Science.gov

Sample records for continuous cathodic protection

  1. Photovoltaic Power Without Batteries for Continuous Cathodic Protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muehl, W. W., Sr.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this project was to successfully demonstrate that renewable energy can efficiently and economically replace dedicated non-renewable power sources. The COASTSYSTA designed, installed, and started up on 20 Jan. 1990, a state-of-the-art photovoltaic powered impressed current cathodic protection system (PVCPSYS) for steel and iron submerged structures. This system does not require any auxiliary/battery backup power. The PVCPSYS installed on 775 ft. of steel sheet piling of a Navy bulkhead is continuing to provide complete, continuous corrosion protection. This installation is well documented by COASTSYSTA and was verified on-site by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The PVCPSYS uses only renewable energy and is environmentally clean. A patent is pending on the new technology. Other possible PVCPSYS applications are mothballed ships, docks, dams, locks, bridges, marinas, and pipelines. The Department of Defense Photovoltaic Review Committee and Sandia National Laboratories consider this successful and cost effective system a major advance in the application of photovoltaics.

  2. Photovoltaic power without batteries for continuous cathodic protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muehl, W. W., Sr.

    1994-01-01

    The COASTSYSTA designed, installed, and started up on 20 Jan. 1990, a state-of-the-art stand alone photovoltaic powered impressed current cathodic protection system (PVCPSYS) not requiring any auxiliary/battery backup power for steel and iron submerged structures. The PVCPSYS installed on 775' of steel sheet piling of a Navy bulkhead is continuing to provide complete, continuous corrosion protection. This has been well documented by COASTSYSTA and verified on-site by the U.S. Army Civil Engineering Research Laboratory, Champaign, Illinois and the Navy Energy Program Office-Photovoltaic Programs, China Lake, California. The Department of Defense (DoD) Photovoltaic Review Committee and Sandia National Laboratories consider this successful and cost effective system a major advance in the application of photovoltaic power. The PVCPSYS uses only renewable energy and is environmentally clean. A patent is pending on the new technology. Other possible PVCPSYS applications are mothballed ships, docks, dams, locks, bridges, marinas, offshore structures, and pipelines. The initial cost savings by installing a PVCPSYS vs. a conventional CP system was in excess of $46,000.00.

  3. Photovoltaic power without batteries for continuous cathodic protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muehl, W. W., Sr.

    1994-02-01

    The COASTSYSTA designed, installed, and started up on 20 Jan. 1990, a state-of-the-art stand alone photovoltaic powered impressed current cathodic protection system (PVCPSYS) not requiring any auxiliary/battery backup power for steel and iron submerged structures. The PVCPSYS installed on 775' of steel sheet piling of a Navy bulkhead is continuing to provide complete, continuous corrosion protection. This has been well documented by COASTSYSTA and verified on-site by the U.S. Army Civil Engineering Research Laboratory, Champaign, Illinois and the Navy Energy Program Office-Photovoltaic Programs, China Lake, California. The Department of Defense (DoD) Photovoltaic Review Committee and Sandia National Laboratories consider this successful and cost effective system a major advance in the application of photovoltaic power. The PVCPSYS uses only renewable energy and is environmentally clean. A patent is pending on the new technology. Other possible PVCPSYS applications are mothballed ships, docks, dams, locks, bridges, marinas, offshore structures, and pipelines. The initial cost savings by installing a PVCPSYS vs. a conventional CP system was in excess of $46,000.00.

  4. Cathodic protection -- Rectifier 47

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, W.M.

    1995-06-14

    This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) has been prepared to demonstrate that the cathodic protection system functions as required by project criteria. The cathodic protection system is for the tank farms at the Hanford Reservation. The tank farms store radioactive waste.

  5. Cathodic protection -- Rectifier 46

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, W.M.

    1995-06-14

    This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) has been prepared to demonstrate that the cathodic protection system functions as required by project criteria. The cathodic protection system is for the tank farms on the Hanford Reservation. The tank farms store radioactive waste.

  6. Photovoltaic power without batteries for continuous cathodic protection and an alternate photovoltaic/ultracapacitor combined power source

    SciTech Connect

    Muehl, W.W. Sr.

    1995-12-31

    The Coastal Systems Station (COASTSYSTA) designed, installed, and started up on 20 January 1990, a state-of-the-art stand-alone photovoltaic powered impressed current cathodic protection system (PVCPSYS) not requiring any backup power for steel and iron submerged structures. The PVCPSYS, installed on a 775-foot steel sheet piling of a Navy dock bulkhead, provides complete, continuous corrosion protection. The PVCPSYS has been in operation for more than five years, has not required any repair or maintenance, and is environmentally clean. Initial cost savings of the PVCPSYS versus conventional cathodic protection system was $46,000. A second PVCPSYS was installed on another 800-foot bulkhead on 21 May 1993. It is also providing complete corrosion protection without backup power. Performance is well documented. Other potential applications are moth-balled ships, locks, dams, bridges, pipelines, and similar structures. These systems are considered a major advance by Sandia and the Department of Defense (DOD) Photovoltaic Review Committee. An ultracapacitor, a recent hi-tech development that is environmentally clean, will be incorporated in the PVCPSYS when required to enhance the system`s capability. A photovoltaic/ultracapacitor (or equivalent) combined power source operating under adverse conditions, and/or to satisfy or meet regulations will assure cathodic protection, including pipelines carrying combustibles or other products that could otherwise create environmental problems. Patents are pending on this PVCPSYS and the photovoltaic/ ultracapacitor powered systems.

  7. Photovoltaic power without batteries for continuous cathodic protection and an alternate photovoltaic/ultracapacitor combined power source

    SciTech Connect

    Muehl, W.W.

    1994-12-31

    The Coastal Systems Station (COASTSYSTA) designed, installed, and started up on 20 January 1990, a state-of-the-art stand-alone photovoltaic powered impressed current cathodic protection system (PVCPSYS) not requiring any backup power for steel and iron submerged structures. The PVCPSYS, installed on a 775-foot steel sheet piling of a Navy dock bulkhead, provides complete, continuous corrosion protection. The PVCPSYS has been in operation for more than five years, has not required any repair or maintenance, ad is environmentally clean. Initial cost savings of the PVCPSYS versus conventional cathodic protection system was $46,000. A second PVCPSYS was installed on another 800-foot bulkhead on 21 May 1993. It is also providing complete corrosion protection without backup power. Performance is well documented. Other potential applications are moth-balled ships, locks, dams, bridges, pipelines, and similar structures. These systems are considered a major advance by Sandia and the Department of Defense (DOD) Photovoltaic Review Committee. An ultra-capacitor, a recent hi-tech development that is environmentally clean, will be incorporated in the PVCPSYS when required to enhance the system`s capability. A photovoltaic/ultracapacitor (or equivalent) combined power source operating under adverse conditions, and/or to satisfy or meet regulations will assure cathodic protection, including pipelines carrying combustibles or other products that could otherwise create environmental problems.

  8. 49 CFR 192.463 - External corrosion control: Cathodic protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false External corrosion control: Cathodic protection. 192.463 Section 192.463 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued... for Corrosion Control § 192.463 External corrosion control: Cathodic protection. (a) Each...

  9. 49 CFR 192.463 - External corrosion control: Cathodic protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false External corrosion control: Cathodic protection. 192.463 Section 192.463 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued... for Corrosion Control § 192.463 External corrosion control: Cathodic protection. (a) Each...

  10. 49 CFR 192.463 - External corrosion control: Cathodic protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false External corrosion control: Cathodic protection. 192.463 Section 192.463 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued... for Corrosion Control § 192.463 External corrosion control: Cathodic protection. (a) Each...

  11. 49 CFR 192.463 - External corrosion control: Cathodic protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false External corrosion control: Cathodic protection. 192.463 Section 192.463 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued... for Corrosion Control § 192.463 External corrosion control: Cathodic protection. (a) Each...

  12. Interrelationship between marine biofouling and cathodic protection

    SciTech Connect

    Little, B.J.; Wagner, P.A. )

    1993-09-01

    Microorganisms colonize and form a gelatinous biofilm on all engineering materials exposed in natural marine environments, including cathodically protected surfaces. The impact of cathodic protection (CP) potentials on the chemical/biological composition of the biofilm and the impact of the biofilms on potentials required for CP have been the subject of many recent investigations. Literature on these subjects will be reviewed with emphasis on clarifying interactions between living and nonliving deposits on cathodically protected metal surfaces.

  13. 49 CFR 192.463 - External corrosion control: Cathodic protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false External corrosion control: Cathodic protection. 192.463 Section 192.463 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS...

  14. Cathodic protection in simulated geothermal environments

    SciTech Connect

    Bandy, R.; van Rooyen, D.

    1983-01-01

    The results of cathodic protection of carbon steel and AISI Type 316 stainless steel in simulated geothermal brines are described. Impressed current tests on carbon steel and stainless steel were conducted under controlled potential, and cathodic protection of carbon steel using zinc sacrificial anodes was studied by monitoring the galvanic current and potential of the couple with a zero-resistance ammeter. Weight-loss measurements and photomicrographs of test coupons were taken whenever necessary to determine the nature of attack and degree of protection. Tests were generally conducted at 90/sup 0/C. However, some tests on carbon steel were conducted up to 150/sup 0/C in a titanium autoclave. Results show that the weight loss of carbon steel can be reduced significantly and the pitting corrosion of the stainless steel can be prevented by shifting the potentials of the metals 60 to 80 mV cathodic to their respective open-circuit potentials.

  15. Cathodic protection of pipelines in discontinuous permafrost

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, C.J.; Wright, M.D.; Waslen, D.W.

    1997-08-01

    This paper discusses the challenges in providing cathodic protection for a pipeline located in an area with discontinuous permafrost. Specific challenges included: unknown time for the permafrost to melt out, unpredictable current distribution characteristics and wet, inaccessible terrain. Based on preliminary pipe-to-soil data, it appears that cathodic protection coverage was achieved in discontinuous permafrost regions without the need of local anodes. Future work is required to verify whether this conclusion can be extended over the course of an annual freeze-thaw cycle.

  16. Cathodic protection of pipelines in discontinuous permafrost

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, C.J.; Wright, M.D.; Waslen, D.W.

    1997-10-01

    There are many unknowns and challenges in providing cathodic protection (CP) for a pipeline located in discontinuous permafrost areas. Preliminary pipe-to-soil data indicates that CP coverage was achieved in these regions without needing local anodes. Work is required to verify whether this conclusion can be extended over the course of an annual freeze-thaw cycle.

  17. Acceptance Test Procedure for Cathodic Protection, Rectifier 11

    SciTech Connect

    Clifton, F.T.

    1995-04-28

    This Acceptance Test Procedure for Project W-030 Cathodic Protection Installation, 241-AY and 241-AZ Tank Farm Ventilation Upgrade, has been prepared to demonstrate that the cathodic protection system functions as required by project criteria.

  18. Cathodic protection requirements for deepwater systems

    SciTech Connect

    Menendez, C.M.; Hanson, H.R.; Kane, R.D.; Farquhar, G.B.

    1999-07-01

    Field and laboratory experience related to requirements for cathodic protection (CP) in deep water are reviewed with emphasis on identification of the major variables that need to be specified for successful deepwater CP designs for offshore structures. The subject is addressed based on the historical development of cathodic protection design methodologies for offshore structures focusing on sacrificial anode systems and trends that have resulted in specific changes in design requirements. Three main subjects are discussed: (1) application of existing industry standards such as NACE RP0176; (2) environmental factors--dissolved oxygen, temperature, salinity, pH, water velocity and fouling; and (3) calcareous deposits--difference between shallow and deep waters. Current practice of design criteria and systems for deepwater applications is assessed, including initial polarization, use of coatings and anode materials. The results from laboratory tests are compared with available documented service experiences and field tests results.

  19. Auger Tension Leg Platform cathodic protection system

    SciTech Connect

    Goolsby, A.D.; Smith, J.D.

    1996-04-01

    Corrosion control design for the exterior submerged and buried steel surfaces of the 2,850 ft (869 m) water depth Auger Tension Leg Platform structure is described. Each major type of structural component has its own combination of coating and cathodic protection (CP) systems designed for a 35-year lifetime. Results of early in-service CP surveys of the tendons and guidebases are presented, showing the successful achievement of CP against seawater corrosion.

  20. Use of conservatism in cathodic protection design

    SciTech Connect

    Sydberger, T.; Edwards, J.D.; Tiller, I.B.

    1996-10-01

    Sacrificial anode cathodic protection offers cost-effective corrosion protection of submerged marine structures. However, it should be appreciated that longevity of the protection systems can only be estimated with a limited degree of accuracy. To ensure a certain reliability, i.e. probability that a cathodic protection system will achieve its design life, some intentional overcapacity must be included in the design. In contemporary design, specific parameters are defined with an intrinsic conservation rather than using some overall design factor. The paper discusses how design parameters should be selected to provide adequate reliability, taking account of the additional investment cost for an overcapacity which may not be utilized on the one hand, and comparing this with the potential costs associated with increased monitoring and maintenance, including subsea retrofitting of anodes, if the design capacity initially installed proves to be insufficient. A comparison is made between pertinent design parameters in DNV RP B401 (1993), NACE RP0176-94 and NORSOK M-CR-503 (1994).

  1. Anodes for cathodic protection of reinforced concrete

    SciTech Connect

    S.J. Bullard; B.S. Covino, Jr.; S.D. Cramer; G.R. Holcomb; J.H. Russell

    2000-03-01

    Consumable anodes were evaluated in the laboratory for use in cathodic protection systems for steel reinforced concrete bridges in coastal environments and in areas where de-icing salts are employed. The anode materials include Zn-hydrogel and thermal-sprayed Zn, Zn-15Al, and Al-12Zn-0.2In. These anodes were evaluated for service in both galvanic (GCP) and impressed current (ICCP) cathodic protection systems. ICCP anodes were electrochemically aged at a factor of 15 times greater than used by the Oregon Department of Transportation in typical coastal ICCP systems (2.2 mA/m{sup 2} based on anode area). Increasing moisture at the anode-concrete interface reduced the operating voltage of all the anodes. The pH at the anode-concrete interface fell to 7 to 8.5 with electrochemical age. Bond strength between the anodes and concrete decreased with electrochemical aging. Interfacial chemistry was the critical link between long-term anode performance and electrochemical age. Zn-hydrogel and the rmal-sprayed Zn and Al-12Zn-0.2In GCP anodes appear to supply adequate protection current to rebar in the Cape Perpetua Viaduct.

  2. Cathodic protection -- Addition of 6 anodes to existing rectifier 31

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, W.M.

    1995-06-14

    This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) has been prepared to demonstrate that the cathodic protection system additions are installed, connected, and function as required by project criteria. The cathodic protection system is for the tank farms on the Hanford Reservation. The tank farms store radioactive wastes.

  3. Cathodic protection design using the regression and correlation method

    SciTech Connect

    Niembro, A.M.; Ortiz, E.L.G.

    1997-09-01

    A computerized statistical method which calculates the current demand requirement based on potential measurements for cathodic protection systems is introduced. The method uses the regression and correlation analysis of statistical measurements of current and potentials of the piping network. This approach involves four steps: field potential measurements, statistical determination of the current required to achieve full protection, installation of more cathodic protection capacity with distributed anodes around the plant and examination of the protection potentials. The procedure is described and recommendations for the improvement of the existing and new cathodic protection systems are given.

  4. Cathodic Protection of the Yaquina Bay Bridge

    SciTech Connect

    Bullard, Sophie J.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Russell, James H.; Laylor, H.M.; Cryer, C.B.

    2001-02-01

    The Yaquina Bay Bridge in Newport, Oregon, was designed by Conde B. McCullough and built in 1936. The 3,223-foot (982 m) structure is a combination of concrete arch approach spans and a steel through arch over the shipping channel. Cathodic protection is used to prevent corrosion damage to the concrete arches. The Oregon Department of Transportation (Oregon DOT) installed a carbon anode coating (DAC-85) on two of the north approach spans in 1985. This anode was operated at a current density of 6.6 mA/m2(0.6 mA/ft2). No failure of the conductive anode was observed in 1990, five years after application, or in 2000, 15 years after application. Thermal-sprayed zinc anodes 20 mils (0.5 mm) thick were applied to half the south approach spans beginning in 1990. Thermal-sprayed zinc anodes 15 mils (0.4 mm) thick were applied to the remaining spans in 1996. These anodes were operated at a current density of 2.2 mA/m2(0.2 mA/ft2). In 1999, four zones on the approach spans were included in a two-year field trial of humectants to improve zinc anode performance. The humectants LiNO3 and LiBr were applied to two zones; the two adjacent zones were left untreated as controls. The humectants substantially reduced circuit resistance compared to the controls.

  5. Effects of cathodic disbonding and blistering on current demand for cathodic protection of coated steel

    SciTech Connect

    Knudsen, O.O.; Steinsmo, U.

    2000-03-01

    Cathodic disbonding, blistering, and current demand for cathodic protection were measured for nine commercial coatings for submerged steel structures. The ASTM-G8 standard test and a long-term test (2 years), simulating North Sea conditions, were used. The relevance of the ASTM-G8 test as a prequalification test was evaluated by comparing cathodic disbonding in the two tests. After 800 days in the long-term test, the correlation to ASTM-G8 was good. The correlation coefficient was 0.98. The current demand for cathodic protection increased when the coatings blistered. Examination of the blisters showed that they had cracked. After 2 years of testing, the current demand only had increased for the thin coatings (< 150 {micro}m). The current demand for the thicker coatings (> 450 {micro}m) had not increased, in spite of significant cathodic disbonding for some coatings. Coating breakdown factors, defined as the ratio between current demand for cathodic protection for the coated samples and samples of bare steel, were calculated. These factors were compared with the design values for cathodic protection in Det Norske Veritas (DNV) RP B401 and NORSOK M-CR-503. For all coatings, the coating breakdown rate was lower than the design values.

  6. Exploring the complexity of the mechanism of cathodic protection

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, N.G.; Lawson, K.M.; Beavers, J.A.

    1994-12-31

    The present understanding of the mechanism of cathodic protection is too simplistic to explain when, why, and under what conditions corrosion is mitigated for a buried pipeline. This paper presents a general framework which attempts to explain why cathodic protection is achieved and what factors are critical in determining the ability of cathodic protection to mitigate corrosion. It is speculated that the changes in the ``near-surface`` environment due to the reduction processes on the cathodically protected steel surface play a significant role in mitigating corrosion and in defining the level of polarization achieved. This is accomplished by contributing a concentration polarization term to the overall level of polarization. Furthermore, the concentration polarization term explains many field related observations not easily explained by activation polarization and mixed potential theory. 32 refs.

  7. 49 CFR 195.563 - Which pipelines must have cathodic protection?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... protection as a result of electrical inspections. See previous editions of this part in 49 CFR, parts 186 to... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Which pipelines must have cathodic protection? 195.563 Section 195.563 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued)...

  8. 49 CFR 195.563 - Which pipelines must have cathodic protection?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... protection as a result of electrical inspections. See previous editions of this part in 49 CFR, parts 186 to... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Which pipelines must have cathodic protection? 195.563 Section 195.563 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued)...

  9. 49 CFR 195.563 - Which pipelines must have cathodic protection?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... protection as a result of electrical inspections. See previous editions of this part in 49 CFR, parts 186 to... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Which pipelines must have cathodic protection? 195.563 Section 195.563 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued)...

  10. 49 CFR 195.563 - Which pipelines must have cathodic protection?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... protection as a result of electrical inspections. See previous editions of this part in 49 CFR, parts 186 to... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Which pipelines must have cathodic protection? 195.563 Section 195.563 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued)...

  11. 49 CFR 195.563 - Which pipelines must have cathodic protection?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... protection as a result of electrical inspections. See previous editions of this part in 49 CFR, parts 186 to... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Which pipelines must have cathodic protection? 195.563 Section 195.563 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued)...

  12. Platform cathodic protection design in the South China Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Rippon, I.

    1997-09-01

    The 1993 revision of one of the industry recommended practices on cathodic protection design offers the operator the opportunity to use his own experience and data to justify more or less conservative designs. Examples of the use of this option to achieve an economic South China Sea design are presented. The design approach on how to subdivide the object being cathodically protected can be applied in any operating area where there is good environmental data. An example of the cost savings achievable by using this approach is presented. The optimized design is 55% of the cost of the design following the 1993 code.

  13. Computerized cathodic protection technology reduces pipeline reconditioning costs

    SciTech Connect

    Rizzo, M.E.; Wildman, T.A.

    1997-10-01

    New data collection technology and improved interpretation methods reducing excessive costs to recondition poorly coated pipelines without compromising safety. Application of alternative cathodic protection criteria will reward operators with additional resources for competitiveness. These technologies and the application of sound engineering principles ensure safe pipeline operation, and exceed the letter and the spirit of NACE and US Department of Transportation requirements.

  14. Cost of Impressed Current Cathodic Protection for Coastal Oregon Bridges

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, Gordon R.; Cryer, Curtis B.

    1998-07-01

    The State of Oregon is using arc-sprayed zinc coatings for anodes in impressed current cathodic protection (ICCP) systems on reinforced concrete coastal bridges. The two lowest bids for four ICCP projects were averaged and converted to 1997 dollars. The total average cost for the ICCP projects was $51.63/ft2 ($555.51/m2) of protected concrete. The cathodic protection part of the ICCP projects average $14.08/ft2 ($151.47/m2), while zinc anode installation cost an average of $7.13/ft2 ($76.67/m2). Oregon's rugged and beautiful coastline is graced with a series of historical arched bridges designed by Conde B. McCullough. McCullough is the internationally recognized architect who designed many of the Oregon Coast Highway (U.S. 101) bridges in the 1920s and 1930s. Many are listed on the National Historic Register. After the expense ($45m) and public outcry associated with the replacement of the historic Alsea Bay Bridge in Waldport, Oregon, the Oregon Department of Transportation began using impressed current cathodic protection (ICCP) to extend the service life of reinforced concrete bridges. Figure 1 visually illustrates the need for such remediation. It shows exposed rebar from underneath the Brush Creek Bridge, which is very representative of the conditions found underneath many coastal Oregon bridges. Four ICCP projects have been funded, put out for bid, and completed. The four projects, their bid closing dates, and their completion dates are the Cape Creek Bridge (1990- 1992), the Yaquina Bay Bridge south arches (1991-1995), the Depoe Bay Bridge (1993-1997), and the Yaquina Bay Bridge south approach (1995-1997). The Cape Creek, Yaquina Bay, and Depoe Bay Bridges are shown in Figs. 2-4. Other ICCP projects are underway on the Oregon coast. In the ICCP systems, arc-sprayed zinc coatings on the concrete surface are anodes that protect the steel rebar. Accelerated laboratory studies at the Albany Research Center have predicted zinc anode service lives of

  15. Cathodic protection requirements of ship hull materials

    SciTech Connect

    Khambhaita, P.; Tighe-Ford, D.J.; Hinks, K.J.

    1994-12-31

    The current density requirements for the laboratory polarization of bare steel, bronze and painted steel in seawater have been examined at a potential of {minus}800mV (SSC). Flow at velocities up to 3.0 m/s markedly increased demand with the bare alloys, with a greater effect upon polished specimens than upon aged. The beneficial effect of chalking deposits was evident under flow but not in static seawater. Propeller rotation increased protection requirements, particularly for a bright surface, although to a lesser extent than with flow. From the experimental and ship data it would appear that the majority of the effect of flow and under way conditions occurs within approximately the first 2.5 m/s (5 knots). The requirement for standardization of techniques for determining protection current density requirements is identified. Results are discussed in relation to the need to install ICCP systems with a current output capacity sufficient to meet maximum anticipated demand and to define the requirements of individual zones.

  16. Humectant use in the cathodic protection of reinforced concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, Gordon R.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Russell, James H.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Collins, W.K.; Bennett, J.E.; Laylor, H.M.

    2000-11-01

    Use of humectants to improve the thermal-sprayed zinc anode performance during the cathodic protection (CP) of reinforced concrete was examined. A humectant is a hygroscopic material. It is applied onto the surface of the zinc anode to keep the concrete-anode interface moist and a good conductor. The thermodynamics of humectants are discussed. Laboratory results are presented on the effects of using lithium bromide (LiBr) and lithium nitrate (LiNO{sub 3}) as humectants in galvanic cathodic protection (GCP) and impressed current cathodic protection (ICCP) systems, in high and low relative humidities, and on new and previously electrochemically aged CP systems. LiNO{sub 3} and LiBr promoted more effective CP performance. Both improved the performance of aged slabs, suggesting that application of humectants onto existing CP systems would be of benefit. Microscopy showed that humectant-treated slabs develop the same cement-reaction zone, zinc anode structures as untreated slabs. Microscopy of LiBr-treated slabs revealed that the highest concentration of bromide was in the reaction zone. In GCP tests, LiBr was more effective than LiNO{sub 3}. In accelerated ICCP tests, LiNO{sub 3} was more effective than LiBr. It was surmised that bromide could be oxidized in the high-voltage accelerated ICCP tests. At the lower impressed currents of most installed ICCP systems, LiBr may perform as well as or better than LiNO{sub 3}.

  17. Computer modeling of cathodic protection on risers/tendons

    SciTech Connect

    Osvoll, H.; Gartland, P.O.; Thomason, W.H.

    1995-02-01

    Computer modeling is gaining popularity in the design and verification of cathodic protection (CP) systems for offshore structures. The work presented in this article expands the use of CP simulation to consider the metallic electrical resistance of risers/tendons used with tension leg platforms where anodes are mounted on the hull or subsea structure. The SEACORR/CP computer system was used to perform a parametric study to identify the limitations of CP and coatings in providing corrosion protection. The effect of using a titanium riser instead of a steel riser was also considered.

  18. Cathodic Protection Deployment on Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Boosters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zook, Lee M.

    1998-01-01

    Corrosion protection of the space shuttle solid rocket boosters incorporates the use of cathodic protection(anodes) in concert with several coatings systems. The SRB design has large carbon/carbon composites(motor nozzle) electrically connected to an aluminum alloy structure. Early in the STS program, the aluminum structures incurred tremendous corrosive attack due primarily to the galvanic couple to the carbon/carbon nozzle at coating damage locations. Also contributing to the galvanic corrosion problem were stainless steel and titanium alloy components housed within the aluminum structures and electrically connected to the aluminum structures. This paper will highlight the evolution in the protection of the aluminum structures, providing historical information and summary data from the operation of the corrosion protection systems. Also, data and information will be included regarding the evaluation and deployment of inorganic zinc rich primers as anode area on the aluminum structures.

  19. Cathodic protection deployment on space shuttle solid rocket boosters

    SciTech Connect

    Zook, L.M.

    1999-07-01

    Corrosion protection of the space shuttle solid rocket boosters incorporates the use of cathodic protection (anodes) in concert with several coatings systems. The SRB design has large carbon/carbon composite (motor nozzle) electrically connected to an aluminum alloy structure. Early in the STS program, the aluminum structures incurred tremendous corrosive attack at coating damage locations due primarily to galvanic coupling with the carbon/carbon nozzle. Also contributing to the galvanic corrosion problem were stainless steel and titanium alloy components housed within the aluminum structures and electrically connected to the aluminum structures. This paper highlights the evolution in the protection of the aluminum structures, providing historical information and summary data from the operation of the corrosion protection systems. Also, data and information are included regarding the evaluation and application of inorganic zinc rich primers to provide anode area on the aluminum structures.

  20. Alternate anode materials for cathodic protection of steel reinforced concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, James H.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Cryer, Curtis B.

    2001-01-01

    Consumable and non-consumable anodes were evaluated in the laboratory for use in cathodic protection (CP) systems for steel reinforced concrete bridges in coastal environments and in areas where deicing salts are employed. The anode materials included Zn-hydrogel and thermal-sprayed Zn, Zn-15Al, Al-12Zn-0.2In, and cobalt-sprayed Ti. These anodes were evaluated for service in both galvanic (GCP) and impressed current (ICCP) cathodic protection systems. Impressed current CP anodes were electrochemically aged at a current density 15 times as great as that used by the Oregon Department of Transportation in typical coastal ICCP systems (2.2 mA/m2 based on anode area). Increasing moisture at the anode-concrete interface reduced the operating voltage of all the anodes. Bond strength between the anodes and concrete decreased with electrochemical aging. The Zn-15Al and Al-12Zn-0.2In anodes provided adequate protection in GCP but their life was too short in the accelerated ICCP tests. Zinc had an adequate life in ICCP tests but was inadequate as a galvanic anode. Zinc-hydrogel performed well in both tests when the hydrogel was kept moist. Titanium was an excellent anode for ICCP, but is not suitable for GCP.

  1. Cathodic protection of aboveground storage tanks in an Arctic environment

    SciTech Connect

    Barletta, T.; Bayle, R.; Kennelley, K.

    1996-05-01

    The Trans Alaska Pipeline System (TAPS) is one of the largest pipeline systems in the world. Fifty eight major aboveground storage tanks (ASTs) are a critical part of the daily operation of the pipeline. A variety of cathodic protection (CP) retrofit systems are available for aboveground storage tanks. The presence of secondary containment liners, refrigeration systems, and an Arctic environment necessitates the use of a CP system in which the anodes are located in close proximity to the tank bottom. Impressed current CP retrofit systems were evaluated.

  2. TAPS storage tank bottoms fitted with improved cathodic protection

    SciTech Connect

    Barletta, T.; Bayle, R.; Kennelley, K.

    1995-10-23

    Discovery of external corrosion on tank floors at several aboveground storage tanks (ASTs) along the Trans Alaska Pipeline system (TAPS) led engineers to evaluate methods of repairing corrosion damage and to examine how to improve tank bottoms` cathodic protection. The corrosion underscored Alaska`s difficult operating conditions. Warm crude oil and turbine fuel, at temperatures of up to 120 F, are stored at various stages of pumping and transport in 31 above-ground steel storage tanks located at 11 pump stations along the pipeline. The paper describes the discovery of external corrosion and the three types of repairs undertaken at the tanks.

  3. 49 CFR Appendix D to Part 192 - Criteria for Cathodic Protection and Determination of Measurements

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Criteria for Cathodic Protection and Determination.... 192, App. D Appendix D to Part 192—Criteria for Cathodic Protection and Determination of Measurements... cell. Determination of this voltage must be made with the protective current applied, and in...

  4. 49 CFR Appendix D to Part 192 - Criteria for Cathodic Protection and Determination of Measurements

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Criteria for Cathodic Protection and Determination.... 192, App. D Appendix D to Part 192—Criteria for Cathodic Protection and Determination of Measurements... cell. Determination of this voltage must be made with the protective current applied, and in...

  5. Alternative consumable anodes for cathodic protection of reinforced concrete bridges

    SciTech Connect

    Bullard, Sophie J.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Russell, James H.; Cryer, C.B.; Laylor, H.M.

    1999-01-01

    Alternative consumable anodes were evaluated in the laboratory for use in cathodic protection systems for steel reinforced concrete bridges in coastal environments and in areas where deicing salts are employed. The anode materials included zinc hydrogel foil and thermal-sprayed Zn, Zn-15Al, and Al-12Zn-0.2In alloys. They were evaluated for service in both impressed current (ICCP) and galvanic (GCP) cathodic protection systems. ICCP anodes were electrochemically aged at current densities of five to fifteen times that used by the Oregon Department of Transportation (Oregon DOT) in typical coastal CP systems (2.2 mA/m2 based on anode area). GCP anodes were electrochemically aged at a rate defined by the steel-anode couple. Both types of anodes were exposed to 80°F, a relative humidity of 85 pct, and were periodically wetted with deionized water. The Zn anode gave the best performance in ICCP systems. The four anodes all produced sufficient current density suitable for use in GCP systems. The anodes materials, ranked in increasing order of GCP current output, were: thermal-sprayed Al-12Zn-0.2In, Zn hydrogel, thermal-sprayed Zn-15Al, and thermal-sprayed Zn.

  6. Study of Discharging Characteristics of Hollow Cathode Surge Protective Gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Xueling; Chen, Jingliang; Xu, Xiaowei; Liu, Yong; Zhao, Yong

    2010-02-01

    A hollow cathode surge protective gap (HCSPG) was designed, and the discharge characteristics was investigated in an air and nitrogen gas environment. For both the gap spacing D and the hole diameter varphi of HCSPG of 3 mm, the voltage protective value Up of HCSPG is about 3.5 kV and its converting time tc exceeds 100 ns at an air pressure from 10 Pa to 100 Pa. The maximum converting time tc from glow to arc discharging reaches 1600 ns at an air pressure of 100 Pa, while the minimum converting time tc is 120 ns at 10 Pa. For a triggered HCSPG, Up is reduced to about 1.6 kV while the converting time is 120 ns with a semiconductor trigger device and 50 ns with a dielectric porcelain trigger device under an air pressure of 100 Pa.

  7. North Sea platform cathodic protection -- A performance vs design review

    SciTech Connect

    Ridd, B.R.; Queen, D.M.E.; Osvoll, H.; Bjornaas, F.

    1999-07-01

    Modern day cathodic protection (CP) design codes are typically highly conservative when compared with early CP system designs. Review of historical survey data from platforms in service for approximately 25 to 30 years illustrates the conservatism now employed when constructing new structures for installation in the North Sea. This paper illustrates this level of conservatism by reviewing the CP system performance of a gas gathering platform complex in the Southern North Sea and comparing the results of that review with present day design codes. The paper details the findings of a CP design review and ROV validation inspection to determine the present system status. The effect of combined impressed current and sacrificial anode systems is also illustrated. Finally a discussion on the definition and optimization of additional CP system requirements and future survey strategy to ensure protection is maintained to the anticipated end of field life is provided highlighting the cost benefits of basing retrofit designs on system performance rather than design theory.

  8. Cathodic polarization and protection of simulated prestressed concrete pilings in seawater

    SciTech Connect

    Pangrazzi, R. ); Hartt, W.H. . Center for Marine Materials); Kessler, R. . Florida Dept. of Transportation)

    1994-03-01

    Experiments were conducted to determine the effectiveness of localized cathodic polarization for reducing corrosion of simulated prestressed concrete piles containing continuous and segmented tendons exposed to seawater. Conductive rubber was used as the anode material. Corrosion of the steel was enhanced for most specimens by admixing calcium chloride (CaCl[sub 2]) during concrete pouring. Specimens were polarized cathodically at constant potentials (current on) ranging from [minus]0.72 V[sub SCE] to [minus]1.10 V[sub SCE]. The magnitude of impressed current and its distribution along the embedded steel were monitored as a function of exposure time and level of polarization. Potential distributions for the continuous and segmented tendons were measured also. The level of cathodic polarization was assessed as a function of position along the specimens by the depolarization method and by post-test visual inspection. Protection was achieved where instant-off potentials were more negative than [minus]0.75 V[sub SCE]. Polarization was negligible at heights > [approximately]1 dm above the anode. Results were presented within the context of protecting marine pilings from corrosion.

  9. E.M.I Effects of Cathodic Protection on Electromagnetic Flowmeters

    PubMed Central

    Gundogdu, Serdar; Sahin, Ozge

    2007-01-01

    Electromagnetic flowmeters are used to measure the speed of water flow in water distribution systems. Corrosion problem in metal pipelines can be solved by cathodic protection methods. This paper presents a research on corruptive effects of the cathodic protection system on electromagnetic flowmeter depending on its measuring principle. Experimental measurements are realized on the water distribution pipelines of the Izmir Municipality, Department of Water and Drainage Administration (IZSU) in Turkey and measurement results are given. Experimental results proved that the values measured by the electromagnetic flowmeter (EMF) are affected by cathodic protection system current. Comments on the measurement results are made and precautions to be taken are proposed.

  10. Designing cathodic protection systems for marine structures and vehicles. ASTM special technical publication 1370

    SciTech Connect

    Hack, H.P.

    1999-07-01

    Cathodic protection is an important method of protecting structures and ships from the corrosive effects of seawater. Poor designs can be far more costly to implement than optimal designs, Improper design can cause overprotection, with resulting paint blistering and accelerated corrosion of some alloys, underprotection, with resultant structure corrosion, or stray current corrosion of nearby structures. The first ASTM symposium specifically aimed at cathodic protection in seawater was intended to compile all the criteria and philosophy for designing both sacrificial and impressed current cathodic protection systems for structures and vehicles in seawater. The papers which are included in this STP are significant in that they summarize the major seawater cathodic protection system design philosophies. Papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the database.

  11. Humectant use in the cathodic protection of reinforced concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, G.R.; Covino, B.S. Jr.; Russell, J.H.; Bullard, S.J.; Cramer, S.D.; Collins, W.K.; Bennett, J.E.; H.M. Laylor

    2000-03-01

    The use of humectants to improve the thermal-sprayed zinc anode performance during the cathodic protection (CP) of reinforced concrete is examined. A humectant is a hygroscopic material. It is applied onto the surface of the zinc anode to keep the concrete-anode interface moist and a good conductor. The thermodynamics of humectants are discussed. Laboratory results are presented on the effects of using LiBr and LiNO{sub 3} as humectants in galvanic (GCP) and impressed current (ICCP) systems, in high and low relative humidities, and on new and previously electrochemically aged CP systems. LiNO{sub 3} and LiBr promoted more effective CP performance. Both improved the performance of aged slabs, suggesting that application of humectants onto existing CP systems would be of benefit. Microscopy showed that humectant-treated slabs develop the same cement-reaction zone-zinc anode structures as untreated slabs. Microscopy of LiBr-treated slabs revealed that the highest concentration of bromide was in the reaction zone. In GCP tests, LiBr was more effective than LiNO{sub 3}. In accelerated ICCP tests, LiNO{sub 3} was more effective than LiBr. It was surmised that bromide could be oxidized in the high-voltage accelerated ICCP tests. At the lower impressed currents of most installed ICCP systems, LiBr may perform as well as or better than LiNO{sub 3}.

  12. DEMONSTRATION AND EVALUATION OF TECHNOLOGIES FOR DETERMINING THE SUITABILITY OF USTS FOR UPGRADING WITH CATHODIC PROTECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Field applications of three alternate technologies for assessing the suitability of underground storage tanks for upgrading by the addition of cathodic protection were observed and documented. The technologies were applied to five existing underground storage tanks that were slat...

  13. Practical considerations for effective and economical cathodic protection of underground fuel storage tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Rothman, P.S.

    1987-01-01

    Once an economic luxury, the application of cathodic protection to buried fuel and hazardous material storage facilities is now a regulatory necessity. With the advent of the ''Hazardous Solid Waste Amendments of 1984'', a myriad of state, federal, and local codes has appeared, making it mandatory to provide facilities which will ''prevent releases due to corrosion or structural failure for the operational life of the tank''. One technique to achieve this, cathodic protection, has received mixed reception. This is due to misconceptions relative to its application, resulting from variations in tank construction, piping layout and installation practices. This paper outlines the principles of cathodic protection for buried structures, and the major factors to be considered to provide cost effective cathodic protection to these facilities. Coating materials, electrical isolation, backfill type, and monitoring provisions and techniques are discussed. To illustrate the potential pitfalls to be avoided in this type of installation, actual case histories are presented.

  14. Application and guidelines for use of cathodic protection in titanium-tubed condensers

    SciTech Connect

    Peroni, B.M.; Billemeyer, G.W.; Mountford, J.A. Jr.

    1995-12-31

    The use of dissimilar metals in power plant condensers often dictates the need for cathodic protection (C.P.) of the more electrochemically active metal(s). Coatings are also used to control corrosion on some tube sheets and water boxes. In these cases, the intent of the C.P. is to protect the metal substrate at the coating voids or holidays. Proper design and application is necessary not only to mitigate corrosion of the active metals, but also to prevent to metals such as titanium and ferritic stainless steels. Improper application of cathodic protection potentials can lead to severe corrosion or unwanted hydrogen absorption by these materials. Proper design and control of C.P. systems implies a balance between obtaining a potential sufficient for corrosion protection while at the same time achieving minimal hydrogen production. This paper will update the history of cathodic protection used at a large utility, as well as present relevant and practical guidelines for trouble-free use of cathodic protection. In addition, the impact of new technology, such as tube sheet reference electrodes, will be addressed. The main focus will be on titanium tubing because of its ever-increasing, large scale use, and because the majority of condenser systems using titanium also require a cathodic protection system.

  15. Cathodic protection system design for steel pilings of a wharf structure

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolakakos, S.

    1999-07-01

    Corrosion of steel pilings in sea and brackish water is mostly due to the establishment of localized corrosion cells and the effects of the tidal changes. The most frequently used corrosion protection systems are coatings and/or cathodic protection. These protective systems when properly designed, installed and operated are very effective in preventing corrosion problems. The design of a cathodic protection system, in order to be effective and reliable, must take into consideration all technical design criteria, the type of materials used, the geometric shape of the structure, environmental conditions, site restrictions, and any outside interferences. These design considerations, as well as the use of design data and an overall design methodology for a cathodic protection system for pipe and sheet piling used in a wharf structure, are discussed in this paper.

  16. Cathodic protection by zinc sacrificial anodes: impact on marine sediment metallic contamination.

    PubMed

    Rousseau, C; Baraud, F; Leleyter, L; Gil, O

    2009-08-15

    Cathodic protection by sacrificial zinc anodes is often applied to prevent immerged metallic structures from corrosion. But this technique induces the zinc anodes dissolution, which can induce marine sediments and seawater contamination. A large scale experiment, in natural seawater, was conducted during 12 months, in order to evaluate the potential environmental impact of this continuous zinc dissolution, and of some necessary cleaning operations of the anodes surfaces. The heavy metal (Cr, Cu, Pb and Zn) concentration in water and sediment samples was monitored. A sequential extraction procedure was applied on sediment samples to differentiate the zinc mobile fractions from the residual one. A significant increase of zinc concentration was observed in water as well as in the surface sediments under the specific operating conditions. Sediments then become a secondary pollution source, as the sorbed labile zinc can be remobilized to seawater. PMID:19250740

  17. Cathodic protection upgrade of the 1,050 ft water depth Cognac platform

    SciTech Connect

    Goolsby, A.D.; McGuire, D.P.

    1997-09-01

    This paper reports the steps of a cathodic protection upgrade of a three year old deep water platform (the Cognac structure, Mississippi Canyon 194A) installed in 1977/78. These steps include obtaining results from an ROV survey, using the survey data to calculate added currents needed to upgrade cathodic protection of the platform, achieving retrofit anode installation using then novel methods, and following-up with CP surveys showing the success of the upgrade. The authors calculated that 3,100 amperes of additional current applied at depths from 250 to 1,050 feet would be needed to achieve full cathodic protection of the well conductors and jacket of Cognac. Approximately 1,100 additional aluminum anodes were installed during the early 1980`s, using two novel installation methods. Installed cost was estimated at $5.4MM. Potentials since the time of the upgrade have been very satisfactory.

  18. Protected Sulfur Cathode with Mixed Conductive Coating Layer for Lithium Sulfur Battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Jun; Wen, Zhaoyin; Wang, Qingsong; Gu, Sui; Huang, Xiao; Chen, Chunhua

    2016-08-01

    A mixed conductive coating layer composed of lithium ion conductive ceramic powder, carbon and binder was introduced on the surface of a sulfur electrode. This coating layer is designed to suppress the migration of lithium polysulfides from the sulfur electrode, and improve the cycling capacity of a lithium sulfur battery. The protected sulfur cathode with a mixed conductive coating layer delivered an initial specific capacity of 1236 mAh g-1 at 0.5C and maintained a capacity of 842 mAh g-1 after 100 cycles. In particular, a soft package battery with protected cathode exhibits improved cycling capacity and excellent rate performance.

  19. Protected Sulfur Cathode with Mixed Conductive Coating Layer for Lithium Sulfur Battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Jun; Wen, Zhaoyin; Wang, Qingsong; Gu, Sui; Huang, Xiao; Chen, Chunhua

    2016-10-01

    A mixed conductive coating layer composed of lithium ion conductive ceramic powder, carbon and binder was introduced on the surface of a sulfur electrode. This coating layer is designed to suppress the migration of lithium polysulfides from the sulfur electrode, and improve the cycling capacity of a lithium sulfur battery. The protected sulfur cathode with a mixed conductive coating layer delivered an initial specific capacity of 1236 mAh g-1 at 0.5C and maintained a capacity of 842 mAh g-1 after 100 cycles. In particular, a soft package battery with protected cathode exhibits improved cycling capacity and excellent rate performance.

  20. Mathematical models for cathodic protection of an underground pipeline with coating holidays. Part 2: Case studies of parallel anode cathodic protection systems

    SciTech Connect

    Orazem, M.E.; Esteban, J.M.; Kennelley, K.J.; Degerstedt, R.M.

    1997-06-01

    A boundary element mathematical model was used to assess the influence of cathodic protection (CP) design parameters on performance of a parallel-ribbon sacrificial anode CP system for coated pipelines. The model accounted for current and potential distributions associated with discrete holidays on coated pipelines that expose bare steel to the environment. Case studies, based on the CP system were used to provide protection to the Trans-Alaska pipeline, were selected to show conditions under which a given CP system will and will not protect a pipe. In the cases studied, Mg ribbons provided adequate protection i n 50 k{Omega}-cm soil, but almost no additional protection was achieved by retrofitting Mg anodes to a CP system using Zn ribbons if the Zn ribbons remained connected to the pipe. The model also was used to show the lack of sensitivity of above ground on-potential surveys to localized corrosion on the buried pipe.

  1. As-built design criteria: B-234 cathodic protection, C.P. wire to pipe connections

    SciTech Connect

    Brezler, T.A.

    1994-11-14

    This document presents the as-built conditions (cathodic protection wire connections to miscellaneous underground piping) that do not otherwise exist on the current {open_quotes}Released for Construction{close_quotes} design drawings. A note will be added to each applicable drawing, referencing this support document.

  2. 49 CFR Appendix D to Part 192 - Criteria for Cathodic Protection and Determination of Measurements

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... material or structure may be used in place of the saturated copper-copper sulfate half cell if its... I. Criteria for cathodic protection— A. Steel, cast iron, and ductile iron structures. (1) A... cell. Determination of this voltage must be made with the protective current applied, and in...

  3. 49 CFR Appendix D to Part 192 - Criteria for Cathodic Protection and Determination of Measurements

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... material or structure may be used in place of the saturated copper-copper sulfate half cell if its... I. Criteria for cathodic protection— A. Steel, cast iron, and ductile iron structures. (1) A... cell. Determination of this voltage must be made with the protective current applied, and in...

  4. Hydrogen Induced Stress Cracking of Materials Under Cathodic Protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaCoursiere, Marissa P.

    Hydrogen embrittlement of AISI 4340, InconelRTM 718, Alloy 686 and Alloy 59 was studied using slow strain rate tests of both smooth and notched cylindrical specimens. Two heat treatments of the AISI 4340 material were used as a standard for two levels of yield strength: 1479 MPa, and 1140 MPa. A subset of the 1140 MPa AISI 4340 material also underwent plasma nitriding. The InconelRTM 718 material was hardened following AMS 5663M to obtain a yield strength of 1091 MPa. The Alloy 686 material was obtained in the Grade 3 condition with a minimum yield strength of 1034 MPa. The Alloy 59 material was obtained with a cold worked condition similar to the Alloy 686 and with a minimum yield strength of 1034 MPa. Ninety-nine specimens were tested, including smooth cylindrical tensile test specimens and smooth and notched cylindrical slow strain rate tensile tests specimens. Testing included specimens that had been precharged with hydrogen in 3.5% NaCl at 50°C for 2 weeks (AISI 4340), 4 weeks (InconelRTM 718, Alloy 686, Alloy 59) and 16 weeks (InconelRTM 718, Alloy 686, Alloy 59) using a potentiostat to deliver a cathodic potential of -1100 mV vs. SCE. The strain rate over the gauge section for the smooth specimens and in the notch root for the notched specimens was 1 x 10-6 /s. It was found that the AISI 4340 was highly embrittled in simulated ocean water when compared to the nickel based superalloys. The higher strength AISI 4340 showed much more embrittlement, as expected. Testing of the AISI 4340 at both 20°C and 4°C showed that the temperature had no effect on the hydrogen embrittlement response. The InconelRTM 718 was highly embrittled when precharged, although it only showed low levels of embrittlement when unprecharged. Both the Alloy 686 and Alloy 59 showed minimal embrittlement in all conditions. Therefore, for the materials examined, the use of Alloy 686 and Alloy 59 for components in salt water environments when under a cathodic potential of -1100 mV vs. SCE is

  5. The sacrificial cathodic protection of UNS C71500 heat exchanger tubes in Arabian Gulf sea water

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Hashem, A.; Carew, J.A.; Al-Sayegh, A.

    1997-12-01

    A laboratory investigation using a specially designed circulating test rig was carried out to study the effectiveness of achieving complete cathodic protection of UNS C71500 heat exchanger tubes in seawater applications. Results indicated that the galvanic current distribution covered the entire 6m length of the tube. The presence of sulfide ions as pollutants in seawater shifted the galvanic potentials of the tubes to more active potentials and prevented the formation of protective films that normally form.

  6. The long term effects of cathodic protection on corroding, pre-stressed concrete structures: Hydrogen embrittlement of the reinforcing steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enos, David George

    Assessment of the effect of cathodic protection on a chloride contaminated bridge pile involves the definition of the hydrogen embrittlement behavior of the pearlitic reinforcement combined with quantification of the local (i.e., at the steel/concrete interface) chemical and electrochemical conditions, both prior to and throughout the application of cathodic protection. The hydrogen embrittlement behavior of the reinforcement was assessed through a combination of Devanathan/Stachurski permeation experiments to quantify subsurface hydrogen concentrations, CsbH, as a function of the applied hydrogen overpotential, eta, and crack initiation tests for bluntly notched and fatigue pre-cracked tensile specimens employing elastic-plastic finite element analysis and linear elastic fracture mechanics, respectively. A threshold mobile lattice hydrogen concentration for embrittlement of 2×10sp{-7} mol/cmsp3 was established for bluntly notched and fatigue pre-cracked specimens. Crack initiation occurred by the formation of shear cracks oriented at an angle approaching 45sp° from the tensile axis, as proposed by Miller and Smith (Miller, 1970), in regions where both the longitudinal and shear stresses were maximized (i.e., near the notch root). These Miller cracks then triggered longitudinal splitting which continued until fast fracture of the remaining ligament occurred. Instrumented laboratory scale piles were constructed and partially immersed in ASTM artificial ocean water. With time, localized corrosion (crevicing) was initiated along the reinforcement, and was accompanied by an acidic shift in the pH of the occluded environment due to ferrous ion hydrolysis. Cathodic protection current densities from -0.1 muA/cmsp2 to -3.0 muA/cmsp2 were applied via a skirt anode located at the waterline. Current densities as low as 0.66 muA/cmsp2 were sufficient to deplete the dissolved oxygen concentration at the steel/concrete interface and result in the observance of hydrogen

  7. Cathodic protection of pre-tensioned concrete. Part 2: Experiments upon prestressed beams

    SciTech Connect

    Poeydomenge, A.; Hartt, W.H.

    1998-12-31

    Experiments were performed upon a series of pre-tensioned concrete beams whereby these were subjected sequentially to accelerated tendon corrosion via anodic polarization and then to cathodic over-protection. Lastly, the beams were autopsied, and the tendons were analyzed with regard to the extent of corrosion and occurrence of any fractures. A model was formulated which characterizes the stress state of a corroding tendon in concrete, and the data from the beams were evaluated within the context of this and of Constant Extension Rate Testing (CERT) results that were developed in companion research. Implications of the results with regard to criteria for qualification of precorroded pre-tensioned concrete members for cathodic protection are discussed.

  8. Zinc/hydrogel system for cathodic protection of reinforced concrete structures

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, J.; Firlotte, C.

    1997-03-01

    Zinc, aluminum, and several aluminum alloys were tested as anodes in contact with hydrogel adhesives. Zinc was found to offer the best combination of working potential, resistance to passivation, cost, and availability. Several hydrogels used for medical applications were found to be inadequate for this use, but a hydrogel adhesive was developed specifically to bond sacrificial anodes to concrete. This hydrogel achieve a total charge in accelerated testing equal to 12 years of life at current densities normally used for cathodic protection (CP).

  9. A multi-element approach for cathodic protection of reinforced concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Polder, R.B.; Nuiten, P.C. )

    1994-06-01

    A cathodic protection (CP) system was designed and installed on precast concrete cantilever beams that were suffering severe reinforcement corrosion due to mixed-in chloride. Activated titanium strip anodes were placed with a geometry based on laboratory current distribution experiments. The CP system was divided into relatively small zones for easy control and monitoring. Two years of monitoring has shown that the system functions satisfactorily.

  10. Continuing life test of a xenon hollow cathode for a space plasma contactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarver-Verhey, Timothy R.

    1994-01-01

    Implementation of a hollow cathode plasma contactor for charge control on the Space Station has required validation of long-life hollow cathodes. A test series of hollow cathodes and hollow cathode plasma contactors was initiated as part of the plasma contactor development program. An on-going wear-test of a hollow cathode has demonstrated cathode operation in excess of 10,000 hours with small changes in operating parameters. The discharge has experienced 10 shutdowns during the test, all of which were due to test facility failures or expellant replenishment. In all cases, the cathode was re-ignited at approximately 42 volts and resumed typical operation. This test represents the longest demonstrated stable operation of a high current (greater than 1 A) xenon hollow cathode reported to date.

  11. Cathodic protection against crevice corrosion of high-alloy steel in seawater

    SciTech Connect

    Baptista, W.; Pimenta, G.

    1995-10-01

    Localized corrosion of high-alloy steel in seawater, mainly under crevices, limits the alloys` use in such environments. An in-situ test program was conducted to study this corrosive process and possible protective measures. Attention focused on the resistance of several types of high-alloy steels under corrosive conditions and on the response of type 316 stainless steel to cathodic protection (CP) by carbon steel and zinc anodes. It was found that CP could effectively mitigate crevice corrosion in these subsea conditions.

  12. Protective sheath for a continuous measurement thermocouple

    DOEpatents

    Phillippi, R.M.

    1991-12-03

    Disclosed is a protective thermocouple sheath of a magnesia graphite refractory material for use in continuous temperature measurements of molten metal in a metallurgical ladle and having a basic slag layer thereon. The sheath includes an elongated torpedo-shaped sheath body formed of a refractory composition and having an interior borehole extending axially therethrough and adapted to receive a thermocouple. The sheath body includes a lower end which is closed about the borehole and forms a narrow, tapered tip. The sheath body also includes a first body portion integral with the tapered tip and having a relatively constant cross section and providing a thin wall around the borehole. The sheath body also includes a second body portion having a relatively constant cross section larger than the cross section of the first body portion and providing a thicker wall around the borehole. The borehole terminates in an open end at the second body portion. The tapered tip is adapted to penetrate the slag layer and the thicker second body portion and its magnesia constituent material are adapted to withstand chemical attack thereon from the slag layer. The graphite constituent improves thermal conductivity of the refractory material and, thus, enhances the thermal responsiveness of the device. 4 figures.

  13. Protective sheath for a continuous measurement thermocouple

    DOEpatents

    Phillippi, R. Michael

    1991-01-01

    Disclosed is a protective thermocouple sheath of a magnesia graphite refractory material for use in continuous temperature measurements of molten metal in a metallurgical ladle and having a basic slag layer thereon. The sheath includes an elongated torpedo-shaped sheath body formed of a refractory composition and having an interior borehole extending axially therethrough and adapted to receive a thermocouple. The sheath body includes a lower end which is closed about the borehole and forms a narrow, tapered tip. The sheath body also includes a first body portion integral with the tapered tip and having a relatively constant cross section and providing a thin wall around the borehole. The sheath body also includes a second body portion having a relatively constant cross section larger than the cross section of the first body portion and providing a thicker wall around the borehole. The borehole terminates in an open end at the second body portion. The tapered tip is adapted to penetrate the slag layer and the thicker second body portion and its magnesia constituent material are adapted to withstand chemical attack thereon from the slag layer. The graphite constituent improves thermal conductivity of the refractory material and, thus, enhances the thermal responsiveness of the device.

  14. Thermal-sprayed zinc anodes for cathodic protection of steel-reinforced concrete bridges

    SciTech Connect

    Bullard, Sophie J.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Cramer, Stephen D.; McGill, Galen E.

    1996-01-01

    Thermal-sprayed zinc anodes are being used in Oregon in impressed current cathodic protection (ICCP) systems for reinforced concrete bridges. The U.S. Department of Energy, Albany Research Center, is collaborating with the Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT) to evaluate the long-term performance and service life of these anodes. Laboratory studies were conducted on concrete slabs coated with 0.5 mm (20 mil) thick, thermal-sprayed zinc anodes. The slabs were electrochemically aged at an accelerated rate using an anode current density of 0.032 A/m2 (3mA/ft2). Half the slabs were preheated before thermal-spraying with zinc; the other half were unheated. Electrochemical aging resulted in the formation at the zinc-concrete interface of a thin, low pH zone (relative to cement paste) consisting primarily of ZnO and Zn(OH)2, and in a second zone of calcium and zinc aluminates and silicates formed by secondary mineralization. Both zones contained elevated concentrations of sulfate and chloride ions. The original bond strength of the zinc coating decreased due to the loss of mechanical bond to the concrete with the initial passage of electrical charge (aging). Additional charge led to an increase in bond strength to a maximum as the result of secondary mineralization of zinc dissolution products with the cement paste. Further charge led to a decrease in bond strength and ultimately coating disbondment as the interfacial reaction zones continued to thicken. This occurred at an effective service life of 27 years at the 0.0022 A/m2 (0.2 mA/ft2) current density typically used by ODOT in ICCP systems for coastal bridges. Zinc coating failure under tensile stress was primarily cohesive within the thickening reaction zones at the zinc-concrete interface. There was no difference between the bond strength of zinc coatings on preheated and unheated concrete surfaces after long service times.

  15. A zinc/hydrogel system for cathodic protection of reinforced concrete structures

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, J.; Firlotte, C.

    1996-11-01

    A zinc/hydrogel system has been developed for the cathodic protection of steel in reinforced concrete. This system consists of a thin foil of zinc which is attached to the concrete surface by an ionically conductive hydrogel adhesive. A direct electrical connection between the zinc and the reinforcing steel allows the zinc to function galvanically, polarizing the steel and protecting it from corrosion. Zinc, aluminum, and several aluminum alloys were tested as anodes in contact with hydrogel adhesives, and zinc was found to offer the best combination of working potential, resistance to passivation, cost and availability. Several hydrogels used for medical applications were found to be inadequate for this use, but a hydrogel adhesive was developed specifically to bond sacrificial anodes to concrete. This hydrogel achieved a total charge in accelerated testing equal to 12 years of life at current densities normally used for cathodic protection. Zinc/hydrogel was installed on about 1000 ft{sup 2} (100 m{sup 2}) of a fishing pier in Ft. Pierce, Florida on members including prestressed pilings, conventionally reinforced pile caps, and prestressed beams. Installation of this system was relatively easy, and initial performance is encouraging. After 5 months of service, adhesion is good and current densities remain high.

  16. Cathodic protection of steel by electrodeposited zinc-nickel alloy coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, K.R.; Smith, C.J.E.; Robinson, M.J.

    1995-12-01

    The ability of electrodeposited zinc-nickel alloy coatings to cathodically protect steel was studied in dilute chloride solutions. The potential distribution along steel strips partly electroplated with zinc-nickel alloys was determined, and the length of exposed steel that was held below the minimum protection potential (E{sub prot}) was taken as a measure of the level of cathodic protection (CP) provided by the alloy coatings. The level of CP afforded by zinc alloy coatings was found to decrease with increasing nickel content. When nickel content was increased to {approx} {ge} 21 wt%, no CP was obtained. Surface analysis of uncoupled zinc-nickel alloys that were immersed in sodium chloride (NaCl) solutions showed the concentration of zinc decreased in the surface layers while the concentration of nickel increased, indicating that the alloys were susceptible to dezincification. The analysis of zinc-nickel alloy coatings on partly electroplated steel strips that were immersed in chloride solution showed a significantly higher level of dezincification than that found for uncoupled alloy coatings. This effect accounted for the rapid loss of CP afforded to steel by some zinc alloy coatings, particularly those with high initial nickel levels.

  17. Cathodic protection survey of deep-water structures and subsea installations

    SciTech Connect

    Leask, L.J. )

    1989-11-01

    The successful and efficient cathodic protection (CP) survey of a deep water structure using a remotely operated vehicle (ROV) has remained an enigma to many corrosion engineers in oil companies. The location of the corrosion group within the company structure often plays a major role in the success of the project. Operators locate their corrosion departments in different groups, some in the offshore/onshore operations and others in the design group. This location often has a bearing on the financial and operational approach to the project. The author discusses how a successful CP survey is both an achievable and exciting project with experienced preplanning and selection of the correct equipment.

  18. Extended cathodic protection monitoring of one of the world`s deepest fixed offshore platforms -- Bullwinkle

    SciTech Connect

    Goolsby, A.D.; Wolfson, S.L.

    1998-12-31

    This paper reports the design, construction and operation of a hardwired Cathodic Protection (CP) monitoring system for the 1,350ft (411 m) water depth Gulf of Mexico (GOM) Bullwinkle Platform. Results from this system are reported along with analyses of the data showing performance relative to the CP design assumptions, and the importance of increasing CP current density design values in deeper water. The data have also been useful in: examining seasonal and storm effects on CP, developing anode life predictions, observing polarization processes, planning ROV surveys, verifying ROV data, and confirming the company`s laboratory anode testing relevance to in-service performance.

  19. Cathodic protection of above ground storage tanks in an Arctic environment

    SciTech Connect

    Barletta, T.; Bayle, R.; Kennelley, K.

    1995-11-01

    A variety of cathodic protection retrofit systems are available today for above ground storage tanks. The presence of secondary containment liners, refrigeration systems, and an Arctic environment necessitates the use of a CP system in which the anodes are located in close proximity to the tank bottom. This paper presents operating experiences with several impressed current CP systems that were installed on existing large diameter tanks along the Pipeline. Impressed current CP retrofit systems that were evaluated include an abandoned tank bottom as the anode, a tank perimeter conductive polymer anode loop, and horizontally installed distributive anode systems beneath the tanks.

  20. Humectants To Augment Current From Metallized Zinc Cathodic Protection Systems on Concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, Gordon R.; Covino Jr., Bernard S.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Russell, James H. Russell; Bullard, Sophie J.; Collins, W. Keith; Bennett, Jack E.; Soltesz, Steven M.; Laylor, H. Martin

    2002-12-01

    Cathodic protection (CP) systems using thermal-sprayed zinc anodes are employed to mitigate the corrosion process in reinforced concrete structures. However, the performance of the anodes is improved by moisture at the anode-concrete interface. Research was conducted to investigate the effect of hydrophilic chemical additives, humectants, on the electrical performance and service life of zinc anodes. Lithium bromide and lithium nitrate were identified as feasible humectants with lithium bromide performing better under galvanic CP and lithium nitrate performing better under impressed current CP. Both humectants improved the electrical operating characteristics of the anode and increased the service life by up to three years.

  1. Chemically modified thermal-spray zinc anodes for galvanic cathodic protection

    SciTech Connect

    Covino, B.S. Jr.; Bullard, S.J.; Holcomb, G.R.; Russell, J.H.; Cramer, S.D.; Bennett, J.E.; Laylor, H.M.

    1999-12-01

    Humectants, substances that promote the retention of moisture, were applied to new and previously aged thermal-sprayed Zn anodes to improve the performance of galvanic cathodic protection systems. Anodes on steel-reinforced concrete were treated with aqueous solutions of the humectants lithium nitrate (LiNO{sub 3}) and lithium bromide (LiBr). LiBr was the most beneficial humectant, increasing the average galvanic current density of new thermal-sprayed Zn anodes by as much as a factor of six.

  2. Design and operating characteristics of cathodic protection systems associated with large seawater intake reinforced concrete structures in the Arabian Gulf

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, M.; Chaudhary, Z.; Al-Muhid, T.M.M.

    1999-07-01

    The large reinforced concrete seawater intake structures, which are part of a cooling system in several petrochemical plants located in the Arabian Gulf, have been catholically protected to arrest chloride-induced corrosion of the steel reinforcement. The cathodic protection systems have an operating history of 1--5 years. The design and operating features of the cathodic protection systems are described and discussed. Monitoring data of each system collected over the years since commissioning of the systems are described and discussed to evaluate performance of each system.

  3. Hydrogen Assisted Crack in Dissimilar Metal Welds for Subsea Service under Cathodic Protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourgeois, Desmond

    Dissimilar metal welds (DMWs) are routinely used in the oil and gas industries for structural joining of high strength steels in order to eliminate the need for post weld heat treatment (PWHT) after field welding. There have been reported catastrophic failures in these DMWs, particularly the AISI 8630 steel - Alloy 625 DMW combination, during subsea service while under cathodic protection (CP). This is due to local embrittlement that occurs in susceptible microstructures that are present at the weld fusion boundary region. This type of cracking is known as hydrogen assisted cracking (HAC) and it is influenced by base/filler metal combination, and welding and PWHT procedures. DMWs of two material combinations (8630 steel -- Alloy 625 and F22 steel -- Alloy 625), produced with two welding procedures (BS1 and BS3) in as welded and PWHT conditions were investigated in this study. The main objectives included: 1) evaluation of the effect of materials composition, welding and PWHT procedures on the gradients of composition, microstructure, and properties in the dissimilar transition region and on the susceptibility to HAC; 2) investigation of the influence of microstructure on the HAC failure mechanism and identification of microstructural constituents acting as crack nucleation and propagation sites; 3) assessment of the applicability of two-step PWHT to improve the resistance to HAC in DMWs; 4) establishment of non-failure criterion for the delayed hydrogen cracking test (DHCT) that is applicable for qualification of DMWs for subsea service under cathodic protection (CP).

  4. Continuous electricity generation by a graphite granule baffled air-cathode microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yujie; Lee, He; Wang, Xin; Liu, Yaolan; He, Weihua

    2010-01-01

    A baffled air-cathode microbial fuel cell (BAFMFC) was designed and operated under continuous flow. With glucose fed as substrate, an average voltage of 652 mV was obtained under the external resistance of 1000 Omega (30 degrees C). The maximum power density was 15.2 W/m(3) with the chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal rate of 88.0%. The overall resistance was 13.7 Omega while ohmic internal resistance was 10.8 Omega. Average COD removal rate was 69.7-88.0%, when COD loading varied from 4.11 kg COD/(m(3)NACd) to 16.0 kg COD/(m(3)NACd). The liquid from corn stover steam explosion process (COD=7160+/-50mg/L) was treated by BAFMFC, and the maximum power density was 10.7 W/m(3) with the average COD removal rate was 89.1%. The present study indicated BAFMFC can be comparable to the traditional anaerobic baffled reactor in COD removal rate for high-concentration wastewater and have an advantage in energy harvest from wastewater.

  5. Continuous flow membrane-less air cathode microbial fuel cell with spunbonded olefin diffusion layer.

    PubMed

    Tugtas, Adile Evren; Cavdar, Pelin; Calli, Baris

    2011-11-01

    The power production performance of a membrane-less air-cathode microbial fuel cell was evaluated for 53 days. Anode and cathode electrodes and the micro-fiber cloth separator were configured by sandwiching the separator between two electrodes. In addition, the air-facing side of the cathode was covered with a spunbonded olefin sheet instead of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) coating to control oxygen diffusion and water loss. The configuration resulted in a low resistance of about 4Ω and a maximum power density of 750 mW/m2. However, as a result of a gradual decrease in the cathode potential, maximum power density decreased to 280 mW/m2. The declining power output was attributed to loss of platinum catalyst (8.26%) and biomass growth (38.44%) on the cathode. Coulombic efficiencies over 55% and no water leakage showed that the spunbonded olefin sheet covering the air-facing side of the cathode can be a cost-effective alternative to PTFE coating.

  6. Localized corrosion probability in stainless steels after cathodic protection in seawater

    SciTech Connect

    Salvago, G.; Bollini, G.

    1999-04-01

    Growth of calcareous deposits on stainless steels (SS) exposed to seawater under cathodic protection (CP) conditions was examined. CP was performed by galvanic coupling with iron, zinc, or magnesium anodes. The influence of the galvanic coupling period on the temporal evolution of localized corrosion susceptibility was examined for various SS with CP removed. The study was carried out using a statistical approach with 33 SS samples from the same group. Temporal evolutions of corrosion potential distributions and breakdown potential distributions were determined. Visual and microscopic observations were compared with the localized corrosion risk evaluated from the superimposition of corrosion potential distributions with breakdown potential distributions. Galvanic coupling of SS with iron anodes in seawater did not lead to growth of calcareous deposits, and protection failed soon after galvanic coupling was removed. Galvanic coupling with zinc anodes in seawater led to growth of a light layer of aragonite, and the protection persisted for >3 weeks after the coupling was removed. Galvanic coupling with magnesium anodes in seawater led to growth of thick calcareous deposits of a different composition. Protection persisted for >1 year after the galvanic couple was removed.

  7. Thermal sprayed titanium anode for cathodic protection of reinforced concrete bridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cramer, S. D.; Covino, B. S.; Holcomb, G. R.; Bullard, S. J.; Collins, W. K.; Govier, R. D.; Wilson, R. D.; Laylor, H. M.

    1999-03-01

    Stable operation of cobalt catalyzed thermal sprayed titanium anodes for cathodic protection (CP) of bridge reinforcing steel was maintained in accelerated tests for a period equivalent to 23 years service at Oregon Department of Transportation (Oregon DOT) bridge CP conditions with no evidence that operation would degrade with further aging. The cobalt catalyst dispersed into the concrete near the anodeconcrete interface with electrochemical aging to produce a more diffuse anode reaction zone. The titanium anode had a porous heterogeneous structure composed of α-titanium containing interstitial oxygen and nitrogen, and a fee phase thought to be Ti(O,N). Splat cooling rates were 10 to 150 K/s, and microstructures were produced by equilibrium processes at the splat solidification front. Nitrogen gas atomization during thermal spraying produced a coating with more uniform composition, less cracking, and lower resistivity than using air atomization.

  8. Electrochemical aging of humectant-treated thermal-sprayed zinc anodes for cathodic protection

    SciTech Connect

    Covino, B.S. Jr.; Holcomb, G.R.; Bullard, S.J.; Russell, J.H.; Cramer, S.D.; Bennett, J.E.; Laylor, H.M.

    1999-07-01

    Humectants, substances that promote the retention of moisture, were studied to determine their effectiveness in improving the performance and extending the service life of both new and previously-aged thermal-sprayed Zn anodes used in impressed current (ICCP) and galvanic cathodic protection (GCP) systems for steel-reinforced concrete structures. Potassium acetate, lithium nitrate, and lithium bromide were applied to a series of thermal-sprayed Zn-coated concrete slabs before starting the ICCP or GCP experiment. All of the humectants altered the behavior of the thermal-sprayed Zn anodes. LiNO{sub 3} was the most beneficial for ICCP anodes and LiBr was the most beneficial for GCP anodes. Circuit resistances for ICCP anodes and galvanic current density for GCP anodes are compared on the basis of electrochemical aging, humidity, and type of humectant.

  9. The slope parameter approach to marine cathodic protection design and its application to impressed current systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hartt, W.H.

    1999-07-01

    The recently developed slope parameter approach to design of galvanic anode cathodic protection (cp) systems for marine structures constitutes an advancement in this technology compared to current practice, primarily because the former is first principles based and the latter is an empirical algorithm. In this paper, the slope parameter approach is reviewed; and related applications for which it can be utilized, including (1) design of new and retrofit cp systems, (2) evaluation of potential survey data, and (3) cp system design for complex geometries, are mentioned. The design current density is identified as the single remaining parameter for which values must be projected solely by experience or experimentation. In addition, the slope parameter approach is applied to the results of impressed current cp experiments, and it is shown how parameters for this can be interrelated with those of galvanic anode cp. Advantages of this capability are identified and discussed.

  10. Influence of scale deposition on cathodic-protection performance in desalination plant conditions.

    PubMed

    Hodgkiess, T; Najm-Mohammed, N A

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes an investigation into the interrelationships between the performance of an impressed current cathodic protection (CP) system and the deposition of scale compounds in a seawater pipe system. Some experiments were conducted on a laboratory set-up but the emphasis was on tests on a 0.25 m diameter steel pipe fed by seawater flowing to a thermal desalination plant. The experimental approach involved monitoring the CP current as a function of time at various set potentials and correlating this data with evidence from visual inspection of the pipe-wall surfaces and small probe specimens. The influences of control potential and seawater flow rate at temperatures of 25-35 degrees C were studied. Selected scale samples were subjected to examination by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The overall findings are discussed in terms of fundamental scale/CP-operation interactions and aspects relevant to practical operation of CP systems on seawater pipe installations.

  11. Mathematical models for cathodic protection of an underground pipeline with coating holidays

    SciTech Connect

    Esteban, J.M.; Orazem, M.E.; Kennelley, K.J.; Degerstedt, R.M.

    1995-11-01

    Mathematical models were developed that can be used to predict the cathodic protection (CP) requirements for coated pipelines protected by parallel anodes. This work was motivated by the need to estimate the current and potential distribution on the pipe when anodes are placed near the pipeline or when discrete coating holidays expose bare steel. The mathematical model solves Laplace`s equation for potential with boundary conditions appropriate for the pipe being protected, the anode, and any region through which current does not pass, such as the edge of a thaw bulb. The current density on bare steel was assumed to be composed of contributions from corrosion, reduction of dissolved oxygen, and evolution of hydrogen. Kinetic parameters were obtained from independent experiments. The anode was assumed to have a constant potential, and current was allowed to flow through the coating under the assumption that the coating is a high resistance ionic conductor. A boundary element technique coupled with Newton-Raphson iteration was used to solve the governing equations for both two and three dimensional configurations. The results show good agreement with experimental values and can be used to assess the viability of CP designs.

  12. Mathematical models for cathodic protection of an underground pipeline with coating holidays. Part 1: Theoretical development

    SciTech Connect

    Orazem, M.E.; Esteban, J.M.; Kennelley, K.J.; Degerstedt, R.M.

    1997-04-01

    Mathematical models were developed to predict cathodic protection (CP) requirements for coated pipelines protected by parallel anodes. This work was motivated by the need to estimate current and potential distribution on a pipe when anodes are placed nearby or when discrete coating holidays expose bare steel. The mathematical model solves Laplace`s equation for potential with boundary conditions appropriate for the pipe being protected, the anode, and any region through which current does not pass. The current density on bare steel was assumed to be composed of contributions from corrosion, reduction of dissolved oxygen, and evolution of hydrogen. Kinetic parameters were obtained from independent experiments. The anode was assumed to have a constant potential, and current was allowed to flow through the coating under the assumption that the coating is a high-resistance ionic conductor. A boundary element technique coupled with Newton-Raphson iteration was sued to solve the governing equations for two-dimensional (2-D) and three-dimensional (3-D) configurations. Results showed good agreement with experimental values and can be used to assess viability of CP designs.

  13. Use of Molten Salt Fluxes and Cathodic Protection for Preventing the Oxidation of Titanium at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwandt, Carsten; Fray, Derek J.

    2014-12-01

    The current study demonstrates that it is possible to protect both solid and liquid titanium and titanium alloys from attack from air by cathodically polarizing the titanium component using an electro-active high-temperature molten salt flux and a moderate polarization potential. The electrolytic cell used comprises a cathode of either solid titanium or liquid titanium alloy, an electrolyte based on molten calcium chloride or fluoride salt, and an anode consisting of an inert oxygen-evolving material such as iridium metal. The new approach renders possible the processing of titanium at elevated temperatures in the presence of oxygen-containing atmospheres.

  14. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY ON EFFECTS OF CATHODIC PROTECTION TO PREVENT MACRO-CELL CORROSION OF STEEL IN CONCRETE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Satoru; Ueno, Moe; Ishii, Kouji; Seki, Hiroshi

    Reinforcing bars embedded in concrete tend to corrode due to salt attack under marine environments. Corrosion of bars might be often caused with phenomenon of macro-cell. Cathodic protection has been, so far, applied to control the corrosion of reinforcing bars in RC members. In order to make clear the mechanisms of macro-cell corr osion and the effect of cathodic protecti on, laboratory tests were carried out. Testing concrete specimens contained two reinforcing bars which were buried at upper area of specimens and at lower area of ones, respectively. Lower zone of the concrete specimens were immersed in water. Testing results indicated as follows: (1) reinforci ng bars under wetting condition were anode and reinforcing bars under drying one cathode, (2) current density of macro-cell between two bars increased according as the potential difference increased and electric resistance of the concrete between two bars decreased, and (3) cathodic protection was effective to prevented macro-cell corrosion of reinforcing bars in concrete. Furthermore, it was presumed that corroded iron might be reduced to metal iron due to the protection current.

  15. Application of Direct Assessment Approaches and Methodologies to Cathodically Protected Nuclear Waste Transfer Lines

    SciTech Connect

    Dahl, Megan M.; Pikas, Joseph; Edgemon, Glenn L.; Philo, Sarah

    2013-01-22

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site is responsible for the safe storage, retrieval, treatment, and disposal of approximately 54 million gallons (204 million liters) of radioactive waste generated since the site's inception in 1943. Today, the major structures involved in waste management at Hanford include 149 carbon steel single-shell tanks, 28 carbon-steel double-shell tanks, plus a network of buried metallic transfer lines and ancillary systems (pits, vaults, catch tanks, etc.) required to store, retrieve, and transfer waste within the tank farm system. Many of the waste management systems at Hanford are still in use today. In response to uncertainties regarding the structural integrity of these systems,' an independent, comprehensive integrity assessment of the Hanford Site piping system was performed. It was found that regulators do not require the cathodically protected pipelines located within the Hanford Site to be assessed by External Corrosion Direct Assessment (ECDA) or any other method used to ensure integrity. However, a case study is presented discussing the application of the direct assessment process on pipelines in such a nuclear environment. Assessment methodology and assessment results are contained herein. An approach is described for the monitoring, integration of outside data, and analysis of this information in order to identify whether coating deterioration accompanied by external corrosion is a threat for these waste transfer lines.

  16. A galvanic zinc-hydrogel system for cathodic protection of reinforced concrete structures

    SciTech Connect

    Wehling, J.E.

    1999-07-01

    Installations of galvanic cathodic protection anodes have been completed on bridge structures in Illinois, Virginia, Florida, Wisconsin, and Oregon, on parking garages in Illinois and Wisconsin, on high voltage transmission tower footings in California, and on condominium balconies in Florida. Some of these installations involve prestressed concrete. The installation of these systems will be described in detail and monitoring data will be presented for at least six months of active service. The system consists of a 10 mil zinc foil bonded to an ionically conductive hydrogel adhesive, which is applied directly to the surface of the steel-reinforced concrete. A copper wire connects the zinc anode to multiple steel rebars and/or strands. The performance is monitored by measuring the current flow in the wire, by measuring the amount of zinc consumed or, more generally, by taking depolarization readings at regular intervals. All of these measurements are an indication of the performance of the galvanic system and the corrosion of the steel rebars that is being prevented.

  17. Offshore cathodic protection design, inspection, and computer modeling: Innovations from the 1980s

    SciTech Connect

    Gartland, P.O.; Strommen, R.D.; Osvoll, H.; Johnsen, R. )

    1993-12-01

    Throughout the 1980s, equipment was used increasingly to monitor electric fields (EF) strength/current density in CP surveys of North Sea structures. Probes for remote-operated vehicle (ROV) and diver operations are used to measure simultaneously the potential and the EF strength at exposed steel, at typical stand-off anodes, at sacrificial bracelet anodes on pipelines, and so on. A sensitive system for such purposes is based on a pair of electrodes at the tips of a T-shaped spindle rotating at a known frequency. The 1980s saw several innovations in the field of offshore cathodic protection (CP). The increasing use of organic coatings on offshore structures is more or less a result of the need to reduce the number of anodes. In a design incorporating coatings, coating breakdown plays a key role. In later years, aluminum-coated structures have been introduced for submerged conditions. It seems that in the future, aluminum coatings will be used merely as barrier coatings. The bare aluminum coating has a very low current demand on the order or 10 mA/m[sup 2] or less. Emphasis is now on CP design by computer modeling and on data retrieved during inspections using sophisticated equipment and procedures. The effect of the innovations on traditional design, on design verification, and on retrofitting is discussed in relation to relevant cases and field work. Future applications that may give better insight into CP system performance at reduced cost are also suggested.

  18. Hydrothermal synthesis and photoelectrochemical performance enhancement of TiO2/graphene composite in photo-generated cathodic protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weiwei; Guo, Hanlin; Sun, Haiqing; Zeng, Rong-Chang

    2016-09-01

    TiO2/graphene composites were synthesized through one-step hydrothermal method. The composites show an enhancement in photo-generated cathodic protection as the time-dependent profiles of photocurrent responses has confirmed. XRD data show that a bicrystalline framework of anatase and brookite formed as graphene provided donor groups in the hydrothermal process. The transfer of photoinduced electrons in the biphasic TiO2 results in effective electron-hole separation. Moreover, graphene lead to a negative shift of the Fermi level as evidenced by Mott-Schottky analysis, which decreases the Schottky barrier formed in the TiO2 and 304 stainless steel interface and results in the enhancement of photo-generated cathodic protection.

  19. Apollo/Saturn C00.00.19.3 operations and maintenance. Cathodic protection of communication cables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Operating and maintenance instructions for cathodic protection of communication cables at the Cape Kennedy Launch Complex are presented. The system is designed to prevent or arrest corrosion of communication cables buried in soil or submerged in water by impressing sufficient direct current from the rectifier through the anodes to the cable. This process neutralizes or counteracts current flowing from the cable into the soil or water, thus preventing or arresting corrosion of the cable sheath material.

  20. A facile approach to derive binder protective film on high voltage spinel cathode materials against high temperature degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Wei-Yu; Jin, Yi-Chun; Duh, Jenq-Gong; Lu, Cheng-Zhang; Liao, Shih-Chieh

    2015-11-01

    The electrochemical performance of spinel LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 cathode combined with different binders at elevated temperature is firstly investigated. The water soluble binder, such as sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) and sodium alginate (SA), is compared with the polyvinylidene difluoride (PVdF) binder used in non-aqueous process. The aqueous process can meet the need of Li-ion battery industry due to environmental-friendly and cost effectiveness by replacing toxic organic solvent, such as N-methyl-pyrrolidone (NMP). In this study, a significantly improved high temperature cycling performance is successfully obtained as compared to the traditional PVdF binder. The aqueous binder can serve as a protective film which inhibits the serious Ni and Mn dissolution especially at elevated temperature. Our result demonstrates a facile approach to solve the problem of capacity fading for high voltage spinel cathodes.

  1. Effects of selected water treatments and cathodic protection on corrosion and embrittlement of condenser tubes: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of a three-year laboratory study investigating: (1) the interaction and effect of sulfide, dissolved oxygen, and temperature on the corrosion of copper alloy condenser tubes; (2) the effectiveness of selected cooling water treatments in mitigating sulfide-accelerated corrosion; (3) the effects of various parameters on the hydriding susceptibility of titanium tubing under cathodic protection conditions; and (4) the hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility of ferritic stainless steels under cathodic protection conditions. The selected cooling water treatments included ferrous sulfate, benzotriazole, sodium dimethyl dithiocarbamate, high molecular weight polyacrylamide, and Calgon CL-5. Much of the work was carried out utilizing seawater test loops designed to simulate condenser tube flow. The results of the study demonstrated that: (1) sulfide contamination of a copper alloy condenser tube can trigger rapid perforation of the tube; (2) ferrous sulfate treatement may be effective in mitigating sulfide-accelerated attack if initiated prior to and during any sulfide exposure; and (3) cathodic protection at high electronegative potentials will embrittle titanium and ferritic stainless steel condenser tubes. The report recommends further research directed at: (1) the long-term effectiveness of ferrous sulfate treatement in retarding sulfide-promoted pitting; (2) corrosion-accelerating mechanisms associated with chlorination and silt build-up; (3) an appropriate method for cleaning condenser tubes contaminated with a corrosion accelerant; (4) a more effective method of on-line monitoring of condenser tube corrosion; and (5) an update of recent electric utility experience concerning corrosion of copper alloy condenser tubes. 32 refs., 39 figs., 10 tabs.

  2. Design and installation of a cathodic protection system for a large reinforced concrete intake structure in the Arabian Gulf

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, M.; Al-Ghannam, H.

    1997-09-01

    The paper describes the condition survey methodology, design and installation of a cathodic protection (C.P.) system for a large reinforced concrete reservoir and sea water intake structure. The structure is critical for the supply of cooling water for a 2.4 million metric ton steel plant. The C.P. System consisting of mixed metal oxide coating on titanium mesh type anodes and automatic voltage/current controlled rectifiers was successfully installed and has been operating within design guidelines for the past 15 months.

  3. Consumable and non-consumable thermal spray anodes for impressed current cathodic protection of reinforced concrete structures

    SciTech Connect

    Covino, B.S. Jr.; Cramer, S.D.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Collins, Wesley K.; McGill, G.E.

    1998-01-01

    A comparison is presented of some of the differences between thermal spray Zn, a consumable anode, and catalyzed thermal spray Ti, a non-consumable anode, used for impressed current cathodic protection of reinforced concrete structures. The thermal spray process for both Ti and Zn is compared using the spray parameters, atomizing gases, spray rate, and cost. The thermal spray Ti and Zn coatings are compared in terms of physical properties, composition, and structure. Results of accelerated laboratory experiments are presented and comparisons between Ti and Zn are made on the effect of electrochemical aging on voltage requirements, bond strength, coating resistivity, water permeability, and anode-concrete interracial composition.

  4. Experience of cathodic protection, fabrication and installation of anodes for deep water pipelines in the North Sea and the Norwegian Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Eliassen, S.; Pettersen, N.H.

    1996-08-01

    Statoil is the major operator of the oil and gas pipelines in the North Sea and the Norwegian Sea. Different coating systems have been used for external corrosion protection of the pipelines. The paper presents the company`s experience regarding cathodic protection design and fabrication and installation of anodes for deep water pipelines.

  5. Performance of Zinc Anodes for Cathodic Protection of Reinforced Concrete Bridges

    SciTech Connect

    Covino, Bernard S. Jr.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Russell, James H.; Collins, W. Keith; Laylor, Martin H.; Cryer, Curtis B.

    2002-03-01

    Operation of thermal spray zinc (Zn) anodes for cathodic protection (CP) of reinforced concrete structures was investigated in laboratory and field studies conducted by the Albany Research Center (ARC) in collaboration with the Oregon Department of Transportation. The purposes of the research presented in this report were: evaluate the need for preheating concrete to improve the adhesion of the anode; estimate the service life of thermal spray Zn CP anodes; determine the optimum thickness for Zn CP anodes; characterize the anode-concrete interfacial chemistry; and correlate field and laboratory results. Laboratory studies involved accelerated electrochemical aging of thermal sprayed Zn anodes on concrete slabs, some of which were periodically wetted while others were unwetted. Concrete used in the slabs contained either 1.2 or 3 kg NaCl /m3 (2 or 5 lbs NaCl /yd3) as part of the concrete mix design. The Zn anodes were applied to the slabs using the twin wire arc-spray technique. Half of the slabs were preheated to 120-160 C (250-320 F) to improve the initial Zn anode bond strength and the other half were not. Accelerated aging was done at a current density of 0.032 A/m2 (3 mA/ft2), 15 times that used on Oregon DOT Coastal bridges, i.e, . 0.0022 A/m2 (0.2 mA/ft2) Cores from the Cape Creek Bridge (OR), the Richmond San Rafael Bridge (CA), and the East Camino Underpass (CA) were used to study the anode-concrete interfacial chemistry, to relate the chemistry to electrochemical age at the time of sampling, and to compare the chemistry of the field anodes to the chemistry of anodes from the laboratory studies. Cores from a CALTRANS study of a silane sealant used prior to the application of the Zn anodes and cores with galvanized rebar from the Longbird Bridge (Bermuda) were also studied. Aged laboratory and field anodes were characterized by measuring some or all of the following parameters: thickness, bond strength, anode-concrete interfacial chemistry, bulk chemistry

  6. Low voltage cathodic protection for high strength steels. Part 1: Definition of a new aluminum galvanic anode material

    SciTech Connect

    Pautasso, J.P.; Le Guyader, H.; Debout, V.

    1998-12-31

    Zn or Al-Zn-In sacrificial anodes are commonly used to protect submerged marine structures from general corrosion and galvanic corrosion. However, such electronegative alloys can also induce stress corrosion cracking or hydrogen embrittlement on high strength steels. Decreasing the electronegative potential applied to the structure, in the suitable range (around {minus}0.80 V vs Ag/AgCl) can significantly reduce the amount of hydrogen produced by the cathodic reaction and thus limit the risk of hydrogen embrittlement. The present work has consisted in determining the criteria for a new cathodic protection system with low voltage anodes and selecting one anode that matches the determined requirements, on the basis of laboratory tests. Among the various alloys tested the Al-O.1% Ga anode provided the most promising results and therefore was selected. The first full scale marine tests performed on an industrial casting of this anode have shown the effectiveness of the Al-O.1% Ga anode in the chosen potential range, with a satisfactory galvanic efficiency in real environments.

  7. Simultaneously Harvesting Thermal and Mechanical Energies based on Flexible Hybrid Nanogenerator for Self-Powered Cathodic Protection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hulin; Zhang, Shangjie; Yao, Guang; Huang, Zhenlong; Xie, Yuhang; Su, Yuanjie; Yang, Weiqing; Zheng, Chunhua; Lin, Yuan

    2015-12-30

    Metal corrosion occurs anytime and anywhere in nature and the corrosion prevention has a great significance everywhere in national economic development and daily life. Here, we demonstrate a flexible hybrid nanogenerator (NG) that is capable of simultaneously or individually harvesting ambient thermal and mechanical energies and used for a self-powered cathodic protection (CP) system without using an external power source. Because of its double peculiarities of both pyroelectric and piezoelectric properties, a polarized poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) film-based NG was constructed to scavenge both thermal and mechanical energies. As a supplementary, a triboelectric NG was constructed below the pyro/piezoelectric NG to grab ambient mechanical energy. The output power of the fabricated hybrid NG can be directly used to protect the metal surface from the chemical corrosion. Our results not only verify the feasibility of self-powered CP-based NGs, but also expand potential self-powered applications. PMID:26669205

  8. Efficient salt removal in a continuously operated upflow microbial desalination cell with an air cathode.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Kyle S; Drew, David M; He, Zhen

    2011-01-01

    Microbial desalination cells (MDCs) hold great promise for drinking water production because of potential energy savings during the desalination process. In this study, we developed a continuously operated MDC--upflow microbial desalination cell (UMDC) for the purpose of salt removal. During the 4-month operation, the UMDC constantly removed salts and generated bio-electricity. At a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 4 days (salt solution) and current production of ∼62 mA, the UMDC was able to remove more than 99% of NaCl from the salt solution that had an initial salt concentration of 30 g total dissolved solids (TDS)/L. In addition, the TDS removal rate was 7.50 g TDSL(-1)d(-1) (salt solution volume) or 5.25 g TDSL(-1)d(-1) (wastewater volume), and the desalinated water met the drinking water standard, in terms of TDS concentration. A high charge transfer efficiency of 98.6% or 81% was achieved at HRT 1 or 4d. The UMDC produced a maximum power density of 30.8 W/m(3). The phenomena of bipolar electrodialysis and proton transport in the UMDC were discussed. These results demonstrated the potential of the UMDC as either a sole desalination process or a pre-desalination reactor for downstream desalination processes.

  9. Bifurcation perspective on topologically protected and non-protected states in continuous systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee-Thorp, James P.

    We study Schrodinger operators perturbed by non-compact (spatially extended) defects. We consider two models: a one-dimensional (1D) dimer structure with a global phase shift, and a two-dimensional (2D) honeycomb structure with a line-defect or "edge''. In both the 1D and 2D settings, the non-compact defects are modeled by adiabatic, domain wall modulations of the respective dimer and honeycomb structures. Our main results relate to the rigorous construction of states via bifurcations from continuous spectra. These bifurcations are controlled by asymptotic effective (homogenized) equations that underlie the protected or non-protected character of the states. In 1D, the states we construct are localized solutions. In 2D, they are "edge states'' - time-harmonic solutions which are propagating (plane-wave-like) parallel to a line-defect or "edge'' and are localized transverse to it. The states are described as protected if they persist in the presence of spatially localized (even strong) deformations of the global phase defect (in 1D) or edge (in 2D). The protected states bifurcate from "Dirac points'' (linear/conical spectral band-crossings) in the continuous spectra and are seeded by an effective Dirac equation. The (more conventional) non-protected states bifurcate from spectral band edges are seeded by an effective Schrodinger equation. Our 2D model captures many aspects of the phenomenon of topologically protected edge states observed in honeycomb structures such as graphene and "artificial graphene''. The protected states we construct in our 1D dimer model can be realized as highly robust TM- electromagnetic modes for a class of photonic waveguides with a phase-defect. We present a detailed computational study of an experimentally realizable photonic waveguide array structure.

  10. Hydrogen embrittlement of cathodically protected high-strength, low-alloy steels exposed to sulfate-reducing bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, M.J.; Kilgallon, P.J. . School of Industrial and Manufacturing Science)

    1994-08-01

    Hydrogen embrittlement (HE) of two high-strength, low-alloy steels was studied in conditions typical of the marine environment. Double-cantilever beam specimens, heat-treated to produce the microstructure in the heat-affected zone of a weld, were tested in seawater containing sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) at a range of cathodic protection potentials. The threshold stress intensities (K[sub th]) required to cause subcritical crack propagation were recorded. The concentration of H absorbed by the steel (C[sub 0]) was measured using a permeation technique and was shown to be higher at more cathodic potentials and significantly increased when SRB were present. An inverse relationship was established between log K[sub th] and C[sub 0] for sterile and biologically active environments. It was concluded that crack propagation occurred by a single HE mechanism, regardless of whether SRB were present. The bacteria were believed to increase sulfide concentration in the biofilm at the metal surface, which promoted increased C[sub 0].

  11. Dechlorination of trichloroethene in a continuous-flow bioelectrochemical reactor: effect of cathode potential on rate, selectivity, and electron transfer mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Aulenta, Federico; Tocca, Lorenzo; Verdini, Roberta; Reale, Priscilla; Majone, Mauro

    2011-10-01

    The exciting discovery that dechlorinating bacteria can use polarized graphite cathodes as direct electron donors in the reductive dechlorination has prompted investigations on the development of novel bioelectrochemical remediation approaches. In this work, we investigated the performance of a bioelectrochemical reactor for the treatment of trichloroethene (TCE). The reactor was continuously operated for about 570 days, at different potentiostatically controlled cathode potentials, ranging from -250 mV to -750 mV vs standard hydrogen electrode. The rate and extent of TCE dechlorination, as well as the competition for the available electrons, were highly dependent on the set cathode potential. When the cathode was controlled at -250 mV, no abiotic hydrogen production occurred and TCE dechlorination (predominantly to cis-DCE and VC), most probably sustained via direct extracellular electron transfer, proceeded at an average rate of 15.5 ± 1.2 μmol e(-)/L d. At this cathode, potential methanogenesis was almost completely suppressed and dechlorination accounted for 94.7 ± 0.1% of the electric current (15.0 ± 0.8 μA) flowing in the system. A higher rate of TCE dechlorination (up to 64 ± 2 μmol e(-)/L d) was achieved at cathode potentials lower than -450 mV, though in the presence of a very active methanogenesis which accounted for over 60% of the electric current. Remarkably, the bioelectrochemical reactor displayed a stable and reproducible performance even without the supply of organic carbon sources with the feed, confirming long-term viability.

  12. A Study on Effects of Mechanical Stress and Cathodic Protection on Marine Coatings on Mild Steel in Artificial Seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hong-Qi; Zhang, Qi; Tu, San-Shan; Li, Yi-Min; Wang, You; Huang, Yi

    2016-07-01

    In this work, the separate and combined effects of elastic stress and cathodic protection (CP) potential on barrier properties of two marine coating systems applied on Q235 steel plates in artificial seawater were investigated through measurements of electrochemical impedance spectra. The obtained results indicated that elastic stress could have a significant influence on coating barrier property, and the extent of this influence depends on both the magnitude and direction of elastic stress. Meanwhile, it was shown that the separate application of CP could also promote coating degradation, and for both coating systems, the more negative the applied CP potential, the more quickly and more seriously the coatings deteriorated. Furthermore, compared with the sample with only stress or CP, the results showed that the interaction between mechanical stress and CP could reduce their respective impact on coating barrier property, and the combined effect depends on the predominant factor.

  13. A Study on Effects of Mechanical Stress and Cathodic Protection on Marine Coatings on Mild Steel in Artificial Seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hong-Qi; Zhang, Qi; Tu, San-Shan; Li, Yi-Min; Wang, You; Huang, Yi

    2016-09-01

    In this work, the separate and combined effects of elastic stress and cathodic protection (CP) potential on barrier properties of two marine coating systems applied on Q235 steel plates in artificial seawater were investigated through measurements of electrochemical impedance spectra. The obtained results indicated that elastic stress could have a significant influence on coating barrier property, and the extent of this influence depends on both the magnitude and direction of elastic stress. Meanwhile, it was shown that the separate application of CP could also promote coating degradation, and for both coating systems, the more negative the applied CP potential, the more quickly and more seriously the coatings deteriorated. Furthermore, compared with the sample with only stress or CP, the results showed that the interaction between mechanical stress and CP could reduce their respective impact on coating barrier property, and the combined effect depends on the predominant factor.

  14. Study of chloride ion migration in reinforced concrete under cathodic protection. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Orlova, N.V.; Westall, J.C.; Rehani, M.; Koretsky, M.D.

    1999-09-01

    The migration of chloride ions in concrete with steel reinforcement was investigated. Mortar blocks (15 cm x 15 cm x 17 cm) of various composition (water to cement ratio, chloride ion content) were cast with an iron mesh cathode imbedded along one face and a thermally sprayed zinc anode applied to the opposite face. Current densities of 0.033 and 0.066 A (sq m) were applied to the blocks over a period of one year at constant temperature and humidity. The zinc face was covered with a pond of saturated calcium hydroxide to prevent polarization of the zinc-concrete interface. Over the course of polarization, potential vs. time curves were recorded and samples of mortar were extracted for determination of chloride concentration.

  15. Evaluation of Cathode-Ray Tube protection for the electronic tabular display subsystem (ETABS) engineering model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, A. R.

    1981-09-01

    This report describes the safety evaluation of the 25-inch (diagonal) rectangular cathode-ray tube (CRT) that is used in the engineering model of the Electronic Tabular Display Subsystem (ETABS). An evaluation of ETABS will be performed at the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Technical Center for possible application in FAA Air Route Traffic Control Centers (ARTCC). The safety evaluation included standard industry pressure testing and special implosion testing on 12 CRT samples. Eleven of the twelve CRT samples satisfactorily met the safety requirements for both the pressure and implosion testing. One CRT cracked when subjected to 45 pounds per square inch (psi) of air pressure; however, the CRT did not implode. The 25-inch rectangular CRT will therefore provide a high degree of safety for use in each of the two tabular displays of the ETABS engineering model.

  16. Core-Protected Platinum Monolayer Shell High-Stability Electrocatalysts for Fuel-Cell Cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Adzic, R.R.; Sasaki, K.; Naohara, H.; Cai, Y.; Choi, Y.M.; Liu, P.; Vukmirovic, M.B.; Wang, J.X.

    2010-11-08

    More than skin deep: Platinum monolayers can act as shells for palladium nanoparticles to lead to electrocatalysts with high activities and an ultralow platinum content, but high platinum utilization. The stability derives from the core protecting the shell from dissolution. In fuel-cell tests, no loss of platinum was observed in 200?000 potential cycles, whereas loss of palladium was significant.

  17. Core-Protected Platinum Monolayer Shell High-Stability Electrocatalysts for Fuel-Cell Cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    K Sasaki; H Naohara; Y Cai; Y Choi; P Liu; M Vukmirovic; J Wang; R Adzic

    2011-12-31

    Platinum monolayers can act as shells for palladium nanoparticles to lead to electrocatalysts with high activities and an ultralow platinum content, but high platinum utilization. The stability derives from the core protecting the shell from dissolution. In fuel-cell tests, no loss of platinum was observed in 200,000 potential cycles, whereas loss of palladium was significant.

  18. Corrosion protection of Arctic offshore structures: Final report. [Effects of temperature and salinity on required cathodic protection current

    SciTech Connect

    Sackinger, W.M.; Rogers, J.C.; Feyk, C.; Theuveny, B.

    1985-10-01

    Results are presented for a research program on corrosion prevention for Arctic offshore structures which are in contact with sea ice for a significant portion of the year. The electrical method most adaptable for structure protection involves the injection of impressed current from several remote anodes buried just beneath the sea floor. The electrical resistivity of annual sea ice as a function of temperature and salinity is presented. Details of the interface layers formed between sea ice and steel in the presence of current injection are shown. A computer program was developed to enable the calculation of protective current density into the structure, in the presence of ice rubble and ridges around the structure. The program and the results of an example calculation are given for a caisson- retained island structure. 81 refs., 103 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Cathodic protection for nuclear waste packaging under gamma ray irradiation by using TiO{sub 2} coating combined with glass scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Fujisawa, Ryutaro; Tsujikawa, Shigeo

    1995-12-31

    The photoelectrochemical behaviors of a TiO{sub 2} single crystal and TiO{sub 2} coating were studied, for the purposes of cathodic protection of stainless steels and Cu via the TiO{sub 2} coating combined with glass scintillators under gamma ray irradiation. It was confirmed that a TiO{sub 2} coating could protect 304 stainless steel cathodically from crevice corrosion under illumination. A logarithmic relationship between the photopotential of single crystal TiO{sub 2} (rutile) and light intensity was found, moreover, the photopotential was found to be least noble when wavelength equals 375 nm. Under illumination by gamma rays combined with the glass scintillators, the electrode potential of single crystal TiO{sub 2} was found to shift in the less noble direction by about 200 mV. Therefore, the technique of cathodic protection by TiO{sub 2} coating is considered to be applicable to protect the packaging metal from corrosion for a long time.

  20. A new approach to the determination of the cathodic protection period in zinc-rich paints

    SciTech Connect

    Abreu, C.M.; Izquierdo, M.; Merino, P.; Novoa, X.R.; Perez, C.

    1999-12-01

    The present study examined the behavior of zinc-rich paints (ZRP) based on an epoxy binder in 3% sodium chloride (NaCl) solution. The study focused on the effect of some design parameters often considered in paint formulation. The paint thickness, the zinc particle grain size, and the zinc particle distribution in the paint were studied. The study was based mainly on electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). EIS results were interpreted using a model involving the contact impedance between zinc particles. The contact impedance and electrolyte resistance throughout the coating defined the protective action of ZRP. Based on these two concepts, a practical approach to evaluate ZRP performance was given. This approach, called total film resistance (TFR), can be used for optimization criteria in paint formulation.

  1. Cathodic protection system for underground M.S. pipeline of watersupply project.

    PubMed

    Patil, V D; Phulari, P S

    2003-01-01

    Corrosion of steel embedded in soil can generally be explained in terms of long cell action arising from differential aeration. The significant factors to promote corrosion are soil potential, Resistivity and draining characteristics. As the corrosive nature of soil is not fixed absolute value, the said study can be analyzed by adopting the following methodology. i) Study of state of soil at different location. ii) Nature of corrosion under consideration With above methodology an attempt can be made to achieve the following objective to, i) Assess the extent of corrosive tendencies of soil along the pipeline. ii) Co-relate potential and resistivity with corrosive parameters of soil and, iii) Suggest the appropriate remedial means for protecting it from corrosion. i.e. Galvanic activity.

  2. 39 CFR 3007.61 - Continued effectiveness of protective conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    .... 3007.61 Section 3007.61 Postal Service POSTAL REGULATORY COMMISSION PERSONNEL TREATMENT OF NON-PUBLIC... a court or other administrative agency issues a subpoena or orders production of non-public materials which a person has obtained under protective conditions ordered by the Commission, the target...

  3. Hydrogen hollow cathode ion source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirtich, M. J., Jr.; Sovey, J. S.; Roman, R. F. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A source of hydrogen ions is disclosed and includes a chamber having at one end a cathode which provides electrons and through which hydrogen gas flows into the chamber. Screen and accelerator grids are provided at the other end of the chamber. A baffle plate is disposed between the cathode and the grids and a cylindrical baffle is disposed coaxially with the cathode at the one end of the chamber. The cylindrical baffle is of greater diameter than the baffle plate to provide discharge impedance and also to protect the cathode from ion flux. An anode electrode draws the electrons away from the cathode. The hollow cathode includes a tubular insert of tungsten impregnated with a low work function material to provide ample electrons. A heater is provided around the hollow cathode to initiate electron emission from the low work function material.

  4. Hierarchical Porous Nickel Cobaltate Nanoneedle Arrays as Flexible Carbon-Protected Cathodes for High-Performance Lithium-Oxygen Batteries.

    PubMed

    Xue, Hairong; Wu, Shichao; Tang, Jing; Gong, Hao; He, Ping; He, Jianping; Zhou, Haoshen

    2016-04-01

    Rechargeable lithium-oxygen (Li-O2) batteries are consequently considered to be an attractive energy storage technology because of the high theoretical energy densities. Here, an effective binder-free cathode with high capacity for Li-O2 batteries, needle-like mesoporous NiCo2O4 nanowire arrays uniformly coated on the flexible carbon textile have been in situ fabricated via a facile hydrothermal process followed by low temperature calcination. Because of the material and structural features, the needle-like NiCo2O4 nanowire arrays (NCONWAs) served as a binder-free cathode exhibits high specific capacity (4221 mAh g(-1)), excellent rate capability, and outstanding cycling stability (200 cycles). This cathode based on nonprecious mesoporous metal oxides nanowire arrays has large open spaces and high surface area, providing numerous catalytically active sites and effective transmission pathways for lithium ion and oxygen, and promises the abundant Li2O2 storage. The fast electron transport by directly anchoring on the substrate ensures fast electrochemical reaction process involved with the every nanowire. Furthermore, a bendable Li-O2 battery assembled by using the flexible NCONWAs as the cathode, can be able to light an LED and shows good rate capability and cyclic stability.

  5. Hierarchical Porous Nickel Cobaltate Nanoneedle Arrays as Flexible Carbon-Protected Cathodes for High-Performance Lithium-Oxygen Batteries.

    PubMed

    Xue, Hairong; Wu, Shichao; Tang, Jing; Gong, Hao; He, Ping; He, Jianping; Zhou, Haoshen

    2016-04-01

    Rechargeable lithium-oxygen (Li-O2) batteries are consequently considered to be an attractive energy storage technology because of the high theoretical energy densities. Here, an effective binder-free cathode with high capacity for Li-O2 batteries, needle-like mesoporous NiCo2O4 nanowire arrays uniformly coated on the flexible carbon textile have been in situ fabricated via a facile hydrothermal process followed by low temperature calcination. Because of the material and structural features, the needle-like NiCo2O4 nanowire arrays (NCONWAs) served as a binder-free cathode exhibits high specific capacity (4221 mAh g(-1)), excellent rate capability, and outstanding cycling stability (200 cycles). This cathode based on nonprecious mesoporous metal oxides nanowire arrays has large open spaces and high surface area, providing numerous catalytically active sites and effective transmission pathways for lithium ion and oxygen, and promises the abundant Li2O2 storage. The fast electron transport by directly anchoring on the substrate ensures fast electrochemical reaction process involved with the every nanowire. Furthermore, a bendable Li-O2 battery assembled by using the flexible NCONWAs as the cathode, can be able to light an LED and shows good rate capability and cyclic stability. PMID:26967936

  6. The Continuing Child Protection Emergency: A Challenge to the Nation. Third Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United States Advisory Board on Child Abuse and Neglect, Washington, DC.

    Three years after the release of its original report (1990), the U.S. Advisory Board on Child Abuse and Neglect reports that the child protection emergency has clearly deepened in all parts of the nation. Reports of child abuse and neglect have continued to climb; an inordinate number of children continue to die at the hands of caretakers; and…

  7. A-e Services to perform a cathodic protection survey of the bulk fuel terminals at N. S. C. Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-06-01

    This section includes one 25,000 bbl, two 80,000 bbl, and two 150,000 bbl tanks in the Pearl City Tank Farm. Tanks in the upper tank farm consist of six 150,000 bbl tanks, eight underground diesel storage tanks at building 60, four 10,000 bbl underground surge tanks, two ballast tanks, two diesel tanks, one hot settling tank and one diesel flotation tank. Four 50,000 bbl tanks and one 80,000 bbl tank at the middle tank farm are included along with four 50,000 bbl tanks at the lower tank farm. One outdoor ballast tank and one water storage tank at the Stilling Basin and associated piping are also included. The existing impressed current type of cathodic protection system and the existing sacrificial type of cathodic protection system are considered and three POL lines located in the lower Red Hill Tunnel from the Red Hill storage tanks to the Pearl Harbor Naval Base are included.

  8. Arcjet Cathode Phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, Francis M.; Haag, Thomas W.; Raquet, John F.

    1989-01-01

    Cathode tips made from a number of different materials were tested in a modular arcjet thruster in order to examine cathode phenomena. Periodic disassembly and examination, along with the data collected during testing, indicated that all of the tungsten-based materials behaved similarly despite the fact that in one of these samples the percentage of thorium oxide was doubled and another was 25 percent rhenium. The mass loss rate from a 2 percent thoriated rhenium cathode was found to be an order of magnitude greater than that observed using 2 percent thoriated tungsten. Detailed analysis of one of these cathode tips showed that the molten crater contained pure tungsten to a depth of about 150 microns. Problems with thermal stress cracking were encountered in the testing of a hafnium carbide tip. Post test analysis showed that the active area of the tip had chemically reacted with the propellant. A 100 hour continuous test was run at about 1 kW. Post test analysis revealed no dendrite formation, such as observed in a 30 kW arcjet lifetest, near the cathode crater. The cathodes from both this test and a previously run 1000 hour cycled test displayed nearly identical arc craters. Data and calculations indicate that the mass losses observed in testing can be explained by evaporation.

  9. Arcjet cathode phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, Francis M.; Haag, Thomas W.; Raquet, John F.

    1989-01-01

    Cathode tips made from a number of different materials were tested in a modular arcjet thruster in order to examine cathode phenomena. Periodic disassembly and examination, along with the data collected during testing, indicated that all of the tungsten-based materials behaved similarly despite the fact that in one of these samples the percentage of thorium oxide was doubled and another was 25 percent rhenium. The mass loss rate from a 2 percent thoriated rhenium cathode was found to be an order of magnitude greater than that observed using 2 percent thoriated tungsten. Detailed analysis of one of these cathode tips showed that the molten crater contained pure tungsten to a depth of about 150 microns. Problems with thermal stress cracking were encountered in the testing of a hafnium carbide tip. Post test analysis showed that the active area of the tip had chemically reacted with the propellant. A 100 hour continuous test was run at about 1 kW. Post test analysis revealed no dendrite formation, such as observed in a 30 kW arcjet lifetest, near the cathode crater. The cathodes from both this test and a previously run 1000 hour cycled test displayed nearly identical arc craters. Data and calculations indicate that the mass losses observed in testing can be explained by evaporation.

  10. Cathodic arcs

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre

    2003-10-29

    Cathodic arc plasma deposition has become the technology of choice for hard, wear and corrosion resistant coatings for a variety of applications. The history, basic physics of cathodic arc operation, the infamous macroparticle problem and common filter solutions, and emerging high-tech applications are briefly reviewed. Cathodic arc plasmas standout due to their high degree of ionization, with important consequences for film nucleation, growth, and efficient utilization of substrate bias. Industrial processes often use cathodic arc plasma in reactive mode. In contrast, the science of arcs has focused on the case of vacuum arcs. Future research directions include closing the knowledge gap for reactive mode, large area coating, linear sources and filters, metal plasma immersion process, with application in high-tech and biomedical fields.

  11. Mechanistic Insight in the Function of Phosphite Additives for Protection of LiNi0.5Co0.2Mn0.3O2 Cathode in High Voltage Li-Ion Cells.

    PubMed

    He, Meinan; Su, Chi-Cheung; Peebles, Cameron; Feng, Zhenxing; Connell, Justin G; Liao, Chen; Wang, Yan; Shkrob, Ilya A; Zhang, Zhengcheng

    2016-05-11

    Triethlylphosphite (TEP) and tris(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl) phosphite (TTFP) have been evaluated as electrolyte additives for high-voltage Li-ion battery cells using a Ni-rich layered cathode material LiNi0.5Co0.2Mn0.3O2 (NCM523) and the conventional carbonate electrolyte. The repeated charge/discharge cycling for cells containing 1 wt % of these additives was performed using an NCM523/graphite full cell operated at the voltage window from 3.0-4.6 V. During the initial charge process, these additives decompose on the cathode surface at a lower oxidation potential than the baseline electrolyte. Impedance spectroscopy and post-test analyses indicate the formation of protective coatings by both additives on the cathode surface that prevent oxidative breakdown of the electrolyte. However, only TTFP containing cells demonstrate the improved capacity retention and Coulombic efficiency. For TEP, the protective coating is also formed, but low Li(+) ion mobility through the interphase layer results in inferior performance. These observations are rationalized through the inhibition of electrocatalytic centers present on the cathode surface and the formation of organophosphate deposits isolating the cathode surface from the electrolyte. The difference between the two phosphites clearly originates in the different properties of the resulting phosphate coatings, which may be in Li(+) ion conductivity through such materials. PMID:27090502

  12. Filtered cathodic arc source

    DOEpatents

    Falabella, S.; Sanders, D.M.

    1994-01-18

    A continuous, cathodic arc ion source coupled to a macro-particle filter capable of separation or elimination of macro-particles from the ion flux produced by cathodic arc discharge is described. The ion source employs an axial magnetic field on a cathode (target) having tapered sides to confine the arc, thereby providing high target material utilization. A bent magnetic field is used to guide the metal ions from the target to the part to be coated. The macro-particle filter consists of two straight solenoids, end to end, but placed at 45[degree] to one another, which prevents line-of-sight from the arc spot on the target to the parts to be coated, yet provides a path for ions and electrons to flow, and includes a series of baffles for trapping the macro-particles. 3 figures.

  13. Filtered cathodic arc source

    DOEpatents

    Falabella, Steven; Sanders, David M.

    1994-01-01

    A continuous, cathodic arc ion source coupled to a macro-particle filter capable of separation or elimination of macro-particles from the ion flux produced by cathodic arc discharge. The ion source employs an axial magnetic field on a cathode (target) having tapered sides to confine the arc, thereby providing high target material utilization. A bent magnetic field is used to guide the metal ions from the target to the part to be coated. The macro-particle filter consists of two straight solenoids, end to end, but placed at 45.degree. to one another, which prevents line-of-sight from the arc spot on the target to the parts to be coated, yet provides a path for ions and electrons to flow, and includes a series of baffles for trapping the macro-particles.

  14. Miniature Reservoir Cathode: An Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vancil, Bernard K.; Wintucky, Edwin G.

    2002-01-01

    We report on recent work to produce a small low power, low cost reservoir cathode capable of long life (more than 100,000 hours) at high loading (> 5 A/sq cm). Our objective is a highly manufacturable, commercial device costing less than $30. Small highly loaded cathodes are needed, especially for millimeter wave tubes, where focusing becomes difficult when area convergence ratios are too high. We currently have 3 models ranging from .060-inch diameter to. 125-inch diameter. Reservoir type barium dispenser cathodes have a demonstrated capability for simultaneous high emission density and long life. Seven reservoir cathodes continue to operate on the cathode life test facility at NSWC, Crane, Indiana at 2 and 4 amps/sq cm. They have accumulated nearly 100,000 hours with practically no change in emission levels or knee temperature.

  15. Monolithic cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, P. R.; Swanson, L. W.

    1985-11-01

    The purpose of this program was to evaluate LaB6 (210) and (310) oriented single crystal material for flat cathode applications and to deliver mounted LaB6 cathodes with (310) orientation for operation in RADC/Varian life test vehicles. To that end, the program was divided into four separate tasks, as shown in the report. This project was extended for 3 months past the initial program period so that unavoidable delays could be overcome and the project completed. The final report covers the entire period of the program, which terminated 29 March 1985.

  16. High current density cathode for electrorefining in molten electrolyte

    DOEpatents

    Li, Shelly X.

    2010-06-29

    A high current density cathode for electrorefining in a molten electrolyte for the continuous production and collection of loose dendritic or powdery deposits. The high current density cathode eliminates the requirement for mechanical scraping and electrochemical stripping of the deposits from the cathode in an anode/cathode module. The high current density cathode comprises a perforated electrical insulated material coating such that the current density is up to 3 A/cm.sup.2.

  17. Multiple Hollow Cathode Wear Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soulas, George C.

    1994-01-01

    A hollow cathode-based plasma contactor has been baselined for use on the Space Station to reduce station charging. The plasma contactor provides a low impedance connection to space plasma via a plasma produced by an arc discharge. The hollow cathode of the plasma contactor is a refractory metal tube, through which xenon gas flows, which has a disk-shaped plate with a centered orifice at the downstream end of the tube. Within the cathode, arc attachment occurs primarily on a Type S low work function insert that is next to the orifice plate. This low work function insert is used to reduce cathode operating temperatures and energy requirements and, therefore, achieve increased efficiency and longevity. The operating characteristics and lifetime capabilities of this hollow cathode, however, are greatly reduced by oxygen bearing contaminants in the xenon gas. Furthermore, an optimized activation process, where the cathode is heated prior to ignition by an external heater to drive contaminants such as oxygen and moisture from the insert absorbed during exposure to ambient air, is necessary both for cathode longevity and a simplified power processor. In order to achieve the two year (approximately 17,500 hours) continuous operating lifetime requirement for the plasma contactor, a test program was initiated at NASA Lewis Research Center to demonstrate the extended lifetime capabilities of the hollow cathode. To date, xenon hollow cathodes have demonstrated extended lifetimes with one test having operated in excess of 8000 hours in an ongoing test utilizing contamination control protocols developed by Sarver-Verhey. The objectives of this study were to verify the transportability of the contamination control protocols developed by Sarver-Verhey and to evaluate cathode contamination control procedures, activation processes, and cathode-to-cathode dispersions in operating characteristics with time. These were accomplished by conducting a 2000 hour wear test of four hollow

  18. Decoherence control: Universal protection of two-qubit states and two-qubit gates using continuous driving fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhry, Adam Zaman; Gong, Jiangbin

    2012-01-01

    A field configuration utilizing local static fields and a few continuous-wave driving fields is constructed to achieve universal (but low-order) protection of two-qubit states. That is, two-qubit states can be protected against arbitrary system-environment coupling with control fields if their frequencies are sufficiently large as compared with the cutoff frequency of the environment. Equally important, we show that it is possible to construct driving fields to protect two-qubit entangling gates against decoherence, without assuming any particular form of system-environment coupling. Using a non-Markovian master equation, we further demonstrate the effectiveness of our continuous dynamical decoupling fields in protecting entanglement and the excellent performance of protected two-qubit gates in generating entanglement. The results are complementary to current studies of entanglement protection using universal dynamical decoupling pulse sequences.

  19. Emerging tools for continuous nutrient monitoring networks: Sensors advancing science and water resources protection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pellerin, Brian; Stauffer, Beth A; Young, Dwane A; Sullivan, Daniel J.; Bricker, Suzanne B.; Walbridge, Mark R; Clyde, Gerard A; Shaw, Denice M

    2016-01-01

    Sensors and enabling technologies are becoming increasingly important tools for water quality monitoring and associated water resource management decisions. In particular, nutrient sensors are of interest because of the well-known adverse effects of nutrient enrichment on coastal hypoxia, harmful algal blooms, and impacts to human health. Accurate and timely information on nutrient concentrations and loads is integral to strategies designed to minimize risk to humans and manage the underlying drivers of water quality impairment. Using nitrate sensors as an example, we highlight the types of applications in freshwater and coastal environments that are likely to benefit from continuous, real-time nutrient data. The concurrent emergence of new tools to integrate, manage and share large data sets is critical to the successful use of nutrient sensors and has made it possible for the field of continuous nutrient monitoring to rapidly move forward. We highlight several near-term opportunities for Federal agencies, as well as the broader scientific and management community, that will help accelerate sensor development, build and leverage sites within a national network, and develop open data standards and data management protocols that are key to realizing the benefits of a large-scale, integrated monitoring network. Investing in these opportunities will provide new information to guide management and policies designed to protect and restore our nation’s water resources.

  20. Hollow cathode apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aston, G. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A hollow cathode apparatus is described, which can be rapidly and reliably started. An ignitor positioned upstream from the hollow cathode, generates a puff of plasma that flows with the primary gas to be ionized through the cathode. The plasma puff creates a high voltage breakdown between the downstream end of the cathode and a keeper electrode, to heat the cathode to an electron-emitting temperature.

  1. Is Sovereign Immunity Archaic? Protections for Colleges and Universities Continue to Erode.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broadhurst, Arthur G.

    1996-01-01

    Public college and university administrators are concerned about steady erosion of immunities and tort caps traditionally relied upon for protection against lawsuits. In this context, institutions must consider their protection in these areas: extension of protection to all employees; scope of employment; nongovernmental functions; foundations and…

  2. Measurement and mitigation of corrosion on self-contained fluid filled (SCFF) submarine circuits for New York Power Authority: Volume 2 -- Stray electrical current measurements and preliminary design of the cathodic protection system. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-10-01

    In 1987, the New York Power Authority (NYPA) installed a 345-kV submarine cable circuit across Long Island Sound between substations at Davenport Neck and Hempstead Harbor. During design and installation of the cable circuit, utility and cable manufacturers engineers identified corrosion as a possible problem for the cable system. They considered such effects in the cable design and discussed preliminary requirements for a cathodic protection system on Long Island Sound circuit. EPRI cosponsored this review of the corrosion effects with NYPA and Empire State Electric Energy Research Corp. (ESEERCO). Volume 1 of this report discusses the results from an in-depth evaluation of the self-contained fluid-filled (SCFF) cable construction materials and their susceptibility to corrosion. Volume 2 provides extended stray current field measurements and a preliminary design for a cathodic protection system to ensure cable service reliability. This study provides a blueprint for East or West Coast utilities evaluating site-specific corrosion processes and cable circuit protection methods suitable for underwater environments.

  3. A-e Services to perform a cathodic protection survey of the bulk fuel terminals at N. S. C. Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. Volume I. Report for Aug 81-May 82

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-06-01

    The purpose of this corrosion survey was to inspect and checkout the existing cathodic protection systems of the underground metallic fuel lines and tanks at the Bulk Fuel Terminal, Naval Supply Center, Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. The corrosion survey was conducted from August 1981 to May of 1982. The corrosion survey was conducted on the following fuel tanks and fuel lines under Contract N62742-81-C-0006. The corrosion evaluation survey was conducted on the following fuel lines under Contract N62742-81-C-0006/P00002.

  4. Nanotube cathodes.

    SciTech Connect

    Overmyer, Donald L.; Lockner, Thomas Ramsbeck; Siegal, Michael P.; Miller, Paul Albert

    2006-11-01

    Carbon nanotubes have shown promise for applications in many diverse areas of technology. In this report we describe our efforts to develop high-current cathodes from a variety of nanotubes deposited under a variety of conditions. Our goal was to develop a one-inch-diameter cathode capable of emitting 10 amperes of electron current for one second with an applied potential of 50 kV. This combination of current and pulse duration significantly exceeds previously reported nanotube-cathode performance. This project was planned for two years duration. In the first year, we tested the electron-emission characteristics of nanotube arrays fabricated under a variety of conditions. In the second year, we planned to select the best processing conditions, to fabricate larger cathode samples, and to test them on a high-power relativistic electron beam generator. In the first year, much effort was made to control nanotube arrays in terms of nanotube diameter and average spacing apart. When the project began, we believed that nanotubes approximately 10 nm in diameter would yield sufficient electron emission properties, based on the work of others in the field. Therefore, much of our focus was placed on measured field emission from such nanotubes grown on a variety of metallized surfaces and with varying average spacing between individual nanotubes. We easily reproduced the field emission properties typically measured by others from multi-wall carbon nanotube arrays. Interestingly, we did this without having the helpful vertical alignment to enhance emission; our nanotubes were randomly oriented. The good emission was most likely possible due to the improved crystallinity, and therefore, electrical conductivity, of our nanotubes compared to those in the literature. However, toward the end of the project, we learned that while these 10-nm-diameter CNTs had superior crystalline structure to the work of others studying field emission from multi-wall CNT arrays, these nanotubes still

  5. Field application of cathodic prevention on reinforced concrete structures

    SciTech Connect

    Bazzoni, A.; Bazzoni, B.; Lazzari, L.; Bertolini, L.; Pedeferri, P.

    1996-11-01

    This paper illustrates the results gained during the first three years of cathodic protection application to Frejus highway viaducts in northern Italy. CP applications deal with corrosion control of chloride contaminated structures (cathodic protection application properly said) and the corrosion prevention of new non-contaminated structures, constructed with incorporated cathodic protection systems (so-called cathodic prevention). Both normal and post-tensioned structures are present: in the latter case the problems connected with the risk of hydrogen embrittlement of the tendons are discussed. The paper illustrates also the computerized system for gathering and monitoring data and the criteria adopted to evaluate and control the cathodic protection and cathodic prevention conditions as well as to avoid overprotection.

  6. Recent Advances in Thermionic Cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Ives, R. Lawrence; Miram, George; Collins, George; Falce, Louis R.

    2010-11-04

    The latest advances in thermionic cathodes, including scandate and controlled porosity reservoir cathodes, are reviewed. These new cathodes provide improved performance over conventional cathodes for many applications. Advantages and disadvantages are presented.

  7. Radial Profiles of Electron Density and Current Components at Cathode Surface in LaB6 Hollow Cathode Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Setsuo; Asano, Toshiaki; Morimiya, Osami

    1987-06-01

    Experimental studies on a hydrogen-fed LaB6 hollow cathode arc have been pursued. The plasma parameter in the cathode has been measured by a Langmuir probe. The radial variation in the electron density inside the cathode was calculated using the continuity and momentum equations, showing good agreement with the experimental results. The electron density at the cathode surface was estimated to be 15%-20% of that at the cathode axis. It was also found from the current balance that the arc current components at the cathode surface consist of a thermionic current which takes into account the Schottky effect, the ion current and the secondary electron current induced by ion bombardment. The ion current and the cathode surface is larger than the electron current emitted from the cathode.

  8. Pulsed mode cathode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Roger M. (Inventor); Rawlin, Vinvent K. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A cathode in an MPD thruster has an internal heater and utilizes low work function material. The cathode is preheated to operating temperature, and then the thruster is fired by discharging a capacitor bank in a pulse forming network.

  9. Sintered wire cathode

    DOEpatents

    Falce, Louis R.; Ives, R. Lawrence

    2009-06-09

    A porous cathode structure is fabricated from a plurality of wires which are placed in proximity to each other in elevated temperature and pressure for a sintering time. The sintering process produces the porous cathode structure which may be divided into a plurality of individual porous cathodes, one of which may be placed into a dispenser cathode support which includes a cavity for containing a work function reduction material such as BaO, CaO, and Al.sub.2O.sub.3. The work function reduction material migrates through the pores of the porous cathode from a work replenishment surface adjacent to the cavity of the dispenser cathode support to an emitting cathode surface, thereby providing a dispenser cathode which has a uniform work function and therefore a uniform electron emission.

  10. Stranger danger? Women's self-protection intent and the continuing stigma of online dating.

    PubMed

    Cali, Billie E; Coleman, Jill M; Campbell, Catherine

    2013-12-01

    The present study examines the stigma associated with online relationship initiation and its relation to women's self-protective behavior. Self-protective behaviors are those an individual engages in to avoid becoming a victim of dating violence. Female participants from a Midwestern university (N=82) were asked to read scenarios describing a hypothetical date. In one scenario, the prospective date was only previously known through an online social networking site, while in the other scenario, the date was previously known through brief face-to-face interaction. After reading the scenario, participants rated the importance of engaging in self-protection behaviors if they were in the date situation being described. As we predicted, participants assigned greater importance to self-protective behavior after reading the online meeting scenario than the face-to-face scenario. This tendency was especially strong among participants who had never been on a date with someone they had met online.

  11. U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (EPA) ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION (ETV) PROGRAM: MERCURY CONTINUOUS EMISSION MONITORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) program evaluates the performance of innovative air, water, pollution prevention and monitoring technologies that have the potential to improve human health and the environment. This techn...

  12. Stranger danger? Women's self-protection intent and the continuing stigma of online dating.

    PubMed

    Cali, Billie E; Coleman, Jill M; Campbell, Catherine

    2013-12-01

    The present study examines the stigma associated with online relationship initiation and its relation to women's self-protective behavior. Self-protective behaviors are those an individual engages in to avoid becoming a victim of dating violence. Female participants from a Midwestern university (N=82) were asked to read scenarios describing a hypothetical date. In one scenario, the prospective date was only previously known through an online social networking site, while in the other scenario, the date was previously known through brief face-to-face interaction. After reading the scenario, participants rated the importance of engaging in self-protection behaviors if they were in the date situation being described. As we predicted, participants assigned greater importance to self-protective behavior after reading the online meeting scenario than the face-to-face scenario. This tendency was especially strong among participants who had never been on a date with someone they had met online. PMID:23849001

  13. Micro hollow cathode discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenbach, K.H.; Peterkin, F.E.; Verhappen, R.

    1995-12-31

    Hollow cathode discharges are glow discharges with the cathode fall and negative glow confined in a cavity in the cathode. For the discharge to develop, the cathode hole dimensions must be on the order of the mean free path. By reducing the cathode hole dimensions it is therefore possible to increase the pressure. Stable hollow cathode discharges in air have been observed at almost one atmosphere when the cathode diameter was reduced to 20 micrometers. In order to study the electrical parameters of a micro hollow cathode discharge, a set of experiments has been performed in argon at pressures in the torr range and a cathode hole diameter of 0.7 mm in molybdenum. The current-voltage characteristics and the appearance of the discharge plasma showed two distinct regions. At lower voltage or pressure the current varies linearly with voltage and the hollow cathode plasma is concentrated around the axis of the cathode hole (low glow mode). At higher values of voltage or pressure the current increases nonlinearly, up to a point where a transition into a low voltage hollow cathode arc was observed, and the plasma column expands and fills almost the entire cathode hole (high glow mode). Spectral measurements showed that the transition from the low glow mode into the high glow mode is related to an increased density of electrode vapor in the hollow cathode discharge. Up to the breakdown into a hollow cathode arc, the current voltage characteristic of the discharge has a positive slope. In this range, hollow cathode discharges can be operated in parallel without a ballast resistor.

  14. Pressed boride cathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolski, W.

    1985-01-01

    Results of experimental studies of emission cathodes made from lanthanum, yttrium, and gadolinium hexaborides are presented. Maximum thermal emission was obtained from lanthanum hexaboride electrodes. The hexaboride cathodes operated stably under conditions of large current density power draw, at high voltages and poor vacuum. A microtron electron gun with a lanthanum hexaboride cathode is described.

  15. Pilot-scale continuous synthesis of a vanadium-doped LiFePO4/C nanocomposite high-rate cathodes for lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Ian D.; Lübke, Mechthild; Wu, On Ying; Makwana, Neel M.; Smales, Glen J.; Islam, Husn U.; Dedigama, Rashmi Y.; Gruar, Robert I.; Tighe, Christopher J.; Scanlon, David O.; Corà, Furio; Brett, Dan J. L.; Shearing, Paul R.; Darr, Jawwad A.

    2016-01-01

    A high performance vanadium-doped LiFePO4 (LFP) electrode is synthesized using a continuous hydrothermal method at a production rate of 6 kg per day. The supercritical water reagent rapidly generates core/shell nanoparticles with a thin, continuous carbon coating on the surface of LFP, which aids electron transport dynamics across the particle surface. Vanadium dopant concentration has a profound effect on the performance of LFP, where the composition LiFe0.95V0.05PO4, achieves a specific discharge capacity which is among the highest in the comparable literature (119 mA h g-1 at a discharge rate of 1500 mA g-1). Additionally, a combination of X-ray absorption spectroscopy analysis and hybrid-exchange density functional theory, suggest that vanadium ions replace both phosphorous and iron in the structure, thereby facilitating Li+ diffusion due to Li+ vacancy generation and changes in the crystal structure.

  16. Bifurcations of edge states—topologically protected and non-protected—in continuous 2D honeycomb structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fefferman, C. L.; Lee-Thorp, J. P.; Weinstein, M. I.

    2016-03-01

    Edge states are time-harmonic solutions to energy-conserving wave equations, which are propagating parallel to a line-defect or ‘edge’ and are localized transverse to it. This paper summarizes and extends the authors’ work on the bifurcation of topologically protected edge states in continuous two-dimensional (2D) honeycomb structures. We consider a family of Schrödinger Hamiltonians consisting of a bulk honeycomb potential and a perturbing edge potential. The edge potential interpolates between two different periodic structures via a domain wall. We begin by reviewing our recent bifurcation theory of edge states for continuous 2D honeycomb structures (http://arxiv.org/abs/1506.06111). The topologically protected edge state bifurcation is seeded by the zero-energy eigenstate of a one-dimensional Dirac operator. We contrast these protected bifurcations with (more common) non-protected bifurcations from spectral band edges, which are induced by bound states of an effective Schrödinger operator. Numerical simulations for honeycomb structures of varying contrasts and ‘rational edges’ (zigzag, armchair and others), support the following scenario: (a) for low contrast, under a sign condition on a distinguished Fourier coefficient of the bulk honeycomb potential, there exist topologically protected edge states localized transverse to zigzag edges. Otherwise, and for general edges, we expect long lived edge quasi-modes which slowly leak energy into the bulk. (b) For an arbitrary rational edge, there is a threshold in the medium-contrast (depending on the choice of edge) above which there exist topologically protected edge states. In the special case of the armchair edge, there are two families of protected edge states; for each parallel quasimomentum (the quantum number associated with translation invariance) there are edge states which propagate in opposite directions along the armchair edge.

  17. 95 GHz Gyrotron with Ferroelectric Cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Einat, M.; Pilossof, M.; Ben-Moshe, R.; Hirshbein, H.; Borodin, D.

    2012-11-01

    Ferroelectric cathodes were reported as a feasible electron source for microwave tubes. However, due to the surface plasma emission characterizing this cathode, operation of millimeter wave tubes based on it remains questionable. Nevertheless, the interest in compact high power sources of millimeter waves and specifically 95 GHz is continually growing. In this experiment, a ferroelectric cathode is used as an electron source for a gyrotron with the output frequency extended up to 95 GHz. Power above a 5 kW peak and ˜0.5μs pulses are reported; a duty cycle of 10% is estimated to be achievable.

  18. Continuing Change in Newark: To Protect Reform, Chris Cerf Builds Collaborative Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colvin, Richard Lee

    2016-01-01

    This article reports on the efforts of Christopher Cerf, the state-appointed superintendent of Newark Public Schools (New Jersey), to protect reform and build collaborative relationships. His tenure followed the controversial leadership of the former superintendent that had enacted a series of unpopular initiatives, including a new citywide…

  19. Protection against Amorimia septentrionalis poisoning in goats by the continuous administration of sodium monofluoroacetate-degrading bacteria.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Layze C A; Pessoa, Danielle A N; Lopes, Jose R G; de Albuquerque, Laio G; da Silva, Leomyr S A; Garino Junior, Felicio; Riet-Correa, Franklin

    2016-03-01

    The intraruminal inoculation of sodium monofluoroacetate (MFA)-degrading bacteria has been proposed as a method to prevent poisoning by MFA-containing plants. In previous experiments, MFA-degrading bacteria were inoculated intraruminally before or concurrent with plant challenge, with both strategies conferring partial protection to poisoning. To evaluate the protection to Amorimia septentrionalis poisoning provided by the continuous inoculation of MFA-degrading bacteria isolated from plants and soils, 18 goats were divided into three experimental groups of six animals each: Group 1 goats received daily doses of a mixture of Paenibacillus sp. and Cupriavidus sp., and Group 2 goats received a mixture of Ralstonia sp. and Burkholderia sp., for 40 days, while Group 3 goats were not inoculated. Ten days after initiation of bacterial inoculation in Groups 1 and 2, all goats were challenged daily with 5 g/kg body weight of green leaves from A. septentrionalis. Four goats from Group 1 consumed the leaves throughout the 30-day consumption period and showed clinical signs such as transient tachycardia and engorgement of the jugular. The two remaining animals from Group 1 showed obvious signs of intoxication, and plant administration was suspended on days 17 and 19. The goats in Group 2 consumed the leaves throughout the 30-day study without showing signs of poisoning. The goats from Group 3 (control) manifested severe clinical signs of poisoning between the 3rd and 10th days following the start of the A. septentrionalis challenge. Under the conditions of this experiment continuous intraruminal administration of Ralstonia sp. and Burkholderia sp. provided complete protection to poisoning by A. septentrionalis in goats, while continuous intraruminal administration of Paenibacillus sp. and Cupriavidus sp. provided partial protection. PMID:26747472

  20. Business continuity, emergency planning and special needs: How to protect the vulnerable.

    PubMed

    Reilly, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Emergencies and disasters affect all segments of the population. Some segments are more at risk during the emergency response and recovery efforts owing to vulnerabilities that increase the risk of harm. These vulnerabilities are due to individuals' disabilities, which must be incorporated into emergency and business continuity planning. Some disabilities are obvious, such as impaired vision, hearing or mobility, while other are less evident, but equally disabling, such as cognitive disorders, geographical or language isolation, and numerous age-related factors. Taken together when creating emergency or business continuity plans, the issues identified as disabilities can be grouped by functionality and termed as special needs. This paper will detail the identification of special needs populations, explain how these persons are vulnerable during the emergency or disaster response and recovery process, and provide examples of how to partner with individuals within identified special needs populations to improve the planning process.

  1. Business continuity, emergency planning and special needs: How to protect the vulnerable.

    PubMed

    Reilly, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Emergencies and disasters affect all segments of the population. Some segments are more at risk during the emergency response and recovery efforts owing to vulnerabilities that increase the risk of harm. These vulnerabilities are due to individuals' disabilities, which must be incorporated into emergency and business continuity planning. Some disabilities are obvious, such as impaired vision, hearing or mobility, while other are less evident, but equally disabling, such as cognitive disorders, geographical or language isolation, and numerous age-related factors. Taken together when creating emergency or business continuity plans, the issues identified as disabilities can be grouped by functionality and termed as special needs. This paper will detail the identification of special needs populations, explain how these persons are vulnerable during the emergency or disaster response and recovery process, and provide examples of how to partner with individuals within identified special needs populations to improve the planning process. PMID:26420394

  2. The protective effects of continuous and interval exercise in athletes with exercise-induced asthma.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, D C; McLuckie, S L; Stirling, D R

    1994-08-01

    To determine the effect of two forms of warm-up on postexercise bronchoconstriction in athletes with exercise-induced asthma, 12 moderately trained persons with asthma (age = 26.5 +/- 2.2 yr; height = 169.2 +/- 2.6 cm; weight = 64.3 +/- 2.6kg; VO2max = 52.7 +/- 1.3 ml.kg-1.min-1) were tested under three experimental conditions; continuous warm-up (CW), interval warm-up (IW), and control (C). CW consisted of 15 min of treadmill running at a velocity corresponding to 60% VO2max followed by an exercise challenge test (ET = 6 min at 90% VO2max). IW involved 8 x 30-s runs (1.5 min rest between bouts of exercise), at an intensity equivalent to 100% VO2max, followed by an ET. C consisted of only the ET. FEV1, FVC, and MMEFR were measured prior to the experimental conditions, repeated before the ET, and every 2 min during a 25-min passive recovery period, using a Breon spirometer. Postexercise changes in pulmonary function were recorded as the largest decrese in FEV1, FVC, and MMEFR during the recovery period, and expressed as a percentage of baseline values. Significant differences were detected in %FEV1 (34. 6,16.7,29.7: P = 0.009), %FVC (30.0,10.7,21.0: P = 0.03), and %MMEFR (50.0,30.2,43.4: P = 0.05), in comparing C, CW, and IW, respectively. Scheffe's test detected significance (P < 0.05) between C and CW for all three dependent variables; no statistical significance between C and IW or IW and CW occurred. These data indicate that a continuous warm-up of 15 min at 60% VO2max can significantly decrease postexercise bronchoconstriction in moderately trained athletes.

  3. Zinc/air cell cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEvoy, J. J.

    1986-04-01

    This invention relates to a cathode for an air depolarized cell in which the hydrophobic catalytic cathode contains or in integrally drophobi catalytic cathode contains or is integrally coated with, on the surface adjacent the cell separator, an absorbent material such as the gelling material used in the anode. The absorbent material, integrated with the cathode surface, adheres the separator to the cathode thereby preventing delamination and provides an electrolyte reservoir for the hydrophobic cathode.

  4. Thermionic Cathode Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Getty, W. D.; Herniter, M. E.

    1986-01-01

    A planar cathode, Pierce type electron gun with a design perveance of .0000032 (amps/volts to the 3/2 power) has been operated with a lanthanum hexaboride (LaB6) cathode. The cathode (useful diameter 1.9 cm) is heated by bombardment by electrons from a small tungsten filament. The bombardment heating system is stabilized by a feedback control circuit. The power required to heat the cathode is 315 W bombardment power and 200 W filament power. Heating power has been reduced by careful heat shielding and reduction of heat conduction losses. Significant additional reductions should be possible. The sintered LaB6 cathode disk is 2.5 cm in diameter, 3.2 mm thick, and has a density of 94%. No problems have been encountered with cracking of the disk. Cathode emission is insensitive to repeated exposure to air after allowing the cathode to fully cool. The measured perveance and anode transmission of the gun are 3.2x10(-6) and 94%, respectively. Current densities up to 6.5 A/sq cm have been reached with 5 micrometer pulses. Measurements were made at cathode temperatures of 1300 to 1600 C.

  5. LOW TEMPERATURE CATHODE SUPPORTED ELECTROLYTES

    SciTech Connect

    Harlan U. Anderson; Fatih Dogan; Vladimir Petrovsky

    2002-03-31

    This project has three main goals: Thin Films Studies, Preparation of Graded Porous Substrates and Basic Electrical Characterization and testing of Planar Single Cells. This period has continued to address the problem of making dense 1/2 to 5 {micro}m thick dense layers on porous substrates (the cathode LSM). Our current status is that we are making structures of 2-5 cm{sup 2} in area, which consist of either dense YSZ or CGO infiltrated into a 2-5 {micro}m thick 50% porous layer made of either nanoncrystalline CGO or YSZ powder. This composite structure coats a macroporous cathode or anode; which serves as the structural element of the bi-layer structure. These structures are being tested as SOFC elements. A number of structures have been evaluated both as symmetrical and as button cell configuration. Results of this testing indicates that the cathodes contribute the most to cell losses for temperatures below 750 C. In this investigation different cathode materials were studied using impedance spectroscopy of symmetric cells and IV characteristics of anode supported fuel cells. Cathode materials studied included La{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}Co{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3} (LSCF), La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.2}MnO{sub 3} (LSM), Pr{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3} (PSCF), Sm{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}Co{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3} (SSCF), and Yb{sub .8}Sr{sub 0.2}Co{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3} (SSCF). A new technique for filtering the Fourier transform of impedance data was used to increase the sensitivity of impedance analysis. By creating a filter specifically for impedance spectroscopy the resolution was increased. The filter was tailored to look for specific circuit elements like R//C, Warburg, or constant phase elements. As many as four peaks can be resolved using the filtering technique on symmetric cells. It may be possible to relate the different peaks to material parameters, like the oxygen exchange coefficient. The cathode grouped in order from lowest to highest ASR is

  6. Nanofiber Scaffold for Cathode of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Zhi, Mingjia; Mariani, Nicholas; Gemmen, Randall; Gerdes, Kirk; Wu, Nianqiang

    2010-10-01

    A high performance solid oxide fuel cell cathode using the yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) nanofibers scaffold with the infiltrated La1-xSrxMnO3 (LSM) shows an enhanced catalytic activity toward oxygen reduction. Such a cathode offers a continuous path for charge transport and an increased number of triple-phase boundary sites.

  7. Cathodes - Technological review

    SciTech Connect

    Cherkouk, Charaf; Nestler, Tina

    2014-06-16

    Lithium cobalt oxide (LiCoO{sub 2}) was already used in the first commercialized Li-ion battery by SONY in 1990. Still, it is the most frequently used cathode material nowadays. However, LiCoO{sub 2} is intrinsically unstable in the charged state, especially at elevated temperatures and in the overcharged state causing volume changes and transport limitation for high power batteries. In this paper, some technological aspects with large impact on cell performance from the cathode material point of view will be reviewed. At first it will be focused on the degradation processes and life-time mechanisms of the cathode material LiCoO{sub 2}. Electrochemical and structural results on commercial Li-ion batteries recorded during the cycling will be discussed. Thereafter, advanced nanomaterials for new cathode materials will be presented.

  8. Extended-testing of xenon ion thruster hollow cathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarver-Verhey, Timothy R.

    1992-01-01

    A hollow cathode wear-test of 508 hours was successfully completed at an emission current of 23.0 A and a xenon flow rate of 10 Pa-L/s. This test was the continuation of a hollow cathode contamination investigation. Discharge voltage was stable at 16.7 V. The cathode temperature averaged 1050 C with a 7 percent drop during the wear-test. Discharge ignition voltage was found to be approximately 20 V and was repeatable over four starts. Post-test analyses of the hollow cathode found a much improved internal cathode condition with respect to earlier wear-test cathodes. Negligible tungsten movement occurred and no formation of mono-barium tungsten was observed. These results correlated with an order-of-magnitude reduction in propellant feed-system leakage rate. Ba2CaWO6 and extensive calcium crystal formation occurred on the upstream end of the insert. Ba-Ca compound depositions were found on the Mo insert collar, on the Re electrical leads, and in the gap between the insert and cathode wall. This wear-test cathode was found to be in the best internal condition and had the most stable operating performance of any hollow cathode tested during this contamination investigation.

  9. Cathode materials review

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, Claus Mohanty, Debasish Li, Jianlin Wood, David L.

    2014-06-16

    The electrochemical potential of cathode materials defines the positive side of the terminal voltage of a battery. Traditionally, cathode materials are the energy-limiting or voltage-limiting electrode. One of the first electrochemical batteries, the voltaic pile invented by Alessandro Volta in 1800 (Phil. Trans. Roy. Soc. 90, 403-431) had a copper-zinc galvanic element with a terminal voltage of 0.76 V. Since then, the research community has increased capacity and voltage for primary (nonrechargeable) batteries and round-trip efficiency for secondary (rechargeable) batteries. Successful secondary batteries have been the lead-acid with a lead oxide cathode and a terminal voltage of 2.1 V and later the NiCd with a nickel(III) oxide-hydroxide cathode and a 1.2 V terminal voltage. The relatively low voltage of those aqueous systems and the low round-trip efficiency due to activation energies in the conversion reactions limited their use. In 1976, Wittingham (J. Electrochem. Soc., 123, 315) and Besenhard (J. Power Sources 1(3), 267) finally enabled highly reversible redox reactions by intercalation of lithium ions instead of by chemical conversion. In 1980, Goodenough and Mizushima (Mater. Res. Bull. 15, 783-789) demonstrated a high-energy and high-power LiCoO{sub 2} cathode, allowing for an increase of terminal voltage far beyond 3 V. Over the past four decades, the international research community has further developed cathode materials of many varieties. Current state-of-the-art cathodes demonstrate voltages beyond any known electrolyte stability window, bringing electrolyte research once again to the forefront of battery research.

  10. Cathode materials review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniel, Claus; Mohanty, Debasish; Li, Jianlin; Wood, David L.

    2014-06-01

    The electrochemical potential of cathode materials defines the positive side of the terminal voltage of a battery. Traditionally, cathode materials are the energy-limiting or voltage-limiting electrode. One of the first electrochemical batteries, the voltaic pile invented by Alessandro Volta in 1800 (Phil. Trans. Roy. Soc. 90, 403-431) had a copper-zinc galvanic element with a terminal voltage of 0.76 V. Since then, the research community has increased capacity and voltage for primary (nonrechargeable) batteries and round-trip efficiency for secondary (rechargeable) batteries. Successful secondary batteries have been the lead-acid with a lead oxide cathode and a terminal voltage of 2.1 V and later the NiCd with a nickel(III) oxide-hydroxide cathode and a 1.2 V terminal voltage. The relatively low voltage of those aqueous systems and the low round-trip efficiency due to activation energies in the conversion reactions limited their use. In 1976, Wittingham (J. Electrochem. Soc., 123, 315) and Besenhard (J. Power Sources 1(3), 267) finally enabled highly reversible redox reactions by intercalation of lithium ions instead of by chemical conversion. In 1980, Goodenough and Mizushima (Mater. Res. Bull. 15, 783-789) demonstrated a high-energy and high-power LiCoO2 cathode, allowing for an increase of terminal voltage far beyond 3 V. Over the past four decades, the international research community has further developed cathode materials of many varieties. Current state-of-the-art cathodes demonstrate voltages beyond any known electrolyte stability window, bringing electrolyte research once again to the forefront of battery research.

  11. Thermionic cathode life test studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, R.; Elmer, P.

    1980-01-01

    An update on the life testing of commerical, high current density impregnated tungsten cathodes is presented. The B-type cathodes, operated at a current density of 2 A/cm2 and a cathode temperature of 1100 C have now been run satisfactorily for more than four years. The M-cathode, at the same current density but at an operating temperature of only 1010 C, have been tested for more than three years. The M-cathodes show no degradation in current over their present operating life whereas the current from the B-cathodes degrade about 6 percent after four years of operation.

  12. Focused cathode design to reduce anode heating during vircator operation

    SciTech Connect

    Lynn, Curtis F.; Dickens, James C.; Neuber, Andreas A.

    2013-10-15

    Virtual cathode oscillators, or vircators, are a type of high power microwave device which operates based on the instability of a virtual cathode, or cloud of electrons, which forms when electron current injected into the drift tube exceeds the space charge limited current within the drift tube. Anode heating by the electron beam during vircator operation ultimately limits achievable pulse lengths, repetition rates, and the duration of burst mode operation. This article discusses a novel cathode design that focuses electrons through holes in the anode, thus significantly reducing anode heating by the electrons emitted from the cathode during the first transit through the A-K gap. Reflexing electrons continue to deposit energy on the anode; however, the discussed minimization of anode heating by main beam electrons has the potential to enable higher repetition rates as well as efficiency and longer diode lifetime. A simulation study of this type of cathode design illustrates possible advantages.

  13. Cathode material for electrochemical cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, D.M.

    1993-08-24

    A primary cell is described having an anode material, an electrolyte material and a cathode material, wherein said cathode material, in the predischarge condition thereof, is K[sub 3]V[sub 5]O[sub 14].

  14. Microscale gradients of oxygen, hydrogen peroxide, and pH in freshwater cathodic biofilms.

    PubMed

    Babauta, Jerome T; Nguyen, Hung Duc; Istanbullu, Ozlem; Beyenal, Haluk

    2013-07-01

    Cathodic reactions in biofilms employed in sediment microbial fuel cells is generally studied in the bulk phase. However, the cathodic biofilms affected by these reactions exist in microscale conditions in the biofilm and near the electrode surface that differ from the bulk phase. Understanding these microscale conditions and relating them to cathodic biofilm performance is critical for better-performing cathodes. The goal of this research was to quantify the variation in oxygen, hydrogen peroxide, and the pH value near polarized surfaces in river water to simulate cathodic biofilms. We used laboratory river-water biofilms and pure culture biofilms of Leptothrix discophora SP-6 as two types of cathodic biofilms. Microelectrodes were used to quantify oxygen concentration, hydrogen peroxide concentration, and the pH value near the cathodes. We observed the correlation between cathodic current generation, oxygen consumption, and hydrogen peroxide accumulation. We found that the 2 e(-) pathway for oxygen reduction is the dominant pathway as opposed to the previously accepted 4 e(-) pathway quantified from bulk-phase data. Biofouling of initially non-polarized cathodes by oxygen scavengers reduced cathode performance. Continuously polarized cathodes could sustain a higher cathodic current longer despite contamination. The surface pH reached a value of 8.8 when a current of only -30 μA was passed through a polarized cathode, demonstrating that the pH value could also contribute to preventing biofouling. Over time, oxygen-producing cathodic biofilms (Leptothrix discophora SP-6) colonized on polarized cathodes, which decreased the overpotential for oxygen reduction and resulted in a large cathodic current attributed to manganese reduction. However, the cathodic current was not sustainable. PMID:23766295

  15. Microscale Gradients of Oxygen, Hydrogen Peroxide, and pH in Freshwater Cathodic Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Babauta, Jerome T.; Nguyen, Hung Duc; Istanbullu, Ozlem

    2014-01-01

    Cathodic reactions in biofilms employed in sediment microbial fuel cells is generally studied in the bulk phase. However, the cathodic biofilms affected by these reactions exist in microscale conditions in the biofilm and near the electrode surface that differ from the bulk phase. Understanding these microscale conditions and relating them to cathodic biofilm performance is critical for better-performing cathodes. The goal of this research was to quantify the variation in oxygen, hydrogen peroxide, and the pH value near polarized surfaces in river water to simulate cathodic biofilms. We used laboratory river-water biofilms and pure culture biofilms of Leptothrix discophora SP-6 as two types of cathodic biofilms. Microelectrodes were used to quantify oxygen concentration, hydrogen peroxide concentration, and the pH value near the cathodes. We observed the correlation between cathodic current generation, oxygen consumption, and hydrogen peroxide accumulation. We found that the 2e− pathway for oxygen reduction is the dominant pathway as opposed to the previously accepted 4e− pathway quantified from bulk-phase data. Biofouling of initially non-polarized cathodes by oxygen scavengers reduced cathode performance. Continuously polarized cathodes could sustain a higher cathodic current longer despite contamination. The surface pH reached a value of 8.8 when a current of only −30 μA was passed through a polarized cathode, demonstrating that the pH value could also contribute to preventing biofouling. Over time, oxygen-producing cathodic biofilms (Leptothrix discophora SP-6) colonized on polarized cathodes, which decreased the overpotential for oxygen reduction and resulted in a large cathodic current attributed to manganese reduction. However, the cathodic current was not sustainable. PMID:23766295

  16. Miniaturized cathodic arc plasma source

    DOEpatents

    Anders, Andre; MacGill, Robert A.

    2003-04-15

    A cathodic arc plasma source has an anode formed of a plurality of spaced baffles which extend beyond the active cathode surface of the cathode. With the open baffle structure of the anode, most macroparticles pass through the gaps between the baffles and reflect off the baffles out of the plasma stream that enters a filter. Thus the anode not only has an electrical function but serves as a prefilter. The cathode has a small diameter, e.g. a rod of about 1/4 inch (6.25 mm) diameter. Thus the plasma source output is well localized, even with cathode spot movement which is limited in area, so that it effectively couples into a miniaturized filter. With a small area cathode, the material eroded from the cathode needs to be replaced to maintain plasma production. Therefore, the source includes a cathode advancement or feed mechanism coupled to cathode rod. The cathode also requires a cooling mechanism. The movable cathode rod is housed in a cooled metal shield or tube which serves as both a current conductor, thus reducing ohmic heat produced in the cathode, and as the heat sink for heat generated at or near the cathode. Cooling of the cathode housing tube is done by contact with coolant at a place remote from the active cathode surface. The source is operated in pulsed mode at relatively high currents, about 1 kA. The high arc current can also be used to operate the magnetic filter. A cathodic arc plasma deposition system using this source can be used for the deposition of ultrathin amorphous hard carbon (a-C) films for the magnetic storage industry.

  17. Cathode material for lithium batteries

    DOEpatents

    Park, Sang-Ho; Amine, Khalil

    2013-07-23

    A method of manufacture an article of a cathode (positive electrode) material for lithium batteries. The cathode material is a lithium molybdenum composite transition metal oxide material and is prepared by mixing in a solid state an intermediate molybdenum composite transition metal oxide and a lithium source. The mixture is thermally treated to obtain the lithium molybdenum composite transition metal oxide cathode material.

  18. Cathode material for lithium batteries

    DOEpatents

    Park, Sang-Ho; Amine, Khalil

    2015-01-13

    A method of manufacture an article of a cathode (positive electrode) material for lithium batteries. The cathode material is a lithium molybdenum composite transition metal oxide material and is prepared by mixing in a solid state an intermediate molybdenum composite transition metal oxide and a lithium source. The mixture is thermally treated to obtain the lithium molybdenum composite transition metal oxide cathode material.

  19. Protective Factors Interrupting the Continuity from School Bullying to Later Internalizing and Externalizing Problems: A Systematic Review of Prospective Longitudinal Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ttofi, Maria M.; Bowes, Lucy; Farrington, David P.; Lösel, Friedrich

    2014-01-01

    A systematic review is presented, based on prospective longitudinal studies, on protective factors that interrupt the continuity from bullying perpetration at school to externalizing problem behaviors later in life; and from bullying victimization to later internalizing problems. Some common factors were established, which seem to interrupt the…

  20. Performance Enhancement of Small Molecular Solar Cells by Bilayer Cathode Buffer.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qinjun; Zhao, Huanbin; Zhou, Miao; Gao, Liyan; Hao, Yuying

    2016-04-01

    An effective composite bilayer cathode buffer structure is proposed for use in small molecular solar cells. CsF was doped in Alq3 to form the first cathode buffer, leading to small serial resistances. BCP was used as the second cathode buffer to block the holes to the electrode. The optimized bilayer cathode buffer significantly increased the short circuit and fill factor of devices. By integrating this bilayer cathode buffer, the CuPc/C60 small molecular heterojunction cell exhibited a power conversion efficiency of up to 0.8%, which was an improvement of 56% compared to a device with only the Alq3 cathode buffer. Meanwhile, the bilayer cathode buffer still has a good protective effect on the performance of the device. PMID:27451719

  1. Synopsis of Cathode #4 Activation

    SciTech Connect

    Kwan, Joe; Ekdahl, C.; Harrison, J.; Kwan, J.; Leitner, M.; McCruistian, T.; Mitchell, R.; Prichard, B.; Roy, P.

    2006-05-26

    The purpose of this report is to describe the activation of the fourth cathode installed in the DARHT-II Injector. Appendices have been used so that an extensive amount of data could be included without danger of obscuring important information contained in the body of the report. The cathode was a 612 M type cathode purchased from Spectra-Mat. Section II describes the handling and installation of the cathode. Section III is a narrative of the activation based on information located in the Control Room Log Book supplemented with time plots of pertinent operating parameters. Activation of the cathode was performed in accordance with the procedure listed in Appendix A. The following sections provide more details on the total pressure and constituent partial pressures in the vacuum vessel, cathode heater power/filament current, and cathode temperature.

  2. Compositionally continuously graded cathode layers of (Ba0.5Sr0.5)(Fe0.91Al0.09)O3-δ-Gd0.1Ce0.9O2 by wet powder spraying technique for solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Taizhi; Wang, Zhenhua; Ren, Baiyu; Qiao, Jinshuo; Sun, Wang; Sun, Kening

    2014-02-01

    Compositionally continuously graded cathode layers (CGCLs) of (Ba0.5Sr0.5)(Fe0.91Al0.09)O3-δ-Gd0.1Ce0.9O2 (BSFA-GDC) have been constructed by a handy and effective technique called wet powder spraying (WPS). CGCLs exhibit similar thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) value between adjacent thin layers. The continuously graded structure and the well-distributed components of BSFA-GDC cathode are confirmed by morphological characterization with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and by compositional analysis with energy dispersion X-ray spectrometer (EDS), respectively. The polarization resistance (Rp) of CGCLs with three different thicknesses is investigated by electrochemical impedance spectra (EIS). The EIS results show that CGCLs with a moderate thickness of 20 μm achieve the lowest Rp of 0.301 Ω cm2 at 800 °C. In addition, anode-supported single cells with the configuration of NiO-YSZ/YSZ/GDC/BSFA-GDC have been fabricated and tested. The cell with the CGCLs thickness of 20 μm reaches the highest output power density of 848 mW cm-2 at 800 °C.

  3. International Space Station Cathode Life Testing Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarver-Verhey, Timothy R.; Soulas, George C.

    1998-01-01

    To demonstrate adequate lifetime and performance capabilities of a hollow cathode for use on the International Space Station (ISS) plasma contactor system, life tests of multiple hollow cathode assemblies (HCAs) were initiated at operating conditions simulating on-orbit operation. Three HCAs are presently being tested. These HCAs are operated with a continuous 6 sccm xenon flow rate and 3 A anode current. Emission current requirements are simulated with a square waveform consisting of 50 minutes at a 2.5 A emission current and 40 minutes with no emission current. As of July 1998, these HCAs have accumulated between 1 1,700 and 14,200 hours. While there have been changes in operatin, behavior the three HCAs continue to operate stably within ISS specifications and are expected to demonstrate the required lifetime.

  4. Air cathode structure manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Momyer, William R.; Littauer, Ernest L.

    1985-01-01

    An improved air cathode structure for use in primary batteries and the like. The cathode structure includes a matrix active layer, a current collector grid on one face of the matrix active layer, and a porous, nonelectrically conductive separator on the opposite face of the matrix active layer, the collector grid and separator being permanently bonded to the matrix active layer. The separator has a preselected porosity providing low IR losses and high resistance to air flow through the matrix active layer to maintain high bubble pressure during operation of the battery. In the illustrated embodiment, the separator was formed of porous polypropylene. A thin hydrophobic film is provided, in the preferred embodiment, on the current collecting metal grid.

  5. Cathodic disbonding of pipeline coatings under realistic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trautman, Brenda Lee

    1998-09-01

    Cathodic disbonding is one undesirable aspect of the combination of the corrosion control technology commonly used for the exterior of buried pipelines. This technology consists of the combined use of protective coatings and cathodic protection. While standard cathodic disbonding tests performed in the laboratory provide a relative ranking of coatings, due to the simplicity of the test environments and accelerated nature of the tests, the results may not necessarily be directly related to service performance. Therefore, the objective of this work was to determine the cathodic disbonding behavior of three commonly used pipeline coating materials (i.e., fusion bonded epoxy, coal tar enamel, and tape coatings) under more realistic conditions. The research plan allowed the comparison of cathodic disbonding tests results between standard and realistic conditions by utilizing laboratory tests with controlled environments and cathodic protection levels. Several areas of focus were the effects of a moderate level of polarization, high level of polarization, and elevated temperatures. Additional factors examined included electrolyte composition (soil extract versus NaCl solutions), wet/dry cycling, and simulated soil conditions (i.e., sand moistened with soil extract). These tests delineated the effects of test parameters on cathodic disbonding and coating performance was related to these parameters. The processes considered to be important to the cathodic disbonding behavior of coatings are discussed as well as the implications of the realistic test results on laboratory cathodic disbonding test procedures. It was confirmed that greater disbonding occurred at more negative (i.e., cathodic) potentials, with higher alkalinity, and at elevated temperatures. This study also showed that disbonding increased greatly when sand moistened with soil extract solution was utilized in place of bulk electrolyte. The addition of such a barrier to convection may present a viable method to

  6. Thermionic emission cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Misumi, A.; Saito, S.

    1981-07-21

    A thermionic emission cathode comprising a base metal made of nickel-tungsten series alloy, for example an alloy comprising 90 to 70% by weight of nickel and 10 to 30% by weight of tungsten, and an emitter layer, which is formed on the base, made from a mixture of tungsten powder or nickel-tungsten alloy powder comprising 90 to 70% by weight of nickel and 10 to 30% by weight of tungsten, Ba/sub 3/Wo/sub 6/ powder and (C) zirconium powder or ZrH/sub 2/ powder, and if necessary interposing a powder layer between the base and the emitter layer, said powder layer having the same composition as the base metal and a particle size of 1 to 10 ..mu..m sealed on the surface of the base with a distribution density of 0.5 to 5.0 mg/cm/sup 2/, can be applied to both directly and indirectly heated type cathodes. Said cathode has such advantages as being able to be miniaturized and to have high current density.

  7. Improved Rare-Earth Emitter Hollow Cathode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goebel, Dan M.

    2011-01-01

    An improvement has been made to the design of the hollow cathode geometry that was created for the rare-earth electron emitter described in Compact Rare Earth Emitter Hollow Cathode (NPO-44923), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 34, No. 3 (March 2010), p. 52. The original interior assembly was made entirely of graphite in order to be compatible with the LaB6 material, which cannot be touched by metals during operation due to boron diffusion causing embrittlement issues in high-temperature refractory materials. Also, the graphite tube was difficult to machine and was subject to vibration-induced fracturing. This innovation replaces the graphite tube with one made out of refractory metal that is relatively easy to manufacture. The cathode support tube is made of molybdenum or molybdenum-rhenium. This material is easily gun-bored to near the tolerances required, and finish machined with steps at each end that capture the orifice plate and the mounting flange. This provides the manufacturability and robustness needed for flight applications, and eliminates the need for expensive e-beam welding used in prior cathodes. The LaB6 insert is protected from direct contact with the refractory metal tube by thin, graphite sleeves in a cup-arrangement around the ends of the insert. The sleeves, insert, and orifice plate are held in place by a ceramic spacer and tungsten spring inserted inside the tube. To heat the cathode, an insulating tube is slipped around the refractory metal hollow tube, which can be made of high-temperature materials like boron nitride or aluminum nitride. A screw-shaped slot, or series of slots, is machined in the outside of the ceramic tube to constrain a refractory metal wire wound inside the slot that is used as the heater. The screw slot can hold a single heater wire that is then connected to the front of the cathode tube by tack-welding to complete the electrical circuit, or it can be a double slot that takes a bifilar wound heater with both leads coming out

  8. Cathodic degradation of antibiotics: characterization and pathway analysis.

    PubMed

    Kong, Deyong; Liang, Bin; Yun, Hui; Cheng, Haoyi; Ma, Jincai; Cui, Minhua; Wang, Aijie; Ren, Nanqi

    2015-04-01

    Antibiotics in wastewaters must be degraded to eliminate their antibacterial activity before discharging into the environment. A cathode can provide continuous electrons for the degradation of refractory pollutants, however the cathodic degradation feasibility, efficiency and pathway for different kinds of antibiotics is poorly understood. Here, we investigated the degradation of four antibiotics, namely nitrofurazone (NFZ), metronidazole (MNZ), chloramphenicol (CAP), and florfenicol (FLO) by a poised cathode in a dual chamber electrochemical reactor. The cyclic voltammetry preliminarily proved the feasibility of the cathodic degradation of these antibiotics. The cathodic reducibility of these antibiotics followed the order of NFZ > MNZ > CAP > FLO. A decreased phosphate buffered solution (PBS) concentration as low as 2 mM or utilization of NaCl buffer solution as catholyte had significant influence on antibiotics degradation rate and efficiency for CAP and FLO but not for NFZ and MNZ. PBS could be replaced by Na2CO3-NaHCO3 buffer solution as catholyte for the degradation of these antibiotics. Reductive dechlorination of CAP proceeded only after the reduction of the nitro group to aromatic amine. The composition of the degradation products depended on the cathode potential except for MNZ. The cathodic degradation process could eliminate the antibacterial activity of these antibiotics. The current study suggests that the electrochemical reduction could serve as a potential pretreatment or advanced treatment unit for the treatment of antibiotics containing wastewaters.

  9. The cathode plasma simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suksila, Thada

    Since its invention at the University of Stuttgart, Germany in the mid-1960, scientists have been trying to understand and explain the mechanism of the plasma interaction inside the magnetoplasmadynamics (MPD) thruster. Because this thruster creates a larger level of efficiency than combustion thrusters, this MPD thruster is the primary cadidate thruster for a long duration (planetary) spacecraft. However, the complexity of this thruster make it difficult to fully understand the plasma interaction in an MPD thruster while operating the device. That is, there is a great deal of physics involved: the fluid dynamics, the electromagnetics, the plasma dynamics, and the thermodynamics. All of these physics must be included when an MPD thruster operates. In recent years, a computer simulation helped scientists to simulate the experiments by programing the physics theories and comparing the simulation results with the experimental data. Many MPD thruster simulations have been conducted: E. Niewood et al.[5], C. K. J. Hulston et al.[6], K. D. Goodfellow[3], J Rossignol et al.[7]. All of these MPD computer simulations helped the scientists to see how quickly the system responds to the new design parameters. For this work, a 1D MPD thruster simulation was developed to find the voltage drop between the cathode and the plasma regions. Also, the properties such as thermal conductivity, electrical conductivity and heat capacity are temperature and pressure dependent. These two conductivity and heat capacity are usually definded as constant values in many other models. However, this 1D and 2D cylindrical symmetry MPD thruster simulations include both temperature and pressure effects to the electrical, thermal conductivities and heat capacity values interpolated from W. F. Ahtye [4]. Eventhough, the pressure effect is also significant; however, in this study the pressure at 66 Pa was set as a baseline. The 1D MPD thruster simulation includes the sheath region, which is the

  10. Depression cathode structure for cathode ray tubes having surface smoothness and method for producing same

    SciTech Connect

    Rychlewski, T.V.

    1984-10-23

    Depression cathode structures for cathode ray tubes are produced by dispensing liquid cathode material into the depression of a metallic supporting substrate, removing excess cathode material by passing a doctor blade across the substrate surface and over the depression, and drying the cathode layer to a substantially immobile state. The cathode layer may optionally be further shaped prior to substantially complete drying thereof.

  11. Cathodic arc deposition of barium oxide for oxide-coated cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Umstattd, R.; Pi, T.; Luhmann, N. Jr.; Scheitrum, G.; Monteiro, O.; Brown, I.

    1998-12-31

    Cathodic arc deposition is used to create a barium oxide plasma which is then deposited/implanted onto a cathode nickel substrate. The primary motivation for this work is the critical need for a reliable, repeatable thermionic cathode for the production of high power, microsecond duration microwave pulses. The deposition is performed by generating a cathodic arc discharge at the surface of a barium of barium-strontium alloy rod. The metal plasma thus created is deposited onto the target in the presence of small amounts of oxygen. Difficulties in handling the highly hygroscopic barium and strontium sources were addressed by encapsulating the source rods in thin nickel sleeves (nickel being the major constituent of the deposition target). Both filtered and unfiltered depositions were performed; the former in the interest of improving film quality and the latter in an effort to improve deposition rate. The plasma deposition is monitored via a rate thickness monitor, an optical emission spectrometer for plasma composition information, and an electrostatic probe for the density and temperature profile of the plasma. Good film adhesion is critical for oxide cathodes since they are continually cycled, this, substrates are pulse biased during deposition to encourage implantation. An initial test was performed in which a film of barium oxide approximately one micron in thickness was deposited onto a small section of a 1 in. diameter nickel cathode with better than expected mission results. These preliminary results will be presented together with the results from follow-up experiments done to improve overall coating quality and emission performance.

  12. Cathodic polarization of sulfur in molten salts

    SciTech Connect

    Demidov, A.I.; Dukhanin, G.P.; Morachevskii, A.G.; Simikov, I.A.

    1985-12-01

    As a continuation of studies on the electrochemical behavior of sulfur in molten salts, this paper reports work on the determination of lithium and potassium ion discharge potentials at a sulfur electrode during cathodic polarization in molten LiNO/sub 3/-LiNO/sub 2/-LiOH and LiNO/sub 3/-KNO/sub 3/ at 423/sup 0/K as well as in molten LiF-LiCl-LiI and LiC1-KC1 ay 650/sup 0/K. The studies were carried out by taking polarization curves in a pulsed galvanostatic mode using a three-electrode electrochemical cell. The sulfur electrode floating on the molten salt electrolyte contacted a 5-mm-diameter graphite rod that also touched the molten salt. The same patterns were observed for the cathodic polarization of sulfur in both halide and nitrate melts.

  13. Titanium diaphragm makes excellent amplitron cathode support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teich, W. W.

    1965-01-01

    Cathode support structure designed around a titanium diaphragm prevents radial misalignment between the cathode and anode in amplitrons. The titanium exhibits low thermal conductivity, tolerates lateral thermal expansion of the cathode, and is a poor primary and secondary emission medium.

  14. Observation of the hollow cathode effect from a dielectric cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Hyeon Seok; Oh, Jin Young; Kim, Youn Sang; Jong Lee, Se; Song, Kie Moon; Baik, Hong Koo

    2010-12-01

    The hollow cathode effect (HCE) is investigated in the dielectric hollow cathode structure in a Ne-Xe mixture at 4%. The influence of the dielectric is shown experimentally by the relationship between voltage and current peaks. The linearity of reduced current density confirms the existence of the HCE and shows that cathode fall has the same value at every pD condition. Varying the pD, the variation in the discharge mode can be measured with IR intensity emitted from the plasma and photographs of discharge in the visible part of the spectra. Voltages and current in the range of 3 kV at 10 µA were used. We suggest an electrode configuration reinforced in cathode sputtering for the display panel and light source using the dielectric hollow cathode discharge (DHCD), and introducing a mechanism of the DHCD mode.

  15. Emission from ferroelectric cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Sampayan, S.E.; Caporaso, G.J.; Holmes, C.L.; Lauer, E.J.; Prosnitz, D.; Trimble, D.O.; Westenskow, G.A.

    1993-05-17

    We have recently initiated an investigation of electron emission from ferroelectric cathodes. Our experimental apparatus consisted of an electron diode and a 250 kV, 12 ohm, 70 ns pulsed high voltage power source. A planar triode modulator driven by a synthesized waveform generator initiates the polarization inversion and allows inversion pulse tailoring. The pulsed high voltage power source is capable of delivering two high voltage pulses within 50 ns of each other and is capable of operating at a sustained repetition rate of 5 Hz. Our initial measurements indicate that emission current densities above the Child-Langmuir Space Charge Limit are possible. We explain this effect to be based on a non-zero initial energy of the emitted electrons. We also determined that this effect is strongly coupled to relative timing between the inversion pulse and application of the main anode-cathode pulse. We also have initiated brightness measurements of the emitted beam. As in our previous measurements at this Laboratory, we performed the measurement using a pepper pot technique. Beam-let profiles are recorded with a fast phosphor and gated cameras. We describe our apparatus and preliminary measurements.

  16. Cathodic hydrodimerization of nitroolefins

    PubMed Central

    Weßling, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Summary Nitroalkenes are easily accessible in high variety by condensation of aldehydes with aliphatic nitroalkanes. They belong to the group of activated alkenes that can be hydrodimerized by cathodic reduction. There are many olefins with different electron withdrawing groups used for cathodic hydrodimerization, but not much is known about the behaviour of the nitro group. Synthetic applications of this group could profit from the easy access to nitroolefins in large variety, the C–C bond formation with the introduction of two nitro groups in a 1,4-distance and the conversions of the nitro group by reduction to oximes and amines, the conversion into aldehydes and ketones via the Nef reaction and base catalyzed condensations at the acidic CH bond. Eight 1-aryl-2-nitro-1-propenes have been electrolyzed in an undivided electrolysis cell to afford 2,5-dinitro-3,4-diaryl hexanes in high yield. The 4-methoxy-, 4-trifluoromethyl-, 2-chloro- and 2,6-difluorophenyl group and furthermore the 2-furyl and 2-pyrrolyl group have been applied. The reaction is chemoselective as only the double bond but not the nitro group undergoes reaction, is regioselective as a ß,ß-coupling with regard to the nitro group and forms preferentially two out of six possible diastereomers as major products. PMID:26199673

  17. Virtual cathode microwave devices: Basics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thode, L. E.; Snell, C. M.

    Unlike a conventional microwave tube, a virtual-cathode device operates above the space-charge limit where the depth of the space-charge potential can cause electron reflection. The region associated with this electron reflection is referred to as a virtual cathode. Microwaves can be generated through oscillations in the position of the virtual cathode and through the bunching of electrons trapped in a potential well between the real and virtual cathodes. These two mechanisms are competitive. There are three basic classes of virtual cathode devices: (1) reflex triode; (2) reditron and side-shoot vircator; and (3) reflex diode or vircator. The reflex diode is the highest power virtual-cathode device. For the reflex diode the energy exchange between the beam and electromagnetic wave occurs in both the axial and radial directions. In some designs the oscillating virtual-cathode frequency exceeds the reflexing-electron frequency while in other designs the reflexing-electron frequency exceeds the oscillating virtual-cathode frequency. For the flex diode, a periodic disruption in magnetic insulation can modulate the high-frequency microwave power. Overall, particle-in-cell simulation predictions and axial reflex diode experiments are in good agreement. Although frequency stability and phase locking of the reflex diode have been demonstrated, little progress has been made in efficiency enhancement.

  18. Hot hollow cathode gun assembly

    DOEpatents

    Zeren, J.D.

    1983-11-22

    A hot hollow cathode deposition gun assembly includes a hollow body having a cylindrical outer surface and an end plate for holding an adjustable heat sink, the hot hollow cathode gun, two magnets for steering the plasma from the gun into a crucible on the heat sink, and a shutter for selectively covering and uncovering the crucible.

  19. Virtual cathode microwave devices -- Basics

    SciTech Connect

    Thode, L.E.; Snell, C.M.

    1991-01-01

    Unlike a conventional microwave tube, a virtual-cathode device operates above the space-charge limit where the depth of the space-charge potential can cause electron reflection. The region associated with this electron reflection is referred to as a virtual cathode. Microwaves can be generated through oscillations in the position of the virtual cathode and through the bunching of electrons trapped in a potential well between the real and virtual cathodes. These two mechanisms are competitive. There are three basic classes of virtual cathode devices: (1) reflex triode; (2) reditron and side-shoot vircator; and (3) reflex diode or vircator. The reflex diode is the highest power virtual-cathode device. For the reflex diode the energy exchange between the beam and electromagnetic wave occurs in both the axial and radial directions. In some designs the oscillating-virtual-cathode frequency exceeds the reflexing-electron frequency exceeds the oscillating-virtual-cathode frequency. For the flex diode a periodic disruption in magnetic insulation can modulate the high- frequency microwave power. Overall, particle-in-cell simulation predictions and axial reflex diode experiments are in good agreement. Although frequency stability and phase locking of the reflex diode have been demonstrated, little progress has been made in efficiency enhancement. 58 refs., 11 figs.

  20. High Pressure Hollow Cathode Discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoenbach, Karl H.; Tessnow, Thomas; Elhabachi, Ahmed

    1996-10-01

    The sustaining voltage of hollow cathode discharges is dependent on the product of pressure and cathode hole diameter. By reducing the dimension of the cathode hole to 0.2 mm we were able to operate micro-hollow cathode discharges at pressures up to 750 Torr in argon in a direct current mode. The current-voltage characteristics of the 0.2 mm cathode hole discharges was found to have a positive slope at currents below 0.25 mA. Up to this current level hollow cathode discharges can be operated in parallel without ballast. The negative slope observed above the threshold current seems to be due to the onset of thermionic electron emission caused by Joule heating of the cathode. This assumption is supported by the experimental observation that multi-hole operation without ballast even at currents far above the dc-threshold current was possible when the discharge was operated in a pulsed mode. The possibility of generating large arrays of ballast-free, pulsed micro-hollow cathode discharges suggests their use as flat panel light sources or electron sources.

  1. Composite Cathode-Ray Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangal, Mukund D.

    1988-01-01

    Proposed composite cathode-ray tube consists of rectangular array of cathode-ray tubes joined at edges, sharing common vacuum. Each electron gun generates independent image on portion of screen. Composite tube operates most advantageously under digital control to make available several display modes. Brightness and resolution of large images increased. Useful for classroom presentations, conferences, and the like.

  2. Continuous Bulk FeCuC Aerogel with Ultradispersed Metal Nanoparticles: An Efficient 3D Heterogeneous Electro-Fenton Cathode over a Wide Range of pH 3-9.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hongying; Qian, Lin; Guan, Xiaohong; Wu, Deli; Zhao, Guohua

    2016-05-17

    Novel iron-copper-carbon (FeCuC) aerogel was fabricated through a one-step process from metal-resin precursors and then activated with CO2 and N2 in environmentally friendly way. The activated FeCuC aerogel was applied in a heterogeneous electro-Fenton (EF) process and exhibited higher mineralization efficiency than homogeneous EF technology. High total organic carbon (TOC) removal of organic pollutants with activated FeCuC aerogel was achieved at a wide range of pH values (3-9). The chemical oxygen demand (COD) of real dyeing wastewater was below China's discharge standard after 30 min of treatment, and the specific energy consumption was low (9.2 kW·h·kg(-1)COD(-1)), corresponding to a power consumption of only ∼0.34 kW·h per ton of wastewater. The enhanced mineralization efficiency of FeCuC aerogel was mostly attributable to ultradispersed metallic Fe-Cu nanoparticles embedded in 3D carbon matrix and the CO2-N2 treatment. The CO2 activation enhanced the accessibility of the aerogel's pores, and the secondary N2 activation enlarged the porosity and regenerated the ultradispersed zerovalent iron (Fe(0)) with reductive carbon. Cu(0) acted as a reduction promoter for interfacial electron transfer. Moreover, activated FeCuC aerogel presented low iron leaching (<0.1 ppm) in acidic solution and can be molded into different sizes with high flexibility. Thus, this material could be used as a low-cost cathode and efficient heterogeneous EF technology for actual wastewater treatment. PMID:27082750

  3. Continuous Bulk FeCuC Aerogel with Ultradispersed Metal Nanoparticles: An Efficient 3D Heterogeneous Electro-Fenton Cathode over a Wide Range of pH 3-9.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hongying; Qian, Lin; Guan, Xiaohong; Wu, Deli; Zhao, Guohua

    2016-05-17

    Novel iron-copper-carbon (FeCuC) aerogel was fabricated through a one-step process from metal-resin precursors and then activated with CO2 and N2 in environmentally friendly way. The activated FeCuC aerogel was applied in a heterogeneous electro-Fenton (EF) process and exhibited higher mineralization efficiency than homogeneous EF technology. High total organic carbon (TOC) removal of organic pollutants with activated FeCuC aerogel was achieved at a wide range of pH values (3-9). The chemical oxygen demand (COD) of real dyeing wastewater was below China's discharge standard after 30 min of treatment, and the specific energy consumption was low (9.2 kW·h·kg(-1)COD(-1)), corresponding to a power consumption of only ∼0.34 kW·h per ton of wastewater. The enhanced mineralization efficiency of FeCuC aerogel was mostly attributable to ultradispersed metallic Fe-Cu nanoparticles embedded in 3D carbon matrix and the CO2-N2 treatment. The CO2 activation enhanced the accessibility of the aerogel's pores, and the secondary N2 activation enlarged the porosity and regenerated the ultradispersed zerovalent iron (Fe(0)) with reductive carbon. Cu(0) acted as a reduction promoter for interfacial electron transfer. Moreover, activated FeCuC aerogel presented low iron leaching (<0.1 ppm) in acidic solution and can be molded into different sizes with high flexibility. Thus, this material could be used as a low-cost cathode and efficient heterogeneous EF technology for actual wastewater treatment.

  4. Apparatus and method for treating a cathode material provided on a thin-film substrate

    DOEpatents

    Hanson, Eric J.; Kooyer, Richard L.

    2001-01-01

    An apparatus and method for treating a cathode material provided on a surface of a continuous thin-film substrate and a treated thin-film cathode having increased smoothness are disclosed. A web of untreated cathode material is moved between a feed mechanism and a take-up mechanism, and passed through a treatment station. The web of cathode material typically includes areas having surface defects, such as prominences extending from the surface of the cathode material. The surface of the cathode material is treated with an abrasive material to reduce the height of the prominences so as to increase an 85 degree gloss value of the cathode material surface by at least approximately 10. The web of cathode material may be subjected to a subsequent abrasive treatment at the same or other treatment station. Burnishing or lapping film is employed at a treatment station to process the cathode material. An abrasive roller may alternatively be used to process the web of cathode material. The apparatus and method of the present invention may also be employed to treat the surface of a lithium anode foil so as to cleanse and reduce the roughness of the anode foil surface.

  5. Apparatus and method for treating a cathode material provided on a thin-film substrate

    DOEpatents

    Hanson, Eric J.; Kooyer, Richard L.

    2003-01-01

    An apparatus and method for treating a cathode material provided on a surface of a continuous thin-film substrate and a treated thin-film cathode having increased smoothness are disclosed. A web of untreated cathode material is moved between a feed mechanism and a take-up mechanism, and passed through a treatment station. The web of cathode material typically includes areas having surface defects, such as prominences extending from the surface of the cathode material. The surface of the cathode material is treated with an abrasive material to reduce the height of the prominences so as to increase an 85 degree gloss value of the cathode material surface by at least approximately 10. The web of cathode material may be subjected to a subsequent abrasive treatment at the same or other treatment station. Burnishing or lapping film is employed at a treatment station to process the cathode material. An abrasive roller may alternatively be used to process the web of cathode material. The apparatus and method of the present invention may also be employed to treat the surface of a lithium anode foil so as to cleanse and reduce the roughness of the anode foil surface.

  6. Lithium rechargeable cell with a poly 3-methylthiophene cathode. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, C.W.; Slane, S.M.

    1992-08-01

    A poly 3-methylthiophene (PMT) cathode showed excellent coulombic efficiency during cycling in a lithium rechargeable cell. An electrolyte containing dimethyl carbonate was used since it is stable at the high anodic potentials reached during cell charging. The polymer cathode tolerated modest overcharge and was able to continue cycling after a severe short-circuit with minimal loss of capacity.

  7. Hollow Cathode With Multiple Radial Orifices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brophy, John R.

    1992-01-01

    Improved hollow cathode serving as source of electrons has multiple radial orifices instead of single axial orifice. Distributes ion current more smoothly, over larger area. Prototype of high-current cathodes for ion engines in spacecraft. On Earth, cathodes used in large-diameter ion sources for industrial processing of materials. Radial orientation of orifices in new design causes current to be dispersed radially in vicinity of cathode. Advantageous where desireable to produce plasma more nearly uniform over wider region around cathode.

  8. Cold cathode vacuum discharge tube

    DOEpatents

    Boettcher, Gordon E.

    1998-01-01

    A cold cathode vacuum discharge tube, and method for making same, with an interior surface of the trigger probe coated with carbon deposited by carbon vapor deposition (CVD) or diamond-like carbon (DLC) deposition. Preferably a solid graphite insert is employed in the probe-cathode structure in place of an aluminum bushing employed in the prior art. The CVD or DLC probe face is laser scribed to allow resistance trimming to match available trigger voltage signals and to reduce electrical aging.

  9. Micro-hollow cathode dischargers

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenbach, K.H.; Verhappen, R.; Peterkin, F.E.

    1995-12-31

    In order to develop a hollow cathode discharge (HCD) with its increased current over planar electrode glow discharges, the cathode fall, which is on the order of the mean free path for ionization, must be comparable in length to the hole diameter. This indicates that the discharge parameters vary with pressure, p, times hole diameter, D. The pD product for stable operation of a hollow cathosde discharge was quoted to be on the order of one to ten Torr cm for noble gases, less for molecular gases. White (1959) observed the hollow cathode effect in a neon discharge at a pressure of 100 Torr when the hole dimensions were less than 1 mm. The cathode hole in his experiments changed from a cylindrical into a spherical cavity due to sputtering. The anode consisted in White`s experiment of a pin on the axis of the discharge geometry. We have studied micro-hollow (submillimeter) cathode discharges between two electrodes with aligned cylindrical holes by determining the current-voltage characteristics and the visual appearance of the discharge in argon over a wide range of pressure and voltage. The cross-section of the discharge geometry. The cathode is made of molybdenum or barium oxide inserted into a tungsten matrix (dispenser-cathode), the anode of molybdenum, and the dielectric spacer is mica. The discharge was operated under dc conditions, with half-wave rectified ac voltage applied, and pulsed with a 400 {mu}s rectangular voltage pulse. The lower limit in pressure was determined by the maximum voltage which could be applied to the discharge geometry without breakdown along insulators. The upper limit, in this study, is determined by the transition from cathode electrode emission due to ion-impact to thermal emission of electrons, which causes a dramatic increase in current and a drop in forward voltage to values on the order of 20 V.

  10. Cold cathode vacuum gauging system

    DOEpatents

    Denny, Edward C.

    2004-03-09

    A vacuum gauging system of the cold cathode type is provided for measuring the pressure of a plurality of separate vacuum systems, such as in a gas centrifuge cascade. Each casing is fitted with a gauge tube assembly which communicates with the vacuum system in the centrifuge casing. Each gauge tube contains an anode which may be in the form of a slender rod or wire hoop and a cathode which may be formed by the wall of the gauge tube. The tube is provided with an insulated high voltage connector to the anode which has a terminal for external connection outside the vacuum casing. The tube extends from the casing so that a portable magnet assembly may be inserted about the tube to provide a magnetic field in the area between the anode and cathode necessary for pressure measurements in a cold cathode-type vacuum gauge arrangement. The portable magnetic assembly is provided with a connector which engages the external high voltage terminal for providing power to the anode within in the gauge tube. Measurement is made in the same manner as the prior cold cathode gauges in that the current through the anode to the cathode is measured as an indication of the pressure. By providing the portable magnetic assembly, a considerable savings in cost, installation, and maintenance of vacuum gauges for pressure measurement in a gas centrifuge cascade is realizable.

  11. Microhollow cathode discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoenbach, K. H.; Moselhy, M.; Shi, W.; Bentley, R.

    2003-07-01

    By reducing the dimensions of hollow cathodes into the hundred micrometer range, stable, direct current, high (atmospheric) pressure glow discharges in rare gases, rare gas-halide mixtures and in air could be generated. The electron energy distribution in these microdischarges is non-Maxwellian, with a pronounced high-energy tail. The high electron energy together with the high gas density, which favors three-body collisions, is the reason for an efficient excimer generation in these microplasmas. Excimer efficiencies from 1% to 9% have been measured for argon, xenon, argon fluoride, and xenon chloride direct current excimer emitters, with a radiant excimer emittance of up to 2 W/cm2 for xenon. Adding small amounts of oxygen to argon has allowed us to generate vacuum ultraviolet line radiation at 130.5 nm with an efficiency approaching 1%. Pulsing xenon discharges with nanosecond electrical pulses has led to an increase in intensity to 15 W/cm2 and to a simultaneous increase in efficiency to more than 20%. Operating the discharges in an abnormal glow mode has allowed us to generate microdischarge arrays without individual ballast. Applications of these plasma arrays are excimer lamps and plasma reactors.

  12. Effect of La0.1Sr0.9Co0.5Mn0.5O3-δ protective coating layer on the performance of La0.6Sr0.4Co0.8Fe0.2O3-δ solid oxide fuel cell cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Ping-Yi; Ciou, Chun-Jing; Lee, Yu-Chen; Hung, I.-Ming

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the interface reactivity between La0.1Sr0.9Co0.5Mn0.5O3-δ (LSCM) protective coating layer and Crofer22H interconnects. Additionally, we report the mechanism of Cr poisoning of the La0.6Sr0.4Co0.8Fe0.2O3-δ (LSCF) cathode's electrochemical properties. The phase, chemical composition, and element distribution of compounds formed at the LSCM-Crofer22H interface are analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and electron dispersive microscopy (EDS). After heat treatment at 800 °C for 100 h, the LSCM/Crofer22H sample contains SrCrO3, a compound with good conductivity; the area specific resistance (ASR) for the LSCM/Crofer22H interconnect is approximately 17-40 mΩ cm2. We found that the amount of (Mn0.98Fe0.02)(Mn0.02Fe0.48Cr1.5)O4, Cr3O4, and (Fe,Cr)2O3 oxides form in LSCF/LSCM/Crofer22H is significantly less than that in LSCF/Crofer22H. LSCF conductivity after heating at 800 °C for 100 h, is notably higher when in contact with LSCM/Crofer22H than it is when in contact with Crofer22H. These results demonstrate that the LSCM protective coating prevents LSCF cathode poisoning by Cr evaporated from the Corfer22H interconnects.

  13. International Space Station Cathode Life Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soulas, George C.; Sarver-Verhey, Timothy R.

    1997-01-01

    Four hollow cathode assembly (HCA) life tests were initiated at operating conditions simulating on-orbit operation of the International Space Station plasma contactor. The objective of these tests is to demonstrate the mission-required 18,000 hour lifetime with high-fidelity development model HCAS. HCAs are operated with a continuous 6 sccm xenon flow rate and 3 A anode current. On-orbit emission current requirements are simulated with a square waveform consisting of 50 minutes at a 2.5 A emission current and 40 minutes with no emission current. One HCA test was terminated after approximately 8,000 hours so that a destructive analysis could be performed. The analysis revealed no life-limiting processes and the ultimate lifetime was projected to be greater than the mission requirement. Testing continues for the remaining three HCAs which have accumulated approximately 8,000 hours, 10,000 hours, and 11,000 hours, respectively, as of June 1997. Anode and bias voltages, strong indicators of cathode electron emitter condition, are within acceptable ranges and have exhibited no life- or performance-limiting phenomena to date.

  14. 40 CFR 261.41 - Notification and Recordkeeping for Used, Intact Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) Exported for Reuse.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Used, Intact Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) Exported for Reuse. 261.41 Section 261.41 Protection of... Tubes (CRTs) Exported for Reuse. (a) Persons who export used, intact CRTs for reuse must send a one-time... forth as follows: § 261.41 Notification and Recordkeeping for Used, Intact Cathode Ray Tubes...

  15. Hollow cathodes for arcjet thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luebben, Craig R.; Wilbur, Paul J.

    1987-01-01

    In an attempt to prevent exterior spot emission, hollow cathode bodies and orifice plates were constructed from boron nitride which is an electrical insulator, but the orifice plates melted and/or eroded at high interelectrode pressures. The most suitable hollow cathodes tested included a refractory metal orifice plate in a boron nitride body, with the insert insulated electrically from the orifice plate. In addition, the hollow cathode interior was evacuated to assure a low pressure at the insert surface, thus promoting diffuse electron emission. At high interelectrode pressures, the electrons tended to flow through the orifice plate rather than through the orifice, which could result in overheating of the orifice plate. Using a carefully aligned centerline anode, electron flow through the orifice could be sustained at interelectrode pressures up to 500 torr - but the current flow path still occasionally jumped from the orifice to the orifice plate. Based on these tests, it appears that a hollow cathode would operate most effectively at pressures in the arcjet regime with a refractory, chemically stable, and electrically insulating cathode body and orifice plate.

  16. Cold cathode vacuum discharge tube

    DOEpatents

    Boettcher, G.E.

    1998-03-10

    A cold cathode vacuum discharge tube, and method for making same, are disclosed with an interior surface of the trigger probe coated with carbon deposited by carbon vapor deposition (CVD) or diamond-like carbon (DLC) deposition. Preferably a solid graphite insert is employed in the probe-cathode structure in place of an aluminum bushing employed in the prior art. The CVD or DLC probe face is laser scribed to allow resistance trimming to match available trigger voltage signals and to reduce electrical aging. 15 figs.

  17. Cold cathode vacuum discharge tube

    DOEpatents

    Boettcher, G.E.

    1998-04-14

    A cold cathode vacuum discharge tube, and method for making same, with an interior surface of the trigger probe coated with carbon deposited by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) or diamond-like carbon (DLC) deposition are disclosed. Preferably a solid graphite insert is employed in the probe-cathode structure in place of an aluminum bushing employed in the prior art. The CVD or DLC probe face is laser scribed to allow resistance trimming to match available trigger voltage signals and to reduce electrical aging. 14 figs.

  18. High-current-density, high brightness cathodes for free electron laser applications

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.C. . Palo Alto Microwave Tube Div.)

    1987-06-01

    This report discusses the following topics: brightness and emittance of electron beams and cathodes; general requirements for cathodes in high brightness electron guns; candidate cathode types; plasma and field emission cathodes; true field emission cathodes; oxide cathodes; lanthanum hexaborides cathodes; laser driven thermionic cathodes; laser driven photocathodes; impregnated porous tungsten dispenser cathodes; and choice of best performing cathode types.

  19. Remote control for anode-cathode adjustment

    DOEpatents

    Roose, Lars D.

    1991-01-01

    An apparatus for remotely adjusting the anode-cathode gap in a pulse power machine has an electric motor located within a hollow cathode inside the vacuum chamber of the pulse power machine. Input information for controlling the motor for adjusting the anode-cathode gap is fed into the apparatus using optical waveguides. The motor, controlled by the input information, drives a worm gear that moves a cathode tip. When the motor drives in one rotational direction, the cathode is moved toward the anode and the size of the anode-cathode gap is diminished. When the motor drives in the other direction, the cathode is moved away from the anode and the size of the anode-cathode gap is increased. The motor is powered by batteries housed in the hollow cathode. The batteries may be rechargeable, and they may be recharged by a photovoltaic cell in combination with an optical waveguide that receives recharging energy from outside the hollow cathode. Alternatively, the anode-cathode gap can be remotely adjusted by a manually-turned handle connected to mechanical linkage which is connected to a jack assembly. The jack assembly converts rotational motion of the handle and mechanical linkage to linear motion of the cathode moving toward or away from the anode.

  20. Novel Cathodes Prepared by Impregnation Procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Eduardo Paz

    2006-09-30

    (1) We showed that similar results were obtained when using various LSM precursors to produce LSM-YSZ cathodes. (2) We showed that enhanced performance could be achieved by adding LSCo to LSMYSZ cathodes. (3) We have preliminary results showing that there is a slow deactivation with LSFYSZ cathodes.

  1. Dual-Cathode Electron-Beam Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, James G.; Conley, Joseph M.; Wittry, David B.

    1988-01-01

    Beam from either cathode electromagnetically aligned with exit port. Electron beam from either of two cathodes deflected by magnetic and electric fields to central axis. Mechanical alignment of beam easy because cathode axes, anode apertures, and electron trajectories coplanar. Applications where uninterrupted service needed: scanning electron microscopes, transmission electron microscopes, electron-beam lithography equipment, Auger instruments, and microfocused x-ray sources.

  2. Design, construction and long life endurance testing of cathode assemblies for use in microwave high-power transmitting tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batra, R.; Marino, D.

    1986-01-01

    The cathode life test program sponsored by NASA Lewis Research Center at Watkins-Johnson Company has been in continuous operation since 1972. Its primary objective has been to evaluate the long life capability of barium dispenser cathodes to produce emission current densities of 2 A sq. cm. or more in an operational environment simulating that of a highpower microwave tube. The life test vehicles were equipped with convergent flow electron guns, drift space tubes with solenoid magnets for electron beam confinement and water-cooled depressed collectors. A variety of cathode types has been tested, including GE Tungstate, Litton Impregnated, Philips Type B and M, Semicon types S and M, and Spectra-Mat Type M. Recent emphasis has been on monitoring the performance of Philips Type M cathodes at 2 A sq. cm. and Sprectra-Mat and Semicon Type M cathodes at 4 A sq. cm. These cathodes have been operated at a constant current of 616 mA and a cathode anode voltage on the order of 10 kV. Cathode temperatures were maintained at 1010 C true as measured from black body holes in the backs of the cathodes. This report presents results of the cathode life test program from July l982 through April l986. The results include hours of operation and performance data in the form of normalized emission current density versus temperature curves (Miram plots).

  3. Cathode for molten salt batteries

    DOEpatents

    Mamantov, Gleb; Marassi, Roberto

    1977-01-01

    A molten salt electrochemical system for battery applications comprises tetravalent sulfur as the active cathode material with a molten chloroaluminate solvent comprising a mixture of AlCl.sub.3 and MCl having a molar ratio of AlCl.sub.3 /MCl from greater than 50.0/50.0 to 80/20.

  4. Modeling cathode boundary layer discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munoz-Serrano, E.; Boeuf, J. P.; Pitchford, L. C.

    2009-10-01

    A Cathode Boundary Layer Discharge or CBL (Schoenbach, et al Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 13, 177,2004) is an electrode/dielectric/electrode sandwich with a central hole pierced through the dielectric and one of the electrodes (the anode). Thus, the cathode surface area available to the discharge is limited by the annular dielectric, and the discharge operates in an abnormal glow mode with a positive V-I characteristic at higher current. Using a two-dimensional fluid model, we have studied the electrical properties of CBLs in argon at 100 and 400 torr pressure. The spatial profiles of charged particle and metastable densities, potential, and gas temperature, as well as calculated V-I characteristics will be shown for a range of conditions for a 800 micron hole diameter. One interesting result (anticipated in the work of Belostotskiy, et al, Plasma Sources Sci. Technol 17, 045018, 2008) is that there is a sharp increase in the slope of the V-I characteristic when gas heating is taken into account. This current limiting effect is not observed when the discharge is able to expand on the outer surface of the cathode as in the case of the MicroHollow Cathode Discharge (MHCD) configuration, for example.

  5. Lithium rechargeable cell with a poly 3-methylthiophene cathode and LiAsF6-dimethyl carbonate electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Charles W., Jr.; Slane, Steven M.

    1991-12-01

    A poly 3-methylthiophene cathode showed excellent coulombic efficiency during cycling in a lithium rechargeable cell. A dimethyl carbonate electrolyte was used since it is stable at the high anodic potentials reached during cell charging. The polymer cathode tolerated modest overcharge and was able to continue cycling after a severe short circuit with minimal loss in capacity.

  6. Microhollow Cathode Discharge Excimer Lamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoenbach, K. H.

    1999-11-01

    character. Reducing the diameter of the cathode hole in a hollow cathode discharge geometry to values on the order of 100 μm has allowed us to extend the pressure range of stable, direct current hollow cathode gas discharges up to atmospheric pressure. The large concentration of high-energy electrons generated in the cathode fall, in combination with the high neutral gas density favors three-body processes such as excimer formation. Excimer emission in xenon discharges peaking at 172 nm, was observed with efficiencies between 6% and 9% at pressures of several hundred Torr. Typical forward voltages are 200 V at dc currents up to 8 mA. Pulsed operation allowed us to extend the current range to 80 mA with corresponding linear increase in optical power. Spatially resolved measurements showed that the source of the excimer radiation at atmospheric pressure and currents of less than 8 mA is confined to the cathode opening. The radiative emittance at 8 mA and atmospheric pressure is approximately 20 W/cm^2. With reduced pressure and increased current, respectively, the excimer source extends into the area outside the cathode hole. Besides in xenon, excimer emission in argon at a peak wavelength of 128 nm has been recorded. In addition to operating the discharge in rare gases, we have also explored its use as rare gas-halide excimer source. In a gas mixture containing 1% ArF we were able to generate stable dc discharges in flowing gas at pressures ranging from 100 Torr to atmospheric pressure. The spectra of the high-pressure ArF discharges are dominated by excimer radiation peaking at 193 nm. The excimer emission of a single ArF discharge at 700 Torr was measured as 150 mW at an efficiency of 3%. Parallel operation of these discharges by means of a resistive anode, which has recently been demonstrated for argon discharges, offers the possibility to use microhollow cathode discharge arrays as dc-excimer lamps, with estimated power densities exceeding 10 W/cm^2. abstract

  7. High-emission cold cathode

    DOEpatents

    Mancebo, L.

    1974-01-29

    A field-emission cathode having a multitude of field emission points for emitting a copious stream of electrons when subjected to a high field is described. The cathode is constructed by compressing a multitude of tungsten strips alternately arranged with molybdenum strips and copper ribbons or compressing alternately arranged copper plated tungsten and molybdenum strips, heating the arrangement to braze the tungsten and molybdenum strips together with the copper, machining and grinding the exposed strip edges of one side of the brazed arrangement to obtain a precisely planar surface, etching a portion of the molybdenum and copper to leave the edges of the tungsten strips protruding for electron emission, and subjecting the protruding edges of the tungsten strips to a high electric field to degas and roughen the surface to pnovide a large number of emitting points. The resulting structure is particularly useful as a cathode in a transversely excited gaseous laser where the cathode is mounted in a vacuum chamber for emitting electrons under the influence of a high electric field between the cathode and an extractor grid. The electrons pass through the extractor grid, a thin window in the wall of the laser chamber and into the laser chamber which is filled with a gaseous mixture of helium, nitrogen, and carbon dioxide. A second grid is mounted on the gaseous side of the window. The electrons pass into the laser chamber under the influence of a second electric field between the second grid and an anode in the laser chamber to raise selected gas atoms of the gaseous mixture to appropriately excited states so that a subsequent coherent light beam passing through the mixture transversely to the electron stream through windows in opposite ends of the laser chamber stimulates the excited atoms to amplify the beam. (Official Gazette)

  8. Anion-redox nanolithia cathodes for Li-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhi; Kushima, Akihiro; Yin, Zongyou; Qi, Lu; Amine, Khalil; Lu, Jun; Li, Ju

    2016-08-01

    The development of lithium-air batteries is plagued by a high potential gap (>1.2 V) between charge and discharge, and poor cyclability due to the drastic phase change of O2 (gas) and Ox- (condensed phase) at the cathode during battery operations. Here we report a cathode consisting of nanoscale amorphous lithia (nanolithia) confined in a cobalt oxide, enabling charge/discharge between solid Li2O/Li2O2/LiO2 without any gas evolution. The cathode has a theoretical capacity of 1,341 Ah kg-1, a mass density exceeding 2.2 g cm-3, and a practical discharge capacity of 587 Ah kg-1 at 2.55 V versus Li/Li+. It also displays stable cycling performance (only 1.8% loss after 130 cycles in lithium-matched full-cell tests against Li4Ti5O12 anode), as well as a round-trip overpotential of only 0.24 V. Interestingly, the cathode is automatically protected from O2 gas release and overcharging through the shuttling of self-generated radical species soluble in the carbonate electrolyte.

  9. Anion-redox nanolithia cathodes for Li-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhi; Kushima, Akihiro; Yin, Zongyou; Qi, Lu; Amine, Khalil; Lu, Jun; Li, Ju

    2016-08-01

    The development of lithium–air batteries is plagued by a high potential gap (>1.2 V) between charge and discharge, and poor cyclability due to the drastic phase change of O2 (gas) and Ox‑ (condensed phase) at the cathode during battery operations. Here we report a cathode consisting of nanoscale amorphous lithia (nanolithia) confined in a cobalt oxide, enabling charge/discharge between solid Li2O/Li2O2/LiO2 without any gas evolution. The cathode has a theoretical capacity of 1,341 Ah kg‑1, a mass density exceeding 2.2 g cm‑3, and a practical discharge capacity of 587 Ah kg‑1 at 2.55 V versus Li/Li+. It also displays stable cycling performance (only 1.8% loss after 130 cycles in lithium-matched full-cell tests against Li4Ti5O12 anode), as well as a round-trip overpotential of only 0.24 V. Interestingly, the cathode is automatically protected from O2 gas release and overcharging through the shuttling of self-generated radical species soluble in the carbonate electrolyte.

  10. Cathode for aluminum producing electrolytic cell

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Craig W.

    2004-04-13

    A method of producing aluminum in an electrolytic cell comprising the steps of providing an anode in a cell, preferably a non-reactive anode, and also providing a cathode in the cell, the cathode comprised of a base material having low electrical conductivity reactive with molten aluminum to provide a highly electrically conductive layer on the base material. Electric current is passed from the anode to the cathode and alumina is reduced and aluminum is deposited at the cathode. The cathode base material is selected from boron carbide, and zirconium oxide.

  11. Nonaqueous battery with organic compound cathode

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaji, A.; Yamaki, J.

    1981-02-17

    A battery embodying this invention comprises: an anode including an anode-active material formed of one metal selected from the Group IA metals or preferably lithium metal; a cathode including a cathode-active material formed of metal or metal-free organic compounds having a phthalocyanine function or organic compounds having a porphin function; and an electrolyte prepared from a material which is chemically stable to the cathode and anode materials and permits the migration of the ion of the anode metal to the cathode for electrochemical reaction with the cathode-active material.

  12. Cathodes for molten-salt batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Argade, Shyam D.

    1993-01-01

    Viewgraphs of the discussion on cathodes for molten-salt batteries are presented. For the cathode reactions in molten-salt cells, chlorine-based and sulfur-based cathodes reactants have relatively high exchange current densities. Sulfur-based cathodes, metal sulfides, and disulfides have been extensively investigated. Primary thermal batteries of the Li-alloy/FeS2 variety have been available for a number of years. Chlorine based rechargable cathodes were investigated for the pulse power application. A brief introduction is followed by the experimental aspects of research, and the results obtained. Performance projections to the battery system level are discussed and the presentation is summarized with conclusions.

  13. Cathodes for molten-salt batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argade, Shyam D.

    1993-02-01

    Viewgraphs of the discussion on cathodes for molten-salt batteries are presented. For the cathode reactions in molten-salt cells, chlorine-based and sulfur-based cathodes reactants have relatively high exchange current densities. Sulfur-based cathodes, metal sulfides, and disulfides have been extensively investigated. Primary thermal batteries of the Li-alloy/FeS2 variety have been available for a number of years. Chlorine based rechargable cathodes were investigated for the pulse power application. A brief introduction is followed by the experimental aspects of research, and the results obtained. Performance projections to the battery system level are discussed and the presentation is summarized with conclusions.

  14. Improved Cathode Structure for a Direct Methanol Fuel Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valdez, Thomas; Narayanan, Sekharipuram

    2005-01-01

    An improved cathode structure on a membrane/electrode assembly has been developed for a direct methanol fuel cell, in a continuing effort to realize practical power systems containing such fuel cells. This cathode structure is intended particularly to afford better cell performance at a low airflow rate. A membrane/electrode assembly of the type for which the improved cathode structure was developed (see Figure 1) is fabricated in a process that includes brush painting and spray coating of catalyst layers onto a polymer-electrolyte membrane and onto gas-diffusion backings that also act as current collectors. The aforementioned layers are then dried and hot-pressed together. When completed, the membrane/electrode assembly contains (1) an anode containing a fine metal black of Pt/Ru alloy, (2) a membrane made of Nafion 117 or equivalent (a perfluorosulfonic acid-based hydrophilic, proton-conducting ion-exchange polymer), (3) a cathode structure (in the present case, the improved cathode structure described below), and (4) the electrically conductive gas-diffusion backing layers, which are made of Toray 060(TradeMark)(or equivalent) carbon paper containing between 5 and 6 weight percent of poly(tetrafluoroethylene). The need for an improved cathode structure arises for the following reasons: In the design and operation of a fuel-cell power system, the airflow rate is a critical parameter that determines the overall efficiency, cell voltage, and power density. It is desirable to operate at a low airflow rate in order to obtain thermal and water balance and to minimize the size and mass of the system. The performances of membrane/electrode assemblies of prior design are limited at low airflow rates. Methanol crossover increases the required airflow rate. Hence, one way to reduce the required airflow rate is to reduce the effect of methanol crossover. Improvement of the cathode structure - in particular, addition of hydrophobic particles to the cathode - has been

  15. Overcharge and overdischarge protection of ambient temperature secondary lithium cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Chen-Kuo (Inventor); Surampudi, Subbarao (Inventor); Attia, Alan I. (Inventor); Halpert, Gerald (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A cathode additive is provided for protecting an ambient temperature secondary lithium cell from overcharging or overdischarging. The cathode additive is chosen to create an upper voltage plateau which is slightly higher than a characteristic charge cutoff voltage of the cathode of the cell. The cathode additive additionally creates a lower voltage plateau which is slightly lower than the characteristic discharge cutoff voltage of the cell. Preferably, the cathode additive is a transition metal oxide or a sulfide and may, for example, include a mixture of Li2Mn2O4 and Li(0.1)MoO2.

  16. Temperature Distributions in Hollow Cathode Emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polk, Jay; Marrese, Colleen; Thornber, Ben; Dang, Lisa; Johnson, Lee

    2004-01-01

    Life-limiting processes in hollow cathodes are determined largely by the temperature of the emitter. To support development of cathode life models we have developed a noncontact temperature measurement technique which employs a stepper motor-driven fiber optic probe. The probe is driven inside the hollow cathode and collects light radiated by the hot interior surface of the emitter. Ratio pyrometry is used determine the axial temperature profile. Thermocouples on the orifice plate provide measurements ofthe external temperature during cathode operation and are used to calibrate the pyrometer system in situ with a small oven enclosing the externally heated cathode. Initial measurements of the temperature distribution in a hollow cathode with the same geometry as a cathode that failed after operating at 12 A emission current for 27800 hours are discussed.

  17. Particle size effect of Ni-rich cathode materials on lithium ion battery performance

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Ilkyu; Lee, Chul Wee; Kim, Jae Chang; Yoon, Songhun

    2012-01-15

    Graphical abstract: The preparation condition of Ni-rich cathode materials was investigated. When the retention time was short, a poor cathode performance was observed. For long retention time condition, cathode performance displayed a best result at pH 12. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ni-rich cathode materials (LiNi{sub 0.8}Co{sub 0.15}Al{sub 0.05}O{sub 2}) were prepared by co-precipitation method using separate addition of Al salt. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Particle size of Ni-rich cathode materials became larger with increase of retention time and solution pH. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cathode performance was poor for low retention time. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Optimal pH for co-precipitation was 12. -- Abstract: Herein, Ni-rich cathode materials (LiNi{sub 0.8}Co{sub 0.15}Al{sub 0.05}O{sub 2}) in lithium ion batteries are prepared by a separate addition of Ni/Co salt and Al sol solution using a continuously stirred tank reactor. Retention time and solution pH were controlled in order to obtain high performance cathode material. Particle size increase was observed with a higher retention time of the reactants. Also, primary and secondary particles became smaller according to an increase of solution pH, which was probably due to a decrease of growth rate. From the cathode application, a high discharge capacity (175 mAh g{sup -1}), a high initial efficiency (90%) and a good cycleability were observed in the cathode material prepared under pH 12 condition, which was attributed to its well-developed layered property and the optimal particle size. However, rate capability was inversely proportional to the particle size, which was clarified by a decrease of charge-transfer resistance measured in the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy.

  18. Microhollow Cathode Discharge Excimer Lamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoenbach, Karl H.

    1999-10-01

    Reducing the diameter of the cathode hole in hollow cathode discharge geometry to values on the order of 100 μm has allowed us to extend the pressure range of stable, direct current hollow cathode discharges up to atmospheric pressure. The large concentration of high-energy electrons in the nonthermal discharge, in combination with the high neutral gas density favors three-body processes such as rare gas excimer formation. Excimer emission in argon and xenon discharges peaking at 130 nm and 172 nm, respectively, was observed with an efficiency for xenon excimer emission between 6% and 9% in a pressure range from 250 Torr and 450 Torr. Typical forward voltages are 200 V at dc currents of up to 8 mA. Pulsed operation allowed us to extend the current range in xenon discharges to 80 mA. At pressures in the hundreds of Torr range the source of the excimer radiation extends over an area of several times the cathode opening. With increasing pressure the source is reduced in size and eventually, at pressures exceeding atmospheric becomes confined to the cathode opening. For a specific pressure the radiative power increases linearly with current at constant radiant emittance. For atmospheric pressure discharges in xenon the radiative emittance is approximately 20 W/cm^2. In addition to operating the discharge in rare gases, we have also explored its use as rare gas-halide excimer source. In a gas mixture containing 1 % ArF we were able to generate stable dc discharges in flowing gas at pressures ranging from 100 Torr to atmospheric pressure. The spectra of the high-pressure ArF discharges are dominated by excimer radiation peaking at 193 nm. The excimer emission of an ArF discharge at 700 Torr was measured as 150 mW. With a discharge voltage of 500 V, and a current of 10 mA the efficiency is 3 %. Parallel operation of the micro-discharges by means of a resistive anode offers the possibility to use microhollow cathode discharge arrays as dc-excimer lamps, with estimated

  19. Filters for cathodic arc plasmas

    DOEpatents

    Anders, Andre; MacGill, Robert A.; Bilek, Marcela M. M.; Brown, Ian G.

    2002-01-01

    Cathodic arc plasmas are contaminated with macroparticles. A variety of magnetic plasma filters has been used with various success in removing the macroparticles from the plasma. An open-architecture, bent solenoid filter, with additional field coils at the filter entrance and exit, improves macroparticle filtering. In particular, a double-bent filter that is twisted out of plane forms a very compact and efficient filter. The coil turns further have a flat cross-section to promote macroparticle reflection out of the filter volume. An output conditioning system formed of an expander coil, a straightener coil, and a homogenizer, may be used with the magnetic filter for expanding the filtered plasma beam to cover a larger area of the target. A cathodic arc plasma deposition system using this filter can be used for the deposition of ultrathin amorphous hard carbon (a-C) films for the magnetic storage industry.

  20. Microhollow cathode discharge excimer lamps

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenbach, Karl H.; El-Habachi, Ahmed; Moselhy, Mohamed M.; Shi, Wenhui; Stark, Robert H.

    2000-05-01

    Microhollow cathode discharges are high-pressure, nonequilibrium gas discharges between a hollow cathode and a planar or hollow anode with electrode dimensions in the 100 {mu}m range. The large concentration of high-energy electrons, in combination with the high-gas density favors excimer formation. Excimer emission was observed in xenon and argon, at wavelengths of 128 and 172 nm, respectively, and in argon fluoride and xenon chloride, at 193 and 308 nm. The radiant emittance of the excimer radiation was found to increase monotonically with pressure. However, due to the decrease in source size with pressure, the efficiency (ratio of excimer radiant power to input electrical power), has for xenon and argon fluoride a maximum at {approx}400 Torr. The maximum efficiency is between 6% and 9% for xenon, and {approx}2% for argon fluoride. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  1. Microhollow cathode discharge excimer lamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoenbach, Karl H.; El-Habachi, Ahmed; Moselhy, Mohamed M.; Shi, Wenhui; Stark, Robert H.

    2000-05-01

    Microhollow cathode discharges are high-pressure, nonequilibrium gas discharges between a hollow cathode and a planar or hollow anode with electrode dimensions in the 100 μm range. The large concentration of high-energy electrons, in combination with the high-gas density favors excimer formation. Excimer emission was observed in xenon and argon, at wavelengths of 128 and 172 nm, respectively, and in argon fluoride and xenon chloride, at 193 and 308 nm. The radiant emittance of the excimer radiation was found to increase monotonically with pressure. However, due to the decrease in source size with pressure, the efficiency (ratio of excimer radiant power to input electrical power), has for xenon and argon fluoride a maximum at ˜400 Torr. The maximum efficiency is between 6% and 9% for xenon, and ˜2% for argon fluoride.

  2. Nickel-titanium-phosphate cathodes

    DOEpatents

    Belharouak, Ilias; Amine, Khalil

    2008-12-16

    Cathode materials having an improved electronic conductivity allowing for faster kinetics in the electrochemical reaction, as well as higher conductivity to meet the power requirements for many consumer applications, especially at low temperatures. The cathode material comprises a compound from the family of compounds where the basic unit is generally represented by Li.sub.xNi.sub.0.5TiOPO.sub.4. The structure of Li.sub.xNi.sub.0.5TiOPO.sub.4 includes corner sharing octahedra [TiO.sub.6] running along the C-axis. The structure is such that nearly three Li atoms are being inserted in Li.sub.xNi.sub.0.5TiOPO.sub.4. A cell in accordance with the principles of the present invention is rechargable and demonstrates a high capacity of lithium intercalation and fast kinetics.

  3. Cathodic phenomena in aluminum electrowinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouteillon, J.; Poignet, J. C.; Rameau, J. J.

    1993-02-01

    Although aluminum is one of the world's highest production-volume primary metals, it is particularly costly to produce for a variety of factors, not the least of which are the expenses associated with electrolytic reduction. Based on the scale of global aluminum processing, even minor improvements in the electrowinning technology can result in significant savings of resources. Thus, from this perspective, the following reviews recent studies of cathodic phenomena in aluminum electrowinning.

  4. Barium-Dispenser Thermionic Cathode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wintucky, Edwin G.; Green, M.; Feinleib, M.

    1989-01-01

    Improved reservoir cathode serves as intense source of electrons required for high-frequency and often high-output-power, linear-beam tubes, for which long operating lifetime important consideration. High emission-current densities obtained through use of emitting surface of relatively-low effective work function and narrow work-function distribution, consisting of coat of W/Os deposited by sputtering. Lower operating temperatures and enhanced electron emission consequently possible.

  5. High contrast cathode ray tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lisovicz, E. J.; Catlaw, T. G. (Inventor)

    1971-01-01

    A layer of material is described, which contains fine grains of phosphor material stimulated by electrons to produce visible radiation. The layer, which also contains fine grains of cobalt oxide, is deposited on the glass screen of a cathode ray tube to provide high contrast, by absorbing most of the visible radiation which is directed to the layer through the screen, while not materially affecting the visible light which the phosphor material produces in response to the electron stimulation.

  6. Theory, Investigation and Stability of Cathode Electrocatalytic Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Dong; Liu, Mingfei; Lai, Samson; Blinn, Kevin; Liu, Meilin

    2012-09-30

    conditions. This was also confirmed by x-ray analyses. For example, soft x-ray XANES data reveal that Co cations displace the Mn cations as being more favored to be reduced. Variations in the Sr-O in the annealed LSCF Fourier-transformed (FT) EXAFS suggest that some Sr segregation is occurring, but is not present in the annealed LSM-infiltrated LSCF cathode materials. Further, a surface enhanced Raman technique was also developed into to probe and map LSM and LSCF phase on underlying YSZ substrate, enabling us to capture important chemical information of cathode surfaces under practical operating conditions. Electrochemical models for the design of test cells and understanding of mechanism have been developed for the exploration of fundamental properties of electrode materials. Novel catalyst coatings through particle depositions (SDC, SSC, and LCC) or continuous thin films (PSM and PSCM) were successfully developed to improve the activity and stability of LSCF cathodes. Finally, we have demonstrated enhanced activity and stability of LSCF cathodes over longer periods of time in homemade and commercially available cells by an optimized LSM infiltration process. Microstructure examination of the tested cells did not show obvious differences between blank and infiltrated cells, suggesting that the infiltrated LSM may form a coherent film on the LSCF cathodes. There was no significant change in the morphology or microstructure of the LSCF cathode due to the structural similarity of LSCF and LSM. Raman analysis of the tested cells indicated small peaks emerging on the blank cells that correspond to trace amounts of secondary phase formation during operation (e.g., CoO{sub x}). The formation of this secondary phase might be attributed to performance degradation. In contrast, there was no such secondary phase observed in the LSM infiltrated cells, indicating that the LSM modification staved off secondary phase formation and thus improved the stability.

  7. Life test of a xenon hollow cathode for a space plasma contractor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarver-Verhey, Timothy R.

    1994-01-01

    A plasma contacting device using a hollow cathode for plasma production has been baselined for use on the Space Station. This application will require reliable, continuous operation of the cathode at electron emission currents of between 0.75 and 10 A for two years (17,500 hours). In order to validate life-time capability, a hollow cathode, operated in a diode configuration, has been tested for more than 8600 hours of stable discharge operation as of March 30, 1994. This cathode is operated at a steady-state emission current of 12.0 and a fixed xenon flow rate of 4.5 sccm. Discharge voltage and cathode temperature have remained relatively stable at approximately 12.9 V and 1260 C during the test. The test has experienced 7 shutdowns to date. In all instances, the cathode was reignited at about 42 V and resumed stable operation. This test represents the longest demonstration of stable operation of high current (greater than 1A) xenon hollow cathodes reported to date.

  8. Considerations of the Role of the Cathodic Region in Localized Corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    R.G. Kelly; A. Agarwal; F. Cui; X. Shan; U. Landau; J.H. Payer

    2006-03-17

    The ability of wetted cathodes of limited area to support localized corrosion sites on passive materials exposed to atmospheric conditions was studied computationally. The analysis pertains to conditions where metal surfaces are covered by thin layers of moisture in contrast to conditions of full immersion. The moisture may be a continuous layer or in patches with and without particulate on the surface. These conditions are of interest for the surfaces of the waste packages at the proposed Yucca Mountain Repository where waste packages are supported in air. The cathode capacity was characterized by the total net cathodic current, I{sub net}, which the surface surrounding a localized corrosion site (i.e., a pit or crevice) could supply. The cathode capacity increases with increasing cathode area, but it saturates at finite cathode sizes due to the resistance of the thin electrolyte layer. The magnitude of the capacity depends on the water layer thickness, the solution conductivity, and the electrochemical reaction kinetics. The presence of particulates is treated by considering both volume and surface coverage effects. The limited electrolyte volume under thin film conditions can lead to rapid pH changes which decrease the cathode capacity due to the slower electrochemical kinetics at elevated pH. These effects can make localized corrosion less likely to be sustained.

  9. A pulsed cathodic arc spacecraft propulsion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, P. R. C.; Bilek, M. M. M.; Tarrant, R. N.; McKenzie, D. R.

    2009-11-01

    We investigate the use of a centre-triggered cathodic arc as a spacecraft propulsion system that uses an inert solid as a source of plasma. The cathodic vacuum arc produces almost fully ionized plasma with a high exhaust velocity (>104 m s-1), giving a specific impulse competitive with other plasma or ion thrusters. A centre trigger design is employed that enables efficient use of cathode material and a high pulse-to-pulse repeatability. We compare three anode geometries, two pulse current profiles and two pulse durations for their effects on impulse generation, energy and cathode material usage efficiency. Impulse measurement is achieved through the use of a free-swinging pendulum target constructed from a polymer material. Measurements show that impulse is accurately controlled by varying cathode current. The cylindrical anode gave the highest energy efficiency. Cathode usage is optimized by choosing a sawtooth current profile. There is no requirement for an exhaust charge neutralization system.

  10. Development program on a cold cathode electron gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spindt, C. A.; Holland, C. E.

    1985-01-01

    During this phase of the cathode development program, SRI improved the multiple electron beam exposure system used to print hole patterns for the cathode arrays, studied anisotropic etch processes, conducted cathode investigations using an emission microscope, reviewed possible alternate materials for cathode fabrication, studied cathode storage techniques, conducted high power operation experiments, and demonstrated high-current-density operation with small arrays of tips.

  11. Pyrite cathode material for a thermal battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pemsler, J. P.; Litchfield, J. K.

    1991-02-01

    The present invention relates in general to a synthetic cathode material for a molten salt battery and, more particularly, to a process of providing and using synthetic pyrite for use as a cathode in a thermal battery. These batteries, which have been successfully used in a number of military applications, include iron disulfide cathode material obtained as benefacted or from natural occurring pyrite deposits, or as a byproduct of flotation concentrate from the processing of base or noble metal ores.

  12. Arc initiation in cathodic arc plasma sources

    DOEpatents

    Anders, Andre

    2002-01-01

    A "triggerless" arc initiation method and apparatus is based on simply switching the arc supply voltage to the electrodes (anode and cathode). Neither a mechanical trigger electrode nor a high voltage flashover from a trigger electrode is required. A conducting path between the anode and cathode is provided, which allows a hot spot to form at a location where the path connects to the cathode. While the conductive path is eroded by the cathode spot action, plasma deposition ensures the ongoing repair of the conducting path. Arc initiation is achieved by simply applying the relatively low voltage of the arc power supply, e.g. 500 V-1 kV, with the insulator between the anode and cathode coated with a conducting layer and the current at the layer-cathode interface concentrated at one or a few contact points. The local power density at these contact points is sufficient for plasma production and thus arc initiation. A conductive surface layer, such as graphite or the material being deposited, is formed on the surface of the insulator which separates the cathode from the anode. The mechanism of plasma production (and arc initiation) is based on explosive destruction of the layer-cathode interface caused by joule heating. The current flow between the thin insulator coating and cathode occurs at only a few contact points so the current density is high.

  13. Phthalocyanine cathode materials for secondary lithium cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tamaki, J.; Yamaji, A.

    1982-01-01

    Discharge and charge characteristics of various phthalocyanine cathodes coupled with lithium metal are studied. The best capacity based only on cathode active material weight is 1440 A-hr/kg in the lithium/iron phthalocyanine system, and the cycle life of the lithium/Cu phthalocyanine system is more than 100 times at the discharge depth of 157 A-hr/kg. The cathode reaction mechanism is supposed to be lithium intercalation between phthalocyanine molecules. The results indicate that these phthalocyanines are promising cathode active materials for lithium secondary batteries.

  14. Development of High Energy Cathode (PNNL)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jiguang; Liu, Jun

    2011-01-01

    Lithium ion batteries with high energy densities are required to reach DOE’s goal on early commercialization of electrical vehicles, including HEV, PHEV and EV. To increase the energy of cathode, voltage or/and capacity of cathode need to be increased. During FY10, we have investigated cathode materials with high operation voltages, for example LiMnPO4, and renewable organic cathode with high capacities. Environmentally friendly materials and low cost synthesis approaches have been intentionally explored during our efforts.

  15. Emission properties of explosive field emission cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Amitava; Patel, Ankur; Menon, Rakhee; Sharma, Archana; Chakravarthy, D. P.; Patil, D. S.

    2011-10-15

    The research results of the explosive field emission cathode plasma expansion velocity and the initial emission area in the planar diode configuration with cathodes made of graphite, stainless steel, polymer velvet, carbon coated, and carbon fiber (needle type) cathodes are presented. The experiments have been performed at the electron accelerator LIA-200 (200 kV, 100 ns, and 4 kA). The diode voltage has been varied from 28-225 kV, whereas the current density has been varied from 86-928 A/cm{sup 2} with 100 ns pulse duration. The experimentally obtained electron beam diode perveance has been compared with the 1 dimensional Child-Langmuir- law. It was found that initially only a part of the cathode take part in the emission process. The plasma expands at 1.7-5.2 cm/{mu}s for 4 mm anode-cathode gap for various cathode materials. It was found that the plasma expansion velocity increases with the decrease in the cathode diameter. At the beginning of the accelerating pulse, the entire cathode area participates in the electron emission process only for the multiple needle type carbon fiber cathode.

  16. Processes For Cleaning a Cathode Tube and Assemblies In A Hollow Cathode Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Michael J. (Inventor); Verhey, Timothy R. R. (Inventor); Soulas, George C. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    The present invention is a process for cleaning a cathode tube and other subassemblies in a hollow cathode assembly. In the disclosed process, hand covering elastomer gloves are used for handling all cathode assembly parts. The cathode tube and other subassemblies are cleaned with a lint-free cloth damped with acetone, then wiped with alcohol, immersed in ethyl alcohol or acetone, and ultrasonic agitation is applied, heating to 60 C. for ethyl alcohol or 56 C. for acetone. The cathode tube and other subassemblies are dried by blowing with nitrogen gas.

  17. Preliminary Results of Field Emission Cathode Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sovey, James S.; Kovaleski, Scott D.

    2001-01-01

    Preliminary screening tests of field emission cathodes such as chemical vapor deposited (CVD) diamond, textured pyrolytic graphite, and textured copper were conducted at background pressures typical of electric thruster test facilities to assess cathode performance and stability. Very low power electric thrusters which provide tens to hundreds micronewtons of thrust may need field emission neutralizers that have a capability of tens to hundreds of microamperes. From current voltage characteristics, it was found that the CVD diamond and textured metals cathodes clearly satisfied the Fowler-Nordheim emission relation. The CVD diamond and a textured copper cathode had average current densities of 270 and 380 mA/sq cm, respectively, at the beginning-of-life. After a few hours of operation the cathode emission currents degraded by 40 to 75% at background pressures in the 10(exp -5) Pa to 10(exp -4) Pa range. The textured pyrolytic graphite had a modest current density at beginning-of-life of 84 mA/sq cm, but this cathode was the most stable of all. Extended testing of the most promising cathodes is warranted to determine if current degradation is a burn-in effect or whether it is a long-term degradation process. Preliminary experiments with ferroelectric emission cathodes, which are ceramics with spontaneous electric polarization, were conducted. Peak current densities of 30 to 120 mA/sq cm were obtained for pulse durations of about 500 ns in the 10(exp -4) Pa pressure range.

  18. Cathode Effects in Cylindrical Hall Thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    Granstedt, E.M.; Raitses, Y.; Fisch, N. J.

    2008-09-12

    Stable operation of a cylindrical Hall thruster (CHT) has been achieved using a hot wire cathode, which functions as a controllable electron emission source. It is shown that as the electron emission from the cathode increases with wire heating, the discharge current increases, the plasma plume angle reduces, and the ion energy distribution function shifts toward higher energies. The observed effect of cathode electron emission on thruster parameters extends and clarifies performance improvements previously obtained for the overrun discharge current regime of the same type of thruster, but using a hollow cathode-neutralizer. Once thruster discharge current saturates with wire heating, further filament heating does not affect other discharge parameters. The saturated values of thruster discharge parameters can be further enhanced by optimal placement of the cathode wire with respect to the magnetic field.

  19. High pressure microhollow cathode discharges in air

    SciTech Connect

    Khedr, M.A.; Stark, R.H.; Watson, B.; Schoenbach, K.H.

    1998-12-31

    Research on high pressure, large volume glow discharges in air is motivated by applications such as reflectors and absorbers for electromagnetic radiation, plasma processing, and the remediation of gaseous pollution. In order to prevent glow-to-arc transitions, which in high-pressure glow discharges start in the cathode region, it is proposed to use a plasma cathode consisting of an array of microhollow cathode discharges. To explore the conditions for stable operation of single 100 {micro}m microhollow cathode discharges in flowing air, the current-voltage characteristics, and the visual appearance of a 100 {micro}m microhollow cathode discharge were studied. The results show that the threshold current for the transition from a glow into a filamentary discharge varies inversely with pressure. At pressures of 400 Torr the current in the 100 {micro}m hollow cathode discharge must not exceed 0.5 mA in order for the discharge to be stable. The type of instability, which causes the transition from dc to fluctuating currents, is not known at this time, but the observed dependence of the threshold current from the gas pressure points to a thermal instability. Assuming that the White-Allis scaling law still holds for air discharges at pressures close to atmospheric, it is expected that reducing the cathode hole diameter to 50 {micro}m will allow us to operate microhollow cathode discharges at atmospheric air with currents of up to 0.25 mA. Experimental studies on the effect of the cathode dimensions and cathode material are underway and results will be discussed at the conference.

  20. Fabrication and Characterization of Functionally Graded Cathodes for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonet, J.; Kapelski, G.; Bouvard, D.

    2008-02-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells are multi-layered designed. The most prevalent structure is an anode supported cell with a thick porous layer of nickel oxide NiO and yttrium stabilized zirconia (YSZ) composite acting as an anode, a thin dense layer of YSZ as an electrolyte, a composite thin porous layer of lanthanum strontium manganate LSM and YSZ and a current collector layer of porous LSM. Regular operating temperature is 1000 °C. The industrial development requires designing cathodes with acceptable electrochemical and mechanical properties at a lower temperature, typically between 700 and 800 °C. A solution consists in designing composite bulk cathodes with more numerous electro-chemical reaction sites. This requirement could be met by grading the composition of the cathode in increasing the YSZ volume fraction near the electrolyte and the LSM volume fraction near the current collector layer so that the repartition of reaction sites and the interfacial adhesion between the cathode and electrolyte layers are optimal. The fabrication of graded composite cathode has been investigated using a sedimentation process that consists of preparing a suspension containing the powder mixture and allowing the particles to fall by gravity upon a substrate. Different composite cathodes with continuous composition gradient have been obtained by sedimentation of LSM and YSZ powder mixture upon a dense YSZ substrate and subsequent firing. Their compositions and microstructures have been analysed with Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and Electron Dispersive Spectrometry (EDS).

  1. Thermal and electrochemical properties of PEO-LiTFSI-Pyr14TFSI-based composite cathodes, incorporating 4 V-class cathode active materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetjen, Morten; Kim, Guk-Tae; Joost, Mario; Appetecchi, Giovanni B.; Winter, Martin; Passerini, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Poly(ethylene oxide)-lithium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide N-butyl-N-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (PEO-LiTFSI-Pyr14TFSI)-based 4 V-class composite cathodes, incorporating either Li(Ni1/3Co1/3Mn1/3)O2 or Li(Ni0.8Co0.15Al0.05)O2 were prepared by a hot-pressing process and successively investigated in terms of their morphological, thermal, and electrochemical properties. Thereby, excellent mechanical and thermal properties could be demonstrated for all composite cathodes. The electrochemical performance of truly dry all-solid-state Li/P(EO)10LiTFSI-(Pyr14TFSI)2/composite cathode batteries at temperatures as low as 40 °C revealed high delivered capacities. However, in comparison with LiFePO4, the 4 V-class composite cathodes also indicated much lower capacity retention. In-depth investigations on the interfacial properties of Li(Ni0.8Co0.15Al0.05)O2 composite cathodes revealed a strong dependence on the anodic cut-off potential and the presence of current flow through the cell, whereby different degradation mechanisms could be characterized upon cycling, according to which the finite growth of a surface films at both electrode/polymer electrolyte interfaces inhibited continuous decomposition of the polymer electrolyte even at potentials as high as 4.3 V. Moreover, the presence of Pyr14TFSI in the 4 V-class composite cathodes sustainably reduced the cathode interfacial resistance and presumably diminished the corrosion of the aluminum current collector.

  2. Emission, plasma formation, and brightness of a PZT ferroelectric cathode

    SciTech Connect

    Sampayan, S.; Caporaso, G.; Trimble, D.; Westenskow, G.

    1995-04-27

    We have measured an 36-A-cm{sup {minus}2} current emission density over the surface area of an 11.4-cm{sup 2}-area Lead-Titanate- Zirconate (PZT) ferroelectric cathode with a pulsed anode-cathode (A-K) potential of 50 kV. We have also observed currents above those predicted by classical Child-Langmuir formula for a wide variety of cases. Since a plasma within the A-K gap could also lead to increase current emission we are attempting to measure the properties of the plasma near the cathode surface at emission time. In other measurements, we have observed strong gap currents in the absence of an A-K potential. Further, we continue to make brightness measurements of the emitted beam and observe spatially non-uniform emission and large shot-to-shot variation. Measurements show individual beamlets with a brightness as high 10{sup 11} Am{sup {minus}2} rad{sup {minus}2}.

  3. 40 CFR 261.40 - Conditional Exclusion for Used, Intact Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) Exported for Recycling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Conditional Exclusion for Used, Intact Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) Exported for Recycling. 261.40 Section 261.40 Protection of Environment...) Exported for Recycling. Used, intact CRTs exported for recycling are not solid wastes if they meet...

  4. 40 CFR 261.40 - Conditional Exclusion for Used, Intact Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) Exported for Recycling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Conditional Exclusion for Used, Intact Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) Exported for Recycling. 261.40 Section 261.40 Protection of Environment...) Exported for Recycling. Used, intact CRTs exported for recycling are not solid wastes if they meet...

  5. 40 CFR 261.40 - Conditional Exclusion for Used, Intact Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) Exported for Recycling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Conditional Exclusion for Used, Intact Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) Exported for Recycling. 261.40 Section 261.40 Protection of Environment...) Exported for Recycling. Used, intact CRTs exported for recycling are not solid wastes if they meet...

  6. 40 CFR 261.40 - Conditional Exclusion for Used, Intact Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) Exported for Recycling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Conditional Exclusion for Used, Intact Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) Exported for Recycling. 261.40 Section 261.40 Protection of Environment...) Exported for Recycling. Used, intact CRTs exported for recycling are not solid wastes if they meet...

  7. 40 CFR 261.40 - Conditional Exclusion for Used, Intact Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) Exported for Recycling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Conditional Exclusion for Used, Intact Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) Exported for Recycling. 261.40 Section 261.40 Protection of Environment...) Exported for Recycling. Used, intact CRTs exported for recycling are not solid wastes if they meet...

  8. 40 CFR 261.41 - Notification and Recordkeeping for Used, Intact Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) Exported for Reuse.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Notification and Recordkeeping for Used, Intact Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) Exported for Reuse. 261.41 Section 261.41 Protection of... Tubes (CRTs) Exported for Reuse. (a) Persons who export used, intact CRTs for reuse must send a...

  9. 40 CFR 261.41 - Notification and Recordkeeping for Used, Intact Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) Exported for Reuse.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Notification and Recordkeeping for Used, Intact Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) Exported for Reuse. 261.41 Section 261.41 Protection of... Tubes (CRTs) Exported for Reuse. (a) Persons who export used, intact CRTs for reuse must send a...

  10. 40 CFR 261.41 - Notification and Recordkeeping for Used, Intact Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) Exported for Reuse.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Notification and Recordkeeping for Used, Intact Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) Exported for Reuse. 261.41 Section 261.41 Protection of... Tubes (CRTs) Exported for Reuse. (a) Persons who export used, intact CRTs for reuse must send a...

  11. 40 CFR 261.41 - Notification and Recordkeeping for Used, Intact Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) Exported for Reuse.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Notification and Recordkeeping for Used, Intact Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) Exported for Reuse. 261.41 Section 261.41 Protection of... Tubes (CRTs) Exported for Reuse. (a) Persons who export used, intact CRTs for reuse must send a...

  12. History of Child Welfare and Protection Social Work in Northern Ireland: Finding Continuity amongst Discontinuity in Case Files from 1950 to 1968

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skehill, Caroline

    2010-01-01

    This article reports on research carried out on 189 child welfare files from the largest welfare authority in Northern Ireland from 1950 to 1968. The literature review provides a commentary on some of the major debates surrounding child welfare and protection social work from the perspective of its historical development. The report of the…

  13. Analysis of cathode geometry to minimize cathode erosion in direct current microplasma jet

    SciTech Connect

    Causa, Federica; Ghezzi, Francesco; Caniello, Roberto; Grosso, Giovanni; Dellasega, David

    2012-12-15

    Microplasma jets are now widely used for deposition, etching, and materials processing. The present study focuses on the investigation of the influence of cathode geometry on deposition quality, for microplasma jet deposition systems in low vacuum. The interest here is understanding the influence of hydrogen on sputtering and/or evaporation of the electrodes. Samples obtained with two cathode geometries with tapered and rectangular cross-sections have been investigated experimentally by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersion X-ray spectroscopy. Samples obtained with a tapered-geometry cathode present heavy contamination, demonstrating cathode erosion, while samples obtained with a rectangular-cross-section cathode are free from contamination. These experimental characteristics were explained by modelling results showing a larger radial component of the electric field at the cathode inner wall of the tapered cathode. As a result, ion acceleration is larger, explaining the observed cathode erosion in this case. Results from the present investigation also show that the ratio of radial to axial field components is larger for the rectangular geometry case, thus, qualitatively explaining the presence of micro-hollow cathode discharge over a wide range of currents observed in this case. In the light of the above findings, the rectangular cathode geometry is considered to be more effective to achieve cleaner deposition.

  14. Analysis of cathode geometry to minimize cathode erosion in direct current microplasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Causa, Federica; Ghezzi, Francesco; Dellasega, David; Caniello, Roberto; Grosso, Giovanni

    2012-12-01

    Microplasma jets are now widely used for deposition, etching, and materials processing. The present study focuses on the investigation of the influence of cathode geometry on deposition quality, for microplasma jet deposition systems in low vacuum. The interest here is understanding the influence of hydrogen on sputtering and/or evaporation of the electrodes. Samples obtained with two cathode geometries with tapered and rectangular cross-sections have been investigated experimentally by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersion X-ray spectroscopy. Samples obtained with a tapered-geometry cathode present heavy contamination, demonstrating cathode erosion, while samples obtained with a rectangular-cross-section cathode are free from contamination. These experimental characteristics were explained by modelling results showing a larger radial component of the electric field at the cathode inner wall of the tapered cathode. As a result, ion acceleration is larger, explaining the observed cathode erosion in this case. Results from the present investigation also show that the ratio of radial to axial field components is larger for the rectangular geometry case, thus, qualitatively explaining the presence of micro-hollow cathode discharge over a wide range of currents observed in this case. In the light of the above findings, the rectangular cathode geometry is considered to be more effective to achieve cleaner deposition.

  15. Cathode for an electrochemical cell

    DOEpatents

    Bates, John B.; Dudney, Nancy J.; Gruzalski, Greg R.; Luck, Christopher F.

    2001-01-01

    Described is a thin-film battery, especially a thin-film microbattery, and a method for making same having application as a backup or primary integrated power source for electronic devices. The battery includes a novel electrolyte which is electrochemically stable and does not react with the lithium anode and a novel vanadium oxide cathode. Configured as a microbattery, the battery can be fabricated directly onto a semiconductor chip, onto the semiconductor die or onto any portion of the chip carrier. The battery can be fabricated to any specified size or shape to meet the requirements of a particular application. The battery is fabricated of solid state materials and is capable of operation between -15.degree. C. and 150.degree. C.

  16. Hall-effect thruster--Cathode coupling: The effect of cathode position and magnetic field topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommerville, Jason D.

    2009-12-01

    Hall-effect thruster (HET) cathodes are responsible for the generation of the free electrons necessary to initiate and sustain the main plasma discharge and to neutralize the ion beam. The position of the cathode relative to the thruster strongly affects the efficiency of thrust generation. However, the mechanisms by which the position affects the efficiency are not well understood. This dissertation explores the effect of cathode position on HET efficiency. Magnetic field topology is shown to play an important role in the coupling between the cathode plasma and the main discharge plasma. The position of the cathode within the magnetic field affects the ion beam and the plasma properties of the near-field plume, which explains the changes in efficiency of the thruster. Several experiments were conducted which explored the changes of efficiency arising from changes in cathode coupling. In each experiment, the thrust, discharge current, and cathode coupling voltage were monitored while changes in the independent variables of cathode position, cathode mass flow and magnetic field topology were made. From the telemetry data, the efficiency of the HET thrust generation was calculated. Furthermore, several ion beam and plasma properties were measured including ion energy distribution, beam current density profile, near-field plasma potential, electron temperature, and electron density. The ion beam data show how the independent variables affected the quality of ion beam and therefore the efficiency of thrust generation. The measurements of near-field plasma properties partially explain how the changes in ion beam quality arise. The results of the experiments show that cathode position, mass flow, and field topology affect several aspects of the HET operation, especially beam divergence and voltage utilization efficiencies. Furthermore, the experiments show that magnetic field topology is important in the cathode coupling process. In particular, the magnetic field

  17. Cathode heating mechanisms in pseudospark plasma switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommerer, Timothy J.; Pak, Hoyoung; Kushner, Mark J.

    1992-10-01

    Pseudosparks, and the back-lighted thyratron (BLT) in particular, are finding increasing application as pulse power switches. An attractive feature of BLTs is that high current densities (≥ tens of kA cm-2) can be sustained from metal cathodes without auxiliary heating. The source of this current is believed to be electric-field-enhanced thermionic emission resulting from heating of the cathode by ion bombardment during commutation which ultimately melts the surface of the cathode. It is proposed that a photon-driven ionization mechanism in the interelectrode gap of the BLT is responsible for initiating the observed patterns of cathode surface melting and electron emission. A 21/2-dimensional computer model is presented that incorporates a photo-induced ionization mechanism to spread the plasma into the interelectrode gap. It predicts a melting of the cathode in a pattern similar to that which is experimentally observed, and predicts a rate of field-enhanced thermionic electron emission that is sufficient to explain the high BLT conduction current density. In the absence of these mechanisms, the model does not predict the observed large-area melting of the face of the cathode. The cathode heating rate during the BLT switching phase is maximum for operating parameters that are very close to the limit for which the switch will close (that is, the smallest possible pressure-electrode spacing product and smallest possible electrode holes).

  18. Glow discharges in high pressure microhollow cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boeuf, J.-P.; Pitchford, L. C.; Schoenbach, K. H.

    2004-09-01

    We have developed a model of high-pressure, microhollow cathode discharges (MHCDs) which has been used to predict the electrical characteristics and other properties of these discharges for comparison with experiment. The configuration studied here is an anode/dielectric/cathode sandwich in which a cylindrical hole with a diameter of some 100's of microns is pierced in the dielectric and in the cathode. Results from the model calculations in xenon at 100 torr and higher pressures show that the positive V-I (voltage-current) characteristic observed experimentally at low current corresponds to an abnormal glow discharge inside the cathode hole. At higher current, the V-I characteristic is that of a normal to slightly abnormal glow discharge between the anode and the outer face of the cathode. The change in slope of the V-I characteristic is consistent with experiment (provided metastables are taken into account). This shape was previously attribed to the onset of the classical hollow cathode effect, but we find no hollow cathode effect for pressures above about 30 torr and for 200 micron hole diameters.

  19. Parallel operation of miniature hollow cathode discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenbach, K.H.; Peterkin, F.E.; Verhappen, R.

    1994-12-31

    The pressure where hollow cathode discharges operate scales inversely with the cathode hole diameter. By reducing the size of the cathode hole to less than one millimeter, the authors were able to obtain stable operation of the hollow cathode glow discharge in air, up to ten`s of torr. The current-voltage characteristic was found to have a positive slope below approximately 5 torr. This allows the authors to operate hollow cathode discharges in parallel at these pressures without using ballast resistors for the individual discharges. In an experiment with four 0.75 mm diameter cathode holes drilled in a 0.75 mm copper plate, the authors obtained stable operation of the discharges at a threshold voltage of 380 V and a total current of 0.16 mA. The intensity of the glow from each hole tended to equalize after several hours of operation. The system was run for approximately 40 hours without evident change in performance. The stability with respect to parallel operation offers the possibility to use miniature hollow cathode discharge arrays as flat panel electron and ion sources.

  20. Batteries: Overview of Battery Cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Doeff, Marca M

    2010-07-12

    The very high theoretical capacity of lithium (3829 mAh/g) provided a compelling rationale from the 1970's onward for development of rechargeable batteries employing the elemental metal as an anode. The realization that some transition metal compounds undergo reductive lithium intercalation reactions reversibly allowed use of these materials as cathodes in these devices, most notably, TiS{sub 2}. Another intercalation compound, LiCoO{sub 2}, was described shortly thereafter but, because it was produced in the discharged state, was not considered to be of interest by battery companies at the time. Due to difficulties with the rechargeability of lithium and related safety concerns, however, alternative anodes were sought. The graphite intercalation compound (GIC) LiC{sub 6} was considered an attractive candidate but the high reactivity with commonly used electrolytic solutions containing organic solvents was recognized as a significant impediment to its use. The development of electrolytes that allowed the formation of a solid electrolyte interface (SEI) on surfaces of the carbon particles was a breakthrough that enabled commercialization of Li-ion batteries. In 1990, Sony announced the first commercial batteries based on a dual Li ion intercalation system. These devices are assembled in the discharged state, so that it is convenient to employ a prelithiated cathode such as LiCoO{sub 2} with the commonly used graphite anode. After charging, the batteries are ready to power devices. The practical realization of high energy density Li-ion batteries revolutionized the portable electronics industry, as evidenced by the widespread market penetration of mobile phones, laptop computers, digital music players, and other lightweight devices since the early 1990s. In 2009, worldwide sales of Li-ion batteries for these applications alone were US$ 7 billion. Furthermore, their performance characteristics (Figure 1) make them attractive for traction applications such as hybrid

  1. Operational Status of the International Space Station Plasma Contactor Hollow Cathode Assemblies from July 2011 to May 2013

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamhawi, Hani; Yim, John T.; Patterson, Michael J.; Dalton, Penni J.

    2014-01-01

    The International Space Station has onboard two Aerojet Rocketdyne developed plasma contactor units that perform the function of charge control. The plasma contactor units contain NASA Glenn Research Center developed hollow cathode assemblies. NASA Glenn Research Center monitors the onorbit operation of the flight hollow cathode assemblies. As of May 31, 2013, HCA.001-F has been ignited and operated 123 times and has accumulated 8072 hours of operation, whereas, HCA.003-F has been ignited and operated 112 times and has accumulated 9664 hours of operation. Monitored hollow cathode ignition times and anode voltage magnitudes indicate that they continue to operate nominally.

  2. Operational Status of the International Space Station Plasma Contactor Hollow Cathode Assemblies July 2001 to May 2013

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamhawi, Hani; Yim, John T.; Patterson, Michael J.; Dalton, Penni J.

    2013-01-01

    The International Space Station has onboard two Aerojet Rocketdyne developed plasma contactor units that perform the function of charge control. The plasma contactor units contain NASA Glenn Research Center developed hollow cathode assemblies. NASA Glenn Research Center monitors the on-orbit operation of the flight hollow cathode assemblies. As of May 31, 2013, HCA.001-F has been ignited and operated 123 times and has accumulated 8072 hours of operation, whereas, HCA.003-F has been ignited and operated 112 times and has accumulated 9664 hours of operation. Monitored hollow cathode ignition times and anode voltage magnitudes indicate that they continue to operate nominally.

  3. Numerical study on rectangular microhollow cathode discharge

    SciTech Connect

    He Shoujie; Ouyang Jiting; He Feng; Li Shang

    2011-03-15

    Rectangular microhollow cathode discharge in argon is investigated by using two-dimensional time-dependent self-consistent fluid model. The electric potential, electric field, particle density, and mean electron energy are calculated. The results show that hollow cathode effect can be onset in the present configuration, with strong electric field and high mean electron energy in the cathode fall while high density and quasineutral plasma in the negative glow. The potential well and electric filed reversal are formed in the negative glow region. It is suggested that the presence of large electron diffusion flux necessitates the field reversal and potential well.

  4. Cathode for molten carbonate fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, Thomas D.; Mrazek, Franklin C.

    1990-01-01

    A porous sintered cathode for a molten carbonate fuel cell and method of making same, the cathode including a skeletal structure of a first electronically conductive material slightly soluble in the electrolyte present in the molten carbonate fuel cell covered by fine particles of a second material of possibly lesser electronic conductivity insoluble in the electrolyte present in the molten carbonate fuel cell, the cathode having a porosity in the range of from about 60% to about 70% at steady-state cell operating conditions consisting of both macro-pores and micro-pores.

  5. Plasma distribution of cathodic ARC deposition system

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, S.; Raoux, S.; Krishnan, K.; MacGill, R.A.; Brown, I.G.

    1996-08-01

    The plasma distribution using a cathodic arc plasma source with and without magnetic macroparticle filter has been determined by depositing on a transparent plastic substrate and measuring the film absorption. It was found that the width of the distribution depends on the arc current, and it also depends on the cathode material which leads to a spatial separation of the elements when an alloy cathode is used. By applying a magnetic multicusp field near the exit of the magnetic filter, it was possible to modify the plasma distribution and obtain a flat plasma profile with a constant and homogeneous elemental distribution.

  6. Pulsed hollow cathode discharge with nanosecond risetime

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, G.; Husoy, P.O.; Schoenbach, K.H.

    1984-12-01

    This paper reports the operation of a cylindrical hollow cathode discharge with current risetimes of a few nanoseconds at current densities at the entrance of the cathode in the range of 50-560A x cm/sup -2/ and at voltages of 280-850 V. Time-dependent measurements of the impedance of the discharge are presented. They allow for the evaluation of discharge quantities such as risetime, delay time, discharge voltage, and current, depending on the operation parameters as applied voltage, pressure, and preionization. The power density in the active region of the hollow cathode exceeded 200 kW x cm/sup -3/.

  7. Cells having cathodes containing polycarbon disulfide materials

    DOEpatents

    Okamoto, Yoshi; Skotheim, Terje A.; Lee, Hung S.

    1995-08-15

    The present invention relates to an electric current producing cell which contains an anode, a cathode having as a cathode-active material one or more carbon-sulfur compounds of the formula (CS.sub.x).sub.n, in which x takes values from 1.2 to 2.3 and n is greater or equal to 2, and where the redox process does not involve polymerization and de-polymerization by forming and breaking S--S bonds in the polymer backbone. The cell also contains an electrolyte which is chemically inert with respect to the anode and the cathode.

  8. Cells having cathodes containing polycarbon disulfide materials

    DOEpatents

    Okamoto, Y.; Skotheim, T.A.; Lee, H.S.

    1995-08-15

    The present invention relates to an electric current producing cell which contains an anode, a cathode having as a cathode-active material one or more carbon-sulfur compounds of the formula (CS{sub x}){sub n}, in which x takes values from 1.2 to 2.3 and n is greater or equal to 2, and where the redox process does not involve polymerization and de-polymerization by forming and breaking S--S bonds in the polymer backbone. The cell also contains an electrolyte which is chemically inert with respect to the anode and the cathode. 5 figs.

  9. Galvanic Liquid Applied Coating System for Protection of Embedded Steel Surfaces from Corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, Joseph; MacDowell, Louis; Voska, N. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The corrosion of reinforcing steel in concrete is an insidious problem for the Kennedy Space Center, government agencies, and the general public. Existing corrosion protection systems on the market are costly, complex, and time-consuming to install, require continuous maintenance and monitoring, and require specialized skills for installation. NASA's galvanic liquid-applied coating offers companies the ability to conveniently protect embedded steel rebar surfaces from corrosion. Liquid-applied inorganic galvanic coating contains one ore more of the following metallic particles: magnesium, zinc, or indium and may contain moisture attracting compounds that facilitate the protection process. The coating is applied to the outer surface of reinforced concrete so that electrical current is established between metallic particles and surfaces of embedded steel rebar; and electric (ionic) current is responsible for providing the necessary cathodic protection for embedded rebar surfaces.

  10. Low temperature aluminum reduction cell using hollow cathode

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Craig W.; Frizzle, Patrick B.

    2002-08-20

    A method of producing aluminum in an electrolytic cell containing alumina dissolved in an electrolyte. A plurality of non-consumable anodes are disposed substantially vertically in the electrolyte along with a plurality of monolithic hollow cathodes. Each cathode has a top and bottom and the cathodes are disposed vertically in the electrolyte and the anodes and the cathodes are arranged in alternating relationship. Each of the cathodes is comprised of a first side facing a first opposing anode and a second side facing a second opposing anode. The first and second sides are joined by ends to form a reservoir in the hollow cathode for collecting aluminum therein deposited at the cathode.

  11. Nanoporous silver cathode surface treated by atomic layer deposition of CeO(x) for low-temperature solid oxide fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Neoh, Ke Chean; Han, Gwon Deok; Kim, Manjin; Kim, Jun Woo; Choi, Hyung Jong; Park, Suk Won; Shim, Joon Hyung

    2016-05-01

    We evaluated the performance of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) with a 50 nm thin silver (Ag) cathode surface treated with cerium oxide (CeO(x)) by atomic layer deposition (ALD). The performances of bare and ALD-treated Ag cathodes were evaluated on gadolinia-doped ceria (GDC) electrolyte supporting cells with a platinum (Pt) anode over 300 °C-450 °C. Our work confirms that ALD CeO(x) treatment enhances cathodic performance and thermal stability of the Ag cathode. The performance difference between cells using a Ag cathode optimally treated with an ALD CeO(x) surface and a reference Pt cathode is about 50% at 450 °C in terms of fuel cell power output in our experiment. The bare Ag cathode completely agglomerated into islands during fuel cell operation at 450 °C, while the ALD CeO(x) treatment effectively protects the porosity of the cathode. We also discuss the long-term stability of ALD CeO(x)-treated Ag cathodes related to the microstructure of the layers.

  12. Nanoporous silver cathode surface treated by atomic layer deposition of CeO x for low-temperature solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chean Neoh, Ke; Han, Gwon Deok; Kim, Manjin; Kim, Jun Woo; Jong Choi, Hyung; Park, Suk Won; Shim, Joon Hyung

    2016-05-01

    We evaluated the performance of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) with a 50 nm thin silver (Ag) cathode surface treated with cerium oxide (CeO x ) by atomic layer deposition (ALD). The performances of bare and ALD-treated Ag cathodes were evaluated on gadolinia-doped ceria (GDC) electrolyte supporting cells with a platinum (Pt) anode over 300 °C-450 °C. Our work confirms that ALD CeO x treatment enhances cathodic performance and thermal stability of the Ag cathode. The performance difference between cells using a Ag cathode optimally treated with an ALD CeO x surface and a reference Pt cathode is about 50% at 450 °C in terms of fuel cell power output in our experiment. The bare Ag cathode completely agglomerated into islands during fuel cell operation at 450 °C, while the ALD CeO x treatment effectively protects the porosity of the cathode. We also discuss the long-term stability of ALD CeO x -treated Ag cathodes related to the microstructure of the layers.

  13. Electrolyte and Cathode Degradation Mechanisms in Lithium Ion Batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tebbe, Jonathon

    Lithium ion battery technologies suffer from limitations in performance, such as capacity fading, due in part to degradation of the cathode and electrolyte materials. Quantum chemical simulations were employed to investigate the reactions leading to degradation of LiCoO2 cathodes and the electrolyte molecules. Formation of HF in the electrolyte resulting from reaction between PF5 and H2O impurities was first investigated. This research predicts HF is produced as a result of PF5 complexing with H2O, then reacting through ligand exchange to form HF and PF4OH with an activation barrier of 1.18 eV and reaction enthalpy of 0.15 eV. HF undergoes dissociative adsorption at that the (101¯4) surface of LiCoO2 without a barrier, leading to formation of LiF-Li+ precipitates and H 2O on the surface with a reaction energy of -2.41 eV. The formation of H2O is of particular concern because H2O drives further formation of HF in the electrolyte, resulting in an autocatalytic cycle of degradation. These findings indicate that HF initially occurs in low concentrations rapidly increases due to H2O generation upon HF attack. Reduction in capacity fading is observed in alumina ALD coated LiCoO2 cathodes and we have investigated a monolayer alumina coating on the LiCoO2 (101¯4) surface to identify the mechanism by which the alumina coating protects the cathode surface. We have found that HF will preferentially dissociate at the alumina coating with a reaction energy of -2.84 eV and without any resolvable barrier to dissociation. Additionally, our calculations predict that H2O does not form as a result of HF dissociation at the alumina monolayer; instead HF dissociation produces neighboring hydroxyl sites on the alumina surface. Consequently, the alumina coating prevents the autocatalytic degradation of the cathode by sequestering HF impurities in the alumina film. Finally, we found that Lewis acid-base complexation between ethylene carbonate (EC) electrolyte molecules and PF5 or the Li

  14. Ion energy measurements near a dormant cathode in a multiple-cathode gridded ion thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Rovey, Joshua L.; Gallimore, Alec D.

    2007-03-15

    A rectangular ion thruster discharge chamber was investigated for operation with multiple discharge cathode assemblies (DCAs). The multiple cathode approach attempts to increase thruster throughput and lifetime by operating three DCAs sequentially, possibly providing a threefold increase in discharge life. Previous multiple-cathode electric propulsion devices, such as the SPT-100, have shown dormant cathode erosion to be a life-limiting phenomenon. Similar results in a multiple-cathode discharge chamber may decrease the anticipated gain in discharge lifetime. In order to assess possible dormant cathode sputtering erosion, a diagnostic canister (DC) was designed and utilized to measure bombarding ion energy at the dormant cathode locations. The DC appeared similar to the active DCA, but was outfitted with a retarding potential analyzer. Most probable ion energy measurements show ions with energy of 27-35 eV ({+-}10%) with respect to cathode common and ion energy increases with increasing magnetic field strength. These results are consistent with an ion falling from the plasma potential to cathode common. A simple sputtering erosion model shows that, if doubly charged ions are present, these energies are enough to cause sputtering erosion of the dormant units.

  15. Effect of Cathode Length on Electrical Characteristics of a Microhollow Cathode Discharge in Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamasaki, Tsutomu; Namba, Shinichi; Takiyama, Ken; Nojima, Hideo

    2012-06-01

    The electrical characteristics of a microhollow cathode discharge (MHCD) have been measured over a wide range of helium gas pressures from 10 to 900 Torr, by using cathodes of 0.5 mm diameter and 0.5-3.0 mm length. A relatively high voltage of the Paschen minimum at high pressure for the shortest cathode and a conventional hollow cathode mode for longer ones were observed. These are explained by a change of the plasma loss owing to the difference in cathode length. The radial extent of the negative glow inside the cathode hole increased with discharge current, and eventually spread along the outer surface. The threshold current for the extension of the plasma outside the cathode hole increased in proportion to the cathode length and to the square of the gas pressure. Thus, the longer cathode provides a favorable condition for the generation of reactive MHCD plasma at high-pressure and high-current operation. On the basis of these results and spectroscopic observation, the sustaining mechanism of an MHCD is briefly discussed.

  16. Quantum Yield of Gold-Cathode Photomultipliers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Childs, Charles B.

    1961-01-01

    Two gold-cathode EMI 6255G tubes have been investigated for their quantum yield between 3100 and 1900 A. The tubes had cathodes of different appearances. One of these, numbered 3012, had a slight bluish tinge and was very transparent to visible light; the other, numbered 3021, had a definite gold coloration. The relative quantum yield of each tube was determined with the aid of a Cary model 14 recording spectrophotometer used as a monochromator. The monochromator relative-energy output was determined from the current output of a sodium-salicylate-coated RCA 1P21 photomultiplier. Each gold-cathode tube was then operated at 3000 v, and the central 1.8 cm cube of the cathode was exposed to the monochromator output.

  17. Time-shared Cathode Ray Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herndon, E. S.

    1969-01-01

    Time-shared cathode tube provides high quality display at low cost display stations which utilize television moniters. It updates a cluster of graphic displays from a computer and is useful in systems not equipped for graphics time-sharing.

  18. The temporal development of hollow cathode discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Ngo, M.T. ); Schoenbach, K.H.; Gerdin, G.A. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering); Lee, J.H. )

    1990-06-01

    This paper reports the temporal development of hollow cathode discharges studied by means of electrical and optical diagnostic techniques. The results indicate that the discharge develops in two stages. The initial breakdown occurs along the longest straight path of the system; i.e., from the anode to the bottom of the cathode hole. This predischarge is confined to a narrow filament along the axis and carries a current of up to hundreds of mA. The resulting distortion of the electric field in the cathode hole is assumed to cause a radial breakdown from the filamentary plasma on the axis to the edge of the cathode hole. After this second breakdown, an increase in current by more than three orders of magnitude is observed. Measurements with axial magnetic fields support the two-stage model.

  19. Corrosion/Fragmentation of Layered Composite Cathode and Related Capacity/Voltage Fading during Cycling Process

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Jianming; Gu, Meng; Xiao, Jie; Zuo, Pengjian; Wang, Chong M.; Zhang, Jiguang

    2013-06-26

    Pristine and cycled layered structure cathode of Li[Li0.2Ni0.2M0.6]O2 samples are characterized by aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy. These analyses provide new insights on capacity/voltage fading mechanism of Li[Li0.2Ni0.2M0.6]O2. Sponge-like structure and fragment pieces were found on the surface of cathode after cycling. Mn2+ species and reduced Li content in the fragments caused significant capacity loss. These results also reveal the functional mechanism of surface coatings, e.g. AlF3, which can protect the electrode from etching by acidic species in the electrolyte, suppress cathode degradation and improve long-term cycling stability.

  20. Co-Flow Hollow Cathode Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hofer, Richard R.; Goebel, Dan M.

    2011-01-01

    Hall thrusters utilize identical hollow cathode technology as ion thrusters, yet must operate at much higher mass flow rates in order to efficiently couple to the bulk plasma discharge. Higher flow rates are necessary in order to provide enough neutral collisions to transport electrons across magnetic fields so that they can reach the discharge. This higher flow rate, however, has potential life-limiting implications for the operation of the cathode. A solution to the problem involves splitting the mass flow into the hollow cathode into two streams, the internal and external flows. The internal flow is fixed and set such that the neutral pressure in the cathode allows for a high utilization of the emitter surface area. The external flow is variable depending on the flow rate through the anode of the Hall thruster, but also has a minimum in order to suppress high-energy ion generation. In the co-flow hollow cathode, the cathode assembly is mounted on thruster centerline, inside the inner magnetic core of the thruster. An annular gas plenum is placed at the base of the cathode and propellant is fed throughout to produce an azimuthally symmetric flow of gas that evenly expands around the cathode keeper. This configuration maximizes propellant utilization and is not subject to erosion processes. External gas feeds have been considered in the past for ion thruster applications, but usually in the context of eliminating high energy ion production. This approach is adapted specifically for the Hall thruster and exploits the geometry of a Hall thruster to feed and focus the external flow without introducing significant new complexity to the thruster design.

  1. CO2 laser cold cathode research results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochuli, U.

    1973-01-01

    The construction and processing of four test lasers are discussed, and the test results are assessed. Tests show that the best performance was obtained from cathodes made from internally oxidized Ag-Cu alloys or pure Cu. Due to the cold cathode technology developments, sealed-off 1 w CO2 lasers with gas volumes of only 50 cu cm were duplicated, and have performed satisfactorily for more than 6000 hours.

  2. Parallel operation of microhollow cathode discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, W.; Stark, R.H.; Schoenbach, K.H.

    1999-02-01

    Parallel operation of dc microhollow cathode discharges in argon at pressures up to several hundred torr was obtained without individual ballast at low currents, where the slope of the current-voltage characteristic is positive. By using semi-insulating silicon as anode material, the authors were able to extend the range of stable operation over the entire current range, including that with negative differential resistance. This opens the possibility to utilize microhollow cathode discharge arrays in flat panel lamps.

  3. Development of plasma cathode electron guns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oks, Efim M.; Schanin, Peter M.

    1999-05-01

    The status of experimental research and ongoing development of plasma cathode electron guns in recent years is reviewed, including some novel upgrades and applications to various technological fields. The attractiveness of this kind of e-gun is due to its capability of creating high current, broad or focused beams, both in pulsed and steady-state modes of operation. An important characteristic of the plasma cathode electron gun is the absence of a thermionic cathode, a feature which leads to long lifetime and reliable operation even in the presence of aggressive background gas media and at fore-vacuum gas pressure ranges such as achieved by mechanical pumps. Depending on the required beam parameters, different kinds of plasma discharge systems can be used in plasma cathode electron guns, such as vacuum arcs, constricted gaseous arcs, hollow cathode glows, and two kinds of discharges in crossed E×B fields: Penning and magnetron. At the present time, plasma cathode electron guns provide beams with transverse dimension from fractional millimeter up to about one meter, beam current from microamperes to kiloamperes, beam current density up to about 100 A/cm2, pulse duration from nanoseconds to dc, and electron energy from several keV to hundreds of keV. Applications include electron beam melting and welding, surface treatment, plasma chemistry, radiation technologies, laser pumping, microwave generation, and more.

  4. Alternative cathodes for molten carbonate fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bloom, I.; Lanagan, M.; Roche, M.F.; Krumpelt, M.

    1996-02-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is developing advanced cathodes for pressurized operation of the molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC). The present cathode, lithiated nickel oxide, tends to transport to the anode of the MCFC, where it is deposited as metallic nickel. The rate of transport increases with increasing CO{sub 2} pressure. This increase is due to an increased solubility of nickel oxide (NiO) in the molten carbonate electrolyte. An alternative cathode is lithium cobaltate (LiCoO{sub 2})-Solid solutions of LiCoO{sub 2} in LiFeO{sub 2} show promise for long-lived cathode materials. We have found that small additions of LiCoO{sub 2} to LiFeO{sub 2} markedly decrease the resistivity of the cathode material. Cells containing the LiCoO{sub 2}-LiFeO{sub 2} cathodes have stable performance for more than 2100 h of operation and display lower cobalt migration.

  5. Uncovering the role of cathode buffer layer in organic solar cells

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Boyuan; Zhang, Zhi-Guo; Wang, Jizheng

    2015-01-01

    Organic solar cells (OSCs) as the third generation photovoltaic devices have drawn intense research, for their ability to be easily deposited by low-cost solution coating technologies. However the cathode in conventional OSCs, Ca, can be only deposited by thermal evaporation and is highly unstable in ambient. Therefore various solution processible cathode buffer layers (CBLs) are synthesized as substitute of Ca and show excellent effect in optimizing performance of OSCs. Yet, there is still no universal consensus on the mechanism that how CBL works, which is evidently a critical scientific issue that should be addressed. In this article detailed studies are targeted on the interfacial physics at the interface between active layer and cathode (with and without treatment of a polar CBL) by using ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy, capacitance-voltage measurement, and impedance spectroscopy. The experimental data demonstrate that CBL mainly takes effect in three ways: suppressing surface states at the surface of active layer, protecting the active layer from being damaged by thermally evaporated cathode, and changing the energy level alignment by forming dipole moments with active layer and/or cathode. Our findings here provide a comprehensive picture of interfacial physics in devices with and without CBL. PMID:25588623

  6. Uncovering the role of cathode buffer layer in organic solar cells.

    PubMed

    Qi, Boyuan; Zhang, Zhi-Guo; Wang, Jizheng

    2015-01-01

    Organic solar cells (OSCs) as the third generation photovoltaic devices have drawn intense research, for their ability to be easily deposited by low-cost solution coating technologies. However the cathode in conventional OSCs, Ca, can be only deposited by thermal evaporation and is highly unstable in ambient. Therefore various solution processible cathode buffer layers (CBLs) are synthesized as substitute of Ca and show excellent effect in optimizing performance of OSCs. Yet, there is still no universal consensus on the mechanism that how CBL works, which is evidently a critical scientific issue that should be addressed. In this article detailed studies are targeted on the interfacial physics at the interface between active layer and cathode (with and without treatment of a polar CBL) by using ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy, capacitance-voltage measurement, and impedance spectroscopy. The experimental data demonstrate that CBL mainly takes effect in three ways: suppressing surface states at the surface of active layer, protecting the active layer from being damaged by thermally evaporated cathode, and changing the energy level alignment by forming dipole moments with active layer and/or cathode. Our findings here provide a comprehensive picture of interfacial physics in devices with and without CBL. PMID:25588623

  7. Uncovering the role of cathode buffer layer in organic solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Boyuan; Zhang, Zhi-Guo; Wang, Jizheng

    2015-01-01

    Organic solar cells (OSCs) as the third generation photovoltaic devices have drawn intense research, for their ability to be easily deposited by low-cost solution coating technologies. However the cathode in conventional OSCs, Ca, can be only deposited by thermal evaporation and is highly unstable in ambient. Therefore various solution processible cathode buffer layers (CBLs) are synthesized as substitute of Ca and show excellent effect in optimizing performance of OSCs. Yet, there is still no universal consensus on the mechanism that how CBL works, which is evidently a critical scientific issue that should be addressed. In this article detailed studies are targeted on the interfacial physics at the interface between active layer and cathode (with and without treatment of a polar CBL) by using ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy, capacitance-voltage measurement, and impedance spectroscopy. The experimental data demonstrate that CBL mainly takes effect in three ways: suppressing surface states at the surface of active layer, protecting the active layer from being damaged by thermally evaporated cathode, and changing the energy level alignment by forming dipole moments with active layer and/or cathode. Our findings here provide a comprehensive picture of interfacial physics in devices with and without CBL.

  8. LOW TEMPERATURE CATHODE SUPPORTED ELECTROLYTES

    SciTech Connect

    Harlan U. Anderson; Fatih Dogan; Vladimir Petrovsky

    2003-03-31

    This report represents a summary of the work carried out on this project which started October 1999 and ended March 2003. A list of the publications resulting from the work are contained in Appendix A. The most significant achievements are: (1) Dense nanocrystalline zirconia and ceria films were obtained at temperatures < 400 C. (2) Nanocrystalline films of both ceria and zirconia were characterized. (3) We showed that under anodic conditions 0.5 to 1 micron thick nanocrystalline films of Sc doped zirconia have sufficient electronic conductivity to prevent them from being useful as an electrolyte. (4) We have developed a process by which dense 0.5 to 5 micron thick dense films of either YSZ or ceria can be deposited on sintered porous substrates which serve as either the cathode or anode at temperatures as low as 400 C. (5) The program has provided the research to produce two PhD thesis for students, one is now working in the solid oxide fuel cell field. (6) The results of the research have resulted in 69 papers published, 3 papers submitted or being prepared for publication, 50 oral presentations and 3 patent disclosures.

  9. Electricity generation and bivalent copper reduction as a function of operation time and cathode electrode material in microbial fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Dan; Huang, Liping; Quan, Xie; Li Puma, Gianluca

    2016-03-01

    The performance of carbon rod (CR), titanium sheet (TS), stainless steel woven mesh (SSM) and copper sheet (CS) cathode materials are investigated in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) for simultaneous electricity generation and Cu(II) reduction, in multiple batch cycle operations. After 12 cycles, the MFC with CR exhibits 55% reduction in the maximum power density and 76% increase in Cu(II) removal. In contrast, the TS and SSM cathodes at cycle 12 show maximum power densities of 1.7 (TS) and 3.4 (SSM) times, and Cu(II) removal of 1.2 (TS) and 1.3 (SSM) times higher than those observed during the first cycle. Diffusional resistance in the TS and SSM cathodes is found to appreciably decrease over time due to the copper deposition. In contrast to CR, TS and SSM, the cathode made with CS is heavily corroded in the first cycle, exhibiting significant reduction in both the maximum power density and Cu(II) removal at cycle 2, after which the performance stabilizes. These results demonstrate that the initial deposition of copper on the cathodes of MFCs is crucial for efficient and continuous Cu(II) reduction and electricity generation over prolonged time. This effect is closely associated with the nature of the cathode material. Among the materials examined, the SSM is the most effective and inexpensive cathode for practical use in MFCs.

  10. Protective factors and predictors of vulnerability to chronic stress: a comparative study of 4 communities after 7 years of continuous rocket fire.

    PubMed

    Gelkopf, Marc; Berger, Rony; Bleich, Avraham; Silver, Roxane Cohen

    2012-03-01

    Many communities across the world are chronically exposed to extreme violence. Responses of residents from a city and rural community in Southern Israel, both exposed to 7 years of daily mortar fire, were compared to residents from demographically, socio-economically and geographically comparable non-exposed control samples to examine protective factors and predictors of vulnerability to chronic war-related attacks. Samples from a highly exposed city (Sderot) and a highly exposed rural community region (Otef Aza), along with a demographically comparable comparison non-exposed city (Ofakim) and non-exposed rural community region (Hevel Lachish), were obtained in 2007 using Random Digit Dialing. In total, 740 individuals (81.8% participation rate) were interviewed about trauma exposure, mental health, functioning and health care utilization. In the highly exposed city of Sderot, 97.8% of residents had been in close proximity to falling rockets; in the highly exposed rural community region of Otef Aza, 95.5% were similarly exposed. Despite exposure to chronic rocket attacks, residents of Otef Aza evidenced little symptomatology: only one person (1.5%) reported symptoms consistent with probable posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and functioning levels did not differ from those of non-exposed communities. In contrast, posttraumatic stress (PTS), distress, functional impairment and health care utilization were substantially higher in the highly exposed city of Sderot than the other three communities. Lack of resources was associated with increased vulnerability among city residents; predictors of PTS across all samples included being female, older, directly exposed to rockets, history of trauma, suffering economic loss, and lacking social support. Increased community solidarity, sense of belonging and confidence in authorities may have served a protective function for residents of rural communities, despite the chronic attacks to which they were exposed. PMID:22316441

  11. Experimental Investigation of Thruster Cathode Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crofton, Mark

    2004-11-01

    Advanced ion propulsion technologies are being developed under the Nuclear Electric Xenon Ion System (NEXIS) program for use in outer planet exploration. A revolutionary approach to thruster cathode design is dictated by the very high lifetime and propellant throughput requirements for nuclear electric applications. In conventional dispenser hollow cathodes used in thrusters, processes leading to depletion, inadequate transport, or insufficient production of barium are among those limiting the lifetime. A reservoir hollow cathode is being developed to address each of these failure mechanisms, exploiting four design variables - matrix material, source material, geometry, and thermal design - to essentially eliminate established failure modes. The very long anticipated lifetime necessitates new life validation methods to augment or replace the conventional lifetest approach. One important tool for quickly evaluating design changes is the ability to measure barium density inside a hollow cathode and/or in the plume. The dependence of barium density on temperature and other factors is an extremely important indicator of cathode health, particularly if the ratio Ba:BaO is also obtained. Comparison of barium production for reservoir and conventional cathodes will enable an assessment of the efficacy of reservoir designs and the goal of reducing barium consumption at a given emission current level. This study describes benchmark measurements made on a conventional cathode previously operated in a 20-kW NEXIS laboratory engine. Data on cathode operation and life-limiting processes were obtained through direct, real-time monitoring of atoms and molecules. A high-resolution, tunable laser system was employed to detect absorption of the low-density barium atoms inside the cathode. The plume was monitored also, using a quadrupole mass spectrometer to monitor multiple species and measure ion charge ratios. Data obtained with retarding potential analyzers or other means are

  12. Compact Rare Earth Emitter Hollow Cathode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, Ronald; Goebel, Dan; Hofer, Richard

    2010-01-01

    A compact, high-current, hollow cathode utilizing a lanthanum hexaboride (LaB6) thermionic electron emitter has been developed for use with high-power Hall thrusters and ion thrusters. LaB6 cathodes are being investigated due to their long life, high current capabilities, and less stringent xenon purity and handling requirements compared to conventional barium oxide (BaO) dispenser cathodes. The new cathode features a much smaller diameter than previously developed versions that permit it to be mounted on axis of a Hall thruster ( internally mounted ), as opposed to the conventional side-mount position external to the outer magnetic circuit ("externally mounted"). The cathode has also been reconfigured to be capable of surviving vibrational loads during launch and is designed to solve the significant heater and materials compatibility problems associated with the use of this emitter material. This has been accomplished in a compact design with the capability of high-emission current (10 to 60 A). The compact, high-current design has a keeper diameter that allows the cathode to be mounted on the centerline of a 6- kW Hall thruster, inside the iron core of the inner electromagnetic coil. Although designed for electric propulsion thrusters in spacecraft station- keeping, orbit transfer, and interplanetary applications, the LaB6 cathodes are applicable to the plasma processing industry in applications such as optical coatings and semiconductor processing where reactive gases are used. Where current electrical propulsion thrusters with BaO emitters have limited life and need extremely clean propellant feed systems at a significant cost, these LaB6 cathodes can run on the crudest-grade xenon propellant available without impact. Moreover, in a laboratory environment, LaB6 cathodes reduce testing costs because they do not require extended conditioning periods under hard vacuum. Alternative rare earth emitters, such as cerium hexaboride (CeB6) can be used in this

  13. Virtual cathode microwave generator having annular anode slit

    SciTech Connect

    Kwan, T.J.T.; Snell, C.M.

    1988-03-08

    A microwave generator using an oscillating virtual cathode is described comprising: a cathode for emitting electrons; an anode for accelerating emitted electrons from the cathode, the anode having an annular slit therethrough effective for forming the virtual cathode and having at least one range thickness relative to electrons reflected from the virtual cathode; and magnet means for producing a magnetic field having a field strength effective to form an annular beam from the emitted electrons in substantial alignment with the annular anode slit and to enable the electrons reflected from the virtual cathode to axially diverge from the annular beam. The reflected electrons return toward the cathode diverge from the annular beam and are absorbed by the anode to substantially eliminate electrons reflexing between the cathode and the virtual cathode.

  14. Role of iNOS gene expression in the anti-inflammatory and tissue protective mechanisms of continuous wave at 630-905nm and 905nm superpulsed laser therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandel, Arkady; Moriyama, Yumi; Fong, Jamie; Dumoulin-White, Roger; Lilge, Lothar

    2012-03-01

    Up regulation of iNOS gene expression is playing a role in the initiation of the anti-inflammatory and tissue protective mechanisms related to nitric oxide (NO) for continuous wave red and infrared as well as 905nm superpulsed laser therapy (SPLT). The iNOS expression before and after laser therapy was evaluated in a zymosan-induced acute arthritis model, in knee joints of young (<15 weeks), middle aged (>15 weeks and < 35 weeks) and old (> 35 weeks) FVB/N-Tg (iNOS-luc) mice by bioluminescence imaging.

  15. Improved cathode materials for microbial electrosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, T; Nie, HR; Bain, TS; Lu, HY; Cui, MM; Snoeyenbos-West, OL; Franks, AE; Nevin, KP; Russell, TP; Lovley, DR

    2013-01-01

    Microbial electrosynthesis is a promising strategy for the microbial conversion of carbon dioxide to transportation fuels and other organic commodities, but optimization of this process is required for commercialization. Cathodes which enhance electrode-microbe electron transfer might improve rates of product formation. To evaluate this possibility, biofilms of Sporomusa ovata, which are effective in acetate electrosynthesis, were grown on a range of cathode materials and acetate production was monitored over time. Modifications of carbon cloth that resulted in a positive-charge enhanced microbial electrosynthesis. Functionalization with chitosan or cyanuric chloride increased acetate production rates 6-7 fold and modification with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane gave rates 3-fold higher than untreated controls. A 3-fold increase in electrosynthesis over untreated carbon cloth cathodes was also achieved with polyaniline cathodes. However, not all strategies to provide positively charged surfaces were successful, as treatment of carbon cloth with melamine or ammonia gas did not stimulate acetate electrosynthesis. Treating carbon cloth with metal, in particular gold, palladium, or nickel nanoparticles, also promoted electrosynthesis, yielding electrosynthesis rates that were 6-,4.7- or 4.5-fold faster than the untreated control, respectively. Cathodes comprised of cotton or polyester fabric treated with carbon nanotubes yielded cathodes that supported acetate electrosynthesis rates that were similar to 3-fold higher than carbon cloth controls. Recovery of electrons consumed in acetate was similar to 80% for all materials. The results demonstrate that one approach to increase rates of carbon dioxide reduction in microbial electrosynthesis is to modify cathode surfaces to improve microbe-electrode interactions.

  16. 2013 Estorm - Invited Paper - Cathode Materials Review

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, Claus; Mohanty, Debasish; Li, Jianlin; Wood III, David L

    2014-01-01

    The electrochemical potential of cathode materials defines the positive side of the terminal voltage of a battery. Traditionally, cathode materials are the energy-limiting or voltage-limiting electrode. One of the first electrochemical batteries, the voltaic pile invented by Alessandro Volta in 1800 (Phil. Trans. Roy. Soc. 90, 403 431) had a copper-zinc galvanic element with a terminal voltage of 0.76 V. Since then, the research community has increased capacity and voltage for primary (nonrechargeable) batteries and round-trip efficiency for secondary (rechargeable) batteries. Successful secondary batteries have been the lead acid with a lead oxide cathode and a terminal voltage of 2.1 V and later the NiCd with a nickel(III) oxide hydroxide cathode and a 1.2 V terminal voltage. The relatively low voltage of those aqueous systems and the low round-trip efficiency due to activation energies in the conversion reactions limited their use. In 1976, Wittingham (J. Electrochem. Soc., 123, 315) and Besenhard (J Power Sources 1(3), 267) finally enabled highly reversible redox reactions by intercalation of lithium ions instead of by chemical conversion. In 1980, Goodenough and Mizushima (Mater. Res. Bull. 15, 783 789) demonstrated a high-energy and high-power LiCoO2 cathode, allowing for an increase of terminal voltage far beyond 3 V. Over the past four decades, the international research community has further developed cathode materials of many varieties. Current state-of-the-art cathodes demonstrate voltages beyond any known electrolyte stability window, bringing electrolyte research once again to the forefront of battery research.

  17. Nanostructured MnO2-Based Cathodes for Li-Ion/Polymer Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skandan, Ganesh; Singhal, Amit

    2005-01-01

    Nanostructured MnO2-based cathodes for Li-ion/polymer electrochemical cells have been investigated in a continuing effort to develop safe, high-energy-density, reliable, low-toxicity, rechargeable batteries for a variety of applications in NASA programs and in mass-produced commercial electronic equipment. Whereas the energy densities of state-of-the-art lithium-ion/polymer batteries range from 150 to 175 W h/kg, the goal of this effort is to increase the typical energy density to about 250 W h/kg. It is also expected that an incidental benefit of this effort will be increases in power densities because the distances over which Li ions must diffuse through nanostructured cathode materials are smaller than those through solid bulk cathode materials.

  18. Multiple cathodic reaction mechanisms in seawater cathodic biofilms operating in sediment microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Babauta, Jerome T; Hsu, Lewis; Atci, Erhan; Kagan, Jeff; Chadwick, Bart; Beyenal, Haluk

    2014-10-01

    In this study, multiple reaction mechanisms in cathodes of sediment microbial fuel cells (SMFCs) were characterized by using cyclic voltammetry and microelectrode measurements of dissolved oxygen and pH. The cathodes were acclimated in SMFCs with sediment and seawater from San Diego Bay. Two limiting current regions were observed with onset potentials of approximately +400 mVAg/AgCl for limiting current I and -120 mVAg/AgCl for limiting current II. The appearance of two catalytic waves suggests that multiple cathodic reaction mechanisms influence cathodic performance. Microscale oxygen concentration measurements showed a zero surface concentration at the electrode surface for limiting current II but not for limiting current I, which allowed us to distinguish limiting current II as the conventional oxygen reduction reaction and limiting current I as a currently unidentified cathodic reaction mechanism. Microscale pH measurements further confirmed these results.

  19. Microhollow Cathode Discharge Excimer Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moselhy, M.; El-Habachi, A.; Shi, W.; Stark, R. H.; Schoenbach, K. H.

    2000-10-01

    Microhollow cathode discharges (MHCDs) are direct current, high-pressure, non-equilibrium gas discharges. When operated in Ar, Xe, ArF and XeCl, these discharges were found to be intense sources of excimer radiation at 130, 172, 193, 308 nm, respectively. Internal conversion efficiencies (from input electrical power to output optical power) of 1% (Ar), 8% (Xe), 2% (ArF) and 3% (XeCl) were achieved [1,2,3]. The spatial distribution of the xenon excimer source was studied by means of an ICCD-MAX intensified CCD camera. The measurements showed that the source expands with current and becomes reduced in size with pressure. The maximum radiant emittance (radiant power per source area) was measured as 2 W/cm^2 at atmospheric pressure and a discharge current of 3 mA. The peak irradiance (radiant power per target area) for a single discharge was calculated to be 3 mW/cm^2 at a distance of 1 cm from the source. Operating multiple discharges in parallel allows us to generate flat panel excimer lamps with an irradiance approaching the value of the radiant emittance (2 W/cm^2). In order to increase the irradiance further MHCDs could be operated in series. First experiments with two discharges in series have shown that the radiant emittance increases linearly with the number of discharges [3]. Besides using systems of MHCDs as lamps, efforts to utilize “stacked discharges” as excimer laser medium are underway. This work is supported by NSF and DARPA. 1. Ahmed El-Habachi and Karl H. Schoenbach, Appl. Phys. Lett. 73, 885 (1998). 2. Wenhui Shi, Ahmed El-Habachi, and Karl H. Schoenbach, Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 44, 25 (1999). 3. Ahmed El-Habachi et. al., “Series Operation of Direct Current Xenon Chloride Excimer Sources”, to appear in J. Appl. Phys.

  20. Electricity generation and brewery wastewater treatment from sequential anode-cathode microbial fuel cell*

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Qing; Wu, Ying; Zhao, Li-xin; Sun, Qian; Kong, Fan-ying

    2010-01-01

    A sequential anode-cathode double-chamber microbial fuel cell (MFC), in which the effluent of anode chamber was used as a continuous feed for an aerated cathode chamber, was constructed in this experiment to investigate the performance of brewery wastewater treatment in conjugation with electricity generation. Carbon fiber was used as anode and plain carbon felt with biofilm as cathode. When hydraulic retention time (HRT) was 14.7 h, a relatively high chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency of 91.7%–95.7% was achieved under long-term stable operation. The MFC displayed an open circuit voltage of 0.434 V and a maximum power density of 830 mW/m3 at an external resistance of 300 Ω. To estimate the electrochemical performance of the MFC, electrochemical measurements were carried out and showed that polarization resistance of anode was the major limiting factor in the MFC. Since a high COD removal efficiency was achieved, we conclude that the sequential anode-cathode MFC constructed with bio-cathode in this experiment could provide a new approach for brewery wastewater treatment. PMID:20104642

  1. An intermediate-temperature solid oxide fuel cell with electrospun nanofiber cathode

    SciTech Connect

    Zhi, Mingjia; Lee, Shiwoo; Miller, Nicholas; Menzler, Norbert H.; Wu, Nianqiang

    2012-05-01

    Lanthanum strontium cobalt ferrite (LSCF) nanofibers have been fabricated by the electrospinning method and used as the cathode of an intermediate-temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) with yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolyte. The three-dimensional nanofiber network cathode has several advantages: (i) high porosity; (ii) high percolation; (iii) continuous pathway for charge transport; (iv) good thermal stability at the operating temperature; and (v) excellent scaffold for infiltration. The fuel cell with the monolithic LSCF nanofiber cathode exhibits a power density of 0.90 W cm{sup −2} at 1.9 A cm{sup −2} at 750 °C. The electrochemical performance of the fuel cell has been further improved by infiltration of 20 wt% of gadolinia-doped ceria (GDC) into the LSCF nanofiber cathode. The fuel cell with the LSCF–20% GDC composite cathode shows a power density of 1.07 W cm{sup −2} at 1.9 A cm{sup −2} at 750 °C. The results obtained show that one-dimensional nanostructures such as nanofibers hold great promise as electrode materials for intermediate-temperature SOFCs.

  2. Requirements for long-life operation of inert gas hollow cathodes: Preliminary report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verhey, Timothy R.; Macrae, Gregory S.

    1990-01-01

    An experimental investigation was initiated to establish conditioning procedures for reliable hollow cathode operation via the characterization of critical parameters in a representative cathode test facility. From vacuum pumpdown rates, it was found that approximately 1.5 hours were required to achieve pressure levels within 5 percent of the lowest attainable pressure for this facility, depending on the purge conditions. The facility atmosphere was determined by a residual gas analyzer to be composed of primarily air and water vapor. The effects of vacuum pumping and inert gas purging were evaluated. A maximum effective leakage rate of 2.0 x 10(exp -3)sccm was observed and its probable causes were examined. An extended test of a 0.64 cm diameter Mo-Re hollow cathode was successfully completed. This test ran for 504 hours at an emission current of 23.0 amperes and a xenon flow rate of 6.1 sccm. Discharge voltage rose continuously from 15 to 21 volts over the course of the test. The temperature of the cathode body during the test was relatively stable at 1160 C. Post-test examination revealed ion-bombardment texturing of the orifice plate to be the only detectable sign of wear on the hollow cathode.

  3. Influence of cathodic polarization upon bond strength of pretensioned tendons in concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Joubert, E.; Hartt, W.H.

    1996-11-01

    The possibility of bond loss for pretensioned tendon in concrete in response to cathodic protection has the potential for limiting applicability of this corrosion control methodology to this material class. To investigate the possible occurrence and significance of such bond loss, a series of pretensioned concrete beams were cathodically polarized utilizing current densities in the range 50--5,000 mA/m{sup 2} (tendon steel surface area basis), during which time specimen dimensional changes were monitored using strain gages which were both mounted upon the tendon and embedded in the concrete. Experimental difficulties were encountered in that the strain gages were not adequately durable; and the results were variable in that the strain data for some specimens at a given current density indicated partial bond loss whereas there was no indication of this for others. In the case of specimens that may have experienced partial bond loss, the results showed that this transpired at a lower total charge transfer the higher the applied cathodic current density and that, if current density upon an actual pretensioned concrete structure is uniform and in the range typical for cathodic protection, bond loss should not occur within the remaining service life of most structures.

  4. Use of Both Anode and Cathode Reactions in Wastewater Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brillas, Enric; Sirés, Ignasi; Cabot, Pere LluíS.

    Here, we describe the fundamentals, laboratory experiments, and environmental applications of indirect electrooxidation methods based on H2O2 electrogeneration such as electro-Fenton, photoelectro-Fenton and peroxicoagulation for the treatment of acidic wastewaters containing toxic and recalcitrant organics. These methods are electrochemical advanced oxidation processes that can be used in divided and undivided electrolytic cells in which pollutants are oxidized by hydroxyl radical (•OH) produced from anode and/or cathode reactions. H2O2 is generated from the two-electron reduction of O2 at reticulated vitreous carbon, graphite, carbon-felt, and O2-diffusion cathodes. The most usual method is electro-Fenton where Fe2 + added to the wastewater reacts with electrogenerated H2O2 to yield •OH and Fe3 + from Fenton's reaction. An advantage of this technique is that Fe2 + is continuously regenerated from cathodic reduction of Fe3 +. The characteristics of different electro-Fenton systems where pollutants are simultaneously destroyed by •OH formed in the medium from Fenton's reaction and at the anode surface from water oxidation are explained. The effect of the anode [Pt or boron-doped diamond (BDD)] and cathode (carbon-felt or O2-diffusion) on the degradation rate of persistent industrial by-products, herbicides, pharmaceuticals, dyes, etc. is examined. Initial pollutants react much more rapidly with •OH formed in the medium and their degradation sequences are discussed from aromatic intermediates and finally short aliphatic acids are detected. The synergetic positive catalytic effect of Cu2 + on the electro-Fenton process is evidenced. The photoelectro-Fenton method involves the irradiation of the wastewater with UVA light that rapidly photodecomposes complexes of Fe3 + with final carboxylic acids enhancing total decontamination. The peroxicoagulation method uses a sacrificial Fe anode that is continuously oxidized to Fe2 + and organics are either mineralized

  5. Power-Efficient, High-Current-Density, Long-Life Thermionic Cathode Developed for Microwave Amplifier Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wintucky, Edwin G.

    2002-01-01

    A power-efficient, miniature, easily manufactured, reservoir-type barium-dispenser thermionic cathode has been developed that offers the significant advantages of simultaneous high electron-emission current density (>2 A/sq cm) and very long life (>100,000 hr of continuous operation) when compared with the commonly used impregnated-type barium-dispenser cathodes. Important applications of this cathode are a wide variety of microwave and millimeter-wave vacuum electronic devices, where high output power and reliability (long life) are essential. We also expect it to enable the practical development of higher purveyance electron guns for lower voltage and more reliable device operation. The low cathode heater power and reduced size and mass are expected to be particularly beneficial in traveling-wave-tube amplifiers (TWTA's) for space communications, where future NASA mission requirements include smaller onboard spacecraft systems, higher data transmission rates (high frequency and output power) and greater electrical efficiency.

  6. Studies on an experimental quartz tube hollow cathode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegfried, D. E.; Wilbur, P. J.

    1979-01-01

    An experimental study is described in which a quartz tube, hollow cathode was operated in a test fixture allowing the simultaneous measurement of internal cathode pressure, insert temperature profiles, and the emission currents from various cathode components as a function of discharge current and propellant (mercury) mass flow rate for a number of different cathode orifice diameters. Results show that the insert temperature profile is essentially independent of orifice diameter but depends strongly on internal cathode pressure and emission current. The product of internal cathode pressure and insert diameter is shown to be important in determining the emission location and the minimum keeper voltage.

  7. Spindt cold cathode electron gun development program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spindt, C. A.

    1983-01-01

    A thin film field emission cathode array and an electron gun based on this emitter array are summarized. Fabricating state of the art cathodes for testing at NASA and NRL, advancing the fabrication technology, developing wedge shaped emitters, and performing emission tests are covered. An anistropic dry etching process (reactive ion beam etching) developed that leads to increasing the packing density of the emitter tips to about 5 x 10 to the 6th power/square cm. Tests with small arrays of emitter tips having about 10 tips has demonstrated current densities of over 100 A/sq cm. Several times using cathodes having a packing density of 1.25 x 10 to the 6th power tips/sq cm. Indications are that the higher packing density achievable with the dry etch process may extend this capability to the 500 A/sq cm range and beyond. The wedge emitter geometry was developed and shown to produce emission. This geometry can (in principle) extend the current density capability of the cathodes beyond the 500 A/sq cm level. An emission microscope was built and tested for use with the cathodes.

  8. Parallel operation of microhollow cathode discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, W.; Schoenbach, K.H.

    1998-12-31

    The dc current-voltage characteristics of microhollow cathode discharges has, in certain ranges of the discharge current, a positive slope. In these current ranges it should be possible to operate multiple discharges in parallel without individual ballast, and be used as flat panel excimer lamps or large area plasma cathodes. In order to verify this hypothesis they have studied the parallel operation of two microhollow cathode discharges of 100 {micro}m hole diameter in argon at pressures from 100 Torr to 800 Torr. Stable dc operation of the two discharges, without individual ballast, was obtained if the voltage-current characteristics of the individual discharges had a positive slope greater than 10 V/mA over a voltage range of more than 5% of the sustaining voltage. Small variations in the discharge geometry generated during fabrication of cathode holes or caused by thermal effects during discharge operation are detrimental to parallel operation. Varying the distance between the discharges from twice the hole diameter to approximately five times did not affect the parallel operation. The total current was always slightly larger than the sum of the currents measured for the individual discharges, indicating coupling between the two discharges. In order to obtain parallel operation even for microhollow cathode geometries with large variations, they have studied the effect of distributed resistive ballast on the operation of such discharges.

  9. Filtered cathodic arc deposition apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Krauss, Alan R.

    1999-01-01

    A filtered cathodic arc deposition method and apparatus for the production of highly dense, wear resistant coatings which are free from macro particles. The filtered cathodic arc deposition apparatus includes a cross shaped vacuum chamber which houses a cathode target having an evaporable surface comprised of the coating material, means for generating a stream of plasma, means for generating a transverse magnetic field, and a macro particle deflector. The transverse magnetic field bends the generated stream of plasma in the direction of a substrate. Macro particles are effectively filtered from the stream of plasma by traveling, unaffected by the transverse magnetic field, along the initial path of the plasma stream to a macro particle deflector. The macro particle deflector has a preformed surface which deflects macro particles away from the substrate.

  10. Advanced rechargeable sodium batteries with novel cathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Di Stefano, S.; Ratnakumar, B. V.; Bankston, C. P.

    1990-01-01

    Various high energy density rechargeable batteries are being considered for future space applications. Of these, the sodium-sulfur battery is one of the leading candidates. The primary advantage is the high energy density (760 W h/kg theoretical). Energy densities in excess of 180 W h/kg have been realized in practical batteries. More recently, cathodes other than sulfur are being evaluated. Various new cathode materials are presently being evaluated for use in high energy density sodium batteries for advanced space applications. The approach is to carry out basic electrochemical studies of these materials in a sodium cell configuration in order to understand their fundamental behaviors. Thus far, the studies have focussed on alternative metal chlorides such as CuCl2 and organic cathode materials such as TCNE.

  11. Advanced rechargeable sodium batteries with novel cathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Distefano, S.; Ratnakumar, B. V.; Bankston, C. P.

    1989-01-01

    Various high energy density rechargeable batteries are being considered for future space applications. Of these, the sodium sulfur battery is one of the leading candidates. The primary advantage is the high energy density (760 Wh/kg theoretical). Energy densities in excess of 180 Wh/kg have been realized in practical batteries. More recently, cathodes other than sulfur are being evaluated. Researchers at JPL are evaluating various new cathode materials for use in high energy density sodium batteries for advanced space applications. The approach is to carry out basic electrochemical studies of these materials in a sodium cell configuration in order to understand their fundamental behaviors. Thus far studies have focused on alternate metal chlorides such as CuCl2 and organic cathode materials such as tetracyanoethylene (TCNE).

  12. 40 CFR 1065.150 - Continuous sampling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Continuous sampling. 1065.150 Section 1065.150 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Equipment Specifications § 1065.150 Continuous sampling. You may use...

  13. 40 CFR 1065.150 - Continuous sampling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Continuous sampling. 1065.150 Section 1065.150 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Equipment Specifications § 1065.150 Continuous sampling. You may use...

  14. 40 CFR 1065.150 - Continuous sampling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Continuous sampling. 1065.150 Section 1065.150 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Equipment Specifications § 1065.150 Continuous sampling. You may use...

  15. 40 CFR 1065.150 - Continuous sampling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Continuous sampling. 1065.150 Section 1065.150 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Equipment Specifications § 1065.150 Continuous sampling. You may use...

  16. 40 CFR 1065.150 - Continuous sampling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Continuous sampling. 1065.150 Section 1065.150 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Equipment Specifications § 1065.150 Continuous sampling. You may use...

  17. 40 CFR 40.165 - Continuation grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Continuation grants. 40.165 Section 40.165 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE RESEARCH AND DEMONSTRATION GRANTS § 40.165 Continuation grants. To be eligible for a continuation...

  18. 40 CFR 40.165 - Continuation grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Continuation grants. 40.165 Section 40.165 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE RESEARCH AND DEMONSTRATION GRANTS § 40.165 Continuation grants. To be eligible for a continuation...

  19. 40 CFR 40.165 - Continuation grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Continuation grants. 40.165 Section 40.165 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE RESEARCH AND DEMONSTRATION GRANTS § 40.165 Continuation grants. To be eligible for a continuation...

  20. 40 CFR 40.165 - Continuation grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Continuation grants. 40.165 Section 40.165 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE RESEARCH AND DEMONSTRATION GRANTS § 40.165 Continuation grants. To be eligible for a continuation...

  1. A Chemical-Adsorption Strategy to Enhance the Reaction Kinetics of Lithium-Rich Layered Cathodes via Double-Shell Surface Modification.

    PubMed

    Guo, Lichao; Li, Jiajun; Cao, Tingting; Wang, Huayu; Zhao, Naiqin; He, Fang; Shi, Chunsheng; He, Chunnian; Liu, Enzuo

    2016-09-21

    Sluggish surface reaction kinetics hinders the power density of Li-ion battery. Thus, various surface modification techniques have been applied to enhance the electronic/ionic transfer kinetics. However, it is challenging to obtain a continuous and uniform surface modification layer on the prime particles with structure integration at the interface. Instead of classic physical-adsorption/deposition techniques, we propose a novel chemical-adsorption strategy to synthesize double-shell modified lithium-rich layered cathodes with enhanced mass transfer kinetics. On the basis of experimental measurement and first-principles calculation, MoO2S2 ions are proved to joint the layered phase via chemical bonding. Specifically, the Mo-O or Mo-S bonds can flexibly rotate to bond with the cations in the layered phase, leading to the good compatibility between the thiomolybdate adsorption layer and layered cathode. Followed by annealing treatment, the lithium-excess-spinel inner shell forms under the thiomolybdate adsorption layer and functions as favorable pathways for lithium and electron. Meanwhile, the nanothick MoO3-x(SO4)x outer shell protects the transition metal from dissolution and restrains electrolyte decomposition. The double-shell modified sample delivers an enhanced discharge capacity almost twice as much as that of the unmodified one at 1 A g(-1) after 100 cycles, demonstrating the superiority of the surface modification based on chemical adsorption. PMID:27582053

  2. A Chemical-Adsorption Strategy to Enhance the Reaction Kinetics of Lithium-Rich Layered Cathodes via Double-Shell Surface Modification.

    PubMed

    Guo, Lichao; Li, Jiajun; Cao, Tingting; Wang, Huayu; Zhao, Naiqin; He, Fang; Shi, Chunsheng; He, Chunnian; Liu, Enzuo

    2016-09-21

    Sluggish surface reaction kinetics hinders the power density of Li-ion battery. Thus, various surface modification techniques have been applied to enhance the electronic/ionic transfer kinetics. However, it is challenging to obtain a continuous and uniform surface modification layer on the prime particles with structure integration at the interface. Instead of classic physical-adsorption/deposition techniques, we propose a novel chemical-adsorption strategy to synthesize double-shell modified lithium-rich layered cathodes with enhanced mass transfer kinetics. On the basis of experimental measurement and first-principles calculation, MoO2S2 ions are proved to joint the layered phase via chemical bonding. Specifically, the Mo-O or Mo-S bonds can flexibly rotate to bond with the cations in the layered phase, leading to the good compatibility between the thiomolybdate adsorption layer and layered cathode. Followed by annealing treatment, the lithium-excess-spinel inner shell forms under the thiomolybdate adsorption layer and functions as favorable pathways for lithium and electron. Meanwhile, the nanothick MoO3-x(SO4)x outer shell protects the transition metal from dissolution and restrains electrolyte decomposition. The double-shell modified sample delivers an enhanced discharge capacity almost twice as much as that of the unmodified one at 1 A g(-1) after 100 cycles, demonstrating the superiority of the surface modification based on chemical adsorption.

  3. Synchrotron Investigations of SOFC Cathode Degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Idzerda, Yves

    2013-09-30

    The atomic variations occurring in cathode/electrolyte interface regions of La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}Co{sub y}Fe{sub 1-y}O{sub 3-δ} (LSCF) cathodes and other SOFC related materials have been investigated and characterized using soft X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) and diffuse soft X-ray Resonant Scattering (XRS). X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy in the soft X-ray region (soft XAS) is shown to be a sensitive technique to quantify the disruption that occurs and can be used to suggest a concrete mechanism for the degradation. For LSC, LSF, and LSCF films, a significant degradation mechanism is shown to be Sr out-diffusion. By using the XAS spectra of hexavalent Cr in SrCrO4 and trivalent Cr in Cr2O3, the driving factor for Sr segregation was identified to be the oxygen vacancy concentration at the anode and cathode side of of symmetric LSCF/GDC/LSCF heterostructures. This is direct evidence of vacancy induced cation diffusion and is shown to be a significant indicator of cathode/electrolyte interfacial degradation. X-ray absorption spectroscopy is used to identify the occupation of the A-sites and B-sites for LSC, LSF, and LSCF cathodes doped with other transition metals, including doping induced migration of Sr to the anti-site for Sr, a significant cathode degradation indicator. By using spatially resolved valence mapping of Co, a complete picture of the surface electrochemistry can be determined. This is especially important in identifying degradation phenomena where the degradation is spatially localized to the extremities of the electrochemistry and not the average. For samples that have electrochemical parameters that are measured to be spatially uniform, the Co valence modifications were correlated to the effects of current density, overpotential, and humidity.

  4. Compatible interface design of CoO-based Li-O2 battery cathodes with long-cycling stability.

    PubMed

    Shang, Chaoqun; Dong, Shanmu; Hu, Pu; Guan, Jing; Xiao, Dongdong; Chen, Xiao; Zhang, Lixue; Gu, Lin; Cui, Guanglei; Chen, Liquan

    2015-02-27

    Lithium-oxygen batteries with high theoretical energy densities have great potential. Recent studies have focused on different cathode architecture design to address poor cycling performance, while the impact of interface stability on cathode side has been barely reported. In this study, we introduce CoO mesoporous spheres into cathode, where the growth of crystalline discharge products (Li2O2) is directly observed on the CoO surface from aberration-corrected STEM. This CoO based cathode demonstrates more than 300 discharge/charge cycles with excessive lithium anode. Under deep discharge/charge, CoO cathode exhibited superior cycle performance than that of Co3O4 with similar nanostructure. This improved cycle performance can be ascribed to a more favorable adsorption configuration of Li2O2 intermediates (LiO2) on CoO surface, which is demonstrated through DFT calculation. The favorable adsorption of LiO2 plays an important role in the enhanced cycle performance, which reduced the contact of LiO2 to carbon materials and further alleviated the side reactions during charge process. This compatible interface design may provide an effective approach in protecting carbon-based cathodes in metal-oxygen batteries.

  5. Compatible interface design of CoO-based Li-O2 battery cathodes with long-cycling stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Chaoqun; Dong, Shanmu; Hu, Pu; Guan, Jing; Xiao, Dongdong; Chen, Xiao; Zhang, Lixue; Gu, Lin; Cui, Guanglei; Chen, Liquan

    2015-02-01

    Lithium-oxygen batteries with high theoretical energy densities have great potential. Recent studies have focused on different cathode architecture design to address poor cycling performance, while the impact of interface stability on cathode side has been barely reported. In this study, we introduce CoO mesoporous spheres into cathode, where the growth of crystalline discharge products (Li2O2) is directly observed on the CoO surface from aberration-corrected STEM. This CoO based cathode demonstrates more than 300 discharge/charge cycles with excessive lithium anode. Under deep discharge/charge, CoO cathode exhibited superior cycle performance than that of Co3O4 with similar nanostructure. This improved cycle performance can be ascribed to a more favorable adsorption configuration of Li2O2 intermediates (LiO2) on CoO surface, which is demonstrated through DFT calculation. The favorable adsorption of LiO2 plays an important role in the enhanced cycle performance, which reduced the contact of LiO2 to carbon materials and further alleviated the side reactions during charge process. This compatible interface design may provide an effective approach in protecting carbon-based cathodes in metal-oxygen batteries.

  6. Compatible interface design of CoO-based Li-O2 battery cathodes with long-cycling stability

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Chaoqun; Dong, Shanmu; Hu, Pu; Guan, Jing; Xiao, Dongdong; Chen, Xiao; Zhang, Lixue; Gu, Lin; Cui, Guanglei; Chen, Liquan

    2015-01-01

    Lithium-oxygen batteries with high theoretical energy densities have great potential. Recent studies have focused on different cathode architecture design to address poor cycling performance, while the impact of interface stability on cathode side has been barely reported. In this study, we introduce CoO mesoporous spheres into cathode, where the growth of crystalline discharge products (Li2O2) is directly observed on the CoO surface from aberration-corrected STEM. This CoO based cathode demonstrates more than 300 discharge/charge cycles with excessive lithium anode. Under deep discharge/charge, CoO cathode exhibited superior cycle performance than that of Co3O4 with similar nanostructure. This improved cycle performance can be ascribed to a more favorable adsorption configuration of Li2O2 intermediates (LiO2) on CoO surface, which is demonstrated through DFT calculation. The favorable adsorption of LiO2 plays an important role in the enhanced cycle performance, which reduced the contact of LiO2 to carbon materials and further alleviated the side reactions during charge process. This compatible interface design may provide an effective approach in protecting carbon-based cathodes in metal-oxygen batteries. PMID:25720845

  7. High reliability cathode heaters for ion thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, L. A.

    1976-01-01

    A number of space missions were proposed which utilize 30-cm mercury bombardment ion thrusters and also require a large number of thruster restarts. A test program was carried out to determine thermal cycle life of several different cathode heater designs. Plasma/flame sprayed heaters and swaged type heaters were tested. Four of the five plasma/flame sprayed heaters tested failed in a comparatively short time. Four tantalum swaged heaters that were brazed to the tantalum cathode tube were successfully tested and met the goals that were set at the start of the test.

  8. High reliability cathode heaters for ion thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, L. A.

    1976-01-01

    A number of space missions have been proposed which will utilize 30-cm mercury bombardment ion thrusters and also will require a large number of thruster restarts. A test program was carried out to determine thermal cycle life of several different cathode heater designs. Plasma/flame sprayed heaters and swaged type heaters were tested. Four of the five plasma/flame sprayed heaters tested failed in a comparatively short time. Four tantalum swaged heaters that were brazed to the tantalum cathode tube were successfully tested and met the goals that were set at the start of the test.

  9. Cathode architectures for alkali metal / oxygen batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Visco, Steven J; Nimon, Vitaliy; De Jonghe, Lutgard C; Volfkovich, Yury; Bograchev, Daniil

    2015-01-13

    Electrochemical energy storage devices, such as alkali metal-oxygen battery cells (e.g., non-aqueous lithium-air cells), have a cathode architecture with a porous structure and pore composition that is tailored to improve cell performance, especially as it pertains to one or more of the discharge/charge rate, cycle life, and delivered ampere-hour capacity. A porous cathode architecture having a pore volume that is derived from pores of varying radii wherein the pore size distribution is tailored as a function of the architecture thickness is one way to achieve one or more of the aforementioned cell performance improvements.

  10. Hollow-Cathode Source Generates Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deininger, W. D.; Aston, G.; Pless, L. C.

    1989-01-01

    Device generates argon, krypton, or xenon plasma via thermionic emission and electrical discharge within hollow cathode and ejects plasma into surrounding vacuum. Goes from cold start up to full operation in less than 5 s after initial application of power. Exposed to moist air between operations without significant degradation of starting and running characteristics. Plasma generated by electrical discharge in cathode barrel sustained and aided by thermionic emission from emitter tube. Emitter tube does not depend on rare-earth oxides, making it vulnerable to contamination by exposure to atmosphere. Device modified for use as source of plasma in laboratory experiments or industrial processes.

  11. Engineering-Scale Liquid Cadmium Cathode Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    D Vaden; B. R. Westphal; S. X. Li; T. A. Johnson; K. B. Davies; D. M. Pace

    2006-08-01

    Recovery of transuranic actinides (TRU) using electrorefining is a process being investigated as part of the Department of Energy (DOE) Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI). TRU recovery via electrorefining onto a solid cathode is very difficult as the thermodynamic properties of transuranics are not favourable for them to remain in the metal phase while significant quantities of uranium trichloride exist in the electrolyte. Theoretically, the concentration of transuranics in the electrolyte must be approximately 106 greater than the uranium concentration in the electrolyte to produce a transuranic deposit on a solid cathode. Using liquid cadmium as a cathode contained within a LiCl-KCl eutectic salt, the co-deposition of uranium and transuranics is feasible because the activity of the transuranics in liquid cadmium is very small. Depositing transuranics and uranium in a liquid cadmium cathode (LCC) theoretically requires the concentration of transuranics to be two to three times the uranium concentration in the electrolyte. Three LCC experiments were performed in an Engineering scale elecdtrorefiner, which is located in the argon hot cell of the Fuel Conditioning Facility at the Materials and Fuels Complex on the Idaho National Laboratory. Figure 1 contains photographs of the LCC assembly in the hot cell prior to the experiment and a cadmium ingot produced after the first LCC test. Figure 1. Liquid Cadmium Cathode (left) and Cadmium Ingot (right) The primary goal of the engineering-scale liquid cadmium cathode experiments was to electrochemically collect kilogram quantities of uranium and plutonium via a LCC. The secondary goal was to examine fission product contaminations in the materials collected by the LCC. Each LCC experiment used chopped spent nuclear fuel from the blanket region of the Experimental Breeder Reactor II loaded into steel baskets as the anode with the LCC containing 26 kg of cadmium metal. In each experiment, between one and two kilograms of

  12. Ferroelectric Cathodes in Transverse Magnetic Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander Dunaevsky; Yevgeny Raitses; Nathaniel J. Fisch

    2002-07-29

    Experimental investigations of a planar ferroelectric cathode in a transverse magnetic field up to 3 kGs are presented. It is shown that the transverse magnetic field affects differently the operation of ferroelectric plasma cathodes in ''bright'' and ''dark'' modes in vacuum. In the ''bright'' mode, when the surface plasma is formed, the application of the transverse magnetic field leads to an increase of the surface plasma density. In the ''dark'' mode, the magnetic field inhibits the development of electron avalanches along the surface, as it does similarly in other kinds of surface discharges in the pre-breakdown mode.

  13. DARHT 2 kA Cathode Development

    SciTech Connect

    Henestroza, E.; Houck, T.; Kwan, J.W.; Leitner, M.; Miram, G.; Prichard, B.; Roy, P.K.; Waldron, W.; Westenskow, G.; Yu, S.; Bieniosek, F.M.

    2009-03-09

    In the campaign to achieve 2 kA of electron beam current, we have made several changes to the DARHT-II injector during 2006-2007. These changes resulted in a significant increase in the beam current, achieving the 2 kA milestone. Until recently (before 2007), the maximum beam current that was produced from the 6.5-inch diameter (612M) cathode was about 1300 A when the cathode was operating at a maximum temperature of 1140 C. At this temperature level, the heat loss was dominated by radiation which is proportional to temperature to the fourth power. The maximum operating temperature was limited by the damage threshold of the potted filament and the capacity of the filament heater power supply, as well as the shortening of the cathode life time. There were also signs of overheating at other components in the cathode assembly. Thus it was clear that our approach to increase beam current could not be simply trying to run at a higher temperature and the preferred way was to operate with a cathode that has a lower work function. The dispenser cathode initially used was the type 612M made by SpectraMat. According to the manufacturer's bulletin, this cathode should be able to produce more than 10 A/cm{sup 2} of current density (corresponding to 2 kA of total beam current) at our operating conditions. Instead the measured emission (space charge limited) was 6 A/cm{sup 2}. The result was similar even after we had revised the activation and handling procedures to adhere more closely to the recommend steps (taking longer time and nonstop to do the out-gassing). Vacuum was a major concern in considering the cathode's performance. Although the vacuum gauges at the injector vessel indicated 10{sup -8} Torr, the actual vacuum condition near the cathode in the central region of the vessel, where there might be significant out-gassing from the heater region, was never determined. Poor vacuum at the surface of the cathode degraded the emission (by raising the work function value). We

  14. Fabrication Of Metal Chloride Cathodes By Sintering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugga, Ratnakumar V.; Di Stefano, Salvador; Bankston, C. Perry

    1992-01-01

    Transition-metal chloride cathodes for use in high-temperature rechargeable sodium batteries prepared by sintering transition-metal powders mixed with sodium chloride. Need for difficult and dangerous chlorination process eliminated. Proportions of transition metal and sodium chloride in mixture adjusted to suit specific requirements. Cathodes integral to sodium/metal-chloride batteries, which have advantages over sodium/sulfur batteries including energy densities, increased safety, reduced material and thermal-management problems, and ease of operation and assembly. Being evaluated for supplying electrical power during peak demand and electric vehicles.

  15. Prevention of cathode damage from positive ion bombardment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, W. H.

    1972-01-01

    Mixed alkaline earth oxide compounds deposited into hole at cathode surface center prevent ion back bombardment damage to cathode by reducing oxide layer and by creating metallic diffusion along sides of hole for enhanced electron emission.

  16. Cathode-ray tube displays for medical imaging.

    PubMed

    Keller, P A

    1990-02-01

    This paper will discuss the principles of cathode-ray tube displays in medical imaging and the parameters essential to the selection of displays for specific requirements. A discussion of cathode-ray tube fundamentals and medical requirements is included.

  17. Electrocatalytic cathode device and a method for making such a Cathode

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, C.L.

    1992-01-01

    An electrocatalytic cathode that will allow hydrogen peroxide, H202, to behave electrochemically within an Al-H202 battery system is provided. The electrocatalytic cathode is comprised of nickel specially coated with one or a combination of the following six metals: platinum, ruthenium, rhodium, osmium, palladium, and iridium. The use of nickel coated with the appropriate combination of metals reduces the problems of excessive peroxide decomposition, thereby producing a battery that can operate efficiently by producing a high voltage at a high current density. The electrocatalytic cathode is produced by pretreating a nickel electrode with a hydrochloric acid bath and then by applying the metal coating by plating methods.

  18. Uniform large-area thermionic cathode for SCALPEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsap, Victor; Sewell, Peter B.; Waskiewicz, Warren K.; Zhu, Wei

    1999-11-01

    An electron beam lithography tool, which employs the SCALPEL technique, requires an extremely uniform beam to illuminate the scattering Mask, with the cathode operating in the temperature limited mode. It has been previously shown that LaB6 cathodes are not stable in this mode of operation. We have explored the possibility of implementing refined Tantalum-based emitters in the SCALPEL source cathode, and have developed large-area flat cathodes featuring suitably high emission uniformity under temperature limited operation.

  19. Photothermal cathode measurements at the Advanced Photon Source.

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Y.-E.; Lewellen, J. W.; Feldman, D. W.; Univ. of Maryland

    2006-01-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) ballistic bunch compression (BBC) gun in the Injector Test Stand (ITS) presently uses an M-type thermionic dispenser cathode as a photocathode. This photothermal cathode offers substantial advantages over conventional metal photocathodes, including easy replacement and easy cleaning via the cathode's built-in heater. We present the results of photoemission measurements as a function of cathode heater power, laser pulse energy, and applied rf field strength.

  20. Microwave generators: oscillating virtual cathodes and reflexing electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Kwan, T.J.T.; Thode, L.E.

    1983-01-01

    Simulation of the generation of a relativistic electron beam in a foil diode configuration and of the subsequent intense microwave generation resulting from the formation of the virtual cathode is presented. The oscillating virtual cathode and the trapped beam electrons between the real and the virtual cathodes were found to generate microwaves. Generation of high-power microwaves with about 10% efficiency might be reasonably expected from such a virtual-cathode configuration.

  1. Plasma-Surface Interactions in Hollow Cathode Discharges for Electric Propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capece, Angela Maria

    surface state cannot be obtained because of the cathode geometry and high particles fluxes, measurements of the emitter temperature using a two-color pyrometer were used to determine the oxygen surface coverage and characterize the rate processes that occur during poisoning. A model describing the material transport in the plasma discharge was developed and is used to predict the barium and oxygen fluxes to the emitter surface during cathode operation by solving the species continuity and momentum equations. The dominant ionization process for molecular oxygen in the plasma gas is resonant charge exchange with xenon ions. Barium is effectively recycled in the plasma; however, BaO and O2 are not. The model shows that the oxygen flux to the surface is not diffusion limited. Experimental results indicate that the oxygen poisoning rate is slow and that the oxygen poisoning coverage on the emitter surface is less than 3%. A time-dependent model of the reaction kinetics of oxygen and barium at the tungsten surface was developed using the experimental results. The experiments and kinetics model indicate that the dominant processes at the emitter surface are dissociative adsorption of O2, sputtering of the O2 precursor, and desorption of O. Ion sputtering of the weakly bound O2 precursor state limits the poisoning rate and yields low oxygen coverage. Removal of chemisorbed atomic oxygen is dominated by thermal processes. Based on the low oxygen coverage and long poisoning transients, plasma cathodes appear to be able to withstand higher oxygen concentrations than vacuum cathodes.

  2. Combined plasma and thermal hollow cathode insert model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, Ira; Polk, James E.; Mikellides, Ionnis G.; Goebel, Dan m.; Hornbeck, Sarah E.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we present the first results from a Hollow Cathode Thermal (HCThermal) model that uses the spatially distributed plasma fluxes calculated by the InsertRegion of an Orificed Cathode (IROrCa2D) code as the heat source to predict the hollow cathode and insert temperatures.

  3. Energetic ion production and electrode erosion in hollow cathode discharges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goebel, Dan M.; Jameson, Kristina; Katz, Ira; Mikellides, Ioannis

    2005-01-01

    Ions with energies significantly in excess of the discharge voltage have been reported in high current hollow cathode discharges. Models of DC potential hills downstream of the cathode and ion acoustic instabilities in a double layer postulated in the cathode orifice have been proposed to explain these energetic ions, but have not been substantiated in experiments.

  4. LOW TEMPERATURE CATHODE SUPPORTED ELECTROLYTES

    SciTech Connect

    Harlan U. Anderson; Wayne Huebner; Igor Kosacki

    2001-09-30

    This project has three main goals: Thin Films Studies, Preparation of Graded Porous Substrates and Basic Electrical Characterization and testing of Planar Single Cells. In this portion of study we have focused on producing YSZ films on porous LSM substrates. When using the polymer precursor there are a number of obstacles to overcome in order to form dense electrolyte layers on porous substrates (cathode or anode). Probably the most difficult problems are: (1) Extreme penetration of the polymer into the substrate must be prevented. (2) Shrinkage cracking must be avoided. (3) Film thickness in the 1 to 5{micro}m range must be achieved. We have demonstrated that cracking due to shrinkage involved during the elimination of solvents and organic matter and densification of the remaining oxide is not a problem as long as the resulting oxide film is < {approx} 0.15 {micro}m in thickness. We have also shown that we can make thicker films by making multiple depositions if the substrate is smooth (roughness {le} 0.1 {micro}m) and contains no surface pores > 0.2 {micro}m. The penetration of the polymer into the porous substrate can be minimized by increasing the viscosity of the polymer and reducing the largest pore at the surface of the substrate to {le} 0.2 {micro}m. We have shown that this can be done, but we have also shown that it is difficult to make dense films that are defect free with areas > 1 cm{sup 2}. This is because of the roughness of the substrate and the difficulty in making a substrate which does not have surface voids > 0.2 {micro}m. Thus the process works well for dense, smooth substrates for films < 1 {micro}m thick, but is difficult to apply to rough, porous surfaces and to make film thickness > 1 {micro}m. As a result of these problems, we have been addressing the issue of how to make dense films in the thickness range of 1 to 5 {micro}m on sintered porous substrates without introducing cracks and holes due to shrinkage and surface voids? These

  5. LOW TEMPERATURE CATHODE SUPPORTED ELECTROLYTES

    SciTech Connect

    Harlan U. Anderson

    2000-03-31

    . However, they have the potential of being useful as an interface on the anode side of the electrolyte. NexTech has focused much of its effort during the past few months on establishing tape casting methods for porous LSM substrates. This work, performed under a separate DOE-funded program, involved tape casting formulations comprising LSM powders with bi-modal particle size distributions and fugitive pore forming additives. Sintered LSM substrates with porosities in the 30 to 40 vol% range, and pore sizes of 10 {approx} 20 microns have been prepared. In addition, tape casting formulations involving composite mixtures of LSM and Sm-doped ceria (SDC) have been evaluated. The LSM/SDC cathode substrates are expected to provide better performance at low temperatures. Characterization of these materials is currently underway.

  6. 40 CFR 261.39 - Conditional Exclusion for Used, Broken Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) and Processed CRT Glass...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... complete until any such claim is resolved in accordance with 40 CFR 260.2. (v) The export of CRTs is... CFR part 266, subpart C instead of the requirements of this section. ... Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) and Processed CRT Glass Undergoing Recycling. 261.39 Section 261.39 Protection...

  7. 40 CFR 261.39 - Conditional Exclusion for Used, Broken Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) and Processed CRT Glass...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... complete until any such claim is resolved in accordance with 40 CFR 260.2. (v) The export of CRTs is... CFR part 266, subpart C instead of the requirements of this section. ... Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) and Processed CRT Glass Undergoing Recycling. 261.39 Section 261.39 Protection...

  8. 40 CFR 261.39 - Conditional Exclusion for Used, Broken Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) and Processed CRT Glass...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... complete until any such claim is resolved in accordance with 40 CFR 260.2. (v) The export of CRTs is... CFR part 266, subpart C instead of the requirements of this section. ... Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) and Processed CRT Glass Undergoing Recycling. 261.39 Section 261.39 Protection...

  9. 40 CFR 261.39 - Conditional Exclusion for Used, Broken Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) and Processed CRT Glass...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... complete until any such claim is resolved in accordance with 40 CFR 260.2. (v) The export of CRTs is... CFR part 266, subpart C instead of the requirements of this section. ... Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) and Processed CRT Glass Undergoing Recycling. 261.39 Section 261.39 Protection...

  10. 40 CFR 261.39 - Conditional Exclusion for Used, Broken Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) and Processed CRT Glass...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... complete until any such claim is resolved in accordance with 40 CFR 260.2. (v) The export of CRTs is... CFR part 266, subpart C instead of the requirements of this section. § 261.39, Nt. Effective Date Note... Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) and Processed CRT Glass Undergoing Recycling. 261.39 Section 261.39 Protection...

  11. Electrochemical struvite precipitation from digestate with a fluidized bed cathode microbial electrolysis cell.

    PubMed

    Cusick, Roland D; Ullery, Mark L; Dempsey, Brian A; Logan, Bruce E

    2014-05-01

    Microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) can be used to simultaneously convert wastewater organics to hydrogen and precipitate struvite, but scale formation at the cathode surface can block catalytic active sites and limit extended operation. To promote bulk phase struvite precipitation and minimize cathode scaling, a two-chamber MEC was designed with a fluidized bed to produce suspended particles and inhibit scale formation on the cathode surface. MEC operation elevated the cathode pH to between 8.3 and 8.7 under continuous flow conditions. Soluble phosphorus removal using digester effluent ranged from 70 to 85% with current generation, compared to 10-20% for the control (open circuit conditions). At low current densities (≤2 mA/m(2)), scouring of the cathode by fluidized particles prevented scale accumulation over a period of 8 days. There was nearly identical removal of soluble phosphorus and magnesium from solution, and an equimolar composition in the collected solids, supporting phosphorus removal by struvite formation. At an applied voltage of 1.0 V, energy consumption from the power supply and pumping (0.2 Wh/L, 7.5 Wh/g-P) was significantly less than that needed by other struvite formation methods based on pH adjustment such as aeration and NaOH addition. In the anode chamber, current generation led to COD oxidation (1.1-2.1 g-COD/L-d) and ammonium removal (7-12 mM) from digestate amended with 1 g/L of sodium acetate. These results indicate that a fluidized bed cathode MEC is a promising method of sustainable electrochemical nutrient and energy recovery method for nutrient rich wastewaters. PMID:24583521

  12. Mode transition of microhollow cathode sustained discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Shoujie; jing, Ha; Zhang, Zhao; Ouyang, Jiting; Li, Qing

    2016-09-01

    The spatio-temporal characteristics of microhollow cathode sustained discharge are investigated using a fully self-consistent fluid model. The evolutions of discharge current, electric potential, electron density, the axial and radial electric fields, and ionization rates are simulated at 100 Torr. The interaction between the microhollow cathode discharge (MHCD) and the microhollow cathode sustained discharge (MCSD) is also investigated. Results show that the mode transition is related to the distance d between the first anode and the second anode. When the distance is large (e.g. d  =  2 mm), a complete discharge process comprises five stages. These stages are Townsend mode, the transition from mainly axial electric field to mainly radial electric field, the formation of the hollow cathode effect, the formation of microcathode sustained discharge, and stable discharge. The influence of MHCD on MCSD is prior to the influence of MCSD on MHCD. By contrast, when d is very small (e.g. d  =  0.3 mm), the influence of MHCD on MCSD is posterior to the influence of MCSD on MHCD.

  13. Barium depletion in hollow cathode emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polk, James E.; Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Capece, Angela M.; Katz, Ira

    2016-01-01

    Dispenser hollow cathodes rely on a consumable supply of Ba released by BaO-CaO-Al2O3 source material in the pores of a tungsten matrix to maintain a low work function surface. The examination of cathode emitters from long duration tests shows deposits of tungsten at the downstream end that appear to block the flow of Ba from the interior. In addition, a numerical model of Ba transport in the cathode plasma indicates that the Ba partial pressure in the insert may exceed the equilibrium vapor pressure of the dominant Ba-producing reaction, and it was postulated previously that this would suppress Ba loss in the upstream part of the emitter. New measurements of the Ba depletion depth from a cathode insert operated for 8200 h reveal that Ba loss is confined to a narrow region near the downstream end, confirming this hypothesis. The Ba transport model was modified to predict the depletion depth with time. A comparison of the calculated and measured depletion depths gives excellent qualitative agreement, and quantitative agreement was obtained assuming an insert temperature 70 °C lower than measured beginning-of-life values.

  14. Luminescent screen composition for cathode ray tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilborn, E. H.

    1968-01-01

    Screen composition for cathode ray tubes exhibits differential color of emission as a function of beam current variation at a constant accelerating voltage. The screen consists of a mixture of phosphors which emit different hues, have different current saturation values and exhibit a nonlinear current-brightness characteristic.

  15. Pattern Formation in Cathode Boundary Layer Microdischarges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoenbach, K. H.; Moselhy, M. M.

    2003-10-01

    Direct current glow discharges in xenon between a planar, 100 μm thick cathode and a ring shaped anode, separated by 250 μm, were found to be stable up to atmospheric pressure. Photographs in the visible and VUV (172 nm) range of the spectrum show the transition from a homogeneous to a structured plasma. The plasma patterns, regularly arranged filaments that are most pronounced at lower pressures (100 Torr), show discrete changes when the current is decreased by fractions of mA. This selforganization of the plasma requires the presence of a second stable branch in addition to the abnormal cathode fall in the voltage-current density characteristic of the "cathode boundary layer" (CBL) discharges. A model of the cathode fall by von Engel and Steenbeck [1], which was modified to take thermal conduction as a loss process into account, in addition to radiation, indicates the presence of stable plasma filaments at current densities in the range from 10 to 100 A/cm^2, before transition into an arc. [1] A. von Engel and M. Steenbeck, "Elektrische Gasentladungen, ihre Physik und Technik," Vol. 2, p. 121. Work supported by NSF (CTS-0078618 and INT-0001438).

  16. Microhollow cathode discharge excimer light sources

    SciTech Connect

    El-Habachi, A.; Moselhy, M.; El-Dakroury, A.; Schoenbach, K.H.

    1999-07-01

    Microhollow Cathode discharges are non-equilibrium, high pressure, direct current discharges. By reducing the diameter of the cathode opening in a hollow cathode discharge geometry to values in the sub millimeter range the authors were able to operate discharges in argon and xenon in a direct current mode up to atmospheric pressure. They have shown that these discharges are intense source of xenon and argon excimer radiation peaking at wavelengths of 172 nm and 130 nm, respectively. Spatially resolved measurements of the excimer source in xenon have been performed. The source was found to be cylindrical along the axis of the electrodes. Its radius increases with current and decreases with pressure. Stacking the discharges, operating them in series, holds the promise for the generation of a laser medium with sufficient length to provide the required threshold gain for a dc excimer laser. Experimental studies of the gain of the plasma column in microhollow cathode discharges are underway. Excimer efficiencies, defined as the ratio of optical to electrical power, of 6% to 9% have been achieved. Further increase of the efficiency seems to be possible; according to the modeling results, efficiencies of 30% to 40% may be obtainable. The effect of various parameters such as electrode geometry, gas flow and pulsed versus cw operation on the excimer efficiency is being studied with the goal to optimize the discharge.

  17. Composite Cathode for High-Power Density Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ilwon Kim; Scott Barnett; Yi Jiang; Manoj Pillai; Nikkia McDonald; Dan Gostovic; Zhongryang Zhan; Jiang Liu

    2004-01-31

    Reduction of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) operating temperature will play a key role in reducing the stack cost by allowing the use of low-cost metallic interconnects and new approaches to sealing, while making applications such as transportation more feasible. Reported results for anode-supported SOFCs show that cathode polarization resistance is the primary barrier to achieving high power densities at operating temperatures of 700 C and lower. This project aims to identify and develop composite cathodes that could reduce SOFC operating temperatures below 700 C. This effort focuses on study and use of (La,Sr)(Co,Fe)O{sub 3} (LSCF) based composite cathodes, which have arguably the best potential to substantially improve on the currently-used, (La,Sr)MnO{sub 3}-Yttria-stabilized Zirconia. During this Phase I, it was successfully demonstrated that high performances can be achieved with LSCF/Gadolinium-Doped Ceria composite cathodes on Ni-based anode supported cells operating at 700 C or lower. We studied electrochemical reactions at LSCF/Yttria-stabilized Zirconia (YSZ) interfaces, and observed chemical reactions between LSCF and YSZ. By using ceria electrolytes or YSZ electrolytes with ceria diffusion barrier layers, the chemical reactions between LSCF and electrolytes were prevented under cathode firing conditions necessary for the optimal adhesion of the cathodes. The protection provided by ceria layer is expected to be adequate for stable long-term cathode performances, but more testing is needed to verify this. Using ceria-based barrier layers, high performance Ni-YSZ anode supported cells have been demonstrated with maximum power densities of 0.8W/cm2 at 700 C and 1.6W/cm{sup 2} at 800 C. Ni-SDC anode supported cells with SDC electrolytes yielded >1W/cm{sup 2} at 600 C. We speculate that the power output of Ni-YSZ anode supported cell at 700 C and lower, was limited by the quality of the Ceria and Ceria YSZ interface. Improvements in the low

  18. Study of azo dye decolorization and determination of cathode microorganism profile in air-cathode microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Kumru, Mert; Eren, Hilal; Catal, Tunc; Bermek, Hakan; Akarsubaşi, Alper Tunga

    2012-09-01

    Five textile azo dyes, as part of an artificial mixture, were treated in single-chamber air-cathode microbial fuel cells while simultaneously utilizing acetate for electricity production. Remazol Black, Remazol Brilliant Blue, Remazol Turquoise Blue, Reactive Yellow and Reactive Red at concentrations of 40 or 80 mg L(-1) were decolorized to a similar extent, at averages of 78, 95, 53, 93 and 74%, respectively, in 24 hours. During the process of decolorization, electricity generation from acetate oxidation continued. Power densities obtained in the presence of textile dyes ranged from 347 to 521 mW m(-2) at the current density range of 0.071 - 0.086 mA cm(-2). Microbial community analyses of cathode biofilm exhibited dynamic changes in abundant species following dye decolorization. Upon the addition of the first dye, a major change (63%) in microbial diversity was observed; however, subsequent addition of other dyes did not affect the community profile significantly. Actinobacteria, Aquamicrobium, Mesorhizobium, Ochrobactrum, Thauera, Paracoccus, Achromobacter and Chelatacoccus affiliated phylotypes were the major phylotypes detected. Our results demonstrate that microbial fuel cells could be a promising alternative for treatment of textile wastewaters and an active bacterial community can rapidly be established for simultaneous azo dye decolorization and sustainable electricity generation.

  19. Study of azo dye decolorization and determination of cathode microorganism profile in air-cathode microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Kumru, Mert; Eren, Hilal; Catal, Tunc; Bermek, Hakan; Akarsubaşi, Alper Tunga

    2012-09-01

    Five textile azo dyes, as part of an artificial mixture, were treated in single-chamber air-cathode microbial fuel cells while simultaneously utilizing acetate for electricity production. Remazol Black, Remazol Brilliant Blue, Remazol Turquoise Blue, Reactive Yellow and Reactive Red at concentrations of 40 or 80 mg L(-1) were decolorized to a similar extent, at averages of 78, 95, 53, 93 and 74%, respectively, in 24 hours. During the process of decolorization, electricity generation from acetate oxidation continued. Power densities obtained in the presence of textile dyes ranged from 347 to 521 mW m(-2) at the current density range of 0.071 - 0.086 mA cm(-2). Microbial community analyses of cathode biofilm exhibited dynamic changes in abundant species following dye decolorization. Upon the addition of the first dye, a major change (63%) in microbial diversity was observed; however, subsequent addition of other dyes did not affect the community profile significantly. Actinobacteria, Aquamicrobium, Mesorhizobium, Ochrobactrum, Thauera, Paracoccus, Achromobacter and Chelatacoccus affiliated phylotypes were the major phylotypes detected. Our results demonstrate that microbial fuel cells could be a promising alternative for treatment of textile wastewaters and an active bacterial community can rapidly be established for simultaneous azo dye decolorization and sustainable electricity generation. PMID:23240212

  20. Continuous Problem of Function Continuity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jayakody, Gaya; Zazkis, Rina

    2015-01-01

    We examine different definitions presented in textbooks and other mathematical sources for "continuity of a function at a point" and "continuous function" in the context of introductory level Calculus. We then identify problematic issues related to definitions of continuity and discontinuity: inconsistency and absence of…

  1. 40 CFR 52.2304 - Visibility protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Visibility protection. 52.2304 Section 52.2304 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS (CONTINUED) Texas § 52.2304 Visibility protection....

  2. 40 CFR 52.2452 - Visibility protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Visibility protection. 52.2452 Section 52.2452 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS (CONTINUED) Virginia § 52.2452 Visibility protection....

  3. 40 CFR 52.1387 - Visibility protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Visibility protection. 52.1387 Section 52.1387 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS (CONTINUED) Montana § 52.1387 Visibility protection....

  4. 40 CFR 52.1387 - Visibility protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Visibility protection. 52.1387 Section 52.1387 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS (CONTINUED) Montana § 52.1387 Visibility protection....

  5. 40 CFR 52.1387 - Visibility protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Visibility protection. 52.1387 Section 52.1387 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS (CONTINUED) Montana § 52.1387 Visibility protection....

  6. 40 CFR 52.2452 - Visibility protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Visibility protection. 52.2452 Section 52.2452 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS (CONTINUED) Virginia § 52.2452 Visibility protection....

  7. 40 CFR 52.1183 - Visibility protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Visibility protection. 52.1183 Section 52.1183 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS (CONTINUED) Michigan § 52.1183 Visibility protection....

  8. 40 CFR 52.2304 - Visibility protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Visibility protection. 52.2304 Section 52.2304 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS (CONTINUED) Texas § 52.2304 Visibility protection....

  9. 40 CFR 52.1928 - Visibility protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Visibility protection. 52.1928 Section 52.1928 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS (CONTINUED) Oklahoma § 52.1928 Visibility protection....

  10. 40 CFR 52.1183 - Visibility protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Visibility protection. 52.1183 Section 52.1183 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS (CONTINUED) Michigan § 52.1183 Visibility protection....

  11. 40 CFR 52.1339 - Visibility protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Visibility protection. 52.1339 Section 52.1339 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS (CONTINUED) Missouri § 52.1339 Visibility protection....

  12. 40 CFR 52.1339 - Visibility protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Visibility protection. 52.1339 Section 52.1339 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS (CONTINUED) Missouri § 52.1339 Visibility protection....

  13. A pulsed DC gas flow hollow cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paduraru, Cristian

    A new gas flow hollow cathode discharge source (GFHC) has been developed, characterized, and applied to thin film deposition by sputtering and low-temperature PECVD. Non-reactive and reactive sputtering processes were investigated using copper and aluminum targets, respectively. For the first time, pulsed DC power was applied to a GFHC in order to avoid arcing caused by electrode surface contamination, and to stabilize the discharge in general. The electrical characteristics of the source, the parameters of the remote plasma and its optical emission, were studied and compared to those of a DC powered GFHC. We determined the electrical characteristics of the plasma, including the temporal behavior of the current and voltage under various conditions of pressure and inert gas flow through the cathode. The transition from a glow discharge mode to the hollow cathode mode was studied in an effort to determine the operating range of the GFHC. A capacitive current was discovered at the beginning of the on-time. The properties of the remote plasma were investigated using averaged and time-resolved Langmuir probe and optical emission measurements. The distribution of the remote plasma density resembles the gas flow velocity distribution through the cathode. Plasma processes during off time (decaying plasma) and on-time (plasma reestablishment) were studied and compared to those in pulsed DC magnetron and high power inductively coupled glow discharges. The dependence of the deposition rate, resistivity and thickness distribution of copper films dependence on pulse parameters, power, inert gas flow through the cathode and pressure have been studied. The thin film thickness distribution is governed by the distribution of the gas flow velocity, which can be calculated using laminar flow gas dynamics. In a pulsed DC GFHC system, the inert gas flow through the cathode prevents the penetration of the reactive gas from the chamber into the cathode. A special reactive gas delivery

  14. Nanoscale Surface Modification of Lithium-Rich Layered-Oxide Composite Cathodes for Suppressing Voltage Fade.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Fenghua; Yang, Chenghao; Xiong, Xunhui; Xiong, Jiawen; Hu, Renzong; Chen, Yu; Liu, Meilin

    2015-10-26

    Lithium-rich layered oxides are promising cathode materials for lithium-ion batteries and exhibit a high reversible capacity exceeding 250 mAh g(-1) . However, voltage fade is the major problem that needs to be overcome before they can find practical applications. Here, Li1.2 Mn0.54 Ni0.13 Co0.13 O2 (LLMO) oxides are subjected to nanoscale LiFePO4 (LFP) surface modification. The resulting materials combine the advantages of both bulk doping and surface coating as the LLMO crystal structure is stabilized through cationic doping, and the LLMO cathode materials are protected from corrosion induced by organic electrolytes. An LLMO cathode modified with 5 wt % LFP (LLMO-LFP5) demonstrated suppressed voltage fade and a discharge capacity of 282.8 mAh g(-1) at 0.1 C with a capacity retention of 98.1 % after 120 cycles. Moreover, the nanoscale LFP layers incorporated into the LLMO surfaces can effectively maintain the lithium-ion and charge transport channels, and the LLMO-LFP5 cathode demonstrated an excellent rate capacity.

  15. Cathodic behaviour of stainless steel in coastal Indian seawater: calcareous deposits overwhelm biofilms.

    PubMed

    Eashwar, M; Subramanian, G; Palanichamy, S; Rajagopal, G; Madhu, S; Kamaraj, P

    2009-01-01

    Type-316 stainless steel (SS) was investigated as the cathode in galvanic couples in full-strength seawater from the Gulf of Mannar on the southeast coast of India. Tests were devised to examine the impact of SS cathodes on anode materials with or without the accrual of marine biofilms. Biofilmed SS cathodes significantly enhanced the rate of corrosion of nickel, causing noble shifts in the couple potentials. With mild steel and zinc as the anodes, calcareous deposits developed quite rapidly on the SS cathodes and led to a significant reduction of bacterial numbers. The calcareous deposits also caused substantial reduction of galvanic corrosion rates for mild steel, whereas there was no difference for zinc. The deposits were identified by XRD as essentially carbonates, oxides and hydroxides of calcium and magnesium. Potentiodynamic polarization performed on the actual couples after disconnection and equilibration provided reasonable interpretations of the galvanic corrosion trends. Data from this work suggest that a potential of about -0.70 V vs. saturated calomel electrode (SCE) should provide optimum protection of SS in warmer, full-strength seawater that supports the precipitation of calcareous deposits. The criterion commonly recommended for temperate conditions of lower water temperature and estuarine waters of lower alkalinity is -1.0 V (SCE). PMID:19169951

  16. Cathodic behaviour of stainless steel in coastal Indian seawater: calcareous deposits overwhelm biofilms.

    PubMed

    Eashwar, M; Subramanian, G; Palanichamy, S; Rajagopal, G; Madhu, S; Kamaraj, P

    2009-01-01

    Type-316 stainless steel (SS) was investigated as the cathode in galvanic couples in full-strength seawater from the Gulf of Mannar on the southeast coast of India. Tests were devised to examine the impact of SS cathodes on anode materials with or without the accrual of marine biofilms. Biofilmed SS cathodes significantly enhanced the rate of corrosion of nickel, causing noble shifts in the couple potentials. With mild steel and zinc as the anodes, calcareous deposits developed quite rapidly on the SS cathodes and led to a significant reduction of bacterial numbers. The calcareous deposits also caused substantial reduction of galvanic corrosion rates for mild steel, whereas there was no difference for zinc. The deposits were identified by XRD as essentially carbonates, oxides and hydroxides of calcium and magnesium. Potentiodynamic polarization performed on the actual couples after disconnection and equilibration provided reasonable interpretations of the galvanic corrosion trends. Data from this work suggest that a potential of about -0.70 V vs. saturated calomel electrode (SCE) should provide optimum protection of SS in warmer, full-strength seawater that supports the precipitation of calcareous deposits. The criterion commonly recommended for temperate conditions of lower water temperature and estuarine waters of lower alkalinity is -1.0 V (SCE).

  17. Electrochemical Wear of Carbon Cathodes in Electrowinning of Aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tschöpe, Kati; Støre, Anne; Solheim, Asbjørn; Skybakmoen, Egil; Grande, Tor; Ratvik, Arne Petter

    2013-11-01

    Cathode wear is the main factor limiting the lifetime of high-amperage aluminum electrolysis cells with graphitized cathodes. The current article deals with an investigation of cathode wear in a laboratory cell, where the cathode is directly exposed to the electrolyte during electrolysis. The wear was shown to be electrochemical in nature and dependent on the current density, the rotation speed, and the depth of prefabricated slots in the cylindrical cathodes. The wear mechanism is discussed with respect to kinetics influencing the electrochemistry as well as the solubility of aluminum carbide in the electrolyte.

  18. Development program on a Spindt cold-cathode electron gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spindt, C. A.

    1982-01-01

    A thin film field emission cathode (TFFEC) array and a cold cathode electron gun based on the emitter were developed. A microwave tube gun that uses the thin film field emission cathode as an electron source is produced. State-of-the-art cathodes were fabricated and tested. The tip-packing density of the arrays were increased thereby increasing the cathode's current density capability. The TFFEC is based on the well known field emission effect and was conceived to exploit the advantages of that phenomenon while minimizing the difficulties associated with conventional field emission structures, e.g. limited life and high voltage requirements. Field emission follows the Fowler-Nordheim equation.

  19. Carbon-containing cathodes for enhanced electron emission

    DOEpatents

    Cao, Renyu; Pan, Lawrence; Vergara, German; Fox, Ciaran

    2000-01-01

    A cathode has electropositive atoms directly bonded to a carbon-containing substrate. Preferably, the substrate comprises diamond or diamond-like (sp.sup.3) carbon, and the electropositive atoms are Cs. The cathode displays superior efficiency and durability. In one embodiment, the cathode has a negative electron affinity (NEA). The cathode can be used for field emission, thermionic emission, or photoemission. Upon exposure to air or oxygen, the cathode performance can be restored by annealing or other methods. Applications include detectors, electron multipliers, sensors, imaging systems, and displays, particularly flat panel displays.

  20. Long lifetime hollow cathodes for 30-cm mercury ion thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirtich, M. J.; Kerslake, W. R.

    1976-01-01

    An experimental investigation of hollow cathodes for 30-cm Hg bombardment thrusters was carried out. Both main and neutralizer cathode configurations were tested with both rolled foil inserts coated with low work function material and impregnated porous tungsten inserts. Temperature measurements of an impregnated insert at various positions in the cathode were made. These, along with the cathode thermal profile are presented. A theory for rolled foil and impregnated insert operation and lifetime in hollow cathodes is developed. Several endurance tests, as long as 18000 hours at emission currents of up to 12 amps were attained with no degradation in performance.

  1. Cathode scraper system and method of using the same for removing uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Williamson, Mark A; Wiedmeyer, Stanley G; Willit, James L; Barnes, Laurel A; Blaskovitz, Robert J

    2015-02-03

    Embodiments include a cathode scraper system and/or method of using the same for removing uranium. The cathode scraper system includes a plurality of cathode assemblies. Each cathode assembly includes a plurality of cathode rods. The cathode scraper system also includes a cathode scraper assembly configured to remove purified uranium deposited on the plurality of cathode rods. The cathode scraper assembly includes a plurality of scrapers arranged in a lattice, and each scraper of the plurality of scrapers is arranged to correspond to a different cathode rod.

  2. Polymer coatings as separator layers for microbial fuel cell cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Valerie J.; Saito, Tomonori; Hickner, Michael A.; Logan, Bruce E.

    2011-03-01

    Membrane separators reduce oxygen flux from the cathode into the anolyte in microbial fuel cells (MFCs), but water accumulation and pH gradients between the separator and cathode reduces performance. Air cathodes were spray-coated (water-facing side) with anion exchange, cation exchange, and neutral polymer coatings of different thicknesses to incorporate the separator into the cathode. The anion exchange polymer coating resulted in greater power density (1167 ± 135 mW m-2) than a cation exchange coating (439 ± 2 mW m-2). This power output was similar to that produced by a Nafion-coated cathode (1114 ± 174 mW m-2), and slightly lower than the uncoated cathode (1384 ± 82 mW m-2). Thicker coatings reduced oxygen diffusion into the electrolyte and increased coulombic efficiency (CE = 56-64%) relative to an uncoated cathode (29 ± 8%), but decreased power production (255-574 mW m-2). Electrochemical characterization of the cathodes ex situ to the MFC showed that the cathodes with the lowest charge transfer resistance and the highest oxygen reduction activity produced the most power in MFC tests. The results on hydrophilic cathode separator layers revealed a trade off between power and CE. Cathodes coated with a thin coating of anion exchange polymer show promise for controlling oxygen transfer while minimally affecting power production.

  3. Scenario for Hollow Cathode End-Of-Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarver-Verhey, Timothy R.

    2000-01-01

    Recent successful hollow cathode life tests have demonstrated that lifetimes can meet the requirements of several space applications. However, there are no methods for assessing cathode lifetime short of demonstrating the requirement. Previous attempts to estimate or predict cathode lifetime were based on relatively simple chemical depletion models derived from the dispenser cathode community. To address this lack of predicative capability, a scenario for hollow cathode lifetime under steady-state operating conditions is proposed. This scenario has been derived primarily from the operating behavior and post-test condition of a hollow cathode that was operated for 28,000 hours. In this scenario, the insert chemistry evolves through three relatively distinct phases over the course of the cathode lifetime. These phases are believed to correspond to demonstrable changes in cathode operation. The implications for cathode lifetime limits resulting from this scenario are examined, including methods to assess cathode lifetime without operating to End-of- Life and methods to extend the cathode lifetime.

  4. Nanostructured material for advanced energy storage : magnesium battery cathode development.

    SciTech Connect

    Sigmund, Wolfgang M.; Woan, Karran V.; Bell, Nelson Simmons

    2010-11-01

    Magnesium batteries are alternatives to the use of lithium ion and nickel metal hydride secondary batteries due to magnesium's abundance, safety of operation, and lower toxicity of disposal. The divalency of the magnesium ion and its chemistry poses some difficulties for its general and industrial use. This work developed a continuous and fibrous nanoscale network of the cathode material through the use of electrospinning with the goal of enhancing performance and reactivity of the battery. The system was characterized and preliminary tests were performed on the constructed battery cells. We were successful in building and testing a series of electrochemical systems that demonstrated good cyclability maintaining 60-70% of discharge capacity after more than 50 charge-discharge cycles.

  5. Cathodic properties of different stainless steels in natural seawater

    SciTech Connect

    Johnsen, R.; Bardal, E.

    1985-05-01

    The cathodic properties of a number of stainless steels, which were exposed to natural seawater flowing at 0 to 2.5 m/s and polarized to potentials from -300 to -950 mV SCE, have been studied. The current density development at constant potential and the free corrosion potential during the exposure time were recorded continuously. At the end of the exposure period, after approximately 28 to 36 days of exposure, polarization curves were determined. After one to three weeks of exposure, depending on the water velocity, microbiological activity on the surface caused an increase in the current density requirement of the specimen. An explanation for the mechanism behind the current density increase caused by slime production from marine bacteria may be increased exchange current density, i/sub 0/. There was no measurable calcareous deposit on the stainless steel surfaces at the end of the exposure periods.

  6. Virtual cathode microwave generator having annular anode slit

    DOEpatents

    Kwan, Thomas J. T.; Snell, Charles M.

    1988-01-01

    A microwave generator is provided for generating microwaves substantially from virtual cathode oscillation. Electrons are emitted from a cathode and accelerated to an anode which is spaced apart from the cathode. The anode has an annular slit therethrough effective to form the virtual cathode. The anode is at least one range thickness relative to electrons reflecting from the virtual cathode. A magnet is provided to produce an optimum magnetic field having the field strength effective to form an annular beam from the emitted electrons in substantial alignment with the annular anode slit. The magnetic field, however, does permit the reflected electrons to axially diverge from the annular beam. The reflected electrons are absorbed by the anode in returning to the real cathode, such that substantially no reflexing electrons occur. The resulting microwaves are produced with a single dominant mode and are substantially monochromatic relative to conventional virtual cathode microwave generators.

  7. Cathode R&D for future light sources.

    SciTech Connect

    Dowell, D. H.; Bazarov, I.; Dunham, B.; Harkay, K.; Hernandez-Garcia, C.; Legg, R.; Padmore, H.; Rao, T.; Smedley, J.; Wan, W.; Accelerator Systems Division; SLAC National Accelerator Lab.; Cornell Univ.; Thomas Jefferson Lab.; Univ. of Wisconsin; LBNL; BNL

    2010-03-18

    This paper reviews the requirements and current status of cathodes for accelerator applications, and proposes a research and development plan for advancing cathode technology. Accelerator cathodes need to have long operational lifetimes and produce electron beams with a very low emittance. The two principal emission processes to be considered are thermionic and photoemission with the photocathodes being further subdivided into metal and semi-conductors. Field emission cathodes are not included in this analysis. The thermal emittance is derived and the formulas used to compare the various cathode materials. To date, there is no cathode which provides all the requirements needed for the proposed future light sources. Therefore a three part research plan is described to develop cathodes for these future light source applications.

  8. Cathode R&D for Future Light Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Dowell, D.H.; Bazarov, I.; Dunham, B.; Harkay, K.; Hernandez-Garcia; Legg, R.; Padmore, H.; Rao, T.; Smedley, J.; Wan, W.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2010-05-26

    This paper reviews the requirements and current status of cathodes for accelerator applications, and proposes a research and development plan for advancing cathode technology. Accelerator cathodes need to have long operational lifetimes and produce electron beams with a very low emittance. The two principal emission processes to be considered are thermionic and photoemission with the photocathodes being further subdivided into metal and semi-conductors. Field emission cathodes are not included in this analysis. The thermal emittance is derived and the formulas used to compare the various cathode materials. To date, there is no cathode which provides all the requirements needed for the proposed future light sources. Therefore a three part research plan is described to develop cathodes for these future light source applications.

  9. Device lifetime improvement of polymer-based bulk heterojunction solar cells by incorporating copper oxide layer at Al cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Mingdong; Xie, Fangyan; Xie, Weiguang; Zheng, Shizhao; Ke, Ning; Chen, Jian; Zhao, Ni; Xu, J. B.

    2011-05-01

    Organic solar cells are commonly susceptible to degradation in air. We present that insertion of a thin layer of thermally evaporated copper oxide (CuOx) between the organic active layer and the Al cathode can greatly extend the lifetime of P3HT:PCBM based bulk heterojunction solar cells. The performance can be further improved by applying an interfacial bilayer of CuOx/LiF. Our results suggest that the CuOx functions not only as a charge transport layer but also as a protection layer, which prevents formation of thick organic-Al interdiffusion area. This leads to a more air-resistive cathode/organic interface.

  10. Cathodic delaminations of poly(phenyl ether ether ketone) (PEEK) coatings overlaid on zinc phosphate-deposited steels

    SciTech Connect

    Sugama, T.; Carciello, N.R. . Dept. of Applied Science)

    1993-12-10

    The melt-crystallized poly(phenyl) ether ether ketone (PEEK) polymer was overlaid on crystalline zinc phosphate (Zn [center dot] Ph) conversion coating-deposited and nondeposited cold-rolled steels at 400 C in air or in N[sub 2] environments. The ability of these coatings systems to protect the steel against corrosion was evaluated from the rate of cathodic delamination of the coating layer from the steel. Because the cathodic reaction, H[sub 2]O + 1/20[sub 2] + 2e[sup [minus

  11. The effect of cathode geometry on barium transport in hollow cathode plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Polk, James E. Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Capece, Angela M.

    2014-05-14

    The effect of barium transport on the operation of dispenser hollow cathodes was investigated in numerical modeling of a cathode with two different orifice sizes. Despite large differences in cathode emitter temperature, emitted electron current density, internal xenon neutral and plasma densities, and size of the plasma-surface interaction region, the barium transport in the two geometries is qualitatively very similar. Barium is produced in the insert and flows to the surface through the porous structure. A buildup of neutral Ba pressure in the plasma over the emitter surface can suppress the reactions supplying the Ba, restricting the net production rate. Neutral Ba flows into the dense Xe plasma and has a high probability of being ionized at the periphery of this zone. The steady state neutral Ba density distribution is determined by a balance between pressure gradient forces and the drag force associated with collisions between neutral Ba and neutral Xe atoms. A small fraction of the neutral Ba is lost upstream. The majority of the neutral Ba is ionized in the high temperature Xe plasma and is pushed back to the emitter surface by the electric field. The steady state Ba{sup +} ion density distribution results from a balance between electrostatic and pressure forces, neutral Xe drag and Xe{sup +} ion drag with the dominant forces dependent on location in the discharge. These results indicate that hollow cathodes are very effective at recycling Ba within the discharge and therefore maintain a high coverage of Ba on the emitter surface, which reduces the work function and sustains high electron emission current densities at moderate temperatures. Barium recycling is more effective in the cathode with the smaller orifice because the Ba is ionized in the dense Xe plasma concentrated just upstream of the orifice and pushed back into the hollow cathode. Despite a lower emitter temperature, the large orifice cathode has a higher Ba loss rate through the orifice

  12. High-current-density gun with a LaB6 cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebihara, K.; Hiramatsu, S.

    1996-08-01

    To develop a high-current electron gun for an induction linac, a prototype of a Pierce-type electron gun using planar 12-mm-diam lanthanum hexaboride (LaB6) is studied as a thermionic emitter at high current densities. The cathode is heated up to temperatures of 1750 °C by electron bombardment and thermal radiation from a tungsten heater. The heater that has the highest temperature in the gun is thermally isolated from the outer vacuum chamber with heat shields. The bombardment voltage of ˜1 kV is typically applied to a gap between the cathode and the heater. The gun has been operated up to voltages of 55 kV, obtaining a maximum current density of 20 A/cm2 with a pulse width of 250 ns at a cathode temperature of 1600 °C. High-voltage pulsing results show that the gun, with applied voltages of over 40 kV, is operated in space-charge-limited region at temperatures of over 1600 °C; also it is operated in a temperature-limited region at temperatures of less than 1500 °C. An effective work function of 2.68 eV is obtained. The cathode, when heated up to 1600 °C, emits over 7 A of electrons with a ˜20% reduction after 850 h of continuous operation. These measurements were made between vacuum pressures of 10-6 and 10-7 Torr.

  13. Numerical study of discharge progress and characteristics in Microhollow Cathode Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Guangqing; Mao, Genwang; Chen, Maolin

    2009-10-01

    The two-dimensional numerical model for Microhollow cathode discharge(MHCD) consists of the continuity equations for electron and ion and Poisson's equation. The model considers the drift-diffusion approximation for the flux of electron and ion and accounts for the mean electron energy dependence of the ionization rate. In the numerical study, two molybdenum foils with 100 μm thickness are stacked on an alumina foil with 250 μm thickness. The ports with the hole diameter 100 μm are drilled. The discharge occurs in argon with the pressure 100 Torr. The computation results show the potential profile, electron density, ion density and electron temperature distribution. The potential contour shows that the axial electric field is dominant at the discharge initialization and then the radial electric field becomes very important as the forming of the cathode sheath. The results indicate the temporal dynamic behavior of MHCD with the electron density of order 10^19 m-3, electron temperature of several to tens of eV. The peak electron/ion density occurs near the region of the cathode and the dielectric as well as near the anode at the discharge initialization, then localizes along the centerline of the hollow near the cathode. Most of the model predictions are in agreement with experimental data for MHCD under the similar conditions.

  14. 40 CFR 52.281 - Visibility protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Haze Rule in 40 CFR 51.308. ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Visibility protection. 52.281 Section 52.281 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS...

  15. 40 CFR 52.281 - Visibility protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Haze Rule in 40 CFR 51.308. ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Visibility protection. 52.281 Section 52.281 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS...

  16. 40 CFR 52.281 - Visibility protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Haze Rule in 40 CFR 51.308. ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Visibility protection. 52.281 Section 52.281 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS...

  17. The coated cathode conductive layer chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouclier, R.; Gaudaen, J.; Sauli, F.

    1991-12-01

    We describe a gaseous detector consisting of thin anode strips vacuum-evaporated on one side of a 100 μm thick plastic layer, alternating on the back side of the same foil with wider parallel cathode strips. Ionization released in a drift space on the anode side is amplified and detected much in the same way as in the microstrip gas chamber; in our detector however spontaneous breakdown due to surface currents is completely avoided by the presence of the insulating layer between anodes and cathodes. To reduce surface and volume charging up, we have used polymer foils with a moderate volume resistivity. The first results show good efficiency, good plateaux and time resolution in detecting low-rate minimum ionizing electrons. Although not suited for high rate or good energy resolution applications, this kind of detector seems rather promising for realizing cheaply large active surfaces.

  18. Magnetron cathodes in plasma electrode pockels cells

    DOEpatents

    Rhodes, Mark A.

    1995-01-01

    Magnetron cathodes, which produce high current discharges, form greatly improved plasma electrodes on each side of an electro-optic crystal. The plasma electrode has a low pressure gas region on both sides of the crystal. When the gas is ionized, e.g., by a glow discharge in the low pressure gas, the plasma formed is a good conductor. The gas electrode acts as a highly uniform conducting electrode. Since the plasma is transparent to a high energy laser beam passing through the crystal, the plasma is transparent. A crystal exposed from two sides to such a plasma can be charged up uniformly to any desired voltage. A typical configuration utilizes helium at 50 millitorr operating. pressure and 2 kA discharge current. The magnetron cathode produces a more uniform plasma and allows a reduced operating pressure which leads to lower plasma resistivity and a more uniform charge on the crystal.

  19. Magnetron cathodes in plasma electrode Pockels cells

    DOEpatents

    Rhodes, M.A.

    1995-04-25

    Magnetron cathodes, which produce high current discharges, form greatly improved plasma electrodes on each side of an electro-optic crystal. The plasma electrode has a low pressure gas region on both sides of the crystal. When the gas is ionized, e.g., by a glow discharge in the low pressure gas, the plasma formed is a good conductor. The gas electrode acts as a highly uniform conducting electrode. Since the plasma is transparent to a high energy laser beam passing through the crystal, the plasma is transparent. A crystal exposed from two sides to such a plasma can be charged up uniformly to any desired voltage. A typical configuration utilizes helium at 50 millitorr operating pressure and 2 kA discharge current. The magnetron cathode produces a more uniform plasma and allows a reduced operating pressure which leads to lower plasma resistivity and a more uniform charge on the crystal. 5 figs.

  20. Barium Depletion in Hollow Cathode Emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polk, James E.; Capece, Angela M.; Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira

    2009-01-01

    The effect of tungsten erosion, transport and redeposition on the operation of dispenser hollow cathodes was investigated in detailed examinations of the discharge cathode inserts from an 8200 hour and a 30,352 hour ion engine wear test. Erosion and subsequent re-deposition of tungsten in the electron emission zone at the downstream end of the insert reduces the porosity of the tungsten matrix, preventing the ow of barium from the interior. This inhibits the interfacial reactions of the barium-calcium-aluminate impregnant with the tungsten in the pores. A numerical model of barium transport in the internal xenon discharge plasma shows that the barium required to reduce the work function in the emission zone can be supplied from upstream through the gas phase. Barium that flows out of the pores of the tungsten insert is rapidly ionized in the xenon discharge and pushed back to the emitter surface by the electric field and drag from the xenon ion flow. This barium ion flux is sufficient to maintain a barium surface coverage at the downstream end greater than 0.6, even if local barium production at that point is inhibited by tungsten deposits. The model also shows that the neutral barium pressure exceeds the equilibrium vapor pressure of the impregnant decomposition reaction over much of the insert length, so the reactions are suppressed. Only a small region upstream of the zone blocked by tungsten deposits is active and supplies the required barium. These results indicate that hollow cathode failure models based on barium depletion rates in vacuum dispenser cathodes are very conservative.

  1. Microwave devices: Carbon nanotubes as cold cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teo, Kenneth B. K.; Minoux, Eric; Hudanski, Ludovic; Peauger, Franck; Schnell, Jean-Philippe; Gangloff, Laurent; Legagneux, Pierre; Dieumegard, Dominique; Amaratunga, Gehan A. J.; Milne, William I.

    2005-10-01

    To communicate, spacecraft and satellites rely on microwave devices, which at present are based on relatively inefficient thermionic electron sources that require heating and cannot be switched on instantaneously. Here we describe a microwave diode that uses a cold-cathode electron source consisting of carbon nanotubes and that operates at high frequency and at high current densities. Because it weighs little, responds instantaneously and has no need of heating, this miniaturized electron source should prove valuable for microwave devices used in telecommunications.

  2. Microwave devices: carbon nanotubes as cold cathodes.

    PubMed

    Teo, Kenneth B K; Minoux, Eric; Hudanski, Ludovic; Peauger, Franck; Schnell, Jean-Philippe; Gangloff, Laurent; Legagneux, Pierre; Dieumegard, Dominique; Amaratunga, Gehan A J; Milne, William I

    2005-10-13

    To communicate, spacecraft and satellites rely on microwave devices, which at present are based on relatively inefficient thermionic electron sources that require heating and cannot be switched on instantaneously. Here we describe a microwave diode that uses a cold-cathode electron source consisting of carbon nanotubes and that operates at high frequency and at high current densities. Because it weighs little, responds instantaneously and has no need of heating, this miniaturized electron source should prove valuable for microwave devices used in telecommunications.

  3. Cathode Ion Bombardment in RF Photoguns

    SciTech Connect

    Pozdeyev,E.; Kayran, D.; Litvinenko, V.

    2008-09-01

    In this paper, we use the method of rapid oscillating field to solve the equation of ion motion in an RF gun. We apply the method to the BNL 1/2-cell SRF photogun and demonstrate that a significant portion of ions produced in the gun can reach the cathode if no special precautions are taken. Also, the paper proposes a simple mitigation recipe that can reduce the rate of ion bombardment.

  4. Copper chloride cathode for a secondary battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugga, Ratnakumar V. (Inventor); Distefano, Salvador (Inventor); Nagasubramanian, Ganesan (Inventor); Bankston, Clyde P. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    Higher energy and power densities are achieved in a secondary battery based on molten sodium and a solid, ceramic separator such as a beta alumina and a molten catholyte such as sodium tetrachloroaluminate and a copper chloride cathode. The higher cell voltage of copper chloride provides higher energy densities and the higher power density results from increased conductivity resulting from formation of copper as discharge proceeds.

  5. The hollow cathode effect in a radio-frequency driven microhollow cathode discharge in nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lianzhu; Zhao, Guoming; Wang, Jing; Han, Qing

    2016-02-01

    A two-dimensional particle-in-cell Monte-Carlo code has been developed to study the physical mechanism of the hollow cathode effect (HCE) in an rf microhollow cathode discharge (rf-MHCD). Under the simulated conditions, the HCE in the rf-MHCD is the result of sheath-superposition, and both α ionization and γ ionization play a role. However, α ionization mode is predominant. Electrons undergo a pendular motion during the negative portion of the rf cycle. When the rf hollow electrode has a positive voltage, the majority of the electrons move toward the rf electrode, and the mean electron energy near the rf electrode is higher than that in a dc hollow cathode discharge, resulting in a large number of energetic electrons bombarding the hollow cathode wall, an important characteristic of the rf-MHCD. When the hollow cathode aperture is sufficiently small, many electrons strike the hollow electrode and are removed from the discharge space, so that the plasma density decreases. The average energy of the ions in the quasi-neutral plasma region near the axis is greater than the thermal energy in a molecular gas. Therefore, high density, high energy, and high chemical activity are characteristic advantages of rf-MHCD plasma sources.

  6. The stationary vacuum arc on non-thermionic hot cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amirov, R. Kh; Antonov, N. N.; Vorona, N. A.; Gavrikov, A. V.; Liziakin, G. D.; Polistchook, V. P.; Samoylov, I. S.; Smirnov, V. P.; Usmanov, R. A.; Yartsev, I. M.

    2015-11-01

    Experimental study of vacuum arc with distributed spot on plumbum cathode at temperatures 1.25-1.45 kK has been presented. At these conditions current density of thermionic emission from cathode was less than 1 μA/cm2, while the mean current density on the cathode was about 10 A/cm2. Plumbum was placed in heat-insulated crucible (cathode) with external diameter 25 mm. Electron-beam heater was situated under the crucible. Arc current was changed in the range 20-70 A, arc voltage was about 15 V. The studied arc is characterized by the absence of the random voltage fluctuations; the micro particles of cathode erosion products were observed only in transition regimes. Spectral data of plasma radiation and values of the heat flow from plasma to cathode were obtained. It has been experimentally established that the evaporation rate in arc approximately two times less than without discharge. The average charge of plumbum particles in the cathode jet was in range 0.2-0.3e. Comparison of the characteristics of studied discharge on thermionic gadolinium cathode and non-thermionic cathodes was fulfilled. One can assume that ions provide the charge transfer on the cathode in the studied discharge.

  7. Development of a high-performance composite cathode for LT-SOFC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Byung Wook

    -ionized (DI) water, zeta potential profile of ESB powder in DI water as a function of pH was first achieved. The effect of a dispersant (ammonium citrate dibasic) on the stability of ESB powder dispersed in DI water was also investigated. Knowledge of BRO7 wet chemical synthesis from previous study was utilized for final product of in-situ BRO7-ESB composite cathodes. Such prepared composite particles were characterized and the electrochemical performance of in-situ BRO7-ESB composite cathodes was examined as well. Performance enhancement was observed so that ASR values of 0.097Ocm2 and 3.58Ocm2 were achieved at 700°C and 500°C, respectively, which were 19% and 22% improvement, respectively compared to those of conventionally mixed composite cathodes of BRO7-ESB. Finally, a highly controlled nanostructured BRO7-ESB composite cathode was developed by infiltration of BRO7 onto ESB scaffolds to maximize the effective TPB length, to improve the connectivity of ESB phase inside the cathode for better oxygen-ion diffusion, and to minimize delamination between the electrolyte and cathode layers. ESB scaffolds were first established by adding a graphite pore-former and controlling heat treatment condition. Nano-sized BRO7 particles were successfully created on the surface of previously formed ESB scaffold by infiltration of concentrated (Bi, Ru) nitrate solution followed by the optimized heat treatment. Such prepared composite cathodes exhibited superior electrochemical performance to conventionally made BRO7-ESB composite cathodes and even better than GNC BRO7-SS ESB developed in this dissertation, e.g. 0.073Ocm2 at 700°C and 1.82Ocm2 at 500°C, respectively. This cathode system was revealed to be highly competitive among all the reported composite cathodes consisting of the same or different materials prepared by various processing techniques. It was demonstrated that the extended TPB length from continuous network of BRO7 nanoparticles and better connectivity of ESB scaffolds

  8. Model of a Hollow Cathode Insert Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Goebel, Dan M.; Polk, James E.

    2004-01-01

    A 2-D axisymmetric fluid model of the plasma in the insert region of a hollow cathode is presented. The level of sophistication included in the model is motivated in part by the need to determine quantitatively plasma fluxes to the emitter surface. The ultimate goal is to assess whether plasma effects can degrade the life of impregnated inserts beyond those documented throughout the 30-50 year history of vacuum cathode technologies. Results from simulations of a 1.2-cm diameter cathode operating at a discharge current of 25 A, and a gas flow rate of 5 sccm, suggest that approximately 10 A of electron current, and 3.5 A of ion current return to the emitter surface. The total emitted electron current computed by the model is about 35 A. Comparisons with plasma measurements suggest that anomalous heating of the plasma due to two-stream instabilities is possible near the orifice region. Solution to the heavy species energy equation, with classical transport and no viscous effects, predicts heavy species temperatures as high as 2640 K.

  9. Progress on diamond amplified photo-cathode

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, E.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Burrill, A.; Kewisch, J.; Chang, X.; Rao, T.; Smedley, J.; Wu, Q.; Muller, E.; Xin, T.

    2011-03-28

    Two years ago, we obtained an emission gain of 40 from the Diamond Amplifier Cathode (DAC) in our test system. In our current systematic study of hydrogenation, the highest gain we registered in emission scanning was 178. We proved that our treatments for improving the diamond amplifiers are reproducible. Upcoming tests planned include testing DAC in a RF cavity. Already, we have designed a system for these tests using our 112 MHz superconducting cavity, wherein we will measure DAC parameters, such as the limit, if any, on emission current density, the bunch charge, and the bunch length. The diamond-amplified photocathode, that promises to support a high average current, low emittance, and a highly stable electron beam with a long lifetime, is under development for an electron source. The diamond, functioning as a secondary emitter amplifies the primary current, with a few KeV energy, that comes from the traditional cathode. Earlier, our group recorded a maximum gain of 40 in the secondary electron emission from a diamond amplifier. In this article, we detail our optimization of the hydrogenation process for a diamond amplifier that resulted in a stable emission gain of 140. We proved that these characteristics are reproducible. We now are designing a system to test the diamond amplifier cathode using an 112MHz SRF gun to measure the limits of the emission current's density, and on the bunch charge and bunch length.

  10. Excimer Emission from Cathode Boundary Layer Discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moselhy, M. M.; Ansari, J.; Schoenbach, K. H.

    2003-10-01

    The excimer emission from direct current glow discharges between a planar cathode and a ring shaped anode of 0.75 mm diameter, separated by only 250 μm, was studied in high-pressure xenon and argon. The thickness of the "cathode boundary layer" (CBL) plasma, approximately 150 μm, with a discharge sustaining voltage of approximately 200 V, indicates that the discharge is restricted to the cathode fall and the negative glow. For currents on the order of 1 mA, the discharge in xenon changes from an abnormal glow into a mode showing selforganization of the plasma. At this transition, maximum excimer emission (at 172 nm) with internal efficiencies of 3 to 5% is observed. The maximum radiant emittance is 4 W/cm^2 for atmospheric pressure operation. In the case of argon, selforganization of the plasma was not seen, however the emission of the excimer radiation (128 nm) again shows a maximum, in this case at the transition from abnormal to normal glow, with efficiencies of 2%. The maximum radiant emittance is 1.6 W/cm^2 for argon at 600 Torr. The positive slope of the current-voltage characteristics at maximum excimer emission indicates the possibility to generate large area flat excimer sources. Work supported by NSF (CTS-0078618 and INT-0001438).

  11. Sub-2 nm Thick Fluoroalkylsilane Self-Assembled Monolayer-Coated High Voltage Spinel Crystals as Promising Cathode Materials for Lithium Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Zettsu, Nobuyuki; Kida, Satoru; Uchida, Shuhei; Teshima, Katsuya

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate herein that an ultra-thin fluoroalkylsilane self-assembled monolayer coating can be used as a modifying agent at LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4-δcathode/electrolyte interfaces in 5V-class lithium-ion batteries. Bare LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4-δ cathode showed substantial capacity fading, with capacity dropping to 79% of the original capacity after 100 cycles at a rate of 1C, which was entirely due to dissolution of Mn(3+) from the spinel lattice via oxidative decomposition of the organic electrolyte. Capacity retention was improved to 97% on coating ultra-thin FAS17-SAM onto the LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 cathode surface. Such surface protection with highly ordered fluoroalkyl chains insulated the cathode from direct contact with the organic electrolyte and led to increased tolerance to HF. PMID:27553901

  12. Sub-2 nm Thick Fluoroalkylsilane Self-Assembled Monolayer-Coated High Voltage Spinel Crystals as Promising Cathode Materials for Lithium Ion Batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zettsu, Nobuyuki; Kida, Satoru; Uchida, Shuhei; Teshima, Katsuya

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate herein that an ultra-thin fluoroalkylsilane self-assembled monolayer coating can be used as a modifying agent at LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4‑δcathode/electrolyte interfaces in 5V-class lithium-ion batteries. Bare LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4‑δ cathode showed substantial capacity fading, with capacity dropping to 79% of the original capacity after 100 cycles at a rate of 1C, which was entirely due to dissolution of Mn3+ from the spinel lattice via oxidative decomposition of the organic electrolyte. Capacity retention was improved to 97% on coating ultra-thin FAS17-SAM onto the LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 cathode surface. Such surface protection with highly ordered fluoroalkyl chains insulated the cathode from direct contact with the organic electrolyte and led to increased tolerance to HF.

  13. Sub-2 nm Thick Fluoroalkylsilane Self-Assembled Monolayer-Coated High Voltage Spinel Crystals as Promising Cathode Materials for Lithium Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Zettsu, Nobuyuki; Kida, Satoru; Uchida, Shuhei; Teshima, Katsuya

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate herein that an ultra-thin fluoroalkylsilane self-assembled monolayer coating can be used as a modifying agent at LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4-δcathode/electrolyte interfaces in 5V-class lithium-ion batteries. Bare LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4-δ cathode showed substantial capacity fading, with capacity dropping to 79% of the original capacity after 100 cycles at a rate of 1C, which was entirely due to dissolution of Mn(3+) from the spinel lattice via oxidative decomposition of the organic electrolyte. Capacity retention was improved to 97% on coating ultra-thin FAS17-SAM onto the LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 cathode surface. Such surface protection with highly ordered fluoroalkyl chains insulated the cathode from direct contact with the organic electrolyte and led to increased tolerance to HF.

  14. Modular Low-Heater-Power Cathode/Electron Gun Assembly for Microwave and Millimeter Wave Traveling Wave Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wintucky, Edwin G.

    2000-01-01

    cathode/electron gun assembly consists of four subassemblies the cathode, the focus electrode, the header (including the electrical feedthroughs), and the gun envelope (including the anode) a diagram of which is shown. The modular construction offers a number of significant advantages, including flexibility of design, interchangeability of parts, and a drop-in final assembly procedure for quick and accurate alignment. The gun can accommodate cathodes ranging in size from 0.050 to 0.250-in. in diameter and is applicable to TWT's over a broad range of sizes and operating parameters, requiring the substitution of only a few parts: that is, the cathode, focus electrode, and anode. The die-pressed cathode pellets can be made with either flat or concave (Pierce gun design) emitting surfaces. The gun can be either gridded (pulse operation) or ungridded (continuous operation). Important factors contributing to low cost are the greater use of CRT materials and parts, the standardization of processes (welding and mechanical capture), and tooling amenable to automated production. Examples are the use of simple shapes, drawn or stamped metal parts, and parts joined by welding or mechanical capture. Feasibility was successfully demonstrated in the retrofit and testing of a commercial Kaband (22-GHz) TWT. The modular cathode/electron gun assembly was computer modeled to replicate the performance of the original electron gun and fabricated largely from existing CRT parts. Significant test results included demonstration of low heater power (1.5-W, 1010 C brightness temperature for a 0.085-in.-diameter cathode), mechanical ruggedness (100g shock and vibration tests in accordance with military specifications (MIL specs)), and a very fast warmup. The results of these tests indicate that the low-cost CRT manufacturing approach can be used without sacrificing performance and reliability.

  15. Production of High Energy Ions Near an Ion Thruster Discharge Hollow Cathode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, Ira; Mikellides, I. G.; Goebel, D. M.; Jameson, K. K.; Wirz, R.; Polk, James E.

    2006-01-01

    Several researchers have measured ions leaving ion thruster discharge chambers with energies far greater than measured discharge chamber potentials. Presented in this paper is a new mechanism for the generation of high energy ions and a comparison with measured ion spectra. The source of high energy ions has been a puzzle because they not only have energies in excess of measured steady state potentials, but as reported by Goebel et. al. [1], their flux is independent of the amplitude of time dependent plasma fluctuations. The mechanism relies on the charge exchange neutralization of xenon ions accelerated radially into the potential trough in front of the discharge cathode. Previous researchers [2] have identified the importance of charge exchange in this region as a mechanism for protecting discharge cathode surfaces from ion bombardment. This paper is the first to identify how charge exchange in this region can lead to ion energy enhancement.

  16. Surface studies of thermionic cathodes and the mechanism of operation of an impregnated tungsten cathode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, R.

    1976-01-01

    The surface properties of conventional impregnated cathodes were investigated by the use of Auger spectroscopy and work function measurements, and these were compared with a synthesized barium or barium oxide coated tungsten surface. The barium and barium oxide coated surfaces were prepared by evaporating barium onto a tungsten surface that can be heated to elevated temperatures. Multilayer or monolayer coverages can be investigated using this technique. The results of this study show that the surface of an impregnated tungsten cathode is identical to that observed for a synthesized monolayer or partial monolayer of barium on partially oxidized tungsten, using the criteria of identical Auger patterns and work functions. Desorption measurements of barium from a tungsten surface were also made. These results in conjunction with Auger and work function data were interpreted to show that throughout most of its life an impregnated cathode operating in the range of 1100 C has a partial monolayer rather than a monolayer of barium on its surface.

  17. Cathode power distribution system and method of using the same for power distribution

    DOEpatents

    Williamson, Mark A; Wiedmeyer, Stanley G; Koehl, Eugene R; Bailey, James L; Willit, James L; Barnes, Laurel A; Blaskovitz, Robert J

    2014-11-11

    Embodiments include a cathode power distribution system and/or method of using the same for power distribution. The cathode power distribution system includes a plurality of cathode assemblies. Each cathode assembly of the plurality of cathode assemblies includes a plurality of cathode rods. The system also includes a plurality of bus bars configured to distribute current to each of the plurality of cathode assemblies. The plurality of bus bars include a first bus bar configured to distribute the current to first ends of the plurality of cathode assemblies and a second bus bar configured to distribute the current to second ends of the plurality of cathode assemblies.

  18. Surface studies on scandate cathodes and synthesized scandates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lesny, Gary; Forman, Ralph

    1990-01-01

    Auger, ESCA, electron emission, evaporation, and desorption measurements were made on three different types of scandate surfaces. They are: (1) an impregnated top layer scandate cathode, (2) an unimpregnated top layer scandate cathode with a deposited barium or barium oxide adsorbate surface layer, and (3) a synthesized scandate surface, which replicates a scandate cathode surface. The purpose of these experiments was to determine the role that Sc2O3 plays in making the scandate cathode a more copious electron emitter than the conventional impregnated-type cathode. The synthesized scandate surface experiments consisted of depositing multilayer scandium on a tungsten surface, oxidizing the scandium, and then depositing either Ba or BaO on the scandium oxide surface. The results of these measurements showed that the low work function portions of the thin-film scandate cathode are where the Sc2O3 is the substrate and BaO is the adsorbate.

  19. Rf Gun with High-Current Density Field Emission Cathode

    SciTech Connect

    Jay L. Hirshfield

    2005-12-19

    High current-density field emission from an array of carbon nanotubes, with field-emission-transistor control, and with secondary electron channel multiplication in a ceramic facing structure, have been combined in a cold cathode for rf guns and diode guns. Electrodynamic and space-charge flow simulations were conducted to specify the cathode configuration and range of emission current density from the field emission cold cathode. Design of this cathode has been made for installation and testing in an existing S-band 2-1/2 cell rf gun. With emission control and modulation, and with current density in the range of 0.1-1 kA/cm2, this cathode could provide performance and long-life not enjoyed by other currently-available cathodes

  20. Cathodic electrocatalyst layer for electrochemical generation of hydrogen peroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, Christopher P. (Inventor); Tennakoon, Charles L. K. (Inventor); Singh, Waheguru Pal (Inventor); Anderson, Kelvin C. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A cathodic gas diffusion electrode for the electrochemical production of aqueous hydrogen peroxide solutions. The cathodic gas diffusion electrode comprises an electrically conductive gas diffusion substrate and a cathodic electrocatalyst layer supported on the gas diffusion substrate. A novel cathodic electrocatalyst layer comprises a cathodic electrocatalyst, a substantially water-insoluble quaternary ammonium compound, a fluorocarbon polymer hydrophobic agent and binder, and a perfluoronated sulphonic acid polymer. An electrochemical cell using the novel cathodic electrocatalyst layer has been shown to produce an aqueous solution having between 8 and 14 weight percent hydrogen peroxide. Furthermore, such electrochemical cells have shown stable production of hydrogen peroxide solutions over 1000 hours of operation including numerous system shutdowns.

  1. Preliminary experimental study of a carbon fiber array cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, An-kun; Fan, Yu-wei

    2016-08-01

    The preliminary experimental results of a carbon fiber array cathode for the magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator (MILO) operations are reported. When the diode voltage and diode current were 480 kV and 44 kA, respectively, high-power microwaves with a peak power of about 3 GW and a pulse duration of about 60 ns were obtained in a MILO device with the carbon fiber array cathode. The preliminary experimental results show that the shot-to-shot reproducibility of the diode current and the microwave power is stable until 700 shots. No obvious damage or deterioration can be observed in the carbon fiber surface morphology after 700 shots. Moreover, the cathode performance has no observable deterioration after 700 shots. In conclusion, the maintain-free lifetime of the carbon fiber array cathode is more than 700 shots. In this way, this carbon fiber array cathode offers a potential replacement for the existing velvet cathode.

  2. Scanning optical pyrometer for measuring temperatures in hollow cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Polk, J. E.; Marrese-Reading, C. M.; Thornber, B.; Dang, L.; Johnson, L. K.; Katz, I.

    2007-09-15

    Life-limiting processes in hollow cathodes are determined largely by the temperature of the electron emitter. To support cathode life assessment, a noncontact temperature measurement technique which employs a stepper motor-driven fiber optic probe was developed. The probe is driven inside the hollow cathode and collects light radiated by the hot interior surface of the emitter. Ratio pyrometry is used to determine the axial temperature profile. Thermocouples on the orifice plate provide measurements of the external temperature during cathode operation and are used to calibrate the pyrometer system in situ with a small oven enclosing the externally heated cathode. The diagnostic method and initial measurements of the temperature distribution in a hollow cathode are discussed.

  3. Scanning optical pyrometer for measuring temperatures in hollow cathodes.

    PubMed

    Polk, J E; Marrese-Reading, C M; Thornber, B; Dang, L; Johnson, L K; Katz, I

    2007-09-01

    Life-limiting processes in hollow cathodes are determined largely by the temperature of the electron emitter. To support cathode life assessment, a noncontact temperature measurement technique which employs a stepper motor-driven fiber optic probe was developed. The probe is driven inside the hollow cathode and collects light radiated by the hot interior surface of the emitter. Ratio pyrometry is used to determine the axial temperature profile. Thermocouples on the orifice plate provide measurements of the external temperature during cathode operation and are used to calibrate the pyrometer system in situ with a small oven enclosing the externally heated cathode. The diagnostic method and initial measurements of the temperature distribution in a hollow cathode are discussed. PMID:17902941

  4. 40 CFR 52.1831 - Visibility protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

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  5. 40 CFR 52.2498 - Visibility protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

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  6. 40 CFR 52.2533 - Visibility protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

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  7. 40 CFR 52.2179 - Visibility protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

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  8. 40 CFR 52.1531 - Visibility protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

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  9. 40 CFR 52.2179 - Visibility protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

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  10. 40 CFR 52.1831 - Visibility protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

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  11. 40 CFR 52.2179 - Visibility protection.

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  12. 40 CFR 52.2533 - Visibility protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

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  13. 40 CFR 52.2498 - Visibility protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

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  14. 40 CFR 52.1531 - Visibility protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

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  15. 40 CFR 52.2498 - Visibility protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

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  16. 40 CFR 52.1531 - Visibility protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

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  17. 40 CFR 52.2498 - Visibility protection.

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  18. 40 CFR 52.2498 - Visibility protection.

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  19. 40 CFR 52.1629 - Visibility protection.

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  1. 40 CFR 52.2179 - Visibility protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

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  2. 40 CFR 52.2179 - Visibility protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

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  3. The development of a multi-cathode electron gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, L. A.

    1973-01-01

    A multicathode electron gun, capable of automatically interchanging cathode structures of a microwave electron tube upon command was developed. This technique extends the life of a microwave electron tube into the range of fifty to one hundred years. The concept consists of mounting a number of cathode structures on a rotating platform. Rotation of the platform moves the different cathodes into operating position. The component tests, construction and operation of the gun are described.

  4. Molten carbonate fuel cell cathode with mixed oxide coating

    DOEpatents

    Hilmi, Abdelkader; Yuh, Chao-Yi

    2013-05-07

    A molten carbonate fuel cell cathode having a cathode body and a coating of a mixed oxygen ion conductor materials. The mixed oxygen ion conductor materials are formed from ceria or doped ceria, such as gadolinium doped ceria or yttrium doped ceria. The coating is deposited on the cathode body using a sol-gel process, which utilizes as precursors organometallic compounds, organic and inorganic salts, hydroxides or alkoxides and which uses as the solvent water, organic solvent or a mixture of same.

  5. Characterization of Hollow Cathode Performance and Thermal Behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polk, James E.; Goebel, Dan M.; Watkins, Ron; Jameson, Kristina; Yoneshige, Lance; Przybylowski, JoHanna; Cho, Lauren

    2006-01-01

    Hollow cathodes are one of the main life-limiting components in ion engines and Hall thrusters. Although state-of-the-art hollow cathodes have demonstrated up to 30,352 hours of operation in ground tests with careful handling, future missions are likely to require longer life, more margin and greater resistance to reactive contaminant gases. Three alternate hollow cathode technologies that exploit different emitter materials or geometries to address some of the limitations of state-of-the-art cathodes are being investigated. Performance measurements of impregnated tungsten-iridium dispenser cathodes at discharge currents of 4 to 15 A demonstrated that they have the same operating range and ion production efficiency as conventional tungsten dispenser cathodes. Temperature measurements indicated that tungsten-iridium cathodes also operate at the same emitter temperatures. They did not exhibit the expected reduction in work function at the current densities tested. Hollow cathodes with lanthanum hexaboride emitters operated over a wide current range, but suffered from lower ion production efficiency at currents below about 12.4 A because of higher insert heating requirements. Differences in operating voltages and ion production rates are explained with a simple model of the effect of cathode parameters on discharge behavior.

  6. Development of spray coated cathodes for RITS-6.

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, Sean; Leckbee, Joshua J.; Miller, Stephen Samuel

    2013-09-01

    This report documents work conducted in FY13 to conduct a feasibility study on thermal spray coated cathodes to be used in the RITS-6 accelerator in an attempt to improve surface uniformity and repeatability. Currently, the cathodes are coated with colloidal silver by means of painting by hand. It is believed that improving the cathode coating process could simplify experimental setup and improve flash x-ray radiographic performance. This report documents the experimental setup and summarizes the results of our feasibility study. Lastly, it describes the path forward and potential challenges that must be overcome in order to improve the process for creating uniform and repeatable silver coatings for cathodes.

  7. Surface Characterization of the LCLS RF Gun Cathode

    SciTech Connect

    Brachmann, Axel; Decker, Franz-Josef; Ding, Yuantao; Dowell, David; Emma, Paul; Frisch, Josef; Gilevich, Sasha; Hays, Gregory; Hering, Philippe; Huang, Zhirong; Iverson, Richard; Loos, Henrik; Miahnahri, Alan; Nordlund, Dennis; Nuhn, Heinz-Dieter; Pianetta, Piero; Turner, James; Welch, James; White, William; Wu, Juhao; Xiang, Dao; /SLAC

    2012-06-25

    The first copper cathode installed in the LCLS RF gun was used during LCLS commissioning for more than a year. However, after high charge operation (> 500 pC), the cathode showed a decline of quantum efficiency within the area of drive laser illumination. They report results of SEM, XPS and XAS studies that were carried out on this cathode after it was removed from the gun. X-ray absorption and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy reveal surface contamination by various hydrocarbon compounds. In addition they report on the performance of the second installed cathode with emphasis on the spatial distribution of electron emission.

  8. Secondary-electrons-induced cathode plasma in a relativistic magnetron

    SciTech Connect

    Queller, T.; Gleizer, J. Z.; Krasik, Ya. E.

    2012-11-19

    Results of time- and space-resolved spectroscopic studies of cathode plasma during a S-band relativistic magnetron operation and a magnetically insulated diode having an identical interelectrode gap are presented. It was shown that in the case of the magnetron operation, one obtains an earlier, more uniform plasma formation due to energetic electrons' interaction with the cathode surface and ionization of desorbed surface monolayers. No differences were detected in the cathode's plasma temperature between the magnetron and the magnetically insulated diode operation, and no anomalous fast cathode plasma expansion was observed in the magnetron at rf power up to 350 MW.

  9. Cathode fall measurement in a dielectric barrier discharge in helium

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, Yanpeng; Zheng, Bin; Liu, Yaoge

    2013-11-15

    A method based on the “zero-length voltage” extrapolation is proposed to measure cathode fall in a dielectric barrier discharge. Starting, stable, and discharge-maintaining voltages were measured to obtain the extrapolation zero-length voltage. Under our experimental conditions, the “zero-length voltage” gave a cathode fall of about 185 V. Based on the known thickness of the cathode fall region, the spatial distribution of the electric field strength in dielectric barrier discharge in atmospheric helium is determined. The strong cathode fall with a maximum field value of approximately 9.25 kV/cm was typical for the glow mode of the discharge.

  10. Multi-cathode metal vapor arc ion source

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Ian G.; MacGill, Robert A.

    1988-01-01

    An ion generating apparatus utilizing a vacuum chamber, a cathode and an anode in the chamber. A source of electrical power produces an arc or discharge between the cathode and anode. The arc is sufficient to vaporize a portion of the cathode to form a plasma. The plasma is directed to an extractor which separates the electrons from the plasma, and accelerates the ions to produce an ion beam. One embodiment of the appaatus utilizes a multi-cathode arrangement for interaction with the anode.

  11. Apparatuses for making cathodes for high-temperature, rechargeable batteries

    DOEpatents

    Meinhardt, Kerry D.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Coffey, Gregory W.

    2016-09-13

    The approaches and apparatuses for fabricating cathodes can be adapted to improve control over cathode composition and to better accommodate batteries of any shape and their assembly. For example, a first solid having an alkali metal halide, a second solid having a transition metal, and a third solid having an alkali metal aluminum halide are combined into a mixture. The mixture can be heated in a vacuum to a temperature that is greater than or equal to the melting point of the third solid. When the third solid is substantially molten liquid, the mixture is compressed into a desired cathode shape and then cooled to solidify the mixture in the desired cathode shape.

  12. Design, construction and long life endurance testing of cathode assemblies for use in microwave high-power transmitting tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorshe, R.

    1982-01-01

    The ability of state of the art cathode types to produce current densities of 2A/sq cm, respectively, over a minimum designed life of 30,000 hours of continuous operation without failures was demonstrated. The performance of the state of the art cathode types was evaluated by endurance testing while operating under identical electrical geometrical, and vacuum conditions that realistically duplicate the operating conditions present in a transmitter tube. Although there has been considerable life testing done on high current density types of cathodes, these have beem primarily limited to diodes. A diode and high power microwave tube are grossly different devices. A comparison of these two devices is provided. A diode and high power microwave tube are quite different; one could therefore assume different internal environments, especially in the cathode region. Therefore, in order to establish life capabilities of the cathodes just mentioned, they should be tested in a vehicle which has an internal environment similar to that of a high power microwave tube.

  13. Overcoming bottlenecks of enzymatic biofuel cell cathodes: crude fungal culture supernatant can help to extend lifetime and reduce cost.

    PubMed

    Sané, Sabine; Jolivalt, Claude; Mittler, Gerhard; Nielsen, Peter J; Rubenwolf, Stefanie; Zengerle, Roland; Kerzenmacher, Sven

    2013-07-01

    Enzymatic biofuel cells (BFCs) show great potential for the direct conversion of biochemically stored energy from renewable biomass resources into electricity. However, enzyme purification is time-consuming and expensive. Furthermore, the long-term use of enzymatic BFCs is hindered by enzyme degradation, which limits their lifetime to only a few weeks. We show, for the first time, that crude culture supernatant from enzyme-secreting microorganisms (Trametes versicolor) can be used without further treatment to supply the enzyme laccase to the cathode of a mediatorless BFC. Polarization curves show that there is no significant difference in the cathode performance when using crude supernatant that contains laccase compared to purified laccase in culture medium or buffer solution. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the oxygen reduction activity of this enzymatic cathode can be sustained over a period of at least 120 days by periodic resupply of crude culture supernatant. This is more than five times longer than control cathodes without the resupply of culture supernatant. During the operation period of 120 days, no progressive loss of potential is observed, which suggests that significantly longer lifetimes than shown in this work may be possible. Our results demonstrate the possibility to establish simple, cost efficient, and mediatorless enzymatic BFC cathodes that do not require expensive enzyme purification procedures. Furthermore, they show the feasibility of an enzymatic BFC with an extended lifetime, in which self-replicating microorganisms provide the electrode with catalytically active enzymes in a continuous or periodic manner.

  14. 40 CFR 52.690 - Visibility protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Visibility protection. 52.690 Section 52.690 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Idaho § 52.690 Visibility protection. (a)...

  15. 40 CFR 52.2781 - Visibility protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Visibility protection. 52.2781 Section 52.2781 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED... protection. (a) The requirements of section 169A of the Clean Air Act are not met, because the plan does...

  16. 40 CFR 52.2132 - Visibility protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Visibility protection. 52.2132 Section 52.2132 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED... protection. (a) The requirements of section 169A of the Clean Air Act are not met, because the plan does...

  17. 40 CFR 52.2132 - Visibility protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Visibility protection. 52.2132 Section 52.2132 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED... protection. (a) The requirements of section 169A of the Clean Air Act are not met, because the plan does...

  18. 40 CFR 52.2781 - Visibility protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Visibility protection. 52.2781 Section 52.2781 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED... protection. (a) The requirements of section 169A of the Clean Air Act are not met, because the plan does...

  19. 40 CFR 52.690 - Visibility protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Visibility protection. 52.690 Section 52.690 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Idaho § 52.690 Visibility protection. (a)...

  20. 40 CFR 52.2781 - Visibility protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Visibility protection. 52.2781 Section 52.2781 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED... protection. (a) The requirements of section 169A of the Clean Air Act are not met, because the plan does...

  1. 40 CFR 144.37 - Continuation of expiring permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Continuation of expiring permits. 144.37 Section 144.37 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAM Authorization by Permit § 144.37 Continuation...

  2. Excimer emission from cathode boundary layer discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moselhy, Mohamed; Schoenbach, Karl H.

    2004-02-01

    The excimer emission from direct current glow discharges between a planar cathode and a ring-shaped anode of 0.75 and 1.5 mm diameter, respectively, separated by a gap of 250 μm, was studied in xenon and argon in a pressure range from 75 to 760 Torr. The thickness of the "cathode boundary layer" plasma, in the 100 μm range, and a discharge sustaining voltage of approximately 200 V, indicates that the discharge is restricted to the cathode fall and the negative glow. The radiant excimer emittance at 172 nm increases with pressure and reaches a value of 4 W/cm2 for atmospheric pressure operation in xenon. The maximum internal efficiency, however, decreases with pressure having highest values of 5% for 75 Torr operation. When the discharge current is reduced below a critical value, the discharge in xenon changes from an abnormal glow into a mode showing self-organization of the plasma. Also, the excimer spectrum changes from one with about equal contributions from the first and second continuum to one that is dominated by the second continuum emission. The xenon excimer emission intensity peaks at this discharge mode transition. In the case of argon, self-organization of the plasma was not seen, but the emission of the excimer radiation (128 nm) again shows a maximum at the transition from abnormal to normal glow. As was observed with xenon, the radiant emittance of argon increases with pressure, and the efficiency decreases. The maximum radiant emittance is 1.6 W/cm2 for argon at 600 Torr. The maximum internal efficiency is 2.5% at 200 Torr. The positive slope of the current-voltage characteristics at maximum excimer emission in both cases indicates the possibility of generating intense, large area, flat excimer lamps.

  3. Crystallization behavior of MgB2 films fabricated on copper cathodes via electrochemical technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Huazhe; Sun, Xiaguang; Yu, Xiaoming; Qi, Yang

    2012-11-01

    An electrochemical technique was devised and settled to prepare MgB2 films on copper cathodes in MgCl2-Mg(BO2)2-NaCl-KCl molten salts. X-ray diffraction and scanning probe microscopy were adopted to investigate the phase composition and elements distribution of sample. R-T curve of film was monitored through standard four-probe method. Transmission electron microscope and scanning electron microscope analysis were chosen to investigate the crystallization behavior and morphology of the films at different electrolytic temperatures. The results indicated that MgB2 films were successfully fabricated on the copper cathodes, and the optimal electrolytic temperature was 601 °C. It was presumed that the non-conducting MgO impurities hindered continuous growth of MgB2 grain, which may result in dendritic growth of MgB2 grain.

  4. Study of Stable Cathodes and Electrolytes for High Specific Density Lithium-Air Battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hernandez-Lugo, Dionne M.; Wu, James; Bennett, William; Ming, Yu; Zhu, Yu

    2015-01-01

    Future NASA missions require high specific energy battery technologies, greater than 400 Wh/kg. Current NASA missions are using "state-of-the-art" (SOA) Li-ion batteries (LIB), which consist of a metal oxide cathode, a graphite anode and an organic electrolyte. NASA Glenn Research Center is currently studying the physical and electrochemical properties of the anode-electrolyte interface for ionic liquid based Li-air batteries. The voltage-time profiles for Pyr13FSI and Pyr14TFSI ionic liquids electrolytes studies on symmetric cells show low over-potentials and no dendritic lithium morphology. Cyclic voltammetry measurements indicate that these ionic liquids have a wide electrochemical window. As a continuation of this work, sp2 carbon cathode and these low flammability electrolytes were paired and the physical and electrochemical properties were studied in a Li-air battery system under an oxygen environment.

  5. Evaluation of microbial fuel cell operation using algae as an oxygen supplier: carbon paper cathode vs. carbon brush cathode.

    PubMed

    Kakarla, Ramesh; Min, Booki

    2014-12-01

    Microbial fuel cell (MFC) and its cathode performances were compared with use of carbon fiber brush and plain carbon paper cathode electrodes in algae aeration. The MFC having carbon fiber brush cathode exhibited a voltage of 0.21 ± 0.01 V (1,000 Ω) with a cathode potential of around -0.14 ± 0.01 V in algal aeration, whereas MFC with plain carbon paper cathode resulted in a voltage of 0.06 ± 0.005 V with a cathode potential of -0.39 ± 0.01 V. During polarizations, MFC equipped with carbon fiber brush cathode showed a maximum power density of 30 mW/m(2), whereas the MFC equipped with plain carbon paper showed a power density of 4.6 mW/m(2). In algae aeration, the internal resistance with carbon fiber brush cathode was 804 Ω and with plain carbon paper it was 1,210 Ω. The peak currents of MFC operation with carbon fiber brush and plain carbon paper cathodes were -31 mA and -850 µA, respectively. PMID:24890136

  6. Evaluation of microbial fuel cell operation using algae as an oxygen supplier: carbon paper cathode vs. carbon brush cathode.

    PubMed

    Kakarla, Ramesh; Min, Booki

    2014-12-01

    Microbial fuel cell (MFC) and its cathode performances were compared with use of carbon fiber brush and plain carbon paper cathode electrodes in algae aeration. The MFC having carbon fiber brush cathode exhibited a voltage of 0.21 ± 0.01 V (1,000 Ω) with a cathode potential of around -0.14 ± 0.01 V in algal aeration, whereas MFC with plain carbon paper cathode resulted in a voltage of 0.06 ± 0.005 V with a cathode potential of -0.39 ± 0.01 V. During polarizations, MFC equipped with carbon fiber brush cathode showed a maximum power density of 30 mW/m(2), whereas the MFC equipped with plain carbon paper showed a power density of 4.6 mW/m(2). In algae aeration, the internal resistance with carbon fiber brush cathode was 804 Ω and with plain carbon paper it was 1,210 Ω. The peak currents of MFC operation with carbon fiber brush and plain carbon paper cathodes were -31 mA and -850 µA, respectively.

  7. Continuous verification using multimodal biometrics.

    PubMed

    Sim, Terence; Zhang, Sheng; Janakiraman, Rajkumar; Kumar, Sandeep

    2007-04-01

    Conventional verification systems, such as those controlling access to a secure room, do not usually require the user to reauthenticate himself for continued access to the protected resource. This may not be sufficient for high-security environments in which the protected resource needs to be continuously monitored for unauthorized use. In such cases, continuous verification is needed. In this paper, we present the theory, architecture, implementation, and performance of a multimodal biometrics verification system that continuously verifies the presence of a logged-in user. Two modalities are currently used--face and fingerprint--but our theory can be readily extended to include more modalities. We show that continuous verification imposes additional requirements on multimodal fusion when compared to conventional verification systems. We also argue that the usual performance metrics of false accept and false reject rates are insufficient yardsticks for continuous verification and propose new metrics against which we benchmark our system. PMID:17299225

  8. Polypyrrole Electrodes as Cathodes in a Rechargeable Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidanapathirana, K. P.; Careem, M. A.; Skaarup, S.; West, K.

    2002-12-01

    A study on Li ion rechargeable cells fabricated with polypyrrole (PPy) conducting polymer cathodes is reported in this paper. The PPy was prepared by electropolymerization of pyrrole in the presence of large surfactant anion dodecylbenzene sulphonate. Polyacrylonitrile based solid polymer electrolytes containing lithium triflate and ethylene carbonate (EC) and propylene carbonate (PC) as plasticisers were used as the separators. Cycling capacities of the cells were studied using cyclic voltammetry. Continuous charge/discharge experiments were performed using a custom-made charge/discharge setup. Impedance measurements were carried out in the frequency range 1 mHz to 10 kHz to investigate the charge transfer across the electrolyte-electrode interfaces. Cyclic voltammetry studies showed that the cells have a cycling capacity close to the theoretical value at slow scan rates and the capacity was considerable even at high scan rates. According to the continuous charge/discharge results, the cells could be cycled more than 1000 times without a significant decay in cycling charge. The charge/discharge factor of the cells was close to unity.

  9. Organic Cathode Materials for Rechargeable Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Ruiguo; Qian, Jiangfeng; Zhang, Jiguang; Xu, Wu

    2015-06-28

    This chapter will primarily focus on the advances made in recent years and specify the development of organic electrode materials for their applications in rechargeable lithium batteries, sodium batteries and redox flow batteries. Four various organic cathode materials, including conjugated carbonyl compounds, conducting polymers, organosulfides and free radical polymers, are introduced in terms of their electrochemical performances in these three battery systems. Fundamental issues related to the synthesis-structure-activity correlations, involved work principles in energy storage systems, and capacity fading mechanisms are also discussed.

  10. Cathode side hardware for carbonate fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Xu, Gengfu; Yuh, Chao-Yi

    2011-04-05

    Carbonate fuel cathode side hardware having a thin coating of a conductive ceramic formed from one of Perovskite AMeO.sub.3, wherein A is at least one of lanthanum and a combination of lanthanum and strontium and Me is one or more of transition metals, lithiated NiO (Li.sub.xNiO, where x is 0.1 to 1) and X-doped LiMeO.sub.2, wherein X is one of Mg, Ca, and Co.

  11. Electrochemical machining analysis on grid cathode composed of square cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yonghua; Liu, Kai; Zhao, Dongbiao

    2013-07-01

    During the electrochemical machining (ECM), the cathodes designed by the existing methods are mainly unitary cathodes, which can be only used to produce the workpieces with the same shapes. However, there are few researches on designing cathodes for machining the different workpieces with the different surfaces. This paper presents the grid cathode composed of the square cells to produce the workpieces with different shapes. Three types of the square cells, 2.5 mm×2.5 mm, 3 mm×3 mm, and 4 mm×4 mm, are utilized to construct the plane, the slant, and the blade cathode. The material of the cathode and the anode is CrNi18Ti9, and the ingredient of electrolyte is 15% NaCl and 15% NaNO3. The machining equilibrium machining current and time are acquired and analyzed, the machining process and the workpiece quality are compared between using the grid cathode and the unitary cathode. Moreover, the machining errors on the workpiece surface are measured and analyzed, and the error reasons are traced and discussed to obtain the better surface quality of the workpiece. The experiment and analysis results show that the grid cathode can be used to manufacture the workpieces with complex shapes in certain range of the error. The workpiece quality improves with the size of the square cell being reduced, and if the square element is small enough, the workpiece quality is almost equal to the one machined by the unitary cathode. The proposed research realizes a single cathode machining the different workpieces with the different surfaces.

  12. Electrical contacts between cathodes and metallic interconnects in solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhenguo; Xia, Guanguang; Singh, Prabhakar; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    In this work, simulated cathode/interconnect structures were used to investigate the effects of different contact materials on the contact resistance between a strontium doped lanthanum ferrite cathode and a Crofer22 APU interconnect. Among the materials studied, Pt, which has a prohibitive cost for the application, demonstrated the best performance as a contact paste. For the relatively cost-effective perovskites, the contact ASR was found to depend on their electrical conductivity, scale growth on the metallic interconnect, and interactions between the contact material and the metallic interconnect or particularly the scale grown on the interconnect. Manganites appeared to promote manganese-containing spinel interlayer formation that helped minimize the increase of contact ASR. Chromium from the interconnects reacted with strontium in the perovskites to form SrCrO 4. An improved performance was achieved by application of a thermally grown (Mn,Co) 3O 4 spinel protection layer on Crofer22 APU that dramatically minimized the contact resistance between the cathodes and interconnects.

  13. Current limiting of field emitter array cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K.J.

    1986-01-01

    The Field Emitter Array (FEA) cathode possesses high emission potential (approx.30A/cm/sup 2/) at low applied voltages (100-200 volts) but performance has been hampered by non-uniform emission across the array. Poor emission uniformity is mainly related to small variations in emitter tip geometry (of the order of 10-100A), which cannot be rectified by present fabrication techniques. To improve emission uniformity from the arrays, this dissertation investigated the use of current-limiting resistors, individually dedicated to and in series with each emitter, to compensate for the differences in emission. A thin film of silicon was deposited on the backside of a ZrO/sub 2/-W composite chip (the substrate on which emitter structure was based) to form series resistors. Characterization of the silicon film was carried out in a SEM with a micromanipulator capable of making contact with a single tungsten pin so that direct I-V measurement of individual series resistors was possible. To supplement the experimental effort, a mathematical mode of the Current-Limited Field Emitter Array (CLFEA) cathode was devised. A study of the model indicated the Fowler-Nordheim (F-N) plot of resistor current-limited emission from an array would have an upturning curvature.

  14. Hollow cathode plasma coupling study, 1986

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilbur, Paul J.

    1986-01-01

    The electron collection and emission characteristics of a simple hollow cathode contactor, an extended anode hollow cathode contactor supplied by JSC, and a ring cusp magnetic field contactor are presented and the effects of discharge power and argon or xenon expellant flowrate on these characteristics are examined. All of the contactors are shown to exhibit good electron emission performance over a wide range of discharge power and expellant type and flowrate. Good electron performance is shown to be more difficult to achieve. Results suggest that the extended anode and ring cusp contactors should perform satisfactorily to electron emission currents beyond 1000 mA and electron collection currents beyond 500 mA. All contactors performed better on xenon than argon. A general theory of plasma contactor operation in both the electron collection and electron emission modes, which describes the current-limiting effects of space-charge phenomena is given. This current-limiting and collecting phenomenon is shown to be a function of driving potential differences and emitting and collecting surface radius ratio for the case of a spherical geometry. Discharge power did not appear to influence the electron collection current substantially in the experiments so it is suggested in light of the model that the contactors are generally not limited by their ion production capabilities under conditions at which they were tested.

  15. Emission from ferroelectric cathodes. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Sampayan, S.E.; Caporaso, G.J.; Holmes, C.L.; Lauer, E.J.; Prosnitz, D.; Trimble, D.O.; Westenskow, G.A.

    1993-05-01

    The authors have recently initiated an investigation of electron emission from ferroelectric cathodes. The experimental apparatus consisted of an electron diode and a 250 kV, 12 ohm, 70 ns pulsed high voltage power source. A planar triode modulator driven by a synthesized waveform generator initiates the polarization inversion and allows inversion pulse tailoring. The pulsed high voltage power source is capable of delivering two high voltage pulses within 50 {mu}s of each other and is capable of operating at a sustained repetition rate of 5 Hz. The initial measurements indicate that emission current densities above the Child-Langmuir Space Charge Limit, J{sub CL}, are possible. They explain this effect to be based on a non-zero initial energy of the emitted electrons. They also determined that this effect is strongly coupled to relative timing between the inversion pulse and application of the main anode-cathode pulse. They also have initiated brightness measurements of the emitted beam and estimate a preliminary lower bound to be on the order of 10{sup 9} A/m{sup 2}-rad{sup 2} for currents close to J{sub CL} and factor of two less at currents over 4J{sub CL}. As in previous measurements at this Laboratory, they performed the measurement using a pepper pot technique. Beamlet profiles are recorded with a fast phosphor and gated cameras. They describe their apparatus and preliminary measurements.

  16. Semitransparent cathodes for organic light emitting devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burrows, P. E.; Gu, G.; Forrest, S. R.; Vicenzi, E. P.; Zhou, T. X.

    2000-03-01

    We optimize transparent organic light emitting devices (TOLEDs) using compound cathodes consisting of a thermally evaporated metal contact layer capped with indium-tin-oxide (ITO). The ITO is sputtered at rates of up to 1.6 Å/s using a high power radio frequency magnetron process. With a Mg:Ag contact layer, we demonstrate a TOLED with 50% transparency and an operating voltage within 0.3 V of a device with identical organic layers and a conventional Mg:Ag cathode. The operational lifetime of the TOLED is shown to be equal to that of a similar, nontransparent device. We also study the effects of using different contact metals, including Ca, Al and LiF, on the operating characteristics of the TOLEDs. With a thin Ca contact layer, undoped TOLEDs with >80% peak transparency operating at (5.9±0.1) V at a brightness of >100 cd/m2 are demonstrated. These devices have application to transparent, head-up displays and to full color, stacked organic light emitting devices.

  17. Cathodic ARC surface cleaning prior to brazing

    SciTech Connect

    Dave, V. R.; Hollis, K. J.; Castro, R. G.; Smith, F. M.; Javernick, D. A.

    2002-01-01

    Surface cleanliness is one the critical process variables in vacuum furnace brazing operations. For a large number of metallic components, cleaning is usually accomplished either by water-based alkali cleaning, but may also involve acid etching or solvent cleaning / rinsing. Nickel plating may also be necessary to ensure proper wetting. All of these cleaning or plating technologies have associated waste disposal issues, and this article explores an alternative cleaning process that generates minimal waste. Cathodic arc, or reserve polarity, is well known for welding of materials with tenacious oxide layers such as aluminum alloys. In this work the reverse polarity effect is used to clean austenitic stainless steel substrates prior to brazing with Ag-28%Cu. This cleaning process is compared to acid pickling and is shown to produce similar wetting behavior as measured by dynamic contact angle experiments. Additionally, dynamic contact angle measurements with water drops are conducted to show that cathodic arc cleaning can remove organic contaminants as well. The process does have its limitations however, and alloys with high titanium and aluminum content such as nickel-based superalloys may still require plating to ensure adequate wetting.

  18. Cathodic and anodic biofilms in Single Chamber Microbial Fuel Cells.

    PubMed

    Cristiani, P; Carvalho, M L; Guerrini, E; Daghio, M; Santoro, C; Li, B

    2013-08-01

    The oxygen reduction due to microaerophilic biofilms grown on graphite cathodes (biocathodes) in Single Chamber Microbial Fuel Cells (SCMFCs) is proved and analysed in this paper. Pt-free cathode performances are compared with those of different platinum-loaded cathodes, before and after the biofilm growth. Membraneless SCMFCs were operating in batch-mode, filled with wastewater. A substrate (fuel) of sodium acetate (0.03 M) was periodically added and the experiment lasted more than six months. A maximum of power densities, up to 0.5 W m(-2), were reached when biofilms developed on the electrodes and the cathodic potential decreased (open circuit potential of 50-200 mV vs. SHE). The power output was almost constant with an acetate concentration of 0.01-0.05 M and it fell down when the pH of the media exceeded 9.5, independently of the Pt-free/Pt-loading at the cathodes. Current densities varied in the range of 1-5 Am(-2) (cathode area of 5 cm(2)). Quasi-stationary polarization curves performed with a three-electrode configuration on cathodic and anodic electrodes showed that the anodic overpotential, more than the cathodic one, may limit the current density in the SCMFCs for a long-term operation. PMID:23474690

  19. High Current Cathodes Fabricated by KrF Laser Ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Gilgenbach, Ronald M.; Lau, Y. Y.; Jones, M. C.; Johnston, M. D.; Jordan, N. M.; Hoff, B. W.

    2010-10-08

    In this paper we review several high power laser ablation techniques that have been utilized to fabricate high current (1-80 kA) electron beam cathodes for accelerators and microwave sources: 1) Projection Ablation Lithography (PAL) cathodes, 2) Ablation Line Focus (ALF) cathodes, and 3) Metal-Oxide-Junction (MOJ) cathodes. Laser-ablative micromachining techniques (PAL and ALF) have been utilized to generate micron-scale features on metal substrates that provide electric field (beta) enhancement for Fowler-Nordheim emission and plasma cathodes. Since these laser-ablated patterns are directly, laser-written on the substrate metal they exhibit much higher thermal conductivity for higher current capability and increased damage thresholds. Metal-Oxide-Junction (MOJ) cathodes exploit the triple-point electron emission that occurs at the interface between metal, insulator and vacuum.The ablation laser is a KrF excimer laser with a pulse energy of 600 mJ and pulselength of 20 ns. Cathode experiments were performed on the MELBA-C accelerator: V = -300 kV, pulselength = 0.5 microsecond. Data will be presented for PAL, ALF and MOJ cathodes.

  20. Effects of Humidity on Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, John S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Singh, Prabhakar; Mahapatra, Manoj K.; Wachsman, E. D.; Liu, Meilin; Gerdes, Kirk R.

    2015-03-17

    This report summarizes results from experimental studies performed by a team of researchers assembled on behalf of the Solid-state Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) Core Technology Program. Team participants employed a variety of techniques to evaluate and mitigate the effects of humidity in solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) cathode air streams on cathode chemistry, microstructure, and electrochemical performance.