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Sample records for continuing medical education

  1. Continuing Education for Medical Practitioners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kendall, Patricia L.

    A survey was made of medical schools' provision for continuing education for physicians. While few such courses are provided in most communities studied, in one there is a department of postgraduate education with a full-time director, courses of high scientific content, lectures given in rural areas, and careful records of participants. These…

  2. Continuing medical education and pharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed

    Vakani, Farhan Saeed; Jafri, Wasim; Amin, Almas; Sheerani, Mughis

    2011-06-01

    Continuing medical education providers' (academia) and industrial relationship is drawing attention all over the world. To date, there are no national commercial support guidelines available in Pakistan to properly regulate cooperation between the two distinct entities. However, the fact is that the future of all continuing medical education depends on pharmaceutical support and the providers are heavily dependent on the pharmaceutical industry to remain in action. It should always be remembered that medical education and profession is regarded as a moral of enterprise based on a blind faith between the physician and the patient. The funding support by the industry should not bind or influence physician's prescription for any reason. To be trusted, medicine must be free of all such dependency; it should be accountable only to the society it serves and to its own professional standards.

  3. [Network-based continuing medical education].

    PubMed

    Romanov, Kalle

    2011-01-01

    Network-based training can provide continuing medical education with methods, whose implementation by means of traditional training is difficult or practically impossible. By virtue of its chronological and geographical flexibility, educational application of the network may provide extra advantage for the trainee and the trainer. Implementation of network-based training is, however, demanding and laborious both technically and pedagogically, whereby organizations should strive for collaboration in organizing the training. In addition, the status of network-based continuing education in relation to the physician's working time should be clearly defined.

  4. THE NEED FOR CONTINUING MEDICAL EDUCATION.

    PubMed

    STEEVES, L C

    1965-04-03

    Continuing medical education is an essential feature of the practice of modern medicine since it furnishes the means to maintain the doctor's ability to provide quality patient care.TO ENSURE THAT CONTINUING MEDICAL EDUCATION IS PROVIDED EFFICIENTLY AND IN THE BEST QUALITY, AND UTILIZED FULLY, IT IS NECESSARY THAT: (1) the medical faculty inculcate in the student the concept of lifelong learning; (2) the practitioner adopt less time-consuming patterns of practice, to free more of his time for learning; (3) community hospital-based clinical teaching be provided universally; and (4) research be conducted to determine the best of current teaching methods and develop better ones. Conflicting efforts to meet these needs by practitioners (whose primary responsibility it is) and by organized medicine, specialty societies, voluntary health agencies and others have led to inefficient use of medical faculty teachers. The key parties in continuing medical education-practitioner and teacher-can learn best in medical school-administered programs, which need be supported by all other interested organizations.

  5. Online Continuing Medical Education in Saudi Arabia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alwadie, Adnan D.

    2013-01-01

    As the largest country in the Middle East, Saudi Arabia and its health care system are well positioned to embark on an online learning intervention so that health care providers in all areas of the country have the resources for updating their professional knowledge and skills. After a brief introduction, online continuing medical education is…

  6. Online Continuing Medical Education in Saudi Arabia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alwadie, Adnan D.

    2013-01-01

    As the largest country in the Middle East, Saudi Arabia and its health care system are well positioned to embark on an online learning intervention so that health care providers in all areas of the country have the resources for updating their professional knowledge and skills. After a brief introduction, online continuing medical education is…

  7. The Need for Continuing Medical Education

    PubMed Central

    Steeves, Lea C.

    1965-01-01

    Continuing medical education is an essential feature of the practice of modern medicine since it furnishes the means to maintain the doctor's ability to provide quality patient care. To ensure that continuing medical education is provided efficiently and in the best quality, and utilized fully, it is necessary that: (1) the medical faculty inculcate in the student the concept of lifelong learning; (2) the practitioner adopt less time-consuming patterns of practice, to free more of his time for learning; (3) community hospital-based clinical teaching be provided universally; and (4) research be conducted to determine the best of current teaching methods and develop better ones. Conflicting efforts to meet these needs by practitioners (whose primary responsibility it is) and by organized medicine, specialty societies, voluntary health agencies and others have led to inefficient use of medical faculty teachers. The key parties in continuing medical education—practitioner and teacher—can learn best in medical school-administered programs, which need be supported by all other interested organizations. PMID:14278031

  8. Continuing medical education and the anesthesiologist.

    PubMed

    Tetzlaff, J E; Schoenwald, P; Jackman, D; Smith, J

    1999-03-01

    There are a large variety of scheduled activities and courses available to meet the continuing medical education (CME) needs of anesthesiologists. The presentation of CME material varies in format and delivery style. The reasons for attending CME activities include licensure requirements, participation in state and national societies, keeping current with technology, review of old subject material, participation as a lecturer, and other personal reasons. Funding occurs via personal funds, employer support, commercial support, or by research grants. External bodies, such as the American Council of Continuing Medical Education and the American Medical Association, have imposed guidelines in these areas. Methods to evaluate CME activities include retrospective needs analysis based on exit interviews, prospective needs assessment, focus groups, and complex systems such as the CRISIS criteria. Self-directed CME can be evaluated by data collection that identifies how quickly information is received and by the effect of this data on measurable outcome. In the future, CME will increasingly utilize simulators and multimedia computers. Multimedia can bring CME to the physician as opposed to the physician traveling to a CME site. Virtual reality and artificial intelligence are on the horizon and may interface well with the field of anesthesiology due to the technical nature of the discipline and the increasing use of computers and electronic data collection already occurring in clinical practice.

  9. [Internet-based continuing medical education: as effective as live continuing medical education].

    PubMed

    Maisonneuve, Hervé; Chabot, Olivier

    2009-10-01

    E-learning consists in using new multimedia and Internet technologies to improve the quality of learning activities by facilitating access to resources and services, as well as exchanges and remote collaboration. The Internet is used for adult education in most professional domains, but its use for continuing medical education is less developed. Advantages are observed for teachers (e.g., permanent updating, interactive links, illustrations, archiving, and collective intelligence) and for the learners (e.g., accessibility, autonomy, flexibility, and adaptable pace). Research and meta-analyses have shown that e-CME is as effective as live events for immediate and retained learning. English-language educational medical websites that grant CME credits are numerous; few such French-language sites can currently grant credits. Accreditation of websites for CME, in its infancy in Europe, is common in North America.

  10. Medical Asepsis, Research, and Continuing Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trussell, Patricia M.; Crow, Sue

    1977-01-01

    Emphasizes the need that continuing education programs for nurses in hospitals orient newly employed graduate nurses specifically to infection control measures as carried out in that institution and then to reinforce these learnings by regular planned programs. Points out ways that those responsible for inservice nursing education can facilitate…

  11. Medical Asepsis, Research, and Continuing Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trussell, Patricia M.; Crow, Sue

    1977-01-01

    Emphasizes the need that continuing education programs for nurses in hospitals orient newly employed graduate nurses specifically to infection control measures as carried out in that institution and then to reinforce these learnings by regular planned programs. Points out ways that those responsible for inservice nursing education can facilitate…

  12. Judicious Use of Simulation Technology in Continuing Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, Michael T.; DiazGranados, Deborah; Feldman, Moshe

    2012-01-01

    Use of simulation-based training is fast becoming a vital source of experiential learning in medical education. Although simulation is a common tool for undergraduate and graduate medical education curricula, the utilization of simulation in continuing medical education (CME) is still an area of growth. As more CME programs turn to simulation to…

  13. Judicious Use of Simulation Technology in Continuing Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, Michael T.; DiazGranados, Deborah; Feldman, Moshe

    2012-01-01

    Use of simulation-based training is fast becoming a vital source of experiential learning in medical education. Although simulation is a common tool for undergraduate and graduate medical education curricula, the utilization of simulation in continuing medical education (CME) is still an area of growth. As more CME programs turn to simulation to…

  14. Twelve tips for effective online discussions in continuing medical education.

    PubMed

    Sandars, John

    2006-11-01

    Online discussions for continuing medical education are increasing but many are ineffective. Close attention needs to be paid to the requirements of the learner and the wider healthcare organizational context within which continuing medical education takes place. There is a preference for structured and facilitated online discussions by this group of doctors. The essential skills for effective online facilitation are outlined.

  15. A Taxonomy of Continuing Medical Education Endeavour

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Donald H.

    1967-01-01

    Five basic forms of continuing educational endeavour by physicians are listed in rank order. These components constitute an indivisible unit bound together by self-learning. The scholarly habit of planned daily reading and study in a home library-sanctuary as an integral part of a physician's workday heads the list. Day-to-day informal and formal colleague-association in patient care in the community and teaching hospital, in group practice and by consultation is the present major form of continuing educational endeavour. Emphasized is the sabbatical return every three to five years for three months at least to the teaching hospital to reinforce scholarly motivation and attitudes and to acquire new skills and knowledge. Attendance at scientific sessions of learned professional societies and short courses should be accompanied by presession and post-session guided reading to be undertaken in the physician's home library-sanctuary. PMID:6020552

  16. Determining continuing education interests of medical technologists: an initial step.

    PubMed

    Fritsma, G; Matthews, L; Schoeff, L; Young, W

    1979-03-01

    Continuing education is an ever-increasing need for medical technologists who want to maintain and upgrade their professional knowledge and skills. Professional groups strive to develop programs to meet a diversity of needs. Planning groups often encounter difficulty during the program development process as they identify topics and select effective educational strategies for presentation. In order to help identify topics of interest and desirable educational methods for the continuing education of laboratory personnel, a continuing medical technology education interest assessment tool was developed and used by a medical technology continuing education committee. Development and use of this assessment tool and resulting statistical survey results formed the basis for two continuing education courses, both considered highly successful.

  17. A New Vision for Distance Learning and Continuing Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harden, Ronald M.

    2005-01-01

    Increasing demands on continuing medical education (CME) are taking place at a time of significant developments in educational thinking and new learning technologies. Such developments allow today's CME providers to better meet the CRISIS criteria for effective continuing education: convenience, relevance, individualization, self-assessment,…

  18. Medical Care Evaluation: An Experience in Continuing Medical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandlow, L. J.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    The educational contribution of medical care evaluation (MCE) has been portrayed as the identification of physicians' educational needs. A study of 13 MCE committees was undertaken to document the learning that occurs in these committees and to discover the conditions affecting their educational value. (Author/MLW)

  19. Continuing medical education: ethical collaboration between sponsor and industry.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Frederic S

    2003-07-01

    The quandary is, "How can the very different fiduciary responsibilities of physicians and pharmaceutical companies ethically coexist in a society where its healthcare system is under increasing financial scrutiny?" It is paradoxical that the number of states requiring continuing medical education for medical licensure has increased to 39, in the face of reduced federal funding and the squeeze of managed care. Despite industry's providing more than half of the funding required to sustain the increasing need for continuing medical education, some physicians claim it is inappropriate for continuing medical education sponsors to collaborate with pharmaceutical companies because of their vested interest in selling prescription medications. Is the integrity of the physician-patient relationship at risk? I will show that there are ethical standards in place, for professionals and industry, that are effectively maintaining the continuing medical education system in balance. Eliminating the current opportunities for collaboration between sponsors and commercial supporters would severely compromise the continuing medical education enterprise in the United States, ultimately, a disservice to patients, who expect their physicians to continue their medical education lifelong.

  20. Commercial Sites Outbid Medical Schools for Instructors in Continuing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mangan, Katherine S.

    2000-01-01

    Reports that prominent medical professors are being solicited away from medical schools by large honoraria or high remuneration offered by commercial companies that provide continuing education services to physicians on the Internet. Suggests that medical schools consider potential partnerships with dot-com companies to develop continuing…

  1. Continuing Veterinary Medical Education: Responsibilities, Support and Rewards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gage, E. Dean; And Others

    1978-01-01

    The Advanced Studies Committee of the Association of American Veterinary Medical Colleges addresses these questions: What are the responsibilities of the school of veterinary science department in continuing education? How should continuing education be funded? What are the appropriate mechanisms for recognizing or rewarding faculty participation…

  2. Effect of Continuing Medical Education on Practice Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talley, Robert C.

    1978-01-01

    Data are reported suggesting that a change in practice patterns did occur subsequent to a continuing medical education program. Twenty-eight physicians took a course in pulmonary artery pressure monitoring and followup surveys indicate its objectives were met. (LBH)

  3. Effect of Continuing Medical Education on Practice Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talley, Robert C.

    1978-01-01

    Data are reported suggesting that a change in practice patterns did occur subsequent to a continuing medical education program. Twenty-eight physicians took a course in pulmonary artery pressure monitoring and followup surveys indicate its objectives were met. (LBH)

  4. The Future of Computers in Continuing Medical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Storey, Patrick B.

    1983-01-01

    This article provides an attempt to project the way in which a computer-based approach to continuing medical education might emerge based on the present perception of what patient care, teaching, and learning are like. (SSH)

  5. Evaluation of Continuing Medical Education for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Diseases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li Wang, Virginia; And Others

    1979-01-01

    A continuing medical education program is discussed that addresses chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and that links primary care physicians to a source of needed clinical knowledge at a relatively low cost. The educational methods, evaluation design, diagnosis of educational needs, selection of program content and behavioral outcomes are…

  6. Current guidelines regarding industry-sponsored continuing medical education.

    PubMed

    DelSignore, Jeanne L

    2003-07-01

    The importance of continuing medical education has been long recognized by the orthopaedic profession as vital in maintaining a current knowledge and skills base. There has been increasing concern over the expanding involvement of industry in sponsoring continuing medical education. Concomitant with rising costs of medical education is a decreasing source of funds from government and other sources; therefore industry has taken an active role in sponsoring continuing medical education, leading to a potential for serious conflict of interest. National and federal guidelines have been created to allow commercial sponsorship, yet leave the responsibility for the design, faculty, and content to the accredited provider. The guidelines are intended to prevent bias, keep commercial displays separate from educational presentations, and clearly state that industry-sponsored events should be primarily educational in nature and directly benefit the patient. Because of the potential conflict inherent within industry-sponsored continuing medical education, a cooperative relationship between educators, industry, and attendees of educational activities must be achieved to prevent bias and to keep the patient's best interest as paramount. Each orthopaedic surgeon has an ethical obligation to resolve any conflicts of interest in the best interest of the patient.

  7. Do Continuing Medical Education Articles Foster Shared Decision Making?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Labrecque, Michel; Lafortune, Valerie; Lajeunesse, Judith; Lambert-Perrault, Anne-Marie; Manrique, Hermes; Blais, Johanne; Legare, France

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Defined as reviews of clinical aspects of a specific health problem published in peer-reviewed and non-peer-reviewed medical journals, offered without charge, continuing medical education (CME) articles form a key strategy for translating knowledge into practice. This study assessed CME articles for mention of evidence-based…

  8. The contribution of hospital library services to continuing medical education.

    PubMed

    Gluck, Jeannine Cyr

    2004-01-01

    Much of the literature relating to continuing medical education programs laments the lack of effectiveness of traditional lecture-based format, the most often used method of presentation in hospitals. A gap exists between the content taught in lectures and the application of that knowledge in actual patient care. The services of the medical librarian, already employed in most hospitals, can help ameliorate this problem. Further, libraries help to support quality improvement efforts. These three functions (library services, continuing medical education, and quality improvement) are interdependent. Each lends strength to the other, and, ideally, all are coordinated within the hospital structure.

  9. [The Journals role in continuing medical education].

    PubMed

    Ramiro-H, Manuel; Cruz-A, J Enrique

    2017-01-01

    In the 19th century, the first journals in medicine appeared in order to disseminate knowledge among creators and discoverers, but especially among users of knowledge, some of these journals continue to be published nowadays. Subsequently, an organization that initially aspired to collect, sort, archive and distribute the publications: the Index Medicus. Over time, it was imperative to create indexes that measure the performance of journals and with that of researchers.

  10. Cardiopulmonary Disease in Newborns: A Study in Continuing Medical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinberg, Armin D.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    A film describing tachypea as an early manifestation of congenital heart disease was shown to physicians and nurses at 27 hospitals during regular continuing medical education activities. Findings from pre-test and post-test data show that need-oriented educational programs can measurably improve the quality of patient care. (Author/LBH)

  11. Cardiopulmonary Disease in Newborns: A Study in Continuing Medical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinberg, Armin D.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    A film describing tachypea as an early manifestation of congenital heart disease was shown to physicians and nurses at 27 hospitals during regular continuing medical education activities. Findings from pre-test and post-test data show that need-oriented educational programs can measurably improve the quality of patient care. (Author/LBH)

  12. The challenges of "continuing medical education" in a pandemic era.

    PubMed

    Lim, Erle C H; Oh, Vernon M S; Koh, Dow-Rhoon; Seet, Raymond C S

    2009-08-01

    Closure of medical schools or the barring of "live patient" contact during an epidemic or pandemic is potentially disruptive to medical education. During the SARS epidemic, the use of web-based learning, role play, video vignettes and both live and mannequin-based simulated patients minimised disruptions to medical education. This article examines the pedagogical innovations that allow clinical teaching to continue without medical students examining actual patients, and proposes a contingency plan in the event of future outbreaks that may necessitate similar containment measures.

  13. Problem-based learning in continuing medical education

    PubMed Central

    Al-Azri, Hilal; Ratnapalan, Savithiri

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To investigate the effects of problem-based learning (PBL) in continuing medical education. Data sources PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and ERIC databases were searched for randomized controlled trials published in English from January 2001 to May 2011 using key words problem-based learning, practice-based, self-directed, learner-centered, and active learning, combined with continuing medical education, continuing professional development, post professional, postgraduate, and adult learning. Study selection Randomized controlled trials that described the effects of PBL on knowledge enhancement, performance improvement, participants’ satisfaction, or patients’ health outcomes were selected for analysis. Synthesis Fifteen studies were included in this review: 4 involved postgraduate trainee doctors, 10 involved practising physicians, and 1 had both groups. Online learning was used in 7 studies. Among postgraduate trainees PBL showed no significant differences in knowledge gain compared with lectures or non–case-based learning. In continuing education, PBL showed no significant difference in knowledge gain when compared with other methods. Several studies did not provide an educational intervention for the control group. Physician performance improvement showed an upward trend in groups participating in PBL, but no significant differences were noted in health outcomes. Conclusion Online PBL is a useful method of delivering continuing medical education. There is limited evidence that PBL in continuing education would enhance physicians’ performance or improve health outcomes. PMID:24522680

  14. General practitioners' continuing medical education within and outside their practice.

    PubMed Central

    Owen, P. A.; Allery, L. A.; Harding, K. G.; Hayes, T. M.

    1989-01-01

    To study continuing medical education 96 out of 101 general practitioners chosen at random from the list held by a family practitioner committee were interviewed. The results provided little evidence of regular attendance at local postgraduate centre meetings, though practice based educational meetings were common. Thirty one of the general practitioners worked in practices that held one or more practice based educational meetings each month at which the doctors provided the main educational content. Performance review was undertaken in the practices of 51 of the general practitioners, and 80 of the doctors recognised its value. The general practitioners considered that the most valuable educational activities occurred within the practice, the most valued being contact with partners. They asked for increased contact with hospital doctors. The development of general practitioners' continuing medical education should be based on the content of the individual general practitioner's day to day work and entail contact with his or her professional colleagues. PMID:2504381

  15. Continuing education for medical professionals: a reflective model.

    PubMed Central

    Brigley, S.; Young, Y.; Littlejohns, P.; McEwen, J.

    1997-01-01

    The Royal Colleges and their Faculties have moved continuing professional development up the agenda of doctors in the UK. The low educational value and failure to change professional practice of much continuing medical education has led to criticism of its emphasis on formal, didactic teaching and academic knowledge. The ubiquitous scientific or technical bias in medical education makes questionable assumptions about the nature of professional knowledge, how professionals learn, and the linkage of theory and practice in professional work. Given its narrow conception of professional knowledge, it is hardly surprising that the effectiveness of continuing medical education has proven difficult to evaluate. These points of criticism suggest that a more systematic and coherent approach to continuing education is required. The adoption of the concept of continuing professional development, which draws on learning by reflective practice, marks an important step in this direction. Continuing professional development emphasises self-directed learning, professional self-awareness, learning developed in context, multidisciplinary and multilevel collaboration, the learning needs of individuals and their organisations, and an inquiry-based concept of professionalism. It also involves a widening of accountability to patients, the community, managers and policymakers, and a form of evaluation which is internal, participatory and collaborative rather than external and scientific in character. PMID:9039405

  16. Revisiting "Discrepancy Analysis in Continuing Medical Education: A Conceptual Model"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Robert D.

    2011-01-01

    Based upon a review and analysis of selected literature, the author presents a conceptual model of discrepancy analysis evaluation for planning, implementing, and assessing the impact of continuing medical education (CME). The model is described in terms of its value as a means of diagnosing errors in the development and implementation of CME. The…

  17. Who Is Driving Continuing Medical Education for Family Medicine?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Douglas; Allan, G. Michael; Manca, Donna; Sargeant, Joan; Barnett, Carly

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Considerable time and money are invested in continuing medical education (CME) for family physicians (FPs) but the effectiveness is uncertain. The participation of FPs as coordinators and teachers is not well known. The goal of this project was to describe the role of FPs in organizing and teaching CME events that are accredited for…

  18. Physician Preferences for Accredited Online Continuing Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Kevin J.; Kim, Julie J.; Yeung, George; Sit, Christina; Tobe, Sheldon W.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: The need for up-to-date and high-quality continuing medical education (CME) is growing while the financial investment in CME is shrinking. Despite online technology's potential to efficiently deliver electronic CME (eCME) to large numbers of users, it has not yet displaced traditional CME. The purpose of this study was to explore…

  19. Research in Continuing Medical Education. An Historical Review (and) Response.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abrahamson, Stephen; Lloyd, John S.

    1984-01-01

    Includes an historical review of continuing medical education (CME) in the United States from 1909, when the Blackburn Plan began, to the post-World War II era, with the growth of instructional technology. Two earlier studies that reviewed evaluation research in CME are discussed. Lloyd's brief response disputes some of Abrahamson's points. (SK)

  20. Who Is Driving Continuing Medical Education for Family Medicine?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Douglas; Allan, G. Michael; Manca, Donna; Sargeant, Joan; Barnett, Carly

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Considerable time and money are invested in continuing medical education (CME) for family physicians (FPs) but the effectiveness is uncertain. The participation of FPs as coordinators and teachers is not well known. The goal of this project was to describe the role of FPs in organizing and teaching CME events that are accredited for…

  1. Continuing Medical Education: What Delivery Format Do Physicians Prefer?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stancic, Nancy; Mullen, Patricia Dolan; Prokhorov, Alexander V.; Frankowski, Ralph F.; McAlister, Alfred L.

    2003-01-01

    Background: Although physicians are in a unique position to prevent life-threatening outcomes by counseling patients to stop smoking, many of them miss the opportunity to intervene in their patients' use of tobacco. Nicotine Dependence Across the Lifespan was developed as a continuing medical education (CME) program to teach and encourage…

  2. Revisiting "Discrepancy Analysis in Continuing Medical Education: A Conceptual Model"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Robert D.

    2011-01-01

    Based upon a review and analysis of selected literature, the author presents a conceptual model of discrepancy analysis evaluation for planning, implementing, and assessing the impact of continuing medical education (CME). The model is described in terms of its value as a means of diagnosing errors in the development and implementation of CME. The…

  3. Physician Preferences for Accredited Online Continuing Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Kevin J.; Kim, Julie J.; Yeung, George; Sit, Christina; Tobe, Sheldon W.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: The need for up-to-date and high-quality continuing medical education (CME) is growing while the financial investment in CME is shrinking. Despite online technology's potential to efficiently deliver electronic CME (eCME) to large numbers of users, it has not yet displaced traditional CME. The purpose of this study was to explore…

  4. Continuing Medical Education: What Delivery Format Do Physicians Prefer?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stancic, Nancy; Mullen, Patricia Dolan; Prokhorov, Alexander V.; Frankowski, Ralph F.; McAlister, Alfred L.

    2003-01-01

    Background: Although physicians are in a unique position to prevent life-threatening outcomes by counseling patients to stop smoking, many of them miss the opportunity to intervene in their patients' use of tobacco. Nicotine Dependence Across the Lifespan was developed as a continuing medical education (CME) program to teach and encourage…

  5. Continuing medical education for general practitioners: a practice format

    PubMed Central

    VanNieuwenborg, Lena; Goossens, Martine; De Lepeleire, Jan; Schoenmakers, Birgitte

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Our current knowledge-based society and the many actualisations within the medical profession require a great responsibility of physicians to continuously develop and refine their skills. In this article, we reflect on some recent findings in the field of continuing education for professional doctors (continuing medical education, CME). Second, we describe the development of a CME from the Academic Center for General Practice (ACHG) of the KU Leuven. Methods First, we performed a literature study and we used unpublished data of a need assessment performed (2013) in a selected group of general practitioners. Second, we describe the development of a proposal to establish a CME programme for general practitioners. Results CME should go beyond the sheer acquisition of knowledge, and also seek changes in practice, attitudes and behaviours of physicians. The continuing education offerings are subject to the goals of the organising institution, but even more to the needs and desires of the end user. Conclusions Integrated education is crucial to meet the conditions for efficient and effective continuing education. The ACHG KU Leuven decided to offer a postgraduate programme consisting of a combination of teaching methods: online courses (self-study), contact courses (traditional method) and a materials database. PMID:26850504

  6. Continuing education for medical students: a library model.

    PubMed

    Swanberg, Stephanie M; Engwall, Keith; Mi, Misa

    2015-10-01

    The research assessed a three-year continuing medical education-style program for medical students in a Midwestern academic medical library. A mixed methods approach of a survey and two focus groups comparing attendees versus non-attendees assessed the program. Eleven students participated in the focus groups. Attendance was driven by topic interest and lunch. Barriers included lack of interest, scheduling, location, and convenience. Although attendance was a challenge, students valued opportunities to learn new skills. This study show cases a reproducible method to engage students outside the curriculum.

  7. Continuing Medical Education, Maintenance of Certification, and Physician Reentry

    PubMed Central

    Luchtefeld, Martin; Kerwel, Therese G.

    2012-01-01

    Continuing medical education serves a central role in the licensure and certification for practicing physicians. This chapter explores the different modalities that constitute CME along with their effectiveness, including simulation and best education practices. The evolution to maintenance of certification and the requirements for both the American Board of Surgery and the American Board of Colon and Rectal Surgery are delineated. Further progress in the education of practicing surgeons is evidenced through the introduction of laparoscopic colectomy and the improvements made from the introduction of laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Finally, reentry of physicians into practice following a voluntary leave of absence, a new and challenging issue for surgeons, is also discussed. PMID:23997673

  8. Commercial support and the quandary of continuing medical education.

    PubMed

    Schaffer, M H

    2000-01-01

    Commercial funding is a major source of financial support for the continued development and conduct of continuing education activities for physicians. However, we are again beginning to see challenges about who really controls these activities. Questions are being raised about the ethical behavior of physicians, sponsors, and grantors as they relate to compliance with the Standards for Commercial Support and other related documents. The Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education, grantors, providers, and physicians are challenged to help each other to comply with the intent, as well as the letter, of the documents. Without an immediate change, the cynicism of the public and the press may begin to drive outside forces to put into place and enforce policies that would be to the detriment of all interested parties.

  9. Judicious Use of Simulation Technology in Continuing Medical Education

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, Michael T.; DiazGranados, Deborah; Feldman, Moshe

    2013-01-01

    Use of simulation-based training is fast becoming a vital source of experiential learning in medical education. Although simulation is a common tool for undergraduate and graduate medical education curricula, the utilization of simulation in continuing medical education (CME) is still an area of growth. As more CME programs turn to simulation to address their training needs, it is important to highlight concepts of simulation technology that can help to optimize learning outcomes. This article discusses the role of fidelity in medical simulation. It provides support from a cross section of simulation training domains for determining the appropriate levels of fidelity, and it offers guidelines for creating an optimal balance of skill practice and realism for efficient training outcomes. After defining fidelity, 3 dimensions of fidelity, drawn from the human factors literature, are discussed in terms of their relevance to medical simulation. From this, research-based guidelines are provided to inform CME providers regarding the use of simulation in CME training. PMID:23280528

  10. [50 years' of continuing medical education in Sarajevo].

    PubMed

    Masić, I; Kulenović, H

    1996-01-01

    This year it has been 50 years since the Medical Faculty in Sarajevo was founded. Half a century in existence of a scientific and educational institution represents a period which is sufficient to make a serious retrospective, but also to make a serious analysis and projections for the future. Medical Faculty in Sarajevo was therefore been opened in 1944. There were students in the first generation, who completed the educational process from the first year program of studies. Due to circumstances of war this process at the Faculty was interrupted. On November 16, 1946. Medical Faculty in Sarajevo was reopened and since then it has been continuously working for 50 years, maintaining its educational, scientific and health activities. Former departments of the General Hospital in Sarajevo have grown into its clinical departments and during the period between 1947 until 1952, the majority of its institutes have been already constructed. The development of some of the clinics was however a little bit slower. Within the educational process we can separate four stages in the development of the Faculty; period from 1954 which has been characterized by a classical middle-european educational plan and program; from 1954-1956, the so-called "block system" of monocourse educational process; in the period 1956-1990, a five years study curriculum has been promoted with attempts to reform the educational process; from 1990 until today, the six-years study curriculum has been introduced, being in accordance with the plans and programs of European educational institutions. There were 14,000 students who have throughout this period been enrolled in Medical Faculty in Sarajevo, and 6575 have successfully completed their academic curriculum and obtained the title doctor of medicine. The Faculty has also preserved the continuity of its work under the circumstances of aggression and blockade of Sarajevo. Educational process was maintained without interruptions applying the methods

  11. Continuing medical education challenges in chronic fatigue syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) affects at least 4 million people in the United States, yet only 16% of people with CFS have received a diagnosis or medical care for their illness. Educating health care professionals about the diagnosis and management of CFS may help to reduce population morbidity associated with CFS. Methods This report presents findings over a 5-year period from May 2000 to June 2006 during which we developed and implemented a health care professional educational program. The objective of the program was to distribute CFS continuing education materials to providers at professional conferences, offer online continuing education credits in different formats (e.g., print, video, and online), and evaluate the number of accreditation certificates awarded. Results We found that smaller conference size (OR = 80.17; 95% CI 8.80, 730.25), CFS illness related target audiences (OR = 36.0; 95% CI 2.94, 436.34), and conferences in which CFS research was highlighted (OR = 4.15; 95% CI 1.16, 14.83) significantly contributed to higher dissemination levels, as measured by visit rates to the education booth. While print and online courses were equally requested for continuing education credit opportunities, the online course resulted in 84% of the overall award certificates, compared to 14% for the print course. This remained consistent across all provider occupations: physicians, nurses, physician assistants, and allied health professionals. Conclusion These findings suggest that educational programs promoting materials at conferences may increase dissemination efforts by targeting audiences, examining conference characteristics, and promoting online continuing education forums. PMID:19954535

  12. Physician Performance and Assessment and Their Effect on Continuing Medical Education and Continuing Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melnick, Donald E.

    2004-01-01

    This article has three key points. The first proposes and illustrates a model for planning effective continuing medical education (CME) and continuing professional development (CPD) and how assessment might fit into it. The second reviews major trends in assessment, particularly with regard to regulation and CME. The third addresses challenges for…

  13. [Continuing Medical Education in Germany - mandatory and voluntary obligations].

    PubMed

    Böthin, Elke

    2013-01-01

    After 1945 the common medical training infrastructure was broken up into two different political systems. While in the Federal Republic of Germany the structure was based on physicians' self-governance, in the German Democratic Republic medical professional structures were organised by the government. After the unification of the two German states, which took place on October 3, 1990, the centralistic structure was replaced by the system of physician self-governance. Before January 1, 2004, continuing medical education (CME) in West Germany relied on a system of voluntary obligations. In East Germany, though, professional CMEs were compulsory; they were called "obligatorische periphere Fortbildung." Based on 15 expert interviews on the topic of "CME in Germany", the different circumstances and conditions were analysed taking account of the historical background. Only selected professionals with experience in both German states (one with a federal, the other with a centralistic system), were chosen for the survey. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  14. Continuing medical education tuition: a survey of charges.

    PubMed

    Andrews, N C

    1980-04-01

    A survey was carried out on the tuition charged for continuing medical education (CME) programs offered by a variety of providers. These included schools of medicine throughout the United States, national organizations and societies, state-wide organizations and societies located in California, and a small group of hospitals in or near Sacramento, California. The fees charged for continuing medical education (expressed in this article as the amount in dollars that a physician must pay for one hour of approved Category I credit) may vary from nothing to more than $20 an hour. The average charge per hour for CME courses sponsored by medical colleges in the United States ranged from none to $11.19 during 1976 and 1977. Recent data indicate that most schools have increased tuition for CME courses because of inflation. Many schools of medicine provide CME through grand rounds, conferences and special lectures at no cost to participants. Similarly, in a small sample of hospitals in California, CME was found to be available at a minimal charge to physicians. Some CME programs are more costly because fees may include the expenses of honored visiting faculty, and costs of food or social activities. There may be further expense if travel is required, although these additional costs may be offset by the benefits of study in a relaxed atmosphere away from practice and office pressures.

  15. Continuing Education Course to Attain Collaborative Comprehensive Medication Review Competencies

    PubMed Central

    Tuomainen, Lea; Ovaskainen, Harri; Peura, Sirpa; Sevón-Vilkman, Nina; Tanskanen, Paavo; Airaksinen, Marja S.A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To implement a long-term continuing education course for pharmacy practitioners to acquire competency in and accreditation for conducting collaborative comprehensive medication reviews (CMRs). Design A 1½- year curriculum for practicing pharmacists that combined distance learning (using e-learning tools) and face-to-face learning was created. The training consisted of 5 modules: (1) Multidisciplinary Collaboration; (2) Clinical Pharmacy and Pharmacotherapy; (3) Rational Pharmacotherapy; (4) CMR Tools; and (5) Optional Studies. Assessment The curriculum and participants' learning were evaluated using essays and learning diaries. At the end of the course, students submitted portfolios and completed an Internet-based survey instrument. Almost all respondents (92%) indicated their educational needs had been met by the course and 68% indicated they would conduct CMRs in their practice. The most important factors facilitating learning were working with peers and in small groups. Factors preventing learning were mostly related to time constraints. Conclusion Comprehensive medication review competencies were established by a 1½- year continuing education curriculum that combined different teaching methods and experiential learning. Peer support was greatly appreciated as a facilitator of learning by course participants. PMID:19885077

  16. [Quality control in medical education and continuing medical education in allergology in Germany].

    PubMed

    Ring, Johannes; Rakoski, Jürgen

    2003-10-01

    Quality control in education and training in allergology comprises activities at the different levels of the curriculum of medical schools, residency programs and postgraduate education. Unfortunately, until now allergology in Germany has not yet been regularly embedded in the medical curriculum of all medical schools. Therefore, the German Society for Allergology and Clinical Immunology (DGAI) has demanded for years that chairs and departments of allergology be introduced at every Medical Faculty in Germany. The new Medical Licensure Rules (Approbationsordnung) offer the possibility to select allergology, amongst others, as an obligatory subject in the medical state examination. Furthermore, allergological topics can now be introduced into the newly established interdisciplinary fields (Querschnittsbereiche). At the level of residency training, doctors who want to become allergists have to undergo a special curriculum in the field of allergology, formerly called additional specialisation in allergology (Zusatzbezeichnung) after having finished their board examination in an organ-related specialty subject. Following a decision of the German "Arztetag" in May 2003, this 24-months curriculum has unfortunately been reduced to 18 months. 12 months of this 18 months requirement may be fulfilled during a residency programme in either dermatovenerology, otolaryngology, internal medicine, pulmology and/or paediatrics. Compared to previous years, this results in a drastic deterioration of allergy training in Germany. The DGAI has decided to take up the fight for its improvement in both a quantitative and qualitative respect. The crucial issue is to develop quality criteria for persons as well as institutions eligible as training centres in allergology. As regards post-graduate education, the German Academy of Allergology and Environmental Medicine (Deutsche Akademie für Allergie und Umweltmedizin, DAAU) has introduced a system of certified continuing medical education (CME

  17. Continuing Medical Education, Professional Development, and Requirements for Medical Licensure: A White Paper of the Conjoint Committee on Continuing Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Stephen H.; Thompson, James N.; Mazmanian, Paul E.; Aparicio, Alejandro; Davis, David A.; Spivey, Bruce E.; Kahn, Norman B., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    To provide the best care to patients, a physician must commit to lifelong learning, but continuing education and evaluation systems in the United States typically require little more than records of attendance for professional association memberships, hospital staff privileges, or reregistration of a medical license. While 61 of 68 medical and…

  18. Council of Medical Specialty Societies: Committed to Continuing Medical Education Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Walter J.

    2005-01-01

    The Council of Medical Specialty Societies (CMSS) recognizes the need for continuing medical education (CME) reform and intends to be actively engaged in that process. While recognizing that CME reform must involve many organizations, the CMSS and particularly the 23 societies that make up the CMSS are in a position to affect many of the needed…

  19. Council of Medical Specialty Societies: Committed to Continuing Medical Education Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Walter J.

    2005-01-01

    The Council of Medical Specialty Societies (CMSS) recognizes the need for continuing medical education (CME) reform and intends to be actively engaged in that process. While recognizing that CME reform must involve many organizations, the CMSS and particularly the 23 societies that make up the CMSS are in a position to affect many of the needed…

  20. Improving continuing medical education by enhancing interactivity: lessons from Iran.

    PubMed

    Faghihi, Seyed Aliakbar; Khankeh, Hamid Reza; Hosseini, Seyed Jalil; Soltani Arabshahi, Seyed Kamran; Faghih, Zahra; Parikh, Sagar V; Shirazi, Mandana

    2016-04-01

    Continuing Medical Education (CME) has been considered as a lifelong commitment for doctors to provide the optimal care for patients. Despite a long history of creating CME programs, outcomes are far from ideal. The present qualitative study aims to clarify the barriers affecting effectiveness of the CME programs in Iran based on the experiences of general practitioners. Sixteen general practitioners were recruited to participate in in-depth interviews and field observations concerning experiences with CME. The study was performed using a qualitative content analysis method. The codes, categories and themes were explored through an inductive process in which the researchers moved from specific to general. The participants' experiences identified a number of barriers, particularly insufficient interaction with the instructors; additional problems included the teachers' use of an undifferentiated approach; unreal and abstract CME; and ignorance of the diverse reasons to participate in CME. Based on the study results, there are multiple barriers to effective implementation of CME in Iran. The key barriers include insufficient interaction between the trainees and providers, which must be considered by other stakeholders and program designers. Such interactions would facilitate improved program design, invite more specific tailoring of the education to the participants, allow for more effective educational methods and set the stage for outcome evaluation from the learners actually applying their new knowledge in practice. Replication of these findings with another sample would improve confidence in these recommendations, but these findings are broadly consistent with findings in the educational literature on improving the efficacy of CME.

  1. Online Continuing Medical Education for the Latin American Nephrology Community.

    PubMed

    Margolis, Alvaro; Gonzalez-Martinez, Francisco; Noboa, Oscar; Abbud-Filho, Mario; Lorier, Leticia; Nin, Marcelo; Silvariño, Ricardo; García, Sofía; Pefaur, Jacqueline; Greloni, Gustavo C; Noronha, Irene L; Lopez, Antonio; Ribeiro-Alves, María A; Tanús, Roberto; Fernández-Cean, Juan

    2015-01-01

    A continuing medical education (CME) course was implemented for Latin American nephrologists in 2013. The topic was Immunopathology in native and transplanted kidneys. The course was given in Spanish and Portuguese. The activities included a distance education seven-week asynchronous online modality with multiple educational strategies. Thirty hours of study workload were estimated to complete the course. Four hundred and ninety-eight physicians coming from 18 countries registered for the course; 442 of them participated in it. Of those who participated, 51% received a certificate of completion and 29% a certificate of participation. Sixty-five percent of registrants participated in the case discussions. Eighty-six percent were very satisfied and 13% were satisfied. Lack of time to devote to the course was the main limitation expressed (62%), while Internet access or difficulties in the use of technology were considered by only 12 and 6% of participants, respectively. There was a significant increase in knowledge between before and after the course; the average grade increased from 64 to 83%. In conclusion, technology-enabled education demonstrated potential to become an instrument for Latin American nephrologists.

  2. Four Characteristics for Regional Continuing Education in Medical Allied Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koewing, J. Robert; And Others

    1976-01-01

    The Area Health Education Centers (AHEC) Program (created under the Comprehensive Health Manpower Act of 1971) is briefly described followed by a discussion of the University of North Carolina's regional planning efforts for continuing education. Major planning problems--aggregate numbers, continuing education suppliers, geographic distribution,…

  3. Evaluation of an online bioterrorism continuing medical education course.

    PubMed

    Casebeer, Linda; Andolsek, Kathryn; Abdolrasulnia, Maziar; Green, Joseph; Weissman, Norman; Pryor, Erica; Zheng, Shimin; Terndrup, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    Much of the international community has an increased awareness of potential biologic, chemical, and nuclear threats and the need for physicians to rapidly acquire new knowledge and skills in order to protect the public's health. The present study evaluated the educational effectiveness of an online bioterrorism continuing medical education (CME) activity designed to address clinical issues involving suspected bioterrorism and reporting procedures in the United States. This was a retrospective survey of physicians who had completed an online CME activity on bioterrorism compared with a nonparticipant group who had completed at least 1 unrelated online CME course from the same medical school Web site and were matched on similar characteristics. An online survey instrument was developed to assess clinical and systems knowledge and confidence in recognition of illnesses associated with a potential bioterrorism attack. A power calculation indicated that a sample size of 100 (50 in each group) would achieve 90% power to detect a 10% to 15% difference in test scores between the two groups. Compared with nonparticipant physicians, participants correctly diagnosed anthrax (p = .01) and viral exanthem (p = .01), but not smallpox, more frequently than nonparticipants. Participants knew more frequently than nonparticipants who to contact regarding a potential bioterrorism event (p = .03) Participants were more confident than nonparticipants about finding information to guide diagnoses of patients with biologic exposure (p = .01), chemical exposure (p = .02), and radiation exposure (p = .04). An online bioterrorism course shows promise as an educational intervention in preparing physicians to better diagnose emerging rare infections, including those that may be associated with a bioterrorist event, in increasing confidence in diagnosing these infections, and in reporting of such infections for practicing physicians.

  4. Do continuing medical education articles foster shared decision making?

    PubMed

    Labrecque, Michel; Lafortune, Valérie; Lajeunesse, Judith; Lambert-Perrault, Anne-Marie; Manrique, Hermes; Blais, Johanne; Légaré, France

    2010-01-01

    Defined as reviews of clinical aspects of a specific health problem published in peer-reviewed and non-peer-reviewed medical journals, offered without charge, continuing medical education (CME) articles form a key strategy for translating knowledge into practice. This study assessed CME articles for mention of evidence-based information on benefits and harms of available treatment and/or preventive options that are deemed essential for shared decision making (SDM) to occur in clinical practice. Articles were selected from 5 medical journals that publish CME articles and are provided free of charge to primary-care physicians of the Province of Quebec, Canada. Two individuals independently scored each article with the use of a 10-item checklist based on the International Patient Decision Aid Standards. In case of discrepancy, the item score was established by team consensus. Scores were added to produce a total article score ranging from 0 (no item present) to 10 (all items present). Thirty articles (6 articles per journal) were selected. Total article scores ranged from 1 to 9, with a mean (+/- SD) of 3.1 +/- 2.0 (95% confidence interval 2.8-4.3). Health conditions and treatment options were the items most frequently discussed in the articles; next came treatment benefits. Possible harms, the use of the same denominators for benefits and harms, and methods to facilitate the communication of benefits and harms to patients were almost never described. No significant differences between journals were observed. The CME articles evaluated did not include the evidence-based information necessary to foster SDM in clinical practice. Peer-reviewed and non-peer-reviewed medical journals should require CME articles to include this type of information.

  5. Improving continuing medical education by enhancing interactivity: lessons from Iran

    PubMed Central

    FAGHIHI, SEYED ALIAKBAR; KHANKEH, HAMID REZA; HOSSEINI, SEYED JALIL; SOLTANI ARABSHAHI, SEYED KAMRAN; FAGHIH, ZAHRA; PARIKH, SAGAR V.; SHIRAZI, MANDANA

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Continuing Medical Education (CME) has been considered as a lifelong commitment for doctors to provide the optimal care for patients. Despite a long history of creating CME programs, outcomes are far from ideal. The present qualitative study aims to clarify the barriers affecting effectiveness of the CME programs in Iran based on the experiences of general practitioners. Methods Sixteen general practitioners were recruited to participate in in-depth interviews and field observations concerning experiences with CME. The study was performed using a qualitative content analysis method. The codes, categories and themes were explored through an inductive process in which the researchers moved from specific to general. Results The participants’ experiences identified a number of barriers, particularly insufficient interaction with the instructors; additional problems included the teachers’ use of an undifferentiated approach; unreal and abstract CME; and ignorance of the diverse reasons to participate in CME. Conclusion Based on the study results, there are multiple barriers to effective implementation of CME in Iran. The key barriers include insufficient interaction between the trainees and providers, which must be considered by other stakeholders and program designers. Such interactions would facilitate improved program design, invite more specific tailoring of the education to the participants, allow for more effective educational methods and set the stage for outcome evaluation from the learners actually applying their new knowledge in practice. Replication of these findings with another sample would improve confidence in these recommendations, but these findings are broadly consistent with findings in the educational literature on improving the efficacy of CME. PMID:27104199

  6. Continuing Medical Education in Community Hospitals: A Manual for Program Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stearns, Norman S.; And Others

    1971-01-01

    This manual provides guidelines for: (1) developing community hospital-based programs of continuing medical education; and (2) delivering education consultation to community hospitals. Chapters I and II outline principles of continuing medical education, present a model for education program development, and provide specific how-to techniques and…

  7. Physicians Learning Continuing Medical Education from Third-Year Medical Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verby, John E.

    1991-01-01

    The Rural Physician Associate Program places third year medical students with rural Minnesota physicians, giving students practical experience and giving physicians onsite opportunities for continuing education. Library services, microcomputers, and an electronic mail system serve the information needs of the student/mentor pairs. (SK)

  8. Portfolios in continuing medical education--effective and efficient?

    PubMed

    Mathers, N J; Challis, M C; Howe, A C; Field, N J

    1999-07-01

    A cross over comparison between 'traditional' continuing medical education (CME) activities and portfolio-based learning in general practice is described. Thirty-two volunteer general practitioners (GPs) were divided into two cohorts; each cohort spent six months following a 'traditional' route to postgraduate educational accreditation (PGEA) and six months following a portfolio-based learning route supported by three CME tutors. These were the submission of a completed portfolio with evidence of the completion of learning cycles and participants reflections on the educational process. Qualitative and quantitative evaluation data were collected by questionnaire, semi-structured interview, participant observation and review of completed portfolios. The themes identified by GPs as hopes for the portfolios were largely fulfilled and the anxieties generally confounded. The flexibility of the portfolio learning process was particularly important to the participants. The breadth of topics covered by the portfolios was extremely wide and comparison with the submissions for 'traditional' PGEA showed a much smaller spread of learning activities and fewer subjects of study. The use of the portfolios of critical incidents and the completion of learning cycles with application to practice provided evidence of the effectiveness of such learning. EFFICIENCY: The mean number of hours spent by GPs preparing the portfolios was 24.5 +/- 12 (SD) which was significantly more than the 15 hours of PGEA awarded. This study demonstrates that a portfolio-based learning scheme can meet the needs of GPs relevant to their professional practice; it can give learners control over how, what and when they learn and encourage active and peer-supported learning; it can build personal and professional confidence and be thought both valid and reliable by participants. Learning outcomes can also be reliably assessed by PGEA within the context of an individually created learning plan.

  9. An Overview of Current Guidelines for Commercial Support of Continuing Medical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, R. Van

    1993-01-01

    A number of bodies have produced guidelines concerning financial support from commercial companies for continuing medical education. Basic principles include independence of the continuing education provider, balanced content, no unusual benefits, and disclosure of potential for bias. (SK)

  10. Continuing medical education in Brazil: what about obstetricians and gynecologists?

    PubMed

    Sass, Nelson; Torloni, Maria Regina; Soares, Bernardo Garcia de Oliveira; Atallah, Alvaro Nagib

    2005-01-02

    In Brazil, obstetricians and gynecologists are not required to submit to periodical evaluations to ascertain their professional competence in dealing with new concepts and therapies. To evaluate the performance of a group of obstetricians and gynecologists on a written evidence-based obstetrics test and determine their opinions and use of systematic reviews. Prospective cohort. Brazilian Obstetrics and Gynecology Congress 2001. 230 doctors agreed to participate in the study during a national obstetrics and gynecology congress. Participants took an individual anonymous written multiple-choice test with seven questions on clinical obstetrics, one question on the interpretation of a meta-analysis graph and two questions on their opinions and actual use of systematic reviews. Scores were analyzed and compared after grouping the participants according to year of graduation, residence training, doctoral program and faculty status. The general average score was 49.2 +/- 17.4. The scores tended to decline as the years since graduation advanced. Doctors who graduated in the last five years had higher scores than those who graduated over 25 years ago (52.2 versus 42.9). The performance did not vary according to medical residence, postgraduate program or teaching status. While 98.2% considered systematic reviews relevant, only 54.9% said that they routinely used this source of information. The participants' average score was low, even though they were highly qualified and trained. Despite the limitations of the study, the results are worrisome. If motivated physicians participating in a national congress obtained such low scores, we can speculate that the results might be even worse among other doctors that do not attend these events. These findings suggest that Brazilian obstetricians and gynecologists could benefit from continuing medical education and raise questions about the recycling methods currently available.

  11. Continuing Medical Education via Telemedicine and Sustainable Improvements to Health

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background. This research aims to investigate the quantitative relationship between telemedicine and online continuing medical education (CME) and to find the optimal CME lectures to be delivered via telemedicine to improve the population's health status. Objective. This study examines the following: (1) What factors foster learning processes in CME via telemedicine? (2) What is the possible role of online CME in health improvement? And (3) How optimal learning processes can be integrated with various health services? Methods. By applying telemedicine experiences in Taiwan over the period 1995–2004, this study uses panel data and the method of ordinary least squares to embed an adequate set of phenomena affecting the provision of online CME lectures versus health status. Results. Analytical results find that a nonlinear online CME-health nexus exists. Increases in the provision of online CME lectures are associated with health improvements. However, after the optimum has been reached, greater provision of online CME lectures may be associated with decreasing population health. Conclusion. Health attainment could be partially viewed as being determined by the achievement of the appropriately providing online CME lectures. This study has evaluated the population's health outcomes and responded to the currently inadequate provision of online CME lectures via telemedicine. PMID:27660637

  12. Continuing Medical Education via Telemedicine and Sustainable Improvements to Health.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fuhmei

    2016-01-01

    Background. This research aims to investigate the quantitative relationship between telemedicine and online continuing medical education (CME) and to find the optimal CME lectures to be delivered via telemedicine to improve the population's health status. Objective. This study examines the following: (1) What factors foster learning processes in CME via telemedicine? (2) What is the possible role of online CME in health improvement? And (3) How optimal learning processes can be integrated with various health services? Methods. By applying telemedicine experiences in Taiwan over the period 1995-2004, this study uses panel data and the method of ordinary least squares to embed an adequate set of phenomena affecting the provision of online CME lectures versus health status. Results. Analytical results find that a nonlinear online CME-health nexus exists. Increases in the provision of online CME lectures are associated with health improvements. However, after the optimum has been reached, greater provision of online CME lectures may be associated with decreasing population health. Conclusion. Health attainment could be partially viewed as being determined by the achievement of the appropriately providing online CME lectures. This study has evaluated the population's health outcomes and responded to the currently inadequate provision of online CME lectures via telemedicine.

  13. Report on the Continuing Education of Health Professionals and Graduate Medical Education in Venezuela.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Thomas C.

    An analysis of health care in Venezuela indicates that if the health of the Venezuelan population is to be maintained and improved then there must be undertaken a major effort to develop continuing educational programs for physicians. Venezuelan undergraduate medical education is largely didactic, with little exposure to patient care;…

  14. Continuing education for medical students: a library model

    PubMed Central

    Swanberg, Stephanie M.; Engwall, Keith; Mi, Misa

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The research assessed a three-year continuing medical education–style program for medical students in a Midwestern academic medical library. Methods A mixed methods approach of a survey and two focus groups comparing attendees versus non-attendees assessed the program. Results Eleven students participated in the focus groups. Attendance was driven by topic interest and lunch. Barriers included lack of interest, scheduling, location, and convenience. Conclusions Although attendance was a challenge, students valued opportunities to learn new skills. This study showcases a reproducible method to engage students outside the curriculum. PMID:26512222

  15. The Relationship between Continuing Medical Education, Physician Behavior, and Patient Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosinski, Edwin F.

    1987-01-01

    The author reviews studies on the relationship between continuing medical education and its impact on physician behavior. These studies have supported the positive impact of education on physician behavior. The author calls for research on the effect of continuing medical education on patient outcomes. (Author/CH)

  16. 78 FR 18990 - Medical Professionals Recruitment and Continuing Education Programs

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-28

    .... B. Grantee Cooperative Agreement Award Activities (1) Overall coordination and management of the... pursuing excellence in Native American health care by promoting education in the medical disciplines.... The applicant will be notified by email by the Division of Grants Management (DGM) of this...

  17. Women Physicians Are Early Adopters of On-Line Continuing Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, John M., Jr.; Novalis-Marine, Cheryl; Harris, Robin B.

    2003-01-01

    Introduction: On-line continuing medical education (CME) provides advantages to physicians and to medical educators. Although practicing physicians increasingly use on-line CME to meet their educational needs, the overall use of on-line CME remains limited. There are few data to describe the physicians who use this new educational medium; yet,…

  18. Continuing medical education, professional development, and requirements for medical licensure: a white paper of the Conjoint Committee on Continuing Medical Education.

    PubMed

    Miller, Stephen H; Thompson, James N; Mazmanian, Paul E; Aparicio, Alejandro; Davis, David A; Spivey, Bruce E; Kahn, Norman B

    2008-01-01

    To provide the best care to patients, a physician must commit to lifelong learning, but continuing education and evaluation systems in the United States typically require little more than records of attendance for professional association memberships, hospital staff privileges, or reregistration of a medical license. While 61 of 68 medical and osteopathic licensing boards mandate that physicians participate in certain numbers of hours of continuing medical education (CME), 17 of them require physicians to participate in legislatively mandated topics that may have little to do with the types of patients seen by the applicant physician. Required CME should evolve from counting hours of CME participation to recognizing physician achievement in knowledge, competence, and performance. State medical boards should require valid and reliable assessment of physicians' learning needs and collaborate with physician and CME communities to assure that legislatively mandated CME achieves maximal benefit for physicians and patients. To assure the discovery and use of best practices for continuing professional development and for maintenance of competence, research in CME and physician assessment should be raised as a national priority.

  19. Evaluation of an Online Bioterrorism Continuing Medical Education Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casebeer, Linda; Andolsek, Kathryn; Abdolrasulnia, Maziar; Green, Joseph; Weissman, Norman; Pryor, Erica; Zheng, Shimin; Terndrup, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: Much of the international community has an increased awareness of potential biologic, chemical, and nuclear threats and the need for physicians to rapidly acquire new knowledge and skills in order to protect the public's health. The present study evaluated the educational effectiveness of an online bioterrorism continuing medical…

  20. Evaluation of an Online Bioterrorism Continuing Medical Education Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casebeer, Linda; Andolsek, Kathryn; Abdolrasulnia, Maziar; Green, Joseph; Weissman, Norman; Pryor, Erica; Zheng, Shimin; Terndrup, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: Much of the international community has an increased awareness of potential biologic, chemical, and nuclear threats and the need for physicians to rapidly acquire new knowledge and skills in order to protect the public's health. The present study evaluated the educational effectiveness of an online bioterrorism continuing medical…

  1. Defining Quality Criteria for Online Continuing Medical Education Modules Using Modified Nominal Group Technique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shortt, S. E. D.; Guillemette, Jean-Marc; Duncan, Anne Marie; Kirby, Frances

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: The rapid increase in the use of the Internet for continuing education by physicians suggests the need to define quality criteria for accredited online modules. Methods: Continuing medical education (CME) directors from Canadian medical schools and academic researchers participated in a consensus process, Modified Nominal Group…

  2. Charter on continuing medical education/continuing professional development approved by the UEMS Specialist Section and European Board of Anaesthesiology.

    PubMed

    Alahuhta, S; Mellin-Olsen, J; Blunnie, W P; Knape, J T A

    2007-06-01

    The mission of the Section and Board of Anaesthesiology of the European Union of Medical Specialists (EUMS/UEMS) is to harmonize training and medical practice in all European countries to continuously improve the quality of care. The need for continuous medical education in the field of anaesthesiology has long been recognized. However, specialty-based competencies are not the only requirements for successful medical practice. The need to acquire medical, managerial, ethical, social and personal communication skills on top of specialty-based competencies has developed into the principle of continuous professional development, which embraces both objectives. The Section and Board of Anaesthesiology of the EUMS/UEMS has approved a proposal of its Standing Committee on Continuous Medical Education/Continuous Professional Development to adopt the following charter on the subject.

  3. Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education Intervention Guideline Series: Guideline 3, Educational Meetings.

    PubMed

    Van Hoof, Thomas J; Grant, Rachel E; Sajdlowska, Joanna; Bell, Mary; Campbell, Craig; Colburn, Lois; Dorman, Todd; Fischer, Michael; Horsley, Tanya; LeBlanc, Constance; Lockyer, Jocelyn; Moore, Donald E; Morrow, Robert; Olson, Curtis A; Silver, Ivan; Thomas, David C; Turco, Mary; Kitto, Simon

    2015-01-01

    The Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education commissioned a study to clarify and, if possible, to standardize the terminology for a set of important educational interventions. In the form of a guideline, this article describes one such intervention, educational meetings, which is a common intervention in health professions' education. An educational meeting is an opportunity for clinicians to assemble to discuss and apply important information relevant to patient care. Based on a review of recent evidence and a facilitated discussion with US and Canadian experts, we describe proper educational meeting terminology and other important information about the intervention. We encourage leaders and researchers to consider and to build on this guideline as they plan, implement, evaluate, and report educational meeting efforts. Clear and consistent use of terminology is imperative, along with complete and accurate descriptions of interventions, to improve the use and study of educational meetings.

  4. The cost of postgraduate medical education and continuing medical education: re-examining the status fifty years back.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Kieran

    2015-03-01

    The subject of the cost and value of medical education is becoming increasingly important. However, this subject is not a new one. Fifty years ago, Mr. DH Patey, Dr. OF Davies, and Dr. John Ellis published a report on the state of postgraduate medical education in the UK. The report was wide-ranging, but it made a considerable mention of cost. In this short article, I have presented the documentary research that I conducted on their report. I have analyzed it from a positivist perspective and have concentrated on the subject of cost, as it appears in their report. The authors describe reforms within postgraduate medical education; however, they are clear from the start that the issue of cost can often be a barrier to such reforms. They state the need for basic facilities for medical education, but then outline the financial barriers to their development. The authors then discuss the costs of library services for education. They state that the "annual spending on libraries varies considerably throughout the country." The authors also describe the educational experiences of newly graduated doctors. According to them, the main problem is that these doctors do not have time to attend formal educational events, and that this will not be possible until there is "a more graduated approach to responsible clinical work," something which is not possible without financial investment. While concluding their report, the authors state that the limited money invested in postgraduate medical education and continuing medical education has been well spent, and that this has had a dual effect on improving medical education as well as the standards of medical care.

  5. The Cost of Postgraduate Medical Education and Continuing Medical Education: Re-Examining the Status Fifty Years Back

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The subject of the cost and value of medical education is becoming increasingly important. However, this subject is not a new one. Fifty years ago, Mr. DH Patey, Dr. OF Davies, and Dr. John Ellis published a report on the state of postgraduate medical education in the UK. The report was wide-ranging, but it made a considerable mention of cost. In this short article, I have presented the documentary research that I conducted on their report. I have analyzed it from a positivist perspective and have concentrated on the subject of cost, as it appears in their report. The authors describe reforms within postgraduate medical education; however, they are clear from the start that the issue of cost can often be a barrier to such reforms. They state the need for basic facilities for medical education, but then outline the financial barriers to their development. The authors then discuss the costs of library services for education. They state that the "annual spending on libraries varies considerably throughout the country." The authors also describe the educational experiences of newly graduated doctors. According to them, the main problem is that these doctors do not have time to attend formal educational events, and that this will not be possible until there is "a more graduated approach to responsible clinical work," something which is not possible without financial investment. While concluding their report, the authors state that the limited money invested in postgraduate medical education and continuing medical education has been well spent, and that this has had a dual effect on improving medical education as well as the standards of medical care. PMID:25802685

  6. Mobile Audience Response Systems at a Continuing Medical Education Conference.

    PubMed

    Beaumont, Alexandra; Gousseau, Michael; Sommerfeld, Connor; Leitao, Darren; Gooi, Adrian

    2017-01-01

    Mobile audience response systems (mARS) are electronic systems allowing speakers to ask questions and audience members to respond anonymously and immediately on a screen which enables learners to view their peers' responses as well as their own. mARS encourages increased interaction and active learning. This study aims to examine the perceptions of audience members and speakers towards the implementation of mARS at a national medical conference. mARS was implemented at the CSO Annual Meeting in Winnipeg 2015. Eleven presenters agreed to participate in the mARS trial. Both audience and presenters received instructions. Five-point Likert questions and short answer questions were emailed to all conference attendees and the data was evaluated. Twenty-seven participants responded, 23 audience members and 4 instructors. Overall, responders indicated improved attention, involvement, engagement and recognition of audience's understanding of topics with the use of mARS. mARS was perceived as easy to use, with clear instructions, and the majority of respondents expressed an interest in using mARS in more presentations and in future national medical conferences. Most respondents preferred lectures with mARS over lectures without mARS. Some negative feedback on mARS involved dissatisfaction with how some presenters implemented mARS into the workshops. Overall mARS was perceived positively with the majority of respondents wanting mARS implemented in more national medical conferences. Future studies should look at how mARS can be used as an educational tool to help improve patient outcomes.

  7. Designing effective on-line continuing medical education.

    PubMed

    Zimitat, Craig

    2001-03-01

    The Internet, and new information and communication technologies available through the Internet, provides medical educators with an opportunity to develop unique on-line learning environments with real potential to improve physicians' knowledge and effect change in their clinical practice. There are approximately 100 websites offering on-line CME courses in the USA alone. However, few of these CME courses appear to be based on sound educational principles or CME research and may have little chance of achieving the broader goals of CME. The majority of these courses closely resemble their traditional counterparts (e.g. paper-based books are now electronic books) and appear to be mere substitutions for old-technology CME resources. Whilst some CME providers add unique features of the Internet to enrich their websites, they do not employ strategies to optimize the learning opportunities afforded by this new technology. The adoption of adult learning principles, reflective practice and problem-based approaches can be used as a foundation for sound CME course design. In addition, knowledge of Internet technology and the learning opportunities it affords, together with strategies to maintain participation and new assessment paradigms, are all needed for developing online CME. We argue for an evidence-based and strategic approach to the development of on-line CME courses designed to enhance physician learning and facilitate change in clinical behaviour.

  8. The virtual course: delivery of live and recorded continuing medical education material over the Internet.

    PubMed

    Tello, R; Davison, B D; Blickman, J G

    2000-06-01

    Our objective was to deliver live and recorded lectures from a continuing medical education course, including the representations of original slides, over the Internet, using streaming audio media. The streaming audio media, an emerging technology, not only delivers large lectures over the Internet using commercially available PCs and modems, but also allows review at any time by individuals with access to the Web. An interactive conference of continuing medical education curriculum can thus be delivered and continuing medical education credit earned without leaving home.

  9. The emergency physician and knowledge transfer: continuing medical education, continuing professional development, and self-improvement.

    PubMed

    Kilian, Barbara J; Binder, Louis S; Marsden, Julian

    2007-11-01

    A workshop session from the 2007 Academic Emergency Medicine Consensus Conference, Knowledge Translation in Emergency Medicine: Establishing a Research Agenda and Guide Map for Evidence Uptake, focused on developing a research agenda for continuing medical education (CME) in knowledge transfer. Based on quasi-Delphi methodology at the conference session, and subsequent electronic discussion and refinement, the following recommendations are made: 1) Adaptable tools should be developed, validated, and psychometrically tested for needs assessment. 2) "Point of care" learning within a clinical context should be evaluated as a tool for practice changes and improved knowledge transfer. 3) The addition of a CME component to technological platforms, such as search engines and databases, simulation technology, and clinical decision-support systems, may help knowledge transfer for clinicians or increase utilization of these tools and should, therefore, be evaluated. 4) Further research should focus on identifying the appropriate outcomes for physician CME. Emergency medicine researchers should transition from previous media-comparison research agendas to a more rigorous qualitative focus that takes into account needs assessment, instructional design, implementation, provider change, and care change. 5) In the setting of continued physician learning, barriers to the subsequent implementation of knowledge transfer and behavioral changes of physicians should be elicited through research.

  10. Using a Quasi-Experimental Research Design to Assess Knowledge in Continuing Medical Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markert, Ronald J.; O'Neill, Sally C.; Bhatia, Subhash C.

    2003-01-01

    Introduction: The objectives of continuing medical education (CME) programs include knowledge acquisition, skill development, clinical reasoning and decision making, and health care outcomes. We conducted a yearlong medical education research study in which knowledge acquisition in our CME programs was assessed. Method: A randomized…

  11. The future of continuing medical education: effectiveness of continuing medical education: American College of Chest Physicians Evidence-Based Educational Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Mary Martin; Aparicio, Alejandro; Galbraith, Robert; Dorman, Todd; Dellert, Edwin

    2009-03-01

    To ensure that continuing medical education (CME) continues to evolve so that it offers educational activities that are relevant to physicians in keeping with the definition of CME, CME providers must respond to and prepare for emerging expectations. This article puts into context the impact of the current emphasis on lifelong learning in medicine, particularly the requirement for maintenance of certification and licensure, on CME. Further, the effect of changing needs assessments and the impact of the integration of new technology in CME is included. Finally, a discussion of the emerging unique needs of CME providers and organizations related to these changes are addressed in the following four broad categories: CME as a value center, resources in support of CME, research to further advance the field, and leadership to guide the profession.

  12. Continuing medical education costs and benefits: lessons for competing in a changing health care economy.

    PubMed

    Mazmanian, Paul E

    2009-01-01

    Current approaches to evaluation in continuing medical education (CME) feature results defined as changes in participation, satisfaction, knowledge, behavior, and patient outcomes. Few studies link costs and effectiveness of CME to improved quality of care. As continuing education programs compete for scarce resources, cost-inclusive evaluation offers strategies to measure change and to determine value for resources spent.

  13. Attitudes and Preferences of Pennsylvania Primary Care Physicians Regarding Continuing Medical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mansfield, Phyllis; And Others

    Primary care physicians in Pennsylvania were asked to give their attitudes and preferences regarding continuing medical education (CME) in an effort to expand and develop physician-oriented CME programs for the Hershey Continuing Education department at Penn State. A 32-item questionnaire was mailed to 952 primary care physicians practicing in…

  14. Targeting Continuing Medical Education on Decision Makers: Who Decides to Transfuse Blood?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodnough, Lawrence T.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Staff communication patterns were observed during 13 open-heart surgeries to identify the transfusion decision makers. It was determined that targeting decision makers for continuing medical education would improve the quality of transfusion practice and increase the efficiency of continuing education. (SK)

  15. Attitudes and Preferences of Pennsylvania Primary Care Physicians Regarding Continuing Medical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mansfield, Phyllis; And Others

    Primary care physicians in Pennsylvania were asked to give their attitudes and preferences regarding continuing medical education (CME) in an effort to expand and develop physician-oriented CME programs for the Hershey Continuing Education department at Penn State. A 32-item questionnaire was mailed to 952 primary care physicians practicing in…

  16. Mandatory Continuing Veterinary Medical Education Requirements in the United States and Canada.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Dale A.; Klingborg, Donald J.; Wright, Teressa

    2003-01-01

    Lists by state and province the current continuing veterinary medical education (CVME) requirements in the United States and Canada and provides additional analysis and comment on CVME requirements. (EV)

  17. Mandatory Continuing Veterinary Medical Education Requirements in the United States and Canada.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Dale A.; Klingborg, Donald J.; Wright, Teressa

    2003-01-01

    Lists by state and province the current continuing veterinary medical education (CVME) requirements in the United States and Canada and provides additional analysis and comment on CVME requirements. (EV)

  18. Developing Continuing Professional Education in the Health and Medical Professions through Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tisdell, Elizabeth J.; Wojnar, Margaret; Sinz, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    This chapter focuses on how to negotiate power and interest among multiple stakeholders to develop continuing professional education programs as graduate study for those in the health and medical professions.

  19. Developing Continuing Professional Education in the Health and Medical Professions through Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tisdell, Elizabeth J.; Wojnar, Margaret; Sinz, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    This chapter focuses on how to negotiate power and interest among multiple stakeholders to develop continuing professional education programs as graduate study for those in the health and medical professions.

  20. Lessons for continuing medical education from simulation research in undergraduate and graduate medical education: effectiveness of continuing medical education: American College of Chest Physicians Evidence-Based Educational Guidelines.

    PubMed

    McGaghie, William C; Siddall, Viva J; Mazmanian, Paul E; Myers, Janet

    2009-03-01

    Simulation technology is widely used in undergraduate and graduate medical education as well as for personnel training and evaluation in other healthcare professions. Simulation provides safe and effective opportunities for learners at all levels to practice and acquire clinical skills needed for patient care. A growing body of research evidence documents the utility of simulation technology for educating healthcare professionals. However, simulation has not been widely endorsed or used for continuing medical education (CME). This article reviews and evaluates evidence from studies on simulation technology in undergraduate and graduate medical education and addresses its implications for CME. The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Evidence Report suggests that simulation training is effective, especially for psychomotor and communication skills, but that the strength of the evidence is low. In another review, the Best Evidence Medical Education collaboration supported the use of simulation technology, focusing on high-fidelity medical simulations under specific conditions. Other studies enumerate best practices that include mastery learning, deliberate practice, and recognition and attention to cultural barriers within the medical profession that present obstacles to wider use of this technology. Simulation technology is a powerful tool for the education of physicians and other healthcare professionals at all levels. Its educational effectiveness depends on informed use for trainees, including providing feedback, engaging learners in deliberate practice, integrating simulation into an overall curriculum, as well as on the instruction and competence of faculty in its use. Medical simulation complements, but does not replace, educational activities based on real patient-care experiences.

  1. [Continuing medical education: a clinical research institutional project].

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Nora A; Giunta, Diego H; Pazo, Valeria; Elizondo, Cristina M; Figar, Silvana; González Bernaldo de Quirós, Fernán

    2010-01-01

    In Argentina, education in clinical investigation is based on courses with theoric content. In developed countries programs with ongoing and practical content exist, generating the proper context to learn. In 2006, the Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires (HIBA) created an area to train physicians, Research Area in Internal Medicine, and enable them to participate in every step of the clinical investigation process. The objective of this study is to describe this teaching area and its impact on the investigation in Internal Medicine in the HIBA, in the period 2006-2008. This area counts with fellow positions and provides training in Clinical Investigation for rotating residents. It has different activities including lectures, project counseling and 3 ongoing Institutional Registers for prevalent medical problems, 33% (6/18) of Intern staff are currently participating, with 3 fellows and 7 monitors for the Registers; 25 residents rotated in the area and generated their own research projects. 59 posters were presented in local and international congresses. Currently 6 original articles are in process of publication and 2 in peer review evaluation. A survey was carried out to evaluate the area where 76% (35/46) of the participants believed that they have acquired new skills; with 93% (44/47) using these knowledges in their every day practice. A 100% thought that they were adequately oriented in their projects, their ideas being fully respected (97%) (45/46). The inclusion of the Research Area in Internal Medicine improved the knowledge of the process of clinical Investigation and increased independent scientific production.

  2. Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education Intervention Guideline Series: Guideline 4, Interprofessional Education.

    PubMed

    Van Hoof, Thomas J; Grant, Rachel E; Sajdlowska, Joanna; Bell, Mary; Campbell, Craig; Colburn, Lois; Davis, David; Dorman, Todd; Fischer, Michael; Horsley, Tanya; Jacobs-Halsey, Virginia; Kane, Gabrielle; LeBlanc, Constance; Lockyer, Jocelyn; Moore, Donald E; Morrow, Robert; Olson, Curtis A; Reeves, Scott; Sargeant, Joan; Silver, Ivan; Thomas, David C; Turco, Mary; Kitto, Simon

    2015-01-01

    The Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education commissioned a study to clarify and, if possible, to standardize the terminology for a set of important educational interventions. In the form of a guideline, this article describes one such intervention, interprofessional education (IPE), which is a common intervention in health professions education. IPE is an opportunity for individuals of multiple professions to interact to learn together, to break down professional silos, and to achieve interprofessional learning outcomes in the service of high-value patient care. Based on a review of recent evidence and a facilitated discussion with US and Canadian experts, we describe IPE, its terminology, and other important information about the intervention. We encourage leaders and researchers to consider and to build on this guideline as they plan, implement, evaluate, and report IPE efforts. Clear and consistent use of terminology is imperative, along with complete and accurate descriptions of interventions, to improve the use and study of IPE.

  3. [Sleifting from continuing medical education to continuing professional development. The example of the German assessment system for surgeons].

    PubMed

    Ansorg, J; Betzler, M

    2006-05-01

    In addition to medical knowledge and skills, medical competency includes critical self-refection and professional mistake management, the ability to manage the administrative workload and techniques of professional communication and leadership. In addition to that physicians have to develop social competency and empathy for staff members and patients. Continuing medical education (CME) focuses on continuing development of medical knowledge and skills. To develop the additional aspects of medical competency the concept of medical education has to be broadened to continuing professional development (CPD). In different European countries and North America CPD includes a regular mandatory system to evaluate medical competency. Assessment systems like PAR in Alberta/Canada provide doctors with a 360 degree analysis of their daily work, showing the potential for future improvement. ECKO (Evaluation of Surgical Competency) is an adapted assessment system for German surgeons available on a voluntary basis. For the first time in Germany physicians are able to take part in a strength-weakness analysis of their daily work. They receive recommendations on practice improvement and an educational prescription for individual further education.

  4. Regionalized Continuing Medical Education: Building Multi-Institutional Support.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Joseph S.

    1981-01-01

    Obtaining institutional support from multiple hospitals requires new approaches to identifying needs, developing educational activities, and designing political strategies for implementation. (Author)

  5. Human factors tools for improving simulation activities in continuing medical education.

    PubMed

    Seagull, F Jacob

    2012-01-01

    Human factors (HF) is a discipline often drawn upon when there is a need to train people to perform complex, high-stakes tasks and effectively assess their performance. Complex tasks often present unique challenges for training and assessment. HF has developed specialized techniques that have been effective in overcoming several of these challenges in work settings such as aviation, process control, and the military. Many HF techniques could be applied to simulation in continuing medical education to enhance effectiveness of simulation and training, yet these techniques are not widely known by medical educators. Three HF techniques are described that could benefit health care simulation in areas of training techniques, assessment, and task design: (1) bandwidth feedback techniques for designing better feedback and task guidance, (2) dual-task assessment techniques that can differentiate levels of expertise in tasks where performance is essentially perfect, and (3) task abstraction techniques for developing task-relevant fidelity for simulations. Examples of each technique are given from work settings in which these principles have been applied successfully. Application of these principles to medical simulation and medical education is discussed. Adapting these techniques to health care could improve training in medical education. Copyright © 2012 The Alliance for Continuing Education in the Health Professions, the Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education, and the Council on CME, Association for Hospital Medical Education.

  6. Guidelines for Effective Teleconference Presentations in Continuing Medical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raszkowski, Robert R.; Chute, Alan G.

    Designing teleconference programs for the physician learner puts unique demands on the teleconferencing medium. Typically, physicians expect a 1-hour lecture presentation with high information density. To effectively present the medical content material in an audio medium, strategies which structure and organize the content material are necessary.…

  7. Television in Postgraduate and Continuing Medical Education. 4th and 5th October, 1968.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engel, C. E., Ed.; Meyrick, R. Ll., Ed.

    The proceedings of a conference on television in postgraduate and continuing medical education for general practitioners are presented in this three-part report. Part One contains papers on medical broadcast television which examine the problems of informing the isolated doctor and groups of doctors of new developments; the usefulness and…

  8. Academia-Industry Collaboration in Continuing Medical Education: Description of Two Approaches.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, Harvey P.; Goldfinger, Stephen E.; Fletcher, Suzanne W.

    2002-01-01

    During 4 continuing medical education conferences, 221 Harvard Medical School lectures and 103 pharmaceutical company symposia were held. There were no differences in perceived quality of presentations, but the range of topics in industry-sponsored programs was narrower and primarily linked to new products. (SK)

  9. Measuring Continuing Medical Education Effectiveness and Its Ramification in a Community Hospital.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pazirandeh, Mahmood

    2000-01-01

    Cholesterol measurements of 328 volunteers were taken before and after continuing medical education interventions (lectures and information dissemination to physicians, patient education). Although 50% reduced their serum cholesterol, the only practice change was an increase in physicians giving dietary instructions. (SK)

  10. Management of Hypertension in Private Practice: A Randomized Controlled Trial in Continuing Medical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gullion, David S.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    A randomized control trial was used to evaluate a physician education program designed to improve physician management of patients' hypertension, hypertension-related behaviors, and diastolic blood pressure. It was suggested that more intensive continuing medical education programs are needed to improve physician performance and patient outcome.…

  11. Three Strategies for Delivering Continuing Medical Education in Geriatrics to General Practitioners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rikkert, Marcel G. M.; Rigaud, Anne-Sophie

    2004-01-01

    General practitioners (GPs) need advanced skills in geriatric assessment to be competent to treat the increasing number of elderly patients. Continuing medical education in geriatrics for GPs is heterogeneous, and not assessed for effectiveness. In this study we compared the educational effects of three geriatric post-graduate training methods on…

  12. Management of Hypertension in Private Practice: A Randomized Controlled Trial in Continuing Medical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gullion, David S.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    A randomized control trial was used to evaluate a physician education program designed to improve physician management of patients' hypertension, hypertension-related behaviors, and diastolic blood pressure. It was suggested that more intensive continuing medical education programs are needed to improve physician performance and patient outcome.…

  13. Three Strategies for Delivering Continuing Medical Education in Geriatrics to General Practitioners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rikkert, Marcel G. M.; Rigaud, Anne-Sophie

    2004-01-01

    General practitioners (GPs) need advanced skills in geriatric assessment to be competent to treat the increasing number of elderly patients. Continuing medical education in geriatrics for GPs is heterogeneous, and not assessed for effectiveness. In this study we compared the educational effects of three geriatric post-graduate training methods on…

  14. Measuring Continuing Medical Education Effectiveness and Its Ramification in a Community Hospital.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pazirandeh, Mahmood

    2000-01-01

    Cholesterol measurements of 328 volunteers were taken before and after continuing medical education interventions (lectures and information dissemination to physicians, patient education). Although 50% reduced their serum cholesterol, the only practice change was an increase in physicians giving dietary instructions. (SK)

  15. Build-a-Case: A Brand New Continuing Medical Education Technique that Is Peculiarly Familiar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, David Patrick; Marlow, Bernard

    2004-01-01

    An observation at a problem-based learning, case-building meeting prompted the realization that building cases might itself be an effective educational intervention. We developed a process for a new continuing medical education technique that is peculiarly familiar that we call "build-a-case." Build-a-case has now been used for teaching and…

  16. [Continuing medical education and the Social Balance Sheet].

    PubMed

    Gatti, Giorgio

    2010-06-01

    The social balance sheet is an instrument used to obtain a clear and transparent account, that helps to develop an analysis of the budget from the point of view of the stakeholders; this is not all that is required by law, but it takes into account the ability of the health institutions to obtain a collaboration with the neighboring environment and with the social issues that enter into the relationship. This could be a valuable tool also for educational purposes; it is an useful task to be performed by the health workers, and an opportunity to redefine the information needs through the analysis of the results achieved.

  17. [Continuing medical education: how to write multiple choice questions].

    PubMed

    Soler Fernández, R; Méndez Díaz, C; Rodríguez García, E

    2013-06-01

    Evaluating professional competence in medicine is a difficult but indispensable task because it makes it possible to evaluate, at different times and from different perspectives, the extent to which the knowledge, skills, and values required for exercising the profession have been acquired. Tests based on multiple choice questions have been and continue to be among the most useful tools for objectively evaluating learning in medicine. When these tests are well designed and correctly used, they can stimulate learning and even measure higher cognitive skills. Designing a multiple choice test is a difficult task that requires knowledge of the material to be tested and of the methodology of test preparation as well as time to prepare the test. The aim of this article is to review what can be evaluated through multiple choice tests, the rules and guidelines that should be taken into account when writing multiple choice questions, the different formats that can be used, the most common errors in elaborating multiple choice tests, and how to analyze the results of the test to verify its quality. Copyright © 2012 SERAM. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  18. Advancing educational continuity in primary care residencies: an opportunity for patient-centered medical homes.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Judith L; Hirsh, David; Aagaard, Eva; Kaminetzky, Catherine P; Smith, Marie; Hardman, Joseph; Chheda, Shobhina G

    2015-05-01

    Continuity of care is a core value of patients and primary care physicians, yet in graduate medical education (GME), creating effective clinical teaching environments that emphasize continuity poses challenges. In this Perspective, the authors review three dimensions of continuity for patient care-informational, longitudinal, and interpersonal-and propose analogous dimensions describing continuity for learning that address both residents learning from patient care and supervisors and interprofessional team members supporting residents' competency development. The authors review primary care GME reform efforts through the lens of continuity, including the growing body of evidence that highlights the importance of longitudinal continuity between learners and supervisors for making competency judgments. The authors consider the challenges that primary care residency programs face in the wake of practice transformation to patient-centered medical home models and make recommendations to maximize the opportunity that these practice models provide. First, educators, researchers, and policy makers must be more precise with terms describing various dimensions of continuity. Second, research should prioritize developing assessments that enable the study of the impact of interpersonal continuity on clinical outcomes for patients and learning outcomes for residents. Third, residency programs should establish program structures that provide informational and longitudinal continuity to enable the development of interpersonal continuity for care and learning. Fourth, these educational models and continuity assessments should extend to the level of the interprofessional team. Fifth, policy leaders should develop a meaningful recognition process that rewards academic practices for training the primary care workforce.

  19. Continuing Medical Education Reform for Competency-Based Education and Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nahrwold, David L.

    2005-01-01

    The development of competency-based education and evaluation for residents and practicing physicians by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education and the American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS), respectively, includes the competency of practice-based learning and improvement. Efforts to implement this and the other competencies…

  20. Medical continuing education: reform of teaching methods about high altitude disease in China.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yongjun; Zhou, Qiquan; Huang, Jianjun; Luo, Rong; Yang, Xiaohong; Gao, Yuqi

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of high altitude continuing medical education is to adapt knowledge and skills for practical application on the plateau. Most trainees have experience with academic education and grassroots work experience on the plateau, so they want knowledge about new advances in the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of high altitude disease. As such, traditional classroom teaching methods are not useful to them. Training objects, content, and methods should attempt to conduct a variety of teaching practices. Through continuing medical education on high altitude disease, the authors seek to change the traditional teaching model away from a single classroom and traditional written examinations to expand trainees' abilities. These innovative methods of training can improve both the quality of teaching and students' abilities to prevent and treat acute mountain sickness, high altitude pulmonary edema, high altitude cerebral edema, and chronic mountain sickness to increase the quality of high altitude medical care.

  1. EMS Attitudes Towards Geriatric Prehospital Care And Continuing Medical Education in Geriatrics

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Lars-Kristofer N.; Fairbanks, Rollin J.; Hettinger, Aaron Z.; Shah, Manish N.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives To understand the opinions of emergency medical service (EMS) providers regarding their ability to care for older adults, the domains of geriatric medicine in which they need more training, and the modality through which continuing education could be best delivered. Design Qualitative study using key informant interviews. Setting Prehospital EMS system in Rochester, New York. Participants EMS providers, EMS instructors and administrators, emergency physicians, and geriatricians. Outcome Measures Semi-structured interviews were conducted using an interview guide that addressed the following domains: 1)knowledge and skill deficiencies; 2)recommendations for improvement of geriatrics continuing education; 3)delivery methods of education. Results Participant responses were generally congruous despite the diverse backgrounds, and redundancy was achieved rapidly. All participants perceived a deficit in EMS education on the care of older adults, particularly related to communications with patients and skilled nursing facility staff. All desired more geriatric continuing education for EMS providers, especially in communications and psychosocial issues. Education was desired in various modalities. Conclusion Further geriatrics continuing education for EMS providers is needed. Some specific topics relate to medical issues, but a large proportion involve communications and psychosocial issues. Education should be delivered in a variety of modalities to meet the needs of the EMS community. Emerging online video technologies may bridge the gap between learners preferring classroom based modailities and those preferring self-study modules. PMID:19170777

  2. [General practitioners' needs for continuing medical education in the Sousse region (Tunisia)].

    PubMed

    Ben Abdelaziz, Ahmed; Haddad, Sofiène; Harrabi, Imed; Ghannem, Hassen

    2002-01-01

    A continuing medical education is an essential activity in the search for doctors' performance, provided it is adapted to the specificity of their medical practice. The objective of this work is to identify the needs of general practitioners in relation to continuing medical education. It is a structural descriptive and transversal survey of about 112 general practitioners among the 140 doctors in the Sousse region in 2000. Data have been collected through a questionnaire that develops the expectation of general practitioners concerning the themes, domains and specialties privileged in a continued training. This research shows that the diagnostic and therapeutic strategies of current affections were themes requested by 85% of general practitioners. The doctor-patient relation has been chosen by 71% of doctors. Emergency medicine was the specialty proposed by most of them. Thus, general practitioners expect a permanent training specific to their profile that could improve their clinical and relational competences.

  3. An online spaced-education game for global continuing medical education: a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Kerfoot, B Price; Baker, Harley

    2012-07-01

    To assess the efficacy of a "spaced-education" game as a method of continuing medical education (CME) among physicians across the globe. The efficacy of educational games for the CME has yet to be established. We created a novel online educational game by incorporating game mechanics into "spaced education" (SE), an evidence-based method of online CME. This 34-week randomized trial enrolled practicing urologists across the globe. The SE game consisted of 40 validated multiple-choice questions and explanations on urology clinical guidelines. Enrollees were randomized to 2 cohorts: cohort A physicians were sent 2 questions via an automated e-mail system every 2 days, and cohort B physicians were sent 4 questions every 4 days. Adaptive game mechanics re-sent the questions in 12 or 24 days if answered incorrectly and correctly, respectively. Questions expired if not answered on time (appointment dynamic). Physicians retired questions by answering each correctly twice-in-a-row (progression dynamic). Competition was fostered by posting relative performance among physicians. Main outcome measures were baseline scores (percentage of questions answered correctly upon initial presentation) and completion scores (percentage of questions retired). A total of 1470 physicians from 63 countries enrolled. Median baseline score was 48% (interquartile range [IQR] 17) and, in multivariate analyses, was found to vary significantly by region (Cohen dmax = 0.31, P = 0.001) and age (dmax = 0.41, P < 0.001). Median completion score was 98% (IQR 25) and varied significantly by age (dmax = 0.21, P < 0.001) and American Board of Urology certification (d = 0.10, P = 0.033) but not by region (multivariate analyses). Question clustering reduced physicians' performance (d = 0.43, P < 0.001). Seventy-six percent of enrollees (1111/1470) requested to participate in future SE games. An online SE game can substantially improve guidelines knowledge and is a well-accepted method of global CME delivery.

  4. Attributes of an Ideal Continuing Medical Education Institution Identified through Nominal Group Technique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kristofco, Robert; Shewchuk, Richard; Casebeer, Linda; Bellande, Bruce; Bennett, Nancy

    2005-01-01

    Introduction: Continuing medical education (CME) is an important resource physicians use to maintain their clinical competence. While many options for CME programs are available, there are few measures of their impact and few measures for physicians to use to systematically gauge their efforts in maintaining competence. This study initiates a…

  5. A Standardized Approach to Assessing Physician Expectations and Perceptions of Continuing Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shewchuk, Richard M.; Schmidt, Hilary J.; Benarous, Alexandra; Bennett, Nancy L.; Abdolrasulnia, Maziar; Casebeer, Linda L.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: Rapidly expanding science and mandates for maintaining credentials place increasing demands on continuing medical education (CME) activities to provide information that is current and relevant to patient care. Quality may be seen as the perceived level of service measured against consumer expectations. Standard tools have not been…

  6. Continuing Medical Education and Professional Revalidation in Europe: Five Case Examples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maisonneuve, Herve; Matillon, Yves; Negri, Alfonso; Pallares, Luis; Vigneri, Ricardo; Young, Howard L.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Since reliable information is scarce to describe continuing medical education (CME) and revalidation in Europe, we carried out a survey in 5 selected countries (France, Germany, Italy, Spain, and the United Kingdom). Methods: A tested questionnaire was sent to 2 experts per country (except in Germany), during August-September 2004.…

  7. Motivating Learning and Assessing Outcomes in Continuing Medical Education Using a Personal Learning Plan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Virginia A.; Schifferdecker, Karen E.; Turco, Mary G.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Although there is increasing focus on provider behavior change as an outcome of continuing medical education (CME), it has long been known that an increase in knowledge alone is rarely sufficient to induce such change. The Personal Learning Plan (PLP), designed to motivate and assess CME learning, was partly derived from SMART goals…

  8. Assessing the Impact of Continuing Medical Education through Structured Physician Dialogue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wergin, Jon F.; And Others

    A method for evaluating physicians' practice behavior after undertaking continuing medical education (CME) conducted by the American College of Cardiology (ACC) was developed and tested during 1983-1985. The literature on CME effectiveness and physician behavior change was reviewed. Physicians who were trained interviewers conducted telephone…

  9. Viability of the Commitment-for-Change Evaluation Strategy in Continuing Medical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Deborah L.

    1990-01-01

    Several features of a two-day national nephrology continuing medical education conference were analyzed using commitments for change and subsequent self-reports of implementation of change as the dependent variables. Subjects were those physician participants (N=84) who completed demographic information forms and agreed to participate in the…

  10. Marketing to Increase Participation in a Web-Based Continuing Medical Education Cultural Competence Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Estrada, Carlos A.; Krishnamoorthy, Periyakaruppan; Smith, Ann; Staton, Lisa; Korf, Michele J.; Allison, Jeroan J.; Houston, Thomas K.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: CME providers may be interested in identifying effective marketing strategies to direct users to specific content. Online advertisements for recruiting participants into activities such as clinical trials, public health programs, and continuing medical education (CME) have been effective in some but not all studies. The purpose of…

  11. Viability of the Commitment-for-Change Evaluation Strategy in Continuing Medical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Deborah L.

    1990-01-01

    Several features of a two-day national nephrology continuing medical education conference were analyzed using commitments for change and subsequent self-reports of implementation of change as the dependent variables. Subjects were those physician participants (N=84) who completed demographic information forms and agreed to participate in the…

  12. German Ambulatory Care Physicians' Perspectives on Continuing Medical Education--A National Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kempkens, Daniela; Dieterle, Wilfried E.; Butzlaff, Martin; Wilson, Andrew; Bocken, Jan; Rieger, Monika A.; Wilm, Stefan; Vollmar, Horst C.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: This survey aimed to investigate German ambulatory physicians' opinions about mandatory continuing medical education (CME) and CME resources shortly before the introduction of mandatory CME in 2004. Methods: A structured national telephone survey of general practitioners and specialists was conducted. Main outcome measures were…

  13. Motivating Learning and Assessing Outcomes in Continuing Medical Education Using a Personal Learning Plan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Virginia A.; Schifferdecker, Karen E.; Turco, Mary G.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Although there is increasing focus on provider behavior change as an outcome of continuing medical education (CME), it has long been known that an increase in knowledge alone is rarely sufficient to induce such change. The Personal Learning Plan (PLP), designed to motivate and assess CME learning, was partly derived from SMART goals…

  14. Assessing the Impact of Continuing Medical Education through Structured Physician Dialogue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wergin, Jon F.; And Others

    A method for evaluating physicians' practice behavior after undertaking continuing medical education (CME) conducted by the American College of Cardiology (ACC) was developed and tested during 1983-1985. The literature on CME effectiveness and physician behavior change was reviewed. Physicians who were trained interviewers conducted telephone…

  15. Marketing to Increase Participation in a Web-Based Continuing Medical Education Cultural Competence Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Estrada, Carlos A.; Krishnamoorthy, Periyakaruppan; Smith, Ann; Staton, Lisa; Korf, Michele J.; Allison, Jeroan J.; Houston, Thomas K.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: CME providers may be interested in identifying effective marketing strategies to direct users to specific content. Online advertisements for recruiting participants into activities such as clinical trials, public health programs, and continuing medical education (CME) have been effective in some but not all studies. The purpose of…

  16. A Risk Stratification Tool to Assess Commercial Influences on Continuing Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, Barbara E.; Cole, Jeanne G.; King, Catherine Thomas; Zukowski, Rebecca; Allgier-Baker, Tracy; Rubio, Doris McGartland; Thorndyke, Luanne E.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: Heightened concerns about industry influence on continuing medical education (CME) have prompted tighter controls on the management of commercial funding and conflict of interest. As a result, CME providers must closely monitor their activities and intervene if bias or noncompliance with accreditation standards is likely. Potential…

  17. Continuing Medical Education and Professional Revalidation in Europe: Five Case Examples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maisonneuve, Herve; Matillon, Yves; Negri, Alfonso; Pallares, Luis; Vigneri, Ricardo; Young, Howard L.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Since reliable information is scarce to describe continuing medical education (CME) and revalidation in Europe, we carried out a survey in 5 selected countries (France, Germany, Italy, Spain, and the United Kingdom). Methods: A tested questionnaire was sent to 2 experts per country (except in Germany), during August-September 2004.…

  18. A Risk Stratification Tool to Assess Commercial Influences on Continuing Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, Barbara E.; Cole, Jeanne G.; King, Catherine Thomas; Zukowski, Rebecca; Allgier-Baker, Tracy; Rubio, Doris McGartland; Thorndyke, Luanne E.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: Heightened concerns about industry influence on continuing medical education (CME) have prompted tighter controls on the management of commercial funding and conflict of interest. As a result, CME providers must closely monitor their activities and intervene if bias or noncompliance with accreditation standards is likely. Potential…

  19. Need for Comprehensive Women's Health Continuing Medical Education among Primary Care Physicians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwolek, Deborah S.; Donnelly, Michael B.; Carr, Ellen; Sloan, David A.; Haist, Steven A.

    2000-01-01

    Women's health topics of interest for continuing medical education were identified by 91 primary care physicians. Most felt that more knowledge of these topics would reduce the number of referrals to specialists. A more comprehensive, rather than reproductive, perspective of women's health was called for. (SK)

  20. A Continuing Medical Education Course for Physicians and Mid-Level Practitioners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burr, Bill D.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    An expanded concept of continuing medical education (CME) is reported that fills the needs of both physicians and mid-level practitioners (nurse practitioners or physician's assistants). The Family Practice Refresher Course sponsored by the University of California, Davis, School of Medicine and its evaluation are described. (LBH)

  1. Perceptions of Continuing Medical Education, Professional Development, and Organizational Support in the United Arab Emirates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Younies, Hassan; Berham, Belal; Smith, Pamela C.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: This paper investigates the views of health care providers on continuous medical education (CME). To our knowledge, this is one of the first surveys to examine perspectives of CME in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). Methods: A 6-part questionnaire focused on the following areas of CME: the workshop leaders/trainers, the training…

  2. Assessment of Television and Video Tape Recordings for Utilization in Continuing Medical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Charles Raymond

    This survey was conducted to assess the usefulness of video tape recording and closed-circuit live television as methods of continuing medical education. Specifically, a group of physicians in Indiana were surveyed as to their use of and attitudes towards programs of the Indiana University School of Medicine which used those methods. Of 3,400…

  3. Shifting the Culture of Continuing Medical Education: What Needs To Happen and Why Is It So Difficult?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Towle, Angela

    2000-01-01

    The Informed Shared Decision-Making project focused on overcoming physician resistance to continuing education and developing allies for change among stakeholders and opinion leaders. Strategies included substantive incorporation of continuing medical education into the medical education continuum and involvement of patients in planning and…

  4. Abstracts from the Proceedings of the Research in Continuing Medical Education Session of the 2007 Spring Meeting, Copper Mountain, Colorado

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Craig M.

    2007-01-01

    The following abstracts were peer-reviewed for presentation and publication. They were edited by Craig M. Campbell, MD, chairman, Research Committee, Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education.

  5. Abstracts from the Proceedings of the Research in Continuing Medical Education Session of the 2007 Spring Meeting, Copper Mountain, Colorado

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Craig M.

    2007-01-01

    The following abstracts were peer-reviewed for presentation and publication. They were edited by Craig M. Campbell, MD, chairman, Research Committee, Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education.

  6. Media richness and social information processing: rationale for multifocal continuing medical education activities.

    PubMed

    Gilman, S C; Turner, J W

    2001-01-01

    Academic business communication has studied the results of media selection in organizations. Little of this work has been discussed in the context of continuing medical education (CME); however, it may apply to improving the design of educational activities. This article reviews literature on media richness and social information processing theories. The concept of media richness suggests that media choice results from a match between the objective characteristics of the medium and the content requirements of a message. In this context, media include face-to-face conversation and print and electronic media. Social information processing theory suggests that media selection is also based on participants' social norms for how information is communicated in their environment and the participants' familiarity with specific media types. Appraisal of CME with respect to these theories suggests that the complex relationship of CME content and CME participant environments invites the most effective strategies of multiple media experienced over time in what might be called multifocal continuing medical education.

  7. Biomedical physics in continuing medical education: an analysis of learning needs.

    PubMed

    Rotomskis, Ricardas; Karenauskaite, Violeta; Balzekiene, Aiste

    2009-01-01

    To examine the learning and practice needs of medical professionals in the field of continuing education of biomedical physics in Lithuania. The study was based on a questionnaire survey of 309 medical professionals throughout Lithuania, 3 focus group discussions, and 18 interviews with medical and physics experts. The study showed that medical professionals lack knowledge of physics: only 15.1% of the respondents admitted that they had enough knowledge in biomedical physics to understand the functioning of the medical devices that they used, and 7.5% of respondents indicated that they had enough knowledge to understand and adopt medical devices of the new generation. Physics knowledge was valued more highly by medical professionals with scientific degrees. As regards continuing medical education, it was revealed that personal motivation (88.7%) and responsibility for patients (44.3%) were the most important motives for upgrading competencies, whereas workload (65.4%) and financial limits (45.3%) were the main obstacles. The most popular teaching methods were those based on practical work (78.9%), and the least popular was project work (27.8%). The study revealed that biomedical physics knowledge was needed in both specializations and practical work, and the most important factor for determining its need was professional aspirations. Medical professionals' understanding of medical devices, especially those of the new generation, is essentially functional in nature. Professional upgrading courses contain only fragmented biomedical physics content, and new courses should be developed jointly by experts in physics and medicine to meet the specialized needs of medical professionals.

  8. Continuing interprofessional education in geriatrics and gerontology in medically underserved areas.

    PubMed

    Toner, John A; Ferguson, K Della; Sokal, Regina Davis

    2009-01-01

    There is a widening gap between the health care needs of older persons and the treatment skills of the health care professionals who serve them. This gap is especially severe in rural areas, where there is a shortage of and inadequate collaboration between health care professionals and poor access to services for older persons. There is also a special opportunity in rural areas, particularly those designated as "medically underserved," for continuing interprofessional education as a vehicle for retaining health care professionals who tend to leave medically underserved areas for more lucrative professional opportunities elsewhere. In collaboration with the Consortium of New York Geriatric Education Centers, the Columbia-New York Geriatric Education Center at the Stroud Center of Columbia University has developed the Program for Outreach to Interprofessional Services and Education (POISE). The purpose of POISE is to develop, implement, evaluate, and sustain interprofessional education and training for health care learners, while emphasizing improved access to health services for the geriatric population in medically underserved areas. The POISE model was designed as an effective approach to teaching the core geriatrics and gerontology curriculum endorsed by the national (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services) network of Geriatric Education Centers to health care learners in medically underserved areas of upstate New York. This article describes the adaptation and implementation of the POISE model.

  9. Early adoption of new drug treatments: the role of continuing medical education and physician adaptivity.

    PubMed

    Mascarenhas, Desmond; Singh, Baljit K; Singh, Amoolya H; Veer, Sally Vander

    2007-03-01

    The influence of continuing medical education (CME) on the adoption of new treatments is widely regarded as self-evident. Less well understood is how the dynamics of dissemination of new healthcare practices are influenced by the intersection of education with the adaptive characteristics of providers. We developed and validated a 43-item online instrument (eSAIL) for measuring adaptive style and used it to investigate the interplay of physician adaptivity with key components of effective medical education. Satisfactory Cronbach alpha and test-retest reliability coefficients were observed for all primary psychometric scales and a composite adaptivity scale. Discriminant, convergent, and predictive validities of eSAIL scales were consistent across all cohorts. Using an online medical education program for which data on physician behavioral change are available, we show that the rate of adoption of new drugs is driven by both psychological (adaptivity) and environmental (educational) inputs. We show for the first time that topic eminence, length of reinforcement period and physician adaptive score in the eSAIL are each proportional to early-adoption-related behavioral change. Using a simple forced-choice question, a cohort of 208 physicians was segmented into "A" (adaptive) and "C" (conservative) segments based on their eSAIL adaptivity z scores (+0.170 versus -0.234 respectively; P < 0.01). Early adoption of new drug treatments by similarly segmented physician cohorts was driven almost entirely by A-segment physicians, but only when those physicians were additionally exposed to effective medical education.

  10. Motivating learning and assessing outcomes in continuing medical education using a personal learning plan.

    PubMed

    Reed, Virginia A; Schifferdecker, Karen E; Turco, Mary G

    2012-01-01

    Although there is increasing focus on provider behavior change as an outcome of continuing medical education (CME), it has long been known that an increase in knowledge alone is rarely sufficient to induce such change. The Personal Learning Plan (PLP), designed to motivate and assess CME learning, was partly derived from SMART goals (specific, measurable, attainable, realistic, and timely), a concept well supported as a strategy to promote behavior change. The goal of this study was to explore the relationship between SMART goals developed after attending a CME conference and subsequent provider behavior change, using the PLP as a tool. PLPs were used as the outcome measure for Dartmouth-Hitchcock Continuing Medical Education conferences conducted during the fall of 2010. Three months later, participants were asked how close they were to completing their goals. All participants' goals were analyzed according to SMART criteria. Of the 841 participants attending conferences in fall 2010, 347 completed a PLP. An independent t-test found that among the 125 participants who completed the follow-up survey, those who indicated that they had completed their goal or were "very close" or "extremely close" to completing their goal wrote SMARTer goals than those who reported being "not at all close" to "moderately close" to completing their goal (t = 2.48, df = 123, p = 0.015). Our results corroborate previous research that has found "use of specific strategies to implement research-based recommendations seems to be necessary to ensure that practices change." Future directions include both a study of use of a PLP compared to a simple intent to change document and work on helping participants to write SMARTer goals. Copyright © 2012 The Alliance for Continuing Education in the Health Professions, the Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education, and the Council on CME, Association for Hospital Medical Education.

  11. Continuation Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fremont Unified School District, CA.

    The Fremont, California Unified School District organized a continuing education program through a workshop held in the summer of 1968. This paper presents the results of that workshop. Following a statement of philosophy, an outline of the characteristics of the continuation student, and an outline of the functions of the program, an overview of…

  12. The Need for Specialty Curricula Based on Core Competencies: A White Paper of the Conjoint Committee on Continuing Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Marcia J.; Gallis, Harry A.; Gilman, Stuart C.; Grossman, Michael; Holzman, Gerald B.; Marquis, Damon; Trusky, Sandra K.

    2007-01-01

    At present there is no curriculum to guide physician lifelong learning in a prescribed, deliberate manner. The Conjoint Committee on Continuing Medical Education, a group representing 16 major stakeholder organizations in continuing medical education, recommends that each specialty society and corresponding board reach consensus on the…

  13. Canadian pediatricians: demographic characteristics, perceptions of training, and continuing medical education.

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, W; Milner, R; Punthakee, N

    1980-01-01

    A nationwide survey of Canadian pediatricians was undertaken to answer questions about demographic and practice characteristics, perceptions of the quantity and quality of residency training in relation to the realities of practice, and the patterns of use and the value of continuing medical education. The findings included a lower average age of pediatricians from that determined 10 years earlier, a higher proportion of women practising pediatrics, and higher proportions of pediatricians entering practice in smaller communities, doing geographic full-time university work and doing mainly consulting work. Pediatrics is still perceived as an attractive discipline, but there is dissatisfaction with the quantity and quality of training in adolescent medicine, ophthalmology, dermatology, psychosocial pediatrics and orthopedics. The changing patterns of continuing medical education among the most recent certificants suggest a need for journals and professional societies to assess how they can better meet the needs of Canadian pediatricians in this area. PMID:7260758

  14. [Conflict of interest in continuing medical education - Studies on certified CME courses].

    PubMed

    Lenzen, Laura Marianne; Weidringer, Johann Wilhelm; Ollenschläger, Günter

    2016-01-01

    Although the problem of conflict of interest in medical education is discussed intensively, few valid data have been published on how to deal with the form, content, funding, sponsorship, and the influence of economic interests in continuing medical education (CME). Against this background, we carried out an analysis of data which had been documented for the purpose of certification by a German Medical Association. A central aim of the study was to obtain evidence of possible influences of economic interests on continuing medical education. Furthermore, strategies for quality assurance of CME contents and their implementation were to be examined. We analyzed all registration data for courses certified in the category D ("structured interactive CME via print media, online media and audiovisual media") by the Bavarian Chamber of Physicians in 2012. To measure the effects of conflict of interest, relationships between topics of training and variables relating to the alleged self-interest of the organizer/sponsor (for example, drug sales in a group of physicians) were statistically verified. These data were taken from the Bavarian Medical Statistics 2012 and the GKV-Arzneimittelschnellinformation. In 2012, a total of 734 CME course offerings have been submitted for 51 medical specialties by 30 course suppliers in the Bavarian Medical Association. To ensure the neutrality of interests of the CME courses the course suppliers signed a cooperation treaty ensuring their compliance with defined behavior towards the Bavarian Medical Association concerning sponsorship. The correlation between course topics and drug data suggests that course suppliers tend to submit topics that are economically attractive to them. There was a significant correlation between the number of CME courses in a specific field and the sales from drug prescriptions issued by physicians in the respective field. The results show that neutrality of interests regarding continuing medical education is

  15. Postal survey of approaches to learning among Ontario physicians: implications for continuing medical education

    PubMed Central

    Delva, M Dianne; Kirby, John R; Knapper, Christopher K; Birtwhistle, R V

    2002-01-01

    Objectives To understand the approaches to learning of practising physicians in their workplace and to assess the relation of these approaches to their motivation for, preferred methods of, and perceived barriers to continuing medical education. Design Postal survey of 800 Ontario physicians. Participants 373 physicians who responded. Main outcome measures Correlations of approaches to learning and perceptions of workplace climate with methods, motives, and barriers to continuing medical education. Results Perceived heavy workload was significantly associated with the surface disorganised (r=0.463, P<0.01) and surface rational approach (r=0.135, P<0.05) to learning. The deep approach to learning was significantly correlated with a perception of choice-independence and a supportive-receptive climate at work (r=0.341 and 0.237, P<0.01). Physicians who adopt a deep approach to learning seem to be internally motivated to learn, whereas external motivation is associated with surface approaches to learning. Heavy workload and a surface disorganised approach to learning were correlated with every listed barrier to continuing medical education. The deep approach to learning was associated with independent learning activities and no barriers. Conclusions Perception of the workplace climate affects physicians' approaches to learning at work and their motivation for and perceived barriers to continuing medical education. Younger, rural, family physicians may be most vulnerable to feeling overworked and adopting less effective approaches to learning. Further work is required to determine if changing the workplace environment will help physicians learn more effectively. What is already known on this topicThroughout their careers physicians face enormous challenges in managing the growth of medical knowledgeStudents who perceive choice, independence, and good teaching at university take a deep, integrative approach to learning whereas those who feel overworked or overwhelmed

  16. Drug advertising, continuing medical education, and physician prescribing: a historical review and reform proposal.

    PubMed

    Rodwin, Marc A

    2010-01-01

    Through the 1960s, many people claimed that drug advertising was educational and physicians often relied on it. Continuing Medical Education (CME) was developed to provide an alternative. However, because CME relied on grants, industry funders chose the subjects offered. Now policymakers worry that drug firms support CME to promote sales and that commercial support biases prescribing and fosters inappropriate drug use. A historical review reveals parallel problems between advertising and industry-funded CME. To preclude industry influence and improve CME, we should ensure independent funding by taxing medical industries, facilities and physicians. Independent public and professional authorities should create CME curricula. An independent agency should allocate all funds to educational institutions for approved curricula. © 2010 American Society of Law, Medicine & Ethics, Inc.

  17. Enhancing practice improvement by facilitating practitioner interactivity: new roles for providers of continuing medical education.

    PubMed

    Parboosingh, I John; Reed, Virginia A; Caldwell Palmer, James; Bernstein, Henry H

    2011-01-01

    Research into networking and interactivity among practitioners is providing new information that has the potential to enhance the effectiveness of practice improvement initiatives. This commentary reviews the evidence that practitioner interactivity can facilitate emergent learning and behavior change that lead to practice improvements. Insights from learning theories provide a framework for understanding emergent learning as the product of interactions between individuals in trusted relationships, such as occurs in communities of practice. This framework helps explain why some groups respond more favorably to improvement initiatives than others. Failure to take advantage of practitioner interactivity may explain in part the disappointingly low mean rates of practice improvement reported in studies of the effectiveness of practice improvement projects. Examples of improvement models in primary care settings that explicitly use relationship building and facilitation techniques to enhance practitioner interactivity are provided. Ingredients of a curriculum to teach relationship building in communities of practice and facilitation skills to enhance learning in small group education sessions are explored. Sufficient evidence exists to support the roles of relationships and interactivity in practice improvement initiatives such that we recommend the development of training programs to teach these skills to CME providers. Copyright © 2011 The Alliance for Continuing Medical Education, the Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education, and the Council on CME, Association for Hospital Medical Education.

  18. The consultant's role in continuing medical education of general practitioners: the case of rheumatology.

    PubMed Central

    Badley, E M; Lee, J

    1987-01-01

    Consultant rheumatologists were surveyed by questionnaire about their contribution to the continuing education of general practitioners, and 84% (203/243) replied. Altogether 157 respondents had participated in some form of teaching, 147 in collective teaching sessions such as lectures and 99 in the teaching of small groups. Arthritis comprised 44% of the rheumatological topics taught; there was a noticeable lack of teaching on problems commonly encountered in general practice, such as soft tissue rheumatism and injury and back pain, and on clinical skills including examination and injection of joints. Eighty eight respondents made comments and suggestions. The favoured educational strategies were small group teaching, apprenticeship schemes, and interchange between general practitioners and consultants about shared cases. This contrasts with what was typically done--namely, formal lectures on rheumatoid arthritis in postgraduate medical centres. These findings raise questions about the continuing education of consultants themselves as well as about the consultants' role in teaching others. PMID:3105633

  19. Build-a-case: a brand new continuing medical education technique that is peculiarly familiar.

    PubMed

    Ryan, David Patrick; Marlow, Bernard

    2004-01-01

    An observation at a problem-based learning, case-building meeting prompted the realization that building cases might itself be an effective educational intervention. We developed a process for a new continuing medical education technique that is peculiarly familiar that we call "build-a-case." Build-a-case has now been used for teaching and learning in many clinical situations and with several kinds of health professionals. Subjective evaluations of the approach are consistently positive, and people feel that they learn from it because it prompts the discussion of practice as it is in their clinics and communities. In what follows, we describe the build-a-case process and our experiences with it and suggest several theoretical constructs that might be useful in promoting thoughtful research on what may become a useful new tool for continuing education.

  20. [The workplace-based learning: a main paradigm of an effective continuing medical education].

    PubMed

    Lelli, Maria Barbara

    2010-01-01

    On the strength of the literature analysis and the Emilia-Romagna Region experience, we suggest a reflection on the workplace-based learning that goes beyond the analysis of the effectiveness of specific didactic methodologies and aspects related to Continuing Medical Education. Health education and training issue is viewed from a wider perspective, that integrates the three learning dimensions (formal, non formal and informal). In such a perspective the workplace-based learning becomes an essential paradigm to reshape the explicit knowledge conveyed in formal context and to emphasize informal contexts where innovation is generated.

  1. Continuing education in ethical decision making using case studies from medical social work.

    PubMed

    McCormick, Andrew J; Stowell-Weiss, Patti; Carson, Jennifer; Tebo, Gerald; Hanson, Inga; Quesada, Bianca

    2014-01-01

    Medical social workers have needs for training in ethics that is specific to dilemmas that arise while providing service to patients who are very ill, mentally compromised, or in a terminal condition. A social work department developed a continuing education training to educate social workers in bioethics related to determining decisional capacity and understanding standards of ethical decision making. Case studies are used to illustrate ethical conflicts and the role of social workers in resolving them. The benefits of case study training are discussed.

  2. A needs and resource assessment of continuing medical education in Haiti.

    PubMed

    Nádas, Marisa; Bedenbaugh, Rachel; Morse, Michelle; McMahon, Graham T; Curry, Christine L

    2015-01-01

    Haiti has a chronic physician shortage, and the country has been facing an increased disease burden since the 2010 earthquake and the subsequent introduction of cholera. In such resource-challenged settings, access to postgraduate medical education often is limited due to inadequate financial, structural, and academic resources. A crucial component to improved health in Haiti is the expansion of continuing medical education (CME). To our knowledge there have been no previous studies investigating the continuing professional development needs of Haitian physicians working in this context. The objectives of this study are to describe the educational resources available to Haitian physicians and to understand their continuing professional development needs. We performed a needs and resource assessment of CME available to Haitian physicians using surveys and focus groups. We surveyed 62 physicians and led 3 focus groups. Questions gathered data on physicians' access to educational resources. Descriptive statistics were calculated from surveys, and focus group transcripts were manually reviewed for themes. In all, 82 conference attendees were invited to participate. Of these, 62 physicians completed the needs and resource assessment survey. Of the participants, 16% had a medical library at work and 31% had access to a computer at work. Educational conferences were available at work for 27% of participants, and 50% attended conferences outside of work. Less than half (45%) identified a clinical mentor. Focus group participants described inadequate tangible and reference resources, lack of colleague support, and lack of avenues for specialty training and employment. In this needs assessment, Haitian physicians identified lack of support for clinical decision making, poor access to CME activities, limited professional development, and absence of employment opportunities as key areas of need in support of their clinical and professional work. Copyright © 2015 The Authors

  3. Online continuing medical education (CME) for GPs: does it work? A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Thepwongsa, Isaraporn; Kirby, Catherine N; Schattner, Peter; Piterman, Leon

    2014-10-01

    Numerous studies have assessed the effectiveness of online continuing medical education (CME) designed to improve healthcare professionals' care of patients. The effects of online educational interventions targeted at general practitioners (GP), however, have not been systematically reviewed. A computer search was conducted through seven databases for studies assessing changes in GPs' knowledge and practice, or patient outcomes following an online educational intervention. Eleven studies met the eligibility criteria. Most studies (8/11, 72.7%) found a significant improvement in at least one of the following outcomes: satisfaction, knowledge or practice change. There was little evidence for the impact of online CME on patient outcomes. Variability in study design, characteristics of online and outcome measures limited conclusions on the effects of online CME. Online CME could improve GP satisfaction, knowledge and practices but there are very few well-designed studies that focus on this delivery method of GP education.

  4. Perspective: delivering effective and engaging continuing medical education on physicians' disruptive behavior.

    PubMed

    McLaren, Kimberly; Lord, Julie; Murray, Suzanne

    2011-05-01

    Education about physicians' disruptive behavior is relevant for practicing physicians, who must demonstrate competence in professionalism for maintenance of certification. In addition, physicians need to know about newer regulatory standards that define disruptive behavior and mandated processes for dealing with such behavior, as health care organizations are now charged with having formal policies addressing this issue. There is a growing literature about dealing with disruptive behavior, but it has not addressed education, including continuing medical education (CME), aimed at reducing or preventing disruptive behavior. The authors suggest specific strategies for such CME educational programs, including knowing the audience before the presentation, avoiding potential pitfalls, defusing defensiveness, and increasing audience "buy-in." They present two viewpoints from which to approach the topic of disruptive behavior, depending on the audience: "rekindling of values" and "risk reduction." The authors also recommend interactive teaching methods designed to maximize audience participation and foster self-awareness and reflection.

  5. Online nutrition and T2DM continuing medical education course launched on state-level medical association.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Kristen K; Murano, Peter S

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this research study was to determine whether a 1-hour online continuing medical education (CME) course focused on nutrition for type 2 diabetes would result in a gain in nutrition knowledge by practicing physicians. A practicing physician and dietitian collaborated to develop an online CME course (both webinar and self-study versions) on type 2 diabetes. This 1-hour accredited course was launched through the state-level medical association's education library, available to all physicians. Physicians (n=43) registered for the course, and of those, 31 completed the course in its entirety. A gain in knowledge was found when comparing pre- versus post-test scores related to the online nutrition CME (P<0.0001). Online CME courses launched via state-level medical associations offer convenient continuing education to assist practicing physicians in addressing patient nutrition and lifestyle concerns related to chronic disease. The present diabetes CME one-credit course allowed physicians to develop basic nutrition care concepts on this topic to assist patients in a better way.

  6. How to fill an application for accreditation of Continuing Medical Education activity in Allergology.

    PubMed

    Negro Alvarez, J M; Molina Durán, F; Pallarés Neila, L; Aguinaga Ontoso, E; Sanz Gómez, J M; Guillen-Grima, F; Annan, J W

    2008-01-01

    Continuing medical education (CME) is a critical tool as well as a generally accepted concern for physicians, while being both a commitment and an obligation for the Administration. In Spain, during the past decades, CME has been a constant concern of many groups; however, it was not until the end of the eighties when efforts at accreditation began to emerge. A significant step was the establishment of the Commission on Continuing Education of Health Professions of the National Health System, an agency of the Consejo Interterritorial (Inter-regional Council), whose accreditation system started in 1998, using the figure of Sector Conference, included in Articles 5 and 8 of the Ley de Régimen Jurídico de las Administraciones Públicas y del Procedimiento Administrativo Común (Law on Legal Regime of Public Administration and Common Administrative Procedures), as Senior Technical Body on the matter. Since then, various Regional Committees and the Spanish Accreditation System of Continuing Medical Education (SEAFORMEC) have been created. Although we earlier published a guide, in this manuscript we have updated the steps that must be taken to apply for accreditation of CME activity in Allergology, explaining the different items in the official application form, clarifying to whom the request should be addressed, and outlining the foundations on which the activities will be evaluated for accreditation purposes, in order to ensure that the training meets the highest standards for quality, so that the objectives that lead to achieving maximum performance and competence of health professionals may be reached.

  7. Managing conflicts of interest in continuing medical education: a comparison of policies.

    PubMed

    Lisi, Anthony J

    2009-01-01

    Altruism is a central underpinning of professional behavior; however physicians may face instances in which their secondary (financial) interest is in competition with their primary (patient health, research integrity, professional education) interests. Most medical institutions have developed policies to manage conflicts of interest, but chiropractic institutions, organizations and providers may not be well-acquainted with such policies. To compare the policies of the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) and the North American Spine Society (NASS) regarding management of conflicts of interest in continuing medical education (CME). A qualitative review of published policies of the VA and NASS was performed. The policies of each organization were retrieved and reviewed, and data were entered into a spreadsheet for comparison. Content experts at each organization were contacted to provide additional information. The VA and NASS provide explicit, similar policies to manage conflicts of interest in CME. Proposed speakers are required to disclose the nature and value of financial relationships relevant to content of their planned talk/presentation. Procedures for committee review, mitigation of conflict, or prohibiting the participation of a given speaker have been described. Disclosure must be made to the attendees of an educational activity in printed materials and at the time of presentation. The VA and NASS appear similar in their policies to manage conflicts of interest in CME. The policies of the VA and NASS may provide examples for the chiropractic profession to consider in relation to chiropractic continuing education.

  8. Paediatric continuing medical education needs and preferences of UNRWA physicians in Jordan.

    PubMed

    Nasir, A; Khader, A; Nasir, L; Abuzayed, I; Seita, A

    2016-04-19

    Most physicians who work in the United Nations Relief and Works Agency (UNRWA) infant and child health programme in Jordan are general practitioners with no postgraduate training in paediatrics. Furthermore, in resource-poor or remote settings, the ability to deliver live continuing medical education (CME) is often limited. A questionnaire exploring the resources available for accessing CME, preferences for types of CME, current sources of CME and topics of interest in the field of paediatric care was sent to all 92 physicians practising in UNRWA clinics in Jordan. Of the 89 respondents 80% had attended live medical lectures for CME and 70% CME meetings. Despite most physicians having access to the Internet only 52.8% were interested in Internet-based courses for accessing CME. There was a statistically significant relationship between year of graduation from medical school and preference for Internet-based CME. Implications for CME participation and paediatric CME topics are discussed.

  9. Association between participation and compliance with Continuing Medical Education and care production by physicians: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Carrera, Renato Melli; Cendoroglo, Miguel; Gonçales, Paulo David Scatena; Marques, Flavio Rocha Brito; Sardenberg, Camila; Glezer, Milton; dos Santos, Oscar Fernando Pavão; Rizzo, Luiz Vicente; Lottenberg, Claudio Luiz; Schvartsman, Cláudio

    2015-01-01

    Objective Physician participation in Continuing Medical Education programs may be influenced by a number of factors. To evaluate the factors associated with compliance with the Continuing Medical Education requirements at a private hospital, we investigated whether physicians’ activity, measured by volumes of admissions and procedures, was associated with obtaining 40 Continuing Medical Education credits (40 hours of activities) in a 12-month cycle. Methods In an exclusive and non-mandatory Continuing Medical Education program, we collected physicians’ numbers of hospital admissions and numbers of surgical procedures performed. We also analyzed data on physicians’ time since graduation, age, and gender. Results A total of 3,809 credentialed, free-standing, private practice physicians were evaluated. Univariate analysis showed that the Continuing Medical Education requirements were more likely to be achieved by male physicians (odds ratio 1.251; p=0.009) and who had a higher number of hospital admissions (odds ratio 1.022; p<0.001). Multivariate analysis showed that age and number of hospital admissions were associated with achievement of the Continuing Medical Education requirements. Each hospital admission increased the chance of achieving the requirements by 0.4%. Among physicians who performed surgical procedures, multivariate analysis showed that male physicians were 1.3 time more likely to achieve the Continuing Medical Education requirements than female physicians. Each surgical procedure performed increased the chance of achieving the requirements by 1.4%. Conclusion The numbers of admissions and number of surgical procedures performed by physicians at our hospital were associated with the likelihood of meeting the Continuing Medical Education requirements. These findings help to shed new light on our Continuing Medical Education program. PMID:25807247

  10. Information technology and its role in anaesthesia training and continuing medical education.

    PubMed

    Chu, Larry F; Erlendson, Matthew J; Sun, John S; Clemenson, Anna M; Martin, Paul; Eng, Reuben L

    2012-03-01

    Today's educators are faced with substantial challenges in the use of information technology for anaesthesia training and continuing medical education. Millennial learners have uniquely different learning styles than previous generations of students. These preferences distinctly incorporate the use of digital information technologies and social technologies to support learning. To be effective teachers, modern educators must be familiar with these new information technologies and understand how to use them for medical education. Examples of new information technologies include learning management systems, lecture capture, social media (YouTube, Flickr), social networking (Facebook), Web 2.0, multimedia (video learning triggers and point-of-view video) and mobile computing applications. The information technology challenges for educators in the twenty-first century include: (a) understanding how technology shapes the learning preferences of today's anaesthesia residents, (b) distinguishing between the function and properties of new learning technologies and (c) properly using these learning technologies to enhance the anaesthesia curriculum. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. An assessment of practice support and continuing medical education needs of rural Pennsylvania family physicians.

    PubMed

    Forti, E M; Martin, K E; Jones, R L; Herman, J M

    1996-01-01

    Family physicians provide the greatest proportion of care in rural communities. Yet, the number of physicians choosing family practice and rural practice has continued to decline. Undesirable aspects of rural practice, such as professional isolation and a lack of or inadequate resources, are assumed to be associated with this decline. This article reports on the practice support and continuing medical education needs of rural family physicians. A mail survey was conducted in 1993 on a purposive sample of family physicians in 39 of 67 rural-designated or urban Pennsylvania counties with low population densities. The physicians identified needs that included patient education materials and programs, community health promotion, federal regulation updates, technical assistance with computers and business management, database software and a videotape lending library, a drug hotline, and mini-fellowships on clinical skill development. A majority of respondents were willing to participate in clinical educational experiences for students and residents. Some physicians indicated a lack of interest in access to information through telecommunications, e.g., video conference referrals and consultations. Overall, findings revealed that family physicians need and are receptive to a variety of practice support and continuing education programs. A practice support program coupled with policy coordination among public and private organizations is likely to lessen complaints by rural primary care physicians.

  12. Continuing medical education as a national strategy to improve access to primary care in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the development, implementation, and evaluation of an educational program in family medicine for general practitioners in Saudi Arabia from 2009 to 2011. A continuing medical education program called Family Medicine Education (FAME) was developed with 7 modules each consisting of 12-14 hours of teaching to be delivered in 3 day blocks, over 45 days. Twenty percent (2,761) of all general practitioners participated in the FAME program. Initial assessment of the program showed significant improvement of knowledge from scores of 49% on a pre-test to 89% on post-tests. FAME program in Saudi Arabia facilitated primary care physicians’ knowledge. PMID:24250833

  13. A method of self-directed learning in continuing medical education with implications for recertification.

    PubMed

    Manning, P R; Clintworth, W A; Sinopoli, L M; Taylor, J P; Krochalk, P C; Gilman, N J; Denson, T A; Stufflebeam, D L; Knowles, M S

    1987-12-01

    A method of self-directed learning for physicians that can be used to satisfy a portion of specialty board recertification requirements integrates contract learning (self-formulated learning plans), information brokering (linking physicians with consultants and community resources), and collegial networking (discussion groups). The method encourages physicians to focus on educational objectives, supplies learning resources, and promotes interactions with colleagues in study groups. Fifty-nine (53%) of the 102 learning goals update physicians' knowledge. Print sources and discussions with experts were the commonest resources used. Forty-five (49%) of 91 participants completed their learning plans. Forty-nine (74%) completed projects were judged successful in achieving their goals. Twenty-five (45%) of 56 physicians responding to a questionnaire stated that the method was superior to traditional continuing medical education. Fifty-two percent of the participants found the method as effective as traditional continuing medical education. Proof of accomplishment allows the method to be used as part of a specialty board recertification process.

  14. Mining reflective continuing medical education data for family physician learning needs.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Denice Colleen; Pluye, Pierre; Rodriguez, Charo; Grad, Roland

    2016-04-06

    A mixed methods research (sequential explanatory design) studied the potential of mining the data from the consumers of continuing medical education (CME) programs, for the developers of CME programs. The quantitative data generated by family physicians, through applying the information assessment method to CME content, was presented to key informants from the CME planning community through a qualitative description study.The data were revealed to have many potential applications including supporting the creation of CME content, CME program planning and personal learning portfolios.

  15. The Haiti Medical Education Project: development and analysis of a competency based continuing medical education course in Haiti through distance learning.

    PubMed

    Battat, Robert; Jhonson, Marc; Wiseblatt, Lorne; Renard, Cruff; Habib, Laura; Normil, Manouchka; Remillard, Brian; Brewer, Timothy F; Sacajiu, Galit

    2016-10-19

    Recent calls for reform in healthcare training emphasize using competency-based curricula and information technology-empowered learning. Continuing Medical Education programs are essential in maintaining physician accreditation. Haitian physicians have expressed a lack access to these activities. The Haiti Medical Education Project works in alliance with Haitian medical leadership, faculty and students to support the Country's medical education system. We present the creation, delivery and evaluation of a competency-based continuing medical education curriculum for physicians in rural Haiti. Real time lectures from local and international institutions were teleconferenced to physicians in remote Haitian sites using VidyoConferencing™ technology. With American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP) and College of Family Physicians Canada (CFPC) guidelines as references, a competency-derived syllabus was created for a Haitian continuing medical education program. The resulting educational goals were reviewed by a committee of Haitian and North American physician/medical education practitioners to reflect local needs. All authors reviewed lectures and then conferred to establish agreement on competencies presented for each lecture. Sixty-seven lectures were delivered. Human immunodeficiency virus/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome, ophthalmologic, infectious diseases, renal and endocrine competencies were well-represented, with more than 50 % of the joint AAFP and CFPC recommended competencies outlined. Areas under-represented included allergy and immunology, cardiology, surgery, pain management, gastroenterology, neurology, pulmonology, men's health and rheumatology; these topics accounted for less than 25 % of AAFP/CFPC recommended competencies. Areas not covered included geriatrics, nutrition, occupational health and women's health. Within practice-based lectures, only disaster medicine, health promotion and information management were included, but only partially

  16. [Continuous medical education of general practitioners/family doctors in chronic wound care].

    PubMed

    Sinozić, Tamara; Kovacević, Jadranka

    2014-10-01

    A number of healthcare professionals, specialists in different fields and with different levels of education, as well as non-healthcare professionals, are involved in the care of chronic wound patients, thus forming a multidisciplinary team that is not only responsible for the course and outcome of treatment, but also for the patient quality of life. Family doctor is also member of the team the task of which is to prevent, diagnose, monitor and anticipate complications and relapses, as well as complete recovery of chronic wound patients, with the overall care continuing even after the wound has healed, or is involved in palliative care. A family medicine practitioner with specialized education and their team of associates in the primary health care, along with material conditions and equipment improvement, can provide quality care for patients with peripheral cardiovascular diseases and chronic wounds, organized according to the holistic approach. It is essential that all professional associations of family medicine as well as professional associations of other specialties - fields that are involved in wound prevention and treatment - be included in developing the continuous medical education program. The benefits of modern information technology should be used to good advantage. The education should be adapted to the needs of family practitioners in terms of the form, place, time, volume, financial affordability and choice of topic. The interest shown in team education should be transformed into specialized programs in the creation of which it is essential to include both physicians and nurses and their respective professional associations. Special attention should be paid to education and training of young doctors/nurses, those with less work experience, those that have not yet been part of such education, those that lack experience in working with wound patients, those whose teams deal mostly with elderly patients, and also residents in family medicine and

  17. Marketing to increase participation in a Web-based continuing medical education cultural competence curriculum.

    PubMed

    Estrada, Carlos A; Krishnamoorthy, Periyakaruppan; Smith, Ann; Staton, Lisa; Korf, Michele J; Allison, Jeroan J; Houston, Thomas K

    2011-01-01

    CME providers may be interested in identifying effective marketing strategies to direct users to specific content. Online advertisements for recruiting participants into activities such as clinical trials, public health programs, and continuing medical education (CME) have been effective in some but not all studies. The purpose of this study was to compare the impact of 2 marketing strategies in the context of an online CME cultural competence curriculum (www.c-comp.org). In an interrupted time-series quasi-experimental design, 2 marketing strategies were tested: (1) wide dissemination to relevant organizations over a period of approximately 4 months, and (2) Internet paid search using Google Ads (5 consecutive 8-week periods--control 1, cultural/CME advertisement, control 2, hypertension/ content advertisement, control 3). Outcome measures were CME credit requests, Web traffic (visits per day, page views, pages viewed per visit), and cost. Overall, the site was visited 19,156 times and 78,160 pages were viewed. During the wide dissemination phase, the proportion of visits requesting CME credit decreased between the first (5.3%) and second (3.3%) halves of this phase (p = .04). During the Internet paid search phase, the proportion of visits requesting CME credit was highest during the cultural/CME advertisement period (control 1, 1.4%; cultural/CME ad, 4.3%; control 2, 1.5%; hypertension/content ad, 0.6%; control 3, 0.8%; p < .001). All measures of Web traffic changed during the Internet paid search phase (p < .01); however, changes were independent of the advertisement periods. The incremental cost for the cultural advertisement per CME credit requested was US $0.64. Internet advertisement focusing on cultural competence and CME was associated with about a threefold increase in requests for CME credit at an incremental cost of under US $1; however, Web traffic changes were independent of the advertisement strategy. Copyright © 2011 The Alliance for Continuing

  18. Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education Intervention Guideline Series: Guideline 2, Practice Facilitation.

    PubMed

    Van Hoof, Thomas J; Grant, Rachel E; Campbell, Craig; Colburn, Lois; Davis, David; Dorman, Todd; Fischer, Michael; Horsley, Tanya; Jacobs-Halsey, Virginia; Kane, Gabrielle; LeBlanc, Constance; Moore, Donald E; Morrow, Robert; Olson, Curtis A; Silver, Ivan; Thomas, David C; Turco, Mary; Kitto, Simon

    2015-01-01

    The Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education commissioned a study to clarify and, if possible, standardize the terminology for a set of important educational interventions. In the form of a guideline, this article describes one such intervention, practice facilitation, which is a common strategy in primary care to help practices develop capacity and infrastructure to support their ability to improve patient care. Based on a review of recent evidence and a facilitated discussion with US and Canadian experts, we describe practice facilitation, its terminology, and other important information about the intervention. We encourage leaders and researchers to consider and build on this guideline as they plan, implement, evaluate, and report practice facilitation efforts. Clear and consistent use of terminology is imperative, along with complete and accurate descriptions of interventions, to improve the use and study of practice facilitation.

  19. Application of International Videoconferences for Continuing Medical Education Programs Related to Laparoscopic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ke-Jian; Cen, Gang; Jiang, Tao; Cao, Jun; Fu, Chun-Yu

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Continuing medical education (CME) is an effective way for practicing physicians to acquire up-to-date clinical information. Materials and Methods: We conducted four CME seminars in 2007–2010 endorsed by the Chinese Medical Association Council on Medical Education. Overseas telelectures and live case demonstrations were introduced in each seminar via telemedicine based on a digital video transport system. Network stability and packet loss were recorded. An anonymous mini-questionnaire was conducted to evaluate the satisfaction of attendees regarding the image and sound quality, content selection, and overall evaluation. Results: Four telelectures and five live case demonstrations were successfully conducted. Stability of the network was maintained during each videoconference. High-quality videos of 720×480 pixels at the rate of 30 frames per second were shown to the entire group of attendees. The time delay between Shanghai and Fukuoka, Japan, was only 0.3 s, and the packet loss was 0%. We obtained 129 valid responses to the mini-questionnaire from a total of 146 attendees. The majority of the attendees were satisfied with the quality of transmitted images and voices and with the selected contents. The overall evaluation was ranked as excellent or good. Conclusions: Videoconferences are excellent channels for CME programs associated with laparoscopic training. PMID:23758077

  20. Continuing medical education and pharmaceutical industry involvement: An evaluation of policies adopted by Canadian professional medical associations.

    PubMed

    Shnier, Adrienne; Lexchin, Joel

    2017-01-01

    Professional medical associations (PMAs) play a crucial role in providing accredited continuing medical education (CME) to physicians. Funding from the pharmaceutical industry may lead to biases in CME. This study examines publicly available policies on CME, adopted by Canadian PMAs as of December 2015. Policies were evaluated using an original scoring tool comprising 21 items, two questions about PMAs' general and CME funding from industry, and three enforcement measures. We assessed 236 policies adopted by Canadian PMAs (range, 0 to 32). Medical associations received summative scores that ranged from 0% to 49.2% of the total possible points (maximum score = 63). Twenty-seven associations received an overall score of 0%. The highest mean scores were achieved in the areas of industry involvement in planning CME activities (mean: 1.1/3), presence of a review process for topics of CME activities (mean: 1.1/3), content review for balanced information (mean: 1.1/3), and responsibility of distribution of funds (mean: 1.0/3). The lowest mean scores were achieved in the areas of awards (mean: 0.0/3), industry personnel, representatives, and employees (mean: 0.1/3), distribution of industry-funded educational materials at CME activities (mean: 0.1/3), and distinction between marketing and educational materials (mean: 0.1/3). These results suggest that Canadian PMAs' publicly available policies on industry involvement in CME are generally weak or non-existent; therefore, the accredited CME that is provided to Canadian physicians may be viewed as open to bias. We encourage all Canadian medical associations to strengthen their policies to avoid the potential for industry influence in CME.

  1. Education techniques for lifelong learning: writing multiple-choice questions for continuing medical education activities and self-assessment modules.

    PubMed

    Collins, Jannette

    2006-01-01

    The multiple-choice question (MCQ) is the most commonly used type of test item in radiologic graduate medical and continuing medical education examinations. Now that radiologists are participating in the maintenance of certification process, there is an increased need for self-assessment modules that include MCQs and persons with test item-writing skills to develop such modules. Although principles of effective test item writing have been documented, violations of these principles are common in medical education. Guidelines for test construction are related to development of educational objectives, defining levels of learning for each objective, and writing effective MCQs that test that learning. Educational objectives should be written in observable, behavioral terms that allow for an accurate assessment of whether the learner has achieved the objectives. Learning occurs at many levels, from simple recall to problem solving. The educational objectives and the MCQs that accompany them should target all levels of learning appropriate for the given content. Characteristics of effective MCQs can be described in terms of the overall item, the stem, and the options. Flawed MCQs interfere with accurate and meaningful interpretation of test scores and negatively affect student pass rates. Therefore, to develop reliable and valid tests, items must be constructed that are free of such flaws. The article provides an overview of established guidelines for writing effective MCQs, a discussion of writing appropriate educational objectives and MCQs that match those objectives, and a brief review of item analysis.

  2. Adapting continuing medical education for post-conflict areas: assessment in Nagorno Karabagh - a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Balalian, Arin A; Simonyan, Hambardzum; Hekimian, Kim; Crape, Byron

    2014-08-06

    One of the major challenges in the current century is the increasing number of post-conflict states where infrastructures are debilitated. The dysfunctional health care systems in post-conflict settings are putting the lives of the populations in these zones at increased risk. One of the approaches to improve such situations is to strengthen human resources by organizing training programmes to meet the special needs in post-conflict zones. Evaluations of these training programmes are essential to assure effectiveness and adaptation to the health service needs in these conditions. A specialized qualitative evaluation was conducted to assess and improve a post-conflict continuing medical education (CME) programme that was conducted in Nagorno Karabagh. Qualitative research guides were designed for this post-conflict zone that included focus group discussions with physician programme participants and semi-structured in-depth interviews with directors of hospitals and training supervisors. Saturation was achieved among the three participating groups in the themes of impact of participation in the CME and obstacles to application of obtained skills. All respondents indicated that the continuing medical education programme created important physician networks absent in this post-conflict zone, updated professional skills, and improved professional confidence among participants. However, all respondents indicated that some skills gained were inapplicable in Nagorno Karabagh hospitals and clinics due to lack of appropriate medical equipment, qualified supporting human resources and facilities. The qualitative research methods evaluation highlighted the fact that the health care human resources training should be closely linked to appropriate technologies, supplies, facilities and human resources available in post-conflict zones and identified the central importance of creating health professional networks and professional confidence among physicians in these zones. The

  3. Adapting continuing medical education for post-conflict areas: assessment in Nagorno Karabagh - a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background One of the major challenges in the current century is the increasing number of post-conflict states where infrastructures are debilitated. The dysfunctional health care systems in post-conflict settings are putting the lives of the populations in these zones at increased risk. One of the approaches to improve such situations is to strengthen human resources by organizing training programmes to meet the special needs in post-conflict zones. Evaluations of these training programmes are essential to assure effectiveness and adaptation to the health service needs in these conditions. Methods A specialized qualitative evaluation was conducted to assess and improve a post-conflict continuing medical education (CME) programme that was conducted in Nagorno Karabagh. Qualitative research guides were designed for this post-conflict zone that included focus group discussions with physician programme participants and semi-structured in-depth interviews with directors of hospitals and training supervisors. Results Saturation was achieved among the three participating groups in the themes of impact of participation in the CME and obstacles to application of obtained skills. All respondents indicated that the continuing medical education programme created important physician networks absent in this post-conflict zone, updated professional skills, and improved professional confidence among participants. However, all respondents indicated that some skills gained were inapplicable in Nagorno Karabagh hospitals and clinics due to lack of appropriate medical equipment, qualified supporting human resources and facilities. Conclusion The qualitative research methods evaluation highlighted the fact that the health care human resources training should be closely linked to appropriate technologies, supplies, facilities and human resources available in post-conflict zones and identified the central importance of creating health professional networks and professional confidence

  4. Improving Continuing Medical Education for Surgical Techniques: Applying the Lessons Learned in the First Decade of Minimal Access Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, David A.; Elstein, Arthur S.; Bordage, Georges

    2001-01-01

    Objective To examine the first decade of experience with minimal access surgery, with particular attention to issues of training surgeons already in practice, and to provide a set of recommendations to improve technical training for surgeons in practice. Summary Background Data Concerns about the adequacy of training in new techniques for practicing surgeons began almost immediately after the introduction of laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The concern was restated throughout the following decade with seemingly little progress in addressing it. Methods A preliminary search of the medical literature revealed no systematic review of continuing medical education for technical skills. The search was broadened to include educational, medical, and psychological databases in four general areas: surgical training curricula, continuing medical education, learning curve, and general motor skills theory. Results The introduction and the evolution of minimal access surgery have helped to focus attention on technical skills training. The experience in the first decade has provided evidence that surgical skills training shares many characteristics with general motor skills training, thus suggesting several ways of improving continuing medical education in technical skills. Conclusions The educational effectiveness of the short-course type of continuing medical education currently offered for training in new surgical techniques should be established, or this type of training should be abandoned. At present, short courses offer a means of introducing technical innovation, and so recommendations for improving the educational effectiveness of the short-course format are offered. These recommendations are followed by suggestions for research. PMID:11176120

  5. Imperatives for continuing research education: results of a Medical Library Association survey.

    PubMed Central

    Dalrymple, P W; Dahlen, K H; Stoddart, J

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a survey assessing the interest of Medical Library Association (MLA) members in acquiring or improving research skills through continuing education (CE). It describes respondents' educational preparation for research and selected research activities, reviews MLA's experiences with offering CE courses on research topics, and discusses MLA's role in providing education to prepare members for research. The paper includes recommendations for improving research skills through CE and other professional activities. Topics of greatest interest to MLA members were survey development, problem identification, evaluation and cost studies, survey methodology, and methods of data collection. Many respondents preferred local courses. Academic health sciences librarians, as a group, were found to be more productive publishers than hospital librarians. Many respondents reported the availability of free or subsidized research-support services, but more than half did not. More than 90% of respondents indicated that MLA should actively encourage, require, or offer research education. A comprehensive plan for obtaining research skills through CE, along with individual self-assessment and counseling, is recommended. PMID:1525614

  6. Do State Continuing Medical Education Requirements for Physicians Improve Clinical Knowledge?

    PubMed

    Vandergrift, Jonathan L; Gray, Bradley M; Weng, Weifeng

    2017-04-16

    To evaluate the effect of state continuing medical education (CME) requirements on physician clinical knowledge. Secondary data for 19,563 general internists who took the Internal Medicine Maintenance of Certification (MOC) examination between 2006 and 2013. We took advantage of a natural experiment resulting from variations in CME requirements across states over time and applied a difference-in-differences methodology to measure associations between changes in CME requirements and physician clinical knowledge. We measured changes in clinical knowledge by comparing initial and MOC examination performance 10 years apart. We constructed difference-in-differences estimates by regressing examination performance changes against physician demographics, county and year fixed effects, trend-state indicators, and state CME change indicators. Physician data were compiled by the American Board of Internal Medicine. State CME policies were compiled from American Medical Association reports. More rigorous CME credit-hour requirements (mostly implementing a new requirement) were associated with an increase in examination performance equivalent to a shift in examination score from the 50th to 54th percentile. Among physicians required to engage in a summative assessment of their clinical knowledge, CME requirements were associated with an improvement in physician clinical knowledge. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  7. Interactive videodisc and compact disc-interactive for ophthalmic basic science and continuing medical education.

    PubMed

    Folberg, R; Dickinson, L K; Christiansen, R A; Huntley, J S; Lind, D G

    1993-06-01

    The authors designed and implemented a complete curriculum in ophthalmic pathology using IBM- and Macintosh-based interactive videodisc (IVD) technology. They also redesigned a portion of this curriculum for a new television-based platform, compact disc-interactive (CD-I). The following issues were addressed: curriculum design, instructional design, the assembly of illustrations and the ownership of such materials, the generation of computer-based medical art and animation, and programming. The issue of academic credit for faculty participating in this effort also was considered. The computer-based IVD program provides the following features: (1) rapid access to thousands of high-quality illustrations with the option of superimposing graphic labels and text directly over pictures; (2) the ability to view enlargements of photographs; (3) an online glossary to view definition of terms coupled with high-quality photographs; and (4) a dynamic introduction to pathophysiology using interactive animation sequences. The authors were able to incorporate the same interactive features into the CD-I version. High-quality medical illustrations can be used effectively on the CD-I platform. Computer-based multimedia workstations are relatively expensive for personal use but may be useful if the equipment can be shared in a learning center or library. Compared with interactive computer-based solutions, consumer-oriented television-based technology such as CD-I is a relatively inexpensive vehicle for providing continuing medical education programs intended for use in the individual practitioner's office or home.

  8. A tale of Congress, continuing medical education, and the history of medicine

    PubMed Central

    Kushner, Howard I.; Horton, Mary E. Kollmer

    2014-01-01

    Well-intentioned attempts by the Senate Finance Committee to improve the content and quality of continuing medical education (CME) offerings had the unanticipated consequence of decimating academically oriented history of medicine conferences. New guidelines intended to keep CME courses free of commercial bias from the pharmaceutical industry were worded in a fashion that caused CME officials at academic institutions to be reluctant to offer CME credit for history of medicine gatherings. At the 2013 annual conference of the American Association for the History of Medicine, we offered a novel solution for determining CME credit in line with current guidelines. We asked attendees to provide narrative critiques for each presentation for which they desired CME credit. In this essay, we evaluate the efficacy of this approach. PMID:24688209

  9. A tale of Congress, continuing medical education, and the history of medicine.

    PubMed

    Partin, Clyde; Kushner, Howard I; Horton, Mary E Kollmer

    2014-04-01

    Well-intentioned attempts by the Senate Finance Committee to improve the content and quality of continuing medical education (CME) offerings had the unanticipated consequence of decimating academically oriented history of medicine conferences. New guidelines intended to keep CME courses free of commercial bias from the pharmaceutical industry were worded in a fashion that caused CME officials at academic institutions to be reluctant to offer CME credit for history of medicine gatherings. At the 2013 annual conference of the American Association for the History of Medicine, we offered a novel solution for determining CME credit in line with current guidelines. We asked attendees to provide narrative critiques for each presentation for which they desired CME credit. In this essay, we evaluate the efficacy of this approach.

  10. What is Taught on Firearm Safety in Undergraduate, Graduate, and Continuing Medical Education? A Review of Educational Programs.

    PubMed

    Puttagunta, R; Coverdale, T R; Coverdale, J

    2016-10-01

    Because there have been no published formal reviews on teaching of firearm safety, we set out to systematically locate and review the literature on curricula that educated physicians and other health care providers, residents across specialties, and medical students on how to counsel on firearm safety. We searched for all papers with outcomes that described firearm safety training programs for healthcare providers and trainees. Studies were identified through PubMed, Scopus, Google Scholar, PsychInfo, EMBASE, and MedEdPortal databases and electronically searched using combinations of words from general topic areas of firearms, learners, and education. We found four programs that met inclusion criteria. These targeted a narrow range of learners including medical students, pediatric residents, practicing pediatricians, and nurse practitioners. Teaching methods included lectures, case-based learning, group discussions, and audiotape training. There were two randomized controlled trials, one cohort design, and one posttest design. One of the randomized controlled trials was an office-based high quality multisite national study, although the focus of teaching was not on firearm safety alone. All studies used different outcomes, and only one study validated the outcome measures. There were no studies targeting psychiatrists or psychiatry residents. These results underscore a priority for developing firearm safety education programs in undergraduate, graduate, and continuing medical education settings.

  11. Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education Intervention Guideline Series: Guideline 1, Performance Measurement and Feedback.

    PubMed

    Van Hoof, Thomas J; Grant, Rachel E; Miller, Nicole E; Bell, Mary; Campbell, Craig; Colburn, Lois; Davis, David; Dorman, Todd; Horsley, Tanya; Jacobs-Halsey, Virginia; Kane, Gabrielle; LeBlanc, Constance; Lockyer, Jocelyn; Moore, Donald E; Morrow, Robert; Olson, Curtis A; Silver, Ivan; Thomas, David C; Kitto, Simon

    2015-01-01

    The Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education commissioned a study to clarify and, if possible, to standardize the terminology for a set of important educational interventions. In the form of a guideline, this article describes one such intervention, performance measurement and feedback, which is a common intervention in health professions education. In the form of a summary report, performance measurement and feedback is an opportunity for clinicians to view data about the care they provide compared with some standard and often with peer and benchmark comparisons. Based on a review of recent evidence and a facilitated discussion with the US and Canadian experts, we describe proper terminology for performance measurement and feedback and other important information about the intervention. We encourage leaders and researchers to consider and build on this guideline as they plan, implement, evaluate, and report efforts with performance measurement and feedback. Clear and consistent use of terminology is imperative, along with complete and accurate descriptions of interventions, to improve the use and study of performance measurement and feedback.

  12. Continuing medical education: interests of former and current residents of a physical medicine and rehabilitation residency program.

    PubMed

    Hart, K A; Kevorkian, G; Rintala, D H

    1999-01-01

    To plan targeted, relevant continuing medical educational activities, a study was undertaken to assess demographic data, practice patterns, and current continuing medical educational needs of former graduates of the physical medicine and rehabilitation program. A survey was sent to the 168 physicians who had completed a physical medicine and rehabilitation residency program from 1961 to 1995 and to the 34 then current residents in the program. Questions were asked regarding gender, year of completion of residency, certification, fellowships, current employment situation, size of practice community, work time distribution, and busiest areas of clinical practice. In addition, from a list of 47 topics plus "other," the respondents indicated in which topics they had a current strong interest in continuing their education. They also responded to questions about their most important considerations when deliberating about attending an educational activity, the amount of notice required regarding an upcoming course, and the preferred duration of educational activities. The response rate of former residents was 56% and of then current residents was 100%. Topics of interest to greater than half of the respondents, in descending order, were musculoskeletal/soft tissue disorders, therapeutic injections/nerve blocks, industrial medicine, back and neck pain rehabilitation, and sports-related disorders. There were significant differences on some topics based on gender, year of residency completion, academic affiliation, private practice, and ratings of residency training in that topic. The most important consideration when deciding whether to attend an educational activity was, by far, interest in topic, followed by provision of continuing medical educational credits. There are among physiatrists several differences in educational interests that challenge continuing medical education planners to determine efficient, effective ways to deliver continuing medical education to meet

  13. Lifetime Learning for Physicians; Principles, Practices, Proposals; A Report from the Joint Study Committee in Continuing Medical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dryer, Bernard V.

    Historical and present-day developments indicate that the continuing education of physicians is one of the most important problems in medical education today. The gap between scientific knowledge and application is increasing, largely because of the rapid advance of research, imbalance in the quantity, quality, and availability of opportunities…

  14. Promoting networks between evidence-based medicine and values-based medicine in continuing medical education

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In recent years, medical practice has followed two different paradigms: evidence-based medicine (EBM) and values-based medicine (VBM). There is an urgent need to promote medical education that strengthens the relationship between these two paradigms. This work is designed to establish the foundations for a continuing medical education (CME) program aimed at encouraging the dialogue between EBM and VBM by determining the values relevant to everyday medical activities. Methods A quasi-experimental, observational, comparative, prospective and qualitative study was conducted by analyzing through a concurrent triangulation strategy the correlation between healthcare personnel-patient relationship, healthcare personnel's life history, and ethical judgments regarding dilemmas that arise in daily clinical practice. In 2009, healthcare personnel working in Mexico were invited to participate in a free, online clinical ethics course. Each participant responded to a set of online survey instruments before and after the CME program. Face-to-face semi-structured interviews were conducted with healthcare personnel, focusing on their views and representations of clinical practice. Results The healthcare personnel's core values were honesty and respect. There were significant differences in the clinical practice axiology before and after the course (P <0.001); notably, autonomy climbed from the 10th (order mean (OM) = 8.00) to the 3rd position (OM = 5.86). In ethical discernment, the CME program had an impact on autonomy (P ≤0.0001). Utilitarian autonomy was reinforced in the participants (P ≤0.0001). Regarding work values, significant differences due to the CME intervention were found in openness to change (OC) (P <0.000), self-transcendence (ST) (P <0.001), and self-enhancement (SE) (P <0.019). Predominant values in life history, ethical discernment and healthcare personnel-patient relation were beneficence, respect and compassion, respectively. Conclusions The

  15. Promoting networks between evidence-based medicine and values-based medicine in continuing medical education.

    PubMed

    Altamirano-Bustamante, Myriam M; Altamirano-Bustamante, Nelly F; Lifshitz, Alberto; Mora-Magaña, Ignacio; de Hoyos, Adalberto; Avila-Osorio, María Teresa; Quintana-Vargas, Silvia; Aguirre, Jorge A; Méndez, Jorge; Murata, Chiharu; Nava-Diosdado, Rodrigo; Martínez-González, Oscar; Calleja, Elisa; Vargas, Raúl; Mejía-Arangure, Juan Manuel; Cortez-Domínguez, Araceli; Vedrenne-Gutiérrez, Fernand; Sueiras, Perla; Garduño, Juan; Islas-Andrade, Sergio; Salamanca, Fabio; Kumate-Rodríguez, Jesús; Reyes-Fuentes, Alejandro

    2013-02-15

    In recent years, medical practice has followed two different paradigms: evidence-based medicine (EBM) and values-based medicine (VBM). There is an urgent need to promote medical education that strengthens the relationship between these two paradigms. This work is designed to establish the foundations for a continuing medical education (CME) program aimed at encouraging the dialogue between EBM and VBM by determining the values relevant to everyday medical activities. A quasi-experimental, observational, comparative, prospective and qualitative study was conducted by analyzing through a concurrent triangulation strategy the correlation between healthcare personnel-patient relationship, healthcare personnel's life history, and ethical judgments regarding dilemmas that arise in daily clinical practice.In 2009, healthcare personnel working in Mexico were invited to participate in a free, online clinical ethics course. Each participant responded to a set of online survey instruments before and after the CME program. Face-to-face semi-structured interviews were conducted with healthcare personnel, focusing on their views and representations of clinical practice. The healthcare personnel's core values were honesty and respect. There were significant differences in the clinical practice axiology before and after the course (P <0.001); notably, autonomy climbed from the 10th (order mean (OM) = 8.00) to the 3rd position (OM = 5.86). In ethical discernment, the CME program had an impact on autonomy (P ≤0.0001). Utilitarian autonomy was reinforced in the participants (P ≤0.0001). Regarding work values, significant differences due to the CME intervention were found in openness to change (OC) (P <0.000), self-transcendence (ST) (P <0.001), and self-enhancement (SE) (P <0.019). Predominant values in life history, ethical discernment and healthcare personnel-patient relation were beneficence, respect and compassion, respectively. The healthcare personnel participating in a CME

  16. Use of a continuing medical education course to improve fellows' knowledge and skills in esophageal disorders.

    PubMed

    Kim, H C; Pandolfino, J E; Komanduri, S; Hirano, I; Cohen, E R; Wayne, D B

    2011-08-01

    Advanced esophageal endoscopic procedures such as stricture dilation, hemostasis tools, and stent placement as well as high-resolution manometry (HRM) interpretation are necessary skills for gastroenterology fellows to obtain during their training. Becoming proficient in these skills may be challenging in light of higher complication rates compared with diagnostic procedures and infrequent opportunities to practice these skills. Our aim was to determine if intensive training during a continuing medical education (CME) course boosts the knowledge and skills of gastroenterology fellows in esophageal diagnostic test interpretation and performance of therapeutic procedures. This was a pretest-posttest design without a control group of a simulation-based, educational intervention in esophageal stricture balloon dilation and HRM interpretation. The participants were 24 gastroenterology fellows from 21 accredited US training programs. This was an intensive CME course held in Las Vegas, Nevada from August 7 to August 9, 2009. The research procedure had two phases. First, the subjects were measured at baseline (pretest) for their knowledge and procedural skill. Second, the fellows received 6 hours of education sessions featuring didactic content, instruction in HRM indications and interpretation, and deliberate practice using an esophageal stricture dilation model. After the intervention, all of the fellows were retested (posttest). A 17-item checklist was developed for the esophageal balloon dilation procedure using relevant sources, expert opinion, and rigorous step-by-step procedures. Nineteen representative HRM swallow studies were obtained from Northwestern's motility lab and formed the pretest and posttest in HRM interpretation. Mean scores on the dilation checklist improved 81% from 39.4% (standard deviation [SD]= 33.4%) at pretest to 71.3% (SD = 29.5%) after simulation training (P < 0.001). HRM mean examination scores increased from 27.2% (SD = 16.4%) to 46.5% (SD

  17. Assessing the impact of a medical librarian on identification of valid and actionable practice gaps for a continuing medical education committee.

    PubMed

    Bartkowiak, Barbara A; Safford, Lindsey A; Stratman, Erik J

    2014-01-01

    Identifying educational needs related to professional practice gaps can be a complex process for continuing medical education (CME) committees and for physicians who submit activity applications. Medical librarians possess unique skills that may be useful for identifying practice gaps relevant to CME committees. We assessed this assumption by assessing a medical librarian's contributions to practice gap identification for the Marshfield Clinic's CME Committee. We reviewed all locally relevant, locally actionable practice gaps identified annually by various stakeholders and presented to our CME Committee from 2010 to 2013. Total numbers of practice gaps identified, total categorized as actionable, and numbers of subsequent activities resulting from these gaps were calculated for each year. Medical librarian totals were compared to those of other CME committee stakeholders to determine the relative contribution. The medical librarian identified unique, actionable published practice gaps that directly contributed to CME activity planning. For each study year, contributions by the medical librarian grew, from 0 of 27 actionable gaps validated by CME Committee in 2010 to 49 of 108 (45.4%) in 2013. With the librarian's assistance, the number of valid practice gaps submitted between 2010 and 2013 by stakeholders climbed from 23 for 155 activities (14.8%) to 133 for 157 activities (84.7%). Medical librarians can provide a valuable service to CME committees by identifying valid professional practice gaps that inform decisions about educational activities aimed at improving clinical practice. Medical librarians bring into deliberations unique information, including national health policy priorities, practice gaps found in the literature, and point-of-care search engine statistics. © 2014 The Alliance for Continuing Education in the Health Professions, the Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education, and the Council on Continuing Medical Education, Association for

  18. The influence of double-credit evidence-based continuing medical education on presenters and learners.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Steven L; Morzinski, Jeffrey A; Radjenovich, Mary Ellen

    2008-07-01

    Medical specialties are adopting methods to improve continuing medical education (CME). A "double credit" option, sponsored by the American Academy of Family Physicians, is now available for presentations submitted and approved as evidence based (EB). To compare usual and double-credit CME presentations to determine differences in preparation resources and time, and to compare conference attendees' satisfaction. Those not submitting double-credit applications were asked about perceived barriers. Three pretested, written surveys were administered at a 2.5 day CME conference held annually in Southeastern Wisconsin. Subjects were 38 presenters and 172 attendees, mostly primary care physicians. Twelve presentations were approved for double-credit; these presenters used a greater percentage of on-line EB resources to prepare their talks (64% versus 23%), and preparation required an additional 4.75 hours on average. Over 90% of attendees perceived greater conference quality due to the EB emphasis. Top barriers to double-credit EB applications were time limits and perceptions that topics were inappropriate. Double-credit presenters use a greater percentage of EB resources, while their counterparts used more professional experience to prepare CME presentations. Attendees reported improved quality and value with increased EB CME. Time is a perceived and real factor in preparing double-credit applications.

  19. Using social media to improve continuing medical education: a survey of course participants.

    PubMed

    Wang, Amy T; Sandhu, Nicole P; Wittich, Christopher M; Mandrekar, Jayawant N; Beckman, Thomas J

    2012-12-01

    To determine continuing medical education (CME) course participants' use of social media (SM) and their attitudes about the value of SM for enhancing CME education and to examine associations between participants' characteristics and attitudes toward SM. We conducted a cross-sectional survey and validation study of 539 participants at a Mayo Clinic Internal Medicine CME course in November 2011. The Social Media Use and Perception Instrument (SMUPI) consisted of 10 items (5-point Likert scales) and categorical response options. The main outcome measures were psychometric characteristics of the SMUPI scale, course participants' use of SM, and their attitudes regarding the importance of SM for enhancing CME. Of 539 CME course participants, 327 (61%) responded to the SMUPI survey. Most respondents (291 [89%]) reported using SM, with the most common types being YouTube (189 of the 327 participants [58%]) and Facebook (163 of 327 [50%]). Factor analysis revealed a 2-dimensional assessment of course participants' attitudes. Internal consistency reliability (Cronbach α) was excellent for factor 1 (0.94), factor 2 (0.89), and overall (0.94). The CME course participants' favorable attitudes toward SM were associated with younger age (20-29 years, mean score 3.13; 30-39 years, 3.40; 40-49 years, 3.39; 50-59 years, 3.18; 60-69 years, 2.93; and ≥70 years, 2.92; P=.02), using SM frequently (never, mean score 2.49; less than once monthly, 2.75; once monthly, 3.21; weekly, 3.31; and daily, 3.81; P<.0001), and professional degree (PhD, mean score 3.00; MD, 3.05; DO, 3.35; PA, 3.42; and NP, 3.50; P=.01). We describe the first validated measure of CME course participants' use of and attitudes toward SM. Our results suggest that CME course directors should guide SM strategies toward more youthful, technology-savvy CME participants and that SM will become increasingly worthwhile in CME as younger learners continue to enter the profession. Copyright © 2012 Mayo Foundation for

  20. Evaluation of the status of laboratory practices and the need for continuing education in medical mycology.

    PubMed

    Rosner, Eunice R; Reiss, Errol; Warren, Nancy G; Shadomy, H Jean; Lipman, Harvey B

    2002-08-01

    A survey to determine the need for training in medical mycology was sent to 605 US laboratories. Training needs were determined by comparing actual laboratory mycology practices with recommended practices, documenting the extent of mycology training reported by employees, and asking respondents to specify the fungi they considered most difficult to identify. The response rate was 56.7% (with only 316 laboratories providing sufficient information). Results showed a large degree of interlaboratory variation in practices and suggested that more judicious practices could lower costs and improve clinical relevance. Only 55.6% of laboratories reported that at least 1 employee attended a formal mycology continuing education program in the 4 years before the survey. Species of dermatophytes, dematiaceous fungi, and non-Candida yeasts were the most difficult to identify. Training may be needed in basic isolation procedures and in advanced topics such as identification of problematic molds and yeasts and antifungal susceptibility testing. Educators should consider clinical relevance and cost-containment without sacrificing quality when designing courses. Support for additional mycology training may improve if hospital and laboratory administrators are alerted to potential dangers and costs involved in treating patients with invasive fungal infections.

  1. Preventive intervention in diabetes: a new model for continuing medical education.

    PubMed

    Beaser, Richard S; Brown, Julie A

    2013-04-01

    Competence and skills in overcoming clinical inertia for diabetes treatment, and actually supporting and assisting the patient through adherence and compliance (as opposed to just reiterating what they "should" be doing and then assigning them the blame if they fail) is a key component to success in addressing diabetes, and to date it is a component that has received little formal attention. To improve and systematize diabetes care, it is critical to move beyond the "traditional" continuing medical education (CME) model of imparting knowledge as the entirety of the educational effort, and move toward a focus on Performance Improvement CME. This new approach does not just teach new information but also provides support for improvements where needed most within practice systems based on targeted data-based on self-assessments for the entire system of care. Joslin data conclude that this new approach will benefit support, clinical, and office teams as well as the specialist. In short, the Performance Improvement CME structure reflects the needed components of the successful practice today, particularly for chronic conditions such as diabetes, including the focus on interdisciplinary team care and on quality improvement, which is becoming more and more aligned with reimbursement schemes, public and private, in the U.S. Copyright © 2013 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The reported validity and reliability of methods for evaluating continuing medical education: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Ratanawongsa, Neda; Thomas, Patricia A; Marinopoulos, Spyridon S; Dorman, Todd; Wilson, Lisa M; Ashar, Bimal H; Magaziner, Jeffrey L; Miller, Redonda G; Prokopowicz, Gregory P; Qayyum, Rehan; Bass, Eric B

    2008-03-01

    To appraise the reported validity and reliability of evaluation methods used in high-quality trials of continuing medical education (CME). The authors conducted a systematic review (1981 to February 2006) by hand-searching key journals and searching electronic databases. Eligible articles studied CME effectiveness using randomized controlled trials or historic/concurrent comparison designs, were conducted in the United States or Canada, were written in English, and involved at least 15 physicians. Sequential double review was conducted for data abstraction, using a traditional approach to validity and reliability. Of 136 eligible articles, 47 (34.6%) reported the validity or reliability of at least one evaluation method, for a total of 62 methods; 31 methods were drawn from previous sources. The most common targeted outcome was practice behavior (21 methods). Validity was reported for 31 evaluation methods, including content (16), concurrent criterion (8), predictive criterion (1), and construct (5) validity. Reliability was reported for 44 evaluation methods, including internal consistency (20), interrater (16), intrarater (2), equivalence (4), and test-retest (5) reliability. When reported, statistical tests yielded modest evidence of validity and reliability. Translated to the contemporary classification approach, our data indicate that reporting about internal structure validity exceeded reporting about other categories of validity evidence. The evidence for CME effectiveness is limited by weaknesses in the reported validity and reliability of evaluation methods. Educators should devote more attention to the development and reporting of high-quality CME evaluation methods and to emerging guidelines for establishing the validity of CME evaluation methods.

  3. Remote and rural: do mentors enhance the value of distance learning continuing medical education?

    PubMed

    Butterworth, K; Hayes, B; Zimmerman, M

    2011-12-01

    Experts suggest that distance learning continuing medical education (CME) is only effective when there is the opportunity for two-way discussion and reflection. The value of on-line mentoring has been mainly studied in the West. We examined the benefits and practical implications of providing mentors for distance learning CME in a low technology setting. We conducted a randomized controlled trial with qualitative and quantitative analysis of the impact of mentoring on completion of CME and quality of reflective learning. Twenty-six of 64 doctors completed all four CME modules. Non-completers were interviewed by telephone. Odds ratio analysis suggested that mentored doctors were three times more likely to complete their CME; however, this did not reach statistical significance (p = 0.07, 95% CI 0.89-10.57). Being in rural practice (p = 0.05) and younger in age (p = 0.005) were significantly associated with completion of CME. Mentored doctors seemed to show a higher quality of reflection on learning. Contact between mentors and mentees was difficult. Both mentors and mentees felt that optimal use of the system was not made. Despite mentors' perceptions that they had little impact, mentored doctors did appear to be more likely to complete CME. Work is needed to increase the quality of interpersonal and educational interaction between mentors and mentees.

  4. Discourse analysis of computer-mediated conferencing in World Wide Web-based continuing medical education.

    PubMed

    Curran, Vernon; Kirby, Fran; Parsons, Ean; Lockyer, Jocelyn

    2003-01-01

    Computer-mediated conferencing (CMC) is a computer messaging system that allows users to engage in asynchronous text-based communications that are independent of time and place. It has been suggested that CMC is an effective modality for facilitating constructivist learning environments that enable adult learners to engage in a continuous, collaborative process of building and reshaping knowledge and understanding. The goals of this exploratory study were to assess the nature of the interactions and collaborative learning characteristics exhibited in World Wide Web-based continuing medical education courseware programs that used CMC and to examine physicians' satisfaction with on-line CMC discussion as a planned learning activity of Web-based CME. The Transcript Analysis Tool (TAT) was used to analyze the nature of the discourse that took place in four different Web-based CME courseware programs. Course evaluation surveys and interviews were also conducted with participants to evaluate their satisfaction with on-line CMC discussion. The results suggest that the nature of participation in the programs consisted primarily of independent messages with a minimal amount of learner-to-learner interaction. Elements of critical reflection, interaction, and debate between participants appeared to be missing from these discussions. As such, these discussions were not characteristic of the principles of constructivist learning environments. Interactive participation will not occur just because CMC is being used. The design of Web-based CME learning activities, participant characteristics, and facilitation are key factors that influence the effective use of CMC.

  5. [Medical technology and medical education].

    PubMed

    von Mallek, D; Biersack, H-J; Mull, R; Wilhelm, K; Heinz, B; Mellert, F

    2010-08-01

    The education of medical professionals is divided into medical studies, postgraduate training leading to the qualification as a specialist, and continuing professional development. During education, all scientific knowledge and practical skills are to be acquired, which enable the physician to practice responsibly in a specialized medical area. In the present article, relevant curricula are analyzed regarding the consideration of medical device-related topics, as the clinical application of medical technology has reached a central position in modern patient care. Due to the enormous scientific and technical progress, this area has become as important as pharmacotherapy. Our evaluation shows that medical device-related topics are currently underrepresented in the course of medical education and training and should be given greater consideration in all areas of medical education. Possible solutions are presented.

  6. Associations between teaching effectiveness and participant self-reflection in continuing medical education.

    PubMed

    Ratelle, John T; Bonnes, Sara L; Wang, Amy T; Mahapatra, Saswati; Schleck, Cathy D; Mandrekar, Jayawant N; Mauck, Karen F; Beckman, Thomas J; Wittich, Christopher M

    2017-03-16

    Effective medical educators can engage learners through self-reflection. However, little is known about the relationships between teaching effectiveness and self-reflection in continuing medical education (CME). We aimed to determine associations between presenter teaching effectiveness and participant self-reflection in conference-based CME. This cross-sectional study evaluated presenters and participants at a national CME course. Participants provided CME teaching effectiveness (CMETE) ratings and self-reflection scores for each presentation. Overall CMETE and CME self-reflection scores (five-point Likert scale with one as strongly disagree and five as strongly agree) were averaged for each presentation. Correlations were measured among self-reflection, CMETE, and presentation characteristics. In total, 624 participants returned 430 evaluations (response, 68.9%) for the 38 presentations. Correlation between CMETE and self-reflection was medium (Pearson correlation, 0.3-0.5) or large (0.5-1.0) for most presentations (n = 33, 86.9%). Higher mean (SD) CME reflection scores were associated with clinical cases (3.66 [0.12] vs. 3.48 [0.14]; p = 0.003) and audience response (3.66 [0.12] vs. 3.51 [0.14]; p = 0.005). To our knowledge, this is the first study to show a relationship between teaching effectiveness and participant self-reflection in conference-based CME. Presenters should consider using clinical cases and audience response systems to increase teaching effectiveness and promote self-reflection among CME learners.

  7. Addressing the hiatus of learning incentives for prevocational doctors: continuing medical education points for interns.

    PubMed

    Agnew, Allyson J; O'Kane, Carl J

    2011-04-04

    To describe the development and uptake of a new self-directed learning program for interns, and to evaluate interns' attitudes towards the program. Using design-based research methodologies, a facility education program was developed to provide flexible learning options, complement the situated learning that occurs at the bedside and foster the development of self-directed and self-regulated learning behaviour. From 2008 to 2010, interns at a large regional Australian hospital (Townsville Hospital) were required to accrue a minimum 100 continuing medical education (CME) points. Mean number of CME points accrued per intern and attitudes of interns towards the CME points system. A total of 30, 39 and 59 interns participated in the program during 2008, 2009 and 2010, respectively. The mean number of points accrued by interns increased from 114 points (range, 60-168; median, 113) in 2008 to 132 points (range, 85-298; median, 127) in 2010. There was a corresponding decrease in failure to accrue 100 points, from 20% of interns (6/30) in 2008 to 8% of interns (5/59) in 2010. Evaluations showed that the majority of interns (surveyed at the end of 2009 [n = 22] and 2010 [n = 46]) liked the flexible learning options of the CME points system, and also felt that the professional development helped them gain better knowledge and skills and develop as a clinician. However, about half of them felt pressured to accrue points. A CME points system is acceptable to and used by interns. This system has the flexibility to be expanded to other junior doctor years and implemented in all Australian facilities to ensure that self-directed and self-regulated learning occurs across the entire prevocational continuum. ©The Medical Journal of Australia 2011

  8. Clinician attitudes about commercial support of continuing medical education: results of a detailed survey.

    PubMed

    Tabas, Jeffrey A; Boscardin, Christy; Jacobsen, Donna M; Steinman, Michael A; Volberding, Paul A; Baron, Robert B

    2011-05-09

    Pharmaceutical and medical device company funding supports up to 60% of accredited continuing medical education (CME) costs in the United States. Some have proposed measures to limit the size, scope, and potential influence of commercial support for CME activities. We sought to determine whether participants at CME activities perceive that commercial support introduces bias, whether this is affected by the amount or type of support, and whether they would be willing to accept higher fees or fewer amenities to decrease the need for such funding. We delivered a structured questionnaire to 1347 participants at a series of 5 live CME activities about the impact of commercial support on bias and their willingness to pay additional amounts to eliminate the need for commercial support. Of the 770 respondents (a 57% response rate), most (88%) believed that commercial support introduces bias, with greater amounts of support introducing greater risk of bias. Only 15%, however, supported elimination of commercial support from CME activities, and less than half (42%) were willing to pay increased registration fees to decrease or eliminate commercial support. Participants who perceived bias from commercial support more frequently agreed to increase registration fees to decrease such support (2- to 3-fold odds ratio). Participants greatly underestimated the costs of ancillary activities, such as food, as well as the degree of support actually provided by commercial funding. Although the medical professionals responding to this survey were concerned about bias introduced from commercial funding of CME, many were not willing to pay higher fees to offset or eliminate such funding sources.

  9. Profile of doctors who participate in continuing medical education in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Shahabudin, S H; Edariah, A B

    1991-09-01

    A random survey of 400 doctors was carried out over a period of 3 months to determine the factors that would facilitate or inhibit the participation of doctors in continuing medical education (CME) in Malaysia. Regular participation in CME was defined as participation in any activity (self-directed reading or attending organized activities) at least once a month during the past year. It was found that 78% of doctors regularly participated in CME. Working in a hospital environment and being members of the Malaysian Medical Association and at least one specialty organization appeared to be important facilitatory factors in CME participation. These doctors also read the local medical journals regularly and subscribed to other journals. In addition, they were more likely to possess postgraduate qualifications and would have teaching, research, diagnostic or clinical responsibilities as major components of their work. They were more likely to practise in the big cities and would tend to be active in at least one voluntary or social organization. If they were in the Government sector, they were more likely to work in the Universities or in the Hospital Division of the Ministry of Health. The 22% who were less likely to participate in CME were general practitioners in the private sector. They worked long hours with day, evening and/or night shifts every day. If the doctors were in the Government sector, they were more likely to be in the Health Division, working in administration and public health, or they were in the armed forces and other organizations such as local councils. They worked in the smaller towns or in the districts.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Commentary: "I hope i'll continue to grow": rubrics and reflective writing in medical education.

    PubMed

    Coulehan, Jack; Granek, Iris A

    2012-01-01

    One respected tradition in medical education holds that physicians should struggle to maintain sensibility, openness, and compassion in the face of strong contravening tendencies. However, today's medical education is structured around a more recent tradition, which maintains that physicians should struggle to develop emotional detachment as a prerequisite for objectivity. In this model, sensibility and reflective capacity are potentially subversive. Reflective writing is one component of a revisionist approach to medical education that explicitly addresses reflective "habits of the mind" as core competencies and builds on existential concerns voiced by medical students. In response to Wald and colleagues' study, the authors reflect on the role of repeated formative feedback in developing reflective capacity. Formative feedback is as critical in this process as it is in traditional clinical learning. The authors emphasize that well-designed rubrics can assist learners in delineating desired outcomes and teachers in providing appropriate guidance.

  11. Continuing Medical Education Improves Gastroenterologists' Compliance with Inflammatory Bowel Disease Quality Measures.

    PubMed

    Sapir, Tamar; Moreo, Kathleen; Carter, Jeffrey D; Greene, Laurence; Patel, Barry; Higgins, Peter D R

    2016-07-01

    Low rates of compliance with quality measures for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have been reported for US gastroenterologists. We assessed the influence of quality improvement (QI) education on compliance with physician quality reporting system (PQRS) measures for IBD and measures related to National Quality Strategy (NQS) priorities. Forty community-based gastroenterologists participated in the QI study; 20 were assigned to educational intervention and control groups, respectively. At baseline, randomly selected charts of patients with moderate-to-severe ulcerative colitis were retrospectively reviewed for the gastroenterologists' performance of 8 PQRS IBD measures and 4 NQS-related measures. The intervention group participated in a series of accredited continuing medical education (CME) activities focusing on QI. Follow-up chart reviews were conducted 6 months after the CME activities. Independent t tests were conducted to compare between-group differences in baseline-to-follow-up rates of documented compliance with each measure. The analysis included 299 baseline charts and 300 follow-up charts. The intervention group had significantly greater magnitudes of improvement than the control group for the following measures: assessment of IBD type, location, and activity (+14 %, p = 0.009); influenza vaccination (+13 %, p = 0.025); pneumococcal vaccination (+20 %, p = 0.003); testing for latent tuberculosis before anti-TNF-α therapy (+10 %, p = 0.028); assessment of hepatitis B virus status before anti-TNF-α therapy (+9 %, p = 0.010); assessment of side effects (+17 %, p = 0.048), and counseling patients about cancer risks (+13 %, p = 0.013). QI-focused CME improves community-based gastroenterologists' compliance with IBD quality measures and measures aligned with NQS priorities.

  12. Continuing education module styles vary when teaching expectant parents about medications.

    PubMed

    Hotelling, Barbara A

    2012-01-01

    In this column, the author presents information from prominent Lamaze childbirth educators and from the literature to describe various options that educators can share with expectant parents regarding the use of pain relief medications during labor and birth. Ann Tumblin teaches about epidurals in a hospital class without losing sight of evidence-based practices that support normal birth. Jessica English focuses her classes on the natural processes of giving birth and spends only a little time presenting information about pain medications. Judith Lothian encourages educators to consider a new framework for Lamaze classes that involves letting go of the details and incorporating Lamaze's six Healthy Birth Practices and storytelling.

  13. Journal Club: Prevalence of flawed multiple-choice questions in continuing medical education activities of major radiology journals.

    PubMed

    DiSantis, David J; Ayoob, Andres R; Williams, Lindsay E

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess whether the continuing medical education (CME) multiple-choice questions (MCQs) in three major radiology journals adhere to standard question-writing principles. All CME MCQs (total of 181) in the January 2013 editions of the AJR, RadioGraphics, and Radiology composed the test sample. Each question was evaluated by three reviewers for compliance with seven MCQ-writing guidelines that have been documented in the medical education literature as associated with frequent flaws in medical CME. Seventy-eight of the 181 (43%) questions contained one to four flaws. A large fraction of radiology CME questions violate standard question-writing principles.

  14. The changing paradigm for continuing medical education: impact of information on the teachable moment.

    PubMed Central

    Leist, J C; Kristofco, R E

    1990-01-01

    The teachable moment is the time when a learner is ready to accept new information for use conceptually or in practice. Adult educators are always searching for that "moment" and models in which it has been incorporated. This article reviews the changing paradigm for continuing education of the health professional and the impact of information from the context of university-based providers of continuing education and information. Providers of continuing education and information face similar external opportunities and threats. The continuing education provider is a "marginal dweller" in the organization. The information provider (the library), although moving in that direction as technology affects the way information is accessed and managed, is much more a part of the core institutional mission. These parallel conditions provide opportunities for both organizations to work closely together to identify successful models to serve the "teachable moments" of all health care practitioners. A range of new library roles that suggest strong interaction with continuing educators is presented. Workable models are identified as well as characteristics of successful models. Suggestions for survival for continuing educators and librarians in "stalking the teachable moment" are discussed. PMID:2328366

  15. Task-based learning versus problem-oriented lecture in neurology continuing medical education.

    PubMed

    Vakani, Farhan; Jafri, Wasim; Ahmad, Amina; Sonawalla, Aziz; Sheerani, Mughis

    2014-01-01

    To determine whether general practitioners learned better with task-based learning or problem-oriented lecture in a Continuing Medical Education (CME) set-up. Quasi-experimental study. The Aga Khan University, Karachi campus, from April to June 2012. Fifty-nine physicians were given a choice to opt for either Task-based Learning (TBL) or Problem Oriented Lecture (PBL) in a continuing medical education set-up about headaches. The TBL group had 30 participants divided into 10 small groups, and were assigned case-based tasks. The lecture group had 29 participants. Both groups were given a pre and a post-test. Pre/post assessment was done using one-best MCQs. The reliability coefficient of scores for both the groups was estimated through Cronbach's alpha. An item analysis for difficulty and discriminatory indices was calculated for both the groups. Paired t-test was used to determine the difference between pre- and post-test scores of both groups. Independent t-test was used to compare the impact of the two teaching methods in terms of learning through scores produced by MCQ test. Cronbach's alpha was 0.672 for the lecture group and 0.881 for TBL group. Item analysis for difficulty (p) and discriminatory indexes (d) was obtained for both groups. The results for the lecture group showed pre-test (p) = 42% vs. post-test (p) = 43%; pre- test (d) = 0.60 vs. post-test (d) = 0.40. The TBL group showed pre -test (p) = 48% vs. post-test (p) = 70%; pre-test (d) = 0.69 vs. post-test (d) = 0.73. Lecture group pre-/post-test mean scores were (8.52 ± 2.95 vs. 12.41 ± 2.65; p < 0.001), where TBL group showed (9.70 ± 3.65 vs. 14 ± 3.99; p < 0.001). Independent t-test exhibited an insignificant difference at baseline (lecture 8.52 ± 2.95 vs. TBL 9.70 ± 3.65; p = 0.177). The post-scores were not statistically different lecture 12.41 ± 2.65 vs. TBL 14 ± 3.99; p = 0.07). Both delivery methods were found to be equally effective, showing statistically insignificant differences

  16. Delivering biodefense continuing education to military medical providers by allowing a biodefense educational curriculum to unfold in practice.

    PubMed

    D'Alessandro, Donna M; D'Alessandro, Michael P

    2007-12-01

    A challenge today is how to deliver initial and continuing education on biodefense to military medical providers in a manner that can be integrated into their workflow and lifestyle. A summative evaluation of a prototypical biodefense digital library (BDL) and learning collaboratory was performed. The BDL posted daily links to biodefense news stories from January 2004 to December 2005. Four evaluations were completed, that is, content evaluation, curriculum comparison with a biodefense graduate program, usage evaluation, and impact factor analysis. News stories (N = 678) came from a broad range of authoritative national and international news sources (N = 178). News stories covered all of the categories in the required and elective formal biodefense graduate program courses. The BDL was consistently displayed on the first page of the top three Internet search engines, meaning that it was among the top 10 authoritative Internet sites on biodefense. Presenting biodefense news stories to busy military medical providers in an organized chronological fashion produces an unstructured biodefense educational curriculum that unfolds in practice and becomes an educational resource that is ultimately well regarded and may be efficient to use.

  17. Continuing Medical Education: A Cross Sectional Study on a Developing Country's Perspective.

    PubMed

    Ali, Syed Arsalan; Hamiz Ul Fawwad, Shaikh; Ahmed, Gulrayz; Naz, Sumayya; Waqar, Syeda Aimen; Hareem, Anam

    2017-03-27

    To determine the attitude of general practitioners towards continuing medical education (CME) and reasons motivating or hindering them from attending CME procedures, we conducted a cross-sectional survey from November 2013 to April 2014 in Karachi. Three hundred general practitioners who possessed a medical license for practice in Pakistan filled a pre-designed questionnaire consisting of questions pertaining to attitudes towards CME. Data was entered and analyzed using SPSS v16.0. 70.3% (n = 211) of the participants were males. Mean age was 47.75 ± 9.47 years. Only 67.33% knew about CME and only 52% had attended a CME session. Reasons for attending CME procedures reported were: need for updating knowledge, skills and competencies (67.30%), opportunity to meet colleagues (18.58%) and presenting scientific papers (8.97%). Mean Likert score was 1.67 (±0.667) for those who thought CME is worthwhile and 1.44 (±0.686) for those who consider their clinical duties as the major hurdle in attending CME procedures. Most common cause for not attending CME was lack of knowledge (32.66%) followed by time constraint (24%). Most physicians were not sufficiently informed about the potential benefits of CME and had never attended a CME session. Most common reason for attending CME procedures reported was need for updating knowledge, skills and competencies while reasons hindering physicians from attending CME were lack of knowledge and time constraint.

  18. Teleconferencing: Cost optimization of satellite and ground systems for continuing progressional education and medical services

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, D.; Lusignan, B.

    1972-01-01

    A set of analytical capabilities that are needed to assess the role satellite communications technology will play in public and other services was developed. It is user oriented in that it starts from descriptions of user demand and develops the ability to estimate the cost of satisfying that demand with the lowest cost communications system. To ensure that the analysis could cope with the complexities of the real users, two services were chosen as examples, continuing professional education and medical services. Telecommunications costs are effected greatly by demographic factors, involving distribution of users in urban areas and distances between towns in rural regions. For this reason the analytical tools were exercised on sample locations. San Jose, California and Denver, Colorado were used to represent an urban area and the Rocky Mountain states were used to represent a rural region. In assessing the range of satellite system costs, two example coverage areas were considered, one appropriate to cover the contiguous forty-eight states, a second appropriate to cover about one-third that area.

  19. CONTINUING MEDICAL EDUCATION ON INFECTIOUS DISEASES: A SAUDI UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL EXPERIENCE

    PubMed Central

    Al-Qurashi, Abdulrahman M.

    2000-01-01

    Background: Continuing medical education (CME) is an important and useful activity for updating knowledge in order to improve for outcome of health care. A CME update symposium on Infectious Diseases was therefore organized at the King Fahd Hospital of the University (KFHU), Al-Khobar, Saudi Arabia. Participants included clinicians, laboratory personnel and nursing staff from different hospitals and universities in Saudi Arabia. Objectives: To report the proceedings of the first CME on Infectious Diseases in the region and to evaluate it using a questionnaire-based feedback. Methodology: This CME was evaluated on specific feedback obtained on standardized evaluation forms provided during the symposium. The responses of 194 participants were statistically analyzed for the various components of the symposium. Results and Conclusion: Salient important issues covered during the program are presented. The CME included five sessions on: hospital acquired infections, immunology, mycotic diseases, malaria, lesihmaniasis and virology. Some lacunae were also identified. The evaluation of the scientific sessions showed a satisfaction level of 3.98 ± 0.59, on a scale of five. As this CME activity proved successful on many counts, it was concluded that it was worthwhile to conduct updates on infectious diseases on a regular basis. PMID:23008630

  20. Game-based versus traditional case-based learning: comparing effectiveness in stroke continuing medical education.

    PubMed

    Telner, Deanna; Bujas-Bobanovic, Maja; Chan, David; Chester, Bob; Marlow, Bernard; Meuser, James; Rothman, Arthur; Harvey, Bart

    2010-09-01

    To evaluate family physicians' enjoyment of and knowledge gained from game-based learning, compared with traditional case-based learning, in a continuing medical education (CME) event on stroke prevention and management. An equivalence trial to determine if game-based learning was as effective as case-based learning in terms of attained knowledge levels. Game questions and small group cases were developed. Participants were randomized to either a game-based or a case-based group and took part in the event. Ontario provincial family medicine conference. Thirty-two family physicians and 3 senior family medicine residents attending the conference. Participation in either a game-based or a case-based CME learning group. Scores on 40-item immediate and 3-month posttests of knowledge and a satisfaction survey. Results from knowledge testing immediately after the event and 3 months later showed no significant difference in scoring between groups. Participants in the game-based group reported higher levels of satisfaction with the learning experience. Games provide a novel way of organizing CME events. They might provide more group interaction and discussion, as well as improve recruitment to CME events. They might also provide a forum for interdisciplinary CME. Using games in future CME events appears to be a promising approach to facilitate participant learning.

  1. WWW-based continuing medical education: how do general practitioners use it?

    PubMed

    Dickmann, C; Habermeyer, E; Spitzer, K

    2000-01-01

    WWW-based Continuing Medical Education (CME) is assumed to have the potential to make up for shortcomings in traditional lifelong learning of General Practitioners (GPs). This is obvious for CME systems with accreditation and control of the individual GP's CME activities but seems less clear for non-controlled CME systems like in several European countries, e.g. Germany. This paper reports results from the evaluation of a German CME website by 59 GPs (internet experience of 20 months on average) during a 4-months period. GPs mainly learned at home after work, with 46% of the GPs visiting the website at least once per month. Self-study and information seeking accounted for 58% of the activities, while communication and interaction were used infrequently. 77% of the GPs judged less but detailed information on selected topics more important than being able to access many but broad contents. GPs mostly prefer established means of learning and communication. It is concluded that the GPs' self-directed individual learning mainly needs high-quality information and well-structured collections of existing relevant WWW resources. Communication, virtual community building and sophisticated interactivity are of little importance at present. WWW-based CME complements existing CME activities, especially regarding individual information seeking on focused problems.

  2. Value of unstructured time (breaks) during formal continuing medical education events.

    PubMed

    Tipping, J; Donahue, J; Hannah, E

    2001-01-01

    Unstructured time (breaks) at formal continuing medical education (CME) events is nonaccredited in some jurisdictions. Program participants, however, perceive this time as valuable to their learning. The purpose of this research was to determine what activities occur during unstructured time in formal CME events and how these activities impact learning for physicians. A qualitative method based on grounded theory was used to determine themes of behavior. Both individual and focus group interviews were conducted. Data were analyzed and coded into themes, which were then further explored and validated by the use of a questionnaire survey. One hundred ninety-seven family physicians were involved in the study. Several activities related to the enhancement of learning were identified and grouped into themes. There were few differences in the ranking of importance between the themes identified, nor were differences determined based on gender or type of CME in which the break occurred. The results suggest that unstructured time (breaks) should be included in formal CME events to help physician learners integrate new material, solve individual practice problems, and make new meaning out of their experience. The interaction between colleagues that occurs as a result of the provision of breaks is perceived as crucial in aiding the process of applying knowledge to practice.

  3. Continuing medical education for pathologists: an evaluation of the Royal College of Pathologists' Wessex pilot scheme.

    PubMed Central

    du Boulay, C

    1997-01-01

    AIM: To discover the attitudes to continuing medical education (CME) of the Wessex pathologists who participated in the Wessex CME pilot scheme and to identify their preferences and difficulties in pursuing CME activities. METHOD: The views of pathologists in the scheme were collected during a period of one year using workshops and discussions. A confidential, anonymous postal questionnaire based on these issues was sent to the 103 pathologists in Wessex who participated in the pilot scheme. RESULTS: A 64% response rate was obtained. The respondents identified lack of time and funded study leave as major barriers to CME and highlighted the gap between CME activity and its recognition and funding by employers. They wanted a wide variety of locally based CME activities to be recognised, and they valued local activities that linked theory with practice. They believed that the college scheme tended to favour academic activities over more practical and locally based ones. They found the paired peer review process time consuming but valuable for identifying their learning needs in some cases, but demonstrated that they have mixed preferences about the way they do their CME. CONCLUSIONS: The Wessex pathologists believe that CME is important and have positive attitudes to it. Their attitudes to CME echo the current literature about what makes CME effective. Unless individuals' preferences and difficulties are taken into account, CME programmes in which they participate are not likely to succeed. PMID:9516886

  4. [E-Learning--an important contribution to general medical training and continuing education?].

    PubMed

    Ruf, D; Berner, M M; Kriston, L; Härter, M

    2008-09-01

    There is increasing activity in the development of e-learning modules for general medical training and continuing education. One of the central advantages of e-learning is flexibility regarding time and place of its use. The quality of the available e-learning opportunities varies quite considerably. For users it is often not easy to assess the quality of e-learning modules or to find offers of high quality. This could be a reason for the fact that despite the huge number of e-learning modules still only few students and physicians are using them. This is although e-learning has proven to be as effective as and even more efficient than learning in the classroom or with paper-based materials. This article summarizes the different models of e-learning, how and where to find offers of high quality, advantages of using e-learning, and the effectiveness and efficiency of such offers. In addition problems of e-learning and possibilities to overcome these problems are shown.

  5. Contents of a core library in continuing medical education: a Delphi study.

    PubMed

    Olson, Curtis A; Tooman, Tricia R; Leist, James C

    2005-01-01

    In developing their professional competence, those who are interested in the practice of continuing medical education (CME) should recognize the knowledge base that defines their field. This study systematically identifies and organizes a list of books and journals comprising a core library (100 books/15 journals) for CME professionals. The Delphi method was applied to elicit and combine the judgments of a fifty member panel considered knowledgeable about the CME field. The panelists participated in three iterations of the survey to first identify and then rank order nominated works. Separate ranked lists were created for books and journals. Forty-four participants completed the study (88% response rate). 268 books and 34 journals were identified. Mean ratings ranged from 4.78 (high) to 1.50 (low). The results of the study reflect the panel's judgment. The list is not definitive; instead, it describes what a select group of individuals knowledgeable about the CME field considered important. The list should therefore be seen as a general guide and a resource to facilitate decision-making, not as a prescription for creating a library.

  6. Continuing Medical Education Speakers with High Evaluation Scores Use more Image-based Slides.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Ian; Phillips, Andrew W; Lin, Michelle

    2017-01-01

    Although continuing medical education (CME) presentations are common across health professions, it is unknown whether slide design is independently associated with audience evaluations of the speaker. Based on the conceptual framework of Mayer's theory of multimedia learning, this study aimed to determine whether image use and text density in presentation slides are associated with overall speaker evaluations. This retrospective analysis of six sequential CME conferences (two annual emergency medicine conferences over a three-year period) used a mixed linear regression model to assess whether post-conference speaker evaluations were associated with image fraction (percentage of image-based slides per presentation) and text density (number of words per slide). A total of 105 unique lectures were given by 49 faculty members, and 1,222 evaluations (70.1% response rate) were available for analysis. On average, 47.4% (SD=25.36) of slides had at least one educationally-relevant image (image fraction). Image fraction significantly predicted overall higher evaluation scores [F(1, 100.676)=6.158, p=0.015] in the mixed linear regression model. The mean (SD) text density was 25.61 (8.14) words/slide but was not a significant predictor [F(1, 86.293)=0.55, p=0.815]. Of note, the individual speaker [χ(2)(1)=2.952, p=0.003] and speaker seniority [F(3, 59.713)=4.083, p=0.011] significantly predicted higher scores. This is the first published study to date assessing the linkage between slide design and CME speaker evaluations by an audience of practicing clinicians. The incorporation of images was associated with higher evaluation scores, in alignment with Mayer's theory of multimedia learning. Contrary to this theory, however, text density showed no significant association, suggesting that these scores may be multifactorial. Professional development efforts should focus on teaching best practices in both slide design and presentation skills.

  7. Continuing Medical Education Speakers with High Evaluation Scores Use more Image-based Slides

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Ian; Phillips, Andrew W.; Lin, Michelle

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Although continuing medical education (CME) presentations are common across health professions, it is unknown whether slide design is independently associated with audience evaluations of the speaker. Based on the conceptual framework of Mayer’s theory of multimedia learning, this study aimed to determine whether image use and text density in presentation slides are associated with overall speaker evaluations. Methods This retrospective analysis of six sequential CME conferences (two annual emergency medicine conferences over a three-year period) used a mixed linear regression model to assess whether post-conference speaker evaluations were associated with image fraction (percentage of image-based slides per presentation) and text density (number of words per slide). Results A total of 105 unique lectures were given by 49 faculty members, and 1,222 evaluations (70.1% response rate) were available for analysis. On average, 47.4% (SD=25.36) of slides had at least one educationally-relevant image (image fraction). Image fraction significantly predicted overall higher evaluation scores [F(1, 100.676)=6.158, p=0.015] in the mixed linear regression model. The mean (SD) text density was 25.61 (8.14) words/slide but was not a significant predictor [F(1, 86.293)=0.55, p=0.815]. Of note, the individual speaker [χ2(1)=2.952, p=0.003] and speaker seniority [F(3, 59.713)=4.083, p=0.011] significantly predicted higher scores. Conclusion This is the first published study to date assessing the linkage between slide design and CME speaker evaluations by an audience of practicing clinicians. The incorporation of images was associated with higher evaluation scores, in alignment with Mayer’s theory of multimedia learning. Contrary to this theory, however, text density showed no significant association, suggesting that these scores may be multifactorial. Professional development efforts should focus on teaching best practices in both slide design and presentation

  8. Content of web-based continuing medical education about HPV vaccination.

    PubMed

    Kornides, Melanie L; Garrell, Jacob M; Gilkey, Melissa B

    2017-08-16

    Addressing low HPV vaccination coverage will require U.S. health care providers to improve their recommendation practices and vaccine delivery systems. Because readily available continuing medical education (CME) could be an important tool for supporting providers in this process, we sought to assess the content of web-based CME activities related to HPV vaccination. We conducted a content analysis of web-based CME activities about HPV vaccination available to U.S. primary care providers in May-September 2016. Using search engines, educational clearinghouses, and our professional networks, we identified 15 activities eligible for study inclusion. Through a process of open coding, we identified 45 commonly occurring messages in the CME activities, which we organized into five topic areas: delivering recommendations for HPV vaccination, addressing common parent concerns, implementing office-based strategies to increase HPV vaccination coverage, HPV epidemiology, and guidelines for HPV vaccine administration and safety. Using a standardized abstraction form, two coders then independently assessed which of the 45 messages each CME activity included. CME activities varied in the amount of content they delivered, with inclusion of the 45 messages ranging from 17% to 86%. Across activities, the most commonly included messages were related to guidelines for HPV vaccine administration and safety. For example, all activities (100%) specified that routine administration is recommended for ages 11 and 12. Most activities (73%) also noted that provider recommendations are highly influential. Fewer activities modeled examples of effective recommendations (47%), gave specific approaches to addressing common parent concerns (47%), or included guidance on office-based strategies to increase coverage (40%). Given that many existing CME activities lack substantive content on how to change provider practice, future activities should focus on the practical application of interpersonal

  9. Improved rural provider access to continuing medical education through interactive videoconferencing.

    PubMed

    Callas, P W; Ricci, M A; Caputo, M P

    2000-01-01

    We sought to describe use patterns and user evaluation of remotely-attended continuing medical education (CME) programs in Vermont and upstate New York. Remote attendees were required to return an evaluation form to receive CME credit. The form included name and date of the program; name, location, and specialty of the respondent; and questions regarding program quality, value, effectiveness, and attendee plans if the program had not been available via telemedicine. From April, 1996, through December, 1998, health care providers from 14 remote sites used the network 927 times to attend 394 CME programs at Fletcher Allen Health Care in Burlington, Vermont. After the start-up period, an average of over three programs per week was attended, with an average of 2.4 remote attendees per program. Seventy-seven percent of remote attendees stated that they would not have attended the program if it had not been available over telemedicine, while the remaining 23% said that they avoided traveling due to videoconferencing. When asked the effectiveness of telemedicine technology for attending, 73% said it was as effective as having the presenter in the room, 23% said it was less effective, and 4% said it was more effective. Major technical problems, such as having the call disconnect during the presentation, decreased over time. There were continuing minor logistical problems common to large group videoconferencing. The telemedicine system has increased availability of CME programs for rural providers in Vermont and upstate New York. Most attendees have found the programs to be worthwhile, and technological advancements have improved the quality of the system.

  10. A Comparison of Internet-Based Learning and Traditional Classroom Lecture to Learn CPR for Continuing Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hemmati, Nima; Omrani, Soghra; Hemmati, Naser

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the satisfaction and effectiveness of Internet-based learning (IBL) and traditional classroom lecture (TCL) for continuing medical education (CME) programs by comparing final resuscitation exam results of physicians who received the newest cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) curriculum guidelines training…

  11. A Correlational Study of Self-Directed Learning Readiness and Learning Activity Preference for Continuing Medical Education among Family Physicians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, Theresa J.

    2014-01-01

    This quantitative, nonexperimental, correlational study sought to determine whether a relationship exists between family physicians' levels of self-directed learning readiness (SDLR) and their preferences for continuing medical education (CME) activities. The study also sought to determine whether years in clinical practice or size of clinical…

  12. A Correlational Study of Self-Directed Learning Readiness and Learning Activity Preference for Continuing Medical Education among Family Physicians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, Theresa J.

    2014-01-01

    This quantitative, nonexperimental, correlational study sought to determine whether a relationship exists between family physicians' levels of self-directed learning readiness (SDLR) and their preferences for continuing medical education (CME) activities. The study also sought to determine whether years in clinical practice or size of clinical…

  13. Using Social Media to Improve Continuing Medical Education: A Survey of Course Participants

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Amy T.; Sandhu, Nicole P.; Wittich, Christopher M.; Mandrekar, Jayawant N.; Beckman, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine continuing medical education (CME) course participants' use of social media (SM) and their attitudes about the value of SM for enhancing CME education and to examine associations between participants' characteristics and attitudes toward SM. Participants and Methods We conducted a cross-sectional survey and validation study of 539 participants at a Mayo Clinic Internal Medicine CME course in November 2011. The Social Media Use and Perception Instrument (SMUPI) consisted of 10 items (5-point Likert scales) and categorical response options. The main outcome measures were psychometric characteristics of the SMUPI scale, course participants' use of SM, and their attitudes regarding the importance of SM for enhancing CME. Results Of 539 CME course participants, 327 (61%) responded to the SMUPI survey. Most respondents (291 [89%]) reported using SM, with the most common types being YouTube (189 of the 327 participants [58%]) and Facebook (163 of 327 [50%]). Factor analysis revealed a 2-dimensional assessment of course participants' attitudes. Internal consistency reliability (Cronbach α) was excellent for factor 1 (0.94), factor 2 (0.89), and overall (0.94). The CME course participants' favorable attitudes toward SM were associated with younger age (20-29 years, mean score 3.13; 30-39 years, 3.40; 40-49 years, 3.39; 50-59 years, 3.18; 60-69 years, 2.93; and ≥70 years, 2.92; P=.02), using SM frequently (never, mean score 2.49; less than once monthly, 2.75; once monthly, 3.21; weekly, 3.31; and daily, 3.81; P<.0001), and professional degree (PhD, mean score 3.00; MD, 3.05; DO, 3.35; PA, 3.42; and NP, 3.50; P=.01). Conclusion We describe the first validated measure of CME course participants' use of and attitudes toward SM. Our results suggest that CME course directors should guide SM strategies toward more youthful, technology-savvy CME participants and that SM will become increasingly worthwhile in CME as younger learners continue to enter the

  14. Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome and the Delivery of Continuing Medical Education: Case Study from Toronto

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Dave; Ryan, David; Sibbald, Gary; Rachlis, Anita; Davies, Sharon; Manchul, Lee; Parikh, Sagar

    2004-01-01

    Introduction: Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) struck Toronto in the spring of 2003, causing many deaths, serious morbidity, forced quarantine of thousands of individuals, and the closure of all provincial hospitals for several weeks. Given the direction by public health authorities to cancel or postpone all continuing medical education…

  15. Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome and the Delivery of Continuing Medical Education: Case Study from Toronto

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Dave; Ryan, David; Sibbald, Gary; Rachlis, Anita; Davies, Sharon; Manchul, Lee; Parikh, Sagar

    2004-01-01

    Introduction: Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) struck Toronto in the spring of 2003, causing many deaths, serious morbidity, forced quarantine of thousands of individuals, and the closure of all provincial hospitals for several weeks. Given the direction by public health authorities to cancel or postpone all continuing medical education…

  16. Continuing Education Module Styles Vary When Teaching Expectant Parents About Medications

    PubMed Central

    Hotelling, Barbara A.

    2012-01-01

    In this column, the author presents information from prominent Lamaze childbirth educators and from the literature to describe various options that educators can share with expectant parents regarding the use of pain relief medications during labor and birth. Ann Tumblin teaches about epidurals in a hospital class without losing sight of evidence-based practices that support normal birth. Jessica English focuses her classes on the natural processes of giving birth and spends only a little time presenting information about pain medications. Judith Lothian encourages educators to consider a new framework for Lamaze classes that involves letting go of the details and incorporating Lamaze’s six Healthy Birth Practices and storytelling. PMID:23277731

  17. Presentation of evidence in continuing medical education programs: a mixed methods study.

    PubMed

    Allen, Michael; MacLeod, Tanya; Handfield-Jones, Richard; Sinclair, Douglas; Fleming, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Clinical trial data can be presented in ways that exaggerate treatment effectiveness. Physicians consider therapy more effective, and may be more likely to make inappropriate practice changes, when data are presented in relative terms such as relative risk reduction rather than in absolute terms such as absolute risk reduction and number needed to treat. Our purpose was to determine (1) how frequently continuing medical education (CME) speakers present research data in relative terms compared to absolute terms; (2) how knowledgeable CME speakers and learners are about these terms; and (3) how CME learners want these terms presented. Analysis of videotapes and PowerPoint slides of 26 CME presentations, questionnaire survey of CME speakers and learners, and focus groups with learners. Speakers presented data more frequently in relative than absolute terms, but most frequently in general terms such as frequencies, percentages, graphs, and P-values with no data. Of 1367 PowerPoint slides, 269 presented research data, and of these, 225 (84%) presented data in general terms, 50 (19%) in relative terms and 19 (7%) in absolute terms. CME speakers understood relative and absolute terms better than learners. Approximately 25-35% of speakers and 45-65% of learners could not correctly calculate relative risk reduction, absolute risk reduction, and number needed to treat. Learners wished to have these terms presented in CME programs in a consistent and easily understood format and requested a brief review of them at the beginning of CME programs. Presentation of research data in most CME programs is inadequate to allow learners to make fully informed therapeutic decisions. Speakers and learners need professional development to improve their presentation and understanding of research data.

  18. Continuing Medical Education and Attitudes of Health Care Providers toward Treating Diabetes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharp, Lisa K.; Lipsky, Martin S.

    2002-01-01

    Health care providers who attended a continuing education program on type 2 diabetes (n=315) completed pre/post assessments; 146 completed 3-month follow-ups. Physicians had significantly more positive attitude changes than physician assistants, nurse practitioners, and nurses. All groups had more positive attitudes toward treating diabetes, but…

  19. Physicians' and Patients' Attitudes toward Manual Medicine: Implications for Continuing Medical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoll, Scott T.; Russo, David P.; Atchison, James W.

    2003-01-01

    In a survey of 165 physicians and 166 patients, the majority felt that manual medicine (musculoskeletal manipulation) was safe, beneficial, and appropriate in primary care. Only 40% of physicians had relevant training; 56% were willing to pay to acquire appropriate continuing education credits. (Contains 23 references.) (SK)

  20. Impact on Clinical Behavior of Face-to-Face Continuing Medical Education Blended with Online Spaced Education: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Timothy; Long, Andrea; Chopra, Sanjiv; Kerfoot, B. Price

    2011-01-01

    Background: Spaced education (SE) is a novel, evidence-based form of online learning. We investigated whether an SE program following a face-to-face continuing medical education (CME) course could enhance the course's impact on providers' clinical behaviors. Methods: This randomized controlled trial was conducted from March 2009 to April 2010,…

  1. Leveraging Social Media to Promote Evidence-Based Continuing Medical Education.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Simone; Hebert, Paul; Korenstein, Deborah; Ryan, Mark; Jordan, William B; Keyhani, Salomeh

    2017-01-01

    New dissemination methods are needed to engage physicians in evidence-based continuing medical education (CME). To examine the effectiveness of social media in engaging physicians in non-industry-sponsored CME. We tested the effect of different media platforms (e-mail, Facebook, paid Facebook and Twitter), CME topics, and different "hooks" (e.g., Q&A, clinical pearl and best evidence) on driving clicks to a landing site featuring non-industry sponsored CME. We modelled the effects of social media platform, CME topic, and hook using negative binomial regression on clicks to a single landing site. We used clicks to landing site adjusted for exposure and message number to calculate rate ratios. To understand how physicians interact with CME content on social media, we also conducted interviews with 10 physicians. The National Physicians Alliance (NPA) membership. NPA e-mail recipients, Facebook followers and friends, and Twitter followers. Clicks to the NPA's CME landing site. On average, 4,544 recipients received each message. Messages generated a total of 592 clicks to the landing site, for a rate of 5.4 clicks per 1000 recipients exposed. There were 5.4 clicks from e-mail, 11.9 clicks from Facebook, 5.5 clicks from paid Facebook, and 6.9 clicks from Twitter to the landing site for 1000 physicians exposed to each of 4 selected CME modules. A Facebook post generated 2.3x as many clicks to the landing site as did an e-mail after controlling for participant exposure, hook type and CME topic (p<0.001). Twitter posts (p = 0.13) and paid Facebook posts (p = 0.06) were not statistically different from e-mail in generating clicks to the landing site. Use of different hooks to engage physicians had no impact on clicks to the landing site. Interviews with physicians suggested that social media might not be a preferred vehicle for disseminating CME. Social media has a modest impact on driving traffic to evidence-based CME options. Facebook had a superior effect on driving

  2. Leveraging Social Media to Promote Evidence-Based Continuing Medical Education

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Simone; Hebert, Paul; Korenstein, Deborah; Ryan, Mark; Jordan, William B.

    2017-01-01

    Importance New dissemination methods are needed to engage physicians in evidence-based continuing medical education (CME). Objective To examine the effectiveness of social media in engaging physicians in non-industry-sponsored CME. Design We tested the effect of different media platforms (e-mail, Facebook, paid Facebook and Twitter), CME topics, and different “hooks” (e.g., Q&A, clinical pearl and best evidence) on driving clicks to a landing site featuring non-industry sponsored CME. We modelled the effects of social media platform, CME topic, and hook using negative binomial regression on clicks to a single landing site. We used clicks to landing site adjusted for exposure and message number to calculate rate ratios. To understand how physicians interact with CME content on social media, we also conducted interviews with 10 physicians. Setting The National Physicians Alliance (NPA) membership. Participants NPA e-mail recipients, Facebook followers and friends, and Twitter followers. Main Outcomes and Measures Clicks to the NPA’s CME landing site. Results On average, 4,544 recipients received each message. Messages generated a total of 592 clicks to the landing site, for a rate of 5.4 clicks per 1000 recipients exposed. There were 5.4 clicks from e-mail, 11.9 clicks from Facebook, 5.5 clicks from paid Facebook, and 6.9 clicks from Twitter to the landing site for 1000 physicians exposed to each of 4 selected CME modules. A Facebook post generated 2.3x as many clicks to the landing site as did an e-mail after controlling for participant exposure, hook type and CME topic (p<0.001). Twitter posts (p = 0.13) and paid Facebook posts (p = 0.06) were not statistically different from e-mail in generating clicks to the landing site. Use of different hooks to engage physicians had no impact on clicks to the landing site. Interviews with physicians suggested that social media might not be a preferred vehicle for disseminating CME. Conclusions Social media has a modest

  3. Educational needs of family physicians in the domains of health and conformity with continuing education in Fasa University of Medical Sciences

    PubMed Central

    ZARIF SANAIEY, NAHID; KARAMNEJAD, SAHAR; REZAEE, RITA

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Assessment and prioritization are the first steps of planning. According to the family physician's idea, evaluating programs in order to improve them is one of the necessities of promoting quality and increases the efficiency and effectiveness of continuing education. This study aimed to determine family physicians’ educational needs regarding health and its applicability in continuous medical education in Fasa University of Medical Sciences. Methods In this cross-sectional study, viewpoints of 45 general physicians working at Fasa University of Medical Sciences in 2013 were studied. Samples were selected through census. Data collection was done using a researcher-made questionnaire using 10-point Likert scale and a checklist with Delphi technique.  Content validity of the questionnaire and its reliability were confirmed by the experts’ opinion and Cronbach's alpha of 80%.  The data were analyzed through SPSS software version 16, using both descriptive and inferential statistics (mean and standard deviation, standard score (SQ), t-test, ANOVAs). A significance level of <0.05 was considered. Results The highest educational priority was in the field of mental health (SQ= 0.38), and environmental and professional health was the lowest priority (SQ= _0.24). Additionally, within each of the areas above specific priorities were determined. Based on the results of this study, gender, graduation date, cooperation time, and university they were educated in did not affect expressing educational needs (p>0.05). The most educational conformity with continuing education was in the diseases area (topic 27%, content 37%). In the areas of environmental and professional health and health education, compliance was zero. Conclusions The physicians stated that mental health was the first educational need and environmental and professional health was the last one. According to the results, proper continuing medical programs should be coordinated with educational

  4. Educational needs of family physicians in the domains of health and conformity with continuing education in Fasa University of Medical Sciences.

    PubMed

    Zarif Sanaiey, Nahid; Karamnejad, Sahar; Rezaee, Rita

    2015-04-01

    Assessment and prioritization are the first steps of planning. According to the family physician's idea, evaluating programs in order to improve them is one of the necessities of promoting quality and increases the efficiency and effectiveness of continuing education. This study aimed to determine family physicians' educational needs regarding health and its applicability in continuous medical education in Fasa University of Medical Sciences. In this cross-sectional study, viewpoints of 45 general physicians working at Fasa University of Medical Sciences in 2013 were studied. Samples were selected through census. Data collection was done using a researcher-made questionnaire using 10-point Likert scale and a checklist with Delphi technique.  Content validity of the questionnaire and its reliability were confirmed by the experts' opinion and Cronbach's alpha of 80%.  The data were analyzed through SPSS software version 16, using both descriptive and inferential statistics (mean and standard deviation, standard score (SQ), t-test, ANOVAs). A significance level of <0.05 was considered. The highest educational priority was in the field of mental health (SQ= 0.38), and environmental and professional health was the lowest priority (SQ= _0.24). Additionally, within each of the areas above specific priorities were determined. Based on the results of this study, gender, graduation date, cooperation time, and university they were educated in did not affect expressing educational needs (p>0.05). The most educational conformity with continuing education was in the diseases area (topic 27%, content 37%). In the areas of environmental and professional health and health education, compliance was zero. The physicians stated that mental health was the first educational need and environmental and professional health was the last one. According to the results, proper continuing medical programs should be coordinated with educational needs.

  5. Medical education.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, P

    1992-01-01

    In theory, the Medical Council of India (MCI) determines the standards and qualifications of medical schools. It also sanctions curricula and ensures standards. Yet no standards exist on the mode of selection in medical schools, duration of study, course content, student stipends or period of internship. It takes 4.5 years to finish medical school. Students undergo preclinical, paraclinical, and clinical training. Most courses are in English which tends to favor the urban elite. Students cannot always communicate with patients in local languages. Textbooks often provide medical examples unrelated to India. Pedagogy consists mainly of lectures and rote learning predominates. Curricula tend not to provide courses in community health. Students pick up on the elitist attitudes of the faculty. For example, faculty do not put much emphasis on community health, individual health, equity in health care delivery, and teamwork. Further the education system is not patient oriented, but hospital or disease oriented. Faculty should train students in creating sanitation programs, knowing local nutritious foods, and in making community diagnoses. Yet they tend to be practitioners 1st then educators. Further faculty are not paid well and are not always invited to take part in improving curriculum, so morale is often low. Moreover experience in health planning and management issues is not required for administrators. In addition, medical schools are not well equipped with learning aids, libraries, or teaching staff. Tax revenues finance medical education. 75% of graduating physicians set up a private practice. Further many physicians go to urban areas. 34-57% emigrate to other countries. The problems of medical education will not be solved until the political and economic system becomes more responsive to the health needs of the people.

  6. ["Training cum research" an obligatory form of continuing medical education in Croatia].

    PubMed

    Milaković, Sanja Blazeković; Stojanović-Spehar, Stanislava; Marković, Biserka Bergman; Katić, Milica; Zupanić, Gordana; Supe, Svjetlana

    2007-02-01

    Family medicine as a discipline is more than other specialties oriented to holistic approach to patient. The physician has to know and use the possibilities of clinical, first of all somatic but also psychosociological medicine, and to continuously evaluate and follow-up results of his/her own work. The aim of the article is to present differences in clinical judgment before and after postgraduate study in family medicine. A 60-year-old woman living with her disabled son is presented. She visited her family physician many times complaining of a number of symptoms: itching, hypertension, sleep disturbance, poor general condition, trembling. It took ten months to diagnose hyperthyroidism and to begin appropriate therapy. Polysymptomatolgy of the disease based on the patient's psychological and family situation was the reason for the long-lasting wandering to definitive diagnosis. Analysis of the case revealed that neither clinical nor holistic approach was properly used in family medicine. The wrong clinical approach could be explained by fact that this physician worked for years without specialization or continuing education in family medicine. The authors conclude that postgraduate education as part of professional training in family medicine enables physicians to recognize and distinguish the interference of psychological, somatic and environmental factors, which is a major characteristic of good family practice.

  7. The role of audience characteristics and external factors in continuing medical education and physician change: effectiveness of continuing medical education: American College of Chest Physicians Evidence-Based Educational Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Mary Martin; Bennett, Nancy; Aparicio, Alejandro

    2009-03-01

    The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) Evidence Report identified and assessed audience characteristics (internal factors) and external factors that influence the effectiveness of continuing medical education (CME) in changing physician behavior. Thirteen studies examined a series of CME audience characteristics (internal factors), and six studies looked at external factors to reinforce the effects of CME in changing behavior. With regard to CME audience characteristics, the 13 studies examined age, gender, practice setting, years in practice, specialty, foreign vs US medical graduate, country of practice, personal motivation, nonmonetary rewards and motivations, learning satisfaction, and knowledge enhancement. With regard to the external characteristics, the six studies looked at the role of regulation, state licensing boards, professional boards, hospital credentialing, external audits, monetary and financial rewards, academic advancement, provision of tools, public demand and expectations, and CME credit. No consistent findings were identified. The AHRQ Evidence Report provides no conclusions about the ways that internal or external factors influence CME effectiveness in changing physician behavior. However, given what is known about how individuals approach learning, it is likely that internal factors play an important role in the design of effective CME. Regulatory and professional organizations are providing new structures, mandates, and recommendations for CME activities that influence the way CME providers design and present activities, supporting a role that is not yet clear for external factors. More research is needed to understand the impact of these factors in enhancing the effectiveness of CME.

  8. Don't forget the learner: an essential aspect for developing effective hypermedia online learning in continuing medical education.

    PubMed

    Sandars, John; Homer, Matthew; Walsh, Kieran; Rutherford, Alaster

    2012-03-01

    There is increasing use of hypermedia online learning in continuing medical education (CME) that presents the learner with a wide range of different learning resources, requiring the learner to use self-regulated learning (SRL) skills. This study is the first to apply an SRL perspective to understand how learners engage with hypermedia online learning in CME. We found that the main SRL skills used by learners were use of strategies and monitoring. The increasing use of strategies was associated with increasing interest in the topic and with increasing satisfaction with the learning experience. Further research is recommended to understand SRL processes and its impact on learning in other aspects of hypermedia online learning across the different phases of medical education. Research is also recommended to implement and evaluate the learning impact of a variety of approaches to develop the SRL skills of hypermedia online learners in CME.

  9. Peer-to-Peer JXTA Architecture for Continuing Mobile Medical Education Incorporated in Rural Public Health Centers.

    PubMed

    Rajasekaran, Rajkumar; Iyengar, Nallani Chackravatula Sriman Narayana

    2013-04-01

    Mobile technology helps to improve continuing medical education; this includes all aspects of public health care as well as keeping one's knowledge up-to-date. The program of continuing medical and health education is intertwined with mobile health technology, which forms an imperative component of national strategies in health. Continuing mobile medical education (CMME) programs are designed to ensure that all medical and health-care professionals stay up-to-date with the knowledge required through mobile JXTA to appraise modernized strategies so as to achieve national goals of health-care information distribution. In this study, a 20-item questionnaire was distributed to 280 health professionals practicing traditional training learning methodologies (180 nurses, 60 doctors, and 40 health inspectors) in 25 rural hospitals. Among the 83% respondents, 56% are eager to take new learning methodologies as part of their evaluation, which is considered for promotion to higher grades, increments, or as part of their work-related activities. The proposed model was executed in five public health centers in which nurses and health inspectors registered in the JXTA network were referred to the record peer group by administrators. A mobile training program on immunization was conducted through the ADVT, with the lectures delivered on their mobiles. Credits are given after taking the course and completing an evaluation test. The system is faster compared with traditional learning. Medical knowledge management and mobile-streaming application support the CMME system through JXTA. The mobile system includes online lectures and practice quizzes, as well as assignments and interactions with health professionals. Evaluation and assessments are done online and credits certificates are provided based on the score the student obtains. The acceptance of mobile JXTA peer-to-peer learning has created a drastic change in learning methods among rural health professionals. The professionals

  10. Peer-to-Peer JXTA Architecture for Continuing Mobile Medical Education Incorporated in Rural Public Health Centers

    PubMed Central

    Rajasekaran, Rajkumar; Iyengar, Nallani Chackravatula Sriman Narayana

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Mobile technology helps to improve continuing medical education; this includes all aspects of public health care as well as keeping one’s knowledge up-to-date. The program of continuing medical and health education is intertwined with mobile health technology, which forms an imperative component of national strategies in health. Continuing mobile medical education (CMME) programs are designed to ensure that all medical and health-care professionals stay up-to-date with the knowledge required through mobile JXTA to appraise modernized strategies so as to achieve national goals of health-care information distribution. Methods: In this study, a 20-item questionnaire was distributed to 280 health professionals practicing traditional training learning methodologies (180 nurses, 60 doctors, and 40 health inspectors) in 25 rural hospitals. Among the 83% respondents, 56% are eager to take new learning methodologies as part of their evaluation, which is considered for promotion to higher grades, increments, or as part of their work-related activities. Results: The proposed model was executed in five public health centers in which nurses and health inspectors registered in the JXTA network were referred to the record peer group by administrators. A mobile training program on immunization was conducted through the ADVT, with the lectures delivered on their mobiles. Credits are given after taking the course and completing an evaluation test. The system is faster compared with traditional learning. Conclusion: Medical knowledge management and mobile-streaming application support the CMME system through JXTA. The mobile system includes online lectures and practice quizzes, as well as assignments and interactions with health professionals. Evaluation and assessments are done online and credits certificates are provided based on the score the student obtains. The acceptance of mobile JXTA peer-to-peer learning has created a drastic change in learning methods among

  11. Programmes in Continuing Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shah, L. R.

    1976-01-01

    The various types and forms of credit and non-credit university continuing education programmes are described in these extracts from a paper presented at the Hyderabad conference on university continuing education. (ABM)

  12. The Gap in Medical Informatics and Continuing Education Between the United States and China: A Comparison of Conferences in 2016.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jun; Wei, Kunyan; Meng, Qun; Chen, Zhenying; Zhang, Jiajie; Lei, Jianbo

    2017-06-21

    China launched its second health reform in 2010 with considerable investments in medical informatics (MI). However, to the best of our knowledge, research on the outcomes of this ambitious undertaking has been limited. Our aim was to understand the development of MI and the state of continuing education in China and the United States from the perspective of conferences. We conducted a quantitative and qualitative analysis of four MI conferences in China and two in the United States: China Medical Information Association Annual Symposium (CMIAAS), China Hospital Information Network Annual Conference (CHINC), China Health Information Technology Exchange Annual Conference (CHITEC), China Annual Proceeding of Medical Informatics (CPMI) versus the American Medical Informatics Association (AMIA) and Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society (HIMSS). The scale, composition, and regional distribution of attendees, topics, and research fields for each conference were summarized and compared. CMIAAS and CPMI are mainstream academic conferences, while CHINC and CHITEC are industry conferences in China. Compared to HIMSS 2016, the meeting duration of CHITEC was 3 versus 5 days, the number of conference sessions was 132 versus 950+, the number of attendees was 5000 versus 40,000+, the number of vendors was 152 versus 1400+, the number of subforums was 12 versus 230, the number of preconference education symposiums and workshops was 0 versus 12, and the duration of preconference educational symposiums and workshops was 0 versus 1 day. Compared to AMIA, the meeting duration of Chinese CMIAAS was 2 versus 5 days, the number of conference sessions was 42 versus 110, the number of attendees was 200 versus 2500+, the number of vendors was 5 versus 75+, and the number of subforums was 4 versus 10. The number of preconference tutorials and working groups was 0 versus 29, and the duration of tutorials and working group was 0 versus 1.5 days. Given the size of the Chinese

  13. Teaching a Systematic Approach for Transitioning Patients to College: An Interactive Continuing Medical Education Program.

    PubMed

    Martel, Adele; Derenne, Jennifer; Chan, Vivien

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this article is to determine the effectiveness of a hands-on continuing education program for practicing child and adolescent psychiatrists (CAPs) with a focus on best practices in transitioning psychiatric patients to college. The plan was to build on the unique knowledge and skill set of CAPs, use audience and facilitator feedback from prior programs to inform program content, structure, and format, and incorporate findings from the evolving literature. A 3-h interactive workshop was designed with an emphasis on audience participation. The workshop was divided into three main segments: didactics, whole group discussion/brainstorming, and small group discussion of illustrative case vignettes. Improvements and changes in knowledge, skills, and attitudes related to transition planning were identified by program participants. Quantitative feedback in the form of course evaluations, pre- and posttests, and a 6-month follow-up questionnaire indicate that the use of interactive teaching techniques is a productive learning experience for practicing CAPs. Qualitative feedback was that the discussion of the case vignettes was the most helpful. The use of a workshop format is an effective strategy to engage practicing CAPs in learning about and implementing best practices to support the transition of their patients to college and into young adulthood. Comprehensive and proactive transition planning, facilitated by clinicians, should promote the wellness of college-bound patients and help to reduce the potential risks in the setting of an upcoming transition.

  14. Use of flawed multiple-choice items by the New England Journal of Medicine for continuing medical education.

    PubMed

    Stagnaro-Green, Alex S; Downing, Steven M

    2006-09-01

    Physicians in the United States are required to complete a minimum number of continuing medical education (CME) credits annually. The goal of CME is to ensure that physicians maintain their knowledge and skills throughout their medical career. The New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) provides its readers with the opportunity to obtain weekly CME credits. Deviation from established item-writing principles may result in a decrease in validity evidence for tests. This study evaluated the quality of 40 NEJM MCQs using the standard evidence-based principles of effective item writing. Each multiple-choice item reviewed had at least three item flaws, with a mean of 5.1 and a range of 3 to 7. The results of this study demonstrate that the NEJM uses flawed MCQs in its weekly CME program.

  15. Survey on knowledge, attitude and practice about blood donation among continuing medical education (CME) students in Sichuan province, China.

    PubMed

    Gao, Lei; Wang, Qiang

    2017-06-01

    The study was to assess the knowledge, attitude and practice of blood donation among continuing medical education students in Sichuan.This study was carried out on 841 continuing medical education students using a self-administered structured questionnaire. The statistical analysis was done by using the SPSS software.Among the 800 students, 424 were donors and 417 were non-donors The score of knowledge (mean11.71±2.22 VS 8.46±3.27) and attitude (mean 9.19±2.42 VS 7.08±2.02) in donors were statistically significant higher than the non-donors. The moral responsibility of altruism was the major reason for donating blood and worrying of the sanitation and getting infectious disease during donation was the major reason for not donating blood. Being male, aged more than 40, worked in grassroots hospital were predictors of being a blood donor.Blood services should take more efforts to improve donation experience and reinforce the positive KAP of CME students through blood donation training could help more grassroots people to know the blood donation and abandon the prejudice of blood donation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. GaIN (Georgia Interactive Network for Medical Information) study on health professionals' search requests and continuing education needs.

    PubMed

    LaBeause, J; Van de Water, N; Carey, P; Fielder, M; Sorrow, B; Woolbright, C

    1999-01-01

    Health sciences librarians are being called upon to be more proactive in their institutions' continuing education efforts. In an effort to identify whether search requests indicated CE needs, a study was conducted by a group of members of GaIN (Georgia Interactive Network for Medical Information). MEDLINE requests from health care professionals for subject specific clinical topics were collected during a six-month period via a standard search request form created for the study. Copies of all completed requests were collected and broad ICD-9 codes assigned to the search topics. Institutional reports were generated for each participating library to share with hospital CE coordinators. They were also compiled for the group as a whole, and reflected the "hottest" topics requested during the study period for physicians and for non-physicians (nurses, allied health, administrators). A survey to hospital librarians and CE educators showed some value in the reports, but greater potential for further collaboration between librarians and CE coordinators.

  17. Point of care information services: a platform for self-directed continuing medical education for front line decision makers

    PubMed Central

    Moja, Lorenzo; Kwag, Koren Hyogene

    2015-01-01

    The structure and aim of continuing medical education (CME) is shifting from the passive transmission of knowledge to a competency-based model focused on professional development. Self-directed learning is emerging as the foremost educational method for advancing competency-based CME. In a field marked by the constant expansion of knowledge, self-directed learning allows physicians to tailor their learning strategy to meet the information needs of practice. Point of care information services are innovative tools that provide health professionals with digested evidence at the front line to guide decision making. By mobilising self-directing learning to meet the information needs of clinicians at the bedside, point of care information services represent a promising platform for competency-based CME. Several points, however, must be considered to enhance the accessibility and development of these tools to improve competency-based CME and the quality of care. PMID:25655251

  18. Commercial support of continuing medical education in the United States: the politics of doubt, the value of studies.

    PubMed

    Mazmanian, Paul E

    2009-01-01

    The continuing medical education (CME) system of the United States is being questioned for its integrity. Leaders in medicine and in government are asking about the effectiveness of CME, the influence of commercial support, and the value of CME credit and accreditation in assuring CME courses offer valid content, free of commercial bias. Nationally accredited CME organizations received $1.2B in commercial support during 2007, much of it associated with CME in formats shown to be less effective for improving clinical behavior and patient outcomes. There are few reliable data to respond to careful criticism. In 2007, U.S. expenditures for health exceed $2.2 trillion, with physicians responsible for clinical decisions that account for a large part of the spending. Approximately $4013 was spent per physician on CME. Rigorous studies are required to describe and explain relationships of CME accreditation and credit to better education and improved patient outcomes.

  19. The Albany Two-Way Radio Conferences, 1955-1981: a retrospective look at a program providing interactive continuing medical education at a distance.

    PubMed

    Tulgan, Henry

    2014-01-01

    Despite early widespread recognition of the necessity of continuing medical education (CME) for practicing physicians and surgeons, medical schools and national medical organizations were slow to mobilize to address the need. One pioneering program, developed by the Albany Medical College in New York, not only provided CME, but did so in a live distance education format that allowed for interaction between the participants and the faculty presenters. The Albany Program commenced in 1955 using what was then state-of-the-art technology; it exemplified principles and practices that can be seen as the precursors for the distance education approaches used to reach physicians today. This short article describes the contributions of the Albany Two-Way Radio Conferences and places them in the context of developments in national organizations and policies in the 20th century. © 2014 The Alliance for Continuing Education in the Health Professions, the Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education, and the Council on Continuing Medical Education, Association for Hospital Medical Education.

  20. Assessment of instructors' readiness for implementing e-learning in continuing medical education in Iran.

    PubMed

    Eslaminejad, Tahereh; Masood, Mona; Ngah, Nor Azilah

    2010-01-01

    E-learning provides new levels of flexibility in learning and teaching. This contribution of e-learning is dependent on the levels of readiness in several critical factors particularly in an educational organization. The purpose of this study was to assess instructors' readiness and to identify the most important factors that affect their readiness in e-learning in CME programs in order to use the effective opportunities that facilitate e-learning in CME programs. A 5-point Likert scale instrument consisting of two domains (technical and pedagogical) was constructed according to four subdomains (knowledge, attitude, skills, and habits) and distributed to 70 faculty members. A factor analysis was employed to extract significant factors. The results revealed that the mean of readiness on e-learning for faculty members was 3.25 ± 0.58 in technical and 3.37 ± 0.49 in pedagogical domains on a 5-point Likert scale (1-5). The factors such as "familiarity with learning management system," "willingness to teach by adopting a new technology," "willingness to use e-learning as a viable alternative," "ability to deliver e-material and to provide e-content for teaching," and "being accustomed to the virtual environment and utilization of the computer and the internet" were extracted on technical readiness domain. In addition, the pedagogical readiness factors were: "familiarity with online teaching principle and method," "willingness to use technology in instruction and material development," "ability to design content for e-material and online course evaluation," and "being accustomed to providing information back up regularly and employing eclectic methods and multiple approaches in teaching." The findings of this study suggest that training should be offered to instructors on a continuous, rather than a one-off basis so that their IT knowledge and skills are upgraded over time. In addition, results indicate that pedagogical innovations are required to develop and implement

  1. Learning Associated with Participation in Journal-Based Continuing Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Thomas B.; Glass, Richard M.

    2004-01-01

    Introduction: Medical journal reading is a standard method of increasing awareness among physicians of evidence-based approaches to medical care. Theories of physician learning and practice change have suggested that journal reading may be more influential at some stages of behavioral change than at others, but it is not clear how journal reading…

  2. Reinventing Continuing Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walshok, Mary Lindenstein

    2012-01-01

    Re-inventing continuing higher education is about finding ways to be a more central player in a region's civic, cultural, and economic life as well as in the education of individuals for work and citizenship. Continuing higher education will require data gathering, analytical tools, convening authority, interpretive skills, new models of delivery,…

  3. Improving the effect of FDA-mandated drug safety alerts with Internet-based continuing medical education.

    PubMed

    Kraus, Carl N; Baldwin, Alan T; McAllister, R G

    2013-02-01

    The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) requires risk communication as an element of Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategies (REMS) to alert and educate healthcare providers about severe toxicities associated with approved drugs. The educational effectiveness of this approach has not been evaluated. To support the communication plan element of the ipilimumab REMS, a Medscape Safe Use Alert (SUA) letter was distributed by Medscape via email and mobile device distribution to clinicians specified in the REMS. This alert contained the FDA-approved Dear Healthcare Provider (DHCP) letter mandated for distribution. A continuing medical education (CME) activity describing ipilimumab toxicities and the appropriate management was simultaneously posted on the website and distributed to Medscape members. Data were collected over a 6-month period regarding the handling of the letter and the responses to pre- and post-test questions for those who participated in the CME activity. Analysis of the answers to the pre- and posttest questions showed that participation in the CME activity resulted in an improvement in correct answer responses of 47%. Our experience shows that there are likely distinct information sources that are utilized by different HCP groups. The ready availability of a brief CME activity was utilized by 24,063 individuals, the majority of whom showed enhanced understanding of ipilimumab toxicity by improvement in post-test scores, educational data that are not available via implementation of standard safety alert communications. These results demonstrate that improvement in understanding of specific drug toxicities is enhanced by a CME intervention.

  4. Relations between professional medical associations and healthcare industry, concerning scientific communication and continuing medical education: a policy statement from the European Society of Cardiology.

    PubMed

    2012-01-01

    Physicians have an ethical duty to keep up-to-date with current knowledge. Professional medical associations such as the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) support these obligations. In Europe, the costs of continuing medical education (CME) are insufficiently supported from governments and employers; however, medical associations have been criticized for accepting alternative financial support from industry. Medical education and training in research include learning how to assess the quality and reliability of any information. There is some risk of bias in any form of scientific communication including intellectual, professional, and financial and it is essential that in particular, the latter must be acknowledged by full disclosure. It is essential that there is strong collaboration between basic and clinical researchers from academic institutions on the one hand, with engineers and scientists from the research divisions of device and pharmaceutical companies on the other. This is vital so that new diagnostic methods and treatments are developed. Promotion of advances by industry may accelerate their implementation into clinical practice. Universities now frequently exhort their academic staff to protect their intellectual property or commercialize their research. Thus, it is not commercial activity or links per se that have become the target for criticism but the perceived influence of commercial enterprises on clinical decision-making or on messages conveyed by professional medical organizations. This document offers the perspective of the ESC on the current debate, and it recommends how to minimize bias in scientific communications and CME and how to ensure proper ethical standards and transparency in relations between the medical profession and industry.

  5. Relations between professional medical associations and the health-care industry, concerning scientific communication and continuing medical education: a policy statement from the European Society of Cardiology.

    PubMed

    2012-06-01

    Physicians have an ethical duty to keep up-to-date with current knowledge. Professional medical associations such as the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) support these obligations. In Europe, the costs of continuing medical education (CME) are insufficiently supported from governments and employers; however, medical associations have been criticized for accepting alternative financial support from industry. Medical education and training in research include learning how to assess the quality and reliability of any information. There is some risk of bias in any form of scientific communication including intellectual, professional, and financial and it is essential that in particular, the latter must be acknowledged by full disclosure. It is essential that there is strong collaboration between basic and clinical researchers from academic institutions on the one hand, with engineers and scientists from the research divisions of device and pharmaceutical companies on the other. This is vital so that new diagnostic methods and treatments are developed. Promotion of advances by industry may accelerate their implementation into clinical practice. Universities now frequently exhort their academic staff to protect their intellectual property or commercialize their research. Thus, it is not commercial activity or links per se that have become the target for criticism but the perceived influence of commercial enterprises on clinical decision-making or on messages conveyed by professional medical organizations. This document offers the perspective of the ESC on the current debate, and it recommends how to minimize bias in scientific communications and CME and how to ensure proper ethical standards and transparency in relations between the medical profession and industry.

  6. Relations between professional medical associations and the health-care industry, concerning scientific communication and continuing medical education: a Policy Statement from the European Society of Cardiology.

    PubMed

    2012-03-01

    Physicians have an ethical duty to keep up-to-date with current knowledge. Professional medical associations such as the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) support these obligations. In Europe, the costs of continuing medical education (CME) are insufficiently supported from governments and employers; however, medical associations have been criticized for accepting alternative financial support from industry. Medical education and training in research include learning how to assess the quality and reliability of any information. There is some risk of bias in any form of scientific communication including intellectual, professional, and financial and it is essential that in particular, the latter must be acknowledged by full disclosure. It is essential that there is strong collaboration between basic and clinical researchers from academic institutions on the one hand, with engineers and scientists from the research divisions of device and pharmaceutical companies on the other. This is vital so that new diagnostic methods and treatments are developed. Promotion of advances by industry may accelerate their implementation into clinical practice. Universities now frequently exhort their academic staff to protect their intellectual property or commercialize their research. Thus, it is not commercial activity or links per se that have become the target for criticism but the perceived influence of commercial enterprises on clinical decision-making or on messages conveyed by professional medical organizations. This document offers the perspective of the ESC on the current debate, and it recommends how to minimize bias in scientific communications and CME and how to ensure proper ethical standards and transparency in relations between the medical profession and industry.

  7. Distance Education for Continuing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharma, Motilal

    The role of distance education as a vehicle for delivering continuing education in Asia was examined from the following standpoints: facilitating development amidst poverty; making human resource development the prime strategy; overcoming the stagnation of education amidst wrenching change; and using distance education to accomplish those…

  8. Lifelong Learning in Ethical Practice: A Challenge for Continuing Medical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenny, Nuala; Sargeant, Joan; Allen, Michael

    2001-01-01

    Questionnaires and small-group discussions with a physician-ethicist revealed that physicians had very little formal ethics training in medical school. They did not feel they needed a very high level of confidence regarding ethical issues in practice, but lacked a systematic approach to identification and analysis of ethical issues. (Contains 24…

  9. Physician Internet Medical Information Seeking and On-line Continuing Education Use Patterns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casebeer, Linda; Bennett, Nancy; Kristofco, Robert; Carillo, Anna; Centor, Robert

    2002-01-01

    Responses from 2,200 physicians indicated that nearly all have Internet access and use it primarily for medical information and professional development, not for communicating with patients. Credibility of source, speed, accessibility, and searching ease were most important. Barriers included information overload and too little information…

  10. Lifelong Learning in Ethical Practice: A Challenge for Continuing Medical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenny, Nuala; Sargeant, Joan; Allen, Michael

    2001-01-01

    Questionnaires and small-group discussions with a physician-ethicist revealed that physicians had very little formal ethics training in medical school. They did not feel they needed a very high level of confidence regarding ethical issues in practice, but lacked a systematic approach to identification and analysis of ethical issues. (Contains 24…

  11. Physician Internet Medical Information Seeking and On-line Continuing Education Use Patterns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casebeer, Linda; Bennett, Nancy; Kristofco, Robert; Carillo, Anna; Centor, Robert

    2002-01-01

    Responses from 2,200 physicians indicated that nearly all have Internet access and use it primarily for medical information and professional development, not for communicating with patients. Credibility of source, speed, accessibility, and searching ease were most important. Barriers included information overload and too little information…

  12. Continuing Liberal Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, E. M.; Nord, Warren

    1988-01-01

    Liberal education is as essential as continuing professional education, partly because the humanities and liberal arts are "adult matters." Institutions must (1) raise consciousness about its role, and (2) develop concrete ideas for using university resources effectively. (LB)

  13. Impact of various continuing medical education activities on clinical practice - a survey of Malaysian doctors on its perceived importance.

    PubMed

    Loh, Li-Cher; Ong, Hean-Teik; Quah, Soon-Hoe

    2007-04-01

    Medical talks, newsletter circulars, scientific meetings and conferences, and interaction with members of the pharmaceutical industry, have become convenient means of carrying out continuing medical education (CME) for many busy doctors. To study the perceived importance of these various CME activities, a self-completed posted questionnaire survey was conducted among registered practitioners of a densely populated urban state in Malaysia. Of the 172 respondents [male, 77%; hospital-based, 37%; general practitioner (GP), 55%; private practice, 70%; respondent rate of 19.5%], most preferred local conferences and endorsements by local experts to their foreign counterparts. Meetings or conferences sponsored by the pharmaceutical industry were ranked similarly with those without such links, while the reputation of the pharmaceutical firms was of foremost importance. Among GPs (n = 95) and non-GPs (n = 77), medical society newsletters were rated significantly higher by GPs while overseas conferences were rated higher by non-GPs. Our findings provide an important first look at this under-explored area among Malaysian doctors and described a high degree of acceptance for the involvement of the pharmaceutical industry in CME activities.

  14. Continuing Education about Alcoholism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Signe S.; Murphy, Julianne

    1978-01-01

    Describes a statewide continuing education program for emergency room nurses on the care of alcohol abusers. Covers planning and scheduling, resources, format and content, participants, and evaluation. (EM)

  15. Needs Assessment and Telecommunications Cost Benefit Analysis for Army Medical Department Continuing Clinical Education Requirements.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-04-01

    Partial Dentures 20 0 Revised 𔄀 Med 148 and Lab Prescriptions 15 0 Balancing Demands and Resources 13 0 Nutrition and Fitness 12.5 0 Management of...Composite Retained-Acid Etched Fixed Partial Dentures ---20 Efficiency of non-surgical treatment modalities of periodontal disease Medical emergencies...Specialist Personal Risk Program 20 Laser in Surgery: Safety Principles 20 Composite Retained Acid Etched Fixed Partial Dentures 20 Clinical Research Issues

  16. Conceptualization and Reporting of Context in the North American Continuing Medical Education Literature: A Scoping Review Protocol.

    PubMed

    Grant, Rachel E; Sajdlowska, Joanna; Van Hoof, Thomas J; Kitto, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Within continuing medication education (CME), it has been argued that an "authentic" clinical context should be built into CME activities for knowledge to be effectively translated into clinical practice. However, although context is considered significant in the success (or lack thereof) of an intervention, there is a lack of consensus on what exactly context is. This scoping review arises from concerns surrounding the opaque, complex, and potentially problematic relationship between context and the effective design and implementation of CME interventions. In this article, we present a protocol for examining how context is discussed within the CME literature. The specific purpose of this scoping review is to summarize the breadth of existing evidence on context within the North American CME literature. The scoping review methodology will also highlight gaps in the current literature, which can inform future research endeavors.

  17. Does Patient Partnership in Continuing Medical Education (CME) Improve the Outcome in Osteoporosis Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pazirandeh, Mahmood

    2002-01-01

    Patients (n=672) were screened and instructed about osteoporosis; 53 of their physicians attended lectures, a control group did not. A survey of 258 patients showed doctor-ordered screening tests increased regardless of lecture attendance. Increased patient-initiated discussions about osteoporosis suggest that patient education is effective.…

  18. Medical Education in the Anatomical Sciences: The Winds of Change Continue to Blow

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drake, Richard L.; McBride, Jennifer M.; Lachman, Nirusha; Pawlina, Wojciech

    2009-01-01

    At most institutions, education in the anatomical sciences has undergone several changes over the last decade. To identify the changes that have occurred in gross anatomy, microscopic anatomy, neuroscience/neuroanatomy, and embryology courses, directors of these courses were asked to respond to a survey with questions pertaining to total course…

  19. Medical Education in the Anatomical Sciences: The Winds of Change Continue to Blow

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drake, Richard L.; McBride, Jennifer M.; Lachman, Nirusha; Pawlina, Wojciech

    2009-01-01

    At most institutions, education in the anatomical sciences has undergone several changes over the last decade. To identify the changes that have occurred in gross anatomy, microscopic anatomy, neuroscience/neuroanatomy, and embryology courses, directors of these courses were asked to respond to a survey with questions pertaining to total course…

  20. Does Patient Partnership in Continuing Medical Education (CME) Improve the Outcome in Osteoporosis Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pazirandeh, Mahmood

    2002-01-01

    Patients (n=672) were screened and instructed about osteoporosis; 53 of their physicians attended lectures, a control group did not. A survey of 258 patients showed doctor-ordered screening tests increased regardless of lecture attendance. Increased patient-initiated discussions about osteoporosis suggest that patient education is effective.…

  1. The role of simulation in continuing medical education for acute care physicians: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Khanduja, P Kristina; Bould, M Dylan; Naik, Viren N; Hladkowicz, Emily; Boet, Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    We systematically reviewed the effectiveness of simulation-based education, targeting independently practicing qualified physicians in acute care specialties. We also describe how simulation is used for performance assessment in this population. Data source included: DataMEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Cochrane CENTRAL Database of Controlled Trials, and National Health Service Economic Evaluation Database. The last date of search was January 31, 2013. All original research describing simulation-based education for independently practicing physicians in anesthesiology, critical care, and emergency medicine was reviewed. Data analysis was performed in duplicate with further review by a third author in cases of disagreement until consensus was reached. Data extraction was focused on effectiveness according to Kirkpatrick's model. For simulation-based performance assessment, tool characteristics and sources of validity evidence were also collated. Of 39 studies identified, 30 studies focused on the effectiveness of simulation-based education and nine studies evaluated the validity of simulation-based assessment. Thirteen studies (30%) targeted the lower levels of Kirkpatrick's hierarchy with reliance on self-reporting. Simulation was unanimously described as a positive learning experience with perceived impact on clinical practice. Of the 17 remaining studies, 10 used a single group or "no intervention comparison group" design. The majority (n = 17; 44%) were able to demonstrate both immediate and sustained improvements in educational outcomes. Nine studies reported the psychometric properties of simulation-based performance assessment as their sole objective. These predominantly recruited independent practitioners as a convenience sample to establish whether the tool could discriminate between experienced and inexperienced operators and concentrated on a single aspect of validity evidence. Simulation is perceived as a positive learning

  2. Telemedicine for Access to Quality Care on Medical Practice and Continuing Medical Education in a Global Arena

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rafiq, Azhar; Merrell, Ronald C.

    2005-01-01

    Health care practices continue to evolve with technological advances integrating computer applications and patient information management into telemedicine systems. Telemedicine can be broadly defined as the use of information technology to provide patient care and share clinical information from one geographic location to another. Telemedicine…

  3. Telemedicine for Access to Quality Care on Medical Practice and Continuing Medical Education in a Global Arena

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rafiq, Azhar; Merrell, Ronald C.

    2005-01-01

    Health care practices continue to evolve with technological advances integrating computer applications and patient information management into telemedicine systems. Telemedicine can be broadly defined as the use of information technology to provide patient care and share clinical information from one geographic location to another. Telemedicine…

  4. The Effect of Physician Continuing Medical Education on Patient-Reported Outcomes for Identifying and Optimally Managing Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Sara S.; Castle, Patricia H.; Van Marter, Deborah; Roc, Anne; Neubauer, David; Auerbach, Sanford; DeAguiar, Emma

    2015-01-01

    Study Objective: To evaluate the effect of continuing medical education (CME) activities on patient reported outcomes with regard to (1) screening for excessive sleepiness (ES) and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and (2) appropriate referral and treatment. Methods: A total of 725 patients were recruited from 75 providers who either participated or did not participate in Transtheoretical Model (TTM)-based OSA CME activities. Patient reported outcomes from participating (n = 36) and non-participating providers (n = 39) were compared using generalized estimating equations examining random effects of provider as unit of assignment. Results: Patients' reports demonstrate that participating physicians were 1.7 times more likely to initiate discussion of sleep problems than non-participating physicians (t1,411 = 3.71, p = 0.05) and 2.25–2.86 times more likely to administer validated measures for OSA (Epworth Sleepiness Scale and STOP-BANG). Patient reports also indicated that participating clinicians (79.9%) were significantly more likely to recommend seeing a sleep specialist compared to non-participating clinicians (60.7%; t1,348 = 9.1, p < 0.01, OR = 2.6). Furthermore, while 89.4% of participating clinicians recommended a sleep study, only 73.2% of the non-participating physicians recommended one (t1,363 = 11.46, p < 0.001, OR = 3.1). Conclusions: Participation in TTM-based OSA CME activities was associated with improved patient reported outcomes compared to the non-participating clinicians. Citation: Johnson SS, Castle PH, Van Marter D, Roc A, Neubauer D, Auerbach S, DeAguiar E. The effect of physician continuing medical education on patient-reported outcomes for identifying and optimally managing obstructive sleep apnea. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(3):197–204. PMID:25845903

  5. Development and evaluation of a simulation-based continuing medical education course: beyond lectures and credit hours.

    PubMed

    Pugh, Carla M; Arafat, Fahd O; Kwan, Calvin; Cohen, Elaine R; Kurashima, Yo; Vassiliou, Melina C; Fried, Gerald M

    2015-10-01

    The aim of our study was to modify our previously developed laparoscopic ventral hernia (LVH) simulator to increase difficulty and then reassess validity and feasibility for using the simulator in a newly developed simulation-based continuing medical education course. Participants (N = 30) were practicing surgeons who signed up for a hands-on postgraduate laparoscopic hernia course. An LVH simulator, with prior validity evidence, was modified for the course to increase difficulty. Participants completed 1 of the 3 variations in hernia anatomy: incarcerated omentum, incarcerated bowel, and diffuse adhesions. During the procedure, course faculty and peer observers rated surgeon performance using Global Operative Assessment of Laparoscopic Skills-Incisional Hernia and Global Operative Assessment of Laparoscopic Skills rating scales with prior validity evidence. Rating scale reliability was reassessed for internal consistency. Peer and faculty raters' scores were compared. In addition, quality and completeness of the hernia repairs were rated. Internal consistency on the general skills performance (peer α = .96, faculty α = .94) and procedure-specific performance (peer α = .91, faculty α = .88) scores were high. Peers were more lenient than faculty raters on all LVH items in both the procedure-specific skills and general skills ratings. Overall, participants scored poorly on the quality and completeness of their hernia repairs (mean = 3.90/16, standard deviation = 2.72), suggesting a mismatch between course attendees and hernia difficulty and identifying a learning need. Simulation-based continuing medical education courses provide hands-on experiences that can positively affect clinical practice. Although our data appear to show a significant mismatch between clinical skill and simulator difficulty, these findings also underscore significant learning needs in the surgical community. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Participation of French Hospital Physicians to Continuing Medical Education Events: A Survey with 300 Physicians to Assess Duration, Methods, Financing, and Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maisonneuve, Herve; Touboul, Chantal; Bonnelye, Genevieve; Bertrand, Dominique

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Little data on the educational needs and practices of French hospital physicians have been obtained through surveys. Given that continuing medical education (CME) information is now available on http://www.cnfmc.fr and providers are accredited, we investigated CME practices and knowledge of the CME system with the use of a…

  7. Participation of French Hospital Physicians to Continuing Medical Education Events: A Survey with 300 Physicians to Assess Duration, Methods, Financing, and Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maisonneuve, Herve; Touboul, Chantal; Bonnelye, Genevieve; Bertrand, Dominique

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Little data on the educational needs and practices of French hospital physicians have been obtained through surveys. Given that continuing medical education (CME) information is now available on http://www.cnfmc.fr and providers are accredited, we investigated CME practices and knowledge of the CME system with the use of a…

  8. [Medical education and professionalism].

    PubMed

    Martins e Silva, João

    2013-01-01

    Is briefly analyzed the evolution that the objectives, strategies and models of medical education have had since their presentation and subsequent implementation of the famous model of Abraham Flexner, is now 103 years. Although globally accepted in their original pedagogical principles and instruments, that model does not have avoided the continuing dissatisfaction by the medical community and students and, most markedly in recent decades, the demanding of a most efficient health care by society, in general, and by patients in particular. In response to these ambitions, the medical community felt that it was essential to review the traditional criteria of medical professionalism, adapting them to a new paradigm of society and an appropriate and more efficient model of medical education. In this respect, are analyzed strategies and methodologies, apparently more suitable proposals for the inclusion of the principles and responsibilities of medical professionalism since the early period of pre-graduated medical education. It is assumed that the emphasis in teaching and practice of reflection throughout the course will have positive and lasting repercussions during active working life. However, the author believes that the success of the measures to be introduced in medical education programs to a new model of professionalism continues to depend, above all, of the humanistic and cognitive attributes of the students to be chosen, and the pedagogical quality, professional and academic of their teachers.

  9. Residential Continuing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houle, Cyril O.

    The theme of this discursive essay is residential continuing education: its definition, its development along somewhat different lines in Europe and in America, and its practice in university centers in the United States. Continuing education includes any learning or teaching program that is based on the assumptions that the learners have studied…

  10. [Dermatology in the tropics and in medical missions: Consequences for the training of dermatologists and for continuing medical education].

    PubMed

    Elsner, P

    2015-05-01

    Dermatologists from Germany are increasingly involved in international missions under tropical conditions. While civilian operations take place primarily in the context of international development cooperation, non-governmental organizations and private initiatives, dermatologists of the German Armed Forces have been engaged in numerous military missions and international disaster relief missions abroad. The specific requirements of these missions require a specialist qualification; however, the specialist training in "Skin and Venereal Diseases" under the conditions for medical care in Germany is frequently not sufficient. For an optimal preparation for dermatological missions in tropical regions, an additional qualification in tropical medicine is to be recommended. Since this additional training is time-consuming and can often not be put into practice, especially in the civilian sector, the acquisition of the certificate "Tropical and Travel Dermatology (DDA)" of the International Society for Dermatology in the Tropics in cooperation with the German Dermatological Academy (DDA) can be recommended. In the future, training in tropical dermatology should be incorporated into the main curriculum of dermatology for those specialists planning to work on dermatological missions in the tropics.

  11. [Online continuing medical education based on national disease management guidelines. The e-learning platform leitlinien-wissen.de].

    PubMed

    Vollmar, H C; Schürer-Maly, C-C; Lelgemann, M; Koneczny, N; Koch, M; Butzlaff, M

    2006-05-01

    Effective translation of relevant knowledge into clinical practice is essential for modern health care systems. National Disease Management Guidelines (NDMG) are considered relevant instruments to support this transfer. To implement NDMG Internet-based continuing medical education (CME), modules and online case-based learning objects were designed and published. To ensure high quality the contents are based on NDMG and subjected to multi-step review processes. Presentation on the web was realized through a modified content management system. To obtain a CME certificate, completing an online questionnaire using a four-point Likert scale was mandatory. Between June 2003 and April 2005, 3,105 physicians were registered and used the platform: 95% of the physicians expressed positive feedback in the evaluation questionnaire, and 35% actually used the corresponding NDMG in practice. This prompted the development of interactive medical case-based learning objects as a second learning pathway. An Internet platform for CME including case-based learning objects can be a helpful tool to assure the provision of scientific knowledge for patient care.

  12. Measuring Participants' Attitudes Toward Mobile Device Conference Applications in Continuing Medical Education: Validation of an Instrument.

    PubMed

    Wittich, Christopher M; Wang, Amy T; Fiala, Justin A; Mauck, Karen F; Mandrekar, Jayawant N; Ratelle, John T; Beckman, Thomas J

    2016-01-01

    Mobile device applications (apps) may enhance live CME courses. We aimed to (1) validate a measure of participant attitudes toward using a conference app and (2) determine associations between participant characteristics and attitudes toward CME apps with conference app usage. We conducted a cross-sectional validation study of participants at the Mayo Clinic Selected Topics in Internal Medicine Course. A conference app was developed that included presentation slides, note-taking features, search functions, social networking with other attendees, and access to presenter information. The CME app attitudes survey instrument (CMEAPP-10) was designed to determine participant attitudes toward conference apps. Of the 602 participants, 498 (82.7%) returned surveys. Factor analysis revealed a two-dimensional model for CMEAPP-10 scores (Cronbach α, 0.97). Mean (SD) CMEAPP-10 scores (maximum possible score of five) were higher for women than for men (4.06 [0.91] versus 3.85 [0.92]; P = .04). CMEAPP-10 scores (mean [SD]) were significantly associated (P = .02) with previous app usage as follows: less than once per month, 3.73 (1.05); monthly, 3.41 (1.16); weekly, 4.03 (0.69); and daily or more, 4.06 (0.89). Scores were unrelated to participant age, specialty, practice characteristics, or previous app use. This is the first validated measure of attitudes toward CME apps among course participants. App usage was higher among younger participants who had previously used educational or professional apps. Additionally, attitudes were more favorable among women and those who had previously used apps. These findings have important implications regarding efforts to engage participants with portable and accessible technology.

  13. Quality indicators for the development and didactics of ultrasound courses in continuing medical education.

    PubMed

    Hofer, M; Kamper, L; Miese, F; Kröpil, P; Naujoks, C; Handschel, J; Heussen, N

    2012-02-01

    Based on evaluation data from participant feedback, a concept was to be developed for introductory abdominal ultrasound courses lasting several days. This approach was to be developed incrementally with the intent of maximizing the learning effect per time. This concept has been modified annually over several years based on the findings of educational research and the scores on final examinations in OSCE format. It has been modified with the aid of detailed questionnaires completed by approximately 2000 participating physicians and has thus undergone incremental optimization. Analysis of the most recent 1005 questionnaires has shown that participants recommend a modular course design with only brief lectures on theory (average optimal duration of 20 min., SD 9.6 min.). These should alternate with longer practical "hands-on" ultrasound exercises (60 - 90 min., accounting for at least 50 - 60 % of the course time), consolidating drawing exercises, and breaks. 51 % of the physicians specified 5 participants as the ideal group size for practical exercises, while 43 % specified only 4. The discussion presents 10 specific quality indicators for efficient ultrasound courses. It elucidates the feasibility and logistical prerequisites of this model, and compares it with other basic course concepts. Furthermore, this article presents a model for an evaluation covering the course concept and tutors as well as discussing a training program for tutors including a cost analysis. In summary, the participants estimate the course design to represent a mature concept that has demonstrated its feasibility and broad acceptance among physicians in CME. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. [Continuing medical education and accreditation in occupational health: the new context].

    PubMed

    Franco, G; Costa, G

    2008-01-01

    In the future many changes will extensively affect workforce, workplace and work organization. The changes expected in the workforce will be a larger share of workers over 55 years and of women and a larger share of migrants. Two main changes will affect the workplace: the increasing percentage of jobs in the service sector and the decreasing permanent relationship of the worker with the workplace with an increase in temporary work, on-call work and work at home. The evolution of global trade is accelerating the transformation of work organization, with important changes in management systems, production and services processes and their influence on the way work is performed. Although working conditions will continue to improve overall, many matters remain to be resolved due to the increase in workers' health demands and awareness. Old diseases, such as tuberculosis, and new aspects of the more common health disorders, such as stress related-disorders, will represent a challenge for the specialist. In addition, new hazards, such as the exposure to nanoparticles or to static magnetic fields, will be conditions worthy to be considered for the possible implication to health. The workplace will represent a privileged place to promote health and well being of workers aiming at ensuring an effective healthy lifestyle, career and employment security. In this rapidly changing and demanding context, a new challenge for the occupational physicians will start with having a good understanding of the implications for adhering to the ethical principles and to values of quality, equity, relevance and cost-effectiveness and maintaining a balance among them.

  15. Knowledge and attitudes of family physicians coming to COPD continuing medical education.

    PubMed

    Yawn, Barbara P; Wollan, Peter C

    2008-01-01

    COPD remains under-recognized and under-treated. Much of early COPD care is given by primary care physicians but only when COPD is recognized. This survey explores the attitudes, beliefs, and knowledge related to COPD recognition, diagnosis, and treatment from family physicians and nurse practitioners (NPs) and physician assistants (PAs) working in primary care. We completed a survey of family physicians, and NPs/PAs attending one of three CME programs on five common chronic conditions including COPD. Return rate was 62% (n = 284) including 178 physicians and 100 NPs/PAs. Fewer than half of the respondents reported knowledge of or use of COPD guidelines. The barriers to recognition and diagnosis of COPD they reported included the multiple morbidities of most COPD patients, failure of patients to report COPD symptoms, as well as lack of knowledge and inadequate training in COPD diagnosis and management. Three quarters (74%) of respondents reported use of spirometry to diagnose COPD but only 32% said they included reversibility assessment. COPD was incorrectly assessed as a disease primarily of men (78% ofrespondents) that appeared after age 60 (61%). Few respondents reported that they believed COPD treatment was useful or very useful for improving symptoms (15%) or decreasing exacerbations (3%) or that pulmonary rehabilitation was helpful (3%), but 13% reported they thought COPD treatment could extend longevity. Primary care physicians and NPs/PAs working in primary care continue to report lack of awareness and use of COPD guidelines, as well as correct information related to COPD epidemiology or potential benefits of available treatments including pulmonary rehabilitation. It is unlikely that diagnosis and management of COPD will improve in primary care until these knowledge gaps and discrepancies with published efficacy of therapy issues are addressed.

  16. Knowledge and attitudes of family physicians coming to COPD continuing medical education

    PubMed Central

    Yawn, Barbara P; Wollan, Peter C

    2008-01-01

    Purpose COPD remains under-recognized and under-treated. Much of early COPD care is given by primary care physicians but only when COPD is recognized. This survey explores the attitudes, beliefs, and knowledge related to COPD recognition, diagnosis, and treatment from family physicians and nurse practitioners (NPs) and physician assistants (PAs) working in primary care. Methods We completed a survey of family physicians, and NPs/PAs attending one of three CME programs on five common chronic conditions including COPD. Results Return rate was 62% (n = 284) including 178 physicians and 100 NPs/PAs. Fewer than half of the respondents reported knowledge of or use of COPD guidelines. The barriers to recognition and diagnosis of COPD they reported included the multiple morbidities of most COPD patients, failure of patients to report COPD symptoms, as well as lack of knowledge and inadequate training in COPD diagnosis and management. Three quarters (74%) of respondents reported use of spirometry to diagnose COPD but only 32% said they included reversibility assessment. COPD was incorrectly assessed as a disease primarily of men (78% of respondents) that appeared after age 60 (61%). Few respondents reported that they believed COPD treatment was useful or very useful for improving symptoms (15%) or decreasing exacerbations (3%) or that pulmonary rehabilitation was helpful (3%), but 13% reported they thought COPD treatment could extend longevity. Conclusions Primary care physicians and NPs/PAs working in primary care continue to report lack of awareness and use of COPD guidelines, as well as correct information related to COPD epidemiology or potential benefits of available treatments including pulmonary rehabilitation. It is unlikely that diagnosis and management of COPD will improve in primary care until these knowledge gaps and discrepancies with published efficacy of therapy issues are addressed. PMID:18686740

  17. The importance of social and collaborative learning for online continuing medical education (OCME): directions for future development and research.

    PubMed

    Sandars, John; Kokotailo, Patricia; Singh, Gurmit

    2012-01-01

    There is an increasing use of online continuing medical education (OCME), but the potential use of social and collaborative learning to change professional performance and improve patient care has yet to be fully realised. The integration of the main themes from the presentations and comments from participants at a symposium at AMEE 2011. Sociological perspectives on change in professional performance highlight the need for social and collaborative learning in OCME so that learners can share information (explicit knowledge) and opinion (tacit knowledge). The educational topic should be relevant to the complexity of professional practice and use iterative cycles of implementation and critical reflection in social networks so that proposed solutions can be tested in actual practice. The challenge of developing effective online discussions for collaborative learning is recognised. The provision of OCME requires a shift in both policy and practice to emphasise the importance of social and collaborative learning. Further research is recommended, especially to evaluate the implementation and impact of social and collaborative learning for OCME on patient care and the use of newer Web 2.0 approaches.

  18. First aid and initial management for childhood burns in Vietnam--an appeal for public and continuing medical education.

    PubMed

    Lam, Nguyen Nhu; Dung, Nguyen Tien

    2008-02-01

    A prospective study to investigate first aid and initial management for 247 paediatric burn patients from 1 June, 2004 to 31 June, 2006 at the Burn Intensive Care Unit, National Institute of Burns (NIB), Hanoi. Data were collected from documents from referring hospitals and direct interview of patients, relative and transport team as guided by the International Society for Burn Injury (ISBI) and the World Health Organization (WHO). Results showed that cooling the burn surface by cold water was applied in 27.17%. Among 132 patients transferred from other hospitals, fluid resuscitation was given in 102 patients (77.28%) before transferring and over a half of these patients were not given intravenous fluid during the time of transfer, especially for children under 1 year of age (p<0.05). Dressings were applied in 36.36% of transferred patients. Burn surface area was accurately diagnosed in only 21.90% of total cases. In conclusion, first aid and initial management in Vietnam are still far from ideal. Further public education and continuing medical education should be applied in Vietnam.

  19. Feasibility of scenario-based simulation training versus traditional workshops in continuing medical education: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Brendan; Hawkins, Trisha Lee-Ann; Herman, Robert; Barnes, Sue; Kaufmann, Stephanie; Fraser, Kristin; Ma, Irene W Y

    2013-07-18

    Although simulation-based training is increasingly used for medical education, its benefits in continuing medical education (CME) are less established. This study seeks to evaluate the feasibility of incorporating simulation-based training into a CME conference and compare its effectiveness with the traditional workshop in improving knowledge and self-reported confidence. Participants (N=27) were group randomized to either a simulation-based workshop or a traditional case-based workshop. Post-training, knowledge assessment score neither did increase significantly in the traditional group (d=0.13; p=0.76) nor did significantly decrease in the simulation group (d= - 0.44; p=0.19). Self-reported comfort in patient assessment parameters increased in both groups (p<0.05 in all). However, only the simulation group reported an increase in comfort in patient management (d=1.1, p=0.051 for the traditional group and d=1.3; p= 0.0003 for the simulation group). At 1 month, comfort measures in the traditional group increased consistently over time while these measures in the simulation group increased post-workshop but decreased by 1 month, suggesting that some of the effects of training with simulation may be short lived. The use of simulation-based training was not associated with benefits in knowledge acquisition, knowledge retention, or comfort in patient assessment. It was associated with superior outcomes in comfort in patient management, but this benefit may be short-lived. Further studies are required to better define the conditions under which simulation-based training is beneficial.

  20. Feasibility of scenario-based simulation training versus traditional workshops in continuing medical education: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Brendan; Lee-Ann Hawkins, Trisha; Herman, Robert; Barnes, Sue; Kaufmann, Stephanie; Fraser, Kristin; Ma, Irene W Y

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Although simulation-based training is increasingly used for medical education, its benefits in continuing medical education (CME) are less established. This study seeks to evaluate the feasibility of incorporating simulation-based training into a CME conference and compare its effectiveness with the traditional workshop in improving knowledge and self-reported confidence. Methods Participants (N=27) were group randomized to either a simulation-based workshop or a traditional case-based workshop. Results Post-training, knowledge assessment score neither did increase significantly in the traditional group (d=0.13; p=0.76) nor did significantly decrease in the simulation group (d= - 0.44; p=0.19). Self-reported comfort in patient assessment parameters increased in both groups (p<0.05 in all). However, only the simulation group reported an increase in comfort in patient management (d=1.1, p=0.051 for the traditional group and d=1.3; p= 0.0003 for the simulation group). At 1 month, comfort measures in the traditional group increased consistently over time while these measures in the simulation group increased post-workshop but decreased by 1 month, suggesting that some of the effects of training with simulation may be short lived. Discussion The use of simulation-based training was not associated with benefits in knowledge acquisition, knowledge retention, or comfort in patient assessment. It was associated with superior outcomes in comfort in patient management, but this benefit may be short-lived. Further studies are required to better define the conditions under which simulation-based training is beneficial.

  1. Feasibility of scenario-based simulation training versus traditional workshops in continuing medical education: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, Brendan; Hawkins, Trisha Lee-Ann; Herman, Robert; Barnes, Sue; Kaufmann, Stephanie; Fraser, Kristin; Ma, Irene W. Y.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Although simulation-based training is increasingly used for medical education, its benefits in continuing medical education (CME) are less established. This study seeks to evaluate the feasibility of incorporating simulation-based training into a CME conference and compare its effectiveness with the traditional workshop in improving knowledge and self-reported confidence. Methods Participants (N=27) were group randomized to either a simulation-based workshop or a traditional case-based workshop. Results Post-training, knowledge assessment score neither did increase significantly in the traditional group (d=0.13; p=0.76) nor did significantly decrease in the simulation group (d= − 0.44; p=0.19). Self-reported comfort in patient assessment parameters increased in both groups (p<0.05 in all). However, only the simulation group reported an increase in comfort in patient management (d=1.1, p=0.051 for the traditional group and d=1.3; p= 0.0003 for the simulation group). At 1 month, comfort measures in the traditional group increased consistently over time while these measures in the simulation group increased post-workshop but decreased by 1 month, suggesting that some of the effects of training with simulation may be short lived. Discussion The use of simulation-based training was not associated with benefits in knowledge acquisition, knowledge retention, or comfort in patient assessment. It was associated with superior outcomes in comfort in patient management, but this benefit may be short-lived. Further studies are required to better define the conditions under which simulation-based training is beneficial. PMID:23870304

  2. Educational technology in medical education.

    PubMed

    Han, Heeyoung; Resch, David S; Kovach, Regina A

    2013-01-01

    This article aims to review the past practices of educational technology and envision future directions for medical education. The discussion starts with a historical review of definitions and perspectives of educational technology, in which the authors propose that educators adopt a broader process-oriented understanding of educational technology. Future directions of e-learning, simulation, and health information technology are discussed based on a systems view of the technological process. As new technologies continue to arise, this process-oriented understanding and outcome-based expectations of educational technology should be embraced. With this view, educational technology should be valued in terms of how well the technological process informs and facilitates learning, and the acquisition and maintenance of clinical expertise.

  3. Do general practitioners' risk-taking propensities and learning styles influence their continuing medical education preferences?

    PubMed

    Robinson, Geoffrey

    2002-01-01

    the risk averse and assimilators. The success of a combined educational strategy will depend on an inclusive philosophy, both recognizing and engaging the wide range of differences in learning style and risk taking for all the individuals who make up learning teams.

  4. Status of medical mycology education.

    PubMed

    Steinbach, William J; Mitchell, Thomas G; Schell, Wiley A; Espinel-Ingroff, Ana; Coico, Richard F; Walsh, Thomas J; Perfect, John R

    2003-12-01

    The number of immunocompromised patients and subsequent invasive fungal infections continues to rise. However, the education of future medical mycologists to engage this growing problem is diminishing. While there are an increasing number of publications and grants awarded in mycology, the time and detail devoted to teaching medical mycology in United States medical schools are inadequate. Here we review the history in medical mycology education and the current educational opportunities. To accurately gauge contemporary teaching we also conducted a prospective survey of microbiology and immunology departmental chairpersons in United States medical schools to determine the amount and content of contemporary education in medical mycology.

  5. [A continuous 4-year evaluation of medical informatics education in a graduate school of health sciences using a questionnaire survey].

    PubMed

    Monzen, Satoru; Matsutani, Hideya; Kashiwakura, Ikuo

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the level of awareness among undergraduate students regarding medical informatics and to ascertain whether educational training has progressed with time in the Department of Health Sciences at Hirosaki University, Japan, which is a co-medical staff training institution that conducts a 4-year university course in medical informatics. The university accepts students who have completed the 3rd grade of medical licensing tests and who have attended the medical informatics lectures for 4 years (2007-2010). The ratio of first sight terminology percentage in any given fiscal year in all the 30 terminology categories varied widely from 0% to 80%, but the trend in various categories did not vary between fiscal years. The terminology of informatics under medical technology students obtained high scores of 52.5-77.3% after attending courses, which was higher compared with students from other classes. On the other hand, student nurses and occupational therapy students obtained 0-44.2%. Each class scored a high percentage of correct answers in the medical information-related terminology. Among the radiology students who attended the classes, the percentage of correct answers in categories of "digital imaging and communication in medicine" and "picture archiving and communication system" were lower than other medical terminology categories. These results reflect the gaps in educational curriculum of 1st and 2nd grades of medical licensing tests.

  6. Continuing Education Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piatt, Virginia; Seybert, Jeff

    An in-class survey of 683 continuing education students was conducted at Johnson County Community College (JCCC) to obtain information on: (1) student characteristics, including age, sex, family characteristics, income, educational background, occupation, area of residence, distance to class, sources of information about JCCC, and method of…

  7. Continuing Education in Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, Frieda Smith; And Others

    This book is planned to provide guidance for nurses in planning, conducting, and evaluating programs of continuing education; content is built on the collective experiences and thinking of a regional group of nurse educators engaged in developing a coordinated program for a large geographical area. After discussion of changing patterns of health…

  8. Continuing Health Education Through Computer Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Held, Thomas H.; Kappelman, Murray M.

    Computer assisted instruction is beginning to have an important role in the rapidly expanding field of continuing education for health science professionals. At the present time, there are 22 medical specialty boards, all of which require or are about to require some form of continuing medical education for re-certification, and studies are being…

  9. A Theory-Based Study of Factors Explaining General Practitioners' Intention to Use and Participation in Electronic Continuing Medical Education.

    PubMed

    Hadadgar, Arash; Changiz, Tahereh; Dehghani, Zahra; Backheden, Magnus; Mirshahzadeh, Nahidalsadat; Zary, Nabil; Masiello, Italo

    2016-01-01

    Electronic modes of continuing medical education (eCME) can provide an appropriate and scalable way of updating the knowledge and skills of general practitioners (GPs). To optimize the adoption of eCME and develop efficient and cost-effective eCME programs, factors explaining GPs' intention to use eCME must first be elucidated. Using the Theory of Planned Behavior as a framework, we developed a questionnaire and administered it to GPs in seven CME seminars in Isfahan, Iran, in 2014. Three domains of GPs' intention to use eCME were measured: attitudes, perceived behavioral control, and subjective norms. We used linear and logistic regression to identify the main predictors of intention and behavior. GPs who had high score in perceived behavioral control and a more positive attitude toward e-learning had a higher intention to adopt it for CME. In contrast, subjective norms (eg, social pressures to use eCME) were not a predictor. Attitude toward usefulness of eCME was the main predictor of being an actual eCME user. Perceived behavioral control and attitude constitute the main predictors of the intention to use eCME. Establishing discussions forums and strengthening organizational support for eCME through an increased awareness among clinical superiors and CME managers would be expected to increase GPs' intention to use eCME.

  10. Efficacy of an integrated continuing medical education (CME) and quality improvement (QI) program on radiation oncologist (RO) clinical practice

    SciTech Connect

    Leong, Cheng Nang . E-mail: Cheng_Nang_Leong@mail.nhg.com.sg; Shakespeare, Thomas Philip; Mukherjee, Rahul K.; Back, Michael F.; Lee, Khai Mun; Lu, Jiade Jay; Wynne, Christopher J.; Lim, Keith; Tang, Johann; Zhang Xiaojian

    2006-12-01

    Purpose: There has been little radiation oncologist (RO)-specific research in continuing medical education (CME) or quality improvement (QI) program efficacy. Our aim was to evaluate a CME/QI program for changes in RO behavior, performance, and adherence to department protocols/studies over the first 12 months of the program. Methods and Materials: The CME/QI program combined chart audit with feedback (C-AWF), simulation review AWF (SR-AWF), reminder checklists, and targeted CME tutorials. Between April 2003 and March 2004, management of 75 patients was evaluated by chart audit with feedback (C-AWF) and 178 patients via simulation review audit (SR-AWF) using a validated instrument. Scores were presented, and case management was discussed with individualized educational feedback. RO behavior and performance was compared over the first year of the program. Results: Comparing the first and second 6 months, there was a significant improvement in mean behavior (12.7-13.6 of 14, p = 0.0005) and RO performance (7.6-7.9 of 8, p = 0.018) scores. Protocol/study adherence significantly improved from 90.3% to 96.6% (p = 0.005). A total of 50 actions were generated, including the identification of learning needs to direct CME tutorials, the systematic change of suboptimal RO practice, and the alteration of deficient management of 3% of patients audited during the program. Conclusion: An integrated CME/QI program combining C-AWF, SR-AWF, QI reminders, and targeted CME tutorials effectively improved targeted RO behavior and performance over a 12-month period. There was a corresponding increase in departmental protocol and study adherence.

  11. USING ONLINE MARKETING TO INCREASE PARTICIPATION IN A WEB-BASED CONTINUING MEDICAL EDUCATION CULTURAL COMPETENCE CURRICULUM

    PubMed Central

    Estrada, Carlos A.; Krishnamoorthy, Periyakaruppan; Smith, Ann; Staton, Lisa; Korf, Michele J.; Allison, Jeroan J.; Houston, Thomas K.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction CME providers may be interested in identifying effective marketing strategies to direct users to specific content. The use of online advertisements to recruit participants for clinical trials, public health programs, and Continuing Medical Education (CME) has been shown to be effective in some but not all studies. The purpose of this study was to compare the impact of two marketing strategies in the context of an online CME cultural competence curriculum (www.c-comp.org). Methods In an interrupted time-series quasi-experimental design, two marketing strategies were tested: a) wide dissemination to relevant organizations over a period of approximately four months, and b) Internet paid search using Google Ads (five consecutive eight-week periods--control 1, cultural/ CME advertisement, control 2, hypertension/ content advertisement, control 3). Outcome measures were CME credit requests, Web traffic (visits per day, page views, pages viewed per visit), and cost. Results Overall, the site was visited 19,156 times and 78,160 pages were viewed. During the wide dissemination phase, the proportion of visits requesting CME credit decreased between the first (5.3%) and second halves (3.3%) of this phase (p= .04). During the Internet paid search phase, the proportion of visits requesting CME credit was highest during the cultural/ CME advertisement period (control 1, 1.4%; cultural/CME ad, 4.3%; control 2, 1.5%; hypertension/content ad, 0.6%; control 3, 0.8%; p<.001). All measures of Web traffic changed during the Internet paid search phase (p<.01); however, changes were independent of the advertisement periods. The incremental cost for the cultural advertisement per CME credit requested was $0.64US. Discussion Internet advertisement focusing on cultural competence and CME was associated with about a three-fold increase in requests for CME credit at an incremental cost of under $1; however, Web traffic changes were independent of the advertisement strategy. PMID

  12. The mCME Project: A Randomized Controlled Trial of an SMS-Based Continuing Medical Education Intervention for Improving Medical Knowledge among Vietnamese Community Based Physicians’ Assistants

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Christopher J.; Le Ngoc, Bao; Halim, Nafisa; Nguyen Viet, Ha; Larson Williams, Anna; Nguyen Van, Tan; McNabb, Marion; Tran Thi Ngoc, Lien; Falconer, Ariel; An Phan Ha, Hai; Rohr, Julia; Hoang, Hai; Michiel, James; Nguyen Thi Thanh, Tam; Bird, Liat; Pham Vu, Hoang; Yeshitla, Mahlet; Ha Van, Nhu; Sabin, Lora

    2016-01-01

    Background Community health workers (CHWs) provide critical services to underserved populations in low and middle-income countries, but maintaining CHW’s clinical knowledge through formal continuing medical education (CME) activities is challenging and rarely occurs. We tested whether a Short Message Service (SMS)-based mobile CME (mCME) intervention could improve medical knowledge among a cadre of Vietnamese CHWs (Community Based Physician’s Assistants–CBPAs) who are the leading providers of primary medical care for rural underserved populations. Methods The mCME Project was a three arm randomized controlled trial. Group 1 served as controls while Groups 2 and 3 experienced two models of the mCME intervention. Group 2 (passive model) participants received a daily SMS bullet point, and were required to reply to the text to acknowledge receipt; Group 3 (interactive model) participants received an SMS in multiple choice question format addressing the same thematic area as Group 2, entering an answer (A, B, C or D) in their response. The server provided feedback immediately informing the participant whether the answer was correct. Effectiveness was based on standardized examination scores measured at baseline and endline (six months later). Secondary outcomes included job satisfaction and self-efficacy. Results 638 CBPAs were enrolled, randomized, and tested at baseline, with 592 returning at endline (93.7%). Baseline scores were similar across all three groups. Over the next six months, participation of Groups 2 and 3 remained high; they responded to >75% of messages. Group 3 participants answered 43% of the daily SMS questions correctly, but their performance did not improve over time. At endline, the CBPAs reported high satisfaction with the mCME intervention, and deemed the SMS messages highly relevant. However, endline exam scores did not increase over baseline, and did not differ between the three groups. Job satisfaction and self-efficacy scores also did

  13. The mCME Project: A Randomized Controlled Trial of an SMS-Based Continuing Medical Education Intervention for Improving Medical Knowledge among Vietnamese Community Based Physicians' Assistants.

    PubMed

    Gill, Christopher J; Le Ngoc, Bao; Halim, Nafisa; Nguyen Viet, Ha; Larson Williams, Anna; Nguyen Van, Tan; McNabb, Marion; Tran Thi Ngoc, Lien; Falconer, Ariel; An Phan Ha, Hai; Rohr, Julia; Hoang, Hai; Michiel, James; Nguyen Thi Thanh, Tam; Bird, Liat; Pham Vu, Hoang; Yeshitla, Mahlet; Ha Van, Nhu; Sabin, Lora

    2016-01-01

    Community health workers (CHWs) provide critical services to underserved populations in low and middle-income countries, but maintaining CHW's clinical knowledge through formal continuing medical education (CME) activities is challenging and rarely occurs. We tested whether a Short Message Service (SMS)-based mobile CME (mCME) intervention could improve medical knowledge among a cadre of Vietnamese CHWs (Community Based Physician's Assistants-CBPAs) who are the leading providers of primary medical care for rural underserved populations. The mCME Project was a three arm randomized controlled trial. Group 1 served as controls while Groups 2 and 3 experienced two models of the mCME intervention. Group 2 (passive model) participants received a daily SMS bullet point, and were required to reply to the text to acknowledge receipt; Group 3 (interactive model) participants received an SMS in multiple choice question format addressing the same thematic area as Group 2, entering an answer (A, B, C or D) in their response. The server provided feedback immediately informing the participant whether the answer was correct. Effectiveness was based on standardized examination scores measured at baseline and endline (six months later). Secondary outcomes included job satisfaction and self-efficacy. 638 CBPAs were enrolled, randomized, and tested at baseline, with 592 returning at endline (93.7%). Baseline scores were similar across all three groups. Over the next six months, participation of Groups 2 and 3 remained high; they responded to >75% of messages. Group 3 participants answered 43% of the daily SMS questions correctly, but their performance did not improve over time. At endline, the CBPAs reported high satisfaction with the mCME intervention, and deemed the SMS messages highly relevant. However, endline exam scores did not increase over baseline, and did not differ between the three groups. Job satisfaction and self-efficacy scores also did not improve. Average times spent

  14. CEU [Continuing Education Unit].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adult Basic Education Region V Staff Development Bulletin, 1974

    1974-01-01

    The Continuing Education Unit (CEU) is a means of recording and accounting non-credit programs and activities which are professional in nature. Seven criteria have been established to assure the professionalism and quality of instruction. The criteria concern the need, objectives, and rationale of the activity; the course planning and…

  15. Continuing Education Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bird, K. A.; Fenwick, P. R.

    In 1978, a national survey was conducted in New Zealand to determine the extent of participation in continuing education and the level of unmet need for these activities. A questionnaire was developed dealing with respondent characteristics, spare time and interests, agency-directed learning activities (ADLAS), and unmet needs, and administered to…

  16. Continuing Professional Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matarazzo, James M.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the value of continuing education for staff members of special libraries as reported by information professionals in a study of excellence in corporate libraries. Background on the Special Libraries Association's Professional Development Program is also provided, and the importance of keeping current with the literature is emphasized.…

  17. Promoting Continuing Education Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendrickson, Gayle A.

    This handbook is intended for use by institutions in marketing their continuing education programs. A section on "Devising Your Strategy" looks at identifying a target audience, determining the marketing approach, and developing a marketing plan and promotional techniques. A discussion of media options looks at the advantages and…

  18. Adult and Continuing Education: Continuities and Discontinuities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennant, Mark

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive review of the five-volume set, "Adult and Continuing Education." This publication is a monumental and diverse collection of material related directly or indirectly to the broad theme of adult and continuing education. The collection captures a great deal of the thought which has informed the…

  19. The Academic Backbone: longitudinal continuities in educational achievement from secondary school and medical school to MRCP(UK) and the specialist register in UK medical students and doctors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Selection of medical students in the UK is still largely based on prior academic achievement, although doubts have been expressed as to whether performance in earlier life is predictive of outcomes later in medical school or post-graduate education. This study analyses data from five longitudinal studies of UK medical students and doctors from the early 1970s until the early 2000s. Two of the studies used the AH5, a group test of general intelligence (that is, intellectual aptitude). Sex and ethnic differences were also analyzed in light of the changing demographics of medical students over the past decades. Methods Data from five cohort studies were available: the Westminster Study (began clinical studies from 1975 to 1982), the 1980, 1985, and 1990 cohort studies (entered medical school in 1981, 1986, and 1991), and the University College London Medical School (UCLMS) Cohort Study (entered clinical studies in 2005 and 2006). Different studies had different outcome measures, but most had performance on basic medical sciences and clinical examinations at medical school, performance in Membership of the Royal Colleges of Physicians (MRCP(UK)) examinations, and being on the General Medical Council Specialist Register. Results Correlation matrices and path analyses are presented. There were robust correlations across different years at medical school, and medical school performance also predicted MRCP(UK) performance and being on the GMC Specialist Register. A-levels correlated somewhat less with undergraduate and post-graduate performance, but there was restriction of range in entrants. General Certificate of Secondary Education (GCSE)/O-level results also predicted undergraduate and post-graduate outcomes, but less so than did A-level results, but there may be incremental validity for clinical and post-graduate performance. The AH5 had some significant correlations with outcome, but they were inconsistent. Sex and ethnicity also had predictive effects on

  20. An Analysis of 2.3 Million Participations in the Continuing Medical Education Program of a General Medical Journal: Suitability, User Characteristics, and Evaluation by Readers.

    PubMed

    Christ, Hildegard; Franklin, Jeremy; Griebenow, Reinhard; Baethge, Christopher

    2017-04-03

    Physicians frequently use continuing medical education (CME) in journals. However, little is known of the evaluation of journal CME by readers and also user and participation characteristics. Deutsches Ärzteblatt, the journal of the German Medical Association, is distributed to every physician in Germany and regularly offers its readers CME articles. Therefore, it provides a unique opportunity to analyze a journal CME program directed at an entire population of physicians. The aim is to show key sociodemographic characteristics of participants, frequency and temporal distributions of participations, and to analyze whether the articles are suitable for a general medical audience, how physicians rate the CME articles, how successful they were in answering simple multiple-choice questions, and to detect distinct clusters of participants. Using obligatory online evaluation forms and multiple-choice questions, we analyzed all participations of the entire 142 CME articles published between September 2004 and February 2014. We compared demographic characteristics of participants with official figures on those characteristics as provided by the German Medical Association. A total of 128,398 physicians and therapists (male: 54.64%, 70,155/128,393; median age class 40 to 49 years) participated 2,339,802 times (mean 16,478, SD 6436 participations/article). Depending on the year, between 12.33% (44,064/357,252) and 16.15% (50,259/311,230) of all physicians in the country participated at least once. The CME program was disproportionally popular with physicians in private practice, and many participations took place in the early mornings and evenings (4544.53%, 1,041,931/2,339,802) as well as over the weekend (28.70%, 671,563/2,339,802). Participation by specialty (ranked in descending order) was internal medicine (18.25%, 23,434/128,392), general medicine (16.38%, 21,033/128,392), anesthesiology (10.00%, 12,840/128,392), and surgery (7.06%, 9059/128,392). Participants rated

  1. Unresolved crisis in medical education.

    PubMed

    Monif, G R; Severin, M J

    1994-01-01

    A crisis exists in medical education. Changes in methodology have diverted attention from synthesis to mass accumulation of factual data. The response to this crisis has been largely focused on a shell game involving new pathways and curriculum changes without addressing the critical issue of what constitutes education. The ultimate problem in medical education is a crisis of leadership. Until education is given a priority status and the obligations to teach on the part of medical educators and to learn on the part of students are translated into a creative policy by those who can lead, the wheels of learning will continue to spin without significant progress.

  2. Overview of Geriatric Distance Education for Academic Courses and Continuing Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Helen Arleen

    2004-01-01

    Distance education technologies may be applied to academic settings, continuing education/continuing medical education settings or in combination to both. This article provides an overview of what we have learned about academic and continuing education/continuing medical education in geriatrics and gerontology. It includes information on the scope…

  3. Overview of Geriatric Distance Education for Academic Courses and Continuing Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Helen Arleen

    2004-01-01

    Distance education technologies may be applied to academic settings, continuing education/continuing medical education settings or in combination to both. This article provides an overview of what we have learned about academic and continuing education/continuing medical education in geriatrics and gerontology. It includes information on the scope…

  4. [Is continuing medical education under suspicion of corruption? Contribution to the discussion by the Committee for Quality Preservation of the Swiss Society of Gynaecology and Obstetrics].

    PubMed

    Drack, G; Kuhn, H P; Haller, U

    2003-04-01

    The requirements laid down by law and by the medical profession itself with regard to continuing medical education have recently been tightened. The cost of good training is high, both in time and money. Sponsoring, especially by the pharmaceutical industry, has helped to keep costs down for individual participants. The question of a tariff system for the payment of compulsory training is now being raised. Rates have been set to ensure that, in the future, indirect costs are covered. In the event of a full tariff-based payment of costs being introduced, various disadvantages could be expected both for participants and the quality of the training. Changes in Swiss criminal law and the new medicines act do not forbid sponsoring, but they do call for rules of professional ethics and of personnel law in public hospitals governing behaviour in respect of funding by sponsors. Various sponsoring models are conceivable with differences in allocation to organizers, individual participants or distribution via a pool system. There are strong arguments in favour of continuing the existing practice of mixed funding by participants and sponsoring, provided that it is subject to certain rules of transparency. What is lacking to date is a political decision on the issue of funding for continuing medical education.

  5. Effective Measures of Continuing Education

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    Effective Measures of Continuing Education by Colonel Morris A. Turner United States Army Dr. Craig Bullis Department... Effective Measures of Continuing Education by Colonel Morris A. Turner United States Army United...STRATEGY RESEARCH PROJECT .33 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Effective Measures of Continuing Education

  6. Medical education in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Muuta

    2007-11-01

    Nigeria is the most populated black African nation, with a population of 140 million from the 2006 population census. Medical education began with the establishment of the University College Hospital, Ibadan as a College branch of the University of London in 1948. Since then four generations of medical schools have evolved. The newer medical schools adopted the curriculum of the older schools with little modification. The subsequent introduction of changes and modification in the curriculum of medical education worldwide did not seem to affect Nigerian medical schools. Teacher training in educational methods for medical educators has not been introduced, nor has there been any curriculum planning or review. Efforts made regionally and nationally to change the medical curriculum and improve quality of medical training has not yielded the desired results. The regulatory bodies, the National Universities Commission and the Medical and Dental Council of Nigeria introduced separate curricula for medical schools, as a guide to minimum standards, but there has been so far a varying degree of compliance by the Universities. There is an urgent need to bring Medical Education and teacher training issues to the fore. Needs assessment of medical school faculty to determine their training would be seen to be a good starting point, as well as curriculum transformation and the introduction of newer assessment methods. It is suggested that the Medical and Dental Council of Nigeria (MDCN) should take a leading role by collaborating with outside bodies concerned with medical education.

  7. Medical education in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Samarasekera, Dujeepa D; Ooi, Shirley; Yeo, Su Ping; Hooi, Shing Chuan

    2015-02-19

    Abstract Allopathic medical education in Singapore extends for more than a century from its simple beginnings. In recent times, changes have been rapid, both in undergraduate and postgraduate specialty medical training. Over the last decade, undergraduate medical education has increased from a single to three medical schools and the postgraduate training has expanded further by incorporating the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education International framework. With these changes, the curricula, assessment systems, as well as teaching and learning approaches, with the use of technology-enhanced learning and program evaluation processes have expanded, largely based on best evidence medical education. To support these initiatives and the recent rapid expansion, most training institutions have incorporated faculty development programs, such as the Centre for Medical Education at the National University of Singapore.

  8. Using disease-state management as the key to promoting employer sponsorship of medical nutrition therapy (continuing education credit).

    PubMed

    Israel, D A; McCabe, M

    1999-05-01

    The purpose of this project was to design, implement, and improve a nationwide medical nutrition therapy (MNT) intervention program for nutritionally at-risk employees and their dependents and retirees (hereinafter referred to as clients) with a Fortune 100 company (Texas Instruments, Dallas, Tex) with a dispersed population of 80,000. Preferred Nutrition Therapists (PNT), a network of registered dietitians, with the assistance of the Texas Instruments Health Promotion and Benefits Department, identified International Classification of Diseases, 9th ed (ICD-9), codes for which MNT intervention was appropriate. PNT then negotiated a contract with the Texas Instruments Health Promotion and Benefits Department and implemented clients' self-referral process. The main challenge was to promote utilization of a new service from an outside vendor (PNT) and to measure outcomes in meaningful ways. The goal was to use MNT as a tool to prevent the progression of clients' diseases to states that require more costly treatments. PNT used a continuous quality improvement process to refine the system and improve information gathering and reporting, by providing quarterly reports to the Health Promotion and Benefits Department. These reports summarized the outcomes for all clients seen at least 3 times during the quarter. The cost was less than $0.35 per member per month (less than the employer spent on advertising the program), and 0.5% of the population requested MNT during the first year of implementation (about what was expected for a new carveout benefit).

  9. Furthering Medical Education in Texas.

    PubMed

    Varma, Surendra K; Jennings, John

    2016-02-01

    Medical education in Texas is moving in the right direction. The Texas Medical Association has been a major partner in advancing medical education initiatives. This special symposium issue on medical education examines residency training costs, the Next Accreditation System, graduate medical education in rural Texas, Texas' physician workforce needs, the current state of education reform, and efforts to retain medical graduates in Texas.

  10. [Education in medical technology].

    PubMed

    Mimura, Kunihiro

    2004-10-01

    This year the education of Medical Technologists has reached the third turning point. The first turning point was the start of the two-year education of health laboratory technicians in 1958 and the second turning point was the start of the three-year education of Medical Technologists in 1971 and, this time, the third turning point is the start of the full-fledged university education. All 20 national education facilities for Medical Technologists and 2 public junior colleges have started the university education from this year. Adding the existing universities, about a half of education facilities for Medical Technologists are universities. From this situation, human resource development with not only knowledge and technique as medical technologists but also with humanly nurtured sentiment is expected in the future. In such situation, I'd like to discuss the progress of education of Medical technologists for 53 years, the current educational situation, and the future education of Medical technologists including the direction of desirable course for the three-year educational facilities.

  11. Identifying outcome-based indicators and developing a curriculum for a continuing medical education programme on rational prescribing using a modified Delphi process

    PubMed Central

    Esmaily, Hamideh M; Savage, Carl; Vahidi, Rezagoli; Amini, Abolghasem; Zarrintan, Mohammad Hossein; Wahlstrom, Rolf

    2008-01-01

    Background Continuing medical education (CME) is compulsory for physicians in Iran. Recent studies in Iran show that modifications of CME elements are necessary to improve the effectiveness of the educational programmes. Other studies point to an inappropriate, even irrational drug prescribing. Based on a needs assessment study regarding CME for general physicians in the East Azerbaijan province in Iran, rational prescribing practice was recognized as a high priority issue. Considering different educational methods, outcome-based education has been proposed as a suitable approach for CME. The purpose of the study was to obtain experts' consensus about appropriate educational outcomes of rational prescribing for general physicians in CME and developing curricular contents for this education. Methods The study consisted of two phases: The first phase was conducted using a two-round Delphi consensus process to identify the outcome-based educational indicators regarding rational prescribing for general physicians in primary care (GPs). In the second phase the agreed indicators were submitted to panels of experts for assessment and determination of content for a CME program in the field. Results Twenty one learning outcomes were identified through a modified Delphi process. The indicators were used by the panels of experts and six educational topics were determined for the CME programme and the curricular content of each was defined. The topics were 1) Principles of prescription writing, 2) Adverse drug reactions, 3) Drug interactions, 4) Injections, 5) Antibiotic therapy, and 6) Anti-inflammatory agents therapy. One of the topics was not directly related to any outcome, raising a question about the need for a discussion on constructive alignment. Conclusions Consensus on learning outcomes was achieved and an educational guideline was designed. Before suggesting widespread use in the country the educational package should be tested in the CME context. PMID:18510774

  12. Improving Dairy Organizational Communication from the Veterinarian's Perspective: Results of a Continuing Veterinary Medical Education Pilot Program.

    PubMed

    Moore, Dale A; Sischo, William M; Kurtz, Suzanne; Siler, Julie D; Pereira, Richard V; Warnick, Lorin D; Davis, Margaret A

    2016-01-01

    The increasing size and complexity of US dairy farms could make it more difficult for a veterinary practitioner to effectively communicate protocol recommendations for prevention or treatment on the farm. A continuing education workshop was set up based on the results of research on dairy organizational communication on dairy farms, which resulted in a tool to assess dairy communication structure and flow. The workshop specifically focused on communication structure and whom to talk to when implementing health care changes in calf rearing. In addition, modern methods of veterinary-client communication knowledge and skills were provided. Primary outcomes of the workshops were to obtain feedback from participants about research findings and the communication model, to improve awareness about the complexity of communication structures on dairy farms, and to change participants' knowledge and skills associated with on-farm communication by providing communication theory and skills and an approach to evaluate and improve dairy organizational communication. Of the 37 participants completing the pre-program assessment, most recognized a need for themselves or their practice to improve communication with clients and farm employees. After the program, most participants were confident in their new communication skills and would consider using them. They highlighted specific new ideas they could apply in practice, such as conducting a "communication audit." The results from the assessment of this communication workshop, focused on dairy veterinarians, highlighted the need for communication training in this sector of the profession and practitioners' desire to engage in this type of training.

  13. Improving Dairy Organizational Communication from the Veterinarian's Perspective: Results of a Continuing Veterinary Medical Education Pilot Program

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Dale A.; Sischo, William M.; Kurtz, Suzanne; Siler, Julie D.; Pereira, Richard V.; Warnick, Lorin D.; Davis, Margaret A.

    2016-01-01

    The increasing size and complexity of US dairy farms could make it more difficult for a veterinary practitioner to effectively communicate protocol recommendations for prevention or treatment on the farm. A continuing education workshop was set up based on the results of research on dairy organizational communication on dairy farms, which resulted in a tool to assess dairy communication structure and flow. The workshop specifically focused on communication structure and whom to talk to when implementing health care changes in calf rearing. In addition, modern methods of veterinary–client communication knowledge and skills were provided. Primary outcomes of the workshops were to obtain feedback from participants about research findings and the communication model, to improve awareness about the complexity of communication structures on dairy farms, and to change participants' knowledge and skills associated with on-farm communication by providing communication theory and skills and an approach to evaluate and improve dairy organizational communication. Of the 37 participants completing the pre-program assessment, most recognized a need for themselves or their practice to improve communication with clients and farm employees. After the program, most participants were confident in their new communication skills and would consider using them. They highlighted specific new ideas they could apply in practice, such as conducting a “communication audit”. The results from the assessment of this communication workshop, focused on dairy veterinarians, highlighted the need for communication training in this sector of the profession and practitioners' desire to engage in this type of training. PMID:26751909

  14. Handing Over and Letting Go: Using Online Continuing Medical Education in Teaching and Assessing Medical English Language and Communication Skills to Undergraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vekemans, Herlinda

    2016-01-01

    In the last few decades the medical community has increasingly underlined the necessity for medical students and healthcare professionals to acquire adequate and patient-friendly medical language and communication skills. Although teachers of foreign languages for medical purposes are usually not medically trained, their learners present them with…

  15. Handing Over and Letting Go: Using Online Continuing Medical Education in Teaching and Assessing Medical English Language and Communication Skills to Undergraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vekemans, Herlinda

    2016-01-01

    In the last few decades the medical community has increasingly underlined the necessity for medical students and healthcare professionals to acquire adequate and patient-friendly medical language and communication skills. Although teachers of foreign languages for medical purposes are usually not medically trained, their learners present them with…

  16. Overview of geriatric distance education for academic courses and continuing education.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Helen Arleen

    2004-01-01

    Distance education technologies may be applied to academic settings, continuing education/continuing medical education settings or in combination to both. This article provides an overview of what we have learned about academic and continuing education/continuing medical education in geriatrics and gerontology. It includes information on the scope of distance education, the strengths and challenges of distance education, and discusses issues related to technology, intellectual property, instructional design and curriculum development, collaborative effort, marketing, evaluation, and research.

  17. Benefits and Limitations of Text Messages to Stimulate Higher Learning Among Community Providers: Participants' Views of an mHealth Intervention to Support Continuing Medical Education in Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Sabin, Lora L; Larson Williams, Anna; Le, Bao Ngoc; Herman, Augusta R; Viet Nguyen, Ha; Albanese, Rebecca R; Xiong, Wenjun; Shobiye, Hezekiah OA; Halim, Nafisa; Tran, Lien Thi Ngoc; McNabb, Marion; Hoang, Hai; Falconer, Ariel; Nguyen, Tam Thi Thanh; Gill, Christopher J

    2017-01-01

    Background: A randomized controlled trial was conducted in 2015 to evaluate a mobile continuing medical education (mCME) intervention that provided daily text messages to community-based physicians' assistants (CBPAs) in Thai Nguyen Province, Vietnam. Although the intervention failed to improve medical knowledge over a 6-month period, a companion qualitative study provided insights on the views and experiences of intervention participants. Methods: We conducted focus group discussions (FGDs) and in-depth interviews (IDIs) among participants randomized to receive text messages containing either simple medical facts or quiz questions. Trained interviewers collected data immediately following the conclusion of the trial in December 2015. Using semi-structured question guides, respondents were queried on their views of the intervention, positive and negative, and perceived impacts of the intervention. During analysis, after learning that the intervention had failed to increase knowledge among participants, we also examined reasons for lack of improvement in medical knowledge. All analyses were performed in NVivo using a thematic approach. Results: A total of 70 CBPAs engaged in one of 8 FGDs or an IDI. One-half were men; average age among all respondents was 40 years. Most (81%) practiced in rural settings and most (51%) focused on general medicine. The mean length of work experience was 3 years. All respondents made positive comments about the intervention; convenience, relevance, and quick feedback (quiz format) were praised. Downsides encompassed lack of depth of information, weak interaction, technology challenges, and challenging/irrelevant messages. Respondents described perceived impacts encompassing increased motivation, knowledge, collegial discussions, Internet use to search for more information, and clinical skills. Overall, they expressed a desire for the intervention to continue and recommended expansion to other medical professionals. Overreliance on the

  18. Meeting the challenge of mandatory continuing education.

    PubMed

    Hayes, E R; Morin, K H; Sylvia, B; Bashford, M R

    1995-01-01

    A state's decision to institute mandatory continuing education has ramifications for individuals involved in staff development and inservice education. In collaboration with the University of Delaware College of Nursing along with the Medical Center of Delaware, the Delaware Nurses' Association in 1990 assessed the continuing education needs and interests of a convenience sample of 547 registered nurse Delaware Nurses' Association members. Analysis of the data revealed a variety of interests within practice, education, administration, and research. The most preferred method of acquiring continuing education was attendance at a live conference, with part-day morning programs favored by a majority of the sample. Consequently, staff development and inservice educators are challenged with meeting the needs of the organization and the individual employee in an era of diminishing resources.

  19. Continuing Education: Facing the Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broadbent, Marianne

    1986-01-01

    Examines a number of issues facing the Australian library and information services community in the area of continuing education, including recommendations of the Library Association of Australia, the cost of continuing education activities, the role and responsibility of schools of library and information studies, and notions of coordination.…

  20. THE EMERGENCE OF CONTINUING EDUCATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ADAMS, HENRY BABCOCK

    THE CRISIS OVER RELIGIOUS BELIEFS, RAPID SOCIAL CHANGE, THE KNOWLEDGE EXPLOSION, AND AVAILABILITY OF OPPORTUNITIES FOR STUDY HAVE CONTRIBUTED TO A PHENOMENAL EMERGENCE OF CONTINUING EDUCATION FOR MINISTERS. BECAUSE CONTINUING EDUCATION IS MORE LIKELY TO BE ACTION RESEARCH, IT MUST ASK WHAT THE CHURCH'S MISSION IS AND WHAT METHODS ARE MOST…

  1. Wanted: A Continuing Education Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calhoun, A. Brian

    1986-01-01

    Describes the efforts of the Triton College Continuing Education Department to develop a unified curriculum and to market the program. Includes information on developing a continuing education philosophy, providing a unified curriculum, and creating a marketing bulletin. Illustrates ways to recombine courses to provide a unified approach. (CH)

  2. Continuing Education: Facing the Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broadbent, Marianne

    1986-01-01

    Examines a number of issues facing the Australian library and information services community in the area of continuing education, including recommendations of the Library Association of Australia, the cost of continuing education activities, the role and responsibility of schools of library and information studies, and notions of coordination.…

  3. Medical education: changes and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qin; Lee, Liming; Gruppen, Larry D; Ba, Denian

    2013-08-01

    As medical education undergoes significant internationalization, it is important for the medical education community to understand how different countries structure and provide medical education. This article highlights the current landscape of medical education in China, particularly the changes that have taken place in recent years. It also examines policies and offers suggestions about future strategies for medical education in China. Although many of these changes reflect international trends, Chinese medical education has seen unique transformations that reflect its particular culture and history.

  4. The RAFT network: 5 years of distance continuing medical education and tele-consultations over the Internet in French-speaking Africa.

    PubMed

    Geissbuhler, Antoine; Bagayoko, Cheick Oumar; Ly, Ousmane

    2007-01-01

    Continuing education of healthcare professionals is a key element for the quality and efficiency of a health system. In developing countries, this activity is usually limited to capitals, and delocalized professionals do not have access to such opportunities, or to didactic material adapted to their needs. This limits the interest of such professionals to remain active in the periphery, where they are most needed to implement effective strategies for prevention and first-line healthcare. Telemedicine tools enable the communication and sharing of medical information in electronic form, and thus facilitate access to remote expertise. A physician located far from a reference center can consult its colleagues remotely in order to resolve a difficult case, follow a continuous education course over the Internet, or access medical information from digital libraries or knowledge bases. These same tools can also be used to facilitate exchanges between centers of medical expertise: health institutions of a same country as well as across borders. Since 2000, the Geneva University Hospitals have been involved in coordinating the development of a network for eHealth in Africa (the RAFT, Réseau en Afrique Francophone pour la Télémédecine), first in Mali, and now extending to 10 French-speaking African countries. The core activity of the RAFT is the webcasting of interactive courses. These sessions put the emphasis on knowledge sharing across care professionals, usually in the form of presentations and dialogs between experts in different countries. The technology used for the webcasting works with a slow (25 kbits/s) internet connection. Other activities of the RAFT network include visioconferences, teleconsultations based on the iPath system, collaborative knowledge bases development, support for medical laboratories quality control, and the evaluation of the use of telemedicine in rural areas (via satellite connections) in the context of multisectorial development. Finally

  5. Continuing Education and Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alger, Ian, Ed.

    1983-01-01

    Reviews two conferences sponsored by the Ackerman Institute for Family Therapy: "Professional Systems and the Family," focusing on the interfaces among family therapists and professionals in education, health care, and human resources, and "Family Systems Over Time: The Fourth Dimension," focusing on the family life cycle, and…

  6. [An evaluation of a continuing medical education program for primary care services in the prescription of hypoglycemic agents in diabetes mellitus type 2].

    PubMed

    Castro-Ríos, Angélica; Reyes-Morales, Hortensia; Pérez-Cuevas, Ricardo

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of a continuing medical education program on family doctors to improve prescription of hypoglycemic drugs. An observational study was conducted with two groups of comparison (with-without program) and before-after periods. The unit of analysis was the visit. The period of evaluation comprised six months before and six after implementing the program. The outcome variable was the appropriateness of prescription that was based upon two criteria: appropriate selection and proper indication of the drug. Logistic regression models and the double differences technique were used to analyze the information. Models were adjusted by independent variables related with the patient, the visit and the PCC, the more relevant ones were: sex, obesity, conditions other than diabetes, number of visits in the analyzed period, number of drugs prescribed, size of the PCC and period. the program increases 0.6% the probability of appropriate prescription and 11% the probability of appropriate choice of the hypoglycemic drug in obese patients.

  7. An international dermatological image atlas on the WWW: practical use for undergraduate and continuing medical education, patient education and epidemiological research.

    PubMed

    Eysenbach, G; Bauer, J; Sager, A; Bittorf, A; Simon, M; Diepgen, T

    1998-01-01

    We describe the development of an image database DOIA (Dermatological OnlIne Atlas) and present several spin-off projects using images of the atlas, e.g. student education using the atlas including results of an questionnaire evaluating computer-literacy, prerequisites and interests of students for using computers and the World-Wide-Web (WWW), a patient information system and an experiment to collect epidemiological data from patients with dermatological diseases via WWW. The database, available on the WWW at http:@www.derma.med.uni-erlangen.de, contains about 3,000 clinical images covering more than 540 dermatological diagnoses. It is designed for worldwide use; international submissions are encouraged. One aim of the project is to compile an international reference for dermatological images, containing images of high educational quality and also covering conditions on different skin types and rare diagnoses which are not commonly illustrated in ordinary textbooks. All images were originally mapped to the Erlanger Diagnosis Code, which is a proprietary modified ICD-9 key, later also to the UMLS (Unified Medical Language System). In addition, images are described with keys for the location, physical attributes of the location and clinical and histopathological features of the lesion. In order to facilitate the integration of the atlas into other web-based medical resources and to allow easy access to additional information, the Erlanger Diagnosis Code was mapped to the CUIs (unique concept identifiers) of the UMLS Metathesaurus. One purpose of the UMLS is to allow conversion of terms from one controlled medical vocabulary to another, thus, mapping of our diagnosis code to the UMLS CUIs allows simultaneous search for a given diagnosis in a number of other databases and also access to our image database from other databases. Mapping was successful for 619 out of 1383 dermatological diagnosis terms. For images with these diagnoses we are able to provide a hyperlink to

  8. Continuing Education and the Relationship to the Profession.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parochka, Jacqueline; And Others

    Ideas underlying both professional and public attitudes toward continuing education in clinical laboratory science are examined, and the history of the American Society for Medical Technology (ASMT) in continuing education is traced. Continuing education may be defined as any systematic effort developed by a clinical laboratory scientist to update…

  9. Reflection in Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hargreaves, Ken

    2016-01-01

    This paper offers a medical-education perspective that I will hope complement other disciplinary perspectives in examining the value of reflection for learning in tertiary education. The paper outlines some of the theoretical strands of reflective practice facilitated in a unique course subject for professionalism and patient safety, within the…

  10. Medical education in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Lindgren, Stefan; Brännström, Thomas; Hanse, Eric; Ledin, Torbjörn; Nilsson, Gunnar; Sandler, Stellan; Tidefelt, Ulf; Donnér, Jakob

    2011-01-01

    Undergraduate medical education in Sweden has moved from nationally regulated, subject-based courses to programmes integrated either around organ systems or physiological and patho-physiological processes, or organised around basic medical science in conjunction with clinical specialities, with individual profiles at the seven medical schools. The national regulations are restricted to overall academic and professional outcomes. The 5½ year long university undergraduate curriculum is followed by a mandatory 18 months internship, delivered by the County Councils. While quality control and accreditation for the university curriculum is provided by the Swedish National Agency for Higher Education, no such formal control exists for the internship; undergraduate medical education is therefore in conflict with EU directives from 2005. The Government is expected to move towards 6 years long university undergraduate programmes, leading to licence, which will facilitate international mobility of both Swedish and foreign medical students and doctors. Ongoing academic development of undergraduate education is strengthened by the Bologna process. It includes outcome (competence)-based curricula, university Masters level complying with international standards, progression of competence throughout the curriculum, student directed learning, active participation and roles in practical clinical education and a national assessment model to assure professional competence. In the near future, the dimensioning of Swedish undergraduate education is likely to be decided more by international demands and aspects of quality than by national demands for doctors.

  11. Medical education in Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Joffre, Carrillo P; Delgado, Belgica; Kosik, Russell Olive; Huang, Lei; Zhao, Xudong; Su, Tung-Ping; Wang, Shuu-Jiun; Chen, Qi; Fan, Angela Pei-Chen

    2013-12-01

    Ecuador, the smallest of the Andean countries, is located in the northwest portion of South America. The nation's 14.5 million people have a tremendous need for high quality primary care. To describe the profound advances as well as the persistent needs in medical education in Ecuador that have occurred with globalization and with the modernization of the country. Through an extensive search of the literature; medical school data; reports from the Ecuador Ministry of Public Health and Ministry of Education; and information from the National Secretary of Higher Education, Science, and Innovation (SENESCYT), the medical education system in Ecuador has been thoroughly examined. The National System of Higher Education in Ecuador has experienced significant growth over the last 20 years. As of 2009 the system boasts 19 medical schools, all of which offer the required education needed to obtain the title of Physician, but only 12 of which offer postgraduate clinical training. Of these 19 universities, nine are public, five are private and self-financed, and five are private and co-financed. Post-graduate options for medical students include: (1) Clinical specialization, (2) Higher diploma, (3) Course specialization, (4) Master's degree, and (5) PhD degree. The rapid growth of Ecuador's system of medical education has led to inevitable gaps that threaten its ability to sustain itself. Chief among these is the lack of well-trained faculty to supply its medical schools. To ensure an adequate supply of faculty exists, the creation of sufficient postgraduate, sub-specialization, and PhD training positions must be created and maintained.

  12. Marketing Essentials for Continuing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fong, Jim

    2001-01-01

    A survey of continuing education providers showed the need for greater investment in marketing, cultivation of outsourcing relationships, staff development in marketing techniques, and new ways of communicating the message to potential customers. (SK)

  13. Competitive Strategy in Continuing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baden, Clifford

    1987-01-01

    Reviews strategic variables available to those planning continuing education marketing programs. Discusses generic competitive strategies: (1) overall cost leadership, (2) differentiation, and (3) specialization. Mentions several potential problems. (CH)

  14. Defining the Continuing Education Professional.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    English, John K.

    1992-01-01

    A job description for continuing education practitioners includes 11 domains and the job responsibilities for each: client management, external marketing, internal marketing, strategic planning, administration, program development, technology management, adult learning, personal development, career management, and community and professional…

  15. Communications Technology and Continuing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldstein, Sheldon

    1984-01-01

    Focusing on three recent developments in communications technology--communications satellites, multichannel cable systems, and home videodisc players--the author discusses the current and potential applications of each to continuing education programs. (SK)

  16. Wright State Expands Continuing Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1974

    1974-01-01

    By leasing the Eugene W. Kettering Engineering and Science Center in downtown Dayton, Ohio, Wright State University plans to enlarge significantly its activities in continuing education for engineers, scientists, and others. (JR)

  17. Marketing Essentials for Continuing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fong, Jim

    2001-01-01

    A survey of continuing education providers showed the need for greater investment in marketing, cultivation of outsourcing relationships, staff development in marketing techniques, and new ways of communicating the message to potential customers. (SK)

  18. Defining the Continuing Education Professional.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    English, John K.

    1992-01-01

    A job description for continuing education practitioners includes 11 domains and the job responsibilities for each: client management, external marketing, internal marketing, strategic planning, administration, program development, technology management, adult learning, personal development, career management, and community and professional…

  19. The Engineering Societies & Continuing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Professional Engineer, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Gives a description of what the major engineering societies (ASCE, ASME, AICHE, and IEEE) are doing in the area of continuing education. The description includes the short courses, their costs, duration, type and scope of the content. (GA)

  20. The Engineering Societies & Continuing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Professional Engineer, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Gives a description of what the major engineering societies (ASCE, ASME, AICHE, and IEEE) are doing in the area of continuing education. The description includes the short courses, their costs, duration, type and scope of the content. (GA)

  1. Communications Technology and Continuing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldstein, Sheldon

    1984-01-01

    Focusing on three recent developments in communications technology--communications satellites, multichannel cable systems, and home videodisc players--the author discusses the current and potential applications of each to continuing education programs. (SK)

  2. [New avenues of communication for continuous medical education: first experiences of live broadcasting of ophthalmologY congresses via Internet].

    PubMed

    Michelson, G; Scibor, M

    1999-11-01

    The usage of the Internet in live-broadcasting ophthalmological lectures might be helpful in the education of eye doctors. The purpose is to report first experiences of a live-broadcasted congress. The congress "Autonomic Innervation and Microcirculation of the Eye--Implications in Glaucoma Pathophysiology", held in the Department of Ophthalmology of the University Erlangen-Nürnberg at the 27th January 1999 was live-broadcasted via Internet by the electronic journal "Online Journal of Ophthalmology" (www.onjoph.com). The congress was organized by the "Sonderforschungsbereich 539, Glaukome, einschliesslich PEX" of the University Erlangen-Nürnberg. The original sound of the lectures was digitized by 8000 Hz and coded with 14 bit. Using the free software "Real-Audio-Player" the user could hear the speech of the lecturer in radio quality. Two live-pictures from two digital video cameras and the digitized slides were available at the screen within two frames. Two weeks before all 6576 ophthalmologists in Germany were informed about the event by conventional mail. The live-broadcasted congress was followed by 899 online-participants (899/6576 = 13.6%). 238 of 899 participants were able to hear the original sound. 154 of 6576 (2.3%) ophthalmologists answered by FAX. 18% of the answering eye doctors have followed the congress by Internet. Mainly all (98%) of them were very interested in live-broadcasted lectures or congresses and wanted to be informed about the next lecture or congress broadcasted by means of Internet. The lectures-on demand of this congress with sound and pictures are now available under the address http:/(/)www.onjoph. com/global/livewrk1/Default.htm. The major part of eye doctors in Germany seems very interested in live-broadcasted lectures for online-education. In the first national-wide trial 899 of 6576 informed eye doctors followed the congress.

  3. The Value of Continuing Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schejbal, David; Wilson, David

    2008-01-01

    Higher education--and continuing education as one arm of that enterprise--is not just an economic engine; it contributes directly and in a multifaceted fashion to the common good. It generates and makes accessible a great deal of the knowledge that drives the economy; it helps develop an understanding of the society and the world for millions of…

  4. Medical education in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Lim, Victor K E

    2008-01-01

    Malaysia has a long history of medical education, with Singapore becoming the first medical school to serve the region after its foundation in 1905. The first school to be established in Kuala Lumpur after independence from the British was the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Malaya in 1963. Whilst today there are 21 public and private medical schools, all offering a 5 year undergraduate programme, some private schools have diversified by developing international collaboration and conduct twinning or credit-transfer programmes. All medical schools require accreditation by the National Accreditation Board and the Malaysian Medical Council. Although the criteria for accreditation is comprehensive and covers a broad range of areas of assessment, it is debatable whether it always matches the needs of the country. The dramatic increase in medical schools in the last two decades has posed challenges in terms of maintenance of quality, physical infrastructure and suitably qualified faculty.

  5. [Role of a credit system in the development of continuous postgraduate training of physicians within the framework of the innovation educational space formation program of the I. M. Sechenov Moscow Medical Academy].

    PubMed

    Vyzhigina, M A; Buniatian, A A; Sizova, Zh M; Protopopova, T A; Zaugol'nikova, T V; Zhukova, S G

    2007-01-01

    Russia 's joining the European higher educational space and an increase in the international competitive capacity of the European higher educational system envisage first of all that the European credit test system (ECTS) should be accepted and introduced into all national higher educational schools, which ensures both credit test and cumulative functions and guarantees the academic recognition of the education abroad. The issues of modernization of approaches to reforming the continuous postgraduate training of physicians, by using the credit test system, as well as new forms and technologies for an educational process in accordance with the European educational system principles are under discussion. The novelty of the proposed development is that the credit test system is first applied to the continuous postgraduate training of physicians within the framework of the Russian higher medical educational system. The Russian continuous postgraduate medical training pattern that is common in form and content is proposed in accordance with the Bologna declaration principles; approaches have been developed to incorporating the European educational traditions into the Russian national continuous postgraduate medical training system, by employing the credit test system; criteria have been elaborated for adapting the European credit test system at all stages of reformation of the Russian educational system; guidelines have been worked out for the conversion of academic load of various forms of the continuous postgraduate training of physicians to the credit test system; ways of introducing the new forms and technologies into an educational process have been proposed in accordance with the European education system principles, by taking into account the credit test system. The introduction of new technologies of an educational process, by using the credit test system will contribute to personality formation in a physician who has a high competence, a capacity for valuable

  6. Curiosity and medical education.

    PubMed

    Dyche, Lawrence; Epstein, Ronald M

    2011-07-01

    For doctors, curiosity is fundamental to understanding each patient's unique experience of illness, building respectful relationships with patients, deepening self-awareness, supporting clinical reasoning, avoiding premature closure and encouraging lifelong learning. Yet, curiosity has received limited attention in medical education and research, and studies from the fields of cognitive psychology and education suggest that common practices in medical education may inadvertently suppress curiosity. This study aimed to identify common barriers to and facilitators of curiosity and related habits of mind in the education of doctors. We conducted a theory-driven conceptual exploration and qualitative review of the literature. Curiosity is related to inquisitiveness, reflection and mindfulness. Instructional practices can suppress curiosity by confusing haste with efficiency, neglecting negative emotions, promoting overconfidence and using teaching approaches that encourage passive learning. Curiosity tends to flourish in educational environments that promote the student's responsibility for his or her own learning, multiple perspectives and mindful reflection on both the subject and the learning process. Specific educational strategies that can support curiosity in classroom and clinical settings include the mindful pacing of teaching, modelling effective management of emotions, confronting uncertainty and overconfidence, using inquiry-based learning, helping students see familiar situations as novel, simultaneously considering multiple perspectives, and maximising the value of small-group discussions. Instructor attributes that contribute to the development of student curiosity include patience, a habit of inquiry, emotional candour, intellectual humility, transparency and recognition of the benefits to be gained in learning from peers.   Curiosity, inquisitiveness and related habits of mind can be supported in medical education through specific, evidence

  7. Financing medical education.

    PubMed

    Petersdorf, R G

    1991-02-01

    The cost of a medical education may dissuade qualified young people from entering the medical profession or may so load them with debt that they cannot pursue relatively low-paid careers in primary care or clinical investigation. Three aspects of this problem are examined: (1) the cost of medical school, (2) the magnitude of student indebtedness, and (3) the effects of this indebtedness on career choices. High tuition and fees require many students to assume sizable educational debts, some of which are so large that the trainees will be unable to repay them unless they enter highly remunerative specialties. Also, high levels of indebtedness may increase default levels once graduates feel the full impact of scheduled repayments. Several steps would help to alleviate this problem, but are unlikely to solve it. First, medical schools should lower tuition or at least declare a moratorium on increases. Second, limits should be imposed on the amount of total education debt a student is allowed to assume. Third, hospitals with extensive residency programs should assume some responsibility for helping trainees manage their finances. Fourth, the government should institute a loan forgiveness program that addresses the need for physician-investigators, primary care physicians, those willing to practice in underserved areas, and those from underrepresented minorities. And fifth, all institutions involved in medical training and its finance should work together to advise students on managing their debts.

  8. Slow medical education.

    PubMed

    Wear, Delese; Zarconi, Joseph; Kumagai, Arno; Cole-Kelly, Kathy

    2015-03-01

    Slow medical education borrows from other "slow" movements by offering a complementary orientation to medical education that emphasizes the value of slow and thoughtful reflection and interaction in medical education and clinical care. Such slow experiences, when systematically structured throughout the curriculum, offer ways for learners to engage in thoughtful reflection, dialogue, appreciation, and human understanding, with the hope that they will incorporate these practices throughout their lives as physicians. This Perspective offers several spaces in the medical curriculum where slowing down is possible: while reading and writing at various times in the curriculum and while providing clinical care, focusing particularly on conducting the physical exam and other dimensions of patient care. Time taken to slow down in these ways offers emerging physicians opportunities to more fully incorporate their experiences into a professional identity that embodies reflection, critical awareness, cultural humility, and empathy. The authors argue that these curricular spaces must be created in a very deliberate manner, even on busy ward services, throughout the education of physicians.

  9. Enhancing critical thinking in paramedic continuing education.

    PubMed

    Dalton, A L

    1996-01-01

    Critical thinking has become a buzzword, especially in medical education. The challenge is first to determine what skills compose critical thinking and what teaching techniques promote critical-thinking skills, and then to determine how to apply these techniques effectively and efficiently to a given population in the classroom. This article begins with a working definition of critical thinking and explores the parameters and skills implied or stated in the definition. Then a teaching environment constructed around a model of critical thinking and characteristics of the audience is described. A specific teaching method, suggested by research and designed to exercise critical-thinking skills, is then applied to a specific patient problem in a continuing education class. Preliminary outcomes are presented. The purpose of this article is to propose a productive and efficient educational method for promoting and enhancing critical-thinking skills appropriate for paramedic-level continuing education.

  10. Pediatric hospitalists and medical education.

    PubMed

    Ottolini, Mary C

    2014-07-01

    Pediatric hospital medicine (PHM) is moving toward becoming an American Board of Pediatrics (ABP) subspecialty, roughly a decade after its formal inception in 2003. Education has played a central role as the field has evolved. Hospitalists are needed to educate trainees, medical students, residents, fellows, and nurse practitioner and physician assistant students in inpatient pediatric practice. Continuous professional development is needed for hospitalists currently in practice to augment clinical skills, such as providing sedation and placing peripherally inserted central catheter lines, and nonclinical skills in areas such as quality improvement methodology, hospital administration, and health service research. To address the educational needs of the current and future state of PHM, additional training is now needed beyond residency training. Fellowship training will be essential to continue to advance the field of PHM as well as to petition the ABP for specialty accreditation. Training in using adult educational theory, curriculum, and assessment design are critical for pediatric hospitalists choosing to advance their careers as clinician-educators. Several venues are available for gaining advanced knowledge and skill as an educator. PHM clinician-educators are advancing the field of pediatric education as well as their own academic careers by virtue of the scholarly approach they have taken to designing and implementing curricula for unique PHM teaching situations. PHM educators are changing the educational paradigm to address challenges to traditional education strategies posed by duty hour restrictions and the increasing drive to shorten the duration of the hospitalization. By embracing learning with technology, such as simulation and e-learning with mobile devices, PHM educators can address these challenges as well as respond to learning preferences of millennial learners. The future for PHM education is bright. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  11. Medical education: Changes and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qin; Lee, Liming; Gruppen, Larry D.; Ba, Denian

    2013-01-01

    As medical education undergoes significant internationalization, it is important for the medical education community to understand how different countries structure and provide medical education. This article highlights the current landscape of medical education in China, particularly the changes that have taken place in recent years. It also examines policies and offers suggestions about future strategies for medical education in China. Although many of these changes reflect international trends, Chinese medical education has seen unique transformations that reflect its particular culture and history. PMID:23631405

  12. How One Professional Society Provides Continuing Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abramson, Harold I.

    1977-01-01

    Described is the American Institute of Chemical Engineers' program of continuing education. Included are comparisons between continuing education programs as offered by universities, industry, and professional societies. (SL)

  13. Does an offer for a free on-line continuing medical education (CME) activity increase physician survey response rate? A randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Achieving a high response rate in a physician survey is challenging. Monetary incentives increase response rates but obviously add cost to a survey project. We wondered whether an offer of a free continuing medical education (CME) activity would be effective in improving survey response rate. Results As part of a survey of a national sample of physicians, we randomized half to an offer for a free on-line CME activity upon completion of a web-based survey and the other half to no such offer. We compared response rates between the groups. A total of 1214 out of 8477 potentially eligible physicians responded to our survey, for an overall response rate of 14.3%. The response rate among the control group (no offer of CME credit) was 16.6%, while among those offered the CME opportunity, the response rate was 12.0% (p < 0.0001). Conclusions An offer for a free on-line CME activity did not improve physician survey response rate. On the contrary, the offer for a free CME activity actually appeared to worsen the response rate. PMID:22397624

  14. Does an offer for a free on-line continuing medical education (CME) activity increase physician survey response rate? A randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Viera, Anthony J; Edwards, Teresa

    2012-03-07

    Achieving a high response rate in a physician survey is challenging. Monetary incentives increase response rates but obviously add cost to a survey project. We wondered whether an offer of a free continuing medical education (CME) activity would be effective in improving survey response rate. As part of a survey of a national sample of physicians, we randomized half to an offer for a free on-line CME activity upon completion of a web-based survey and the other half to no such offer. We compared response rates between the groups. A total of 1214 out of 8477 potentially eligible physicians responded to our survey, for an overall response rate of 14.3%. The response rate among the control group (no offer of CME credit) was 16.6%, while among those offered the CME opportunity, the response rate was 12.0% (p < 0.0001). An offer for a free on-line CME activity did not improve physician survey response rate. On the contrary, the offer for a free CME activity actually appeared to worsen the response rate. © 2011 Viera et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  15. Business continuity after catastrophic medical events: the Joplin medical business continuity report.

    PubMed

    Carlton, Paul K; Bringle, Dottie

    2012-01-01

    On May 22, 2011, The St Johns Mercy Medical Center in Joplin, MO, was destroyed by an F-5 tornado. There were 183 patients in the building at that time in this 367-bed Medical Center. The preparation and response were superbly done and resulted in many lives saved. This report is focused on the reconstitution phase of this disaster response, which includes how to restore business continuity. As 95 percent of our medical capacity resides in the private sector in the United States, we must have a proper plan for how to restore business continuity or face the reality of the medical business failing and not providing critical medical services to the community. A tornado in 2007 destroyed a medical center in Sumter County, GA, and it took more than 365 days to restore business continuity at a cost of $18M. The plan executed by the Mercy Medical System after the disaster in Joplin restored business continuity in 88 days and cost a total of $6.6M, with all assets being reusable. The recommendation from these lessons learned is that every county, state, and Federal Emergency Management Agency region has a plan on the shelf to restore business continuity and the means to be able to do so. The hard work that the State of Missouri and the Mercy Medical System did after this disaster can serve as a model for the nation in how to quickly recover from any loss of medical capability.

  16. Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) annual anesthesiology residency and fellowship program review: a "report card" model for continuous improvement.

    PubMed

    Rose, Steven H; Long, Timothy R

    2010-02-08

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) requires an annual evaluation of all ACGME-accredited residency and fellowship programs to assess program quality. The results of this evaluation must be used to improve the program. This manuscript describes a metric to be used in conducting ACGME-mandated annual program review of ACGME-accredited anesthesiology residencies and fellowships. A variety of metrics to assess anesthesiology residency and fellowship programs are identified by the authors through literature review and considered for use in constructing a program "report card." Metrics used to assess program quality include success in achieving American Board of Anesthesiology (ABA) certification, performance on the annual ABA/American Society of Anesthesiology In-Training Examination, performance on mock oral ABA certification examinations, trainee scholarly activities (publications and presentations), accreditation site visit and internal review results, ACGME and alumni survey results, National Resident Matching Program (NRMP) results, exit interview feedback, diversity data and extensive program/rotation/faculty/curriculum evaluations by trainees and faculty. The results are used to construct a "report card" that provides a high-level review of program performance and can be used in a continuous quality improvement process. An annual program review is required to assess all ACGME-accredited residency and fellowship programs to monitor and improve program quality. We describe an annual review process based on metrics that can be used to focus attention on areas for improvement and track program performance year-to-year. A "report card" format is described as a high-level tool to track educational outcomes.

  17. Standards for medical educators.

    PubMed

    Purcell, Nigel; Lloyd-Jones, Gaynor

    2003-02-01

    In the current UK socio-political climate of mounting regulation of professional practice, a debate on the topic of standards amongst medical teachers seems timely. The role of teacher is increasingly recognised as a core professional activity for all doctors and one that cannot be left to chance, aptitude or inclination. As a consequence, faculties have developed a plethora of teacher training programmes for medical teachers. But what is good medical teaching? Unless we know what it is, how can we develop it? One possible approach is to develop clear and comprehensive standards, defining what we mean by competent or effective clinical teaching. In this article we have evaluated and compared two models of standards for clinical educators. The first is the outcome-based approach developed at Dundee Medical School and the second is the scholarship model devised initially by Boyer and then elaborated by Glassick and Fincher et al. The key features of both models are briefly described and their comparative strengths and problematic aspects explored. Both models offer interesting and stimulating ideas and together they provide an instructive contrast. They make a valuable contribution to the ongoing process of improving the provision of medical education.

  18. Marketing Continuing Education for Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board, Atlanta, GA.

    This guide presents an overview of marketing and its potential value in continuing education programs for nurses. The first portion of the guide briefly discusses the concept of marketing. It contains definitions of key marketing concepts (product, place, price, and promotion), discussion of the basic tenets of marketing (consumer needs…

  19. Midwives' Motivation for Continuing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laszlo, Halldora; Strettle, Robert J.

    1996-01-01

    Responses from 83 of 120 British midwives showed that motivation for continuing education was strongest in regard to professional competence and innate desire for knowledge, less in regard to legal requirements for practice. Strongest motivators were internal and learning related. Social integration was the least important aspect of continuing…

  20. Continuing Education Courses in Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Herbert S.

    1987-01-01

    Examines issues of special library management and the emphases in SLA (Special Libraries Association) continuing education courses dealing with these issues. Five courses taught for SLA are described, including one-day courses on management communications, delegation, and effective supervisory skills, as well as seminars dealing with human…

  1. Competency Assessment and Continuing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlegel, John F.

    1978-01-01

    Described is the competency project being conducted by the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy and the American Pharmaceutical Association, and its relationship to the development of continuing education programs. The project is attempting to specify standards of competency and develop self-assessment devices to be used by pharmacists.…

  2. A comprehensive systematic review of the use of simulation in the continuing education and training of qualified medical, nursing and midwifery staff.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Sharon; Murrell, Karen; Harper, Peter; Stephens, Tim; Pellowe, Carol

    2011-01-01

    Simulation can be defined as a person, device or set of conditions made to resemble a real life situation. It is used in many high-risk industries particularly when reality is dangerous, critical events are rare and errors are costly in human and/or financial terms. The use of simulation in the UK is now considered an essential component of education programmes designed for healthcare practitioners. However the use of simulation in undergraduate education has been studied in depth but little is known about its use in postgraduate education. The aim of this systematic review was to establish: where and in which context is simulation an effective educational medium in post qualifying/continuing education; what is the benefit to learners of using simulation in respect of their knowledge, skills and confidence and what are the implications for future research in this area? This review looked for both quantitative and qualitative evidence in the form of primary research.The review focused on post qualification medical, nursing and midwifery staff undertaking educational development programmes utilising simulation. Types of interventions: the intervention explored in this review is simulation in the form of the re-creation of a patient centred scenario / event in a realistic context. The review explicitly excluded simulation designed to specifically to improve motor skills in isolation from context, such as part task trainers. The outcome measures to be explored in this review were: demonstration of the application of knowledge to the simulated clinical situation; demonstrable improvement in knowledge of the environment and equipment; demonstration of risk assessment; safe working practice in relation to the clinical environment; recognition of own limitations and knowing when to call for help; effective communication; team working and leadership skills; evidence from learners in relation to the educational experience; evidence of increased learner confidence following

  3. Motivation in medical education().

    PubMed

    Pelaccia, Thierry; Viau, Rolland

    2017-02-01

    Motivation is a concept which has fascinated researchers for many decades. The field of medical education has become interested in motivation recently, having always assumed that medical students must be motivated because of their commitment to highly specific training, leading to a very specific profession. However, motivation is a major determinant of the quality of learning and success, the lack of which may well explain why teachers sometimes observe medical students who are discouraged, have lost interest or abandon their studies, with a feeling of powerlessness or resignation. After describing the importance of motivation for learning in medicine, this Guide will define the concept of motivation, setting it within the context of a social cognitive approach. In the second part of this Guide, recommendations are made, based upon the so-called "motivational dynamic model", which provides a multitude of various strategies with positive effects on students' motivation to learn.

  4. The Future of Medical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graves, Judy, Ed.

    The purpose of this monograph is to present the thoughts of a small group of medical educators and administrators on the expansion of medical education's scope and responsibilities, basic conditions for progress, and medical education's obligations to the nation's health. In Chapter 1, the health delivery system of the future is discussed. Chapter…

  5. Challenges and opportunities facing medical education.

    PubMed

    Densen, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Medical education is at a crossroads. Although unique features exist at the undergraduate, graduate, and continuing education levels, shared aspects of all three levels are especially revealing, and form the basis for informed decision-making about the future of medical education.This paper describes some of the internal and external challenges confronting undergraduate medical education. Key internal challenges include the focus on disease to the relative exclusion of behavior, inpatient versus outpatient education, and implications of a faculty whose research is highly focused at the molecular or submolecular level. External factors include the exponential growth in knowledge, associated technologic ("disruptive") innovations, and societal changes. Addressing these challenges requires decisive institutional leadership with an eye to 2020 and beyond--the period in which current matriculants will begin their careers. This paper presents a spiral-model format for a curriculum of medical education, based on disease mechanisms, that addresses many of these challenges and incorporates sound educational principles.

  6. Virtual Patients in continuing medical education and residency training: a pilot project for acceptance analysis in the framework of a residency revision course in pediatrics

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, Ronny; Hanebeck, Benjamin; Oberle, Stephan; Simon, Anke; Choukair, Daniela; Tönshoff, Burkhard; Huwendiek, Sören

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Virtual patients (VPs) are a one-of-a-kind e-learning resource, fostering clinical reasoning skills through clinical case examples. The combination with face-to-face teaching is important for their successful integration, which is referred to as “blended learning”. So far little is known about the use of VPs in the field of continuing medical education and residency training. The pilot study presented here inquired the application of VPs in the framework of a pediatric residency revision course. Methods: Around 200 participants of a pediatric nephology lecture (‘nephrotic and nephritic syndrome in children’) were offered two VPs as a wrap-up session at the revision course of the German Society for Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine (DGKJ) 2009 in Heidelberg, Germany. Using a web-based survey form, different aspects were evaluated concerning the learning experiences with VPs, the combination with the lecture, and the use of VPs for residency training in general. Results: N=40 evaluable survey forms were returned (approximately 21%). The return rate was impaired by a technical problem with the local Wi-Fi firewall. The participants perceived the work-up of the VPs as a worthwhile learning experience, with proper preparation for diagnosing and treating real patients with similar complaints. Case presentations, interactivity, and locally and timely independent repetitive practices were, in particular, pointed out. On being asked about the use of VPs in general for residency training, there was a distinct demand for more such offers. Conclusion: VPs may reasonably complement existing learning activities in residency training. PMID:26604993

  7. The Impact of Financial Disclosure on Attendee Assessment of Objectivity in Continuing Medical Education Programs in Psychiatry: A Randomized, Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Jibson, Michael D; Cobourn, Lisa A; Seibert, Jennifer K

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of financial conflict of interest disclosures by speakers at continuing medical education (CME) programs is to assist attendees in their assessment of the objectivity of the information presented. This empirical study was undertaken to determine what level of disclosure is optimal to achieve this goal. Attendees at five CME programs were randomly assigned to receive either a standard financial disclosure, an intermediate level that included whether speakers received more or less than 5% of their income from each company they disclosed, or a high level of disclosure that included the percent of their income derived from each company. A total of 169 attendees (85.4% response rate) completed a questionnaire regarding the objectivity of the CME presentation they attended. Attendees receiving the highest level of disclosure came significantly closer to the ratings of speaker bias made by peer reviewers than did attendees receiving medium or low levels of disclosure (p = 0.03; effect size 0.31). Among the minority of attendees who received the highest level of disclosure but whose assessment of bias differed from that of peer reviewers, however, there was a tendency to underestimate bias (5.9 vs 31.4%; p < 0.0001). The major limitation of this study was an overall low level of bias in the presentations, making it difficult to generalize these findings to less objective programs. The study did not address whether the process of disclosure had an impact on speakers' behavior. This study provides mixed support for higher levels of financial disclosure than are currently required for CME programs.

  8. Use of a national continuing medical education meeting to provide simulation-based training in temporary hemodialysis catheter insertion skills: a pre-test post-test study.

    PubMed

    Clark, Edward G; Paparello, James J; Wayne, Diane B; Edwards, Cedric; Hoar, Stephanie; McQuillan, Rory; Schachter, Michael E; Barsuk, Jeffrey H

    2014-01-01

    Simulation-based-mastery-learning (SBML) is an effective method to train nephrology fellows to competently insert temporary, non-tunneled hemodialysis catheters (NTHCs). Previous studies of SBML for NTHC-insertion have been conducted at a local level. Determine if SBML for NTHC-insertion can be effective when provided at a national continuing medical education (CME) meeting. Describe the correlation of demographic factors, prior experience with NTHC-insertion and procedural self-confidence with simulated performance of the procedure. Pre-test - post-test study. 2014 Canadian Society of Nephrology annual meeting. Nephrology fellows, internal medicine residents and medical students. Participants were surveyed regarding demographics, prior NTHC-insertion experience, procedural self-confidence and attitudes regarding the training they received. NTHC-insertion skills were assessed using a 28-item checklist. Participants underwent a pre-test of their NTHC-insertion skills at the internal jugular site using a realistic patient simulator and ultrasound machine. Participants then had a training session that included a didactic presentation and 2 hours of deliberate practice using the simulator. On the following day, trainees completed a post-test of their NTHC-insertion skills. All participants were required to meet or exceed a minimum passing score (MPS) previously set at 79%. Trainees who did not reach the MPS were required to perform more deliberate practice until the MPS was achieved. Twenty-two individuals participated in SBML training. None met or exceeded the MPS at baseline with a median checklist score of 20 (IQR, 7.25 to 21). Seventeen of 22 participants (77%) completed post-testing and improved their scores to a median of 27 (IQR, 26 to 28; p < 0.001). All met or exceeded the MPS on their first attempt. There were no significant correlations between demographics, prior experience or procedural self-confidence with pre-test performance. Small sample-size and

  9. Sport concussion knowledge base, clinical practises and needs for continuing medical education: a survey of family physicians and cross-border comparison.

    PubMed

    Lebrun, Constance M; Mrazik, Martin; Prasad, Abhaya S; Tjarks, B Joel; Dorman, Jason C; Bergeron, Michael F; Munce, Thayne A; Valentine, Verle D

    2013-01-01

    Evolving concussion diagnosis/management tools and guidelines make Knowledge Transfer and Exchange (KTE) to practitioners challenging. Identify sports concussion knowledge base and practise patterns in two family physician populations; explore current/preferred methods of KTE. A cross-sectional study. Family physicians in Alberta, Canada (CAN) and North/South Dakota, USA. CAN physicians were recruited by mail: 2.5% response rate (80/3154); US physicians through a database: 20% response rate (109/545). INTERVENTION/INSTRUMENT: Online survey. MAIN AND SECONDARY OUTCOME MEASURES: Diagnosis/management strategies for concussions, and current/preferred KTE. Main reported aetiologies: sports/recreation (52.5% CAN); organised sports (76.5% US). Most physicians used clinical examination (93.8% CAN, 88.1% US); far fewer used the Sport Concussion Assessment Tool (SCAT1/SCAT2) and balance testing. More US physicians initially used concussion-grading scales (26.7% vs 8.8% CAN, p=0.002); computerised neurocognitive testing (19.8% vs 1.3% CAN; p<0.001) and Standardised Assessment of Concussion (SAC) (21.8% vs 7.5% CAN; p=0.008). Most prescribed physical rest (83.8% CAN, 75.5% US), while fewer recommended cognitive rest (47.5% CAN, 28.4% US; p=0.008). Return-to-play decisions were based primarily on clinical examination (89.1% US, 73.8% CAN; p=0.007); US physicians relied more on neurocognitive testing (29.7% vs 5.0% CAN; p<0.001) and recognised guidelines (63.4% vs 23.8% CAN; p<0.001). One-third of Canadian physicians received KTE from colleagues, websites and medical school training. Leading KTE preferences included Continuing Medical Education (CME) courses and online CME. Existing published recommendations regarding diagnosis/management of concussion are not always translated into practise, particularly the recommendation for cognitive rest; predicating enhanced, innovative CME initiatives.

  10. Transforming Medical Education: Is Competency-Based Medical Education the Right Approach?

    PubMed

    Whitcomb, Michael E

    2016-05-01

    There is growing recognition within the medical education community that medical education in this country needs to be changed to better prepare doctors for the challenges they will face in providing their patients high-quality medical care. A competency-based medical education (CBME) approach was endorsed by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education and the American Board of Medical Specialties approximately 15 years ago, and a self-designated group-the International Competency-Based Medical Education (ICBME) Collaborators-is now calling on members of the medical education community to join them in their effort to establish CBME as the approach to be used in transforming medical education, not only in the United States but also around the world.In response to an article in this issue by a group of ICBME Collaborators, the author argues that more evidence about the effectiveness of CBME is needed before a global shift to this approach is undertaken. It is time for major organizations and foundations that are committed to improving medical education to step forward and take the lead in partnering with the medical education community to conduct a critical evaluation of CBME. In addition, maintenance of certification, relicensure, and continuing medical education programs should be evaluated for their effectiveness in ensuring that physicians are clinically competent not only at the beginning of their career but also until the end.

  11. Quality of postgraduate medical education.

    PubMed

    Nizamov, I G; Sadykova, T I

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, huge efforts to improve quality control process and efficiency of healthcare were put in advancing health systems in Russia. There are measurable and noteworthy achievements, there are unresolved issues.It's impossible to manage the process of improving the quality and efficiency of care without high-quality training of respective troops. However, in the last decade a phrase about the poor quality of postgraduate medical education has been heard periodically in the speeches of the leaders at various levels. The source is unknown, but this information continues to be spread by word of mouth as a regular component of speeches about health issues. Considering that the "poor quality" of postgraduate education has not been substantiated by solid evidence, this informational spam, of course, needs to be overcome. It is not only harmful to health system overall, it is harmful in particular for the process of formation of personnel reserve, but it also discredits the whole system of postgraduate education and a titanic work of thousands of teachers, who work as enthusiasts, most of them performing valuable research, teaching and organizational work. To provide situation analysis in the field of postgraduate medical education. First of all, it begs the question - how and who measures the quality of education. What indicators in the evaluation process are key? As a rule, when assessing quality in any field, preference is given to the opinion of the consumer.Our direct customers are the heads of health organs and institutions who regularly undergo advanced training in the specialty "Public Health and Health Care" at sub-faculty. After the completion of each cycle of training and exams, each participant fills out a questionnaire, which points out the level of quality of pedagogical activity of the sub-faculty. The analysis of these questionnaires shows that the students generally give high assessment of the quality of pedagogical process. The health

  12. Continuing education for performance improvement: a creative approach.

    PubMed

    Collins, Patti-Ann; Hardesty, Ilana; White, Julie L; Zisblatt, Lara

    2012-10-01

    In an effort to improve patient safety and health care outcomes, continuing medical education has begun to focus on performance improvement initiatives for physician practices. Boston University School of Medicine's (BUSM) Continuing Nursing Education Accredited Provider Unit has begun a creative project to award nursing contact hours for nurses' participation in performance improvement activities. This column highlights its initial efforts.

  13. The Case for Continuing Education in Veterinary Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, David E.

    2003-01-01

    Explores why continuing veterinary medical education (CVME) programs can play a vital role in supporting the overall strategy of a veterinary college. Discusses the current and future market for CVME programs and strategies for sustainability and synergy. (EV)

  14. The Case for Continuing Education in Veterinary Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, David E.

    2003-01-01

    Explores why continuing veterinary medical education (CVME) programs can play a vital role in supporting the overall strategy of a veterinary college. Discusses the current and future market for CVME programs and strategies for sustainability and synergy. (EV)

  15. [Assessment in Medical Education].

    PubMed

    Ramírez, Martha Delgado; Gómez-Restrepo, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    The assessment of medical education is fundamental for proper feedback and evaulation of students. The overall purpose of the evaluation is numerically and formatively revised. The suggested evaluation processes is described taking into account the Miller competence pyramid as a tool for designing evaluations and concepts of validity and reproducibility in assessments. The utility of student and the teacher is also raised. The issue of assessment should leave the knowledge parameters that are usually used. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  16. Professionalism beyond medical school: an educational continuum?

    PubMed

    van Mook, Walther N K A; Gorter, Simone L; de Grave, Willem S; van Luijk, Scheltus J; O'Sullivan, Helen; Wass, Valerie; Zwaveling, Jan Harm; Schuwirth, Lambert W; van der Vleuten, Cees P M

    2009-12-01

    Given the changes in society we are experiencing, the increasing focus on patient centred care and acknowledgment that medical education needs to continue not only in the residency programmes but throughout the doctors career, is not surprising. This article describes the attention currently paid to professionalism in the residency programmes, differences in perception of professionalism between patients, faculty, students and residents, differences in professionalism issues in the different educational phases, as well as their consequences for training and assessment regarding professionalism. Continuous medical education in professionalism is thereafter briefly discussed.

  17. Graduate and medical education - 2000 and beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Putman, C.E.

    1995-12-31

    The author addresses the fate and future of Graduate and Medical Education. The dominant concern lies with the identification of a reliable and continuous source of funding for the education, training and research experience of the students. The problems and the needs are discussed along with some potential remedies.

  18. Handbook for Directors of Continuing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Div. of Continuing Education.

    This handbook is designed to aid directors of continuing education programs in New York State. The chapters of the guide are as follows: I. Overview--Why Continuing Education?; Historical Backgroun; Goals, Purposes, and Principles; Role of the Public Schools in Continuing Education; II. Regulations of the Commissioner of Education and…

  19. Blended Learning in Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zayapragassarazan, Z.; Kumar, Santosh

    2012-01-01

    The ongoing pedagogical advancements in medical education across the globe have gained the attention of academicians for the preparation of well-educated and competent physicians to address the healthcare issues facing today. The integration of technology into medical pedagogy has proved effective in many ways. This has made the medical education…

  20. Community-Oriented Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hays, Richard

    2007-01-01

    Community-orientated medicine is a topical area for debate in the current discussions about medical education, but it can be argued that medical education has always been in the community because medical practice is located therein. It is widely accepted that community settings provide a wealth of learning opportunities for students and trainees…

  1. Community-Oriented Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hays, Richard

    2007-01-01

    Community-orientated medicine is a topical area for debate in the current discussions about medical education, but it can be argued that medical education has always been in the community because medical practice is located therein. It is widely accepted that community settings provide a wealth of learning opportunities for students and trainees…

  2. [Information technology in medical education].

    PubMed

    Ramić, A

    1999-01-01

    The role of information technology in educational models of under-graduate and post-graduate medical education is growing in 1980's influenced by PC's break-in in medical practice and creating relevant data basis, and, particularly, in 1990's by integration of information technology on international level, development of international network, Internet, Telemedicin, etc. The development of new educational information technology is evident, proving that information in transfer of medical knowledge, medical informatics and communication systems represent the base of medical practice, medical education and research in medical sciences. In relation to the traditional approaches in concept, contents and techniques of medical education, new models of education in training of health professionals, using new information technology, offer a number of benefits, such as: decentralization and access to relevant data sources, collecting and updating of data, multidisciplinary approach in solving problems and effective decision-making, and affirmation of team work within medical and non-medical disciplines. Without regard to the dynamics of change and progressive reform orientation within health sector, the development of modern medical education is inevitable for all systems a in which information technology and available data basis, as a base of effective and scientifically based medical education of health care providers, give guarantees for efficient health care and improvement of health of population.

  3. 31 CFR 10.9 - Continuing education providers and continuing education programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Continuing education providers and continuing education programs. 10.9 Section 10.9 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the... Continuing education providers and continuing education programs. (a) Continuing education providers—(1) In...

  4. 31 CFR 10.9 - Continuing education providers and continuing education programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Continuing education providers and continuing education programs. 10.9 Section 10.9 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the... Continuing education providers and continuing education programs. (a) Continuing education providers—(1) In...

  5. 31 CFR 10.9 - Continuing education providers and continuing education programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Continuing education providers and continuing education programs. 10.9 Section 10.9 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the... Continuing education providers and continuing education programs. (a) Continuing education providers—(1) In...

  6. 31 CFR 10.9 - Continuing education providers and continuing education programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Continuing education providers and continuing education programs. 10.9 Section 10.9 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the... Continuing education providers and continuing education programs. (a) Continuing education providers—(1)...

  7. Continuing education for hospice staff.

    PubMed

    Conedera, F; Schoessler, M

    1985-06-01

    Hospice nursing is unique because of the philosophy and issues surrounding hospice care. Program planning for hospice staff follows basic principles. The real challenge in developing programs for orientation, continuing, and inservice education is using a format that will truly enable staff to meet the objectives. A lecture, programmed instruction, or video/slide format works well for the "nuts and bolts," but more creativity is needed for the other issues facing the hospice nurse--death, grief, symptom control, stress, team roles, and helping patients with options. Incorporating into the program some of the methods suggested will offer staff the opportunity to become involved in learning and make that learning more meaningful.

  8. Competence, continuing education, and computers.

    PubMed

    Hegge, Margaret; Powers, Penny; Hendrickx, Lori; Vinson, Judith

    2002-01-01

    A survey of RNs in South Dakota was performed to determine their perceived level of competence, the extent to which their continuing nursing education (CNE) needs are being met, and their use of computers for CNE. Nationally certified nurses rated themselves significantly more competent than nurses who are not nationally certified. Fewer than half of the RNs reported their CNE needs were being met despite geographic access to CNE and programs available in their specialty. Three-fourths of nurses had computers at home while 76% had computers at work, yet fewer than 20% of nurses used these computers for CNE.

  9. The Continuing Challenge of Multicultural Health Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pahnos, Markella L.

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the currently insufficient multicultural health education, which influences health status, disease prevention, wellness, and compliance with medical protocols. The article recommends administrative policy changes, educational philosophy renewal, communication via community and parents, multicultural preservice teacher education, and…

  10. Five suggestions for future medical education in Korea.

    PubMed

    Yang, Eunbae B; Meng, Kwang Ho

    2014-09-01

    This study is to investigate the historical characteristics of medical education and healthcare environment in Korea and to suggest the desirable direction for future medical education. We draw a consensus through the literature analysis and several debates from the eight experts of medical education. There are several historical characteristics of medical education: medical education as vocational education and training, as a higher education, rapid growth of new medical schools, change to the medical education system, curriculum development, reinforcement of medical humanities, improvement of teaching and evaluation methods, validation of the national health personnel licensing examination, accreditation system for quality assurance, and establishment of specialized medical education division. The changes of health care environment in medical education are development of medical technologies, changes in the structures of the population and diseases, growth of information and communication technology, consumer-centered society, and increased intervention by the third party stakeholder. We propose five suggestions to be made to improve future medical education. They are plan for outcome and competency-based medical education, connection between the undergraduate and graduate medical education, reinforcement of continuous quality improvement of medical education, reorganization of the medical education system and construction of leadership of "academic medicine."

  11. Continuing education/beyond higher education.

    PubMed

    Brandt, E N

    1990-04-01

    Publicly funded institutions, such as NIH, NLM, and state-supported universities, have explicit public service missions that extend beyond the walls of a single institution. During the past few years, national organizations, such as NLM and AAMC, have funded studies and projects to measure how well universities are adapting to technological change and educational reform. The IAIMS models are evidence of universities fostering cooperative rather than duplicative effort. Opportunities and problems facing universities extending systems and services to the private practice setting, to community-based health care HMO's, and to state and local health care agencies are discussed in terms of political, economic, and geographic realities. Instilling lifelong learning concepts begins before the health professional enters practice and is dependent on the emphasis universities place on "excellence in teaching." Without cooperation among core facilities, such as libraries, computer centers, and excellent instructors, continuing education will remain a parochial issue instead of a national thrust toward the continuum of the learning process. If continuing education is to become a high priority for universities and take its place on the education spectrum, flexible policies must be established to accommodate individual practitioners' expectations and interests.

  12. Medical education... meet Michel Foucault.

    PubMed

    Hodges, Brian D; Martimianakis, Maria A; McNaughton, Nancy; Whitehead, Cynthia

    2014-06-01

    There have been repeated calls for the greater use of conceptual frameworks and of theory in medical education. Although it is familiar to few medical educators, Michel Foucault's work is a helpful theoretical and methodological source. This article explores what it means to use a 'Foucauldian approach', presents a sample of Foucault's historical-genealogical studies that are relevant to medical education, and introduces the work of four researchers currently undertaking Foucauldian-inspired medical education research. Although they are not without controversy, Foucauldian approaches are employed by an increasing number of scholars and are helpful in shedding light on what it is possible to think, say and be in medical education. Our hope in sharing this Foucauldian work and perspective is that we might stimulate a dialogue that is forward-looking and optimistic about the possibilities for change in medical education. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. The continual assessment of medical students.

    PubMed

    Gosling, H; Nhonoli, A M

    1978-01-01

    At the new Medical Faculty at the University of Dar-es-Salaam (East Africa) a number of innovations were instituted. The most significant was continual assessment of students. During the first 3 years of the course, results of weekly testing may comprise three-fourths of each student's assessment. Later they are assessed on each rotation and clerkship; and these must be completed satisfactorily before Final Examinations are taken. These assessments never contribute less than one-half of the final results. Failures were reduced from 10 to 2% with no reduction in standards or performance levels. The method utilizes Reinforcement Theory techniques; specifically referred to are schedules of testing, grades as reinforcers, and frequent feed-back for students, self-shaping of study strategies and for constant surveilance of its teaching by the Faculty.

  14. Evaluation in Continuing Education: Is it Practical?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitsunaga, Betty; Shores, Louise

    1977-01-01

    The authors discuss approaches used in the evaluation of continuing education for nurses, defined as planned learning experiences beyond a basic nursing program and excluding academic credit courses. A framework for evaluation of continuing education is offered. (MF)

  15. The Role of a Continuing Education Division

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colafella, Nicholas

    1973-01-01

    The dean of continuing education at the Communiity College of Beaver County (Pennsylvania) defines community services as one portion of continuing education - and the program in Beaver County. (Editor)

  16. Empathy and medical education.

    PubMed

    Schatz, I J

    1995-04-01

    Spiro has said, "computed tomographic scans offer no compassion and magnetic resonance imaging has no human face. Only men and women are capable of empathy." Empathy is an essential and required part of our roles as caregivers. We must enhance this natural emotion that exists in each of us; we can do so by carefully designing a curriculum, much as we would for learning about the physiology of the liver. The roots of our need for detachment and equanimity go back to Sir William Osler, but the pendulum has swung too far, and the need for retention of millions of data bits overwhelms our souls. Although excessive emotion is destructive and counter-productive, we must not suppress our passion--but control it. The best physician both feels with the patient and prescribes for the patient at the same time. To do one without the other is inadequate care. As medical educators our task is clear.

  17. Medical education in Spain: current status and new challenges.

    PubMed

    Palés, Jorge; Gual, Arcadi

    2008-01-01

    As in other countries, medical education in Spain is structured across three distinct stages: undergraduate or basic medical education; postgraduate specialized training; and continuing medical education. The aim of this article is to give an overview of the current state of these three stages, discussing the strengths and weaknesses and the challenges facing each one in the coming years, and how Spain can look to the international community to support change. We suggest that the undergraduate medical education system should be adapted to Spain's new social requirements and requires to be increasingly aligned with postgraduate training. We suggest that continuing medical education should develop its Continuous Professional Development programmes to ensure the permanent competence of Spanish medical professionals. The European Higher Education arena, as defined by the Bologna Declaration, provides many opportunities as well as a challenging situation for improving any current weaknesses in the Spanish medical education system.

  18. Osteopathic graduate medical education.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Elizabeth; Lischka, Terri A

    2009-03-01

    The information provided in the present report on osteopathic graduate medical education (OGME) is based primarily on annual data provided through the American Osteopathic Association (AOA) Intern/Resident Registration Program (ie, the AOA Match) and the AOA Trainee Information, Verification, and Registration Audit reporting system. In 2007, the number of osteopathic medical graduates totaled 3103, surpassing 3000 for the first time. In 2008, the total reached 3462 graduates. Statistics on the Match in this article are reported for both 2007 and 2008. A total of 1267 (41%) and 1316 (38%) graduates and previous graduates participated and matched in 2007 and 2008, respectively. With post-Match scramble data, the number of graduates and previous graduates in AOA-approved internships and first-year residency positions rose to 1645 (53%) for the 2007-2008 academic year and is estimated to be 1828 (51%) for the 2008-2009 academic year. The response of students through the Match and the increased attention to innovative OGME development activities--particularly the internship restructuring and OGME Development Initiative--are evidence of a positive momentum in OGME in recent years.

  19. Reflective writing in medical education.

    PubMed

    Song, Philip; Stewart, Rosalyn

    2012-01-01

    The teaching of reflection and the use of reflective writing assignments is commonplace in medical school education. There is a preponderance of research in medical education, which appraises and discusses new ways of teaching reflection. Students often complain about having to write about their experience with that patient. This work explores some of the reasoning between the variability of student acceptance of reflection in medical education. The method is based on available literature as well as a personal perspective regarding reflective writing in medical education. Reflection is a skill that requires teaching and practice. It is within the explicit process of teaching reflection in medical education that reflective learners can be developed. Reflection includes the take-home lesson from patient encounters. Its use can help learners become better physicians in terms of medical and humanistic effectiveness and support personal growth.

  20. Power and Resistance: Leading Change in Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sundberg, Kristina; Josephson, Anna; Reeves, Scott; Nordquist, Jonas

    2017-01-01

    A key role for educational leaders within undergraduate medical education is to continually improve the quality of education; global quality health care is the goal. This paper reports the findings from a study employing a power model to highlight how educational leaders influence the development of undergraduate medical curricula and the…

  1. Power and Resistance: Leading Change in Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sundberg, Kristina; Josephson, Anna; Reeves, Scott; Nordquist, Jonas

    2017-01-01

    A key role for educational leaders within undergraduate medical education is to continually improve the quality of education; global quality health care is the goal. This paper reports the findings from a study employing a power model to highlight how educational leaders influence the development of undergraduate medical curricula and the…

  2. The Emergence of Continuing Education in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Xiao; Davey, Gareth

    2008-01-01

    This article reports on continuing education in China. It discusses the emergence of the field in the 1980s, the Chinese characteristics of continuing education, recent developments, and limitations. Continuing education became available in China in the 1980s following a change in government policy and economic reform. It caters mainly for…

  3. Integrating Interprofessional Education into Continuing Education: A Planning Process for Continuing Interprofessional Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owen, John A.; Schmitt, Madeline H.

    2013-01-01

    Informal continuing interprofessional education (CIPE) can be traced back decades in the United States; however, interest in formal CIPE is recent. Interprofessional education (IPE) now is recognized as an important component of new approaches to continuing education (CE) that are needed to increase health professionals' ability to improve…

  4. Integrating Interprofessional Education into Continuing Education: A Planning Process for Continuing Interprofessional Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owen, John A.; Schmitt, Madeline H.

    2013-01-01

    Informal continuing interprofessional education (CIPE) can be traced back decades in the United States; however, interest in formal CIPE is recent. Interprofessional education (IPE) now is recognized as an important component of new approaches to continuing education (CE) that are needed to increase health professionals' ability to improve…

  5. Midwives in medical student and resident education and the development of the medical education caucus toolkit.

    PubMed

    Radoff, Kari; Nacht, Amy; Natch, Amy; McConaughey, Edie; Salstrom, Jan; Schelling, Karen; Seger, Suzanne

    2015-01-01

    Midwives have been involved formally and informally in the training of medical students and residents for many years. Recent reductions in resident work hours, emphasis on collaborative practice, and a focus on midwives as key members of the maternity care model have increased the involvement of midwives in medical education. Midwives work in academic settings as educators to teach the midwifery model of care, collaboration, teamwork, and professionalism to medical students and residents. In 2009, members of the American College of Nurse-Midwives formed the Medical Education Caucus (MECA) to discuss the needs of midwives teaching medical students and residents; the group has held a workshop annually over the last 4 years. In 2014, MECA workshop facilitators developed a toolkit to support and formalize the role of midwives involved in medical student and resident education. The MECA toolkit provides a roadmap for midwives beginning involvement and continuing or expanding the role of midwives in medical education. This article describes the history of midwives in medical education, the development and growth of MECA, and the resulting toolkit created to support and formalize the role of midwives as educators in medical student and resident education, as well as common challenges for the midwife in academic medicine. This article is part of a special series of articles that address midwifery innovations in clinical practice, education, interprofessional collaboration, health policy, and global health. © 2015 by the American College of Nurse-Midwives.

  6. Twelve tips on teaching and learning humanism in medical education.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Libby Gordon; Sherif, Youmna Ashraf

    2014-08-01

    The teaching of humanistic values is recognized as an essential component of medical education and continuing professional development of physicians. The application of humanistic values in medical care can benefit medical students, clinicians and patients. This article presents 12 tips on fostering humanistic values in medical education. The authors reviewed the literature and present 12 practical tips that are relevant to contemporary practices. The tips can be used in teaching and sustaining humanistic values in medical education. Humanistic values can be incorporated in formal preclinical environments, the transition into clinical settings, medical curricula and clinical clerkships. Additionally, steps can be taken so that medical educators and institutions promote and sustain humanistic values.

  7. Professional Continuing Education: Participatory Characteristics of Allied Health Practitioners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turgeon, Mary L.

    In late 1983, a study was conducted to examine the continuing education participation and related characteristics of medical technology practitioners in the service area of Corning Community College (CCC). Survey forms were distributed by hospital laboratory managers to all levels of medical technology practitioners in seven local hospitals…

  8. Electives in Graduate Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumar, Santosh; Zayapragassarazan, Z.

    2013-01-01

    Modern curricula have both compulsory portions and electives or portions chosen by students. Electives have been a part of graduate and postgraduate general higher education. Electives are included in various standards for graduate medical education and are also included in proposed Medical Council of India Regulations on Graduate Medical…

  9. Perceptions of current and recent military internal medicine residents on operational medicine, managed care, graduate medical education, and continued military service.

    PubMed

    Salerno, S; Cash, B; Cranston, M; Schoomaker, E

    1998-06-01

    Current and recent internal medicine residents were surveyed on their level of confidence in practicing operational medicine, satisfaction with graduate medical education, the impact of TRICARE, the military managed care plan, on their patients and education, and intentions on remaining in uniformed service. Their sentiments were recorded on a five-point Likert scale (1 = strongly agree, 3 = neutral, 5 = strongly disagree). Two hundred twenty-one of the 294 surveys were returned (75.2%). Most physicians felt unprepared to perform duties in a nuclear, biological, or chemical warfare environment, or handle administrative aspects of operational medicine (mean scores, 3.2-3.7). A majority of respondents felt satisfied with the quality of their residency experience (mean score, 1.9). Although more than half of those surveyed (53.6%) listed the opportunity to teach residents as a top factor influencing their retention decision, most felt skeptical that graduate medical education would remain important in the future (mean score, 3.6). Most physicians agreed that restriction of TRICARE to patients less than 65 years old may degrade the quality of military internal medicine residencies (mean score, 1.6). Previous service, Reserve Officer Training Corps experience, and graduation from the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences were factors associated with increased physician intention to remain beyond their obligated service. The most common factors inducing physicians to leave the military included frequent deployments, relocations, and financial compensation. Factors cited most frequently as influencing physicians to stay on active duty included high-quality colleagues, opportunities for teaching residents, and freedom from malpractice and office management details.

  10. Abraham Flexner and medical education.

    PubMed

    Ludmerer, Kenneth M

    2011-01-01

    The Flexner Report had its roots in the recognition in the mid-19th century that medical knowledge is not something fixed but something that grows and evolves. This new view of medical knowledge led to a recasting of the goal of medical education as that of instilling the proper techniques of acquiring and evaluating information rather than merely inculcating facts through rote memorization. Abraham Flexner, a brilliant educator, had the background to understand and popularize the meaning of this new view of education, and he took the unprecedented step of relating the developments in medical education to the ideas of John Dewey and the progressive education movement. Although the Flexner Report is typically viewed as a historical document--due to an understandable tendency to refer only to the second half of the report, where Flexner provides his famous critiques of the medical schools that existed at the time--this article argues that the Flexner Report is actually a living educational document of as much significance to medical educators today as in Flexner's time. The article analyzes Flexner's discussion of medical education and shows that his message--the importance of academic excellence, professional leadership, proper financial support, and service and altruism--is timeless, as applicable to the proper education of physicians today and tomorrow as in the past.

  11. Implications for Veterinary Medical Education: Postprofessional Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahrs, Robert F.

    1980-01-01

    Concern about delivery of veterinary medical services to animal agriculture and implications for postprofessional veterinary medical education are discussed. The individual needs and goals of livestock producers, practicing veterinarians, and veterinary academicians are so varied that actual delivery of veterinary medical services is difficult to…

  12. Geriatric Medical Education in Israel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leibovitz, Arthur; Baumoehl, Yehuda; Habot, Beni

    2004-01-01

    In this article we will focus on geriatric medical education in Israel and will review our experience in this field. A coordinated effort of the Ministry of Health and the Israeli Medical Association led to the establishment of a modern geriatric system and to the recognition of geriatrics as a medical specialty in the early 1980s. All four…

  13. Medical education in The Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Ten Cate, Olle

    2007-10-01

    This paper aims to draw a picture of current medical education in The Netherlands. Based on strong historical roots in the seventeenth century, Dutch medical education has adapted to changing circumstances through the ages. Nowadays, medical education in The Netherlands may be called "modern", according to international standards and schools such as the one in Maastricht serve as examples, nationally and internationally. After considerable redesign of undergraduate education in the 1980s and 1990s, the first decade of the new century shows a revolutionary development of postgraduate medical education, with the introduction of nationwide competency-based training, and mandatory in-training assessments and portfolios for residents. The high level of activity in medical education development is reflected in high research productivity, measured as Dutch articles in international journals. Despite these strengths, several critical issues around medical education are in debate, ranging from entrance selection, small group tutoring, the two-cycle bachelor-master model and the relevance of basic sciences to the planning of enrolment numbers and working hours for residents. Medical education in The Netherlands is a dynamic field.

  14. Funding for graduate medical education.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Valerie P

    2006-12-01

    The education of radiology residents and fellows is a vitally important but costly process. This paper reviews the most common methods of funding graduate medical education. The majority of graduate medical education in the United States is funded by Medicare, but there are caps on the number of trainees allowed, and the government is cutting payments. Academic medicine, particularly academic radiology, is at a point of crisis today if new methods to provide additional support are not found.

  15. In Search of Coherence: A View from the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leach, David C.

    2005-01-01

    The Conjoint Committee on Continuing Medical Education has developed a position paper, a set of recommendations, and next steps in the reform of continuing medical education (CME). The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) sets standards for and accredits residency programs in graduate medical education and is not directly…

  16. CONTINUING EDUCATION FOR DEAF ADULTS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    STRENG, ALICE H.

    A THREE-YEAR EDUCATION PROGRAM FOR DEAF ADULTS IN WISCONSIN, BEGUN IN 1966 AND FUNDED IN PART UNDER THE HIGHER EDUCATION ACT OF 1965, HAD TWO GOALS--TO PROVIDE EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES TO THE DEAF AND TO ENABLE TEACHERS TO GAIN INSIGHTS INTO THE EDUCATIONAL AND SOCIAL PROBLEMS CREATED BY DEAFNESS. NON-CREDIT CLASSES WERE OFFERED IN LANGUAGE,…

  17. Strategy Planning in Continuing Nursing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aiken, Eula

    Corporate strategies that can be used in continuing nursing education programs are discussed, based on the Regional Action for Continuing Education in Nursing Education project. Attention is focused on strategies employed at Southern State University (SSU). A practical planning method was used to guide the process of corporate strategy formulation…

  18. WWW Technologies and Adult Continuing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheung, Bruce; Yiu, S. M.

    Adult continuing education (ACE) has different audiences and characteristics than distance learning and full-time education. The University of Hong Kong is regarded as the leading provider of ACE through the programs offered by the School of Professional and Continuing Education (SPACE). To maintain that position, SPACE's challenge is to develop…

  19. A Strategy for Sourcing Continuing Engineering Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baukal, Charles E., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    Many are calling for increased continuing education for engineers, but few details are provided as to how to source that education. This paper recommends a strategy for sourcing continuing engineering education (CEE). Providers of CEE are categorized here as internal (the organization itself), external (universities, professional/trade…

  20. Standards for Continuing Education in Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Nurses' Association, New York, NY.

    The quality of health care depends to a large degree on the knowledge, skills, and attitudes of practicing nurses. Continuing education is one way nurses can maintain competence and meet the standards of their profession. Continuing education in nursing consists of planned learning experiences beyond a basic nursing educational program. Providers…

  1. Staff Development for the Continuing Education Staff.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hentschel, Doe

    1990-01-01

    Advocating development for all continuing education staff, the author asserts that staff who understand adult education theory, the goals and visions of the organization, the environmental context of continuing education, and the roles of other staff members will be more effective. Also essential are support mechanisms that facilitate change. (SK)

  2. A Strategy for Sourcing Continuing Engineering Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baukal, Charles E., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    Many are calling for increased continuing education for engineers, but few details are provided as to how to source that education. This paper recommends a strategy for sourcing continuing engineering education (CEE). Providers of CEE are categorized here as internal (the organization itself), external (universities, professional/trade…

  3. Assessment of Continuing Interprofessional Education: Lessons Learned

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmons, Brian; Wagner, Susan

    2009-01-01

    Although interprofessional education (IPE) and continuing interprofessional education (CIPE) are becoming established activities within the education of health professions, assessment of learners continues to be limited. Arguably, this in part is due to a lack of IPE and CIPE within in the clinical workplace. The accountability of…

  4. Tele-education as method of medical education.

    PubMed

    Masic, Izet; Pandza, Haris; Kulasin, Igor; Masic, Zlatan; Valjevac, Salih

    2009-01-01

    Development of computer networks and introduction and application of new technologies in all aspects of human activity needs to be followed by universities in their transformation on how to approach scientific, research, and education teaching curricula. Development and increased use of distance learning (DL) over the past decade have clearly shown the potential and efficiency of information technology applied in education. Use of information technology in medical education is where medical informatics takes its place as important scientific discipline which ensures benefit from IT in teaching and learning process involved. Definition of telemedicine as "use of technologies based on health care delivered on distance" covers areas such as electronic health, tele-health (eHealth), telematics, but also tele-education. Web based medical education today is offered in different forms--from online lectures, online exams, web based continuous education programs, use of electronic libraries, online medical and scientific databases etc. Department of Medical Informatics of Medical Faculty of University of Sarajevo has taken many steps to introduce distance learning in medical curricula--from organising professional--scientific events (congresses, workshop etc), organizing first tele-exam at the faculty and among first at the university, to offering online lectures and online education material at the Department's website (www.unsa-medinfo.org). Distance learning in medical education, as well as telemedicine, significantly influence health care in general and are shaping the future model of medical practice. Basic computer and networks skills must be a part of all future medical curricula. The impact of technical equipment on patient-doctor relationship must be taken into account, and doctors have to be trained and prepared for diagnosing or consulting patients by use of IT. Telemedicine requires special approach in certain medical fields--tele-consultation, tele

  5. [The globalization of medical education].

    PubMed

    Stevens, Fred C J

    2013-01-01

    With reference to a recently published research article on the applicability and effectiveness of problem-based learning (PBL) in non-Western medical schools, this commentary explores the assumption that a set of shared values is the common denominator of the globalisation of medical education. The use and effectiveness of PBL are not isolated from the cultural and social structural context in which it is applied; critical differences in values and in views on education underlie what educators and students perceive to be effective locally. The globalisation of medical education is more than the import of instructional designs, and includes Western models of social organisation that require deep reflection and adaptation for success; hence, instead of spreading models for medical education across the globe, more effort should be put into the support of 'home-grown' equivalents and alternatives.

  6. Research and Evaluation in Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferris, Helena A.; Collins, Mary E.

    2015-01-01

    The landscape of medical education is continuously evolving, as are the needs of the learner. The appropriate use of research and evaluation is key when assessing the need for change and instituting one's innovative endeavours. This paper demonstrates how research seeks to generate new knowledge, whereas evaluation uses information acquired from…

  7. Continuing Education -- A Management Point of View.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, J. D.

    The needs for continuing engineering education to avoid technical obsolescence and the programs offered by one company to fill this need are discussed. Ten educational alternative programs of the Sandia Laboratories, Albuquerque (New Mexico) are described. (CP)

  8. Continuing Legal Education: Should It Be Compulsory?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leete, Burt A.

    1975-01-01

    Discusses the possibility of compulsory legal education, examining recent experience of the accounting profession with mandatory continuing education, and presenting results of a survey of 400 lawyers which indicated no consensus on the subject. (JT)

  9. [Continuing education aimed at occupational risk prevention].

    PubMed

    De Vito, G; Tibiletti, M; Stella, A

    2007-01-01

    The implementation of European Commission directives has radically modified occupational risk management. In fact, widespread and continuous education addressed to exposed workers is seen by the legislator as one of the most effective means to avoid occupational diseases. The recent establishment of Continuing Medical Education (CME) has helped the system grant CME credits to participants in occupational courses organized by health-care providers. Moreover, the constant development of new health technologies coupled with the high productivity of the legislator confer a short lifetime on the acquired knowledge. Biological risks, biomechanical overload of the lumbar spine, and stress are among the classical risks requiring attention, discussion, and regular updating. Not only health-care workers but also safety technicians, occupational physicians, managers and union representatives should receive scheduled refresher training. Modern technologies such as distance learning, interactive simulation software, and online training tools are often the best teaching solutions. Occupational disease prevention should no longer be seen as a cost but as a cost savings indicator. Since it is closely related to quality promotion, it should play a primary role in the core business of health-care providers.

  10. [The Changing World of Continuing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Changing Education: A Journal for Teachers and Administrators, 1997

    1997-01-01

    "Changing Education" is targeted for Australian teachers and administrators. This theme issue, which the editorial defines as about "The Changing World of Continuing Education," contains eight articles and an editorial about recent developments in adult literacy and basic education (ALBE), vocational education and training, and…

  11. [Art in undergraduate medical education].

    PubMed

    Fjellstad, Kenneth; Isaksen, Tor Olav; Frich, Jan C

    2003-08-28

    During the last decades attempts have been made at integrating art in medical education. What should be the form, content and objectives of such teaching? We address this question on the basis of a review of articles in medical journals from 1990 until May 2001 about art and undergraduate medical education. A common reason for integrating art in undergraduate medical education is that art may act as a balance to the dominance of natural science. One pedagogical approach is to use art as a tool for training skills. Many articles emphasise that teaching art should also contribute to the personal and professional development of medical students. The majority of articles report on courses in literature and medicine. Art is often taught in small or medium-sized groups; courses may last from single lessons to programmes over years. The aim of art courses may be the development of skills, but also one of facilitating personal growth and professional development.

  12. Applying adult learning practices in medical education.

    PubMed

    Reed, Suzanne; Shell, Richard; Kassis, Karyn; Tartaglia, Kimberly; Wallihan, Rebecca; Smith, Keely; Hurtubise, Larry; Martin, Bryan; Ledford, Cynthia; Bradbury, Scott; Bernstein, Henry Hank; Mahan, John D

    2014-07-01

    The application of the best practices of teaching adults to the education of adults in medical education settings is important in the process of transforming learners to become and remain effective physicians. Medical education at all levels should be designed to equip physicians with the knowledge, clinical skills, and professionalism that are required to deliver quality patient care. The ultimate outcome is the health of the patient and the health status of the society. In the translational science of medical education, improved patient outcomes linked directly to educational events are the ultimate goal and are best defined by rigorous medical education research efforts. To best develop faculty, the same principles of adult education and teaching adults apply. In a systematic review of faculty development initiatives designed to improve teaching effectiveness in medical education, the use of experiential learning, feedback, effective relationships with peers, and diverse educational methods were found to be most important in the success of these programs. In this article, we present 5 examples of applying the best practices in teaching adults and utilizing the emerging understanding of the neurobiology of learning in teaching students, trainees, and practitioners. These include (1) use of standardized patients to develop communication skills, (2) use of online quizzes to assess knowledge and aid self-directed learning, (3) use of practice sessions and video clips to enhance significant learning of teaching skills, (4) use of case-based discussions to develop professionalism concepts and skills, and (5) use of the American Academy of Pediatrics PediaLink as a model for individualized learner-directed online learning. These examples highlight how experiential leaning, providing valuable feedback, opportunities for practice, and stimulation of self-directed learning can be utilized as medical education continues its dynamic transformation in the years ahead

  13. Podiatric Medical Education: A Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollock, George P.

    1980-01-01

    The basic curricular structure and courses deemed necessary to podiatric medical education are outlined and their rationale explained. Specialties appropriate to podiatric practice, such as electrophysiology and cardiovascular physiology, are noted, and the sequence of coursework suggested. (MSE)

  14. Podiatric Medical Education: A Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollock, George P.

    1980-01-01

    The basic curricular structure and courses deemed necessary to podiatric medical education are outlined and their rationale explained. Specialties appropriate to podiatric practice, such as electrophysiology and cardiovascular physiology, are noted, and the sequence of coursework suggested. (MSE)

  15. Microethics in medical education and practice

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Jharna; Dinoop, KP; Parija, Subhash Chandra

    2015-01-01

    “Microethics” is an avant-garde in the field of ethics. When the term “ethics” is brought into discussion in medical education or clinical practice, it customarily points to the traditional ethics, that is, biomedical ethics that deals with the ethical issues faced during unaccustomed or rare clinical circumstances. In contrast, microethics is a continuous ethical science existing in the physician-patient interaction that happens each day in every physician's clinical liaison. These ethical issues of everyday importance need to be introduced in the ethics training programs of medical institutions to provide insight and thereby promoting improvement in medical care and outcome. PMID:26629449

  16. Learning Experiences in Medical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leggat, Peter A.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the learning experience from both traditional and computer-assisted instructional methods. Describes the environments in which these methods are effective. Focuses on learning experiences in medical education and describes educational strategies, particularly the 'SPICES' model. Discusses the importance of mentoring in the psychosocial…

  17. Learning Experiences in Medical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leggat, Peter A.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the learning experience from both traditional and computer-assisted instructional methods. Describes the environments in which these methods are effective. Focuses on learning experiences in medical education and describes educational strategies, particularly the 'SPICES' model. Discusses the importance of mentoring in the psychosocial…

  18. A meaningful MESS (Medical Education Scholarship Support)

    PubMed Central

    Whicker, Shari A.; Engle, Deborah L.; Chudgar, Saumil; DeMeo, Stephen; Bean, Sarah M.; Narayan, Aditee P.; Grochowski, Colleen O'Connor; Nagler, Alisa

    2016-01-01

    Background Graduate medical education faculty bear the responsibility of demonstrating active research and scholarship; however, faculty who choose education-focused careers may face unique obstacles related to the lack of promotion tracks, funding, career options, and research opportunities. Our objective was to address education research and scholarship barriers by providing a collaborative peer-mentoring environment and improve the production of research and scholarly outputs. Methods We describe a Medical Education Scholarship Support (MESS) group created in 2013. MESS is an interprofessional, multidisciplinary peer-mentoring education research community that now spans multiple institutions. This group meets monthly to address education research and scholarship challenges. Through this process, we develop new knowledge, research, and scholarly products, in addition to meaningful collaborations. Results MESS originated with eight founding members, all of whom still actively participate. MESS has proven to be a sustainable unfunded local community of practice, encouraging faculty to pursue health professions education (HPE) careers and fostering scholarship. We have met our original objectives that involved maintaining 100% participant retention; developing increased knowledge in at least seven content areas; and contributing to the development of 13 peer-reviewed publications, eight professional presentations, one Masters of Education project, and one educational curriculum. Discussion The number of individuals engaged in HPE research continues to rise. The MESS model could be adapted for use at other institutions, thereby reducing barriers HPE researchers face, providing an effective framework for trainees interested in education-focused careers, and having a broader impact on the education research landscape. PMID:27476538

  19. A meaningful MESS (Medical Education Scholarship Support).

    PubMed

    Whicker, Shari A; Engle, Deborah L; Chudgar, Saumil; DeMeo, Stephen; Bean, Sarah M; Narayan, Aditee P; Grochowski, Colleen O'Connor; Nagler, Alisa

    2016-01-01

    Graduate medical education faculty bear the responsibility of demonstrating active research and scholarship; however, faculty who choose education-focused careers may face unique obstacles related to the lack of promotion tracks, funding, career options, and research opportunities. Our objective was to address education research and scholarship barriers by providing a collaborative peer-mentoring environment and improve the production of research and scholarly outputs. We describe a Medical Education Scholarship Support (MESS) group created in 2013. MESS is an interprofessional, multidisciplinary peer-mentoring education research community that now spans multiple institutions. This group meets monthly to address education research and scholarship challenges. Through this process, we develop new knowledge, research, and scholarly products, in addition to meaningful collaborations. MESS originated with eight founding members, all of whom still actively participate. MESS has proven to be a sustainable unfunded local community of practice, encouraging faculty to pursue health professions education (HPE) careers and fostering scholarship. We have met our original objectives that involved maintaining 100% participant retention; developing increased knowledge in at least seven content areas; and contributing to the development of 13 peer-reviewed publications, eight professional presentations, one Masters of Education project, and one educational curriculum. The number of individuals engaged in HPE research continues to rise. The MESS model could be adapted for use at other institutions, thereby reducing barriers HPE researchers face, providing an effective framework for trainees interested in education-focused careers, and having a broader impact on the education research landscape.

  20. Professional Accreditation for International Continuing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edelson, Paul Jay

    It is reasonable to argue that the members of a profession are the only ones who can directly address issues of accreditation. In the context of accreditation for international continuing education, it may be argued that professional organizations in continuing education cannot function as accrediting bodies except in the sense that they determine…

  1. Maryland Community Colleges Continuing Education Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malcolm-Rodgers, R.

    This manual outlines Maryland's community college course evaluation system. Part I provides a historical overview of continuing education in Maryland, including the legal provisions establishing the development of continuing education courses as a function of community college instructional development. Part II presents policies for state…

  2. Nourishing Professional Practice: Continuing Education in Dietetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinneer, James W.

    The literature on continuing education (CE) in dietetics was reviewed. The review focused on the following: motivators and barriers for participation in continuing dietetic education, formats for CE in dietetics, and approaches to assessing learner needs. The role of professional associations, the existence of voluntary credentialing programs, the…

  3. Principles of Good Practice in Continuing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council on the Continuing Education Unit, Silver Spring, MD.

    Intended to serve as a standard reference document for the field of continuing education and training, this set of criteria for good practice is for general use by all sponsors, providers, and users of continuing education within any setting, for any clientele, and for individual learners. Following an introduction, suggestions are made for use of…

  4. Motivation for Continuing Education: Some Preliminary Considerations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rouch, Mark A.

    That adults learn what they need and want to learn is as true for continuing education in the ministry as in other fields, and the question of motivation for continuing education is crucial. Significant clues to motivation can be found in the close relationship between learning and work, in personal and corporate growth, and in collegiality…

  5. Continuing Higher Education: The Coming Wave.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lerner, Allan W., Ed.; King, B. Kay, Ed.

    This book, containing seven chapters and an epilogue, describes how continuing education--as a structure and a function--can become a unique tool for reorienting major universities toward confronting new societal challenges. "The Coming Wave" (Lerner) discusses relevant organizational theory to explain the special role of continuing education in…

  6. Continuing Education on Dying and Death.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chodil, Judith J.; Dulaney, Peggy E.

    1984-01-01

    "Dying and Death in Critical Care Practice" was a one-day continuing education offering designed for registered nurses who practiced in settings such as emergency rooms, intensive care units, coronary care units, and operating rooms. The workshop was part of a continuing education curriculum in critical care nursing. (SSH)

  7. Continuing Higher Education: The Coming Wave.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lerner, Allan W., Ed.; King, B. Kay, Ed.

    This book, containing seven chapters and an epilogue, describes how continuing education--as a structure and a function--can become a unique tool for reorienting major universities toward confronting new societal challenges. "The Coming Wave" (Lerner) discusses relevant organizational theory to explain the special role of continuing education in…

  8. Maryland Community Colleges Continuing Education Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malcolm-Rodgers, R.

    This manual outlines Maryland's community college course evaluation system. Part I provides a historical overview of continuing education in Maryland, including the legal provisions establishing the development of continuing education courses as a function of community college instructional development. Part II presents policies for state…

  9. Continuing Education Needs in Latin America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capanema, Clelia de Freitas

    Continuing education needs of the Latin American population are related to the need of Latin American countries for social and economic development. The source of continuing educaton needs is the area's differentiated socioeconomic development and cultural diversity. Some common features of Latin American educational systems, well known as…

  10. Review Articles for Continuing Education in Pharmacology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dionne, Raymond A.

    1983-01-01

    A study of 196 dentists' comprehension of an article in a leading dental continuing education journal revealed about four-fifths gaining knowledge, and the remainder decreasing or showing no change in knowledge. Use of scholarly articles as an efficient continuing education method is recommended. (MSE)

  11. New Life Styles for Continuing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Univ., East Lansing. Continuing Education Service.

    Major addresses presented at the 13th Seminar for College and University Leaders in Continuing Education are provided in these proceedings. The addresses are as follows: "Seminar Preview" by Russell J. Kleis; "Welcome" by Armand L. Hunter; "The Continuing Education University" by Charles E. Perry; "Major Problems Facing the University: Internal…

  12. Continuing Education Needs in Latin America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capanema, Clelia de Freitas

    Continuing education needs of the Latin American population are related to the need of Latin American countries for social and economic development. The source of continuing educaton needs is the area's differentiated socioeconomic development and cultural diversity. Some common features of Latin American educational systems, well known as…

  13. Accreditation of Continuing Education in Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Nurses' Association, Kansas City, MO.

    The American Nursing Association accreditation mechanism for continuing education in nursing is outlined. The mechanism encompasses local, state, regional, and national levels and identifies criteria for accrediting other agencies and associations and for the approval of continuing education offerings and programs. It includes programs in nursing…

  14. Assessing the learning potential of an interactive digital game versus an interactive-style didactic lecture: the continued importance of didactic teaching in medical student education.

    PubMed

    Courtier, Jesse; Webb, Emily M; Phelps, Andrew S; Naeger, David M

    2016-12-01

    Games with educational intent offer a possible advantage of being more interactive and increasing learner satisfaction. We conducted a two-armed experiment to evaluate student satisfaction and content mastery for an introductory pediatric radiology topic, taught by either an interactive digital game or with a traditional didactic lecture. Medical students participating in a fourth-year radiology elective were invited to participate. Student cohorts were alternatively given a faculty-supervised 1h session playing a simple interactive digital Tic-tac-toe quiz module on pediatric gastrointestinal radiology or a 1h didactic introductory lecture on the same topic. Survey questions assessed the learners' perceived ability to recall the material as well as their satisfaction with the educational experience. Results of an end-of-rotation exam were reviewed to evaluate a quantitative measure of learning between groups. Survey responses were analyzed with a chi-squared test. Exam results for both groups were analyzed with a paired Student's t-test. Students in the lecture group had higher test scores compared to students in the game group (4.0/5 versus 3.6/5, P = 0.045). Students in the lecture group reported greater understanding and recall of the material than students in the game group (P < 0.001 and P = 0.004, respectively). Students in the lecture group perceived the lecture to be more enjoyable and a better use of their time compared to those in the game group (P = 0.04 and P < 0.001, respectively). There was no statistically significant difference between the lecture and game group in ability to maintain interest (P = 0.187). In comparison to pre-survey results, there was a statistically significant decrease in interest for further digital interactive materials reported by students in the game group (P = 0.146). Our experience supported the use of a traditional lecture over a digital game module. While these results might be affected by the

  15. Patient Care Appraisal as a Method of Continuing Education

    PubMed Central

    MacIntyre, Karen

    1982-01-01

    Patient care appraisal (PCA) is a type of medical audit specifically designed for educational purposes. It can be instituted in solo or group practices. A subject is selected (preferably a commonly treated condition), criteria for care are established (the most educational element of PCA), records of cases are searched to see if these criteria are met, results are reviewed, and corrective action is planned. A follow up audit is then done. This method of CME is currently under study at Dalhousie University's Division of Continuing Medical Education as a possible alternative to formal courses. PMID:20469392

  16. The art of medical education.

    PubMed

    Scheele, F

    2012-01-01

    Is the art of medical education just making sure to provide sufficient up to date medical knowledge and a lot of clinical experience? It is much more. The art of medical education is about a teaching program that is designed to serve the community of the near future. The program is the result of a thorough evaluation of societal needs and is capable of influencing the properties of future care. New care professionals who are trained in the program will -become instrumental in solving complex problems in health systems. The art of medical education is about the change of traditional ideas of how to cope with these health systems. This change will raise anger and resistance. Effective change management is essential to survive attacks from laggards and to maintain enthusiasm to invest in the health care of the future. Educationalist science provides several important insights that help us find the optimal shape of the program. Good role models and a learning environment that is an example of the intended professional and organisational behaviour, learning by doing, simulation programs, educational tools like e-learning systems, a good assessment and feedback system, and a portfolio to prove and discuss professional progress are all pivotal components of the ideal program. To achieve mastery within the art of medical education, a quality improvement program will be the crown of the process. Medical education is a multifaceted process and so the quality improvement should be. The art of medical education is a great challenge. The health care of your future deserves it.

  17. The art of medical education

    PubMed Central

    Scheele, F.

    2012-01-01

    Is the art of medical education just making sure to provide sufficient up to date medical knowledge and a lot of clinical experience? It is much more. The art of medical education is about a teaching program that is designed to serve the community of the near future. The program is the result of a thorough evaluation of societal needs and is capable of influencing the properties of future care. New care professionals who are trained in the program will become instrumental in solving complex problems in health systems. The art of medical education is about the change of traditional ideas of how to cope with these health systems. This change will raise anger and resistance. Effective change management is essential to survive attacks from laggards and to maintain enthusiasm to invest in the health care of the future. Educationalist science provides several important insights that help us find the optimal shape of the program. Good role models and a learning environment that is an example of the intended professional and organisational behaviour, learning by doing, simulation programs, educational tools like e-learning systems, a good assessment and feedback system, and a portfolio to prove and discuss professional progress are all pivotal components of the ideal program. To achieve mastery within the art of medical education, a quality improvement program will be the crown of the process. Medical education is a multifaceted process and so the quality improvement should be. The art of medical education is a great challenge. The health care of your future deserves it. PMID:24753919

  18. Medical education in the United States of America.

    PubMed

    Dezee, Kent J; Artino, Anthony R; Elnicki, D Michael; Hemmer, Paul A; Durning, Steven J

    2012-01-01

    This article was written to provide a brief history of the medical educational system in the USA, the current educational structure, and the current topics and challenges facing USA medical educators today. The USA is fortunate to have a robust educational system, with over 150 medical schools, thousands of graduate medical education programs, well-accepted standardized examinations throughout training, and many educational research programs. All levels of medical education, from curriculum reform in medical schools and the integration of competencies in graduate medical education, to the maintenance of certification in continuing medical education, have undergone rapid changes since the turn of the millennium. The intent of the changes has been to involve the patient sooner in the educational process, use better educational strategies, link educational processes more closely with educational outcomes, and focus on other skills besides knowledge. However, with the litany of changes have come increased regulation without (as of yet) clear evidence as to which of the changes will result in better physicians. In addition, the USA governmental debt crisis threatens the current educational structure. The next wave of changes in the USA medical system needs to focus on what particular educational strategies result in the best physicians and how to fund the system over the long term.

  19. The use of continuing adult education

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redd, Frank J.

    1990-01-01

    The objectives of the National Space Grant and Fellowship Program include the expansion of space-oriented educational programs beyond the traditional boundaries of university campuses to reach 'non-traditional' students whose personal and professional lives would be enhanced by access to such programs. These objectives coincide with those of the continuing education programs that exist on most university campuses. By utilizing continuing educations resources and facilities, members of the National Space Grant Program can greatly enhance the achievement of program objectives.

  20. Professionalism in Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilton, Sean; Southgate, Lesley

    2007-01-01

    Medical professionalism in today's society requires the exhibition of a range of qualities deployed in the service of patients, rather than more traditionally defined aspects such as mastery, autonomy and self-regulation. These qualities incorporate demonstrated clinical competence; aspiring to excellence in practice while demonstrating humility…

  1. Professionalism in Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilton, Sean; Southgate, Lesley

    2007-01-01

    Medical professionalism in today's society requires the exhibition of a range of qualities deployed in the service of patients, rather than more traditionally defined aspects such as mastery, autonomy and self-regulation. These qualities incorporate demonstrated clinical competence; aspiring to excellence in practice while demonstrating humility…

  2. An Overview of Continuing Interprofessional Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reeves, Scott

    2009-01-01

    Interprofessional education, continuing interprofessional education, interprofessional collaboration, and interprofessional care are moving to the forefront of approaches with the potential to reorganize the delivery of health professions education and health care practice. This article discusses 7 key trends in the scholarship and practice of…

  3. Board of Regents Symposium on Continuing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany.

    As discussed in several addresses at a New York State Board of Regents symposium, the task of continuing education in New York State includes adult basic education, job training, and other forms of involvement by educators and other segments of society in efforts to enable individuals, communities, and organizations to function effectively in a…

  4. Organizational Dynamics in University Continuing Professional Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knox, Alan B.

    1982-01-01

    A recent national study analyzed university-based continuing professional education in the fields of medicine, pharmacy, social work, education, and law. Programs varied greatly in their vitality; the best efforts were characterized by educational leadership, institutional support, and involvement of practitioners. (Author/SK)

  5. An Overview of Continuing Interprofessional Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reeves, Scott

    2009-01-01

    Interprofessional education, continuing interprofessional education, interprofessional collaboration, and interprofessional care are moving to the forefront of approaches with the potential to reorganize the delivery of health professions education and health care practice. This article discusses 7 key trends in the scholarship and practice of…

  6. The need for evidence in medical education: the development of best evidence medical education as an opportunity to inform, guide, and sustain medical education research.

    PubMed

    Dauphinee, W Dale; Wood-Dauphinee, Sharon

    2004-10-01

    The development of the Best Evidence Medical Education (BEME) Collaboration is introduced in the context of other systematic review initiatives, specifically the Cochrane and Campbell collaborations. The commentary addresses two goals: to describe the current status of BEME and to situate BEME in the broader context of the medical education community's need to be accountable, to conduct research to understand educational processes and results, and the key role that medical educational research must play within the quality-improvement agenda. Lessons drawn from the evidence-based practice movement of the last ten years and the current experience with BEME suggest that, although BEME will inform some educational policies and practices, its initial success may be limited because of the paucity of studies that meet current standards for evidence and the great difficulty in conducting methodologically rigorous studies in the complex social interaction called education. Nonetheless, the need exists for medical education research to continue to address key issues in medical education using experimental designs, while at the same time anticipating the need for more situation-specific data to permit educators to monitor and benchmark their existing programs within a quality-improvement and accountability framework. The authors conclude that the very nature of being professional in today's social and fiscal context demands that medical educators provide evidence of effectiveness and efficiency of their programs while at the same time BEME and medical education research continue to grow and mature.

  7. Medical marijuana users continue to experience legal barriers.

    PubMed

    Betteridge, Glenn

    2006-04-01

    Four recent developments highlight that people continue to face significant legal and administrative barriers to using marijuana for medical purposes--despite the existence of the Marihuana Medical Access Regulations (MMAR), enacted by the federal government, as a result of court rulings, to enable people who require marijuana for medical purposes to exercise their constitutional right to such medicine.

  8. Undergraduate medical education in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Chenot, Jean-François

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to give international readers an overview of the organisation, structure and curriculum, together with important advances and problems, of undergraduate medical education in Germany. Interest in medical education in Germany has been relatively low but has gained momentum with the new "Regulation of the Licensing of Doctors" which came into effect in 2003. Medical education had required substantial reform, particularly with respect to improving the links between theoretical and clinical teaching and the extension of interdisciplinary and topic-related instruction. It takes six years and three months to complete the curriculum and training is divided into three sections: basic science (2 years), clinical science (3 years) and final clinical year. While the reorganisation of graduate medical education required by the new "Regulation of the Licensing of Doctors" has stimulated multiple excellent teaching projects, there is evidence that some of the stipulated changes have not been implemented. Indeed, whether the medical schools have complied with this regulation and its overall success remains to be assessed systematically. Mandatory external accreditation and periodic reaccreditation of medical faculties need to be established in Germany. PMID:19675742

  9. Medical education: creating physicians or medical technicians?

    PubMed

    Berkow, Robert

    2002-02-01

    The 20th century witnessed phenomenal growth in scientific medical knowledge and technology, enabling physicians to more accurately diagnose and effectively treat a wide range of diseases. However, these advances led to longer and more complex training periods for physicians and increasing specialization and dependence on the new technology. An adverse outcome of these changes has been the development of many physicians who are less able to communicate with their patients and deal with them in a humanistic and personally caring manner; ie, the development of finely trained medical technologists as opposed to caring physicians. Their behavior and their blind trust in science and technology without understanding the patients in whom illness occurs often leads to making incorrect, incomplete, or inappropriate diagnoses or to unnecessary failures of treatment. It also results in excessive costs, hazardous procedures, and ill will from patients. Unfortunately, such technologically oriented physicians are often the primary role models for students. The best hope for a remedy to the problem lies in recognizing that it exists, understanding its causes, and modifying medical education accordingly. Providing students with good role models and some rudimentary techniques can lead to significant gains, but sophisticated programs have been designed only in some schools.

  10. Dental hygiene continuing education. Satisfaction and achievement.

    PubMed

    Young, L J; Keenan, K M; Bakdash, M B; Grayden, S K

    1989-01-01

    This study addresses questions associated with performance on a continuing education course in periodontics and the participants' satisfaction with that course. The authors examine relationships between pre- and post-course test scores and various characteristics of the 120 dental hygienists who enrolled in one or more continuing education courses on periodontics. Four characteristics were found to be related to pre-course test scores. Those who performed significantly better on the written pre-course test generally were (1) younger, (2) less experienced, (3) educators and (4) four-year graduates rather than two-year graduates. Those who went on to take additional continuing education courses in periodontics had higher mean scores on the post-course I test than those who did not. Satisfaction with the course was generally high. Additional research is needed on factors which may influence achievement in a continuing education program and encourage participation in additional learning experiences.

  11. Clinical evidence continuous medical education: a randomised educational trial of an open access e-learning program for transferring evidence-based information – ICEKUBE (Italian Clinical Evidence Knowledge Utilization Behaviour Evaluation) – study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Moja, Lorenzo; Moschetti, Ivan; Cinquini, Michela; Sala, Valeria; Compagnoni, Anna; Duca, Piergiorgio; Deligant, Christian; Manfrini, Roberto; Clivio, Luca; Satolli, Roberto; Addis, Antonio; Grimshaw, Jeremy M; Dri, Pietro; Liberati, Alessandro

    2008-01-01

    Background In an effort to ensure that all physicians have access to valid and reliable evidence on drug effectiveness, the Italian Drug Agency sponsored a free-access e-learning system, based on Clinical Evidence, called ECCE. Doctors have access to an electronic version and related clinical vignettes. Correct answers to the interactive vignettes provide Continuing Medical Education credits. The aims of this trial are to establish whether the e-learning program (ECCE) increases physicians' basic knowledge about common clinical scenarios, and whether ECCE is superior to the passive diffusion of information through the printed version of Clinical Evidence. Design All Italian doctors naïve to ECCE will be randomised to three groups. Group one will have access to ECCE for Clinical Evidence chapters and vignettes lot A and will provide control data for Clinical Evidence chapters and vignettes lot B; group two vice versa; group three will receive the concise printed version of Clinical Evidence. There are in fact two designs: a before and after pragmatic trial utilising a two by two incomplete block design (group one versus group two) and a classical design (group one and two versus group three). The primary outcome will be the retention of Clinical Evidence contents assessed from the scores for clinical vignettes selected from ECCE at least six months after the intervention. To avoid test-retest effects, we will randomly select vignettes out of lot A and lot B, avoiding repetitions. In order to preserve the comparability of lots, we will select vignettes with similar, optimal psychometric characteristics. Trial registration ISRCTN27453314 PMID:18637189

  12. Clinical evidence continuous medical education: a randomised educational trial of an open access e-learning program for transferring evidence-based information - ICEKUBE (Italian Clinical Evidence Knowledge Utilization Behaviour Evaluation) - study protocol.

    PubMed

    Moja, Lorenzo; Moschetti, Ivan; Cinquini, Michela; Sala, Valeria; Compagnoni, Anna; Duca, Piergiorgio; Deligant, Christian; Manfrini, Roberto; Clivio, Luca; Satolli, Roberto; Addis, Antonio; Grimshaw, Jeremy M; Dri, Pietro; Liberati, Alessandro

    2008-07-17

    In an effort to ensure that all physicians have access to valid and reliable evidence on drug effectiveness, the Italian Drug Agency sponsored a free-access e-learning system, based on Clinical Evidence, called ECCE. Doctors have access to an electronic version and related clinical vignettes. Correct answers to the interactive vignettes provide Continuing Medical Education credits. The aims of this trial are to establish whether the e-learning program (ECCE) increases physicians' basic knowledge about common clinical scenarios, and whether ECCE is superior to the passive diffusion of information through the printed version of Clinical Evidence. All Italian doctors naïve to ECCE will be randomised to three groups. Group one will have access to ECCE for Clinical Evidence chapters and vignettes lot A and will provide control data for Clinical Evidence chapters and vignettes lot B; group two vice versa; group three will receive the concise printed version of Clinical Evidence. There are in fact two designs: a before and after pragmatic trial utilising a two by two incomplete block design (group one versus group two) and a classical design (group one and two versus group three). The primary outcome will be the retention of Clinical Evidence contents assessed from the scores for clinical vignettes selected from ECCE at least six months after the intervention. To avoid test-retest effects, we will randomly select vignettes out of lot A and lot B, avoiding repetitions. In order to preserve the comparability of lots, we will select vignettes with similar, optimal psychometric characteristics.

  13. Advancing Public Health through Continuing Education of Health Care Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudmon, Karen Suchanek; Addleton, Robert L.; Vitale, Frank M.; Christiansen, Bruce A.; Mejicano, George C.

    2011-01-01

    This article describes how the CS2day (Cease Smoking Today) initiative positioned continuing education (CE) in the intersection between medicine and public health. The authors suggest that most CE activities address the medical challenges that clinicians confront, often to the neglect of the public health issues that are key risk factors for the…

  14. Advancing Public Health through Continuing Education of Health Care Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudmon, Karen Suchanek; Addleton, Robert L.; Vitale, Frank M.; Christiansen, Bruce A.; Mejicano, George C.

    2011-01-01

    This article describes how the CS2day (Cease Smoking Today) initiative positioned continuing education (CE) in the intersection between medicine and public health. The authors suggest that most CE activities address the medical challenges that clinicians confront, often to the neglect of the public health issues that are key risk factors for the…

  15. Medical Education: The Hot Seat

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Ranabir; Kumar, Raman; Pal, Shrayan; Vidyasagar; Mukherji, Bijay; Debabrata, Sarbapalli

    2016-01-01

    Medical science has eventually metamorphosed from ‘Knowledge based’ to ‘Skill based’ applied social science. So, the age-old traditional courses and curriculums in Indian medical education need a overhauling with radical modifications. With a paradigm shift, we have to take into account not only the help of scientific feedback from the teachers and students but also from all the stakeholders of health care delivery system. PMID:27453838

  16. Medical Education and the Physician Workforce of Iraq

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al Mosawi, Aamir Jalal

    2008-01-01

    The lack of resources in a country experiencing decades of successive wars, blockade, administrative corruption, and poor governance led to deteriorated standards throughout medical education. Although professional certification programs exist, continuing medical education accreditation and credit systems are required to monitor and certify the…

  17. Medical Education and the Physician Workforce of Iraq

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al Mosawi, Aamir Jalal

    2008-01-01

    The lack of resources in a country experiencing decades of successive wars, blockade, administrative corruption, and poor governance led to deteriorated standards throughout medical education. Although professional certification programs exist, continuing medical education accreditation and credit systems are required to monitor and certify the…

  18. [Humanities in medical education: between reduction and integration].

    PubMed

    Han, Taehee

    2015-09-01

    Reductive logic has been a major reasoning style in development of modern biomedical sciences. However, when "medical humanities" is developed by reductive reasoning, integrative and holistic values of humanities tend to be weakened. In that sense, identity and significance of "medical humanities" continue to be controversial despite of its literal clarity. Humanities in medical education should be established by strengthening humanistic and socialistic aspects of regular medical curriculum as well as developing individual "medical humanities" programs.

  19. Using cognitive theory to facilitate medical education.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Yu Qi; Shen, Jun; Liang, Xiao; Ding, Song; Chen, Fang Yuan; Shao, Li; Zheng, Qing; Ran, Zhi Hua

    2014-04-14

    Educators continue to search for better strategies for medical education. Although the unifying theme of reforms was "increasing interest in, attention to, and understanding of the knowledge base structures", it is difficult to achieve all these aspects via a single type of instruction. We used related key words to search in Google Scholar and Pubmed. Related search results on this topic were selected for discussion. Despite the range of different methods used in medical education, students are still required to memorize much of what they are taught, especially for the basic sciences. Subjects like anatomy and pathology carry a high intrinsic cognitive load mainly because of the large volume of information that must be retained. For these subjects, decreasing cognitive load is not feasible and memorizing appears to be the only strategy, yet the cognitive load makes learning a challenge for many students. Cognitive load is further increased when inappropriate use of educational methods occurs, e.g., in problem based learning which demands clinical reasoning, a high level and complex cognitive skill. It is widely known that experts are more skilled at clinical reasoning than novices because of their accumulated experiences. These experiences are based on the formation of cognitive schemata. In this paper we describe the use of cognitive schemata, developed by experts as worked examples to facilitate medical students' learning and to promote their clinical reasoning. We suggest that cognitive load theory can provide a useful framework for understanding the challenges and successes associated with education of medical professionals.

  20. [Piercing: health education or medicalization?].

    PubMed

    Meningaud, J P; Moutel, G; Hervé, C

    2000-06-10

    In Europe, the piercing mode has naturally been associated with specific complications raising an important public health problem. The debate on the role physicians should play requires a careful analysis of the ethical issues involved. Specifically, should the piercing be done in a medical setting? This question is raised because, when performed under ideal conditions, the act of piercing requires a certain degree of medical competency: history taking, asepsia, technical procedure (hemostasis), anesthesia.... However, mandatory medicalization would not, in our opinion, appear to be desirable since we are dealing with a social rite which lies outside the domain of specific medical care. Nevertheless, although we do not advocate systematic medicalization, we do believe that medicine should play a role, in terms of public health, in this emerging practice. We discuss the modalities of a health education dialogue which could be established with professional practicing piercing.