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Sample records for continuous culture system

  1. Lean management systems: creating a culture of continuous quality improvement.

    PubMed

    Clark, David M; Silvester, Kate; Knowles, Simon

    2013-08-01

    This is the first in a series of articles describing the application of Lean management systems to Laboratory Medicine. Lean is the term used to describe a principle-based continuous quality improvement (CQI) management system based on the Toyota production system (TPS) that has been evolving for over 70 years. Its origins go back much further and are heavily influenced by the work of W Edwards Deming and the scientific method that forms the basis of most quality management systems. Lean has two fundamental elements--a systematic approach to process improvement by removing waste in order to maximise value for the end-user of the service and a commitment to respect, challenge and develop the people who work within the service to create a culture of continuous improvement. Lean principles have been applied to a growing number of Healthcare systems throughout the world to improve the quality and cost-effectiveness of services for patients and a number of laboratories from all the pathology disciplines have used Lean to shorten turnaround times, improve quality (reduce errors) and improve productivity. Increasingly, models used to plan and implement large scale change in healthcare systems, including the National Health Service (NHS) change model, have evidence-based improvement methodologies (such as Lean CQI) as a core component. Consequently, a working knowledge of improvement methodology will be a core skill for Pathologists involved in leadership and management.

  2. A Bacterial Continuous Culture System Based on a Microfluidic Droplet Open Reactor.

    PubMed

    Ito, Manami; Sugiura, Haruka; Ayukawa, Shotaro; Kiga, Daisuke; Takinoue, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Recently, micrometer-sized bacterial culture systems have attracted attention as useful tools for synthetic biology studies. Here, we present the development of a bacterial continuous culture system based on a microdroplet open reactor consisting of two types of water-in-oil microdroplets with diameters of several hundred micrometers. A continuous culture was realized the through supply of nutrient substrates and the removal of waste and excess bacterial cells based on repeated fusion and fission of droplets. The growth dynamics was controlled by the interval of fusion. We constructed a microfluidic system and quantitatively assessed the dynamics of the bacterial growth using a mathematical model. This system will facilitate the study of synthetic biology and metabolic engineering in the future.

  3. Multi-stage continuous high cell density culture systems: a review.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ho Nam; Jung, Kwonsu; Choi, Jin-Dal-Rae; Lee, Joon Chul; Woo, Hee-Chul

    2014-01-01

    A multi-stage continuous high cell density culture (MSC-HCDC) system makes it possible to achieve high productivity together with high product titer of many bioproducts. For long-term continuous operation of MSC-HCDC systems, the cell retention time and hydraulic retention time must be decoupled and strains (bacteria, yeast, plant, and animal cells) must be stable. MSC-HCDC systems are suitable for low-value high-volume extracellular products such as fuel ethanol, lactic acid or volatile fatty acids, and high-value products such as monoclonal antibodies as well as intracellular products such as polyhydroxybutyric acid (PHB), microbial lipids or a number of therapeutics. Better understanding of the fermentation kinetics of a specific product and reliable high-density culture methods for the product-generating microorganisms will facilitate timely industrialization of MSC-HCDC systems for products that are currently obtained in fed-batch bioreactors.

  4. Plasma-mediated inactivation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms grown on borosilicate surfaces under continuous culture system.

    PubMed

    Vandervoort, Kurt G; Brelles-Mariño, Graciela

    2014-01-01

    Biofilms are microbial communities attached to a surface and embedded in a matrix composed of exopolysaccharides and excreted nucleic acids. Bacterial biofilms are responsible for undesirable effects such as disease, prostheses colonization, biofouling, equipment damage, and pipe plugging. Biofilms are also more resilient than free-living cells to regular sterilization methods and therefore it is indispensable to develop better ways to control and remove them. The use of gas discharge plasmas is a good alternative since plasmas contain a mixture of reactive agents well-known for their decontamination potential against free microorganisms. We have previously reported that Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms were inactivated after a 1-min plasma exposure. We determined that the adhesiveness and the thickness of Pseudomonas biofilms grown on borosilicate were reduced. We also reported sequential morphological changes and loss of viability upon plasma treatment. However, the studies were carried out in batch cultures. The use of a continuous culture results in a more homogenous environment ensuring reproducible biofilm growth. The aim of this work was to study plasma-mediated inactivation of P. aeruginosa biofilms grown on borosilicate in a continuous culture system. In this paper we show that biofilms grown on glass under continuous culture can be inactivated by using gas discharge plasma. Both biofilm architecture and cell culturability are impacted by the plasma treatment. The inactivation kinetics is similar to previously described ones and cells go through sequential changes ranging from minimal modification without loss of viability at short plasma exposure times, to major structure and viability loss at longer exposure times. We report that changes in biofilm structure leading to the loss of culturability and viability are related to a decrease of the biofilm matrix adhesiveness. To our knowledge, there has been no attempt to evaluate the inactivation

  5. Plasma-Mediated Inactivation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms Grown on Borosilicate Surfaces under Continuous Culture System

    PubMed Central

    Vandervoort, Kurt G.; Brelles-Mariño, Graciela

    2014-01-01

    Biofilms are microbial communities attached to a surface and embedded in a matrix composed of exopolysaccharides and excreted nucleic acids. Bacterial biofilms are responsible for undesirable effects such as disease, prostheses colonization, biofouling, equipment damage, and pipe plugging. Biofilms are also more resilient than free-living cells to regular sterilization methods and therefore it is indispensable to develop better ways to control and remove them. The use of gas discharge plasmas is a good alternative since plasmas contain a mixture of reactive agents well-known for their decontamination potential against free microorganisms. We have previously reported that Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms were inactivated after a 1-min plasma exposure. We determined that the adhesiveness and the thickness of Pseudomonas biofilms grown on borosilicate were reduced. We also reported sequential morphological changes and loss of viability upon plasma treatment. However, the studies were carried out in batch cultures. The use of a continuous culture results in a more homogenous environment ensuring reproducible biofilm growth. The aim of this work was to study plasma-mediated inactivation of P. aeruginosa biofilms grown on borosilicate in a continuous culture system. In this paper we show that biofilms grown on glass under continuous culture can be inactivated by using gas discharge plasma. Both biofilm architecture and cell culturabilty are impacted by the plasma treatment. The inactivation kinetics is similar to previously described ones and cells go through sequential changes ranging from minimal modification without loss of viability at short plasma exposure times, to major structure and viability loss at longer exposure times. We report that changes in biofilm structure leading to the loss of culturability and viability are related to a decrease of the biofilm matrix adhesiveness. To our knowledge, there has been no attempt to evaluate the inactivation

  6. A Continuous Culture System for Assessing Microbial Activities in the Piezosphere

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Rodríguez, Ileana

    2015-01-01

    Continuous culture under elevated pressures is an important technique for expanding the exploration of microbial growth and survival in extreme environments associated with the deep biosphere. Here we present a benchtop stirred continuous culture bioreactor capable of withstanding temperatures ranging from 25 to 120°C and pressures as high as 69 MPa. The system is configured to allow the employment of media enriched in dissolved gases, under oxic or anoxic conditions, while permitting periodic sampling of the incubated organisms with minimal physical/chemical disturbance inside the reactor. In a pilot experiment, the fermentative growth of the thermopiezophilic bacterium Marinitoga piezophila was investigated continuously for 382 h at 65°C and at pressures ranging from 0.1 to 40 MPa while the medium flow rate was varied from 2 to 0.025 ml/min. The enhanced growth observed at 30 and 40 MPa and 0.025 ml/min supports the pressure preferences of M. piezophila when grown fermentatively. This assay successfully demonstrates the capabilities of the bioreactor for continuous culturing at a variety of dilution rates, pressures, and temperatures. We anticipate that this technology will accelerate our understanding of the physiological and metabolic status of microorganisms under temperature, pressure, and energy regimes resembling those of the Earth's piezosphere. PMID:26209666

  7. Use of a novel continuous culture fermentor system for in vitro determination of enteric methane output from ruminants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Continuous culture fermentor systems (CCFS) serve to evaluate the effect of diet on in vitro nutrient digestibility, fermentation, and microbial protein synthesis. Limitations of CCFS are: maintaining protozoa populations, and avoiding accumulation of undigested material in the vessels. Therefore, a...

  8. An analysis of the productivity of a CELSS continuous algal culture system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radmer, R.; Behrens, P.; Fernandez, E.; Arnett, K.

    1986-01-01

    One of the most attractive aspects of using algal cultures as plant components for a Closed Ecological Life Support Systems (CELSS) is the efficiency with which they can be grown. Although algae are not necessarily intrinsically more efficient than higher plants, the ease which they can be handled and manipulated (more like chemical reagents than plants), and the culturing techniques available, result in much higher growth rates than are usually attainable with higher plants. Furthermore, preliminary experiments have demonstrated that algal growth and physiology is not detectable altered in a microgravity environment, (1) whereas the response of higher plants to zero gravity is unknown. In order to rationally design and operate culture systems, it is necessary to understand how the macroparameters of a culture system, e.g., productivity, are related to the physiological aspects of the algal culture. A first principles analysis of culture system is discussed, and a mathematical model that describes the relationship of culture productivity to the cell concentration of light-limited culture is derived. The predicted productivity vs cell concentration curve agrees well with the experimental data obtained to test this model, indicating that this model permits an accurate prediction of culture productivity given the growth parameters of the system.

  9. Modeling and Properties of Nonlinear Stochastic Dynamical System of Continuous Culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lei; Feng, Enmin; Ye, Jianxiong; Xiu, Zhilong

    The stochastic counterpart to the deterministic description of continuous fermentation with ordinary differential equation is investigated in the process of glycerol bio-dissimilation to 1,3-propanediol by Klebsiella pneumoniae. We briefly discuss the continuous fermentation process driven by three-dimensional Brownian motion and Lipschitz coefficients, which is suitable for the factual fermentation. Subsequently, we study the existence and uniqueness of solutions for the stochastic system as well as the boundedness of the Two-order Moment and the Markov property of the solution. Finally stochastic simulation is carried out under the Stochastic Euler-Maruyama method.

  10. Electronically Controlled Continuous Culture Device

    PubMed Central

    Eisler, William J.; Webb, Robert B.

    1968-01-01

    A photocell-controlled continuous culture device, a Nephelostat, is described that maintains a wide variety of cultures of microorganisms in balanced growth. This Nephelostat controls concentrations of bacteria within ±3% over a cell concentration range of 106 to 109 cells per ml. Growth rates are recorded so that changes in the growth rate are observed over small increments of time. Spontaneous and caffeine-induced mutation rates of two strains of Escherichia coli were compared under Nephelostat and chemostat conditions. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:4877660

  11. Improved apparatus for continuous culture of hydrogen-fixing bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, J. F.; Litchfield, J. H.

    1970-01-01

    Improved apparatus permits the continuous culture of Hydrogenomonas eutropha. System incorporates three essential subsystems - /1/ environmentally isolated culture vessel, /2/ analytical system with appropriate sensors and readout devices, /3/ control system with feedback responses to each analytical measurement.

  12. Continuity and Change: Building a Quality Culture in the Romanian Educational System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bunda, Nicoleta Ramona; Baciu, Livia Loredana

    2009-01-01

    Educational objectives, like educational quality, are contextual and evolving--they may exhibit both continuity and change. This paper capitalizes on the role of neo-institutionalism and on the contribution of Douglass North (one major representative of the neo-institutionalism trend) in identifying the institutional impact upon cognitive…

  13. Simultaneous production and separation of biohydrogen in mixed culture systems by continuous dark fermentation.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Morales, Juan E; Tapia-Venegas, Estela; Toledo-Alarcón, Javiera; Ruiz-Filippi, Gonzalo

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen production by dark fermentation is one promising technology. However, there are challenges in improving the performance and efficiency of the process. The important factors that must be considered to obtain a suitable process are the source of the inoculum and its pre-treatment, types of substrates, the reactor configurations and the hydrogen partial pressure. Furthermore, to obtain high-quality hydrogen, it is necessary to integrate an effective separation procedure that is compatible with the intrinsic characteristics of a biological process. Recent studies have suggested that a stable and robust process could be established if there was an effective selection of a mixed microbial consortium with metabolic pathways directly targeted to high hydrogen yields. Additionally, the integration of membrane technology for the extraction and separation of the hydrogen produced has advantages for the upgrading step, because this technology could play an important role in reducing the negative effect of the hydrogen partial pressure. Using this technology, it has been possible to implement a production-purification system, the 'hydrogen-extractive membrane bioreactor'. This configuration has great potential for direct applications, such as fuel cells, but studies of new membrane materials, module designs and reactor configurations are required to achieve higher separation efficiencies.

  14. Colonization of Mucin by Human Intestinal Bacteria and Establishment of Biofilm Communities in a Two-Stage Continuous Culture System

    PubMed Central

    Macfarlane, Sandra; Woodmansey, Emma J.; Macfarlane, George T.

    2005-01-01

    The human large intestine is covered with a protective mucus coating, which is heavily colonized by complex bacterial populations that are distinct from those in the gut lumen. Little is known of the composition and metabolic activities of these biofilms, although they are likely to play an important role in mucus breakdown. The aims of this study were to determine how intestinal bacteria colonize mucus and to study physiologic and enzymatic factors involved in the destruction of this glycoprotein. Colonization of mucin gels by fecal bacteria was studied in vitro, using a two-stage continuous culture system, simulating conditions of nutrient availability and limitation characteristic of the proximal (vessel 1) and distal (vessel 2) colon. The establishment of bacterial communities in mucin gels was investigated by selective culture methods, scanning electron microscopy, and confocal laser scanning microscopy, in association with fluorescently labeled 16S rRNA oligonucleotide probes. Gel samples were also taken for analysis of mucin-degrading enzymes and measurements of residual mucin sugars. Mucin gels were rapidly colonized by heterogeneous bacterial populations, especially members of the Bacteroides fragilis group, enterobacteria, and clostridia. Intestinal bacterial populations growing on mucin surfaces were shown to be phylogenetically and metabolically distinct from their planktonic counterparts. PMID:16269790

  15. A Continuous-Exchange Cell-Free Protein Synthesis System Based on Extracts from Cultured Insect Cells

    PubMed Central

    Stech, Marlitt; Quast, Robert B.; Sachse, Rita; Schulze, Corina; Wüstenhagen, Doreen A.; Kubick, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we present a novel technique for the synthesis of complex prokaryotic and eukaryotic proteins by using a continuous-exchange cell-free (CECF) protein synthesis system based on extracts from cultured insect cells. Our approach consists of two basic elements: First, protein synthesis is performed in insect cell lysates which harbor endogenous microsomal vesicles, enabling a translocation of de novo synthesized target proteins into the lumen of the insect vesicles or, in the case of membrane proteins, their embedding into a natural membrane scaffold. Second, cell-free reactions are performed in a two chamber dialysis device for 48 h. The combination of the eukaryotic cell-free translation system based on insect cell extracts and the CECF translation system results in significantly prolonged reaction life times and increased protein yields compared to conventional batch reactions. In this context, we demonstrate the synthesis of various representative model proteins, among them cytosolic proteins, pharmacological relevant membrane proteins and glycosylated proteins in an endotoxin-free environment. Furthermore, the cell-free system used in this study is well-suited for the synthesis of biologically active tissue-type-plasminogen activator, a complex eukaryotic protein harboring multiple disulfide bonds. PMID:24804975

  16. Asthma, culture, and cultural analysis: continuing challenges.

    PubMed

    Fortun, Mike; Fortun, Kim; Costelloe-Kuehn, Brandon; Saheb, Tahereh; Price, Daniel; Kenner, Alison; Crowder, Jerome

    2014-01-01

    Recent research indicates that asthma is more complicated than already recognized, requiring a multilateral approach of study in order to better understand its many facets. Apart from being a health problem, asthma is seen as a knowledge problem, and as we argue here, a cultural problem. Employing cultural analysis we outline ways to challenge conventional ideas and practices about asthma by considering how culture shapes asthma experience, diagnosis, management, research, and politics. Finally, we discuss the value of viewing asthma through multiple lenses, and how such "explanatory pluralism" advances transdisciplinary approaches to asthma.

  17. Continuous purification of antibodies from cell culture supernatant with aqueous two-phase systems: from concept to process.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Paula A J; Azevedo, Ana M; Sommerfeld, S; Mutter, Martina; Bäcker, Werner; Aires-Barros, M Raquel

    2013-03-01

    An aqueous two-phase extraction (ATPE) process based on a PEG/phosphate system was developed for the capture of human immunoglobulin G and successfully applied to a Chinese hamster ovary and a PER.C6® cell supernatant. A continuous ATPE process incorporating three different steps (extraction, back-extraction, and washing) was set up and validated in a pump mixer-settler battery. Most of the higher molecular weight cell supernatant impurities were removed during the extraction step, while most of the lower molecular weight impurities were removed during the subsequent steps. A global recovery yield of 80% and a final protein purity of more than 99% were obtained for the IgG purification from a CHO cell supernatant, representing a 155-fold reduction in the protein/IgG ratio. For the purification of IgG from a PER.C6® cell supernatant, a global recovery yield of 100%, and a host cell protein purity were attained, representing a 22-fold reduction in the host cell protein/IgG ratio. These results, thus, open promising perspectives for the application of the developed ATPE process as a platform for the capture of antibodies. In fact, this new process has shown the ability to successfully recover and purify different antibodies from distinct cell culture supernatants. This technology can also overcome some of the limitations encountered using the typical chromatographic processes, besides inherent advantages of scalability, process integration, capability of continuous operation, and economic feasibility.

  18. Cultural Continuities: An Australian Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ebbeck, Marjory

    2001-01-01

    Examined school attitudes of 101 mothers of preschoolers who were immigrants to Australia from Vietnam, Cambodia, Indonesia, mainland China, and the Philippines; also examined views of 100 early childhood teachers. Found differences in views regarding the importance of maintaining family culture and first language, and the importance of sharing…

  19. Continuing professional development in sensitive cultures.

    PubMed

    Huntington, Mark K

    2008-01-01

    Many cultures of the world face threats to their existence due to the homogenizing effects of the global commercial pop culture. These same influences present challenges to vulnerable cultures that seek the benefits of modern medicine, while attempting to preserve their unique identities. This paper briefly reviews some of these challenges and presents one novel approach to providing continuing medical education that minimizes the potential for adverse influences on the sensitive culture.

  20. Effects of carbohydrate and nitrogen supplementation on fermentation of cheatgrass () in a dual-flow continuous culture system.

    PubMed

    Silva, L G; Benedeti, P D B; Paula, E M; Malekjahani, F; Amaral, P M; Mariz, L D S; Shenkoru, T; Faciola, A P

    2017-03-01

    Cheatgrass (CG; ), an introduced winter annual grass, is an aggressive invader of the sagebrush community in the Western United States. Because of its greater flammability, mature CG constitutes a fire hazard leading to repeated wildfires. One fuel-reduction strategy is livestock grazing. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of urea, molasses, or a combination of urea and molasses supplementation of a CG-based diet on digestibility, microbial fermentation, bacterial protein synthesis, and nutrient flow using a dual-flow continuous culture system. Eight fermenters were used in a replicate 4 × 4 Latin square design with four 10-d experimental periods. Experimental treatments (DM basis) were 1) forage only (CON), 2) CG plus urea alone (URE; 1.36% urea), 3) CG plus molasses alone (MOL; 15.9% molasses), and 4) CG plus urea and molasses combined (URE+MOL; 1.28% urea plus 19.3% molasses). Each fermenter was fed 72 g/d of DM, and data were analyzed using the GLIMMIX procedure of SAS (SAS Inst. Inc., Cary, NC). The true digestibilities of NDF and ADF were not affected by diets ( > 0.05). Molasses-containing diets had greater true digestibility of OM ( = 0.02). However, true digestibility of CP was increased when molasses was fed alone ( < 0.01). Molasses-containing diets had lower pH ( < 0.01) and greater VFA concentrations ( < 0.01) compared to those of the other diets. The URE+MOL diet resulted in a greater VFA concentration ( < 0.01). Propionate concentration increased ( < 0.01), whereas acetate concentration decreased ( < 0.01) when molasses alone or in combination with urea was added to the diets. Supplying molasses alone resulted in greater ( = 0.03) total branched-chain VFA compared to the other diets. The concentration of NH-N and total N flow increased ( < 0.01) in response to urea supplementation and was greater ( < 0.01) when urea alone was supplemented in the diet. On the other hand, molasses-supplemented diets yielded more non-ammonia N

  1. Short versus continuous gemcitabine treatment of non-small cell lung cancer in an in vitro cell culture bioreactor system.

    PubMed

    Kirstein, Mark N; Wieman, Katie M; Williams, Brent W; Fisher, James E; Marker, Paul H; Le, Chap T; Yee, Douglas; Kratzke, Robert A

    2007-11-01

    Five-year survival for non-small cell lung cancer is 15%. Gemcitabine is a nucleoside analogue that inhibits ribonucleotide reductase and interferes with DNA replication. In this study, we sought to compare short versus continuous infusion gemcitabine in an in vitro bioreactor system using pharmacokinetic-guided dosing. Gemcitabine was infused over either 0.5 or 2.5h to produce concentration-time profiles that mimic those measured in biological samples (i.e., patient plasma). The effects of gemcitabine on the growth and survival of H2009 cells were examined using trypan blue staining, cell cycle analysis, TUNEL assay, and clonogenic assay. Data were analyzed with two ways analysis of variance. Maximum gemcitabine (Cmax) concentrations during the short infusion were 51.2+/-10.4 microM and for the continuous, 14.8+/-2.93 microM. Steady-state concentrations during the continuous infusions were 14.9+/-2.90 microM. Gemcitabine treatment resulted in a decrease for G1 fraction relative to controls. G2/M, subG1 and TUNEL were higher following gemcitabine relative to controls. Survival was approximately 20-fold higher following the short infusion compared with the continuous infusion (p = 0.0085). In conclusion, gemcitabine infused by this novel method induced apoptosis after both the short and continuous infusions, and long-term survival was significantly diminished following continuous compared with the short infusion.

  2. The Enduring Utility of Continuous Culturing in Experimental Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Gresham, David; Dunham, Maitreya J.

    2015-01-01

    Studying evolution in the laboratory provides a means of understanding the processes, dynamics and outcomes of adaptive evolution in precisely controlled and readily replicated conditions. The advantages of experimental evolution are maximized when selection is well defined, which enables linking genotype, phenotype and fitness. One means of maintaining a defined selection is continuous culturing: chemostats enable the study of adaptive evolution in nutrient-limited environments in which growth is sub-maximal, whereas cells in turbidostats evolve in nutrient abundance that allows maximal growth. Although the experimental effort required for continuous culturing is considerable relative to the experimental simplicity of serial batch culture, the opposite is true of the environments they produce: continuous culturing results in simplified and constant conditions whereas serial batch cultures are complex and dynamic. The comparative simplicity of the selective environment that is unique to continuous culturing provides an ideal experimental system for addressing key questions in adaptive evolution. PMID:25281774

  3. The enduring utility of continuous culturing in experimental evolution.

    PubMed

    Gresham, David; Dunham, Maitreya J

    2014-12-01

    Studying evolution in the laboratory provides a means of understanding the processes, dynamics and outcomes of adaptive evolution in precisely controlled and readily replicated conditions. The advantages of experimental evolution are maximized when the selection is well defined, which enables linking genotype, phenotype and fitness. One means of maintaining a defined selection is continuous culturing: chemostats enable the study of adaptive evolution in constant nutrient-limited environments, whereas cells in turbidostats evolve in constant nutrient abundance. Although the experimental effort required for continuous culturing is considerable relative to the experimental simplicity of serial batch culture, the opposite is true of the environments they produce: continuous culturing results in simplified and invariant conditions whereas serially diluted batch cultures are complex and dynamic. The comparative simplicity of the selective environment that is unique to continuous culturing provides an ideal experimental system for addressing key questions in adaptive evolution. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Continuous system modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cellier, Francois E.

    1991-01-01

    A comprehensive and systematic introduction is presented for the concepts associated with 'modeling', involving the transition from a physical system down to an abstract description of that system in the form of a set of differential and/or difference equations, and basing its treatment of modeling on the mathematics of dynamical systems. Attention is given to the principles of passive electrical circuit modeling, planar mechanical systems modeling, hierarchical modular modeling of continuous systems, and bond-graph modeling. Also discussed are modeling in equilibrium thermodynamics, population dynamics, and system dynamics, inductive reasoning, artificial neural networks, and automated model synthesis.

  5. Comparison of Difco ESP and Organon Teknika BacT/Alert continuous-monitoring blood culture systems.

    PubMed

    Zwadyk, P; Pierson, C L; Young, C

    1994-05-01

    The Difco ESP and Organon Teknika BacT/Alert (BTA) systems were evaluated in a clinical study of 5,421 aerobic and 5,035 anaerobic blood cultures. Of 405 clinically significant positive cultures evaluated, 272 grew in both systems, 86 grew in ESP only, and 47 grew in BTA only (P < 0.005). Of 320 organisms detected in aerobic bottles, 208 grew in both systems, 68 grew in ESP only and 45 grew in BTA only (P < 0.05), with Staphylococcus aureus the only organism showing a statistically significant difference. The ESP anaerobic bottle also detected more anaerobes (16 of 17 versus 4 of 17, P < 0.005) and more organisms overall (57 versus 34, P < 0.05). However, with the exception of patients with anaerobic bacteremia (12 of 13 for ESP and 4 of 13 for BTA, P < 0.05), there was no statistical difference in the detection of patient episodes. Average detection time of matched aerobic bottles was 18.3 h for ESP and 22.0 h for BTA (P < 0.001). For matched pairs of anaerobic bottles, the average detection time was faster in the BTA bottles (P < 0.001), because of the growth of facultative organisms. To explore the differences in anaerobic detection more fully, 20 sets of anaerobic bottles were seeded with 12 anaerobic species mixed with human blood. ESP grew more organisms (17 of 20 versus 10 of 20, P < 0.025), and the average time to detection for the 10 paired positive cultures was 21.6 h for ESP and 50.8 h for BTA (P < 0.05). Times for loading and unloading bottles were similar for both systems.

  6. Effects of Partial Replacement of Corn with Glycerin on Ruminal Fermentation in a Dual-Flow Continuous Culture System.

    PubMed

    Del Bianco Benedeti, Pedro; Galoro da Silva, Lorrayny; Marostegan de Paula, Eduardo; Shenkoru, Teshome; Marcondes, Marcos Inácio; Monteiro, Hugo Fernando; Amorati, Brad; Yeh, Yenling; Poulson, Simon Roger; Faciola, Antonio Pinheiro

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of partially replacing dry ground corn with glycerin on ruminal fermentation using a dual-flow continuous culture system. Six fermenters (1,223 ± 21 ml) were used in a replicated 3x3 Latin square arrangement with three periods of 10 d each, with 7 d for diet adaptation and 3 d for sample collections. All diets contained 75% concentrate and three dietary glycerin levels (0, 15, and 30% on dry matter basis), totaling six replicates per treatment. Fermenters were fed 72 g of dry matter/d equally divided in two meals/d, at 0800 and 2000 h. Solid and liquid dilution rates were adjusted daily to 5.5 and 11%/h, respectively. On d 8, 9, and 10, samples of 500 ml of solid and liquid digesta effluent were mixed, homogenized, and stored at -20°C. Subsamples of 10 ml were collected and preserved with 0.2 mL of a 50% H2SO4 solution for later determination of NH3-N and volatile fatty acids. Microbial biomass was isolated from fermenters for chemical analysis at the end of each experimental period. Data were analyzed using the MIXED procedure in SAS with α = 0.05. Glycerin levels did not affect apparent digestibility of DM (PLin. = 0.13; PQuad. = 0.40), OM (PLin. = 0.72; PQuad. = 0.15), NDF (PLin. = 0.38; PQuad. = 0.50) and ADF (PLin. = 0.91; PQuad. = 0.18). Also, glycerin inclusion did not affect true digestibility of DM (PLin. = 0.35; PQuad. = 0.48), and OM (PLin. = 0.08; PQuad. = 0.19). Concentrations of propionate (P < 0.01) and total volatile fatty acids (P < 0.01) increased linearly and concentrations of acetate (P < 0.01), butyrate (P = 0.01), iso-valerate (P < 0.01), and total branched-chain volatile fatty acids, as well as the acetate: propionate ratio (P < 0.01) decreased with glycerin inclusion. Linear increases on NH3-N concentration in digesta effluent (P < 0.01) and on NH3-N flow (P < 0.01) were observed due to glycerin inclusion in the diets. Crude protein digestibility (P = 0.04) and microbial N flow (P

  7. Effects of Partial Replacement of Corn with Glycerin on Ruminal Fermentation in a Dual-Flow Continuous Culture System

    PubMed Central

    Del Bianco Benedeti, Pedro; Galoro da Silva, Lorrayny; Marostegan de Paula, Eduardo; Shenkoru, Teshome; Marcondes, Marcos Inácio; Monteiro, Hugo Fernando; Amorati, Brad; Yeh, Yenling; Poulson, Simon Roger; Faciola, Antonio Pinheiro

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of partially replacing dry ground corn with glycerin on ruminal fermentation using a dual-flow continuous culture system. Six fermenters (1,223 ± 21 ml) were used in a replicated 3x3 Latin square arrangement with three periods of 10 d each, with 7 d for diet adaptation and 3 d for sample collections. All diets contained 75% concentrate and three dietary glycerin levels (0, 15, and 30% on dry matter basis), totaling six replicates per treatment. Fermenters were fed 72 g of dry matter/d equally divided in two meals/d, at 0800 and 2000 h. Solid and liquid dilution rates were adjusted daily to 5.5 and 11%/h, respectively. On d 8, 9, and 10, samples of 500 ml of solid and liquid digesta effluent were mixed, homogenized, and stored at -20°C. Subsamples of 10 ml were collected and preserved with 0.2 mL of a 50% H2SO4 solution for later determination of NH3-N and volatile fatty acids. Microbial biomass was isolated from fermenters for chemical analysis at the end of each experimental period. Data were analyzed using the MIXED procedure in SAS with α = 0.05. Glycerin levels did not affect apparent digestibility of DM (PLin. = 0.13; PQuad. = 0.40), OM (PLin. = 0.72; PQuad. = 0.15), NDF (PLin. = 0.38; PQuad. = 0.50) and ADF (PLin. = 0.91; PQuad. = 0.18). Also, glycerin inclusion did not affect true digestibility of DM (PLin. = 0.35; PQuad. = 0.48), and OM (PLin. = 0.08; PQuad. = 0.19). Concentrations of propionate (P < 0.01) and total volatile fatty acids (P < 0.01) increased linearly and concentrations of acetate (P < 0.01), butyrate (P = 0.01), iso-valerate (P < 0.01), and total branched-chain volatile fatty acids, as well as the acetate: propionate ratio (P < 0.01) decreased with glycerin inclusion. Linear increases on NH3-N concentration in digesta effluent (P < 0.01) and on NH3-N flow (P < 0.01) were observed due to glycerin inclusion in the diets. Crude protein digestibility (P = 0.04) and microbial N flow (P

  8. Establishment of a continuous culture system for Entamoeba muris and analysis of the small subunit rRNA gene.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, S; Suzuki, J; Takeuchi, T

    2009-06-01

    We established a culture system for Entamoeba muris (MG-EM-01 strain isolated from a Mongolian gerbil) using a modified Balamuth's egg yolk infusion medium supplemented with 4% adult bovine serum and Bacteroides fragilis cocultured with Escherichia coli. Further, encystation was observed in the culture medium. The morphological characteristics of E. muris are similar to those of Entamoeba coli (E. coli); moreover, the malic isoenzyme electrophoretic band, which shows species-specific electrophoretic mobility, of E. muris had almost the same mobility as that observed with the malic isoenzyme electrophorectic band of E. coli (UZG-EC-01 strain isolated from a gorilla). We determined the small subunit rRNA (SSU-rRNA) gene sequence of the MG-EM-01 strain, and this sequence was observed to show 82.7% homology with that of the UZG-EC-01 strain. Further, the resultant phylogenetic tree for molecular taxonomy based on the SSU-rRNA genes of the 21 strains of the intestinal parasitic amoeba species indicated that the MG-EM-01 strain was most closely related to E. coli.

  9. Continuous pressure letdown system

    DOEpatents

    Sprouse, Kenneth M.; Matthews, David R.; Langowski, Terry

    2010-06-08

    A continuous pressure letdown system connected to a hopper decreases a pressure of a 2-phase (gas and solid) dusty gas stream flowing through the system. The system includes a discharge line for receiving the dusty gas from the hopper, a valve, a cascade nozzle assembly positioned downstream of the discharge line, a purge ring, an inert gas supply connected to the purge ring, an inert gas throttle, and a filter. The valve connects the hopper to the discharge line and controls introduction of the dusty gas stream into the discharge line. The purge ring is connected between the discharge line and the cascade nozzle assembly. The inert gas throttle controls a flow rate of an inert gas into the cascade nozzle assembly. The filter is connected downstream of the cascade nozzle assembly.

  10. Effects of time at suboptimal pH on rumen fermentation in a dual-flow continuous culture system.

    PubMed

    Cerrato-Sánchez, M; Calsamiglia, S; Ferret, A

    2007-03-01

    Ruminal pH varies considerably during the day, achieving values below 6.0 when cows consume large amounts of concentrates. Low ruminal pH has negative effects on ruminal fermentation. However, previous studies have indicated that rumen bacteria may resist short periods of low ruminal pH, and it is not clear how long this period may be before rumen microbial fermentation is negatively affected. Seven dual-flow continuous culture fermenters (1,320 mL) were used in 3 replicated periods with the same diet (97 g of dry matter/d of a 60:40 forage-to-concentrate diet, 18.3% crude protein, 35.9% neutral detergent fiber), temperature (39 degrees C), and solid (5%/h) and liquid (10%/h) dilution rates to study the effects of increasing time at suboptimal pH on rumen microbial fermentation and nutrient flow. Treatments were a constant pH of 6.4 and 6 different intervals of time during the day (4, 8, 12, 16, 20, 24 h) at suboptimal pH (5.5), with the rest of the day being at pH 6.4. Polynomial equations were derived using the Mixed procedure of SAS, and linear, quadratic and cubic terms were left in the equation if P < 0.10. True organic matter digestion decreased with increasing time at suboptimal pH and was best described by a cubic regression (TOMD = 58.5 - 2.15x + 0.16x2 -0.0037x3; R2 = 0.74). Digestion of NDF (DNDF = 55.1 - 1.00x; R2 = 0.75) and digestion of ADF (DADF = 56.2 - 1.33x; R2 = 0.78) decreased linearly with increasing time at suboptimal pH. Total VFA had a cubic response (VFA = 112.7 - 2.09x + 0.17x2 - 0.0054x3; R2 = 0.82). The proportion of acetate decreased linearly (acetate = 58.7 - 0.61x; R2 = 0.79). The propionate proportion increased (propionate = 17.6 + 2.09 x -0.044x2; R2 = 0.85) and branched-chain VFA decreased (BCVFA = 4.45 -0.51x + 0.014x2; R2 = 0.75) quadratically. The ammonia N concentration (NH3-N = 5.85 - 0.13x; R2 = 0.46) and flow (NH3-N flow = 0.18 - 0.0039x; R2 = 0.43) decreased linearly as the time at suboptimal pH increased. Crude protein

  11. Direct blood culturing on solid medium outperforms an automated continuously monitored broth-based blood culture system in terms of time to identification and susceptibility testing

    PubMed Central

    Idelevich, E.A.; Grünastel, B.; Peters, G.; Becker, K.

    2015-01-01

    Pathogen identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) should be available as soon as possible for patients with bloodstream infections. We investigated whether a lysis-centrifugation (LC) blood culture (BC) method, combined with matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) identification and Vitek 2 AST, provides a time advantage in comparison with the currently used automated broth-based BC system. Seven bacterial reference strains were added each to 10 mL human blood in final concentrations of 100, 10 and 1 CFU/mL. Inoculated blood was added to the Isolator 10 tube and centrifuged at 3000 g for 30 min, then 1.5 mL sediment was distributed onto five 150-mm agar plates. Growth was observed hourly and microcolonies were subjected to MALDI-TOF MS and Vitek 2 as soon as possible. For comparison, seeded blood was introduced into an aerobic BC bottle and incubated in the BACTEC 9240 automated BC system. For all species/concentration combinations except one, successful identification and Vitek 2 inoculation were achieved even before growth detection by BACTEC. The fastest identification and inoculation for AST were achieved with Escherichia coli in concentrations of 100 CFU/mL and 10 CFU/mL (after 7 h each, while BACTEC flagged respective samples positive after 9.5 h and 10 h). Use of the LC-BC method allows skipping of incubation in automated BC systems and, used in combination with rapid diagnostics from microcolonies, provides a considerable advantage in time to result. This suggests that the usefulness of direct BC on solid medium should be re-evaluated in the era of rapid microbiology. PMID:26909155

  12. Direct blood culturing on solid medium outperforms an automated continuously monitored broth-based blood culture system in terms of time to identification and susceptibility testing.

    PubMed

    Idelevich, E A; Grünastel, B; Peters, G; Becker, K

    2016-03-01

    Pathogen identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) should be available as soon as possible for patients with bloodstream infections. We investigated whether a lysis-centrifugation (LC) blood culture (BC) method, combined with matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) identification and Vitek 2 AST, provides a time advantage in comparison with the currently used automated broth-based BC system. Seven bacterial reference strains were added each to 10 mL human blood in final concentrations of 100, 10 and 1 CFU/mL. Inoculated blood was added to the Isolator 10 tube and centrifuged at 3000 g for 30 min, then 1.5 mL sediment was distributed onto five 150-mm agar plates. Growth was observed hourly and microcolonies were subjected to MALDI-TOF MS and Vitek 2 as soon as possible. For comparison, seeded blood was introduced into an aerobic BC bottle and incubated in the BACTEC 9240 automated BC system. For all species/concentration combinations except one, successful identification and Vitek 2 inoculation were achieved even before growth detection by BACTEC. The fastest identification and inoculation for AST were achieved with Escherichia coli in concentrations of 100 CFU/mL and 10 CFU/mL (after 7 h each, while BACTEC flagged respective samples positive after 9.5 h and 10 h). Use of the LC-BC method allows skipping of incubation in automated BC systems and, used in combination with rapid diagnostics from microcolonies, provides a considerable advantage in time to result. This suggests that the usefulness of direct BC on solid medium should be re-evaluated in the era of rapid microbiology.

  13. Continuous culture methodology for the screening of microalgae for oil.

    PubMed

    Del Río, Esperanza; Armendáriz, Ana; García-Gómez, Elena; García-González, Mercedes; Guerrero, Miguel G

    2015-02-10

    A basic criterion in the selection of microalgae suitable as source of oil for biodiesel should be their actual capacity to produce lipids or, more properly, the fatty acid yield. Performance assessment of 10 preselected microalgae under both batch and continuous culture points to the latter approach as the most adequate for evaluating fatty acid productivity. Differences were patent in continuous culture among strains that otherwise had analogous oil accumulation potential under batch culture. Some promising strains under batch culture (like Muriella aurantiaca and Monoraphidium braunii) exhibited, however, values for actual fatty acid productivity lower than 40 mgL(-1)d(-1) in continuous regime. The analysis performed in photochemostat under continuous culture regime revealed the great potential of Chlorococcum olefaciens, Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata and Scenedesmus almeriensis as oil producing microalgae. Fatty acid productivity levels over 90 mgL(-1)d(-1) were recorded for the latter strains under moderate nitrogen limitation, conditions which led to an enrichment in saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids, a more suitable profile as raw material for biodiesel. The continuous culture methodology employed represents a sound procedure for screening microalgae for biofuel production, providing a reliable evaluation of their fatty acid production capacity, under conditions close to those of outdoor production systems.

  14. Short communication: Effect of blackberry and pomegranate oils on vaccenic acid formation in a single-flow continuous culture fermentation system.

    PubMed

    Ishlak, A; AbuGhazaleh, A A; Günal, M

    2014-02-01

    A single-flow continuous culture fermenter system was used to study the effect of blackberry and pomegranate oils on vaccenic acid (trans-11 C18:1; VA) formation. Four continuous culture fermenters were used in a 4 × 4 Latin square design with 4 periods of 10d each. Diets were (1) control (CON), (2) control plus soybean oil (SBO), (3) control plus blackberry oil (BBO), and (4) control plus pomegranate oil (PMO). Oil supplements were added at 30 g/kg of diet dry matter. Effluents were collected from each fermenter during the last 3d of each period and analyzed for nutrient and fatty acid composition. The concentration of VA in effluents increased with oil supplements and was greatest with the BBO diet. The concentration of stearic acid (C18:0) increased with the addition of soybean oil but decreased with the addition of pomegranate oil compared with the CON diet. The concentration of cis-9,trans-11 conjugated linoleic acid increased with oil supplements and was greatest with the PMO diet. In conclusion, all 3 oil sources were effective in increasing the production of VA. The effect of PMO and BBO on VA may have resulted in part from inhibition of the final step in the biohydrogenation of VA to stearic acid. Copyright © 2014 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Persistent cultural systems.

    PubMed

    Spicer, E H

    1971-11-19

    I have indicated here some features of a kind of entity which I have called a cultural identity system, and I have focused on a variety of this general type-the persistent system. In general terms it is best described as a system of beliefs and sentiments concerning historical events. I suggest using the term "a people" for the human beings who, at any given time, hold beliefs of this kind. These are phenomena with which we have been long familiar, but they have not been systematically studied by any but a few investigators. I have emphasized that a persistent system is a cumulative cultural phenomenon, an open-ended system that defines a course of action for the people believing in it. Such peoples are able to maintain continuity in their experience and their conception of themselves in a wide variety of sociocultural environments. I hold that certain kinds of identifiable conditions give rise to this type of cultural system. These may best be summarized as an oppositional process involving the interactions of individuals in the environment of a state or a similar large-scale organization. The oppositional process frequently produces intense collective consciousness and a high degree of internal solidarity. This is accompanied by a motivation for individuals to continue the kind of experience that is "stored" in the identity system in symbolic form. The persistent identity system is more stable as a cultural structure than are large-scale political organizations. When large-scale states disintegrate, they often appear to decompose into cultural systems of the persistent type. Large-scale organizations also give rise to the kind of environment that can result in the formation of new persistent systems. It is possible that, while being formed, states depend for their impetus on the accumulated energy of persistent peoples. A proposition for consideration is that states tend to dissipate the energy of peoples after transforming that energy into state

  16. Continuing Professional Development in Context: Teachers' Continuing Professional Development Culture in Germany and Sweden

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wermke, Wieland

    2011-01-01

    This article investigates the continuing professional development (CPD) culture of teachers, and asks how it is influenced by properties of the school system. It reports the results of a questionnaire study with 418 secondary teachers from Sweden and Germany. The results show highly significant differences between Swedish and German teachers'…

  17. Effects of flaxseed and chia seed on ruminal fermentation, nutrient digestibility, and long-chain fatty acid flow in a dual-flow continuous culture system.

    PubMed

    Silva, L G; Bunkers, J; Paula, E M; Shenkoru, T; Yeh, Y; Amorati, B; Holcombe, D; Faciola, A P

    2016-04-01

    Flaxseed (FS) and chia seed (CS) are oilseeds rich in omega-3 fatty acids, which may change meat and milk composition when added to ruminants' diets and may have health benefits for humans. Literature on the effects of CS supplementation on ruminal metabolism is nonexistent. A dual-flow continuous culture fermenter system consisting of 6 fermenters was used to assess the effect of FS and CS supplementation in an alfalfa hay-based diet on ruminal fermentation, nutrient digestibility, microbial protein synthesis, and long-chain fatty acid flow. Diets were randomly assigned to fermenters in a replicated 3 × 3 Latin square design, with 3 consecutive periods of 10 d each, consisting of 7 d for diet adaptation and 3 d for sample collection. Each fermenter was fed a total of 72 g of DM/d divided in 6 equal portions. Treatments were 1) alfalfa hay + calcium soaps of palm oil fatty acid (MEG; 69.3 g DM/d of alfalfa hay plus 2.7 g DM/d of calcium soaps of palm oil fatty acid), 2) alfalfa hay + FS (FLAX; 68.4 g DM/d of alfalfa hay plus 3.6 g DM/d of ground FS), and 3) alfalfa hay + CS (CHIA; 68.04 g DM/d of alfalfa hay plus 3.96 g DM/d of ground CS). Dietary treatments had similar amounts of total fat, and fat supplements were ground to 2-mm diameter. Effluents from the last 3 d of incubation were composited for analyses. Data were analyzed using the MIXED procedure of SAS. Ruminal apparent and true nutrient digestibility of all nutrients did not differ ( > 0.05) among treatments. Compared with MEG, FLAX and CHIA increased the flows of C18:3 -3, C20:4 -6, and total PUFA ( < 0.01). Both CHIA and FLAX treatments had greater ruminal concentrations of C18:0, indicating that both CS and FS fatty acids were extensively biohydrogenated in the rumen. The NH-N concentration, microbial N flow, and efficiency of microbial protein synthesis were not affected ( > 0.05) by treatments. Lastly, there were no differences ( > 0.05) among diets for total VFA concentration and molar proportions

  18. Comparison of alfalfa, birdsfoot trefoil, and cicer milkvetch in combination with 25, 50, or 75% tall fescue in a continuous-culture system

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A continuous culture experiment was performed to investigate the effects of tall fescue (TF)-to-legume ratios (TF: = 75:25, 50:50, or 25:75 on a DM basis) of 3 different TF-legume mixed diets [TF-alfalfa (TF+AF), TF-birdsfoot trefoil (TF+BT), or TF-cicer milkvetch (TF+CM)] on in vitro fermentation c...

  19. A systems biology approach to investigate the effect of pH-induced gene regulation on solvent production by Clostridium acetobutylicum in continuous culture.

    PubMed

    Haus, Sylvia; Jabbari, Sara; Millat, Thomas; Janssen, Holger; Fischer, Ralf-Jörg; Bahl, Hubert; King, John R; Wolkenhauer, Olaf

    2011-01-19

    Clostridium acetobutylicum is an anaerobic bacterium which is known for its solvent-producing capabilities, namely regarding the bulk chemicals acetone and butanol, the latter being a highly efficient biofuel. For butanol production by C. acetobutylicum to be optimized and exploited on an industrial scale, the effect of pH-induced gene regulation on solvent production by C. acetobutylicum in continuous culture must be understood as fully as possible. We present an ordinary differential equation model combining the metabolic network governing solvent production with regulation at the genetic level of the enzymes required for this process. Parameterizing the model with experimental data from continuous culture, we demonstrate the influence of pH upon fermentation products: at high pH (pH 5.7) acids are the dominant product while at low pH (pH 4.5) this switches to solvents. Through steady-state analyses of the model we focus our investigations on how alteration in gene expression of C. acetobutylicum could be exploited to increase butanol yield in a continuous culture fermentation. Incorporating gene regulation into the model of solvent production by C. acetobutylicum enables an accurate representation of the pH-induced switch to solvent production to be obtained and theoretical investigations of possible synthetic-biology approaches to be pursued. Steady-state analyses suggest that, to increase butanol yield, alterations in the expression of single solvent-associated genes are insufficient; a more complex approach targeting two or more genes is required.

  20. Effects of Static or Oscillating Dietary Crude Protein Levels on Fermentation Dynamics of Beef Cattle Diets Using a Dual-Flow Continuous Culture System

    PubMed Central

    Benedeti, Pedro Del Bianco; da Silva, Lorrayny Galoro; de Paula, Eduardo Marostegan; Monteiro, Hugo Fernando; Shenkoru, Teshome; Santos, Stefanie Alvarenga; Poulson, Simon Roger

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of increasing dietary crude protein (CP) levels and also comparing the effects of static versus oscillating dietary CP on ruminal nutrient digestibility, ruminal fermentation, nitrogen (N) metabolism, and microbial efficiency in beef cattle diets using a dual-flow continuous culture system. Eight fermenters (1,223 ± 21 mL) were used in a replicated 4 x 4 Latin square design with periods lasting 12 d each (8 d for adaptation and 4 d for sampling). Dietary treatments were: 1) 10% CP, 2) 12% CP, 3) 14% CP, and 4) 10 and 14% CP diets oscillating at 48-h intervals. Experimental diets consisted of 50% orchard hay and 50% concentrate. Fermenters were fed 72 g/d and solid and liquid dilution rates were adjusted to 5.5 and 11%/h, respectively. Data were analyzed using the MIXED procedure in SAS with α = 0.05. Apparent and true ruminal digestibilities of dry matter and organic matter were not affected (P > 0.05) by increasing dietary CP, nor by oscillating dietary CP. Total volatile fatty acids concentration and molar proportions of acetate, propionate, butyrate, valerate, iso-butyrate and iso-valerate were not affected (P > 0.05) by increasing or oscillating dietary CP. Ruminal NH3-N concentration increased linearly (P < 0.01) in response to increasing dietary CP. Total N, non-ammonia N, and rumen undegraded protein flows did not differ among treatments or between oscillating dietary CP and static 12% CP. Microbial N and NH3-N flows and microbial efficiency did not differ when comparing oscillating versus static CP (P > 0.05). However, there was a quadratic effect (P < 0.05) for these variables when dietary CP was increased. These results indicate that either ruminal microorganisms do not respond to oscillating CP levels or are capable of coping with 48-h periods of undernourishment. PMID:28036405

  1. Cultural Continuity and Change in Mexico and the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Marion J.; Barnes, Buckley R.

    Culture is the main subject of this student material for a quarter or one-semester course on a comparative study of Mexico and the United States. The ongoing processes of continuity and change in culture and their relationship are emphasized. The first chapter is devoted to the concept of culture, the total way of life of a people from language…

  2. High-speed microscopy of continuously moving cell culture vessels

    PubMed Central

    Schenk, Friedrich Walter; Brill, Nicolai; Marx, Ulrich; Hardt, Daniel; König, Niels; Schmitt, Robert

    2016-01-01

    We report a method of high-speed phase contrast and bright field microscopy which permits large cell culture vessels to be scanned at much higher speed (up to 30 times faster) than when conventional methods are used without compromising image quality. The object under investigation moves continuously and is captured using a flash illumination which creates an exposure time short enough to prevent motion blur. During the scan the object always stays in focus due to a novel hardware-autofocus system. PMID:27667637

  3. A systems biology approach to investigate the effect of pH-induced gene regulation on solvent production by Clostridium acetobutylicum in continuous culture

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Clostridium acetobutylicum is an anaerobic bacterium which is known for its solvent-producing capabilities, namely regarding the bulk chemicals acetone and butanol, the latter being a highly efficient biofuel. For butanol production by C. acetobutylicum to be optimized and exploited on an industrial scale, the effect of pH-induced gene regulation on solvent production by C. acetobutylicum in continuous culture must be understood as fully as possible. Results We present an ordinary differential equation model combining the metabolic network governing solvent production with regulation at the genetic level of the enzymes required for this process. Parameterizing the model with experimental data from continuous culture, we demonstrate the influence of pH upon fermentation products: at high pH (pH 5.7) acids are the dominant product while at low pH (pH 4.5) this switches to solvents. Through steady-state analyses of the model we focus our investigations on how alteration in gene expression of C. acetobutylicum could be exploited to increase butanol yield in a continuous culture fermentation. Conclusions Incorporating gene regulation into the model of solvent production by C. acetobutylicum enables an accurate representation of the pH-induced switch to solvent production to be obtained and theoretical investigations of possible synthetic-biology approaches to be pursued. Steady-state analyses suggest that, to increase butanol yield, alterations in the expression of single solvent-associated genes are insufficient; a more complex approach targeting two or more genes is required. PMID:21247470

  4. Anaerobic thermophilic culture system

    DOEpatents

    Ljungdahl, Lars G.; Wiegel, Jurgen K. W.

    1981-01-01

    A mixed culture system of the newly discovered microorganism Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus ATCC31550 and the microorganism Clostridium thermocellum ATCC31549 is described. In a mixed nutrient culture medium that contains cellulose, these microorganisms have been coupled and cultivated to efficiently ferment cellulose to produce recoverable quantities of ethanol under anaerobic, thermophilic conditions.

  5. Effects of Phytoecdysteroids (PEDS) Extracted from Cyanotis arachnoidea on Rumen Fermentation, Enzyme Activity and Microbial Efficiency in a Continuous-Culture System

    PubMed Central

    Li, Deyong; Zhang, Yawei; Cui, Zhenliang; He, Liwen; Chen, Wanbao; Meng, Qingxiang; Ren, Liping

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of supplementation of phytoecdysteroids (PEDS) extracted from Cyanotis arachnoidea on rumen fermentation, enzymes activity and microbial efficiency in a dual flow continuous-culture system. A single-factor experimental design was used with twelve fermenters in 4 groups with 3 replicates each. Fermenters were incubated for a total of 7 days that included first 4 days for adaptation and last 3 days for sampling. PEDS was added at levels of zero (as control), 5, 10, and 15 mg/g of the substrate (DM). The results showed that increasing supplementation levels of PEDS resulted in incremental digestibility of dry matter (DMD) (quadratic, P = 0.001) and organic matter (OMD) (quadratic, P = 0.031), but unchanged digestibility of neutral detergent fiber (NDFD), crude protein (CPD) and acid detergent acid (ADFD). As supplementation levels of PEDS increased, there were decreased response in the concentration of ammonia nitrogen (NH3-N) (linear, P = 0.015) and increased response in molar proportions of butyrate (linear, P = 0.004), but unchanged response in total volatile fatty acid (TVFA) and the molar proportion of acetate and propionate, respectively. Increasing PEDS supplementation levels decreased the ratio of acetate to propionate (linear, P = 0.038), suggesting an alteration of rumen fermentation pattern occurring due to PEDS supplementation in the diet. Supplementation of PEDS significantly increased activities of glutamate dehydrogenase (quadratic, P = 0.001), alanine dehydrogenase (quadratic, P = 0.004), glutamate synthase (linear, P = 0.038), glutamine synthetase (quadratic, P = 0.011), respectively. There were no discernible differences in the activity of carboxymethyl cellulose (CMCase), xylanase and protease regardless of the treatments. The daily production of microbial nitrogen (linear, P = 0.002) and microbial efficiency (MOEEF) (linear, P = 0.001) increased linearly as supplementation levels of PEDS

  6. Conveyor system moves material continuously

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-12-01

    German technology and equipment is used in mining operations worldwide. A PHB Wesserhutte system is being used with face shovel, mobile crusher, crawler-mounted transfer conveyor, and shiftable conveyor which results in crushing and transporting the minerals to the processing plant in a continuous flow path. The entire process is controlled by a programmable logic controller (a mini-computer) and all systems are sequentially interlocked according to the material flow path. Working methods using the mobile crusher and conveying systems are illustrated.

  7. Developing a Continuous Improvement System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-16

    Advocates for successful change methodologies generally tout their particular improvement pro-gram as the “silver bullet” process to solve all problems ...establish cooperative relationships at workplaces that have implemented a comprehensive safety and health management system. Approval into VPP is...increased productivity and reduced waste. Problems with this involve the continual costs of maintaining the processes and the lack of linking the product

  8. Continuous microbial cultures maintained by electronically-controlled device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eisler, W. J., Jr.; Webb, R. B.

    1967-01-01

    Photocell-controlled instrument maintains microbial culture. It uses commercially available chemostat glassware, provides adequate aeration through bubbling of the culture, maintains the population size and density, continuously records growth rates over small increments of time, and contains a simple, sterilizable nutrient control mechanism.

  9. Effects of propicillin on mixed continuous cultures of periodontal bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    van der Hoeven, J S; van den Kieboom, C W

    1991-01-01

    Experiments were designed to test the antibiotic (1-phenoxypropyl)penicillin (propicillin) against a complex microflora of periodontal bacteria. This was accomplished by using a continuously growing mixed culture that was obtained by enrichment of periodontal plaque in human serum. Peptostreptococcus species, Prevotella intermedia, Lactobacillus, catenaforme, and Streptococcus species were dominant members of the enrichment culture. None of the strains isolated from the enrichment culture exhibited detectable beta-lactamase activity. MICs of propicillin for the organisms ranged from 0.1 to 1.2 mg/liter. Propicillin was added to the cultures in single doses that were repeated once or twice at 24-h intervals, that is, after 2.4 volume changes of the culture vessel. Analyses done 24 h after the last addition of propicillin revealed that total cell counts of the culture were hardly affected by 1 mg of propicillin per liter, although some changes in the microbial composition occurred. The relative insusceptibility of the culture might be explained by the low growth rate. Higher concentrations (5, 10, and 50 mg/liter) of the antibiotic caused 10- to 20-fold drops in total cell counts. In these cultures P. intermedia was selectively suppressed to below the detection level, whereas other organisms that were equally susceptible to propicillin were less affected. It was concluded that mixed continuous cultures are a useful tool for studying the effects of antibiotics against the periodontal microbiota. PMID:1952836

  10. Continuous recovery system for electrorefiner system

    DOEpatents

    Williamson, Mark A.; Wiedmeyer, Stanley G.; Willit, James L.; Barnes, Laurel A.; Blaskovitz, Robert J.

    2014-06-10

    A continuous recovery system for an electrorefiner system may include a trough having a ridge portion and a furrow portion. The furrow portion may include a first section and a second section. An inlet and exit pipe may be connected to the trough. The inlet pipe may include an outlet opening that opens up to the first section of the furrow portion of the trough. The exit pipe may include an entrance opening that opens up to the second section of the furrow portion of the trough. A chain may extend through the inlet and exit pipes and along the furrow portion of the trough. The chain may be in a continuous loop form. A plurality of flights may be secured to the chain. Accordingly, the desired product may be continuously harvested from the electrorefiner system without having to halt the electrical power and/or remove the cathode and anode assemblies.

  11. Culture systems: air quality.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Theodore

    2012-01-01

    Poor laboratory air quality is a known hazard to the culture of human gametes and embryos. Embryologists and chemists have employed analytical methods for identifying and measuring bulk and select air pollutants to assess the risk they pose to the embryo culture system. However, contaminant concentrations that result in gamete or embryotoxicity are poorly defined. Combating the ill effects of poor air quality requires an understanding of how toxicants can infiltrate the laboratory, the incubator, and ultimately the culture media. A further understanding of site-specific air quality can then lead to the consideration of laboratory design and management strategies that can minimize the deleterious effects that air contamination may have on early embryonic development in vitro.

  12. Culturable prokaryotic diversity of deep, gas hydrate sediments: first use of a continuous high-pressure, anaerobic, enrichment and isolation system for subseafloor sediments (DeepIsoBUG)

    PubMed Central

    Parkes, R John; Sellek, Gerard; Webster, Gordon; Martin, Derek; Anders, Erik; Weightman, Andrew J; Sass, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    Deep subseafloor sediments may contain depressurization-sensitive, anaerobic, piezophilic prokaryotes. To test this we developed the DeepIsoBUG system, which when coupled with the HYACINTH pressure-retaining drilling and core storage system and the PRESS core cutting and processing system, enables deep sediments to be handled without depressurization (up to 25 MPa) and anaerobic prokaryotic enrichments and isolation to be conducted up to 100 MPa. Here, we describe the system and its first use with subsurface gas hydrate sediments from the Indian Continental Shelf, Cascadia Margin and Gulf of Mexico. Generally, highest cell concentrations in enrichments occurred close to in situ pressures (14 MPa) in a variety of media, although growth continued up to at least 80 MPa. Predominant sequences in enrichments were Carnobacterium, Clostridium, Marinilactibacillus and Pseudomonas, plus Acetobacterium and Bacteroidetes in Indian samples, largely independent of media and pressures. Related 16S rRNA gene sequences for all of these Bacteria have been detected in deep, subsurface environments, although isolated strains were piezotolerant, being able to grow at atmospheric pressure. Only the Clostridium and Acetobacterium were obligate anaerobes. No Archaea were enriched. It may be that these sediment samples were not deep enough (total depth 1126–1527 m) to obtain obligate piezophiles. PMID:19694787

  13. Culture of Primary Bovine Chondrocytes on a Continuously Expanding Surface Inhibits Dedifferentiation

    PubMed Central

    Rosenzweig, Derek H.; Matmati, Mourad; Khayat, Ghazaleh; Chaudhry, Sidharth; Hinz, Boris

    2012-01-01

    Expansion of autologous chondrocytes in vitro is used to generate adequate populations for cell-based therapies. However, standard (SD) culture methods cause loss of chondrocyte phenotype and dedifferentiation to fibroblast-like cells. Here, we use a novel surface expansion culture system in an effort to inhibit chondrocyte dedifferentiation. A highly elastic silicone rubber culture surface was continuously stretched over a 13-day period to 600% of its initial surface area. This maintained cells at a high density while limiting contact inhibition and reducing the need for passaging. Gene expression analysis, biochemical assays, and immunofluorescence microscopy of follow-on pellet cultures were used to characterize the results of continuous expansion (CE) culture versus SD cultures on rigid polystyrene. CE culture yielded cells with a more chondrocyte-like morphology and higher RNA-level expression of the chondrogenic markers collagen type II, aggrecan, and cartilage oligomeric matrix protein. Furthermore, the expression of collagen type I RNA and α-smooth muscle actin protein were significantly reduced, indicating suppression of fibroblastic features. Pellet cultures from CE chondrocytes contained more sulphated glycosaminoglycan and collagen type II than pellets from SD culture. Additional control cultures on static (unexpanded) silicone (SS culture) indicated that benefits of CE culture were partially due to features of the culture surface itself and partially due to the reduced passaging which that surface enabled through CE. Chondrocytes grown in CE culture may, therefore, be a superior source for cell-based therapies. PMID:22738340

  14. Culture of primary bovine chondrocytes on a continuously expanding surface inhibits dedifferentiation.

    PubMed

    Rosenzweig, Derek H; Matmati, Mourad; Khayat, Ghazaleh; Chaudhry, Sidharth; Hinz, Boris; Quinn, Thomas M

    2012-12-01

    Expansion of autologous chondrocytes in vitro is used to generate adequate populations for cell-based therapies. However, standard (SD) culture methods cause loss of chondrocyte phenotype and dedifferentiation to fibroblast-like cells. Here, we use a novel surface expansion culture system in an effort to inhibit chondrocyte dedifferentiation. A highly elastic silicone rubber culture surface was continuously stretched over a 13-day period to 600% of its initial surface area. This maintained cells at a high density while limiting contact inhibition and reducing the need for passaging. Gene expression analysis, biochemical assays, and immunofluorescence microscopy of follow-on pellet cultures were used to characterize the results of continuous expansion (CE) culture versus SD cultures on rigid polystyrene. CE culture yielded cells with a more chondrocyte-like morphology and higher RNA-level expression of the chondrogenic markers collagen type II, aggrecan, and cartilage oligomeric matrix protein. Furthermore, the expression of collagen type I RNA and α-smooth muscle actin protein were significantly reduced, indicating suppression of fibroblastic features. Pellet cultures from CE chondrocytes contained more sulphated glycosaminoglycan and collagen type II than pellets from SD culture. Additional control cultures on static (unexpanded) silicone (SS culture) indicated that benefits of CE culture were partially due to features of the culture surface itself and partially due to the reduced passaging which that surface enabled through CE. Chondrocytes grown in CE culture may, therefore, be a superior source for cell-based therapies.

  15. Manuals of Cultural Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballonoff, Paul

    2014-10-01

    Ethnography often studies social networks including empirical descriptions of marriages and families. We initially concentrate on a special subset of networks which we call configurations. We show that descriptions of the possible outcomes of viable histories form a manual, and an orthoalgebra. We then study cases where family sizes vary, and show that this also forms a manual. In fact, it demonstrates adiabatic invariance, a property often associated with physical system conservation laws, and which here expresses conservation of the viability of a cultural system.

  16. Continuous and semi-continuous cell culture for production of blood clotting factors.

    PubMed

    Desai, Sunil G

    2015-11-10

    Recombinant clotting factors are important biotherapeutics that Pfizer has produced and marketed for over fifteen years. Owing to the complexity of the structure and function of these blood factors, it can be challenging to achieve the required product quality and manufacturing productivity. The article highlights the semi-continuous and continuous cell culture processes employed by Pfizer for the production of BeneFIX and ReFacto AF. The benefits of such processes, the challenges of maintaining an aseptic production culture for extended periods, and batch definition are discussed in this article. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. The effects of a garlic oil chemical compound, propyl-propane thiosulfonate, on ruminal fermentation and fatty acid outflow in a dual-flow continuous culture system.

    PubMed

    Foskolos, A; Siurana, A; Rodriquez-Prado, M; Ferret, A; Bravo, D; Calsamiglia, S

    2015-08-01

    The ban on the use of antibiotics as growth promoters in animal feeds in the European Union has stimulated research on potential alternatives. Recently, propyl-propane thiosulfonate (PTSO), a stable organosulfurate compound of garlic, was purified. The objectives of the current study were to investigate the potential effects of PTSO on rumen microbial fermentation and to define effective doses. Two experiments were conducted using dual-flow continuous culture fermenters in 2 replicated periods. Each experimental period consisted of 5 d for adaptation of the ruminal fluid and 3 d for sampling. Temperature (39°C), pH (6.4), and liquid (0.10 h(-1)) and solid (0.05 h(-1)) dilution rates were maintained constant. Samples were taken 2 h after feeding and from the 24-h effluent. Samples were analyzed for volatile fatty acids (VFA) and nitrogen fractions, and degradation of nutrients was calculated. In addition, 24-h effluents from experiment 2 were analyzed for their fatty acid (FA) profile. Treatments in experiment 1 included a negative control without additive, a positive control with monensin (12mg/L), and PTSO at 30 and 300mg/L. The addition of 30mg/L did not affect any of the measurements tested. The addition of 300mg/L reduced microbial fermentation, as suggested by the decreased total VFA concentration, true degradation of organic matter and acid detergent fiber, and a tendency to decrease neutral detergent fiber degradation. Experiment 2 was conducted to test increasing doses of PTSO (0, 50, 100, and 150mg/L) on rumen microbial fermentation. At 2 h postfeeding, total VFA and molar proportion of propionate responded quadratically, with higher values in the intermediate doses. Molar proportions of butyrate increased and branched-chain VFA decreased linearly as the dose of PTSO increased. In the 24-h effluents, total VFA, acetate, and branched-chain VFA concentrations decreased linearly and those of propionate responded cubically with the highest value at 100mg

  18. Kinetic Study of Acetone-Butanol-Ethanol Fermentation in Continuous Culture.

    PubMed

    Buehler, Edward A; Mesbah, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation by clostridia has shown promise for industrial-scale production of biobutanol. However, the continuous ABE fermentation suffers from low product yield, titer, and productivity. Systems analysis of the continuous ABE fermentation will offer insights into its metabolic pathway as well as into optimal fermentation design and operation. For the ABE fermentation in continuous Clostridium acetobutylicum culture, this paper presents a kinetic model that includes the effects of key metabolic intermediates and enzymes as well as culture pH, product inhibition, and glucose inhibition. The kinetic model is used for elucidating the behavior of the ABE fermentation under the conditions that are most relevant to continuous cultures. To this end, dynamic sensitivity analysis is performed to systematically investigate the effects of culture conditions, reaction kinetics, and enzymes on the dynamics of the ABE production pathway. The analysis provides guidance for future metabolic engineering and fermentation optimization studies.

  19. Kinetic Study of Acetone-Butanol-Ethanol Fermentation in Continuous Culture

    PubMed Central

    Buehler, Edward A.; Mesbah, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation by clostridia has shown promise for industrial-scale production of biobutanol. However, the continuous ABE fermentation suffers from low product yield, titer, and productivity. Systems analysis of the continuous ABE fermentation will offer insights into its metabolic pathway as well as into optimal fermentation design and operation. For the ABE fermentation in continuous Clostridium acetobutylicum culture, this paper presents a kinetic model that includes the effects of key metabolic intermediates and enzymes as well as culture pH, product inhibition, and glucose inhibition. The kinetic model is used for elucidating the behavior of the ABE fermentation under the conditions that are most relevant to continuous cultures. To this end, dynamic sensitivity analysis is performed to systematically investigate the effects of culture conditions, reaction kinetics, and enzymes on the dynamics of the ABE production pathway. The analysis provides guidance for future metabolic engineering and fermentation optimization studies. PMID:27486663

  20. A self-feeding roller bottle for continuous cell culture.

    PubMed

    Berson, R Eric; Friederichs, Goetz

    2008-01-01

    The concept of a self-feeding roller bottle that delivers a continuous supply of fresh media to cells in culture, which is mechanically simplistic and works with existing roller apparatuses, is presented here. A conventional roller bottle is partitioned into two chambers; one chamber contains the fresh culture media reservoir, and the other contains the cell culture chamber. A spiroid of tubing inside the fresh media reservoir acts as a pump when the bottle rotates on its horizontal axis, continuously delivering fresh media through an opening in the partition to the cell culture chamber. The modified bottle proved capable of maintaining steady-state cell densities of a hybridoma cell line over the 10-day period tested, although at lower densities than reached during batch operation due to the continuous volume dilution. Steady-state density proved to be controllable by adjusting the perfusion rate, which changes with the rotation rate of the bottle. Specific antibody production rate is as much as 3.7 times the rate in conventional roller bottles operating with intermittent batch feeding.

  1. Continuous Approximations of a Class of Piecewise Continuous Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danca, Marius-F.

    In this paper, we provide a rigorous mathematical foundation for continuous approximations of a class of systems with piecewise continuous functions. By using techniques from the theory of differential inclusions, the underlying piecewise functions can be locally or globally approximated. The approximation results can be used to model piecewise continuous-time dynamical systems of integer or fractional-order. In this way, by overcoming the lack of numerical methods for differential equations of fractional-order with discontinuous right-hand side, unattainable procedures for systems modeled by this kind of equations, such as chaos control, synchronization, anticontrol and many others, can be easily implemented. Several examples are presented and three comparative applications are studied.

  2. Culture and Social Systems Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parsons, Talcott

    1972-01-01

    A brief statement of the history of the relation between culture concepts is given, then, proceeding on the assumption that all human societies are interpenetrated with culture, the author attempts a relatively systematic outline of the structure of cultural systems and of their modes of articulation in social systems. (JB)

  3. Culture and Social Systems Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parsons, Talcott

    1972-01-01

    A brief statement of the history of the relation between culture concepts is given, then, proceeding on the assumption that all human societies are interpenetrated with culture, the author attempts a relatively systematic outline of the structure of cultural systems and of their modes of articulation in social systems. (JB)

  4. Degradation of phenol by Pseudomonas putida ATCC 11172 in continuous culture at different ratios of biofilm surface to culture volume

    SciTech Connect

    Molin, G.; Nilsson, I.

    1985-10-01

    Pseudomonas putida ATCC 11172 was grown in continuous culture with phenol as the only carbon and energy source; a culture practically without biofilm was compared with biofilm cultures of differing surface area/volume ratios. The biofilm did not significantly affect the maximal suspended cell concentration in the effluent, but it increased the maximal phenol reduction rate from 0.23 g/liter per h (without biofilm) to 0.72 g/liter per h at the highest biofilm level (5.5 cm/sup 2/ of biofilm surface per ml of reactor volume). The increase in phenol reduction rate was linear up to the surface area/volume ratio of 1.4 cm/sup 2//ml. The continuous cultures with biofilms could tolerate a higher phenol concentration of the medium (3.0 g/liter) than the nonbiofilm system (2.5 g/liter). At higher dilution rates an intermediate product, 2-hydroxymuconic semialdehyde, accumulated in the culture. When the biomass of the effluent started to decrease, the concentration of 2-hydroxymuconic semialdehyde, accumulated in the culture. When the biomass of the effluent started to decrease, the concentration of 2-hydroxymuconic semialdehyde reached a peak value. The authors conclude that biofilms in continuous culture have the potential to enhance the aerobic degradation of aromatic compounds.

  5. Mixed-Culture Interactions I. Commensalism of Proteus vulgaris with Saccharomyces cerevisiae in Continuous Culture

    PubMed Central

    Shindala, Adnan; Bungay, Henry R.; Krieg, Noel R.; Culbert, Kathleen

    1965-01-01

    Shindala, Adnan (Virginia Polytechnic Institute, Blacksburg), Henry R. Bungay III, Noel R. Krieg, and Kathleen Culbert. Mixed-culture interactions. I. Commensalism of Proteus vulgaris with Saccharomyces cerevisiae in continuous culture. J. Bacteriol. 89:693–696. 1965.—A chemically defined medium was selected which supported the growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, but not Proteus vulgaris, in pure culture; however, P. vulgaris grew in mixed culture with the yeast. Steady-state populations of each organism in mixed culture at various dilution rates were enumerated with a Coulter electronic counter. The size differences in the organisms permitted easy resolution. An essential niacinlike factor elaborated by the yeast and required by the bacterium caused a dependence of the bacterium on the growth of the yeast. At high dilution rates causing wash-out, the bacterial population continued to reflect changes in the numbers of yeast. The numbers of S. cerevisiae were identical in pure culture or in mixed culture; thus, the interaction is a true commensalism. A single addition of niacin or related compound was made to a steady-state mixed culture, and the dependence of the bacterium on the yeast was upset. The numbers of the bacteria rose, causing a decrease in the yeast population, until continued pumping diluted the added niacin and restored the initial steady state. PMID:14273647

  6. On exchangeable continuous variable systems

    SciTech Connect

    Koenig, Robert; Wolf, Michael M.

    2009-01-15

    We investigate permutation-invariant continuous variable quantum states and their covariance matrices. We provide a complete characterization of the latter with respect to permutation invariance and exchangeability and representing convex combinations of tensor power states. On the level of the respective density operators this leads to necessary criteria for all these properties which become necessary and sufficient for Gaussian states. For these we use the derived results to provide de Finetti-type theorems for various distance measures.

  7. The Fate of Hexahydro-1,3,5-Trinitro-1,3,5-Triazine (RDX) and Related Compounds in Anaerobic Denitrifying Continuous Culture Systems Using Simulated Waste Water.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-07-01

    One Type-FL system was set up containing 20% alkaline -hydrolyzed sludge . The kinetics of disappearance of the four compounds are seen in Fig. 17 and...values. It is apparent that alkaline hydrolysis does not promote the efficiency of the system as well as the use of acid-hydrolyzed sludge . The system...System Hydrolyzed Sludge Experiments 18 Basal Salts-Methanol Studies 28 Sediment Studies 28 DISCUSSION 41 CONCLUSIONS 43 REFERENCES 44 vb ’-p. -. .v

  8. Phenotypic plasticity in heterotrophic marine microbial communities in continuous cultures

    PubMed Central

    Beier, Sara; Rivers, Adam R; Moran, Mary Ann; Obernosterer, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    Phenotypic plasticity (PP) is the development of alternate phenotypes of a given taxon as an adaptation to environmental conditions. Methodological limitations have restricted the quantification of PP to the measurement of a few traits in single organisms. We used metatranscriptomic libraries to overcome these challenges and estimate PP using the expressed genes of multiple heterotrophic organisms as a proxy for traits in a microbial community. The metatranscriptomes captured the expression response of natural marine bacterial communities grown on differing carbon resource regimes in continuous cultures. We found that taxa with different magnitudes of PP coexisted in the same cultures, and that members of the order Rhodobacterales had the highest levels of PP. In agreement with previous studies, our results suggest that continuous culturing may have specifically selected for taxa featuring a rather high range of PP. On average, PP and abundance changes within a taxon contributed equally to the organism's change in functional gene abundance, implying that both PP and abundance mediated observed differences in community function. However, not all functional changes due to PP were directly reflected in the bulk community functional response: gene expression changes in individual taxa due to PP were partly masked by counterbalanced expression of the same gene in other taxa. This observation demonstrates that PP had a stabilizing effect on a community's functional response to environmental change. PMID:25397947

  9. The Genotypic and Phenotypic Stability of Plasmodium falciparum Field Isolates in Continuous In Vitro Culture

    PubMed Central

    Yeda, Redemptah; Ingasia, Luicer A.; Cheruiyot, Agnes C.; Okudo, Charles; Chebon, Lorna J.; Cheruiyot, Jelagat; Akala, Hoseah M.; Kamau, Edwin

    2016-01-01

    The Plasmodium falciparum in vitro culture system is critical for genotypic and phenotypic analyses of the parasites. For genotypic analysis, the genomic DNA can be obtained directly from the patient blood sample or from culture adapted parasites whereas for phenotypic analysis, immediate ex vivo or in vitro culture adapted parasites are used. However, parasite biology studies have not investigated whether culture adaptation process affects genotypic and/or phenotypic characteristics of the parasites in short- or long-term cultures. Here, we set out to study the dynamics and stability of parasite genetic and phenotypic profiles as field isolate parasites were adapted in continuous cultures. Parasites collected from three different patients presenting with uncomplicated malaria were adapted and maintained in drug-free continuous cultures. Aliquots from the continuous cultures were collected every 24–48 hours for analyses. Each aliquot was treated as a separate parasite sample. For genetic analysis, microsatellite (MS) typing and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analyses of 23 drug resistance markers were done. The 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50) for some of the samples were also established for four antimalarial drugs. Samples from each patient (parasite-line) were compared as they were passed through the continuous culture. Data revealed genotypic and phenotypic profiles for the three parasite-lines fluctuated from one generation to the next with no specific pattern or periodicity. With few exceptions, multilocus analysis revealed samples from each parasite-line had high genetic diversity with unique haplotypes. Interestingly, changes in MS and SNP profiles occurred simultaneously. The difference in the IC50s of samples in each parasite-line reached statistical significance. However, phenotypic changes did not correspond or correlate to genotypic changes. Our study revealed parasite genetic and phenotypic characteristics fluctuates in short- and long

  10. Enterotoxin production by Vibrio cholerae and Vibrio mimicus grown in continuous culture with microbial cell recycle.

    PubMed Central

    Spira, W M; Fedorka-Cray, P J

    1983-01-01

    We have examined the effect of complete cell recycle on the production of cholera toxin (CT) by Vibrio cholerae and CT-like toxin by Vibrio mimicus in continuous culture fermentations. Complete cell recycle was obtained by filtering culture fluids through Amicon hollow fibers with an exclusion limit of 100,000 daltons (H1P100-20) and returning the concentrated cell slurry to the fermentor. A single 1-liter laboratory fermentor system modified with this recycle loop was capable of producing over 20 liters of cell-free culture filtrate per day. Toxin production in this system was compared with yields obtained in traditional continuous cultures and in shake flask cultures. Yields of CT from V. cholerae 569B in the recycle fermentor were highest at the highest dilution rate employed (1.0 vol/vol per h). The use of complete cell recycle dramatically increased yields over those obtained in continuous culture and equaled those obtained in shake flasks. The concentration of CT in the filtrate was slightly less than half of that measured in culture fluids sampled at the same time. Similarly, V. mimicus 61892 grown in the presence of 50 micrograms of lincomycin per ml produced 280 ng of CT per ml in the recycle fermentor, compared with 210 ng/ml in shake flasks under optimal conditions. The sterile filtrate from this fermentation contained 110 ng/ml. PMID:6357081

  11. Continuous coarse ash depressurization system

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Guohai; Peng, Wan Wang; Vimalchand, Pannalal

    2012-11-13

    A system for depressurizing and cooling a high pressure, high temperature dense phase solids stream having coarse solid particles with entrained gas therein. In one aspect, the system has an apparatus for at least partially depressurizing and cooling the high pressure, high temperature dense phase solids stream having gas entrained therein and a pressure letdown device for further depressurization and separating cooled coarse solid particles from a portion of the entrained gas, resulting in a lower temperature, lower pressure outlet of solid particles for downstream processing or discharge to a storage silo for future use and/or disposal. There are no moving parts in the flow path of the solids stream in the system.

  12. Continuous fine ash depressurization system

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Guohai [Birmingham, AL; Peng, Wan Wang [Birmingham, AL; Vimalchand, Pannalal [Birmingham, AL

    2011-11-29

    A system for depressurizing and cooling a high pressure, high temperature fine solid particles stream having entrained gas therein. In one aspect, the system has an apparatus for cooling the high pressure, high temperature fine solid particles stream having entrained gas therein and a pressure letdown device for depressurization by separating the cooled fine solid particles from a portion of the fine solid particles stream having entrained gas therein, resulting in a lower temperature, lower pressure outlet of solid particles for disposal or handling by downstream equipment.

  13. Continuous Culture of Ruminal Microorganisms in Chemically Defined Medium1

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Loyd Y.; Burroughs, Wise; Christiansen, William C.

    1962-01-01

    Ruminal ciliates have been grown in continuous culture in chemically defined media and in the absence of viable bacteria. Oligotrichic ruminal ciliates seem to require insoluble carbohydrates for growth; the holotrichic ciliates require soluble carbohydrates, but at low concentrations. Both groups of ciliates utilize amino acids as their principal nitrogen source when these are supplied in micromolar concentrations; at millimolar concentrations, amino acids are toxic, possibly from excessive ammonia formation arising from ciliate deaminase activity. Holotrichic ruminal ciliates are destroyed by overdeposition of amylopectin when glucose is present above 0.1% concentration in the medium. Ecological requirements of ruminal ciliates are also described. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 PMID:13972780

  14. Risk reduction and TQM: A corporate culture of continuous improvement

    SciTech Connect

    Nau, D.C. )

    1992-01-01

    A company supplying products and services to the nuclear industry that implements a cultural commitment to continuous improvement, in addition to providing higher quality products and services, also represents a significant reduction in operational risk to that industry. The implementation of a culture of total quality management (TQM), initiated by Sorrento Electronics (SE) in 1989, involves total commitment to the basic TQM principles: continuous improvement, people performing the work are the best sources of how to do it better, and employees must be empowered to make the improvements. What this means to the nuclear industry is a significant reduction in operational risk through: (1) products based on simpler, standardized, proven designs with established operational track records, enhancing confidence that they will perform as expected; (2) the highest confidence that products and supporting documentation are delivered with zero defects; (3) critical power plant schedules can be supported through the shortest possible equipment delivery times; (4) highly motivated employees with extremely positive attitudes, working together in cross-functional teams, virtually eliminate the possibility of deliberate product tampering or sabotage.

  15. Enteric methane production and ruminal fermentation from forage brassica diets fed in continuous culture

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Brassicas provide forage for livestock during the late fall when traditional perennial cool-season forages are not productive. However, little research exists on ruminal fermentation and methane(CH4) production of brassicas fed as forage. A continuous culture fermentor system was used to assess nutr...

  16. Effect of Protein Supplementation on Ruminal Digestion of Herbage during Continuous Culture Fermentation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Preliminary data suggests that level of crude protein (CP) supplementation may direct species selection in mixed species pastures by grazing ruminants through post-ingestive feedback of ruminal by-products. A dual-flow continuous culture fermenter system was used to investigate the effect of increas...

  17. Effect of summer annuals on ruminal fermentation and methane output in continuous culture

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Summer annuals (SA) provide forage during the summer “forage slump”, yet research on ruminal fermentation and CH4 output of SA is lacking. A 4-unit, dual-flow continuous culture fermentor system was used to assess nutrient digestibility, VFA production, bacterial protein synthesis, and CH4 output of...

  18. Microbial ecophysiology of whey biomethanation: comparison of carbon transformation parameters, species composition, and starter culture performance in continuous culture.

    PubMed

    Chartrain, M; Bhatnagar, L; Zeikus, J G

    1987-05-01

    Changes in lactose concentration and feed rate altered bacterial growth and population levels in a whey-processing chemostat. The bacterial population and methane production levels increased in relation to increased lactose concentrations comparable to those in raw whey (6%) and converted over 96% of the substrate to methane, carbon dioxide, and cells. Sequential increases in the chemostat dilution rate demonstrated excellent biomethanation performance at retention times as low as 25 h. Retention times shorter than 25 h caused prevalent bacterial populations and methane production to decrease, and intermediary carbon metabolites accumulated in the following order: acetate, butyrate, propionate, lactate, ethanol, and lactose. Bacterial species dominated in the chemostat as a function of their enhanced substrate uptake and growth kinetic properties. The substrate uptake kinetic properties displayed by the mixed chemostat population were equivalent to those of individual species measured in pure culture, whereas the growth kinetic properties of species in mixed culture were better than those measured in pure culture. A designed starter culture consisting of Leuconostoc mesenteroides, Desulfovibrio vulgaris, Methanosarcina barkeri, and Methanobacterium formicicum displayed biomethanation performance, which was similar to that of a diverse adapted mixed-culture inoculum, in a continuous contact digestor system to which 10 g of dry whey per liter was added. Preserved starter cultures were developed and used as inocula for the start-up of a continuous anaerobic digestion process that was effective for biomethanation of raw whey at a retention time of 100 h.

  19. Mass algal culture system

    DOEpatents

    Raymond, Lawrence P.

    1982-01-01

    An apparatus and process for the culture of algae in a liquid medium is disclosed. The medium circulates through an open trough and is exposed to an atmosphere which is temperature regulated. The nutrient content of the liquid medium is regulated to control the chemical composition growth and reproduction characteristics of the cultured algae. Before it is allowed to strike the medium, sunlight is passed through a filter to remove wavelengths which are not photosynthetically active. Heat energy can be recovered from the filter.

  20. Mass algal culture system

    DOEpatents

    Raymond, Lawrence P.

    1981-01-01

    An apparatus and process for the culture of algae in a liquid medium is disclosed. The medium circulates through an open trough and is exposed to an atmosphere which is temperature regulated. The nutrient content of the liquid medium is regulated to control the chemical composition growth and reproduction characteristics of the cultured algae. Before it is allowed to strike the medium, sunlight is passed through a filter to remove wavelengths which are not photosynthetically active. Heat energy can be recovered from the filter.

  1. In-situ continuous water monitoring system

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, Cyril V.; Wise, Marcus B.

    1998-01-01

    An in-situ continuous liquid monitoring system for continuously analyzing volatile components contained in a water source comprises: a carrier gas supply, an extraction container and a mass spectrometer. The carrier gas supply continuously supplies the carrier gas to the extraction container and is mixed with a water sample that is continuously drawn into the extraction container by the flow of carrier gas into the liquid directing device. The carrier gas continuously extracts the volatile components out of the water sample. The water sample is returned to the water source after the volatile components are extracted from it. The extracted volatile components and the carrier gas are delivered continuously to the mass spectrometer and the volatile components are continuously analyzed by the mass spectrometer.

  2. In-situ continuous water monitoring system

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, C.V.; Wise, M.B.

    1998-03-31

    An in-situ continuous liquid monitoring system for continuously analyzing volatile components contained in a water source comprises: a carrier gas supply, an extraction container and a mass spectrometer. The carrier gas supply continuously supplies the carrier gas to the extraction container and is mixed with a water sample that is continuously drawn into the extraction container by the flow of carrier gas into the liquid directing device. The carrier gas continuously extracts the volatile components out of the water sample. The water sample is returned to the water source after the volatile components are extracted from it. The extracted volatile components and the carrier gas are delivered continuously to the mass spectrometer and the volatile components are continuously analyzed by the mass spectrometer. 2 figs.

  3. Conveyor system for a continuous mining machine

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, J.C.

    1981-07-07

    A conveyor gathering system suitable for use with a continuous narrow seam mining machine is disclosed. The system is a single continuous conveyor extending from the auger or cutting head to the rear or discharge end of the machine and is particularly useful with a dozer gathering head. Conveying of the mined material is achieved by an endless conveyor comprised of ''flight bars'' attached at each end to two drive chains. The single continuous conveyor is driven from the rear of the mining machine , may pivot up and down, and makes a very small diameter, 180 degree turn around, at the front of the mining machine adjacent the auger or cutting head. Because the conveying system uses a single continuous system of flight bars, the tensions on the conveyor can be significantly reduced such that the conveyor drive motor can be selected having a work capacity less than one half of other systems.

  4. High density cell culture system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaulding, Glenn F. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An annular culture vessel for growing mammalian cells is constructed in a one piece integral and annular configuration with an open end which is closed by an endcap. The culture vessel is rotatable about a horizontal axis by use of conventional roller systems commonly used in culture laboratories. The end wall of the endcap has tapered access ports to frictionally and sealingly receive the ends of hypodermic syringes. The syringes permit the introduction of fresh nutrient and withdrawal of spent nutrients. The walls are made of conventional polymeric cell culture material and are subjected to neutron bombardment to form minute gas permeable perforations in the walls.

  5. A novel parallel shaken bioreactor system for continuous operation.

    PubMed

    Akgün, Ali; Maier, Bernd; Preis, Diana; Roth, Birthe; Klingelhöfer, Renata; Büchs, Jochen

    2004-01-01

    A novel continuous bioreactor system was developed as a shaken culture vessel for the investigation of the growth kinetics and product formation of microorganisms in milliscale. The novel bioreactor system mainly consists of a specially designed 250-mL shake flask with two inlets, one for gas supply and one for medium supply, and one combined outlet on the side of flask for exhaust gas and culture liquid. As a result of the circulating motion of the fermentation broth in the shake flask, the maximum liquid height reaches the edge of the outlet and the fermentation broth is accelerated into the outlet by centrifugal force. Additionally, the excess fermentation broth leaving the culture vessel is continuously driven by the exhaust gas. Because of the small scale and the simple handling it is possible to operate many of these shaken bioreactor vessels simultaneously. By using parallel vessels operated at different dilution rates on the same shaker, the data for a complete biomass over dilution rate (X-D) diagram of a biological culture can be evaluated in an efficient manner, thus saving money, materials, and time. Continuous fermentations of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae H1022 (ATCC 32167) in the shaken bioreactor system and in a conventional stirred tank fermentor showed very similar results.

  6. The effects of cyanide on the growth and respiration of Enterobacter aerogenes in continuous culture.

    PubMed

    Porter, N; Drozd, J W; Linton, J D

    1983-01-01

    The effect of cyanide on the physiology of lactate- and oxygen-limited Enterobacter aerogenes NCTC 10336 was studied in chemostat culture (D = 0.1 h-1). In the absence of cyanide, the molar growth yield from oxygen (YO2) under oxygen limitation was 60% of the carbon-limited value. A similar decrease in yield was observed in a lactate-limited culture (excess oxygen) which was continuously fed low concentrations of potassium cyanide. The cultures with the lower growth yields possessed respiratory systems less sensitive to inhibition by cyanide. This was particularly marked in cultures grown in the presence of cyanide. Increased cyanide resistance was associated with an increase in the concentration of a cytochrome oxidase tentatively identified as a d-type and the appearance of additional cytochromes tentatively identified as b-type.

  7. Continuous perfusion microfluidic cell culture array for high-throughput cell-based assays.

    PubMed

    Hung, Paul J; Lee, Philip J; Sabounchi, Poorya; Lin, Robert; Lee, Luke P

    2005-01-05

    We present for the first time a microfluidic cell culture array for long-term cellular monitoring. The 10 x 10 array could potentially assay 100 different cell-based experiments in parallel. The device was designed to integrate the processes used in typical cell culture experiments on a single self-contained microfluidic system. Major functions include repeated cell growth/passage cycles, reagent introduction, and real-time optical analysis. The single unit of the array consists of a circular microfluidic chamber, multiple narrow perfusion channels surrounding the main chamber, and four ports for fluidic access. Human carcinoma (HeLa) cells were cultured inside the device with continuous perfusion of medium at 37 degrees C. The observed doubling time was 1.4 +/- 0.1 days with a peak cell density of approximately 2.5*10(5) cells/cm(2). Cell assay was demonstrated by monitoring the fluorescence localization of calcein AM from 1 min to 10 days after reagent introduction. Confluent cell cultures were passaged within the microfluidic chambers using trypsin and successfully regrown, suggesting a stable culture environment suitable for continuous operation. The cell culture array could offer a platform for a wide range of assays with applications in drug screening, bioinformatics, and quantitative cell biology. (c) 2004 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Simulation of a continuous lignite excavation system

    SciTech Connect

    Michalakopoulos, T.N.; Arvaniti, S.E.; Panagiotou, G.N.

    2005-07-01

    A discrete-event simulation model using the GPSS/H simulation language has been developed for a excavation system at a multi- level terrace mine. The continuous excavation system consists of five bucket wheel excavators and a network of 22 km of belt conveyors. Ways of dealing with the continuous material flow and frequent changes of material type are considered. The principal model output variables are production and arrival rate at the transfer point of mineral and waste. Animation and comparison with previous production data have been used to validate the model. 14 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  9. An action research study; cultural differences impact how manufacturing organizations receive continuous improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kattman, Braden R.

    National culture and organizational culture impact how continuous improvement methods are received, implemented and deployed by suppliers. Previous research emphasized the dominance of national culture over organizational culture. The countries studied included Poland, Mexico, China, Taiwan, South Korea, Estonia, India, Canada, the United States, the United Kingdom, and Japan. The research found that Canada was most receptive to continuous improvement, with China being the least receptive. The study found that organizational culture was more influential than national culture. Isomorphism and benchmarking is driving continuous-improvement language and methods to be more universally known within business. Business and management practices are taking precedence in driving change within organizations.

  10. Quantitative high-throughput population dynamics in continuous-culture by automated microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Merritt, Jason; Kuehn, Seppe

    2016-01-01

    We present a high-throughput method to measure abundance dynamics in microbial communities sustained in continuous-culture. Our method uses custom epi-fluorescence microscopes to automatically image single cells drawn from a continuously-cultured population while precisely controlling culture conditions. For clonal populations of Escherichia coli our instrument reveals history-dependent resilience and growth rate dependent aggregation. PMID:27616752

  11. Combination of extractive solvent addition and immobilization culture for continuous production of scopoletin by tobacco cells.

    PubMed

    Iizuka, Yasuhiro; Kato, Ryohei; Shibasaki-Kitakawa, Naomi; Yonemoto, Toshikuni

    2005-01-01

    Extractive solvent addition was combined with immobilization cultures of Nicotiana tabacum cells to produce scopoletin. Using various solvents, the partition coefficients of scopoletin between the solvent and water phases and the solvent toxicity to the cell viability were investigated. The effect of the solvent addition on cell growth and scopoletin production was elucidated in the suspension cultures. Coconut oil, one of the natural vegetable oils, was selected as the most suitable extractive solvent. The cells were immobilized in the calcium alginate gel bead coated with a cell-free gel film and then the batch cultures with the addition of various volumes of the coconut oil were performed. The total scopoletin production increased with the solvent volume according to the amount of scopoletin transferred from the medium to the solvent. The maximum productivity obtained in the batch immobilization cultures was about 16 times larger than that in the suspension culture without solvent. A continuous production system, in which the fresh solvent was supplied to the culture system and the solvent containing scopoletin was recovered from it, was constructed. The integrated scopoletin production in the effluent oil attained 2.21 mg/gDCW for 30 days at 100 cm(3)/day without cell leakage.

  12. Layered Polymeric Optical Systems Using Continuous Coextrusion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    nonlinear fashion in order to achieve the desired output. Examples of both an imaging and non-imaging system designed with spherical GRIN lenses will...Weder, C. "Continuous melt processing of all-polymer distributed feedback lasers." J. Mater. Chem. DOI:10.1039/b909348f (2009). [31] Dowling , J. P

  13. Photoelectric system continuously monitors liquid level

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Immersion probe presents a depth-sensitive optical transmission path between a light source and a photoelectric cell to continuously monitor the level of a transparent liquid in a tank. This system operates automatically, without moving parts, and provides output signals to a remote recorder.

  14. Shuttle-Car System for Continuous Mining

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, E. R., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Buffer storage catches coal production between loadings. Telescoping reservoir filled continuously. With tailgate down, shuttle car slides into place along sides and bottom of reservoir. Reservoir retracts along inside of car and out through tailgate, leaving coal behind in car. System not restricted to coal mining and may prove economical for hauling other solid materials.

  15. Trypanosoma acomys (Wenyon, 1909): continuous culturing with a mouse fibroblast cell-line (A9).

    PubMed

    Abdallah, M A; Abdel-Hafez, S K; al-Yaman, F M

    1990-01-01

    The continuous culturing of Trypanosoma acomys in the presence of a murine areolar-adipose cell line (A9) was possible for the 1st time. The trypanosomes were cultured at 37 degrees C with A9 in DMEM supplemented with 20% heat inactivated fetal bovine serum, using an initial inoculum from primary cultures of lung or blood clots from infected spiny mice. The cultures were maintained for 115 days and underwent 15 passages before termination and cryopreservation. Using this culture system T. acomys subcultures were initiated from 3 different initial inocula (3 x 10(4), 1.5 x 10(5) and 7.4 x 10(5) parasites/ml) and growth curves revealed that the lowest inoculum gave the best growth pattern. This inoculum yielded a population doubling time of less than 12 h for 4 days, a high peak density of 7 x 10(6) parasites/ml and the most gradual decline compared to the other 2 inocula. Rosetting epimastigotes and nests of amastigotes were observed in close association with the feeder layer cells. Epimastigotes were the most predominant form in culture supernatants but other morphological forms observed included trypomastigotes and sphaeromastigotes.

  16. Cultural Consensus Theory: Aggregating Continuous Responses in a Finite Interval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batchelder, William H.; Strashny, Alex; Romney, A. Kimball

    Cultural consensus theory (CCT) consists of cognitive models for aggregating responses of "informants" to test items about some domain of their shared cultural knowledge. This paper develops a CCT model for items requiring bounded numerical responses, e.g. probability estimates, confidence judgments, or similarity judgments. The model assumes that each item generates a latent random representation in each informant, with mean equal to the consensus answer and variance depending jointly on the informant and the location of the consensus answer. The manifest responses may reflect biases of the informants. Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods were used to estimate the model, and simulation studies validated the approach. The model was applied to an existing cross-cultural dataset involving native Japanese and English speakers judging the similarity of emotion terms. The results sharpened earlier studies that showed that both cultures appear to have very similar cognitive representations of emotion terms.

  17. Metabolism of lactose by Clostridium thermolacticum growing in continuous culture.

    PubMed

    Collet, Christophe; Girbal, Laurence; Péringer, Paul; Schwitzguébel, Jean-Paul; Soucaille, Philippe

    2006-06-01

    The objective of the present study was to characterize the metabolism of Clostridium thermolacticum, a thermophilic anaerobic bacterium, growing continuously on lactose (10 g l(-1)) and to determine the enzymes involved in the pathways leading to the formation of the fermentation products. Biomass and metabolites concentration were measured at steady-state for different dilution rates, from 0.013 to 0.19 h(-1). Acetate, ethanol, hydrogen and carbon dioxide were produced at all dilution rates, whereas lactate was detected only for dilution rates below 0.06 h(-1). The presence of several key enzymes involved in lactose metabolism, including beta-galactosidase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase, acetate kinase, ethanol dehydrogenase and lactate dehydrogenase, was demonstrated. Finally, the intracellular level of NADH, NAD+, ATP and ADP was also measured for different dilution rates. The production of ethanol and lactate appeared to be linked with the re-oxidation of NADH produced during glycolysis, whereas hydrogen produced should come from reduced ferredoxin generated during pyruvate decarboxylation. To produce more hydrogen or more acetate from lactose, it thus appears that an efficient H2 removal system should be used, based on a physical (membrane) or a biological approach, respectively, by cultivating C. thermolacticum with efficient H2 scavenging and acetate producing microorganisms.

  18. Disentanglement in bipartite continuous-variable systems

    SciTech Connect

    Barbosa, F. A. S.; Coelho, A. S.; Nussenzveig, P.; Martinelli, M.; Faria, A. J. de; Cassemiro, K. N.; Villar, A. S.

    2011-11-15

    Entanglement in bipartite continuous-variable systems is investigated in the presence of partial losses such as those introduced by a realistic quantum communication channel, e.g., by propagation in an optical fiber. We find that entanglement can vanish completely for partial losses, in a situation reminiscent of so-called entanglement sudden death. Even states with extreme squeezing may become separable after propagation in lossy channels. Having in mind the potential applications of such entangled light beams to optical communications, we investigate the conditions under which entanglement can survive for all partial losses. Different loss scenarios are examined, and we derive criteria to test the robustness of entangled states. These criteria are necessary and sufficient for Gaussian states. Our study provides a framework to investigate the robustness of continuous-variable entanglement in more complex multipartite systems.

  19. Cooling system for continuous metal casting machines

    DOEpatents

    Draper, Robert; Sumpman, Wayne C.; Baker, Robert J.; Williams, Robert S.

    1988-01-01

    A continuous metal caster cooling system is provided in which water is supplied in jets from a large number of small nozzles 19 against the inner surface of rim 13 at a temperature and with sufficient pressure that the velocity of the jets is sufficiently high that the mode of heat transfer is substantially by forced convection, the liquid being returned from the cooling chambers 30 through return pipes 25 distributed interstitially among the nozzles.

  20. Cooling system for continuous metal casting machines

    DOEpatents

    Draper, R.; Sumpman, W.C.; Baker, R.J.; Williams, R.S.

    1988-06-07

    A continuous metal caster cooling system is provided in which water is supplied in jets from a large number of small nozzles against the inner surface of rim at a temperature and with sufficient pressure that the velocity of the jets is sufficiently high that the mode of heat transfer is substantially by forced convection, the liquid being returned from the cooling chambers through return pipes distributed interstitially among the nozzles. 9 figs.

  1. Selection of ethanol-tolerant yeast hybrids in pH-regulated continuous culture

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez, J.; Benitez, T.

    1988-04-01

    Hybrids between naturally occurring wine yeast strains and laboratory strains were formed as a method of increasing genetic variability to improve the ethanol tolerance of yeast strains. The hybrids were subjected to competition experiments under continuous culture controlled by pH with increasing ethanol concentrations over a wide range to select the fastest-growing strain at any concentration of ethanol. The continuous culture system was obtained by controlling the dilution rate of a chemostat connected to a pH-meter. The nutrient pump of the chemostat was switched on and off in response to the pH of the culture, which was thereby kept near a critical value (pH/sub c/). Under these conditions, when the medium was supplemented with ethanol, the ethanol concentration of the culture increased with each pulse of dilution. A hybrid strain was selected by this procedure that was more tolerant than any of the highly ethanol-tolerant wine yeast strains at any concentration of ethanol and was able to grow at up to 16% (vol/vol) ethanol. This improvement in ethanol tolerance led to an increase in both the ethanol production rate and the total amount of ethanol produced.

  2. Continuously charged flywheel type power delivery system

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, A.A.; Omitsu, T.

    1986-04-22

    In a method of controlling the operation of a flywheel-type power delivery system having an energy-storing flywheel, an internal combustion engine is described operatively coupled to the flywheel for delivering power to the flywheel, and a continuously variable ratio transmission operatively coupled to the flywheel for delivering power to an output shaft. The improvement described here consists of: predetermining a desired maximum output shaft speed limit; and adjusting the working displacement of the engine in proportion to the output shaft speed limit, whereby the efficient power output of the engine is tailored to the power requirements of the system.

  3. Efficient State Tomography for Continuous Variable Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Chao; Jiang, Luyao; Krastanov, Stefan; Albert, Victor V.; Heeres, Reinier; Vlastakis, Brian; Schoelkopf, Rob; Jiang, Liang

    2015-03-01

    We propose an efficient and error robust scheme for state tomography of a continuous variable system, which is dispersively coupled to a two-level system. Our adaptive tomography protocol offers a significant speed up compared to the conventional Wigner tomography for a practically interesting class of states, such as Schrodinger cat states. In the presence of typical experimental errors, the number of measurements required is still close to the information theoretic limit. Our proposals can be readily implemented in platforms such as superconducting transmon qubit inside a microwave cavity.

  4. Waiting time distribution for continuous stochastic systems.

    PubMed

    Gernert, Robert; Emary, Clive; Klapp, Sabine H L

    2014-12-01

    The waiting time distribution (WTD) is a common tool for analyzing discrete stochastic processes in classical and quantum systems. However, there are many physical examples where the dynamics is continuous and only approximately discrete, or where it is favourable to discuss the dynamics on a discretized and a continuous level in parallel. An example is the hindered motion of particles through potential landscapes with barriers. In the present paper we propose a consistent generalization of the WTD from the discrete case to situations where the particles perform continuous barrier crossing characterized by a finite duration. To this end, we introduce a recipe to calculate the WTD from the Fokker-Planck (Smoluchowski) equation. In contrast to the closely related first passage time distribution (FPTD), which is frequently used to describe continuous processes, the WTD contains information about the direction of motion. As an application, we consider the paradigmatic example of an overdamped particle diffusing through a washboard potential. To verify the approach and to elucidate its numerical implications, we compare the WTD defined via the Smoluchowski equation with data from direct simulation of the underlying Langevin equation and find full consistency provided that the jumps in the Langevin approach are defined properly. Moreover, for sufficiently large energy barriers, the WTD defined via the Smoluchowski equation becomes consistent with that resulting from the analytical solution of a (two-state) master equation model for the short-time dynamics developed previously by us [Phys. Rev. E 86, 061135 (2012)]. Thus, our approach "interpolates" between these two types of stochastic motion. We illustrate our approach for both symmetric systems and systems under constant force.

  5. Motor monitoring system for a continuous miner

    SciTech Connect

    Thalimer, J.R.; McClelland, J.J.; Homce, G.T. )

    1993-01-01

    The US Bureau of Mines has investigated the early detection of insulation failure in squirrel cage induction motors for the past 4 years. Research was done using a sophisticated empirical data-modeling technique based on values calculated from a motor's voltage and current phasors. This technique produces two polynomial equations that calculate the insulation leakage current and power. These models were implemented in a prototype system that monitors six motors on a continuous miner for insulation leakage. These insulation leakage values are used to anticipate insulation failure. The system consists of a motor-data-system for each motor on the machine and a control computer located away from the miner. Each motor-data-system consists of an analog interface to the motor's voltages and currents, a single-board computer that reads digitized data and calculates voltage and current phasors, and a bus node that interfaces the single-board computer with the rest of the system by way of a serial bus system. Using this bus system, the control computer requests and receives phasor data from the motor-data-systems. From these data the control computer calculates and displays two deterioration values for each motor, for leakage current and power, using Bureau-developed models. These values are stored in a data base from which the user can display graphs of each motor's deterioration values over time.

  6. Continuous Glucose Monitoring Systems: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Vashist, Sandeep Kumar

    2013-01-01

    There have been continuous advances in the field of glucose monitoring during the last four decades, which have led to the development of highly evolved blood glucose meters, non-invasive glucose monitoring (NGM) devices and continuous glucose monitoring systems (CGMS). Glucose monitoring is an integral part of diabetes management, and the maintenance of physiological blood glucose concentration is the only way for a diabetic to avoid life-threatening diabetic complications. CGMS have led to tremendous improvements in diabetic management, as shown by the significant lowering of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) in adults with type I diabetes. Most of the CGMS have been minimally-invasive, although the more recent ones are based on NGM techniques. This manuscript reviews the advances in CGMS for diabetes management along with the future prospects and the challenges involved. PMID:26824930

  7. Cultural continuity, traditional Indigenous language, and diabetes in Alberta First Nations: a mixed methods study.

    PubMed

    Oster, Richard T; Grier, Angela; Lightning, Rick; Mayan, Maria J; Toth, Ellen L

    2014-10-19

    We used an exploratory sequential mixed methods approach to study the association between cultural continuity, self-determination, and diabetes prevalence in First Nations in Alberta, Canada. We conducted a qualitative description where we interviewed 10 Cree and Blackfoot leaders (members of Chief and Council) from across the province to understand cultural continuity, self-determination, and their relationship to health and diabetes, in the Alberta First Nations context. Based on the qualitative findings, we then conducted a cross-sectional analysis using provincial administrative data and publically available data for 31 First Nations communities to quantitatively examine any relationship between cultural continuity and diabetes prevalence. Cultural continuity, or "being who we are", is foundational to health in successful First Nations. Self-determination, or "being a self-sufficient Nation", stems from cultural continuity and is seriously compromised in today's Alberta Cree and Blackfoot Nations. Unfortunately, First Nations are in a continuous struggle with government policy. The intergenerational effects of colonization continue to impact the culture, which undermines the sense of self-determination, and contributes to diabetes and ill health. Crude diabetes prevalence varied dramatically among First Nations with values as low as 1.2% and as high as 18.3%. Those First Nations that appeared to have more cultural continuity (measured by traditional Indigenous language knowledge) had significantly lower diabetes prevalence after adjustment for socio-economic factors (p =0.007). First Nations that have been better able to preserve their culture may be relatively protected from diabetes.

  8. Effect of Organizational Culture on Patient Access, Care Continuity, and Experience of Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Hung, Dorothy; Chung, Sukyung; Martinez, Meghan; Tai-Seale, Ming

    2016-01-01

    This study examined relationships between organizational culture and patient-centered outcomes in primary care. Generalized least squares regression was used to analyze patient access, care continuity, and reported experiences of care among 357 physicians in 41 primary care departments. Compared with a "Group-oriented" culture, a "Rational" culture type was associated with longer appointment wait times, and both "Hierarchical" and "Developmental" culture types were associated with less care continuity, but better patient experiences with care. Understanding the unique effects of organizational culture can enhance the delivery of more patient-centered care.

  9. Advanced continuous cultivation methods for systems microbiology.

    PubMed

    Adamberg, Kaarel; Valgepea, Kaspar; Vilu, Raivo

    2015-09-01

    Increasing the throughput of systems biology-based experimental characterization of in silico-designed strains has great potential for accelerating the development of cell factories. For this, analysis of metabolism in the steady state is essential as only this enables the unequivocal definition of the physiological state of cells, which is needed for the complete description and in silico reconstruction of their phenotypes. In this review, we show that for a systems microbiology approach, high-resolution characterization of metabolism in the steady state--growth space analysis (GSA)--can be achieved by using advanced continuous cultivation methods termed changestats. In changestats, an environmental parameter is continuously changed at a constant rate within one experiment whilst maintaining cells in the physiological steady state similar to chemostats. This increases the resolution and throughput of GSA compared with chemostats, and, moreover, enables following of the dynamics of metabolism and detection of metabolic switch-points and optimal growth conditions. We also describe the concept, challenge and necessary criteria of the systematic analysis of steady-state metabolism. Finally, we propose that such systematic characterization of the steady-state growth space of cells using changestats has value not only for fundamental studies of metabolism, but also for systems biology-based metabolic engineering of cell factories.

  10. The association between event learning and continuous quality improvement programs and culture of patient safety.

    PubMed

    Mazur, Lukasz; Chera, Bhishamjit; Mosaly, Prithima; Taylor, Kinley; Tracton, Gregg; Johnson, Kendra; Comitz, Elizabeth; Adams, Robert; Pooya, Pegah; Ivy, Julie; Rockwell, John; Marks, Lawrence B

    2015-01-01

    To present our approach and results from our quality and safety program and to report their possible impact on our culture of patient safety. We created an event learning system (termed a "good catch" program) and encouraged staff to report any quality or safety concerns in real time. Events were analyzed to assess the utility of safety barriers. A formal continuous quality improvement program was created to address these reported events and make improvements. Data on perceptions of the culture of patient safety were collected using the Agency for Health Care Research and Quality survey administered before, during, and after the initiatives. Of 560 good catches reported, 367 could be ascribed to a specific step on our process map. The calculated utility of safety barriers was highest for those embedded into the pretreatment quality assurance checks performed by physicists and dosimetrists (utility score 0.53; 93 of 174) and routine checks done by therapists on the initial day of therapy. Therapists and physicists reported the highest number of good catches (24% each). Sixty-four percent of events were caused by performance issues (eg, not following standardized processes, including suboptimal communications). Of 31 initiated formal improvement events, 26 were successfully implemented and sustained, 4 were discontinued, and 1 was not implemented. Most of the continuous quality improvement program was conducted by nurses (14) and therapists (7). Percentages of positive responses in the patient safety culture survey appear to have increased on all dimensions (p < .05). Results suggest that event learning and continuous quality improvement programs can be successfully implemented and that there are contemporaneous improvements in the culture of safety. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Radiation Oncology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Continuing the Cultural Liberation and Transformation of Counseling Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Andrea, Michael

    2005-01-01

    The multicultural movement has been and continues to represent a major force that is transforming the mental health professions. The field of counseling psychology has been particularly important in promoting many of these transformative changes. Over the past three decades, multicultural advocates in counseling psychology have expanded our…

  12. Continuing the Cultural Liberation and Transformation of Counseling Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Andrea, Michael

    2005-01-01

    The multicultural movement has been and continues to represent a major force that is transforming the mental health professions. The field of counseling psychology has been particularly important in promoting many of these transformative changes. Over the past three decades, multicultural advocates in counseling psychology have expanded our…

  13. Control system for continuously variable transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumura, T.; Oshiage, K.

    1987-06-02

    A control system is described for a continuously variable transmission for a vehicle having an engine wherein a reduction ratio is determined in response to an operating position of a shift actuator that is operable on a shift command signal. The system comprises: means for producing a feed-forward control valve indicative signal representative of a target operating position of the shift actuator; means for producing a target value indicative signal representative of a target operating position of the shift actuator; and means for producing a feed-back value which is variable in response to a change in the operating position of the shift actuator and generating a feed-back indicative signal.

  14. Continuous-Time Bilinear System Identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juang, Jer-Nan

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to describe a new method for identification of a continuous-time multi-input and multi-output bilinear system. The approach is to make judicious use of the linear-model properties of the bilinear system when subjected to a constant input. Two steps are required in the identification process. The first step is to use a set of pulse responses resulting from a constant input of one sample period to identify the state matrix, the output matrix, and the direct transmission matrix. The second step is to use another set of pulse responses with the same constant input over multiple sample periods to identify the input matrix and the coefficient matrices associated with the coupling terms between the state and the inputs. Numerical examples are given to illustrate the concept and the computational algorithm for the identification method.

  15. System for Continuous Deaeration of Hydraulic Oil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Christopher W.

    2006-01-01

    A system for continuous, rapid deaeration of hydraulic oil has been built to replace a prior system that effected deaeration more slowly in a cyclic pressure/ vacuum process. Such systems are needed because (1) hydraulic oil has an affinity for air, typically containing between 10 and 15 volume percent of air and (2) in the original application for which these systems were built, there is a requirement to keep the proportion of dissolved air below 1 volume percent because a greater proportion can lead to pump cavitation and excessive softness in hydraulic-actuator force-versus-displacement characteristics. In addition to overcoming several deficiencies of the prior deaeration system, the present system removes water from the oil. The system (see figure) includes a pump that continuously circulates oil at a rate of 10 gal/min (38 L/min) between an 80-gal (303-L) airless reservoir and a tank containing a vacuum. When the circulation pump is started, oil is pumped, at a pressure of 120 psi (827 kPa), through a venturi tube below the tank with a connection to a stand-pipe in the tank. This action draws oil out of the tank via the standpipe. At the same time, oil is sprayed into the tank in a fine mist, thereby exposing a large amount of oil to the vacuum. When the oil level in the tank falls below the lower of two level switches, a vacuum pump is started, drawing a hard vacuum on the tank through a trap that collects any oil and water entrained in the airflow. When the oil level rises above higher of the two level switches or when the system is shut down, a solenoid valve between the tank and the vacuum pump is closed to prevent suction of oil into the vacuum pump. Critical requirements that the system is designed to satisfy include the following: 1) The circulation pump must have sufficient volume and pressure to operate the venturi tube and spray nozzles. 2) The venturi tube must be sized to empty the tank (except for the oil retained by the standpipe) and maintain a

  16. Continuous quality improvement: educating towards a culture of clinical governance

    PubMed Central

    Heard, S; Schiller, G; Aitken, M; Fergie, C; Hall, L

    2001-01-01

    The National Health Service in England and Wales has recently adopted a policy aimed at embedding continuous quality improvement (CQI) at all levels and across all services. The key goal is to achieve changes in practice which improve patient outcomes. This paper describes the use of a training course for multiprofessional groups of participants tailored to offer them relevant knowledge, management and team working skills, and approaches to personal and career development. These were intended to assist them in changing their practice for the benefit of patients. The participants rated the course highly in fulfilling its objectives. One cohort followed up for 6 months named changes in practice which related specifically to learning from the course. This paper shows the important contribution of multiprofessional learning to CQI and presents a useful method of evaluating links between learning and performance. Key Words: continuous quality improvement; clinical governance; multiprofessional learning; performance PMID:11700383

  17. Continuous enrichment cultures: insights into prokaryotic diversity and metabolic interactions in deep-sea vent chimneys.

    PubMed

    Postec, Anne; Lesongeur, Françoise; Pignet, Patricia; Ollivier, Bernard; Querellou, Joël; Godfroy, Anne

    2007-11-01

    The prokaryotic diversity of culturable thermophilic communities of deep-sea hydrothermal chimneys was analysed using a continuous enrichment culture performed in a gas-lift bioreactor, and compared to classical batch enrichment cultures in vials. Cultures were conducted at 60 degrees C and pH 6.5 using a complex medium containing carbohydrates, peptides and sulphur, and inoculated with a sample of a hydrothermal black chimney collected at the Rainbow field, Mid-Atlantic Ridge, at 2,275 m depth. To assess the relevance of both culture methods, bacterial and archaeal diversity was studied using cloning and sequencing, DGGE, and whole-cell hybridisation of 16S rRNA genes. Sequences of heterotrophic microorganisms belonging to the genera Marinitoga, Thermosipho, Caminicella (Bacteria) and Thermococcus (Archaea) were obtained from both batch and continuous enrichment cultures while sequences of the autotrophic bacterial genera Deferribacter and Thermodesulfatator were only detected in the continuous bioreactor culture. It is presumed that over time constant metabolite exchanges will have occurred in the continuous enrichment culture enabling the development of a more diverse prokaryotic community. In particular, CO(2) and H(2) produced by the heterotrophic population would support the growth of autotrophic populations. Therefore, continuous enrichment culture is a useful technique to grow over time environmentally representative microbial communities and obtain insights into prokaryotic species interactions that play a crucial role in deep hydrothermal environments.

  18. Dynamic cell culture system (7-IML-1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cogoli, Augusto

    1992-01-01

    This experiment is one of the Biorack experiments being flown on the International Microgravity Laboratory 1 (MIL-1) mission as part of an investigation studying cell proliferation and performance in space. One of the objectives of this investigation is to assess the potential benefits of bioprocessing in space with the ultimate goal of developing a bioreactor for continuous cell cultures in space. This experiment will test the operation of an automated culture chamber that was designed for use in a Bioreactor in space. The device to be tested is called the Dynamic Cell Culture System (DCCS). It is a simple device in which media are renewed or chemicals are injected automatically, by means of osmotic pumps. This experiment uses four Type I/O experiment containers. One DCCS unit, which contains a culture chamber with renewal of medium and a second chamber without a medium supply fits in each container. Two DCCS units are maintained under zero gravity conditions during the on-orbit period. The other two units are maintained under 1 gh conditions in a 1 g centrifuge. The schedule for incubator transfer is given.

  19. Dynamic cell culture system (7-IML-1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cogoli, Augusto

    1992-01-01

    This experiment is one of the Biorack experiments being flown on the International Microgravity Laboratory 1 (MIL-1) mission as part of an investigation studying cell proliferation and performance in space. One of the objectives of this investigation is to assess the potential benefits of bioprocessing in space with the ultimate goal of developing a bioreactor for continuous cell cultures in space. This experiment will test the operation of an automated culture chamber that was designed for use in a Bioreactor in space. The device to be tested is called the Dynamic Cell Culture System (DCCS). It is a simple device in which media are renewed or chemicals are injected automatically, by means of osmotic pumps. This experiment uses four Type I/O experiment containers. One DCCS unit, which contains a culture chamber with renewal of medium and a second chamber without a medium supply fits in each container. Two DCCS units are maintained under zero gravity conditions during the on-orbit period. The other two units are maintained under 1 gh conditions in a 1 g centrifuge. The schedule for incubator transfer is given.

  20. Anaerobic Biodegradation Of Methyl tert-Butyl Ether Under Iron-Reducing Conditions In Batch And Continuous-Flow Cultures

    EPA Science Inventory

    The feasibility of biodegradation of the fuel oxygenate methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) under iron-reducing conditions was explored in batch and continuous-flow systems. A porous pot completely-mixed reactor was seeded with diverse cultures and operated under iron-reducing...

  1. Effect of feeding warm-season annuals with orchardgrass on ruminal fermentation and methane output in continuous culture

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A 4-unit, dual-flow continuous culture fermentor system was used to assess nutrient digestibility, volatile fatty acids (VFA) production, bacterial protein synthesis and CH4 output of warm-season summer annual grasses. Treatments were randomly assigned to fermentors in a 4 × 4 Latin square design us...

  2. Effect of supplement type on ruminal fermentation of an orchardgrass-based pasture diet during continuous culture

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A dual-flow continuous culture fermenter system was used to investigate the effect of supplemental crude protein (CP) level on digestion and ruminal fermentation of a vegetative orchardgrass (Dactylis glomerata L.) pasture-based diet. Treatments were: 10, 12, 14, and 16% supplemental CP fed at a rat...

  3. Effects of timing of supplementation on ruminal digestion and fermentation pattern during continuous culture fermentation of grass herbage

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Several researchers have investigated cattle supplementation strategies, yet few studies focused on the benefits of supplementation time on herbage utilization. Using a dual flow continuous culture fermenter system designed to simulate ruminal digestion and nutrient outflow to the intestines, this s...

  4. Effect of incremental flaxseed supplementation of an herbage diet on methane output and ruminal fermentation in continuous culture

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A 4-unit dual-flow continuous culture fermentor system was used to assess the effect of increasing flax supplementation of an herbage-based diet on nutrient digestibility, bacterial N synthesis and methane output. Treatments were randomly assigned to fermentors in a 4 x 4 Latin square design with 7 ...

  5. Anaerobic Biodegradation Of Methyl tert-Butyl Ether Under Iron-Reducing Conditions In Batch And Continuous-Flow Cultures

    EPA Science Inventory

    The feasibility of biodegradation of the fuel oxygenate methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) under iron-reducing conditions was explored in batch and continuous-flow systems. A porous pot completely-mixed reactor was seeded with diverse cultures and operated under iron-reducing...

  6. Effect of starchy or fibrous carbohydrate supplementation of an herbage diet on ruminal fermentation and methane output in continuous culture

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A 4-unit dual-flow continuous culture fermentor system was used to assess the effect of supplementing 2 levels (5 and 10% of diet DM) of starchy (barley grain: BAR) or fibrous (beet pulp: BP) carbohydrate (CHO) to an orchardgrass diet on nutrient digestibility, VFA production, bacterial protein synt...

  7. Effect of starchy or fibrous carbohydrate supplementation of orchardgrass on ruminal fermentation and methane output in continuous culture

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A 4-unit dual-flow continuous culture fermentor system was used to assess the effect of supplementing an orchardgrass (Dactylis glomerata L.) herbage diet with 2 levels [5 and 10% of total dry matter (DM) fed] of starchy (barley grain; BAR) or fibrous (beet pulp; BP) carbohydrates on nutrient diges...

  8. Effect of starchy or fibrous carbohydrate supplementation of an herbage diet on ruminal fermentation and methane output in continuous culture

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A dual-flow continuous culture fermentor system was used to assess the effect of supplementing 2 levels (5 or 10% of diet DM) of starchy (barley: BAR) or fibrous (beet pulp: BP) carbohydrate (CHO) to an orchardgrass diet on nutrient digestibility, VFA production, bacterial protein synthesis, and met...

  9. Continued Analysis of EUVE Solar System Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gladstone, G. Randall

    2001-01-01

    This is the final report for this project. We proposed to continue our work on extracting important results from the EUVE (Extreme UltraViolet Explorer) archive of lunar and jovian system observations. In particular, we planned to: (1) produce several monochromatic images of the Moon at the wavelengths of the brightest solar EUV emission lines; (2) search for evidence of soft X-ray emissions from the Moon and/or X-ray fluorescence at specific EUV wavelengths; (3) search for localized EUV and soft X-ray emissions associated with each of the Galilean satellites; (4) search for correlations between localized Io Plasma Torus (IPT) brightness and volcanic activity on Io; (5) search for soft X-ray emissions from Jupiter; and (6) determine the long term variability of He 58.4 nm emissions from Jupiter, and relate these to solar variability. However, the ADP review panel suggested that the work concentrate on the Jupiter/IPT observations, and provided half the requested funding. Thus we have performed no work on the first two tasks, and instead concentrated on the last three. In addition we used funds from this project to support reduction and analysis of EUVE observations of Venus. While this was not part of the original statement of work, it is entirely in keeping with extracting important results from EUVE solar system observations.

  10. Clarivate Analytics: Continued Omnia vanitas Impact Factor Culture.

    PubMed

    Teixeira da Silva, Jaime A; Bernès, Sylvain

    2017-02-23

    This opinion paper takes aim at an error made recently by Clarivate Analytics in which it sent out an email that congratulated academics for becoming exclusive members of academia's most cited elite, the Highly Cited Researchers (HCRs). However, that email was sent out to an undisclosed number of non-HCRs, who were offered an apology shortly after, through a bulk mail, which tried to down-play the importance of the error, all the while praising the true HCRs. When Clarivate Analytics senior management was contacted, the company declined to offer an indication of the number of academics who had been contacted and erroneously awarded the HCR status. We believe that this regrettable blunder, together with the opacity offered by the company, fortify the corporate attitude about the value of the journal impact factor (JIF), and what it represents, namely a marketing tool that is falsely used to equate citations with quality, worth, or influence. The continued commercialization of metrics such as the JIF is at the heart of their use to assess the "quality" of a researcher, their work, or a journal, and contributes to a great extent to driving scientific activities towards a futile endeavor.

  11. Continuation: The EOSDIS testbed data system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emery, Bill; Kelley, Timothy D.

    1995-01-01

    The continuation of the EOSDIS testbed ('Testbed') has materialized from a multi-task system to a fully functional stand-alone data archive distribution center that once was only X-Windows driven to a system that is accessible by all types of users and computers via the World Wide Web. Throughout the past months, the Testbed has evolved into a completely new system. The current system is now accessible through Netscape, Mosaic, and all other servers that can contact the World Wide Web. On October 1, 1995 we will open to the public and we expect that the statistics of the type of user, where they are located, and what they are looking for will drastically change. What is the most important change in the Testbed has been the Web interface. This interface will allow more users access to the system and walk them through the data types with more ease than before. All of the callbacks are written in such a way that icons can be used to easily move around in the programs interface. The homepage offers the user the opportunity to go and get more information about each satellite data type and also information on free programs. These programs are grouped into categories for types of computers that the programs are compiled for, along with information on how to FTP the programs back to the end users computer. The heart of the Testbed is still the acquisition of satellite data. From the Testbed homepage, the user selects the 'access to data system' icon, which will take them to the world map and allow them to select an area that they would like coverage on by simply clicking that area of the map. This creates a new map where other similar choices can be made to get the latitude and longitude of the region the satellite data will cover. Once a selection has been made the search parameters page will appear to be filled out. Afterwards, the browse image will be called for once the search is completed and the images for viewing can be selected. There are several other option pages

  12. Role of continuous renal replacement therapy ultrafiltrate cultures in the microbial diagnosis of sepsis.

    PubMed

    Michaud, Jennine M; Zitter, Jessica N; Kaplan, Joshua; Dever, Lisa L

    2014-08-01

    In a cohort of 23 critically ill patients receiving continuous renal replacement therapy, we investigated the role of ultrafiltrate fluid cultures as an adjunct to blood cultures in identifying the microbial etiology of sepsis. We found they provided no additional benefit and may yield false positives due to contamination.

  13. Development of a miniature bioreactor for continuous culture in a space laboratory.

    PubMed

    Walther, I; van der Schoot, B H; Jeanneret, S; Arquint, P; de Rooij, N F; Gass, V; Bechler, B; Lorenzi, G; Cogoli, A

    1994-11-30

    A new type of miniature bioreactor for continuous culture of yeast cells in space laboratories has been developed. Silicon microtechnology has permitted the integration of numerous functions and systems in a volume of 87 x 63 x 63 mm3 and a weight of 610 g. The 100 ml of fresh medium can be delivered at variable flow rates to the cultivation chamber (volume 3 ml) by means of a micropump. The culture is agitated by a magnetic stirrer. Microsensors monitor pH, temperature and redox potential. The decrease of pH occurring during the cultivation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is compensated electrochemically. A window allows the inspection of the culture status. Samples of up to 1 ml can be drawn through a silicone rubber septum. The data measured by the sensors are transmitted on-line to the ground station during operations in space. The bioreactor had to fulfil several requirements related to the safety regulation of the space agencies. In particular, new materials had to be selected and tested for their biocompatibility. The instrument has now passed all space and biological qualification tests and will be used in an experiment selected by ESA for the International Microgravity Laboratory-2 Mission in Spacelab in July 1994. This paper gives the results of the functional and biological tests and a detailed description of the instrument.

  14. Microbial film formation: dental plaque deposition on acrylic tiles using continuous culture techniques.

    PubMed

    Keevil, C W; Bradshaw, D J; Dowsett, A B; Feary, T W

    1987-02-01

    A chemostat system has been developed to model the attachment of oral bacteria, and the subsequent development of plaque film, to acrylic surfaces immersed in steady state cultures. Plaque was removed from the teeth and gingival margin of volunteers who refrained from oral hygiene for at least 72 h. Samples were pooled and inoculated into a complex growth medium maintained at 37 degrees C. Glucose-limited continuous culture was established at a dilution rate of 0.05/h and at pH 7.0. Microbiological analysis of the culture indicated that a complex community of oral bacteria was established, typical of that found in dental plaque. Acrylic tiles were immersed in the fermenter through a modified fermenter head and incubated therein for up to 21 d. Scanning electron microscopy showed that either side of the tiles contained a rough and a smooth surface and these initially favoured the attachment of fusiform bacteria, particularly on the rough surface. Cocci attached to those surfaces which were not heavily colonized by the fusiforms and eventually grew into and on the colonial sheets of the fusiforms.

  15. The Australian health system: continuity and change.

    PubMed

    Harris, M G; Harris, R D

    1998-01-01

    The health of Australians, with the exception of Aboriginals and Torres Strait Islanders, compares favourably with other industrialised nations. Since 1984, universal access for citizens to medical and public hospital services has been achieved under a national Health Insurance Scheme called Medicare, partially funded by a 1.4 percent levy on all taxpayers. Medicare found early widespread support from the electorate but continues to be buffeted by a minority coalition of some medical associations, private health insurers, and conservative "libertarian" politicians. Over the decade since its inception, Medicare has provided stability in maintaining total health costs around 8 percent of GDP. This has been largely due to capping hospital costs via Commonwealth-State agreements. Medicare has failed in the past five years to contain medical costs which have increased proportionally with increases in the medical workforce. This article examines the structure and performance of Medicare and its role within Australia's overall health system. Benefits of a universal access insurance program are outlined together with challenges associated with inequities in health status, geography, aging of the population, burgeoning technology, ideological diversity, and an economic climate requiring cost containment and favouring privatisation and the role of the market. It can be concluded that, despite these challenges, universal access to health care is here to stay. Australia's Medicare program has become popular with the electorate.

  16. Mechanism for multiplicity of steady states with distinct cell concentration in continuous culture of mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Yongky, Andrew; Lee, Jongchan; Le, Tung; Mulukutla, Bhanu Chandra; Daoutidis, Prodromos; Hu, Wei-Shou

    2015-07-01

    Continuous culture for the production of biopharmaceutical proteins offers the possibility of steady state operations and thus more consistent product quality and increased productivity. Under some conditions, multiplicity of steady states has been observed in continuous cultures of mammalian cells, wherein with the same dilution rate and feed nutrient composition, steady states with very different cell and product concentrations may be reached. At those different steady states, cells may exhibit a high glycolysis flux with high lactate production and low cell concentration, or a low glycolysis flux with low lactate and high cell concentration. These different steady states, with different cell concentration, also have different productivity. Developing a mechanistic understanding of the occurrence of steady state multiplicity and devising a strategy to steer the culture toward the desired steady state is critical. We establish a multi-scale kinetic model that integrates a mechanistic intracellular metabolic model and cell growth model in a continuous bioreactor. We show that steady state multiplicity exists in a range of dilution rate in continuous culture as a result of the bistable behavior in glycolysis. The insights from the model were used to devise strategies to guide the culture to the desired steady state in the multiple steady state region. The model provides a guideline principle in the design of continuous culture processes of mammalian cells. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Cartilaginous constructs using primary chondrocytes from continuous expansion culture seeded in dense collagen gels.

    PubMed

    Rosenzweig, D H; Chicatun, F; Nazhat, S N; Quinn, T M

    2013-12-01

    Cell-based therapies such as autologous chondrocyte implantation require in vitro cell expansion. However, standard culture techniques require cell passaging, leading to dedifferentiation into a fibroblast-like cell type. Primary chondrocytes grown on continuously expanding culture dishes (CE culture) limits passaging and protects against dedifferentiation. The authors tested whether CE culture chondrocytes were advantageous for producing mechanically competent cartilage matrix when three-dimensionally seeded in dense collagen gels. Primary chondrocytes, grown either in CE culture or passaged twice on static silicone dishes (SS culture; comparable to standard methods), were seeded in dense collagen gels and cultured for 3 weeks in the absence of exogenous chondrogenic growth factors. Compared with gels seeded with SS culture chondrocytes, CE chondrocyte-seeded gels had significantly higher chondrogenic gene expression after 2 and 3 weeks in culture, correlating with significantly higher aggrecan and type II collagen protein accumulation. There was no obvious difference in glycosaminoglycan content from either culture condition, yet CE chondrocyte-seeded gels were significantly thicker and had a significantly higher dynamic compressive modulus than SS chondrocyte-seeded gels after 3 weeks. Chondrocytes grown in CE culture and seeded in dense collagen gels produce more cartilaginous matrix with superior mechanical properties, making them more suitable than SS cultured cells for tissue engineering applications. Copyright © 2013 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Purification of cell culture-derived influenza A virus via continuous anion exchange chromatography on monoliths.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Laura M; Wolff, Michael W; Reichl, Udo

    2017-07-17

    The continuously increasing demand for potent and safe vaccines and the intensifying economic pressure on health care systems underlines the need for further optimization of vaccine manufacturing. Here, we focus on downstream processing of human influenza vaccines, investigating the purification of serum-free cell culture-derived influenza virus (A/PR/8/34 H1N1) using continuous chromatography. Therefore, quaternary amine anion exchange monoliths (CIM® QA) were characterized for their capacity to capture virus particles from animal cells cultivated in different media and their ability to separate virions from contaminating host cell proteins and DNA. The continuous chromatography was implemented as simulated moving bed chromatography (SMB) in a three zone open loop configuration with a detached high salt zone for regeneration. SMBs exploiting 10% and 50% of the monoliths' dynamic binding capacity, respectively, allowed the depletion of >98% of the DNA and >52% of the total protein. Based on the hemagglutination assay (HA assay), the virus yield was higher at 10% capacity use (89% vs. 45%). Both SMB separations resulted in a ratio of total protein to hemagglutinin antigen (based on single radial diffusion assay, SRID assay) below the required levels for manufacturing of human vaccines (less than 100µg of protein per virus strain per dose). The level of contaminating DNA was five-times lower for the 10% loading, but still exceeded the required limit for human vaccines. A subsequent Benzonase® treatment step, however, reduced the DNA contamination below 10ng per dose. Coupled to continuous cultivations for virus propagation, the establishment of integrated processes for fully continuous production of vaccines seems to be feasible. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Application of an improved continuous parallel shaken bioreactor system for three microbial model systems.

    PubMed

    Akgün, Ali; Müller, Carsten; Engmann, Ramona; Büchs, Jochen

    2008-04-01

    A continuous parallel shaken bioreactor system, combining the advantages of shaken bioreactors with the advantages of continuous fermentation, was specifically manufactured from quartz glass and provides a geometric accuracy of <1 mm. Two different model systems (facultative anaerobic bacterium C. glutamicum, and Crabtree-negative yeast P. stipitis), whose growth behaviour and metabolite formation are affected by dilution rate and oxygen availability, were studied. The transition from non-oxygen to limited conditions as function of the dilution rate could precisely be predicted applying the approach described by Maier et al. (Biochem Eng J 17:155-167, 2004). In addition, the Crabtree-positive yeast S. cerevisiae was simultaneously studied in the continuous parallel shaken bioreactor system and in a conventional 1-L bioreactor, for comparison. Essentially the same results were obtained in both types of bioreactors. However, many more reading points were obtained with the parallel shaken bioreactor system in the same time at much lower consumption of culture media.

  20. ATTACHMENT AND GROWTH OF BACTERIA ON SURFACES OF CONTINUOUS-CULTURE VESSELS

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Don H.; Dimmick, R. L.

    1964-01-01

    Don H. Larsen (Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah), and R. L. Dimmick. Attachment and growth of bacteria on surfaces of continuous-culture vessels. J. Bacteriol. 88:1380–1387. 1964.—Initial attempts to induce synchrony in a continuous culture of Serratia marcescens by alternating growth temperatures produced fluctuations in the population of a magnitude and at a density higher than predicted by theory. Without temperature change, the density in the 14-ml volume changed with dilution rate, but the total output of cells per hour remained constant, even at dilution rates greater than critical. When glass wool was added to the culture vessel, the total output per hour increased 30-fold. Nonlethal ultrasonic agitation applied to the vessel reduced the population density in continuous culture under both a static and a cyclic temperature program. The decrease in population density, when the washout rate was momentarily increased about tenfold, was less than theoretically predicted, and the subsequent rapid rise, when flow was terminated, indicated the presence of a reservoir of cells on the walls of the vessel continually discharging their progeny into the medium. Several genera were examined in the latter manner; it is estimated that in some cases as many as 90% (S. marcescens, Escherichia coli), and in others (Bacillus spp.) possibly none, of the cells in suspension arose from wall inhabitants. Growth of bacteria on the walls of continuous-culture vessels can significantly influence the population density and, hence, the kinetics of continuous growth. PMID:14234796

  1. Use of a continuous culture fermentation system to investigate the effect of GanedenBC30 (Bacillus coagulans GBI-30, 6086) supplementation on pathogen survival in the human gut microbiota.

    PubMed

    Honda, Harue; Gibson, Glenn R; Farmer, Sean; Keller, David; McCartney, Anne L

    2011-02-01

    Single-stage continuous fermentation systems were employed to examine the effects of GanedenBC(30) supplementation on the human gastrointestinal microbiota in relation to pathogen challenge in vitro. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis demonstrated that GanedenBC(30) supplementation modified the microbial profiles in the fermentation systems compared with controls, with profiles clustering according to treatment. Overall, GanedenBC(30) supplementation did not elicit major changes in bacterial population counts in vitro, although notably higher Bcoa191 counts were seen following probiotic supplementation (compared to the controls). Pathogen challenge did not elicit significant modification of the microbial counts in vitro, although notably higher Clit135 counts were seen in the control system post-Clostridium difficile challenge than in the corresponding GanedenBC(30)-supplemented systems. Sporulation appears to be associated with the anti-microbial activity of GanedenBC(30), suggesting that a bi-modal lifecycle of GanedenBC(30)in vivo may lead to anti-microbial activity in distal regions of the gastrointestinal tract.

  2. Newly cultured bacteria with broad diversity isolated from 8 week continuous culture enrichments of cow feces on complex polysaccharides

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    One of the fascinating functions of the mammalian intestinal microbiota is the fermentation of plant cell wall components. Eight week continuous culture enrichments of cow feces with cellulose and xylan/pectin were used to isolate bacteria from this community. A total of 459 bacterial isolates were ...

  3. A microfluidic system for automatic cell culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chun-Wei; Lee, Gwo-Bin

    2007-07-01

    This study presents a new chip capable of automating the cell culture process by using microfluidic technology. This microfluidic cell culture system comprising microheaters, a micro temperature sensor, micropumps, microvalves, microchannels, a cell culture area and several reservoirs was fabricated by using micro-electro-mechanical-systems' fabrication processes. Traditional manual cell culture processes can be performed on this chip. A uni-directional pneumatic micropump was developed to transport the culture reagents and constraint the solutions to flow only in one direction, safeguarding the entire culture process from contamination. A new micro check valve was also used to prevent the culture solutions from flowing back into the microchannels. The microheaters and the micro temperature sensor were used to maintain a constant temperature during the cell culturing process. The pH value suitable for cell growth was also regulated during the cell culture process. A typical cell culturing process for human lung cancer cells (A549) was successfully performed to demonstrate the capability of the developed microfluidic system. This automatic cell culturing system can be eventually integrated with subsequent microfluidic modules for cell purification, collection, counting and lysis to form a cell-based micro-total-analysis system. Preliminary results have been presented in The Asia-Pacific Conference of Transducers and Micro-Nano Technology (APCOT), 25-28 June 2006

  4. Evaluation of a Multi-Parameter Sensor for Automated, Continuous Cell Culture Monitoring in Bioreactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pappas, D.; Jeevarajan, A.; Anderson, M. M.

    2004-01-01

    Compact and automated sensors are desired for assessing the health of cell cultures in biotechnology experiments in microgravity. Measurement of cell culture medium allows for the optirn.jzation of culture conditions on orbit to maximize cell growth and minimize unnecessary exchange of medium. While several discrete sensors exist to measure culture health, a multi-parameter sensor would simplify the experimental apparatus. One such sensor, the Paratrend 7, consists of three optical fibers for measuring pH, dissolved oxygen (p02), dissolved carbon dioxide (pC02) , and a thermocouple to measure temperature. The sensor bundle was designed for intra-arterial placement in clinical patients, and potentially can be used in NASA's Space Shuttle and International Space Station biotechnology program bioreactors. Methods: A Paratrend 7 sensor was placed at the outlet of a rotating-wall perfused vessel bioreactor system inoculated with BHK-21 (baby hamster kidney) cells. Cell culture medium (GTSF-2, composed of 40% minimum essential medium, 60% L-15 Leibovitz medium) was manually measured using a bench top blood gas analyzer (BGA, Ciba-Corning). Results: A Paratrend 7 sensor was used over a long-term (>120 day) cell culture experiment. The sensor was able to track changes in cell medium pH, p02, and pC02 due to the consumption of nutrients by the BHK-21. When compared to manually obtained BGA measurements, the sensor had good agreement for pH, p02, and pC02 with bias [and precision] of 0.02 [0.15], 1 mm Hg [18 mm Hg], and -4.0 mm Hg [8.0 mm Hg] respectively. The Paratrend oxygen sensor was recalibrated (offset) periodically due to drift. The bias for the raw (no offset or recalibration) oxygen measurements was 42 mm Hg [38 mm Hg]. The measured response (rise) time of the sensor was 20 +/- 4s for pH, 81 +/- 53s for pC02, 51 +/- 20s for p02. For long-term cell culture measurements, these response times are more than adequate. Based on these findings , the Paratrend sensor could

  5. Growth and nutrient removal in free and immobilized green algae in batch and semi-continuous cultures treating real wastewater.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Marin, Alejandro; Mendoza-Espinosa, Leopoldo G; Stephenson, Tom

    2010-01-01

    Two species of microalgae growing as immobilized and free-cells were compared to test its ability to remove N and P in batch cultures of urban wastewater. The best microalgae-cell growth configuration was selected to be tested in bioreactor operated in semi-continuous mode. Scenedesmus obliquus showed a higher N and P uptake rate in urban wastewater than Chlorella vulgaris. When tested in semi-continuous mode and with the re-calcification of beads, S. obliquus was more effective in removing N and P for longer periods (181 h) than batch cultures; fecal coliforms removal was good (95%) although the final concentration was still unsuitable for discharge to natural water bodies. Protein and lipids content analysis suggest that, from a practical point of view, immobilized systems could facilitate the separation of the biomass from the treated wastewater although in terms of nutritional value of the biomass, immobilized systems do not represent an advantage over free-cell systems.

  6. Staphylococcus aureus in Continuous Culture: A Tool for the Rational Design of Antibiotic Treatment Protocols

    PubMed Central

    Udekwu, Klas I.; Levin, Bruce R.

    2012-01-01

    In vitro measures of the pharmacodynamics of antibiotics that account for the factors anticipated for bacteria in infected patients are central to the rational design of antibiotic treatment protocols. We consider whether or not continuous culture devices are a way to obtain these measures. Staphylococcus aureus PS80 in high-density continuous cultures were exposed to oxacillin, ciprofloxacin, vancomycin, gentamicin, daptomycin and linezolid. Contrary to results from low density retentostats as well as to predictions of traditional PK/MIC ratios, daily dosing with up to 100× MIC did not clear these cultures. The densities of S. aureus in these cultures oscillated with constant amplitude and never fell below 105 CFU per ml. Save for daptomycin “treated” populations, the densities of bacteria in these cultures remained significantly below that of similar antibiotic-free cultures. Although these antibiotics varied in their pharmacodynamic properties there were only modest differences in their mean densities. Mathematical models and experiments suggest that the dominant factor preventing clearance was wall-adhering subpopulations reseeding the planktonic population which can be estimated and corrected for. Continuous cultures provide a way to evaluate the potential efficacy of antibiotic treatment regimes in vitro under conditions that are more clinically realistic and comprehensive than traditional in vitro PK/PD indices. PMID:22911681

  7. Staphylococcus aureus in continuous culture: a tool for the rational design of antibiotic treatment protocols.

    PubMed

    Udekwu, Klas I; Levin, Bruce R

    2012-01-01

    In vitro measures of the pharmacodynamics of antibiotics that account for the factors anticipated for bacteria in infected patients are central to the rational design of antibiotic treatment protocols. We consider whether or not continuous culture devices are a way to obtain these measures. Staphylococcus aureus PS80 in high-density continuous cultures were exposed to oxacillin, ciprofloxacin, vancomycin, gentamicin, daptomycin and linezolid. Contrary to results from low density retentostats as well as to predictions of traditional PK/MIC ratios, daily dosing with up to 100× MIC did not clear these cultures. The densities of S. aureus in these cultures oscillated with constant amplitude and never fell below 10(5) CFU per ml. Save for daptomycin "treated" populations, the densities of bacteria in these cultures remained significantly below that of similar antibiotic-free cultures. Although these antibiotics varied in their pharmacodynamic properties there were only modest differences in their mean densities. Mathematical models and experiments suggest that the dominant factor preventing clearance was wall-adhering subpopulations reseeding the planktonic population which can be estimated and corrected for. Continuous cultures provide a way to evaluate the potential efficacy of antibiotic treatment regimes in vitro under conditions that are more clinically realistic and comprehensive than traditional in vitro PK/PD indices.

  8. The Continued Evolution of the Credit System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aparicio, Alejandro; Willis, Charles E.

    2005-01-01

    In its ongoing support of continuous physician professional development, the American Medical Association (AMA) for use in the AMA Physician's Recognition Award has adopted 2 new learning platforms: Performance Improvement (PI) and Internet Point of Care (PoC). This article highlights the process that led to their adoption and places these new…

  9. Influence of iron-limited continuous culture on physiology and virulence of Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed Central

    James, B W; Mauchline, W S; Fitzgeorge, R B; Dennis, P J; Keevil, C W

    1995-01-01

    A virulent strain of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1, subgroup Pontiac, was grown in continuous culture at a constant growth rate under iron-replete and iron-limited conditions. Iron limitation was achieved by the removal of ferrous sulfate and hemin from the chemically defined medium. Residual contaminating iron, 0.45 microM, was sufficient to support iron-limited growth. Typical iron-replete cultures metabolized 3.3 microM iron. Serine provided the principal source of carbon and energy for both cultures, although iron-replete cultures also depleted a number of other amino acids. There was a 40% decrease in culture biomass under iron-restricted conditions. Iron limitation did not significantly affect carbohydrate metabolism, with the molar growth yield for carbon (Ycarbon) comparable for both cultures. However, under iron-limited conditions a sixfold increase in Yiron correlated with a significant decrease in the iron content of the biomass, as the culture utilized the available iron more efficiently. Highly pleomorphic iron-replete cultures became uniform cultures of short fine rods when adapted to iron-deficient conditions. In addition to the morphological and physiological changes, iron limitation had a critical effect on culture virulence. The virulence of this strain was significantly (P < 0.05) reduced when the culture was subjected to iron-limited conditions. This phenomenon was reversible, with a significant increase in culture virulence upon reversion to iron-replete conditions. When compared in an in vitro macrophage assay, the number of culturable avirulent iron-limited cells located intracellularly after infection was significantly lower than for the virulent replete and control cultures. These results further support the role of environmental parameters in regulating the virulence of L. pneumophila. PMID:7591051

  10. Lactic acid production in a cell retention continuous culture using lignocellulosic hydrolysate as a substrate.

    PubMed

    Melzoch, K; Votruba, J; Hábová, V; Rychtera, M

    1997-07-23

    The effect of lignocellulosic hydrolysate of crushed corn cobs on the kinetics of growth and lactic acid production of Lactobacillus casei and L. lactis in the cell retention continuous culture was studied. The continuous cultivations were carried out in a continuous flow stirred bioreactor combined in a recycle loop with an ultrafiltration module retaining all biomass and allowing the continuous removal of metabolites, including lactic acid, as a cell-free permeate. Based on computer-aided analysis of experimental data, a simple physiological model of lactic acid cultivation was developed. The parameters of the model were estimated by non-linear regression.

  11. Synergistic Interaction Between Anabaena and Zoogloea spp. in Carbon Dioxide-Limited Continuous Cultures.

    PubMed

    Schiefer, G E; Caldwell, D E

    1982-07-01

    Flocs consisting of Anabaena and Zoogloea spp. were used as a model system for the study of planktonic phototroph-heterotroph interactions. In CO(2)-limited continuous culture (3.2 mumol of NaHCO(3) liter h, 1.5 mumol of glucose liter h, pH 8.5, D = 0.026 h), the biomass of the phototroph increased 8.6-fold due to association. However, direct CO(2) exchange accounted for only a 3.8-fold increase. When the glucose supply rate was increased to 7.5 mumol liter h, there was a 26-fold increase in biomass. When CO(2) was supplied in excess, there was no difference due to association. In batch culture, using the same medium, the specific growth rate was 0.029 h for the phototroph alone and 0.047 h for the phototroph in association with the heterotroph. The stimulatory effect of the heterotroph was found only under CO(2)-limiting conditions and was directly related to the concentration of organic matter supplied in the medium. Both the biomass and the growth rate of the Anabaena sp. were increased by association with the Zoogloea sp. Thus, dissolved organic matter may substitute for CO(2) to maximize both growth rate and biomass production by phototrophs when heterotrophic bacteria are present.

  12. Synergistic Interaction Between Anabaena and Zoogloea spp. in Carbon Dioxide-Limited Continuous Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Schiefer, G. E.; Caldwell, D. E.

    1982-01-01

    Flocs consisting of Anabaena and Zoogloea spp. were used as a model system for the study of planktonic phototroph-heterotroph interactions. In CO2-limited continuous culture (3.2 μmol of NaHCO3 liter−1 h−1, 1.5 μmol of glucose liter−1 h−1, pH 8.5, D = 0.026 h−1), the biomass of the phototroph increased 8.6-fold due to association. However, direct CO2 exchange accounted for only a 3.8-fold increase. When the glucose supply rate was increased to 7.5 μmol liter−1 h−1, there was a 26-fold increase in biomass. When CO2 was supplied in excess, there was no difference due to association. In batch culture, using the same medium, the specific growth rate was 0.029 h−1 for the phototroph alone and 0.047 h−1 for the phototroph in association with the heterotroph. The stimulatory effect of the heterotroph was found only under CO2-limiting conditions and was directly related to the concentration of organic matter supplied in the medium. Both the biomass and the growth rate of the Anabaena sp. were increased by association with the Zoogloea sp. Thus, dissolved organic matter may substitute for CO2 to maximize both growth rate and biomass production by phototrophs when heterotrophic bacteria are present. PMID:16346070

  13. The rich detail of cultural symbol systems.

    PubMed

    Read, Dwight W

    2014-08-01

    The goal of forming a science of intentional behavior requires a more richly detailed account of symbolic systems than is assumed by the authors. Cultural systems are not simply the equivalent in the ideational domain of culture of the purported Baldwin Effect in the genetic domain.

  14. Continuous Observability for the Anisotropic Maxwell System

    SciTech Connect

    Eller, Matthias M.

    2007-03-15

    A boundary observability inequality for the homogeneous Maxwell system with variable, anisotropic coefficients is proved. The result implies uniqueness for an ill-posed Cauchy problem for Maxwell's system. Both results are so far known only in the special case of isotropic coefficients, i.e., when Maxwell's system reduces to a vector wave equation. Here the analysis has been carried out for the first-order system directly without references to the wave equation.

  15. Researching Rural American Schools: Continuing Cultural Themes and Cultural Conflicts in the Countryside.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeYoung, Alan J.

    The "rural school problem" continues to plague current researchers, as it did school reformers of the past. There are basically two academic literatures focusing upon rural communities and their schools where rurality rather than ethnicity is the focus. The historical literature typically features tales of rural economic decline,…

  16. Toward a Continuous Intravascular Glucose Monitoring System

    PubMed Central

    Beier, Brooke; Musick, Katherine; Matsumoto, Akira; Panitch, Alyssa; Nauman, Eric; Irazoqui, Pedro

    2011-01-01

    Proof-of-concept studies that display the potential of using a glucose-sensitive hydrogel as a continuous glucose sensor are presented. The swelling ratio, porosity, and diffusivity of the hydrogel increased with glucose concentration. In glucose solutions of 50, 100, 200, and 300 mg/dL, the hydrogel swelling ratios were 4.9, 12.3, 15.9, and 21.7, respectively, and the swelling was reversible. The impedance across the hydrogel depended solely on the thickness and had an average increase of 47 Ω/mm. The hydrogels exposed to a hyperglycemic solution were more porous than the hydrogels exposed to a normal glycemic solution. The diffusivity of 390 Da MW fluorescein isothiocyanate in hydrogels exposed to normal and hyperglycemic solutions was examined using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching and was found to be 9.3 × 10−14 and 41.4 × 10−14 m2/s, respectively, compared to 6.2 × 10−10 m2/s in glucose solution. There was no significant difference between the permeability of hydrogels in normal and hyperglycemic glucose solutions with averages being 5.26 × 10−17 m2 and 5.80 × 10−17 m2, respectively, which resembles 2–4% agarose gels. A prototype design is presented for continuous intravascular glucose monitoring by attaching a glucose sensor to an FDA-approved stent. PMID:22344366

  17. Continuous Learning Environments: Online Performance Support Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forman, David C.; Kaplan, Sandra J.

    1994-01-01

    Describes technology-based systems that offer performance support, called online performance support systems (OPSS), that help increase productivity and efficiency. Changes in information-related, organization-related, and learning-related factors in corporations are considered; OPSS components are explained, including user-centered design; and…

  18. Culture systems: mineral oil overlay.

    PubMed

    Morbeck, Dean E; Leonard, Phoebe H

    2012-01-01

    Mineral oil overlay microdrop is commonly used during in vitro fertilization (IVF) procedures. Though mineral oil appears homogeneous, it is an undefined product that can vary in quality. Here, we describe the history, chemistry, processing, and optimal use of mineral oil for IVF and embryo culture.

  19. Fractional System Identification: An Approach Using Continuous Order-Distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, Tom T.; Lorenzo, Carl F.

    1999-01-01

    This paper discusses the identification of fractional- and integer-order systems using the concept of continuous order-distribution. Based on the ability to define systems using continuous order-distributions, it is shown that frequency domain system identification can be performed using least squares techniques after discretizing the order-distribution.

  20. Emerging Pedagogies of Linguistic and Cultural Continuity in Papua New Guinea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pickford, Steve

    2005-01-01

    This paper explores issues of linguistic and cultural continuity in vernacular education in the south pacific state of Papua New Guinea (PNG). It draws from an ongoing ethnographic study of the introduction of vernacular teaching in elementary and lower primary schooling where English has recently been replaced as the medium of instruction making…

  1. The Role of Cultural Context in Continuing Vocational Training: A Study on Auto Repairmen in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akbas, Oktay

    2011-01-01

    This study analysed how auto repairmen working in micro-enterprises undertake continuing vocational training in relation to cultural context. The study was conducted in Kirikkale, a city in central Anatolia in Turkey. To this end, the descriptive research technique of structured interview was used. Interviews with 33 auto repairmen were recorded…

  2. Continuing Bonds in Bereaved Pakistani Muslims: Effects of Culture and Religion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suhail, Kausar; Jamil, Naila; Oyebode, Jan; Ajmal, Mohammad Asir

    2011-01-01

    This study explores the bereavement process and continuing bond in Pakistani Muslims with the focus on how culture and religion influence these processes. Ten participants were interviewed and their transcribed interviews were analyzed using a grounded theory approach. Three main domains were identified from the narratives expressed by the…

  3. Continuing Bonds in Bereaved Pakistani Muslims: Effects of Culture and Religion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suhail, Kausar; Jamil, Naila; Oyebode, Jan; Ajmal, Mohammad Asir

    2011-01-01

    This study explores the bereavement process and continuing bond in Pakistani Muslims with the focus on how culture and religion influence these processes. Ten participants were interviewed and their transcribed interviews were analyzed using a grounded theory approach. Three main domains were identified from the narratives expressed by the…

  4. Traditional ranching heritage and cultural continuity in the southwestern United States

    Treesearch

    Carol Raish; Alice M. McSweeney

    2008-01-01

    This study, conducted among ranchers on the Santa Fe and Carson National Forests in the Southwestern United States, examines the role of ranching in maintaining traditional heritage and cultural continuity. The mainly Hispanic ranching families of northern New Mexico first came into the region in 1598 with Spanish colonization. Many of the villages received community...

  5. Effects of Organizational Role and Culture on Participation in Continuing Professional Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grzyb, Stanley W.; And Others

    This study extends the investigation of professionals' reasons for participation in continuing education beyond personal and practice-based factors into the arena of organizational structure and culture. The Participation Reasons Scale (PRS) and the Respondent Information Form (RIF) were used to examine the motives influencing Army Engineers…

  6. Affective, Normative, and Continuance Commitment Levels across Cultures: A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, John P.; Stanley, David J.; Jackson, Timothy A.; McInnis, Kate J.; Maltin, Elyse R.; Sheppard, Leah

    2012-01-01

    With increasing globalization of business and diversity within the workplace, there has been growing interest in cultural differences in employee commitment. We used meta-analysis to compute mean levels of affective (AC; K=966, N=433,129), continuance (CC; K=428, N=199,831), and normative (NC; K=336, N=133,277) organizational commitment for as…

  7. Cultural Continuity in EFL Teaching in International Higher Education: From a Discourse Perspective of Chinese Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Wenhui; Chen, Linhan

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an ethnographic study of the application of cultural continuity in English as Foreign Language (EFL) teaching in International College, GDUFS China. Based on Holliday's (2001) findings and Brown's (2000) twelve "manifestos" together with interviews of the Chinese learners, the authors investigate the discoursal…

  8. Affective, Normative, and Continuance Commitment Levels across Cultures: A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, John P.; Stanley, David J.; Jackson, Timothy A.; McInnis, Kate J.; Maltin, Elyse R.; Sheppard, Leah

    2012-01-01

    With increasing globalization of business and diversity within the workplace, there has been growing interest in cultural differences in employee commitment. We used meta-analysis to compute mean levels of affective (AC; K=966, N=433,129), continuance (CC; K=428, N=199,831), and normative (NC; K=336, N=133,277) organizational commitment for as…

  9. Lessons learned from building a culture and infrastructure for continuous quality improvement at Cabarrus Health Alliance.

    PubMed

    Randolph, Greg D; Stanley, Cappie; Rowe, Bobbie; Massie, Sara E; Cornett, Amanda; Harrison, Lisa Macon; Lea, C Suzanne

    2012-01-01

    This case study describes a local public health agency's multiyear effort to establish an infrastructure and organizational culture for continuous quality improvement, using data from interviews with the agency's senior leaders, managers, and frontline staff. Lessons learned include the importance of setting stretch goals, engaging leaders at all levels of the organization, empowering frontline staff to make changes, providing quality improvement training for staff and leaders, starting with small projects first, spreading quality improvement efforts to involve all parts of the agency, and sustaining momentum by creating a supporting infrastructure for continuous quality improvement and continually initiating new projects.

  10. Impact of a continuing professional development intervention on midwifery academics' awareness of cultural safety.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Tania; Creedy, Debra K; West, Roianne

    2017-06-01

    Cultural safety in higher education learning and teaching environments is paramount to positive educational outcomes for Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander (hereafter called First Peoples) students. There is a lack of research evaluating the impact of continuing professional development on midwifery academics' awareness of cultural safety. To implement and evaluate a continuing professional development intervention to improve midwifery academics' awareness of cultural safety in supporting First Peoples midwifery students success. A pre-post intervention mixed methods design was used. Academics (n=13) teaching into a Bachelor of Midwifery program agreed to participate. The intervention consisted of two workshops and five yarning circles across a semester. Data included the Awareness of Cultural Safety Scale, self-assessment on cultural safety and perceptions of racism, evaluation of the intervention, participants' journal entries, and researcher's reflections. Responses on the Awareness of Cultural Safety Scale revealed significant improvement in participants' awareness of cultural safety. There was an upward trend in self-assessment ratings. Participants reported high levels of satisfaction with the intervention or workshops and yarning circles. Participants' journal entries revealed themes willingness to participate and learn, confidence as well as anger and distress. Increased awareness of cultural safety can be transformative for midwifery academics. Workshops and yarning circles can support academics in moving beyond a 'sense of paralysis' and engage in challenging conversations to transform their learning and teaching and in turn foster a culturally safe learning and teaching environment for First Peoples midwifery students towards success. Copyright © 2017 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Instability of asymmetric continuous shaft system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinath, R.; Sarkar, Abhijit; Sekhar, A. S.

    2016-11-01

    In this work, the governing equation of asymmetric continuous shaft in inertial frame of reference is studied. In particular, determination of the parameter ranges for the stability or instability of the shaft response is the focus of the present work. The governing equations are a fourth-order coupled partial differential equations containing time dependent coefficients. The equations are non-dimensionalized in terms of two parameters related to the average moment of inertia and the difference of moments of inertia about the principal axes. Using the latter as the asymptotic parameter and employing modal superposition, a formal methodology based on perturbation methods is developed to ascertain the stability and instability characteristics. The methodology is applicable to shafts subjected to some of the classical boundary conditions viz. simply supported, cantilever, and fixed-fixed. Similar stability curves are obtained for each mode for these different boundary conditions. The novel non-dimensionalization scheme chosen leads to the stability boundaries as well as the loci of varying speeds to be in the form of straight lines. The intersection of these lines determine the stable and unstable speed ranges of different asymmetric shafts. The results are generalized for different material and geometric properties of the shaft.

  12. Control system for a continuously variable transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Vahabzadeh, H.

    1986-08-26

    A hydraulic control is described for a continuously variable transmission having hydraulically adjustable axially movable pulley members and a gearing arrangement for the transmitting of torque between an input shaft and a output shaft. The control consists of: a source of fluid pressure; first valve means connected with the source and being operable to supply control fluid to one of the first valve means to impose a force thereon; feedback means for imposing a force proportional to the axial position of the one adjustable pulley member on the first valve means in addition to the control fluid imposed force; torque sensing means operatively connected with the gearing arrangement for transmitting a force proportional to the torque transmitted by the gearing arrangement; servo motor means operatively connected with the torque sensing means; second valve means connected with the torque sensing means and being operable on a change of torque transmission to distribute a pressure signal from the source to the servo motor means and the servo motor means being responsive to the pressure fluid to balance the force on the torque to balance the force on the torque sensing means and discontinue fluid distribution thereto; and means for directing the pressure signal from the second valve means to the first valve means.

  13. Supporting Continuous Improvement in California's Education System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darling-Hammond, Linda; Plank, David N.

    2015-01-01

    California's new accountability system originated in the radical decentralization of power and authority from Sacramento to local schools and their communities brought about by the Legislature's adoption of the Local Control Funding Formula (LCFF) in 2013. Under California's previous accountability policies and the federal "No Child Left…

  14. Growing B Lymphocytes in a Three-Dimensional Culture System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, J. H. David; Bottaro, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) culture system for growing long-lived B lymphocytes has been invented. The capabilities afforded by the system can be expected to expand the range of options for immunological research and related activities, including testing of immunogenicity of vaccine candidates in vitro, generation of human monoclonal antibodies, and immunotherapy. Mature lymphocytes, which are the effectors of adaptive immune responses in vertebrates, are extremely susceptible to apoptotic death, and depend on continuous reception of survival-inducing stimulation (in the forms of cytokines, cell-to-cell contacts, and antigen receptor signaling) from the microenvironment. For this reason, efforts to develop systems for long-term culture of functional, non-transformed and non-activated mature lymphocytes have been unsuccessful until now. The bone-marrow microenvironment supports the growth and differentiation of many hematopoietic lineages, in addition to B-lymphocytes. Primary bone-marrow cell cultures designed to promote the development of specific cell types in vitro are highly desirable experimental systems, amenable to manipulation under controlled conditions. However, the dynamic and complex network of stromal cells and insoluble matrix proteins is disrupted in prior plate- and flask-based culture systems, wherein the microenvironments have a predominantly two-dimensional (2D) character. In 2D bone-marrow cultures, normal B-lymphoid cells become progressively skewed toward precursor B-cell populations that do not retain a normal immunophenotype, and such mature B-lymphocytes as those harvested from the spleen or lymph nodes do not survive beyond several days ex vivo in the absence of mitogenic stimulation. The present 3D culture system is a bioreactor that contains highly porous artificial scaffolding that supports the long-term culture of bone marrow, spleen, and lymph-node samples. In this system, unlike in 2D culture systems, B-cell subpopulations developing

  15. Multiplying steady-state culture in multi-reactor system.

    PubMed

    Erm, Sten; Adamberg, Kaarel; Vilu, Raivo

    2014-11-01

    Cultivation of microorganisms in batch experiments is fast and economical but the conditions therein change constantly, rendering quantitative data interpretation difficult. By using chemostat with controlled environmental conditions the physiological state of microorganisms is fixed; however, the unavoidable stabilization phase makes continuous methods resource consuming. Material can be spared by using micro scale devices, which however have limited analysis and process control capabilities. Described herein are a method and a system combining the high throughput of batch with the controlled environment of continuous cultivations. Microorganisms were prepared in one bioreactor followed by culture distribution into a network of bioreactors and continuation of independent steady state experiments therein. Accelerostat cultivation with statistical analysis of growth parameters demonstrated non-compromised physiological state following distribution, thus the method effectively multiplied steady state culture of microorganisms. The theoretical efficiency of the system was evaluated in inhibitory compound analysis using repeated chemostat to chemostat transfers.

  16. Economic Systems: A Modular Approach. Cultural Anthropology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kassebaum, Peter

    Designed for use as supplementary instructional material in a cultural anthropology course, this learning module uses a systems approach to allow students to see the connections and similarities which most cultural groups share on the basis of the type of economic organization that they exhibit. The module begins with a general discussion of…

  17. Holonomic Quantum Control with Continuous Variable Systems.

    PubMed

    Albert, Victor V; Shu, Chi; Krastanov, Stefan; Shen, Chao; Liu, Ren-Bao; Yang, Zhen-Biao; Schoelkopf, Robert J; Mirrahimi, Mazyar; Devoret, Michel H; Jiang, Liang

    2016-04-08

    Universal computation of a quantum system consisting of superpositions of well-separated coherent states of multiple harmonic oscillators can be achieved by three families of adiabatic holonomic gates. The first gate consists of moving a coherent state around a closed path in phase space, resulting in a relative Berry phase between that state and the other states. The second gate consists of "colliding" two coherent states of the same oscillator, resulting in coherent population transfer between them. The third gate is an effective controlled-phase gate on coherent states of two different oscillators. Such gates should be realizable via reservoir engineering of systems that support tunable nonlinearities, such as trapped ions and circuit QED.

  18. Holonomic Quantum Control with Continuous Variable Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, Victor V.; Shu, Chi; Krastanov, Stefan; Shen, Chao; Liu, Ren-Bao; Yang, Zhen-Biao; Schoelkopf, Robert J.; Mirrahimi, Mazyar; Devoret, Michel H.; Jiang, Liang

    2016-04-01

    Universal computation of a quantum system consisting of superpositions of well-separated coherent states of multiple harmonic oscillators can be achieved by three families of adiabatic holonomic gates. The first gate consists of moving a coherent state around a closed path in phase space, resulting in a relative Berry phase between that state and the other states. The second gate consists of "colliding" two coherent states of the same oscillator, resulting in coherent population transfer between them. The third gate is an effective controlled-phase gate on coherent states of two different oscillators. Such gates should be realizable via reservoir engineering of systems that support tunable nonlinearities, such as trapped ions and circuit QED.

  19. Constructing a High Density Cell Culture System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaulding, Glenn F. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    An annular culture vessel for growing mammalian cells is constructed in a one piece integral and annular configuration with an open end which is closed by an endcap. The culture vessel is rotatable about a horizontal axis by use of conventional roller systems commonly used in culture laboratories. The end wall of the endcap has tapered access ports to frictionally and sealingly receive the ends of hypodermic syringes. The syringes permit the introduction of fresh nutrient and withdrawal of spent nutrients. The walls are made of conventional polymeric cell culture material and are subjected to neutron bombardment to form minute gas permeable perforations in the walls.

  20. Short communication: effect of oilseed supplementation of an herbage diet on ruminal fermentation in continuous culture.

    PubMed

    Soder, K J; Brito, A F; Rubano, M D

    2013-04-01

    A 4-unit continuous culture fermentor system was used to evaluate the effects of oilseed supplementation of an herbage-based diet on nutrient digestibility, fermentation profile, and bacterial nitrogen (N) synthesis. Treatments were randomly assigned to fermentors in a 4×4 Latin square design with 7d for diet adaptation and 3d for data and sample collection. Dietary treatments were an herbage-only diet (HERB), or the following ground oilseeds supplemented to an herbage-based diet at 10% of total dry matter (DM) fed: flaxseed (FLAX), canola (CAN), or sunflower (SUN). Apparent DM, organic matter, and neutral detergent fiber digestibility were not affected by diet, averaging 62, 68, and 78%, respectively. True DM and organic matter digestibility were not affected by diet, averaging 78 and 82%, respectively. Fermentor pH and total volatile fatty acids were not affected by diet. Branched-chain volatile fatty acids tended to be lower for HERB compared with the 3 oilseed diets. Ammonia N concentrations were lowest for the HERB diet. Crude protein digestibility was not affected by diet. Flow of NH3-N was lowest for the HERB diet reflecting the lowest culture concentration of NH3-N. Bacterial N flows were lowest for HERB and SUN diets, intermediate for FLAX, and greatest for CAN. Flows of total N, non-NH3-N, and dietary N were not affected by diet. Likewise, efficiency of bacterial N synthesis was not affected by diet. Supplementation with FLAX, CAN, or SUN at 10% of total DM fed did not affect nutrient digestibility or ruminal fermentation compared with an all-herbage diet. The oilseeds tested herein may be considered as alternative energy supplements for grazing dairy cows, particularly during times of low availability of corn. However, in vivo studies are needed to further evaluate the effects of oilseeds supplementation of an herbage-based diet on milk production and composition (specifically human-beneficial fatty acids).

  1. Spectral fluorescence signature techniques and absorption measurements for continuous monitoring of biofuel-producing microalgae cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín de la Cruz, M. C.; Gonzalez Vilas, L.; Yarovenko, N.; Spyrakos, E.; Torres Palenzuela, J. M.

    2013-08-01

    Biofuel production from microalgae can be both sustainable and economically viable. Particularly in the case of algal growth in wastewater an extra benefit is the removal or biotransformation of pollutants from these types of waters. A continuous monitoring system of the microalgae status and the concentration of different wastewater contaminants could be of great help in the biomass production and the water characterisation. In this study we present a system where spectral fluorescence signature (SFS) techniques are used along with absorption measurements to monitor microalgae cultures in wastewater and other mediums. This system aims to optimise the microalgae production for biofuel applications or other uses and was developed and tested in prototype indoor photo-bioreactors at the University of Vigo. SFS techniques were applied using the fluorescence analyser INSTAND-SCREENER developed by Laser Diagnostic Instruments AS. INSTAND-SCREENER permits wavelength scanning in two modes, one in UV and another in VIS. In parallel, it permits the on-line monitoring and rapid analysis of both water quality and phytoplankton status without prior treatment of the sample. Considering that different contaminants and microalgae features (density, status etc.) have different spectral signatures of fluorescence and absorption properties, it is possible to characterise them developing classification libraries. Several algorithms were used for the classification. The implementation of this system in an outdoor raceway reactor in a Spanish wastewater treatment plant is also discussed. This study was part of the Project EnerBioAlgae (http://www.enerbioalgae.com/), which was funded by the Interreg SUDOE and led by the University of Vigo.

  2. Influence of discrete and continuous culture conditions on human mesenchymal stem cell lineage choice in RGD concentration gradient hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Smith Callahan, Laura A; Policastro, Gina M; Bernard, Sharon L; Childers, Erin P; Boettcher, Ronna; Becker, Matthew L

    2013-09-09

    Stem cells have shown lineage-specific differentiation when cultured on substrates possessing signaling groups derived from the native tissue. A distinct determinant in this process is the concentration of the signaling motif. While several groups have been working actively to determine the specific factors, concentrations, and mechanisms governing the differentiation process, many have been turning to combinatorial and gradient approaches in attempts to optimize the multiple chemical and physical parameters needed for the next advance. However, there has not been a direct comparison between the cellular behavior and differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells cultured in gradient and discrete substrates, which quantitates the effect of differences caused by cell-produced, soluble factors due to design differences between the culture systems. In this study, the differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells in continuous and discrete polyethylene glycol dimethacrylate (PEGDM) hydrogels containing an RGD concentration gradient from 0 to 14 mM were examined to study the effects of the different culture conditions on stem-cell behavior. Culture condition was found to affect every osteogenic (alkaline phosphatase, Runx 2, type 1 collagen, bone sailoprotein, and calcium content) and adipogenic marker (oil red and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma) examined regardless of RGD concentration. Only in the continuous gradient culture did RGD concentration affect human mesenchymal stem-cell lineage commitment with low RGD concentrations expressing higher osteogenic differentiation than high RGD concentrations. Conversely, high RGD concentrations expressed higher adipogenic differentiation than low RGD concentrations. Cytoskeletal actin organization was only affected by culture condition at low RGD concentrations, indicating that it played a limited role in the differences in lineage commitment observed. Therefore, the role of discrete versus gradient

  3. Linear optimal control of continuous time chaotic systems.

    PubMed

    Merat, Kaveh; Abbaszadeh Chekan, Jafar; Salarieh, Hassan; Alasty, Aria

    2014-07-01

    In this research study, chaos control of continuous time systems has been performed by using dynamic programming technique. In the first step by crossing the response orbits with a selected Poincare section and subsequently applying linear regression method, the continuous time system is converted to a discrete type. Then, by solving the Riccati equation a sub-optimal algorithm has been devised for the obtained discrete chaotic systems. In the next step, by implementing the acquired algorithm on the quantized continuous time system, the chaos has been suppressed in the Rossler and AFM systems as some case studies.

  4. Adaptation of Streptococcus mutans and Enterococcus hirae to acid stress in continuous culture.

    PubMed Central

    Belli, W A; Marquis, R E

    1991-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans GS-5 and IB1600 adapted to growth in acidic environments in continuous culture at slow (generation time = 8.3 h) or fast (generation time = 2.4 h) rates of growth in complex medium with a restricted glucose supply. The extent of adaptation was indicated by changes in minimum pH values attained by harvested cells suspended in dense suspensions with excess glucose and by increased levels of ATPase activity assayed in permeabilized cells. Also, adapted cells better withstood potentially lethal acidification. Cells harvested from cultures growing at pH values close to 5 reduced suspension pH to lower values than cells from cultures maintained at pH 7. Cells from pH 6 cultures were intermediate. The IB1600 strain had a higher level of constitutive acid resistance than the GS-5 strain and also was better able to adapt to growth in acidified media. Both had less adaptive capacity than Enterococcus hirae ATCC 9790. Adaptation occurred rapidly, mainly within a single generation in continuous culture, while deadaptation occurred more slowly over multiple generations. The capacity of S. mutans to adapt to acid conditions is likely to be important in the ecology of dental plaque and also for the cariogenicity of the organism. PMID:1829347

  5. Computer graphics and cultural heritage, part 2: continuing inspiration for future tools.

    PubMed

    Arnold, David

    2014-01-01

    The availability of large quantities of cultural-heritage data will enable new, previously inconceivable, types of analysis and new applications. Currently, most emerging analysis methods are experimental research. It's likely to take many years before the research matures and provides cultural-heritage professionals with novel research methods that they use routinely. Indeed, we can expect further disruptive technologies to emerge in the foreseeable future and a "steady state" of continuing rapid change. Part 1 can be found at 10.1109/MCG.2014.47.

  6. Cellulase production in continuous and fed-batch culture by Trichoderma reesei MCG80

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, A.L.; Andreotti, R.E.

    1982-01-01

    Continuous culture of Natick's strain MCG80 of Trichoderma reesei at a dilution rate of 0.028 h/sup -1/ has yielded a cellulase titer of over 61 U/mL using 5% lactose as the sole carbon source. Enzyme productivity at this dilution rate is 168 IU/L/h. Repeated fed-batch cultures using this strain on lactose as the carbon source have titers of 10 IU/mL with productivities in excess of 100 IU/L/h. 5 figures, 1 table.

  7. Phosphate-limited continuous culture of Rhodotorula rubra: kinetics of transport, leakage, and growth.

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, B R; Button, D K

    1979-01-01

    The phosphate-limited growth kinetics of Rhodotorula rubra, a small yeast of marine origin, were examined by analysis of 32P distributions in continuous cultures. Isotope relaxation procedures were used to identify unidirectional flows of Pi and organic phosphate among compartments modeled during growth. The concentrations of phosphates in these compartments at various growth rates were used, together with attendant flows, to produce a mathematical model of growth. Both Pi and phosphate-containing metabolic intermediates leaked from cells during growth. Total leakage ranged from 4 to 10% of influx and was comprised mostly of Pi. Transport capacity was at least 10 times that required for growth at saturating Pi concentrations, so that influx was linear with concentration during growth. This led to the realization that the curvature of Monod plots (Kmu = 12 nM mumax = 0.18/h, and the threshold At = 2.5 nM) is due to change in yield with growth rate. Growth rate related to Pi by the affinity, aA (= 0.43 liter/mg of cells.h) of cells for Pi and the growth rate-dependent yield. It was also specified by a series of kinetic constants that specified flow among the various compartments and equilibrium compartment concentrations as they were set by extracellular Pi. The importance of leakage by healthy cells to the organic chemistry of aquatic systems is noted. PMID:37231

  8. Synergistic Action of Gentamicin and Bacteriophage in a Continuous Culture Population of Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Kirby, Amy E.

    2012-01-01

    With the increasing frequency of antibiotic resistance and the decreasing frequency of new antibiotics entering the market, interest has returned to developing bacteriophage as a therapeutic agent. Acceptance of phage therapy, however, is limited by the unknown pharmacodynamics of a replicating agent, as well as the potential for the evolution of resistant bacteria. One way to overcome some of these limitations is to incorporate phage and antibiotics into a dual therapy regimen; however, this increases the complexity of the pharmacodynamics. The aim of this study is to develop an experimental system to evaluate the pharmacodynamics of dual phage-drug therapy. A continuous culture system for Staphylococcus aureus is used to simulate the pharmacokinetics of periodic antibiotic dosing alone and in combination with lytic phage. A computer model representation of the system allows further evaluation of the conditions governing the observed pharmacodynamics. The results of this experimental/modeling approach suggest that dual therapy can be more efficacious than single therapies, particularly if there is an overlap in the physiological pathways targeted by the individual agents. In this case, treatment with gentamicin induces a population of cells with a strong aggregation phenotype. These aggregators also have an increased ability to form biofilm, which is a well-known, non-genetic mechanism of drug resistance. However, the aggregators are also more susceptible than the parental strain to the action of the phage. Thus, dual treatment with gentamicin and phage resulted in lower final cell densities than either treatment alone. Unlike in the phage-only treatment, phage-resistant isolates were not detected in the dual treatment. PMID:23226451

  9. Multi-stage microbial system for continuous hydrogen production

    DOEpatents

    Kosourov, Sergey; Ghirardi, Maria L.; Seibert, Michael

    2010-06-08

    A method of using sequential chemostat culture vessels to provide continuous H.sub.2 production, in which photosynthetic O.sub.2 evolution and H.sub.2 photoproduction are separated physically into two separate bioreactors, comprising: a) growing a microorganism culture able to continuously generate H.sub.2 by photosynthetically producing cells at about the early-to-late log state in a first photobioreactor operating as a sulfur chemostat under aerobic and/or conditions; b) continuously feeding cells from the first photobioreactor to a second photobioreactor operating under anaerobic conditions and sulfur deprivation conditions resulting from constant uptake of sulfate in the first bioreactor and a low rate of culture flow between the first and second bioreactors, for induction of hydrogenase and H.sub.2 photoproduction to allow for continuous cultivation of the microorganism's cells in the first photobioreactor and constant H.sub.2 production in the second photobioreactor, and c) H.sub.2 gas from the second photobioreactor.

  10. Child Sexual Abuse and Continuous Influence of Cultural Practices: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Shafe, S; Hutchinson, G

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aim: To provide information on the possible influence of cultural practices in perpetuating child sexual abuse and to examine documented examples of these cultural influences. Methods: A computer literature search was done of Medline, Science Direct, PSYCInfo, Embase and PubMed for keywords. There were also manual searches in the library of journals that are not accessible online. Keywords for searches included: sexual abuse, child abuse, psychopathology, name of countries (eg Jordan, China and Morocco), culture and cultural practices. Results: There is documented evidence of cultural practices that continue to fuel the persistently high level of child sexual abuse across the globe. The definition has evolved to now include simple genital-genital and non-genital contact such as oral-genital contacts, exhibitionism and pornography. Conclusions: Cultural practices are no longer restricted to one geographical collection of people due to migratory influence, as these practices may also spread to different groups who intermingle. There are few empirical studies of child sexual abuse in the Caribbean, but one factor that could be used as a proxy is age of first sexual activity. The World Bank reports that this age is youngest in the Caribbean and is likely to be significantly influenced by child sexual abuse. PMID:25803380

  11. Continuation of periodic orbits in symmetric Hamiltonian and conservative systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galan-Vioque, J.; Almaraz, F. J. M.; Macías, E. F.

    2014-12-01

    We present and review results on the continuation and bifurcation of periodic solutions in conservative, reversible and Hamiltonian systems in the presence of symmetries. In particular we show how two-point boundary value problem continuation software can be used to compute families of periodic solutions of symmetric Hamiltonian systems. The technique is introduced with a very simple model example (the mathematical pendulum), justified with a theoretical continuation result and then applied to two non trivial examples: the non integrable spring pendulum and the continuation of the figure eight solution of the three body problem.

  12. Toxoplasma gondii from liquid nitrogen for continuous cell culture: methods to maximise efficient retrieval.

    PubMed

    Mavin, S; Evans, R; Chatterton, J M W; Ashburn, D; Joss, A W L; Ho-Yen, D O

    2003-01-01

    This study aims to increase the efficiency of continuous growth of Toxoplasma gondii in HeLa cells from tachyzoite stocks frozen in liquid nitrogen. Freezing and retrieval of tachyzoites for continuous cell culture requires more stringent protocols than those published for animal culture. The freezing and retrieval conditions are optimised so that a quality harvest (> or = 1 x 10(6) tachyzoites/mL, > or = 90% viability) can be produced using T. gondii recovered from liquid nitrogen as fast and reliably as possible. Retrieval success rate increased from 36% to 100%. An improved freezing procedure using chilled reagents and freshly harvested parasites, and adoption of an effective recovery protocol with retrieval of 3 x 10(7) tachyzoites into 75 cm2 flasks, change of maintenance media after six hours and subsequent blind passage all contributed to this success. The result is faster and more dependable production of T. gondii for diagnostic and experimental use.

  13. Toxoplasma gondii from liquid nitrogen for continuous cell culture:methods to maximise efficient retrieval.

    PubMed

    Mavin, S; Evans, R; Chatterton, J M W; Ashburn, D; Joss, A W L; Ho-Yen, D O

    2003-01-01

    This study aims to increase the efficiency of continuous growth of Toxoplasma gondii in HeLa cells from tachyzoite stocks frozen in liquid nitrogen. Freezing and retrieval of tachyzoites for continuous cell culture requires more stringent protocols than those published for animal culture. The freezing and retrieval conditions are optimised so that a quality harvest (≥ 1 x 10(6) tachyzoites/mL, ≥ 90% viability) can be produced using T. gondii recovered from liquid nitrogen as fast and reliably as possible. Retrieval success rate increased from 36% to 100%. An improved freezing procedure using chilled reagents and freshly harvested parasites, and adoption of an effective recovery protocol with retrieval of 3 x 10(7) tachyzoites into 75cm(2) flasks, change of maintenance media after six hours and subsequent blind passage all contributed to this success. The result is faster and more dependable production of T. gondii for diagnostic and experimental use.

  14. Copper Sulfate-induced Fermentation Changes in Continuous Cultures of the Rumen Microbial Ecosystem1

    PubMed Central

    Slyter, L. L.; Wolin, M. J.

    1967-01-01

    The effect of CuSO4 on fermentation was studied in a continuously cultured rumen ecosystem. CuSO4, introduced at a level of 50 mg/500 ml of culture volume twice daily, caused a marked inhibition of fermentation of concentrates. Fermentation of alfalfa hay was not inhibited by the same CuSO4 concentration when the inoculum for the culture was obtained from a cow maintained on a normal concentrate ration. When the inoculum was from a cow on a high concentrate ration, hay fermentation was partially inhibited by CuSO4. Concentrations of CuSO4 that did not inhibit the fermentation of alfalfa hay or hay-concentrate mixtures caused preferential production of propionic acid and decreased production of methane. PMID:6077413

  15. Fermentation of cellulosic substrates in batch and continuous culture by Clostridium thermocellum

    SciTech Connect

    Lynd, L.R.; Grethlein, H.E.; Wolkin, R.H. )

    1989-12-01

    Fermentation of dilute-acid-pretreated mixed hardwood and Avicel by Clostridium thermocellum was compared in batch and continuous cultures. Results indicate that fermentation parameters, with the exception of free cellulase activity, are essentially the same for pretreated mixed hardwood and Avicel under a variety of conditions. Hydrolysis yields obtained with C. thermocellum cellulase acting either in vitro or in vivo were comparable to those previously reported for Trichoderma reesei on the same substrates.

  16. An Interactive Reservation-Registration System for Continuing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniel, Leonard R.

    A relatively rapid system for reservation and/or registration of continuing education (noncredit) students at Clayton Junior College, Georgia, is described. The system was developed on a Texas Instruments 990/10 computer system in COBOL, and makes extensive use of a few function keys. System features include provision for reservation and waiting…

  17. Lipid accumulation in Schizochytrium G13/2S produced in continuous culture.

    PubMed

    Ganuza, E; Izquierdo, M S

    2007-10-01

    Lipid and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) accumulation into Schizochytrium G13/2S was studied under batch and continuous culture. Different glucose and glutamate concentrations were supplemented in a defined medium. During batch cultivation, lipid accumulation, 35% total fatty acids (TFA) occurred at the arithmetic growth phase but ceased when cell growth stopped. When continuous culture was performed under different glutamate concentrations, nitrogen-growth-limiting conditions induced the accumulation of 30-28% TFA in Schizochytrium. As the dilution rate decreased from 0.08 to 0.02 h(-1), both cell dry weight and TFA content of the cell increased. Under a constant dilution rate of 0.04 h(-1), carbon-limiting conditions decreased the TFA to 22%. Fatty acid profile was not affected by the different nutrient concentrations provided during continuous culture. Consequently, lipid accumulation can be induced through the carbon and nitrogen source concentration in the medium to maximise the TFA and subsequently DHA productivity by this microorganism.

  18. Application of a multi-channel system for continuous monitoring and an early warning system.

    PubMed

    Lee, J H; Song, C H; Kim, B C; Gu, M B

    2006-01-01

    A multi-channel continuous toxicity monitoring system developed in our laboratory, based on two-stage mini-bioreactors, was successfully implemented in the form of computer-based data acquisition. The multi-channel system consists of a series of a two-stage minibioreactor systems connected by a fiber optic probe to a luminometer, and uses genetically engineered bioluminescent bacteria for the detection of the potential toxicity from the soluble chemicals. This system can be stably and continuously operated due to the separation of the culture reactor from the test reactor and accomplish easy and long-term monitoring without system shut down by abrupt inflows of severe polluting chemicals. Four different recombinant bioluminescent bacteria were used in different channels so that the modes of the samples toxicities can be reasonably identified and evaluated based upon the response signature of each channel. The bioluminescent signatures were delivered from four channels by switching one at once, while the data is automatically logged to an IBM compatible computer. We also achieved the enhancement of the system through the manipulation of the dilution rate and the use of thermo-lux fusion strains. Finally, this system is now being implemented to a drinking water reservoir and river for remote sensing as an early warning system.

  19. [Bacteria ecology in planting-culturing system].

    PubMed

    Huang, Fenglian; Xia, Beicheng; Dai, Xin; Chen, Guizhu

    2004-06-01

    Planting-culturing system in inter-tidal zone is a new type eco-culturing model. The survey on bacteria biomass and water quality in the designed planting-culturing system in inter-tidal zone showed that the mangrove planted in the system improved water quality and made water quality to II-III type, better than the IV and V type in the control pond. Designed ponds made heterotrophic bacteria, vibrio, phosphorus bacteria and enzyme-producing bacteria populations 1-2 order lower than the control pond without mongrove planting. Correlation analyses with CORREL software showed that the biomass of these bacteria was positively related with the nitrogen and phosphorus contents in water of the system, and the correlation coefficient for heterogeneous bacteria and vibrio was up to 0.9205. Heterotrophic bacteria and vibrio could be used as the water-quality monitoring organisms.

  20. Continuous plant cell perfusion culture: bioreactor characterization and secreted enzyme production.

    PubMed

    Su, Wei Wen; Arias, Renee

    2003-01-01

    Culture perfusion is widely practiced in mammalian cell processes to enhance secreted antibody production. Here, we report the development of an efficient continuous perfusion process for the cultivation of plant cell suspensions. The key to this process is a perfusion bioreactor that incorporates an annular settling zone into a stirred-tank bioreactor to achieve continuous cell/medium separation via gravitational sedimentation. From washout experiments, we found that under typical operating conditions (e.g., 200 rpm and 0.3 vvm) the liquid phase in the entire perfusion bioreactor was homogeneous despite the presence of the cylindrical baffle. Using secreted acid phosphatase (APase) produced in Anchusa officinalis cell culture as a model we have studied the perfusion cultures under complete or partial cell retention. The perfusion culture was operated under phosphate limitation to stimulate APase production. Successful operation of the perfusion process over four weeks has been achieved in this work. When A. officinalis cells were grown in the perfusion reactor and perfused at up to 0.4 vvd with complete cell retention, a cell dry weight exceeding 20 g/l could be achieved while secreted APase productivity leveled off at approximately 300 units/l/d. The culture became extremely dense with the maximum packed cell volume (PCV) surpassing 70%. In comparison, the maximum cell dry weight and overall secreted APase productivity in a typical batch culture were 10-12 g/l and 100-150 units/l/d, respectively. Operation of the perfusion culture under extremely high PCV for a prolonged period, however, led to declined oxygen uptake and reduced viability. Subsequently, cell removal via a bleed stream at up to 0.11 vvd was tested and shown to stabilize the culture at a PCV below 60%. With culture bleeding, both specific oxygen uptake rate and viability were shown to increase. This also led to a higher cell dry weight exceeding 25 g/l, and further improvement of secreted APase

  1. Building a Culture of Continuous Quality Improvement in an Academic Radiology Department.

    PubMed

    Katzman, Gregory L; Paushter, David M

    2016-04-01

    As we enter a new era of health care in the United States, radiologists must be adequately prepared to prove, and continually improve, our value to our customers. This goal can be achieved in large part by providing high-quality services. Although quality efforts on the national and international levels provide a framework for improving radiologic quality, some of the greatest opportunities for quality improvement can be found at the departmental level, through the implementation of total quality management programs. Establishing such a program requires not only strong leadership and employee engagement, but also a firm understanding of the multiple total quality management tools and continuous quality improvement strategies available. In this article, we discuss key tools and strategies required to build a culture of continuous quality improvement in an academic department, based on our experience.

  2. "I Am a Human Being like You": An Identification Strategy to Maintain Continuity in a Cultural Contact Zone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Sullivan-Lago, Ria; de Abreu, Guida; Burgess, Mark

    2008-01-01

    In this article, we discuss a qualitative study carried out in a cultural contact zone. Irish nationals, immigrants, and asylum seekers in Cork, Ireland, were interviewed about their cultural identities and future trajectories. Cultural Continuity theory was used as a model to offer an insight into the processes and strategies of the Dialogical…

  3. "I Am a Human Being like You": An Identification Strategy to Maintain Continuity in a Cultural Contact Zone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Sullivan-Lago, Ria; de Abreu, Guida; Burgess, Mark

    2008-01-01

    In this article, we discuss a qualitative study carried out in a cultural contact zone. Irish nationals, immigrants, and asylum seekers in Cork, Ireland, were interviewed about their cultural identities and future trajectories. Cultural Continuity theory was used as a model to offer an insight into the processes and strategies of the Dialogical…

  4. A continuous real-time expert system for computer operations

    SciTech Connect

    Ennis, R.L.; Griesmer, J.H.; Hong, S.J.; Karnaugh, M.; Kastner, J.K.; Klein, D.A.; Milliken, K.R.; Schor, M.I.; Van Woerkom, H.M.

    1986-01-01

    The Yorktown Expert System/MVS Manager (or YES/MVS for short) is a continuous real-time expert system that exerts active control over a computing system and provides advice to computer operators. YES/MVS provides advice on routine operations and detects, diagnoses, and responds to problems in the computer operator's domain. This paper discusses the YES/MVS system, its domain of application, and issues that arise in the design and development of an expert system that runs continuously in real time.

  5. HBV culture and infectious systems.

    PubMed

    Hayes, C Nelson; Chayama, Kazuaki

    2016-07-01

    While an effective vaccine against hepatitis B virus (HBV) has long been available, chronic HBV infection remains a severe global public health concern. Current treatment options have limited effectiveness, and long-term therapy is required to suppress HBV replication; however, complete elimination of the virus is rare. The lack of suitable animal models and infection systems has hindered efforts to unravel the HBV life cycle, particularly the early events in HBV entry, which appear to be highly species- and tissue-specific. Human primary hepatocytes remain the gold standard for HBV replication studies but are limited by availability and variability. While the HepaRG cell line is permissive for HBV replication, other hepatoma cell lines such as HepG2 do not support HBV replication. The recent discovery of sodium taurocholate transporting peptide (NTCP) as a primary receptor for HBV binding has led to the development of replication-competent cell lines such as HepG2-NTCP. Human hepatocytes grown in chimeric mice have provided another approach that allows primary human hepatocytes to be used while overcoming many of their limitations. Although the difficulty in developing HBV infection systems has hindered development of effective treatments, the variability and limited replication efficiency among cell lines point to additional liver-specific factors involved in HBV infection. It is hoped that HBV infection studies will lead to novel drug targets and therapeutic options for the treatment of chronic HBV infection.

  6. Immobilized yeast cell systems for continuous fermentation applications.

    PubMed

    Verbelen, Pieter J; De Schutter, David P; Delvaux, Filip; Verstrepen, Kevin J; Delvaux, Freddy R

    2006-10-01

    In several yeast-related industries, continuous fermentation systems offer important economical advantages in comparison with traditional systems. Fermentation rates are significantly improved, especially when continuous fermentation is combined with cell immobilization techniques to increase the yeast concentration in the fermentor. Hence the technique holds a great promise for the efficient production of fermented beverages, such as beer, wine and cider as well as bio-ethanol. However, there are some important pitfalls, and few industrial-scale continuous systems have been implemented. Here, we first review the various cell immobilization techniques and reactor setups. Then, the impact of immobilization on cell physiology and fermentation performance is discussed. In a last part, we focus on the practical use of continuous fermentation and cell immobilization systems for beer production.

  7. Developing a Promotional Campaign for a Statewide Continuing Education System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munger, Paul; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Describes activities developed in promoting a statewide continuing education system. They included television and radio advertisements, a user's manual, and a logo. Program evaluation and implementation are also discussed. (CT)

  8. Development of Variable Camber Continuous Trailing Edge Flap System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urnes, Jim, Sr.; Nguyen, Nhan T.; Dykman, John

    2012-01-01

    This presentation describes the current status of the joint NASA/Boeing collaboration on the development of a variable camber continuous trailing edge flap system for use in wing shaping control for cruise drag reduction.

  9. Continuous butanol fermentation from xylose with high cell density by cell recycling system.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jin; Tashiro, Yukihiro; Yoshida, Tsuyoshi; Gao, Ming; Wang, Qunhui; Sonomoto, Kenji

    2013-02-01

    A continuous butanol production system with high-density Clostridium saccharoperbutylacetonicum N1-4 generated by cell recycling was established to examine the characteristics of butanol fermentation from xylose. In continuous culture without cell recycling, cell washout was avoided by maintaining pH>5.6 at a dilution rate of 0.26 h(-1), indicating pH control was critical to this experiment. Subsequently, continuous culture with cell recycling increased cell concentration to 17.4 g L(-1), which increased butanol productivity to 1.20 g L(-1) h(-1) at a dilution rate of 0.26 h(-1) from 0.529 g L(-1) h(-1) without cell recycling. The effect of dilution rates on butanol production was also investigated in continuous culture with cell recycling. Maximum butanol productivity (3.32 g L(-1) h(-1)) was observed at a dilution rate of 0.78 h(-1), approximately 6-fold higher than observed in continuous culture without cell recycling (0.529 g L(-1) h(-1)). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Predator-specific enrichment of actinobacteria from a cosmopolitan freshwater clade in mixed continuous culture.

    PubMed

    Pernthaler, J; Posch, T; Simek, K; Vrba, J; Pernthaler, A; Glöckner, F O; Nübel, U; Psenner, R; Amann, R

    2001-05-01

    We investigated whether individual populations of freshwater bacteria in mixed experimental communities may exhibit specific responses to the presence of different bacterivorous protists. In two successive experiments, a two-stage continuous cultivation system was inoculated with nonaxenic batch cultures of the cryptophyte Cryptomonas sp. Algal exudates provided the sole source of organic carbon for growth of the accompanying microflora. The dynamics of several 16S rRNA-defined bacterial populations were followed in the experimental communities. Although the composition and stability of the two microbial communities differed, numerous members of the first assemblage could again be detected during the second experiment. The introduction of a size-selectively feeding mixotrophic nanoflagellate (Ochromonas sp.) always resulted in an immediate bloom of a single phylotype population of members of the class Actinobacteria (Ac1). These bacteria were phylogenetically affiliated with an uncultured lineage of gram-positive bacteria that have been found in freshwater habitats only. The Ac1 cells were close to the average size of freshwater bacterioplankton and significantly smaller than any of the other experimental community members. In contrast, no increase of the Ac1 population was observed in vessels exposed to the bacterivorous ciliate Cyclidium glaucoma. However, when the Ochromonas sp. was added after the establishment of C. glaucoma, the proportion of population Ac1 within the microbial community rapidly increased. Populations of a beta proteobacterial phylotype related to an Aquabacterium sp. decreased relative to the total bacterial communities following the addition of either predator, albeit to different extents. The community structure of pelagic microbial assemblages can therefore be influenced by the taxonomic composition of the predator community.

  11. Predator-Specific Enrichment of Actinobacteria from a Cosmopolitan Freshwater Clade in Mixed Continuous Culture

    PubMed Central

    Pernthaler, Jakob; Posch, Thomas; S̆imek, Karel; Vrba, Jaroslav; Pernthaler, Annelie; Glöckner, Frank Oliver; Nübel, Ulrich; Psenner, Roland; Amann, Rudolf

    2001-01-01

    We investigated whether individual populations of freshwater bacteria in mixed experimental communities may exhibit specific responses to the presence of different bacterivorous protists. In two successive experiments, a two-stage continuous cultivation system was inoculated with nonaxenic batch cultures of the cryptophyte Cryptomonas sp. Algal exudates provided the sole source of organic carbon for growth of the accompanying microflora. The dynamics of several 16S rRNA-defined bacterial populations were followed in the experimental communities. Although the composition and stability of the two microbial communities differed, numerous members of the first assemblage could again be detected during the second experiment. The introduction of a size-selectively feeding mixotrophic nanoflagellate (Ochromonas sp.) always resulted in an immediate bloom of a single phylotype population of members of the class Actinobacteria (Ac1). These bacteria were phylogenetically affiliated with an uncultured lineage of gram-positive bacteria that have been found in freshwater habitats only. The Ac1 cells were close to the average size of freshwater bacterioplankton and significantly smaller than any of the other experimental community members. In contrast, no increase of the Ac1 population was observed in vessels exposed to the bacterivorous ciliate Cyclidium glaucoma. However, when the Ochromonas sp. was added after the establishment of C. glaucoma, the proportion of population Ac1 within the microbial community rapidly increased. Populations of a beta proteobacterial phylotype related to an Aquabacterium sp. decreased relative to the total bacterial communities following the addition of either predator, albeit to different extents. The community structure of pelagic microbial assemblages can therefore be influenced by the taxonomic composition of the predator community. PMID:11319094

  12. Marketing to increase participation in a Web-based continuing medical education cultural competence curriculum.

    PubMed

    Estrada, Carlos A; Krishnamoorthy, Periyakaruppan; Smith, Ann; Staton, Lisa; Korf, Michele J; Allison, Jeroan J; Houston, Thomas K

    2011-01-01

    CME providers may be interested in identifying effective marketing strategies to direct users to specific content. Online advertisements for recruiting participants into activities such as clinical trials, public health programs, and continuing medical education (CME) have been effective in some but not all studies. The purpose of this study was to compare the impact of 2 marketing strategies in the context of an online CME cultural competence curriculum (www.c-comp.org). In an interrupted time-series quasi-experimental design, 2 marketing strategies were tested: (1) wide dissemination to relevant organizations over a period of approximately 4 months, and (2) Internet paid search using Google Ads (5 consecutive 8-week periods--control 1, cultural/CME advertisement, control 2, hypertension/ content advertisement, control 3). Outcome measures were CME credit requests, Web traffic (visits per day, page views, pages viewed per visit), and cost. Overall, the site was visited 19,156 times and 78,160 pages were viewed. During the wide dissemination phase, the proportion of visits requesting CME credit decreased between the first (5.3%) and second (3.3%) halves of this phase (p = .04). During the Internet paid search phase, the proportion of visits requesting CME credit was highest during the cultural/CME advertisement period (control 1, 1.4%; cultural/CME ad, 4.3%; control 2, 1.5%; hypertension/content ad, 0.6%; control 3, 0.8%; p < .001). All measures of Web traffic changed during the Internet paid search phase (p < .01); however, changes were independent of the advertisement periods. The incremental cost for the cultural advertisement per CME credit requested was US $0.64. Internet advertisement focusing on cultural competence and CME was associated with about a threefold increase in requests for CME credit at an incremental cost of under US $1; however, Web traffic changes were independent of the advertisement strategy. Copyright © 2011 The Alliance for Continuing

  13. Temperature effects on microbial respiration assessed with CO2-exchange and continuous culture techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmeier, C.; Min, K.; Song, C.; Ballantyne, F.; Billings, S. A.

    2012-12-01

    Recent work attempts to incorporate requirements of soil microorganisms for carbon and other resources, and how these requirements may respond to temperature, into theoretical concepts of soil organic matter decomposition and climate change. Because of the difficulties of measuring resource fluxes in natural soils, empirical data to guide these concepts remain scarce. Here, we present an experimental system that combines continuous culture techniques with CO2 measurements to study carbon fluxes through microbes in a reductionist, controlled environment amenable to experimental manipulation. In this pilot study, we quantified mass specific respiration rates (MSR) and δ13C of respired CO2 of Pseudomonas fluorescens, a Gram-negative bacterium common to soils, grown at 15°C and 25°C with otherwise identical environmental conditions. The microbes were grown in a 1.9 L bioreactor, in 0.9 L of nutrient medium with C:N:P atomic ratios of 100:10:3, and with 10 mM cellobiose as the carbon source. A peristaltic pump continuously supplied the bioreactor with sterile medium, and removed medium from the bioreactor, at a rate of 63 mL h-1. Both vessels were contained within a temperature incubator, and stir bars provided continuously well mixed volumes. CO2-free air was continuously bubbled through the reactor medium so to provide the microbes with O2; a cavity ring down spectrometer withdrew reactor headspace air and measured concentration and δ13C of the CO2. Air supply was regulated with a pressure/mass flow controller to approx. 27 mL min-1. In both temperature regimes, the pH of the bioreactor as well as concentration and δ13C of the CO2 in the head space air were constant over the course of 1 d, such that any imbalances in the CO2-H2CO3 equilibrium were considered negligible in the assessment of microbial respiration rates and the δ13C of respired CO2. After this time period, reactor medium was passed through a 0.22 μm filter and the filtrate dried for 24 h to obtain

  14. Control systems engineering in continuous pharmaceutical manufacturing. May 20-21, 2014 Continuous Manufacturing Symposium.

    PubMed

    Myerson, Allan S; Krumme, Markus; Nasr, Moheb; Thomas, Hayden; Braatz, Richard D

    2015-03-01

    This white paper provides a perspective of the challenges, research needs, and future directions for control systems engineering in continuous pharmaceutical processing. The main motivation for writing this paper is to facilitate the development and deployment of control systems technologies so as to ensure quality of the drug product. Although the main focus is on small-molecule pharmaceutical products, most of the same statements apply to biological drug products. An introduction to continuous manufacturing and control systems is followed by a discussion of the current status and technical needs in process monitoring and control, systems integration, and risk analysis. Some key points are that: (1) the desired objective in continuous manufacturing should be the satisfaction of all critical quality attributes (CQAs), not for all variables to operate at steady-state values; (2) the design of start-up and shutdown procedures can significantly affect the economic operation of a continuous manufacturing process; (3) the traceability of material as it moves through the manufacturing facility is an important consideration that can at least in part be addressed using residence time distributions; and (4) the control systems technologies must assure quality in the presence of disturbances, dynamics, uncertainties, nonlinearities, and constraints. Direct measurement, first-principles and empirical model-based predictions, and design space approaches are described for ensuring that CQA specifications are met. Ways are discussed for universities, regulatory bodies, and industry to facilitate working around or through barriers to the development of control systems engineering technologies for continuous drug manufacturing. Industry and regulatory bodies should work with federal agencies to create federal funding mechanisms to attract faculty to this area. Universities should hire faculty interested in developing first-principles models and control systems technologies for

  15. Control Systems Engineering in Continuous Pharmaceutical Manufacturing May 20-21, 2014 Continuous Manufacturing Symposium.

    PubMed

    Myerson, Allan S; Krumme, Markus; Nasr, Moheb; Thomas, Hayden; Braatz, Richard D

    2015-03-01

    This white paper provides a perspective of the challenges, research needs, and future directions for control systems engineering in continuous pharmaceutical processing. The main motivation for writing this paper is to facilitate the development and deployment of control systems technologies so as to ensure quality of the drug product. Although the main focus is on small-molecule pharmaceutical products, most of the same statements apply to biological drug products. An introduction to continuous manufacturing and control systems is followed by a discussion of the current status and technical needs in process monitoring and control, systems integration, and risk analysis. Some key points are that: (1) the desired objective in continuous manufacturing should be the satisfaction of all critical quality attributes (CQAs), not for all variables to operate at steady-state values; (2) the design of start-up and shutdown procedures can significantly affect the economic operation of a continuous manufacturing process; (3) the traceability of material as it moves through the manufacturing facility is an important consideration that can at least in part be addressed using residence time distributions; and (4) the control systems technologies must assure quality in the presence of disturbances, dynamics, uncertainties, nonlinearities, and constraints. Direct measurement, first-principles and empirical model-based predictions, and design space approaches are described for ensuring that CQA specifications are met. Ways are discussed for universities, regulatory bodies, and industry to facilitate working around or through barriers to the development of control systems engineering technologies for continuous drug manufacturing. Industry and regulatory bodies should work with federal agencies to create federal funding mechanisms to attract faculty to this area. Universities should hire faculty interested in developing first-principles models and control systems technologies for

  16. Fortress State, Cultural Continuities and Economic Change: Higher Education in Mainland China and Taiwan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Law, Wing-Wah

    1996-01-01

    Analyzes the role of higher education in China and Taiwan as an agent of both political socialization and economic modernization in the context of economic and social transformations, 1949-95. Examines how cultural traditions, a national belief system, nation building, and foreign relations help maintain a 200-year-old tension between…

  17. Comparison of nitrogen-15 and purines as microbial markers in continuous culture.

    PubMed

    Calsamiglia, S; Stern, M D; Firkins, J L

    1996-06-01

    Eight dual-flow continuous-culture fermenters were used in four replicated periods to compare the effects of diet and microbial marker on estimates of N metabolism in continuous culture of ruminal microorganisms. A basal diet was supplemented with urea and tryptone, soybean meal (SBM), lignosulfonate-treated SBM, corn gluten meal, blood meal (BM), hydrolyzed feather meal, fish meal (FM), or meat and bone meal (MBM). Microbial protein flow and protein degradation in fermenters were estimated using purines, purine N, and 15N in bacteria obtained from fermenter flasks or from the effluent. The ratio of purine N to total N in bacteria averaged .083 and was not affected (P > .05) by treatment. Dietary purine content (percentage of DM) ranged from .033 in BM to .084 in FM. Escape of feed purine N (percentage of total purine N flow) averaged 1.7% (SE = 2.9) and was not different (P > .05) among treatments. Bacterial N flows obtained using purines were more variable than estimates obtained using 15N. Bacterial N flows calculated using 15N in bacteria isolated from fermenters were more variable than those obtained using bacteria isolated from the effluent. The use of purines as a microbial marker resulted in lower estimates of protein degradation and smaller differences among treatments compared with use of 15N. Data suggest that escape of feed purine N seems to be a minor factor affecting calculation of bacterial N flow and that the use of 15N in effluent bacteria may be a more accurate procedure when using continuous-culture fermenters.

  18. Inorganic phosphate accumulation and cadmium detoxification in Klebsiella aerogenes NCTC 418 growing in continuous culture

    SciTech Connect

    Aiking, H.; Stijnman, A.; van Garderen, C.; van Heerikhuizen, H.; van Riet, J.

    1984-02-01

    Klebsiella aerogenes NCTC-418, growing in the presence of cadmium under glucose-, sulfate-, or phosphate-limited conditions in continuous culture, exhibits two different cadmium detoxifying mechanisms. In addition to sulfide formation, increased accumulation of P/sub i/ is demonstrated as a novel mechanism. Intracellular cadmium is always quantitatively counterbalanced by a concerted increase in both inorganic sulfide and P/sub i/ contents of the cells. This led to the conclusion that production of sulfide and accumulation of P/sub i/ are detoxification mechanisms present in K. aerogenes but that their relative importance is crucially dependent on the strain and the growth conditions employed.

  19. INTEGRATED SAFETY MANAGEMENT SYSTEM SAFETY CULTURE IMPROVEMENT INITIATIVE

    SciTech Connect

    MCDONALD JA JR

    2009-01-16

    In 2007, the Department of Energy (DOE) identified safety culture as one of their top Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) related priorities. A team was formed to address this issue. The team identified a consensus set of safety culture principles, along with implementation practices that could be used by DOE, NNSA, and their contractors. Documented improvement tools were identified and communicated to contractors participating in a year long pilot project. After a year, lessons learned will be collected and a path forward determined. The goal of this effort was to achieve improved safety and mission performance through ISMS continuous improvement. The focus of ISMS improvement was safety culture improvement building on operating experience from similar industries such as the domestic and international commercial nuclear and chemical industry.

  20. Qualitative analysis of the stability of a continuous vermicomposting system.

    PubMed

    Hu, Enzhu; Liu, Hong

    2012-12-01

    A mathematical model was established to describe ecological relationships in a continuous vermicomposting system. The distributions of organic matter, microbes and earthworms on non-dimensional specific growth rates were simulated. The range of specific growth rates were visualized utilizing three-dimensional reconstruction technology. The stability of a vermicomposting system was not influenced by the initial concentrations of microbes and earthworms, only their species. The coordinates of the stable point depended on the dilution rate and initial amount of organic matter. The method described could be help for establishing a stable continuous vermicomposting system. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A laboratory continuous crystallization system for aluminium hydroxide precipitation studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, V. A.; Ang, H. M.

    1996-09-01

    A mechanically agitated laboratory continuous crystallization system of capacity 1 litre has been developed with special application to the precipitation of aluminium hydroxide. It consists of continuous liquor and seed feeding arrangements and semi-continuous product evacuation as recommended by Randolph and Larson [Theory of Particulate Processes, 2nd ed. (Academic Press, London, 1988)] [1]. A study of the particle dynamics and the solid and liquid residence time distributions has shown that the set-up represents a normal continuous mixed suspension mixed product removal (CMSMPR) system. It was found that the liquor concentration achieved steady state after 2 to 3 residence times and the slurry density, after 4 residence times; however, it was difficult to attain an absolute steady state for the solid CSD.

  2. A comparative study on the effect of subtherapeutic tylosin administration on select feral or domestic porcine gut microflora grown in continuous-flow culture

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Continuous flow cultures of feral (culture FC) and domesticated (culture RPCF) pig gut microflora were established in steady state. Cultures, in duplicate, were continuously infused subtherapeutic (25 ug/ml) levels of tylosin and sampled at intervals to assess effects on total culturable anaerobes,...

  3. Sustaining organizational culture change in health systems.

    PubMed

    Willis, Cameron David; Saul, Jessie; Bevan, Helen; Scheirer, Mary Ann; Best, Allan; Greenhalgh, Trisha; Mannion, Russell; Cornelissen, Evelyn; Howland, David; Jenkins, Emily; Bitz, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    The questions addressed by this review are: first, what are the guiding principles underlying efforts to stimulate sustained cultural change; second, what are the mechanisms by which these principles operate; and, finally, what are the contextual factors that influence the likelihood of these principles being effective? The paper aims to discuss these issues. The authors conducted a literature review informed by rapid realist review methodology that examined how interventions interact with contexts and mechanisms to influence the sustainability of cultural change. Reference and expert panelists assisted in refining the research questions, systematically searching published and grey literature, and helping to identify interactions between interventions, mechanisms and contexts. Six guiding principles were identified: align vision and action; make incremental changes within a comprehensive transformation strategy; foster distributed leadership; promote staff engagement; create collaborative relationships; and continuously assess and learn from change. These principles interact with contextual elements such as local power distributions, pre-existing values and beliefs and readiness to engage. Mechanisms influencing how these principles sustain cultural change include activation of a shared sense of urgency and fostering flexible levels of engagement. The principles identified in this review, along with the contexts and mechanisms that influence their effectiveness, are useful domains for policy and practice leaders to explore when grappling with cultural change. These principles are sufficiently broad to allow local flexibilities in adoption and application. This is the first study to adopt a realist approach for understanding how changes in organizational culture may be sustained. Through doing so, this review highlights the broad principles by which organizational action may be organized within enabling contextual settings.

  4. 40 CFR 60.1725 - How are the data from the continuous emission monitoring systems used?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... continuous emission monitoring systems used? You must use data from the continuous emission monitoring systems for sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and carbon monoxide to demonstrate continuous compliance with...

  5. Successful operation of continuous reactors at short retention times results in high-density, fast-rate Dehalococcoides dechlorinating cultures.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Anca G; Fajardo-Williams, Devyn; Popat, Sudeep C; Torres, César I; Krajmalnik-Brown, Rosa

    2014-03-01

    The discovery of Dehalococcoides mccartyi reducing perchloroethene and trichloroethene (TCE) to ethene was a key landmark for bioremediation applications at contaminated sites. D. mccartyi-containing cultures are typically grown in batch-fed reactors. On the other hand, continuous cultivation of these microorganisms has been described only at long hydraulic retention times (HRTs). We report the cultivation of a representative D. mccartyi-containing culture in continuous stirred-tank reactors (CSTRs) at a short, 3-d HRT, using TCE as the electron acceptor. We successfully operated 3-d HRT CSTRs for up to 120 days and observed sustained dechlorination of TCE at influent concentrations of 1 and 2 mM TCE to ≥ 97 % ethene, coupled to the production of 10(12) D. mccartyi cells Lculture (-1). These outcomes were possible in part by using a medium with low bicarbonate concentrations (5 mM) to minimize the excessive proliferation of microorganisms that use bicarbonate as an electron acceptor and compete with D. mccartyi for H2. The maximum conversion rates for the CSTR-produced culture were 0.13 ± 0.016, 0.06 ± 0.018, and 0.02 ± 0.007 mmol Cl(-) Lculture (-1) h(-1), respectively, for TCE, cis-dichloroethene, and vinyl chloride. The CSTR operation described here provides the fastest laboratory cultivation rate of high-cell density Dehalococcoides cultures reported in the literature to date. This cultivation method provides a fundamental scientific platform for potential future operations of such a system at larger scales.

  6. Unmanned aircraft system sense and avoid integrity and continuity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamoom, Michael B.

    This thesis describes new methods to guarantee safety of sense and avoid (SAA) functions for Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) by evaluating integrity and continuity risks. Previous SAA efforts focused on relative safety metrics, such as risk ratios, comparing the risk of using an SAA system versus not using it. The methods in this thesis evaluate integrity and continuity risks as absolute measures of safety, as is the established practice in commercial aircraft terminal area navigation applications. The main contribution of this thesis is a derivation of a new method, based on a standard intruder relative constant velocity assumption, that uses hazard state estimates and estimate error covariances to establish (1) the integrity risk of the SAA system not detecting imminent loss of '"well clear," which is the time and distance required to maintain safe separation from intruder aircraft, and (2) the probability of false alert, the continuity risk. Another contribution is applying these integrity and continuity risk evaluation methods to set quantifiable and certifiable safety requirements on sensors. A sensitivity analysis uses this methodology to evaluate the impact of sensor errors on integrity and continuity risks. The penultimate contribution is an integrity and continuity risk evaluation where the estimation model is refined to address realistic intruder relative linear accelerations, which goes beyond the current constant velocity standard. The final contribution is an integrity and continuity risk evaluation addressing multiple intruders. This evaluation is a new innovation-based method to determine the risk of mis-associating intruder measurements. A mis-association occurs when the SAA system incorrectly associates a measurement to the wrong intruder, causing large errors in the estimated intruder trajectories. The new methods described in this thesis can help ensure safe encounters between aircraft and enable SAA sensor certification for UAS integration into

  7. Continuing bonds in bereaved Pakistani Muslims: effects of culture and religion.

    PubMed

    Suhail, Kausar; Jamil, Naila; Oyebode, Jan; Ajmal, Mohammad Asir

    2011-01-01

    This study explores the bereavement process and continuing bond in Pakistani Muslims with the focus on how culture and religion influence these processes. Ten participants were interviewed and their transcribed interviews were analyzed using a grounded theory approach. Three main domains were identified from the narratives expressed by the participants: death and the process of grieving, continuing the link with the deceased, and influencing agents. The findings indicated that Pakistani Muslims maintained their link with the deceased through cultural and religious rituals, such as performing prayers, reciting holy verses, talking and dreaming about the deceased, doing charity, visiting graves, and arranging communal gatherings. The prime purpose of many of these practices was the forgiveness of the deceased. Grief reactions seemed to be determined by the nature of death, prior relationships with the deceased, reaction of society and gender of the bereaved. Religion provided a strong basis for coping and adjustment of the bereaved, through rationalizing and accepting the death. This study has important implications for counselors and family therapists who can use religious affliations to reduce the impact of loss and complicated bereavement.

  8. Continuous hybridoma suspension cultures with and without cell retention: kinetics of growth, metabolism and product formation.

    PubMed

    Schmid, G; Wilke, C R; Blanch, H W

    1992-01-01

    A laboratory scale bioreactor was constructed from glass and polycarbonate materials whereby a track-etch membrane (3 microns pore diameter) was integrated into its two-part bottom flange. The reactor performance was evaluated for continuous hybridoma suspension cultures under various conditions of cell retention. A total retention experiment demonstrated that this type of stirred tank reactor cannot be operated at near zero growth rate conditions. Instead, at steady viable cell concentrations of congruent to 3 x 10(6) cells per ml, specific growth and death rates were estimated at 0.60 +/- 0.06 d-1. Specific substrate (glucose, glutamine, O2, amino acids) consumption, by-product (ammonia, alanine, amino acids) and product (antibody) production rates as well as various apparent molar yield coefficients were obtained and are compared to metabolic quotients and yield coefficients previously calculated from standard continuous culture experiments, i.e., without cell retention, at specific growth rates of 0.63 and 1.24 d-1. Furthermore, steady-state data on viable cell and antibody concentrations, spec. mAb productivities, and space-time yields determined before and after a step change (2.5-fold increase) in dilution rate at identical specific growth rates mu are presented.

  9. Changes in bacterial communities from swine feces during continuous culture with starch.

    PubMed

    Ricca, D M; Ziemer, C J; Kerr, B J

    2010-10-01

    Bacteria from swine feces were grown in continuous culture with starch as the sole carbohydrate in order to monitor changes during fermentation and to determine how similar fermenter communities were to each other. DNA extracted from fermenter samples was analyzed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). A significant decrease in diversity was observed, the Shannon-Weaver index dropped from 1.92 to 1.13 after 14 days of fermentation. Likewise, similarity of fermenter communities to those in the fecal inoculum also decreased over time. Both diversity and similarity to the inoculum decreased most rapidly in the first few days of fermentation, reflecting a period of adaptation. Sequencing of DGGE bands indicated that the same species were present in replicate fermenters. Most of these bacteria were placed in the Clostridium coccoides/Eubacterium rectale group (likely saccharolytic butyrate producers), a dominant bacterial group in the intestinal tract of pigs. DGGE proved useful to monitor swine fecal communities in vitro and indicated the selection and maintenance of native swine intestinal bacteria during continuous culture.

  10. Continuous-terahertz-wave molecular imaging system for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Liangliang; Wu, Tong; Wang, Ruixue; Zuo, Shasha; Wu, Dong; Zhang, Cunlin; Zhang, Jue; Fang, Jing

    2016-07-01

    Molecular imaging techniques are becoming increasingly important in biomedical research and potentially in clinical practice. We present a continuous-terahertz (THz)-wave molecular imaging system for biomedical applications, in which an infrared (IR) laser is integrated into a 0.2-THz reflection-mode continuous-THz-wave imaging system to induce surface plasmon polaritons on the nanoparticles and further improve the intensity of the reflected signal from the water around the nanoparticles. A strong and rapid increment of the reflected THz signal in the nanoparticle solution upon the IR laser irradiation is demonstrated, using either gold or silver nanoparticles. This low-cost, simple, and stable continuous-THz-wave molecular imaging system is suitable for miniaturization and practical imaging applications; in particular, it shows great promise for cancer diagnosis and nanoparticle drug-delivery monitoring.

  11. Continuous hydroponic wheat production using a recirculating system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackowiak, C. L.; Owens, L. P.; Hinkle, C. R.; Prince, R. P.

    1989-01-01

    Continuous crop production, where plants of various ages are growing simultaneously in a single recirculating nutrient solution, is a possible alternative to batch production in a Controlled Ecological Life Support System. A study was conducted at John F. Kennedy Space Center where 8 trays (0.24 sq m per tray) of Triticum aestivum L. Yecora Rojo were grown simultaneously in a growth chamber at 23 C, 65 percent relative humidity, 1000 ppm CO2, continuous light, with a continuous flow, thin film nutrient delivery system. The same modified Hoagland nutrient solution was recirculated through the plant trays from an 80 L reservoir throughout the study. It was maintained by periodic addition of water and nutrients based on chemical analyses of the solution. The study was conducted for 216 days, during which 24 trays of wheat were consecutively planted (one every 9 days), 16 of which were grown to maturity and harvested. The remaining 8 trays were harvested on day 216. Grain yields averaged 520 g m(exp -2), and had an average edible biomass of 32 percent. Consecutive yields were unaffected by nutrient solution age. It was concluded that continual wheat production will work in this system over an extended period of time. Certain micronutrient deficiencies and toxicities posed problems and must be addressed in future continuous production systems.

  12. Adaptation of the genetically tractable malaria pathogen Plasmodium knowlesi to continuous culture in human erythrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Robert W.; Hall, Joanna; Rangkuti, Farania; Ho, Yung Shwen; Almond, Neil; Mitchell, Graham H.; Pain, Arnab; Holder, Anthony A.; Blackman, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Research into the aetiological agent of the most widespread form of severe malaria, Plasmodium falciparum, has benefitted enormously from the ability to culture and genetically manipulate blood-stage forms of the parasite in vitro. However, most malaria outside Africa is caused by a distinct Plasmodium species, Plasmodium vivax, and it has become increasingly apparent that zoonotic infection by the closely related simian parasite Plasmodium knowlesi is a frequent cause of life-threatening malaria in regions of southeast Asia. Neither of these important malarial species can be cultured in human cells in vitro, requiring access to primates with the associated ethical and practical constraints. We report the successful adaptation of P. knowlesi to continuous culture in human erythrocytes. Human-adapted P. knowlesi clones maintain their capacity to replicate in monkey erythrocytes and can be genetically modified with unprecedented efficiency, providing an important and unique model for studying conserved aspects of malarial biology as well as species-specific features of an emerging pathogen. PMID:23267069

  13. Purification of monoclonal antibodies from clarified cell culture fluid using Protein A capture continuous countercurrent tangential chromatography.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Amit K; Tran, Travis; Napadensky, Boris; Teella, Achyuta; Brookhart, Gary; Ropp, Philip A; Zhang, Ada W; Tustian, Andrew D; Zydney, Andrew L; Shinkazh, Oleg

    2015-11-10

    Recent studies using simple model systems have demonstrated that continuous countercurrent tangential chromatography (CCTC) has the potential to overcome many of the limitations of conventional Protein A chromatography using packed columns. The objective of this work was to optimize and implement a CCTC system for monoclonal antibody purification from clarified Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cell culture fluid using a commercial Protein A resin. Several improvements were introduced to the previous CCTC system including the use of retentate pumps to maintain stable resin concentrations in the flowing slurry, the elimination of a slurry holding tank to improve productivity, and the introduction of an "after binder" to the binding step to increase antibody recovery. A kinetic binding model was developed to estimate the required residence times in the multi-stage binding step to optimize yield and productivity. Data were obtained by purifying two commercial antibodies from two different manufactures, one with low titer (∼ 0.67 g/L) and one with high titer (∼ 6.9 g/L), demonstrating the versatility of the CCTC system. Host cell protein removal, antibody yields and purities were similar to those obtained with conventional column chromatography; however, the CCTC system showed much higher productivity. These results clearly demonstrate the capabilities of continuous countercurrent tangential chromatography for the commercial purification of monoclonal antibody products. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Purification of monoclonal antibodies from clarified cell culture fluid using Protein A capture continuous countercurrent tangential chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Amit K.; Tran, Travis; Napadensky, Boris; Teella, Achyuta; Brookhart, Gary; Ropp, Philip A.; Zhang, Ada W.; Tustian, Andrew D.; Zydney, Andrew L.; Shinkazh, Oleg

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies using simple model systems have demonstrated that Continuous Countercurrent Tangential Chromatography (CCTC) has the potential to overcome many of the limitations of conventional Protein A chromatography using packed columns. The objective of this work was to optimize and implement a CCTC system for monoclonal antibody purification from clarified Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cell culture fluid using a commercial Protein A resin. Several improvements were introduced to the previous CCTC system including the use of retentate pumps to maintain stable resin concentrations in the flowing slurry, the elimination of a slurry holding tank to improve productivity, and the introduction of an “after binder” to the binding step to increase antibody recovery. A kinetic binding model was developed to estimate the required residence times in the multi-stage binding step to optimize yield and productivity. Data were obtained by purifying two commercial antibodies from two different manufactures, one with low titer (~0.67 g/L) and one with high titer (~6.9 g/L), demonstrating the versatility of the CCTC system. Host cell protein removal, antibody yields and purities were similar to that obtained with conventional column chromatography; however, the CCTC system showed much higher productivity. These results clearly demonstrate the capabilities of continuous countercurrent tangential chromatography for the commercial purification of monoclonal antibody products. PMID:25747172

  15. Effect of sprouted barley grain supplementation of an herbage-based or haylage-based diet on ruminal fermentation and methane output in continuous culture

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A 4-unit dual-flow continuous culture fermentor system was used to assess the effect of supplementing 7-d sprouted barley (SB) or barley grain (BG) with an herbage-based or haylage-based diet on nutrient digestibility, volatile fatty acid (VFA) profiles, bacterial protein synthesis, and methane outp...

  16. Effect of sprouted barley grain supplementation of an herbage or haylage diet on ruminal fermentation and methane output in continuous culture

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A 4-unit dual-flow continuous culture fermentor system was used to assess the effect of supplementing 7-d sprouted barley (SB) or barley grain (BG), with a pasture (orchardgrass) or haylage diet, on nutrient digestibility, VFA production, bacterial protein synthesis, and methane production. Treatmen...

  17. Effect of supplementing orchardgrass herbage with a total mixed ration or flaxseed fermentation profile and bacterial protein synthesis in continuous culture

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A 4-unit dual-flow continuous culture fermentor system was used to evaluate the effects of herbage, a total mixed ration (TMR) and flaxseed on nutrient digestibility and microbial N synthesis. Treatments were randomly assigned to fermentors in a 4 x 4 Latin square design. Each fermentor was fed a to...

  18. Effect of introducing legumes containing condensed tannins in an orchardgrass diet on forage nutritive value and enteric methane output in continuous culture

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Legumes containing condensed tannins (CT) have been shown to reduce enteric CH4 in ruminants; however, research is lacking on how increased CT levels affect forage nutritive value and CH4 output. A 4-unit, dual-flow continuous culture fermentor system was used to assess CH4 output of CT legumes in a...

  19. Effects of timing of corn silage supplementation on ruminal digestion, fermentation pattern and nutrient flow during continuous culture fermentation of a short and intensive orchardgrass herbage meal

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Using a dual-flow continuous culture fermenter system, this study evaluated the effect of timing of corn silage supplementation on ruminal digestion and nutrient flows of a short and intensive orchardgrass herbage meal. Fermenters were operated over four 10-d periods. Treatments included: 28 g DM of...

  20. Continuous integrable systems with multi-Poisson brackets

    SciTech Connect

    Okubo, S. )

    1992-06-01

    For discrete finite systems, it is known that the zero Nijenhuis tensor condition can be used to explicitly construct conserved quantities in involution. Although the same method is not directly generalizable for continuous systems because of the divergence problem, the difficulty can be overcome with some minor modifications. In this way, various cases of KdV, nonlocal KdV, continuous Toda lattice, Kac--Moody hierarchy, and a model based upon a {ital W}{sub 3}-algebra systematically by the same technique can be discussed.

  1. Design of launch systems using continuous improvement process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Richard W.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to identify a systematic process for improving ground operations for future launch systems. This approach is based on the Total Quality Management (TQM) continuous improvement process. While the continuous improvement process is normally identified with making incremental changes to an existing system, it can be used on new systems if they use past experience as a knowledge base. In the case of the Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV), the Space Shuttle operations provide many lessons. The TQM methodology used for this paper will be borrowed from the United States Air Force 'Quality Air Force' Program. There is a general overview of the continuous improvement process, with concentration on the formulation phase. During this phase critical analyses are conducted to determine the strategy and goals for the remaining development process. These analyses include analyzing the mission from the customers point of view, developing an operations concept for the future, assessing current capabilities and determining the gap to be closed between current capabilities and future needs and requirements. A brief analyses of the RLV, relative to the Space Shuttle, will be used to illustrate the concept. Using the continuous improvement design concept has many advantages. These include a customer oriented process which will develop a more marketable product and a better integration of operations and systems during the design phase. But, the use of TQM techniques will require changes, including more discipline in the design process and more emphasis on data gathering for operational systems. The benefits will far outweigh the additional effort.

  2. Polyhydroxyalkanoates production with mixed microbial cultures: from culture selection to polymer recovery in a high-rate continuous process.

    PubMed

    Villano, Marianna; Valentino, Francesco; Barbetta, Andrea; Martino, Lucrezia; Scandola, Mariastella; Majone, Mauro

    2014-06-25

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) production with mixed microbial cultures (MMC) has been investigated by means of a sequential process involving three different stages, consisting of a lab-scale sequencing batch reactor for MMC selection, a PHA accumulation reactor and a polymer extraction reactor. All stages were performed under continuous operation for at least 4 months to check the overall process robustness as well as the related variability of polymer composition and properties. By operating both biological stages at high organic loads (8.5 and 29.1 gCOD/Ld, respectively) with a synthetic mixture of acetic and propionic acid, it was possible to continuously produce PHA at 1.43 g/Ld with stable performance (overall, the storage yield was 0.18 COD/COD). To identify the optimal operating conditions of the extraction reactor, two digestion solutions have been tested, NaOH (1m) and NaClO (5% active Cl2). The latter resulted in the best performance both in terms of yield of polymer recovery (around 100%, w/w) and purity (more than 90% of PHA content in the residual solids, on a weight basis). In spite of the stable operating conditions and performance, a large variation was observed for the HV content, ranging between 4 and 20 (%, w/w) for daily samples after accumulation and between 9 and 13 (%, w/w) for weekly average samples after extraction and lyophilization. The molecular weight of the produced polymer ranged between 3.4 × 10(5) and 5.4 × 10(5)g/mol with a large polydispersity index. By contrast, TGA and DSC analysis showed that the thermal polymer behavior did not substantially change over time, although it was strongly affected by the extraction agent used (NaClO or NaOH). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Continuous-Time System Identification of a Smoking Cessation Intervention.

    PubMed

    Timms, Kevin P; Rivera, Daniel E; Collins, Linda M; Piper, Megan E

    2014-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is a major global public health issue and the leading cause of preventable death in the United States. Toward a goal of designing better smoking cessation treatments, system identification techniques are applied to intervention data to describe smoking cessation as a process of behavior change. System identification problems that draw from two modeling paradigms in quantitative psychology (statistical mediation and self-regulation) are considered, consisting of a series of continuous-time estimation problems. A continuous-time dynamic modeling approach is employed to describe the response of craving and smoking rates during a quit attempt, as captured in data from a smoking cessation clinical trial. The use of continuous-time models provide benefits of parsimony, ease of interpretation, and the opportunity to work with uneven or missing data.

  4. Continuous-time system identification of a smoking cessation intervention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timms, Kevin P.; Rivera, Daniel E.; Collins, Linda M.; Piper, Megan E.

    2014-07-01

    Cigarette smoking is a major global public health issue and the leading cause of preventable death in the United States. Toward a goal of designing better smoking cessation treatments, system identification techniques are applied to intervention data to describe smoking cessation as a process of behaviour change. System identification problems that draw from two modelling paradigms in quantitative psychology (statistical mediation and self-regulation) are considered, consisting of a series of continuous-time estimation problems. A continuous-time dynamic modelling approach is employed to describe the response of craving and smoking rates during a quit attempt, as captured in data from a smoking cessation clinical trial. The use of continuous-time models provide benefits of parsimony, ease of interpretation, and the opportunity to work with uneven or missing data.

  5. New salary system supports changing culture.

    PubMed

    Esquibel, O; Ning, J; Sugg, J

    1990-10-01

    Changing job classification, salary administration and benefits programs for the sake of change can create considerable problems in an organization. However, as the organizational culture changes, these HR systems need to adjust to help the process. Associate involvement requires considerable planning, time and effort, but the results often prove worthwhile. As the company moves into the future, this involvement process or something similar will help shape other human resource programs.

  6. Building enterprise-wide resilience by integrating business continuity capability into day-to-day business culture and technology.

    PubMed

    Alesi, Patrick

    2008-04-01

    This paper follows the development of the business continuity planning (BCP) programme at Lehman Brothers following the events of September 11th. Previous attempts to implement a `traditional' form of BCP had been ineffective, but following the events, the firm began to look at BCP in a new light. This paper deals with three main themes: creating a culture of resiliency, leveraging technology, and building flexible plans. Distributing accountability for BCP to business line managers, integrating BCP change management into the normal course of business, and providing every employee with personalised BCP information breeds a culture of resiliency where people are empowered to react to events without burdensome, hierarchical response and recovery procedures. Building a strong relationship with one's application development community can result in novel, customised BCP solutions; existing systems and data structures can be used to enhance an existing BCP. Even the best plans are often challenged by events; understanding that flexibility is essential to effective incident response is a critical element in the development of a proper business continuity plan.

  7. The Corticostriatal System in Dissociated Cell Culture

    PubMed Central

    Randall, Fiona E.; Garcia-Munoz, Marianela; Vickers, Catherine; Schock, Sarah C.; Staines, William A.; Arbuthnott, Gordon W.

    2011-01-01

    The sparse connectivity within the striatum in vivo makes the investigation of individual corticostriatal synapses very difficult. Most studies of the corticostriatal input have been done using electrical stimulation under conditions where it is hard to identify the precise origin of the cortical input. We have employed an in vitro dissociated cell culture system that allows the identification of individual corticostriatal pairs and have been developing methods to study individual neuron inputs to striatal neurons. In mixed corticostriatal cultures, neurons had resting activity similar to the system in vivo. Up/down states were obvious and seemed to encompass the entire culture. Mixed cultures of cortical neurons from transgenic mice expressing green fluorescent protein with striatal neurons from wild-type mice of the same developmental stage allowed visual identification of individual candidate corticostriatal pairs. Recordings were performed between 12 and 37 days in vitro (DIV). To investigate synaptic connections we recorded from 69 corticostriatal pairs of which 44 were connected in one direction and 25 reciprocally. Of these connections 41 were corticostriatal (nine inhibitory) and 53 striatocortical (all inhibitory). The observed excitatory responses were of variable amplitude (−10 to −370 pA, n = 32). We found the connections very secure – with negligible failures on repeated stimulation (approximately 1 Hz) of the cortical neuron. Inhibitory corticostriatal responses were also observed (−13 to −314 pA, n = 9). Possibly due to the mixed type of culture we found an inhibitory striatocortical response (−14 to −598 pA, n = 53). We are now recording from neurons in separate compartments to more closely emulate neuroanatomical conditions but still with the possibility of the easier identification of the connectivity. PMID:21743806

  8. Influences of religion and culture on continuing bonds in a sample of British Muslims of Pakistani origin.

    PubMed

    Hussein, Hanan; Oyebode, Jan R

    2009-11-01

    This study considered the nature of continuing bonds with deceased relatives in a sample of Pakistani Muslims living in the United Kingdom. Ten participants were interviewed following a cultural psychology approach and transcripts were analyzed using grounded theory methodology. Dreaming, talking with others about the deceased, following the deceased's example, keeping memories and mementos, and doing actions thought to help the deceased were forms of continued relationship found. These were intertwined with the process of grieving and were influenced by the family, culture, and religion. Religion was a strong influence on the prominence given by participants to finishing well and on the notion of doing actions thought to help the deceased. Cultural mores, such as the community, and collectivist ethos and the expectation that emotion would be expressed around the time of death, were found to be supportive for some but sources of tension for other participants. Expressing a continuing bond through following the deceased's example so as to make them proud or happy seemed to be reinforced by cultural roots in respect for elders. Participants gave instances of tensions in areas such as expression of emotion and communality versus individualism that arose as a result of their position between two cultural frameworks, some illustrating how assimilation into the host culture set up conflict with the expected norms of their family/ancestral culture. The study highlights how understanding different cultural and religious influences may enrich the concept of continuing bonds.

  9. Transfer of tylosin resistance between Enterococcus spp. during continuous-flow culture of feral or domestic porcine gut microbes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Mixed populations of domesticated and feral pig gut microbes (RPCF and FC, respectively) were grown in continuous culture to investigate the effects of tylosin on antimicrobial resistance. Cultures established in steady state were inoculated with 9.7 log10 colony forming units (CFU) of a tylosin-re...

  10. Expression of a carrot invertase gene in tobacco suspension cells cultivated in batch and continuous culture conditions.

    PubMed

    Verdelhan des Molles, D; Gomord, V; Bastin, M; Faye, L; Courtois, D

    1999-01-01

    Plant cells (Nicotiana tabacum) were genetically modified to produce an heterologous protein, the acidic invertase from carrot, and invertase production from suspension tobacco cells was investigated. Suspension cultures were grown in shake flasks and stirred bioreactor. Total invertase activity was growth related. A 75 d continuous culture in 10 l bioreactor was performed. Our study demonstrates the high potential of plant cell cultures for long term production of heterologous protein.

  11. CDC-1 Enclose Continuous Rearing System for Phytoseiid Mites

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This document describes a prototype for an enclosed and continuous rearing system for Phytoseiid mites. The document includes operation procedures and materials. Bean plants are grown in planters through a grid, which is the bottom of a tray. One-week old bean plants are infested with spider mites. ...

  12. Continuous control systems for non-contact ECG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodkin, Vladimir L.; Yakovleva, Galina V.; Smirnov, Alexey S.

    2017-03-01

    South Ural State University is still conducting the research work dedicated to innovations in biomedicine. Development of system for continuous control and diagnosis of the functional state in large groups of people is based on studies of non-contact ECG recording reported by the authors at the SPIE conference in 2016. The next stage of studies has been performed this year.

  13. HANDBOOK: CONTINUOUS EMISSION MONITORING SYSTEMS FOR NON-CRITERIA POLLUTANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This Handbook provides a description of the methods used to continuously monitor non-criteria pollutants emitted from stationary sources. The Handbook contains a review of current regulatory programs, the state-of-the-art sampling system design, analytical techniques, and the use...

  14. Technology, Systems and School Librarians: An Approach to Continuing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broadbent, Marianne; And Others

    This paper describes a continuing education course designed to introduce school librarians to computer and communications technology as applied to indexing, cataloging, and networks, and to the principles and techniques of systems analysis. It is based on the premise that although computer and communications technology presents school librarians…

  15. Distributed software framework and continuous integration in hydroinformatics systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jianzhong; Zhang, Wei; Xie, Mengfei; Lu, Chengwei; Chen, Xiao

    2017-08-01

    When encountering multiple and complicated models, multisource structured and unstructured data, complex requirements analysis, the platform design and integration of hydroinformatics systems become a challenge. To properly solve these problems, we describe a distributed software framework and it’s continuous integration process in hydroinformatics systems. This distributed framework mainly consists of server cluster for models, distributed database, GIS (Geographic Information System) servers, master node and clients. Based on it, a GIS - based decision support system for joint regulating of water quantity and water quality of group lakes in Wuhan China is established.

  16. Continuous operation of four-state continuous-variable quantum key distribution system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsubara, Takuto; Ono, Motoharu; Oguri, Yusuke; Ichikawa, Tsubasa; Hirano, Takuya; Kasai, Kenta; Matsumoto, Ryutaroh; Tsurumaru, Toyohiro

    2016-10-01

    We report on the development of continuous-variable quantum key distribution (CV-QKD) system that are based on discrete quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM) and homodyne detection of coherent states of light. We use a pulsed light source whose wavelength is 1550 nm and repetition rate is 10 MHz. The CV-QKD system can continuously generate secret key which is secure against entangling cloner attack. Key generation rate is 50 kbps when the quantum channel is a 10 km optical fiber. The CV-QKD system we have developed utilizes the four-state and post-selection protocol [T. Hirano, et al., Phys. Rev. A 68, 042331 (2003).]; Alice randomly sends one of four states {|+/-α⟩,|+/-𝑖α⟩}, and Bob randomly performs x- or p- measurement by homodyne detection. A commercially available balanced receiver is used to realize shot-noise-limited pulsed homodyne detection. GPU cards are used to accelerate the software-based post-processing. We use a non-binary LDPC code for error correction (reverse reconciliation) and the Toeplitz matrix multiplication for privacy amplification.

  17. Algal culture studies related to a Closed Ecological Life Support System (CELSS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radmer, R. O.; Ollinger, O.; Venables, A.; Fernandez, E.

    1982-01-01

    Studies with algal cultures which relate to closed ecological life support systems (CELSS) are discussed. A description of a constant cell density apparatus for continuous culture of algae is included. Excretion of algal by-products, and nitrogen utilization and excretion are discussed.

  18. Line-scan system for continuous hand authentication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaofeng; Kong, Lingsheng; Diao, Zhihui; Jia, Ping

    2017-03-01

    An increasing number of heavy machinery and vehicles have come into service, giving rise to a significant concern over protecting these high-security systems from misuse. Conventionally, authentication performed merely at the initial login may not be sufficient for detecting intruders throughout the operating session. To address this critical security flaw, a line-scan continuous hand authentication system with the appearance of an operating rod is proposed. Given that the operating rod is occupied throughout the operating period, it can be a possible solution for unobtrusively recording the personal characteristics for continuous monitoring. The ergonomics in the physiological and psychological aspects are fully considered. Under the shape constraints, a highly integrated line-scan sensor, a controller unit, and a gear motor with encoder are utilized. This system is suitable for both the desktop and embedded platforms with a universal serial bus interface. The volume of the proposed system is smaller than 15% of current multispectral area-based camera systems. Based on experiments on a database with 4000 images from 200 volunteers, a competitive equal error rate of 0.1179% is achieved, which is far more accurate than the state-of-the-art continuous authentication systems using other modalities.

  19. Physiological and Morphological Changes Induced by Nutrient Limitation of Pseudomonas fluorescens 378 in Continuous Culture

    PubMed Central

    Persson, Anders; Molin, Göran; Weibull, Claes

    1990-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens 378 was studied in continuous culture at a dilution rate of 0.05 or 0.15 h−1 and under a limitation of carbon/energy, nitrogen, phosphorus, iron(III), or oxygen. Cultures were examined for nutritional consumption, production of biosurfactant AP-6 and lipase, and electron microscopy morphology. Morphological features were lysis and plasmolysis of the cells, vacuoles in the cells, granules in cell nuclei, and DNA coagulation during transmission electron microscopy preparation. Biosurfactant and lipase production were lost after 8 to 15 retention times, but under iron limitation and at low dilution rate they were maintained for more than 30 retention times. Consumption of nutrients varied between different cultures. Between 2.4 and 6.0 g of succinic acid per g (dry weight) was consumed; the highest value was obtained under phosphorus limitation. The uptake of nitrogen was mostly about 0.16 g/g (dry weight), and that of phosphorus varied between 13 and 58 mg/g (dry weight). Phosphorus-limited cells reduced their phosphorus consumption by at least 50% compared with other limitations. Cell morphology varied among different cultures. Up to 25% cell lysis occurred at the higher dilution rate. The frequencies of plasmolysis varied between 0 and 85%. Granules in nuclei were found in 65 to 100% of the cells. Vacuoles appeared mostly in low numbers, but at the lower dilution rate under phosphorus or iron limitation the frequencies increased to between 25 and 85%. At high dilution rate, the DNA coagulated in 30 to 70% of the cells. Multivariate data analysis demonstrated a general difference between the two tested dilution rates; i.e., both nutritional and morphological features differed more between the two tested dilution rates than between the different limitations. Cultures at the lower dilution rate changed more with time; this was especially pronounced for phosphorus or iron limitation. The data analysis also showed a correlation between

  20. Investigating Nitrosomonas europaea stress biomarkers in batch, continuous culture, and biofilm reactors.

    PubMed

    Radniecki, Tyler S; Lauchnor, Ellen G

    2011-01-01

    The understanding of nitrification inhibition in ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) by priority pollutants and emerging contaminants is critical in managing the nitrogen cycle to preserve current water supplies, one of the National Academy of Engineers Grand Challenges in Engineering for the twenty-first century. Nitrosomonas europaea is an excellent model AOB for nitrification inhibition experimentation due to its well-defined NH(3) metabolism and the availability of a wide range of physiological and transcriptional tools that can characterize the mechanism of nitrification inhibition and probe N. europaea's response to the inhibitor. This chapter is a compilation of the physiological and transcriptional methods that have been used to characterize nitrification inhibition of N. europaea under a wide variety of growth conditions including batch, continuously cultured, and in biofilms. The protocols presented here can be applied to other AOB, and may be readily adapted for other autotrophic bacteria (e.g., nitrite oxidizing bacteria).

  1. Derivation, expansion and differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells in continuous suspension cultures

    PubMed Central

    Fluri, David A.; Tonge, Peter D.; Song, Hannah; Baptista, Ricardo P.; Shakiba, Nika; Shukla, Shreya; Clarke, Geoffrey; Nagy, Andras; Zandstra, Peter W.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate derivation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from terminally differentiated mouse cells in serum- and feeder-free stirred suspension cultures. Temporal analysis of global gene expression revealed high correlations between cells reprogrammed in suspension and cells reprogrammed in adhesion-dependent conditions. Suspension (S) reprogrammed iPSCs (SiPSCs) could be differentiated into all three germ layers in vitro and contributed to chimeric embryos in vivo. SiPSC generation allowed for efficient selection of reprogramming factor expressing cells based on their differential survival and proliferation in suspension. Seamless integration of SiPSC reprogramming and directed differentiation enabled the scalable production of functionally and phenotypically defined cardiac cells in a continuous single cell- and small aggregate-based process. This method is an important step towards the development of a robust PSC generation, expansion and differentiation technology. PMID:22447133

  2. System and method for continuous solids slurry depressurization

    DOEpatents

    Leininger, Thomas Frederick; Steele, Raymond Douglas; Cordes, Stephen Michael

    2017-07-11

    A system includes a first pump having a first outlet and a first inlet, and a controller. The first pump is configured to continuously receive a flow of a slurry into the first outlet at a first pressure and to continuously discharge the flow of the slurry from the first inlet at a second pressure less than the first pressure. The controller is configured to control a first speed of the first pump against the flow of the slurry based at least in part on the first pressure, wherein the first speed of the first pump is configured to resist a backflow of the slurry from the first outlet to the first inlet.

  3. Hydraulic control system for continuously variable V-belt transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Abo, K.; Kumura, H.; Tanaka, Y.; Hirano, H.; Yamamuro, S.

    1986-04-29

    A hydraulic control system is described for a continuously variable V-belt transmission which includes a continuously variable transmission mechanism having a drive pulley, a driven pulley and a V-belt interconnecting the drive and driven pulleys and a change-direction gearing disposed between an engine and the drive pulley to establish a forward drive path or a reverse drive path from the engine to the drive pulley, the change-direction gearing including a forward clutch and a reverse clutch.

  4. Continuous-flow free acid monitoring method and system

    DOEpatents

    Strain, J.E.; Ross, H.H.

    1980-01-11

    A free acid monitoring method and apparatus is provided for continuously measuring the excess acid present in a process stream. The disclosed monitoring system and method is based on the relationship of the partial pressure ratio of water and acid in equilibrium with an acid solution at constant temperature. A portion of the process stream is pumped into and flows through the monitor under the influence of gravity and back to the process stream. A continuous flowing sample is vaporized at a constant temperature and the vapor is subsequently condensed. Conductivity measurements of the condensate produces a nonlinear response function from which the free acid molarity of the sample process stream is determined.

  5. Continuous-flow free acid monitoring method and system

    DOEpatents

    Strain, James E.; Ross, Harley H.

    1981-01-01

    A free acid monitoring method and apparatus is provided for continuously measuring the excess acid present in a process stream. The disclosed monitoring system and method is based on the relationship of the partial pressure ratio of water and acid in equilibrium with an acid solution at constant temperature. A portion of the process stream is pumped into and flows through the monitor under the influence of gravity and back to the process stream. A continuous flowing sample is vaporized at a constant temperature and the vapor is subsequently condensed. Conductivity measurements of the condensate produces a nonlinear response function from which the free acid molarity of the sample process stream is determined.

  6. Fully-automated roller bottle handling system for large scale culture of mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Kunitake, R; Suzuki, A; Ichihashi, H; Matsuda, S; Hirai, O; Morimoto, K

    1997-01-20

    A fully automatic and continuous cell culture system based on roller bottles is described in this paper. The system includes a culture rack storage station for storing a large number of roller bottles filled with culture medium and inoculated with mammalian cells, mass-handling facility for extracting completed cultures from the roller bottles, and replacing the culture medium. The various component units of the system were controlled either by a general-purpose programmable logic controller or a dedicated controller. The system provided four subsequent operation modes: cell inoculation, medium change, harvesting, and medium change. The operator could easily select and change the appropriate mode from outside of the aseptic area. The development of the system made large-scale production of mammalian cells, and manufacturing and stabilization of high quality products such as erythropoietin possible under total aseptic control, and opened up the door for industrial production of physiologically active substances as pharmaceutical drugs by mammalian cell culture.

  7. Design of VisSWIR continuous zoom optical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Mingyang; Yang, Hongtao; Qu, Rui; Mei, Chao; Zhou, Zuofeng

    2017-02-01

    For 640 pixel×512 pixel cooled staring focal plane array detector, a VisSWIR wideband continuous zoom optical system with 7X zoom range is presented based on the pattern of the negative zoom group and compensating lens group. The zoom system provides continuous changed in the field of view from narrow to the wide. The zoom optical system works in the range of 0.4μm 1.7μm, F number is 4, the pixel of the detector is 15μm. It realizes 20mm 140mm continuous zoom with a smooth zoom path and provided high image quality with the whole zoom range, the zoom ratio is 7:1. The modulation transfer function(MTF) for the system is above 0.5 within the whole focal length range at spatial frequency of 34lp/mm and it almost approaches the diffraction limit. RMS value of spot diameter was investigation, the maximum distortion value is less than 5% and the surface type of all lens applied is spherical. Moreover, the cam curve after optimization is given by the optical design software Code V macro. The design results provide that the zoom system has the small size, high resolution, excellent image quality and the smooth cam curve etc.

  8. Intracellular carbon isotope distributions of continuous-culture Allochromatium vinosum grown on acetate vs. CO2.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, T.; Mohr, W.; Sattin, S.; Rogers, D.; Girguis, P. R.; Pearson, A.

    2016-02-01

    Sulfur oxidizing bacteria are commonly observed in various aquatic environments, which use reduced sulfur compounds as electron donors to complete the carbon metabolism. Their carbon isotope fractionations during biosynthesis can be preserved in the fossil records. Here we grew a model sulfur oxidizing bacterium, Allochromatium vinosum, in two mode of continuous culture. One of the A. vinosum culture was grown autotrophically with CO2 as the carbon source; while the other one was grown heterotrophically on acetate. A novel protein isotope fingerprinting analysis was applied combining proteomics and protein isotope analysis together, which indicates no isotope fractionation among individual proteins, whereas the bulk protein d13C relative to bulk biomass were substantially different between autotrophic and heterotrophic cells. The same trend was also observed in d13C values of bulk amino acids, fatty acids and nucleic acids. The observed difference in major classes of organic compounds may result from the difference in biosynthetic pathways of autotrophic and heterotrophic cells. A closer look into d13C value of individual amino acids and fatty acids provides us further evidence to identify isotopic response to key reactions of central carbon metabolism as revealed by proteomic analysis. Our work suggests that we can decipher diverse microbial carbon metabolisms by combining proteomics with compound specific analysis of major classes of organic compounds.

  9. Temperature-dependent growth kinetics of Escherichia coli ML 30 in glucose-limited continuous culture.

    PubMed Central

    Kovárová, K; Zehnder, A J; Egli, T

    1996-01-01

    Detailed comparison of growth kinetics at temperatures below and above the optimal temperature was carried out with Escherichia coli ML 30 (DSM 1329) in continuous culture. The culture was grown with glucose as the sole limiting source of carbon and energy (100 mg liter(-1) in feed medium), and the resulting steady-state concentrations of glucose were measured as a function of the dilution rate at 17.4, 28.4, 37, and 40 degrees C. The experimental data could not be described by the conventional Monod equation over the entire temperature range, but an extended form of the Monod model [mu = mu(max) x (s - s(min))/(Ks + s - s(min))], which predicts a finite substrate concentration at 0 growth rate (s(min)), provided a good fit. The two parameters mu(max) and s(min) were temperature dependent, whereas, surprisingly, fitting the model to the experimental data yielded virtually identical Ks values (approximately 33 microg liter(-1)) at all temperatures. A model that describes steady-state glucose concentrations as a function of temperature at constant growth rates is presented. In similar experiments with mixtures of glucose and galactose (1:1 mixture), the two sugars were utilized simultaneously at all temperatures examined, and their steady-state concentrations were reduced compared with to growth with either glucose or galactose alone. The results of laboratory-scale kinetic experiments are discussed with respect to the concentrations observed in natural environments. PMID:8755881

  10. Human language is a culturally evolving system.

    PubMed

    Steels, Luc

    2017-02-01

    It is well accepted that languages change rapidly in a process of cultural evolution. But some animal communication systems, in particular bird song, also exhibit cultural change. So where exactly is the difference? This article argues that the main selectionist pressure on human languages is not biological-that is, related to survival and fecundity-but instead is linked to producing enough expressive power for the needs of the community, maximizing communicative success, and reducing cognitive effort. The key question to be answered by an "evolutionary linguistics" approach to language is, What are the causal mechanisms sustaining an evolutionary dynamic based on these selection criteria? In other words, what cognitive mechanisms and social interaction patterns are needed, and how do they allow a language to emerge and remain shared, despite profound variation and never-ending change?

  11. Quantitative Diagnosis of Continuous-Valued, Stead-State Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rouquette, N.

    1995-01-01

    Quantitative diagnosis involves numerically estimating the values of unobservable parameters that best explain the observed parameter values. We consider quantitative diagnosis for continuous, lumped- parameter, steady-state physical systems because such models are easy to construct and the diagnosis problem is considerably simpler than that for corresponding dynamic models. To further tackle the difficulties of numerically inverting a simulation model to compute a diagnosis, we propose to decompose a physical system model in terms of feedback loops. This decomposition reduces the dimension of the problem and consequently decreases the diagnosis search space. We illustrate this approach on a model of thermal control system studied in earlier research.

  12. Quantitative Diagnosis of Continuous-Valued, Stead-State Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rouquette, N.

    1995-01-01

    Quantitative diagnosis involves numerically estimating the values of unobservable parameters that best explain the observed parameter values. We consider quantitative diagnosis for continuous, lumped- parameter, steady-state physical systems because such models are easy to construct and the diagnosis problem is considerably simpler than that for corresponding dynamic models. To further tackle the difficulties of numerically inverting a simulation model to compute a diagnosis, we propose to decompose a physical system model in terms of feedback loops. This decomposition reduces the dimension of the problem and consequently decreases the diagnosis search space. We illustrate this approach on a model of thermal control system studied in earlier research.

  13. How to select a continuous emission monitoring system

    SciTech Connect

    Radigan, M.J. )

    1994-02-01

    Selecting a continuous emission monitoring system (CEMS) involves more than picking an analyzer. Successful CEMS interface sampling and data-management systems to produce accurate, reliable reports required by regulatory agencies. Following objective guidelines removes some of the misery from CEMS shopping. However, prospective CEMS buyers should do their homework and develop well-thought-out, detailed specification for the processes' sampling criteria. Fine tuning the analyzer/data management system can eliminate maintenance costs and keep the facility operating within its permit restrictions.

  14. Algal culture studies related to a Closed Ecological Life Support System (CELSS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radmer, R.; Behrens, P.; Fernandez, E.; Ollinger, O.; Howell, C.; Venables, A.; Huggins, D.; Gladue, R.

    1984-01-01

    In many respects, algae would be the ideal plant component for a biologically based controlled life support system, since they are eminently suited to the closely coupled functions of atmosphere regeneration and food production. Scenedesmus obliquus and Spirulina platensis were grown in three continuous culture apparatuses. Culture vessels their operation and relative merits are described. Both light and nitrogen utilization efficiency are examined. Long term culture issues are detailed and a discussion of a plasmid search in Spirulina is included.

  15. Pigment production and isotopic fractionations in continuous culture: okenone producing purple sulfur bacteria Part II.

    PubMed

    Smith, D A; Steele, A; Fogel, M L

    2015-05-01

    Okenone is a carotenoid pigment unique to certain members of Chromatiaceae, the dominant family of purple sulfur bacteria (PSB) found in euxinic photic zones. Diagenetic alteration of okenone produces okenane, the only recognized molecular fossil unique to PSB. The in vivo concentrations of okenone and bacteriochlorophyll a (Bchl a) on a per cell basis were monitored and quantified as a function of light intensity in continuous cultures of the purple sulfur bacterium Marichromatium purpuratum (Mpurp1591). We show that okenone-producing PSB have constant bacteriochlorophyll to carotenoid ratios in light-harvesting antenna complexes. The in vivo concentrations of Bchl a, 0.151 ± 0.012 fmol cell(-1), and okenone, 0.103 ± 0.012 fmol cell(-1), were not dependent on average light intensity (10-225 Lux) at both steady and non-steady states. This observation revealed that in autotrophic continuous cultures of Mpurp1591, there was a constant ratio for okenone to Bchl a of 1:1.5. Okenone was therefore constitutively produced in planktonic cultures of PSB, regardless of light intensity. This confirms the legitimacy of okenone as a signature for autotrophic planktonic PSB and by extrapolation water column euxinia. We measured the δ(13)C, δ(15)N, and δ(34)S bulk biomass values from cells collected daily and determined the isotopic fractionations of Mpurp1591. There was no statistical relationship in the bulk isotope measurements or stable isotope fractionations to light intensity or cell density under steady and non-steady-state conditions. The carbon isotope fractionation between okenone and Bchl a with respect to overall bulk biomass ((13)ε pigment - biomass) was 2.2 ± 0.4‰ and -4.1 ± 0.9‰, respectively. The carbon isotopic fractionation (13ε pigment-CO2) for the production of pigments in PSB is more variable than previously thought with our reported values for okenone at -15.5 ± 1.2‰ and -21.8 ± 1.7‰ for Bchl a.

  16. Family systems theory, attachment theory, and culture.

    PubMed

    Rothbaum, Fred; Rosen, Karen; Ujiie, Tatsuo; Uchida, Nobuko

    2002-01-01

    Family systems theory and attachment theory have important similarities and complementarities. Here we consider two areas in which the theories converge: (a) in family system theorists' description of an overly close, or "enmeshed," mother-child dyad, which attachment theorists conceptualize as the interaction of children's ambivalent attachment and mothers' preoccupied attachment; (b) in family system theorists' description of the "pursuer-distance cycle" of marital conflict, which attachment theorists conceptualize as the interaction of preoccupied and dismissive partners. We briefly review family systems theory evidence, and more extensively review attachment theory evidence, pertaining to these points of convergence. We also review cross-cultural research, which leads us to conclude that the dynamics described in both theories reflect, in part, Western ways of thinking and Western patterns of relatedness. Evidence from Japan suggests that extremely close ties between mother and child are perceived as adaptive, and are more common, and that children experience less adverse effects from such relationships than do children in the West. Moreover, in Japan there is less emphasis on the importance of the exclusive spousal relationship, and less need for the mother and father to find time alone to rekindle romantic, intimate feelings and to resolve conflicts by openly communicating their differences. Thus, the "maladaptive" pattern frequently cited by Western theorists of an extremely close mother-child relationship, an unromantic, conflictual marriage characterized by little verbal communication and a peripheral, distant father, may function very differently in other cultures. While we believe that both theories will be greatly enriched by their integration, we caution against the application of either theory outside the cultures in which they were developed.

  17. High Resolution Continuous Flow Analysis System for Polar Ice Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dallmayr, Remi; Azuma, Kumiko; Yamada, Hironobu; Kjær, Helle Astrid; Vallelonga, Paul; Azuma, Nobuhiko; Takata, Morimasa

    2014-05-01

    In the last decades, Continuous Flow Analysis (CFA) technology for ice core analyses has been developed to reconstruct the past changes of the climate system 1), 2). Compared with traditional analyses of discrete samples, a CFA system offers much faster and higher depth resolution analyses. It also generates a decontaminated sample stream without time-consuming sample processing procedure by using the inner area of an ice-core sample.. The CFA system that we have been developing is currently able to continuously measure stable water isotopes 3) and electrolytic conductivity, as well as to collect discrete samples for the both inner and outer areas with variable depth resolutions. Chemistry analyses4) and methane-gas analysis 5) are planned to be added using the continuous water stream system 5). In order to optimize the resolution of the current system with minimal sample volumes necessary for different analyses, our CFA system typically melts an ice core at 1.6 cm/min. Instead of using a wire position encoder with typical 1mm positioning resolution 6), we decided to use a high-accuracy CCD Laser displacement sensor (LKG-G505, Keyence). At the 1.6 cm/min melt rate, the positioning resolution was increased to 0.27mm. Also, the mixing volume that occurs in our open split debubbler is regulated using its weight. The overflow pumping rate is smoothly PID controlled to maintain the weight as low as possible, while keeping a safety buffer of water to avoid air bubbles downstream. To evaluate the system's depth-resolution, we will present the preliminary data of electrolytic conductivity obtained by melting 12 bags of the North Greenland Eemian Ice Drilling (NEEM) ice core. The samples correspond to different climate intervals (Greenland Stadial 21, 22, Greenland Stadial 5, Greenland Interstadial 5, Greenland Interstadial 7, Greenland Stadial 8). We will present results for the Greenland Stadial -8, whose depths and ages are between 1723.7 and 1724.8 meters, and 35.520 to

  18. Dynamical decoupling and homogenization of continuous variable systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arenz, Christian; Burgarth, Daniel; Hillier, Robin

    2017-03-01

    For finite-dimensional quantum systems, such as qubits, a well established strategy to protect such systems from decoherence is dynamical decoupling. However many promising quantum devices, such as oscillators, are infinite dimensional, for which the question if dynamical decoupling could be applied remained open. Here we first show that not every infinite-dimensional system can be protected from decoherence through dynamical decoupling. Then we develop dynamical decoupling for continuous variable systems which are described by quadratic Hamiltonians. We identify a condition and a set of operations that allow us to map a set of interacting harmonic oscillators onto a set of non-interacting oscillators rotating with an averaged frequency, a procedure we call homogenization. Furthermore we show that every quadratic system-environment interaction can be suppressed with two simple operations acting only on the system. Using a random dynamical decoupling or homogenization scheme, we develop bounds that characterize how fast we have to work in order to achieve the desired uncoupled dynamics. This allows us to identify how well homogenization can be achieved and decoherence can be suppressed in continuous variable systems.

  19. Methods for Automated and Continuous Commissioning of Building Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Larry Luskay; Michael Brambley; Srinivas Katipamula

    2003-04-30

    Avoidance of poorly installed HVAC systems is best accomplished at the close of construction by having a building and its systems put ''through their paces'' with a well conducted commissioning process. This research project focused on developing key components to enable the development of tools that will automatically detect and correct equipment operating problems, thus providing continuous and automatic commissioning of the HVAC systems throughout the life of a facility. A study of pervasive operating problems reveled the following would most benefit from an automated and continuous commissioning process: (1) faulty economizer operation; (2) malfunctioning sensors; (3) malfunctioning valves and dampers, and (4) access to project design data. Methodologies for detecting system operation faults in these areas were developed and validated in ''bare-bones'' forms within standard software such as spreadsheets, databases, statistical or mathematical packages. Demonstrations included flow diagrams and simplified mock-up applications. Techniques to manage data were demonstrated by illustrating how test forms could be populated with original design information and the recommended sequence of operation for equipment systems. Proposed tools would use measured data, design data, and equipment operating parameters to diagnosis system problems. Steps for future research are suggested to help more toward practical application of automated commissioning and its high potential to improve equipment availability, increase occupant comfort, and extend the life of system equipment.

  20. Reexamination of continuous fuzzy measurement on two-level systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolovski, D.; Rusconi, S.; Brouard, S.; Akhmatskaya, E.

    2017-04-01

    Imposing restrictions on the Feynman paths of the monitored system has in the past been proposed as a universal model-free approach to continuous quantum measurements. Here we revisit this proposition and demonstrate that a Gaussian restriction, resulting in a sequence of many highly inaccurate (weak) von Neumann measurements, is not sufficiently strong to ensure proximity between a readout and the Feynman paths along which the monitored system evolves. Rather, in the continuous limit, the variations of a typical readout become much larger than the separation between the eigenvalues of the measured quantity. Thus, a typical readout is not represented by a nearly constant curve, correlating with one of the eigenvalues of the measured quantity A ̂, even when decoherence or Zeno effect is achieved for the observed two-level system, and does not point directly to the system's final state. We show that the decoherence in a "free" system can be seen as induced by a Gaussian random walk with a drift, eventually directing the system towards one of the eigenstates of A ̂. A similar mechanism appears to be responsible for the Zeno effect in a driven system, when its Rabi oscillations are quenched by monitoring. Alongside the Gaussian case, which can only be studied numerically, we also consider a fully tractable model with a "hard wall" restriction and show the results to be similar.

  1. Continuously microscopically observed and process-controlled cell culture within the SlideReactor: proof of a new concept for cell characterization.

    PubMed

    Schwartlander, Ruth; Schmid, Jochen; Brandenburg, Börries; Katenz, Ekaterina; Vondran, Florian Wolfgang Rudolf; Pless, Gesine; Cheng, Xiangdong; Pascher, Andreas; Neuhaus, Peter; Sauer, Igor Maximilian

    2007-01-01

    Certain cell types, especially primary human cells, favor a well-defined culture environment offering continuous supply of nutrients and oxygen and waste product removal. Several bioreactors based on special matrices or hollow fibers have been developed that provide such conditions. However, characterization of matrix re-organization or growth of tissue within these systems is possible only after culture termination. Evaluation of the influence of certain medium additives or culture conditions (e.g., temperature, oxygenation) on cell viability, expansion, and differentiation within these systems remains a challenging task. The SlideReactor, a miniaturized hollow fiber-based bioreactor, was developed to enable the observation of cells during culture. An operation concept offering predefined conditions for various cell types has been designed. For proof of concept, primary human cells (hepatocytes, fibroblasts, keratinocytes) and cell lines (HepG2, HuH7, C3A, WiDr, SkHep1) were cultured and observed. A series of experiments (n=40) showed the feasibility of the set-up; determination of process parameters and continuous observation is possible. The SlideReactor may serve as a simple and cost-efficient tool for cell characterization and optimization of cell-culture conditions.

  2. Digestion during continuous culture fermentation when replacing perennial ryegrass with barley and steam-flaked corn.

    PubMed

    Wales, W J; Kolver, E S; Egan, A R

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to quantify the optimal inclusion rate of grain required to maximize nutrient digestion of a diet based on highly digestible pasture. It was hypothesized that maximum digestion would occur at a rate of grain inclusion that resulted in a culture pH of 6.0, reflecting the pH below which fiber digestion would be expected to be compromised. Four dual-flow continuous culture fermenters were used to establish the effects on digestion of replacing freeze-dried, highly digestible ryegrass with 0, 15, 30, and 45% of dry matter as 60% barley, 35% steam-flaked corn, and 5% molasses mix. The respective composite diets were fed twice daily to mimic intake patterns observed in dairy cows offered supplements during milking and offered half their daily allowance of pasture after each milking. Digesta samples were collected during the last 3 d of each of four 9-d experimental periods. Average daily culture pH decreased linearly as proportion of cereal grain in the diet increased, with average daily pH ranging from 6.29 to 5.74. Concentrations of neutral detergent fiber and total fatty acids decreased linearly with increasing proportion of cereal grain in the diet. Digestion of organic matter (OM) was maximized at an interpolated value of 24% grain inclusion and culture pH of 6.0, but the difference in the OM digestibility over the range of grain treatments from 0 to 45% was small (3 percentage units) despite pH changes over a range of 6.3 to 5.7. The relatively small change in OM digestibility was explained by reduced fiber and crude protein digestibilities being balanced by an increased digestion of nonstructural carbohydrate. Although different relationships between ruminal pH and digestibility appear to exist when cows are fed pasture alone compared with a total mixed ration, when starch supplements are included in pasture diets, the relationships associated with feeding a total mixed ration may then be more likely to apply.

  3. Bipartite entanglement in continuous-variable tripartite systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, M. K.; Corney, J. F.

    2016-11-01

    In the field of continuous-variable tripartite entanglement, the systems utilised can be either asymmetric or symmetric. It is therefore of interest to examine the differences in the entanglement properties of these two types of system, using two examples that are known to produce tripartite entanglement. We examine one asymmetric and one fully symmetric Gaussian continuous-variable system in terms of their tripartite and bipartite entanglement properties. We first treat pure states and are able to find analytic solutions using the undepleted pump approximation for the Hamiltonian models. Our symmetric system exhibits perfect tripartite correlations, but only in the unphysical limit of infinite squeezing. For more realistic squeezing parameters, the two systems exhibit both tripartite and bipartite entanglement. Secondly we treat the more experimentally reasonable situation where the interactions take place inside optical cavities and we are dealing with mixed states. In these cases, where the criteria for genuine tripartite entanglement are more stringent, we find that tripartite entanglement is still available, although over smaller bandwidths than three-mode inseparability. In general, the spectral results are consistent with the analytical solutions. We conclude that none of the outputs are completely analogous to either GHZ or W states, but there are parameter regions of the Hamiltonian dynamics where they produce T states as introduced by Adesso et al. [1,2]. In the intracavity cases, both bipartite entanglement and tripartite inseparability are always present, with genuine tripartite entanglement appearing as the pumping rate is increased. The qualitative differences in the output states for different interaction parameters indicate that continuous-variable tripartite quantum information systems offer a versatility not found in two-mode bipartite systems.

  4. Model-based fault diagnosis in continuous dynamic systems.

    PubMed

    Lo, C H; Wong, Y K; Rad, A B

    2004-07-01

    Traditional fault detection and isolation methods are based on quantitative models which are sometimes difficult and costly to obtain. In this paper, qualitative bond graph (QBG) reasoning is adopted as the modeling scheme to generate a set of qualitative equations. The QBG method provides a unified approach for modeling engineering systems, in particular, mechatronic systems. An input-output qualitative equation derived from QBG formalism performs continuous system monitoring. Fault diagnosis is activated when a discrepancy is observed between measured abnormal behavior and predicted system behavior. Genetic algorithms (GA's) are then used to search for possible faulty components among a system of qualitative equations. In order to demonstrate the performance of the proposed algorithm, we have tested it on a laboratory scale servo-tank liquid process rig. Results of the proposed model-based fault detection and diagnosis algorithm for the process rig are presented and discussed.

  5. pH-induced gene regulation of solvent production by Clostridium acetobutylicum in continuous culture: Parameter estimation and sporulation modelling

    PubMed Central

    Thorn, Graeme J.; King, John R.; Jabbari, Sara

    2013-01-01

    The acetone–butanol (AB) fermentation process in the anaerobic endospore-forming Gram-positive bacterium Clostridium acetobutylicum is useful as a producer of biofuels, particularly butanol. Recent work has concentrated on trying to improve the efficiency of the fermentation method, either through changes in the environmental conditions or by modifying the genome to selectively favour the production of one particular solvent over others. Fermentation of glucose by C. acetobutylicum occurs in two stages: initially the acids acetate and butyrate are produced and excreted and then, as the external pH falls, acetate and butyrate are ingested and further metabolised into the solvents acetone, butanol and ethanol. In order to optimise butanol production, it is important to understand how pH affects the enzyme-controlled reactions in the metabolism process. We adapt an ordinary differential equation model of the metabolic network with regulation at the genetic level for the required enzymes; parametrising the model using experimental data generated from continuous culture, we improve on previous point predictions (S. Haus, S. Jabbari, T. Millat, H. Janssen, R.-J. Fisher, H. Bahl, J. R. King, O. Wolkenhauer, A systems biology approach to investigate the effect of pH-induced gene regulation on solvent production by Clostridium acetobutylicum in continuous culture, BMC Systems Biology 5 (2011)) [1] both by using a different optimisation approach and by computing confidence intervals and correlation coefficients. We find in particular that the parameters are ill-determined from the data and that two separate clusters of parameters appear correlated, reflecting the importance of two metabolic intermediates. We extend the model further to include another aspect of the clostridial survival mechanism, sporulation, and by computation of the Akaike Information Criterion values find that the there is some evidence for the presence of sporulation during the shift. PMID:23201580

  6. pH-induced gene regulation of solvent production by Clostridium acetobutylicum in continuous culture: parameter estimation and sporulation modelling.

    PubMed

    Thorn, Graeme J; King, John R; Jabbari, Sara

    2013-02-01

    The acetone-butanol (AB) fermentation process in the anaerobic endospore-forming Gram-positive bacterium Clostridium acetobutylicum is useful as a producer of biofuels, particularly butanol. Recent work has concentrated on trying to improve the efficiency of the fermentation method, either through changes in the environmental conditions or by modifying the genome to selectively favour the production of one particular solvent over others. Fermentation of glucose by C. acetobutylicum occurs in two stages: initially the acids acetate and butyrate are produced and excreted and then, as the external pH falls, acetate and butyrate are ingested and further metabolised into the solvents acetone, butanol and ethanol. In order to optimise butanol production, it is important to understand how pH affects the enzyme-controlled reactions in the metabolism process. We adapt an ordinary differential equation model of the metabolic network with regulation at the genetic level for the required enzymes; parametrising the model using experimental data generated from continuous culture, we improve on previous point predictions (S. Haus, S. Jabbari, T. Millat, H. Janssen, R.-J. Fisher, H. Bahl, J. R. King, O. Wolkenhauer, A systems biology approach to investigate the effect of pH-induced gene regulation on solvent production by Clostridium acetobutylicum in continuous culture, BMC Systems Biology 5 (2011)) [1] both by using a different optimisation approach and by computing confidence intervals and correlation coefficients. We find in particular that the parameters are ill-determined from the data and that two separate clusters of parameters appear correlated, reflecting the importance of two metabolic intermediates. We extend the model further to include another aspect of the clostridial survival mechanism, sporulation, and by computation of the Akaike Information Criterion values find that the there is some evidence for the presence of sporulation during the shift. Copyright © 2012

  7. Quantification and scaling of multipartite entanglement in continuous variable systems.

    PubMed

    Adesso, Gerardo; Serafini, Alessio; Illuminati, Fabrizio

    2004-11-26

    We present a theoretical method to determine the multipartite entanglement between different partitions of multimode, fully or partially symmetric Gaussian states of continuous variable systems. For such states, we determine the exact expression of the logarithmic negativity and show that it coincides with that of equivalent two-mode Gaussian states. Exploiting this reduction, we demonstrate the scaling of the multipartite entanglement with the number of modes and its reliable experimental estimate by direct measurements of the global and local purities.

  8. Systems biology for organotypic cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Grego, Sonia; Dougherty, Edward R; Alexander, Francis J; Auerbach, Scott S; Berridge, Brian R; Bittner, Michael L; Casey, Warren; Cooley, Philip C; Dash, Ajit; Ferguson, Stephen S; Fennell, Timothy R; Hawkins, Brian T; Hickey, Anthony J; Kleensang, Andre; Liebman, Michael N J; Martin, Florian; Maull, Elizabeth A; Paragas, Jason; Qiao, Guilin Gary; Ramaiahgari, Sreenivasa; Sumner, Susan J; Yoon, Miyoung

    2016-11-14

    Translating in vitro biological data into actionable information related to human health holds the potential to improve disease treatment and risk assessment of chemical exposures. While genomics has identified regulatory pathways at the cellular level, translation to the organism level requires a multiscale approach accounting for intra-cellular regulation, inter-cellular interaction, and tissue/organ-level effects. Tissue-level effects can now be probed in vitro thanks to recently developed systems of three-dimensional (3D), multicellular, "organotypic" cell cultures, which mimic functional responses of living tissue. However, there remains a knowledge gap regarding interactions across different biological scales, complicating accurate prediction of health outcomes from molecular/genomic data and tissue responses. Systems biology aims at mathematical modeling of complex, non-linear biological systems. We propose to apply a systems biology approach to achieve a computational representation of tissue-level physiological responses by integrating empirical data derived from organotypic culture systems with computational models of intracellular pathways to better predict human responses. Successful implementation of this integrated approach will provide a powerful tool for faster, more accurate and cost-effective screening of potential toxicants and therapeutics. On September 11, 2015, an interdisciplinary group of scientists, engineers, and clinicians gathered for a workshop in Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, to discuss this ambitious goal. Participants represented laboratory-based and computational modeling approaches to pharmacology and toxicology, as well as the pharmaceutical industry, government, non-profits, and academia. Discussions focused on identifying critical system perturbations to model, the computational tools required, and the experimental approaches best suited to generating key data.

  9. Systems Biology for Organotypic Cell Cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Grego, Sonia; Dougherty, Edward R.; Alexander, Francis J.; Auerbach, Scott S.; Berridge, Brian R.; Bittner, Michael L.; Casey, Warren; Cooley, Philip C.; Dash, Ajit; Ferguson, Stephen S.; Fennell, Timothy R.; Hawkins, Brian T.; Hickey, Anthony J.; Kleensang, Andre; Liebman, Michael N.; Martin, Florian; Maull, Elizabeth A.; Paragas, Jason; Qiao, Guilin; Ramaiahgari, Sreenivasa; Sumner, Susan J.; Yoon, Miyoung

    2016-08-04

    Translating in vitro biological data into actionable information related to human health holds the potential to improve disease treatment and risk assessment of chemical exposures. While genomics has identified regulatory pathways at the cellular level, translation to the organism level requires a multiscale approach accounting for intra-cellular regulation, inter-cellular interaction, and tissue/organ-level effects. Tissue-level effects can now be probed in vitro thanks to recently developed systems of three-dimensional (3D), multicellular, “organotypic” cell cultures, which mimic functional responses of living tissue. However, there remains a knowledge gap regarding interactions across different biological scales, complicating accurate prediction of health outcomes from molecular/genomic data and tissue responses. Systems biology aims at mathematical modeling of complex, non-linear biological systems. We propose to apply a systems biology approach to achieve a computational representation of tissue-level physiological responses by integrating empirical data derived from organotypic culture systems with computational models of intracellular pathways to better predict human responses. Successful implementation of this integrated approach will provide a powerful tool for faster, more accurate and cost-effective screening of potential toxicants and therapeutics. On September 11, 2015, an interdisciplinary group of scientists, engineers, and clinicians gathered for a workshop in Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, to discuss this ambitious goal. Participants represented laboratory-based and computational modeling approaches to pharmacology and toxicology, as well as the pharmaceutical industry, government, non-profits, and academia. Discussions focused on identifying critical system perturbations to model, the computational tools required, and the experimental approaches best suited to generating key data. This consensus report summarizes the discussions held.

  10. 300 mK Continuous Cooling, Sorption-Adr System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duval, J. M.; Duband, L.; Luchier, N.; Tirolien, T.

    2010-04-01

    The 300 mK cooling system of two instruments onboard the Herschel satellite is achieved by the use of 3He sorption coolers developed and manufactured in CEA/SBT. This cooling system provides alternate (i.e. one-shot) cooling. The addition of a small ADR stage with a gas-gap heat switch allows continuous cooling at 300 mK by using the magnetic stage as an active thermal ballast. The realization of this continuous cooling based on a Herschel type sorption cooler is described here. It is shown that our prototype can provide continuous cooling at a stable temperature or alternatively gives the possibility of changing the setting of the nominal temperature rapidly and without thermal losses. The former mode is indeed extremely useful for detector tests and qualifications. The thermal stability is discussed. This project funded by the French Space Agency, CNES, will also provide additional knowledge to CEA/SBT in the design and realization of 50 mK cooling system using these coupled technologies.

  11. Cell-specific Labeling Enzymes for Analysis of Cell–Cell Communication in Continuous Co-culture*

    PubMed Central

    Tape, Christopher J.; Norrie, Ida C.; Worboys, Jonathan D.; Lim, Lindsay; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.; Jørgensen, Claus

    2014-01-01

    We report the orthologous screening, engineering, and optimization of amino acid conversion enzymes for cell-specific proteomic labeling. Intracellular endoplasmic-reticulum-anchored Mycobacterium tuberculosis diaminopimelate decarboxylase (DDCM.tub-KDEL) confers cell-specific meso-2,6-diaminopimelate-dependent proliferation to multiple eukaryotic cell types. Optimized lysine racemase (LyrM37-KDEL) supports D-lysine specific proliferation and efficient cell-specific isotopic labeling. When ectopically expressed in discrete cell types, these enzymes confer 90% cell-specific isotopic labeling efficiency after 10 days of co-culture. Moreover, DDCM.tub-KDEL and LyrM37-KDEL facilitate equally high cell-specific labeling fidelity without daily media exchange. Consequently, the reported novel enzyme pairing can be used to study cell-specific signaling in uninterrupted, continuous co-cultures. Demonstrating the importance of increased labeling stability for addressing novel biological questions, we compare the cell-specific phosphoproteome of fibroblasts in direct co-culture with epithelial tumor cells in both interrupted (daily media exchange) and continuous (no media exchange) co-cultures. This analysis identified multiple cell-specific phosphorylation sites specifically regulated in the continuous co-culture. Given their applicability to multiple cell types, continuous co-culture labeling fidelity, and suitability for long-term cell–cell phospho-signaling experiments, we propose DDCM.tub-KDEL and LyrM37-KDEL as excellent enzymes for cell-specific labeling with amino acid precursors. PMID:24820872

  12. Hybrid Automated Diagnosis of Discrete/Continuous Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Han; James, Mark; MacKey, Ryan; Cannon, Howard; Bajwa, Anapa; Maul, William

    2007-01-01

    A recently conceived method of automated diagnosis of a complex electromechanical system affords a complete set of capabilities for hybrid diagnosis in the case in which the state of the electromechanical system is characterized by both continuous and discrete values (as represented by analog and digital signals, respectively). The method is an integration of two complementary diagnostic systems: (1) beacon-based exception analysis for multi-missions (BEAM), which is primarily useful in the continuous domain and easily performs diagnoses in the presence of transients; and (2) Livingstone, which is primarily useful in the discrete domain and is typically restricted to quasi-steady conditions. BEAM has been described in several prior NASA Tech Briefs articles: "Software for Autonomous Diagnosis of Complex Systems" (NPO-20803), Vol. 26, No. 3 (March 2002), page 33; "Beacon-Based Exception Analysis for Multimissions" (NPO-20827), Vol. 26, No. 9 (September 2002), page 32; "Wavelet-Based Real-Time Diagnosis of Complex Systems" (NPO-20830), Vol. 27, No. 1 (January 2003), page 67; and "Integrated Formulation of Beacon-Based Exception Analysis for Multimissions" (NPO-21126), Vol. 27, No. 3 (March 2003), page 74. Briefly, BEAM is a complete data-analysis method, implemented in software, for real-time or off-line detection and characterization of faults. The basic premise of BEAM is to characterize a system from all available observations and train the characterization with respect to normal phases of operation. The observations are primarily continuous in nature. BEAM isolates anomalies by analyzing the deviations from nominal for each phase of operation. Livingstone is a model-based reasoner that uses a model of a system, controller commands, and sensor observations to track the system s state, and detect and diagnose faults. Livingstone models a system within the discrete domain. Therefore, continuous sensor readings, as well as time, must be discretized. To reason about

  13. Water spray ventilator system for continuous mining machines

    DOEpatents

    Page, Steven J.; Mal, Thomas

    1995-01-01

    The invention relates to a water spray ventilator system mounted on a continuous mining machine to streamline airflow and provide effective face ventilation of both respirable dust and methane in underground coal mines. This system has two side spray nozzles mounted one on each side of the mining machine and six spray nozzles disposed on a manifold mounted to the underside of the machine boom. The six spray nozzles are angularly and laterally oriented on the manifold so as to provide non-overlapping spray patterns along the length of the cutter drum.

  14. Numerical continuation methods for large-scale dissipative dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umbría, Juan Sánchez; Net, Marta

    2016-11-01

    A tutorial on continuation and bifurcation methods for the analysis of truncated dissipative partial differential equations is presented. It focuses on the computation of equilibria, periodic orbits, their loci of codimension-one bifurcations, and invariant tori. To make it more self-contained, it includes some definitions of basic concepts of dynamical systems, and some preliminaries on the general underlying techniques used to solve non-linear systems of equations by inexact Newton methods, and eigenvalue problems by means of subspace or Arnoldi iterations.

  15. The Continuing Importance of the "Cultural" in the Study of Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Andy

    2011-01-01

    The academic study of youth culture has changed markedly in the past two decades. The early 1990s saw a "cultural turn" as the sociological focus moved from "institutional and structural features of society to the study of culture". Andy Bennett begins this article with a critical evaluation of the "cultural turn" and its impact on the field of…

  16. The Continuing Importance of the "Cultural" in the Study of Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Andy

    2011-01-01

    The academic study of youth culture has changed markedly in the past two decades. The early 1990s saw a "cultural turn" as the sociological focus moved from "institutional and structural features of society to the study of culture". Andy Bennett begins this article with a critical evaluation of the "cultural turn" and its impact on the field of…

  17. Persistence of Escherichia coli in batch and continuous vermicomposting systems.

    PubMed

    Hénault-Ethier, Louise; Martin, Vincent J J; Gélinas, Yves

    2016-10-01

    Vermicomposting is a biooxidation process in which epigeicearthworms act in synergy with microbial populations to degrade organic matter. Vermicomposting does not go through a thermophilic stage as required by North American legislations for pathogen eradication. We examined the survival of a Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) labeled Escherichia coli MG1655 as a model for the survival of pathogenic bacteria in both small-scale batch and medium-scale continuously-operated systems to discern the influence of the earthworm Eisenia fetida, nutrient content and the indigenous vermicompost microbial community on pathogen abundance. In batch systems, the microbial community had the greatest influence on the rapid decline of E. coli populations, and the effect of earthworms was only visible in microbially-impoverishedvermicomposts. No significant earthworm density-dependent relationship was observed on E. coli survival under continuous operation. E. coli numbers decreased below the US EPA compost sanitation guidelines of 10(3)Colony Forming Units (CFU)/g (dry weight) within 18-21days for both the small-scale batch and medium-scale continuous systems, but it took up to 51days without earthworms and with an impoverished microbial community to reach the legal limit. Nutrient replenishment (i.e. organic carbon) provided by continuous feed input did not appear to extend E. coli survival. In fact, longer survival of E. coli was noticed in treatments where less total and labile sugars were available, suggesting that sugars may support potentially antagonist bacteria in the vermicompost. Total N, pH and humidity did not appear to affect E. coli survival. Several opportunistic human pathogens may be found in vermicompost, and their populations are likely kept in check by antagonists. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The Influence of Nutrient Availability on Trophic Energy Transfer Using Two-Stage Continuous Cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBeain, K. A.; Halsey, K.

    2016-02-01

    Areas of extreme nutrient limitation are expected to expand in the surface ocean as a consequence of climate change. Phytoplankton are the base of the marine food web and their physiology is strongly influenced by nutrient availability. Two-stage continuous cultures were used to investigate trophic energy and nutrient transfers between phytoplankton and microzooplankton under conditions simulating high and low nutrient availability. The first stage contained either fast (μ=1.2 d-1) or slow (μ=0.2 d-1) growing nitrogen-limited prey organisms: a green alga (Dunaliella tertiolecta) or a diatom (Thalassiosira pseudonana). The second stage contained the dinoflagellate Oxyrrhis marina, which was fed a constant biomass of prey delivered from the first stage. Cultures were allowed to reach steady state before the physiologies of both prey and predator were analyzed. The population of O. marina was five-fold higher when fed with the fast growing D. tertiolecta compared to slow-growing D. tertiolecta. D. tertiolecta also supported a population of O. marina that was an order of magnitude higher than the diatom prey type. The fitness of the prey and O. marina under each nutrient limiting condition were further assessed using a suite of physiological measurements including chlorophyll, C:N:P ratios, lipid body formation, cell volume, motility, and fecal pellet accumulation. Regardless of prey type, O. marina were consistently larger and less abundant when fed prey growing at 0.2 d-1. These results suggest that major shifts in ecosystem food web structure are likely as surface waters become increasingly depleted of nutrients.

  19. Evolved aniline catabolism in Acinetobacter calcoaceticus during continuous culture of river water.

    PubMed Central

    Wyndham, R C

    1986-01-01

    Adaptation of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus from river water to aniline depends on the dynamics of parent and mutant populations. The parent, Acinetobacter strain DON26 phenotype Ani0, was common in river water and assimilated aniline effectively at micromolar concentrations, but was inhibited at higher concentrations of aniline. The Ani0 phenotype was also characterized by a broad specificity for oxidation of chloroanilines by aniline-induced cells. The mutant Ani+ phenotype was represented by DON2, isolated from a population of less than 100 cells ml-1 in a mixed river water culture, and by DON261, isolated during continuous culture of DON26. Ani+ strains assimilated aniline at a greater maximum specific rate than the parent and were able to grow at concentrations of aniline greater than 16 mM. These strains cooxidized phenol after growth at high aniline concentrations, but showed reduced activity toward chloroanilines. These changes plus kinetic data, oxygen uptake data, and the results of auxanography indicate that the mutant has an increased activity and altered specificity of the initial enzyme in the aniline catabolic pathway. The parent strain, DON26, was at a selective advantage relative to the mutant at low concentrations of aniline, but was replaced by the mutant when aniline concentrations increased. Adaptation of the mixed river water community to aniline involved selection of both phenotypes. Reversion of the Ani+ to Ani0 phenotype occurred at a frequency of 10(-2) in the absence of aniline selection. Plasmid content was not altered during either acquisition or loss of the Ani+ phenotype. Adaptive changes in Acinetobacter spp. populations illustrate important differences in the catabolic activities of natural and pollutant selected strains.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images PMID:3707123

  20. Continuous system with microwave irradiation to obtain alkyl benzoates.

    PubMed

    Cáceres, Ana; Jaimes, María; Chávez, Gerson; Bravo, Bélgica; Ysambertt, Fredy; Márquez, Nelson

    2005-12-15

    In this study, a continuous linear alcohol derivatization is developed. Reaction of alcohol group (ROH) with benzoyl chloride (BC) is carried out in an on-line system with UV detection. All reaction conditions, as flow rate (FR), ROH/BC molar ratio, wavelength, temperature, microwave (MW) irradiation and reaction coil size (internal diameter and length) were optimized. 0.5mLmin(-1), 2.49 [BC]/[ROH], 230nm, 60 degrees C or medium power (225W) when MW irradiation was used and a reactor coil of 159muL (0.5mmx810mm) were the optimum conditions. The on-line system with microwave irradiation was more efficient than the one with a water bath heating. The developed system reduces analysis time consumption, reagent amounts and this system was used to evaluate the composition of commercial samples of alcohols polyethoxylated (surfactants).

  1. Continuous-sterilization system that uses photosemiconductor powders.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, T; Tomoda, R; Nakajima, T; Nakamura, N; Komine, T

    1988-06-01

    We report a novel photochemical sterilization system in which Escherichia coli cells were sterilized with photosemiconductor powders (titanium oxide). For sterilization that could be used in practice, it was necessary to separate the TiO2 powders from the cell suspension. Therefore, semiconductor powders were immobilized on acetylcellulose membranes. We constructed a continuous-sterilization system consisting of a TiO2-immobilized acetylcellulose membrane reactor, a mercury lamp, and a masterflex pump. As a result, under the various sterilization conditions examined, E. coli (10(2) cells per ml) was sterilized to less than 1% survival when the cell suspension flowed in this system at a mean residence time of 16.0 min under irradiation (1,800 microeinsteins/m2 per s). We found that this system was reusable.

  2. Continuous-sterilization system that uses photosemiconductor powders. [Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Matsunaga, T.; Tomoda, R.; Nakajima, T.; Nakamura, N.; Komine, T.

    1988-06-01

    We report a novel photochemical sterilization system in which Escherichia coli cells were sterilized with photosemiconductor powders (titanium oxide). For sterilization that could be used in practice, it was necessary to separate the TiO/sub 2/ powders from the cell suspension. Therefore, semiconductor powders were immobilized on acetylcellulose membranes. We constructed a continuous-sterilization system consisting of TiO/sub 2/-immobilized acetylcellulose membrane reactor, a mercury lamp, and a masterflex pump. As a result, under the various sterilization conditions examined, E.coli (10/sup 2/ cells per ml) was sterilized to < 1% survival when the cell suspension flowed in this system at a mean residence time of 16.0 min under irradiation (1800 microeinsteins/m/sup 2/ per s). We found that this system was reusable.

  3. Extremal entanglement and mixedness in continuous variable systems

    SciTech Connect

    Adesso, Gerardo; Serafini, Alessio; Illuminati, Fabrizio

    2004-08-01

    We investigate the relationship between mixedness and entanglement for Gaussian states of continuous variable systems. We introduce generalized entropies based on Schatten p norms to quantify the mixedness of a state and derive their explicit expressions in terms of symplectic spectra. We compare the hierarchies of mixedness provided by such measures with the one provided by the purity (defined as tr {rho}{sup 2} for the state {rho}) for generic n-mode states. We then review the analysis proving the existence of both maximally and minimally entangled states at given global and marginal purities, with the entanglement quantified by the logarithmic negativity. Based on these results, we extend such an analysis to generalized entropies, introducing and fully characterizing maximally and minimally entangled states for given global and local generalized entropies. We compare the different roles played by the purity and by the generalized p entropies in quantifying the entanglement and the mixedness of continuous variable systems. We introduce the concept of average logarithmic negativity, showing that it allows a reliable quantitative estimate of continuous variable entanglement by direct measurements of global and marginal generalized p entropies.

  4. Investigation of continuously traversing microphone system for mode measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cicon, D. E.; Sofrin, T. G.; Mathews, D. C.

    1982-01-01

    The continuously Traversing Microphone System consists of a data acquisition and processing method for obtaining the modal coefficients of the discrete, coherent acoustic field in a fan inlet duct. The system would be used in fan rigs or full scale engine installations where present measurement methods, because of the excessive number of microphones and long test times required, are not feasible. The purpose of the investigation reported here was to develop a method for defining modal structure by means of a continuously traversing microphone system and to perform an evaluation of the method, based upon analytical studies and computer simulated tests. A variety of system parameters were examined, and the effects of deviations from ideal were explored. Effects of traverse speed, digitizing rate, run time, roundoff error, calibration errors, and random noise background level were determined. For constant fan operating speed, the sensitivity of the method to normal errors and deviations was determined to be acceptable. Good recovery of mode coefficients was attainable. Fluctuating fan speed conditions received special attention, and it was concluded that by employing suitable time delay procedures, satisfactory information on mode coefficients can be obtained under realistic conditions. A plan for further development involving fan rig tests was prepared.

  5. Growth of Geobacter sulfurreducens under nutrient-limiting conditions in continuous culture.

    PubMed

    Esteve-Núñez, Abraham; Rothermich, Mary; Sharma, Manju; Lovley, Derek

    2005-05-01

    A system for growing Geobacter sulfurreducens under anaerobic conditions in chemostats was developed in order to study the physiology of this organism under conditions that might more closely approximate those found in the subsurface than batch cultures. Geobacter sulfurreducens could be cultured under acetate-limiting conditions with fumarate or Fe(III)-citrate as the electron acceptor at growth rates between 0.04 and 0.09 h(-1). The molar growth yield was threefold higher with fumarate as the electron acceptor than with Fe(III), despite the lower mid-point potential of the fumarate/succinate redox couple. When growth was limited by availability of fumarate, high steady-state concentrations were detected, suggesting that fumarate is unlikely to be an important electron acceptor in sedimentary environments. The half-saturation constant, Ks, for acetate in Fe(III)-grown cultures (10 microM) suggested that the growth of Geobacter species is likely to be acetate limited in most subsurface sediments, but that when millimolar quantities of acetate are added to the subsurface in order to promote the growth of Geobacter for bioremediation applications, this should be enough to overcome any acetate limitations. When the availability of electron acceptors, rather than acetate, limited growth, G. sulfurreducens was less efficient in incorporating acetate into biomass but had higher respiration rates, a desirable physiological characteristic when adding acetate to stimulate the activity of Geobacter species during in situ uranium bioremediation. These results demonstrate that the ability to study the growth of G. sulfurreducens under steady-state conditions can provide insights into its physiological characteristics that have relevance for its activity in a diversity of sedimentary environments.

  6. Ultroser G and brain extract induce a continuous basement membrane with specific synaptic elements in aneurally cultured human skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    van Kuppevelt, T H; Benders, A A; Versteeg, E M; Veerkamp, J H

    1992-06-01

    Basement membrane (BM) components were studied on human muscle and skeletal muscle cells cultured on different media by immunofluorescence and electron microscopy. Their topographical relation with acetylcholine receptors was investigated. Myotubes cultured on a combination of the serum substitute Ultroser G and brain extract show a continuous layer of heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs), laminin, and type IV collagen. In contrast, myotubes cultured on serum-containing media are associated with granular depositions of HSPG and laminin and only with wisps of type IV collagen. Omission of brain extract or substitution by chicken embryo extract results in an intermediate staining pattern. For all types of cultures, fibronectin is localized in and around mononuclear cells, but hardly associated with myotubes. A codistribution between clusters of acetylcholine receptors and HSPG and laminin and Vicia villosa B4 lectin-positive material exists only in Ultroser G/brain extract-based myotubes like in muscle in vivo. No clustering is observed in serum-based myotubes. Electron microscopy reveals that the former myotubes are surrounded by a continuous BM consisting of a lamina lucida, lamina densa, and lamina fibroreticularis. Proteoglycans are present on the external site of the lamina densa and associated in a regular fashion with collagen fibrils. In conclusion, BMs associated with myotubes cultured on Ultroser G/brain extract resemble in many ways the in vivo situation, including synaptic specializations. Cultured myotubes may serve as a model system for studies on the structure and function of human muscular (synaptic) BM under normal and pathological conditions.

  7. Evaluation of continuous-haulage systems for computer-assisted continuous-mining machines. Information Circular/1991

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatt, S.K.

    1991-01-01

    The report reviews major developments in continuous haulage technology for underground coal mines. Haulage systems, both in use and under development, were investigated through a comprehensive literature search and visits to mines and manufacturers. The systems include flexible conveyor train, mobile conveyor, monorail bridge conveyor, multiple-unit continuous haulage, extensible, and belt turning systems. Strengths and weaknesses of the systems are assessed in light of their operating under remote control and their application to the computer-assisted continuous mining machine research being conducted by the Bureau. Through mining scenarios, candidate haulage systems are conceptualized to be consistent with the capabilities of the mining machine.

  8. Propagation of human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells in an indirect co-culture system

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Sheena; Sheridan, Steven D.; Laurent, Louise C.; Albert, Kelsey; Stubban, Christopher; Ulitsky, Igor; Miller, Bradley; Loring, Jeanne F.; Rao, Raj R.

    2010-01-01

    We have developed and validated a microporous poly(ethylene terephthalate) membrane-based indirect co-culture system for human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC) propagation, which allows real-time conditioning of the culture medium with human fibroblasts while maintaining the complete separation of the two cell types. The propagation and pluripotent characteristics of a human embryonic stem cell (hESC) line and a human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC) line were studied in prolonged culture in this system. We report that hPSCs cultured on membranes by indirect co-culture with fibroblasts were indistinguishable by multiple criteria from hPSCs cultured directly on a fibroblast feeder layer. Thus this co-culture system is a significant advance in hPSC culture methods, providing a facile stem cell expansion system with continuous medium conditioning while preventing mixing of hPSCs and feeder cells. This membrane culture method will enable testing of novel feeder cells and differentiation studies using co-culture with other cell types, and will simplify stepwise changes in culture conditions for staged differentiation protocols. PMID:20117095

  9. Effects of fish meals on rumen bacterial fermentation in continuous culture.

    PubMed

    Hoover, W H; Miller, T K; Stokes, S R; Thayne, W V

    1989-11-01

    Effects of various forms of fish meal on microbial metabolism were investigated in continuous cultures of rumen contents. Five diets were formulated to contain 12% ruminally degradable protein and 47 to 48% nonstructural carbohydrate. Soybean meal was the major protein source in the control diet, whereas in the other four diets, various fish meals were substituted for 6% of total diet DM. Fish meals were: fish meal containing 34.4% FFA, fish meal containing 34.4% FFA with CaCl2 added, fish meal containing 65.6% FFA, and fish meal defatted using 1:1 ethanol:ether extraction. The five treatments were fermented with pH either held constant at 6.2 or not controlled. When pH was maintained at 6.2, the inclusion of any fish meal except defatted fish meal reduced the acetate:propionate ratio, decreased protein digestion, and reduced microbial N produced/per kilogram DM digested when compared with the soybean control. When not controlled, pH decreased after feeding to 6.0 or lower. Under these conditions, the soybean control had a lower acetate:propionate ratio and lower NDF digestion than all diets containing fish meal. In this study, oil-containing fish meal affected microbial metabolism more negatively when the fermentation pH was held at 6.2 than when the pH was 6.0 or lower.

  10. Maximum growth rate of Mycobacterium avium in continuous culture or chronically infected BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, C M; Taylor, M A; Dennis, M W

    1987-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium is a human pathogen which may cause either chronic or disseminated disease and the organism exhibits a slow rate of growth. This study provides information on the growth rate of the organism in chronically infected mice and its maximal growth rate in vitro. M. avium was grown in continuous culture, limited for nitrogen with 0.5 mM ammonium chloride and dilution rates that ranged from 0.054 to 0.153 h-1. The steady-state concentration of ammonia nitrogen and M. avium cells for each dilution rate were determined. The bacterial saturation constant for growth-limiting ammonia was 0.29 mM (4 micrograms nitrogen/ml) and, from this, the maximal growth rate for M. avium was estimated to be 0.206 h-1 or a doubling time of 3.4 h. BALB/c mice were infected intravenously with 3 x 10(6) colony-forming units and a chronic infection resulted, typical of virulent M. avium strains. During a period of 3 months, the number of mycobacteria remained constant in the lungs, but increased 30-fold and 8,900-fold, respectively, in the spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes. The latter increase appeared to be due to proliferation in situ. The generation time of M. avium in the mesenteric lymph nodes was estimated to be 7 days.

  11. Nitrogen-regulated transcription and enzyme activities in continuous cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    ter Schure, E G; Silljé, H H; Raeven, L J; Boonstra, J; Verkleij, A J; Verrips, C T

    1995-05-01

    Variations in the transcription of nitrogen-regulated genes and in the activities of nitrogen-regulated enzymes of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae were studied by changing the carbon and nitrogen fluxes. S. cerevisiae was grown in continuous culture at various dilution rates (D) under nitrogen limitation with NH4Cl as sole nitrogen source. With an increase in D from 0.05 to 0.29 h-1, both the glucose and the ammonia flux increased sixfold. The activities of the two ammonia-incorporating enzymes, NADPH-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (NADPH-GDH) and glutamine synthetase (GS), encoded by GDH1 and GLN1, respectively, increased with increasing D, while the activity of the glutamate-degrading enzyme, NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (NAD-GDH), decreased. Surprisingly, no changes were observed in the transcription of GDH1 and GLN1; however increased D was accompanied by an increase in GAP1 transcription. At the metabolite level, the increase in the glucose and nitrogen flux did not result in changes in the intracellular 2-oxoglutarate, glutamate or glutamine concentrations. It is shown that growth on ammonia alone is not sufficient to cause repression of GAP1 and GLN1 transcription and that the regulation of GAP1 transcription and both NADPH-GDH and GS activity is not an on/off switch, but is gradually modulated in correlation with the ammonia concentration.

  12. 3-Phenylpropanoic Acid Improves the Affinity of Ruminococcus albus for Cellulose in Continuous Culture

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Mark; Mackie, Roderick I.; Kistner, Albrecht

    1990-01-01

    A continuous-culture device, adapted for use with solid substrates, was used to evaluate the effects of 3-phenylpropanoic acid (PPA) upon the ability of the South African strain Ruminococcus albus Ce63 to ferment cellulose. Steady states of fermentation were established with a dilution rate of 0.17 h−1, and the extent and volumetric rates of cellulose fermentation were determined over four consecutive days. When the growth medium contained no additions (control), 25 μM phenylacetate alone, 25 μM PPA alone, or 25 μM each of phenylacetate and PPA, the extent of cellulose hydrolysis was determined to be 41.1, 35.7, 90.2, and 86.9%, respectively, and the volumetric rate of cellulose hydrolysis was 103.0, 97.9, 215.5, and 230.4 mg liter−1 h−1, respectively. To evaluate the effect of PPA availability on affinity for cellulose, the values for dilution rate and extent of cellulose hydrolysis were used in combination with values for maximum specific growth rate determined from previous studies of growth rates and kinetics of cellulose hydrolysis. The findings support the contention that PPA maintains a competitive advantage for R. albus when grown in a dynamic, fiber-rich environment. Images PMID:16348327

  13. Detoxification of mercury, cadmium, and lead in Klebsiella aerogenes NCTC 418 growing in continuous culture

    SciTech Connect

    Aiking, H.; Govers, H.; van 'T Riet, J.

    1985-11-01

    Klebsiella aerogenes NCTC 418 growing in the presence of cadmium under glucose-, sulfate-, or phosphate-limited conditions in continuous culture exhibited sulfide formation and P/sub i/ accumulation as the only demonstrable detoxification mechanisms. In the presence of mercury under similar conditions only HgS formation could be confirmed, by an increased sensitivity to mercury under sulfate-limited conditions, among others. The fact that the cells were most sensitive to cadmium under conditions of phosphate limitation and most sensitive to mercury under conditions of sulfate limitation led to the hypothesis that these inorganic detoxification mechanisms generally depended on a kind of facilitated precipitation. The process was coined thus because heavy metals were probably accumulated and precipitated near the cell perimeter due to the relatively high local concentrations of sulfide and phosphate there. Depending on the growth-limiting nutrient, mercury proved to be 25-fold (phosphate limitation), 75-fold (glycerol limitation), or 150-fold (sulfate limitation) more toxic than cadmium to this organism. In the presence of lead, PbS formation was suggested. since no other detoxification mechanisms were detected, for example, rendering heavy metal ions innocuous as metallo-organic compounds, it was concluded that formation of heavy metal precipitates is crucially important to this organism. In addition, it was observed that several components of a defined mineral medium were able to reduce mercuric ions to elemental mercury. This abiotic mercury volatilization was studied in detail, and its general and environmental implications are discussed.

  14. Continuity of the entropy of macroscopic quantum systems.

    PubMed

    Swendsen, Robert H

    2015-11-01

    The proper definition of entropy is fundamental to the relationship between statistical mechanics and thermodynamics. It also plays a major role in the recent debate about the validity of the concept of negative temperature. In this paper, I analyze and calculate the thermodynamic entropy for large but finite quantum mechanical systems. A special feature of this analysis is that the thermodynamic energy of a quantum system is shown to be a continuous variable, rather than being associated with discrete energy eigenvalues. Calculations of the entropy as a function of energy can be carried out with a Legendre transform of thermodynamic potentials obtained from a canonical ensemble. The resultant expressions for the entropy are able to describe equilibrium between quantum systems having incommensurate energy-level spacings. This definition of entropy preserves all required thermodynamic properties, including satisfaction of all postulates and laws of thermodynamics. It demonstrates the consistency of the concept of negative temperature with the principles of thermodynamics.

  15. Pole topology of the structure functions of continuous systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tutschka, Christian; Kahl, Gerhard

    2002-05-01

    We develop a theory of the pole topology of the Laplace transform of the structure functions of continuous N component systems based on the Wiener-Hopf technique. We classify systems according to the spectrum of the N×N matrix Q~(t), with elements Qij(t)=δij- 2π(ρiρj)∫e- trqij(r)dr, associated with their factor functions qij(r). For the simplest nontrivial class of systems-namely, that with only two eigenvalues of Q~(t) different from one-a full and explicit analysis of the pole topology is possible. We illustrate the theory with exactly solvable examples, such as the Percus-Yevick equation for arbitrary mixtures of hard spheres (HS) and polydisperse HS and the mean spherical model for binary mixtures of adhesive spheres.

  16. High-sensitivity, high-speed continuous imaging system

    DOEpatents

    Watson, Scott A; Bender, III, Howard A

    2014-11-18

    A continuous imaging system for recording low levels of light typically extending over small distances with high-frame rates and with a large number of frames is described. Photodiode pixels disposed in an array having a chosen geometry, each pixel having a dedicated amplifier, analog-to-digital convertor, and memory, provide parallel operation of the system. When combined with a plurality of scintillators responsive to a selected source of radiation, in a scintillator array, the light from each scintillator being directed to a single corresponding photodiode in close proximity or lens-coupled thereto, embodiments of the present imaging system may provide images of x-ray, gamma ray, proton, and neutron sources with high efficiency.

  17. Immobilized yeast bioreactor systems for continuous beer fermentation

    PubMed

    Tata; Bower; Bromberg; Duncombe; Fehring; Lau; Ryder; Stassi

    1999-01-01

    Two different types of immobilized yeast bioreactors were examined for continuous fermentation of high-gravity worts. One of these is a fluidized bed reactor (FBR) that employs porous glass beads for yeast immobilization. The second system is a loop reactor containing a porous silicon carbide cartridge (SCCR) for immobilizing the yeast cells. Although there was some residual fermentable sugar in the SCCR system product, nearly complete attenuation of the wort sugars was achieved in either of the systems when operated as a two-stage process. Fermentation could be completed in these systems in only half the time required for a conventional batch process. Both the systems showed similar kinetics of extract consumption, and therefore similar volumetric productivity. As compared to the batch fermentation, total fusel alcohols were lower; total esters, while variable, were generally higher. The yeast biomass production was similar to that in a conventional fermentation process. As would be expected in an accelerated fermentation system, the levels of vicinal diketones (VDKs) were higher. To remove the VDKs, the young beer was heat-treated to convert the VDK precursors and processed through a packed bed immobilized yeast bioreactor for VDK assimilation. The finished product from the FBR system was found to be quite acceptable from a flavor perspective, albeit different from the product from a conventional batch process. Significantly shortened fermentation times demonstrate the feasibility of this technology for beer production.

  18. Continuous-Flow System Produces Medical-Grade Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akse, James R.; Dahl, Roger W.; Wheeler, Richard R.

    2009-01-01

    A continuous-flow system utilizes microwave heating to sterilize water and to thermally inactivate endotoxins produced in the sterilization process. The system is designed for use in converting potable water to medical-grade water. Systems like this one could be used for efficient, small-scale production of medical- grade water in laboratories, clinics, and hospitals. This system could be adapted to use in selective sterilization of connections in ultra-pure-water-producing equipment and other equipment into which intrusion by microorganisms cannot be tolerated. Lightweight, port - able systems based on the design of this system could be rapidly deployed to remote locations (e.g., military field hospitals) or in response to emergencies in which the normal infrastructure for providing medical-grade water is disrupted. Larger systems based on the design of this system could be useful for industrial production of medical-grade water. The basic microwave-heating principle of this system is the same as that of a microwave oven: An item to be heated, made of a lossy dielectric material (in this case, flowing water) is irradiated with microwaves in a multimode microwave cavity. The heating is rapid and efficient because it results from absorption of microwave power throughout the volume of the lossy dielectric material. In this system, a copper tube having a length of 49.5 cm and a diameter of 2.25 cm serves as both the microwave cavity and the sterilization chamber. Microwave power is fed via a coaxial cable to an antenna mounted inside the tube at mid-length (see figure). Efficient power transfer occurs due to the shift in wavelength associated with the high permittivity of water combined with the strong coupling of 2.45-GHz microwaves with rotational-vibrational transitions of the dipolar water molecule.

  19. Telemedicine system for patients on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Nakamoto, Hidetomo

    2007-06-01

    Over recent decades, rapid progress in information and telecommunications technology has led to the application of these technologies in the medical field. In 1999, we reported on a telemedicine system (version 1.0) that used an automated peritoneal dialysis machine to collect data on patients with end-stage renal disease. After 2002, we focused on using cellular telephones in a new telemedicine system (version 2.0) to monitor patient data at home, including blood pressure (BP), heart rate, body weight, urine volume, and blood glucose. By 2003, we had developed a fully automatic system called I-converter (version 3.0) to collect data from a fully automatic device and send it via cellular telephone. After the fully automatic device measures a patient's BP, I-converter sends the data directly to the main server in our central data center. That server is directly connected to Web site by application service provider (ASP) technology. Recently, to make the system simpler, we developed a new version called D-converter (version 4.0). The telephone used in this new system is a Personal Handy-phone System (PHS). The PHS has several advantages: high-speed data transmission, low power output, little electromagnetic interference with medical devices, and easy locating of patients. The D-converter system uses a small computer and a PHS card called a Dopa card. Our telemedicine systems monitor continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) patients at home. For elderly and handicapped patients, these systems are very advantageous because they reduce visits to the outpatient clinic. In addition, data can be monitored at the patient's home in real time. The present paper reports our recent advances in telemedicine systems for CAPD patients.

  20. Comparison of human optimized bacterial luciferase, firefly luciferase, and green fluorescent protein for continuous imaging of cell culture and animal models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Close, Dan M.; Hahn, Ruth E.; Patterson, Stacey S.; Baek, Seung J.; Ripp, Steven A.; Sayler, Gary S.

    2011-04-01

    Bioluminescent and fluorescent reporter systems have enabled the rapid and continued growth of the optical imaging field over the last two decades. Of particular interest has been noninvasive signal detection from mammalian tissues under both cell culture and whole animal settings. Here we report on the advantages and limitations of imaging using a recently introduced bacterial luciferase (lux) reporter system engineered for increased bioluminescent expression in the mammalian cellular environment. Comparison with the bioluminescent firefly luciferase (Luc) system and green fluorescent protein system under cell culture conditions demonstrated a reduced average radiance, but maintained a more constant level of bioluminescent output without the need for substrate addition or exogenous excitation to elicit the production of signal. Comparison with the Luc system following subcutaneous and intraperitoneal injection into nude mice hosts demonstrated the ability to obtain similar detection patterns with in vitro experiments at cell population sizes above 2.5 × 104 cells but at the cost of increasing overall image integration time.

  1. Recovering classical dynamics from coupled quantum systems through continuous measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Ghose, Shohini; Alsing, Paul; Deutsch, Ivan; Bhattacharya, Tanmoy; Habib, Salman; Jacobs, Kurt

    2003-05-01

    We study the role of continuous measurement in the quantum to classical transition for a system with coupled internal (spin) and external (motional) degrees of freedom. Even when the measured motional degree of freedom can be treated classically, entanglement between spin and motion causes strong measurement back action on the quantum spin subsystem so that classical trajectories are not recovered in this mixed quantum-classical regime. The measurement can extract localized quantum trajectories that behave classically only when the internal action also becomes large relative to ({Dirac_h}/2{pi})

  2. All-optoelectronic continuous-wave terahertz systems.

    PubMed

    Löffler, Torsten; Siebert, Karsten J; Quast, Holger; Hasegawa, Noburu; Loata, Gabriel; Wipf, Robert; Hahn, Tobias; Thomson, Mark; Leonhardt, Rainer; Roskos, Hartmut G

    2004-02-15

    We discuss the optoelectronic generation and detection of continuous-wave terahertz (THz) radiation by the mixing of visible/near-infrared laser radiation in photoconductive antennas. We review attempts to reach higher THz output-power levels by reverting from mobility-lifetime-limited photomixers to transit-time-limited p-i-n photodiodes. We then describe our implementation of a THz spectroscopy and imaging-measurement system and demonstrate its imaging performance with several examples. Possible application areas of THz imaging in the biomedical field and in surface characterization for industrial purposes are explored.

  3. The Arabic culture of Jordan and its impacts on a wider Jordanian adoption of business continuity management.

    PubMed

    Sawalha, Ihab H; Meaton, Julia

    2012-01-01

    Culture is important to individuals and societies, as well as organisations. Failing to address cultural aspects will hinder the wider adoption and development of business continuity management (BCM) and will subsequently increase the vulnerabilities of organisations to crises, disasters and business interruptions. Three main issues are discussed in this paper. The first is the background to culture and the characteristics of the Jordanian culture. Secondly, the influence of the Arab culture on the wider adoption and development of BCM in Jordan is considered. Thirdly, the paper looks at potential factors that underpin the role of culture in the BCM process in Jordan. These issues are significant, as they represent the characteristics and influence of the Arab culture. This paper contributes to the understanding of the significance of culture in the adoption and development of BCM for organisations operating in Jordan and in the Arab world more generally. It also highlights current cultural changes and trends taking place in the Arab world in a time of huge political instability in the Middle East and Arab countries.

  4. Simulation and optimization of continuous extractive fermentation with recycle system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widjaja, Tri; Altway, Ali; Rofiqah, Umi; Airlangga, Bramantyo

    2017-05-01

    Extractive fermentation is continuous fermentation method which is believed to be able to substitute conventional fermentation method (batch). The recovery system and ethanol refinery will be easier. Continuous process of fermentation will make the productivity increase although the unconverted sugar in continuous fermentation is still in high concentration. In order to make this process more efficient, the recycle process was used. Increasing recycle flow will enhance the probability of sugar to be re-fermented. However, this will make ethanol enter fermentation column. As a result, the accumulated ethanol will inhibit the growth of microorganism. This research aims to find optimum conditions of solvent to broth ratio (S:B) and recycle flow to fresh feed ratio in order to produce the best yield and productivity. This study employed optimization by Hooke Jeeves method using Matlab 7.8 software. The result indicated that optimum condition occured in S: B=2.615 and R: F=1.495 with yield = 50.2439 %.

  5. Rapid estimation of drifting parameters in continuously measured quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortez, Luis; Chantasri, Areeya; García-Pintos, Luis Pedro; Dressel, Justin; Jordan, Andrew N.

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the determination of a Hamiltonian parameter in a quantum system undergoing continuous measurement. We demonstrate a computationally rapid method to estimate an unknown and possibly time-dependent parameter, where we maximize the likelihood of the observed stochastic readout. By dealing directly with the raw measurement record rather than the quantum-state trajectories, the estimation can be performed while the data are being acquired, permitting continuous tracking of the parameter during slow drifts in real time. Furthermore, we incorporate realistic nonidealities, such as decoherence processes and measurement inefficiency. As an example, we focus on estimating the value of the Rabi frequency of a continuously measured qubit and compare maximum likelihood estimation to a simpler fast Fourier transform. Using this example, we discuss how the quality of the estimation depends on both the strength and the duration of the measurement; we also discuss the trade-off between the accuracy of the estimate and the sensitivity to drift as the estimation duration is varied.

  6. An accurate continuous calibration system for high voltage current transformer

    SciTech Connect

    Tong Yue; Li Binhong

    2011-02-15

    A continuous calibration system for high voltage current transformers is presented in this paper. The sensor of this system is based on a kind of electronic instrument current transformer, which is a clamp-shape air core coil. This system uses an optical fiber transmission system for its signal transmission and power supply. Finally the digital integrator and fourth-order convolution window algorithm as error calculation methods are realized by the virtual instrument with a personal computer. It is found that this system can calibrate a high voltage current transformer while energized, which means avoiding a long calibrating period in the power system and the loss of power metering expense. At the same time, it has a wide dynamic range and frequency band, and it can achieve a high accuracy measurement in a complex electromagnetic field environment. The experimental results and the on-site operation results presented in the last part of the paper, prove that it can reach the 0.05 accuracy class and is easy to operate on site.

  7. Diverse, continuous, and plastic sexual systems in barnacles.

    PubMed

    Yusa, Yoichi; Takemura, Mayuko; Sawada, Kota; Yamaguchi, Sachi

    2013-10-01

    Barnacles (Crustacea: Thoracica) show diverse sexual systems, including simultaneous hermaphroditism, androdioecy (hermaphrodites + males), and dioecy (females + males). When males occur, they are always much smaller (called dwarf males) than conspecific hermaphrodites or females. Ever since Darwin made this discovery, many scientists have been fascinated by such diversity. In this study, we provide an overview of (1) the diversity of sexual systems in barnacles, (2) the continuity between different sexual systems in some genera or species, and (3) the plasticity in sexual expression in several species. First, although most barnacles are hermaphroditic, both theoretical and empirical studies suggest that females and dwarf males tend to occur in species with small mating groups. Low sperm competition among hermaphrodites and little chance to act as a male are both associated with small group sizes and identified as the forces promoting the evolution of dwarf males and pure females, respectively. Second, in some groups of barnacles, the distinction between hermaphrodites and dwarf males is unclear because of the potential of dwarf males to become hermaphrodites. As many barnacle species tend toward protandric simultaneous hermaphroditism (develop male function first and then add female function without discarding male function), the dwarf males in such cases are best described as potential hermaphrodites that arrest growth and emphasize male function much earlier because of attachment to conspecifics. This is presumably advantageous in fertilizing the eggs of the host individuals. The distinction between hermaphrodites and females may also be obscured in some species. Third, sex allocation and penial morphology are plastic in some species. We also report the results of a transplanting experiment on small individuals of the pedunculate barnacle Octolasmis angulata, which suggests that individuals transplanted onto conspecifics developed longer and broader penises than

  8. Invertase activity of intact cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae growing on sugar cane molasses. 1. Steady-state continuous culture tests

    SciTech Connect

    Vitolo, M.; Vairo, M.L.R.; Borzani, W.

    1985-08-01

    During the steady-state continuous culture of Saccharomyces cerevisiae on sugar cane blackstrap molasses under different experimental conditions, oscillatory variations of the invertase activity of the intact yeast cells were observed. The continuous morphological changes of the cells wall and of the periplasmic space affecting the interaction between invertase and sucrose molecules could be responsible by the observed oscillatory phenomena. The average invertase activity at the steady state is linearly correlated to the cell's growth rate.

  9. A Miniaturized Transcutaneous System for Continuous Glucose Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Croce, Robert A.; Vaddiraju, SanthiSagar; Kondo, Jun; Wang, Yan; Zuo, Liang; Zhu, Kai; Islam, Syed K.; Burgess, Diane; Papadimitrakopoulos, Fotios; Jain, Faquir C.

    2012-01-01

    Implantable sensors for continuous glucose monitoring hold great potential for optimal diabetes management. This is often undermined by a variety of issues associated with: (1) negative tissue response; (2) poor sensor performance; and (3) lack of device miniaturization needed to reduce implantation trauma. Herein, we report our initial results towards constructing an implantable device that simultaneously address all three aforementioned issues. In terms of device miniaturization, a highly miniaturized CMOS (complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor) potentiostat and signal processing unit was employed (with a combined area of 0.665 mm2). The signal processing unit converts the current generated by a transcutaneous, Clark-type amperometric sensor to output frequency in a linear fashion. The Clark-type amperometric sensor employs stratification of five functional layers to attain a well-balanced mass transfer which in turn yields a linear sensor response from 0 to 25 mM of glucose concentration, well beyond the physiologically observed (2 to 22 mM) range. In addition, it is coated with a thick polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) hydrogel with embedded poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres intended to provide continuous, localized delivery of dexamethasone to suppress inflammation and fibrosis. In vivo evaluation in rat model has shown that the transcutaneous sensor system reproducibly tracks repeated glycemic events. Clarke’s error grid analysis on the as –obtained glycemic data has indicated that all of the measured glucose readings fell in the desired Zones A & B and none fell in the erroneous Zones C, D and E. Such reproducible operation of the transcutaneous sensor system, together with low power (140 μW) consumption and capability for current-to-frequency conversion renders this a versatile platform for continuous glucose monitoring and other biomedical sensing devices. PMID:22992979

  10. A miniaturized transcutaneous system for continuous glucose monitoring.

    PubMed

    Croce, Robert A; Vaddiraju, SanthiSagar; Kondo, Jun; Wang, Yan; Zuo, Liang; Zhu, Kai; Islam, Syed K; Burgess, Diane J; Papadimitrakopoulos, Fotios; Jain, Faquir C

    2013-02-01

    Implantable sensors for continuous glucose monitoring hold great potential for optimal diabetes management. This is often undermined by a variety of issues associated with: (1) negative tissue response; (2) poor sensor performance; and (3) lack of device miniaturization needed to reduce implantation trauma. Herein, we report our initial results towards constructing an implantable device that simultaneously address all three aforementioned issues. In terms of device miniaturization, a highly miniaturized CMOS (complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor) potentiostat and signal processing unit was employed (with a combined area of 0.665 mm(2)). The signal processing unit converts the current generated by a transcutaneous, Clark-type amperometric sensor to output frequency in a linear fashion. The Clark-type amperometric sensor employs stratification of five functional layers to attain a well-balanced mass transfer which in turn yields a linear sensor response from 0 to 25 mM of glucose concentration, well beyond the physiologically observed (2 to 22 mM) range. In addition, it is coated with a thick polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) hydrogel with embedded poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres intended to provide continuous, localized delivery of dexamethasone to suppress inflammation and fibrosis. In vivo evaluation in rat model has shown that the transcutaneous sensor system reproducibly tracks repeated glycemic events. Clarke's error grid analysis on the as-obtained glycemic data has indicated that all of the measured glucose readings fell in the desired Zones A & B and none fell in the erroneous Zones C, D and E. Such reproducible operation of the transcutaneous sensor system, together with low power (140 μW) consumption and capability for current-to-frequency conversion renders this a versatile platform for continuous glucose monitoring and other biomedical sensing devices.

  11. Oscillatory control of sample dispersion in a continuous flow system.

    PubMed

    Bruno, H; Andrade, F; Iñón, F; Tudino, M; Troccoli, O

    2001-03-01

    A new strategy for the instrumental control of sample dispersion in continuous flow systems is presented. The method is based on shaking a loosely held straight reactor while the sample travels through the flow injection manifold. This external disturbance yields a sample transport more similar to the plug flow type because of the changes promoted on the flow pattern. Up to a three-fold increase in peak height, a comparable reduction in peak width and a more Gaussian peak profile are observed when the signals obtained with the shaken reactor are compared with those obtained with the same reactor but static. Improvements in the analytical performance as a function of different operational variables are shown for systems with or without a chemical reaction. Analytical implications and possible uses are discussed since this strategy allows the control of dispersion by simply selecting the frequency and amplitude of oscillation.

  12. Nonlinear wave propagation in discrete and continuous systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothos, V. M.

    2016-09-01

    In this review we try to capture some of the recent excitement induced by a large volume of theoretical and computational studies addressing nonlinear Schrödinger models (discrete and continuous) and the localized structures that they support. We focus on some prototypical structures, namely the breather solutions and solitary waves. In particular, we investigate the bifurcation of travelling wave solution in Discrete NLS system applying dynamical systems methods. Next, we examine the combined effects of cubic and quintic terms of the long range type in the dynamics of a double well potential. The relevant bifurcations, the stability of the branches and their dynamical implications are examined both in the reduced (ODE) and in the full (PDE) setting. We also offer an outlook on interesting possibilities for future work on this theme.

  13. Continuous diesel emissions speciation with a transportable MBMS system

    SciTech Connect

    Ratcliff, M.A.; Gratson, D.A.; Milne, T.A.

    1995-03-01

    A unique transportable molecular beam mass spectrometer (TMBMS) has been developed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to extend the virtues of MBMS analysis to new applications beyond the traditional laboratory scope and scale. The TMBMS is based on a three stage vacuum system; the transport capability dictated the minimization of size. weight and required utilities. The instrument has demonstrated a dynamic range of at least 10{sup 6} and a limit of detection of 0.5 ppmv, depending on the species and system being investigated. The instrument has been successfully used as a continuous emissions monitor and a chemical process monitor. Continuous, near real-time speciation of diesel exhaust demonstrated the potential of MBMS analysis in the field of emissions monitoring. Controlled steady state and transient tests were conducted with conventional diesel and soybean derived methyl-ester biodiesel fuels. The emissions differences between the two fuels were readily apparent, with the diesel fuel producing higher concentrations of hydrocarbon species. It was statistically demonstrated that many unburned diesel fuel hydrocarbons can be reproducibly detected and followed under a variety of steady state conditions. Carbon dioxide, water, nitric oxide and sulfur dioxide were monitored simultaneously with the unburned hydrocarbons. The transient testing demonstrated the instruments ability to follow changes, on the seconds time scale, of multiple combustion products as a function of engine speed, load and throttle position.

  14. Controlling light-use by Rhodobacter capsulatus continuous cultures in a flat-panel photobioreactor.

    PubMed

    Hoekema, Sebastiaan; Douma, Rutger D; Janssen, Marcel; Tramper, Johannes; Wijffels, René H

    2006-11-05

    The main bottleneck in scale-up of phototrophic fermentation is the low efficiency of light energy conversion to the desired product, which is caused by an excessive dissipation of light energy to heat. The photoheterotrophic formation of hydrogen from acetate and light energy by the microorganism Rhodobacter capsulatus NCIMB 11773 was chosen as a case study in this work. A light energy balance was set up, in which the total bacterial light energy absorption is split up and attributed to its destinations. These are biomass growth and maintenance, generation of hydrogen and photosynthetic heat dissipation. The constants defined in the light energy balance were determined experimentally using a flat-panel photobioreactor with a 3-cm optical path. An experimental method called D-stat was applied. Continuous cultures were kept in a so-called pseudo steady state, while the dilution rate was reduced slowly and smoothly. The biomass yield and maintenance coefficients of Rhodobacter capsulatus biomass on light energy were determined at 12.4 W/m(2) (400-950 nm) and amounted to 2.58 x 10(-8) +/- 0.04 x 10(-8) kg/J and 102 +/- 3.5 W/kg, respectively. The fraction of the absorbed light energy that was dissipated to heat at 473 W/m(2) depended on the biomass concentration in the reactor and varied between 0.80 and 0.88, as the biomass concentration was increased from 2.0 to 8.0 kg/m(3). The process conditions were estimated at which a 3.7% conversion efficiency of absorbed light energy to produced hydrogen energy should be attainable at 473 W/m(2). (c) 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Effects of carbohydrates from citrus pulp and hominy feed on microbial fermentation in continuous culture.

    PubMed

    Ariza, P; Bach, A; Stern, M D; Hall, M B

    2001-10-01

    Eight dual-flow continuous-culture fermenters were used to evaluate the effect of neutral detergent-soluble carbohydrates (NDSC) on fermentation by ruminal microorganisms. Citrus pulp and hominy feed were added to a basal diet as sources of NDSC, with citrus pulp providing neutral detergent-soluble fiber (NDSF) in the form of pectic substances and with hominy feed in the form of starch. The basal diet contained 26.7% corn silage, 6.0% alfalfa hay and 3.8% cottonseed hulls on a DM basis. The dried citrus pulp diet contained on a DM basis 17.2% CP, 34.7% NDF, 33.7% NDSC, and 14.4% NDSF, whereas the hominy feed diet contained 17.9% CP, 33.2% NDF, 35.9% NDSC, and 8.8% NDSF. Organic matter, DM, and NDF and ADF digestion were not affected by source of carbohydrate. Ammonia N concentration was greater (P < 0.05) for the hominy feed diet (14.2 mg/100 mL) than for the dried citrus pulp diet (9.3 mg/100 mL). Total N, nonammonia N, microbial N, and dietary N flows were not affected by treatments; however, the efficiency of microbial protein synthesis was greater (P = 0.055) for the dried citrus pulp diet than for the hominy feed diet (30.6 vs 27.8 g of bacterial N/kg of OM truly digested). Results from this experiment indicate that NDSF from citrus pulp can provide similar sources of energy compared with starch from hominy feed to support ruminal microbial growth.

  16. Climate proxies from Sr/Ca of coccolith calcite: calibrations from continuous culture of Emiliania huxleyi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoll, Heather M.; Rosenthal, Yair; Falkowski, Paul

    2002-03-01

    Continuous culture of the coccolithophorid Emiliania huxleyi reveals that coccolith Sr/Ca ratios depend on temperature and growth rate. At a constant temperature of 18°C, coccolith Sr/Ca ratios increased nearly 15% as growth rate increased from 0.1 to 1.5 divisions per day and calcification rate increased from 1.5 to 50 pg calcite per cell per day. When temperature increased from 7 to 26°C, Sr/Ca ratios increased by more than 25% (i.e., 1%/1°C), although the range in growth and calcification rates was the same as for experiments at constant temperature. The temperature dependence of Sr/Ca ratios in coccoliths is consistent with that observed in planktonic foraminifera and abiogenic calcites, suggesting that it is controlled by thermodynamic processes. However, the positive correlation of coccolith Sr/Ca with temperature contrasts with field studies in the equatorial Pacific, where Sr/Ca ratios are highest at the locus of maximum upwelling and productivity despite depressed temperatures. This paradox may reflect different calcification rate effects between E. huxleyi and the other species dominating assemblages in the equatorial Pacific sediments, which may be resolved by new techniques for separation of monospecific coccolith samples from sediments. Models of crystal growth indicate that kinetic effects on Sr partitioning in calcite due to surface enrichment could explain the Sr/Ca variations observed in constant temperature experiments but not the larger amplitude calcification rate effects observed in equatorial Pacific sediments. Despite the dual influence of temperature and growth rate on coccolith Sr/Ca, coccolith Sr/Ca correlates with "b," the slope of the dependence of carbon isotope fractionation in biomarkers (ɛ p) on CO 2(aq) at a range of growth rates and temperatures. Consequently, using coccolith Sr/Ca in combination with alkenone ɛ p may improve paleo-CO 2 determinations.

  17. Effects of type of carbohydrate supplementation to lush pasture on microbial fermentation in continuous culture.

    PubMed

    Bach, A; Yoon, I K; Stern, M D; Jung, H G; Chester-Jones, H

    1999-01-01

    Eight single-flow continuous culture fermenters were used to study the effects of the type of energy source on ruminal N utilization from high quality pasture. The four dietary treatments included high quality grass and legume pasture alone (50:50; wt/wt), pasture plus soybean hulls, pasture plus beet pulp, and pasture plus corn. Diets supplemented with additional sources of energy (soybean hulls, beet pulp, and corn) were isocaloric but differed in the type and rate of carbohydrate fermentation. Energy supplements constituted 45% of the total dietary dry matter and were fed twice daily at 12-h intervals in place of pasture, which is characteristic of grain feeding at milking when animals are in a grazing situation. Energy supplementation reduced pH, NH3 N flow, and NH3 N concentration and increased bacterial N flow (as a percentage of N intake). The supplementation of corn and soybean hulls resulted in the highest microbial N flow (as a percentage of N intake). Corn had a tendency to reduce fiber digestion because of excessively low NH3 N concentrations. Beet pulp was similar to corn in that it decreased NH3 N concentrations. Supplementation of soybean hulls resulted in a more synchronized fermentation, greater volatile fatty acid production, and greater fiber digestion. Nitrogen utilization by microbes was maximized by supplementation with soybean hulls or corn twice a day. With diets based on pasture, it may be more important to improve bacterial N flow and bacterial utilization of N than to maximize the efficiency of bacterial protein synthesis because better utilization of N by ruminal microorganisms results in higher bacterial N flow and higher fiber digestion.

  18. Growth energetics and metabolic fluxes in continuous cultures of Penicillium chrysogenum.

    PubMed

    Henriksen, C M; Christensen, L H; Nielsen, J; Villadsen, J

    1996-02-28

    Continuous cultures of the penicillin producing fungus Penicillium chrysogenum have been analyzed with respect to the macromolecular composition of the mycelium. All cultivations were carried out using a chemically defined medium with glucose as the growth limiting component. Biomass was harvested at steady state and analyzed for proteins, lipids, RNA, DNA, and carbohydrates. Carbohydrates present in the cell wall, i.e., glucans and chitin, and carbohydrates serving as storage materials, i.e., glycogen, were measured. It was observed that the levels of DNA and lipids are relative constant, whereas the proteins and stable RNA levels increase with the specific growth rate and the total amount of carbohydrates decreases with the specific growth rate. Glycogen is only present in small amounts, decreasing with the specific growth rate. As an average the measured macromolecules account for 77 +/- 2% (w/w) of the biomass. On the basis of estimations of the metabolic costs for biosynthesis and polymerization of the different macromolecules the total ATP and NADPH requirements for cell biosynthesis from glucose and inorganic salts, i.e., YxATP,growth and YxNADPH, have been quantified. The biosynthesis of 1 g biomass was calculated to require 39.9 mmol of ATP and 7.5 mmol of NADPH when cytosolic acetyl-CoA is formed from citrate by citrate lyase and oxaloacetate is recycled back into the TCA cycle. Other pathways of acetyl-CoA biosynthesis have been considered. The calculations show that the different biosynthetic routes for generating cytosolic acetyl-CoA have a significant influence on the theoretical value of ATP and NADPH requirements for cell biosynthesis. Combining a detailed stoichiometric model for growth and product formation of P. chrysogenum with experimental data on the macromolecular composition of P. chrysogenum and precise measurements of substrate uptake and product formation the intracellular flux distribution was calculated for different cultivation

  19. Influences of Religion and Culture on Continuing Bonds in a Sample of British Muslims of Pakistani Origin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hussein, Hanan; Oyebode, Jan R.

    2009-01-01

    This study considered the nature of continuing bonds with deceased relatives in a sample of Pakistani Muslims living in the United Kingdom. Ten participants were interviewed following a cultural psychology approach and transcripts were analyzed using grounded theory methodology. Dreaming, talking with others about the deceased, following the…

  20. Influences of Religion and Culture on Continuing Bonds in a Sample of British Muslims of Pakistani Origin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hussein, Hanan; Oyebode, Jan R.

    2009-01-01

    This study considered the nature of continuing bonds with deceased relatives in a sample of Pakistani Muslims living in the United Kingdom. Ten participants were interviewed following a cultural psychology approach and transcripts were analyzed using grounded theory methodology. Dreaming, talking with others about the deceased, following the…

  1. Parent and Staff Expectations for Continuity of Home Practices in the Child Care Setting for Families with Diverse Cultural Backgrounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Gioia, Katey

    2009-01-01

    The use of childcare services for very young children (birth to three years) has increased dramatically in the past two decades (Department of Families, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs, 2004). This article investigates the expectations for cultural continuity of caregiving practices (with particular emphasis on sleep and feeding) between…

  2. Creating a Culture of Data Use for Continuous Improvement: A Case Study of an Edison Project School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutherland, Stephanie

    2004-01-01

    In this article, I outline how, with the appropriate mix of external requirements and internal motivation, structure and capacity, a school can promote and maintain a culture of evaluative practices, specifically data use, for continuous improvement. I draw upon qualitative data conducted in a study of an Edison Project school. The findings from…

  3. More than a Food Fight: Intellectual Traditions and Cultural Continuity in Chilocco's "Indian School Journal, 1902-1918"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bess, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Through his many works calling for the evolution of indigenous theory, Duane Champagne has emphasized the importance of recovering indigenous voices such as Chilocco Indian Industrial School graduate Mack Setima's and documenting forms of cultural continuity. According to Champagne, case studies such as K. Tsianina Lomawaima's scholarship on…

  4. More than a Food Fight: Intellectual Traditions and Cultural Continuity in Chilocco's "Indian School Journal, 1902-1918"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bess, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Through his many works calling for the evolution of indigenous theory, Duane Champagne has emphasized the importance of recovering indigenous voices such as Chilocco Indian Industrial School graduate Mack Setima's and documenting forms of cultural continuity. According to Champagne, case studies such as K. Tsianina Lomawaima's scholarship on…

  5. Parent and Staff Expectations for Continuity of Home Practices in the Child Care Setting for Families with Diverse Cultural Backgrounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Gioia, Katey

    2009-01-01

    The use of childcare services for very young children (birth to three years) has increased dramatically in the past two decades (Department of Families, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs, 2004). This article investigates the expectations for cultural continuity of caregiving practices (with particular emphasis on sleep and feeding) between…

  6. Global Grazing Systems: Their Continuing Importance in Meeting Global Demand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, K. F.; D'Odorico, P.

    2014-12-01

    Animal production exerts significant demand on land, water and food resources and is an extensive means by which humans modify natural systems. Demand for animal source foods has more than tripled over the past 50 years due to population growth and dietary change. To meet this demand, livestock intensification (e.g. concentrated animal feeding operations) has increased and with it the water, nitrogen and carbon footprints of animal production. However, grass-fed systems continue to contribute significantly to overall animal production. To date, little is known about the contributions of grass- and grain-fed systems to animal calorie production, how this has changed through time and to what extent these two systems are sensitive to climate. Using a calorie-based approach we hypothesize that grain-fed systems are increasing in importance (with serious implications for water and nutrient demand) and that rangeland productivity is correlated with rainfall. Our findings show that grass-fed systems made up the majority of animal calorie production since 1960 years but that the relative contribution of grain-fed system has increased (from 27% to 49%). This rapid transition towards grain-fed animal production is largely a result of changing diets demand, as we found the growth of grass-fed production only kept pace with population growth. On a regional scale, we find that Asia has been the major contributor to the increase in grass-fed animal calorie production and that Africa has undergone the most drastic transition from grass-fed to grain-fed dependence. Finally, as expected we see a positive relationship between rangeland productivity and precipitation and a shift from dairy- to meat-dominated production going from drier to wetter climates. This study represents a new means of analyzing the food security of animal products and an important step in understanding the historic trends of animal production, their relation to climate, their prospects for the future and their

  7. Soft bio-integrated systems for continuous health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raj, M.; Wei, P. H.; Morey, B.; Wang, X.; Keen, B.; DePetrillo, P.; Hsu, Y. Y.; Ghaffari, R.

    2014-06-01

    Electronically-enabled wearable systems that monitor physiological activity and electrophysiological activity hold the key to truly personalized medical care outside of the hospital setting. However, fundamental technical challenges exist in achieving medical systems that are comfortable, unobtrusive and fully integrated without external connections to bench top instruments. In particular, there is a fundamental mismatch in mechanical coupling between existing classes of rigid electronics and soft biological substrates, like the skin. Here we describe new mechanical and electrical design strategies for wearable devices with mechanical properties that approach that of biological tissue. These systems exploit stretchable networks of conformal sensors (i.e. electrodes, temperature sensors, and accelerometers) and associated circuitry (i.e. microcontroller, memory, voltage regulators, rechargeable battery, wireless communication modules) embedded in ultrathin, elastomeric substrates. Quantitative analyses of sensor performance and mechanics under tensile and torsional stresses illustrate the ability to mechanically couple with soft tissues in a way that is mechanically invisible to the user. Representative examples of these soft biointegrated systems can be applied for continuous sensing of muscle and movement activity in the home and ambulatory settings.

  8. A multichannel continuously selectable multifrequency electrical impedance spectroscopy measurement system.

    PubMed

    Hartov, A; Mazzarese, R A; Reiss, F R; Kerner, T E; Osterman, K S; Williams, D B; Paulsen, K D

    2000-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that alterations in the electrical property spectrum of tissues below 10 MHz is diagnostic for tissue pathology and/or pathophysiology. Yet, the complexity associated with constructing a high-fidelity multichannel, multifrequency data acquisition instrument has limited widespread development of spectroscopic electrical impedance imaging concepts. To contribute to the relatively sparse experience with multichannel spectroscopy systems this paper reports on the design, realization and evaluation of a prototype 32-channel instrument. The salient features of the system include a continuously selectable driving frequency up to 1 MHz, either voltage or current source modes of operation and simultaneous measurement of both voltage and current on each channel in either of these driving configurations. Comparisons of performance with recently reported fixed-frequency systems is favorable. Volts dc (VDC) signal-to-noise ratios of 75-80 dB are achieved and the noise floor for ac signals is near 100 dB below the signal strength of interest at 10 kHz and 60 dB down at 1 MHz. The added benefit of being able to record multispectral information on source and sense signal amplitudes and phases has also been realized. Phase-sensitive detection schemes and multiperiod undersampling techniques have been deployed to ensure measurement fidelity over the full bandwidth of system operation.

  9. Sensor concentrator unit for the Continuous Automated Vault Inventory System

    SciTech Connect

    Nodine, R.N.; Lenarduzzi, R.

    1997-06-01

    The purpose of this document is to describe the use and operation of the sensor concentrator in the Continuous Automated Vault Inventory System (CAVIS). The CAVIS electronically verifies the presence of items of stored special nuclear material (SNM). US Department of Energy orders require that stored SNM be inventoried periodically to provide assurance that the material is secure. Currently this inventory is a highly manual activity, requiring personnel to enter the storage vaults. Using a CAVIS allows the frequency of physical inventories to be significantly reduced, resulting in substantial cost savings, increased security, and improved safety. The electronic inventory of stored SNM requires two different types of sensors for each item. The two sensors measure different parameters of the item, usually weight and gamma rays. A CAVIS is constructed using four basic system components: sensors, sensor concentrators, a data collection unit, and a database/user interface unit. One sensor concentrator supports the inventory of up to 20 items (40 sensors) and continuously takes readings from the item sensors. On request the sensor concentrator outputs the most recent sensor readings to the data collection unit. The information transfer takes place over a RS485 communications link. The data collection unit supports from 1 to 120 sensor concentrators (1 to 2,400 items) and is referred to as the Sensor Polling and Configuration System (SPCS). The SPCS is connected by a secure Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) network to the database/user interface unit, which is referred to as the Graphical Facility Information Center (GraFIC). A CAVIS containing more than 2,400 items is supported by connecting additional SPCS units to the GraFIC.

  10. Removing Cultural Barriers to Care during Childbearing: A Continuing Education Module

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-01

    the same way they expect their physical and psychological needs to be recognized, respected and understood (Branch & Paxton, 1976; Leininger , 1978...providers are expected to know, understand, and interact favorably with strangers from diverse cultural backgrounds ( Leininger , 1978; Rothenburger, 1987...care can also offer insights about one’s own culture in relationship to another culture ( Leininger , 1978). However, the caregiver must be sensitive to

  11. Cultural systems for growing potatoes in space.

    PubMed

    Tibbitts, T; Bula, R; Corey, R; Morrow, R

    1988-01-01

    Higher plants are being evaluated for life support to provide needed food, oxygen and water as well as removal of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. The successful utilization of plants in space will require the development of not only highly productive growing systems but also highly efficient bioregenerative systems. It will be necessary to recycle all inedible plant parts and all human wastes so that the entire complement of elemental compounds can be reused. Potatoes have been proposed as one of the desirable crops because they are 1) extremely productive, yielding more than 100 metric tons per hectare from field plantings, 2) the edible tubers are high in digestible starch (70%) and protein (10%) on a dry weight basis, 3) up to 80% of the total plant production is in tubers and thus edible, 4) the plants are easily propagated either from tubers or from tissue culture plantlets, 5) the tubers can be utilized with a minimum of processing, and 6) potatoes can be prepared in a variety of different forms for the human diet (Tibbitts et al., 1982). However potatoes have a growth pattern that complicates the development of growing the plants in controlled systems. Tubers are borne on underground stems that are botanically termed 'rhizomes', but in common usage termed 'stolons'. The stolons must be maintained in a dark, moist area with sufficient provision for enlargement of tubers. Stems rapidly terminate in flowers forcing extensive branching and spreading of plants so that individual plants will cover 0.2 m2 or more area. Thus the growing system must be developed to provide an area that is darkened for tuber and root growth and of sufficient size for plant spread. A system developed for growing potatoes, or any plants, in space will have certain requirements that must be met to make them a useful part of a life support system. The system must 1) be constructed of materials, and involve media, that can be reused for many successive cycles of plant growth, 2

  12. Cultural systems for growing potatoes in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tibbitts, T.; Bula, R.; Corey, R.; Morrow, R.

    1988-01-01

    Higher plants are being evaluated for life support to provide needed food, oxygen and water as well as removal of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. The successful utilization of plants in space will require the development of not only highly productive growing systems but also highly efficient bioregenerative systems. It will be necessary to recycle all inedible plant parts and all human wastes so that the entire complement of elemental compounds can be reused. Potatoes have been proposed as one of the desirable crops because they are 1) extremely productive, yielding more than 100 metric tons per hectare from field plantings, 2) the edible tubers are high in digestible starch (70%) and protein (10%) on a dry weight basis, 3) up to 80% of the total plant production is in tubers and thus edible, 4) the plants are easily propagated either from tubers or from tissue culture plantlets, 5) the tubers can be utilized with a minimum of processing, and 6) potatoes can be prepared in a variety of different forms for the human diet (Tibbitts et al., 1982). However potatoes have a growth pattern that complicates the development of growing the plants in controlled systems. Tubers are borne on underground stems that are botanically termed 'rhizomes', but in common usage termed 'stolons'. The stolons must be maintained in a dark, moist area with sufficient provision for enlargement of tubers. Stems rapidly terminate in flowers forcing extensive branching and spreading of plants so that individual plants will cover 0.2 m2 or more area. Thus the growing system must be developed to provide an area that is darkened for tuber and root growth and of sufficient size for plant spread. A system developed for growing potatoes, or any plants, in space will have certain requirements that must be met to make them a useful part of a life support system. The system must 1) be constructed of materials, and involve media, that can be reused for many successive cycles of plant growth, 2

  13. Cultural systems for growing potatoes in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tibbitts, T.; Bula, R.; Corey, R.; Morrow, R.

    1988-01-01

    Higher plants are being evaluated for life support to provide needed food, oxygen and water as well as removal of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. The successful utilization of plants in space will require the development of not only highly productive growing systems but also highly efficient bioregenerative systems. It will be necessary to recycle all inedible plant parts and all human wastes so that the entire complement of elemental compounds can be reused. Potatoes have been proposed as one of the desirable crops because they are 1) extremely productive, yielding more than 100 metric tons per hectare from field plantings, 2) the edible tubers are high in digestible starch (70%) and protein (10%) on a dry weight basis, 3) up to 80% of the total plant production is in tubers and thus edible, 4) the plants are easily propagated either from tubers or from tissue culture plantlets, 5) the tubers can be utilized with a minimum of processing, and 6) potatoes can be prepared in a variety of different forms for the human diet (Tibbitts et al., 1982). However potatoes have a growth pattern that complicates the development of growing the plants in controlled systems. Tubers are borne on underground stems that are botanically termed 'rhizomes', but in common usage termed 'stolons'. The stolons must be maintained in a dark, moist area with sufficient provision for enlargement of tubers. Stems rapidly terminate in flowers forcing extensive branching and spreading of plants so that individual plants will cover 0.2 m2 or more area. Thus the growing system must be developed to provide an area that is darkened for tuber and root growth and of sufficient size for plant spread. A system developed for growing potatoes, or any plants, in space will have certain requirements that must be met to make them a useful part of a life support system. The system must 1) be constructed of materials, and involve media, that can be reused for many successive cycles of plant growth, 2

  14. New method for selection of hydrogen peroxide adapted bifidobacteria cells using continuous culture and immobilized cell technology.

    PubMed

    Mozzetti, Valeria; Grattepanche, Franck; Moine, Déborah; Berger, Bernard; Rezzonico, Enea; Meile, Leo; Arigoni, Fabrizio; Lacroix, Christophe

    2010-07-27

    Oxidative stress can severely compromise viability of bifidobacteria. Exposure of Bifidobacterium cells to oxygen causes accumulation of reactive oxygen species, mainly hydrogen peroxide, leading to cell death. In this study, we tested the suitability of continuous culture under increasing selective pressure combined with immobilized cell technology for the selection of hydrogen peroxide adapted Bifidobacterium cells. Cells of B. longum NCC2705 were immobilized in gellan-xanthan gum gel beads and used to continuously ferment MRS medium containing increasing concentration of H2O2 from 0 to 130 ppm. At the beginning of the culture, high cell density of 10(13) CFU per litre of reactor was tested. The continuous culture gradually adapted to increasing H2O2 concentrations. However, after increasing the H2O2 concentration to 130 ppm the OD of the culture decreased to 0. Full wash out was prevented by the immobilization of the cells in gel matrix. Hence after stopping the stress, it was possible to re-grow the cells that survived the highest lethal dose of H2O2 and to select two adapted colonies (HPR1 and HPR2) after plating of the culture effluent. In contrast to HPR1, HPR2 showed stable characteristics over at least 70 generations and exhibited also higher tolerance to O2 than non adapted wild type cells. Preliminary characterization of HPR2 was carried out by global genome expression profile analysis. Two genes coding for a protein with unknown function and possessing trans-membrane domains and an ABC-type transporter protein were overexpressed in HPR2 cells compared to wild type cells. Our study showed that continuous culture with cell immobilization is a valid approach for selecting cells adapted to hydrogen peroxide. Elucidation of H2O2 adaptation mechanisms in HPR2 could be helpful to develop oxygen resistant bifidobacteria.

  15. Cell-specific labeling enzymes for analysis of cell-cell communication in continuous co-culture.

    PubMed

    Tape, Christopher J; Norrie, Ida C; Worboys, Jonathan D; Lim, Lindsay; Lauffenburger, Douglas A; Jørgensen, Claus

    2014-07-01

    We report the orthologous screening, engineering, and optimization of amino acid conversion enzymes for cell-specific proteomic labeling. Intracellular endoplasmic-reticulum-anchored Mycobacterium tuberculosis diaminopimelate decarboxylase (DDC(M.tub-KDEL)) confers cell-specific meso-2,6-diaminopimelate-dependent proliferation to multiple eukaryotic cell types. Optimized lysine racemase (Lyr(M37-KDEL)) supports D-lysine specific proliferation and efficient cell-specific isotopic labeling. When ectopically expressed in discrete cell types, these enzymes confer 90% cell-specific isotopic labeling efficiency after 10 days of co-culture. Moreover, DDC(M.tub-KDEL) and Lyr(M37-KDEL) facilitate equally high cell-specific labeling fidelity without daily media exchange. Consequently, the reported novel enzyme pairing can be used to study cell-specific signaling in uninterrupted, continuous co-cultures. Demonstrating the importance of increased labeling stability for addressing novel biological questions, we compare the cell-specific phosphoproteome of fibroblasts in direct co-culture with epithelial tumor cells in both interrupted (daily media exchange) and continuous (no media exchange) co-cultures. This analysis identified multiple cell-specific phosphorylation sites specifically regulated in the continuous co-culture. Given their applicability to multiple cell types, continuous co-culture labeling fidelity, and suitability for long-term cell-cell phospho-signaling experiments, we propose DDC(M.tub-KDEL) and Lyr(M37-KDEL) as excellent enzymes for cell-specific labeling with amino acid precursors. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Continuous culture of the microalgae Schizochytrium limacinum on biodiesel-derived crude glycerol for producing docosahexaenoic acid.

    PubMed

    Ethier, Shannon; Woisard, Kevin; Vaughan, David; Wen, Zhiyou

    2011-01-01

    Crude glycerol is a major byproduct of the biodiesel industry; previous research has proved the feasibility of producing docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6 n-3) through fermentation of the algae Schizochytrium limacinum on crude glycerol. The objective of this work is to investigate the cell growth kinetics, substrate utilization efficiency, and DHA production of the algae through a continuous culture. Steady-state biomass yield, biomass productivity, growth yield on glycerol, specific glycerol consumption rate, and fatty acid composition were investigated within the range of dilution rate (D) from 0.2 to 0.6 day(-1), and the range of feed crude glycerol concentration (S(0)) from 15 to 120 g/L. The maximum specific growth rate was determined as 0.692 day(-1). The cells had a true growth yield of 0.283 g/g but with a relatively high maintenance coefficient (0.2216 day(-1)). The highest biomass productivity of 3.88 g/L-day was obtained at D=0.3 day(-1) and S(0)=60 g/L, while the highest DHA productivity (0.52 g/L-day) was obtained at D=0.3 day(-1) and S(0)=90 g/L due to the higher DHA content at S(0)=90 g/L. The biomass and DHA productivity of the continuous culture was comparable to those of batch culture, while lower than the fed-batch culture, mainly because of the lower DHA content obtained by the continuous culture. Overall, the results show that continuous culture is a powerful tool to investigate the cell growth kinetics and physiological behaviors of the algae growing on biodiesel-derived crude glycerol.

  17. A Model (Based upon Open Systems Organizational Theory) for Continuous Educational Needs Assessment in Continuing Professional Education Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazmanian, Paul E.

    This paper suggests that since continuing professional educators must address the ever present gap between new knowledge and practitioner competence, accurate identification and prioritization of practitioners' educational needs must be maintained on a continuous basis. Describing an adult education agency as an open system whose output depends on…

  18. Design of high ratio middle infrared continuous zoom optical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Zheyuan; Cao, Jianzhong; Yang, Hongtao; Qu, Enshi; Wu, Dengshan

    2011-08-01

    In recent years, the demand for infrared zoom systems is increasing in proportion with the development of infrared technology and its applications. To meet this demand a variety of zoom lenses have been designed. Infrared cameras operating in the 3-5μm spectral band are used in a wide variety of applications such as targeting, rescue, guidance and surveillance systems as well as other equipment. This paper using cool 320×240 detector with staring focal plane array and secondary imaging, a mid-wave optical system using mechanical-compensated with large-aperture and a zoom range of 10:1 is designed. The Pixel Dimensions of the detector is 30μm, and the wavelength between 3.7μm ~4.8μm.The system adopts negative group variable times and positive group of compensation which can realize 33mm~330mm continuous zoom and FOV =20.61°~2.08° ,it consists of 7 lenses including 3 aspheric surface. The length of the system is 262mm with the reflection mirror multipass optical path. The results show that the modulation transfer function(MTF)are above 0.4 within the whole focal range at spatial frequency of 17 lp/mm, and Root Mean Square (RMS) value of spot diameter were smaller than the Pixel Dimensions. After the image quality being optimized, the narcissus analysis is done and 100% cold shield efficiency is obtained. Finallythe monotonic and smooth Cam curve is given. The curve shows that the imaging plane is stable and the cam is easy to process. The system has advantages of simple structure, high image quality and short zoom path etc.

  19. Regulation of embryonic size in early mouse development in vitro culture system.

    PubMed

    Hisaki, Tomoka; Kawai, Ikuma; Sugiura, Koji; Naito, Kunihiko; Kano, Kiyoshi

    2014-08-01

    Mammals self-regulate their body size throughout development. In the uterus, embryos are properly regulated to be a specific size at birth. Previously, size and cell number in aggregated embryos, which were made from two or more morulae, and half embryos, which were halved at the 2-cell stage, have been analysed in vivo in preimplantation and post-implantation development in mice. Here, we examined whether or not the mouse embryo has the capacity to self-regulate growth using an in vitro culture system. To elucidate embryonic histology, cells were counted in aggregated or half embryos in comparison with control embryos. Both double- and triple-aggregated embryos contained more cells than did control embryos during all culture periods, and the relative growth ratios showed no growth inhibition in an in vitro culture system. Meanwhile, half embryos contained fewer cells than control embryos, but the number grew throughout the culture period. Our data suggest that the growth of aggregated embryos is not affected and continues in an in vitro culture system. On the other hand, the growth of half embryos accelerates and continues in an in vitro culture system. This situation, in turn, implied that post-implantation mouse embryos might have some potential to regulate their own growth and size as seen by using an in vitro culture system without uterus factors. In conclusion, our results indicated that embryos have some ways in which to regulate their own size in mouse early development.

  20. Effect of incremental flaxseed supplementation of an herbage diet on methane output and ruminal fermentation in continuous culture.

    PubMed

    Soder, K J; Brito, A F; Rubano, M D; Dell, C J

    2012-07-01

    A 4-unit dual-flow continuous culture fermentor system was used to assess the effect of increasing flaxseed (Linum usitatissimum) supplementation of an herbage-based diet on nutrient digestibility, microbial N synthesis, and methane (CH(4)) output. Treatments were randomly assigned to fermentors in a 4 × 4 Latin square design, with 7d for diet adaptation and 3d for data and sample collection. Treatments were 0, 5, 10, and 15% ground flaxseed supplementation of an orchardgrass (Dactylis glomerata L.) diet [70 g of total dry matter (DM) fed daily]. Samples were collected from the fermentors 4 times daily at feeding (0730, 1030, 1400, and 1900 h) on d 8 to 10 of each of four 10-d periods and analyzed for pH, ammonia-N, and volatile fatty acids. Gas samples for CH(4) analysis were collected immediately before and 1 and 2h after the 0730 h feeding on d 8, 9, and 10 and at the 1400 h feeding on d 7, 8, and 9 of each period. Effluents were analyzed for DM, organic matter, crude protein, and neutral detergent fiber for determination of nutrient digestibilities, and for total purine concentration for estimation of microbial protein synthesis. Apparent DM, organic matter, and neutral detergent fiber digestibilities decreased linearly with increasing supplemental flaxseed, whereas true DM and organic matter digestibilities were not significantly affected by treatment, averaging 77.6 and 79.1%, respectively. Mean ruminal pH and concentration of total volatile fatty acids were not significantly affected by increasing the dietary concentration of flaxseed, averaging 6.68 and 55.9 mmol/L across treatments, respectively. However, molar proportions of acetate and propionate increased linearly, whereas those of butyrate and valerate decreased linearly with increasing flaxseed supplementation. Although CH(4) output decreased linearly as supplemental flaxseed increased from 0 to 15% of diet DM, ammonia-N concentration, apparent crude protein digestibility, and microbial N synthesis

  1. Adaptive model reduction for continuous systems via recursive rational interpolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lilly, John H.

    1994-01-01

    A method for adaptive identification of reduced-order models for continuous stable SISO and MIMO plants is presented. The method recursively finds a model whose transfer function (matrix) matches that of the plant on a set of frequencies chosen by the designer. The algorithm utilizes the Moving Discrete Fourier Transform (MDFT) to continuously monitor the frequency-domain profile of the system input and output signals. The MDFT is an efficient method of monitoring discrete points in the frequency domain of an evolving function of time. The model parameters are estimated from MDFT data using standard recursive parameter estimation techniques. The algorithm has been shown in simulations to be quite robust to additive noise in the inputs and outputs. A significant advantage of the method is that it enables a type of on-line model validation. This is accomplished by simultaneously identifying a number of models and comparing each with the plant in the frequency domain. Simulations of the method applied to an 8th-order SISO plant and a 10-state 2-input 2-output plant are presented. An example of on-line model validation applied to the SISO plant is also presented.

  2. Continuous beer fermentation using immobilized yeast cell bioreactor systems.

    PubMed

    Brányik, Tomás; Vicente, António A; Dostálek, Pavel; Teixeira, José A

    2005-01-01

    Traditional beer fermentation and maturation processes use open fermentation and lager tanks. Although these vessels had previously been considered indispensable, during the past decades they were in many breweries replaced by large production units (cylindroconical tanks). These have proved to be successful, both providing operating advantages and ensuring the quality of the final beer. Another promising contemporary technology, namely, continuous beer fermentation using immobilized brewing yeast, by contrast, has found only a limited number of industrial applications. Continuous fermentation systems based on immobilized cell technology, albeit initially successful, were condemned to failure for several reasons. These include engineering problems (excess biomass and problems with CO(2) removal, optimization of operating conditions, clogging and channeling of the reactor), unbalanced beer flavor (altered cell physiology, cell aging), and unrealized cost advantages (carrier price, complex and unstable operation). However, recent development in reactor design and understanding of immobilized cell physiology, together with application of novel carrier materials, could provide a new stimulus to both research and application of this promising technology.

  3. Solar powered wrist worn acquisition system for continuous photoplethysmogram monitoring.

    PubMed

    Dieffenderfer, James P; Beppler, Eric; Novak, Tristan; Whitmire, Eric; Jayakumar, Rochana; Randall, Clive; Qu, Weiguo; Rajagopalan, Ramakrishnan; Bozkurt, Alper

    2014-01-01

    We present a solar-powered, wireless, wrist-worn platform for continuous monitoring of physiological and environmental parameters during the activities of daily life. In this study, we demonstrate the capability to produce photoplethysmogram (PPG) signals using this platform. To adhere to a low power budget for solar-powering, a 574 nm green light source is used where the PPG from the radial artery would be obtained with minimal signal conditioning. The system incorporates two monocrystalline solar cells to charge the onboard 20 mAh lithium polymer battery. Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) is used to tether the device to a smartphone that makes the phone an access point to a dedicated server for long term continuous storage of data. Two power management schemes have been proposed depending on the availability of solar energy. In low light situations, if the battery is low, the device obtains a 5-second PPG waveform every minute to consume an average power of 0.57 mW. In scenarios where the battery is at a sustainable voltage, the device is set to enter its normal 30 Hz acquisition mode, consuming around 13.7 mW. We also present our efforts towards improving the charge storage capacity of our on-board super-capacitor.

  4. Performance of a newly designed continuous soot monitoring system (COSMOS).

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Yuzo; Kondo, Yutaka; Sahu, Lokesh K; Imaru, Junichi; Fukushima, Nobuhiko; Kano, Minoru

    2008-10-01

    We designed a continuous soot monitoring system (COSMOS) for fully automated, high-sensitivity, continuous measurement of light absorption by black carbon (BC) aerosols. The instrument monitors changes in transmittance across an automatically advancing quartz fiber filter tape using an LED at a 565 nm wavelength. To achieve measurements with high sensitivity and a lower detectable light absorption coefficient, COSMOS uses a double-convex lens and optical bundle pipes to maintain high light intensity and signal data are obtained at 1000 Hz. In addition, sampling flow rate and optical unit temperature are actively controlled. The inlet line for COSMOS is heated to 400 degrees C to effectively volatilize non-refractory aerosol components that are internally mixed with BC. In its current form, COSMOS provides BC light absorption measurements with a detection limit of 0.45 Mm(-1) (0.045 microg m(-3) for soot) for 10 min. The unit-to-unit variability is estimated to be within +/- 1%, demonstrating its high reproducibility. The absorption coefficients determined by COSMOS agreed with those by a particle soot absorption photometer (PSAP) to within 1% (r2 = 0.97). The precision (+/- 0.60 Mm(-1)) for 10 min integrated data was better than that of PSAP and an aethalometer under our operating conditions. These results showed that COSMOS achieved both an improved detection limit and higher precision for the filter-based light absorption measurements of BC compared to the existing methods.

  5. Spatiotemporal System Identification With Continuous Spatial Maps and Sparse Estimation.

    PubMed

    Aram, Parham; Kadirkamanathan, Visakan; Anderson, Sean R

    2015-11-01

    We present a framework for the identification of spatiotemporal linear dynamical systems. We use a state-space model representation that has the following attributes: 1) the number of spatial observation locations are decoupled from the model order; 2) the model allows for spatial heterogeneity; 3) the model representation is continuous over space; and 4) the model parameters can be identified in a simple and sparse estimation procedure. The model identification procedure we propose has four steps: 1) decomposition of the continuous spatial field using a finite set of basis functions where spatial frequency analysis is used to determine basis function width and spacing, such that the main spatial frequency contents of the underlying field can be captured; 2) initialization of states in closed form; 3) initialization of state-transition and input matrix model parameters using sparse regression-the least absolute shrinkage and selection operator method; and 4) joint state and parameter estimation using an iterative Kalman-filter/sparse-regression algorithm. To investigate the performance of the proposed algorithm we use data generated by the Kuramoto model of spatiotemporal cortical dynamics. The identification algorithm performs successfully, predicting the spatiotemporal field with high accuracy, whilst the sparse regression leads to a compact model.

  6. Incubator-independent cell-culture perfusion platform for continuous long-term microelectrode array electrophysiology and time-lapse imaging

    PubMed Central

    Saalfrank, Dirk; Konduri, Anil Krishna; Latifi, Shahrzad; Habibey, Rouhollah; Golabchi, Asiyeh; Martiniuc, Aurel Vasile; Knoll, Alois; Ingebrandt, Sven; Blau, Axel

    2015-01-01

    Most in vitro electrophysiology studies extract information and draw conclusions from representative, temporally limited snapshot experiments. This approach bears the risk of missing decisive moments that may make a difference in our understanding of physiological events. This feasibility study presents a simple benchtop cell-culture perfusion system adapted to commercial microelectrode arrays (MEAs), multichannel electrophysiology equipment and common inverted microscopy stages for simultaneous and uninterrupted extracellular electrophysiology and time-lapse imaging at ambient CO2 levels. The concept relies on a transparent, replica-casted polydimethylsiloxane perfusion cap, gravity- or syringe-pump-driven perfusion and preconditioning of pH-buffered serum-free cell-culture medium to ambient CO2 levels at physiological temperatures. The low-cost microfluidic in vitro enabling platform, which allows us to image cultures immediately after cell plating, is easy to reproduce and is adaptable to the geometries of different cell-culture containers. It permits the continuous and simultaneous multimodal long-term acquisition or manipulation of optical and electrophysiological parameter sets, thereby considerably widening the range of experimental possibilities. Two exemplary proof-of-concept long-term MEA studies on hippocampal networks illustrate system performance. Continuous extracellular recordings over a period of up to 70 days revealed details on both sudden and gradual neural activity changes in maturing cell ensembles with large intra-day fluctuations. Correlated time-lapse imaging unveiled rather static macroscopic network architectures with previously unreported local morphological oscillations on the timescale of minutes. PMID:26543581

  7. Evaluation of different culture methods for the diagnosis of peritonitis in patients on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Iyer, R N; Reddy, A K; Gande, S; Aiyangar, A

    2014-05-01

    A total of 170 continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) fluids were processed by various culture methods, including direct inoculation of the centrifuged sediment, inoculation into automated blood culture bottles, water lysis, Tween-80 incorporated blood agar, and Triton-X treatment of the specimen. Of 170 CAPD fluids, 127 showed the growth of bacteria/fungi. Sixty-three fluids showed growth by all methods, the water lysis alone detected 24 additional positive cultures, while Tween-80 blood agar and Triton-X yielded 30 additional positive cultures. A combination of water lysis, Tween-80 blood agar and Triton-X treatment of the CAPD fluid is recommended for diagnosis of CAPD peritonitis in resource-limited settings. © 2013 The Authors Clinical Microbiology and Infection © 2013 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.

  8. Continuous antigenic stimulation system (CASS) as a new immunization strategy.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Vargas, Andrew; Rosenthal, Kenneth L; McDermott, Mark R; Hortelano, Gonzalo

    2004-09-28

    Protection against diseases is mediated by a sustained immune response. Here, we describe a new immunization strategy. Mice implanted with encapsulated C2C12 myoblasts secreting human factor IX (hFIX) elicited a strong humoral response against the transgene, as compared to mice immunized with complete Freund's adjuvant (FA). Mice also had increasing IgG2a antibody titer, indicating a switch to a Th1 profile immune response. Mice developed strong hFIX-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) that was detectable 213 days after implantation, demonstrating the sustained immunity elicited by encapsulated cells. Here, we propose continuous antigenic stimulation system (CASS) as a novel immunization strategy with potential application in the design of novel vaccines.

  9. Continuous growth of the motor system in the axolotl

    SciTech Connect

    Holder, N.; Clarke, J.D.; Stephens, N.; Wilson, S.W.; Orsi, C.; Bloomer, T.; Tonge, D.A. )

    1991-01-22

    During growth of the axolotl, motor neurons, and muscle fibres are added to the motor system. By double labelling neurons with tritiated thymidine and retrogradely transported HRP, we show that some motor neurons are born at postembryonic stages. Further analysis of motor neurons with the aid of HRP reveals this population of newly born cells relatively frequently in small (5-7 cm long) axolotls, but only rarely in large (7-13 cm long) axolotls. Evidence is presented that suggests that these immature cells are in the process of migrating from close to the ependyma out to the ventral horn. HRP transport also reveals growth cones of advancing axons within spinal nerves in animals up to 6 cm in length. Cell counts by light and electron microscopic methods show that muscle fibres are generated throughout larval life in the iliotibialis, a typical limb muscle. This analysis provides data consistent with the notion that new muscle fibres are added from a localised growth zone situated at the superficial edge of the muscle. These results are discussed in terms of the correlation between continuous growth of the motor system and the ability of the axolotl to functionally repair lesions to the peripheral nervous system.

  10. Continuous growth of the motor system in the axolotl.

    PubMed

    Holder, N; Clarke, J D; Stephens, N; Wilson, S W; Orsi, C; Bloomer, T; Tonge, D A

    1991-01-22

    During growth of the axolotl, motor neurons, and muscle fibres are added to the motor system. By double labelling neurons with tritiated thymidine and retrogradely transported HRP, we show that some motor neurons are born at postembryonic stages. Further analysis of motor neurons with the aid of HRP reveals this population of newly born cells relatively frequently in small (5-7 cm long) axolotls, but only rarely in large (7-13 cm long) axolotls. Evidence is presented that suggests that these immature cells are in the process of migrating from close to the ependyma out to the ventral horn. HRP transport also reveals growth cones of advancing axons within spinal nerves in animals up to 6 cm in length. Cell counts by light and electron microscopic methods show that muscle fibres are generated throughout larval life in the iliotibialis, a typical limb muscle. This analysis provides data consistent with the notion that new muscle fibres are added from a localised growth zone situated at the superficial edge of the muscle. These results are discussed in terms of the correlation between continuous growth of the motor system and the ability of the axolotl to functionally repair lesions to the peripheral nervous system.

  11. Forum: Cultural Identity and (Dis)Continuities of Children of Immigrant Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Obsiye, Mohamed; Cook, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    Susan Harper's study centres on "funds of knowledge" as a pedagogical resource for the development of a science curriculum, drawing on Karen refugee parents' cultural knowledge and identity. She argues that engagement in this process helps the parent generation of this community to "rebuild their cultural resilience" and cope…

  12. Forum: Cultural Identity and (Dis)Continuities of Children of Immigrant Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Obsiye, Mohamed; Cook, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    Susan Harper's study centres on "funds of knowledge" as a pedagogical resource for the development of a science curriculum, drawing on Karen refugee parents' cultural knowledge and identity. She argues that engagement in this process helps the parent generation of this community to "rebuild their cultural resilience" and cope…

  13. Cultural Continuity in an Educational Institution: A Case Study of the Suzuki Method of Music Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taniuchi, Lois

    As the Suzuki method of music instruction has spread from Japan to other countries, its methods have been modified to adapt to the culture of those countries. In this paper the Japanese cultural background, and the principles and methods developed in Japan are discussed and compared with the adaptations made in the United States. The Suzuki method…

  14. Modifying the Toyota Production System for continuous performance improvement in an academic children's hospital.

    PubMed

    Stapleton, F Bruder; Hendricks, James; Hagan, Patrick; DelBeccaro, Mark

    2009-08-01

    The Toyota Production System (TPS) has become a successful model for improving efficiency and eliminating errors in manufacturing processes. In an effort to provide patients and families with the highest quality clinical care, our academic children's hospital has modified the techniques of the TPS for a program in continuous performance improvement (CPI) and has expanded its application to educational and research programs. Over a period of years, physicians, nurses, residents, administrators, and hospital staff have become actively engaged in a culture of continuous performance improvement. This article provides background into the methods of CPI and describes examples of how we have applied these methods for improvement in clinical care, resident teaching, and research administration.

  15. Effect of the nutritional status of semi-continuous microalgal cultures on the productivity and biochemical composition of Brachionus plicatilis.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Martiña; Seixas, Pedro; Coutinho, Paula; Fábregas, Jaime; Otero, Ana

    2011-12-01

    The rotifer Brachionus plicatilis was cultured using the microalga Isochrysis aff. galbana clone T-ISO as feed. T-ISO was cultured semi-continuously with daily renewal rates of 10%, 20%, 30%, 40%, and 50% of the volume of cultures. The increase of renewal rate led to increasing nutrient and light availability in microalgal cultures, which caused differences in the biochemical composition of microalgal biomass. Growth rate, individual dry weight, organic content, and biomass productivity of rotifer cultures increased in response to higher growth rate in T-ISO cultures. Rotifer growth rate showed a strong negative correlation (R² = 0.90) with the C/N ratio of microalgal biomass. Rotifer dry weight was also affected by nutrient availability of T-ISO cultures, increasing up to 50% from nutrient-limited to nutrient-sufficient conditions. Consequently, biomass productivity of rotifer cultures increased more than twofold with the increase of renewal rate of T-ISO cultures. Rotifer organic content underwent the same trend of total dry weight. Maximum content of polyunsaturated fatty acids was reached in rotifers fed T-ISO from the renewal rate of 40%, with percentages of docosahexaenoic acid (22:6ω-3, DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5ω-3, EPA) of 11% and 5% of total fatty acids, respectively. Selecting the most appropriate conditions for microalgal culture can therefore enhance the nutritive quality of microalgal biomass, resulting in a better performance of filter feeders and their nutrient content, and may constitute a useful tool to improve the rearing of fish larvae and other aquaculture organisms that require live feed in some or all the stages of their life cycle.

  16. Rumen degradable protein supply affects microbial efficiency in continuous culture and growth in steers.

    PubMed

    Brooks, M A; Harvey, R M; Johnson, N F; Kerley, M S

    2012-12-01

    We hypothesized that microbial efficiency and output from fermentation in the rumen would be optimized when peptide supply was balanced with peptide requirement of ruminal microflora. This study was conducted to measure response of varying rumen degradable peptide (RDPep) supply on ruminal fermentation characteristics and steer growth. A continuous culture experiment was conducted with diets formulated to achieve a predicted RDPep balance (RDPep supplied above RDPep required) of -0.30 to 1.45% CP with rumen degradable N (RDN) balance (RDN supplied above RDN required) above dietary ammonia-N requirement of microbes. Two additional treatments had RDPep balances of -0.30 and 0.78% CP with insufficient ammonia-N supply to meet microbial requirements. Single-flow fermenters (N = 24; n = 6) were inoculated with rumen fluid and maintained anaerobically at 39°C with a 0.06 h(-1) dilution rate. Inadequate RDN decreased OM digestion and microbial N flow, and increased rumen undegradable N (P < 0.01). Microbial efficiency decreased in RDN-deficient diets and was greatest when RDPep balance did not excessively exceed microbial requirement of RDPep predicted (P < 0.01). A growth study was conducted with 49 yearling, crossbred, Angus steers (initial BW 370 ± 34 kg). Animals were assigned to 1 of 4 treatment groups by BW and further divided into 3 pens with 4 steers per pen to achieve similar initial pen weights. Treatments consisted of 4 isonitrogenous diets balanced for RDN but varying in predicted RDPep balance (0.55%, -0.02%, -0.25%, and -0.65% CP). Animals were maintained on treatment for 70 d with individual BW taken on d 0, 1, 21, 42, 70, and 71. Final BW decreased linearly with decreasing RDPep (P = 0.05). Average daily gain and G:F displayed a quadratic effect with greater ADG and G:F at greater and lesser RDPep levels (P = 0.02). We concluded that balancing RDPep supply to predicted requirement improved fermentation efficiency and microbial output, which in turn

  17. Effect of Long Generation Times on Growth of Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron in Carbohydrate-Limited Continuous Culture

    PubMed Central

    Kotarski, Susan F.; Salyers, Abigail A.

    1981-01-01

    We investigated the ability of Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, an obligate anaerobe from human colonic microflora, to grow in a carbohydrate-limited continuous culture at generation times ranging from 3.5 to 28 h per division. Four carbohydrates were tested: glucose, N-acetylglucosamine, glucuronic acid, and glucosamine. At a generation time of 3.5 h per division, the growth yields for bacteria growing on glucose, N-acetylglucosamine, and glucuronic acid were 76, 68, and 50 g of cells (dry weight) per mol of substrate, respectively. Growth yields at 28 h per division were 61, 52, and 37 g/mol of substrate, respectively. When glucosamine was the carbohydrate source, a stable population of bacteria was attainable only at generation times longer than 12 h per division. Growth yields at 15 and 32 h per division were 11 and 33 g/mol of substrate, respectively. There was no significant variation with increasing generation times in the specific activities of selected glycolytic enzymes, of disaccharidases such as α- and β-glucosidases and α- and β-galactosidases, or of the polysaccharidase chondroitin sulfate lyase. By contrast, the pattern of fermentation products varied with both the generation time and the carbon source. At a generation time of 3.5 h per division, the main products from the fermentation of glucose were acetate and succinate, with a trace of propionate. At 28 h per division, propionate concentrations were higher and succinate concentrations were lower than at 3.5 h per division. The products from the fermentation of glucosamine were the same as those from glucose fermentation. However, when N-acetylglucosamine was fermented, the concentration of acetate was much higher at all generation times than when glucose was the carbon source. When glucuronic acid was the carbon source, acetate was the main fermentation product, and only traces of propionate and succinate were detected. Another characteristic that varied with the growth rate was the ability of B

  18. Continuous precipitation of process related impurities from clarified cell culture supernatant using a novel coiled flow inversion reactor (CFIR).

    PubMed

    Kateja, Nikhil; Agarwal, Harshit; Saraswat, Aditya; Bhat, Manish; Rathore, Anurag S

    2016-10-01

    Coiled Flow Inverter Reactor (CFIR) has recently been explored for facilitating continuous operation of several unit operations involved in downstream processing of biopharmaceuticals such as viral inactivation and protein refolding. The application of CFIR for continuous precipitation of clarified cell culture supernatant has been explored. The pH based precipitation is optimized in the batch mode and then in the continuous mode in CFIR using a design of experiments (DOE) study. Improved clearance of host cell DNA (52× vs. 39× in batch), improved clearance of host cell proteins (HCP) (7× vs. 6× in batch) and comparable recovery (90 vs. 91.5 % in batch) are observed along with six times higher productivity. To further demonstrate wider applicability of CFIR in performing continuous precipitation, two more case studies involving use of two different precipitation protocols (CaCl2 based and caprylic acid based) are also performed. In both cases, clearance of host cell DNA, HCP, and product recovery are found to be comparable or better in CFIR than in batch operations. Moreover, increase in productivity of 16 times (CaCl2 based) and eight times (caprylic acid based) is obtained for the two precipitation protocols, respectively. The data clearly demonstrate that CFIR can be seamlessly integrated into a continuous bioprocess train for performing continuous precipitation of clarified cell culture supernatant. To our knowledge this is the first report of such use.

  19. Oxygenation of intensive cell-culture system.

    PubMed

    Emery, A N; Jan, D C; al-Rubeai, M

    1995-11-01

    The abilities of various methods of oxygenation to meet the demands of high-cell-density culture were investigated using a spin filter perfusion system in a bench-top bioreactor. Oxygen demand at high cell density could not be met by sparging with air inside a spin filter (oxygen transfer values in this condition were comparable with those for surface aeration). Sparging with air outside a spin filter gave adequate oxygen transfer for the support of cell concentrations above 10(7) ml-1 in fully aerobic conditions but the addition of antifoam to control foaming caused blockage of the spinfilter mesh. Bubble-free aeration through immersed silicone tubing with pure oxygen gave similar oxygen transfer rates to that of sparging with air but without the problems of bubble damage and fouling of the spin filter. A supra-optimal level of dissolved oxygen (478% air saturation) inhibited cell growth. However, cells could recover from this stress and reach high density after reduction of the dissolved oxygen level to 50% air saturation.

  20. Treatment of industrial effluents by a continuous system: electrocoagulation--activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Moisés, Tejocote-Pérez; Patricia, Balderas-Hernández; Barrera-Díaz, C E; Gabriela, Roa-Morales; Natividad-Rangel, Reyna

    2010-10-01

    A continuous system electrocoagulation--active sludge was designed and built for the treatment of industrial wastewater. The system included an electrochemical reactor with aluminum electrodes, a clarifier and a biological reactor. The electrochemical reactor was tested under different flowrates (50, 100 and 200 mL/min). In the biological reactor, the performance of different cultures of active sludge was assessed: coliform bacterial, ciliate and flagellate protozoa and aquatic fungus. Overall treatment efficiencies of color, turbidity and COD removal were 94%, 92% and 80%, respectively, under optimal conditions of 50 mL/min flowrate and using ciliate and flagellate protozoa. It was concluded that the system was efficient for the treatment of industrial wastewater.

  1. Levan production by Zymomonas mobilis in batch and continuous fermentation systems.

    PubMed

    Silbir, Selim; Dagbagli, Seval; Yegin, Sirma; Baysal, Taner; Goksungur, Yekta

    2014-01-01

    Levan production in batch and continuous fermentation systems by Zymomonas mobilis B-14023 was investigated. The culture medium used in both of the fermentation systems contained sucrose and various organic nitrogen sources. Maximum concentration of levan was produced with yeast extract among the nitrogen sources tested. Response surface methodology was used to investigate the effects of three factors on the concentration of levan in batch cultures of Z. mobilis. Maximum levan concentration was 40.2 g/L and this concentration was reached at the optimum levels of process variables, which were 299.1 g/L initial substrate concentration, 42.3 h incubation time, and initial pH 6.0. Continuous fermentation experiments were done in packed bed bioreactor using Ca-alginate immobilized Z. mobilis cells. The highest levan concentration (31.8 ± 0.21 g/L) was obtained at a dilution rate of 0.14 h(-1) while maximum volumetric productivity (6.556 g/(Lh)) was obtained at a dilution rate of 0.22 h(-1). Increasing the dilution rate resulted in decreased levan and increased residual sugar concentrations.

  2. Metabolism of cellulose by Phanerochaete chrysosporium in continuously agitated culture is associated with enhanced production of lignin peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Zacchi, L; Burla, G; Zuolong, D; Harvey, P J

    2000-03-10

    Production of the extracellular heme protein lignin peroxidase (LiP) by Phanerochaete chrysosporium is currently associated with a number of requirements, namely exposure of the cultures to oxygen; limiting nutrient nitrogen or carbon and static or semi-static culture conditions. To obtain LiP activity in continuously agitated liquid culture requires the inclusion of a surfactant. However, using cellulose as the carbon source, we obtained high titres (0.2-0.4 U ml(-1)) of LiP in submerged liquid cultures under conditions of continuous agitation, without substrate limitation or the need to add oxygen or surfactant. Comparison of the morphological and physiological traits of hyphae maintained on either cellulose or free glucose supports observations that the synthesis of extracellular polysaccharide in the cultures grown on glucose, restricts oxygen diffusion into the hyphae, which is necessary for LiP induction. They also suggest that isozymes of LiP synthesised under these conditions may be triggered in response to oxidant stress.

  3. 40 CFR 60.1250 - What is my schedule for evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... continuous emission monitoring systems? 60.1250 Section 60.1250 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Continuous Emission Monitoring § 60.1250 What is my schedule for evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems? (a) Conduct annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring systems no more than...

  4. 40 CFR 60.1250 - What is my schedule for evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... continuous emission monitoring systems? 60.1250 Section 60.1250 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Continuous Emission Monitoring § 60.1250 What is my schedule for evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems? (a) Conduct annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring systems no more than...

  5. 40 CFR 60.1250 - What is my schedule for evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... continuous emission monitoring systems? 60.1250 Section 60.1250 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Continuous Emission Monitoring § 60.1250 What is my schedule for evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems? (a) Conduct annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring systems no more than...

  6. 40 CFR 60.1250 - What is my schedule for evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... continuous emission monitoring systems? 60.1250 Section 60.1250 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Continuous Emission Monitoring § 60.1250 What is my schedule for evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems? (a) Conduct annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring systems no more than...

  7. 40 CFR 60.1250 - What is my schedule for evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... continuous emission monitoring systems? 60.1250 Section 60.1250 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Continuous Emission Monitoring § 60.1250 What is my schedule for evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems? (a) Conduct annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring systems no more than...

  8. Continuously functioning artificial nephron system: the promise of nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Nissenson, Allen R; Ronco, Claudio; Pergamit, Gayle; Edelstein, Martin; Watts, Richard

    2005-07-01

    Nearly 900,000 patients worldwide have end-stage renal disease and require dialysis or kidney transplantation. Despite the availability of these forms of renal replacement therapy for nearly four decades, mortality and morbidity are high and patients often have a poor quality of life. We have developed a human nephron filter (HNF) utilizing nanotechnology that would eventually make feasible a continuously functioning, wearable or implantable artificial kidney. The device consists of two membranes operating in series within one device cartridge. The first membrane mimics the function of the glomerulus, using convective transport to generate a plasma ultrafiltrate containing all solutes approaching the molecular weight of albumin. The second membrane mimics the function of the renal tubules, selectively reclaiming designated solutes to maintain body homeostasis. No dialysis solution is used in this device. The HNF has been computer-modeled, and operating 12 hr per day, 7 days per week the HNF provides the equivalent of 30 mL/min glomerular filtration rate (compared to half that amount for conventional thrice-weekly hemodialysis). Animal studies should begin in the next 1 to 2 years, and clinical trials would then follow 1 to 2 years subsequent. The HNF system, by eliminating dialysate and utilizing a novel membrane system created through applied nanotechnology, represents a breakthrough in renal replacement therapy based on the functioning of native kidneys. The enhanced solute removal and wearable design should substantially improve patient outcomes and quality of life.

  9. Framework for continuous performance improvement in small drinking water systems.

    PubMed

    Bereskie, Ty; Haider, Husnain; Rodriguez, Manuel J; Sadiq, Rehan

    2017-01-01

    Continuous performance improvement (CPI) can be a useful approach to overcome water quality problems impacting small communities. Small drinking water systems (SDWSs) struggle to meet regulatory requirements and often lack the economic and human resource flexibility for immediate improvement. A CPI framework is developed to provide SDWS managers and operators an approach to gauge their current performance against similar systems and to track performance improvement from the implementation of the new technologies or innovations into the future. The proposed CPI framework incorporates the use of a water quality index (WQI) and functional performance benchmarking to evaluate and compare drinking water quality performance of an individual water utility against that of a representative benchmark. The results are then used to identify and prioritize the most vulnerable water quality indicators and subsequently identify and prioritize performance improvement strategies. The proposed CPI framework has been demonstrated using data collected from SDWSs in the province of Newfoundland and Labrador (NL), Canada and using the Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment (CCME) WQI.

  10. Batch and continuous culture-based selection strategies for acetic acid tolerance in xylose-fermenting Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Wright, Jeremiah; Bellissimi, Eleonora; de Hulster, Erik; Wagner, Andreas; Pronk, Jack T; van Maris, Antonius J A

    2011-05-01

    Acetic acid tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is crucial for the production of bioethanol and other bulk chemicals from lignocellulosic plant-biomass hydrolysates, especially at a low pH. This study explores two evolutionary engineering strategies for the improvement of acetic acid tolerance of the xylose-fermenting S. cerevisiae RWB218, whose anaerobic growth on xylose at pH 4 is inhibited at acetic acid concentrations >1 g L(-1) : (1) sequential anaerobic, batch cultivation (pH 4) at increasing acetic acid concentrations and (2) prolonged anaerobic continuous cultivation without pH control, in which acidification by ammonium assimilation generates selective pressure for acetic acid tolerance. After c. 400 generations, the sequential-batch and continuous selection cultures grew on xylose at pH≤4 with 6 and 5 g L(-1) acetic acid, respectively. In the continuous cultures, the specific xylose-consumption rate had increased by 75% to 1.7 g xylose g(-1) biomass h(-1) . After storage of samples from both selection experiments at -80 °C and cultivation without acetic acid, they failed to grow on xylose at pH 4 in the presence of 5 g L(-1) acetic acid. Characterization in chemostat cultures with linear acetic acid gradients demonstrated an acetate-inducible acetic acid tolerance in samples from the continuous selection protocol. © 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Forum: cultural identity and (dis)continuities of children of immigrant communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obsiye, Mohamed; Cook, Rachel

    2016-12-01

    Susan Harper's study centres on `funds of knowledge' as a pedagogical resource for the development of a science curriculum, drawing on Karen refugee parents' cultural knowledge and identity. She argues that engagement in this process helps the parent generation of this community to `rebuild their cultural resilience' and cope with the resettlement process (p. 43). Drawing on our own research with Somali, Sierra Leonean and Nigerian diaspora communities in London, the following article extends this discussion with a particular focus on the intricate intergenerational dynamics between children and their parents' generation in relation to cultural identity development though engagement with education.

  12. Achieving a culture of continuous improvement by adopting the principles of self-assessment and business excellence.

    PubMed

    Jackson, S

    1999-01-01

    Following a brief description of the inception of self-assessment and the European Foundation for Quality business excellence model, this article describes how one clinical directorate in an NHS Trust used the principles of both to secure a culture of continuous improvement. The journey from a mainly hierarchical, bureaucratic, individualist culture to one where the norms, values and beliefs reflected teamwork, involvement and empowerment is described. The highs, lows and learning points are all included, in an attempt to enlighten other healthcare organisations considering the benefits and pitfalls of using the business excellence model to improve the quality of their healthcare delivery.

  13. Fitness and proteome changes accompanying the development of erythromycin resistance in a population of Escherichia coli grown in continuous culture.

    PubMed

    Petráčková, Denisa; Janeček, Jiří; Bezoušková, Silvia; Kalachová, Ladislava; Techniková, Zuzana; Buriánková, Karolína; Halada, Petr; Haladová, Kateřina; Weiser, Jaroslav

    2013-10-01

    We studied the impact of a sublethal concentration of erythromycin on the fitness and proteome of a continuously cultivated population of Escherichia coli. The development of resistance to erythromycin in the population was followed over time by the gradient plate method and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) measurements. We measured the growth rate, standardized efficiency of synthesis of radiolabeled proteins, and translation accuracy of the system. The proteome changes were followed over time in two parallel experiments that differed in the presence or absence of erythromycin. A comparison of the proteomes at each time point (43, 68, and 103 h) revealed a group of unique proteins differing in expression. From all 35 proteins differing throughout the cultivation, only three were common to more than one time point. In the final population, a significant proportion of upregulated proteins was localized to the outer or inner cytoplasmic membranes or to the periplasmic space. In a population growing for more than 100 generations in the presence of antibiotic, erythromycin-resistant bacterial clones with improved fitness in comparison to early resistant culture predominated. This phenomenon was accompanied by distinct changes in protein expression during a stepwise, population-based development of erythromycin resistance.

  14. Dynamics of glutamate synthesis and excretion fluxes in batch and continuous cultures of temperature-triggered Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Uy, Davin; Delaunay, Stéphane; Goergen, Jean-Louis; Engasser, Jean-Marc

    2005-05-01

    Corynebacterium glutamicum 2262 strain, when triggered for glutamate excretion, experiences a rapid decrease in growth rate and increase in glutamate efflux. In order to gain a better quantitative understanding of the factors controlling the metabolic transition, the fermentation dynamics was investigated for a temperature-sensitive strain cultivated in batch and glucose-limited continuous cultures. For non-excreting cells at 33 degrees C, increasing the growth rate resulted in strong increases in the central metabolic fluxes, but the intracellular glutamate level, the oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (ODHC) activity and the flux distribution at the oxoglutarate node remained essentially constant. When subjected to a temperature rise to 39 degrees C, at both high- and low-metabolic activities, the bacteria showed a rapid attenuation in ODHC activity and an increase from 28% to more than 90% of the isocitrate dehydrogenase flux split towards glutamate synthesis. Simultaneously to the reduction in growth rate, the cells activated a high capacity export system capable of expelling the surplus of synthesized glutamate.

  15. Blastocyst utilization rates after continuous culture in two commercial single-step media: a prospective randomized study with sibling oocytes.

    PubMed

    Sfontouris, Ioannis A; Kolibianakis, Efstratios M; Lainas, George T; Venetis, Christos A; Petsas, George K; Tarlatzis, Basil C; Lainas, Tryfon G

    2017-07-17

    The aim of this study is to determine whether blastocyst utilization rates are different after continuous culture in two different commercial single-step media. This is a paired randomized controlled trial with sibling oocytes conducted in infertility patients, aged ≤40 years with ≥10 oocytes retrieved assigned to blastocyst culture and transfer. Retrieved oocytes were randomly allocated to continuous culture in either Sage one-step medium (Origio) or Continuous Single Culture (CSC) medium (Irvine Scientific) without medium renewal up to day 5 post oocyte retrieval. Main outcome measure was the proportion of embryos suitable for clinical use (utilization rate). A total of 502 oocytes from 33 women were randomly allocated to continuous culture in either Sage one-step medium (n = 250) or CSC medium (n = 252). Fertilization was performed by either in vitro fertilization or intracytoplasmic sperm injection, and embryo transfers were performed on day 5. Two patients had all blastocysts frozen due to the occurrence of severe ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome. Fertilization and cleavage rates, as well as embryo quality on day 3, were similar in the two media. Blastocyst utilization rates (%, 95% CI) [55.4% (46.4-64.1) vs 54.7% (44.9-64.6), p = 0.717], blastocyst formation rates [53.6% (44.6-62.5) vs 51.9 (42.2-61.6), p = 0.755], and proportion of good quality blastocysts [36.8% (28.1-45.4) vs 36.1% (27.2-45.0), p = 0.850] were similar in Sage one-step and CSC media, respectively. Continuous culture of embryos in Sage one-step and CSC media is associated with similar blastocyst development and utilization rates. Both single-step media appear to provide adequate support during in vitro preimplantation embryo development. Whether these observations are also valid for other continuous single medium protocols remains to be determined. NCT02302638.

  16. Partial splenic embolization to permit continuation of systemic chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Luz, Jose Hugo M; Luz, Paula M; Marchiori, Edson; Rodrigues, Leonardo A; Gouveia, Hugo R; Martin, Henrique S; Faria, Igor M; Souza, Roberto R; Gil, Roberto de Almeida; Palladino, Alexandre de M; Pimenta, Karina B; de Souza, Henrique S

    2016-10-01

    Systemic chemotherapy treatments, commonly those that comprise oxaliplatin, have been linked to the appearance of distinctive liver lesions that evolves to portal hypertension, spleen enlargement, platelets sequestration, and thrombocytopenia. This outcome can interrupt treatment or force dosage reduction, decreasing efficiency of cancer therapy. We conducted a prospective phase II study for the evaluation of partial splenic embolization in patients with thrombocytopenia that impeded systemic chemotherapy continuation. From August 2014 through July 2015, 33 patients underwent partial splenic embolization to increase platelets count and allow their return to treatment. Primary endpoint was the accomplishment of a thrombocyte level superior to 130 × 10(9) /L and the secondary endpoints were the return to chemotherapy and toxicity. Partial splenic embolization was done 36 times in 33 patients. All patients presented gastrointestinal cancer and colorectal malignancy was the commonest primary site. An average of 6.4 cycles of chemotherapy was done before splenic embolization and the most common regimen was Folfox. Mean platelet count prior to embolization was 69 × 10(9) /L. A total of 94% of patients achieved primary endpoint. All patients in need reinitiated treatment and median time to chemotherapy return was 14 days. No grade 3 or above adverse events were identified. Aiming for a 50% to 70% infarction area may be sufficient to achieve success without the complications associated with more extensive infarction. Combined with the better safety profile, partial splenic embolization is an excellent option in the management of thrombocytopenia, enabling the resumption of systemic chemotherapy with minimal procedure-related morbidity. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. VAXCMS - VAX CONTINUOUS MONITORING SYSTEM, VERSION 2.2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farkas, L.

    1994-01-01

    The VAX Continuous Monitoring System (VAXCMS) was developed at NASA Headquarters to aid system managers in monitoring the performance of VAX systems through the generation of graphic images which summarize trends in performance metrics over time. Since its initial development, VAXCMS has been extensively modified at the NASA Lewis Research Center. Data is produced by utilizing the VMS MONITOR utility to collect the performance data, and then feeding the data through custom-developed linkages to the Computer Associates' TELL-A-GRAF computer graphics software to generate the chart images for analysis by the system manager. The VMS ACCOUNTING utility is also utilized to gather interactive process information. The charts that are generated by VAXCMS are: 1) CPU modes for each node over the most recent four month period 2) CPU modes for the cluster as a whole using a weighted average of all the nodes in the cluster based on processing power 3) Percent of primary memory in use for each node over the most recent four month period 4) Interactive processes for all nodes over the most recent four month period 5) Daily, weekly, and monthly, performance summaries for CPU modes, percent of primary memory in use, and page fault rates for each node 6) Daily disk I/O performance data plotting Average Disk I/O Response Time based on I/O Operation Rate and Queue Length. VAXCMS is written in DCL and VAX FORTRAN for use with DEC VAX series computers running VMS 5.1 or later. This program requires the TELL-A-GRAF graphics package in order to generate plots of system data. A FORTRAN compiler is required. The standard distribution medium for VAXCMS is a 9-track 1600 BPI magnetic tape in DEC VAX BACKUP format. It is also available on a TK50 tape cartridge in DEC VAX BACKUP format. An electronic copy of the documentation in ASCII format is included on the distribution medium. Portions of this code are copyrighted by Mr. David Lavery and are distributed with his permission. These portions

  18. VAXCMS - VAX CONTINUOUS MONITORING SYSTEM, VERSION 2.2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farkas, L.

    1994-01-01

    The VAX Continuous Monitoring System (VAXCMS) was developed at NASA Headquarters to aid system managers in monitoring the performance of VAX systems through the generation of graphic images which summarize trends in performance metrics over time. Since its initial development, VAXCMS has been extensively modified at the NASA Lewis Research Center. Data is produced by utilizing the VMS MONITOR utility to collect the performance data, and then feeding the data through custom-developed linkages to the Computer Associates' TELL-A-GRAF computer graphics software to generate the chart images for analysis by the system manager. The VMS ACCOUNTING utility is also utilized to gather interactive process information. The charts that are generated by VAXCMS are: 1) CPU modes for each node over the most recent four month period 2) CPU modes for the cluster as a whole using a weighted average of all the nodes in the cluster based on processing power 3) Percent of primary memory in use for each node over the most recent four month period 4) Interactive processes for all nodes over the most recent four month period 5) Daily, weekly, and monthly, performance summaries for CPU modes, percent of primary memory in use, and page fault rates for each node 6) Daily disk I/O performance data plotting Average Disk I/O Response Time based on I/O Operation Rate and Queue Length. VAXCMS is written in DCL and VAX FORTRAN for use with DEC VAX series computers running VMS 5.1 or later. This program requires the TELL-A-GRAF graphics package in order to generate plots of system data. A FORTRAN compiler is required. The standard distribution medium for VAXCMS is a 9-track 1600 BPI magnetic tape in DEC VAX BACKUP format. It is also available on a TK50 tape cartridge in DEC VAX BACKUP format. An electronic copy of the documentation in ASCII format is included on the distribution medium. Portions of this code are copyrighted by Mr. David Lavery and are distributed with his permission. These portions

  19. Sustainable utility business continuity planning: a primer, an overview and a proven culture-based approach

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, Edward M.

    2008-12-15

    Treat the creation of a robust business continuity planning program, its continuous improvement, and the ongoing activities that support preparedness as an exercise in change management. Obtain executive sponsorship, use it only to initiate dialogue, and then seek to engage the entire workforce. (author)

  20. Functional Systems and Culturally-Determined Cognitive Differences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiseman, Richard L.

    Noting that one means of better understanding the nature of cultural differences is to elucidate the cognitive differences between members of differing cultures, this paper examines Alexander Luria's sociohistorical theory of functional cognitive systems. The paper first describes Luria's notion of functional systems, the crux of which postulates…

  1. Fermentation and growth response of a primary poultry isolate of Salmonella typhimurium grown under strict anaerobic conditions in continuous culture and amino acid-limited batch culture.

    PubMed

    Maciorowski, K G; Nisbet, D J; Ha, S D; Corrier, D E; DeLoach, J R; Ricke, S C

    1997-01-01

    Salmonella typhimurium is a significant hazard to consumer health that is carried asymptomatically in poultry gastrointestinal tracts. Nurmi cultures may prevent Salmonella colonization in young chicks, but the mechanism of competitive exclusion is unclear. Modeling Salmonella's metabolism in pure culture may allow for greater definition in choosing strains for Nurmi cultures. The growth rates and affinity constants of S. typhimurium growing in amino acid-limited conditions were determined in batch culture and compared to primary poultry isolates of cecal strains. Serine and NH4Cl were the best N sources for growth of all organisms tested in this study. The fermentation response of S. typhimurium was also monitored in continuous culture at a slow dilution rate of 0.021 h-1. S. typhimurium was found to adapt to VL media, with trends in protein disappearance, Yglucose, and Yprotein. This may show that amino acid or protein concentrations may be an integral component of the initial establishment of S. typhimurium in the cecum.

  2. Use of a Fiber Optic Probe for Spectral Measurements and the Continuous Recording of the Turbidity of Growing Microbial Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Robrish, S. A.; LeRoy, A. F.; Chassy, B. M.; Wilson, J. J.; Krichevsky, M. I.

    1971-01-01

    This paper describes the properties and use of a fiber optic probe as an attachment to a spectrophotometer and its use for measurements in solutions and turbid suspensions. Measurements of a standard were identical when a spectrophotometer equipped with the probe was used or when a spectrophotometer was used in a conventional manner. The probe was calibrated for turbidimetric measurements with microorganisms by relating the apparent absorbancy measured on the spectrophotometer to the dry weight of each species of organism. Continuous measurements were made of the turbidity of growing cultures of Escherichia coli, Streptococcus mutans, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Transient changes in cell mass were observed in some cultures during continuous monitoring of growth. The data were recovered in a manner which allowed direct computer processing. Images PMID:4927404

  3. High yield single stage conversion of glucose to hydrogen by photofermentation with continuous cultures of Rhodobacter capsulatus JP91.

    PubMed

    Abo-Hashesh, Mona; Desaunay, Nicolas; Hallenbeck, Patrick C

    2013-01-01

    Photofermentative hydrogen (H(2)) production from glucose with the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus JP91 (hup(-)) was examined using a photobioreactor operated in continuous mode. Stable and high hydrogen yields on glucose were obtained at three different retention times (HRTs; 24, 48 and 72 h). The H(2) production rates, varying between 0.57 and 0.81 mmol/h, and optical densities (OD(600 nm)) were similar for the different HRTs examined. However, the rate of glucose consumption was influenced by HRT being greater at HRT 24h than HRTs 48 and 72 h. The highest hydrogen yield, 9.0 ± 1.2 mol H(2)/mol glucose, was obtained at 48 h HRT. These results show that single stage photofermentative hydrogen production from glucose using photobioreactors operated in continuous culture mode gives high, nearly stoichiometric yields of hydrogen from glucose, and thus is considerably more promising than either two stage photofermentation or co-culture approaches.

  4. Effects of BioChlor and Fermenten on microbial protein synthesis in continuous culture fermenters.

    PubMed

    Lean, I J; Webster, T K Miller; Hoover, W; Chalupa, W; Sniffen, C J; Evans, E; Block, E; Rabiee, A R

    2005-07-01

    Meta analysis models were constructed from a data-set of 15 continuous culture fermenter trials and 118 observations on studies with either BioChlor (n = 23 observations) or Fermenten (n = 95) included at 10 and 3%, respectively, of dietary dry matter (DM) to evaluate effects of the ingredients BioChlor and Fermenten (B/F) on rumen function. Digestibility of crude protein was significantly increased by 11% with B/F treatment. This was reflected in significant increases in digestibility of DM and organic matter (OM) by 3.6 and 7.9%, respectively. Increased amounts of sugar in the diet in the presence of B/F tended to reduce digestibility of non-structural carbohydrates (NSC); however, the net effect on NSC digestion was small. There was no effect of treatment on most individual volatile fatty acids (VFA) or total VFA production. Propionate production, however, was significantly reduced in treated fermenters. The main effect of B/F as well as of starch and soluble fiber when combined with the treatment was to increase propionate production; however, the interaction between B/F treatment and sugar decreased propionate production markedly, resulting in a net decrease. The acetate-to-propionate ratio increased by 6% with B/F, largely as a result of the decrease in propionate. Production of nonammonia nitrogen was 1% less in B/F-treated fermenters, and interactions between treatment and starch, sugar, or soluble fiber were significant. Treated fermenters produced 15.7% more microbial nitrogen, in association with a significant 37% increase in rumen protein digestion. Interactions between treatment and starch, soluble fiber, or sugar influenced these results. The interaction of B/F and sugar resulted in a decrease in undegradable protein N and an increase in microbial nitrogen production. Ammonia nitrogen concentrations were increased by 24.6% in treated fermenters. Efficiency of microbial nitrogen production from DM, OM, or carbohydrate was significantly increased by B

  5. Comparative analysis of Micrococcus luteus isolates from blood cultures of patients with pulmonary hypertension receiving epoprostenol continuous infusion.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Yoshinori; Sata, Makoto; Makiuchi, Yuko; Morikane, Keita; Wada, Akihito; Okabe, Nobuhiko; Tomoike, Hitonobu

    2009-12-01

    During the period 2002-2008, at the National Cardiovascular Center, Osaka, 28 Micrococcus luteus isolates and one Kocuria spp. isolate were obtained from blood cultures of pulmonary hypertension (PH) patients who were receiving continuous infusion therapy with epoprostenol. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis patterns of the isolates were unrelated, suggesting that the infections had multiple origins. The preparation of epoprostenol solution by patients themselves was thought to be a risk factor.

  6. Organizing the Baby Boomer Construct: An Exploration of Marketing, Social Systems, and Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipschultz, Jeremy H.; Hilt, Michael L.; Reilly, Hugh J.

    2007-01-01

    Baby boomer trends are applied in the development of a conceptual framework that offers a social systems and cultural model for future studies. While there has been considerable recent attention paid to baby boomers, the studies lack a coherent theoretical base that would allow for more advanced and continuing research. Aging baby boomers heading…

  7. Organizing the Baby Boomer Construct: An Exploration of Marketing, Social Systems, and Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipschultz, Jeremy H.; Hilt, Michael L.; Reilly, Hugh J.

    2007-01-01

    Baby boomer trends are applied in the development of a conceptual framework that offers a social systems and cultural model for future studies. While there has been considerable recent attention paid to baby boomers, the studies lack a coherent theoretical base that would allow for more advanced and continuing research. Aging baby boomers heading…

  8. Stock culture heterogeneity rather than new mutational variation complicates short-term cell physiology studies of Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655 in continuous culture.

    PubMed

    Nahku, Ranno; Peebo, Karl; Valgepea, Kaspar; Barrick, Jeffrey E; Adamberg, Kaarel; Vilu, Raivo

    2011-09-01

    Nutrient-limited continuous cultures in chemostats have been used to study microbial cell physiology for over 60 years. Genome instability and genetic heterogeneity are possible uncontrolled factors in continuous cultivation experiments. We investigated these issues by using high-throughput (HT) DNA sequencing to characterize samples from different phases of a glucose-limited accelerostat (A-stat) experiment with Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655 and a duration regularly used in cell physiology studies (20 generations of continuous cultivation). Seven consensus mutations from the reference sequence and five subpopulations characterized by different mutations were detected in the HT-sequenced samples. This genetic heterogeneity was confirmed to result from the stock culture by Sanger sequencing. All the subpopulations in which allele frequencies increased (betA, cspG/cspH, glyA) during the experiment were also present at the end of replicate A-stats, indicating that no new subpopulations emerged during our experiments. The fact that ~31 % of the cells in our initial cultures obtained directly from a culture stock centre were mutants raises concerns that even if cultivations are started from single colonies, there is a significant chance of picking a mutant clone with an altered phenotype. Our results show that current HT DNA sequencing technology allows accurate subpopulation analysis and demonstrates that a glucose-limited E. coli K-12 MG1655 A-stat experiment with a duration of tens of generations is suitable for studying cell physiology and collecting quantitative data for metabolic modelling without interference from new mutations.

  9. Diverse drug-resistant subpopulations of Mycobacterium tuberculosis are sustained in continuous culture

    PubMed Central

    Hendon-Dunn, Charlotte; Bacon, Joanna; Colijn, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Drug resistance to tuberculosis (TB) has become more widespread over the past decade. As such, understanding the emergence and fitness of antibiotic-resistant subpopulations is crucial for the development of new interventions. Here we use a simple mathematical model to explain the differences in the response to isoniazid (INH) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis cells cultured under two growth rates in a chemostat. We obtain posterior distributions of model parameters consistent with data using a Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method. We explore the dynamics of diverse INH-resistant subpopulations consistent with these data in a multi-population model. We find that the simple model captures the qualitative behaviour of the cultures under both dilution rates and also present testable predictions about how diversity is maintained in such cultures. PMID:27807274

  10. Testing plasmid stability of Escherichia coli using the Continuously Operated Shaken BIOreactor System.

    PubMed

    Sieben, Michaela; Steinhorn, Gregor; Müller, Carsten; Fuchs, Simone; Ann Chin, Laura; Regestein, Lars; Büchs, Jochen

    2016-11-01

    Plasmids are common vectors to genetically manipulate Escherichia coli or other microorganisms. They are easy to use and considerable experience has accumulated on their application in heterologous protein production. However, plasmids can be lost during cell growth, if no selection pressure like, e.g., antibiotics is used, hampering the production of the desired protein and endangering the economic success of a biotechnological production process. Thus, in this study the Continuously Operated Shaken BIOreactor System (COSBIOS) is applied as a tool for fast parallel testing of strain stability and operation conditions and to evaluate measures to counter such plasmid loss. In specific, by applying various ampicillin concentrations, the lowest effective ampicillin dosage is investigated to secure plasmid stability while lowering adverse ecological effects. A significant difference was found in the growth rates of plasmid-bearing and plasmid-free cells. The undesired plasmid-free cells grew 30% faster than the desired plasmid-bearing cells. During the testing of plasmid stability without antibiotics, the population fraction of plasmid-bearing cells rapidly decreased in continuous culture to zero within the first 48 h. An initial single dosage of ampicillin did not prevent plasmid loss. By contrast, a continuous application of a low dosage of 10 µg/mL ampicillin in the feed medium maintained plasmid stability in the culture. Consequently, the COSBIOS is an apt reactor system for measuring plasmid stability and evaluating methods to enhance this stability. Hence, decreased production of heterologous protein can be prevented. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:1418-1425, 2016.

  11. Effective enrichment of cholangiocarcinoma secretomes using the hollow fiber bioreactor culture system.

    PubMed

    Weeraphan, Churat; Diskul-Na-Ayudthaya, Penchatr; Chiablaem, Khajeelak; Khongmanee, Amnart; Chokchaichamnankit, Daranee; Subhasitanont, Pantipa; Svasti, Jisnuson; Srisomsap, Chantragan

    2012-09-15

    The Northeastern region of Thailand is well known to have high incidence of bile duct cancer known as cholangiocarcinoma. So there is a continued need to improve diagnosis and treatment, and discovery of biomarkers for early detection of bile duct cancer should greatly improve treatment outcome for these patients. The secretome, a collection of proteins secreted from cells, is a useful source for identifying circulating biomarkers in blood secreted from cancer cells. Here a Hollow Fiber Bioreactor culture system was used for enrichment of cholangiocarcinoma secretomes, since this culture system mimics the dense three-dimensional microenvironment of the tumor found in vivo. Two-dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis using a sensitive Fluor saturation dye staining, followed by LC/MS/MS, was used to compare protein expression in the secretomes of cells cultured in the Hollow Fiber system and cells cultured in the monolayer culture system. For the first time, the 2D-patterns of cholangiocarcinoma secretomes from the two culture systems could be compared. The Hollow Fiber system improved the quality and quantity of cholangiocarcinoma secreted proteins compared to conventional monolayer system, showing less interference by cytoplasmic proteins and yielding more secreted proteins. Overall, 75 spots were analyzed by LC/MS/MS and 106 secreted proteins were identified. Two novel secreted proteins (C19orf10 and cystatin B) were found only in the Hollow Fiber system and were absent from the traditional monolayer culture system. Among the highly expressed proteins, 22 secreted soluble proteins were enriched by 5 fold in Hollow Fiber system compared to monolayer culture system. The Hollow Fiber system is therefore useful for preparing a wide range of proteins from low-abundance cell secretomes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Design and Implementation of an Automated Illuminating, Culturing, and Sampling System for Microbial Optogenetic Applications.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Cameron J; McClean, Megan N

    2017-02-19

    Optogenetic systems utilize genetically-encoded proteins that change conformation in response to specific wavelengths of light to alter cellular processes. There is a need for culturing and measuring systems that incorporate programmed illumination and stimulation of optogenetic systems. We present a protocol for building and using a continuous culturing apparatus to illuminate microbial cells with programmed doses of light, and automatically acquire and analyze images of cells in the effluent. The operation of this apparatus as a chemostat allows the growth rate and the cellular environment to be tightly controlled. The effluent of the continuous cell culture is regularly sampled and the cells are imaged by multi-channel microscopy. The culturing, sampling, imaging, and image analysis are fully automated so that dynamic responses in the fluorescence intensity and cellular morphology of cells sampled from the culture effluent are measured over multiple days without user input. We demonstrate the utility of this culturing apparatus by dynamically inducing protein production in a strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae engineered with an optogenetic system that activates transcription.

  13. Evaluation of the BD BACTEC FX blood volume monitoring system as a continuous quality improvement measure.

    PubMed

    Coorevits, L; Van den Abeele, A-M

    2015-07-01

    The yield of blood cultures is proportional to the volume of blood cultured. We evaluated an automatic blood volume monitoring system, recently developed by Becton Dickinson within its BACTEC EpiCenter module, that calculates mean volumes of negative aerobic bottles and generates boxplots and histograms. First, we evaluated the filling degree of 339 aerobic glass blood cultures by calculating the weight-based volume for each bottle. A substantial amount of the bottles (48.3%) were inadequately filled. Evaluation of the accuracy of the monitoring system showed a mean bias of -1.4 mL (-15.4%). Additional evaluation, using the amended software on 287 aerobic blood culture bottles, resulted in an acceptable mean deviation of -0.3 mL (-3.3%). The new software version was also tested on 200 of the recently introduced plastic bottles, which will replace the glass bottles in the near future, showing a mean deviation of +2.8 mL (+26.7%). In conclusion, the mean calculated volumes can be used for the training of a single phlebotomist. However, filling problems appear to be masked when using them for phlebotomist groups or on wards. Here, visual interpretation of boxplots and histograms can serve as a useful tool to observe the spread of the filling degrees and to develop a continuous improvement program. Re-adjustment of the software has proven to be necessary for use with plastic bottles. Due to our findings, BD has developed further adjustments to the software for validated use with plastic bottles, which will be released soon.

  14. Effect of air supplement on the performance of continuous ethanol fermentation system.

    PubMed

    Ryu, D D; Kim, Y J; Kim, J H

    1984-01-01

    For the purpose of improving ethanol productivity, the effect of air supplement on the performance of continuous ethanol fermentation system was studied. The effect of oxygen supplement on yeast concentration, cell yield, cell viability, extracellular ethanol concentration, ethanol yield, maintenance coefficient, specific rates of glucose assimilation, ethanol production, and ethanol productivity have been evaluated, using a high alcohol tolerant Saccharomyces cerevisiae STV89 strain and employing a continuous fermentor equipped with an accurate air metering system in the flow rate range 0-11 mL air/L/h. It was found that, when a small amount of oxygen up to about 80mu mol oxygen/L/h was supplied, the ethanol productivity was significantly enhanced as compared to the productivity of the culture without any air supplement. It was also found that the oxygen supplement improved cell viability considerably as well as the ethanol tolerance level of yeast. As the air supply rate was increased, from 0 to 11 mL air/L/h while maintaining a constant dilution rate at about 0.06 h(-1), the cell concentration increased from 2.3 to 8.2 g/L and the ethanol productivity increased from 1.7 to 4.1 g ethanol/L/h, although the specific ethanol production rate decreased slightly from 0.75 to 0.5 g ethanol/g cell/h. The ethanol yield was slightly improved also with an increase in air supply rate, from about 0.37 to 0.45 ethanol/g glucose. The maintenance coefficient increased by only a small amount with the air supplement. This kind of air supplement technique may very well prove to be of practical importance to a development of a highly productive ethanol fermentation process system especially as a combined system with a high density cell culture technique.

  15. Microfluidic mass production system for hydrogel microtubes for microbial culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, Kazuma; Higashi, Kazuhiko; Onoe, Hiroaki; Miki, Norihisa

    2017-06-01

    In this study, we characterize the formation of hydrogel microtubes for microbial culture formed using a mass production system. We demonstrated microbial culture using hydrogel microtubes, which can protect the target microorganism inside from competitive microorganisms outside while they allow oxygen, nutrition, and byproducts to diffuse through. The hydrogel microtubes can be produced using a microfluidic device, but the scale-up of microtube production is crucial for practical applications. We propose and develop a fluidic system that can produce multiple microtubes in parallel. We experimentally characterized the microtube formation using the device and demonstrated microbial culture in the microtubes. Tube thickness was found to be a critical parameter for the culture.

  16. Effect of Growth Rate and Glucose Concentration on the Biochemical Properties of Streptococcus mutans Ingbritt in Continuous Culture

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, I. R.; Phipps, P. J.; Ellwood, D. C.

    1979-01-01

    A comparison was made of the properties of Streptococcus mutans Ingbritt grown in continuous culture under conditions of excess glucose (nitrogen limitation) and limiting glucose at mean generation times of 1.7 to 14 h. Only low levels of glucoamylase-specific glycogen were formed in cells from either culture, and the total carbohydrate content of the cells under excess glucose was only at most 1.6-fold higher than in the glucose-limited culture. A negligible amount of cell-free polysaccharide was formed in either culture, although a significant level of glucosyltransferase activity was observed in both, with the highest activity at D = 0.2 and 0.4 h-1 with a glucose limitation. Other differences were observed. (i) Lactate was the main end product of the glucose-excess culture, whereas acetate, formate, and ethanol were the main products of the glucose-limited culture except at a mean generation time of 1.5, when lactate represented 30% of the products. (ii) The yield (in grams per mole of glucose) of the latter culture was 2.6- to 4.0- fold higher than the yield of the glucose-excess culture. (iii) Washed cells from the glucose-limited culture were much more acidogenic (1.7- to 6.2-fold) than the glucose-excess cells when incubated with glucose, sucrose, and fructose. Endogenous glycolytic activity by the latter cells was significant, being 31 to 92% of the exogenous glucose rate at the four dilution rates. (iv) Cells from the glucose-excess culture were more insensitive to fluoride than cells from the glucose-limited culture. The NaF 50% inhibition dose values for the effect of fluoride on the metabolism of glucose, sucrose, and fructose were calculated for the four dilution rates at four pH values. This analysis indicated that rapidly metabolizing cells were more sensitive to fluoride than cells that metabolized the sugars more slowly. PMID:43291

  17. Shear sensitivity of hybridoma cells in batch, fed-batch, and continuous cultures.

    PubMed

    Petersen, J F; McIntire, L V; Papoutsakis, E T

    1990-01-01

    Previously, we observed that CRL-8018 hybridoma cells were more sensitive to well-defined viscometric shear during the lag and stationary phases than during the exponential phase of batch cultures. Some potential hypotheses for explaining the increase in shear sensitivity are (1) nutrient limitations that result in a decrease in production of specific cellular components responsible for the mechanical strength of the cell, (2) nutrient limitations that lead to synchronization of the culture in a cell cycle phase that is more sensitive to shear, or (3) a link between cell growth and shear sensitivity, such that slowly growing cells are more sensitive to shear. Here, the duration of the exponential phase was increased with use of fed-batch, and the effect on shear sensitivity of the cultures was measured with a viscometric technique. Extension of exponential growth resulted in an increased period during which the cells were insensitive to shear. Additionally, the shear sensitivity of the cells was constant over a wide range of growth rates and metabolic yields in chemostat cultures. These observations suggest that as long as the cells are actively (exponentially) growing, their shear sensitivity does not depend on the growth rate or metabolic state of the cell as expressed by metabolic yields. Thus, hypothesis 3 above can be dismissed.

  18. Education, Democracy, and Cultural Pluralism: Continuing Higher Education in an Age of Diversity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moe, John F.

    1990-01-01

    Commonalities between the late nineteenth- and late twentieth-century U.S. society emphasize the idea of diversity as the basis of unity. Programs to encourage minority adult participation in education must address the serious problems of immigrants and minorities while respecting cultural identity. (36 references) (SK)

  19. How to Continue the Beauty of Traditional Architecture of Dong Village ------the exploration of cultural protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Fan; Xiaohua, Zhu

    Based on architectural culture of ethnic minority and folk customs, keep multiple characteristics of traditional architecture, inject new connotation, meet people's new demand of living condition. Explore a feasible approach to inherit traditional dwellings and diversify architecture. Ensure the healthy development of traditional architecture.

  20. Rapid DNA, RNA and protein extraction protocols optimized for slow continuously growing yeast cultures.

    PubMed

    Sasidharan, Kalesh; Amariei, Cornelia; Tomita, Masaru; Murray, Douglas B

    2012-08-01

    Conventional extraction protocols for yeast have been developed for relatively rapid-growing low cell density cultures of laboratory strains and often do not have the integrity for frequent sampling of cultures. Therefore, these protocols are usually inefficient for cultures under slow growth conditions or of non-laboratory strains. We have developed a combined mechanical and chemical disruption procedure using vigorous bead-beating that can consistently disrupt yeast cells (> 95%), irrespective of cell cycle and metabolic state. Using this disruption technique coupled with quenching, we have developed DNA, RNA and protein extraction protocols that are optimized for a large number of samples from slow-growing high-density industrial yeast cultures. Additionally, sample volume, the use of expensive reagents/enzymes, handling times and incubations were minimized. We have tested the reproducibility of our methods using triplicate/time-series extractions and compared these with commonly used protocols or commercially available kits. Moreover, we utilized a simple flow-cytometric approach to estimate the mitochondrial DNA copy number. Based on the results, our methods have shown higher reproducibility, yield and quality. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Foundations Symposium: A Continued Dialogue on Critical Theory, Cultural Analysis, and Ethical Aspects of the Field.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Jane; And Others

    Seven articles are presented from a symposium on critical theory, cultural analysis, and the ethical aspects of the use of educational technology. Two papers deal with the educational philosophy of two modern thinkers, and others focus on educational technology in the modern or postmodern era. The following papers are included: (1) "Foucault…

  2. Feeder-independent continuous culture of the PICM-19 pig liver stem cell line

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The PICM-19 pig liver stem cell line is a bipotent cell line, i.e., capable of forming either bile ductules or hepatocyte monolayers in vitro, that was derived from the primary culture of pig embryonic stem cells. The cell line has been strictly feeder-dependent in that cell replication morphology,...

  3. Energetics and kinetics of maltose transport in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: a continuous culture study.

    PubMed Central

    Weusthuis, R A; Adams, H; Scheffers, W A; van Dijken, J P

    1993-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, maltose is transported by a proton symport mechanism, whereas glucose transport occurs via facilitated diffusion. The energy requirement for maltose transport was evaluated with a metabolic model based on an experimental value of YATP for growth on glucose and an ATP requirement for maltose transport of 1 mol.mol-1. The predictions of the model were verified experimentally with anaerobic, sugar-limited chemostat cultures growing on a range of maltose-glucose mixtures at a fixed dilution rate of 0.1 h-1. The biomass yield (grams of cells.gram of sugar-1) decreased linearly with increasing amounts of maltose in the mixture. The yield was 25% lower during growth on maltose than during that on glucose, in agreement with the model predictions. During sugar-limited growth, the residual concentrations of maltose and glucose in the culture increased in proportion to their relative concentrations in the medium feed. From the residual maltose concentration, the in situ rates of maltose consumption by cultures, and the Km of the maltose carrier for maltose, it was calculated that the amount of this carrier was proportional to the in situ maltose consumption rate. This was also found for the amount of intracellular maltose. These two maltose-specific enzymes therefore exert high control over the maltose flux in S. cerevisiae in anaerobic, sugar-limited, steady-state cultures. Images PMID:8215379

  4. Cell yields and fermentation responses of a Salmonella Typhimurium poultry isolate at different dilution rates in an anaerobic steady state continuous culture

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objectives of these studies were to determine cell yield and fermentation responses of a Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium poultry isolate using various dilution rates in steady state continuous culture incubations. S. enterica Typhimurium cells were propagated in continuous cultures with ...

  5. Biona-C Cell Culture pH Monitoring System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedericks, C.

    1999-01-01

    Sensors 2000! is developing a system to demonstrate the ability to perform accurate, real-time measurements of pH and CO2 in a cell culture media in Space. The BIONA-C Cell Culture pH Monitoring System consists of S2K! developed ion selective sensors and control electronics integrated with the fluidics of a cell culture system. The integrated system comprises a "rail" in the Cell Culture Module (CCM) of WRAIR (Space Biosciences of Walter Read Army Institute of Research). The CCM is a Space Shuttle mid-deck locker experiment payload. The BIONA-C is displayed along with associated graphics and text explanations. The presentation will stimulate interest in development of sensor technology for real-time cell culture measurements. The transfer of this technology to other applications will also be of interest. Additional information is contained in the original document.

  6. Biona-C Cell Culture pH Monitoring System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedericks, C.

    1999-01-01

    Sensors 2000! is developing a system to demonstrate the ability to perform accurate, real-time measurements of pH and CO2 in a cell culture media in Space. The BIONA-C Cell Culture pH Monitoring System consists of S2K! developed ion selective sensors and control electronics integrated with the fluidics of a cell culture system. The integrated system comprises a "rail" in the Cell Culture Module (CCM) of WRAIR (Space Biosciences of Walter Read Army Institute of Research). The CCM is a Space Shuttle mid-deck locker experiment payload. The BIONA-C is displayed along with associated graphics and text explanations. The presentation will stimulate interest in development of sensor technology for real-time cell culture measurements. The transfer of this technology to other applications will also be of interest. Additional information is contained in the original document.

  7. Bell's theorems without inequalities for continuous variable systems and even-dimensional systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Lin-mei; Li, Cheng-zu

    2003-10-01

    Bell's theorems without inequalities for continuous variable systems and for even-dimensional systems are shown in this Letter. This Letter was mainly sparked by Cabello's work [Phys. Rev. Lett. 87 (2001) 010403] and Chen et al. work [Phys. Rev. Lett. 88 (2002) 040406].

  8. Optimization of culture medium for the continuous cultivation of the microalga Haematococcus pluvialis.

    PubMed

    Fábregas, J; Domínguez, A; Regueiro, M; Maseda, A; Otero, A

    2000-05-01

    The freshwater microalga Haematococcus pluvialis is one of the best microbial sources of the carotenoid astaxanthin, but this microalga shows low growth rates and low final cell densities when cultured with traditional media. A single-variable optimization strategy was applied to 18 components of the culture media in order to maximize the productivity of vegetative cells of H. pluvialis in semicontinuous culture. The steady-state cell density obtained with the optimized culture medium at a daily volume exchange of 20% was 3.77 x 10(5) cells ml(-1), three times higher than the cell density obtained with Bold basal medium and with the initial formulation. The formulation of the optimal Haematococcus medium (OHM) is (in g l(-1)) KNO3 0.41, Na2HPO4 0.03, MgSO4 x 7H2O 0.246, CaCl2 x 2H2O 0.11, (in mg l(-1)) Fe(III)citrate x H2O 2.62, CoCl2 x 6H2O 0.011, CuSO4 x 5H2O 0.012, Cr2O3 0.075, MnCl2 x 4H2O 0.98, Na2MoO4 x 2H2O 0.12, SeO2 0.005 and (in microg l(-1)]) biotin 25, thiamine 17.5 and B12 15. Vanadium, iodine, boron and zinc were demonstrated to be non-essential for the growth of H. pluvialis. Higher steady-state cell densities were obtained by a three-fold increase of all nutrient concentrations but a high nitrate concentration remained in the culture medium under such conditions. The high cell productivities obtained with the new optimized medium can serve as a basis for the development of a two-stage technology for the production of astaxanthin from H. pluvialis.

  9. Efficient polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) accumulation by a new continuous feeding mode in three-stage mixed microbial culture (MMC) PHA production process.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhiqiang; Huang, Long; Wen, Qinxue; Guo, Zirui

    2015-09-10

    A new continuous feeding mode was developed to optimize the polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) accumulation step in the three-stage PHAs production process by mixed microbial cultures (MMCs) using mixed volatile fatty acids (VFAs) as substrate. The continuous feeding assays under low biomass loading rate (BLR) (in the range of 3.5-5.5Cmol VFA/Cmol X/d) can be directly fed with feedstock with pH from 5.0 to 10.0 without any pH regulation. The maximum intracellular PHA content of 70.4% and system PHA yield (YPHA/S(sys)) of 0.81Cmol PHA/Cmol VFA were achieved under the continuous feeding mode at BLR of 3.86Cmol VFA/Cmol X/d when directly fed with substrate at pH 5. These values were higher than those under the pulse wise feeding mode with the same substrate and active biomass concentration. The results indicated that a self-balanced pH state was formed in the continuous feeding system. Further studies on the reaction pH and kinetics of the MMCs in the continuous feeding reactor were conducted to understand the pH variation mechanism and accumulation process. The optimal BLR to get high PHA content and YPHA/S(sys) was 3.5-5.5Cmol VFA/Cmol X/d. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of culture residence time on substrate uptake and storage by a pure culture of Thiothrix (CT3 strain) under continuous or batch feeding.

    PubMed

    Valentino, Francesco; Beccari, Mario; Villano, Marianna; Tandoi, Valter; Majone, Mauro

    2017-05-25

    A pure culture of the filamentous bacterium Thiothrix, strain CT3, was aerobically cultured in a chemostat under continuous acetate feeding at three different culture residence times (RT 6, 12 or 22 d) and the same volumetric organic load rate (OLR 0.12gCOD/L/d). Cells cultured at decreasing RT in the chemostat had an increasing transient response to acetate spikes in batch tests. The maximum specific acetate removal rate increased from 25 to 185mgCOD/gCOD/h, corresponding to a 1.8 to 8.1 fold higher respective steady-state rate in the chemostat. The transient response was mainly due to acetate storage in the form of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB), whereas no growth response was observed at any RT. Interestingly, even though the storage rate also decreased as the RT increased, the storage yield increased from 0.41 to 0.50 COD/COD. This finding does not support the traditional view that storage plays a more important role as the transient response increases. The transient response of the steady-state cells was much lower than in cells cultured under periodic feeding (at 6 d RT, from 82 to 247mgCOD/gCOD/h), with the latter cells showing both storage and growth responses. On the other hand, even though steady-state cells had no growth response and their storage rate was also less, steady-state cells showed a higher storage yield than cells cultured under dynamic feeding. This suggests that in Thiothrix strain CT3, the growth response is triggered by periodic feeding, whereas the storage response is a constitutive mechanism, independent from previous acclimation to transient conditions.

  11. Performance of Gram staining on blood cultures flagged negative by an automated blood culture system.

    PubMed

    Peretz, A; Isakovich, N; Pastukh, N; Koifman, A; Glyatman, T; Brodsky, D

    2015-08-01

    Blood is one of the most important specimens sent to a microbiology laboratory for culture. Most blood cultures are incubated for 5-7 days, except in cases where there is a suspicion of infection caused by microorganisms that proliferate slowly, or infections expressed by a small number of bacteria in the bloodstream. Therefore, at the end of incubation, misidentification of positive cultures and false-negative results are a real possibility. The aim of this work was to perform a confirmation by Gram staining of the lack of any microorganisms in blood cultures that were identified as negative by the BACTEC™ FX system at the end of incubation. All bottles defined as negative by the BACTEC FX system were Gram-stained using an automatic device and inoculated on solid growth media. In our work, 15 cultures that were defined as negative by the BACTEC FX system at the end of the incubation were found to contain microorganisms when Gram-stained. The main characteristic of most bacteria and fungi growing in the culture bottles that were defined as negative was slow growth. This finding raises a problematic issue concerning the need to perform Gram staining of all blood cultures, which could overload the routine laboratory work, especially laboratories serving large medical centers and receiving a large number of blood cultures.

  12. Evaluation of Verigene Blood Culture Test Systems for Rapid Identification of Positive Blood Cultures.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Seok; Kang, Go-Eun; Kim, Han-Sung; Kim, Hyun Soo; Song, Wonkeun; Lee, Kyu Man

    2016-01-01

    The performance of molecular tests using the Verigene Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Blood Culture nucleic acid tests (BC-GP and BC-GN, resp.; Naosphere, Northbrook, IL, USA) was evaluated for the identification of microorganisms detected from blood cultures. Ninety-nine blood cultures containing Gram-positive bacteria and 150 containing Gram-negative bacteria were analyzed using the BC-GP and BC-GN assays, respectively. Blood cultures were performed using the Bactec blood culture system (BD Diagnostic Systems, Franklin Lakes, NJ, USA) and conventional identification and antibiotic-susceptibility tests were performed using a MicroScan system (Siemens, West Sacramento, CA, USA). When a single strain of bacteria was isolated from the blood culture, Verigene assays correctly identified 97.9% (94/96) of Gram-positive bacteria and 93.8% (137/146) of Gram-negative bacteria. Resistance genes mecA and vanA were correctly detected by the BC-GP assay, while the extended-spectrum β-lactamase CTX-M and the carbapenemase OXA resistance gene were detected from 30 cases cultures by the BC-GN assay. The BC-GP and BC-GN assays showed high agreement with conventional identification and susceptibility tests. These tests are useful for rapid identification of microorganisms and the detection of clinically important resistance genes from positive Bactec blood cultures.

  13. Cultural Development through Human Resource Systems Integration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albert, Michael

    1985-01-01

    Discusses the framework for developing a cultural human resources management (HRM) perspective. Central to this framework is modifying HRM programs to reinforce the organization's preferred practices. Modification occurs through selection, orientation, training and development, performance appraisal, career development, and compensation and…

  14. An on-chip system to monitor the pH of cell culture media.

    PubMed

    Shah, Sahil; Arafa, Hany; Blain Christen, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    We presents an ion sensitive field effect transistor to measure the pH of the cell culture media of human mammary adenocarcinoma (SKBR3). We use a drift mitigation technique that cycles the transistor to reset the drift in the system. We use to technique in the system to demonstrate an integrated system to monitor the pH continuously. As a part of the system a pulse width modulation circuit is designed in a 0.5 μm CMOS process which cycles the vertical electric field of the ion sensitive field effect transistor to reset the threshold voltage drift. We demonstrate the viability of a complete integrated system implementing our drift mitigation technique to monitor cultured cells. The integration is important in this application to allow for autonomous operation inside an incubator during cell culture.

  15. Continuous renal replacement therapy for congestive heart failure: the wearable continuous ultrafiltration system.

    PubMed

    Gura, Victor; Beizai, Masoud; Ezon, Carlos; Rambod, Edmond

    2006-01-01

    Ultrafiltration is effective in the treatment of fluid and sodium overload in congestive heart failure. There is no available device to provide this therapy to ambulatory patients. We built and tested in vivo a wearable belt that can provide continuous ultrafiltration, 168 hours a week. Nine pigs underwent ureteral ligation and subsequently were allowed fluids ad lib, producing fluid overload. Next day, ultrafiltration was performed for 8 hours. The device consists of a hollow-fiber filter, a 9 V battery-operated pulsatile blood pump, a micro pump for heparin infusion, and another micro pump to control ultrafiltration rate. Blood flow was 65 ml/min and the weight of the device is less than 2.5 lb. Fluid removal rate ranged from 0 to 700 ml/h and averaged 106 ml/h. Salt removed was 7.6 g. No complications were observed. The potential impact on the quality of life of these patients by reducing the shortness of breath, leg swelling, and returning their ability to enjoy salt in their food might be significant, and a reduction in morbidity could be expected. The economic impact in reducing hospital admissions and length of stay, intensive care unit utilization, and drug consumption could be significant. Further studies are needed to compare this innovative approach with traditional drug-based therapy.

  16. Adapting cultural mixture modeling for continuous measures of knowledge and memory fluency.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yin-Yin Sarah; Mueller, Shane T

    2016-09-01

    Previous research (e.g., cultural consensus theory (Romney, Weller, & Batchelder, American Anthropologist, 88, 313-338, 1986); cultural mixture modeling (Mueller & Veinott, 2008)) has used overt response patterns (i.e., responses to questionnaires and surveys) to identify whether a group shares a single coherent attitude or belief set. Yet many domains in social science have focused on implicit attitudes that are not apparent in overt responses but still may be detected via response time patterns. We propose a method for modeling response times as a mixture of Gaussians, adapting the strong-consensus model of cultural mixture modeling to model this implicit measure of knowledge strength. We report the results of two behavioral experiments and one simulation experiment that establish the usefulness of the approach, as well as some of the boundary conditions under which distinct groups of shared agreement might be recovered, even when the group identity is not known. The results reveal that the ability to recover and identify shared-belief groups depends on (1) the level of noise in the measurement, (2) the differential signals for strong versus weak attitudes, and (3) the similarity between group attitudes. Consequently, the method shows promise for identifying latent groups among a population whose overt attitudes do not differ, but whose implicit or covert attitudes or knowledge may differ.

  17. 40 CFR 60.1740 - What is my schedule for evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... continuous emission monitoring systems? 60.1740 Section 60.1740 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems? (a) Conduct annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring systems no more than 13 months after the previous evaluation was conducted. (b) Evaluate...

  18. 40 CFR 60.1740 - What is my schedule for evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... continuous emission monitoring systems? 60.1740 Section 60.1740 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems? (a) Conduct annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring systems no more than 13 months after the previous evaluation was conducted. (b) Evaluate...

  19. 40 CFR 62.15195 - What is my schedule for evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... continuous emission monitoring systems? 62.15195 Section 62.15195 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems? (a) Conduct annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring systems no more than 13 months after the previous evaluation was conducted. (b) Evaluate...

  20. 40 CFR 60.2941 - What is my schedule for evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... continuous emission monitoring systems? 60.2941 Section 60.2941 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Monitoring § 60.2941 What is my schedule for evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems? (a) Conduct annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring systems no more than 12 months after...

  1. 40 CFR 62.15195 - What is my schedule for evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... continuous emission monitoring systems? 62.15195 Section 62.15195 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems? (a) Conduct annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring systems no more than 13 months after the previous evaluation was conducted. (b) Evaluate...

  2. 40 CFR 60.2939 - What continuous emission monitoring systems must I install?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... § 60.2939 What continuous emission monitoring systems must I install? (a) You must install, calibrate, maintain, and operate continuous emission monitoring systems for carbon monoxide and for oxygen. You must..., evaluate, and operate each continuous emission monitoring system according to the “Monitoring...

  3. 40 CFR 60.3040 - What is my schedule for evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... continuous emission monitoring systems? 60.3040 Section 60.3040 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... continuous emission monitoring systems? (a) Conduct annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring... emission monitoring systems daily and quarterly as specified in appendix F of this part....

  4. 40 CFR 60.1235 - How are the data from the continuous emission monitoring systems used?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... emission monitoring systems used? 60.1235 Section 60.1235 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Continuous Emission Monitoring § 60.1235 How are the data from the continuous emission monitoring systems used? You must use data from the continuous emission monitoring systems for sulfur dioxide,...

  5. 40 CFR 60.2939 - What continuous emission monitoring systems must I install?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... § 60.2939 What continuous emission monitoring systems must I install? (a) You must install, calibrate, maintain, and operate continuous emission monitoring systems for carbon monoxide and for oxygen. You must..., evaluate, and operate each continuous emission monitoring system according to the “Monitoring...

  6. 40 CFR 60.2941 - What is my schedule for evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... continuous emission monitoring systems? 60.2941 Section 60.2941 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Monitoring § 60.2941 What is my schedule for evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems? (a) Conduct annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring systems no more than 12 months after...

  7. 40 CFR 62.15195 - What is my schedule for evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... continuous emission monitoring systems? 62.15195 Section 62.15195 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems? (a) Conduct annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring systems no more than 13 months after the previous evaluation was conducted. (b) Evaluate...

  8. 40 CFR 60.1740 - What is my schedule for evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... continuous emission monitoring systems? 60.1740 Section 60.1740 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems? (a) Conduct annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring systems no more than 13 months after the previous evaluation was conducted. (b) Evaluate...

  9. 40 CFR 60.3040 - What is my schedule for evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... continuous emission monitoring systems? 60.3040 Section 60.3040 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... continuous emission monitoring systems? (a) Conduct annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring... emission monitoring systems daily and quarterly as specified in appendix F of this part....

  10. 40 CFR 60.1740 - What is my schedule for evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... continuous emission monitoring systems? 60.1740 Section 60.1740 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems? (a) Conduct annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring systems no more than 13 months after the previous evaluation was conducted. (b) Evaluate...

  11. 40 CFR 60.3040 - What is my schedule for evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... continuous emission monitoring systems? 60.3040 Section 60.3040 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... continuous emission monitoring systems? (a) Conduct annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring... emission monitoring systems daily and quarterly as specified in appendix F of this part....

  12. 40 CFR 62.15195 - What is my schedule for evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... continuous emission monitoring systems? 62.15195 Section 62.15195 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems? (a) Conduct annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring systems no more than 13 months after the previous evaluation was conducted. (b) Evaluate...

  13. 40 CFR 60.1235 - How are the data from the continuous emission monitoring systems used?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... emission monitoring systems used? 60.1235 Section 60.1235 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Continuous Emission Monitoring § 60.1235 How are the data from the continuous emission monitoring systems used? You must use data from the continuous emission monitoring systems for sulfur dioxide,...

  14. 40 CFR 62.15195 - What is my schedule for evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... continuous emission monitoring systems? 62.15195 Section 62.15195 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems? (a) Conduct annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring systems no more than 13 months after the previous evaluation was conducted. (b) Evaluate...

  15. 40 CFR 60.1740 - What is my schedule for evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... continuous emission monitoring systems? 60.1740 Section 60.1740 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems? (a) Conduct annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring systems no more than 13 months after the previous evaluation was conducted. (b) Evaluate...

  16. 40 CFR 60.3040 - What is my schedule for evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... continuous emission monitoring systems? 60.3040 Section 60.3040 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... continuous emission monitoring systems? (a) Conduct annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring... emission monitoring systems daily and quarterly as specified in appendix F of this part....

  17. 40 CFR 60.3040 - What is my schedule for evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... continuous emission monitoring systems? 60.3040 Section 60.3040 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... continuous emission monitoring systems? (a) Conduct annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring... emission monitoring systems daily and quarterly as specified in appendix F of this part....

  18. 40 CFR 60.1235 - How are the data from the continuous emission monitoring systems used?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... emission monitoring systems used? 60.1235 Section 60.1235 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Continuous Emission Monitoring § 60.1235 How are the data from the continuous emission monitoring systems used? You must use data from the continuous emission monitoring systems for sulfur dioxide,...

  19. Marketing to Increase Participation in a Web-Based Continuing Medical Education Cultural Competence Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Estrada, Carlos A.; Krishnamoorthy, Periyakaruppan; Smith, Ann; Staton, Lisa; Korf, Michele J.; Allison, Jeroan J.; Houston, Thomas K.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: CME providers may be interested in identifying effective marketing strategies to direct users to specific content. Online advertisements for recruiting participants into activities such as clinical trials, public health programs, and continuing medical education (CME) have been effective in some but not all studies. The purpose of…

  20. Cultural Continuity amid Social Change: Adolescents' Use of Free Time in India.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verma, Suman; Sharma, Deepali

    2003-01-01

    Used the experience sampling method to examine Indian adolescents' use of free time. Found that adolescents' free time use was influenced by both tradition and modernization, and varied according to social class, urban versus rural setting, and gender. Concluded that youth activities continue to reflect the sociocultural and historical nature of…

  1. Marketing to Increase Participation in a Web-Based Continuing Medical Education Cultural Competence Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Estrada, Carlos A.; Krishnamoorthy, Periyakaruppan; Smith, Ann; Staton, Lisa; Korf, Michele J.; Allison, Jeroan J.; Houston, Thomas K.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: CME providers may be interested in identifying effective marketing strategies to direct users to specific content. Online advertisements for recruiting participants into activities such as clinical trials, public health programs, and continuing medical education (CME) have been effective in some but not all studies. The purpose of…

  2. Cultural Continuity amid Social Change: Adolescents' Use of Free Time in India.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verma, Suman; Sharma, Deepali

    2003-01-01

    Used the experience sampling method to examine Indian adolescents' use of free time. Found that adolescents' free time use was influenced by both tradition and modernization, and varied according to social class, urban versus rural setting, and gender. Concluded that youth activities continue to reflect the sociocultural and historical nature of…

  3. The Legacies of Literacy: Continuities and Contradictions in Western Culture and Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graff, Harvey J.

    Arguing that the subject of literacy is immense and complex, this book contends that literacy is a subject with continuities and contradictions at its very core and that literacy can be understood only in its historical and societal contexts. Since the book is a critical, selective synthesis of a vast amount of research, the notes appended are…

  4. Culturally grounded indicators of resilience in social-ecological systems

    Treesearch

    Eleanor Sterling; Tamara Ticktin; Tē Kipa Kepa Morgan; Georgina Cullman; Diana Alvira; Pelika Andrade; Nadia Bergamini; Erin Betley; Kate Burrows; Sophie Caillon; Joachim Claudet; Rachel Dacks; Pablo Eyzaguirre; Chris Filardi; Nadav Gazit; Christian Giardina; Stacy Jupiter; Kealohanuiopuna Kinney; Joe McCarter; Manuel Mejia; Kanoe Morishige; Jennifer Newell; Lihla Noori; John Parks; Pua‘ala Pascua; Ashwin Ravikumar; Jamie Tanguay; Amanda Sigouin; Tina Stege; Mark Stege; Alaka Wali

    2017-01-01

    Measuring progress toward sustainability goals is a multifaceted task. International, regional, and national organizations and agencies seek to promote resilience and capacity for adaptation at local levels. However, their measurement systems may be poorly aligned with local contexts, cultures, and needs. Understanding how to build effective, culturally grounded...

  5. Physiology of fish in intensive culture systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wedemeyer, Gary

    1996-01-01

    Fish culture in hatcheries and other aquacultural facilities is becoming much more intensive all over the world. The success of all kinds of fish rearing depends on the quality of management and this depends, in turn, on understanding the biology of fishes and the aquatic environment in which they live. This book directly addresses the relationship between the aquatic environment and the fishes. An understanding of this by the reader will result in a reduction of disease outbreaks through improved management.

  6. Daily Management System of the Henry Ford Production System: QTIPS to Focus Continuous Improvements at the Level of the Work.

    PubMed

    Zarbo, Richard J; Varney, Ruan C; Copeland, Jacqueline R; D'Angelo, Rita; Sharma, Gaurav

    2015-07-01

    To support our Lean culture of continuous improvement, we implemented a daily management system designed so critical metrics of operational success were the focus of local teams to drive improvements. We innovated a standardized visual daily management board composed of metric categories of Quality, Time, Inventory, Productivity, and Safety (QTIPS); frequency trending; root cause analysis; corrective/preventive actions; and resulting process improvements. In 1 year (June 2013 to July 2014), eight laboratory sections at Henry Ford Hospital employed 64 unique daily metrics. Most assessed long-term (>6 months), monitored process stability, while short-term metrics (1-6 months) were retired after successful targeted problem resolution. Daily monitoring resulted in 42 process improvements. Daily management is the key business accountability subsystem that enabled our culture of continuous improvement to function more efficiently at the managerial level in a visible manner by reviewing and acting based on data and root cause analysis. Copyright© by the American Society for Clinical Pathology.

  7. USING ONLINE MARKETING TO INCREASE PARTICIPATION IN A WEB-BASED CONTINUING MEDICAL EDUCATION CULTURAL COMPETENCE CURRICULUM

    PubMed Central

    Estrada, Carlos A.; Krishnamoorthy, Periyakaruppan; Smith, Ann; Staton, Lisa; Korf, Michele J.; Allison, Jeroan J.; Houston, Thomas K.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction CME providers may be interested in identifying effective marketing strategies to direct users to specific content. The use of online advertisements to recruit participants for clinical trials, public health programs, and Continuing Medical Education (CME) has been shown to be effective in some but not all studies. The purpose of this study was to compare the impact of two marketing strategies in the context of an online CME cultural competence curriculum (www.c-comp.org). Methods In an interrupted time-series quasi-experimental design, two marketing strategies were tested: a) wide dissemination to relevant organizations over a period of approximately four months, and b) Internet paid search using Google Ads (five consecutive eight-week periods--control 1, cultural/ CME advertisement, control 2, hypertension/ content advertisement, control 3). Outcome measures were CME credit requests, Web traffic (visits per day, page views, pages viewed per visit), and cost. Results Overall, the site was visited 19,156 times and 78,160 pages were viewed. During the wide dissemination phase, the proportion of visits requesting CME credit decreased between the first (5.3%) and second halves (3.3%) of this phase (p= .04). During the Internet paid search phase, the proportion of visits requesting CME credit was highest during the cultural/ CME advertisement period (control 1, 1.4%; cultural/CME ad, 4.3%; control 2, 1.5%; hypertension/content ad, 0.6%; control 3, 0.8%; p<.001). All measures of Web traffic changed during the Internet paid search phase (p<.01); however, changes were independent of the advertisement periods. The incremental cost for the cultural advertisement per CME credit requested was $0.64US. Discussion Internet advertisement focusing on cultural competence and CME was associated with about a three-fold increase in requests for CME credit at an incremental cost of under $1; however, Web traffic changes were independent of the advertisement strategy. PMID

  8. Batch and continuous culture kinetics for production of carotenoids by beta-ionone-resistant mutant of Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous.

    PubMed

    Park, Ki-Moon; Song, Min-Woo; Kang, Seog-Jin; Lee, Jae-Heung

    2007-07-01

    A beta-ionone-resistant mutant strain isolated from the red yeast Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous KCTC 7704 was used for batch and continuous fermentation kinetic studies with glucose media in a 2.5-1 jar fermentor at 22 degrees C and pH 4.5. The kinetic pattern of growth and carotenoid concentration in the batch fermentations exhibited a so-called mixed-growth-associated product formation, possibly due to the fact that the content of intracellular carotenoids depends on the degree of physical maturation toward adulthood. To determine the maximum specific growth rate constant (microm) and Monod constant (k(s)) for the mutant, glucose-limited continuous culture studies were performed at different dilution rates within a range of 0.02-0.10 h(-1). A reciprocal plot of the steady-state data (viz., reciprocal of glucose concentration versus residence time) obtained from continuous culture experiments was used to estimate a microm of 0.15 h(-1) and k(s) of 1.19 g/l. The carotenoid content related to the residence time appeared to assume a typical form of saturation kinetics. The maximum carotenoid content (Xm) for the mutant was estimated to be 1.04 microg/mg dry cell weight, and the Lee constant (k(m)), which was tentatively defined in this work, was found to be 3.0 h.

  9. Kinetic and stoichiometric characterization of organoautotrophic growth of Ralstonia eutropha on formic acid in fed-batch and continuous cultures.

    PubMed

    Grunwald, Stephan; Mottet, Alexis; Grousseau, Estelle; Plassmeier, Jens K; Popović, Milan K; Uribelarrea, Jean-Louis; Gorret, Nathalie; Guillouet, Stéphane E; Sinskey, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Formic acid, acting as both carbon and energy source, is a safe alternative to a carbon dioxide, hydrogen and dioxygen mix for studying the conversion of carbon through the Calvin-Benson-Bassham (CBB) cycle into value-added chemical compounds by non-photosynthetic microorganisms. In this work, organoautotrophic growth of Ralstonia eutropha on formic acid was studied using an approach combining stoichiometric modeling and controlled cultures in bioreactors. A strain deleted of its polyhydroxyalkanoate production pathway was used in order to carry out a physiological characterization. The maximal growth yield was determined at 0.16 Cmole Cmole(-1) in a formate-limited continuous culture. The measured yield corresponded to 76% to 85% of the theoretical yield (later confirmed in pH-controlled fed-batch cultures). The stoichiometric study highlighted the imbalance between carbon and energy provided by formic acid and explained the low growth yields measured. Fed-batch cultures were also used to determine the maximum specific growth rate (μmax  = 0.18 h(-1) ) and to study the impact of increasing formic acid concentrations on growth yields. High formic acid sensitivity was found in R eutropha since a linear decrease in the biomass yield with increasing residual formic acid concentrations was observed between 0 and 1.5 g l(-1) .

  10. Kinetic and stoichiometric characterization of organoautotrophic growth of Ralstonia eutropha on formic acid in fed-batch and continuous cultures

    PubMed Central

    Grunwald, Stephan; Mottet, Alexis; Grousseau, Estelle; Plassmeier, Jens K; Popović, Milan K; Uribelarrea, Jean-Louis; Gorret, Nathalie; Guillouet, Stéphane E; Sinskey, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Formic acid, acting as both carbon and energy source, is a safe alternative to a carbon dioxide, hydrogen and dioxygen mix for studying the conversion of carbon through the Calvin–Benson–Bassham (CBB) cycle into value-added chemical compounds by non-photosynthetic microorganisms. In this work, organoautotrophic growth of Ralstonia eutropha on formic acid was studied using an approach combining stoichiometric modeling and controlled cultures in bioreactors. A strain deleted of its polyhydroxyalkanoate production pathway was used in order to carry out a physiological characterization. The maximal growth yield was determined at 0.16 Cmole Cmole−1 in a formate-limited continuous culture. The measured yield corresponded to 76% to 85% of the theoretical yield (later confirmed in pH-controlled fed-batch cultures). The stoichiometric study highlighted the imbalance between carbon and energy provided by formic acid and explained the low growth yields measured. Fed-batch cultures were also used to determine the maximum specific growth rate (μmax = 0.18 h−1) and to study the impact of increasing formic acid concentrations on growth yields. High formic acid sensitivity was found in R eutropha since a linear decrease in the biomass yield with increasing residual formic acid concentrations was observed between 0 and 1.5 g l−1. PMID:25123319

  11. Evidence of biogenic corrosion of titanium after exposure to a continuous culture of thiobacillus ferrooxidans grown in thiosulfate medium

    SciTech Connect

    Horn, J M; Martin, S I; Masterson, B

    2000-12-07

    Experiments were undertaken to evaluate extreme conditions under which candidate materials intended for use in a proposed nuclear waste repository might be susceptible to corrosion by endogenous microorganisms. Thiobucillus ferrooxidans, a sulfur-oxidizing bacterium, was grown in continuous culture using thiosulfate as an energy source; thiosulfate is oxidized to sulfate as a metabolic endproduct by this organism. Culture conditions were optimized to produce a high-density, metabolically active culture throughout a period of long term incubation in the presence of Alloy 22 (a high nickel-based alloy) and Titanium grade 7 (Tigr7) material coupons. After seven months incubation under these conditions, material coupons were withdrawn and analyzed by high resolution microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray analyses. Alloy 22 coupons showed no detectable signs of corrosion. Tigr7, however, demonstrated distinct roughening of the coupon surface, and [presumably solubilized and precipitated] titanium was detected on Alloy 22 coupons incubated in the same T. ferrooxiduns culture vessel. Control coupons of these materials incubated in sterile thiosulfate medium did not demonstrate any signs of corrosion, thus showing that observed corrosive effects were due to the T. ferrooxidans metabolic activities. T. ferrooxidans intermediates of thiosulfate oxidation or sulfate may have caused the corrosive effects observed on Tigr7.

  12. A Planning System for Continuing Education Divisions: A Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bazik, Martha S.

    1985-01-01

    Details steps in a continuing education division planning model; i.e., define the planning group, develop a planning attitude, analyze internal and external environments, develop a mechanism for forecasting trends, hold planning sessions for determining strategic focus and operational plans, establish a timetable, hold follow-up/evaluation…

  13. Streaming of Continuous Media for Distance Education Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dashti, Ali; Safar, Maytham

    2007-01-01

    Distance education created new challenges regarding the delivery of large size isochronous continuous streaming media (SM) objects. In this paper, we consider the design of a framework for customized SM presentations, where each presentation consists of a number of SM objects that should be retrieved and displayed to the user in a coherent…

  14. Student Performance Requirements: Minitary Service. Continuation Education System Development Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    La Puente Union High School District, CA.

    Funded under Title III of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965, the La Puente, California, continuation education project investigated (1) attitudes of former students concerning the success of the school in preparing them for entry into military service, (2) the minimal skills and knowledge required by each of the armed forces, (3)…

  15. Continuous cultures of Pseudomonas putida mt-2 overcome catabolic function loss under real case operating conditions.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Raúl; Hernández, María; Segura, Ana; Gouveia, Joao; Rojas, Antonia; Ramos, Juan Luis; Villaverde, Santiago

    2009-05-01

    The long-term performance and stability of Pseudomonas putida mt-2 cultures, a toluene-sensitive strain harboring the genes responsible for toluene biodegradation in the archetypal plasmid pWW0, was investigated in a chemostat bioreactor functioning under real case operating conditions. The process was operated at a dilution rate of 0.1 h(-1) under toluene loading rates of 259 +/- 23 and 801 +/- 78 g m(-3) h(-1) (inlet toluene concentrations of 3.5 and 10.9 g m(-3), respectively). Despite the deleterious effects of toluene and its degradation intermediates, the phenotype of this sensitive P. putida culture rapidly recovered from a 95% Tol(-) population at day 4 to approx. 100% Tol(+) cells from day 13 onward, sustaining elimination capacities of 232 +/- 10 g m(-3) h(-1) at 3.5 g Tol m(-3) and 377 +/- 13 g m(-3) h(-1) at 10.9 g Tol m(-3), which were comparable to those achieved by highly tolerant strains such as P. putida DOT T1E and P. putida F1 under identical experimental conditions. Only one type of Tol(-) variant, harboring a TOL-like plasmid with a 38.5 kb deletion (containing the upper and meta operons for toluene biodegradation), was identified.

  16. Cellular economy in fission yeast cells continuously cultured with limited nitrogen resources

    PubMed Central

    Chikashige, Yuji; Arakawa, Shin'ichi; Leibnitz, Kenji; Tsutsumi, Chihiro; Mori, Chie; Osakada, Hiroko; Murata, Masayuki; Haraguchi, Tokuko; Hiraoka, Yasushi

    2015-01-01

    In ribosome biogenesis, a large fraction of ribosomes is used for producing ribosomal proteins themselves. Here, we applied simulation and experimentation to determine what fraction of ribosomes should be allocated for the synthesis of ribosomal proteins to optimize cellular economy for growth. We define the “r-fraction” as the fraction of mRNA of the ribosomal protein genes out of the total mRNA, and we simulated the effect of the r-fraction on the number of ribosomes. We then empirically measured the amount of protein and RNA in fission yeast cells cultured with high and low nitrogen sources. In the cells cultured with a low nitrogen source, the r-fraction decreased from 0.46 to 0.42 with a 40% reduction of rRNA, but the reduction of the total protein was smaller at 30%. These results indicate that the r-fraction is internally controlled to optimize the efficiency of protein synthesis at a limited cellular cost. PMID:26486373

  17. Cellular economy in fission yeast cells continuously cultured with limited nitrogen resources.

    PubMed

    Chikashige, Yuji; Arakawa, Shin'ichi; Leibnitz, Kenji; Tsutsumi, Chihiro; Mori, Chie; Osakada, Hiroko; Murata, Masayuki; Haraguchi, Tokuko; Hiraoka, Yasushi

    2015-10-21

    In ribosome biogenesis, a large fraction of ribosomes is used for producing ribosomal proteins themselves. Here, we applied simulation and experimentation to determine what fraction of ribosomes should be allocated for the synthesis of ribosomal proteins to optimize cellular economy for growth. We define the "r-fraction" as the fraction of mRNA of the ribosomal protein genes out of the total mRNA, and we simulated the effect of the r-fraction on the number of ribosomes. We then empirically measured the amount of protein and RNA in fission yeast cells cultured with high and low nitrogen sources. In the cells cultured with a low nitrogen source, the r-fraction decreased from 0.46 to 0.42 with a 40% reduction of rRNA, but the reduction of the total protein was smaller at 30%. These results indicate that the r-fraction is internally controlled to optimize the efficiency of protein synthesis at a limited cellular cost.

  18. Long term culture of epithelia in a continuous fluid gradient for biomaterial testing and tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Minuth, W W; Strehl, R; Schumacher, K; de Vries, U

    2001-01-01

    Epithelia perform barrier functions being exposed to different fluids on the luminal and basal side. For long-term testing of new biomaterials as artificial basement membrane substitutes, it is important to simulate this fluid gradient. Individually-selected biomaterials can be placed in tissue carriers and in gradient containers, where different media are superfused. Epithelia growing on the tissue carriers form a physiological barrier during the whole culture period. Frequently however, pressure differences between the luminal and basal compartments occur. This is caused by a unilateral accumulation of gas bubbles in the container compartments resulting in tissue damage. Consequently, the occurence of gas bubbles has to be minimized. Air bubbles in the perfusion culture medium preferentially accumulate at sites where different materials come into contact. The first development is new screw caps for media bottles, specifically designed to allow fluid contact with only the tube and not the cap material. The second development is the separation of remaining gas bubbles from the liquid phase in the medium using newly-developed gas expander modules. By the application of these new tools, the yield of embryonic renal collecting duct epithelia with intact barrier function on a fragile natural support material can be significantly increased compared to earlier experiments.

  19. a Cultural Landscape Information System Developed with Open Source Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chudyk, C.; Müller, H.; Uhler, M.; Würriehausen, F.

    2013-07-01

    Since 2010, the state of Rhineland-Palatinate in Germany has developed a cultural landscape information system as a process to secure and further enrich aggregate data about its cultural assets. In an open dialogue between governing authorities and citizens, the intention of the project is an active cooperation of public and private actors. A cultural landscape information system called KuLIS was designed as a web platform, combining semantic wiki software with a geographic information system. Based on data sets from public administrations, the information about cultural assets can be extended and enhanced by interested participants. The developed infrastructure facilitates local information accumulation through a crowdsourcing approach. This capability offers new possibilities for e-governance and open data developments. The collaborative approach allows governing authorities to manage and supervise official data, while public participation enables affordable information acquisition. Gathered cultural heritage information can provide incentives for touristic valorisation of communities or concepts for strengthening regional identification. It can also influence political decisions in defining significant cultural regions worth of protecting from industrial influences. The presented cultural landscape information allows citizens to influence the statewide development of cultural landscapes in a democratic way.

  20. Control uncertain continuous-time chaotic dynamical system.

    PubMed

    Qi, Dong-Lian; Zhao, Guang-Zhou

    2003-01-01

    The new chaos control method presented in this paper is useful for taking advantage of chaos. Based on sliding mode control theory, this paper provides a switching manifold controlling strategy of chaotic system, and also gives a kind of adaptive parameters estimated method to estimate the unknown systems' parameters by which chaotic dynamical system can be synchronized. Taking the Lorenz system as example, and with the help of this controlling strategy, we can synchronize chaotic systems with unknown parameters and different initial conditions.

  1. Closed and continuous algae cultivation system for food production and gas exchange in CELSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oguchi, Mitsuo; Otsubo, Koji; Nitta, Keiji; Shimada, Atsuhiro; Fujii, Shigeo; Koyano, Takashi; Miki, Keizaburo

    In CELSS (Controlled Ecological Life Support System), utilization of photosynthetic algae is an effective means for obtaining food and oxygen at the same time. We have chosen Spirulina, a blue-green alga, and have studied possibilities of algae utilization. We have developed an advanced algae cultivation system, which is able to produce algae continuously in a closed condition. Major features of the new system are as follows. o (1)In order to maintain homogeneous culture conditions, the cultivator was designed so as to cause a swirl on medium circulation. (2)Oxygen gas separation and carbon dioxide supply are conducted by a newly designed membrane module. (3)Algae mass and medium are separated by a specially designed harvester. (4)Cultivation conditions, such as pH, temperature, algae growth rate, light intensity and quanlity of generated oxygen gas are controlled by a computer system and the data are automatically recorded. This equipment is a primary model for ground experiments in order to obtain some design data for space use. A feasibility of algae cultivation in a closed condition is discussed on the basis of data obtained by use of this new system.

  2. Miniature Bioreactor System for Long-Term Cell Culture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steve R.; Kleis, Stanley J.; Geffert, Sandara K.

    2010-01-01

    A prototype miniature bioreactor system is designed to serve as a laboratory benchtop cell-culturing system that minimizes the need for relatively expensive equipment and reagents and can be operated under computer control, thereby reducing the time and effort required of human investigators and reducing uncertainty in results. The system includes a bioreactor, a fluid-handling subsystem, a chamber wherein the bioreactor is maintained in a controlled atmosphere at a controlled temperature, and associated control subsystems. The system can be used to culture both anchorage-dependent and suspension cells, which can be either prokaryotic or eukaryotic. Cells can be cultured for extended periods of time in this system, and samples of cells can be extracted and analyzed at specified intervals. By integrating this system with one or more microanalytical instrument(s), one can construct a complete automated analytical system that can be tailored to perform one or more of a large variety of assays.

  3. Organ culture system as a means to detect celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Picarelli, Antonio; Libanori, Valerio; De Nitto, Daniela; Saponara, Annarita; Di Tola, Marco; Donato, Giuseppe

    2010-01-01

    Anti-endomysial and anti-transglutaminase antibodies can be produced in vitro by the intestinal mucosa of celiac disease (CD) patients in clinical remission, when the culture is performed in the presence of gliadin peptides. Our aim was to use this organ culture system as a means to detect the pathognomonic antibodies of celiac disease (CD) in the culture supernatants. Organ culture was performed in the presence of three different activators to evaluate which one induced the strongest antibody response in intestinal mucosa from patients in clinical remission of CD. Our data confirm the high efficiency of synthetic peptide 31-43 as a specific immunological activator in CD and demonstrate its capability to stimulate production/secretion of CD-specific antibodies. We envision that this organ culture system may prove to be useful as a new technique for CD diagnosis.

  4. A novel method for toxicology: in vitro culture system of a rat preantral follicle.

    PubMed

    Wan Xuying; Zhu Jiangbo; Zhu Yuping; Xili, Ma; Liu Zhen; Wang Fei; Xu Guifeng; Zhang Tianbao

    2011-08-01

    Preantral follicle in vitro culture systems have been successfully or nearly successfully established for sheep, pig and mouse, and applied on follicle development and regulation research on reproductive biology and physiology. However, there have been few studies concerning rat preantral follicle in vitro development. The objective is to establish an in vitro culture system for rat preantral follicles which can be used for reproductive biology and toxicology research. Rat preantral follicles are mechanically separated, cultured in vitro in single follicle mode for continuous 12 days using 96-well plates, and then administrated ovulation induction. The observation on follicle development, hormone level, and ovum formation are recorded and assessed. Taking in vivo growth and in vitro maturation of oocytes group as control group, in vitro growth and maturation of oocytes group is assessed to see whether this in vitro culture method is successful. The conditions for rat follicle culture are determined based on the mouse pre-antral follicle culture. The in vitro culture system for rat preantral follicles established in this study is feasible and successful, and can serve as model for reproductive biology and toxicology research.

  5. Class, Culture and the Education System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alvarado, Manuel

    1977-01-01

    Recognizes the fact that an elaboration of a particular theory of education and of the position film studies occupy within the educational system will determine system strategies and understanding. (MH)

  6. In vitro quantitation of lethal and physiologic effects of total body irradiation on stromal and hematopoietic stem cells in continuous bone marrow cultures from Rf mice

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberger, J.S.; Eckner, R.J.; Otten, J.A.; Tennant, R.W.

    1982-07-01

    The effects of in vivo total body irradiation (TBI) and interval from TBI to explant of marrow on: stromal cell proliferation in vitro; stromal cell support of hematopoiesis in continuous bone marrow culture; and generation of WEHI-3 growth factor (GF)-dependent lines of hematopoietic progenitor cells were evaluated. Explant of marrow at 2, 4, 5, or 6 months after single fraction TBI (300-800 rad) was associated with decreased longevity of hemopoiesis and a decrease in the proliferative capacity of fibroblastic adherent-stromal colony forming cells (CFUf) as measured by colony size at 14 days and number of colonies per 10/sup 6/ cells plated. In contrast, explant of marrow 8 to 24 months after TBI produced cultures with longevity that was indistinguishable from age-matched control cultures (19-24 weeks). Marrow from irradiated first and second generation recipients of serially transferred marrow demonstrated a similar 7-month in vivo recovery period; however, the plateau maximum duration of hemopoiesis did not return to control levels. Purified stromal cell cultures were prepared by corticosteroid-deprivation of explanted marrow for 28 days and were then engrafted in vitro with marrow from C57BL/6J or RfM/UN mice that had been irradiated 1 month previously. Hemopoiesis in these cultures was restored, and they produced GM-CFUc and granulocytes for 15-24 weeks. Thus, healthy stroma supported growth of recently irradiated hemopoietic cells in vitro. Indirect effects of x-irradiation on hemopoietic stem cells through damage and repair in the stromal cell compartment can be effectively studied with the present bone marrow culture system. (JMT)

  7. Effect of external pH on the growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermenting maltose in batch and continuous culture

    SciTech Connect

    Olivero, I.; Ruiz-Macias, C.; Chordi, A.; Peinado, J.M.

    1982-12-01

    Maltose utilization by S. cerevisiae is mediated by an inducible mechanism which is subject to repression and inactivation by glucose. Recently it has been reported that the active maltose transport in resting yeasts is not ATP dependent, and is coupled to the electrochemical gradient of protons across the yeast plasma membrane; a stoichiometry of one proton per mole of maltose cotransported has been measured. This implies that the external pH should have a great influence on maltose-limited growth of S. cerevisiae. We have studied the effect of external proton concentration on exponential growth of this yeast on maltose, in batch and continuous cultures. (Refs. 10).

  8. Continuing the dialogue: postcolonial feminist scholarship and Bourdieu - discourses of culture and points of connection.

    PubMed

    Anderson, J M; Reimer Kirkham, S; Browne, A J; Lynam, M J

    2007-09-01

    Postcolonial feminist theories provide the analytic tools to address issues of structural inequities in groups that historically have been socially and economically disadvantaged. In this paper we question what value might be added to postcolonial feminist theories on culture by drawing on Bourdieu. Are there points of connection? Like postcolonial feminists, he puts forward a position that aims to unmask oppressive structures. We argue that, while there are points of connection, there are also epistemologic and methodologic differences between postcolonial feminist perspectives and Bourdieu's work. Nonetheless, engagement with different theoretical perspectives carries the promise of new insights - new ways of 'seeing' and 'understanding' that might enhance a praxis-oriented theoretical perspective in healthcare delivery.

  9. A theoretical and empirical investigation of delayed growth response in the continuous culture of bacteria.

    PubMed

    Ellermeyer, Sean; Hendrix, Jerald; Ghoochan, Nariman

    2003-06-21

    When the growth of bacteria in a chemostat is controlled by limiting the supply of a single essential nutrient, the growth rate is affected both by the concentration of this nutrient in the culture medium and by the amount of time that it takes for the chemical and physiological processes that result in the production of new biomass. Thus, although the uptake of nutrient by cells is an essentially instantaneous process, the addition of new biomass is delayed by the amount of time that it takes to metabolize the nutrient. Mathematical models that incorporate this "delayed growth response" (DGR) phenomenon have been developed and analysed. However, because they are formulated in terms of parameters that are difficult to measure directly, these models are of limited value to experimentalists. In this paper, we introduce a DGR model that is formulated in terms of measurable parameters. In addition, we provide for this model a complete set of criteria for determining persistence versus extinction of the bacterial culture in the chemostat. Specifically, we show that DGR plays a role in determining persistence versus extinction only under certain ranges of chemostat operating parameters. It is also shown, however, that DGR plays a role in determining the steady-state nutrient and bacteria concentrations in all instances of persistence. The steady state and transient behavior of solutions of our model is found to be in agreement with data that we obtained in growing Escherichia coli 23716 in a chemostat with glucose as a limiting nutrient. One of the theoretical predictions of our model that does not occur in other DGR models is that under certain conditions a large delay in growth response might actually have a positive effect on the bacteria's ability to persist.

  10. Breaking Gaussian incompatibility on continuous variable quantum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Heinosaari, Teiko; Kiukas, Jukka; Schultz, Jussi

    2015-08-15

    We characterise Gaussian quantum channels that are Gaussian incompatibility breaking, that is, transform every set of Gaussian measurements into a set obtainable from a joint Gaussian observable via Gaussian postprocessing. Such channels represent local noise which renders measurements useless for Gaussian EPR-steering, providing the appropriate generalisation of entanglement breaking channels for this scenario. Understanding the structure of Gaussian incompatibility breaking channels contributes to the resource theory of noisy continuous variable quantum information protocols.

  11. Cultural relativism: maintenance of genomic imprints in pluripotent stem cell culture systems.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Maxim Vc; Bourc'his, Déborah

    2015-04-01

    Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) in culture have become a widely used model for studying events occurring during mammalian development; they also present an exciting avenue for therapeutics. However, compared to their in vivo counterparts, cultured PSC derivatives have unique properties, and it is well established that their epigenome is sensitive to medium composition. Here we review the specific effects on genomic imprints in various PSC types and culture systems. Imprinted gene regulation is developmentally important, and imprinting defects have been associated with several human diseases. Therefore, imprint abnormalities in PSCs may have considerable consequences for downstream applications.

  12. 40 CFR 62.15180 - How are the data from the continuous emission monitoring systems used?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... emission monitoring systems used? 62.15180 Section 62.15180 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Constructed on or Before August 30, 1999 Continuous Emission Monitoring § 62.15180 How are the data from the continuous emission monitoring systems used? You must use data from the continuous emission...

  13. 40 CFR 60.1725 - How are the data from the continuous emission monitoring systems used?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... emission monitoring systems used? 60.1725 Section 60.1725 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Before August 30, 1999 Model Rule-Continuous Emission Monitoring § 60.1725 How are the data from the continuous emission monitoring systems used? You must use data from the continuous emission...

  14. 40 CFR 62.15180 - How are the data from the continuous emission monitoring systems used?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... emission monitoring systems used? 62.15180 Section 62.15180 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Constructed on or Before August 30, 1999 Continuous Emission Monitoring § 62.15180 How are the data from the continuous emission monitoring systems used? You must use data from the continuous emission...

  15. 40 CFR 60.2939 - What continuous emission monitoring systems must I install?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... and Qualification Monitoring § 60.2939 What continuous emission monitoring systems must I install? (a) You must install, calibrate, maintain, and operate continuous emission monitoring systems for carbon... carbon monoxide. (b) You must install, evaluate, and operate each continuous emission monitoring...

  16. 40 CFR 60.1725 - How are the data from the continuous emission monitoring systems used?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... emission monitoring systems used? 60.1725 Section 60.1725 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Before August 30, 1999 Model Rule-Continuous Emission Monitoring § 60.1725 How are the data from the continuous emission monitoring systems used? You must use data from the continuous emission...

  17. 40 CFR 60.2939 - What continuous emission monitoring systems must I install?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... and Qualification Monitoring § 60.2939 What continuous emission monitoring systems must I install? (a) You must install, calibrate, maintain, and operate continuous emission monitoring systems for carbon... carbon monoxide. (b) You must install, evaluate, and operate each continuous emission monitoring...

  18. 40 CFR 60.2939 - What continuous emission monitoring systems must I install?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... and Qualification Monitoring § 60.2939 What continuous emission monitoring systems must I install? (a) You must install, calibrate, maintain, and operate continuous emission monitoring systems for carbon... carbon monoxide. (b) You must install, evaluate, and operate each continuous emission monitoring...

  19. 40 CFR 62.15180 - How are the data from the continuous emission monitoring systems used?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... emission monitoring systems used? 62.15180 Section 62.15180 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Constructed on or Before August 30, 1999 Continuous Emission Monitoring § 62.15180 How are the data from the continuous emission monitoring systems used? You must use data from the continuous emission...

  20. 40 CFR 60.1725 - How are the data from the continuous emission monitoring systems used?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... emission monitoring systems used? 60.1725 Section 60.1725 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Before August 30, 1999 Model Rule-Continuous Emission Monitoring § 60.1725 How are the data from the continuous emission monitoring systems used? You must use data from the continuous emission...