

    1999-08-13

    A qubit was designed that can be fabricated with conventional electron beam lithography and is suited for integration into a large quantum computer. The qubit consists of a micrometer-sized loop with three or four Josephson junctions; the two qubit states have persistent currents of opposite direction. Quantum superpositions of these states are obtained by pulsed microwave modulation of the enclosed magnetic flux by currents in control lines. A superconducting flux transporter allows for controlled transfer between qubits of the flux that is generated by the persistent currents, leading to entanglement of qubit information.

  16. Persistence to antihypertensive drug classes

    PubMed Central

    Qvarnström, Miriam; Kahan, Thomas; Kieler, Helle; Brandt, Lena; Hasselström, Jan; Boström, Kristina Bengtsson; Manhem, Karin; Hjerpe, Per; Wettermark, Björn

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim was to study persistence to, and switching between, antihypertensive drug classes and to determine factors associated with poor persistence. This was an observational cohort study. The Swedish Primary Care Cardiovascular Database includes data from medical records, socioeconomic data, filled prescriptions, and hospitalizations from national registries for 75,000 patients with hypertension. Patients included in the study were initiated on antihypertensive drug treatment in primary healthcare in 2006 to 2007. We defined class persistence as the proportion remaining on the initial drug class, including 30 days of gap. Patients with a filled prescription of another antihypertensive drug class after discontinuation of the initial drug, including 30 days of gap, were classified as switchers. Persistence to the various drug classes were compared with that for diuretics. We identified 4997 patients (mean age 60 ± 12 years in men and 63 ± 13 years in women). Out of these, 95 (2%) filled their first prescription for fixed combination therapy and 4902 (98%) for monotherapy, including angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (37%), angiotensin receptor blockers (4%), beta blockers (21%), calcium channel blockers (8%), and diuretics (28%). Persistence to the initial drug class was 57% after 1 year and 43% after 2 years. There were no differences in persistence between diuretics and any of the other antihypertensive drug classes, after adjustment for confounders. Discontinuation (all adjusted) was more common in men (P = 0.004), younger patients (P < 0.001), those with mild systolic blood pressure elevation (P < 0.001), and patients born outside the Nordic countries (P < 0.001). Among 1295 patients who switched drug class after their first prescription, only 21% had a blood pressure recorded before the switch occurred; and out them 69% still had high blood pressures. In conclusion, there appears to be no difference in drug class

  17. Non-Persisting Student Follow-Up.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willett, Lynn H.

    A survey was conducted to determine the characteristics and opinions of the non-persisting students at Moraine Valley Community College. A random sample of 500 non-persisting students was selected, with equal numbers of full-time and part-time ex-students. Separate questionnaires were used for non-persisting full-time and non-persisting part-time…

  18. Comparative NMR studies of diffusional water permeability of red blood cells from different species: XV. Agile wallaby (Macropus agilis), red-necked wallaby (Macropus rufogriseus) and Goodfellow's tree kangaroo (Dendrolagus goodfellowi).

    PubMed

    Benga, Gheorghe; Chapman, Bogdan E; Kuchel, Philip W

    2009-09-01

    The water diffusional permeability (P(d)) of red blood cells (RBC) from agile wallaby (Macropus agilis), red-necked wallaby (Macropus rufogriseus) and Goodfellow's tree kangaroo (Dendrolagus goodfellowi) was monitored using an Mn(2+)-doping (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique at 400 MHz. The P(d) (cm s(-1)) values of agile wallaby RBCs were 7.5 x 10(-3) at 25 degrees C, 9 x 10(-3) at 30 degrees C, 11 x 10(-3) at 37 degrees C, and 13 x 10(-3) at 42 degrees C. The inhibitory effect of a mercury-containing sulfhydryl (SH)-modifying reagent p-chloromercuribenzoate (PCMB) on agile wallaby RBCs was investigated. The maximal inhibition was reached in 90 min at 37 degrees C with 2 mmol L(-1) PCMB. The value of maximal inhibition was approximately 63% when measured at 25 degrees C, approximately 52% at 37 degrees C and approximately 45% at 42 degrees C. The lowest value of P(d) (corresponding to the basal permeability to water) was approximately 3 x 10(-3) cm s(-1) at 25 degrees C. For the RBCs from red-necked wallaby (M. rufogriseus) the values of P(d) (cm s(-1)) were 7 x 10(-3) at 25 degrees C, 8 x 10(-3) at 30 degrees C, 10 x 10(-3) at 37 degrees C, and 12 x 10(-3) at 42 degrees C. Higher values of P(d) (cm s(-1)) were found for the RBCs from Goodfellow's tree kangaroo (D. goodfellowi): 8.5 x 10(-3) at 25 degrees C, 10 x 10(-3) at 30 degrees C, 13 x 10(-3) at 37 degrees C, and 15 x 10(-3) at 42 degrees C. The mean values of the activation energy of water diffusion (E(a,d)) were approximately 25 kJ mol(-1) for RBCs from the agile wallaby and tree kangaroo, respectively, and approximately 23 kJ mol(-1) for RBCs from red-necked wallaby. The values of E(a,d) increased after exposure of agile wallaby RBCs to PCMB, reaching a value of approximately 43-46 kJ mol(-1) when the maximal inhibition of P(d) was achieved.

  19. Persistent papillomatosis associated with immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Duncan, J R; Corbeil, L B; Davies, D H; Schultz, R D; Whitlock, R H

    1975-04-01

    A case report of a young bull with persistent papillomatosis associated with immunodeficiency is presented. Humoral immune responses were normal but cell mediated immunity was deficient. The possible significance of the findings to pathogenesis and therapy of the disease is discussed.

  20. Toward a Persistent Object Base.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-07-01

    toward Improving the practice of software engineering. Such environments provide support for software development, management, and maintenance. There...standardization can all contribute to the openness, In actual practice , of an environment. Integration means that the components of the environment work together...In a persistent obed base, data abstraction should be practiced so that logical concepts are decoupled from physical representations; richer

  1. Persistence Length of Stable Microtubules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, Taviare; Mirigian, Matthew; Yasar, M. Selcuk; Ross, Jennifer

    2011-03-01

    Microtubules are a vital component of the cytoskeleton. As the most rigid of the cytoskeleton filaments, they give shape and support to the cell. They are also essential for intracellular traffic by providing the roadways onto which organelles are transported, and they are required to reorganize during cellular division. To perform its function in the cell, the microtubule must be rigid yet dynamic. We are interested in how the mechanical properties of stable microtubules change over time. Some ``stable'' microtubules of the cell are recycled after days, such as in the axons of neurons or the cilia and flagella. We measured the persistence length of freely fluctuating taxol-stabilized microtubules over the span of a week and analyzed them via Fourier decomposition. As measured on a daily basis, the persistence length is independent of the contour length. Although measured over the span of the week, the accuracy of the measurement and the persistence length varies. We also studied how fluorescently-labeling the microtubule affects the persistence length and observed that a higher labeling ratio corresponded to greater flexibility. National Science Foundation Grant No: 0928540 to JLR.

  2. Visual Persistence and Adult Dyslexia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winters, Roberta L.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Visual persistence was investigated in adults with and without dyslexia in order to determine whether dyslexic adults demonstrate problems similar to those found in childhood dyslexia. Results showed that sensitivity of dyslexic adults was impaired when parts of a test stimulus were presented to adjacent retinal areas, suggesting that under…

  3. Rhinophototherapy in persistent allergic rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Bella, Zsolt; Kiricsi, Ágnes; Viharosné, Éva Dósa-Rácz; Dallos, Attila; Perényi, Ádám; Kiss, Mária; Koreck, Andrea; Kemény, Lajos; Jóri, József; Rovó, László; Kadocsa, Edit

    2017-03-01

    Previous published results have revealed that Rhinolight(®) intranasal phototherapy is safe and effective in intermittent allergic rhinitis. The present objective was to assess whether phototherapy is also safe and effective in persistent allergic rhinitis. Thirty-four patients with persistent allergic rhinitis were randomized into two groups; twenty-five subjects completed the study. The Rhinolight(®) group was treated with a combination of UV-B, UV-A, and high-intensity visible light, while the placebo group received low-intensity visible white light intranasal phototherapy on a total of 13 occasions in 6 weeks. The assessment was based on the diary of symptoms, nasal inspiratory peak flow, quantitative smell threshold, mucociliary transport function, and ICAM-1 expression of the epithelial cells. All nasal symptom scores and nasal inspiratory peak flow measurements improved significantly in the Rhinolight(®) group relative to the placebo group and this finding persisted after 4 weeks of follow-up. The smell and mucociliary functions did not change significantly in either group. The number of ICAM-1 positive cells decreased non-significantly in the Rhinolight(®) group. No severe side-effects were reported during the treatment period. These results suggest that Rhinolight(®) treatment is safe and effective in persistent allergic rhinitis.

  4. Retrospection and Persistent School Absenteeism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Ken

    1983-01-01

    This paper presents and discusses data based on the perceptions of 128 persistent school absentees on their initial and continued reasons for missing school. The findings suggest that a greater proportion of the students were inclined to blame their institutions, rather than social or psychological factors, for their behavior. (SSH)

  5. Persistent Monitoring Platforms Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, C L

    2007-02-22

    This project was inspired and motivated by the need to provide better platforms for persistent surveillance. In the years since the inception of this work, the need for persistence of surveillance platforms has become even more widely appreciated, both within the defense community and the intelligence community. One of the most demanding technical requirements for such a platform involves the power plant and energy storage system, and this project concentrated almost exclusively on the technology associated with this system for a solar powered, high altitude, unmanned aircraft. An important realization for the feasibility of such solar powered aircraft, made at the outset of this project, was that thermal energy may be stored with higher specific energy density than for any other known practical form of rechargeable energy storage. This approach has proved to be extraordinarily fruitful, and a large number of spin-off applications of this technology were developed in the course of this project.

  6. Does persisting fear sustain catatonia?

    PubMed

    Fink, M; Shorter, E

    2017-11-01

    To examine the psychological substrate of catatonia. Reviewing the historical descriptions and explanations of catatonic behaviours by clinicians from its delineation in the 19th century to the present. Patients with catatonia are often haunted by fears and terrors; this has not been widely appreciated, and certainly was lost from view in the days when catatonia was considered a subtype of schizophrenia. The report contributes to resolving a major question in catatonia: is the mind in stupor inactive, as the blank state that we picture in anesthetized patients, or is the mind active, so preoccupied as to exclude all other influences. Persistent fear occupies the mind of catatonic patients. The signs of catatonia are adaptations to persistent fear, akin to tonic immobilization. The relief afforded by sedation supports this interpretation. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Persistent Identifiers Implementation in EOSDIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramapriyan, H. K. " Rama"

    2016-01-01

    This presentation provides the motivation for and status of implementation of persistent identifiers in NASA's Earth Observation System Data and Information System (EOSDIS). The motivation is provided from the point of view of long-term preservation of datasets such that a number of questions raised by current and future users can be answered easily and precisely. A number of artifacts need to be preserved along with datasets to make this possible, especially when the authors of datasets are no longer available to address users questions. The artifacts and datasets need to be uniquely and persistently identified and linked with each other for full traceability, understandability and scientific reproducibility. Current work in the Earth Science Data and Information System (ESDIS) Project and the Distributed Active Archive Centers (DAACs) in assigning Digital Object Identifiers (DOI) is discussed as well as challenges that remain to be addressed in the future.

  8. Search along persistent random walks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, Benjamin M.

    2008-06-01

    Optimal search strategies and their implementations in biological systems are a subject of active research. Here we study a search problem which is motivated by the hunt of sperm cells for the egg. We ask for the probability for an active swimmer to find a target under the condition that the swimmer starts at a certain distance from the target. We find that success probability is maximal for a certain level of fluctuations characterized by the persistence length of the swimming path of the swimmer. We derive a scaling law for the optimal persistence length as a function of the initial target distance and search time by mapping the search on a polymer physics problem.

  9. Persistent Patterns in Accretion Disks

    SciTech Connect

    Amin, Mustafa A.; Frolov, Andrei V.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2006-04-03

    We present a set of new characteristic frequencies associated with accretion disks around compact objects. These frequencies arise from persistent rotating patterns in the disk that are finite in radial extent and driven purely by the gravity of the central body. Their existence depends on general relativistic corrections to orbital motion and, if observed, could be used to probe the strong gravity region around a black hole. We also discuss a possible connection to the puzzle of quasi-periodic oscillations.

  10. Dealing with Persistent Pain in Older Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Related Topics Arthritis Cancer COPD Diabetes Joint Problems Pain Management Related Documents PDF Dealing with Persistent Pain in ... provider may also refer you to a special pain management center. Some persistent pain problems are very complex ...

  11. MOOCs and Persistence: Definitions and Predictors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Brent J.; Baker, Rachel B.

    2016-01-01

    The chapter argues for redefining the term "persistence" as it relates to MOOCs and considers how different measures produce different results in the research; it closes with a review of research on persistence in MOOCs.

  12. Divergence in sink contributions to population persistence

    EPA Science Inventory

    Population sinks present unique conservation challenges. The loss of animals in sinks can compromise persistence. Conversely, sinks can bolster population sizes, improving viability. To assess the contribution of sinks to regional persistence, we simulated the removal of sink hab...

  13. High Persister Mutants in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Torrey, Heather L.; Keren, Iris; Via, Laura E.; Lee, Jong Seok; Lewis, Kim

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis forms drug-tolerant persister cells that are the probable cause of its recalcitrance to antibiotic therapy. While genetically identical to the rest of the population, persisters are dormant, which protects them from killing by bactericidal antibiotics. The mechanism of persister formation in M. tuberculosis is not well understood. In this study, we selected for high persister (hip) mutants and characterized them by whole genome sequencing and transcriptome analysis. In parallel, we identified and characterized clinical isolates that naturally produce high levels of persisters. We compared the hip mutants obtained in vitro with clinical isolates to identify candidate persister genes. Genes involved in lipid biosynthesis, carbon metabolism, toxin-antitoxin systems, and transcriptional regulators were among those identified. We also found that clinical hip isolates exhibited greater ex vivo survival than the low persister isolates. Our data suggest that M. tuberculosis persister formation involves multiple pathways, and hip mutants may contribute to the recalcitrance of the infection. PMID:27176494

  14. PERSISTENT CONTAMINANTS: NEW PRIORITIES, NEW CONCERNS

    EPA Science Inventory


    The Stockholm Convention on persistent organic pollutants (POPs) was adopted in 2001 to protect human health and the environment from chemicals that are highly toxic, persistent, bioaccumulative, and undergo long range transport. These POPs include 9 pesticides, polychlorin...

  15. PERSISTENT CONTAMINANTS: NEW PRIORITIES, NEW CONCERNS

    EPA Science Inventory


    The Stockholm Convention on persistent organic pollutants (POPs) was adopted in 2001 to protect human health and the environment from chemicals that are highly toxic, persistent, bioaccumulative, and undergo long range transport. These POPs include 9 pesticides, polychlorin...

  16. MOOCs and Persistence: Definitions and Predictors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Brent J.; Baker, Rachel B.

    2016-01-01

    The chapter argues for redefining the term "persistence" as it relates to MOOCs and considers how different measures produce different results in the research; it closes with a review of research on persistence in MOOCs.

  17. Bilateral persistent pupillary membranes associated with cataract

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Syed Shoeb; Binson, Caroline; Lung, Chong Ka; Ghani, Shuaibah Abdul

    2011-01-01

    Summary Exuberant persistent pupillary membranes (PPM) are rare in adult eyes. We report the case of a 53-year-old man diagnosed with bilateral, profuse, persistent pupillary membranes and unilateral cataract. PMID:23362401

  18. Divergence in sink contributions to population persistence

    EPA Science Inventory

    Population sinks present unique conservation challenges. The loss of animals in sinks can compromise persistence. Conversely, sinks can bolster population sizes, improving viability. To assess the contribution of sinks to regional persistence, we simulated the removal of sink hab...

  19. Persistence-Retention. Snapshot™ Report, Spring 2014

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Student Clearinghouse, 2014

    2014-01-01

    This snapshot report provides information on student persistence and retention rates for Spring 2014. Data is presented in tabular format on the following: (1) First-Year Persistence and Retention Rates by Starting Enrollment Intensity (all institutional sectors); (2) First-Year Persistence and Retention Rates by Age at College Entry (all…

  20. Persistence-Retention. Snapshot™ Report, Spring 2015

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Student Clearinghouse, 2015

    2015-01-01

    This Snapshot Report offers information on student persistence and retention rates for 2009-2013. It offers data on the following: (1) First-Year Persistence and Retention Rates for Students Who Start College at Four-Year Private Nonprofit Institutions; (2) First-Year Persistence and Retention Rates for Students Who Start College at Four-Year…

  1. The Extraction of Information From Visual Persistence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erwin, Donald E.

    1976-01-01

    This research sought to distinguish among three concepts of visual persistence by substituting the physical presence of the target stimulus while simultaneously inhibiting the formation of a persisting representation. Reportability of information about the stimuli was compared to a condition in which visual persistence was allowed to fully develop…

  2. The Extraction of Information From Visual Persistence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erwin, Donald E.

    1976-01-01

    This research sought to distinguish among three concepts of visual persistence by substituting the physical presence of the target stimulus while simultaneously inhibiting the formation of a persisting representation. Reportability of information about the stimuli was compared to a condition in which visual persistence was allowed to fully develop…

  3. A Grounded Theory of Adult Student Persistence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capps, Rosemary

    2010-01-01

    This grounded theory study investigates adult student persistence at a community college. Student persistence in college is a prerequisite for degree achievement, which correlates with higher earnings and overall better quality of life. Persistence rates remain low for adult students, who combine their college endeavors with responsibilities to…

  4. Intent to Persist at Religiously Affiliated Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sansom, J. Mel

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the secondary data analysis was to examine the attributes of students who intend to persist at the same religiously affiliated institution. The review of literature indicated that persistence has been studied extensively, but there has been only limited investigation of persistence focused on religiously affiliated institutions. The…

  5. Persistence with statin therapy in Hungary

    PubMed Central

    Kiss, Zoltan; Nagy, Laszlo; Reiber, Istvan; Paragh, György; Molnar, Mark Peter; Rokszin, György; Abonyi-Toth, Zsolt

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Persistence with lipid-lowering drug therapy by cardiovascular patients in Hungary has not been studied previously. This study was designed to determine the rate with which Hungarian patients with hyperlipidemia persist in taking lipid-lowering agents, and to compare this with rates reported from other countries. Material and methods This was a retrospective study that utilized data from the Institutional Database of the National Health Insurance Fund to analyze persistence rates with statins and ezetimibe. The study included data for patients who started lipid-lowering therapy between January 1, 2007, and March 31, 2009. Variables included type of lipid-lowering therapy, year of therapy start, and patient age. Main outcome measures were medians of persistence in months, percentages of patients persisting in therapy for 6 and 12 months, and Kaplan-Meier persistence plots. Results The percentage of patients who persisted with overall statin therapy was 46% after 1 month, 40.3% after 2 months, 27% after 6 months, and 20.1% after 12 months. Persistence was slightly greater for statin therapy started during 2008 than during 2007. Older patients were more persistent with therapy than younger patients. Persistence with the combination of ezetimibe-statin therapy was greater than with statin or ezetimibe monotherapy. Conclusions Persistence with statin therapy by patients in Hungary was low compared with other countries. Low persistence may have negated potential clinical benefits of long-term statin therapy. PMID:23847660

  6. Cold urticaria with persistent weals.

    PubMed

    Juhlin, L

    1981-06-01

    A patient with cold urticaria is described in whom weals appeared immediately after an ice cube test for 3 min and persisted for a week as a red, tender swelling. The duration of the oedema was dependent on the intensity of the immediate reaction. If the immediate wealing was blocked by treatment with an oral antihistamine 3 h before the ice cube test, no delayed reaction was seen. Antihistamines given after the immediate wealing had occurred did not influence the delayed reaction. Reactions to intradermally injected histamine, prostaglandin E, kallikrein, serotonin and serum appeared normal.

  7. Safe and Efficient Persistent Heaps.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-12-01

    Safe and Efficient Persistent Heaps Scott M. Nettles December 1995 CMU-CS-95-225 KSS© 1 «S’S SO- 1 -""-«« -’ i , School of Computer...under grant F33615-93- 1 -1330. The US Government is authorized to reproduce and distribute reprints for Government purposes, notwithstanding any...Contents I Design and Implementation 1 1 Introduction 3 1.1 Safety 4 1.1.1 Transactions 5 1.1.2 Garbage Collection 6 1.1.3 Orthogonal

  8. Persistent ENSO in different climates?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, A. V.; Manucharyan, G. E.

    2013-12-01

    Growing evidence suggests that, despite profound changes in tropical climate, ENSO has been active over a vast geological epoch stretching millions of years from the Late Cretaceous through the Holocene. In particular, ENSO persisted during the Pliocene when there occurred a dramatic reduction in the mean east-west temperature gradient in the equatorial Pacific - a key element of tropical dynamics. Here we use a comprehensive climate model to explore the dependence of ENSO on this temperature gradient. We find that in a broad range of climates ENSO remains surprisingly robust. When the east-west temperature gradient is reduced from 6oC to 1oC, the amplitude of ENSO decreases only by 30-40%, its dominant period remains close to 3-4 years, and the spectral peak stays above red noise. To explain these results we assess the magnitude of ocean-atmosphere feedbacks that control the stability of the natural mode of ENSO (the Bjerknes Index). We find that due to reorganization of the atmospheric Walker circulation in response to changes in the mean temperature gradient, the growth/decay rates of the ENSO mode stay nearly constant throughout different climates. This factor explains the persistence of the Southern Oscillation in past geological epochs and reconciles the seemingly contradictory findings of ENSO occurrence and the small east-west temperature gradient during the Pliocene. Finally, our results explain why ENSO in many climate models seems to be controlled by a weakly-damped mode just below neutral stability.

  9. Persistence of random walk records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Naim, E.; Krapivsky, P. L.

    2014-06-01

    We study records generated by Brownian particles in one dimension. Specifically, we investigate an ordinary random walk and define the record as the maximal position of the walk. We compare the record of an individual random walk with the mean record, obtained as an average over infinitely many realizations. We term the walk ‘superior’ if the record is always above average, and conversely, the walk is said to be ‘inferior’ if the record is always below average. We find that the fraction of superior walks, S, decays algebraically with time, S ˜ t-β, in the limit t → ∞, and that the persistence exponent is nontrivial, β = 0.382 258…. The fraction of inferior walks, I, also decays as a power law, I ˜ t-α, but the persistence exponent is smaller, α = 0.241 608…. Both exponents are roots of transcendental equations involving the parabolic cylinder function. To obtain these theoretical results, we analyze the joint density of superior walks with a given record and position, while for inferior walks it suffices to study the density as a function of position.

  10. Persistence of solar wind features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rucker, H. O.; Rabl, G. K. F.; Desch, M. D.

    1986-01-01

    Using data from the plasma and magnetometer experiments on board the Voyagers 1 and 2 during the approach to Jupiter, solar wind persistence is investigated over the period from January 1978 (Voyager 1 passing by Voyager 2) through February 1979. The trajectories of both spacecraft provided a unique opportunity to study the radial evolution and variation of the solar wind over about 3 AU, and to analyze the persistence of solar wind features along the radially increasing separation distance of both Voyagers. Some emphasis is placed on a period of DOY (day of year) 152 through 212, 1978, in which the observed propagation delay time of solar wind signatures between both Voyagers significantly deviates from the expected delay time. A decrease in the correlation coefficient of the corresponding Voyager 1 and 2 data profiles indicates a remarkable change of the solar wind flow. This period in question coincides to a great extent with the interval V of June-July 1978, selected by STIP (Study of Travelling Interplanetary Phenomena).

  11. Continuation of point clouds via persistence diagrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gameiro, Marcio; Hiraoka, Yasuaki; Obayashi, Ippei

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we present a mathematical and algorithmic framework for the continuation of point clouds by persistence diagrams. A key property used in the method is that the persistence map, which assigns a persistence diagram to a point cloud, is differentiable. This allows us to apply the Newton-Raphson continuation method in this setting. Given an original point cloud P, its persistence diagram D, and a target persistence diagram D‧, we gradually move from D to D‧, by successively computing intermediate point clouds until we finally find a point cloud P‧ having D‧ as its persistence diagram. Our method can be applied to a wide variety of situations in topological data analysis where it is necessary to solve an inverse problem, from persistence diagrams to point cloud data.

  12. Topical triamcinolone for persistent phimosis.

    PubMed

    Letendre, Julien; Barrieras, Diego; Franc-Guimond, Julie; Abdo, Ala; Houle, Anne-Marie

    2009-10-01

    Between 2% and 5% of uncircumcised boys have persistent or pathological phimosis. Traditional treatment is usually circumcision. Recently medical treatment with topical corticosteroids has become more popular. We evaluated the efficacy of the topical steroid triamcinolone compared to foreskin retraction with an emollient cream and verified the long-term success rate of these treatments. We performed a double-blind, randomized, placebo controlled study to compare 2-month twice daily treatment with emollient cream (placebo group 1) vs 0.1% triamcinolone (experimental group 2). Boys between ages 3 and 12 years with persistent or pathological phimosis were included in analysis. Study EXCLUSION criteria were previous treatment with topical corticosteroid, untreated balanitis and any known medical condition with immune system impairment. Patients were seen 2, 4 and 12 months after treatment initiation. Success was defined as complete, easy foreskin retraction at 4 and 12 months. Statistical analysis was done using Fisher's exact test. We enrolled 63 patients, of whom 43 completed the study. Despite multiple attempts 20 patients had incomplete followup and were excluded from study. Placebo group 1 included 25 patients and triamcinolone group 2 included 21. In group 1 the success rate was significantly lower than in group 2 (9 patients or 39% vs 16 or 76%, p = 0.0086). At 2 months 5 and 16 nonresponders in groups 2 and 1, respectively, were treated in nonblinded fashion with topical triamcinolone. In this subgroup 1 of 3 group 2 patients and 6 of 13 in group 1 achieved complete, easy retraction. Two and 1 patients were lost to followup in groups 1 and 2, respectively. Circumcision was required in only 5 patients (11.6%), including 4 (17.4%) initially in group 1. No complications were noted in either group. Triamcinolone is a highly effective and safe short-term treatment for persistent physiological or pathological phimosis. However, at long-term followup recurrence is

  13. Dematerialization: Variety, caution, and persistence.

    PubMed

    Ausubel, Jesse H; Waggoner, Paul E

    2008-09-02

    Dematerialization, represented by declining consumption per GDP of energy or of goods, offers some hope for rising environmental quality with development. The declining proportion of income spent on staples as affluence grows, which income elasticity <1.0 measures, makes dematerialization widespread. Further, as learning improves efficiency of resource use, the intensity of environmental impact per production of staples often declines. We observe that combinations of low income elasticity for staples and of learning by producers cause a variety of dematerializations and declining intensities of impact, from energy use and carbon emission to food consumption and fertilizer use, globally and in countries ranging from the United States and France to China, India, Brazil, and Indonesia. Because dematerialization and intensity of impact are ratios of parameters that may be variously defined and are sometimes difficult to estimate, their fluctuations must be interpreted cautiously. Nevertheless, substantial declining intensity of impact, and especially, dematerialization persisted between 1980 and 2006.

  14. Persistent currents in ferromagnetic condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamacraft, Austen

    2017-06-01

    Persistent currents in Bose condensates with a scalar order parameter are stabilized by the topology of the order parameter manifold. In condensates with multicomponent order parameters it is topologically possible for supercurrents to "unwind" without leaving the manifold. We study the energetics of this process in the case of ferromagnetic condensates using a long wavelength energy functional that includes both the superfluid and spin stiffnesses. Exploiting analogies to an elastic rod and rigid body motion, we show that the current carrying state in a 1D ring geometry transitions between a spin helix in the energy minima and a solitonlike configuration at the maxima. The relevance to recent experiments in ultracold atoms is briefly discussed.

  15. Long-persistence blue phosphors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yen, William M. (Inventor); Jia, Weiyi (Inventor); Lu, Lizhu (Inventor); Yuan, Huabiao (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    This invention relates to phosphors including long-persistence blue phosphors. Phosphors of the invention are represented by the general formula: MO . mAl.sub.2 O.sub.3 :Eu.sup.2+,R.sup.3+ wherein m is a number ranging from about 1.6 to about 2.2, M is Sr or a combination of Sr with Ca and Ba or both, R.sup.3+ is a trivalent metal ion or trivalent Bi or a mixture of these trivalent ions, Eu.sup.2+ is present at a level up to about 5 mol % of M, and R.sup.3+ is present at a level up to about 5 mol % of M. Phosphors of this invention include powders, ceramics, single crystals and single crystal fibers. A method of manufacturing improved phosphors and a method of manufacturing single crystal phosphors are also provided.

  16. Persistent Pneumonia in an Infant

    PubMed Central

    Padilla, Kristen; Logan, Latania; Codispoti, Christopher; Jones, Carolyn

    2015-01-01

    A 4-month-old boy with past medical history of eczema presented with fever and cough; a chest radiograph showed lung consolidation, and he was initially treated with amoxicillin for presumed community-acquired pneumonia. After several days, his fever persisted. He was also profoundly anemic. Antibiotic coverage was broadened because of the concern for resistant organisms; he began to improve and was discharged from the hospital. However, at 5 months of age, his fever returned, and he continued to demonstrate lung consolidation on chest radiograph. Additionally, he had lost weight and continued to be anemic. Splenic cysts were noted on abdominal ultrasound. He was diagnosed with an unusual etiology for his pneumonia and improved with the appropriate therapy. An underlying immunodeficiency was suspected, but initial testing was nondiagnostic. At 12 months of age, he presented with another infection, and the final diagnosis was made. PMID:26122810

  17. Persistent Pneumonia in an Infant.

    PubMed

    Padilla, Kristen; Logan, Latania; Codispoti, Christopher; Jones, Carolyn; Van Opstal, Elizabeth

    2015-07-01

    A 4-month-old boy with past medical history of eczema presented with fever and cough; a chest radiograph showed lung consolidation, and he was initially treated with amoxicillin for presumed community-acquired pneumonia. After several days, his fever persisted. He was also profoundly anemic. Antibiotic coverage was broadened because of the concern for resistant organisms; he began to improve and was discharged from the hospital. However, at 5 months of age, his fever returned, and he continued to demonstrate lung consolidation on chest radiograph. Additionally, he had lost weight and continued to be anemic. Splenic cysts were noted on abdominal ultrasound. He was diagnosed with an unusual etiology for his pneumonia and improved with the appropriate therapy. An underlying immunodeficiency was suspected, but initial testing was nondiagnostic. At 12 months of age, he presented with another infection, and the final diagnosis was made.

  18. Dematerialization: Variety, caution, and persistence

    PubMed Central

    Ausubel, Jesse H.; Waggoner, Paul E.

    2008-01-01

    Dematerialization, represented by declining consumption per GDP of energy or of goods, offers some hope for rising environmental quality with development. The declining proportion of income spent on staples as affluence grows, which income elasticity <1.0 measures, makes dematerialization widespread. Further, as learning improves efficiency of resource use, the intensity of environmental impact per production of staples often declines. We observe that combinations of low income elasticity for staples and of learning by producers cause a variety of dematerializations and declining intensities of impact, from energy use and carbon emission to food consumption and fertilizer use, globally and in countries ranging from the United States and France to China, India, Brazil, and Indonesia. Because dematerialization and intensity of impact are ratios of parameters that may be variously defined and are sometimes difficult to estimate, their fluctuations must be interpreted cautiously. Nevertheless, substantial declining intensity of impact, and especially, dematerialization persisted between 1980 and 2006. PMID:18728190

  19. Persistent nicorandil induced oral ulceration

    PubMed Central

    Healy, C M; Smyth, Y; Flint, S R

    2004-01-01

    Four patients with nicorandil induced ulceration are described, and the literature on the subject is reviewed. Nicorandil induced ulcers are very painful and distressing for patients. Clinically they appear as large, deep, persistent ulcers that have punched out edges. They are poorly responsive to topical steroids and usually require alteration of nicorandil treatment. The ulceration tends to occur at high doses of nicorandil and all four cases reported here were on doses of 40 mg per day or greater. In these situations reduction of nicorandil dose may be sufficient to promote ulcer healing and prevent further recurrence. However, nicorandil induced ulcers have been reported at doses as low as 10 mg daily and complete cessation of nicorandil may be required. PMID:15201264

  20. Psychoacoustic classification of persistent tinnitus.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Flavia Alencar de Barros; Suzuki, Fabio Akira; Onishi, Ektor Tsuneo; Penido, Norma Oliveira

    2017-08-01

    Tinnitus is a difficult to treat symptom, with different responses in patients. It is classified in different ways, according to its origin and associated diseases. to propose a single and measurable classification of persistent tinnitus, through its perception as sounds of nature or of daily life and its comparison with pure tone or noise, of high or low pitch, presented to the patient by audiometer sound. A total of 110 adult patients, of both genders, treated at the Tinnitus Outpatient Clinic, were enrolled according to the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Otorhinolaryngologic and Audiological, Pitch Matching and Loudness, Visual Analog Scale, Tinnitus Handicap Inventory and Minimum Masking Level assessments were performed. In these 110 patients, 181 tinnitus complaints were identified accordingly to type and ear, with 93 (51%) Pure Tone, and 88 (49%) Noise type; 19 at low and 162 at high frequency; with a mean in the Pure Tone of 5.47 in the Visual Analog Scale and 12.31 decibel in the Loudness and a mean in the Noise of 6.66 and 10.51 decibel. For Tinnitus Handicap Inventory and Minimum Masking Level, the 110 patients were separated into three groups with tinnitus, Pure Tone, Noise and multiple. Tinnitus Handicap Inventory higher in the group with multiple tinnitus, of 61.38. Masking noises such as White Noise and Narrow Band were used for the Minimum Masking Level at the frequencies of 500 and 6000Hz. There was a similarity between the Pure Tone and Multiple groups. In the Noise group, different responses were found when Narrow Band was used at low frequency. classifying persistent tinnitus as pure tone or noise, present in high or low frequency and establishing its different characteristics allow us to know its peculiarities and the effects of this symptom in patients' lives. Copyright © 2017 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  1. Persistent pulmonary hypertension of the neonate (persistent fetal circulation syndrome).

    PubMed

    Drummond, W H

    1983-01-01

    This 15-year-old disease has been clearly described anatomically. Some understanding of possible in utero predisposing conditions has emerged from clinical and animal studies. However, we have very little understanding of the cellular processes that trigger and/or prolong the abnormal medial smooth muscle hypertrophy underlying the condition. Empiric observation has resulted in the development of hyperventilation as a fairly successful treatment modality, although the underlying mechanism of this salubrious effect is unknown. Drugs, a major focus of clinical and laboratory investigations, sometimes are marginally successful (and sometimes are utter failures). Translated into the neonatal intensive care unit, the disease is more frequently accurately diagnosed than in the past, but it remains frustratingly difficult to manage, and thus far is impossible to prevent. The research foundations laid in the past decade provide impetus for accelerated search into the fundamental cellular and biochemical derangements that cause persistent pulmonary hypertension. It is to be hoped that the next decade will yield major advances in both mechanistic understanding and in treatment.

  2. Dualities in Persistent (Co)Homology

    SciTech Connect

    de Silva, Vin; Morozov, Dmitriy; Vejdemo-Johansson, Mikael

    2011-09-16

    We consider sequences of absolute and relative homology and cohomology groups that arise naturally for a filtered cell complex. We establishalgebraic relationships between their persistence modules, and show that they contain equivalent information. We explain how one can use the existingalgorithm for persistent homology to process any of the four modules, and relate it to a recently introduced persistent cohomology algorithm. Wepresent experimental evidence for the practical efficiency of the latter algorithm.

  3. A model for persistency of egg production.

    PubMed

    Grossman, M; Gossman, T N; Koops, W J

    2000-12-01

    The objectives of our study were to propose a new definition for persistency of egg production and to develop a mathematical model to describe the egg production curve, one that includes a new measure for persistency, based on the proposed definition, for use as a selection criterion to improve total egg production. Persistency of egg production is an important determining factor for total egg production. Hens with the same total production, however, can exhibit different egg production curves because of differences in persistency. We propose a new definition for persistency of egg production: the number of weeks during which a level of constant production is maintained. No egg production model exists that includes a measure of persistency in terms of duration of time or that allows this measure of persistency to be derived from model parameters. It was necessary, therefore, to develop a new model to describe an egg production curve for a flock: equation [see text] and for an individual: equation [see text] where y(t) = egg production at time t, t1 and t2 = times at transition, r = duration of transition, y(p) = level of constant production, b4 = rate of decline in production, and P = persistency of constant production. These parameters measure directly the important biological characteristics of an egg production curve. To illustrate the model, six data sets were used: two from flocks (one pullet flock and one hen flock) and four from two pairs of individuals. The proposed definition of persistency should be important for genetic selection because it might be desirable to select for increased persistency. The novel approach to the definition and measure of persistency presented here should provide a better understanding of the relationship between the new measure of persistency and other characteristics of egg production.

  4. Persistent homology analysis of craze formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichinomiya, Takashi; Obayashi, Ippei; Hiraoka, Yasuaki

    2017-01-01

    We apply a persistent homology analysis to investigate the behavior of nanovoids during the crazing process of glassy polymers. We carry out a coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation of the uniaxial deformation of an amorphous polymer and analyze the results with persistent homology. Persistent homology reveals the void coalescence during craze formation, and the results suggest that the yielding process is regarded as the percolation of nanovoids created by deformation.

  5. Persistence Measures for 2d Soap Froth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Y.; Ruskin, H. J.; Zhu, B.

    Soap froths as typical disordered cellular structures, exhibiting spatial and temporal evolution, have been studied through their distributions and topological properties. Recently, persistence measures, which permit representation of the froth as a two-phase system, have been introduced to study froth dynamics at different length scales. Several aspects of the dynamics may be considered and cluster persistence has been observed through froth experiment. Using a direct simulation method, we have investigated persistent properties in 2D froth both by monitoring the persistence of survivor cells, a topologically independent measure, and in terms of cluster persistence. It appears that the area fraction behavior for both survivor and cluster persistence is similar for Voronoi froth and uniform froth (with defects). Survivor and cluster persistent fractions are also similar for a uniform froth, particularly when geometries are constrained, but differences observed for the Voronoi case appear to be attributable to the strong topological dependency inherent in cluster persistence. Survivor persistence, on the other hand, depends on the number rather than size and position of remaining bubbles and does not exhibit the characteristic decay to zero.

  6. Persistant photoconductivity of strontium titanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poole, Violet Mary

    Strontium titanate (SrTiO3) is a transparent conducting oxide with a range of interesting properties, including a large, temperature-dependent dielectric constant and superconductivity at low temperatures. It has a wide indirect band gap of 3.2 eV at room temperature. Annealing in a reducing atmosphere with additional strontium oxide (SrO) powder at 1200°C results in the creation of native defects. These annealed samples show persistent photoconductivity (PPC) at room temperature, when exposed to light of energy 2.9 eV or greater. The three or more order of magnitude change in resistance persists long after the light is turned off. This effect is attributed to an electron being excited from an acceptor defect, with a large barrier for recapture, to the conduction band. This work investigates many of the changes that occur and factors that affect PPC. The right amount of SrO powder is crucial to the formation of PPC. The presence of some oxygen vacancies is also necessary for PPC; however, too many will mute the dramatic change in resistivity. Peaks at 430 nm and 520 nm appear in the visible region of the spectrum. The peak at 430 nm is due to iron, while the peak at 520 nm has not been identified. The infrared region of the spectrum also shows changes. First, the intensity of the transmitted signal drops significantly after light exposure, due to free carrier absorption. Additionally, a hydrogen line at 3500 cm-1 and satellites are often observed in as-received samples. The satellites disappear during annealing and return during PPC. The hydrogen lines have the same thermal kinetics as the 520 nm peak. Hydrogen lines at 3355 and 3384 cm-1, if present, will prevent PPC. An exposed chip can be erased (i.e. returned to its pre-light exposed state) by using a heat treatment. Erasing and polishing an annealed chip prior to light exposure can result in weakly p-type behavior with high mobility holes ( > 100 cm2/Vs). This is an order of magnitude higher than those

  7. A PILOT STUDY OF CHILDREN'S TOTAL EXPOSURE TO PERSISTENT PESTICIDES AND OTHER PERSISTENT ORGANIC POLLUTANTS (CTEPP)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Pilot Study of Children's Total Exposure to Persistent Pesticides and Other Persistent Organic Pollutants (CTEPP) investigated the aggregate exposures of 257 preschool children and their primary adult caregivers to pollutants commonly detected in their everyday environments. ...

  8. A PILOT STUDY OF CHILDREN'S TOTAL EXPOSURE TO PERSISTENT PESTICIDES AND OTHER PERSISTENT ORGANIC POLLUTANTS (CTEPP)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Pilot Study of Children's Total Exposure to Persistent Pesticides and Other Persistent Organic Pollutants (CTEPP) investigated the aggregate exposures of 257 preschool children and their primary adult caregivers to pollutants commonly detected in their everyday environments. ...

  9. Damage and repair in mammalian cells after exposure to non-ionizing radiations. II. Photoreactivation and killing of rat kangaroo cells (Potorous tridactylus) and Herpes simplex virus-1 by exposure to fluorescent "white" light or sunlight.

    PubMed

    Harm, H

    1980-01-01

    Photoreactivation (PR) of ultraviolet (254 nm)-inactivated cornea cells of the potoroo (or rat kangaroo; Potorous tridacylus) has been studied at wavelengths greater than 375 nm from either fluorescent "white" light or sunlight. In both cases the PR kinetics curves pass through maxima, which most likely result from the superposition of concomitant inactivation by the photoreactivating light. The inactivating effect of light was directly demonstrated for non-UV-irradiated cells, permitting correction of the PR curves. Wavelengths greater than 475 nm, and even greater than 560 nm, which do not noticeably damage cells, still photoreactivate, though less effectively than shorter wavelengths. Light treatment of UV-inactivated Herpes simplex Virus-1 (HSV-1) after infection leads to PR effects resembling those observed for cells, while light treatment of unirradiated virus after infection likewise causes inactivation. The "fluence-reduction factor" of PR, which is greater than 3 for the virus, exceeds that for the cells, where it decreases with increasing UV fluence. In vitro tests have indicated that sunlight greater than 375 nm causes photorepairable DNA lesions which are virtually fully repaired by the same light. Thus cell inactivation resulting from these solar wavelengths must be due to non-photorepairable damage.

  10. Persistence of Undergraduate Women in STEM Fields

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedone, Maggie Helene

    2016-01-01

    The underrepresentation of women in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) is a complex problem that continues to persist at the postsecondary level, particularly in computer science and engineering fields. This dissertation explored the pre-college and college level factors that influenced undergraduate women's persistence in…

  11. Long Persistent Light Emitting Diode Indicators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jia, Dongdong; Ma, Yiwei; Hunter, D. N.

    2007-01-01

    An undergraduate laboratory was designed for undergraduate students to make long persistent light emitting diode (LED) indicators using phosphors. Blue LEDs, which emit at 465 nm, were characterized and used as an excitation source. Long persistent phosphors, SrAl[subscript 2]O[subscript 4]:Eu[superscript 2+],Dy[superscript 3+] (green) and…

  12. Personality Characteristics in Relation to College Persistence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Duane E.

    1970-01-01

    Scales of the Minnesota Counseling Inventory (MCI) were used to compare persisters with nonpersisters. All four comparisons involving the Conformity scale and two of four comparisons involving the Family Relationships scale demonstrated significant differences. Persisters scored lower than nonpersisters on all comparisons involving the Conformity…

  13. Correlated neural variability in persistent state networks.

    PubMed

    Polk, Amber; Litwin-Kumar, Ashok; Doiron, Brent

    2012-04-17

    Neural activity that persists long after stimulus presentation is a biological correlate of short-term memory. Variability in spiking activity causes persistent states to drift over time, ultimately degrading memory. Models of short-term memory often assume that the input fluctuations to neural populations are independent across cells, a feature that attenuates population-level variability and stabilizes persistent activity. However, this assumption is at odds with experimental recordings from pairs of cortical neurons showing that both the input currents and output spike trains are correlated. It remains unclear how correlated variability affects the stability of persistent activity and the performance of cognitive tasks that it supports. We consider the stochastic long-timescale attractor dynamics of pairs of mutually inhibitory populations of spiking neurons. In these networks, persistent activity was less variable when correlated variability was globally distributed across both populations compared with the case when correlations were locally distributed only within each population. Using a reduced firing rate model with a continuum of persistent states, we show that, when input fluctuations are correlated across both populations, they drive firing rate fluctuations orthogonal to the persistent state attractor, thereby causing minimal stochastic drift. Using these insights, we establish that distributing correlated fluctuations globally as opposed to locally improves network's performance on a two-interval, delayed response discrimination task. Our work shows that the correlation structure of input fluctuations to a network is an important factor when determining long-timescale, persistent population spiking activity.

  14. Supplemental Instruction: Supporting Persistence in Barrier Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bronstein, Susan B.

    2008-01-01

    Courses that interfere with undergraduate students' persistence are barriers that appear all along the undergraduate continuum. Supplemental Instruction (SI) may contribute to students' achievement in a barrier course and, therefore, to their persistence in their academic program. The purpose of this single-case descriptive study was to explore…

  15. The meaning of persistent infections in nature

    PubMed Central

    Mims, Cedric A.

    1975-01-01

    Viruses that cause persistent infections maintain themselves more effectively in nature than those causing acute and limited infections. There is a tendency for persistent viruses to evolve towards a state of minimal pathogenicity in the host. Vertical transmission, with integration of viral into host genome, represents the state of perfect parasitism. PMID:1085228

  16. Graduate Student Persistence: Evidence from Three Decades

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gururaj, Suchitra; Heilig, Julian Vasquez; Somers, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    This article conducts a meta-analysis of results of studies by Andrieu (1991), DeAngelis (1998), and Liseo (2005) to assess changes over time in the effects of financial aid and other factors on graduate student persistence. A descriptive review of the studies finds that combination aid packages encouraged persistence in 1987 (Andrieu, 1991),…

  17. Long Persistent Light Emitting Diode Indicators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jia, Dongdong; Ma, Yiwei; Hunter, D. N.

    2007-01-01

    An undergraduate laboratory was designed for undergraduate students to make long persistent light emitting diode (LED) indicators using phosphors. Blue LEDs, which emit at 465 nm, were characterized and used as an excitation source. Long persistent phosphors, SrAl[subscript 2]O[subscript 4]:Eu[superscript 2+],Dy[superscript 3+] (green) and…

  18. Persistence of Undergraduate Women in STEM Fields

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedone, Maggie Helene

    2016-01-01

    The underrepresentation of women in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) is a complex problem that continues to persist at the postsecondary level, particularly in computer science and engineering fields. This dissertation explored the pre-college and college level factors that influenced undergraduate women's persistence in…

  19. Counseling on Campus: Client Persistence and Progress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucas, Margaretha S.

    2012-01-01

    Two related studies addressed college students' persistence and progress in psychotherapy. In Study 1, using emotional health variables assessed at intake, students who persisted in counseling and demonstrated clinical improvement were compared with those who either did not return for their first session or who did return but stopped before…

  20. STEM Field Persistence: The Impact of Engagement on Postsecondary STEM Persistence for Underrepresented Minority Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flynn, Daniel T.

    2016-01-01

    Persistence studies in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) fields indicate that the pipeline to degree attainment is "leaky" and underrepresented minorities are not persisting in the STEM fields. Those students who do not persist in the STEM fields either migrate to other fields of study or drop out of higher education…

  1. The long persistence length of model tubules.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Mark J

    2017-07-28

    Young's elastic modulus and the persistence length are calculated for a coarse-grained model of tubule forming polymers. The model uses a wedge shaped composite of particles that previously has been shown to self-assemble into tubules. These calculations demonstrate that the model yields very large persistence lengths (corresponding to 78-126 μm) that are comparable to that observed in experiments for the microtubule lengths accessible to the calculations. The source for the stiffness is the restricted rotation of the monomer due to the excluded volume interactions between bonded macromolecular monomers as well as the binding between monomers. For this reason, large persistence lengths are common in tubule systems with a macromolecule as the monomer. The persistence length increases linearly with increased binding strength in the filament direction. No dependence in the persistence length is found for varying the tubule pitch for geometries with the protofilaments remaining straight.

  2. Pretreatment task persistence predicts smoking cessation outcome.

    PubMed

    Brandon, Thomas H; Herzog, Thaddeus A; Juliano, Laura M; Irvin, Jennifer E; Lazev, Amy B; Simmons, Vani Nath

    2003-08-01

    R. Eisenberger's (1992) learned industriousness theory states that individuals display differing degrees of persistence depending on their history of reinforcement for effortful behavior. These differences may influence the development, maintenance, and cessation of addictive behaviors. In cross-sectional studies, E. P. Quinn, T. H. Brandon, and A. L. Copeland (1996) found that cigarette smokers were less persistent than nonsmokers, and R. A. Brown, C. W. Lejuez, C. W. Kahler, and D. R. Strong (2002) found that smokers who had previously abstained for 3 months were more persistent than those who had never quit. The present study extended these findings by using a prospective design. A pretreatment measure of task persistence (mirror tracing) completed by 144 smokers predicted sustained abstinence throughout 12 months of follow-up. Moreover, persistence predicted outcome independent of other significant predictors: gender, nicotine dependence, negative affect, and self-efficacy.

  3. The long persistence length of model tubules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Mark J.

    2017-07-01

    Young's elastic modulus and the persistence length are calculated for a coarse-grained model of tubule forming polymers. The model uses a wedge shaped composite of particles that previously has been shown to self-assemble into tubules. These calculations demonstrate that the model yields very large persistence lengths (corresponding to 78-126 μ m) that are comparable to that observed in experiments for the microtubule lengths accessible to the calculations. The source for the stiffness is the restricted rotation of the monomer due to the excluded volume interactions between bonded macromolecular monomers as well as the binding between monomers. For this reason, large persistence lengths are common in tubule systems with a macromolecule as the monomer. The persistence length increases linearly with increased binding strength in the filament direction. No dependence in the persistence length is found for varying the tubule pitch for geometries with the protofilaments remaining straight.

  4. Drought Persistence in Models and Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Heewon; Gudmundsson, Lukas; Seneviratne, Sonia

    2017-04-01

    Many regions of the world have experienced drought events that persisted several years and caused substantial economic and ecological impacts in the 20th century. However, it remains unclear whether there are significant trends in the frequency or severity of these prolonged drought events. In particular, an important issue is linked to systematic biases in the representation of persistent drought events in climate models, which impedes analysis related to the detection and attribution of drought trends. This study assesses drought persistence errors in global climate model (GCM) simulations from the 5th phase of Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5), in the period of 1901-2010. The model simulations are compared with five gridded observational data products. The analysis focuses on two aspects: the identification of systematic biases in the models and the partitioning of the spread of drought-persistence-error into four possible sources of uncertainty: model uncertainty, observation uncertainty, internal climate variability and the estimation error of drought persistence. We use monthly and yearly dry-to-dry transition probabilities as estimates for drought persistence with drought conditions defined as negative precipitation anomalies. For both time scales we find that most model simulations consistently underestimated drought persistence except in a few regions such as India and Eastern South America. Partitioning the spread of the drought-persistence-error shows that at the monthly time scale model uncertainty and observation uncertainty are dominant, while the contribution from internal variability does play a minor role in most cases. At the yearly scale, the spread of the drought-persistence-error is dominated by the estimation error, indicating that the partitioning is not statistically significant, due to a limited number of considered time steps. These findings reveal systematic errors in the representation of drought persistence in current

  5. Persistent photosensitivity caused by musk ambrette.

    PubMed

    Zugerman, C

    1981-07-01

    Persistent photosensitivity developed in a man after use of an after-shave lotion containing musk ambrette. His eruption, present over ligh-exposed areas of the face, the "V" area of the neck, and the dorsa of the hands, has persisted for more than three years despite therapy. The patient demonstrated a minimal erythema after an ultraviolet B dose of 5 s, and was strongly ultraviolet A photosensitive to a 2% musk ambrette solution in petrolatum and to the after-shave lotion that contained musk ambrette. A persistent light reactivity induced by musk ambrette has most likely developed in this patient.

  6. Persistent Ice on Lake Superior

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-27

    Though North America is a full month into astronomical spring, the Great Lakes have been slow to give up on winter. As of April 22, 2014, the Great Lakes were 33.9 percent ice covered. The lake they call Superior dominated the pack. In the early afternoon on April 20, 2014, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Aqua satellite captured this natural-color image of Lake Superior, which straddles the United States–Canada border. At the time Aqua passed over, the lake was 63.5 percent ice covered, according to the NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Lab (GLERL). Averaged across Lake Superior, ice was 22.6 centimeters (8.9 inches) thick; it was as much as twice that thickness in some locations. GLERL researcher George Leshkevich affirmed that ice cover this spring is significantly above normal. For comparison, Lake Superior had 3.6 percent ice cover on April 20, 2013; in 2012, ice was completely gone by April 12. In the last winter that ice cover grew so thick on Lake Superior (2009), it reached 93.7 percent on March 2 but was down to 6.7 percent by April 21. Average water temperatures on all of the Great Lakes have been rising over the past 30 to 40 years and ice cover has generally been shrinking. (Lake Superior ice was down about 79 percent since the 1970s.) But chilled by persistent polar air masses throughout the 2013-14 winter, ice cover reached 88.4 percent on February 13 and 92.2 percent on March 6, 2014, the second highest level in four decades of record-keeping. Air temperatures in the Great Lakes region were well below normal for March, and the cool pattern is being reinforced along the coasts because the water is absorbing less sunlight and warming less than in typical spring conditions. The graph below, based on data from Environment Canada, shows the 2014 conditions for all of the Great Lakes in mid-April compared to the past 33 years. Lake Superior ice cover got as high as 95.3 percent on March 19. By April 22, it was

  7. Persistence of Antibiotic Resistance Plasmids in Biofilms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    useful in the care of patients with combat-related wound infections. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Antibiotic resistance, plasmid, biofilm, coevolution , bacteria...Antibiotic!resistance,!plasmid,!biofilm,! coevolution ,!bacteria,!wound!infections! ! ! ! 3! 3. OVERALL PROJECT SUMMARY: The! successful! persistence

  8. The persistent stereotype: children's images of scientists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emens McAdam, Janice

    1990-03-01

    Through their reading children learn to regard scientists as eccentrics. It is shown that this stereotype has persisted for over thirty years and affects many adult attitudes. Some methods of breaking the author-reader cycle are suggested.

  9. Stimuli, Reinforcers, and the Persistence of Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nevin, John A.

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews evidence from basic and translational research with pigeons and humans suggesting that the persistence of operant behavior depends on the contingency between stimuli and reinforcers, and considers some implications for clinical interventions. (Contains 4 figures.)

  10. Stimuli, Reinforcers, and the Persistence of Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nevin, John A.

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews evidence from basic and translational research with pigeons and humans suggesting that the persistence of operant behavior depends on the contingency between stimuli and reinforcers, and considers some implications for clinical interventions. (Contains 4 figures.)

  11. Atypical persistence of tunica vasculosa lentis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ashima V; Chhabra, Manpreet S; Mets, Marilyn B

    2008-01-01

    The authors report an unusual case of persistent tunica vasculosa lentis in a patient with minimal retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). A 3-month-old male infant who had been born at 31 weeks' gestation presented with a significant amount of persistent tunica vasculosa lentis and arteriolar tortuosity with minimal ROP and no plus disease. After weekly observation and no surgical intervention, the arteriolar tortuosity lessened but the tunica vasculosa lentis persisted. Persistent tunica vasculosa lentis can be mistaken for iris vascular engorgement, suggesting plus disease and high-risk prethreshold ROP. Differentiation between tunica vasculosa lentis and iris vascular engorgement, as well as correct diagnosis of plus disease, is critical when considering laser treatment for high-risk prethreshold ROP.

  12. Persistent Pain May Lead to Memory Troubles

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_166304.html Persistent Pain May Lead to Memory Troubles Study even suggests link between chronic aches ... to changes in the brain that contribute to memory problems. The findings may also point to new ...

  13. Persistent homology analysis of phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donato, Irene; Gori, Matteo; Pettini, Marco; Petri, Giovanni; De Nigris, Sarah; Franzosi, Roberto; Vaccarino, Francesco

    2016-05-01

    Persistent homology analysis, a recently developed computational method in algebraic topology, is applied to the study of the phase transitions undergone by the so-called mean-field XY model and by the ϕ4 lattice model, respectively. For both models the relationship between phase transitions and the topological properties of certain submanifolds of configuration space are exactly known. It turns out that these a priori known facts are clearly retrieved by persistent homology analysis of dynamically sampled submanifolds of configuration space.

  14. Persistent and Recurrent Clostridium difficile Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Shola A.; Stahl, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is the most frequent cause of nosocomial diarrhea. It has become a significant dilemma in the treatment of patients, and causes increasing morbidity that, in extreme cases, may result in death. Persistent and recurrent disease hamper attempts at eradication of this infection. Escalating levels of treatment and novel therapeutics are being utilized and developed to treat CDI. Further trials are warranted to definitively determine what protocols can be used to treat persistent and recurrent disease. PMID:26034401

  15. Persistent homology analysis of phase transitions.

    PubMed

    Donato, Irene; Gori, Matteo; Pettini, Marco; Petri, Giovanni; De Nigris, Sarah; Franzosi, Roberto; Vaccarino, Francesco

    2016-05-01

    Persistent homology analysis, a recently developed computational method in algebraic topology, is applied to the study of the phase transitions undergone by the so-called mean-field XY model and by the ϕ^{4} lattice model, respectively. For both models the relationship between phase transitions and the topological properties of certain submanifolds of configuration space are exactly known. It turns out that these a priori known facts are clearly retrieved by persistent homology analysis of dynamically sampled submanifolds of configuration space.

  16. Wolf population persistence in real life

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mech, L.D.; Liberg, O.

    2005-01-01

    Wolf (Canis lupus) populations tend to be resilient and to persist for long periods, and several characteristics contribute to their resilience and persistence: (1) age of first reproduction (2-3 years), (2) high annual litter size (mean = 6), (3) low dispersal age (1-3 years), and (4) long potential dispersal distance (< 880 km). The only documented factor leading to extinction of well established wolf populations with sufficient food is deliberate poisoning, although conceivably disease could have such an effect.

  17. [Therapeutic approach in persistent diabetic macular edema].

    PubMed

    Brănişteanu, Daniel; Moraru, Andreea

    2014-01-01

    Terminology of persistent diabetic macular edema has been initially reserved to cases unresponsive to conventional laser photocoagulation according to ETDRS criteria. While knowledge about pathophysiology of macular edema evolved and new drugs became available, the terminology of persistent diabetic macular edema expanded to include resistance to most current therapies. The purpose of this paper is to review medical and surgical options in the treatment of such difficult cases according to literature data and personal experience.

  18. Persistence of the Lower Stratospheric Polar Vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waugh, Darryn W.; Randel, William J.; Pawson, Steven; Newman, Paul A.; Nash, Eric R.

    1999-01-01

    The persistence of the Arctic and Antarctic lower stratospheric vortices is examined over the period 1958 to 1998. Three different vortex-following diagnostics (two using potential vorticity and one based solely on the zonal winds) are compared, and shown to give very similar results for the break up date. The variability in the timing of the breakup of each vortex is qualitatively the same: there are large interannual variations together with smaller decadal-scale variations and there is a significant increase in the persistence since the mid-1980s (all variations are larger for the Arctic vortex). Also, in both hemispheres there is a high correlation between the persistence and the strength and coldness of the spring vortex, with all quantities having the same interannual and decadal variability. However, there is no such correlation between the persistence and the characteristics of the mid-winter vortex. In the northern hemisphere there is also a high correlation between the vortex persistence and the upper tropospheric/lower stratospheric eddy heat flux averaged over the two months prior to the breakup. This indicates that the variability in the wave activity entering the stratosphere over late-winter to early-spring plays a key role in the variability of the vortex persistence (and spring polar temperatures) on both interannual and decadal time scales. However, the decadal variation in the Arctic vortex coldness and persistence for the 1990's falls outside the range of natural variability, while this is not the case for the eddy heat flux. This suggests that the recent increase in vortex persistence is not due solely to changes in the wave activity entering the stratosphere.

  19. Persistence of the Lower Stratospheric Polar Vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waugh, Darryn W.; Randel, William J.; Pawson, Steven; Newman, Paul A.; Nash, Eric R.

    1999-01-01

    The persistence of the Arctic and Antarctic lower stratospheric vortices is examined over the period 1958 to 1998. Three different vortex-following diagnostics (two using potential vorticity and one based solely on the zonal winds) are compared, and shown to give very similar results for the break up date. The variability in the timing of the breakup of each vortex is qualitatively the same: there are large interannual variations together with smaller decadal-scale variations and there is a significant increase in the persistence since the mid-1980s (all variations are larger for the Arctic vortex). Also, in both hemispheres there is a high correlation between the persistence and the strength and coldness of the spring vortex, with all quantities having the same interannual and decadal variability. However, there is no such correlation between the persistence and the characteristics of the mid-winter vortex. In the northern hemisphere there is also a high correlation between the vortex persistence and the upper tropospheric/lower stratospheric eddy heat flux averaged over the two months prior to the breakup. This indicates that the variability in the wave activity entering the stratosphere over late-winter to early-spring plays a key role in the variability of the vortex persistence (and spring polar temperatures) on both interannual and decadal time scales. However, the decadal variation in the Arctic vortex coldness and persistence for the 1990's falls outside the range of natural variability, while this is not the case for the eddy heat flux. This suggests that the recent increase in vortex persistence is not due solely to changes in the wave activity entering the stratosphere.

  20. Persistent homology in graph power filtrations

    PubMed Central

    Marchette, David J.

    2016-01-01

    The persistence of homological features in simplicial complex representations of big datasets in Rn resulting from Vietoris–Rips or Čech filtrations is commonly used to probe the topological structure of such datasets. In this paper, the notion of homological persistence in simplicial complexes obtained from power filtrations of graphs is introduced. Specifically, the rth complex, r ≥ 1, in such a power filtration is the clique complex of the rth power Gr of a simple graph G. Because the graph distance in G is the relevant proximity parameter, unlike a Euclidean filtration of a dataset where regional scale differences can be an issue, persistence in power filtrations provides a scale-free insight into the topology of G. It is shown that for a power filtration of G, the girth of G defines an r range over which the homology of the complexes in the filtration are guaranteed to persist in all dimensions. The role of chordal graphs as trivial homology delimiters in power filtrations is also discussed and the related notions of ‘persistent triviality’, ‘transient noise’ and ‘persistent periodicity’ in power filtrations are introduced. PMID:27853540