Science.gov

Sample records for continental army 1775-1781

  1. A Short History of the U.S. Army Adjutant General’s Corps, 1775-2013

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    of the Continental Army that General George Washington would command for the duration of the war against Great Britain, 1775-1781. On 16 June 1775...the Korean War eventually forced the school to move to Fort Benjamin Harrison, Indiana, in March 1951.29 Brigadier General Herbert C...Mouseketter on the Mickey Brigadier General Herbert C. Holdridge 1st Commandant, AGS 1942-1943 35 Mouse Club, and second, as Wally Cleaver’s

  2. 32 CFR Appendix G to Part 623 - Continental US Army Boundaries

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Continental US Army Boundaries G Appendix G to Part 623 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY SUPPLIES AND EQUIPMENT LOAN OF ARMY MATERIEL Pt. 623, App. G Appendix G to Part 623—Continental US Army...

  3. 32 CFR Appendix G to Part 623 - Continental US Army Boundaries

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2012-07-01 2009-07-01 true Continental US Army Boundaries G Appendix G to Part 623 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY SUPPLIES AND EQUIPMENT LOAN OF ARMY MATERIEL Pt. 623, App. G Appendix G to Part 623—Continental US Army...

  4. 32 CFR Appendix G to Part 623 - Continental US Army Boundaries

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Continental US Army Boundaries G Appendix G to Part 623 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY SUPPLIES AND EQUIPMENT LOAN OF ARMY MATERIEL Pt. 623, App. G Appendix G to Part 623—Continental US Army...

  5. 32 CFR Appendix G to Part 623 - Continental US Army Boundaries

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Continental US Army Boundaries G Appendix G to Part 623 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY SUPPLIES AND EQUIPMENT LOAN OF ARMY MATERIEL Pt. 623, App. G Appendix G to Part 623—Continental US Army...

  6. 32 CFR Appendix G to Part 623 - Continental US Army Boundaries

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Continental US Army Boundaries G Appendix G to Part 623 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY SUPPLIES AND EQUIPMENT LOAN OF ARMY MATERIEL Pt. 623, App. G Appendix G to Part 623—Continental US Army Boundaries...

  7. Army Materiel Requirements to Support the Continental United States Military Mobilization Base Structure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-10-01

    Materiel Command AMOPS ............. Army Mobilization and Operations Planning System AMPC .............. Army Military Personnel Center AR...must train. The Army Military Personnel Center ( AMPC ) uses an automated mobilization manpower (MOB MAN) requirements data manipulator system to

  8. Army Materiel Requirements to Support the Continental United States Military Mobilization Base Structure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-10-01

    Level of Organization AMC ............... Army Materiel Command AMOPS ............. Army Mobilization and Operations Planning System AMPC ...Military Personnel Center ( AMPC ) uses an automated mobilization manpower (MOB MAN) requirements data manipulator system to prepare time- phased

  9. Organization and Functions: Major Army Commands in the Continental United States

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-10-30

    analysis element ( TCAE ) t h a t p r o v i d e s S I G I N T t e c h n i c a l s u p p o r t a n d p r o p o s e d m i s s i o n steerage to all TROJAN...Army Involvement in Recruiting TAQ Total Army Quality TAREX target exploitation TCAE technical control and analysis element TDA tables of distribution

  10. Regional methamphetamine use among U.S. Army personnel stationed in the continental United States and Hawaii: a six-year retrospective study (2000-2005).

    PubMed

    Lacy, Benjamin W; Ditzler, Thomas F; Wilson, Raymond S; Martin, Thomas M; Ochikubo, Jon T; Roussel, Robert R; Pizarro-Matos, Jose M; Vazquez, Raymond

    2008-04-01

    Substance use disorders constitute a serious and persistent threat to military readiness and to the health and safety of military personnel and their families. Methamphetamine is among the most addictive and damaging of commonly abused drugs; this is of great concern for military health providers in Hawaii due to the unusually high prevalence in the local community. The effect of regional drug use on active duty subpopulations has not been previously studied. This study includes a 6-year retrospective sample of laboratory-confirmed methamphetamine-, cocaine-, and marijuana-positive drug tests among Army soldiers stationed in Hawaii and western and eastern continental U.S. installations. The findings suggest that active duty members are significantly affected by the local drug climate. However, current military drug policies also deter use as evidenced by low absolute drug-positive rates even in regions of high civilian prevalence.

  11. The Saratoga Campaign: Maneuver Warfare, The Continental Army, and the Birth of the American Way of War

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-04-12

    13 Higgenbotham, pg 12. 14 Peter G. Tsouras, Warriors Words: A Quotation Book (London: Arms and Armour Press, 1992), pg 262. 7 Strategic...from Canada was a rudimentary road that led east from Lake Ontario down the Mohawk Valley. The American Plan The Americans knew that the British would... Society 11 The commander responsible for the defense of Fort Ticonderoga was a veteran officer who had served in the British Army, General Arthur

  12. Of the People...U.S. History, 1600-1988. An English as a Second Language Text.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Short, Deborah J., Ed.; And Others

    This textbook for English as a Second Language (ESL) students presents 29 lessons on United States history. The lessons cover the following topics: the New World; two permanent colonies; the 13 colonies; the colonies and England; the Declaration of Independence and the Continental Congresses; Revolutionary War, 1775-1781; Articles of…

  13. General George Washington; Exemplar-in-Chief: A Historical Analysis of George Washington’s Influence on the Early Continental Army and Civil Military Relations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    only by elitist planters and prominent businessmen but by the growing American middle class and its farmers, merchants , and shopkeepers. By 1775, when...because he realized that by adopting a more defensive posture , he could prolong the survival of the army. If the army survived, the revolution survived...even get a simple muster report on troop strength. Poor hygiene , disease, drunkenness, fraternization, unruliness and belligerence were common

  14. An Analysis of Army Contract Administration With Regard to Contracting Officers Representatives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-01

    REGARD TO CONTRACTING OFFICER’S REPRESENTATIVES 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR(S) Tanya V. Peel and Angel R. Acevedo 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME...maximum 200 words) This research project examines Army contract administration procedures in the Continental United States (CONUS) and Outside Continental...ABSTRACT This research project examines Army contract administration procedures in the Continental United States (CONUS) and Outside

  15. Larger Units: Theater Army, Army Group, Field Army

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-09-01

    LARGER UNITS: Theater Army, Army Group , Field Army St Fort LeawiivfoW, Kansas /A ’j>’" /\\(7 ’"VX <\\,» •«:-•$-(••’•.•->’-:-j Report...TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-1984 to 00-00-1984 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Larger Units: Theater Army, Army Group , Field Army 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b...Bibliography No. 4 LARGER UNITS: THEATER ARMY—ARMY GROUP —FIELD ARMY by LTC Gary L. Bounds Combat Studies Institute U.S. Army Command and General Staff

  16. Army Medical Imaging System - ARMIS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-08-08

    The Army Medical Imaging System (ARMIS) would use optical data cards, discs and small computers to perform the required functions of image...a filmless medical imaging system based on stimulable x-ray phosphors and optical data cards. Advantages of the system would be elimination of film

  17. A Comparative Study of Job Burnout in Army Public Affairs Commissioned Officers and Department of the Army Civilians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brokke, Mervin E., Jr.

    A study examined whether commissioned public affairs officers show more instances of job burnout than Department of the Army civilians serving in the Army public affairs positions. Surveys were sent to all public affairs officers working in offices in the continental United States. Of the 399 survey packets mailed to the 56 public affairs offices,…

  18. Continental shelves

    SciTech Connect

    Postma, H.; Zijlstra

    1987-01-01

    Continental shelves form a relatively narrow fringe, of varying width, around the continents. Altogether they take up only about 7% of the ocean's surface and less than 0.2% if its volume. Nevertheless, their specific biological characteristics and economical importance justify a separate discussion in this series. Ecosystems of the World. The specific biological characteristics are due to the position of continental shelves between the land masses on one side and the oceans on the other, to their relative shallowness and variable sea-floor texture and to the fact that, besides residual currents, tidal streams exert a great influence on the movements of water bodies.

  19. Army dreamers.

    PubMed

    1988-05-14

    The birth of the Army Nursing Service took place in 1854, when Florence Nightingale, at the request of the Secretary of State for War, recruited and took to Scutari Hospital 38 women to tend the wounded of the Crimean war.

  20. Army Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-01

    SOLDIER PUBLIC AFFAIRS 16 COMMON OPERATING ENVIRONMENT Sensors move the Army one step closer to foundational software architecture . BY EDRIC THOMPSON...coming from smart sensors continues to be a scientific chal- lenge. Researchers are developing solutions to introduce a common architecture that...pressure and cognitive delays from lack of sleep . The Chief of Staff of the Army vision has mentioned, “Our modernization programs will remain

  1. Army Robotics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-07

    Army Robotics 07 October 2009 Dr. Grant Gerhart, Senior Research Scientist Bernard Theisen, Joint Center for Robotics DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A... Robots 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Grant Gerhart; Bernard Theisen 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK...CBRNE • IED Defeat Systems • Disarm / Disrupt • Reconnaissance • Investigation • Explosive Sniffer • Common Robotic Kit • EOD • Convoy • Log

  2. Army Personnel System Analyses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1968-12-01

    Allen Mr. Mike Redgrave PAMSIM Applied Research, Inc. OPXAA LTC Delyle Redmond Army Aviation OPAR LTC William Rousse Aviator Assignment OPXAA LTC Billy...Rutherford Army Aviation OPEN MAJ Thomas Sands Army Aviation OPAT LTC John Schnibben Army Aviation OPIN LTC Daniel Sharp Officer Assignment- DATCOM

  3. Improving the Quality and Personnel Fill Rates of U.S. Army Reserve Units

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    March 2005. [12] Hogg, R . V . and E. A. Tanis, Probability and Statistical Inference, 3rd Edition. New York, NY: Macmillan Publishing Company, 1988...Chairman, Department of Operations Research iv THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK v ABSTRACT The most...Combat Service Support CMA- R Competitive Market Analysis – Reserve CONUS Continental United States CONUSA Continental United States Army CPS

  4. Army Aviation Equipment Useful Life Cost Benefit Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    Continental United States DoD Department of Defense EIS Executive Information System ELAS Electronic Logbook Automation System FEDLOG Federal...Electronic Logbook Automation System ( ELAS ), and the Standard Army Information System (STAMIS). A large amount of data is available for the different

  5. Army Airmobility Handbook

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1967-03-01

    8217 - . . . ’ B s v ia l C p Best Available Copy DEPARTMENT OF THI ARMY "ARI FIELD UNIT. BENNING U ARMY HLSLARCH INSTITUTE FOR 7HE BEHAVIORAL AND SOCIAL SCIENCES...and Army flare aircraft should be on station for immediate employment. Search light helicopters (Lightning Bug , see Glossary) may be used and assigned...may be provided by Lightning Bug aircraft or illuminating flares from mortars, artillery, or Air Force/Army aircraft. (2) Artillery should be used more

  6. Army Efficiency Initiatives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-28

    directed the military services to incorporate Total Quality Management ( TQM ) principles throughout their organizations. Beginning in 1992, Total Army...Quality (TAQ) was the Army’s new management philosophy, responding to the DOD TQM mandate. This was a significant change of the Army’s culture. In...business practices to meet the Army’s current challenges, it must be determined if TQM is an effective management tool and more importantly if TAQ is

  7. Army Posture Statement 2007

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-02-14

    and overhead. We are now well underway in deploying the Lean Six Sigma methodology as a vehicle to seek continuous process improvement, eliminate...and morale. • Implemented Lean Six Sigma methodology within all Army Commands, Direct Reporting Units, Army Service Components of Joint Commands...between 2007 and 2013. • Implemented Lean Six Sigma methodology within all Army Commands, Direct Reporting Units, Army Service Components of Joint

  8. Army Programs: Army Lessons Learned Program: System Development and Application

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-10-10

    Army Regulation 11–33 Army Programs Army Lessons Learned Program : System Development and Application Headquarters Department of the Army Washington...Army Programs: Army Lessons Learned Program : System Development and Application Contract Number Grant Number Program Element Number Author(s...Pages 14 SUMMARY of CHANGE AR 11–33 Army Lessons Learned Program : System Development and Application This revision-- o Establishes a system to identify

  9. Army Programs: The Army Respiratory Protection Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    leak testing • 3–5, page 4 Maintenance and care of respirators • 3–6, page 4 Procedures for routine worksite inspections • 3–7, page 4 Air quality • 3–8...training provided the DA safety policy for training in smoke is observed. (b) When training and field operations require entrance into con- fined spaces...the Army Respiratory Protection Program as required by law and AR 385–10. 2–3. Commanders of major Army commands Commanders of major Army commands

  10. Continental United States Military Housing Inspection National Capital Region

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-13

    S T 1 3 , 2 0 1 5 Continental United States Military Housing Inspections– National Capital Region Report No. DODIG-2015-162 Mission Our mission...W a s t e & A b u s e DODIG-2015-162 (Project No. D2014-DT0TAD-0005) │ i Results in Brief Continental United States Military Housing Inspection...National Capital Region Visit us at www.dodig.mil Objective Our objective was to inspect DoD military housing in United States Army Garrison (USAG

  11. ARMY CYBER STRUCTURE ALIGNMENT

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-02-16

    Meade , Maryland. USCYBERCOM also has operational command relationships with each of the services’ cyber components that include: Army Cyber Command...domains and deny the same to adversarial forces.36 Lt. Gen. George Flynn, the deputy commandant commanding the Marine Corps Combat Development Command at...www.arcyber.army.mil/Organization/ARCYBERHistory . 12 US Army Cyber Command, “ARCYBER the Next Battlefield,” briefing slides, Ft. Meade , MD, December 10, 2013

  12. Army Space and Transformation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    space mission area that stretches back to the 1940s. The Army established doctrine for conducting space operations in support of the Objective Force. This thesis explains why the Army is involved in space from historical, doctrinal and policy perspectives. The Army created force structure for Space Support Elements (SSE) at the tactical level and organic to Division headquarters, and has planned and proposed additional space elements at the Brigade, Corps and Army organizational levels. The FA40, (Space Operations), Career Field is a relatively new personnel category that

  13. Freshly brewed continental crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazel, E.; Hayes, J. L.; Caddick, M. J.; Madrigal, P.

    2015-12-01

    Earth's crust is the life-sustaining interface between our planet's deep interior and surface. Basaltic crusts similar to Earth's oceanic crust characterize terrestrial planets in the solar system while the continental masses, areas of buoyant, thick silicic crust, are a unique characteristic of Earth. Therefore, understanding the processes responsible for the formation of continents is fundamental to reconstructing the evolution of our planet. We use geochemical and geophysical data to reconstruct the evolution of the Central American Land Bridge (Costa Rica and Panama) over the last 70 Ma. We also include new preliminary data from a key turning point (~12-6 Ma) from the evolution from an oceanic arc depleted in incompatible elements to a juvenile continental mass in order to evaluate current models of continental crust formation. We also discovered that seismic P-waves (body waves) travel through the crust at velocities closer to the ones observed in continental crust worldwide. Based on global statistical analyses of all magmas produced today in oceanic arcs compared to the global average composition of continental crust we developed a continental index. Our goal was to quantitatively correlate geochemical composition with the average P-wave velocity of arc crust. We suggest that although the formation and evolution of continents may involve many processes, melting enriched oceanic crust within a subduction zone, a process probably more common in the Achaean where most continental landmasses formed, can produce the starting material necessary for juvenile continental crust formation.

  14. Assessing the Army Profession

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    pointed questions voiced during Unified Quest 2010 to General (Retired) Fred Franks and the Chief of Staff of the Army, General George Casey. The...Leading vs Leaving: Lack of Development Up the Chain Prompts Many Soldiers to Get Out,” Army Times, May 23, 2011, 16-17; Michelle Tan and Joe Gould , “Toxic

  15. Physical Fitness Symposium, 12-14 October 1970, United States Army Infantry School, Fort Benning, Georgia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1970-10-14

    This is the basic aecnanisa of knee injury. Further activities that stretch the knee ligaasnts, such as full squat Jumps and full squats in weight...evaluate the Army’s physical fitnees test programs. AUTHGRITTt N The Commanding General, Headquarters, United States Continental Army Command...VI. The Knee Joint Structure, Function, end Liaita- VII. Selection of Physical Fitness Test Events — Dr. Flttishaan —————— ——----—•---—— ■ VIII

  16. Continental drift before 1900.

    PubMed

    Rupke, N A

    1970-07-25

    The idea that Francis Bacon and other seventeenth and eighteenth century thinkers first conceived the notion of continental drift does not stand up to close scrutiny. The few authors who expressed the idea viewed the process as a catastrophic event.

  17. Army Contract Writing System (ACWS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-01

    2016 Major Automated Information System Annual Report Army Contract Writing System (ACWS) Defense Acquisition Management Information Retrieval...Program Information Program Name Army Contract Writing System (ACWS) DoD Component Army Responsible Office Program Manager References MAIS... management , execution, and close-out software system . ACWS will facilitate the standardization of Army Procurement business processes and streamline

  18. The Army Needs to Improve Individual Soldier Training in Its Units. Report to the Congress by the Comptroller General of the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comptroller General of the U.S., Washington, DC.

    A study was conducted to determine whether unit level individual skill training is being provided to prepare Army enlisted personnel to perform critical job tasks within their military occupational specialty (MOS). The General Accounting Office reviewed the Army's skill training programs at 10 active units in the continental United States and five…

  19. Index to Army Times 1991

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-08-01

    1991; 51(26): p. 6. ARMY--REORGANIZATION Investigators chaLLenge cadre concept. Army Times; Sept. 30, 1991; 52(9): p. 6. ARROW (MISSILE)-- ISRAEL ...p. 10. NUTRITION--RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT Tickling palates with pizza, pouch bread. Army Times; Nov. 18, 1991; 52(16): p. 10. OBESITY Poor...Aviators awarded. Army Times; June 24, 1991; 51(48): p. 15. Honoring Patriot crews in Israel . Army Times; Apr. 1, 1991; 51(35): p. 17. House passes

  20. Army thermophotovoltaic efforts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruger, John S.; Guazzoni, Guido; Nawrocki, Selma J.

    1999-03-01

    A presentation and description of the several efforts in Thermophotovoltaic (TPV) Energy Conversion for power generation supported/monitored by the Army is provided with their more recent technical status and results. The efforts are related to small business (SBIR, STTR) contracts, academic research grants (MURI), and contracts awarded as the result of specialized solicitations. This paper covers a number of Army potential uses of the TPV power generation and is an attempt to give a more cohesive and integrated picture of the various military interests in TPV. With the exception of low power (<10 W) units, all Army potential uses of TPV power sources will demand operation with logistically available fuels.

  1. Raising the continental crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Ian H.; Davies, D. Rhodri

    2017-02-01

    The changes that occur at the boundary between the Archean and Proterozoic eons are arguably the most fundamental to affect the evolution of Earth's continental crust. The principal component of Archean continental crust is Granite-Greenstone Terranes (GGTs), with granites always dominant. The greenstones consist of a lower sequence of submarine komatiites and basalts, which erupted onto a pre-existing Tonalite-Trondhjemite-Granodiorite (TTG) crust. These basaltic rocks pass upwards initially into evolved volcanic rocks, such as andesites and dacites and, subsequently, into reworked felsic pyroclastic material and immature sediments. This transition coincides with widespread emplacement of granitoids, which stabilised (cratonised) the continental crust. Proterozoic supra-crustal rocks, on the other hand, are dominated by extensive flat-lying platform sequences of mature sediments, which were deposited on stable cratonic basements, with basaltic rocks appreciably less abundant. The siliceous TTGs cannot be produced by direct melting of the mantle, with most hypotheses for their origin requiring them to be underlain by a complimentary dense amphibole-garnet-pyroxenite root, which we suggest acted as ballast to the early continents. Ubiquitous continental pillow basalts in Archean lower greenstone sequences require the early continental crust to have been sub-marine, whereas the appearance of abundant clastic sediments, at higher stratigraphic levels, shows that it had emerged above sea level by the time of sedimentation. We hypothesise that the production of komatiites and associated basalts, the rise of the continental crust, widespread melting of the continental crust, the onset of sedimentation and subsequent cratonisation form a continuum that is the direct result of removal of the continent's dense amphibole-garnet-pyroxenite roots, triggered at a regional scale by the arrival of a mantle plume at the base of the lithosphere. Our idealised calculations suggest

  2. Army Medical Robotics Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    Army Medical Robotics Research Gary Gilbert, Ph.D., U.S. Army TATRC, Ph: (301) 619-4043, Fax: (301) 619-2518 gilbert@tatrc.org, www.tatrc.org...politically sensitive low intensity combat in urban terrain. Research progress has been made in the areas of robotics ; artificial intelligence...institutions have demonstrated intelligent robots that execute functions ranging from performing mechanical repairs to playing soccer. The military has

  3. Army Digitization Operational Impacts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-06-01

    Army Digitization Operational Impacts Fred P. Stein MITRE Corporation HQS III Corps & Fort Hood ATTN: AFZF-DFCC Bldg. 1001, Rm. 316W Fort Hood, TX...one systems, necessary for minimum capability will be fielded to units at Fort Hood. This paper will describe the impact of these news systems on the...of the new technologies. Finally it will project the impact on the objective systems on the operational Army. This paper will provide a view of what

  4. Index to Army Times 1988

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-08-01

    task force told. Army Times; Mar. 14, 1988; 48(31): p. 52. DENTAL RECORDS Army behind in dental record effort. Army Times; Nov. 21, 1988; 49(15): p. 27...p. 17. MILITARY DEPENDENTS-- DENTAL CARE Dental insurance for military families may be expanded. Army Times; Aug. 22, 1988; 49(2): p. 24. MILITARY...compensation bill. Army Times; May 2, 1988; 48(38): p. 38. PENTAGON MEDITATION CLUB Meditators, Soviets munch pasta , push peace. Army Times; May 23, 1988; 48

  5. 78 FR 18473 - Army Privacy Act Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-27

    ... Department of the Army 32 CFR Part 505 Army Privacy Act Program AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Department of the Army is amending its rule on notification of the Army... in Sec. 505.12. The address for notifying the Army Litigation Division of cases citing the...

  6. Continental magnetic anomaly constraints on continental reconstruction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonfrese, R. R. B.; Hinze, W. J.; Olivier, R.; Bentley, C. R.

    1985-01-01

    Crustal magnetic anomalies mapped by the MAGSAT satellite for North and South America, Europe, Africa, India, Australia and Antarctica and adjacent marine areas were adjusted to a common elevation of 400 km and differentially reduced to the radial pole of intensity 60,000 nT. These radially polarized anomalies are normalized for differential inclination, declination and intensity effects of the geomagnetic field, so that in principle they directly reflected the geometric and magnetic polarization attributes of sources which include regional petrologic variations of the crust and upper mantle, and crustal thickness and thermal perturbations. Continental anomalies demonstrate remarkably detailed correlation of regional magnetic sources across rifted margins when plotted on a reconstruction of Pangea. Accordingly, they suggest further fundamental constraints on the geologic evolution of the continents and their reconstructions.

  7. The Continental Crust.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burchfiel, B. Clark

    1983-01-01

    Continental crust underlies the continents, their margins, and also small shallow regions in oceans. The nature of the crust (much older than oceanic crust) and its dynamics are discussed. Research related to and effects of tectonics, volcanism, erosion, and sedimentation on the crust are considered. (JN)

  8. The Continental Crust.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burchfiel, B. Clark

    1983-01-01

    Continental crust underlies the continents, their margins, and also small shallow regions in oceans. The nature of the crust (much older than oceanic crust) and its dynamics are discussed. Research related to and effects of tectonics, volcanism, erosion, and sedimentation on the crust are considered. (JN)

  9. Army ants: an evolutionary bestseller?

    PubMed

    Berghoff, Stefanie M

    2003-09-02

    Army ants are characterized by a complex combination of behavioral and morphological traits. Molecular data now indicate that army ant behavior has a unique evolutionary origin and has been conserved for over more than 100 million years.

  10. Index to Army Times 1990

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-08-01

    CHAMPUS to revise health-care rules. Army Times; Mar. 26, 1990; 50(33): p. 9. CHAMPUS- - CHIROPRACTIC TREATMENT Chiropractic coverage tested. Army Times...FORCES--PANAMA--AMERICAN INVASION, 1989-1990 Women’s action investigated. Army Times; Feb. 5, 1990; 50(26): p. 10. WOMEN IN THE ARMED FORCES-- PREGNANCY ... Pregnancy a growing problem in early outs. Army Times; Sept. 3, 1990; 51(4): p. 10. WOMEN IN THE ARMED FORCES--RECRUITING, ENLISTMENT, ETC. No special

  11. How the Army Resists Change

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    a December 2006 speech to the Commission on National Guard and Reserves, Army Chief of Staff General Schoomaker stated “Following 9/11, our Army...the Army Management Staff College. 7 But in a speech at the Citadel in December of 2001, President Bush stated “The need for military...6 General Peter Schoomaker, "The Official Homepage of the United States Army." Speeches . December 14, 2006

  12. Aeroacoustic research: An Army perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morse, H. A.; Schmitz, F. H.

    1978-01-01

    A short perspective of the Army aeroacoustic research program is presented that emphasizes rotary wing, aerodynamically generated noise. Exciting breakthroughs in experimental techniques and facilities are reviewed which are helping build a detailed understanding of helicopter external noise. Army and joint Army/NASA supported research programs in acoustics which promise to reduce the noise of future helicopters without severe performance penalties are included.

  13. Army Ordnance Satellite Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1958-11-01

    movement, I n a 1958 a r t i c l e prepared f o r t h e Army Information Digest Prof, Oberth advocated j u s t t h i s type propulsion f o r a...p r o j e c t o n Before t h e s e 44. Maj. Gen. H. N, Toftoy, "Army Miss i l e development^" Amv Information Digest , Vole 11, No. 22, Dec...exhausted, 16 15. General Toftoy, Amy Information Digest , Dec. 1956, Vol, 11, No, 12, p. 25-27, ARGMA Technical Library f i l e s , 16, Throughout

  14. Factors Influencing Army Maintenance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    ARI Research Note 89-11 (N 00 Factors Influencing Army Maintenance LOloD Debra C. Evans and J. Thomas Roth Applied Science Associates, Inc. for...1.2.7 .2.7.C.1 11. TITLE (Include Security ClassifIcarIon) Factors Influencing Army Maintenance i2. FERSONAL AuTtiOR(S) Evans, Debra C., and Roth, J...y • ’ Factors and variables that influence maintenance for systems and related manpower, per- sonnel, and training (MPT) characteristics were

  15. Brazilian continental cretaceous

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petri, Setembrino; Campanha, Vilma A.

    1981-04-01

    Cretaceous deposits in Brazil are very well developed, chiefly in continental facies and in thick sequences. Sedimentation occurred essentially in rift-valleys inland and along the coast. Three different sequences can be distinguished: (1) a lower clastic non-marine section, (2) a middle evaporitic section, (3) an upper marine section with non-marine regressive lithosomes. Continental deposits have been laid down chiefly between the latest Jurassic and Albian. The lower lithostratigraphic unit is represented by red shales with occasional evaporites and fresh-water limestones, dated by ostracods. A series of thick sandstone lithosomes accumulated in the inland rift-valleys. In the coastal basins these sequences are often incompletely preserved. Uplift in the beginning of the Aptian produced a widespread unconformity. In many of the inland rift-valleys sedimentation ceased at that time. A later transgression penetrated far into northeastern Brazil, but shortly after continental sedimentation continued, with the deposition of fluvial sandstones which once covered large areas of the country and which have been preserved in many places. The continental Cretaceous sediments have been laid down in fluvial and lacustrine environments, under warm climatic conditions which were dry from time to time. The fossil record is fairly rich, including besides plants and invertebrates, also reptiles and fishes. As faulting tectonism was rather strong, chiefly during the beginning of the Cretaceous, intercalations of igneous rocks are frequent in some places. Irregular uplift and erosion caused sediments belonging to the remainder of this period to be preserved only in tectonic basins scattered across the country.

  16. Index to Army Times 1989

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-08-01

    1989; 50(6): p. 8. RETIRED MILITARY PERSONNEL--LAW AND LEGISLATION Bee swarm of bills: stingers or honey ? Army Times; Feb. 6, 1989; 49(26): p. 18...takes its tolL--even on drill sergeants. Army Times; Oct. 16, 1989; 50(10): p. 20. DRONE AIRCRAFT Unmanned scout plane planned to give infantry the big...50): p. 26. Plans overhauled for unmanned scout planes. Army Times; Aug. 7, 1989; 49(52): p. 28. Army drone may see action in drug war. Army Times; Oct

  17. Army Strong, Superintendent Savvy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mellon, Ericka

    2011-01-01

    Brigadier General Anthony "Tony" Tata of the U.S. Army had one of those "ah-ha" moments in April 2006 when, on the eve of an operation he was heading in Afghanistan, an Al Qaeda rocket shattered a nearby school. The attack killed a teacher and seven students and wounded dozens more. The rocket incident eventually nudged Tata…

  18. Branding the Army

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-05-25

    be sure, a comprehensive recruitment campaign should leverage the strengths of incentives, recruiter saturation, and marketing to be successful ...recruitment campaign should leverage the strengths of incentives, recruiter saturation, and marketing to be successful . This monograph focuses...13 Selling the Army: The History of Marketing Successes and Failures ............................................ 15 The 1970s: A

  19. Army Strong, Superintendent Savvy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mellon, Ericka

    2011-01-01

    Brigadier General Anthony "Tony" Tata of the U.S. Army had one of those "ah-ha" moments in April 2006 when, on the eve of an operation he was heading in Afghanistan, an Al Qaeda rocket shattered a nearby school. The attack killed a teacher and seven students and wounded dozens more. The rocket incident eventually nudged Tata…

  20. Army Leader Transitions Handbook

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    Initiate Organizational Communication (STRATCOM) Plan Step 3: Build and Sustain Knowledge Management Systems Step 4: Build Coalitions Internally and...Externally Step 5: Eliminate Needless Constraints PHASE VI: SUSTAINING (D+91+) Step 1: Manage Organizational Systems and Operations Step 2...field manuals and Army regulations and system -oriented technical manuals. Review Organizational Results Conduct a review of results oriented

  1. 76 FR 66282 - Army Educational Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-26

    ... Department of the Army Army Educational Advisory Committee AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION... CFR 102-3.150, the following meeting notice is announced: Name of Committee: U.S. Army War College Subcommittee of the Army Education Advisory Committee. Dates of Meeting: November 15, 2011. Place of Meeting:...

  2. Converting your Continental

    SciTech Connect

    Wirz, B.M.

    1981-07-01

    Inflation and higher fuel and environmental costs make conventional-generated power as unaffordable (as a Lincoln Continental in the automobile market) for retail and industrial customers, many of whom are looking for alternatives to purchase electric power. The loss of revenue from competing energy sources eliminates the monopoly status that utilities have enjoyed and is forcing utilities to provide what customers want and do it better than the competition. Utilities have only research and development or fuel switching to improve efficiency unless they rethink their approach and come up with new alternatives. 1 table. (DCK)

  3. Army Power and Energy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-11-01

    2011 GreenGov Symposium Oct. 31 ‐ Nov. 2, 2011 Washington Hilton  Washington, DC Clean   Energy  – Session 5 Increasing the DoD Renewable Energy...Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 Clean   Energy  – Session 5 Increasing the DoD Renewable Energy Portfolio November 1, 2011 Army Energy in... Clean   Energy  – Session 5 Increasing the DoD Renewable Energy Portfolio November 1, 2011 3 Army Energy Consumption, 2010 Facilities Vehicles

  4. Army Sociocultural Performance Requirements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    L. M. V., & Herman, J. L. (2007). Cross-cultural competency in Army leaders: A conceptual and empirical foundation (Study Report 2008-01). Arlington...2010). A framework for cross-cultural competence and learning recommendations. Orlando, FL: Naval Air Warfare Center Training Systems Division...McCloskey, M. J., Grandjean, A., Behymer, K. J., & Ross, K. (2010). Assessing the development of cross-cultural competence in Soldiers. (Technical

  5. 2010 Army Modernization Strategy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    leader. Over time, the Army will divest the various commercial- grade hand-held radios (commonly called Land Mobile Radios or LMRs), making them...both 7.62 and .50 Caliber sniper systems. The 7.62 sniper system was recently modernized with the fielding of the M110 Semiautomatic Sniper System...Terrain Container Handler Science and Technology Situational Awareness Soldier as a System Semiautomatic Sniper System Stryker Brigade Combat Team

  6. Army Contigency Contracting.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-11-01

    position of the United States Army. The pronouns "he," "his," and "him," when used in this publication represent both the masculine and feminine genders...comprehensive review of the literature base and interviews with gov- erment and industry personnel on the subjects of international contrac- ting...handling, container handling, machine tools, power generation, etc) are either in short supply or inadequate for the scope of work envisioned. The

  7. Army Public Service Advertising.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-12-01

    34 Marketing and Media Decisions, January 1982, p. 63. 6U.S., General Accounting Office, " Advertising for Military Recruiting," p. 10. 7Dean L. Yarwood...talent and necessary training, they said. 4 8 An article in Marketing and Media Decisions 4 9 offered a brief synopsis of military recruitment advertising ...support, public relations, marketing research, and analysis. The N. W. Ayer field representative’s Army counterpart is the Advertising and Sales

  8. Army Strategic Energy Goals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-09

    3 Cells Modules Packs UNCLASSIFIED TARDEC’s End-to-End Energy Business: From Generation to Application 4UNCLASSIFIED Smart-Charging Micro-Grid...Installation of microgrid at Schofield Barracks, tied to critical infrastructure • Photovolatic array • Dedicated electric vehicle charging • Grid...Installation Forward Base / Camp Vehicle Battery-Fuel Cell Hybrid Battery-Battery Hybrid Soldier Soldier Army Advanced Energy Initiative: Concept for

  9. Returning to Army Leadership

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-15

    Matthews and Dale E. Brown (Washington, DC: Pergamon- Brassey ‟ s , 1989), 3. 36 Ibid. 37 Ibid. 22 38 Ibid., 8. 39 Mary Blake French, ed., “Do We Need... S ) Colonel John M. Riley 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME( S ) AND...MONITORING AGENCY NAME( S ) AND ADDRESS(ES) 10. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM( S ) U.S. Army War College 122 Forbes Avenue 122 Forbes Avenue

  10. Revolutionizing Army Leader Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    historical perspective . While it is relatively common knowledge that education and the military profession have been inherently intertwined since the...17013-5050 USAWC CLASS OF 2011 The U.S. Army War College is accredited by the Commission on Higher Education of the Middle State Association of...Colleges and Schools, 3624 Market Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104, (215) 662-5606. The Commission on Higher Education is an institutional accrediting

  11. The American Armies: 1993

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    implications of these changes for national sovereignty, identity, and security. Additionally, the study considers how proposed military reductions will...funded research and development center (FFRDC) for studies and analysis operated by RAND. The Arroyo Center provides the Army with objective, independent...chaired by the Vice Chief of Staff and by the Assistant Secretary for Research, Development, and Acquisition. Arroyo Center work is performed under

  12. Future of Army Water Studies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-01

    Energy/ Water Nexus • Thermoelectric power • Geothermal • Biofuels • Solar-hot water • Hydropower • Carbon Capture • “ Fracking ” Regional Water Balance...patterns of seasonal and regional water distribution  Condition of distribution systems  Topography  Water quality  Non-point source pollution ...Future of Army Water Studies Marc Kodack Senior Fellow, Army Environmental Policy Institute/Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Army

  13. Army Energy Security Implementation Strategy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-13

    Army for Energy and Partnerships Washington, D.C. 20301-3140 Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for the...Assistant Secretary of the Army for Energy and Partnerships ,Washington,DC,20301-3140 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING...Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Army for Energy and Partnerships , DASA(E&P), at 703-692-9890. This page intentionally left blank. i

  14. Achieving Efficiencies in Army Installations.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    34" ’■■"■" 1 USAWC STRATEGY RESEARCH PROJECT Achieving Efficiencies in Army Installations by Richard Fliss Col. Richard M. Meinhart Project...government agency. STRATEGY RESEARCH PROJECT ACHIEVING EFFICIENCIES IN ARMY INSTALLATIONS BY RICHARD FLISS DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A: Approved...for public release. Distribution is unlimited. DTIC QUALITY INSPECTED & USAWC CLASS OF 1998 U.S. ARMY WAR COLLEGE, CARLISLE BARRACKS, PA 17013-5050

  15. Index to Army Times, 1993

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-02-01

    10. DEPMEDS ff& DEPLOYABLE MEDICAL SYSTEM (DEPMEDS) S DESERT TORTOISE --NATIONAL TRAINING CENTER (NTC), FORT IRM.N, CA Tortoise vs. tank: No contest...Times; Sep. 13, 1993; 54(7): p. 8. Rangers in Somalia: Anatomy of a firefight (After-Action Review). Army Times; Nov. 15, 1993; 54(16): p. 14...TELEPHONE SERVICE International toLl-free numbers mushroom. Army Times; Oct. 11, 1993; 54(11): p. 18. TORTOISE SEE DESERT TORTOISE TOTAL ARMY

  16. 77 FR 9633 - Army National Cemeteries Advisory Commission (ANCAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-17

    ... Department of the Army Army National Cemeteries Advisory Commission (ANCAC) AGENCY: Department of the Army... Army announces the following committee meeting: Name of Committee: Army National Cemeteries Advisory... in Military Service for America Memorial, Conference Room, Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington,...

  17. Integration of Female Army Apprentices,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    ARMY TRAINING, *APPRENTICESHIP, * FEMALES , MILITARY TRAINING, MALES, AUSTRALIA, STRESS(PSYCHOLOGY), ATTITUDES(PSYCHOLOGY), ROLES(BEHAVIOR), ASSIMILATION, SCIENTIFIC LITERATURE, COMMERCE, INSTRUCTORS, WORK

  18. Index to Army Times 1992.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-02-01

    Times; Apr. 27, 1992; 52(39): p. 6. CHILDBIRTH--ANALGESICS Childbirth painkiller to be made available. Army Times; Nov. 2, 1992; 53(14): p. 11...EPIDURAL BLOCK Childbirth painkiller to be made available. Army Times; Nov. 2, 1992; 53(14): p. 11. M1O9A (HOWITZER) Kuwaitis get took at Patadin. Army...Army Times; June 15, 1992; 52(46): p. 4. PA SEE PHYSICIAN ASSISTANTS (PA) PAINKILLING DRUGS SEE ANALGESICS PALADIN SEE M109A6 (HOWITZER) PANAMA

  19. The Army’s Local Economic Effects

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    31 Tables S . 1 . Army-Supported Economic Output and All Army Personnel and Additional Employment Congressional...the results of the analysis. Table S . 1 reports the range of results across the 435 congressional districts of the 113th Congress. All Army direct...effect of total, nationwide Army spending on each congressional district and state. Table S . 1 Army-Supported Economic Output and All Army Personnel

  20. NSF Continental Lithosphere Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayhew, Michael; MacGregor, Ian

    For several months the Continental Lithosphere Program (CL) of the National Science Foundation has been subject to a major review. The process was stimulated by a series of budget setbacks over the past few years. Although Presidential budget requests have been very favorable for the Division of Earth Sciences (EAR), and there has been strong support within the National Science Foundation and Congress, actual appropriations by Congress have been disappointing.In each year the final allocation to EAR has been affected by external factors beyond the control of the Foundation. In the four fiscal years from 1986 through 1989 the factors include reductions tied to the Gramm-Rudman deficit reduction measures, congressional reaction to the October 1987 stock market crash, and two years of protection for the Ocean Sciences part of the NSF budget that was paid for from the budgets of the Atmospheric and Earth Sciences divisions.

  1. Improving Training Assistance from Army Schools to Army Training Managers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kille, Bruce R.

    U.S. Army service schools have been responsible for providing instructional reference materials to training managers of the Active Army and Reserve Components for many years. Regardless of what the service schools did however, it was apparent that far too many of those in charge of training were not aware of the assistance available to them.…

  2. Active Army and Army Reserve Soldiers: A Comparison.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corkan, JoJo T.; And Others

    A study determined whether chemical operations specialists at skill level 1 differ in terms of aptitude, job knowledge, job confidence, and perceptions of task difficulty, task importance, task frequency, and task training, depending on whether the specialists are active U.S. Army soldiers or are in the Army Reserve. The subjects for whom complete…

  3. Active Army and Army Reserve Soldiers: A Comparison.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corkan, JoJo T.; And Others

    A study determined whether chemical operations specialists at skill level 1 differ in terms of aptitude, job knowledge, job confidence, and perceptions of task difficulty, task importance, task frequency, and task training, depending on whether the specialists are active U.S. Army soldiers or are in the Army Reserve. The subjects for whom complete…

  4. Army Force Generation: Balancing Missions in the Army National Guard

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-02-23

    National Guard input for Chief, National Guard Bureau Update brief for 30 January 2007, available from https://gkoportal.ngb.army.mil/sites/ JOP ...January 2007; available from https://gkoportal.ngb.army.mil/sites/ JOP /cngbbrief/default.aspx; Internet; accessed 28 January 2007. 55 U.S. General

  5. The Army Graduate Student Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1972

    The Army Graduate Student Program is a financial assistance program sponsored by the Army to help college graduates who are qualified dietitians, physical therapists, and occupational therapists complete the requirements for a master's degree in their specialties. Dietitians selected for this program may do graduate work for a master's degree in…

  6. Understanding the Army Environmental Structure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-08-01

    Army and Depart- ment of Defense (DOD) positions; share ideas and innova - tions; leverage regional, state, and local environmental management resources...Department of the Army, major commands, and commanders world- wide, including leadership, focus, direction, and innova - tive solutions to the

  7. Army Transformation to Expeditionary Formations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    potatoes " of the United States Army. This is what our nation depends on and expects a land based anned force to be. No formation currently on this...is something to be said about form and functionality. Briefly this, kudos to Army leadership by reducing the level of maintenance ( starching , sewing

  8. Training the Afghan National Army

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-19

    to mold the South Vietnamese Armed Forces (SVAF) into a conventional army in its own image only served to make them “incongruent with the culture it... Spore . “Big Push in Guerrilla Warfare.” Army, vol. 12, no. 8 (March 1962), 36. Obama, Barack H. “Obama’s Strategy for Afghanistan and Pakistan

  9. Women in the Army

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-06-06

    22 The data in tables one through six speaks for itself. In the Health of the Army reports reviewed, the fact that women require more than twice the...campaigns. There was no draft. The average American had no radio to speak of, nor television, or telephone. Life was small town. America was unto family and...Thsrt scmaale1 Zt th Irsn enirdmnsrnt.B Y8 oe Wnofficer content is rnoewa aout .27 percent ohe toe offie tent is expected to be about 11.6 rercent. 13

  10. Palaeomagnetism and the continental crust

    SciTech Connect

    Piper, J.D.A.

    1987-01-01

    This book is an introduction to palaeomagnetism offering treatment of theory and practice. It analyzes the palaeomagnetic record over the whole of geological time, from the Archaean to the Cenozoic, and goes on to examine the impact of past geometries and movements of the continental crust at each geological stage. Topics covered include theory of rock and mineral magnetism, field and laboratory methods, growth and consolidation of the continental crust in Archaean and Proterozoic times, Palaeozoic palaeomagnetism and the formation of Pangaea, the geomagnetic fields, continental movements, configurations and mantle convection.

  11. Dynamics of continental accretion.

    PubMed

    Moresi, L; Betts, P G; Miller, M S; Cayley, R A

    2014-04-10

    Subduction zones become congested when they try to consume buoyant, exotic crust. The accretionary mountain belts (orogens) that form at these convergent plate margins have been the principal sites of lateral continental growth through Earth's history. Modern examples of accretionary margins are the North American Cordilleras and southwest Pacific subduction zones. The geologic record contains abundant accretionary orogens, such as the Tasmanides, along the eastern margin of the supercontinent Gondwana, and the Altaïdes, which formed on the southern margin of Laurasia. In modern and ancient examples of long-lived accretionary orogens, the overriding plate is subjected to episodes of crustal extension and back-arc basin development, often related to subduction rollback and transient episodes of orogenesis and crustal shortening, coincident with accretion of exotic crust. Here we present three-dimensional dynamic models that show how accretionary margins evolve from the initial collision, through a period of plate margin instability, to re-establishment of a stable convergent margin. The models illustrate how significant curvature of the orogenic system develops, as well as the mechanism for tectonic escape of the back-arc region. The complexity of the morphology and the evolution of the system are caused by lateral rollback of a tightly arcuate trench migrating parallel to the plate boundary and orthogonally to the convergence direction. We find geological and geophysical evidence for this process in the Tasmanides of eastern Australia, and infer that this is a recurrent and global phenomenon.

  12. Dynamics of continental accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moresi, L.; Betts, P. G.; Miller, M. S.; Cayley, R. A.

    2014-04-01

    Subduction zones become congested when they try to consume buoyant, exotic crust. The accretionary mountain belts (orogens) that form at these convergent plate margins have been the principal sites of lateral continental growth through Earth's history. Modern examples of accretionary margins are the North American Cordilleras and southwest Pacific subduction zones. The geologic record contains abundant accretionary orogens, such as the Tasmanides, along the eastern margin of the supercontinent Gondwana, and the Altaïdes, which formed on the southern margin of Laurasia. In modern and ancient examples of long-lived accretionary orogens, the overriding plate is subjected to episodes of crustal extension and back-arc basin development, often related to subduction rollback and transient episodes of orogenesis and crustal shortening, coincident with accretion of exotic crust. Here we present three-dimensional dynamic models that show how accretionary margins evolve from the initial collision, through a period of plate margin instability, to re-establishment of a stable convergent margin. The models illustrate how significant curvature of the orogenic system develops, as well as the mechanism for tectonic escape of the back-arc region. The complexity of the morphology and the evolution of the system are caused by lateral rollback of a tightly arcuate trench migrating parallel to the plate boundary and orthogonally to the convergence direction. We find geological and geophysical evidence for this process in the Tasmanides of eastern Australia, and infer that this is a recurrent and global phenomenon.

  13. Dynamics of Continental Accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moresi, L. N.; Betts, P. G.; Miller, M. S.

    2013-12-01

    Subduction zones become congested when they try to swallow buoyant exotic crust. Accretionary mountain belts (orogens) that form at these convergent plate margins are the principal sites of lateral continental growth through Earth's history. Modern examples of accretionary margins are the North and South American Cordilleras and southwest Pacific. The geologic record is riddled with accretionary orogens, such as the Tasmanides along the eastern margin of the supercontinent Gondwana and the Altaides that formed on the southern margin of Laurasia. Both the modern and ancient examples are characterised by episodic switches between extension and shortening associated with transitions from collision of exotic crust and subduction related rollback. We present three-dimensional dynamic models that show for the first time how accretionary margins evolve from the initial collision, through a period of plate margin instability, to re-establishment of a stable convergent margin. The models illustrate how significant curvature of the orogenic system develops, as well as the mechanism for tectonic escape of the back arc region. The complexity of the morphology and evolution of the system are driven by lateral rollback of a tightly arcuate trench migrating parallel to the plate boundary and orthogonal to the convergence direction. We find geological and geophysical evidence for this process in the Tasmanides of eastern Australia, but infer that this is a global phenomena throughout Earth's evolution.

  14. Army Aviation -- Back to Its Roots

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-03

    2 Ibid., 5 – 11, and Richard P. Weinert , Jr., A History of Army Aviation – 1950-1962 (Fort Monroe, VA: U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command, 1991...Doctrine, 75 – 76. 9 Richard P. Weinert , Jr., A History of Army Aviation – 1950-1962 (Fort Monroe, VA: U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command, 1991

  15. Coordination: Southeast continental shelf studies

    SciTech Connect

    Menzel, D.W.

    1989-01-26

    The objective of this investigation is to obtain model descriptions of the flow modifications in the Southeast Atlantic continental shelf due to Gulf Stream fluctuations and topographic effects. 2 refs., 4 figs.

  16. Tooele Army Depot-North Area Suspected Releases SWMUs. Phase 1 RFI report. Volume 1. Text

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-12-01

    location of the continental storm track , most of the precipitation in the Tooele Valley occurs as snow between the months of October and May. Summers are...of railroad tracks . Stormwater from the Administration Area drains via an underground concrete piping system to a depression in a dry wash, where it...Shank (JMM) with Ammunition survelliance Chief, Milo Serreyn, Tooele Army Depot, Utah, October 1992. Siniscalchi, 1991. Telephone interview conducted

  17. Transformation of the Army Depot Maintenance System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-28

    three, Internet accessed 18 January 2007. 21 Colonel Fred L. Hart, Jr., USA (Ret.), “ Lean Manufacturing and the Army Industrial Base,” Army Logistician...Six Sigma Available at http://www.amc.army.mil/lean/index.aspx, Internet accessed 18 January 2007. 24 Colonel Fred L. Hart, Jr., USA (Ret.), “ Lean ... Manufacturing and the Army Industrial Base”, 6. 25 Institute of Land Warfare, Association of the United States Army, Torchbearer, National Security

  18. Personnel Service Support (PSS) in Army Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-10-20

    UNCLASSIFIED N ACN 73765 PERSONNEL SERVICE SUPPORT (PSS) IN ARMY MODELS FINAL REPORT DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY HEADQUARTERS UNITED STATES ARMY TRAINING...Analysis 4-7 A-6 10 Theater Strategic Operational (TSO) Depths B-3 11 Constructing Interval Scales from Ordinal Data E-4 vii GLOSSARY OF ACRONYMS ACN Army...Control Number AI Artificial Intelligence AIDS Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome ALB Airland Battle AMSAA Army Materiel Systems Analysis Agency ANSI

  19. The Institutional Army, FY1975-FY2002

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-04-01

    INTRODUCTION This paper defines the Institutional Army in terms of its functions so that judgments can be made on its size and composition.1 In...broad terms , the Institutional Army is that part of the total Army that provides general or central support for other elements of the Army that support... term “Generating Force” to describe that part of the Army that creates and sustains the operating forces and the term “Deployment Support Force” for

  20. -induced continental warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamae, Youichi; Watanabe, Masahiro; Kimoto, Masahide; Shiogama, Hideo

    2014-11-01

    In this the second of a two-part study, we examine the physical mechanisms responsible for the increasing contrast of the land-sea surface air temperature (SAT) in summertime over the Far East, as observed in recent decades and revealed in future climate projections obtained from a series of transient warming and sensitivity experiments conducted under the umbrella of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5. On a global perspective, a strengthening of land-sea SAT contrast in the transient warming simulations of coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation models is attributed to an increase in sea surface temperature (SST). However, in boreal summer, the strengthened contrast over the Far East is reproduced only by increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration. In response to SST increase alone, the tropospheric warming over the interior of the mid- to high-latitude continents including Eurasia are weaker than those over the surrounding oceans, leading to a weakening of the land-sea SAT contrast over the Far East. Thus, the increasing contrast and associated change in atmospheric circulation over East Asia is explained by CO2-induced continental warming. The degree of strengthening of the land-sea SAT contrast varies in different transient warming scenarios, but is reproduced through a combination of the CO2-induced positive and SST-induced negative contributions to the land-sea contrast. These results imply that changes of climate patterns over the land-ocean boundary regions are sensitive to future scenarios of CO2 concentration pathways including extreme cases.

  1. Application of Army Combat Stress Control doctrine in work with Pentagon survivors.

    PubMed

    Waits, Wendi; Waldrep, Douglas

    2002-09-01

    The authors are Army psychiatrists and were members of the mental health team that responded to the Pentagon attack of September 11, 2001. They were assigned to work at the Hoffman Complex in Alexandria, Virginia, with displaced employees from the Office of the Army Deputy Chief of Staff for Personnel. Never before had anyone committed an unexpected act of war on a garrison unit within the continental United States, making the appropriate psychiatric interventions difficult to discern. The authors conducted a retrospective analysis to examine how closely their interventions paralleled official Army doctrine on Combat Stress Control as detailed in Field Manual 8-51, Combat Stress Control in a Theater of Operations. They discovered that the parallels were considerable but not comprehensive and concluded that following future acts of terror or other disasters on United States soil military mental health providers should apply both traditional and novel principles of Combat Stress Control.

  2. Transforming the Army Service Component Command to a Theater Army

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    student academic research paper are those of the author and do not reflect the official policy or position of the Department of the Army, Department...Association of Colleges and Schools, 3624 Market Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104, (215) 662-5606. The Commission on Higher Education is an institutional...2013 2. REPORT TYPE STRATEGY RESEARCH PROJECT .33 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Transforming the Army Service

  3. Army Families and Soldier Readiness.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-01

    self -sufficiency while they are away on deployments. According to the measures in this study, Army personnel have a high level of individual... levels of confidence in the self -sufficiency of their spouses. There are indications that some Army situations affect well-being. For example...encompasses a broad range of dimensions ranging from emotional status to feelings of happiness or anxiety, self - esteem , global satisfaction, and

  4. US Army TARDEC: Robotics Overview

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-25

    unclassified US ARMY TARDEC Robotics Overview Bernard Theisen, Joint Center for Robotics 25 March 2010 Reference herein to any specific commercial...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE US ARMY TARDEC Robotics Overview 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Bernard... Robotics Industry Partnerships Academia PartnershipsGovernment Partnerships TRADOC Community Outreach • S&T Support to the RS-JPO • Develops and Fosters

  5. Army Occupational Health and AEHA

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-05-01

    of the complex environmental and occupational health problems facing the Army today. As new areas of concern are surfaced, I am sure we will be tasked...Army concern for general control of occupational health hazards occurred in August of 1938 when the Chief of Ordnance requested medical care for its...radiation protection programs beyond the traditional concern for x-ray protection., The Health Physics Division was established and presently exists to

  6. The northern Egyptian continental margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badawy, Ahmed; Mohamed, Gad; Omar, Khaled; Farid, Walid

    2015-01-01

    Africa displays a variety of continental margin structures, tectonics and sedimentary records. The northern Egyptian continental margin represents the NE portion of the North African passive continental margin. Economically, this region is of great importance as a very rich and productive hydrocarbon zone in Egypt. Moreover, it is characterized by remarkable tectonic setting accompanied by active tectonic processes from the old Tethys to recent Mediterranean. In this article, seismicity of the northern Egyptian continental margin has been re-evaluated for more than 100-years and the source parameters of three recent earthquakes (October 2012, January 2013 and July 2013) have been estimated. Moment tensor inversions of 19th October 2012 and 17th January 2013 earthquakes reveal normal faulting mechanism with strike-slip component having seismic moment of 3.5E16 N m and 4.3E15 N m respectively. The operation of the Egyptian National Seismic Network (ENSN) since the end of 1997 has significantly enhanced the old picture of earthquake activity across northern Egyptian continental margin whereas; the record-ability (annual rate) has changed from 2-events/year to 54-event/year before and after ENSN respectively. The spatial distribution of earthquakes foci indicated that the activity tends to cluster at three zones: Mediterranean Ridge (MR), Nile Cone (NC) and Eratosthenes Seamount (ERS). However, two seismic gaps are reported along Levant Basin (LEV) and Herodotus Basin (HER).

  7. Bioenergetics of Continental Serpentinites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardace, D.; Meyer-Dombard, D. R.

    2011-12-01

    Serpentinization is the aqueous alteration of ultramafic (Fe- and Mg-rich) rocks, resulting in secondary mineral assemblages of serpentine, brucite, iron oxyhydroxides and magnetite, talc, and possibly carbonate and silica-rich veins and other minor phases-all depending on the evolving pressure-temperature-composition of the system. The abiotic evolution of hydrogen and possibly organic compounds via serpentinization (McCollom and Bach, 2009) highlights the relevance of this geologic process to carbon and energy sources for the deep biosphere. Serpentinization may fuel life over long stretches of geologic time, throughout the global seabed and in exposed, faulted peridotite blocks (as at Lost City Hydrothermal Field, Kelley et al., 2005), and in obducted oceanic mantle units in ophiolites (e.g., Tiago et al., 2004). Relatively little work has been published on life in continental serpentinite settings, though they likely host a unique resident microbiota. In this work, we systematically model the serpentinizing fluid as an environmental niche. Reported field data for high and moderate pH serpentinizing fluids were modeled from Cyprus, the Philippines, Oman, Northern California, New Caledonia, Yugoslavia, Portugal, Italy, Newfoundland Canada, New Zealand, and Turkey. Values for Gibbs Energy of reaction (ΔGr), kJ per mole of electrons transferred for a given metabolism, are calculated for each field site. Cases are considered both for (1) modest assumptions of 1 nanomolar hydrogen and 1 micromolar methane, based on unpublished data for a similar northern California field site (Cardace and Hoehler, in prep.) and (2) an upper estimate of 10 nanomolar hydrogen and 500 micromolar methane. We survey the feasibility of microbial metabolisms for key steps in the nitrogen cycle, oxidation of sulfur in pyrite, iron oxidation or reduction reactions, sulfate reduction coupled to hydrogen or methane oxidation, methane oxidation coupled to the reduction of oxygen, and

  8. 2014 Center for Army Leadership Annual Survey of Army Leadership (CASAL): Army Civilian Leader Findings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    feedback to learners . The level of rigor or challenge posed by all ix courses shows room for improvement, particularly courses offered entirely...The attributes represent the values and identity of Army leaders (character), how leaders are perceived by followers and others (presence), and...degree. Less than 10% attended a resident Army course, completed structured self-development, learned a foreign language , or engaged in other types of

  9. Continental crust: a geophysical approach

    SciTech Connect

    Meissner, R.

    1986-01-01

    This book develops an integrated and balanced picture of present knowledge of the continental crust. Crust and lithosphere are first defined, and the formation of crusts as a general planetary phenomenon is described. The background and methods of geophysical studies of the earth's crust and the collection of related geophysical parameters are examined. Creep and friction experiments and the various methods of radiometric age dating are addressed, and geophysical and geological investigations of the crustal structure in various age provinces of the continents are studied. Specific tectonic structures such as rifts, continental margins, and geothermal areas are discussed. Finally, an attempt is made to give a comprehensive view of the evolution of the continental crust and to collect and develop arguments for crustal accretion and recycling. 647 references.

  10. Weighing the deep continental biosphere.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Sean; Parnell, John

    2014-01-01

    There is abundant evidence for widespread microbial activity in deep continental fractures and aquifers, with important implications for biogeochemical cycling on Earth and the habitability of other planetary bodies. Whitman et al. (P Natl Acad Sci USA, 95, 1998, 6578) estimated a continental subsurface biomass on the order of 10(16) -10(17) g C. We reassess this value in the light of more recent data including over 100 microbial population density measurements from groundwater around the world. Making conservative assumptions about cell carbon content and the ratio of attached and free-living microorganisms, we find that the evidence continues to support a deep continental biomass estimate of 10(16) -10(17) g C, or 2-19% of Earth's total biomass. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Continental rifts and mineral resources

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, K. . Geosciences Dept.)

    1992-01-01

    Continental rifts are widespread and range in age from the present to 3 b.y. Individual rifts may form parts of complex systems as in E. Africa and the Basin and Range. Rifts have originated in diverse environments such as arc-crests, sites of continental collision, collapsing mountain belts and on continents at rest over the mantle circulation pattern. Continental rift resources can be classified by depth of origin: For example, in the Great Dike, Norilsk and Mwadui magma from the mantle is the host. At shallower depths continental crust partly melted above mafic magma hosts ore (Climax, Henderson). Rift volcanics are linked to local hydrothermal systems and to extensive zeolite deposits (Basin and Range, East Africa). Copper (Zambia, Belt), zinc (Red Dog) and lead ores (Benue) are related to hydrothermal systems which involve hot rock and water flow through both pre-rift basement and sedimentary and volcanic rift fill. Economically significant sediments in rifts include coals (the Gondwana of Inida), marine evaporites (Lou Ann of the Gulf of Mexico) and non-marine evaporites (East Africa). Oil and gas in rifts relate to a variety of source, reservoir and trap relations (North Sea, Libya), but rift-lake sediment sources are important (Sung Liao, Bo Hai, Mina, Cabinda). Some ancient iron ores (Hammersley) may have formed in rift lakes but Algoman ores and greenstone belt mineral deposits in general are linked to oceanic and island arc environments. To the extent that continental environments are represented in such areas as the Archean of the Superior and Slave they are Andean Arc environments which today have locally rifted crests (Ecuador, N. Peru). The Pongola, on Kaapvaal craton may, on the other hand represent the world's oldest preserved, little deformed, continental rift.

  12. Mantle plumes and continental tectonics.

    PubMed

    Hill, R I; Campbell, I H; Davies, G F; Griffiths, R W

    1992-04-10

    Mantle plumes and plate tectonics, the result of two distinct modes of convection within the Earth, operate largely independently. Although plumes are secondary in terms of heat transport, they have probably played an important role in continental geology. A new plume starts with a large spherical head that can cause uplift and flood basalt volcanism, and may be responsible for regional-scale metamorphism or crustal melting and varying amounts of crustal extension. Plume heads are followed by narrow tails that give rise to the familiar hot-spot tracks. The cumulative effect of processes associated with tail volcanism may also significantly affect continental crust.

  13. Motor vehicle crashes among active duty U.S. Army personnel, 1999 to 2006.

    PubMed

    Rossen, Lauren M; Pollack, Keshia M; Canham-Chervak, Michelle; Canada, Sara; Baker, Susan P

    2011-09-01

    In the U.S. Army, motor vehicle crashes (MVCs), both privately owned and military, are a leading cause of injury and death. Few studies have described the distribution and trends of MVCs among Army personnel, which may have been impacted by current military missions. This descriptive study of risk factors and select outcomes is from safety report data maintained by the U.S. Army Combat Readiness/Safety Center on 11,469 active duty Army personnel involved in MVCs, 1999-2006. The majority (66%) of Soldiers in MVCs were in military vehicles within the continental United States (68%). The average age of individuals involved in MVCs was 27.7 years old. Males had a consistently higher MVC rate than females. The average cost per MVC related to property damage and injuries was $36,039 and $24,038, respectively. Results suggest a need for additional exploration of MVCs involving Army vehicles, which were the most common and among the most costly.

  14. 75 FR 19302 - Radiation Sources on Army Land

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-14

    ... organization, would require a specific Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) license or Army Radiation... Department of the Army 32 CFR Part 655 RIN 0702-AA58 Radiation Sources on Army Land AGENCY: Department of the... revise its regulations concerning radiation sources on Army land. The Army requires Non-Army...

  15. 76 FR 6692 - Radiation Sources on Army Land

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-08

    ... a specific Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) license or Army Radiation Authorization (ARA). The... Department of the Army 32 CFR Part 655 RIN 0702-AA58 Radiation Sources on Army Land AGENCY: Department of the... regulation concerning radiation sources on Army land. The Army requires non-Army agencies (including...

  16. Sowing Seeds to Cultivate Future Army Leaders

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-11-01

    U.S. Army has lost many of its core competencies and training skills. One of those degraded skills is officer professional development (OPD). Bearing...U.S. Army officer corps increasingly emphasize its professional development programs.

  17. Estimation of continental precipitation recycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brubaker, Kaye L.; Entekhabi, Dara; Eagleson, P. S.

    1993-01-01

    The total amount of water that precipitates on large continental regions is supplied by two mechanisms: 1) advection from the surrounding areas external to the region and 2) evaporation and transpiration from the land surface within the region. The latter supply mechanism is tantamount to the recycling of precipitation over the continental area. The degree to which regional precipitation is supplied by recycled moisture is a potentially significant climate feedback mechanism and land surface-atmosphere interaction, which may contribute to the persistence and intensification of droughts. Gridded data on observed wind and humidity in the global atmosphere are used to determine the convergence of atmospheric water vapor over continental regions. A simplified model of the atmospheric moisture over continents and simultaneous estimates of regional precipitation are employed to estimate, for several large continental regions, the fraction of precipitation that is locally derived. The results indicate that the contribution of regional evaporation to regional precipitation varies substantially with location and season. For the regions studied, the ratio of locally contributed to total monthly precipitation generally lies between 0. 10 and 0.30 but is as high as 0.40 in several cases.

  18. Estimation of continental precipitation recycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brubaker, Kaye L.; Entekhabi, Dara; Eagleson, P. S.

    1993-01-01

    The total amount of water that precipitates on large continental regions is supplied by two mechanisms: 1) advection from the surrounding areas external to the region and 2) evaporation and transpiration from the land surface within the region. The latter supply mechanism is tantamount to the recycling of precipitation over the continental area. The degree to which regional precipitation is supplied by recycled moisture is a potentially significant climate feedback mechanism and land surface-atmosphere interaction, which may contribute to the persistence and intensification of droughts. Gridded data on observed wind and humidity in the global atmosphere are used to determine the convergence of atmospheric water vapor over continental regions. A simplified model of the atmospheric moisture over continents and simultaneous estimates of regional precipitation are employed to estimate, for several large continental regions, the fraction of precipitation that is locally derived. The results indicate that the contribution of regional evaporation to regional precipitation varies substantially with location and season. For the regions studied, the ratio of locally contributed to total monthly precipitation generally lies between 0. 10 and 0.30 but is as high as 0.40 in several cases.

  19. Evolution of the continental crust.

    PubMed

    Hawkesworth, C J; Kemp, A I S

    2006-10-19

    The continental crust covers nearly a third of the Earth's surface. It is buoyant--being less dense than the crust under the surrounding oceans--and is compositionally evolved, dominating the Earth's budget for those elements that preferentially partition into silicate liquid during mantle melting. Models for the differentiation of the continental crust can provide insights into how and when it was formed, and can be used to show that the composition of the basaltic protolith to the continental crust is similar to that of the average lower crust. From the late Archaean to late Proterozoic eras (some 3-1 billion years ago), much of the continental crust appears to have been generated in pulses of relatively rapid growth. Reconciling the sedimentary and igneous records for crustal evolution indicates that it may take up to one billion years for new crust to dominate the sedimentary record. Combining models for the differentiation of the crust and the residence time of elements in the upper crust indicates that the average rate of crust formation is some 2-3 times higher than most previous estimates.

  20. Green Remediation: Army Policy and Implementation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    treated on-site within a contained asphalt- lined former pH control pond and treated in 300 yard increments – Caustic soda was evenly spread on soil...Army installations and FUDS.  The examples presented are not representative of all Army efforts 11 Energy Example Former Nebraska Ordnance Plant ...Daugherty, mark.e.daugherty@us.army.mil 15 Land and Ecosystems Example #2 Volunteer Army Ammunition Plant (Excess) Cleanup Objective: Treat soil

  1. Fostering Creative Thinking in the Institutional Army

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-10

    FOSTERING CREATIVE THINKING IN THE INSTITUTIONAL ARMY A thesis presented to the Faculty of the U.S. Army Command and General Staff...SUBTITLE Fostering Creative Thinking in the Institutional Army 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...leadership, more specifically the US Army, identified developing creative thinkers as an essential component to the concept of winning in a complex world

  2. Implementing Maneuver Theory in the Australian Army

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    AUSTRALIAN ARMY, A PROCESS OF IMPLEMENTING THIS PHILOSOPHY IS REQUIRED IF THE ARMY IS TO REALIZE ITS FULL BENEFITS . THIS PAPER EXPLORES THE MEANS BY WHICH...warfighting philosophy for the Australian Army, a process of implementing this philosophy is required if the Army is to realize its full benefits . Discussion...smallest of forces. It can be employed in battle and long before combat. It can even be utilized in the organisation and equipping of forces long

  3. The Army National Guard Division Headquarters in the Army of 2020

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-26

    the RC to meet combatant commanders’ objectives. In response to the President’s refined national security strategy, the Army issued the 2013 Army...the nation’s ability to maintain a force structure at a lower cost capable of rapidly mobilizing to meet national security interests. World War I...THE ARMY NATIONAL GUARD DIVISION HEADQUARTERS IN THE ARMY OF 2020 A Monograph by Major Chris M. Mabis Army National

  4. Drift of continental rafts with asymmetric heating.

    PubMed

    Knopoff, L; Poehls, K A; Smith, R C

    1972-06-02

    A laboratory model of a lithospheric raft is propelled through a viscous asthenospheric layer with constant velocity of scaled magnitude appropriate to continental drift. The propulsion is due to differential heat concentration in the model oceanic and continental crusts.

  5. 32 CFR 631.14 - Army policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Army policy. 631.14 Section 631.14 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL...-Installation Operations (Military Patrols and Investigative Activities) and Policy § 631.14 Army policy....

  6. Systemic Army Environmental Issues: Perspectives and Interpretations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-08-01

    satisfy today’s RCRA or HSWA [ Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments of 19841 based information needs" (Butts, 1991). Another observer noted that the Army...Headquarters HQDA Headquarters. Department of the Army HSWA Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments of 1984 MACOM Major Command MCA Military Construction. Army MS

  7. 32 CFR 651.5 - Army policies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-range character of environmental problems will be recognized, and, where consistent with national... Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS OF ARMY ACTIONS (AR 200-2) Introduction § 651.5 Army policies. (a) NEPA establishes broad...

  8. 32 CFR 651.5 - Army policies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-range character of environmental problems will be recognized, and, where consistent with national... Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS OF ARMY ACTIONS (AR 200-2) Introduction § 651.5 Army policies. (a) NEPA establishes broad...

  9. 32 CFR 651.5 - Army policies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-range character of environmental problems will be recognized, and, where consistent with national... Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS OF ARMY ACTIONS (AR 200-2) Introduction § 651.5 Army policies. (a) NEPA establishes broad...

  10. Suicide in the US Army

    PubMed Central

    Lineberry, Timothy W.; O'Connor, Stephen S.

    2012-01-01

    Suicide in the US Army is a high-profile public health problem that is complex and poorly understood. Adding to the confusion surrounding Army suicide is the challenge of defining and understanding individuals/populations dying by suicide. Data from recent studies have led to a better understanding of risk factors for suicide that may be specifically associated with military service, including the impact of combat and deployment on increased rates of psychiatric illness in military personnel. The next steps involve applying these results to the development of empirically supported suicide prevention approaches specific to the military population. This special article provides an overview of suicide in the Army by synthesizing new information and providing clinical pearls based on research evidence. PMID:22958991

  11. Systems Thinking in the Army

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    September 2011) Systems Thinking in the Army Presented by: MG. Nick Justice Commanding General RDECOM Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No...2011 to 00-00-2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Systems Thinking in the Army 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR...18 Why do  Systems   Thinking ?  Systems   Thinking : Outside the Box  Desired Capability: Space explora?on will require a wri?ng  implement that is

  12. Army Net Zero Prove Out. Army Net Zero Training Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-20

    minimization plan, Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessments, Green Procurement Plan, Environmental Management System Material Flow Installation...ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) National Defense Center for Energy and Environment Operated by Concurrent Technologies Corporation 100 CTC Drive...of the Assistant Secretary of the Army for Installations and Environment ) 5850 21st Street, Building 211 Fort Belvoir, VA 22060-5527 Program

  13. Army Training Study: Concepts of the Army Training System.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-08-08

    Resources Laboratory, December 1976. Flfman, C. B. Personal interview, Fort Monroe, VA: 15 December 1977. Fwell, Julian J., and Hunt, Iva A. Jr...skill retencion by individuals and units has al- * ways been a matter of priority interest to the Army. The June 1975 Ad- vanced Training Technology

  14. Army Science Board 1991 Summer Study - Army Simulation Strategy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-01

    May 91, Mr. C. Hatfield, Lawrence Livermore Labor atory JANUS-Technology, 29 May 91, Mr. Paul Herman , Lawrence Livermore Laboratory Aviation...Development, 30 May 91, Mr. Mansur , US Army, Aviation Systems Command Crew Station Research and Development Facility Briefing and Demonstration, 30 May

  15. Management: Army Management of the Electromagnetic Spectrum

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    M 3. IRAC a. FAS b. SPS c. TSC d. ING M M M M M —- —- M M M 4. US BR National Committee M —- 5. US BR Study Groups (US BR SGs) a. SG-1 (Spectrum...management requirements in Army Sys- tems Acquisition Review Councils per AR 15-14. r. Provide the Army member to the IRAC and direct Army par...ticipation in IRAC activities. s. Provide the Army member to the Radio Communications Bu- reau (BR) and direct Army participation in BR study groups. t

  16. Continental collisions and seismic signature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meissner, R.; Wever, Th.; Sadowiak, P.

    1991-04-01

    Reflection seismics in compressional belts has revealed the structure of crustal shortening and thickening processes, showing complex patterns of indentation and interfingering of colliding crusts and subcrustal lithospheres. Generally, in the upper crust large zones of detachments develop, often showing duplexes and 'crocodile' structures. The lower crust from zones of active collision (e.g. Alps, Pyrenees) is characterized by strongly dipping reflections. The base of the crust with the Moho must be continuously equilibrating after orogenic collapse as areas of former continental collision exhibit flat Mohos and subhorizontal reflections. The depth to the Moho increases during collision and decreases after the onset of post-orogenic extension, until finally the crustal root disappears completely together with the erosion of the mountains. Processes, active during continental collisions and orogenic collapse, create distinct structures which are imaged by reflection seismic profiling. Examples are shown and discussed.

  17. Improving Army Operational Contract Support

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    Management in Expeditionary Operations . And, this research reviews the DOD Contingency Contracting Handbook. The research recommends the Army improve...Program Management in Expeditionary Operations and the Department of Defense Office of Inspector General that pertain to recent contingency...Contracting and Contract Management in Expeditionary Operations . And, this research reviews the DOD Contingency Contracting Handbook. The research

  18. The Army Learning Organisation Workshop

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    Knowledge Management DALO DSTO Army Learning Organisation DASS Defence Assisted Study Scheme DLOQ Dimensions of a Learning Organisation Questionnaire...realised. Facilitation was provided through external (academic/subject matter expert) and internal (DALO Research Team) providers. The external...being an organisational archetype characterised by the existence of certain internal conditions and proclivities which facilitate learning at

  19. Army Historic Preservation Campaign Plan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-08-01

    economic viability of historic buildings • Ensure an accurate account of Army historic properties is available for planning purposes Goal - Improve The...options Ensure an accurate account of historic properties for planning purposes Promote strategies to improve economic viability of historic buildings

  20. Army Precision at Central Headquarters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Jay P.

    2005-01-01

    William "Rob" Roberts wasn't thinking about working as a professional educator, much less running a major school system, when he decided he'd had enough of formal schooling himself at age 19. Rather, he dreamed of big adventures, flying combat aircraft for the military. When he discovered the U.S. Army didn't insist on two years of…

  1. The Army word recognition system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadden, David R.; Haratz, David

    1977-01-01

    The application of speech recognition technology in the Army command and control area is presented. The problems associated with this program are described as well as as its relevance in terms of the man/machine interactions, voice inflexions, and the amount of training needed to interact with and utilize the automated system.

  2. Army Maneuver Center of Excellence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-18

    agreements throughout DoD DARPA, JIEDDO, DHS, FAA, DoE, NSA , NASA, SMDC, etc. Strategic Partnerships Benefit the Army Materiel Enterprise External... Neuroscience Network Sciences Hierarchical Computing Extreme Energy Science Autonomous Systems Technology Emerging Sciences Meso-scale (grain...scales • Improvements in Soldier-system overall performance → operational neuroscience and advanced simulation and training technologies

  3. Army Environmental Cleanup Strategic Plan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    Serves an enduring document to guide future strategic plans – Establishes ISO 14001 framework for cleanup; complies w/GPRA  Army Environmental...follow ISO 14001 – Plan - Complete the FY10-11 Strategic Plan – Do - Implement Activities According to the Plan – Check - Evaluate Progress Against the

  4. Full Spectrum Army Officer Management

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-22

    ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER Colonel Ronda G. Urey Department of Military...Lieutenant Colonel Thomas J. Edwards, Jr. United States Army Colonel Ronda G. Urey Project Adviser This SRP is submitted in

  5. Army Forces for Homeland Security

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-01-01

    Overview,” slide presentation at the RAND Corporation, Arlington, Va., June 19, 2002. Feiler , Jeremy, “National Guard Association: Governors Should...Challenge,” Carlisle, Pa.: Strategic Studies Institute, U.S. Army War College, 2001. Pirnie, Bruce R., and Corazon M. Francisco, Assessing Requirements for

  6. Army Precision at Central Headquarters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Jay P.

    2005-01-01

    William "Rob" Roberts wasn't thinking about working as a professional educator, much less running a major school system, when he decided he'd had enough of formal schooling himself at age 19. Rather, he dreamed of big adventures, flying combat aircraft for the military. When he discovered the U.S. Army didn't insist on two years of…

  7. Forecasting Army Enlisted ETS Losses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    civilian labor markets and Army officer retention,” Rand, Santa Monica, CA, 2011. [4] B. J. Asch , P. Heaton, J. Hosek, F. Martorell, C. Simon, and J...Behavioral and Social Sciences, Fort Belvoir, VA, 2010, vol. 1280. [6] J. R. Hosek, B. J. Asch , and M. G. Mattock, "Should the increase in military

  8. Continental crust beneath southeast Iceland

    PubMed Central

    Torsvik, Trond H.; Amundsen, Hans E. F.; Trønnes, Reidar G.; Doubrovine, Pavel V.; Gaina, Carmen; Kusznir, Nick J.; Steinberger, Bernhard; Corfu, Fernando; Ashwal, Lewis D.; Griffin, William L.; Werner, Stephanie C.; Jamtveit, Bjørn

    2015-01-01

    The magmatic activity (0–16 Ma) in Iceland is linked to a deep mantle plume that has been active for the past 62 My. Icelandic and northeast Atlantic basalts contain variable proportions of two enriched components, interpreted as recycled oceanic crust supplied by the plume, and subcontinental lithospheric mantle derived from the nearby continental margins. A restricted area in southeast Iceland—and especially the Öræfajökull volcano—is characterized by a unique enriched-mantle component (EM2-like) with elevated 87Sr/86Sr and 207Pb/204Pb. Here, we demonstrate through modeling of Sr–Nd–Pb abundances and isotope ratios that the primitive Öræfajökull melts could have assimilated 2–6% of underlying continental crust before differentiating to more evolved melts. From inversion of gravity anomaly data (crustal thickness), analysis of regional magnetic data, and plate reconstructions, we propose that continental crust beneath southeast Iceland is part of ∼350-km-long and 70-km-wide extension of the Jan Mayen Microcontinent (JMM). The extended JMM was marginal to East Greenland but detached in the Early Eocene (between 52 and 47 Mya); by the Oligocene (27 Mya), all parts of the JMM permanently became part of the Eurasian plate following a westward ridge jump in the direction of the Iceland plume. PMID:25825769

  9. Physical oceanography of continental shelves

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, J.S.; Beardlsey, R.C.; Blanton, J.O.; Boicourt, W.C.; Butman, B.; Coachman, L.K.; Huyer, A.; Kinder, T.H.; Royer, T.C.; Schumacher, J.D.

    1983-06-01

    Knowledge of the physical oceanography of continental shelves has increased tremendously in recent years, primarily as a result of new current and hydrographic measurements made in locations where no comparable measurements existed previously. In general, observations from geographically distinct continental shelves have shown that the nature of the flow may vary considerably from region to region. Although some characteristics, such as the response of currents to wind forcing, are common to many shelves, the relative importance of various physical processes in influencing the shelf flow field frequently is different. In the last several years, the scientific literature on shelf studies has expanded rapidly, with that for separate regions, to some extent, developing independently because of the variable role played by different physical effects. Consequently, it seems that a simultaneous review of progress in physical oceanographic research in different shelf regions would be especially useful at this time in order to help assess the overall progress in the field. This multi-author report has been compiled as a result. Included are sections on the physical oceanography of continental shelves, in or off of, the eastern Bering Sea, northern Gulf of Alaska, Pacific Northwest, southern California, west Florida, southeastern US, Middle Atlantic Bight, Georges Bank and Peru. These discussions clearly point to the diverse nature of the dominant physics in several of the regions, as well as to some of the dynamical features they share in common. 390 references, 23 figures.

  10. Why does continental convergence stop

    SciTech Connect

    Hynes, A.

    1985-01-01

    Convergence between India and Asia slowed at 45 Ma when they collided, but continues today. This requires that substantial proportions of the Indian and/or Asian lithospheric mantle are still being subducted. The resulting slab-pull is probably comparable with that from complete lithospheric slabs and may promote continued continental convergence even after collision. Since descending lithospheric slabs are present at all collision zones at the time of collision such continued convergence may be general after continental collisions. It may cease only when there is a major (global) plate reorganization which results in new forces on the convergent continents that may counteract the slab-pull. These inferences may be tested on the late Paleozoic collision between Gondwanaland and Laurasia. This is generally considered to have been complete by mid-Permian time (250 Ma). However, this may be only the time of docking of Gondwanaland with North America, not that of the cessation of convergence. Paleomagnetic polar-wander paths for the Gondwanide continents exhibit consistently greater latitudinal shifts from 250 Ma to 200 Ma than those of Laurasia when corrected for post-Triassic drift, suggesting that convergence continued through late Permian well into the Triassic. It may have been accommodated by crustal thickening under what is now the US Coastal Plain, or by strike-slip faulting. Convergence may have ceased only when Pangea began to fragment again, in which case the cause for its cessation may be related to the cause of continental fragmentation.

  11. Continental crust beneath southeast Iceland.

    PubMed

    Torsvik, Trond H; Amundsen, Hans E F; Trønnes, Reidar G; Doubrovine, Pavel V; Gaina, Carmen; Kusznir, Nick J; Steinberger, Bernhard; Corfu, Fernando; Ashwal, Lewis D; Griffin, William L; Werner, Stephanie C; Jamtveit, Bjørn

    2015-04-14

    The magmatic activity (0-16 Ma) in Iceland is linked to a deep mantle plume that has been active for the past 62 My. Icelandic and northeast Atlantic basalts contain variable proportions of two enriched components, interpreted as recycled oceanic crust supplied by the plume, and subcontinental lithospheric mantle derived from the nearby continental margins. A restricted area in southeast Iceland--and especially the Öræfajökull volcano--is characterized by a unique enriched-mantle component (EM2-like) with elevated (87)Sr/(86)Sr and (207)Pb/(204)Pb. Here, we demonstrate through modeling of Sr-Nd-Pb abundances and isotope ratios that the primitive Öræfajökull melts could have assimilated 2-6% of underlying continental crust before differentiating to more evolved melts. From inversion of gravity anomaly data (crustal thickness), analysis of regional magnetic data, and plate reconstructions, we propose that continental crust beneath southeast Iceland is part of ∼350-km-long and 70-km-wide extension of the Jan Mayen Microcontinent (JMM). The extended JMM was marginal to East Greenland but detached in the Early Eocene (between 52 and 47 Mya); by the Oligocene (27 Mya), all parts of the JMM permanently became part of the Eurasian plate following a westward ridge jump in the direction of the Iceland plume.

  12. Composition of the Continental Crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudnick, R. L.; Gao, S.

    2003-12-01

    The Earth is an unusual planet in our solar system in having a bimodal topography that reflects the two distinct types of crust found on our planet. The low-lying oceanic crust is thin (˜7 km on average), composed of relatively dense rock types such as basalt and is young (≤200 Ma old) (see Chapter 3.13). In contrast, the high-standing continental crust is thick (˜40 km on average), is composed of highly diverse lithologies (virtually every rock type known on Earth) that yield an average intermediate or "andesitic" bulk composition (Taylor and McLennan (1985) and references therein), and contains the oldest rocks and minerals yet observed on Earth (currently the 4.0 Ga Acasta gneisses (Bowring and Williams, 1999) and 4.4 Ga detrital zircons from the Yilgarn Block, Western Australia (Wilde et al., 2001)), respectively. Thus, the continents preserve a rich geological history of our planet's evolution and understanding their origin is critical for understanding the origin and differentiation of the Earth.The origin of the continents has received wide attention within the geological community, with hundreds of papers and several books devoted to the topic (the reader is referred to the following general references for further reading: Taylor and McLennan (1985), Windley (1995), and Condie (1997). Knowledge of the age and composition of the continental crust is essential for understanding its origin. Patchett and Samson (Chapter 3.10) review the present-day age distribution of the continental crust and Kemp and Hawkesworth (Chapter 3.11) review secular evolution of crust composition. Moreover, to understand fully the origin and evolution of continents requires an understanding of not only the crust, but also the mantle lithosphere that formed more-or-less contemporaneously with the crust and translates with it as the continents move across the Earth's surface. The latter topic is reviewed in Chapter 2.05.This chapter reviews the present-day composition of the

  13. Privatization of electrical and natural gas utility systems at Army installations

    SciTech Connect

    Eng, W.F.

    1997-06-01

    At the beginning of the 1990`s, ninety-two percent of the Army`s major CONUS (Continental United States) installations owned and operated their own natural gas distribution systems. During the past five years, four more gas systems have been transferred to the local distribution companies and many more are either under study or well on their way towards privatization. Within the Army, the growing trend is towards total privatization of both the plants and piping systems. The statistics on electrical distribution, a highly regulated utility as compared to natural gas, are comparable: ninety-eight percent Army-owned in 1990 with three transferred since then. To counteract years of severe underfunding for maintenance, repair, and rehabilitation of an aging utility infrastructure, as well as an older and shrinking workforce, the Army has embarked on a course of total divestiture of these assets and the purchase of the utility services from the {open_quotes}new utility provider.{close_quotes} The utility provider, be it a private, investor-owned utility company, or municipal utility department, as a condition of the conveyance, must accept full responsibility for system enhancements, enlargements, and environmental compliance. The Army installation, like any other customer, is then charged for service and capital improvements as part of the rate structure. Privatization, through total asset divestiture, is intended to take the burden off the installation and put it on the broader shoulders of the utility company or authority, which is organized, financed, staffed, and equipped to provide a better level of service to all its utility customers.

  14. 2009 Center for Army Leadership Annual Survey of Army Leadership (CASAL): Army Civilians

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    Behavioral Trust Inventory ( BTI ; Gillespie, 2003) were used to assess superior, peer, and subordinate trust among Army civilians:  23% of civilians...of senior leaders (GO and SES level) in the ATLDP study reported that from their vantage point supervisors and managers resist supporting leader

  15. 76 FR 70710 - Army National Cemeteries Advisory Commission (ANCAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-15

    ... Department of the Army Army National Cemeteries Advisory Commission (ANCAC) AGENCY: Department of the Army... the Army announces the following committee meeting: Name of Committee: Army National Cemeteries... Meeting: Women in Service to America Memorial, Conference Room, Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington,...

  16. Army Hearing Program Status Report Quarter 1 Fiscal Year 2017

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-03-27

    Army Hearing Program Status Report, Q1FY17 March 2017 i Army Publ ic Heal th Center Army Hearing Program Status...Report Q1 FY17 Clinical Public Health & Epidemiology Directorate Army Hearing Division 27 March 2017 Army Hearing Program Status...Report, Q1FY17 March 2017 i Table of Contents Introduction

  17. 78 FR 69077 - Army Education Advisory Subcommittee Meeting Notice

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-18

    ... Department of the Army Army Education Advisory Subcommittee Meeting Notice AGENCY: Department of the Army, Do... Army Education Advisory Committee for deliberation by the Committee under the open-meeting rules...@us.army.mil , (831) 242-5828. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Pursuant to 41 CFR 102-3.105(j) and 102-...

  18. 77 FR 11084 - Army Education Advisory Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-24

    ... Department of the Army Army Education Advisory Committee Meeting AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION... the Federal Regulations (CFR 102-3. 140 through 160, the Department of the Army announces the following committee meeting: Name of Committee: Army Education Advisory Committee (AEAC). Date of...

  19. 77 FR 40030 - Army Science Board Summer Study Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-06

    ... Department of the Army Army Science Board Summer Study Meeting AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION... the Federal Regulations (41 CFR 102-3. 140 through 160, the Department of the Army announces the following committee meeting: Name of Committee: Army Science Board (ASB). Date(s) of Meeting: July 26,...

  20. 78 FR 64205 - Army Science Board Fall Plenary Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-28

    ... Department of the Army Army Science Board Fall Plenary Meeting AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION... Defense cancelled the meeting of the U.S. Army Science Board on October 16, 2013. As a result, the... . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: None. Brenda S. Bowen, Army Federal Register Liaison Officer. BILLING CODE 3710-08-P...

  1. 77 FR 4026 - Army Education Advisory Subcommittee Meeting Notice

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-26

    ... Department of the Army Army Education Advisory Subcommittee Meeting Notice AGENCY: Department of the Army, Do... advisory committee meeting will take place: Name of Committee: Board of Visitors, U.S. Army War College Subcommittee. Date of Meeting: February 23, 2012. Place of Meeting: U.S. Army War College, 122 Forbes...

  2. 78 FR 23759 - Army Education Advisory Subcommittee Meeting Notice

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-22

    ... Department of the Army Army Education Advisory Subcommittee Meeting Notice AGENCY: Department of the Army, Do... advisory committee meeting will take place: Name of Committee: Board of Visitors, U.S. Army War College Subcommittee. Dates of Meeting: May 16, 2013. Place of Meeting: U.S. Army War College, 122 Forbes...

  3. 78 FR 38956 - Army Education Advisory Subcommittee; Meeting Notice

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-28

    ... Department of the Army Army Education Advisory Subcommittee; Meeting Notice AGENCY: Department of the Army... Army Education Advisory Committee for deliberation by the Committee under the open- meeting rules. FOR... Designated Federal Officer: ATFL- APO, Monterey, CA, 93944, Robert.Savukinas@us.army.mil , (831)...

  4. 77 FR 21977 - Army Science Board Summer Study Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-12

    ... Department of the Army Army Science Board Summer Study Meeting AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION... the Federal Regulations (CFR 102-3.140 through 160, the Department of the Army announces the following committee meeting: Name of Committee: Army Science Board (ASB). Date(s) of Meeting: May 3, 2012. Time(s)...

  5. 78 FR 24735 - Army Education Advisory Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-26

    ... Department of the Army Army Education Advisory Committee Meeting AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION... the Federal Regulations (CFR 102-3.140 through 160, the Department of the Army announces the following committee meeting: Name of Committee: Army Education Advisory Committee (AEAC). Date of Meeting:...

  6. 77 FR 27209 - Army Education Advisory Subcommittee Meeting Notice

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-09

    ... Department of the Army Army Education Advisory Subcommittee Meeting Notice AGENCY: Department of the Army, Do... ] Federal advisory committee meeting will take place: Name of Committee: Board of Visitors, U.S. Army War College Subcommittee. Date of Meeting: May 31, 2012. Place of Meeting: U.S. Army War College, 122...

  7. 77 FR 66823 - Army Education Advisory Committee Study Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-07

    ... Department of the Army Army Education Advisory Committee Study Meeting AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD... the Federal Regulations (41 CFR 102-3. 140 through 160, the Department of the Army announces the following committee meeting: Name of Committee: Army Education Advisory Committee (AEAC). Date(s) of...

  8. 78 FR 73852 - Army Science Board Winter Plenary Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-09

    ... Department of the Army Army Science Board Winter Plenary Meeting AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION... committee meeting: Name of Committee: Army Science Board (ASB) Winter Plenary Session. Date: January 15.... Purpose of Meeting: The purpose of the meeting is for the Army Science Board to review the results of the...

  9. The development of bacteriology, sanitation science and allied research in the British Army 1850-1918: equipping the RAMC for war.

    PubMed

    Atenstaedt, R L

    2010-09-01

    The recent 90 year anniversary of the end of the First World War is an opportune time to reconsider the important role of the Royal Army Medical Corps in this conflict. One area which has been neglected is the role of the Royal Army Medical Corps in responding to infectious diseases and to understand this properly it is important to consider the development of bacteriology, sanitation science and allied research in the British Army up to the Great War. The context of the home front is also central, with the British population from 1880-1914 increasingly benefiting from improved public sanitation and the new science of bacteriology. Historians acknowledge that the British campaign in the Crimea in the 1850s was pursued with inadequate medical provision and as a result, the Army suffered severely from infectious diseases. Limited changes were introduced after the Crimean War, such as the establishment of the Army Medical School, with its high quality instruction in military hygiene and later bacteriology. Army medics also led the way in various branches of scientific research, through research in the colonies. As compared with the continental powers, however, the application of bacteriology and sanitation to field craft in the British Army was delayed. It took the experiences of the South African and Russo-Japanese Wars for the importance of these sciences to be recognised by the Army as a whole. These subjects began to form part of the education of army Medical Officers, but training was basic and few trainees had specialised in bacteriology by 1914. In spite of these limitations, the Royal Army Medical Corps responded well to the demands placed upon it by World War One, recruiting civilian bacteriologists to its ranks, developing technological innovations such as mobile bacteriological laboratories for them to work in, forming a sanitation service and fostering medical research.

  10. Renewable Energy Assessment Methodology for Japanese OCONUS Army Installations

    SciTech Connect

    Solana, Amy E.; Horner, Jacob A.; Russo, Bryan J.; Gorrissen, Willy J.; Kora, Angela R.; Weimar, Mark R.; Hand, James R.; Orrell, Alice C.; Williamson, Jennifer L.

    2010-08-30

    Since 2005, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been asked by Installation Management Command (IMCOM) to conduct strategic assessments at selected US Army installations of the potential use of renewable energy resources, including solar, wind, geothermal, biomass, waste, and ground source heat pumps (GSHPs). IMCOM has the same economic, security, and legal drivers to develop alternative, renewable energy resources overseas as it has for installations located in the US. The approach for continental US (CONUS) studies has been to use known, US-based renewable resource characterizations and information sources coupled with local, site-specific sources and interviews. However, the extent to which this sort of data might be available for outside the continental US (OCONUS) sites was unknown. An assessment at Camp Zama, Japan was completed as a trial to test the applicability of the CONUS methodology at OCONUS installations. It was found that, with some help from Camp Zama personnel in translating and locating a few Japanese sources, there was relatively little difficulty in finding sources that should provide a solid basis for conducting an assessment of comparable depth to those conducted for US installations. Project implementation will likely be more of a challenge, but the feasibility analysis will be able to use the same basic steps, with some adjusted inputs, as PNNL’s established renewable resource assessment methodology.

  11. Exploring the Complexities of Army Civilians and the Army Profession

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    as the province of practitioners of a profession. For a fiduciary relationship , a profession manifests when the nature of the services provided...9. 94 “5 CFR 2636.305 - Compensation and Other Restrictions Relating to Professions Involving a Fiduciary Relationship ,” linked from The Legal...operations.9 The symbiotic relationship and necessity for Army civilians is apparent in generating land combat power and providing support for

  12. ETL wins Army Lab Prize

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The U.S. Army Engineer Topographic Laboratories (ETL), located in Fort Belvoir, Va., was awarded the 1981 Department of the Army Most Improved Laboratory of the Year Award for ETL's scientific and technical achievements in mapping, military geographic information, and geographic intelligence systems.ETL, the largest topographic research and development organization of its kind in the world, specializes in mapping, geodesy, point positioning, and military geographic information. ETL addresses the full range of development from basic research to a final product in the topographic sciences. In addition, scientists at the laboratory have interpreted feedback from satellites, such as Landsat, to help pinpoint and improve ecological imbalance in some areas. ETL engineers are developing electronic systems to measure dams, while other ETL staff members are designing a pseudo-radar system for the Pershing II missile.

  13. Strategic Mobility, The Force Proejction Army, and the Ottawa Landmine Treaty: Can the Army Get There?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Accessed 27 October 2000. This theme was reiterated in the fiscal year 2001 Army Posture Statement. 70 Louis Caldera and Eric K. Shinseki, A Statement on the...Operations, III-21. 87 Ibid., III-4. 88 Louis Caldera and Eric K. Shinseki, A Statement on the Posture of the United States Army Fiscal Year 2001...October 2000. 50 Caldera , Louis and Eric K. Shinseki. A Statement on the Posture of the United States Army Fiscal Year 2001, (http://www.army.mil/aps

  14. Management: Total Army Quality Management

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-03-15

    meet current and future customer needs . 3–2. Strategic planning a. Strategic planning is the process by which managers at higher levels envision their...framework for all Army organizations to measure how well they are meeting their stated goals and customer needs . It provides a systematic review that...business. (2) Customer-Driven – The organization’s focus is on its customers – ensuring its operations meet customer needs in the most efficient manner

  15. Social Media and the Army

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-01

    media from troops. Although the OPORD has limitations based on operational domain authority and application, the intent is clear: social media has...thoughts, and the latest on dit. Our Army has embraced the world of social media as the power of communication has taken a new turn. Typewriters...landlines, and beepers are communication tools of the past. A new generation of immediacy has created a firestorm of social media tools that encourage

  16. The Army Profession: A Narrative

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-23

    Excellence in Character and Ethical Leadership2 MNF -I Multi-National Forces, Iraq TRADOC US Army Training and Doctrine Command US The United States of...America 1Formerly ACPME 22009 ACPME study conducted through surveys of MNF -I personnel. v...Iraq ( MNF -I) Commander, General David Petraeus. General Petraeus asked to have a study conducted to examine “factors that serve as determinants of

  17. Strategic Sealift Supporting Army Deployments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-10

    graphics, and any other works incorporated into this manuscript. A work of the United States Government is not subject to copyright, however further...Thompson, MAJ 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) U.S. Army Command...project its forces globally. Getting personnel and equipment in position to operate effectively for long periods requires a variety of systems to work

  18. Army PCMH Initiative: Current Status

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-25

    Increasing accessibility and quality of healthcare • Improving Soldier and Family housing • Ensuring excellence in schools, youth services, and child ...2010 Enrollment vs. Capacity Care Continuity Appointment Availability Patient Satisfaction RMC TRICARE Operation Center ( TOC ) 04 OCT 10...2011 MHS Conference  35 Parent Sites  114 Child Sites  11 MTFs with 66 PCMH Teams  Level II NCQA Recognized PCMH: “0” PCMH in Army Inventory 10 of

  19. Tailored Training in Army Courses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    R . J . Sternberg , & R . G. Glasser (Eds.), Learning and individual differences: Advances in theory and research (pp. 13-59). New...tailoring. 41 References Bickley, W. R ., Pleban, R . J ., Diedrich, F., Sidman, J ., Semmens, R ., & Geyer, A. (2010). Army Institutional Training...interdisciplinary learning science (pp. 189-211). Oxford: Elsevier. Dyer, J . L., Fober, G. W., Wampler, R ., Blankenbeckler, N., Dlubac, M., & Centric, J

  20. The Army and Team Learning

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-05-01

    Team Learning Commanders at every level in the Army continually search for a means to make their units more effective and, thereby, accomplish...nature of individual thought into his effective “collective phenomenon” required the interaction of individuals through discourse. Bohm spends a great...where discussion requires a certain amount of deconstruction. Both dialogue and discussion are required for effective discourse, but Senge builds

  1. Military Review: A Changing Army

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-08-01

    The answer lies in recognizing the good and bad er, the bottom line is not negative. There has that came as a result of the normal functioning been an...patriotic, proud ly, this ismuch less an issue. The inspector gen- if their unit can serve with "the Regulars," partic- eral function is much more...34more productive" orga- functional capability in industry and supporting nizations were introduced. Maintenance per- the Army during war, analogous

  2. Army Occupational Health Program, 1978.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-01-01

    conjunctivitis 3 Fungal infection 3 Infection of skin and subcutaneous tissue 3 Code 22: Dust Diseases of the Lungs (Pneumononioses) 2 Includes: Asbestosis 2...f - - - 5-- — -5-- ——5-- - --- -~~~~~~~~~~--5 Army Occupational Heal th Program , 1978 TABLE 16. CANCER SCREENING...oyee education program with much emphasis on Pulmonary Function Testing, Asbestos, Smoking and Lung Disease. A smok i ng withdrawal clini c was held

  3. Army junior dental officer retention.

    PubMed

    Mazuji, Nasrin; Chaffin, Jeffrey G; Beer, Ronald R; Mangelsdorff, A David

    2005-01-01

    The objectives of the survey were to quantify the extent of indebtedness of junior dental officers and to determine the impact of a loan repayment program on career decisions. We designed a customized survey instrument because no preexisting, validated, survey instrument was available. A query was performed in the Medical Operations Data System to identify all captains (0-3) currently on active duty in the Army (N = 348). The survey sample included 64 junior officers with a 2000 date of rank to captain (0-3), of whom only 52 were in the Medical Command Outlook address book or the Army Knowledge Online white pages. The questionnaire was sent out to these targeted junior dental officers through their official e-mail accounts. Dentists assigned to Korea and to dental field units do not use the same e-mail system as the rest of the Dental Command; therefore, their addresses were not available. In an attempt to increase response rates, commanders were asked to emphasize the importance of responding to the questionnaire. From the sample population of 52 officers who were queried directly, 34 responses were received, for a response rate of 65%. However, commanders forwarded the survey to all Dental Command captains and 102 responses were received. The respondents represented 30% of the total Army inventory of captains; 92% of respondents reported that they had dental school loans, with 43% reporting loans in excess of dollar 50,000. The average dental school indebtedness was approximately dollar 60,700. More than 60% of all respondents reported that loan repayment could change their minds about remaining on active duty. Officers not included in the original sample rated the impact of loan repayment statistically higher than did officers in the original sample. The findings were that the majority of junior Army dental officers had significant student loans and many of these officers indicated that they would consider remaining on active duty if loan repayment or other

  4. Plain English for Army Lawyers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-05-01

    TELEPHONE (Include Arta Code) 22c. OFFICE SYMBOL Judy CI irk 207-475.1Ull I FA-AR 0D FRM 1473, 84 MAR 83 APR edition may be used until exhausted SE CURITY...instructions during courts- martial . Contractors and contracting officers outdo each other in blaming lawyers for problems that crop up in Government...of legal practice -- from courts- martial to client services and from business transac- tions to administrative regulations. Although Army clients may

  5. Army Engineers at Pearl Harbor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    the Honolulu Engi- neer District, then part of the South Pacific Division. Colonel Albert K.B. Lyman , a native Hawaiian who later attained the rank...aircraft dis- persal at Wheeler Field. On the civil side, Lieutenant Colonel Theodore Wyman, the Honolulu District Engineer, had offices employing 10...Army Engineers at Pearl Harbor Past in Review Native Hawaiian Colonel Albert K.B. Lyman , the Army’s Ha- waiian Department engineer during the attack

  6. Army Officer Duty Module Manual.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-10-01

    Registry of Officer Job Schedules Inclosure 6 Duty Modules for Tank Platoon Leader, Lieutenant Inclosure 7 Instructions for Participating in Duty...Institutes for Research LEADERSHIP AND MANAGEMENT TECHNICAL AREA It2Dh1Af l U. S. Army Research Institute for the Behavioral and Social Sciences...neceea en ed Identify by block number) Officer Personnel Management Systems (OPMS), Job content description, Duty Modules, Armor Branch 20. A"rlTq ACT m

  7. Recruiting Effects of Army Advertising

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    large amount of newspaper advertising was bought through "groups," or aggregates of related newspapers whose space is marketed together. For example, ads ...im rm’ r .. . 2 advertising on private sector markets when firms attempt to influence consumers’ purchasing decisions. When it comes to research on... adding unique data describing the patterns and distribu- tion of Army advertising expenditures between 1981 and 1984. 3 The specific aims of the

  8. 2011 Army Strategic Planning Guidance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-25

    TESI ) of 22,000 Soldiers, the Army’s total force by the end of the mid-term period is programmed to be 520K (AC). We will achieve a more...dwell ratios, extending TESI authority to adequately man deploying units and sustain the All-Volunteer Force, right-sizing the generating force, and... TESI Temporary End-Strength Increase WMD Weapons of Mass Destruction 2011 ARMY STRATEGIC PLANNING GUIDANCE Page 19 2011

  9. Thermal models pertaining to continental growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Paul; Ashwal, Lew

    1988-01-01

    Thermal models are important to understanding continental growth as the genesis, stabilization, and possible recycling of continental crust are closely related to the tectonic processes of the earth which are driven primarily by heat. The thermal energy budget of the earth was slowly decreasing since core formation, and thus the energy driving the terrestrial tectonic engine was decreasing. This fundamental observation was used to develop a logic tree defining the options for continental growth throughout earth history.

  10. Desiccant-Based Dehumidification for Army Facilities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-11-01

    desiccants are absorbei.ts; they physically zid/or chemically change as they pick up water. Triethylene glycol is a common liquid desiccant . Typically, liquid...AD-A263 305 fc USACERL Technical Report FE-93/10November 1992 Desiccant Cooling/Dehumidification for Army Facilities US A Imy Corps of Engineers...Construction Engineering Research Laboratory Desiccant -Based Dehumidification for Army Facilities by Gerald L. Cler The U.S. Army maintains over 1 billion

  11. Factors Influencing Job Satisfaction among Army Chaplains

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-05-20

    or 20 MAY 1976 STUDY ’ PROJECT FACTORS INFLUENCING JOB SATISFACTION AMONG ARMY CHAPLAINS BY CHAPLAIN(COLONEL) KERMIT D. JOHNSON US ARMY WAR...job •atUfaction among US kxmy chaplain« it b«aad CO • mail aurvay raaponao of 998 chap Ulna out of 1411 in tha Army chaplaincy. Factors which...chaplaincy, and cosseand. Certain professional Irritants were singled out. By means of demographic information, comparisons were made as to how

  12. Controls Over Army Real Property Financial Reporting

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-28

    Assistant Secretary of the Army (Financial Management and Comptroller) AWCF Army Working Capital Fund CIP Construction-in-Progress DCD/ DCW DFAS...Warehouse (DCD/ DCW ). The Assistant Secretary of the Army (Financial Management and Comptroller) (ASA[FM&C]) is responsible for the policies, procedures...entity’s information to automatically populate that indicator. As a result, IFS did not send DCD/ DCW correct information for determining the

  13. U.S. Army Sustainability Needs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-12

    Mine Resistant Ambush Protected (MRAP) A family of armored fighting vehicles designed to survive IED attacks and ambushes 22,600 Total 299,032...the System Research and Testing Demonstrate Systems and Technologies 1 in 8 US Army casualties in Iraq was the result of protecting fuel...Army Aloha Microgrid #1 opens • Jan 2012 – US Army Aloha Microgrid #2 scheduled to be operational Microgrid Technology Achieving Efficiencies

  14. The Cultural Dimension of Army Transition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-06

    TITLE AND SUBTITLE THE CULTURAL DIMENSION OF ARMY TRANSITION 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR( S ) ANGUS M. A. TILNEY 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION...armies. Furthermore, according to the well-recognized “ dimensions of national culture ” studied by Geert Hofstede , Britain and the United States share...Approved for Public Release; Distribution is Unlimited The Cultural Dimension of Army Transition A Monograph by Major Angus Myles Arthur Tilney

  15. U.S. Army Social Media Handbook

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    should visit: www.army.mil/ socialmedia /. Regis- tering on the Army’s social media directory also provides other benefits. Once a site is approved, it...registration to www.army.mil/ socialmedia /. Set default view of your Facebook wall to show posts by only your organization. Make sure YouTube channels...http://www.army.mil/ socialmedia /) DoD Social Media Hub (http://socialmedia.defense.gov/) AKO Social Media Portal

  16. A Cross-Sectional Comparison of Army Advertising Attributes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-11-01

    that identifies the needs and characteristics of individuals in the Armys’ prime market , as well as their exposure to Army advertising . One way the Army...U.S. Army Research Institute for the Behavioral and Social Sciences N Research Report 1578 A Cross-Sectional Comparison I of Army Advertising ...62785A 791 2105 H01 11. TITLE (Include Security Classification) A Cross-Sectional Comparison of Army Advertising Attributes 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S

  17. 2012 Center for Army Leadership Annual Survey of Army Leadership (CASAL): Army Civilian Leaders

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-23

    of the 2012 CASAL, and is meant to serve as a supporting document to the technical report of CASAL main findings (Riley, Hatfield, Paddock ...supporting document to the technical report of CASAL main findings (Riley, Hatfield, Paddock , & Fallesen, 2013). In 2005, the Annual Survey of Army...pertaining to attitudes, opinions and ratings of active duty uniformed leaders are made when useful or for confirmation (Riley, Hatfield, Paddock

  18. The Center for the Army Profession and Ethic (CAPE) Annual Survey of the Army Profession (CASAP FY15)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    TECHNICAL REPORT CENTER FOR THE ARMY PROFESSION AND ETHIC Technical Report 2015-01 The Center for the Army Profession and Ethic (CAPE...CASAP FY15 September 2015 Center for the Army Profession and Ethic (CAPE) U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command Authorized and approved for...distribution: JOHN A. VERMEESCH Colonel, U.S. Army Director, Center for the Army Profession and Ethic NOTICES

  19. Earth's continental crustal gold endowment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frimmel, H. E.

    2008-03-01

    The analysis of the temporal distribution of gold deposits, combined with gold production data as well as reserve and resource estimates for different genetic types of gold deposit, revealed that the bulk of the gold known to be concentrated in ore bodies was added to the continental crust during a giant Mesoarchaean gold event at a time (3 Ga) when the mantle temperature reached a maximum and the dominant style of tectonic movement changed from vertical, plume-related to subhorizontal plate tectonic. A magmatic derivation of the first generation of crustal gold from a relatively hot mantle that was characterized by a high degree of partial melting is inferred from the gold chemistry, specifically high Os contents. While a large proportion of that gold is still present in only marginally modified palaeoplacer deposits of the Mesoarchaean Witwatersrand Basin in South Africa, accounting for about 40% of all known gold, the remainder has been recycled repeatedly on a lithospheric scale, predominantly by plate-tectonically induced magmatic and hydrothermal fluid circulation, to produce the current variety of gold deposit types. Post-Archaean juvenile gold addition to the continental crust has been limited, but a mantle contribution to some of the largest orogenic or intrusion-related gold deposits is indicated, notably for the Late Palaeozoic Tien Shan gold province. Magmatic fluids in active plate margins seem to be the most effective transport medium for gold mobilization, giving rise to a large proportion of volcanic-arc related gold deposits. Due to their generally shallow crustal level of formation, they have a low preservation potential. In contrast, those gold deposits that form at greater depth are more widespread also in older rocks. This explains the high proportion of orogenic (including intrusion-related) gold (32%) amongst all known gold deposits. The overall proportion of gold concentrated in known ore bodies is only 7 × 10- 7 of the estimated total

  20. United States Army, Sixth Army Field Order 74

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1945-01-01

    Sixth Amy Reserve; _!. llth Airborne Division: a.. Commander: -Major General Joseph M. Swing,’U.S.A. b_. Units and Staging: Annex 3h_« (i) Army...HEADQUARTERS SIXTH AMY . APO-442 - 19301 28 July 1945 ANNEX 3f to FO 74 , Troop List, 40th Infantry Division, reinforced (tentative) COMBAT UNITS Unit 40th’ inf...route SHIBUSHI - KA3DYA - TAKASU. • (4) The 281st signal Pigeon Compan;,’- will: (a) provide I, IX, and XI Corps-with, one combat section each prior to

  1. Functional Study of CONUSA (Continental U.S. Army) Management. CONUSA Analysis.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1972-05-01

    PRESENT REC~~~ ENDED DISPOSITION SUBFUNCTI(~ AL AUTH AREA FORCE D& TAREA STRENGTH CMD - GIlD CMI) ELDIINATE Command and Control 13 6 0 0 7 Plans and...Nonconinissioned Officers’ Academy (NCOA) 3-3e 3-10 Mobilization Planning 3-3f 3-10 DCSPER - Other Areas Surveyed 3-3g 3-12 Adjutant Genera l (AG) - Other...Maintenance 3-3q 3-22 Services 3-3r 3-23 • Procurement 3-38 3-24 Logistics Plans and Operations 3-3t 3-25 Logistics Management 3-3u 3-26 Military

  2. Earthquakes in stable continental crust

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, A.C.; Kanter, L.R. )

    1990-03-01

    Earthquakes can strike even in stable crust, well away from the familiar earthquake zones at the edges of tectonic plates, but their mere occurrence is both a source of concern in planning critical facilities such as nuclear power plants. The authors sought answers to two major questions: Just how much seismic activity does take place within the stable parts of continents And are there specific geologic features that make some areas of stable crust particularly susceptible to earthquakes They began by studying North America alone, but it soon became clear that the fairly short record of these rare events on a single continent would not provide enough data for reliable analysis. Hence, they decided to substitute space for time--to survey earthquake frequency and distribution in stable continental areas worldwide. This paper discusses their findings.

  3. Rift asymmetry and continental uplift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doglioni, Carlo; Carminati, Eugenio; Bonatti, Enrico

    2003-06-01

    The topography of ocean ridges and rifts show a distinct asymmetry. The eastern sides of the East Pacific Rise, the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, and the NW Indian Ridge are, on average, 100-300 m more elevated than the conjugate flank to the west. The asymmetry is maintained when bathymetry is plotted versus the square root of crustal age. A comparable topographic asymmetry occurs in the Red Sea and Baikal rifts where the "eastern" continental shoulders are more elevated. We suggest that depleted and lighter asthenosphere generated below the ocean ridge was shifted "eastward" relative to the lithosphere, determining a density deficit below the eastern flank. The eastward migration of the lighter Atlantic asthenosphere below the African continent could eventually have contributed to the anomalous postrift uplift of Africa. This model suggests that the "westward" drift of the lithosphere relative to the underlying mantle might be a global phenomenon.

  4. Composition of the continental plates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gilluly, J.

    1954-01-01

    The structures of continental plates and of oceanic basins suggested by several seismologists are utilized to estimate the relative volumes of sial and sima in the earth's crust. It seems that sial of the composition of the average igneous rock constitutes fully 26% and perhaps as much as 43% of the total crust. This ratio is far higher than seems likely if the sial had been entirely derived through fractional crystallization of a basaltic magma. The relative paucity of intermediate rocks as compared with granite and gabbro in the crust points in the same direction. The tentative conclusion is reached that the sial owes a large part of its volume to some process other than fractional crystallization of basalt-possibly to the emanation of low-melting constituents such as water, silica, potassa, soda, and alumina directly from the mantle to the crust. ?? 1954 Springer-Verlag.

  5. Deformation in the continental lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Physical Properties of Earth Materials Committee, a technical committee of AGU's Tectonophysics Section, is organizing a dinner/colloquium as part of the Fall Meeting in San Francisco, Calif. This event will be held Monday, December 3rd, in the Gold Rush Room of the Holiday Inn Golden Gateway Hotel at 1500 Van Ness St. There will be a no-host bar from 6:30 to 7:30 P.M., followed by dinner from 7:30 to 8:30 P.M. Paul Tapponnier will deliver the after-dinner talk, “Large-Scale Deformation Mechanisms in the Continental Lithosphere: Where Do We Stand?” It will start at 8:30 P.M. and a business meeting will follow at 9:30 P.M.

  6. A Facies Model for Temperate Continental Glaciers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashley, Gail Mowry

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the presence and dynamics of continental glaciers in the domination of the physical processes of erosion and deposition in the mid-latitudes during the Pleistocene period. Describes the use of a sedimentary facies model as a guide to recognizing ancient temperate continental glacial deposits. (TW)

  7. How Continental Bank outsourced its "crown jewels.".

    PubMed

    Huber, R L

    1993-01-01

    No industry relies more on information than banking does, yet Continental, one of America's largest banks, outsources its information technology. Why? Because that's the best way to service the customers that form the core of the bank's business, says vice chairman Dick Huber. In the late 1970s and early 1980s, Continental participated heavily with Penn Square Bank in energy investments. When falling energy prices burst Penn Square's bubble in 1982, Continental was stuck with more than $1 billion in bad loans. Eight years later when Dick Huber came on board, Continental was working hard to restore its once solid reputation. Executives had made many tough decisions already, altering the bank's focus from retail to business banking and laying off thousands of employees. Yet management still needed to cut costs and improve services to stay afloat. Regulators, investors, and analysts were watching every step. Continental executives, eager to focus on the bank's core mission of serving business customers, decided to outsource one after another in-house service--from cafeteria services to information technology. While conventional wisdom holds that banks must retain complete internal control of IT, Continental bucked this argument when it entered into a ten-year, multimillion-dollar contract with Integrated Systems Solutions Corporation. Continental is already reaping benefits from outsourcing IT. Most important, Continental staffers today focus on their true core competencies: intimate knowledge of customers' needs and relationships with customers.

  8. A Facies Model for Temperate Continental Glaciers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashley, Gail Mowry

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the presence and dynamics of continental glaciers in the domination of the physical processes of erosion and deposition in the mid-latitudes during the Pleistocene period. Describes the use of a sedimentary facies model as a guide to recognizing ancient temperate continental glacial deposits. (TW)

  9. Evolution of Oxidative Continental Weathering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konhauser, Kurt; Lalonde, Stefan

    2014-05-01

    The Great Oxidation Event (GOE) is currently viewed as a protracted process during which atmospheric oxygen levels increased above 10-5 times the present atmospheric level. This value is based on the loss of sulphur isotope mass independent fractionation (S-MIF) from the rock record, beginning at 2.45 Ga and disappearing by 2.32 Ga. However, a number of recent papers have pushed back the timing for oxidative continental weathering, and by extension, the onset of atmospheric oxygenation several hundreds of million years earlier despite the presence of S-MIF (e.g., Crowe et al., 2013). This apparent discrepancy can, in part, be resolved by the suggestion that recycling of older sedimentary sulphur bearing S-MIF might have led to this signal's persistence in the rock record for some time after atmospheric oxygenation (Reinhard et al., 2013). Here we suggest another possibility, that the earliest oxidative weathering reactions occurred in environments at profound redox disequilibrium with the atmosphere, such as biological soil crusts, riverbed and estuarine sediments, and lacustrine microbial mats. We calculate that the rate of O2 production via oxygenic photosynthesis in these terrestrial microbial ecosystems provides largely sufficient oxidizing potential to mobilise sulphate and a number of redox-sensitive trace metals from land to the oceans while the atmosphere itself remained anoxic with its attendant S-MIF signature. These findings reconcile geochemical signatures in the rock record for the earliest oxidative continental weathering with the history of atmospheric sulphur chemistry, and demonstrate the plausible antiquity of a terrestrial biosphere populated by cyanobacteria. Crowe, S.A., Dossing, L.N., Beukes, N.J., Bau, M., Kruger, S.J., Frei, R. & Canfield, D.E. Atmospheric oxygenation three billion years ago. Nature 501, 535-539 (2013). Reinhard, C.T., Planavsky, N.J. & Lyons, T.W. Long-term sedimentary recycling of rare sulphur isotope anomalies. Nature 497

  10. Army industrial, landscaping, and agricultural water use

    SciTech Connect

    Stoughton, Kate McMordie; Loper, Susan A.; Boyd, Brian K.

    2014-09-18

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted a task for the Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Army to quantify the Army’s ILA water use and to help improve the data quality and installation water reporting in the Army Energy and Water Reporting System.

  11. The Woman's Land Army: 1918-1920.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laughlin, Margaret

    1994-01-01

    Describes the origins and work of the Women's Land Army, a World War I British volunteer agricultural production unit. Details similar program in the United States. Identifies the impact of the Women's Land Army including enhanced political, economic, and physical freedom for the participants and future generations of women. (CFR)

  12. The Employment Status of Army Spouses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-07-01

    important implications for Army policy and pro- grams. Spouse employment programs aimed at increasing employment opportunities for unemployed Army wives...lower earnings. In particular, geographic location, younger ages and younger children of military wives appear to be important factors of observed work...military life. The results have important implications for retention and readiness to the extent that spouse satisfaction influences these outcomes

  13. An Analysis of the Army Officer Student.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fullerton, Leroy Robert

    This study evaluated the advantages of formal higher education in establishing a second career for retired Army officers. Primary sources of data were Army officer students and recently retired officers. These were among the conclusions: (1) high response to the survey showed interest in, and career-related importance attached to, higher…

  14. Democratic civilian control of the Nepalese Army

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-14

    following are recommendations or principles the Army must institutionalize to guide it through the still-evolving civil-military relationship discussions...society. The following are recommendations or principles the Army must institutionalize to guide it through the still-evolving civil-military...REVIEW ..............................................................................6 Literature on Major CMR Theories

  15. Survey of Army Personnel Interested in Teaching

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-11-01

    Demographic prof’de CurrentActive Army Personnel rent Teachers Actie - ifl~ = -Employment Active Actve Active Outside Army Officers Enlted Educaion Base: 607...Base: 607 345 206 301 1144 2380 0^ PA Desire to work with young people 71 69 70 64 70 78 Value or significance of education in society 69 68 68 75

  16. Integration of New Technology in Army Libraries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-07-02

    process- inc functions of each Army librsr,, Ine consolidnted or centralized’ at the installation level. "Intecration of New Technology in Army Libraries...34 determined the feasibility o-f installation-level networkinc of technical processinc activities, and develops the means throurh which new technology ...17 11. AUTOMATION REQUIREMENTS FOR TECHNICAL PROCESSING Use of Technology in Libraries ................................. 24

  17. Education and Training in the Army.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westmoreland, W. C.

    Higher education and the military have much in common: both are vitally concerned with youth and in preparing young people for effective functioning in society. The army is heavily involved in education and training; in addition to West Point, there is an Army school system which consists of 2 colleges, 20 branch schools, and 11 specialist…

  18. Continental Growth and the Sedimentary Record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhuime, B.; Hawkesworth, C. J.; Robinson, R. A. J.; Cawood, P. A.

    2014-12-01

    Detrital sedimentary rocks provide average samples of the continental crust formed at different times and in different places. Some materials are more susceptible to erosion and/or to preservation bias than others, and one issue is to understand how the compositions of a range of source rocks are then recorded in the sediments. Here we considered two different approaches to model the growth of the continental crust: (i) The variation of Nd isotopes in continental shales with different deposition ages, which requires a correction of the bias induced by preferential erosion of younger rocks through an erosion parameter usually referred to as 'K'. The determination of K, and the extent to which it varies in different erosion systems, thus have fundamental implications for the models of continental growth based on radiogenic isotopes in continental sediments. (ii) The variations in U-Pb, Hf and O isotopes in detrital zircons, from 'modern' sediments sampled worldwide. In this approach, O isotopes are used to screen 'hybrid' Hf model ages (i.e. ages resulting from mixing processes of crustal material from different ages) from Hf model ages that represent actual crust formation ages. These two approaches independently suggest that the continental crust has been generated continuously, but with a marked decrease in the continental growth rate at ~3 Ga. The >4 Ga to ~3 Ga period is characterised by relatively high net rates of continental growth (~3.0 km3.a-1), which are similar to the rates at which new crust is generated, and destroyed, at the present time. Net growth rates are much lower since 3 Ga (~0.8 km3.a-1), which may be attributed to higher rates of destruction of continental crust. The inflexion in the continental growth curve at ~3 Ga indicates a change in the way the crust was generated and preserved. This change may be linked to onset of subduction-driven plate tectonics and discrete subduction zones.

  19. Dental care needs of Army recruits.

    PubMed Central

    Parker, W A; Mangelsdorff, A D; Brunner, D G

    1983-01-01

    To determine the prevalence amng current U.S. Army recruits of dental conditions requiring treatment, an assessment was done of the dental care needs of a 3 percent sample (N = 5,613) of incoming recruits at all seven U.S. Army reception stations that operate under a dental treatment planning concept. Both the treatment needs of the total sample and of each Army component--that is, Regular, Reserve, and National Guard forces--were quantified. The results indicated that the requirement for dental care among Army recruits currently being processed for training is approximately the same as it was for such recruits at the time that the Selective Service System draft was in effect, although the types of care needed have changed. Like the draft-based recruits, current Army recruits enter active-duty status with a substantial backlog of unmet dental care needs. PMID:6867262

  20. US Army blood program: 2025 and beyond.

    PubMed

    Gonzales, Richard; Taylor, Audra L; Atkinson, Andrew J; Malloy, Wilbur W; Macdonald, Victor W; Cap, Andrew P

    2016-03-01

    In preparing to support the Army in 2025 and beyond, the Army Blood Program remains actively engaged with the research and advanced development of blood products and medical technology to improve blood safety and efficacy in conjunction with the US Army Medical Research and Materiel Command. National and International Blood Bank authorities have noted that the US Army research and development efforts in providing new blood products and improving blood safety operate on the cutting edge of technology and are transformational for the global blood industry. Over the past 14 years, the Army has transformed how blood support is provided and improved the survival rate of casualties. Almost every product or process developed by or for the military has found an application in treating civilian patients. Conflicts have many unwanted consequences; however, in times of conflict, one positive aspect is the identification of novel solutions to improve the safety and efficacy of the blood supply.

  1. Providing care for America's Army.

    PubMed

    Webb, Joseph G; von Gonten, Ann Sue; Luciano, W John

    2003-01-01

    The Army Dental Corps' three-part mission is to maintain soldiers fit for combat, promote health, and ensure the Dental Corps ability deploy and deliver in the field. Consistent with this mission, the corps is developing innovative dental delivery systems and promoting tobacco cessation, sealants, mouth guard use, cancer detection, and identification of child, elder, and other abuse. The corps' training programs include options and benefits at the dental student, postdoctoral residency, and specialty levels. Recent technology innovations include light-weight field equipment, an integrated computer database to manage treatment, rapid ordering and delivery of supplies, and distance education.

  2. Aviation medicine and the Army.

    PubMed

    Vyrnwy-Jones, P; Thornton, R

    1984-10-01

    The purpose of this short series of articles is not to present the reader with a vast amount of technical data, soon to be forgotten, but to provide some items of general interest from the past, present, and future of Army aviation. Obviously there will be a concentration on medical matters, but the aim is to give the reader a feel for the rapid progress being made in helicopter design and the likely problems we may face in the future. The first article serves as an introduction to the series and three further articles will cover various aspects of the speciality. The second will be concerned with AAC helicopter accidents and will include accident investigation, crashworthiness and the contribution made by pilot error. The third article will cover major environmental problems of helicopters, particularly noise, vibration and thermal stress. The fourth article will examine ways in which microprocessors and modern technology will affect future helicopter and ancillary equipment development; for instance, a helicopter with no external windows has been suggested, 'The Iron Cockpit'. The fifth article will be concerned with the clinical aspects of Army Aviation medicine.

  3. 32 CFR 536.6 - The Army claims mission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true The Army claims mission. 536.6 Section 536.6 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY CLAIMS AND ACCOUNTS CLAIMS AGAINST THE UNITED STATES The Army Claims System § 536.6 The Army claims mission. (a) Promptly investigate...

  4. Quality in Government: The Army Intern Intake Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ungvarsky, Diane M.; Lilienthal, Richard A.

    The development of the Army Intern Intake Survey (AIIS) is described. The AIIS focuses on the Army civilian intern program, a vehicle for entry-level employees to progress in Army civilian jobs, which produces a profile of past and current interns. The AIIS will identify changes in intern quality over time and will make comparisons of Army interns…

  5. Improving Corrosion Prevention and Control in the Army

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    Improving Corrosion Prevention and Control in the Army by Lieutenant Colonel Adalberto Morales United States Army Logistics...From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Improving Corrosion Prevention and Control in the Army 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c...14. ABSTRACT The Army spends approximately 2.4 billion of dollars annually in corrosion prevention and corrective maintenance of tactical wheeled

  6. Army Basic Skills Provision: Whole Organisation Approach/Lessons Learnt

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basic Skills Agency, 2007

    2007-01-01

    The Army began working in partnership with the Basic Skills Agency in 2000. This was formalised with the establishment of the Basic Skills Agency's National Support Project for the Army (2001) that contributes to the raising of basic skills standards in the Army by advising on, and assisting with, the development of the Army's basic skills policy…

  7. 32 CFR 536.14 - Commanders of major Army commands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Commanders of major Army commands. 536.14 Section 536.14 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY CLAIMS AND ACCOUNTS CLAIMS AGAINST THE UNITED STATES The Army Claims System § 536.14 Commanders of major Army...

  8. Army Recruiters: "Counseling" High-Schoolers to Death

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merrow, John

    2005-01-01

    This article deals with Army recruitment in high schools. Students get to ask questions and hear stories about life In the Army from a soldier of the year, officers, and recruiters. Some brave students will even get a physical taste of life in the Army. According to an Army officer, the primary reason why recruiters go on high school campuses is…

  9. 75 FR 38504 - Army Science Board Plenary Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Army Army Science Board Plenary Meeting AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION: Notice... committee meeting: Name of Committee: Army Science Board (ASB). Date(s) of Meeting: July 21, 2010. Time(s...

  10. 76 FR 43993 - Army Science Board Summer Study Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Army Army Science Board Summer Study Meeting AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION... following committee meeting: Name of Committee: Army Science Board (ASB). Date(s) of Meeting: August 10...

  11. Continental volume and freeboard through geological time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, G.; Reymer, A. P. S.

    1985-01-01

    The consequences of approximately constant freeboard for continental growth are explored using a model that relates the volumes of isostatically compensated continents and oceans to the secular decline in terrestrial heat flow. It is found that a post-Archean increase in freeboard by 200 m requires continental growth of only 10 percent, while a decrease in freeboard by 200 m during this same period necessitates a crustal growth of 40 percent. Shrinkage of the continental crust since the end of the Archean can be ruled out. Changes of more than 10 percent in post-Archean crustal thickness are highly unlikely.

  12. Potential evapotranspiration and continental drying

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Milly, Paul C.D.; Dunne, Krista A.

    2016-01-01

    By various measures (drought area and intensity, climatic aridity index, and climatic water deficits), some observational analyses have suggested that much of the Earth’s land has been drying during recent decades, but such drying seems inconsistent with observations of dryland greening and decreasing pan evaporation. ‘Offline’ analyses of climate-model outputs from anthropogenic climate change (ACC) experiments portend continuation of putative drying through the twenty-first century, despite an expected increase in global land precipitation. A ubiquitous increase in estimates of potential evapotranspiration (PET), driven by atmospheric warming, underlies the drying trends, but may be a methodological artefact. Here we show that the PET estimator commonly used (the Penman–Monteith PET for either an open-water surface or a reference crop) severely overpredicts the changes in non-water-stressed evapotranspiration computed in the climate models themselves in ACC experiments. This overprediction is partially due to neglect of stomatal conductance reductions commonly induced by increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations in climate models. Our findings imply that historical and future tendencies towards continental drying, as characterized by offline-computed runoff, as well as other PET-dependent metrics, may be considerably weaker and less extensive than previously thought.

  13. Continental rifting - Progress and outlook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, B. H.; Morgan, P.

    1981-01-01

    It is noted that in spite of the flood of new data on continental rifts in the last 15 years, there is little consensus about the basic mechanisms and causes of rifting. The remarkable similarities in rift cross sections (shown in a figure), are considered to suggest that the anomalous lithospheric structure of rifts is more dependent on lithosphere properties than the mode of rifting. It is thought that there is a spectrum of rifting processes for which two fundamental mechanisms can be postulated: an active mechanism, whereby thermal energy is transmitted into the lithosphere from the underlying asthenosphere, and a passive mechanism by which mechanical energy is transmitted laterally through the lithosphere as a consequence of plate interactions at a distance. In order to permit the concept of the two fundamentally different mechanisms to be tested, a tentative classification is proposed that divides rifts into two basic categories: active rifting and passive rifting. Here, the magnitude of active rifting will depend on the rate at which lithosphere moves over the thermal source, with rifts being restricted to stationary or slow-moving plates.

  14. Potential evapotranspiration and continental drying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milly, P. C. D.; Dunne, K. A.

    2016-10-01

    By various measures (drought area and intensity, climatic aridity index, and climatic water deficits), some observational analyses have suggested that much of the Earth’s land has been drying during recent decades, but such drying seems inconsistent with observations of dryland greening and decreasing pan evaporation. `Offline’ analyses of climate-model outputs from anthropogenic climate change (ACC) experiments portend continuation of putative drying through the twenty-first century, despite an expected increase in global land precipitation. A ubiquitous increase in estimates of potential evapotranspiration (PET), driven by atmospheric warming, underlies the drying trends, but may be a methodological artefact. Here we show that the PET estimator commonly used (the Penman-Monteith PET for either an open-water surface or a reference crop) severely overpredicts the changes in non-water-stressed evapotranspiration computed in the climate models themselves in ACC experiments. This overprediction is partially due to neglect of stomatal conductance reductions commonly induced by increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations in climate models. Our findings imply that historical and future tendencies towards continental drying, as characterized by offline-computed runoff, as well as other PET-dependent metrics, may be considerably weaker and less extensive than previously thought.

  15. Continental rifting - Progress and outlook

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, B.H.; Morgan, P.

    1981-07-21

    It is noted that in spite of the flood of new data on continental rifts in the last 15 years, there is little consensus about the basic mechanisms and causes of rifting. The remarkable similarities in rift cross sections (shown in a figure), are considered to suggest that the anomalous lithospheric structure of rifts is more dependent on lithosphere properties than the mode of rifting. It is thought that there is a spectrum of rifting processes for which two fundamental mechanisms can be postulated: an active mechanism, whereby thermal energy is transmitted into the lithosphere from the underlying asthenosphere, and a passive mechanism by which mechanical energy is transmitted laterally through the lithosphere as a consequence of plate interactions at a distance. In order to permit the concept of the two fundamentally different mechanisms to be tested, a tentative classification is proposed that divides rifts into two basic categories: active rifting and passive rifting. Here, the magnitude of active rifting will depend on the rate at which lithosphere moves over the thermal source, with rifts being restricted to stationary or slow-moving plates.

  16. 32 CFR 635.22 - Reserve component, U.S. Army Reserve, and Army National Guard personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Reserve component, U.S. Army Reserve, and Army... Offense Reporting § 635.22 Reserve component, U.S. Army Reserve, and Army National Guard personnel. (a) When in a military duty status pursuant to official orders (Federal status for National Guard) Reserve...

  17. 32 CFR 635.22 - Reserve component, U.S. Army Reserve, and Army National Guard personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reserve component, U.S. Army Reserve, and Army... Offense Reporting § 635.22 Reserve component, U.S. Army Reserve, and Army National Guard personnel. (a) When in a military duty status pursuant to official orders (Federal status for National Guard) Reserve...

  18. 32 CFR 635.22 - Reserve component, U.S. Army Reserve, and Army National Guard personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Reserve component, U.S. Army Reserve, and Army... Offense Reporting § 635.22 Reserve component, U.S. Army Reserve, and Army National Guard personnel. (a) When in a military duty status pursuant to official orders (Federal status for National Guard) Reserve...

  19. 32 CFR 635.22 - Reserve component, U.S. Army Reserve, and Army National Guard personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Reserve component, U.S. Army Reserve, and Army... Offense Reporting § 635.22 Reserve component, U.S. Army Reserve, and Army National Guard personnel. (a) When in a military duty status pursuant to official orders (Federal status for National Guard) Reserve...

  20. 32 CFR 635.22 - Reserve component, U.S. Army Reserve, and Army National Guard personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reserve component, U.S. Army Reserve, and Army... Offense Reporting § 635.22 Reserve component, U.S. Army Reserve, and Army National Guard personnel. (a) When in a military duty status pursuant to official orders (Federal status for National Guard) Reserve...

  1. 32 CFR 655.10 - Use of radiation sources by non-Army entities on Army land (AR 385-11).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Use of radiation sources by non-Army entities on...) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY RADIATION SOURCES ON ARMY LAND § 655.10 Use of radiation sources by non-Army entities on Army land (AR 385-11). (a) Army radiation permits are required for...

  2. The Role of Army Intelligence in the Domestic Drug War

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-06-01

    experiences of the American Revolution."’ 4 In it, the author details much about events such as the Whisky 21 Rebellion, the Fries Rebellion, Slave...troops were used during the Whisky Rebellion, to fight domestic Indian Wars, and during the post-Civil War Reconstruction period. Many of the laws that...ARMY CRIMINAL. INVESTIGATION COMMAND US ARMY FORCES COMMAND US ARMY HEALTH SERVICES COMMAND US ARMY INTELLIGENCE AND SECURITY COMMAND US ARMY MATERIEL

  3. Army Ants as Research and Collection Tools

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Adrian A.; Haight, Kevin L.

    2008-01-01

    Ants that fall prey to the raids of army ants commonly respond by evacuating their nests. This documented behavior has been underexploited by researchers as an efficient research tool. This study focuses on the evacuation response of the southwestern desert ant Aphaenogaster cockerelli André (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) to the army ant Newamyrmex nigrescens Cresson. It is shown that army ants can be used to collect mature colonies of ants. The applicability of this tool to ecologically meaningful areas of research is discussed. PMID:20302457

  4. Modeling of Army Research Laboratory EMP simulators

    SciTech Connect

    Miletta, J.R.; Chase, R.J.; Luu, B.B. ); Williams, J.W.; Viverito, V.J. )

    1993-12-01

    Models are required that permit the estimation of emitted field signatures from EMP simulators to design the simulator antenna structure, to establish the usable test volumes, and to estimate human exposure risk. This paper presents the capabilities and limitations of a variety of EMP simulator models useful to the Army's EMP survivability programs. Comparisons among frequency and time-domain models are provided for two powerful US Army Research Laboratory EMP simulators: AESOP (Army EMP Simulator Operations) and VEMPS II (Vertical EMP Simulator II).

  5. Congress and the Army Bridging the Gap.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-01

    f -.U.Th ~ -, * , , - r rr,-.c ~..-. *~r’’- -’ ~ U U .* .-- - * 1U" : ..,.".U"V"~9 3 homeland, deter attack, fight and win if deterrence... leadership must be prepared - . - -t .1~.~ 1~~ - .-v..- - - - - 2.... 5 CHAPTER II CONGRESS AND THE ARMY-HISTORICAL RELATIONS Congress and the Army have been... leadership to work at ways of increasing our credibility and minimizing the skepticism of Congress. Historically speaking, the Army should have the edge

  6. Proposed Aural Nondetectability Limits for Army Materiel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-03-01

    C U a 9\\91AD I@ Technical Meemorandum 3-35 PROPOSED AURAL NONDOTECTABILITY LIMITS FOR ARMY MATERIEL 0 Georges R. Garinther I Joel T. Kalb David C...LIMTTS FOR ARMY MATERIEL , ,, 6. P’ErFOPMIN CG RE POR T Njý 7. AUTHOR(s) 8. CONTRACT O;R C-RAId- HUM1cjRý.•; Georges R. Garinther David C. Hodge...Technical Memorandum 3-85 PROPOSED AUTRAL NONDETFCTABILITY LIMITS FOR ARMY MAT1ERIEL Georc~e% R. Garinther Joel T. Kalb David C. Hodge G. Richard Price March

  7. Photocopy of plan (in U.S. Army office of Army Engineers ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of plan (in U.S. Army office of Army Engineers plans and drawings, Fort Hancock and Sandy hook proving ground, record group 7, drawer 44, Cartographic and Architectural branc, The National Archives, Washington, DC) , Ordnance Dept. U.S. Army, proposed addition to dock at Sandy Hook, 1918 Ordnance wharf and boathouse - U.S. Coast Guard Sandy Hook Station, Western Docking Structure, West of intersection of Canfield Road & Hartshorne Drive, Highlands, Monmouth County, NJ

  8. Volatile components and continental material of planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Florenskiy, K. P.; Nikolayeva, O. V.

    1986-01-01

    It is shown that the continental material of the terrestrial planets varies in composition from planet to planet according to the abundances and composition of true volatiles (H20, CO2, etc.) in the outer shells of the planets. The formation of these shells occurs very early in a planet's evolution when the role of endogenous processes is indistinct and continental materials are subject to melting and vaporizing in the absence of an atmosphere. As a result, the chemical properties of continental materials are related not only to fractionation processes but also to meltability and volatility. For planets retaining a certain quantity of true volatile components, the chemical transformation of continental material is characterized by a close interaction between impact melting vaporization and endogeneous geological processes.

  9. Modeling the dynamics of continental shelf carbon.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Eileen E; Cahill, Bronwyn; Fennel, Katja; Friedrichs, Marjorie A M; Hyde, Kimberly; Lee, Cindy; Mannino, Antonio; Najjar, Raymond G; O'Reilly, John E; Wilkin, John; Xue, Jianhong

    2011-01-01

    Continental margin systems are important contributors to global nutrient and carbon budgets. Effort is needed to quantify this contribution and how it will be modified under changing patterns of climate and land use. Coupled models will be used to provide projections of future states of continental margin systems. Thus, it is appropriate to consider the limitations that impede the development of realistic models. Here, we provide an overview of the current state of modeling carbon cycling on continental margins as well as the processes and issues that provide the next challenges to such models. Our overview is done within the context of a coupled circulation-biogeochemical model developed for the northeastern North American continental shelf region. Particular choices of forcing and initial fields and process parameterizations are used to illustrate the consequences for simulated distributions, as revealed by comparisons to observations using quantitative statistical metrics.

  10. The Continental Plates are Getting Thicker.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerr, Richard A.

    1986-01-01

    Reviews seismological studies that provide evidence of the existence of continental roots beneath the continents. Suggests, that through the collisions of plate tectonics, continents stabilized part of the mobile mantle rock beneath them to form deep roots. (ML)

  11. The Continental Plates are Getting Thicker.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerr, Richard A.

    1986-01-01

    Reviews seismological studies that provide evidence of the existence of continental roots beneath the continents. Suggests, that through the collisions of plate tectonics, continents stabilized part of the mobile mantle rock beneath them to form deep roots. (ML)

  12. Continental Affinities of the Alpha Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, H. Ruth; Li, Qingmou; Shimeld, John; Chian, Deping

    2017-04-01

    Identifying the crustal attributes of the Alpha Ridge (AR) part of the High Arctic Large Igneous Province and tracing the spreading centre across the Amerasia Basin plays a key role in understanding the opening history of the Arctic Ocean. In this approach, we report the evidence for a continental influence on the development of the AR and reduced ocean crust in the Amerasia Basin. These points are inferred from a documented continental sedimentation source in the Amerasia Basin and calculated diagnostic compressional and shear refraction waves, and from the tracing of the distinct spreading centre using the potential field data. (1) The circum-Arctic geology of the small polar ocean provides compelling evidence of a long-lived continental landmass north of the Sverdrup Basin in the Canadian Arctic Islands and north of the Barents Sea continental margin. Based on sediment distribution patterns in the Sverdrup Basin a continental source is required from the Triassic to mid Jurassic. In addition, an extensive continental sediment source to the north of the Barents Sea is required until the Barremian. (2) Offshore data suggest a portion of continental crust in the Alpha and Mendeleev ridges including measured shear wave velocities, similarity of compressional wave velocities with large igneous province with continental fragments and magnetic patterns. Ocean bottom seismometers recorded shear waves velocities that are sensitive to the quartz content of rocks across the Chukchi Borderland and the Mendeleev Ridge that are diagnostic of both an upper and lower continental crust. On the Nautilus Spur of the Alpha Ridge expendable sonobuoys recorded clear converted shear waves also consistent with continental crust. The magnetic patterns (amplitude, frequency, and textures) on the Northwind Ridge and the Nautilus Spur also have similarities. In fact only limited portions of the deepest water portions of the Canada Basin and the Makarov Basin have typical oceanic layer 2 and

  13. Typology of Army Families. Coping Styles of Successful, Career Army Families

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-06-01

    in the world. An all-pervasive culture unto itself, the Army effects the lives of each on( of these people, to a greater or lessei: degree, every day...of their lives. This research was begun in order to look at the effects which this lifestyle has and how individuals and families can cope with it. On... effect , both positive and negative, of Army life on those families" (Army Family White Paper, 1983:20). A different way to investigate Army family life is

  14. Magnesium isotope fractionation during continental weathering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, F. Z.; Huang, K. J.; Li, W.; Liu, X. M.; Ma, L.

    2014-12-01

    Continental weathering links the atmosphere, hydrosphere and continents as it regulates the CO2 content of the atmosphere, shifts the composition of the continental crust from basaltic to andesitic, and ultimately controls the chemical composition of river waters and seawater. Magnesium is a water-soluble major element in the hydrosphere, continental crust and the mantle, and has three stable isotopes (24Mg, 25Mg and 26Mg). Studies of Mg isotopes during continental weathering may help to document the interactions between hydrosphere, crust and mantle. Previous studies have shown that the continental crust has a heterogeneous but on average heavier Mg isotopic composition than the mantle, whereas the hydrosphere is isotopically light. The complementary characteristics of Mg isotopic compositions between continental and hydrosphere have been attributed to continental weathering, with light Mg isotopes partitioned into water, leaving heavy Mg isotopes behind in the crustal residue. Here we summarize our studies of Mg isotope fractionation in four weathering profiles under various climate conditions. We show that large Mg isotope fractionation can occur during continental weathering. Although the weathered residue is usually enriched in heavier Mg isotopes than unaltered parent rocks, some heavily weathered products can be quite light in Mg isotopic composition. The complicated behaviors of Mg isotopes reflect different control factors during weathering such as parent rock lithology, primary mineral dissolution, secondary mineral formation, ion exchange, vegetation uptake etc. Though studies of natural samples can provide direct evidence on isotope fractionation, more well-controlled laboratory experiments on Mg isotope fractionation between fluids and minerals are needed in order to fully understand the behaviors of Mg isotopes during weathering, which ultimately lays the foundation for making Mg isotope geochemistry an important tool for studying different geological

  15. Coordination: southeast continental shelf studies. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Menzel, D.W.

    1981-02-01

    The objectives are to identify important physical, chemical and biological processes which affect the transfer of materials on the southeast continental shelf, determine important parameters which govern observed temporal and spatial varibility on the continental shelf, determine the extent and modes of coupling between events at the shelf break and nearshore, and determine physical, chemical and biological exchange rates on the inner shelf. Progress in meeting these research objectives is presented. (ACR)

  16. Continental underplating after slab break-off

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magni, V.; Allen, M. B.; van Hunen, J.; Bouilhol, P.

    2017-09-01

    We present three-dimensional numerical models to investigate the dynamics of continental collision, and in particular what happens to the subducted continental lithosphere after oceanic slab break-off. We find that in some scenarios the subducting continental lithosphere underthrusts the overriding plate not immediately after it enters the trench, but after oceanic slab break-off. In this case, the continental plate first subducts with a steep angle and then, after the slab breaks off at depth, it rises back towards the surface and flattens below the overriding plate, forming a thick horizontal layer of continental crust that extends for about 200 km beyond the suture. This type of behaviour depends on the width of the oceanic plate marginal to the collision zone: wide oceanic margins promote continental underplating and marginal back-arc basins; narrow margins do not show such underplating unless a far field force is applied. Our models show that, as the subducted continental lithosphere rises, the mantle wedge progressively migrates away from the suture and the continental crust heats up, reaching temperatures >900 °C. This heating might lead to crustal melting, and resultant magmatism. We observe a sharp peak in the overriding plate rock uplift right after the occurrence of slab break-off. Afterwards, during underplating, the maximum rock uplift is smaller, but the affected area is much wider (up to 350 km). These results can be used to explain the dynamics that led to the present-day crustal configuration of the India-Eurasia collision zone and its consequences for the regional tectonic and magmatic evolution.

  17. The Continental Margins Program in Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cocker, M.D.; Shapiro, E.A.

    1999-01-01

    From 1984 to 1993, the Georgia Geologic Survey (GGS) participated in the Minerals Management Service-funded Continental Margins Program. Geological and geophysical data acquisition focused on offshore stratigraphic framework studies, phosphate-bearing Miocene-age strata, distribution of heavy minerals, near-surface alternative sources of groundwater, and development of a PC-based Coastal Geographic Information System (GIS). Seven GGS publications document results of those investigations. In addition to those publications, direct benefits of the GGS's participation include an impetus to the GGS's investigations of economic minerals on the Georgia coast, establishment of a GIS that includes computer hardware and software, and seeds for additional investigations through the information and training acquired as a result of the Continental Margins Program. These addtional investigations are quite varied in scope, and many were made possible because of GIS expertise gained as a result of the Continental Margins Program. Future investigations will also reap the benefits of the Continental Margins Program.From 1984 to 1993, the Georgia Geologic Survey (GGS) participated in the Minerals Management Service-funded Continental Margins Program. Geological and geophysical data acquisition focused on offshore stratigraphic framework studies, phosphate-bearing Miocene-age strata, distribution of heavy minerals, near-surface alternative sources of groundwater, and development of a PC-based Coastal Geographic Information System (GIS). Seven GGS publications document results of those investigations. In addition to those publications, direct benefits of the GGS's participation include an impetus to the GGS's investigations of economic minerals on the Georgia coast, establishment of a GIS that includes computer hardware and software, and seeds for additional investigations through the information and training acquired as a result of the Continental Margins Program. These additional

  18. Mechanisms of continental intraplate earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangopadhyay, Abhijit Kumar

    To better understand the mechanisms of continental intraplate earthquakes, a multistep approach was used. The first step involved analysis and synthesis of multidisciplinary data from 39 intraplate earthquakes spanning 20 continental intraplate regions, to identify their characteristic and diagnostic features. This led to the following testable hypothesis: Intraplate earthquakes occur within pre-existing zones of weakness (most commonly failed rifts), in the vicinity of stress concentrators, such as, intersecting faults, buried plutons, and/or rift pillows in the presence of the ambient stress field. The next step involved testing this hypothesis---first with 2-D mechanical models and then with 3-D models. Since two-thirds of the examined intraplate regions had intersecting faults as a stress concentrator, its role was first evaluated. A Distinct Element Method was used wherein the models comprised of the structural framework of the concerned region represented by a set of rock blocks that are assigned elastic properties conforming to the known geology, and subjected to tectonic loading along the direction of maximum regional compression (S Hmax) at a rate similar to the ambient plate velocity. The 2-D modeling was performed for two major intraplate regions in eastern U.S., viz., New Madrid and Middleton Place Summerville seismic zones, using a commercially available code called UDEC. These models adequately explain the spatial distribution of current seismicity in the regions. However, the absence of the third dimension limited the observation of tectonics in the depth dimension. Thus, 3-D models were developed for these two regions using the 3-D version of UDEC, called 3DEC. The preliminary results of these models adequately demonstrate correlation of locations of current seismicity with fault intersections in 3-D space, and also duplicate vertical movements. Although, the mechanical models demonstrated a causal association of seismicity with intersecting faults

  19. Continental subduction induced tremor activity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tai, H. J.; Chen, K. H.; Ide, S.; Mouyen, M.; Byrne, T. B.

    2015-12-01

    Southern Central Range of Taiwan, a place where deep-seated tectonic tremors (a proxy of slow slip) and earthquake swarms are closely located in space and highly correlated in time, provides rare opportunity towards the understanding of physical mechanisms governing different style of slip. To identify tremor events, we used the identification scheme similar to Ide et al. (2015) but applied slightly different techniques: (1) Higher waveform cross-correlation coefficient (>0.6) (2) careful visual inspection for excluding local earthquakes and short-lasted event (duration < 60 s) (3) Signal to noise ratio higher than 1.2 and lower than 30 (4) No spatio-temporal clustering technique used. During the study period of 2007-2012, we identified 2320 tremor events with duration ranging from 60 s to 1550 s. They are located underneath southern Central Range, forming a NS-striking and SE-dipping pipe-like structure at a depth of 20-40 km. The up-dip extension of this tremor structure reaches an aseismic zone under the western flank of Central Range at shallow depths, where is an area characterized by high heat flow, low Vp and Vs anomaly. Such seismic gap was explained by the buoyancy induced crust detachment during continental subduction of Eurasian Plate. This detachment may open a new channel for hot and ductile material ascending to shallow depth, producing high temperatures along the way. This provides a common mechanism for down-dip tremor and up-dip shallow seismic gap along the same eastern dipping channel. In addition, the tremor events are found to be mostly occurred in high tides and exhibit higher correlation with tide data from west coast of Taiwan. This may again imply the association between tremor activity and subduction of Eurasian Plate.

  20. Continental crust generated in oceanic arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazel, Esteban; Hayes, Jorden L.; Hoernle, Kaj; Kelemen, Peter; Everson, Erik; Holbrook, W. Steven; Hauff, Folkmar; van den Bogaard, Paul; Vance, Eric A.; Chu, Shuyu; Calvert, Andrew J.; Carr, Michael J.; Yogodzinski, Gene M.

    2015-04-01

    Thin oceanic crust is formed by decompression melting of the upper mantle at mid-ocean ridges, but the origin of the thick and buoyant continental crust is enigmatic. Juvenile continental crust may form from magmas erupted above intra-oceanic subduction zones, where oceanic lithosphere subducts beneath other oceanic lithosphere. However, it is unclear why the subduction of dominantly basaltic oceanic crust would result in the formation of andesitic continental crust at the surface. Here we use geochemical and geophysical data to reconstruct the evolution of the Central American land bridge, which formed above an intra-oceanic subduction system over the past 70 Myr. We find that the geochemical signature of erupted lavas evolved from basaltic to andesitic about 10 Myr ago--coincident with the onset of subduction of more oceanic crust that originally formed above the Galápagos mantle plume. We also find that seismic P-waves travel through the crust at velocities intermediate between those typically observed for oceanic and continental crust. We develop a continentality index to quantitatively correlate geochemical composition with the average P-wave velocity of arc crust globally. We conclude that although the formation and evolution of continents may involve many processes, melting enriched oceanic crust within a subduction zone--a process probably more common in the Archaean--can produce juvenile continental crust.

  1. The Continental Crust: A Geophysical Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, Nikolas I.

    Nearly 80 years ago, Yugoslavian seismologist Andrija Mohorovicic recognized, while studying a Balkan earthquake, that velocities of seismic waves increase abruptly at a few tens of kilometers depth , giving rise to the seismological definition of the crust. Since that discovery, many studies concerned with the nature of both the continental and oceanic crusts have appeared in the geophysical literature.Recently, interest in the continental crust has cascaded. This is largely because of an infusion of new data obtained from major reflection programs such as the Consortium for Continental Reflection Profiling (COCORP) and British Institutions Reflection Profiling Syndicate (BIRPS) and increased resolution of refraction studies. In addition, deep continental drilling programs are n ow in fashion. The Continental Crust: A Geophysical Approach is a summary of present knowledge of the continental crust. Meissner has succeeded in writing a book suited to many different readers, from the interested undergraduate to the professional. The book is well documented , with pertinent figures and a complete and up-to-date reference list.

  2. Continental growth seen through the sedimentary record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhuime, Bruno; Hawkesworth, Chris J.; Delavault, Hélène; Cawood, Peter A.

    2017-07-01

    Sedimentary rocks and detrital minerals sample large areas of the continental crust, and they are increasingly seen as a reliable archive for its global evolution. This study presents two approaches to model the growth of the continental crust through the sedimentary archive. The first builds on the variations in U-Pb, Hf and O isotopes in global databases of detrital zircons. We show that uncertainty in the Hf isotope composition of the mantle reservoir from which new crust separated, in the 176Lu/177Hf ratio of that new crust, and in the contribution in the databases of zircons that experienced ancient Pb loss(es), adds some uncertainty to the individual Hf model ages, but not to the overall shape of the calculated continental growth curves. The second approach is based on the variation of Nd isotopes in 645 worldwide fine-grained continental sedimentary rocks with different deposition ages, which requires a correction of the bias induced by preferential erosion of younger rocks through an erosion parameter referred to as K. This dimensionless parameter relates the proportions of younger to older source rocks in the sediment, to the proportions of younger to older source rocks present in the crust from which the sediment was derived. We suggest that a Hadean/Archaean value of K = 1 (i.e., no preferential erosion), and that post-Archaean values of K = 4-6, may be reasonable for the global Earth system. Models built on the detrital zircon and the fine-grained sediment records independently suggest that at least 65% of the present volume of continental crust was established by 3 Ga. The continental crust has been generated continuously, but with a marked decrease in the growth rate at 3 Ga. The period from > 4 Ga to 3 Ga is characterised by relatively high net rates of continental growth (2.9-3.4 km3 yr- 1 on average), which are similar to the rates at which new crust is generated (and destroyed) at the present time. Net growth rates are much lower since 3 Ga (0

  3. Army Response Letter - signed April 27, 1988

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Army response letter regarding a request to elevate the decision of the New England Division Engineer (DE) to issue a permit to the Maine Department of Transportation to construct a marine terminal at Sears Island.

  4. U.S. Army Modernizes Munitions Plants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Science and Technology, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Headquartered at Joliet, Illinois, the Army Ammunition Procurement and Supply Agency aims to mechanize and clean up its manufacturing facilities. Six go-co (government owned - contractor operated) plants involved in the modernization program are described. (BL)

  5. Energy Design Guides for Army Barracks: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Deru, M.; Zhivov, A.; Herron, D.

    2008-08-01

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and NREL are developing target energy budgets and design guides to achieve 30% energy savings. This paper focuses the design guide for one type of barracks called unaccompanied enlisted personal housing.

  6. Army Systems Engineering Career Development Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-15

    Army Systems Engineering Career Development Model Technical Report SERC-2015-TR-042-3 January 15, 2015 Principal Investigators: Dr... Career Development Model 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER HQ0034-13-D-0004 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Pennotti /Val Gavito Michael...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The Army Improved Systems Engineering (SE) Career Development System (CDS) report begins with a description of the

  7. The Evolution of Army Leader Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    and International Studies, 2006), 16; M . Wade 24 Markel, Henry A . Leonard, Charlotte Lynch, Christina Panis, Peter Schirmer, Carra S . Sims...847. 8 M . Wade Markel, Henry A . Leonard, Charlotte Lynch, Christina Panis, Peter Schirmer, Carra S . Sims, Developing U.S. Army Officers...Department of the Army, 01 February, 2010), 15. 10 ibid 11 M . Wade Markel, Henry A . Leonard, Charlotte Lynch, Christina Panis, Peter Schirmer, Carra S

  8. National Military Strategy: Army Reserve Readiness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    like a Chevrolet dealership that only has sedans and mini- van while the Regular Army and National Guard are General Motors dealerships. 31F32 The...pick-ups trucks, and 21 SUVs. 32F33 In this scenario, the General Motors dealerships would be moving more units than the Army Reserve. In order...vehicles they have in stock today, but also start talking to General Motors about getting some other franchises and allocations for sportier model

  9. US Army battery needs -- Present and future

    SciTech Connect

    Hamlen, R.P.; Christopher, H.A.; Gilman, S.

    1995-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the needs of the US Army for silent portable power sources, both in the near and longer term future. As a means of doing this, the programs of the Power Sources Division of the Army Research Laboratory will be discussed. The six program areas in which the Power Sources Division is engaged are: primary batteries, rechargeable batteries, reserve/fuze batteries, pulse batteries and capacitors, fuel cells, and thermophotovoltaic power generation.

  10. Quantifying the Army Supply Chain Water Bootprint

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-01

    dwindling availability. Projected climate changes will likely exacerbate water scarcity in high- risk areas. Army policy does not address supply chain or...indirect water use, and, suppliers and most of industry do not track their own indirect water use or water used to manufacture products. The Army...procures through the supply chain. A primary concern driving the study is that timely provision of critical goods and services could be at risk if

  11. Assuring structural integrity in Army systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The object of this study was to recommend possible improvements in the manner in which structural integrity of Army systems is assured. The elements of a structural integrity program are described, and relevant practices used in various industries and government organizations are reviewed. Some case histories of Army weapon systems are examined. The mandatory imposition of a structural integrity program patterned after the Air Force Aircraft Structural Integrity Program is recommended and the benefits of such an action are identified.

  12. Army dependents: childhood illness and health provision.

    PubMed

    Giles, Sarah

    2005-06-01

    This small qualitative study explored attitudes of a group of Army wives to childhood illness and their expectations of health provision. The author's practice serves a population mainly comprising of Army dependents where GP attendance rates are double the national average. Two focus groups were organised using health visitor groups attached to the practice. Transcripts were examined to produce a framework for semi-structured interviews with nine mothers, who were selected by purposive sampling. Mothers were asked about symptoms, coping, social problems, decisions to take action, health provision and support. Data were analysed and sorted, using the principles of grounded theory, into four main themes: attitude to child's illness, coping, Army culture and accessibility to health services. Many Army wives appear to suffer from high levels of stress. It seemed that the coping ability of the mother was affected by the constant turbulence and isolation of Army life. While mothers displayed a knowledge of common illnesses, they had fears of the unknown and of life threatening illnesses. They sometimes managed childhood illness at home owing to lack of transport. The author concluded that some Army wives suffer from stress and lack confidence in their mothering skills when their children are ill, which may be due, in part, to the constant cycle of postings and isolation from family and services. They need easily accessible health facilities and information regarding these services. Communication should be encouraged between civilian services and the Army. It appears that Army dependents require more support from their GP practice than the average civilian family, offering opportunity for nurses and health visitors to provide alternative and proactive services.

  13. Methodology for Conducting Analyses of Army Capabilities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-06-01

    in time and space. Third, there is a great deal of uncertainty as to the specific nature of the threats that the Army might face and under what...environmental and operational condi- tions they might have to face those threats. Fourth, the task of developing performance measures of complex constructs...Centers, Battle Command Training Program), 0 the conduct of studies to produce lists of critical capability issues facing the Army (e.g., Battlefield

  14. Plan for Research on Army Families

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-09-01

    large standing Army, increased numbers of married personnel, a volunteer force, and general societal changes in family patterns and gender roles . -a...Army life, the service member is more likely to return to civilian life. Societal Changes in Family Patterns and Gender Roles There are a variety of...These societal trends in family patterns and gender roles have had, and are continuing to have, strong impacts on the nature of work and family

  15. Food Program: The Army Field Feeding System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-09-24

    regulation establishes policies and procedures for the Army Field Feeding System. This regulation is applicable to Active Army and Reserve Component...planners while training in a field environment. It further provides operating and reporting procedures for field kitchens, supply activities , and Troop...Issue Subsistence Activities . This regulation supersedes subsistence supply and food service policy and procedures for the Field Ration Issue System(FRIS

  16. US Army History and Role of Armor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-04-01

    Army armor mobile ground warfare, primarily offensive in units to achieve success in later battles. From character, by a self-sustaining unit of great... Armored was rain, and stubborn enemy resistance caused on a 6-hour alert. When the opportunity pre- the VI Corps to go over to the defensive on sented...were slow, War II were the major ground reconnaissance support-type actions without the spectacular units in our Army. They were lightly armored success

  17. Is the Army Developing Strategic Leaders?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-12

    provide a definition and list of competencies that outlines what a strategic leader should possess. With that definition and list of competencies, the...researcher will examine three military leaders, showing linkage to doctrine, which will illustrate examples of this doctrinal definition . Once this is...Army currently developing strategic leaders? The US Army doctrine and the Strategic Studies Institute (SSI) provide a definition and list of

  18. The Army. Field Manual Number 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-14

    of reserve of- ficers and enlisted Soldiers with medical and other skills. 1-22. The early twentieth century found the Nation and the Army involved...the French 161st Division. Attacking behind a fiery barrage, the 369th Infantry assaulted successive German trench lines and captured the town of...contributed to successful major combat operations in Afghanistan and Iraq. These operations removed two repressive regimes. In Afghani- stan, Army and joint

  19. Disruptive Pattern Printed Canvas for Army Vehicles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-01

    determined. 9- 0958 MATERIALS RESEARCH LABORATORY 92 8 3 0,3:5 Contents 1. INTRODUCTION 5 2. EXPERIMENTAL 7 3. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION 7 3.1 Breaking Force...after Tropical Exposure, according to AS 1175 Part 2 20 Disruptive Pattern Printed Canvas for Army Vehicles Gordon Southwell, Janine Stewart and Albert...headed Weatherometer M110 line 7 and line 9: 30 DK should be 3 DK Disruptive Pattern Printed Canvas for Army Vehicles 1. Introduction In 1987, The Office

  20. Army JTIDS: A C3 Case Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-03-01

    Guerra , Director of Combat Developments, United States Army Signal Center, Fort Gordon for his sponsorship. Professor Donald A. Lacer and Professor...radio frequency band. This insures compatibility with civil Distance Measuring Equipment (DME), Military Tactical Air Navigation equipment (TACAN...LEBMNN~JORDAN ,AFGHNISTrAN ISRAEL, EGYPT SAD SUDAN SOUT)H YEMEN YEMEN ETHIOPIA Figure 22 The JSTARS Radar Platform data to Army fire support

  1. Strategic Planning and Army Installation Management.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-01-01

    program. The U.S. Army has adopted the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award criteria for use in the ACOE program. Strategic planning is one of the...seven pillars of the Baldrige criteria. The Army has recognized that strategic planning is the key to the future. Strategic planning is the key to...and utilization of strategic planning . This paper examines through case study analysis several civilian communities and lessons learned through their

  2. Army Study Highlights, Volume 13, December 1992

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-12-01

    distributed training. "* Activity Analysis: With TRAM , activities, resources, and costs can be tracked on a course basis, something the current financial...Effects of Signature Reduction on Smart Weapons Performance Estimating Cost of Changes in Army Individual Skills Training Hazardous Materials Tracking ...achieve the requirements in the NMS. Secretary of the Army Washington. D.C. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION AND PRINCIPA[ AUTHORS Vector Research. Inc. Dr

  3. Estimating Costs for Army Materiei Health Hazards.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-03-01

    associated with Army materiel, it can be used in other areas of preventive medi- cine . The model estimates total medical costs based on the determination of a...ber 1996. Biblio . 1 Leutwyler, Kristin. "The Price of Prevention." Scientific American. April 1995. Logistics Management Institute...Hearing Loss Cases and Compensation for Veterans—1986-1994. Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD, Unpublished, undated. Biblio . 2 Bibliography U.S. Army

  4. Current and Future Army Resiliency Programs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    organizational learning, Peter Senge , illustrates this point very well: “Organizations learn only through individuals who learn. Individual learning does not...downloads/CSF2Newsletter- Issue3.pdf, (accessed March 3, 2013). 11 Griffith, “Army Suicides,” 496. 12 Casey, “Comprehensive Soldier Fitness,” 2. 13 Peter ... Senge , The Fifth Discipline: The Art & Practice of the Learning Organization (New York, NY: Doubleday, 2006), 129. 14 Griffith, “Army Suicides,” 505

  5. The Army’s Operational Energy Challenge

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-01

    battery chargers . Solar Hybrid—a system capable of providing up to 10 kilowatts of power continuously while reducing gen- erator running time by 20... issues that affect operations; increase power-source density and commonality; decrease the size and weight of systems; increase power generation and...Army for Energy and Partnerships. In February 2009, the council issued an Army Energy Security Implementation Strategy, including five strategic energy

  6. Fault linkage and continental breakup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cresswell, Derren; Lymer, Gaël; Reston, Tim; Stevenson, Carl; Bull, Jonathan; Sawyer, Dale; Morgan, Julia

    2017-04-01

    The magma-poor rifted margin off the west coast of Galicia (NW Spain) has provided some of the key observations in the development of models describing the final stages of rifting and continental breakup. In 2013, we collected a 68 x 20 km 3D seismic survey across the Galicia margin, NE Atlantic. Processing through to 3D Pre-stack Time Migration (12.5 m bin-size) and 3D depth conversion reveals the key structures, including an underlying detachment fault (the S detachment), and the intra-block and inter-block faults. These data reveal multiple phases of faulting, which overlap spatially and temporally, have thinned the crust to between zero and a few km thickness, producing 'basement windows' where crustal basement has been completely pulled apart and sediments lie directly on the mantle. Two approximately N-S trending fault systems are observed: 1) a margin proximal system of two linked faults that are the upward extension (breakaway faults) of the S; in the south they form one surface that splays northward to form two faults with an intervening fault block. These faults were thus demonstrably active at one time rather than sequentially. 2) An oceanward relay structure that shows clear along strike linkage. Faults within the relay trend NE-SW and heavily dissect the basement. The main block bounding faults can be traced from the S detachment through the basement into, and heavily deforming, the syn-rift sediments where they die out, suggesting that the faults propagated up from the S detachment surface. Analysis of the fault heaves and associated maps at different structural levels show complementary fault systems. The pattern of faulting suggests a variation in main tectonic transport direction moving oceanward. This might be interpreted as a temporal change during sequential faulting, however the transfer of extension between faults and the lateral variability of fault blocks suggests that many of the faults across the 3D volume were active at least in part

  7. Seismic probing of continental subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Liang; Xu, Xiaobing; Malusà, Marco G.

    2017-09-01

    High-resolution images of Earth's interior provide pivotal information for the understanding of a range of geodynamic processes, including continental subduction and exhumation of ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) metamorphic rocks. Here we present a synthesis of available global seismic observations on continental subduction zones, and selected examples of seismic probing from the European Alps, the Himalaya-Tibet and the Qinling-Dabie orogenic belts. Our synthesis and examples show that slabs recognized beneath exhumed continental UHP terranes generally have shallow dip angles (<45°) at depths <100 km, to become much steeper at depths >100 km. Slabs underlined by a clear high velocity anomaly from Earth's surface to the mantle are generally Cenozoic in age. Some of these slabs are continuous, whereas other continental subduction zones are located above discontinuous high velocity anomalies possibly suggesting slab breakoff. The density of seismic stations and the quality of recordings are of primary importance to get high-resolution images of the upper mantle to be used as a starting point to provide reliable geodynamic interpretations. In some cases, areas previously indicated as possible site of slab breakoff, such as the European Alps, have been later proven to be located above a continuous slab by using higher quality travel time data from denser seismic arrays. Discriminating between oceanic and continental slabs can be challenging, but valuable information can be provided by combining teleseismic tomography and receiver function analysis. The upper mantle beneath most continental UHP terranes generally shows complex seismic anisotropy patterns that are potentially preserved even in pre-Cenozoic subduction zones. These patterns can be used to provide information on continental slabs that are no longer highlighted by a clear high-velocity anomaly.

  8. 2009 Center for Army Leadership Annual Survey of Army Leadership (CASAL): Main Findings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-01

    Effective/Very Effective (AC, 2007-2009) Army Values Empathy Warrior Ethos Military Bearing/Physical Fitness Composure/ Resilence Mental Agility Sound...dependents ( children ) does not appear to have as much of an impact on morale, as 21% of Army leaders who indicate having no dependents report low or

  9. 76 FR 56406 - Science and Technology Reinvention Laboratory Demonstration Project; Department of the Army; Army...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-13

    ... the Army; Army Research, Development and Engineering Command; Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center (TARDEC); Correction AGENCY: Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary of... Research, Development and Engineering Center (TARDEC), 6501 East 11 Mile Road, Attn: RDTA-COS/MS...

  10. Typology of Army Families: Coping Styles of Successful, Career Army Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Russell C.

    The active duty Army has approximately 400,000 families who on a daily basis interact with the largest military system in the world. An all-pervasive culture unto itself, the Army affects the lives of each one of these people. This research was begun in order to look at the effects which this lifestyle has and how individuals and families…

  11. Army Distance Learning: Potential for Reducing Shortages in Army Enlisted Occupations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shanley, Michael G.; Leonard, Henry A.; Winkler, John D.

    The potential of distance learning (DL) to expedite the U.S. Army's efforts to redress personnel shortages in Army enlisted occupations was studied by evaluating how DL-based training strategies might affect skill shortages in the following occupations: helicopter repairer; electronic switching system operator; microwave systems…

  12. Army Distance Learning: Potential for Reducing Shortages in Army Enlisted Occupations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shanley, Michael G.; Leonard, Henry A.; Winkler, John D.

    The potential of distance learning (DL) to expedite the U.S. Army's efforts to redress personnel shortages in Army enlisted occupations was studied by evaluating how DL-based training strategies might affect skill shortages in the following occupations: helicopter repairer; electronic switching system operator; microwave systems…

  13. Perceptions of Army Health Care: A Blueprint for the Future

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-02-17

    positive perceptions. A strong, proactive public affairs program is needed to accomplish this task. 6 ENDNOTES 1. Neil Roland , "Problem Doctors," Army Times...2 November 1987, p. 3. 5. "From the Ferment, Profound Changes," Army, March 1986, p. 31. 6. Neil Roland , "Army Accepts Psychiatrist with Revoked...License," Army Times, 18 March 1985, p. 8. 7. Neil Roland , "Man found to be Bogus Doctor Allowed in Army," Army Times, 25 March 1985, p. 4. 8. Interview

  14. The basins on the Argentine continental margin

    SciTech Connect

    Urien, C.M.

    1996-08-01

    After the stabilization of the central Gondwana Craton, orogenic belts were accreted, as a result of convergence events and an extensive passive margin developed in southwestern Gondwana. Thermal subsidence in Parana, Karoo-Ventania basins and the Late Paleozoic-Early Mesozoic rifts, were modified by the Gondwana breakup and the South Atlantic opening. Early Paleozoic marine transgressions deposited the Table Mountain Group in Ventania. In southwestern Patagonia foreland clastics were deposited. Magmatic arcs and marine units indicate a tectonic trough was formed, alternating with continental sequences, over Late Paleozoic metamorphics and intrusives, resulting from plastered terrains along the Gondwana margin. In Patagonia, Permo-Carboniferous continental and glacio marine clastics infill the basins, while in Ventania, paralic sequences, grade from neritic to continental to the northeast, extending beneath the continental margin. The Triassic-Jurassic rift basins progressed onto regional widespread acid lavas and were infilled by lagoonal organic-rich sequences. Early drift phase built basins transverse to the margin, with fluvio-lacustrine sequences: Salado, Colorado, Valdes-Rawson, San Julian and North Malvinas intracratonic basins, which underwent transtensional faulting. Post-Oxfordian to Neocomian brackish sequences, onlapped the conjugate basins during the margin`s drift, with petroleum systems, as in Austral and Malvinas. In the Valanginian, basic extrusions commenced to form on the continental border, heralding the oceanic phase. Due to thermal subsidence, offlaping sediments prograded onto the remaining half-grabens. Several petroleum systems, proven and hypothetical, are identified in this region.

  15. Constraints on continental accretion from sedimentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbott, Dallas

    1988-01-01

    Heat loss in the ancient Earth was discussed assuming that classical sea floor spreading was the only mechanism. This may be expressed as faster spreading or longer total ridge length. These have important implications as to the size and number of cratonic plates in the distant past, the degree to which they are flooded, the kinds of sediments and volcanics that would be expected, and the amount of recycling of continental material taking place. The higher proportion of marine sedimentary rocks and oceanic volcanics in the Archean, and the relative paucity of evaporites and continental volcanics may in part be due to smaller cratonic blocks. A model was developed of the percentage of continental flooding which utilizes round continents and a constant width of the zone of flooding. This model produces a reasonable good fit to the percentage of flooding on the present day continents.

  16. Cenozoic continental climatic evolution of Central Europe.

    PubMed

    Mosbrugger, Volker; Utescher, Torsten; Dilcher, David L

    2005-10-18

    Continental climate evolution of Central Europe has been reconstructed quantitatively for the last 45 million years providing inferred data on mean annual temperature and precipitation, and winter and summer temperatures. Although some regional effects occur, the European Cenozoic continental climate record correlates well with the global oxygen isotope record from marine environments. During the last 45 million years, continental cooling is especially pronounced for inferred winter temperatures but hardly observable from summer temperatures. Correspondingly, Cenozoic cooling in Central Europe is directly associated with an increase of seasonality. In contrast, inferred Cenozoic mean annual precipitation remained relatively stable, indicating the importance of latent heat transport throughout the Cenozoic. Moreover, our data support the concept that changes in atmospheric CO2 concentrations, although linked to climate changes, were not the major driving force of Cenozoic cooling.

  17. Thermal regime of the continental lithosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, P.; Sass, J. H.

    1984-01-01

    From studies of the global heat flow data set, it has been generalized, with respect to the continental lithosphere, that there is a negative correlation between heat flow and the lithosphere's tectonic edge, and that the lithosphere's thermal evolution is similar to that of the ocean basins, resulting in a 'stable geotherm' in both environments. It is presently noted that a regional study perspective for heat flow data leads to doubts concerning the general applicability of either statement. Rao et al. (1982) have demonstrated that the data are not normally distributed, and that it is not possible to establish a negative correlation between heat flow and age in a rigorous statistical fashion. While some sites of stable continental blocks may have a geotherm that is by chance similar to that for old ocean basins, this need not hold true generally, and many stable continental terranes will be characterized by geotherms very different from those for old ocean basins.

  18. Gas hydrates of outer continental margins

    SciTech Connect

    Kvenvolden, K.A. )

    1990-05-01

    Gas hydrates are crystalline substances in which a rigid framework of water molecules traps molecules of gas, mainly methane. Gas-hydrate deposits are common in continental margin sediment in all major oceans at water depths greater than about 300 m. Thirty-three localities with evidence for gas-hydrate occurrence have been described worldwide. The presence of these gas hydrates has been inferred mainly from anomalous lacoustic reflectors seen on marine seismic records. Naturally occurring marine gas hydrates have been sampled and analyzed at about tensites in several regions including continental slope and rise sediment of the eastern Pacific Ocean and the Gulf of Mexico. Except for some Gulf of Mexico gas hydrate occurrences, the analyzed gas hydrates are composed almost exclusively of microbial methane. Evidence for the microbial origin of methane in gas hydrates includes (1) the inverse relation between methane occurence and sulfate concentration in the sediment, (2) the subparallel depth trends in carbon isotopic compositions of methane and bicarbonate in the interstitial water, and (3) the general range of {sup 13}C depletion ({delta}{sub PDB}{sup 13}C = {minus}90 to {minus}60 {per thousand}) in the methane. Analyses of gas hydrates from the Peruvian outer continental margin in particular illustrate this evidence for microbially generated methane. The total amount of methane in gas hydrates of continental margins is not known, but estimates of about 10{sup 16} m{sup 3} seem reasonable. Although this amount of methane is large, it is not yet clear whether methane hydrates of outer continental margins will ever be a significant energy resource; however, these gas hydrates will probably constitute a drilling hazard when outer continental margins are explored in the future.

  19. Do the pyramids show continental drift?

    PubMed

    Pawley, G S; Abrahamsen, N

    1973-03-02

    The mystery of the orientation of the Great Pyramids of Giza has remained unexplained for many decades. The general alignment is 4 minutes west of north. It is argued that this is not a builders' error but is caused by movement over the centuries. Modern theories of continental drift do not predict quite such large movements, but other causes of polar wandering give even smaller shifts. Thus, continental drift is the most likely explanation, although somewhat implausible, especially as relevant measurements have been made over a 50-year period, whereas geophysical measurements of sea-floor spreading relate to million-year time scales.

  20. Continental drift under the Third Reich.

    PubMed

    Buffetaut, Eric

    2003-12-01

    Contrary to what happened in many other countries in the 1930s and 1940s, Alfred Wegener's theory of continental drift was not generally rejected in Nazi Germany, although several leading German geologists of the time did not accept it. It was actually presented as the modern view of Earth history in books and magazine articles aimed at the general public. Although outlandish geological theories such as Hörbiger's Welteislehre were favoured by some Nazi dignitaries, they were not widely accepted in scientific circles. On the other hand, continental drift received official support under the Third Reich, at a time when it was ignored or ridiculed by most earth scientists outside Germany.

  1. MAGSAT anomaly map and continental drift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemouel, J. L. (Principal Investigator); Galdeano, A.; Ducruix, J.

    1981-01-01

    Anomaly maps of high quality are needed to display unambiguously the so called long wave length anomalies. The anomalies were analyzed in terms of continental drift and the nature of their sources is discussed. The map presented confirms the thinness of the oceanic magnetized layer. Continental magnetic anomalies are characterized by elongated structures generally of east-west trend. Paleomagnetic reconstruction shows that the anomalies found in India, Australia, and Antarctic exhibit a fair consistency with the African anomalies. It is also shown that anomalies are locked under the continents and have a fixed geometry.

  2. 32 CFR 536.6 - The Army claims mission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... potential claims incidents with a view to determining the degree of the Army's exposure to liability, the damage potential, and when the third party is at fault, whether the Army should take action to collect...

  3. 32 CFR 536.6 - The Army claims mission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... potential claims incidents with a view to determining the degree of the Army's exposure to liability, the damage potential, and when the third party is at fault, whether the Army should take action to collect...

  4. Army Response Letter & Analysis - signed February 5, 2001

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    A reply to a letter from Mr. J. Charles Fox, former Administrator for Water requesting to review the proposed decision of the Army Corps of Engineers Sacramento District Department of the Army (DA) permit to Vail Associates.

  5. Nanotechnology Laboratory Collaborates with Army to Develop Botulism Vaccine | FNLCR

    Cancer.gov

    The Nanotechnology Characterization Laboratory (NCL) is collaborating with the Army to develop a candidate vaccine against botulism. Under a collaboration agreement between the National Cancer Institute and the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of

  6. U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... you for your interest in the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID). The dedicated members ... site provides an introduction to the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID) and contains official ...

  7. Bot armies as threats to network security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, Sheila B.; Stytz, Martin R.

    2007-04-01

    "Botnets", or "bot armies", are large groups of remotely controlled malicious software. Bot armies pose one of the most serious security threats to all networks. Botnets, remotely controlled and operated by botmasters or botherders, can launch massive denial of service attacks, multiple penetration attacks, or any other malicious network activity on a massive scale. While bot army activity has, in the past, been limited to fraud, blackmail, and other forms of criminal activity, their potential for causing large-scale damage to the entire internet; for launching large-scale, coordinated attacks on government computers and networks; and for large-scale, coordinated data gathering from thousands of users and computers on any network has been underestimated. This paper will not discuss how to build bots but the threats they pose. In a "botnet" or "bot army", computers can be used to spread spam, launch denial-of-service attacks against Web sites, conduct fraudulent activities, and prevent authorized network traffic from traversing the network. In this paper we discuss botnets and the technologies that underlie this threat to network and computer security. The first section motivates the need for improved protection against botnets, their technologies, and for further research about botnets. The second contains background information about bot armies and their key underlying technologies. The third section presents a discussion of the types of attacks that botnets can conduct and potential defenses against them. The fourth section contains a summary and suggestions for future research and development.

  8. French Extended Continental Shelf Mapping: example of new continental margin understanding offshore French Guiana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roest, Walter; Loubrieu, Benoit; Loncke, Lies; Basile, Christophe; Graindorge, David; Shipboard Party, Guyaplac

    2017-04-01

    Under the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea, Coastal States can extend sovereign rights over the natural resources of the Continental Shelf beyond 200 nautical miles (M) if they can demonstrate that their continental margin extends beyond this distance from the coast. Article 76 of the Convention defines the continental shelf and includes geomorphological and geological criteria to claim such a shelf beyond 200 M. Since 2006, France has filed 7 submissions for a total of 10 distinct geographic regions to the Commission on the Limits of the Continental Shelf that was established by the Convention to examine those claims, and make recommendations with respect to the justification of the outer limits of the continental shelf. To support the French submissions, a significant effort was employed in acquiring new marine geophysical and geological data and compiling existing data along the deep water parts of the continental margins offshore all the French overseas territories. In this presentation, we will discuss the example of French Guiana, where the data collected for the purpose of fulfilling the obligation under the Convention to submit data and information to the Commission within a 10 year time frame have led to new understanding of the transform continental margin and the Demerara Plateau located to the north of French Guiana and Surinam. In addition, the data collected for this purpose have led to new scientific questions and have encouraged new and enhanced scientific collaboration between French government organizations and the academic community. Follow up research and scientific cruises that will be presented in separate communications have addressed sedimentary processes including contourites, giant comet tail like depressions probably associated with the strong bottom currents observed along the continental slope and potentially related to pockmarks, as well as giant submarine landslides. Most recently, multichannel reflection and wide angle

  9. Doctrine Development Process in the Kenya Army: Bridging the Gap

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-13

    DOCTRINE DEVELOPMENT PROCESS IN THE KENYA ARMY: BRIDGING THE GAP A thesis presented to the Faculty of the U.S. Army Command...by ROBA B. WARIO, MAJ, KENYA ARMY Diploma, University of Nairobi, Nairobi, Kenya Fort Leavenworth, Kansas 2014-01...Doctrine Development Process in the Kenya Army: Bridging the Gap 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR

  10. US Army Research Laboratory Directed Energy Internship Program 2014

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-01

    nature that is to be expected of Er ions in a glass host. Small differences are able to be observed though. The height of the 1532-nm peak relative ...ARL-TN-0711 ● NOV 2015 US Army Research Laboratory US Army Research Laboratory Directed Energy Internship Program 2014 Final...is no longer needed. Do not return it to the originator. ARL-TN-0711 ● NOV 2015 US Army Research Laboratory US Army Research

  11. The Army Communications Objectives Measurement System (ACOMS): Survey Analysis Plan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-05-01

    GROUP SUB-GROUP Advertising Army National Guard Officer acquisition 05 09 -- Analysis Army Reserve Questionnaire 05 08 -- Army Modeling Recruiting...were formulated by a conceptual model of advertising effectiveness, a modified Hierarchy of Effects model . A review of background documents and...economic models of enlistment decision-making by the Army Research Institute. As better models of the enlistment decision process are S. developed, more

  12. Army Apprenticeship Program (AAP). Analysis of AAP Participants. Phase 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-06-25

    APPRENTICESHIP PROGRAM EVALUATION STUDY PHASE I - ANALYSIS OF AAP PARTICIPANTS % DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY HEADQUARTERS UNITED STATED ARMY TRAINING AND...fication)I Army Apprenticeship Program Evaluation Phase I, Analysis of AAP Participants (Unclassified) 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Martin R. Walker 13a. TYPE OF...findings of the first phase of the AAP evaluation . The objective of the study was to develop a historical and demographic profile of Army apprentices

  13. Improving Planning for Military Construction of Army Child Development Centers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    77 McAlester Ammunition Plant , Oklahoma 78 Fort Meade, Maryland 79 Presidio of Monterey, California 79 During our audit...7,” May 28, 2010 U.S. Army Audit Agency Army Audit Agency Report No. A-2010-0120- ALO , “American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 - Fort...Stewart and Hunter Army Airfield, Georgia,” June 23, 2010 Army Audit Agency Report No. A-2010-0073- ALO , “American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009

  14. Perspectives on the Utility of Systems Science in the Army

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-10-01

    Systems Science in the Army 7. AUTHORC*; Edgar M. Johnson and T. 0. Jacobs 9. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME AND ADDRESS US Army Research Institute...Perspectives on the Utility of Systems Science in the Army Edgar M. Johnson and T. O. Jacobs U. S. Army •/ Research Institute for the...SOCIAL SCIENCES A Field Operating Agency under the Jurisdiction of the Deputy Chief of Staff for Personnel L. NEALE COSBY EDGAR M. JOHNSON Colonel

  15. Army Hearing Program Status Report Quarter 3 Fiscal Year 2017

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-09-14

    U.S. Army Publ ic Heal th Center Army Hearing Program Status Report Q3 FY17 Clinical Public Health and Epidemiology Directorate Army...Program Status Report (AHPSR) is a component of the Public Health Management System and provides a means for the installation Hearing Program Managers...Army Pamphlet (DA PAM) 40-501, and the Chief of Staff of the Army’s Safety and Occupational Health objectives. Participation in the survey is mandated

  16. Operational Resiliency Assessment of an Army Company Team

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    unlimited OPERATIONAL RESILIENCY ASSESSMENT OF AN ARMY COMPANY TEAM by Army Operational Resiliency Team Cohort SEA 22 December 2015 Project Advisors...DATES COVERED Capstone project report 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE OPERATIONAL RESILIENCY ASSESSMENT OF AN ARMY COMPANY TEAM 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR(S...practical example of how to assess the operational resiliency of an Army company team. In this research, operational resiliency is the ability of a

  17. Posture Statement of the United States Army 2005

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-02-06

    other unit specifi c TADSS. Most importantly in FY04, the ARNG led the way in the development of a Virtual Combat Convoy Trainer ( VCCT ) system...Army Reserve also uses simulation devices like the EST 2000 and the VCCT systems at consolidated training sites, to include mobilization stations. The...United States Army Reserve USARC United States Army Reserve Command USARPAC U.S. Army Pacifi c Command VCCT Virtual Combat Convoy Trainer WMD

  18. Predictors of suicide and accident death in the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS): results from the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS).

    PubMed

    Schoenbaum, Michael; Kessler, Ronald C; Gilman, Stephen E; Colpe, Lisa J; Heeringa, Steven G; Stein, Murray B; Ursano, Robert J; Cox, Kenneth L

    2014-05-01

    The Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS) is a multicomponent study designed to generate actionable recommendations to reduce Army suicides and increase knowledge of risk and resilience factors for suicidality. To present data on prevalence, trends, and basic sociodemographic and Army experience correlates of suicides and accident deaths among active duty Regular Army soldiers between January 1, 2004, and December 31, 2009, and thereby establish a foundation for future Army STARRS investigations. Analysis of trends and predictors of suicide and accident deaths using Army and Department of Defense administrative data systems. Participants were all members of the US Regular Army serving at any time between 2004 and 2009. Death by suicide or accident during active Army service. The suicide rate rose between 2004 and 2009 among never deployed and currently and previously deployed Regular Army soldiers. The accident death rate fell sharply among currently deployed soldiers, remained constant among the previously deployed, and trended upward among the never deployed. Increased suicide risk was associated with being a man (or a woman during deployment), white race/ethnicity, junior enlisted rank, recent demotion, and current or previous deployment. Sociodemographic and Army experience predictors were generally similar for suicides and accident deaths. Time trends in these predictors and in the Army's increased use of accession waivers (which relaxed some qualifications for new soldiers) do not explain the rise in Army suicides. Predictors of Army suicides were largely similar to those reported elsewhere for civilians, although some predictors distinct to Army service emerged that deserve more in-depth analysis. The existence of a time trend in suicide risk among never-deployed soldiers argues indirectly against the view that exposure to combat-related trauma is the exclusive cause of the increase in Army suicides.

  19. Allocation of Army Resources to the Space Mission Area

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-04-07

    USAWC STRATEGY RESEARCH PROJECT ALLOCATION OF ARMY RESOURCES TO THE SPACE MISSION AREA by LTC Patrick H. Rayermann U.S. Army COL William Pierce...2002 to xx-xx-2003 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Allocation of Army Resources to the Space Mission Area Unclassified 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c...Z39.18 ii iii ABSTRACT AUTHOR: LTC Patrick H. Rayermann TITLE: Allocation of Army Resources to the Space Mission Area FORMAT: Strategy Research

  20. 32 CFR 655.10 - Oversight of radiation sources brought on Army land by non-Army entities (AR 385-10).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Oversight of radiation sources brought on Army... (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY RADIATION SOURCES ON ARMY LAND § 655.10 Oversight of radiation sources brought on Army land by non-Army entities (AR 385-10). (a) As used in this...

  1. 32 CFR 655.10 - Oversight of radiation sources brought on Army land by non-Army entities (AR 385-10).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Oversight of radiation sources brought on Army... (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY RADIATION SOURCES ON ARMY LAND § 655.10 Oversight of radiation sources brought on Army land by non-Army entities (AR 385-10). (a) As used in this...

  2. 32 CFR 655.10 - Oversight of radiation sources brought on Army land by non-Army entities (AR 385-10).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Oversight of radiation sources brought on Army... (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY RADIATION SOURCES ON ARMY LAND § 655.10 Oversight of radiation sources brought on Army land by non-Army entities (AR 385-10). (a) As used in this...

  3. 32 CFR 655.10 - Oversight of radiation sources brought on Army land by non-Army entities (AR 385-10).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Oversight of radiation sources brought on Army... (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY RADIATION SOURCES ON ARMY LAND § 655.10 Oversight of radiation sources brought on Army land by non-Army entities (AR 385-10). (a) As used in this...

  4. 32 CFR 644.416 - Army civil works lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Army civil works lands. 644.416 Section 644.416 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL... works lands. The Secretary of the Army is authorized to exchange lands acquired for river and harbor and...

  5. 32 CFR 644.416 - Army civil works lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Army civil works lands. 644.416 Section 644.416 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL... works lands. The Secretary of the Army is authorized to exchange lands acquired for river and harbor and...

  6. 32 CFR 644.416 - Army civil works lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Army civil works lands. 644.416 Section 644.416 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL... works lands. The Secretary of the Army is authorized to exchange lands acquired for river and harbor and...

  7. U.S. Economic Debt Crisis Solutions: Adjusting Army Manpower

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-27

    according to Dov Zakheim, former Pentagon Chief Financial Officer.1 This statement was reinforced by an August 2011 Defense Business Board study, which...U.S. Economic Debt Crisis Solutions: Adjusting Army Manpower by Colonel David Fleckenstein United States Army...United States Army War College Class of 2012 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT : A Approved for Public Release Distribution is Unlimited This manuscript

  8. 32 CFR 581.1 - Army Disability Review Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Army Disability Review Board. 581.1 Section 581.1... § 581.1 Army Disability Review Board. (a) General provisions—(1) Constitution, purpose, and jurisdiction of review board. (i) The Army Disability Review Board (called the review board in this section) is an...

  9. Investigations into Army Enlisted Classification Systems: Concurrent Validation Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    United States Army Research Institute for the Behavioral and Social Sciences...Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. U.S. Army Research Institute for the Behavioral and Social Sciences A...concerning distribution of reports to: U.S. Army Research Institute for the Behavioral and Social Sciences, Attn: DAPE-ARI-ZXM, 2511 Jefferson

  10. Mobile Training: A Necessary Approach to Army Aviation Readiness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-22

    chief-of-staff-united-states-army-before-the-commlsslon~on-national- gua rd-and-reserves(i nd ex.htmL 82 I< Brannen , ate, Axed Programs Let U.S. Army...Aviation BNCOC Mobile Training Team. 11 Army Aviation, 2008: 50. Brannen , Kate. Defense New. January 6, 2011. http://www.defensenews.com/story.php?i=5395047

  11. 32 CFR 581.2 - Army Discharge Review Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Army Discharge Review Board. 581.2 Section 581.2 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY PERSONNEL PERSONNEL REVIEW BOARD § 581.2 Army Discharge Review Board. (a) Purpose. This regulation implements 10 U.S.C. 1553, Pub. L. 95...

  12. Sustainable Painting Operations for the Total Army: SUCCESS!

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-11

    Methylene Chloride-Based Paint Strippers at Anniston Army Depot 2010 Secretary of Defense Environmental Award Environmental Excellence in Weapon System...Changing the Culture at Army Installations  Keep an open mind Work with, not against regulators  Use “green” for your benefit Anniston Army Depot

  13. Army Aviation’s Pacific Rebalance: Evolution Towards Maritime Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-05-26

    Army Aviation’s Pacific Rebalance: Evolution towards Maritime Operations...Monograph nJN 2015 - MAY 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Sa. CONTRACT NUMBER Army Aviation’s Pacific Rebalance: Evolution towards Maritime Operations Sb. GRANT...Candidate: MAJ John M. McLean II Monograph Title: Army Aviation’s Pacific Rebalance: Evolution towards Maritime Operations Approved by

  14. 32 CFR 636.10 - Hunter Army Airfield vehicle registration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Hunter Army Airfield vehicle registration. 636.10 Section 636.10 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW... Stewart, Georgia § 636.10 Hunter Army Airfield vehicle registration. Personnel assigned or employed...

  15. 32 CFR 581.2 - Army Discharge Review Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Army Discharge Review Board. 581.2 Section 581.2 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY PERSONNEL PERSONNEL REVIEW BOARD § 581.2 Army Discharge Review Board. (a) Purpose. This regulation implements 10 U.S.C. 1553, Pub. L....

  16. 32 CFR 651.14 - Integration with Army planning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Integration with Army planning. 651.14 Section 651.14 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS OF ARMY ACTIONS (AR 200-2) National Environmental Policy Act...

  17. 32 CFR 644.328 - Army military leased property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Army military leased property. 644.328 Section 644.328 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL... military leased property. (a) Department of the Army command installations or parts thereof held by...

  18. 32 CFR 644.328 - Army military leased property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Army military leased property. 644.328 Section 644.328 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL... military leased property. (a) Department of the Army command installations or parts thereof held by...

  19. 32 CFR 644.328 - Army military leased property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Army military leased property. 644.328 Section 644.328 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL... military leased property. (a) Department of the Army command installations or parts thereof held by...

  20. 32 CFR 643.112 - Army exchange activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Army exchange activities. 643.112 Section 643.112 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE Additional Authority of Commanders § 643.112 Army exchange activities. Use of space...

  1. 32 CFR 643.112 - Army exchange activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Army exchange activities. 643.112 Section 643.112 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE Additional Authority of Commanders § 643.112 Army exchange activities. Use of space and structures...

  2. THE CHALLENGE OF MOLDS FOR THE U.S. ARMY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US Army and all armies have been interested in molds since there were armies. The most obvious interest was human infections by molds like trench foot. Then there were losses of military animals and contamination of their fodder, most notably the Soviet loss of thousands o...

  3. THE CHALLENGE OF MOLDS FOR THE U.S. ARMY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US Army and all armies have been interested in molds since there were armies. The most obvious interest was human infections by molds like trench foot. Then there were losses of military animals and contamination of their fodder, most notably the Soviet loss of thousands o...

  4. [The army nursing system in the Meiji period].

    PubMed

    Kurosawa, Y

    1993-12-01

    The modern army nursing system was enacted in the period when the Japanese Army established a modern military system; from the sixth year to the ninth year of Meiji. This was about ten years before the organization of the Japanese nursing system. This study clarifies the contents of the modern army nursing system in the Meiji period.

  5. Total Army Analysis Supporting Maximization of National Resources

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    millennium were modularity and Grow the Army ( GTA ). Modularity changed the mission and capabilities of Army headquarters at the Brigade, Division...Corps, and Army Service Component levels while the GTA plan expanded the force from 42 Brigade Combat Teams to 83 by the end of 2013. Congress

  6. 32 CFR 644.328 - Army military leased property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Army military leased property. 644.328 Section 644.328 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL... military leased property. (a) Department of the Army command installations or parts thereof held by lease...

  7. 32 CFR 644.328 - Army military leased property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Army military leased property. 644.328 Section 644.328 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL... military leased property. (a) Department of the Army command installations or parts thereof held by lease...

  8. 32 CFR 581.1 - Army Disability Review Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Army Disability Review Board. 581.1 Section 581... REVIEW BOARD § 581.1 Army Disability Review Board. (a) General provisions—(1) Constitution, purpose, and jurisdiction of review board. (i) The Army Disability Review Board (called the review board in this section)...

  9. Army Reserve Comprehensive Water Efficiency Assessments

    SciTech Connect

    McMordie Stoughton, Kate; Kearney, Jaime

    2015-04-14

    The Army Reserve has partnered with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to develop comprehensive water assessments for numerous Army Reserve Centers in all five regions including the Pacific islands and Puerto Rico, and at Fort Buchanan and Fort Hunter Liggett. The objective of these assessments is to quantify water use at the site, and identify innovative water efficiency projects that can be implemented to help reduce water demand and increase efficiency. Several of these assessments have focused on a strategic plan for achieving net zero water to help meet the Army’s Net Zero Directive . The Army Reserve has also leveraged this approach as part of the energy conservation investment program (ECIP), energy savings performance contracts (ESPCs), and utility energy service contracts (UESCs). This article documents the process involved.

  10. Coordination: Southeast Continental Shelf studies. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Menzel, D.W.

    1981-02-01

    An overview of the Oceanograhic Program of Skidaway Institute of Oceanograhy is presented. Included are the current five year plan for studies of the Southeast Continental Shelf, a summary of research accomplishments, proposed research for 1981-1982, current status of the Savannah Navigational Light Tower, and a list of publications. (ACR)

  11. Plate Tectonics and Continental Drift: Classroom Ideas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stout, Prentice K.

    1983-01-01

    Suggests various classroom studies related to plate tectonics and continental drift, including comments on and sources of resource materials useful in teaching the topics. A complete list of magazine articles on the topics from the Sawyer Marine Resource Collection may be obtained by contacting the author. (JN)

  12. Evolution of continental crust in southern Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, N. B. W.; Hawkesworth, C. J.; Van Calsteren, P.; McDermott, F.

    1987-05-01

    Nd isotopic data from the Zimbabwe and Kaapvaal cratons and the Limpopo, Kalahari, Namaqualand and Damara mobile belts imply that over 50% of present-day continental crust in this region had separated from the mantle by the end of the Archaean and that< 10% of continental crust of southern Africa has formed in the last 1.0 Ga. Such a growth rate implies that average erosion rates through geological time were high and that evolution of continental crust has been dominated by crustal growth prior to 1.4 Ga, and crustal reworking since that time. The evolution of average crust is not represented directly by clastic sediment samples but may be determined from sediment analyses if both the time of orogeneses and the average erosion rate are known. Both trace element data from southern Africa granitoids and the high erosion rates implied by the isotopic study suggest that growth of continental crust in the Archaean was by underplating rather than lateral accretion, but arc accretion was the dominant mechanism after 2.0 Ga.

  13. Elephant teeth from the atlantic continental shelf.

    PubMed

    Whitmore, F C; Emery, K O; Cooke, H B; Swift, D J

    1967-06-16

    Teeth of mastodons and mammoths have been recovered by fishermen from at least 40 sites on the continental shelf as deep as 120 meters. Also present are submerged shorelines, peat deposits, lagoonal shells, anz relict sands. Evidently elephants and other large mammals ranged this region during the glacial stage of low sea level of the last 25,000 years.

  14. Elephant teeth from the atlantic continental shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whitmore, F.C.; Emery, K.O.; Cooke, H.B.S.; Swift, D.J.P.

    1967-01-01

    Teeth of mastodons and mastodons have been recovered by fishermen from at least 40 sites on the continental shelf as deep as 120 meters. Also present are submerged shorelines, peat deposits, lagoonal shells, and relict sands. Evidently elephants and other large mammals ranged this region during the glacial stage of low sea level of the last 25.000 years.

  15. Plate Tectonics and Continental Drift: Classroom Ideas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stout, Prentice K.

    1983-01-01

    Suggests various classroom studies related to plate tectonics and continental drift, including comments on and sources of resource materials useful in teaching the topics. A complete list of magazine articles on the topics from the Sawyer Marine Resource Collection may be obtained by contacting the author. (JN)

  16. Army Energy and Water Reporting System Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Deprez, Peggy C.; Giardinelli, Michael J.; Burke, John S.; Connell, Linda M.

    2011-09-01

    There are many areas of desired improvement for the Army Energy and Water Reporting System. The purpose of system is to serve as a data repository for collecting information from energy managers, which is then compiled into an annual energy report. This document summarizes reported shortcomings of the system and provides several alternative approaches for improving application usability and adding functionality. The U.S. Army has been using Army Energy and Water Reporting System (AEWRS) for many years to collect and compile energy data from installations for facilitating compliance with Federal and Department of Defense energy management program reporting requirements. In this analysis, staff from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory found that substantial opportunities exist to expand AEWRS functions to better assist the Army to effectively manage energy programs. Army leadership must decide if it wants to invest in expanding AEWRS capabilities as a web-based, enterprise-wide tool for improving the Army Energy and Water Management Program or simply maintaining a bottom-up reporting tool. This report looks at both improving system functionality from an operational perspective and increasing user-friendliness, but also as a tool for potential improvements to increase program effectiveness. The authors of this report recommend focusing on making the system easier for energy managers to input accurate data as the top priority for improving AEWRS. The next major focus of improvement would be improved reporting. The AEWRS user interface is dated and not user friendly, and a new system is recommended. While there are relatively minor improvements that could be made to the existing system to make it easier to use, significant improvements will be achieved with a user-friendly interface, new architecture, and a design that permits scalability and reliability. An expanded data set would naturally have need of additional requirements gathering and a focus on integrating

  17. The Role of the US Army Reserve in Support of the US Army Force 2025 and Beyond: Challenges and Opportunities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-12

    41 The US Army Reserve 2015 Posture Statement ............................................................ 42 Rally ...to the communities where they live and work. ― Lieutenant General Jeffrey W. Talley, 32nd Chief of Army Reserve, Rally Point 32.1 The purpose...published in 2011, Rally Point 32.1 published in 2014, The US 18 Army Reserve 2015 Posture Statement, and US Army Reserve at a Glance, published in 2014

  18. A numerical investigation of continental collision styles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghazian, Reza Khabbaz; Buiter, Susanne J. H.

    2013-06-01

    Continental collision after closure of an ocean can lead to different deformation styles: subduction of continental crust and lithosphere, lithospheric thickening, folding of the unsubducted continents, Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instabilities and/or slab break-off. We use 2-D thermomechanical models of oceanic subduction followed by continental collision to investigate the sensitivity of these collision styles to driving velocity, crustal and lithospheric temperature, continental rheology and the initial density difference between the oceanic lithosphere and the asthenosphere. We find that these parameters influence the collision system, but that driving velocity, rheology and lithospheric (rather than Moho and mantle) temperature can be classified as important controls, whereas reasonable variations in the initial density contrast between oceanic lithosphere and asthenosphere are not necessarily important. Stable continental subduction occurs over a relatively large range of values of driving velocity and lithospheric temperature. Fast and cold systems are more likely to show folding, whereas slow and warm systems can experience RT-type dripping. Our results show that a continent with a strong upper crust can experience subduction of the entire crust and is more likely to fold. Accretion of the upper crust at the trench is feasible when the upper crust has a moderate to weak strength, whereas the entire crust can be scraped-off in the case of a weak lower crust. We also illustrate that weakening of the lithospheric mantle promotes RT-type of dripping in a collision system. We use a dynamic collision model, in which collision is driven by slab pull only, to illustrate that adjacent plates can play an important role in continental collision systems. In dynamic collision models, exhumation of subducted continental material and sediments is triggered by slab retreat and opening of a subduction channel, which allows upward flow of buoyant materials. Exhumation continues

  19. Women in the Army Policy Review

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-11-12

    factors that were essentially the same as for men, such as overall health , aptitude, -1 and personal choice, without regard to their ability to...ARIMY CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION COMMAND US ARMY HEALTH SERVICES COlMMAND US AlRMY FORCES CO,,AND US ARIHY TRAINING AND DOCTRINE -OHH*AND US AR𔃻Y US ARHY...M. KOWAL,t Ph.D., Washington, D.C. From the Health and Performance Division, United States Army Research Institute of Environmdntal Medicine, Na tick

  20. Homosexuality, Manliness, and the United States Army

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR( S ) MAJ James C. Dayhoff, U.S. Army 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK...NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME( S ) AND ADDRESS(ES) U.S. Army Command and General Staff College ATTN: ATZL-SWD-GD Fort...Leavenworth, KS 66027-2301 8. PERFORMING ORG REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING / MONITORING AGENCY NAME( S ) AND ADDRESS(ES) 10. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S

  1. How Funding Instability Affects Army Programs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    with LTC Philip Carey , Javelin project manager in the Close Combat Weapon Systems Program Management Office, and with Lloyd Olson, cost and budget...Black = Non-Army White = Army No growth Sample size D ev el o p m en t co st g ro w th f ac to r Sample size ratio 31% 32% 35% 25%36% Years after... ana - lysts have discussed instability in DoD programs for a long time, they have not developed funding instability measures that could help address

  2. How Funding Instability Affects Army Programs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    program benefited from discussions with LTC Philip Carey , Javelin project manager in the Close Combat Weapon Systems Program Management Office, and with...44 20 40 19 30 17 20 11 15 5 Black = Non-Army White = Army No growth Sample size D ev el o p m en t co st g ro w th f ac to r Sample size ratio 31...clearly defined measures. Although ana - lysts have discussed instability in DoD programs for a long time, they have not developed funding instability

  3. US Army primary radiation standards complex

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, S.C.

    1993-12-31

    This paper describes the U.S. Army Primary Radiation Standards Complex (PRSC) to be constructed at Redstone Arsenal, Alabama. The missions of the organizations to be located in the PRSC are described. The health physics review of the facility design is discussed. The radiation sources to be available in the PRSC and the resulting measurement capabilities of the Army Primary Standards Laboratory Nucleonics section are specified. Influence of the National Voluntary Laboratory Accrediation Program (NVLAP) accreditation criteria on facility design and source selection is illustrated.

  4. Smoking and the U.S. Army

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-04-08

    designate smoking areas only where !hey have determined that the secondhand smoke from tobacco usage can be sufficiently isolated to protect nons..aokers...government agency SMOKING AND THE U.S. ARMY I BY GERALD R. McMANUS U.S. Department of State DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A: Approved for public release. Distributin...Include Security Oasfication) SMOKING AND THE U.S. ARMY 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Gerald R. McManus 13a. TYPE OF REPORT 13b. TIME COVERED 714 DATE OF

  5. Deep observation and sampling of the earth's continental crust (DOSECC): Continental scientific drilling workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    Research summaries are presented of ongoing or proposed deep drilling programs to explore hydrothermal systems, buried astroblemes, continental crust, magma systems, mountain belt tectonics, subduction zones, and volcanoes. Separate abstracts have been prepared for individual papers. (ACR)

  6. 75 FR 61512 - Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagrams

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-05

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagrams AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement, Interior. ACTION... Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagrams (OPDs) located within Atlantic Ocean areas,...

  7. High Resolution Quaternary Seismic Stratigraphy of the New York Bight Continental Shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schwab, William C.; Denny, J.F.; Foster, D.S.; Lotto, L.L.; Allison, M.A.; Uchupi, E.; Swift, B.A.; Danforth, W.W.; Thieler, E.R.; Butman, Bradford

    2003-01-01

    A principal focus for the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Coastal and Marine Geology Program (marine.usgs.gov) is regional reconnaissance mapping of inner-continental shelf areas, with initial emphasis on heavily used areas of the sea floor near major population centers. The objectives are to develop a detailed regional synthesis of the sea-floor geology in order to provide information for a wide range of management decisions and to form a basis for further investigations of marine geological processes. In 1995, the USGS, in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACOE), New York District, began to generate reconnaissance maps of the continental shelf seaward of the New York - New Jersey metropolitan area. This mapping encompassed the New York Bight inner-continental shelf, one of the most heavily trafficked and exploited coastal regions in the United States. Contiguous areas of the Hudson Shelf Valley, the largest physiographic feature on this segment of the continental shelf, also were mapped as part of a USGS study of contaminated sediments (Buchholtz ten Brink and others, 1994; 1996). The goal of the reconnaissance mapping was to provide a regional synthesis of the sea-floor geology in the New York Bight area, including: (a) a description of sea-floor morphology; (b) a map of sea-floor sedimentary lithotypes; (c) the geometry and structure of the Cretaceous strata and Quaternary deposits; and (d) the geologic history of the region. Pursuing the course of this mapping effort, we obtained sidescan-sonar images of 100 % of the sea floor in the study area. Initial interpretations of these sidescan data were presented by Schwab and others, (1997a, 1997b, 2000a). High-resolution seismic-reflection profiles collected along each sidescan-sonar line used multiple acoustic sources (e.g., watergun, CHIRP, Geopulse). Multibeam swath-bathymetry data also were obtained for a portion of the study area (Butman and others, 1998;). In this report, we present a series

  8. Army experiments with NASA's Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qualls, Albert D.

    1992-03-01

    NASA's Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) is a switching and processing satellite that is capable of medium data rates using very small aperture (1.2 m) antennae on the ground terminals. ACTS' goal is to stimulate and demonstrate telecommunications technologies. The Army will participate in NASA experiments through the Army Space Exploitation Demonstration Program. The Army will use ACTS to conduct technical, conceptual, and operational demonstrations. This paper describes the goals of these demonstrations and, in particular, ACTS integration with the Army's existing tactical communications networks, the use of ACTS to transfer large data sets, and the implications of these capabilities to Army operations.

  9. [The technique of army nursing in the Meiji period].

    PubMed

    Kurosawa, Y

    1994-06-01

    It was in the nineteenth year of Meiji that Japan introduced the modern nursing system from Europe on the nation-wide level. But the Japanese army introduced the new nursing system from the sixth year of Meiji. For that reason, I studied whether the technique of the army nursing system was modern or not. Since the technical level of the nursing system is represented by the teaching methods and text books, I studied these aspects of the Japanese army nursing system. As the result, I confirmed that the army nursing system was modern. The Japanese army was the first to introduce the modern nursing system from Europe in Japan.

  10. Evaluating Mobile Device Ownership and Usage in the U.S. Army: Implications for Army Training

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-01

    Soldiers will embrace them and use them. 15 . SUBJECT TERMS Mobile Training, Mobile Devices, Training SECURITY...smartphone comparison .................................................... 15 University Sample Results... 15 TABLE 8. PROPORTIONS COMPARING WILLINGNESS TO USE AN ARMY-ISSUED SMARTPHONE BETWEEN

  11. Factors predicting health behaviors among Army Reserve, active duty Army, and civilian hospital employees.

    PubMed

    Wynd, Christine A; Ryan-Wenger, Nancy A

    2004-12-01

    This study identified health-risk and health-promoting behaviors in military and civilian personnel employed in hospitals. Intrinsic self-motivation and extrinsic organizational workplace factors were examined as predictors of health behaviors. Because reservists represent a blend of military and civilian lifestyles, descriptive analyses focused on comparing Army Reserve personnel (n = 199) with active duty Army (n = 218) and civilian employees (n = 193), for a total sample of 610. Self-motivation and social support were significant factors contributing to the adoption of health-promoting behaviors; however, organizational workplace cultures were inconsistent predictors of health among the three groups. Only the active Army subgroup identified a hierarchical culture as having an influence on health promotion, possibly because of the Army's mandatory physical fitness and weight control standards. Social support and self-motivation are essential to promoting health among employees, thus hospital commanders and chief executive officers should encourage strategies that enhance and reward these behaviors.

  12. The U.S. Army Operating Concept: Win in a Complex World, 2020-2040

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-07

    and the Army professional ethic . They remain resilient and preserve their moral character while operating in environments of persistent danger. 43...Doctrine Command Concept Development Guide U.S. Army Center for the Army Profession and Ethic . (2014, July 11). The Army Ethic White Paper. Kansas: Fort...Leavenworth. Retrieved from http://cape.army.mil/repository/white- papers/Army- Ethic -White-Paper.pdf U.S. Army TRADOC Unified Quest Strategic

  13. 7 CFR 319.56-64 - Avocados from continental Spain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Avocados from continental Spain. 319.56-64 Section 319... Avocados from continental Spain. Fresh avocados (Persea americana P. Mill.) may be imported into the United... accordance with § 319.56-6. (2) The avocados must be grown at places of production in continental Spain...

  14. 3. VIEW OF CONTINENTAL EAGLE GIN CO. ACROSS CREEK, TAKEN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW OF CONTINENTAL EAGLE GIN CO. ACROSS CREEK, TAKEN FROM DAM, LOOKING SOUTH. FROM RIGHT TO LEFT: CUPOLA TOWER ON 1854 CONTINENTAL GIN CO., 1848, 1852, 1912 CONTINENTAL GIN CO. BUILDINGS. - Prattville Manufacturing Company, Number One, 242 South Court Street, Prattville, Autauga County, AL

  15. 49 CFR 192.10 - Outer continental shelf pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Outer continental shelf pipelines. 192.10 Section... shelf pipelines. Operators of transportation pipelines on the Outer Continental Shelf (as defined in the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act; 43 U.S.C. 1331) must identify on all their respective pipelines...

  16. 49 CFR 192.10 - Outer continental shelf pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Outer continental shelf pipelines. 192.10 Section... shelf pipelines. Operators of transportation pipelines on the Outer Continental Shelf (as defined in the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act; 43 U.S.C. 1331) must identify on all their respective pipelines...

  17. 49 CFR 195.9 - Outer continental shelf pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Outer continental shelf pipelines. 195.9 Section... HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE General § 195.9 Outer continental shelf pipelines. Operators of transportation pipelines on the Outer Continental Shelf must identify on all their respective pipelines the specific...

  18. 49 CFR 195.9 - Outer continental shelf pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Outer continental shelf pipelines. 195.9 Section... HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE General § 195.9 Outer continental shelf pipelines. Operators of transportation pipelines on the Outer Continental Shelf must identify on all their respective pipelines the specific...

  19. 49 CFR 195.9 - Outer continental shelf pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Outer continental shelf pipelines. 195.9 Section... HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE General § 195.9 Outer continental shelf pipelines. Operators of transportation pipelines on the Outer Continental Shelf must identify on all their respective pipelines the specific...

  20. 49 CFR 192.10 - Outer continental shelf pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Outer continental shelf pipelines. 192.10 Section... shelf pipelines. Operators of transportation pipelines on the Outer Continental Shelf (as defined in the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act; 43 U.S.C. 1331) must identify on all their respective pipelines...

  1. 49 CFR 195.9 - Outer continental shelf pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Outer continental shelf pipelines. 195.9 Section... HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE General § 195.9 Outer continental shelf pipelines. Operators of transportation pipelines on the Outer Continental Shelf must identify on all their respective pipelines the specific...

  2. 49 CFR 192.10 - Outer continental shelf pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Outer continental shelf pipelines. 192.10 Section... shelf pipelines. Operators of transportation pipelines on the Outer Continental Shelf (as defined in the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act; 43 U.S.C. 1331) must identify on all their respective pipelines...

  3. 49 CFR 195.9 - Outer continental shelf pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Outer continental shelf pipelines. 195.9 Section... HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE General § 195.9 Outer continental shelf pipelines. Operators of transportation pipelines on the Outer Continental Shelf must identify on all their respective pipelines the specific...

  4. 49 CFR 192.10 - Outer continental shelf pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Outer continental shelf pipelines. 192.10 Section... shelf pipelines. Operators of transportation pipelines on the Outer Continental Shelf (as defined in the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act; 43 U.S.C. 1331) must identify on all their respective pipelines...

  5. 78 FR 48828 - Airworthiness Directives; Continental Motors, Inc. Reciprocating Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-12

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Continental Motors... Engine Components International Division (ECi), used on the Continental Motors, Inc. (CMI) models 520 and... identified in this proposed AD, contact Continental Motors, Inc., PO Box 90, Mobile, AL 36601; phone:...

  6. Army Working Capital Fund: Army Industrial Operations Could Improve Budgeting and Management of Carryover

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-01

    first driver are not necessary because this work was planned to carry over at the end of the fiscal year as part of the normal business process , and...global network that provides material, services, and equipment to the joint forces. Supply chain management encompasses the processes and systems for...maintenance requirements and budget estimate development processes . Further, DOD stated that the Army will enforce Army policies and business rules on

  7. Army Science Board Ad Hoc Sub-Group Report on Energy Needs of the Army,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-10-01

    and solar. The goal for the year 2000 is to reduce the use of natural petroleum by 75 percent and to replace natural gas with synthetic gas ( syngas ...example, one * goal states that (by 2000) syngas will replace natural gas. The Army has therefore programed efforts to Implement syngas tech- nologies at...the reactor would run at full capacity to make up for shortages and to allow the Army to meet expanded needs. The AHSG notes that such systems resolve

  8. The Army’s Institutional Values: Current Doctrine and the Army’s Values Training Strategy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-06-01

    called Generation X, and the generation after that is being referred to as the Millennials . The current demographic makeup of the Army includes members...Fraternization, Code of Conduct Training, Character Development, Law of War, Military Ethics, Suicide Prevention, Army Family Advocacy, Alcohol and Drug...explains that by introducing height and weight 112 standards, raising PT standards, emphasizing training and education, and deglamorizing alcohol

  9. 2010 Center for Army Leadership Annual Survey of Army Leadership (CASAL): Volume 2, Main Findings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-01

    address uncertainty to face the challenges in Full Spectrum Operations (Nicely, Bryson, Aude, Keller-Glaze, & Vowels , in preparation). 21 3...Affective commitment is an emotional or attachment to the Army. Those strongly committed leaders identify with and enjoy working for the Army...Medical Command. Nicely, K., Bryson, J., Aude, S., Keller-Glaze, H., & Vowels , C. (in preparation). Preparatory Skillsets for Brigade Combat Teams

  10. Photocopy of plan (in U.S. Army office of Army Engineers ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of plan (in U.S. Army office of Army Engineers plans and drawings, Fort Hancock and Sandy hook proving ground, record group 7, drawer 44, Cartographic and Architectural branc, The National Archives, Washington, DC) from Talcott, T.M.R., plot of a survey of site, Fort at Sandy Hook, NJ, 1859-1860 Detail of engineer's wharf - U.S. Coast Guard Sandy Hook Station, Western Docking Structure, West of intersection of Canfield Road & Hartshorne Drive, Highlands, Monmouth County, NJ

  11. Photocopy of plan (in U.S. Army office of Army Engineers ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of plan (in U.S. Army office of Army Engineers plans and drawings, Fort Hancock and Sandy hook proving ground, record group 7, drawer 44, Cartographic and Architectural branc, The National Archives, Washington, DC), cartographer unknown, title unknown, March 28, 1892 1890 lifesaving station shown near fort and beach, no boathouse near engineer's wharf - U.S. Coast Guard Sandy Hook Station, Western Docking Structure, West of intersection of Canfield Road & Hartshorne Drive, Highlands, Monmouth County, NJ

  12. History of the Army Ground Forces. Study Number 17. History of the Third Army

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-01-01

    local needs, there will be produced a progressive increase , rather than a temporary paralysis, in combat effectiveness. The four field army...Army divisions on an experimental basis during the early part of 1940. Pleased by the increased funds made available and by the opportunity to test...inch anti-aircraft guns also took part in the excercises . 29 The maneuvers began on 9 May and four separate exercises, dovering a period of ..-."- three

  13. the Army Ethic-Educating and Equipping the Army Mid-Level Leaders in the CGSOC

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-10

    educates and equips Army’s mid-level leaders on the Army Ethic. With the advent of information technology, the old maxim of “doing the right thing...world becomes more connected through the use of information technology, the old maxim of “doing the right thing when no one is watching” has evolved...to “develop and provide training at selected Army schools on topics to include ethics, world religions , moral leadership, spiritual fitness, and

  14. Army Planning: Comprehensive Risk Assessment Needed for Planned Changes to the Armys Force Structure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-01

    a new permanent duty station. 13 GAO, Risk Management: Further Refinements Needed to Assess Risks and Prioritize Protective Measures at Ports and...limit the Army’s ability to transport troops around the battlefield, among other risks . The Army intends to add 4 medium truck companies to its...ARMY PLANNING Comprehensive Risk Assessment Needed for Planned Changes to the Army’s Force Structure Report to

  15. Design of the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS)

    PubMed Central

    Kessler, Ronald C.; Colpe, Lisa J.; Fullerton, Carol S.; Gebler, Nancy; Naifeh, James A.; Nock, Matthew K.; Sampson, Nancy A.; Schoenbaum, Michael; Zaslavsky, Alan M.; Stein, Murray B.; Ursano, Robert J.; Heeringa, Steven G.

    2014-01-01

    The Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS) is a multi-component epidemiological and neurobiological study designed to generate actionable evidence-based recommendations to reduce U.S. Army suicides and increase basic knowledge about the determinants of suicidality. This report presents an overview of the designs of the six component Army STARRS studies. These include: an integrated study of historical administrative data systems (HADS) designed to provide data on significant administrative predictors of suicides among the more than 1.6 million soldiers on active duty in 2004–2009; retrospective case-control studies of suicide attempts and fatalities; separate large-scale cross-sectional studies of new soldiers (i.e., those just beginning Basic Combat Training [BCT], who completed self-administered questionnaires [SAQ] and neurocognitive tests and provided blood samples) and soldiers exclusive of those in BCT (who completed SAQs); a pre-post deployment study of soldiers in three Brigade Combat Teams about to deploy to Afghanistan (who completed SAQs and provided blood samples) followed multiple times after returning from deployment; and a platform for following up Army STARRS participants who have returned to civilian life. DoD/Army administrative data records are linked with SAQ data to examine prospective associations between self-reports and subsequent suicidality. The presentation closes with a discussion of the methodological advantages of cross-component coordination. PMID:24318217

  16. Design of the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS).

    PubMed

    Kessler, Ronald C; Colpe, Lisa J; Fullerton, Carol S; Gebler, Nancy; Naifeh, James A; Nock, Matthew K; Sampson, Nancy A; Schoenbaum, Michael; Zaslavsky, Alan M; Stein, Murray B; Ursano, Robert J; Heeringa, Steven G

    2013-12-01

    The Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS) is a multi-component epidemiological and neurobiological study designed to generate actionable evidence-based recommendations to reduce US Army suicides and increase basic knowledge about the determinants of suicidality. This report presents an overview of the designs of the six components of the Army STARRS. These include: an integrated analysis of the Historical Administrative Data Study (HADS) designed to provide data on significant administrative predictors of suicides among the more than 1.6 million soldiers on active duty in 2004-2009; retrospective case-control studies of suicide attempts and fatalities; separate large-scale cross-sectional studies of new soldiers (i.e. those just beginning Basic Combat Training [BCT], who completed self-administered questionnaires [SAQs] and neurocognitive tests and provided blood samples) and soldiers exclusive of those in BCT (who completed SAQs); a pre-post deployment study of soldiers in three Brigade Combat Teams about to deploy to Afghanistan (who completed SAQs and provided blood samples) followed multiple times after returning from deployment; and a platform for following up Army STARRS participants who have returned to civilian life. Department of Defense/Army administrative data records are linked with SAQ data to examine prospective associations between self-reports and subsequent suicidality. The presentation closes with a discussion of the methodological advantages of cross-component coordination. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Field procedures in the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS).

    PubMed

    Heeringa, Steven G; Gebler, Nancy; Colpe, Lisa J; Fullerton, Carol S; Hwang, Irving; Kessler, Ronald C; Naifeh, James A; Nock, Matthew K; Sampson, Nancy A; Schoenbaum, Michael; Zaslavsky, Alan M; Stein, Murray B; Ursano, Robert J

    2013-12-01

    The Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS) is a multi-component epidemiological and neurobiological study of unprecedented size and complexity designed to generate actionable evidence-based recommendations to reduce US Army suicides and increase basic knowledge about determinants of suicidality by carrying out coordinated component studies. A number of major logistical challenges were faced in implementing these studies. The current report presents an overview of the approaches taken to meet these challenges, with a special focus on the field procedures used to implement the component studies. As detailed in the paper, these challenges were addressed at the onset of the initiative by establishing an Executive Committee, a Data Coordination Center (the Survey Research Center [SRC] at the University of Michigan), and study-specific design and analysis teams that worked with staff on instrumentation and field procedures. SRC staff, in turn, worked with the Office of the Deputy Under Secretary of the Army (ODUSA) and local Army Points of Contact (POCs) to address logistical issues and facilitate data collection. These structures, coupled with careful fieldworker training, supervision, and piloting, contributed to the major Army STARRS data collection efforts having higher response rates than previous large-scale studies of comparable military samples.

  18. Army Aviation in Operation Just Cause

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-04-15

    and La Palma . The operations would also counter suspected drug cartels in the area. Operations were hampered by the lack of maps, since much of this...compon1ents du to corrosion. Most Army Aviation units aro not knowledgeable of proper corrosion control procedures and techniques. We need additional

  19. Prototype Procedures to Describe Army Jobs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-01

    D. (2009). Assessing professional competence by using occupational judgment tests derived from job analysis questionnaires (Technical Report 1242...occupation/ job and that differentiate an Army occupation/ job , or cluster of occupations/ jobs , from others (e.g., performing operator maintenance ...wheeled vehicle. 1 Obtain service box and read orders for maintenance job . 2 Perform routine inspection and checks of wheeled vehicle. 3

  20. What We Know About Army Families

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-09-01

    23 - How is individual readiness defined and measured ? - How is unit readiness defined and measured ? - What are the impacts of families and...spouse perceptions of the quality of Army programs and services? - What aie the relationships between use of community support programs and family...to Increase Soldiers’ Readiness ...... ............................ 28 4-5. Measures of Unit Readiness ....... .............................. 29 vii 4

  1. Peacekeeping Training in the Army National Guard

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    65 George Minde, e-mail including Annex T, dated 14 September 2003. 66 MG Rodney Hannula ... Hannula , Rodney R., Major General. “Training Year 2001 Yearly Training Guidance.” Minnesota Army National Guard.web page, 1 October 1999. <http

  2. 32 CFR 631.14 - Army policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) Soldiers, military and/or Department of the Army Civilian (DAC) police performing off-installation... areas OCONUS. (b) Military and/or DAC police assigned to off-installation operations have the sole... and/or DAC police accompanying civilian law enforcement officers remain directly responsible to, and...

  3. Army Base Realignment Methodology. Volume II.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-08-01

    Command Operating Program Detailed Guidance FE ii...........Final Environmental Impact Statement FWA ........... Family Houslag Management Account FNSI...effectively systematized the requirements included within the environmental , socio- economic, and EEO realms. HtQDA and MACOM personnel are indeed...This study asesses the current methodology for studying potential Army rea- lignment actions and recommends a system for tracking actions once they

  4. The Army’s Carbon Bootprint

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-06

    GWP relative to CO2 • GWP is determined by stability of the chemical in the atmosphere and its capacity to influence global warming Global Warming Potential...GWP) Mr. Larry Webber/(410)436-1231/ Lawrence.webber.us.army.mil 06MAY2009 The Army’s Carbon Bootprint Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Global Warming Potential

  5. The all Volunteer Army: Impact on Readines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-06-08

    unlimited. .~ 7_ IS. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES Plaster of Military Art and Science (MTAAS) thesis prepared at CGSC in partial fulfillment of the Masters Program...Doubled in Last 8 Years." Army Limes , 22 January 1979, p. 3. Brown, George. "Personnel Problems Facing Services." Air Force Times, 7 March 1977, pp. 18 & 34

  6. Assessing the Assignment Policy for Army Women

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    There was considerably less con- sensus among Army and OSD/JS interviewees regarding the objectives Is Th ere a Sh ared In terp retatio n o f th e A...Preventative medicine officer 60D Occupational medicine officer 60F Pulmonary disease/critical care officer 60G Gastroenterologist 60H Cardiologist 60J

  7. U.S. Army Signal School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Army Signal Center and School, Fort Monmouth, NJ.

    The U. S. Army Signal School at Fort Monmouth, New Jersey, provides military education and appropriate practical training for Armed Forces men and women to prepare them for positions in communications-electronics activities and familiarize them with the application of doctrine, tactics, logistics, and electronic techniques pertinent to the…

  8. U.S. Army Space Operational Narrative

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-20

    NUMBER( S ) . DISTRIBUTION / AVAILABILITY STATEMENT Distribution A : Approved for public release distribution is unlimited 13...cyberspace expertise at the highest levels is a must for the Army. Both ARCYBERCOM and USASMDC/ARSTRAT commands are key positions filled by MFE officers...War College Class of 2012 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT: A Approved for Public Release Distribution is Unlimited This manuscript is submitted in

  9. The Army's High Priority Physical Fitness Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drews, Fred R.

    1984-01-01

    This article explores the importance of physical fitness in the United States Army. The development of expanded fitness assessment and programs is related to health and the prevention of coronary heart disease. Improved physical training programs, improved nutrition, and fundamental research are necessary for maintaining a highly fit and healthy…

  10. Army Deployments of OIF and OEF

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    Congress Cataloging -in-Publication Data Bonds, Tim, 1962– Army deployments to OIF and OEF / Timothy M. Bonds, Dave Baiocchi, Laurie L. McDonald. p...for a short period one or more times to those with 365 days of continuous deployed duty. (The previous “ tachometer ” chart, in contrast, better

  11. Army European Tour Extension: An Interdisciplinary Approach

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-02-01

    authors are grateful to Dr. Robert Holz and his staff at the USAREUR Field Unit of ARI who were responsible -for data collection. We are also grateful...and Recommendation Summaries: A-Personnel, Introduction to Issues-Army 2, 3, 4, 5: Permanent Change of Station Moves, 17-52, 1984. -%’-.% Pindyck , R. S

  12. Enhancing Army Joint Force Headquarters Capabilities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    in OIF, helping the local popu- lation deal with issues relating to sewage, water, electricity, and trash . These projects, which employed local labor...At the Center of the Vortex ,” Field Artillery, October 1993, pp. 12–16. Chiarelli, MG Peter W., Commanding General, 1st Cavalry Division, U.S. Army

  13. The U.S. Army Capstone Concept

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-19

    Army. In these roles, TRADOC designs, develops, integrates, and synchronizes warfighting capability proposals, fosters innovation , and leads change...conflict appear in the operational environment will continue to challenge commanders. Technological innovations will increase the reach of an adversary...actors involved, and the ability of threats to adapt rapidly. Adversaries will employ anti-access and area denial strategies, innovative tactics, and

  14. Multistage Deployment of the Army Theater Hospital

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    capability on the battlefield to include myriad surgical capacity, emergency treatment, pharmacy , psychiatry, community health, clinical laboratory...NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA THESIS Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited MULTISTAGE...DEPLOYMENT OF THE ARMY THEATER HOSPITAL by Trisha A. Cobb December 2013 Thesis Advisor: Ned Dimitrov Second Reader: Lawrence Fulton THIS PAGE

  15. Pacific Armies Management Seminar Series. Executive Summary.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-01-01

    Operations and Training, Assistant Chief of Staff, G3, US Army, Japan 28 KOREA (PAMS 1 -11) Col LEE Joong Hyung, Assistant Deputy Chief of Staff, Taining...Geraldine LEE, Executive Secretary (PAMS I - I1) Mrs. Patricia KACFELDT, Recording Secretary (PAMS 11 and IlZ) Mrs. Heather DIZON, Recording Secretary Ms. Gloria SAMALA, Recording Secretary 35 ...Wb : , DTI

  16. Transformation: Effectively Marketing Change in the Army

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-03-19

    rhetoric. Nothing could be further than the truth .”17 The fact that General Sullivan had to overtly address this topic in such a public forum...remain unchanged.” Pentagram (Special from the Association of the United States Army). 7 March 2003. ARMY—Transformation Wargame 2002.” 22-26 April

  17. The Army's High Priority Physical Fitness Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drews, Fred R.

    1984-01-01

    This article explores the importance of physical fitness in the United States Army. The development of expanded fitness assessment and programs is related to health and the prevention of coronary heart disease. Improved physical training programs, improved nutrition, and fundamental research are necessary for maintaining a highly fit and healthy…

  18. Army health care operations in Iraq.

    PubMed

    Young, Richard S K; Gillan, Eileen; Dingmann, Philip; Casinelli, Paul; Taylor, Colleen

    2008-01-01

    Four years of warfare in the urban environment of Iraq have produced fundamental changes in the Army's health-care system. First, improved communications and air evacuation have streamlined the transport of the wounded soldierfrom the battlefield to stateside medical centers. Second, individual ballistic armor has decreased the number of U.S. troops killed while the number of wounded soldiers has increased. Third, battling an unseen enemy has produced a marked increase in acute stress disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder and traumatic brain injury. Deployment of soldiers with chronic mental health disorders such as anxiety, attention deficit disorder, and depression is problematic. The stress of long combat tours has doubled the incidence of abuse and neglect in children of deployed service members. Comparedto active-componentsoldiers, the prevalence ofmental health disorders is twice as great in soldiers of the Army Reserve and Army National Guard. Finally, the difficulty in determining friend vs. foe in Iraq results in the incarceration of thousands of Iraqis creating both medical and ethical challenges for Army physicians.

  19. Army Research Laboratory (ARL) 2009 Annual Review

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    The Army Research Laboratory supported research on terrain prediction. Classification is aimed toward developing a machine - learning capability for...characteristics may be largely unknown . Field tests: Machine - learning capabilities for an unmanned ground vehicle on sandy terrain . Extramural Basic Research... learning ARL team capable of meeting the challenges associated with the Soldier’s technology requirements . ARL recruits for and fills positions

  20. 76 FR 72914 - Army Educational Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-28

    ... submit a written statement for consideration by the U.S. Army War College Subcommittee. Written statements should be no longer than two type-written pages and must address: The issue, discussion, and a... written statement must submit their statement to the Designated Federal Officer at the following address...

  1. Handbook on Volunteers in Army Community Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of the Army, Washington, DC.

    This handbook has been prepared for the purpose of offering guidance and assistance in the development and administration of a volunteer program within Army Community Service. It contains eight chapters. Chapter 1 is the Introduction. Chapter 2, Volunteers Are Partners and Team Members, considers the importance of attitudes, agreement on volunteer…

  2. The Falklands war: Army field surgical experience.

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, D. S.; Batty, C. G.; Ryan, J. M.; McGregor, W. S.

    1983-01-01

    In the recent Falklands campaign four Army Field Surgical Teams were deployed in the two phases of the war. They functioned as Advanced Surgical Centres and operated on 233 casualties. There were 3 deaths. The patterns of wounding and the methods of casualty management are discussed and compared with other recent campaigns. Images Fig. 1 PMID:6614760

  3. Project Management of Army Aircraft Survivability Equipment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-11-01

    JTCG/AS Report Number JTCG/ AS-74-D-002, ’Proposed MIL-STD- XXX , Aircraft Nonnuclear Sur- vivability/Vulnerability. Terms" . 3 I VULNEPJ4BILITY - The...the JTCC-/AS program has become the primary interface be- teen the Army and the other Services. *27 * I • • 27 SECTION IV SUM.,n arv Project

  4. Strategic Deployment Requirements for an Expeditionary Army

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-29

    operations will directly depend on effective integration of Army combat system development, deployment infrastructure and evolution of strategic lift...Enduring Freedom, (Air Force Historical Research Agency, 14 November 2002), 6. 40 Eastward, the pilings of the bridge were Moron (Spain), Rhein

  5. Automation impact study of Army training management 2: Extension of sampling and collection of installation resource data

    SciTech Connect

    Sanquist, T.F.; McCallum, M.C.; Hunt, P.S.; Slavich, A.L.; Underwood, J.A.; Toquam, J.L.; Seaver, D.A.

    1989-05-01

    This automation impact study of Army training management (TM) was performed for the Army Development and Employment Agency (ADEA) and the Combined Arms Training Activity (CATA) by the Battelle Human Affairs Research Centers and the Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The primary objective of the study was to provide the Army with information concerning the potential costs and savings associated with automating the TM process. This study expands the sample of units surveyed in Phase I of the automation impact effort (Sanquist et al., 1988), and presents data concerning installation resource management in relation to TM. The structured interview employed in Phase I was adapted to a self-administered survey. The data collected were compatible with that of Phase I, and both were combined for analysis. Three US sites, one reserve division, one National Guard division, and one unit in the active component outside the continental US (OCONUS) (referred to in this report as forward deployed) were surveyed. The total sample size was 459, of which 337 respondents contributed the most detailed data. 20 figs., 62 tabs.

  6. Continental crustal composition and lower crustal models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, S. R.

    1983-01-01

    The composition of the upper crust is well established as being close to that of granodiorite. The upper crustal composition is reflected in the uniform REE abundances in shales which represent an homogenization of the various REE patterns. This composition can only persist to depths of 10-15 km, for heat flow and geochemical balance reasons. The composition of the total crust is model dependent. One constraint is that it should be capable of generating the upper granodioritic (S.L.) crust by partial melting within the crust. This composition is based on the andesite model, which assumes that the total crust has grown by accretion of island arc material. A representation of the growth rate of the continental crust is shown. The composition of the lower crust, which comprises 60-80% of the continental crust, remains a major unknown factor for models of terrestrial crustal evolution. Two approaches are used to model the lower crust.

  7. Moroccan crustal response to continental drift.

    PubMed

    Kanes, W H; Saadi, M; Ehrlich, E; Alem, A

    1973-06-01

    The formation and development of a zone of spreading beneath the continental crust resulted in the breakup of Pangea and formation of the Atlantic Ocean. The crust of Morocco bears an extremely complete record of the crustal response to this episode of mantle dynamics. Structural and related depositional patterns indicate that the African margin had stabilized by the Middle Jurassic as a marine carbonate environment; that it was dominated by tensile stresses in the early Mesozoic, resulting in two fault systems paralleling the Atlantic and Mediterranean margins and a basin and range structural-depositional style; and that it was affected by late Paleozoic metamorphism and intrusion. Mesozoic events record the latter portion of African involvement in the spreading episode; late Paleozoic thermal orogenesis might reflect the earlier events in the initiation of the spreading center and its development beneath significant continental crust. In that case, more than 100 million years were required for mantle dynamics to break up Pangea.

  8. Regional magnetic anomaly constraints on continental rifting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonfrese, R. R. B.; Hinze, W. J.; Olivier, R.; Bentley, C. R.

    1985-01-01

    Radially polarized MAGSAT anomalies of North and South America, Europe, Africa, India, Australia and Antarctica demonstrate remarkably detailed correlation of regional magnetic lithospheric sources across rifted margins when plotted on a reconstruction of Pangea. These major magnetic features apparently preserve their integrity until a superimposed metamorphoric event alters the magnitude and pattern of the anomalies. The longevity of continental scale magnetic anomalies contrasts markedly with that of regional gravity anomalies which tend to reflect predominantly isostatic adjustments associated with neo-tectonism. First observed as a result of NASA's magnetic satellite programs, these anomalies provide new and fundamental constraints on the geologic evolution and dynamics of the continents and oceans. Accordingly, satellite magnetic observations provide a further tool for investigating continental drift to compliment other lines of evidence in paleoclimatology, paleontology, paleomagnetism, and studies of the radiometric ages and geometric fit of the continents.

  9. A budget for continental growth and denudation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Howell, D.G.; Murray, R.W.

    1986-01-01

    Oceanic crustal material on a global scale is re-created every 110 million years. From the data presented it is inferred that potential sialic material is formed at a rate of about 1.35 cubic kilometers per year, including hemipelagic volcanic sediments that accumulate at a rate of about 0.05 cubic kilometer per year. It is estimated that the influx of 1.65 cubic kilometers per year of terrigenous and biogenic sediment is deposited on the deep ocean, and this represents continental denudation. Because all this material is brought into a subduction zone, continental accretion rates, which could include all this material, may be as high as 3.0 cubic kilometers per year with a potential net growth for continents of 1.35 cubic kilometers per year.

  10. Continental and oceanic crustal magnetization modelling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, C. G. A.; Hayling, K. L.

    1984-01-01

    Inversion of magnetic data from the MAGSAT satellite, to arrive at intensities of magnetization of the Earth's crust, was performed by two different methods. The first method uses a spherical harmonic model of the magnetic field. The coefficients believed to represent sources in the Earth's crust can then be inverted to arrive at vertical dipole moments per unit area at the Earth's surface. The spherical harmonic models contain coefficients of degrees of harmonics up to 23. The dipole moment per unit area for a surface element can then be determined by summing the contribution for each individual degree of harmonic. The magnetic moments were calculated for continental and oceanic areas separately as well as over certain latitudinal segments. Of primary concern was to determine whether there are any differences between continental and oceanic areas. The second analysis with magnetization intensities was made using narrower ranges of degrees of harmonics, assuming that higher degrees are present in the core field signal.

  11. Modeling Sedimentary Deposits on the Continental Margin

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-09-30

    sedimentation processes. P. 151-164, in Numerical Experiments in Stratigraphy : Recent Advances in stratigraphic and sedimentologic Computer Simulations. Soc...Niedoroda, A.W., 1996, Modeling the sedimentology and stratigraphy of continental margins, Oceanography, v. 9, p183-188 Swift, D. J. P. B. S. Parsons...hypothesis that on muddy shelves such as the northern California shelf, Holocene event stratigraphy consists of the deposits of high-concentration

  12. Iceberg scouring on the Norwegian continental shelf

    SciTech Connect

    Lien, R.

    1983-05-01

    This paper is a condensed version of parts of a Dr. ing. thesis to be presented during 1983. The first part of the paper deals with the regional distribution of iceberg scouring on the Norwegian continental shelf, and some general aspects related to it. The second part deals with iceberg scouring as a local phenomenon and its relation to the sea floor topography, sediment distribution, and geological and geotechnical properties of the sediments.

  13. Ocean processes at the Antarctic continental slope.

    PubMed

    Heywood, Karen J; Schmidtko, Sunke; Heuzé, Céline; Kaiser, Jan; Jickells, Timothy D; Queste, Bastien Y; Stevens, David P; Wadley, Martin; Thompson, Andrew F; Fielding, Sophie; Guihen, Damien; Creed, Elizabeth; Ridley, Jeff K; Smith, Walker

    2014-07-13

    The Antarctic continental shelves and slopes occupy relatively small areas, but, nevertheless, are important for global climate, biogeochemical cycling and ecosystem functioning. Processes of water mass transformation through sea ice formation/melting and ocean-atmosphere interaction are key to the formation of deep and bottom waters as well as determining the heat flux beneath ice shelves. Climate models, however, struggle to capture these physical processes and are unable to reproduce water mass properties of the region. Dynamics at the continental slope are key for correctly modelling climate, yet their small spatial scale presents challenges both for ocean modelling and for observational studies. Cross-slope exchange processes are also vital for the flux of nutrients such as iron from the continental shelf into the mixed layer of the Southern Ocean. An iron-cycling model embedded in an eddy-permitting ocean model reveals the importance of sedimentary iron in fertilizing parts of the Southern Ocean. Ocean gliders play a key role in improving our ability to observe and understand these small-scale processes at the continental shelf break. The Gliders: Excellent New Tools for Observing the Ocean (GENTOO) project deployed three Seagliders for up to two months in early 2012 to sample the water to the east of the Antarctic Peninsula in unprecedented temporal and spatial detail. The glider data resolve small-scale exchange processes across the shelf-break front (the Antarctic Slope Front) and the front's biogeochemical signature. GENTOO demonstrated the capability of ocean gliders to play a key role in a future multi-disciplinary Southern Ocean observing system.

  14. Cyclic growth in Atlantic region continental crust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, A. M.

    1986-01-01

    Atlantic region continental crust evolved in successive stages under the influence of regular, approximately 400 Ma-long tectonic cycles. Data point to a variety of operative tectonic processes ranging from widespread ocean floor consumption (Wilson cycle) to entirely ensialic (Ampferer-style subduction or simple crustal attenuation-compression). Different processes may have operated concurrently in some or different belts. Resolving this remains the major challenge.

  15. Workshop on the Growth of Continental Crust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashwal, Lewis D. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    Constraints and observations were discussed on a fundamental unsolved problem of global scale relating to the growth of planetary crusts. All of the terrestrial planets were considered, but emphasis was placed on the Earth's continental crust. The title of each session is: (1) Extraterrestrial crustal growth and destruction; (2) Constraints for observations and measurements of terrestrial rocks; (3) Models of crustal growth and destruction; and (4) Process of crustal growth and destruction.

  16. Ocean processes at the Antarctic continental slope

    PubMed Central

    Heywood, Karen J.; Schmidtko, Sunke; Heuzé, Céline; Kaiser, Jan; Jickells, Timothy D.; Queste, Bastien Y.; Stevens, David P.; Wadley, Martin; Thompson, Andrew F.; Fielding, Sophie; Guihen, Damien; Creed, Elizabeth; Ridley, Jeff K.; Smith, Walker

    2014-01-01

    The Antarctic continental shelves and slopes occupy relatively small areas, but, nevertheless, are important for global climate, biogeochemical cycling and ecosystem functioning. Processes of water mass transformation through sea ice formation/melting and ocean–atmosphere interaction are key to the formation of deep and bottom waters as well as determining the heat flux beneath ice shelves. Climate models, however, struggle to capture these physical processes and are unable to reproduce water mass properties of the region. Dynamics at the continental slope are key for correctly modelling climate, yet their small spatial scale presents challenges both for ocean modelling and for observational studies. Cross-slope exchange processes are also vital for the flux of nutrients such as iron from the continental shelf into the mixed layer of the Southern Ocean. An iron-cycling model embedded in an eddy-permitting ocean model reveals the importance of sedimentary iron in fertilizing parts of the Southern Ocean. Ocean gliders play a key role in improving our ability to observe and understand these small-scale processes at the continental shelf break. The Gliders: Excellent New Tools for Observing the Ocean (GENTOO) project deployed three Seagliders for up to two months in early 2012 to sample the water to the east of the Antarctic Peninsula in unprecedented temporal and spatial detail. The glider data resolve small-scale exchange processes across the shelf-break front (the Antarctic Slope Front) and the front's biogeochemical signature. GENTOO demonstrated the capability of ocean gliders to play a key role in a future multi-disciplinary Southern Ocean observing system. PMID:24891389

  17. Parameterization of continental boundary layer clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ping; Zhao, Wei

    2008-05-01

    Large eddy simulations (LESs) of continental boundary layer clouds (BLCs) observed at the southern Great Plains (SGP) are used to study issues associated with the parameterization of sub-grid BLCs in large scale models. It is found that liquid water potential temperature θl and total specific humidity qt, which are often used as parameterization predictors in statistical cloud schemes, do not share the same probability distribution in the cloud layer with θl skewed to the left (negatively skewed) and qt skewed to the right (positively skewed). The skewness and kurtosis change substantially in time and space when the development of continental BLCs undergoes a distinct diurnal variation. The wide range of skewness and kurtosis of θl and qt can hardly be described by a single probability distribution function. To extend the application of the statistical cloud parameterization approach, this paper proposes an innovative cloud parameterization scheme that uses the boundary layer height and the lifting condensation level as the primary parameterization predictors. The LES results indicate that the probability distribution of these two quantities is relatively stable compared with that of θl and qt during the diurnal variation and nearly follows a Gaussian function. Verifications using LES output and the observations collected at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ARCF) SGP site indicate that the proposed scheme works well to represent continental BLCs.

  18. CSDP: The seismology of continental thermal regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Aki, K.

    1990-05-01

    This is a progress report for the past one year of research (year 3 of 5-year project) under the project titled CSDP: Seismology of Continental Thermal Regime'', in which we proposed to develop seismological interpretation theory and methods applicable to complex structures encountered in continental geothermal areas and apply them to several candidate sites for the Continental Scientific Drilling Project. The past year has been extremely productive especially in the area of interpretation theory, including the following two major break-throughs. One is the derivation of an integral equation for time-dependent power spectra, which unified all the existing theories on seismic scattering (including the radiative transfer theory for total energy and single and multiple scattering theories based on the ray approach) and offers more complete and economical solutions to the problems of seismic scattering and attenuation. The other is the new formula for synthetic seismograms for layered media with irregular interfaces, combining the T-matrix method for an arbitrary shaped inclusion and the method of global generalized reflection/transmission coefficients for layered media. Both breakthroughs will enable us to deal with seismic observations in complex earth structures more efficiently and accurately. In the area of experimental studies, we discovered seismic guided waves trapped in the San Andreas fault near Parkfield, California. 54 refs., 14 figs.

  19. Abrupt plate accelerations shape rifted continental margins.

    PubMed

    Brune, Sascha; Williams, Simon E; Butterworth, Nathaniel P; Müller, R Dietmar

    2016-08-11

    Rifted margins are formed by persistent stretching of continental lithosphere until breakup is achieved. It is well known that strain-rate-dependent processes control rift evolution, yet quantified extension histories of Earth's major passive margins have become available only recently. Here we investigate rift kinematics globally by applying a new geotectonic analysis technique to revised global plate reconstructions. We find that rifted margins feature an initial, slow rift phase (less than ten millimetres per year, full rate) and that an abrupt increase of plate divergence introduces a fast rift phase. Plate acceleration takes place before continental rupture and considerable margin area is created during each phase. We reproduce the rapid transition from slow to fast extension using analytical and numerical modelling with constant force boundary conditions. The extension models suggest that the two-phase velocity behaviour is caused by a rift-intrinsic strength--velocity feedback, which can be robustly inferred for diverse lithosphere configurations and rheologies. Our results explain differences between proximal and distal margin areas and demonstrate that abrupt plate acceleration during continental rifting is controlled by the nonlinear decay of the resistive rift strength force. This mechanism provides an explanation for several previously unexplained rapid absolute plate motion changes, offering new insights into the balance of plate driving forces through time.

  20. Electrical conductivity of the continental crust

    SciTech Connect

    Glover, P.W.J.; Vine, F.J. |

    1994-11-01

    Geophysical measurements indicate that the Earth`s continental lower crust has a high electrical conductivity for which no simple cause has been found. Explanation usually relies on either saline fluids saturating the pores, or interconnected highly conducting minerals such as graphite, Fe/Ti oxides and sulfides, providing conducting pathways. Attempts in the laboratory to clarify the problem have, hitherto, been unable to recreate conditions likely to be present at depth by controlling the confining pressure and pore fluid pressure applied to a rock saturated with saline fluids at temperatures between 270 C and 1000 C. Here we report conductivity data obtained using a cell designed to make such measurements on rocks saturated with saline fluids. Our results show that the conductivity of saturated samples of acidic rocks is explicable entirely in terms of conduction through the pore fluid whereas the conductivity of saturated basic rocks requires the presence of an additional conduction mechanism(s). We have used the experimental data to construct electrical conductivity/depth profiles for the continental crust, which, when compared with profiles obtained from magnetotelluric observations, demonstrate that a mid to lower crust composed of amphibolite saturated with 0.5 M NaCl shows electrical conductivities sufficient to explain conductivity/depth profiles for the continental crust inferred from geophysical measurements.

  1. Continental Deformation in Madagascar from GNSS Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamps, D. S.; Rajaonarison, T.; Rambolamanana, G.; Herimitsinjo, N.; Carrillo, R.; Jesmok, G.

    2015-12-01

    D.S. Stamps, T. Rajaonarison, G. Rambolamanana Madagascar is the easternmost continental segment of the East African Rift System (EARS). Plate reconstructions assume the continental island behaves as a rigid block, but studies of geologically recent kinematics suggest Madagascar undergoes extension related to the broader EARS. In this work we test for rigidity of Madagascar in two steps. First, we quantify surface motions using a novel dataset of episodic and continuous GNSS observations that span Madagascar from north to south. We established a countrywide network of precision benchmarks fixed in bedrock and with open skyview in 2010 that we measured for 48-72 hours with dual frequency receivers. The benchmarks were remeasured in 2012 and 2014. We processed the episodic GNSS data with ABPO, the only continuous GNSS station in Madagascar with >2.5 years of data, for millimeter precision positions and velocities at 7 locations using GAMIT-GLOBK. Our velocity field shows 2 mm/yr of differential motion between southern and northern Madagascar. Second, we test a suite of kinematic predictions from previous studies and find residual velocities are greater than 95% uncertainties. We also calculate angular velocity vectors assuming Madagascar moves with the Lwandle plate or the Somalian plate. Our new velocity field in Madagascar is inconsistent with all models that assume plate rigidity at the 95% uncertainty level; this result indicates the continental island undergoes statistically significant internal deformation.

  2. Army Industrial Operations: Budgeting and Management of Carryover Could Be Improved

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    1The 13 Industrial Operations’ activities are the Anniston Army...Depot, Anniston , Alabama; the Blue Grass Army Depot, Richmond, Kentucky; the Corpus Christi Army Depot, Corpus Christi, Texas; the Crane Army...maintenance depots ( Anniston , Alabama; Corpus Christi, Texas; Background Page 4 GAO-13-499 Army Industrial Operations Letterkenny, Pennsylvania

  3. The Army Family Team Building Program: Facilitating a Transformative Learning Process--An Intrinsic Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gall, Joseph A.

    2009-01-01

    This study sought to understand how the Army Family Team Building program influences self-reliance and self-sufficiency in Army spouses as they integrate into the Army community. The purpose of the Army Family Team Building program is to empower Army spouses with knowledge and skills, which foster well-being and improve quality of life. The…

  4. Breaking the Toxic Leadership Paradigm in the U.S. Army

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-28

    PARADIGM IN THE U.S. ARMY by Colonel Stephen A. Elle United States Army Dr. Richard M. Meinhart Project Adviser...Breaking the Toxic Leadership Paradigm in the U.S. Army by Colonel Stephen A. Elle United States Army United...States Army War College Class of 2012 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT: A Approved for Public Release Distribution is Unlimited This manuscript is

  5. Improving the Army Planning, Programming, Budgeting, and Execution System (PPBES) The Planning Phase

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-01-01

    In 1997 the Army asked that RAND Arroyo Center assist in the reengineering of The Army Plan (TAP). The Army also reinstituted strategic planning and...the product was the Army Strategic Planning Guidance (ASPG), which provides strategic guidance to TAP. Planning and programming in the Army are

  6. Continental emergence in the Late Archean reconciles early and late continental growth models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flament, Nicolas; Coltice, Nicolas; Rey, Patrice

    2014-05-01

    The analysis of ancient sediments (Rare Earth Element composition of black shales, isotopic strontium composition of marine carbonates, isotopic oxygen composition of zircons) suggests that continental growth culminated around the Archean-Proterozoic transition. In stark contrast, the geochemical analysis of ancient basalts suggests that depletion of the mantle occurred in the Hadean and Eoarchean. This paradox may be solved if continents were extracted from the mantle early in Earth's history, but remained mostly below sea level throughout the Archean. We present a model to estimate the area of emerged land and associated isotopic strontium composition of the mantle and oceans as a function of the coupled evolution of mantle temperature, continental growth and distribution of surface elevations (hypsometry). For constant continental hypsometry and four distinct continental growth models, we show that sea level was between 500 and 2000 m higher in the Archean than at present, resulting in < 12% of emerged land, compared to ~ 28% at present. If in addition the hot Archean lithosphere could not sustain high relief, as little as 2-3% of Earth's surface would have been emerged in the Archean. Using a geochemical box model for the strontium isotopic composition of the mantle and oceans, we show that a reduced area of emerged continental crust can explain why the geochemical fingerprint of continents extracted early in Earth's history was not recorded at the surface of the Earth until the late Archean.

  7. Basins in ARC-continental collisions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Draut, Amy E.; Clift, Peter D.; Busby, Cathy; Azor, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Arc-continent collisions occur commonly in the plate-tectonic cycle and result in rapidly formed and rapidly collapsing orogens, often spanning just 5-15 My. Growth of continental masses through arc-continent collision is widely thought to be a major process governing the structural and geochemical evolution of the continental crust over geologic time. Collisions of intra-oceanic arcs with passive continental margins (a situation in which the arc, on the upper plate, faces the continent) involve a substantially different geometry than collisions of intra-oceanic arcs with active continental margins (a situation requiring more than one convergence zone and in which the arc, on the lower plate, backs into the continent), with variable preservation potential for basins in each case. Substantial differences also occur between trench and forearc evolution in tectonically erosive versus tectonically accreting margins, both before and after collision. We examine the evolution of trenches, trench-slope basins, forearc basins, intra-arc basins, and backarc basins during arc-continent collision. The preservation potential of trench-slope basins is low; in collision they are rapidly uplifted and eroded, and at erosive margins they are progressively destroyed by subduction erosion. Post-collisional preservation of trench sediment and trench-slope basins is biased toward margins that were tectonically accreting for a substantial length of time before collision. Forearc basins in erosive margins are usually floored by strong lithosphere and may survive collision with a passive margin, sometimes continuing sedimentation throughout collision and orogeny. The low flexural rigidity of intra-arc basins makes them deep and, if preserved, potentially long records of arc and collisional tectonism. Backarc basins, in contrast, are typically subducted and their sediment either lost or preserved only as fragments in melange sequences. A substantial proportion of the sediment derived from

  8. On the Evolution of Glaciated Continental Margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sverre Laberg, Jan; Rydningen, Tom Arne; Safronova, Polina A.; Forwick, Matthias

    2016-04-01

    Glaciated continental margins, continental margins where a grounded ice sheet repeatedly has been at or near the shelf break, are found at both northern and southern high-latitudes. Their evolution are in several aspects different from their low-latitude counterparts where eustatic sea-level variations possess a fundamental control on their evolution and where fluvial systems provide the main sediment input. From studies of the Norwegian - Barents Sea - Svalbard and NE Greenland continental margins we propose the following factors as the main control on the evolution of glaciated continental margins: 1) Pre-glacial relief controlling the accommodation space, 2) Ice sheet glaciology including the location of fast-flowing ice streams where source area morphology exerts a fundamental control, 3) Composition of the glacigenic sediments where the clay content in previous studies have been found to be important, and 4) Sea-level controlled both by eustacy and isostacy. From three case studies, 1) the western Barents Sea, 2) part of the North Norwegian (Troms), and 3) the Mid-Norwegian margin, the influence on these factors for the sea-floor morphology, sedimentary processes of the continental slope - deep sea and continental margin architecture are discussed. The pre-glacial relief of the mid-Norwegian and Troms margins relates to the onset of rifting and plate break-up from the early Cenozoic while for the SW Barents Sea, plate shear was followed by rifting. A wide zone of extended continental crust occurs offshore mid-Norway while this zone is much narrower offshore Troms leading to a more pronounced pre-glacial relief. Regarding sediment delivery and ice sheet glaciology the western Barents Sea exemplifies very high sediment input corresponding to an estimated average erosion of the source area of ~0.4 mm/yr (SW Barents Sea), much of which is related to subglacial erosion of Mesozoic - Cenozoic sedimentary rocks from large paleo-ice streams. The mid-Norwegian margin

  9. Reconstructing Rodinia by Fitting Neoproterozoic Continental Margins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stewart, John H.

    2009-01-01

    Reconstructions of Phanerozoic tectonic plates can be closely constrained by lithologic correlations across conjugate margins by paleontologic information, by correlation of orogenic belts, by paleomagnetic location of continents, and by ocean floor magmatic stripes. In contrast, Proterozoic reconstructions are hindered by the lack of some of these tools or the lack of their precision. To overcome some of these difficulties, this report focuses on a different method of reconstruction, namely the use of the shape of continents to assemble the supercontinent of Rodinia, much like a jigsaw puzzle. Compared to the vast amount of information available for Phanerozoic systems, such a limited approach for Proterozoic rocks, may seem suspect. However, using the assembly of the southern continents (South America, Africa, India, Arabia, Antarctica, and Australia) as an example, a very tight fit of the continents is apparent and illustrates the power of the jigsaw puzzle method. This report focuses on Neoproterozoic rocks, which are shown on two new detailed geologic maps that constitute the backbone of the study. The report also describes the Neoproterozoic, but younger or older rocks are not discussed or not discussed in detail. The Neoproterozoic continents and continental margins are identified based on the distribution of continental-margin sedimentary and magmatic rocks that define the break-up margins of Rodinia. These Neoproterozoic continental exposures, as well as critical Neo- and Meso-Neoproterozoic tectonic features shown on the two new map compilations, are used to reconstruct the Mesoproterozoic supercontinent of Rodinia. This approach differs from the common approach of using fold belts to define structural features deemed important in the Rodinian reconstruction. Fold belts are difficult to date, and many are significantly younger than the time frame considered here (1,200 to 850 Ma). Identifying Neoproterozoic continental margins, which are primarily

  10. Automation impact study of Army Training Management

    SciTech Connect

    Sanquist, T.F.; Schuller, C.R.; McCallum, M.C.; Underwood, J.A.; Bettin, P.J.; King, J.L.; Melber, B.D.; Hostick, C.J.; Seaver, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    The main objectives of this impact study were to identify the potential cost savings associated with automated Army Training Management (TM), and to perform a cost-benefit analysis for an Army-wide automated TM system. A subsidiary goal was to establish baseline data for an independent evaluation of a prototype Integrated Training Management System (ITMS), to be tested in the fall of 1988. A structured analysis of TM doctrine was performed for comparison with empirical data gathered in a job analysis survey of selected units of the 9ID (MTZ) at Ft. Lewis, Washington. These observations will be extended to other units in subsequent surveys. The survey data concerning staffing levels and amount of labor expended on eight distinct TM tasks were analyzed in a cost effectiveness model. The main results of the surveys and cost effectiveness modelling are summarized. 18 figs., 47 tabs.

  11. Joint Theater Missile Defense. An Army Assessment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-06-04

    joint force commander’s (JFC’s) JTMD plans. As part of the JTMD scheme of operations, ground maneuver forces ( armor , infantry, Army aviation, and...elements must be given greater importance for deployment. The requirement to push armor -heavy forces forward dictated that many air defense 90 fire...Defenses Aaainst Balistic Missile Attack: Now, More Then Ever, 4 Mar 91. Further development of the need to priotect against this missile threat is

  12. The United States Army 1996 Modernization Plan.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-03-08

    antidotes that do not have performance-degrading side - effects , are safe, and are effective is essential to preserving combat effectiveness . Medical...rapidly expansible, strategically deployable, and effectively employable as part of a joint and multinational team. A Matter of Priorities Army...AMBER for the near-term, and RED for the mid- and far-terms. This rating is a consequence of the lack of an effective combat iv identification system

  13. Parameterization of Terrain in Army Combat Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-03-01

    ABSTRACT (Conttm— on rawaraa aldm II naeaaamrr and tdantlfr by aloek mambar) This study presents and evaluates a methodology for parameterizing terrain...interpretation. However, for those studies which do not require exact representation of terrain, a less costly and time consuming method can be used. In...unique realizations of a type of terrain. This capability overcomes the sensitivity of Army study results to a single sample of terrain. When used for

  14. An Introduction to the Army Personnel System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-01

    Tests and procedures in the personnel sys~cm 14 3. Current selection/classification process . . 15 Aocession For NTIC ’ & J U] V ~8 1A / . .. . . AN...other Armed Services. The Army, which has the largest number of pure combat jobs (i.e. jobs that do not require nor train marketable civilian skills...their recruiting tours. The recruiters are aided by a continuous campaign of advertising and market research, which has been monitored in recent years

  15. The Pros and Cons of Army Automation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-13

    for the Army was changing the identification card to a smart card . Early in 1999, the Secretary of Defense signed a memo about smart card adoption...and implementation. Today that smart card technology is called the Common Access Card (CAC) and it replaced the DA Form 2, identification card. The...www.historyofwar.org 6. Common Access Card – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Retrieved October 24, 2007 from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Common_Access_Card 7. DOD Smart

  16. Global Demands: Limited Forces. US Army Deployment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-01

    space lot tirve. hence a rlassical moble defense is !uled out. in Eur ope, one finds not only a lack of geostrategic depth but also an understandable...fuel and ammunition require- ments, putting greater reliance on technology ; Clausewitz-like "friction" always diminishes expected performance...34 Moreover, as General Donald R. Keith has said, " Technology won’t save us if we don’t field it." 18 One serious drain on Army resources is POMCUS-prepo

  17. Electronic Warfare in Army Models - A Survey.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-08-01

    CCM) PROVING GROUND TENIAS SAMJAM EIEM SPREAD SPECTRUM US ARMY ELECTRONIC FOREIGN SCIENCE & OFFICE OF MISSILE WARFARE LAB (EWL) TECHNOLOGY CENTER...IPAR MULTIRADAR SPREAD SPECTRUM ECMFUZ IRSS OTOALOC TAC ZINGERS EIEM ITF PATCOM TAM EOCM SIM FAC MGM-H4D RFSS TENIAS GTSF MG(-H4H ROLJAM ZAP I HMSM MSL...USAFAS TRASANA USAPAS TCF ASD WPAFU TENIAS ______ ___ ECAC _________ WAR EAGLE _________CATRADA WARRANT am________ 3DBDM ZAP 1 ____________ MEW EWL ZAP 2

  18. Army Field Kitchen Workloads and Fuel Consumption

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-12-01

    the effectiveness and efficiency of overall field feeding operations, the U.S. Army in recent years fielded a new Container Kitchen, new Modem Burner ...Kitchen, Modem Burner Unit, and Unitized Group Rations; and the quantitative data to support future development of a field kitchen workload and staffing...soldier kitchen, results/findings indicate the new Unitized Group Rations and Modern Burner Unit have reduced kitchen daily workloads by about 61 work hours

  19. Army Construction Policy: An Historical Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-04-05

    The first distinction between engineers occurred in the mid eighteenth century when the Englishman, John Smeaton , began calling himself a "civil...burning the Capitol in the War of 1812, marvelously focused the strategic vision of the day. Based on studies after the war, Secretary of War, John C...The Office of the Chief of Engineers of the Army Its Non-Military History. Activities. and Organization. Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins Press, Institute

  20. The Army in the Information Age.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-03-31

    level study agent for the Deputy Chief of Staff for Operations and Plans, Department of the Army. The mission of SSI is to use independent analysis to...appropriate means required to exert control over the forces deployed throughout the area of operations. Our analysis of control would also extend to... analysis of the capabilities required to guard against theft, to establish order, to police the area, and perhaps to neutralize armed bands. Viewed in

  1. Army Tactical Wheeled Vehicle Investment Strategy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-30

    Furthermore, determine the feasibility of a RECAP program to turn M1113 expanded capacity vehicle ( ECV ) HMMWVs into M1152s. The Army should ensure that...common shelter carrier variant today is the M1113 ECV , which ceased production in 2005. Beginning in 2006, the M1152A1 became the replacement for the...cycle, some organizations can maintain the fleet of legacy light utility HMMWVS, others should be equipped with the newer, armor-capable, ECV chassis

  2. Holistic Contract Administration in Army Forces Abroad

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-01

    picture of contractor performance to the procuring contracting office. Lesson Learned . To meet Army requirements, creating a con- tract administration...expenditure of millions of additional dollars to pay for unnegotiated extensions and bridge contracts. Lesson Learned . The CCAS team’s efforts toward...based on recent lessons learned . Once the requirement en- tered into the contract administration phase, the post-award team did not have to revamp

  3. Army Groundwater Modeling Use and Needs Workshop

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-06-01

    Technical Report IRRP-93-1 June 1993 US Army Corps AD-A273 710 of Engineers II[ II Waterways Experiment Station Installation Restoration Research ...was conducted as a part of the Installation Restoration Research Program under HQUSACE-sponorcd RDTE Work Unit Ground- water Mtvcl Assessment AF25-GW... Research and Development Laboratory "Is there any need to continue developing a method of estimating physical, chemical properties for organic

  4. Selecting the Optimum Army Stock Fund Structure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-08-01

    to manage more effectively the DoD and its defense resources.ŕ As a part of the DMR , finance and accounting functions of the Services have been...budget reductions, consolidation of accounting and supply functions across the Services , Army strategic logistics programs, and other initiatives of the...either vertical or horizontal in their structure. In a vertical structure, all Service -managed materiel for both wholesale and retail requirements is

  5. Engineer: The Professional Bulletin of Army Engineers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-01

    disbanded. The new school established by MNC–I C-7, known as the Iraqi Mapping and Survey School ( IMSS ), provided training to enhance Iraqi Army...Company, 20th Engineer Brigade, XVIII Airborne Corps, implemented plans to develop the IMSS . Desktop computers, laptops, and global positioning...were assigned to the school as instructors/advisors. Mission and Training MNC–I C-7 designed the IMSS , located in an Iraqi intelligence compound, to

  6. Geospatial Intelligence School Enhances Iraqi Army Effectiveness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-01

    Iraqi Army was disbanded. The new school established by MNC–I C-7, known as the Iraqi Mapping and Survey School ( IMSS ), provided training to...Topographic Engineer Company, 20th Engineer Brigade, XVIII Airborne Corps, implemented plans to develop the IMSS . Desktop computers, laptops, and global...Engineer Company were assigned to the school as instructors/advisors. Mission and Training MNC–I C-7 designed the IMSS , located in an Iraqi

  7. Army Support during the Hurricane Katrina Disaster

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    General Honoré, the purpose of doctrine is to “ teach you to do the right thing.”6 Even using that general guidance, the doctrine presented in FM 100...the phonetic alphabet (Alpha, Baker, Charlie, etc.) This system proved awkward so the Government adopted a system that used female names in 1953...asked to assess the adequacy of the Army’s doctrine at the time of the crisis, Lieutenant General Russel Honoré explained that Army doctrine teaches

  8. Water Sustainability Assessment for Ten Army Installations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-26

    Limiting water conservation to the requirements of EO 13514 encou- rages installations to reach for the low hanging fruit . Technologies that have...ER D C/ CE RL T R- 11 -5 Water Sustainability Assessment for Ten Army Installations Co ns tr uc tio n En gi ne er in g R es...March 2011 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. ERDC/CERL TR-11-5 March 2011 Water Sustainability Assessment

  9. Force Planning Considerations for Army XXI

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Affecting Future Force Structures. No Tabula Rasa . Revolutionary change may be possible by 2010, but anticipated conditions argue against a radical...programs, and budgets do not allow planners to begin anew with some sort of force structure tabula rasa . Steven Komarow, "Shalikashvili Outlines Plans...author discusses Army XXI in a broad strategic context, examining anticipated security environments and the roles the U.S. Armed Forces, and in

  10. Corrugated QWIP for Tactical Army Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    1 CORRUGATED QWIP FOR TACTICAL ARMY APPLICATIONS David. P. Forrai, Darrel W. Endres L-3 Communications Cincinnati Electronics Mason, OH 45040...Directorate (NVESD) have been developing the corrugated quantum well infrared photodetector (C- QWIP ) technology for applications in tactical LWIR...imaging. The C- QWIP was invented at ARL and shows promise to overcome some of the limitations in commercially available QWIPs . The C- QWIP uses micro

  11. Low Impact Development in Army Construction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-01

    footprint that exceeds 5,000 square feet shall use site planning, design , construction, and maintenance strategies for the property to maintain or...densities). Employ design and construction strategies that reduce storm water runoff and polluted site water runoff. US ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS...impacts after they have occurred. More specifically, nonstructural BMPs take broader planning and design approaches, which are less “structural” in

  12. Army nurses in wartime: distinction and pride.

    PubMed

    Higgins, L P

    1996-08-01

    Nurses have served with distinction in wartime since Florence Nightingale went to the Crimea. Women often accompanied their husbands to battle during the Revolutionary and Civil Wars, caring for the sick and wounded. Although not officially given officer status until 1920, Army nurses served in the Spanish-American War and World War I. As officers, thousands of nurses served in subsequent wars, distinguishing themselves by their heroism, devotion to duty, and sheer tenacity of spirit.

  13. Manning Army Equal Opportunity Officer Positions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    Coast Guard’s military and civilian personnel, who are assigned to EO, Equal Employment Opportunity ( EEO supports civilian personnel), and human...enough, Air Force and Coast Guard personnel support both the EO military policies and the federal EEO requirements for civilians. All other services...separate EO (military) and EEO (civilian) programs. The Army is the only service that provides EO support at all levels of command. However, one of

  14. Transformation and the Army School System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    Journal of Artificial Intelligence in Education, Vol. 8, 1997, pp. 30–43. Kraiger, Kurt , Kevin J . Ford, and Eduardo Salas, “Application of Cognitive...Command, “Army Digital Training Strategy,” Collective Training Directorate, August 28, 2003. Van der Linden , W. J ., and C.A.W. Glas (eds...Masi, Susan G. Straus, Kristin J . Leuschner, Steven Hartman, Sue Stockly Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting

  15. Army Communicator. Volume 35, Number 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    thinking, or endorsement by an agency of the U.S. Army. This publication contains no advertising.U.S. Government Printing Office: 1984-746-045/1429...I am visiting our Soldiers at Fort Bragg. When this edition goes to print I will be standing in the same soil as our deployed Signaleers...in photography to the Signal Corps curriculum at Fort Riley, Kan. In 1896, the Government Printing Office published the Signal Corps’ initial

  16. Army Aviation Operations in the Pacific Theater

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-04

    options and force packages for Army aviation operating from Navy vessels and platforms. It assesses the operational utility of such employment and...operating from Navy vessels and platforms. It assesses the operational utility of such employment and considers a number of implications and impacts...operating from naval vessels . The intent is not to replace US Marine Corps (USMC) and US Navy (USN) capabilities, but to augment, to increase capacity

  17. Management by Objectives -- An Army Perspective.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-04-07

    Harvard Business Review , (March-April 1973), p. 73. 18. McConkey, op. cit., p. 19. 19. Peter F. Drucker, Management: Tasks...Performance Management," Harvard Business Review , (July-August 1976), p. 59. 21. Department of the Army Pamphlet 360-817, "Management by Objectives - A Joint...Objectives: Making it Work," Supervisory Management, January 1972, p. 28. 30. Harry Levinson, "Management by Whose Objectives?" Harvard Business Review ,

  18. Air Power for Patton’s Army

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    and Daniel Mortensen for their unflagging support and enthusiasm for the project. Dennis read the entire manuscript and, as always, offered...understanding of the Army’s special long-term interest in it. David Maclsaac willingly tracked down Gen. James Ferguson’s television interview and provided... read and contributed most helpful sug- gestions are: Perry D. Jamieson, Eduard Mark, David R. Mets, Daniel R. Mortensen, John Schlight, Richard K

  19. Novel ECCM Techniques for Army Tactical Communications.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-06-29

    spectral density 89 AA993 83 TELECOMU4ICATIONS ASSOCIATES FAIRFAX VA F/ 17/4 NOVEL ECCN TECHIU9ES FOR ARMY TACTICAL COMMUNICATIONSd(U) JUN 79 R L...pi-g Geterator ?ijuz. A.8 -?cwer Scectra2. :ems±t 7; N 4, Af~ 7 AA093 W3 TELECOMUNICATIONS ASSOCIATES FAIRFAX VA F/6 17/4 NOVEL ECCN TECHNIQUE F R

  20. The Army Construction Agency Case Study.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    34dumb" things. o Develop adequate "baselines" for valid "before and after" cmparisons. o Army must not relinquish control of experiment to OSD. The CSD...delays and restric- tions imposed by their AFRCE’s than with the Corps. o Model program participants initially experience a flood of sug- gestion ...each 32 " ° with its own supervisor. Coordination of these efforts is achieved by managers in the military branch who have no control over scheduling

  1. Yellowstone hotspot-continental lithosphere interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jean, Marlon M.; Hanan, Barry B.; Shervais, John W.

    2014-03-01

    The Snake River Plain represents 17 m.y. of volcanic activity that took place as the North American continent migrated over a relatively fixed magma source, or hotspot. We present new Pb, Sr, and Nd data for a suite of 25 basalts collected from Western and Central Snake River Plain (SRP). The new isotope data, combined with previously published data from the SRP, provide a traverse of the Wyoming craton margin, from the 87Sr/86Sr = 0.706 line boundary of western SRP with Phanerozoic accreted terranes, east through the central and eastern SRP, to the Yellowstone Plateau. Low-K basalts from the western SRP, overlain by high-K basalts, provide a temporal record of regional source variation from ∼16.8 to 0.2 Ma. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) of the new and previously published SRP basalt Pb isotopes reveals that >97% of the total variability is accounted for by mixing between three end-members and is consistent with a sublithospheric Yellowstone hotspot mantle source with a radiogenic isotope composition similar to the mantle source of the early Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG) and two continental lithosphere end-members, heterogeneous in age and composition. We use the SRP Pb, Sr, and Nd isotope data to model the Yellowstone Hotspot-continental lithosphere interaction by three component mixing between two continental lithospheric components, Archean lithosphere (CL1) that represents older lithosphere underlying the Yellowstone Plateau in the east, and Paleoproterozoic lithosphere (CL2) representing the younger lithosphere underlying the SRP in the west near the craton margin, and a sublithospheric end-member, representing the Yellowstone hotspot (PL). The results suggest a continuous flow of PL material westward as the NA continental lithosphere migrated over the upwelling hotspot along a shoaling gradient in the sub-continental mantle lithosphere. The model shows a decrease in Total Lithosphere end-members (CL1 + CL2) and the Lithosphere Ratio (CL1/CL2

  2. Perspectives on Suicide in the Army National Guard

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-22

    Perspectives on Suicide in the Army National Guard Published by: http://www.sagepublications.com On behalf of: Inter-University Seminar on Armed Forces...22 FEB 2013 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2013 to 00-00-2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Perspectives on Suicide in the Army National Guard...18 Perspectives on Suicide in the Army National Guard James Griffith1 and Mark Vaitkus2 Abstract Suicides in the US military were observed rising in

  3. Evaluation of Army’s Mobile Subscriber Program.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    AD-8158 379 EVALUATION 6F ARMY’S MOBILE SUBSCRIBER PROGRM(U) i/i GENERAL ACCOUNTING OFFICE WASHINGTON DC NATIONAL SECURITY AND INTERNATIONAL...Army’s Mobile Subscriber Equipment Program The Army has embarked on a multibillion dollar ac- quisition of mobile subscriber equipment to improve... mobile subscriber equipment (MSE) for tactical communications. Our August 1984 letter to you high- lighted the MSE acquisition plan and discussed

  4. Transactions of the Conference of Army Mathematicians (25th).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-01-01

    Army position, un- less so designated by other authorized documents. Sponsored by The Army Mthematics Stowing Committee on behalf of THE CHIEF OF...so designated by other authorized docui:ients. U. S. Army Research Office P. 0. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, North Carolina ot. K FOREWORD The...computer codes. The table presents the date of first publication of the users manuals, the authors name, and a short dis- crWipton of the code. The

  5. Smart Cards: An Enabler for Army Personnel Transformation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-04-10

    card is an integral part of this. Technological advancements such as the smart card will significantly enhance the Army’s objective force to provide...a more lethal, survivable, sustainable, deployable, and mobile force. Employing smart card technology is one aspect of keeping pace with the demand for accurate and timely military personnel information....components of the Army and the Services. Emerging 21st Century technologies are aiding the Army’s transformation to the objective force and the smart

  6. Food Program: Army Troop Issue Subsistence Activity Operating Policies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-04

    e r requirements. Semi-perishable subsistence Foods which do not spoil or deteriorate rap- idly (such as canned, dried, dehydrated , and o t h e r i t...Army Regulation 30–18 Food Program Army Troop Issue Subsistence Activity Operating Policies Headquarters Department of the Army Washington, DC 4...Self Service Accessory Food and Condiment Centers. o The use of DA Form 1687 (Notice of Delegation of Authority-Receipt for Supplies) for ordering and

  7. Army Enlisted Personnel Competency Assessment Program: Phase 2 Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    Army Leadership on many important levels . The Army Test Program Advisory Team (ATPAT) The functions and contributions of the ATPAT, as a group, are...SGM (R) James Herrell CSM Robie Roberson SGM Enrique Hoyos CSM Otis Smith Jr CSM Nick Piacentini MSG Matt Northen iv ARMY ENLISTED PERSONNEL... levels must possess the interpersonal, technical, and organizational knowledge, skills, and other attributes (KSAs) to perform effectively in complex

  8. Army Ground Vehicles and Current/Future Emission Standards

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-23

    EPA Heavy-Duty Diesel Emission Standards • Emission Control Technology Discussion • Fuels and Lubricants Discussion • Current Army Ground Vehicle Engine ...bhp) compliant COTS engines and directly integrate into current and new heavy-duty vehicles. peter.schihl@us.army.mil Dist A. Approved for public...approximately three years depending on engine rated power peter.schihl@us.army.mil Dist A. Approved for public release Potential Impacts to DoD

  9. Force Structure: Army’s Analyses of Aviation Alternatives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-27

    Army’s Analyses of Aviation Alternatives In anticipation of budget and military end-strength reductions, the Army is undertaking an extensive effort...to reduce the size of its force and rebalance its combat aviation capabilities. In October 2013, the Army Chief of Staff approved a force-structure...proposal—called the Army Aviation Restructuring Initiative—that would cut approximately 10,700 military positions from the Army’s end strength by

  10. Command and Control: US Army Staffs and the Operations Process

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-05-26

    Force during WWI. During the interwar period, the US Anny captured these lessons in doctrine that the First Army used to overcome the challenges and...willingness to be adaptable and flexible by creating and modifying organizational structures to overcome challenges. Finally, this study highlights...During the interwar period, the US Army captured these lessons in doctrine that the First Army used to overcome the challenges and friction it

  11. Historic Properties Report: Newport Army Ammunition Plant, Newport Indiana

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-08-01

    Holston Army Ammunition Plant (HSAAP) in Kingsport , Tennessee , the only other RDX-manufactur. ng plant in the United States. Information on...January 1984 of all Anrm-owned properties located within the official boundaries of the Newport Army Ammunition Plant (Newport. AAP). The survey...described in the following section of this report. METHODOLOGY 1. Documentary Research The Nercort Army Ammunition Plant (Newport AAP) was constructed

  12. Army Professionalism 1877-1898: Myth or Reality

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-06-01

    country was the European experience. The effect of the changes in American society had a dramatic impact on the Army, directly and indirectly. Lastly... European armies, wars, and schools for lessons applicable to the American situation. Clausewitz was translated into English in 1873 and German was added...8217 Eventually though the European influence helped shape the views of leading American officers and through them American institutions. The Army was a microcosm

  13. Potential Environmental Impacts of Army Laser Operations: An Overview

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-01

    Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21010. AUTHORITY CRDEC ltr, 29 Mar 1990 THIS PAGE IS UNCLASSIFIED AD CHEMICAL S SYSTEMS LA1BORATORY US Army Armament Research ...and Development Command Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland 21010 Lii TECHNICAL REPORT ARCSL-TR-83066 POTENTIAL ENVIRONMENTAL MIACTS OF ARMY LASER...PERIOD COVERED Technical Report POTENTIAL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS OF ARMY LASER 25 March 1982 - 30 June 1983 OPERATIONS. AN OVERVIEW *. PERFORMING ORG

  14. Injuries Among Army Light-Wheel Vehicle Mechanics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-02-01

    trademarked name( s ) does not imply endorsement by the U.S. Army but is intended only to assist in identification of a specific product. INJURIES AMONG...female Army trainees. Am J Sports Med 1993; 21: 705-710 10. Bell NS, Mangione TW, Hemenway D, et al. High injury rates among female Army trainees...A - 2 18. Knapik JJ, Canada S , Toney E, et al. Injury risk factors among Ordnance School

  15. A Critical Analysis of Attribute Development Programs for Army Leaders

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-10

    programs and force structure to accomplish Army missions and functions. It is five-step 6 process used to identify requirements, build organizational ...improvement or best practices. Finally, recommend solutions for leader development organizational redesign to the Army G3/5/7 are provided. 15. SUBJECT...for improvement or best practices. Finally, recommend solutions for leader development organizational redesign to the Army G3/5/7 are provided. v

  16. Army Hearing Program Talking Points Calendar Year 2016

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-09-12

    Reserve ARMY HEARING PROGRAM TALKING POINTS CALENDAR YEAR 2016 TIP No. 51-065-0817 2 BACKGROUND Hearing health in the Army has improved...over time, largely due to the dedicated work of hearing health experts. However, noise-induced hearing loss and associated problems have not been...eliminated. The Army Hearing Program continually evolves to address hearing health challenges, and maintains the momentum to build iteratively upon

  17. Know Before You Go: Improving Army Officer Sociocultural Knowledge

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-04

    by Lieutenant Colonel James C. Laughrey United States Army Dr. Richard Meinhart Project Adviser This SRP is...St ra te gy R es ea rc h Pr oj ec t KNOW BEFORE YOU GO: IMPROVING ARMY OFFICER SOCIOCULTURAL KNOWLEDGE BY LIEUTENANT COLONEL JAMES C...LAUGHREY United States Army DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A: Approved for Public Release. Distribution is Unlimited. USAWC CLASS OF 2008 This SRP is

  18. Army Reserve Culture: A Critical Part of Transformation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-08

    United States Army Reserve Richard Meinhart Project Adviser This SRP is submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements of...St ra te gy R es ea rc h Pr oj ec t ARMY RESERVE CULTURE: A CRITICAL PART OF TRANSFORMATION BY COLONEL LORA L. TUCKER United States... Army Reserve DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A: Approved for Public Release. Distribution is Unlimited. USAWC CLASS OF 2008 This SRP is submitted in partial

  19. Strategic Planning for the United States Army Personnel Function

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-01

    NUMBER OF PAGES WHICH DO NOT REPRODUCE LEGIBLYo R-4074-A Strategic Planning for the United States Army Personnel Function William M. Hlx, Ronald E...Personnel asked RAND to develop a process within which it might conduct strategic planning . This report fulfills that request by proposing that the Army...proposes a strategic planning process for use by Army personnel planners. The overall purpose of the project is to review and evaluate the

  20. Increasing Army National Guard Responsibility, Is the Nation at Risk?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-05-01

    units of men from communities to fight in a generally unpopular war. 6 Historically this nation has depended -n a standing army force ’jacked up by a...then one needs the military capability to back it up . If the political aggressive side has a fundamental change of political objectives will they need...peace as a nation. This country was founded by people who were fleeing countries that had large standing armies. Those armies were paid for by the