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Sample records for continuous flow-type hyperpolarizing

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging of dissolved hyperpolarized 129Xe using a membrane-based continuous flow system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amor, N.; Zänker, P. P.; Blümler, P.; Meise, F. M.; Schreiber, L. M.; Scholz, A.; Schmiedeskamp, J.; Spiess, H. W.; Münnemann, K.

    2009-11-01

    A technique for continuous production of solutions containing hyperpolarized 129Xe is explored for MRI applications. The method is based on hollow fiber membranes which inhibit the formation of foams and bubbles. A systematic analysis of various carrier agents for hyperpolarized 129Xe has been carried out, which are applicable as contrast agents for in vivo MRI. The image quality of different hyperpolarized Xe solutions is compared and MRI results obtained in a clinical as well as in a nonclinical MRI setting are provided. Moreover, we demonstrate the application of 129Xe contrast agents produced with our dissolution method for lung MRI by imaging hyperpolarized 129Xe that has been both dissolved in and outgassed from a carrier liquid in a lung phantom, illustrating its potential for the measurement of lung perfusion and ventilation.

  2. [Continuous dry fermentation of pig manure using up plug-flow type anaerobic reactor].

    PubMed

    Chen, Chuang; Deng, Liang-Wei; Xin, Xin; Zheng, Dan; Liu, Yi; Kong, Chui-Xue

    2012-03-01

    To solve the problems of ammonia inhibition and discharging difficulty in continuous dry fermentation of pig manure, under the experimental conditions of temperature of (25 +/- 2) degrees C and organic loading rate (TS) of 4.44 g x (L x d) (-1), a lab-scale up plug-flow type anaerobic reactor (UPAR) was setup to investigate biogas production, ammonia inhibition, effluent liquidity, and the feasibility of continuous dry fermentation of pig manure using up plug-flow type anaerobic reactor. The experiment was operated for 160 days using the pig manure with four different TS mass fractions (20%, 25%, 30%, 35%) as feeding. Results showed that the feeding TS mass fraction exerted a significant influence on the dry fermentation of pig manure; the stable volumetric biogas production rates of four different feeding TS mass fractions were 2.40, 1.73, 0.89, and 0.62 L x (L x d)(-1), respectively; the biogas producing efficiencies of the reactors with feeding TS mass fractions of 20%, 25% and 30% were obviously superior to that with feeding TS of 35%. With feeding TS mass fraction increased from 20% to 35%, obvious inhibition to biogas producing occurred when concentration of ammonia nitrogen reached more than 2 300 mg x L(-1). When the feeding TS mass fraction was 35%, the concentration of ammonia nitrogen could accumulate to 3 800 mg x L(-1) but biogas production rate decreased 74.1% of that with feeding TS of 20%. Additionally, while the feeding TS mass fraction was 35%, the effluent TS mass fraction achieved 17.1%, and the velocity of effluent was less than 0.002 m x s(-1) the effluent of UPAR could not be smoothly discharged.

  3. Molecular MRI in the Earth's Magnetic Field Using Continuous Hyperpolarization of a Biomolecule in Water.

    PubMed

    Rovedo, Philipp; Knecht, Stephan; Bäumlisberger, Tim; Cremer, Anna Lena; Duckett, Simon B; Mewis, Ryan E; Green, Gary G R; Burns, Michael; Rayner, Peter J; Leibfritz, Dieter; Korvink, Jan G; Hennig, Jürgen; Pütz, Gerhard; von Elverfeldt, Dominik; Hövener, Jan-Bernd

    2016-06-30

    In this work, we illustrate a method to continuously hyperpolarize a biomolecule, nicotinamide, in water using parahydrogen and signal amplification by reversible exchange (SABRE). Building on the preparation procedure described recently by Truong et al. [ J. Phys. Chem. B , 2014 , 118 , 13882 - 13889 ], aqueous solutions of nicotinamide and an Ir-IMes catalyst were prepared for low-field NMR and MRI. The (1)H-polarization was continuously renewed and monitored by NMR experiments at 5.9 mT for more than 1000 s. The polarization achieved corresponds to that induced by a 46 T magnet (P = 1.6 × 10(-4)) or an enhancement of 10(4). The polarization persisted, although reduced, if cell culture medium (DPBS with Ca(2+) and Mg(2+)) or human cells (HL-60) were added, but was no longer observable after the addition of human blood. Using a portable MRI unit, fast (1)H-MRI was enabled by cycling the magnetic field between 5 mT and the Earth's field for hyperpolarization and imaging, respectively. A model describing the underlying spin physics was developed that revealed a polarization pattern depending on both contact time and magnetic field. Furthermore, the model predicts an opposite phase of the dihydrogen and substrate signal after one exchange, which is likely to result in the cancelation of some signal at low field.

  4. Characterization and optimization of the visualization performance of continuous flow overhauser DNP hyperpolarized water MRI: Inversion recovery approach.

    PubMed

    Terekhov, Maxim; Krummenacker, Jan; Denysenkov, Vasyl; Gerz, Kathrin; Prisner, Thomas; Schreiber, Laura Maria

    2016-03-01

    Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) allows the production of liquid hyperpolarized substrate inside the MRI magnet bore as well as its administration in continuous flow mode to acquire MR images with enhanced signal-to-noise ratio. We implemented inversion recovery preparation in order to improve contrast-to-noise ratio and to quantify the overall imaging performance of Overhauser DNP-enhanced MRI. The negative enhancement created by DNP in combination with inversion recovery (IR) preparation allows canceling selectively the signal originated from Boltzmann magnetization and visualizing only hyperpolarized fluid. The theoretical model describing gain of MR image intensity produced by steady-state continuous flow DNP hyperpolarized magnetization was established and proved experimentally. A precise quantification of signal originated purely from DNP hyperpolarization was achieved. A temperature effect on longitudinal relaxation had to be taken into account to fit experimental results with numerical prediction. Using properly adjusted IR preparation, the complete zeroing of thermal background magnetization was achieved, providing an essential increase of contrast-to-noise ratio of DNP-hyperpolarized water images. To quantify and optimize the steady-state conditions for MRI with continuous flow DNP, an approach similar to that incorporating transient-state thermal magnetization equilibrium in spoiled fast field echo imaging sequences can be used. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Continuously Infusing Hyperpolarized 129Xe into Flowing Aqueous Solutions Using Hydrophobic Gas Exchange Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Cleveland, Zackary I.; Möller, Harald E.; Hedlund, Laurence W.; Driehuys, Bastiaan

    2009-01-01

    Hyperpolarized (HP) 129Xe yields high signal intensities in magnetic resonance (MR) and, through its large chemical shift range of ∼300 ppm, provides detailed information about the local chemical environment. To exploit these properties in aqueous solutions and living tissues requires the development of methods for efficiently dissolving HP 129Xe over an extended time period. To this end, we have used commercially available gas exchange modules to continuously infuse concentrated HP 129Xe into flowing liquids, including rat whole blood, for periods as long as one hour, and have demonstrated the feasibility of dissolved-phase MR imaging with sub-millimeter resolution within minutes. These modules, which exchange gases using hydrophobic microporous polymer membranes, are compatible with a variety of liquids and are suitable for infusing HP 129Xe into the bloodstream in vivo. Additionally, we have developed a detailed mathematical model of the infused HP 129Xe signal dynamics that should be useful in designing improved infusion systems that yield even higher dissolved HP 129Xe signal intensities. PMID:19702286

  6. A continuous-flow, high-throughput, high-pressure parahydrogen converter for hyperpolarization in a clinical setting.

    PubMed

    Hövener, Jan-Bernd; Bär, Sébastien; Leupold, Jochen; Jenne, Klaus; Leibfritz, Dieter; Hennig, Jürgen; Duckett, Simon B; von Elverfeldt, Dominik

    2013-02-01

    Pure parahydrogen (pH(2) ) is the prerequisite for optimal pH(2) -based hyperpolarization experiments, promising approaches to access the hidden orders of magnitude of MR signals. pH(2) production on-site in medical research centers is vital for the proliferation of these technologies in the life sciences. However, previously suggested designs do not meet our requirements for safety or production performance (flow rate, pressure or enrichment). In this article, we present the safety concept, design and installation of a pH(2) converter, operated in a clinical setting. The apparatus produces a continuous flow of four standard liters per minute of ≈98% enriched pH(2) at a pressure maximum of 50 bar. The entire production cycle, including cleaning and cooling to 25 K, takes less than 5 h, only ≈45 min of which are required for actual pH(2) conversion. A fast and simple quantification procedure is described. The lifetimes of pH(2) in a glass vial and aluminum storage cylinder are measured to be T(1C) (glass vial) =822 ± 29 min and T(1C) (Al cylinder) =129 ± 36 days, thus providing sufficiently long storage intervals and allowing the application of pH(2) on demand. A dependence of line width on pH(2) enrichment is observed. As examples, (1) H hyperpolarization of pyridine and (13) C hyperpolarization of hydroxyethylpropionate are presented.

  7. Production of carbonaceous adsorbents from agricultural by-products and novolac resin under a continuous countercurrent flow type pyrolysis operation.

    PubMed

    Ioannou, Z; Simitzis, J

    2013-02-01

    Carbonaceous adsorbents based on novolac resin (N) and olive stone biomass (B) in a proportion of 20/80 and 40/60 w./w. N/O were produced. The specimens were cured (c) and pyrolyzed/carbonized (C) up to 1000 °C under a continuous countercurrent flow type pyrolysis operation (N20B-cC, N40B-cC). Commercial activated carbon (AC) was used for comparison reasons. Methylene blue adsorption from its aqueous solutions onto the adsorbents and kinetic analysis were investigated. The specific surface area of adsorbents and the gross calorific values (GCV) of cured materials were determined. The results show that N40B-cC presents lower weight loss and shrinkage but higher methylene blue adsorption than N20B-cC. Pseudo-second order mechanism describes better methylene blue adsorption onto all adsorbents. The specific surface area of carbonaceous and the gross calorific values of cured materials follow the order: AC>N20B-cC>N40B-cC and N100-c>N40B-c>N20B-c>B respectively. Olive stone biomass may constitute a suitable precursor for the production of carbonaceous materials.

  8. Continuous flow production of concentrated hyperpolarized xenon gas from a dilute xenon gas mixture by buffer gas condensation.

    PubMed

    Imai, Hirohiko; Yoshimura, Hironobu; Kimura, Atsuomi; Fujiwara, Hideaki

    2017-08-04

    We present a new method for the continuous flow production of concentrated hyperpolarized xenon-129 (HP (129)Xe) gas from a dilute xenon (Xe) gas mixture with high nuclear spin polarization. A low vapor pressure (i.e., high boiling-point) gas was introduced as an alternative to molecular nitrogen (N2), which is the conventional quenching gas for generating HP (129)Xe via Rb-Xe spin-exchange optical-pumping (SEOP). In contrast to the generally used method of extraction by freezing Xe after the SEOP process, the quenching gas separated as a liquid at moderately low temperature so that Xe was maintained in its gaseous state, allowing the continuous delivery of highly polarized concentrated Xe gas. We selected isobutene as the candidate quenching gas and our method was demonstrated experimentally while comparing its performance with N2. Isobutene could be liquefied and removed from the Xe gas mixture using a cold trap, and the concentrated HP (129)Xe gas exhibited a significantly enhanced nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signal. Although the system requires further optimization depending on the intended purpose, our approach presented here could provide a simple means for performing NMR or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurements continuously using HP (129)Xe with improved sensitivity.

  9. Hyperpolarization MRI

    PubMed Central

    Miloushev, Vesselin Z.; Keshari, Kayvan R.; Holodny, Andrei I.

    2016-01-01

    Hyperpolarization is a novel technology that can dramatically increase signal to noise in magnetic resonance. The method is being applied to small injectable endogenous molecules, which can be used to monitor transient in vivo metabolic events, in real time. The emergence of hyperpolarized 13C-labeled probes, specifically 13C pyruvate, has enabled monitoring of core cellular metabolic events. Neuro-oncological applications have been demonstrated in preclinical models. Many more applications of this technology are envisioned, with transformative potential in magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:26848559

  10. In Vivo MR Imaging of Pulmonary Perfusion and Gas Exchange in Rats via Continuous Extracorporeal Infusion of Hyperpolarized 129Xe

    PubMed Central

    Cleveland, Zackary I.; Möller, Harald E.; Hedlund, Laurence W.; Nouls, John C.; Freeman, Matthew S.; Qi, Yi; Driehuys, Bastiaan

    2012-01-01

    Background Hyperpolarized (HP) 129Xe magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) permits high resolution, regional visualization of pulmonary ventilation. Additionally, its reasonably high solubility (>10%) and large chemical shift range (>200 ppm) in tissues allow HP 129Xe to serve as a regional probe of pulmonary perfusion and gas transport, when introduced directly into the vasculature. In earlier work, vascular delivery was accomplished in rats by first dissolving HP 129Xe in a biologically compatible carrier solution, injecting the solution into the vasculature, and then detecting HP 129Xe as it emerged into the alveolar airspaces. Although easily implemented, this approach was constrained by the tolerable injection volume and the duration of the HP 129Xe signal. Methods and Principal Findings Here, we overcome the volume and temporal constraints imposed by injection, by using hydrophobic, microporous, gas-exchange membranes to directly and continuously infuse 129Xe into the arterial blood of live rats with an extracorporeal (EC) circuit. The resulting gas-phase 129Xe signal is sufficient to generate diffusive gas exchange- and pulmonary perfusion-dependent, 3D MR images with a nominal resolution of 2×2×2 mm3. We also show that the 129Xe signal dynamics during EC infusion are well described by an analytical model that incorporates both mass transport into the blood and longitudinal relaxation. Conclusions Extracorporeal infusion of HP 129Xe enables rapid, 3D MR imaging of rat lungs and, when combined with ventilation imaging, will permit spatially resolved studies of the ventilation-perfusion ratio in small animals. Moreover, EC infusion should allow 129Xe to be delivered elsewhere in the body and make possible functional and molecular imaging approaches that are currently not feasible using inhaled HP 129Xe. PMID:22363613

  11. Transportable hyperpolarized metabolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Xiao; Bornet, Aurélien; Vuichoud, Basile; Milani, Jonas; Gajan, David; Rossini, Aaron J.; Emsley, Lyndon; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey; Jannin, Sami

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear spin hyperpolarization of 13C-labelled metabolites by dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization can enhance the NMR signals of metabolites by several orders of magnitude, which has enabled in vivo metabolic imaging by MRI. However, because of the short lifetime of the hyperpolarized magnetization (typically <1 min), the polarization process must be carried out close to the point of use. Here we introduce a concept that markedly extends hyperpolarization lifetimes and enables the transportation of hyperpolarized metabolites. The hyperpolarized sample can thus be removed from the polarizer and stored or transported for use at remote MRI or NMR sites. We show that hyperpolarization in alanine and glycine survives 16 h storage and transport, maintaining overall polarization enhancements of up to three orders of magnitude.

  12. Transportable hyperpolarized metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Xiao; Bornet, Aurélien; Vuichoud, Basile; Milani, Jonas; Gajan, David; Rossini, Aaron J.; Emsley, Lyndon; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey; Jannin, Sami

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear spin hyperpolarization of 13C-labelled metabolites by dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization can enhance the NMR signals of metabolites by several orders of magnitude, which has enabled in vivo metabolic imaging by MRI. However, because of the short lifetime of the hyperpolarized magnetization (typically <1 min), the polarization process must be carried out close to the point of use. Here we introduce a concept that markedly extends hyperpolarization lifetimes and enables the transportation of hyperpolarized metabolites. The hyperpolarized sample can thus be removed from the polarizer and stored or transported for use at remote MRI or NMR sites. We show that hyperpolarization in alanine and glycine survives 16 h storage and transport, maintaining overall polarization enhancements of up to three orders of magnitude. PMID:28072398

  13. NMR Hyperpolarization Techniques of Gases.

    PubMed

    Barskiy, Danila A; Coffey, Aaron M; Nikolaou, Panayiotis; Mikhaylov, Dmitry M; Goodson, Boyd M; Branca, Rosa T; Lu, George J; Shapiro, Mikhail G; Telkki, Ville-Veikko; Zhivonitko, Vladimir V; Koptyug, Igor V; Salnikov, Oleg G; Kovtunov, Kirill V; Bukhtiyarov, Valerii I; Rosen, Matthew S; Barlow, Michael J; Safavi, Shahideh; Hall, Ian P; Schröder, Leif; Chekmenev, Eduard Y

    2017-01-18

    Nuclear spin polarization can be significantly increased through the process of hyperpolarization, leading to an increase in the sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments by 4-8 orders of magnitude. Hyperpolarized gases, unlike liquids and solids, can often be readily separated and purified from the compounds used to mediate the hyperpolarization processes. These pure hyperpolarized gases enabled many novel MRI applications including the visualization of void spaces, imaging of lung function, and remote detection. Additionally, hyperpolarized gases can be dissolved in liquids and can be used as sensitive molecular probes and reporters. This Minireview covers the fundamentals of the preparation of hyperpolarized gases and focuses on selected applications of interest to biomedicine and materials science. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. NMR Hyperpolarization Techniques for Biomedicine

    PubMed Central

    Nikolaou, Panayiotis; Goodson, Boyd M.

    2015-01-01

    Recent developments in NMR hyperpolarization have enabled a wide array of new in vivo molecular imaging modalities—ranging from functional imaging of the lungs to metabolic imaging of cancer. This Concept article explores selected advances in methods for the preparation and use of hyperpolarized contrast agents, many of which are already at or near the phase of their clinical validation in patients. PMID:25470566

  15. Some electrical properties of the endothelium-dependent hyperpolarization recorded from rat arterial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, G; Suzuki, H

    1989-01-01

    1. Electrical responses produced by acetylcholine (ACh) and histamine were recorded from smooth muscle cells of the intralobular small pulmonary artery (SPA), main pulmonary artery (MPA) and thoracic aorta of rats. 2. In MPA and SPA, ACh and histamine produced a transient hyperpolarization of the membrane, and the potential decayed exponentially with a time constant of 2-3 min. In aorta, ACh produced a sustained and histamine produced a transient hyperpolarization. 3. The ACh- and histamine-induced hyperpolarizations were blocked by atropine and mepyramine, respectively, or by removing the endothelial cells. 4. The amplitude of the hyperpolarization was increased in low [K+]o solutions and decreased in high [K+]o solutions. The ionic conductance of the membrane was increased during the hyperpolarization, suggesting an involvement of the increased potassium conductance. 5. A reproducible amplitude of hyperpolarization was generated when ACh or histamine was applied at intervals of over 10 or 30 min, respectively. 6. In aorta, after the transient hyperpolarization had ceased during continued application of histamine, ACh again produced a hyperpolarization, i.e. the transient nature of the hyperpolarization was not due to desensitization of the receptor upon which the hyperpolarizing substance acted, assuming histamine and ACh release the same hyperpolarizing substance. 7. ACh and histamine relaxed the tissues from SPA, MPA and aorta during the noradrenaline (NA)- or high [K+]o solution-induced contraction, in a concentration-dependent manner, only when the endothelial cells were intact. Both ACh and histamine were potent relaxants in MPA and aorta, but showed weak relaxing actions in SPA. 8. In aorta, ACh and histamine produced a sustained relaxation for up to 10 min, and Methylene Blue diminished and altered it to a transient relaxation (for histamine) or an initial large, followed by a small sustained (for ACh), relaxation. 9. In the presence of NA and NA plus

  16. A magnetic tunnel to shelter hyperpolarized fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Milani, Jonas Vuichoud, Basile; Bornet, Aurélien; Miéville, Pascal; Mottier, Roger; Jannin, Sami; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey

    2015-02-15

    To shield solutions carrying hyperpolarized nuclear magnetization from rapid relaxation during transfer through low fields, the transfer duct can be threaded through an array of permanent magnets. The advantages are illustrated for solutions containing hyperpolarized {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C nuclei in a variety of molecules.

  17. Development of hyperpolarized noble gas MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, M. S.; Balamore, D.

    1998-02-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging using the MR signal from hyperpolarized noble gases 129Xe and 3He may become an important new diagnostic technique. Alex Pines (adapting the hyperpolarization technique pioneered by William Happer) presented MR spectroscopy studies using hyperpolarized 129Xe. The current authors recognized that the enormous enhancement in the detectability of 129Xe, promised by hyperpolarization, would solve the daunting SNR problems impeding their attempts to use 129Xe as an in vivo MR probe, especially in order to study the action of general anesthetics. It was hoped that hyperpolarized 129Xe MRI would yield resolutions equivalent to that achievable with conventional 1H 2O MRI, and that xenon's solubility in lipids would facilitate investigations of lipid-rich tissues that had as yet been hard to image. The publication of hyperpolarized 129Xe images of excised mouse lungs heralded the emergence of hyperpolarized noble-gas MRI. Using hyperpolarized 3He, researchers have obtained images of the lung gas space of guinea pigs and of humans. Lung gas images from patients with pulmonary disease have recently been reported. 3He is easier to hyperpolarize than 129Xe, and it yields a stronger MR signal, but its extremely low solubility in blood precludes its use for the imaging of tissue. Xenon, however, readily dissolves in blood, and the T1 of dissolved 129Xe is long enough for sufficient polarization to be carried by the circulation to distal tissues. Hyperpolarized 129Xe dissolved-phase tissue spectra from the thorax and head of rodents and humans have been obtained, as have chemical shift 129Xe images from the head of rats. Lung gas 129Xe images of rodents, and more recently of humans, have been reported. Hyperpolarized 129Xe MRI (HypX-MRI) may elucidate the link between the structure of the lung and its function. The technique may also be useful in identifying ventilation-perfusion mismatch in patients with pulmonary embolism, in staging and tracking the

  18. Membrane hyperpolarization during human sperm capacitation

    PubMed Central

    López-González, I.; Torres-Rodríguez, P.; Sánchez-Carranza, O.; Solís-López, A.; Santi, C.M.; Darszon, A.; Treviño, C.L.

    2014-01-01

    Sperm capacitation is a complex and indispensable physiological process that spermatozoa must undergo in order to acquire fertilization capability. Spermatozoa from several mammalian species, including mice, exhibit a capacitation-associated plasma membrane hyperpolarization, which is necessary for the acrosome reaction to occur. Despite its importance, this hyperpolarization event has not been adequately examined in human sperm. In this report we used flow cytometry to show that a subpopulation of human sperm indeed undergo a plasma membrane hyperpolarization upon in vitro capacitation. This hyperpolarization correlated with two other well-characterized capacitation parameters, namely an increase in intracellular pH and Ca2+ concentration, measured also by flow cytometry. We found that sperm membrane hyperpolarization was completely abolished in the presence of a high external K+ concentration (60 mM), indicating the participation of K+ channels. In order to identify, which of the potential K+ channels were involved in this hyperpolarization, we used different K+ channel inhibitors including charybdotoxin, slotoxin and iberiotoxin (which target Slo1) and clofilium (a more specific blocker for Slo3). All these K+ channel antagonists inhibited membrane hyperpolarization to a similar extent, suggesting that both members of the Slo family may potentially participate. Two very recent papers recorded K+ currents in human sperm electrophysiologically, with some contradictory results. In the present work, we show through immunoblotting that Slo3 channels are present in the human sperm membrane. In addition, we found that human Slo3 channels expressed in CHO cells were sensitive to clofilium (50 μM). Considered altogether, our data indicate that Slo1 and Slo3 could share the preponderant role in the capacitation-associated hyperpolarization of human sperm in contrast to what has been previously reported for mouse sperm, where Slo3 channels are the main contributors to the

  19. Intracerebral synthesis of glutamine from hyperpolarized glutamate.

    PubMed

    Mazuel, Leslie; Schulte, Rolf F; Cladière, Aurélie; Spéziale, Claudine; Lagrée, Marie; Leremboure, Martin; Jean, Betty; Durif, Franck; Chassain, Carine

    2017-10-01

    Changes in glutamate (Glu) levels occur in a number of neurodegenerative diseases. We proposed the use of (13) C spectroscopy and the highly amplified signal generated by hyperpolarization to achieve spatial and temporal resolutions adequate for in vivo studies of Glu metabolism in the healthy rat brain. Thus, we investigated uptake of hyperpolarized [1(-13C) ]Glu after a temporary blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption protocol and its conversion to glutamine (Gln) in the brain. [1-(13) C]Glu was hyperpolarized using the dynamic nuclear polarization process. A temporary BBB disruption using mannitol allowed hyperpolarized [1-(13) C]Glu to reach the brain. Then, hyperpolarized [1-(13) C]Glu brain metabolism was observed in vivo by MR spectroscopy experiments at 3T. Products synthesized from [1-(13) C]Glu were assigned via liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Hyperpolarized [1-(13) C]Glu reached 20% ± 2.3% polarization after 90 min. After validation of the BBB disruption protocol, hyperpolarized [1-(13) C]Glu (175.4 ppm) was detected inside the rat brain, and the formation of [1-(13) C]Gln at 174.9 ppm was also observed. The Gln synthesis from hyperpolarized [1-(13) C]Glu can be monitored in vivo in the healthy rat brain after opening the BBB. Magn Reson Med 78:1296-1305, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  20. Hyperpolarized (129)Xe T (1) in oxygenated and deoxygenated blood

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albert, M. S.; Balamore, D.; Kacher, D. F.; Venkatesh, A. K.; Jolesz, F. A.

    2000-01-01

    The viability of the new technique of hyperpolarized (129)Xe MRI (HypX-MRI) for imaging organs other than the lungs depends on whether the spin-lattice relaxation time, T(1), of (129)Xe is sufficiently long in the blood. In previous experiments by the authors, the T(1) was found to be strongly dependent upon the oxygenation of the blood, with T(1) increasing from about 3 s in deoxygenated samples to about 10 s in oxygenated samples. Contrarily, Tseng et al. (J. Magn. Reson. 1997; 126: 79-86) reported extremely long T(1) values deduced from an indirect experiment in which hyperpolarized (129)Xe was used to create a 'blood-foam'. They found that oxygenation decreased T(1). Pivotal to their experiment is the continual and rapid exchange of hyperpolarized (129)Xe between the gas phase (within blood-foam bubbles) and the dissolved phase (in the skin of the bubbles); this necessitated a complicated analysis to extract the T(1) of (129)Xe in blood. In the present study, the experimental design minimizes gas exchange after the initial bolus of hyperpolarized (129)Xe has been bubbled through the sample. This study confirms that oxygenation increases the T(1) of (129)Xe in blood, from about 4 s in freshly drawn venous blood, to about 13 s in blood oxygenated to arterial levels, and also shifts the red blood cell resonance to higher frequency. Copyright 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Abbreviations used BOLD blood oxygen level dependent NOE nuclear overhouses effect PO(2) oxygen partial pressure RBC red blood cells RF radio frequency SNR signal-to-noise ratio.

  1. Hyperpolarized (129)Xe T (1) in oxygenated and deoxygenated blood

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albert, M. S.; Balamore, D.; Kacher, D. F.; Venkatesh, A. K.; Jolesz, F. A.

    2000-01-01

    The viability of the new technique of hyperpolarized (129)Xe MRI (HypX-MRI) for imaging organs other than the lungs depends on whether the spin-lattice relaxation time, T(1), of (129)Xe is sufficiently long in the blood. In previous experiments by the authors, the T(1) was found to be strongly dependent upon the oxygenation of the blood, with T(1) increasing from about 3 s in deoxygenated samples to about 10 s in oxygenated samples. Contrarily, Tseng et al. (J. Magn. Reson. 1997; 126: 79-86) reported extremely long T(1) values deduced from an indirect experiment in which hyperpolarized (129)Xe was used to create a 'blood-foam'. They found that oxygenation decreased T(1). Pivotal to their experiment is the continual and rapid exchange of hyperpolarized (129)Xe between the gas phase (within blood-foam bubbles) and the dissolved phase (in the skin of the bubbles); this necessitated a complicated analysis to extract the T(1) of (129)Xe in blood. In the present study, the experimental design minimizes gas exchange after the initial bolus of hyperpolarized (129)Xe has been bubbled through the sample. This study confirms that oxygenation increases the T(1) of (129)Xe in blood, from about 4 s in freshly drawn venous blood, to about 13 s in blood oxygenated to arterial levels, and also shifts the red blood cell resonance to higher frequency. Copyright 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Abbreviations used BOLD blood oxygen level dependent NOE nuclear overhouses effect PO(2) oxygen partial pressure RBC red blood cells RF radio frequency SNR signal-to-noise ratio.

  2. Hyperpolarized 131Xe NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stupic, Karl F.; Cleveland, Zackary I.; Pavlovskaya, Galina E.; Meersmann, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Hyperpolarized (hp) 131Xe with up to 2.2% spin polarization (i.e., 5000-fold signal enhancement at 9.4 T) was obtained after separation from the rubidium vapor of the spin-exchange optical pumping (SEOP) process. The SEOP was applied for several minutes in a stopped-flow mode, and the fast, quadrupolar-driven T1 relaxation of this spin I = 3/2 noble gas isotope required a rapid subsequent rubidium removal and swift transfer into the high magnetic field region for NMR detection. Because of the xenon density dependent 131Xe quadrupolar relaxation in the gas phase, the SEOP polarization build-up exhibits an even more pronounced dependence on xenon partial pressure than that observed in 129Xe SEOP. 131Xe is the only stable noble gas isotope with a positive gyromagnetic ratio and shows therefore a different relative phase between hp signal and thermal signal compared to all other noble gases. The gas phase 131Xe NMR spectrum displays a surface and magnetic field dependent quadrupolar splitting that was found to have additional gas pressure and gas composition dependence. The splitting was reduced by the presence of water vapor that presumably influences xenon-surface interactions. The hp 131Xe spectrum shows differential line broadening, suggesting the presence of strong adsorption sites. Beyond hp 131Xe NMR spectroscopy studies, a general equation for the high temperature, thermal spin polarization, P, for spin I⩾1/2 nuclei is presented.

  3. Hyperpolarized 131Xe NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Stupic, Karl F.; Cleveland, Zackary I.; Pavlovskaya, Galina E.; Meersmann, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Hyperpolarized (hp) 131Xe with up to 2.2% spin polarization (i.e., 5000-fold signal enhancement at 9.4 T) was obtained after separation from the rubidium vapor of the spin-exchange optical pumping (SEOP) process. The SEOP was applied for several minutes in a stopped-flow mode, and the fast, quadrupolar-driven T1 relaxation of this spin I = 3/2 noble gas isotope required a rapid subsequent rubidium removal and swift transfer into the high magnetic field region for NMR detection. Because of the xenon density dependent 131Xe quadrupolar relaxation in the gas phase, the SEOP polarization build-up exhibits an even more pronounced dependence on xenon partial pressure than that observed in 129Xe SEOP. 131Xe is the only stable noble gas isotope with a positive gyromagnetic ratio and shows therefore a different relative phase between hp signal and thermal signal compared to all other noble gases. The gas phase 131Xe NMR spectrum displays a surface and magnetic field dependent quadrupolar splitting that was found to have additional gas pressure and gas composition dependence. The splitting was reduced by the presence of water vapor that presumably influences xenon-surface interactions. The hp 131Xe spectrum shows differential line broadening, suggesting the presence of strong adsorption sites. Beyond hp 131Xe NMR spectroscopy studies, a general equation for the high temperature, thermal spin polarization, P, for spin I⩾1/2 nuclei is presented. PMID:21051249

  4. Hyperpolarized NMR Probes for Biological Assays

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Sebastian; Jensen, Pernille R.; Karlsson, Magnus; Lerche, Mathilde H.

    2014-01-01

    During the last decade, the development of nuclear spin polarization enhanced (hyperpolarized) molecular probes has opened up new opportunities for studying the inner workings of living cells in real time. The hyperpolarized probes are produced ex situ, introduced into biological systems and detected with high sensitivity and contrast against background signals using high resolution NMR spectroscopy. A variety of natural, derivatized and designed hyperpolarized probes has emerged for diverse biological studies including assays of intracellular reaction progression, pathway kinetics, probe uptake and export, pH, redox state, reactive oxygen species, ion concentrations, drug efficacy or oncogenic signaling. These probes are readily used directly under natural conditions in biofluids and are often directly developed and optimized for cellular assays, thus leaving little doubt about their specificity and utility under biologically relevant conditions. Hyperpolarized molecular probes for biological NMR spectroscopy enable the unbiased detection of complex processes by virtue of the high spectral resolution, structural specificity and quantifiability of NMR signals. Here, we provide a survey of strategies used for the selection, design and use of hyperpolarized NMR probes in biological assays, and describe current limitations and developments. PMID:24441771

  5. Hyperpolarized Xenon Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) of Building Stone Materials

    PubMed Central

    Mauri, Michele; Simonutti, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    We have investigated several building stone materials, including minerals and rocks, using continuous flow hyperpolarized xenon (CF-HP) NMR spectroscopy to probe the surface composition and porosity. Chemical shift and line width values are consistent with petrographic information. Rare upfield shifts were measured and attributed to the presence of transition metal cations on the surface. The evolution of freshly cleaved rocks exposed to the atmosphere was also characterized. The CF-HP 129Xe NMR technique is non-destructive and it could complement currently used techniques, like porosimetry and microscopy, providing additional information on the chemical nature of the rock surface and its evolution.

  6. Hyperpolarized noble gases as contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xin

    2011-01-01

    Hyperpolarized noble gases ((3)He and (129)Xe) can provide NMR signal enhancements of 10,000 to 100,000 times that of thermally polarized gases and have shown great potential for applications in lung magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) by greatly enhancing the sensitivity and contrast. These gases obtain a highly polarized state by employing a spin exchange optical pumping technique. In this chapter, the underlying physics of spin exchange optical pumping for production of hyperpolarized noble gases is explained and the basic components and procedures for building a polarizer are described. The storage and delivery strategies of hyperpolarized gases for in vivo imaging are discussed. Many of the problems that are likely to be encountered in practical experiments and the corresponding detailed approaches to overcome them are also discussed.

  7. Do twisted laser beams evoke nuclear hyperpolarization?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, A. B.; Andrews, D. L.; Rohrbach, A.; Gohn-Kreuz, C.; Shatokhin, V. N.; Kiselev, V. G.; Hennig, J.; von Elverfeldt, D.; Hövener, J.-B.

    2016-07-01

    The hyperpolarization of nuclear spins promises great advances in chemical analysis and medical diagnosis by substantially increasing the sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Current methods to produce a hyperpolarized sample, however, are arduous, time-consuming or costly and require elaborate equipment. Recently, a much simpler approach was introduced that holds the potential, if harnessed appropriately, to revolutionize the production of hyperpolarized spins. It was reported that high levels of hyperpolarization in nuclear spins can be created by irradiation with a laser beam carrying orbital angular momentum (twisted light). Aside from these initial reports however, no further experimental verification has been presented. In addition, this effect has so far evaded a critical theoretical examination. In this contribution, we present the first independent attempt to reproduce the effect. We exposed a sample of immersion oil or a fluorocarbon liquid that was placed within a low-field NMR spectrometer to Laguerre-Gaussian and Bessel laser beams at a wavelength of 514.5 nm and various topological charges. We acquired 1H and 19F NMR free induction decay data, either during or alternating with the irradiation that was parallel to B0. We observed an irregular increase in NMR signal in experiments where the sample was exposed to beams with higher values of the topological charge. However, at no time did the effect reach statistical significance of 95%. Given the measured sensitivity of our setup, we estimate that a possible effect did not exceed a hyperpolarization (at 5 mT) of 0.14-6%, depending on the assumed hyperpolarized volume. It should be noted though, that there were some differences between our setup and the previous implementation of the experiment, which may have inhibited the full incidence of this effect. To approach a theoretical description of this effect, we considered the interaction of an electron with a plane wave, which is known to be

  8. NMR and MRI of blood-dissolved hyperpolarized Xe-129 in different hollow-fiber membranes.

    PubMed

    Amor, Nadia; Hamilton, Kathrin; Küppers, Markus; Steinseifer, Ulrich; Appelt, Stephan; Blümich, Bernhard; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas

    2011-11-18

    Magnetic resonance of hyperpolarized (129)Xe has found a wide field of applications in the analysis of biologically relevant fluids. Recently, it has been shown that the dissolution of hyperpolarized gas into the fluid via hollow-fiber membranes leads to bubble-free (129)Xe augmentation, and thus to an enhanced signal. In addition, hollow-fiber membranes permit a continuous operation mode. Herein, a quantitative magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy analysis of a customized hollow-fiber membrane module is presented. Different commercial hollow-fiber membrane types are compared with regard to their (129)Xe dissolution efficiency into porcine blood, its constituents, and other fluids. The presented study gives new insight into the suitability of these hollow-fiber membrane types for hyperpolarized gas dissolution setups.

  9. Hyperpolarization/depolarization on human spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Calzada, L; Salazar, E L; Macias, H

    1991-01-01

    The accumulation of the lipophilic cation radiolabeled triphenylmethylphosphonium (TPMP+) was utilized to determine the resting membrane potential across the plasma membrane (psi) of human sperm. Washed sperm were suspended and incubated in low-K+ and high-K+ medium and allowed to take up the cation to a steady state (20 min at 37 degrees C). By using this differential, the value obtained was inserted in the Nernst equation and the value yielded a psi of -69 +/- 2 mV. When the Na+ or K+ concentration is high in the medium, the accumulation of TPMP+ in the membrane sperm cells was increased or decreased, respectively, inducing hyperpolarization and depolarization of the membrane 20% and 85%, respectively. The presence of divalent cations Zn++ and Mg++ in the incubation medium both induced a hyperpolarization of 10% and 8.6%, respectively. The addition of specific reagents such as p-chloromercuribenzenosulfonate and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid sodium salt both decreased the psi 35% and 58%, respectively. The agents acting on the sperm cell membrane, such as dithiothreitol and progesterone, both induced hyperpolarization and depolarization of the membrane 16% and 40%, respectively. The presence of propranolol and L-alpha-lysophosphatidylcholine, which affect the ionic gradients present across the plasma membrane, both induced a depolarization from 43% and 92%, respectively. Finally the psi was glucose-dependent. The result of these studies was that, by the use of agents causing hyperpolarization or depolarization, we obtained changes in the psi of -83.4 +/- 2.2 mV, until -6 +/- 0.6 mV changes of -76.8 +/- 2 mV translated across the sperm cell membrane.

  10. Hyperpolarization Of Phosphorus Donors In Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorte, Eric; Baker, William; McCamey, Dane; Laicher, Gernot; Boehme, Christoph; Saam, Brian

    2008-10-01

    Silicon phosphorus (Si:P) is a model system for investigating spin effects in solid state materials. Recently, members of this group demonstrated a simple method for optically inducing a non-equilibrium state of spin hyperpolarization in phosphorus doped silicon by exploiting a modified Overhauser process. The ability to pump high nuclear spin polarizations in this system could have far reaching technological implications for many fields. For example, hyperpolarized silicon nanoparticles have the potential to improve contrast in magnetic resonance imaging. Additionally, well-characterized quantum spin states have the potential to be useful as quantum qubits. Our current work attempts to extend these recent electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and electrically detected magnetic resonance (EDMR) measurements to direct nuclear magnetic resonance measurement of the hyperpolarized phosphorus nuclei. In this talk we will report on our current efforts to measure ^31P spin hyper-antipolarization after the sample is briefly exposed to an inert room temperature environment. We demonstrate the procedure of ^31P polarization measurement through low field electron spin resonance as a precursor to direct NMR measurement.

  11. Hyperpolarized Gas MRI: Technique and Applications

    PubMed Central

    McAdams, Holman P.; Kaushik, S. Sivaram; Driehuys, Bastiaan

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Functional imaging today offers a rich world of information that is more sensitive to changes in lung structure and function than traditionally obtained pulmonary function tests. Hyperpolarized helium (3He) and xenon (129Xe) MR imaging of the lungs provided new sensitive contrast mechanisms to probe changes in pulmonary ventilation, microstructure and gas exchange. With the recent scarcity in the supply of 3He the field of hyperpolarized gas imaging shifted to the use of cheaper and naturally available 129Xe. Xenon is well tolerated and recent technical advances have ensured that the 129Xe image quality is on par with that of 3He. The added advantage of 129Xe is its solubility in pulmonary tissue, which allows exploring specific lung function characteristics involved in gas exchange and alveolar oxygenation. With a plethora of contrast mechanisms, hyperpolarized gases and 129Xe in particular, stands to be an excellent probe of pulmonary structure and function, and provide sensitive and non-invasive biomarkers for a wide variety of pulmonary diseases. PMID:25952516

  12. A platform for designing hyperpolarized magnetic resonance chemical probes

    PubMed Central

    Nonaka, Hiroshi; Hata, Ryunosuke; Doura, Tomohiro; Nishihara, Tatsuya; Kumagai, Keiko; Akakabe, Mai; Tsuda, Masashi; Ichikawa, Kazuhiro; Sando, Shinsuke

    2013-01-01

    Hyperpolarization is a highly promising technique for improving the sensitivity of magnetic resonance chemical probes. Here we report [15N, D9]trimethylphenylammonium as a platform for designing a variety of hyperpolarized magnetic resonance chemical probes. The platform structure shows a remarkably long 15N spin–lattice relaxation value (816 s, 14.1 T) for retaining its hyperpolarized spin state. The extended lifetime enables the detection of the hyperpolarized 15N signal of the platform for several tens of minutes and thus overcomes the intrinsic short analysis time of hyperpolarized probes. Versatility of the platform is demonstrated by applying it to three types of hyperpolarized chemical probes: one each for sensing calcium ions, reactive oxygen species (hydrogen peroxide) and enzyme activity (carboxyl esterase). All of the designed probes achieve high sensitivity with rapid reactions and chemical shift changes, which are sufficient to allow sensitive and real-time monitoring of target molecules by 15N magnetic resonance. PMID:24022444

  13. Transmembrane exchange of hyperpolarized 13C-urea in human erythrocytes: subminute timescale kinetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Pagès, Guilhem; Puckeridge, Max; Liangfeng, Guo; Tan, Yee Ling; Jacob, Chacko; Garland, Marc; Kuchel, Philip W

    2013-11-05

    The rate of exchange of urea across the membranes of human erythrocytes (red blood cells) was quantified on the 1-s to 2-min timescale. (13)C-urea was hyperpolarized and subjected to rapid dissolution and the previously reported (partial) resolution of (13)C NMR resonances from the molecules inside and outside red blood cells in suspensions was observed. This enabled a stopped-flow type of experiment to measure the (initially) zero-trans transport of urea with sequential single-pulse (13)C NMR spectra, every second for up to ~2 min. Data were analyzed using Bayesian reasoning and a Markov chain Monte Carlo method with a set of simultaneous nonlinear differential equations that described nuclear magnetic relaxation combined with transmembrane exchange. Our results contribute to quantitative understanding of urea-exchange kinetics in the whole body; and the methodological approach is likely to be applicable to other cellular systems and tissues in vivo.

  14. Nanodiamond-enhanced MRI via in situ hyperpolarization

    PubMed Central

    Waddington, David E. J.; Sarracanie, Mathieu; Zhang, Huiliang; Salameh, Najat; Glenn, David R.; Rej, Ewa; Gaebel, Torsten; Boele, Thomas; Walsworth, Ronald L.; Reilly, David J.; Rosen, Matthew S.

    2017-01-01

    Nanodiamonds are of interest as nontoxic substrates for targeted drug delivery and as highly biostable fluorescent markers for cellular tracking. Beyond optical techniques, however, options for noninvasive imaging of nanodiamonds in vivo are severely limited. Here, we demonstrate that the Overhauser effect, a proton–electron polarization transfer technique, can enable high-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of nanodiamonds in water at room temperature and ultra-low magnetic field. The technique transfers spin polarization from paramagnetic impurities at nanodiamond surfaces to 1H spins in the surrounding water solution, creating MRI contrast on-demand. We examine the conditions required for maximum enhancement as well as the ultimate sensitivity of the technique. The ability to perform continuous in situ hyperpolarization via the Overhauser mechanism, in combination with the excellent in vivo stability of nanodiamond, raises the possibility of performing noninvasive in vivo tracking of nanodiamond over indefinitely long periods of time. PMID:28443626

  15. Nanodiamond-enhanced MRI via in situ hyperpolarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waddington, David E. J.; Sarracanie, Mathieu; Zhang, Huiliang; Salameh, Najat; Glenn, David R.; Rej, Ewa; Gaebel, Torsten; Boele, Thomas; Walsworth, Ronald L.; Reilly, David J.; Rosen, Matthew S.

    2017-04-01

    Nanodiamonds are of interest as nontoxic substrates for targeted drug delivery and as highly biostable fluorescent markers for cellular tracking. Beyond optical techniques, however, options for noninvasive imaging of nanodiamonds in vivo are severely limited. Here, we demonstrate that the Overhauser effect, a proton-electron polarization transfer technique, can enable high-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of nanodiamonds in water at room temperature and ultra-low magnetic field. The technique transfers spin polarization from paramagnetic impurities at nanodiamond surfaces to 1H spins in the surrounding water solution, creating MRI contrast on-demand. We examine the conditions required for maximum enhancement as well as the ultimate sensitivity of the technique. The ability to perform continuous in situ hyperpolarization via the Overhauser mechanism, in combination with the excellent in vivo stability of nanodiamond, raises the possibility of performing noninvasive in vivo tracking of nanodiamond over indefinitely long periods of time.

  16. Hyperpolarized water as an authentic magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent

    PubMed Central

    McCarney, Evan R.; Armstrong, Brandon D.; Lingwood, Mark D.; Han, Songi

    2007-01-01

    Pure water in a highly 1H spin-polarized state is proposed as a contrast-agent-free contrast agent to visualize its macroscopic evolution in aqueous media by MRI. Remotely enhanced liquids for image contrast (RELIC) utilizes a 1H signal of water that is enhanced outside the sample in continuous-flow mode and immediately delivered to the sample to obtain maximum contrast between entering and bulk fluids. Hyperpolarization suggests an ideal contrast mechanism to highlight the ubiquitous and specific function of water in physiology, biology, and materials because the physiological, chemical, and macroscopic function of water is not altered by the degree of magnetization. We present an approach that is capable of instantaneously enhancing the 1H MRI signal by up to 2 orders of magnitude through the Overhauser effect under ambient conditions at 0.35 tesla by using highly spin-polarized unpaired electrons that are covalently immobilized onto a porous, water-saturated gel matrix. The continuous polarization of radical-free flowing water allowed us to distinctively visualize vortices in model reactors and dispersion patterns through porous media. A 1H signal enhancement of water by a factor of −10 and −100 provides for an observation time of >4 and 7 s, respectively, upon its injection into fluids with a T1 relaxation time of >1.5 s. The implications for chemical engineering or biomedical applications of using hyperpolarized solvents or physiological fluids to visualize mass transport and perfusion with high and authentic MRI contrast originating from water itself, and not from foreign contrast agents, are immediate. PMID:17264210

  17. Hyperpolarized water as an authentic magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent.

    PubMed

    McCarney, Evan R; Armstrong, Brandon D; Lingwood, Mark D; Han, Songi

    2007-02-06

    Pure water in a highly (1)H spin-polarized state is proposed as a contrast-agent-free contrast agent to visualize its macroscopic evolution in aqueous media by MRI. Remotely enhanced liquids for image contrast (RELIC) utilizes a (1)H signal of water that is enhanced outside the sample in continuous-flow mode and immediately delivered to the sample to obtain maximum contrast between entering and bulk fluids. Hyperpolarization suggests an ideal contrast mechanism to highlight the ubiquitous and specific function of water in physiology, biology, and materials because the physiological, chemical, and macroscopic function of water is not altered by the degree of magnetization. We present an approach that is capable of instantaneously enhancing the (1)H MRI signal by up to 2 orders of magnitude through the Overhauser effect under ambient conditions at 0.35 tesla by using highly spin-polarized unpaired electrons that are covalently immobilized onto a porous, water-saturated gel matrix. The continuous polarization of radical-free flowing water allowed us to distinctively visualize vortices in model reactors and dispersion patterns through porous media. A (1)H signal enhancement of water by a factor of -10 and -100 provides for an observation time of >4 and 7 s, respectively, upon its injection into fluids with a T(1) relaxation time of >1.5 s. The implications for chemical engineering or biomedical applications of using hyperpolarized solvents or physiological fluids to visualize mass transport and perfusion with high and authentic MRI contrast originating from water itself, and not from foreign contrast agents, are immediate.

  18. Perfusion Imaging with a Freely Diffusible Hyperpolarized Contrast Agent

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Aaron K.; Vinogradov, Elena; Wang, Xiaoen; Lenkinski, Robert E.; Alsop, David C.

    2011-01-01

    Contrast agents that can diffuse freely into or within tissue have numerous attractive features for perfusion imaging. Here we present preliminary data illustrating the suitability of hyperpolarized 13C labeled 2-methylpropan-2-ol (also known as dimethylethanol, tertiary butyl alcohol and tert-butanol) as a freely diffusible contrast agent for magnetic resonance perfusion imaging. Dynamic 13C images acquired in rat brain with a balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) sequence following administration of hyperpolarized 2-methylpropan-2-ol show that this agent can be imaged with 2–4s temporal resolution, 2mm slice thickness, and 700 micron in-plane resolution while retaining adequate signal-to-noise ratio. 13C relaxation measurements on 2-methylpropan-2-ol in blood at 9.4T yield T1=46±4s and T2=0.55±0.03s. In the rat brain at 4.7T, analysis of the temporal dynamics of the bSSFP image intensity in tissue and venous blood indicate that 2-methylpropan-2-ol has a T2 of roughly 2–4s and a T1 of 43±24s. In addition, the images indicate that 2-methylpropan-2-ol is freely diffusible in brain and hence has a long residence time in tissue; this in turn makes it possible to image the agent continuously for tens of seconds. These characteristics show that 2-methylpropan-2-ol is a promising agent for robust and quantitative perfusion imaging in the brain and body. PMID:21432901

  19. Hyperpolarized and inert gas MRI: the future.

    PubMed

    Couch, Marcus J; Blasiak, Barbara; Tomanek, Boguslaw; Ouriadov, Alexei V; Fox, Matthew S; Dowhos, Krista M; Albert, Mitchell S

    2015-04-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a potentially ideal imaging modality for noninvasive, nonionizing, and longitudinal assessment of disease. Hyperpolarized (HP) agents have been developed in the past 20 years for MR imaging, and they have the potential to vastly improve MRI sensitivity for the diagnosis and management of various diseases. The polarization of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-sensitive nuclei other than (1)H (e.g., (3)He, (129)Xe) can be enhanced by a factor of up to 100,000 times above thermal equilibrium levels, which enables direct detection of the HP agent with no background signal. In this review, a number of HP media applications in MR imaging are discussed, including HP (3)He and (129)Xe lung imaging, HP (129)Xe brain imaging, and HP (129)Xe biosensors. Inert fluorinated gas MRI, which is a new lung imaging technique that does not require hyperpolarization, is also briefly discussed. This technique will likely be an important future direction for the HP gas lung imaging community.

  20. Silicon Nanoparticles as Hyperpolarized Magnetic Resonance Imaging Agents

    PubMed Central

    Aptekar, Jacob W.; Cassidy, Maja C.; Johnson, Alexander C.; Barton, Robert A.; Lee, Menyoung; Ogier, Alexander C.; Vo, Chinh; Anahtar, Melis N.; Ren, Yin; Bhatia, Sangeeta N.; Ramanathan, Chandrasekhar; Cory, David G.; Hill, Alison L.; Mair, Ross W.; Rosen, Matthew S.; Walsworth, Ronald L.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging of hyperpolarized nuclei provides high image contrast with little or no background signal. To date, in-vivo applications of pre-hyperpolarized materials have been limited by relatively short nuclear spin relaxation times. Here, we investigate silicon nanoparticles as a new type of hyperpolarized magnetic resonance imaging agent. Nuclear spin relaxation times for a variety of Si nanoparticles are found to be remarkably long, ranging from many minutes to hours at room temperature, allowing hyperpolarized nanoparticles to be transported, administered, and imaged on practical time scales. Additionally, we demonstrate that Si nanoparticles can be surface functionalized using techniques common to other biologically targeted nanoparticle systems. These results suggest that Si nanoparticles can be used as a targetable, hyperpolarized magnetic resonance imaging agent with a large range of potential applications. PMID:19950973

  1. Kinetic Modeling and Constrained Reconstruction of Hyperpolarized [1-13C]-Pyruvate Offers Improved Metabolic Imaging of Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Bankson, James A.; Walker, Christopher M.; Ramirez, Marc S.; Stefan, Wolfgang; Fuentes, David; Merritt, Matthew E.; Lee, Jaehyuk; Sandulache, Vlad C.; Chen, Yunyun; Phan, Liem; Chou, Ping-Chieh; Rao, Arvind; Yeung, Sai-Ching J; Lee, Mong-Hong; Schellingerhout, Dawid; Conrad, Charles A.; Malloy, Craig; Sherry, A. Dean; Lai, Stephen Y.; Hazle, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Hyperpolarized [1-13C]-pyruvate has shown tremendous promise as an agent for imaging tumor metabolism with unprecedented sensitivity and specificity. Imaging hyperpolarized substrates by magnetic resonance is unlike traditional MRI because signals are highly transient and their spatial distribution varies continuously over their observable lifetime. Therefore, new imaging approaches are needed to ensure optimal measurement under these circumstances. Constrained reconstruction algorithms can integrate prior information, including biophysical models of the substrate/target interaction, to reduce the amount of data that is required for image analysis and reconstruction. In this study, we show that metabolic MRI with hyperpolarized pyruvate is biased by tumor perfusion, and present a new pharmacokinetic model for hyperpolarized substrates that accounts for these effects. The suitability of this model is confirmed by statistical comparison to alternates using data from 55 dynamic spectroscopic measurements in normal animals and murine models of anaplastic thyroid cancer, glioblastoma, and triple-negative breast cancer. The kinetic model was then integrated into a constrained reconstruction algorithm and feasibility was tested using significantly under-sampled imaging data from tumor-bearing animals. Compared to naïve image reconstruction, this approach requires far fewer signal-depleting excitations and focuses analysis and reconstruction on new information that is uniquely available from hyperpolarized pyruvate and its metabolites, thus improving the reproducibility and accuracy of metabolic imaging measurements. PMID:26420214

  2. 15N Hyperpolarization by Reversible Exchange Using SABRE-SHEATH

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    NMR signal amplification by reversible exchange (SABRE) is a NMR hyperpolarization technique that enables nuclear spin polarization enhancement of molecules via concurrent chemical exchange of a target substrate and parahydrogen (the source of spin order) on an iridium catalyst. Recently, we demonstrated that conducting SABRE in microtesla fields provided by a magnetic shield enables up to 10% 15N-polarization (Theis, T.; et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc.2015, 137, 1404). Hyperpolarization on 15N (and heteronuclei in general) may be advantageous because of the long-lived nature of the hyperpolarization on 15N relative to the short-lived hyperpolarization of protons conventionally hyperpolarized by SABRE, in addition to wider chemical shift dispersion and absence of background signal. Here we show that these unprecedented polarization levels enable 15N magnetic resonance imaging. We also present a theoretical model for the hyperpolarization transfer to heteronuclei, and detail key parameters that should be optimized for efficient 15N-hyperpolarization. The effects of parahydrogen pressure, flow rate, sample temperature, catalyst-to-substrate ratio, relaxation time (T1), and reversible oxygen quenching are studied on a test system of 15N-pyridine in methanol-d4. Moreover, we demonstrate the first proof-of-principle 13C-hyperpolarization using this method. This simple hyperpolarization scheme only requires access to parahydrogen and a magnetic shield, and it provides large enough signal gains to enable one of the first 15N images (2 × 2 mm2 resolution). Importantly, this method enables hyperpolarization of molecular sites with NMR T1 relaxation times suitable for biomedical imaging and spectroscopy. PMID:25960823

  3. Sodium–calcium exchanger contributes to membrane hyperpolarization of intact endothelial cells from rat aorta during acetylcholine stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Bondarenko, Alexander

    2004-01-01

    The role of sodium–calcium exchanger in acetylcholine (Ach)-induced hyperpolarization of intact endothelial cells was studied in excised rat aorta. The membrane potential was recorded using perforated patch-clamp technique. The mean resting potential of endothelial cells was −44.1±1.4 mV. A selective inhibitor of sodium–calcium exchanger benzamil (100 μM) had no significant effect on resting membrane potential, but reversibly decreased the amplitude of sustained Ach-induced endothelial hyperpolarization from 20.9±1.4 to 5.7±1.1 mV when applied during the plateau phase. The blocker of reversed mode of the exchanger KB-R7943 (2-[2-[4-(4-nitrobenzyloxy)phenyl]ethyl]isothiourea methanesulfonate, 20 μM) reversibly decreased the amplitude of sustained Ach-induced hyperpolarization from 20.5±2.9 to 7.5±1.8 mV. Introduction of tetraethylammonium (10 mM) in the continuous presence of Ach decreased the sustained phase of hyperpolarization from 17.9±1.5 by 12.9±0.9 mV. Subsequent addition of 20 μM KB-R7943 further depolarized endothelial cells by 4.8±1.1 mV. Substituting external sodium with N-methyl D-glucamine during the plateau phase of Ach-evoked hyperpolarization reversibly decreased the hyperpolarization from −61.8±2.7 to −54.2±1.9 mV. In the majority of preparations, the initial response to removal of external sodium was a transient further rise in the membrane potential of several mV. Sodium ionophore monensin hyperpolarized endothelium by 10.3±0.7 mV. The inhibitory effect of benzamil on Ach-induced endothelial sustained hyperpolarization was observed in endothelium mechanically isolated from smooth muscle. These results suggest that the sodium–calcium exchanger of intact endothelial cells is able to operate in reverse following stimulation by Ach, contributing to sustained hyperpolarization. Myoendothelial electrical communications do not mediate the effect of blockers of sodium–calcium exchanger. PMID:15289290

  4. Hyperpolarized 129Xe MRI of the Human Lung

    PubMed Central

    Mugler, John P.; Altes, Talissa A.

    2012-01-01

    By permitting direct visualization of the airspaces of the lung, MR imaging using hyperpolarized gases provides unique strategies for evaluating pulmonary structure and function. Although the vast majority of research in humans has been performed using hyperpolarized 3He, recent contraction in the supply of 3He and consequent increases in price have turned attention to the alternative agent, hyperpolarized 129Xe. Compared to 3He, 129Xe yields reduced signal due to its smaller magnetic moment. Nonetheless, taking advantage of advances in gas-polarization technology, recent studies in humans using techniques for measuring ventilation, diffusion, and partial pressure of oxygen have demonstrated results for hyperpolarized 129Xe comparable to those previously demonstrated using hyperpolarized 3He. In addition, xenon has the advantage of readily dissolving in lung tissue and blood following inhalation, which makes hyperpolarized 129Xe particularly attractive for exploring certain characteristics of lung function, such as gas exchange and uptake, which cannot be accessed using 3He. Preliminary results from methods for imaging 129Xe dissolved in the human lung suggest that these approaches will provide new opportunities for quantifying relationships among gas delivery, exchange, and transport, and thus show substantial potential to broaden our understanding of lung disease. Finally, recent changes in the commercial landscape of the hyperpolarized-gas field now make it possible for this innovative technology to move beyond the research lab. PMID:23355432

  5. Biomedical imaging with hyperpolarized noble gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruppert, Kai

    2014-11-01

    Hyperpolarized noble gases (HNGs), polarized to approximately 50% or higher, have led to major advances in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of porous structures and air-filled cavities in human subjects, particularly the lung. By boosting the available signal to a level about 100 000 times higher than that at thermal equilibrium, air spaces that would otherwise appear as signal voids in an MR image can be revealed for structural and functional assessments. This review discusses how HNG MR imaging differs from conventional proton MR imaging, how MR pulse sequence design is affected and how the properties of gas imaging can be exploited to obtain hitherto inaccessible information in humans and animals. Current and possible future imaging techniques, and their application in the assessment of normal lung function as well as certain lung diseases, are described.

  6. Biomedical imaging with hyperpolarized noble gases.

    PubMed

    Ruppert, Kai

    2014-11-01

    Hyperpolarized noble gases (HNGs), polarized to approximately 50% or higher, have led to major advances in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of porous structures and air-filled cavities in human subjects, particularly the lung. By boosting the available signal to a level about 100 000 times higher than that at thermal equilibrium, air spaces that would otherwise appear as signal voids in an MR image can be revealed for structural and functional assessments. This review discusses how HNG MR imaging differs from conventional proton MR imaging, how MR pulse sequence design is affected and how the properties of gas imaging can be exploited to obtain hitherto inaccessible information in humans and animals. Current and possible future imaging techniques, and their application in the assessment of normal lung function as well as certain lung diseases, are described.

  7. Functional lung imaging using hyperpolarized gas MRI.

    PubMed

    Fain, Sean B; Korosec, Frank R; Holmes, James H; O'Halloran, Rafael; Sorkness, Ronald L; Grist, Thomas M

    2007-05-01

    The noninvasive assessment of lung function using imaging is increasingly of interest for the study of lung diseases, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma. Hyperpolarized gas MRI (HP MRI) has demonstrated the ability to detect changes in ventilation, perfusion, and lung microstructure that appear to be associated with both normal lung development and disease progression. The physical characteristics of HP gases and their application to MRI are presented with an emphasis on current applications. Clinical investigations using HP MRI to study asthma, COPD, cystic fibrosis, pediatric chronic lung disease, and lung transplant are reviewed. Recent advances in polarization, pulse sequence development for imaging with Xe-129, and prototype low magnetic field systems dedicated to lung imaging are highlighted as areas of future development for this rapidly evolving technology.

  8. Optical hyperpolarization of nitrogen donor spins in bulk diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loretz, M.; Takahashi, H.; Segawa, T. F.; Boss, J. M.; Degen, C. L.

    2017-02-01

    We report hyperpolarization of the electronic spins associated with substitutional nitrogen defects in bulk diamond crystals. Hyperpolarization is achieved by optical pumping of nitrogen vacancy centers followed by rapid cross relaxation at the energy level matching condition in a 51 mT bias field. The maximum observed donor spin polarization is 0.9 % , corresponding to an enhancement of 25 compared to the thermal Boltzmann polarization. A further accumulation of polarization is impeded by an anomalous optical saturation effect that we attribute to charge state conversion processes. Hyperpolarized nitrogen donors may form a useful resource for increasing the efficiency of diamond-based dynamic nuclear polarization devices.

  9. Hyperpolarized lithium-6 as a sensor of nanomolar contrast agents

    PubMed Central

    van Heeswijk, Ruud B.; Uffmann, Kai; Comment, Arnaud; Kurdzesau, Fiodar; Perazzolo, Chiara; Cudalbu, Cristina; Jannin, Sami; Konter, Jacobus A.; Hautle, Patrick; van den Brandt, Ben; Navon, Gil; van der Klink, Jacques J.; Gruetter, Rolf

    2009-01-01

    Lithium is widely used in psychotherapy. The 6Li isotope has a long intrinsic longitudinal relaxation time T1 on the order of minutes, making it an ideal candidate for hyperpolarization experiments. In the present study, we demonstrated that lithium-6 can be readily hyperpolarized within 30 min, while retaining a long polarization decay time on the order of a minute. We used the intrinsically long relaxation time for the detection of 500 nM contrast agent in vitro. Hyperpolarized lithium-6 was administered to the rat and its signal retained a decay time on the order of 70 s in vivo. Localization experiments imply that the lithium signal originated from within the brain and that it was detectable up to 5 min after administration. We conclude that the detection of sub-micromolar contrast agents using hyperpolarized NMR nuclei such as 6Li may provide a novel avenue for molecular imaging. PMID:19353663

  10. Hyperpolarized nanodiamond with long spin-relaxation times

    PubMed Central

    Rej, Ewa; Gaebel, Torsten; Boele, Thomas; Waddington, David E.J.; Reilly, David J.

    2015-01-01

    The use of hyperpolarized agents in magnetic resonance, such as 13C-labelled compounds, enables powerful new imaging and detection modalities that stem from a 10,000-fold boost in signal. A major challenge for the future of the hyperpolarization technique is the inherently short spin-relaxation times, typically <60 s for 13C liquid-state compounds, which limit the time that the signal remains boosted. Here we demonstrate that 1.1% natural abundance 13C spins in synthetic nanodiamond can be hyperpolarized at cryogenic and room temperature without the use of free radicals, and, owing to their solid-state environment, exhibit relaxation times exceeding 1 h. Combined with the already established applications of nanodiamonds in the life sciences as inexpensive fluorescent markers and non-cytotoxic substrates for gene and drug delivery, these results extend the theranostic capabilities of nanoscale diamonds into the domain of hyperpolarized magnetic resonance. PMID:26450570

  11. Hyperpolarized nanodiamond with long spin-relaxation times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rej, Ewa; Gaebel, Torsten; Boele, Thomas; Waddington, David E. J.; Reilly, David J.

    2015-10-01

    The use of hyperpolarized agents in magnetic resonance, such as 13C-labelled compounds, enables powerful new imaging and detection modalities that stem from a 10,000-fold boost in signal. A major challenge for the future of the hyperpolarization technique is the inherently short spin-relaxation times, typically <60 s for 13C liquid-state compounds, which limit the time that the signal remains boosted. Here we demonstrate that 1.1% natural abundance 13C spins in synthetic nanodiamond can be hyperpolarized at cryogenic and room temperature without the use of free radicals, and, owing to their solid-state environment, exhibit relaxation times exceeding 1 h. Combined with the already established applications of nanodiamonds in the life sciences as inexpensive fluorescent markers and non-cytotoxic substrates for gene and drug delivery, these results extend the theranostic capabilities of nanoscale diamonds into the domain of hyperpolarized magnetic resonance.

  12. LIGHT-SABRE enables efficient in-magnet catalytic hyperpolarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theis, Thomas; Truong, Milton; Coffey, Aaron M.; Chekmenev, Eduard Y.; Warren, Warren S.

    2014-11-01

    Nuclear spin hyperpolarization overcomes the sensitivity limitations of traditional NMR and MRI, but the most general method demonstrated to date (dynamic nuclear polarization) has significant limitations in scalability, cost, and complex apparatus design. As an alternative, signal amplification by reversible exchange (SABRE) of parahydrogen on transition metal catalysts can hyperpolarize a variety of substrates, but to date this scheme has required transfer of the sample to low magnetic field or very strong RF irradiation. Here we demonstrate "Low-Irradiation Generation of High Tesla-SABRE" (LIGHT-SABRE) which works with simple pulse sequences and low power deposition; it should be usable at any magnetic field and for hyperpolarization of many different nuclei. This approach could drastically reduce the cost and complexity of producing hyperpolarized molecules.

  13. EDH: endothelium-dependent hyperpolarization and microvascular signalling.

    PubMed

    Garland, C J; Dora, K A

    2017-01-01

    Endothelium-dependent hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF) is a powerful vasodilator influence in small resistance arteries and thus an important modulator of blood pressure and flow. As the name suggests, EDHF was thought to describe a diffusible factor stimulating smooth muscle hyperpolarization (and thus vasodilatation). However, this idea has evolved with the recognition that a factor can operate alongside the spread of hyperpolarizing current from the endothelium to the vascular smooth muscle (VSM). As such, the pathway is now termed endothelium-dependent hyperpolarization (EDH). EDH is activated by an increase in endothelial [Ca(2+) ]i , which stimulates two Ca(2+) -sensitive K channels, SKCa and IKCa . This was discovered because apamin and charybdotoxin applied in combination blocked EDHF responses, but iberiotoxin - a blocker of BKCa - was not able to substitute for charybdotoxin. SKCa and IKCa channels are arranged in endothelial microdomains, particularly within projections towards the adjacent smooth muscle, which are rich in IKCa channels and close to interendothelial gap junctions where SKCa channels, are prevalent. KCa activation hyperpolarizes endothelial cells, and K(+) efflux through them can act as a diffusible 'EDHF' by stimulating VSM Na(+) ,K(+) -ATPase and inwardly rectifying K channels (KIR ). In parallel, hyperpolarizing current spreads from the endothelium to the smooth muscle through myoendothelial gap junctions located on endothelial projections. The resulting radial EDH is complemented by the spread of 'conducted' hyperpolarization along the endothelium of arteries and arterioles to affect conducted vasodilatation (CVD). Retrograde CVD effectively integrates blood flow within the microcirculation, but how the underlying hyperpolarization is sustained is unclear. © 2016 Scandinavian Physiological Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Pulmonary Kinematics From Tagged Hyperpolarized Helium-3 MRI

    PubMed Central

    Tustison, Nicholas J.; Awate, Suyash P.; Cai, Jing; Altes, Talissa A.; Miller, G. Wilson; de Lange, Eduard E.; Mugler, John P.; Gee, James C.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To propose and test the feasibility of a novel method for quantifying 3-D regional pulmonary kinematics from hyperpolarized helium-3 tagged MRI in human subjects using a tailored image processing pipeline and a recently developed nonrigid registration framework. Materials and Methods Following image acquisition, inspiratory and expiratory tagged helium-3 MR images were preprocessed using various image filtering techniques to enhance the tag surfaces. Segmentation of the three orthogonal sets of tag planes in each lung produced distinct point-set representations of the tag surfaces. Using these labeled point-sets, deformation fields and corresponding strain maps were obtained via nonrigid point-set registration. Kinematic analysis was performed on three volunteers. Results Tag lines in inspiratory and expiratory images were co-registered producing a continuous 3-D correspondence mapping. Average displacement and directional strains were calculated in three subjects in the inferior, mid, and superior portions of the right and left lungs. As expected, the predominant direction of displacements with expiration is from inferior to superior. Conclusion Kinematic quantitation of pulmonary motion using tagged helium-3 MRI is feasible using the applied image preprocessing filtering techniques and nonrigid point-set registration. Potential benefits from regional pulmonary kinematic quantitation include the facilitation of diagnosis and local assessment of disease progression. PMID:20432362

  15. Quality assurance of PASADENA hyperpolarization for 13C biomolecules

    PubMed Central

    Hövener, Jan-Bernd; Chekmenev, Eduard Y.; Harris, Kent C.; Perman, William H.; Tran, Thao T.; Bhattacharya, Pratip

    2009-01-01

    Object Define MR quality assurance procedures for maximal PASADENA hyperpolarization of a biological 13C molecular imaging reagent. Materials and methods An automated PASADENA polarizer and a parahydrogen generator were installed. 13C enriched hydroxyethyl acrylate, 1-13C, 2,3,3-d3 (HEA), was converted to hyperpolarized hydroxyethyl propionate, 1-13C, 2,3,3-d3 (HEP) and fumaric acid, 1-13C, 2,3-d2 (FUM) to hyperpolarized succinic acid, 1-13C, 2,3-d2 (SUC), by reaction with parahydrogen and norbornadiene rhodium catalyst. Incremental optimization of successive steps in PASADENA was implemented. MR spectra and in vivo images of hyperpolarized 13C imaging agents were acquired at 1.5 and 4.7 T. Results Application of quality assurance (QA) criteria resulted in incremental optimization of the individual steps in PASADENA implementation. Optimal hyperpolarization of HEP of P = 20% was achieved by calibration of the NMR unit of the polarizer (B0 field strength ± 0.002 mT). Mean hyperpolarization of SUC, P = [15.3 ± 1.9]% (N = 16) in D2O, and P = [12.8 ± 3.1]% (N = 12) in H2O, was achieved every 5–8 min (range 13–20%). An in vivo 13C succinate image of a rat was produced. Conclusion PASADENA spin hyperpolarization of SUC to 15.3% in average was demonstrated (37,400 fold signal enhancement at 4.7 T). The biological fate of 13C succinate, a normally occurring cellular intermediate, might be monitored with enhanced sensitivity. PMID:19067009

  16. Translational applications of hyperpolarized 3He and 129Xe.

    PubMed

    Walkup, Laura L; Woods, Jason C

    2014-12-01

    Clinical magnetic resonance imaging of the lung is technologically challenging, yet over the past two decades hyperpolarized noble gas ((3)He and (129)Xe) imaging has demonstrated the ability to measure multiple pulmonary functional biomarkers. There is a growing need for non-ionizing, non-invasive imaging techniques due to increased concern about cancer risk from ionizing radiation, but the translation of hyperpolarized gas imaging to the pulmonary clinic has been stunted by limited access to the technology. New developments may open doors to greater access and more translation to clinical studies. Here we briefly review a few translational applications of hyperpolarized gas MRI in the contexts of ventilation, diffusion, and dissolved-phase imaging, as well as comparing and contrasting (3)He and (129)Xe gases for these applications. Simple static ventilation MRI reveals regions of the lung not participating in normal ventilation, and these defects have been observed in many pulmonary diseases. Biomarkers related to airspace size and connectivity can be quantified by apparent diffusion coefficient measurements of hyperpolarized gas, and have been shown to be more sensitive to small changes in lung morphology than standard clinical pulmonary functional tests and have been validated by quantitative histology. Parameters related to gas uptake and exchange and lung tissue density can be determined using (129)Xe dissolved-phase MRI. In most cases functional biomarkers can be determined via MRI of either gas, but for some applications one gas may be preferred, such as (3)He for long-range diffusion measurements and (129)Xe for dissolved-phase imaging. Greater access to hyperpolarized gas imaging coupled with newly developing therapeutics makes pulmonary medicine poised for a potential revolution, further adding to the prospects of personalized medicine already evidenced by advancements in molecular biology. Hyperpolarized gas researchers have the opportunity to

  17. Hyperpolarized Xenon for NMR and MRI Applications

    PubMed Central

    Witte, Christopher; Kunth, Martin; Döpfert, Jörg; Rossella, Federica; Schröder, Leif

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and imaging (MRI) suffer from intrinsic low sensitivity because even strong external magnetic fields of ~10 T generate only a small detectable net-magnetization of the sample at room temperature 1. Hence, most NMR and MRI applications rely on the detection of molecules at relative high concentration (e.g., water for imaging of biological tissue) or require excessive acquisition times. This limits our ability to exploit the very useful molecular specificity of NMR signals for many biochemical and medical applications. However, novel approaches have emerged in the past few years: Manipulation of the detected spin species prior to detection inside the NMR/MRI magnet can dramatically increase the magnetization and therefore allows detection of molecules at much lower concentration 2. Here, we present a method for polarization of a xenon gas mixture (2-5% Xe, 10% N2, He balance) in a compact setup with a ca. 16000-fold signal enhancement. Modern line-narrowed diode lasers allow efficient polarization 7 and immediate use of gas mixture even if the noble gas is not separated from the other components. The SEOP apparatus is explained and determination of the achieved spin polarization is demonstrated for performance control of the method. The hyperpolarized gas can be used for void space imaging, including gas flow imaging or diffusion studies at the interfaces with other materials 8,9. Moreover, the Xe NMR signal is extremely sensitive to its molecular environment 6. This enables the option to use it as an NMR/MRI contrast agent when dissolved in aqueous solution with functionalized molecular hosts that temporarily trap the gas 10,11. Direct detection and high-sensitivity indirect detection of such constructs is demonstrated in both spectroscopic and imaging mode. PMID:22986346

  18. Towards hyperpolarized 13C-succinate imaging of brain cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Pratip; Chekmenev, Eduard Y.; Perman, William H.; Harris, Kent C.; Lin, Alexander P.; Norton, Valerie A.; Tan, Chou T.; Ross, Brian D.; Weitekamp, Daniel P.

    2007-05-01

    We describe a novel 13C enriched precursor molecule, sodium 1- 13C acetylenedicarboxylate, which after hydrogenation by PASADENA (Parahydrogen and Synthesis Allows Dramatically Enhanced Nuclear Alignment) under controlled experimental conditions, becomes hyperpolarized 13C sodium succinate. Fast in vivo 3D FIESTA MR imaging demonstrated that, following carotid arterial injection, the hyperpolarized 13C-succinate appeared in the head and cerebral circulation of normal and tumor-bearing rats. At this time, no in vivo hyperpolarized signal has been localized to normal brain or brain tumor. On the other hand, ex vivo samples of brain harvested from rats bearing a 9L brain tumor, 1 h or more following in vivo carotid injection of hyperpolarized 13C sodium succinate, contained significant concentrations of the injected substrate, 13C sodium succinate, together with 13C maleate and succinate metabolites 1- 13C-glutamate, 5- 13C-glutamate, 1- 13C-glutamine and 5- 13C-glutamine. The 13C substrates and products were below the limits of NMR detection in ex vivo samples of normal brain consistent with an intact blood-brain barrier. These ex vivo results indicate that hyperpolarized 13C sodium succinate may become a useful tool for rapid in vivo identification of brain tumors, providing novel biomarkers in 13C MR spectral-spatial images.

  19. Calibration of RF transmitter voltages for hyperpolarized gas MRI.

    PubMed

    Bashir, Adil; Conradi, Mark S; Woods, Jason C; Quirk, James D; Yablonskiy, Ddmitriy A

    2009-01-01

    MRI with hyperpolarized gases, (3)He, (129)Xe, (13)C, and others, has the potential to become an important diagnostic technique for clinical imaging. Due to the nonreversible loss of magnetization in hyperpolarized gas imaging, the choice of the flip angle is a major factor that influences the signal intensity, and hence, the signal-to-noise ratio. Conventional automated radiofrequency (RF) calibration procedures for (1)H imaging are not suitable for hyperpolarized gas imaging. Herein, we have demonstrated a simple procedure for RF calibration for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with hyperpolarized gases that is easily adaptable to clinical settings. We have demonstrated that there exists a linear relationship between the RF transmitter voltages required to obtain the same nutation angle for protons (V(1H)) and hyperpolarized gas nuclei (V(3He)). For our (1)H and (3)He coils we found that V(3He) = 1.937 . V(1H) with correlation coefficient r(2) = 0.97. This calibration can be done as a one-time procedure during the routine quality assurance (QA) protocol. The proposed procedure was found to be extremely robust in routine scanning and provided an efficient method to achieve a desired flip angle, thus allowing optimum image quality.

  20. Hydrogen Sulfide as Endothelial Derived Hyperpolarizing Factor Sulfhydrates Potassium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Mustafa, Asif K.; Sikka, Gautam; Gazi, Sadia K.; Steppan, Jochen; Jung, Sung M.; Bhunia, Anil K.; Barodka, Viachaslau M.; Gazi, Farah K.; Barrow, Roxanne K.; Wang, Rui; Amzel, L. Mario; Berkowitz, Dan E.; Snyder, Solomon H.

    2011-01-01

    Rationale Nitric oxide, the classic endothelial derived relaxing factor (EDRF), acts via cyclic GMP and calcium without notably affecting membrane potential. A major component of EDRF activity derives from hyperpolarization and is termed endothelial derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF). Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a prominent EDRF, since mice lacking its biosynthetic enzyme, cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE), display pronounced hypertension with deficient vasorelaxant responses to acetylcholine. Objective The purpose of this study is to determine if H2S is a major physiologic EDHF. Methods and Results We now show that H2S is a major EDHF, as in blood vessels of CSE deleted mice hyperpolarization is virtually abolished. H2S acts by covalently modifying (sulfhydrating) the ATP-sensitive potassium channel, as mutating the site of sulfhydration prevents H2S-elicited hyperpolarization. The endothelial intermediate conductance (IKCa) and small conductance (SKCa) potassium channels mediate in part the effects of H2S, as selective IKCa and SKCa channel inhibitors, charybdotoxin and apamin, inhibit glibenclamide insensitive H2S induced vasorelaxation. Conclusions H2S is a major EDHF that causes vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cell hyperpolarization and vasorelaxation by activating the ATP-sensitive, intermediate conductance and small conductance potassium channels through cysteine S-sulfhydration. As EDHF activity is a principal determinant of vasorelaxation in numerous vascular beds, drugs influencing H2S biosynthesis offer therapeutic potential. PMID:21980127

  1. Towards hyperpolarized 13C-succinate imaging of brain cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Pratip; Chekmenev, Eduard Y.; Perman, William H.; Harris, Kent C.; Lin, Alexander P.; Norton, Valerie A.; Tan, Chou T.; Ross, Brian D.; Weitekamp, Daniel P.

    2009-01-01

    We describe a novel 13C enriched precursor molecule, sodium 1-13C acetylenedicarboxylate, which after hydrogenation by PASADE-NA (Parahydrogen and Synthesis Allows Dramatically Enhanced Nuclear Alignment) under controlled experimental conditions, becomes hyperpolarized 13C sodium succinate. Fast in vivo 3D FIESTA MR imaging demonstrated that, following carotid arterial injection, the hyperpolarized 13C-succinate appeared in the head and cerebral circulation of normal and tumor-bearing rats. At this time, no in vivo hyperpolarized signal has been localized to normal brain or brain tumor. On the other hand, ex vivo samples of brain harvested from rats bearing a 9L brain tumor, 1 h or more following in vivo carotid injection of hyperpolarized 13C sodium succinate, contained significant concentrations of the injected substrate, 13C sodium succinate, together with 13C maleate and succinate metabolites 1-13C-glutamate, 5-13C-glutamate, 1-13C-glutamine and 5-13C-glutamine. The 13C substrates and products were below the limits of NMR detection in ex vivo samples of normal brain consistent with an intact blood–brain barrier. These ex vivo results indicate that hyperpolarized 13C sodium succinate may become a useful tool for rapid in vivo identification of brain tumors, providing novel biomarkers in 13C MR spectral-spatial images. PMID:17303454

  2. Hyperpolarized Water to Study Protein-Ligand Interactions.

    PubMed

    Chappuis, Quentin; Milani, Jonas; Vuichoud, Basile; Bornet, Aurélien; Gossert, Alvar D; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey; Jannin, Sami

    2015-05-07

    The affinity between a chosen target protein and small molecules is a key aspect of drug discovery. Screening by popular NMR methods such as Water-LOGSY suffers from low sensitivity and from false positives caused by aggregated or denatured proteins. This work demonstrates that the sensitivity of Water-LOGSY can be greatly boosted by injecting hyperpolarized water into solutions of proteins and ligands. Ligand binding can be detected in a few seconds, whereas about 30 min is usually required without hyperpolarization. Hyperpolarized water also enhances proton signals of proteins at concentrations below 20 μM so that one can verify in a few seconds whether the proteins remain intact or have been denatured.

  3. A hyperpolarized choline molecular probe for monitoring acetylcholine synthesis.

    PubMed

    Allouche-Arnon, Hyla; Gamliel, Ayelet; Barzilay, Claudia M; Nalbandian, Ruppen; Gomori, J Moshe; Karlsson, Magnus; Lerche, Mathilde H; Katz-Brull, Rachel

    2011-01-01

    Choline as a reporter molecule has been investigated by in vivo magnetic resonance for almost three decades. Accumulation of choline metabolites (mainly the phosphorylated forms) had been observed in malignancy in preclinical models, ex-vivo, in vivo and in patients. The combined choline metabolite signal appears in (1) H-MRS of the brain and its relative intensity had been used as a diagnostic factor in various conditions. The advent of spin hyperpolarization methods for in vivo use has raised interest in the ability to follow the physiological metabolism of choline into acetylcholine in the brain. Here we present a stable-isotope labeled choline analog, [1,1,2,2-D(4) ,2-(13) C]choline chloride, that is suitable for this purpose. In this analog, the (13) C position showed 24% polarization in the liquid state, following DNP hyperpolarization. This nucleus also showed a long T(1) (35 s) at 11.8 T and 25 °C, which is a prerequisite for hyperpolarized studies. The chemical shift of this (13) C position differentiates choline and acetylcholine from each other and from the other water-soluble choline metabolites, namely phosphocholine and betaine. Enzymatic studies using an acetyltransferase enzyme showed the synthesis of the deuterated-acetylcholine form at thermal equilibrium conditions and in a hyperpolarized state. Analysis using a comprehensive model showed that the T(1) of the formed hyperpolarized [1,1,2,2-D(4) ,2-(13) C]acetylcholine was 34 s at 14.1 T and 37 °C. We conclude that [1,1,2,2-D(4) ,2-(13) C]choline chloride is a promising new molecular probe for hyperpolarized metabolic studies and discuss the factors related to its possible use in vivo.

  4. PASADENA hyperpolarization of 13C biomolecules: equipment design and installation

    PubMed Central

    Hövener, Jan-Bernd; Chekmenev, Eduard Y.; Harris, Kent C.; Perman, William H.; Robertson, Larry W.; Bhattacharya, Pratip

    2009-01-01

    Object The PASADENA method has achieved hyperpolarization of 16–20% (exceeding 40,000-fold signal enhancement at 4.7 T), in liquid samples of biological molecules relevant to in vivo MRI and MRS. However, there exists no commercial apparatus to perform this experiment conveniently and reproducibly on the routine basis necessary for translation of PASADENA to questions of biomedical importance. The present paper describes equipment designed for rapid production of six to eight liquid samples per hour with high reproducibility of hyperpolarization. Materials and methods Drawing on an earlier, but unpublished, prototype, we provide diagrams of a delivery circuit, a laminar-flow reaction chamber within a low field NMR contained in a compact, movable housing. Assembly instructions are provided from which a computer driven, semiautomated PASADENA polarizer can be constructed. Results Together with an available parahydrogen generator, the polarizer, which can be operated by a single investigator, completes one cycle of hyperpolarization each 52 s. Evidence of efficacy is presented. In contrast to competing, commercially available devices for dynamic nuclear polarization which characteristically require 90 min per cycle, PASADENA provides a low-cost alternative for high throughput. Conclusions This equipment is suited to investigators who have an established small animal NMR and wish to explore the potential of heteronuclear (13C and 15N) MRI, MRS, which harnesses the enormous sensitivity gain offered by hyperpolarization. PMID:19067008

  5. Probing alanine transaminase catalysis with hyperpolarized 13CD3-pyruvate

    PubMed Central

    Barb, A.W.; Hekmatyar, S.K.; Glushka, J.N.; Prestegard, J.H.

    2013-01-01

    Hyperpolarized metabolites offer a tremendous sensitivity advantage (>104 fold) when measuring flux and enzyme activity in living tissues by magnetic resonance methods. These sensitivity gains can also be applied to mechanistic studies that impose time and metabolite concentration limitations. Here we explore the use of hyperpolarization by dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) in mechanistic studies of alanine transaminase (ALT), a well-established biomarker of liver disease and cancer that converts pyruvate to alanine using glutamate as a nitrogen donor. A specific deuterated, 13C-enriched analog of pyruvic acid, 13C3D3-pyruvic acid, is demonstrated to have advantages in terms of detection by both direct 13C observation and indirect observation through methyl protons introduced by ALT-catalyzed H–D exchange. Exchange on injecting hyperpolarized 13C3D3-pyruvate into ALT dissolved in buffered 1H2O, combined with an experimental approach to measure proton incorporation, provided information on mechanistic details of transaminase action on a 1.5 s timescale. ALT introduced, on average, 0.8 new protons into the methyl group of the alanine produced, indicating the presence of an off-pathway enamine intermediate. The opportunities for exploiting mechanism-dependent molecular signatures as well as indirect detection of hyperpolarized 13C3-pyruvate and products in imaging applications are discussed. PMID:23357427

  6. Large Production of Hyperpolarized 129-Xe for MRI Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruset, Iulian; Hersman, F. W.; Distelbrink, Jan; Ketel, Stephen; Covrig, Silviu; Muradian, Iga; Sindile, Adrian

    2007-03-01

    Although 129-Xe was the first hyperpolarized gas to be used in MRI studies, the research community has focused on 3-He, mainly because of the larger quantities of hyperpolarized gas available. Xenon has advantages over helium, such as natural abundance, lower diffusion, and high solubility in blood. It presents a large frequency chemical shift when dissolved in blood, tissue, brain, or trapped in molecular cages. A new design of a high-flow low-pressure spin-exchange optical pumping Rb-Xe polarizer was recently demonstrated by our group. The concept of counterflowing the gas mixture against laser light and dividing the polarizing cell in three operational zones has resulted in an increase with over an order of magnitude in the output magnetization compared with previously reported polarizers. We were able to produce hyperpolarized xenon at 64% polarization for 0.3 liters/hour flow rate and 22% polarization at 6 liters/hour. We also demonstrated a new design of freezing and thawing hyperpolarized xenon with minimum losses. We will present the concept of the high-flow low-pressure counterflowing xenon polarizer, its performance, as well as new optical pumping laser technologies. We will discuss optimization plans for xenon polarizing systems based on experimental observed limitations and theoretical modeling.

  7. Responses of human sensory and motor axons to the release of ischaemia and to hyperpolarizing currents.

    PubMed

    Lin, Cindy S-Y; Kuwabara, Satoshi; Cappelen-Smith, Cecilia; Burke, David

    2002-06-15

    This study compared directly the post-ischaemic behaviour of sensory and motor axons in the human median nerve, focusing on the excitability changes produced by ischaemia and its release and by continuous polarizing DC. The decrease in threshold during ischaemia for 13 min was greater, the post-ischaemic increase in threshold was more rapid, and the return to the pre-ischaemic excitability took longer in sensory axons. However, a transient depolarizing threshold shift developed in sensory axons a few minutes after release of ischaemia. This pattern could not be reproduced by polarizing currents designed to mimic the probable pump-induced changes in membrane potential, even though the applied currents produced greater changes in threshold. Hyperpolarizing currents of equivalent intensity produced a greater increase in threshold for motor axons than sensory axons and, in studies of threshold electrotonus using graded hyperpolarizing DC, accommodation was greater in sensory than motor axons. The post-ischaemic changes in threshold were not uniform for axons of different threshold, whether sensory or motor, the threshold increase was usually less prominent for low-threshold axons. A transient post-ischaemic depolarization could be produced in motor axons with ischaemia of 20 min duration. Greater ischaemic and post-ischaemic changes in threshold for sensory axons could reflect greater dependence on the electrogenic Na+-K+ pump to maintain resting membrane potential and/or greater extracellular K+ accumulation in ischaemic sensory axons. Inward K+ currents due to extracellular K+ accumulation would then be more likely to trigger a depolarizing shift in membrane potential, the degree of K+ accumulation and pump activity being dependent on the duration of ischaemia. In sensory axons the greater tendency to accommodate to hyperpolarizing stimuli presumably contributes to shaping their post-ischaemic behaviour but is probably insufficient to explain why their behaviour

  8. Imaging pH with hyperpolarized 13C.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Ferdia A; Kettunen, Mikko I; Brindle, Kevin M

    2011-10-01

    pH is a fundamental physiological parameter that is tightly controlled by endogenous buffers. The acid-base balance is altered in many disease states, such as inflammation, ischemia and cancer. Despite the importance of pH, there are currently no routine methods for imaging the spatial distribution of pH in humans. The enormous gain in sensitivity afforded by dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) has provided a novel way in which to image tissue pH using MR, which has the potential to be translated into the clinic. This review explores the advantages and disadvantages of current pH imaging techniques and how they compare with DNP-based approaches for the measurement and imaging of pH with hyperpolarized (13)C. Intravenous injection of hyperpolarized (13)C-labeled bicarbonate results in the rapid production of hyperpolarized (13)CO(2) in the reaction catalyzed by carbonic anhydrase. As this reaction is close to equilibrium in the body and is pH dependent, the ratio of the (13)C signal intensities from H(13)CO(3)(-) and (13)CO(2), measured using MRS, can be used to calculate pH in vivo. The application of this technique to a murine tumor model demonstrated that it measured predominantly extracellular pH and could be mapped in the animal using spectroscopic imaging techniques. A second approach has been to use the production of hyperpolarized (13)CO(2) from hyperpolarized [1-(13)C]pyruvate to measure predominantly intracellular pH. In tissues with a high aerobic capacity, such as the heart, the hyperpolarized [1-(13)C]pyruvate undergoes rapid oxidative decarboxylation, catalyzed by intramitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase. Provided that there is sufficient carbonic anhydrase present to catalyze the rapid equilibration of the hyperpolarized (13)C label between CO(2) and bicarbonate, the ratio of their resonance intensities may again be used to estimate pH, which, in this case, is predominantly intracellular. As both pyruvate and bicarbonate are endogenous molecules they

  9. Propane-d6 Heterogeneously Hyperpolarized by Parahydrogen

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Long-lived spin states of hyperpolarized propane-d6 gas were demonstrated following pairwise addition of parahydrogen gas to propene-d6 using heterogeneous parahydrogen-induced polarization (HET-PHIP). Hyperpolarized molecules were synthesized using Rh/TiO2 solid catalyst with 1.6 nm Rh nanoparticles. Hyperpolarized (PH ∼ 1%) propane-d6 was detected at high magnetic field (9.4 T) spectroscopically and by high-resolution 3D gradient-echo MRI (4.7 T) as the gas flowed through the radiofrequency coil with a spatial and temporal resolution of 0.5 × 0.5 × 0.5 mm3 and 17.7 s, respectively. Stopped-flow hyperpolarized propane-d6 gas was also detected at 0.0475 T with an observed nuclear spin polarization of PH ∼ 0.1% and a relatively long lifetime with T1,eff = 6.0 ± 0.3 s. Importantly, it was shown that the hyperpolarized protons of the deuterated product obtained via pairwise parahydrogen addition could be detected directly at low magnetic field. Importantly, the relatively long low-field T1,eff of HP propane-d6 gas is not susceptible to paramagnetic impurities as tested by exposure to ∼0.2 atm oxygen. This long lifetime and nontoxic nature of propane gas could be useful for bioimaging applications including potentially pulmonary low-field MRI. The feasibility of high-resolution low-field 2D gradient-echo MRI was demonstrated with 0.88 × 0.88 mm2 spatial and ∼0.7 s temporal resolution, respectively, at 0.0475 T. PMID:25506406

  10. The role of BKCa channels on hyperpolarization mediated by hyperosmolarity in human articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Julio C; López-Zapata, Diego F

    2011-03-01

    Chondrocytes, the only cell in cartilage, are subjected to hyperosmotic challenges continuously since extracellular osmolarity in articular cartilage increases in response to mechanical loads during joint movement. Hyperosmolarity can affect membrane transport, and it is possible that load modulates matrix synthesis through alterations in intracellular composition. In the present study, the effects of hyperosmotic challenges were evaluated using the whole-cell patch clamp technique, whole cell mode on freshly isolated human and bovine articular chondrocytes. In human chondrocytes, hypertonicity induced the activation of outward Ca(2+)-sensitive K(+) currents, which were inhibited by iberiotoxin and TEA-Cl. The current induced by hypertonic switching (osmolarity from 300 to 400 mOsm/l) caused cell hyperpolarization (from -39 mV to -70 mV) with a reversal potential of -96 ± 7 mV. These results suggest a role for Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels in human articular chondrocytes, leading to hyperpolarization as a consequence of K(+) efflux through these channels. These channels could have a role in the articular chondrocyte's response to a hyperosmotic challenge and matrix metabolism regulation by load.

  11. Chloride dependence of hyperpolarization-activated chloride channel gates

    PubMed Central

    Pusch, Michael; Jordt, Sven-Eric; Stein, Valentin; Jentsch, Thomas J

    1999-01-01

    ClC proteins are a class of voltage-dependent Cl− channels with several members mutated in human diseases. The prototype ClC-0 Torpedo channel is a dimeric protein; each subunit forms a pore that can gate independently from the other one. A common slower gating mechanism acts on both pores simultaneously; slow gating activates ClC-0 at hyperpolarized voltages. The ClC-2 Cl− channel is also activated by hyperpolarization, as are some ClC-1 mutants (e.g. D136G) and wild-type (WT) ClC-1 at certain pH values.We studied the dependence on internal Cl− ([Cl−]i) of the hyperpolarization-activated gates of several ClC channels (WT ClC-0, ClC-0 mutant P522G, ClC-1 mutant D136G and an N-terminal deletion mutant of ClC-2), by patch clamping channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes.With all these channels, reducing [Cl−]i shifted activation to more negative voltages and reduced the maximal activation at most negative voltages.We also investigated the external halide dependence of WT ClC-2 using two-electrode voltage-clamp recording. Reducing external Cl− ([Cl−]o) activated ClC-2 currents. Replacing [Cl−]o by the less permeant Br− reduced channel activity and accelerated deactivation.Gating of the ClC-2 mutant K566Q in normal [Cl−]o resembled that of WT ClC-2 in low [Cl−]o, i.e. channels had a considerable open probability (Po) at resting membrane potential. Substituting external Cl− by Br− or I− led to a decrease in Po.The [Cl−]i dependence of the hyperpolarization-activated gates of various ClC channels suggests a similar gating mechanism, and raises the possibility that the gating charge for the hyperpolarization-activated gate is provided by Cl−.The external halide dependence of hyperpolarization-activated gating of ClC-2 suggests that it is mediated or modulated by anions as in other ClC channels. In contrast to the depolarization-activated fast gates of ClC-0 and ClC-1, the absence of Cl− favours channel opening. Lysine 556 may be important

  12. Physiological response of rats to delivery of helium and xenon: implications for hyperpolarized noble gas imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramirez, M. P.; Sigaloff, K. C.; Kubatina, L. V.; Donahue, M. A.; Venkatesh, A. K.; Albert, M. S.; ALbert, M. S. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    The physiological effects of various hyperpolarized helium and xenon MRI-compatible breathing protocols were investigated in 17 Sprague-Dawley rats, by continuous monitoring of blood oxygen saturation, heart rate, EKG, temperature and endotracheal pressure. The protocols included alternating breaths of pure noble gas and oxygen, continuous breaths of pure noble gas, breath-holds of pure noble gas for varying durations, and helium breath-holds preceded by two helium rinses. Alternate-breath protocols up to 128 breaths caused a decrease in oxygen saturation level of less than 5% for either helium or xenon, whereas 16 continuous-breaths caused a 31.5% +/- 2.3% decrease in oxygen saturation for helium and a 30.7% +/- 1. 3% decrease for xenon. Breath-hold protocols up to 25 s did not cause the oxygen saturation to fall below 90% for either of the noble gases. Oxygen saturation values below 90% are considered pathological. At 30 s of breath-hold, the blood oxygen saturation dropped precipitously to 82% +/- 0.6% for helium, and to 76.5% +/- 7. 4% for xenon. Breath-holds longer than 10 s preceded by pre-rinses caused oxygen saturation to drop below 90%. These findings demonstrate the need for standardized noble gas inhalation procedures that have been carefully tested, and for continuous physiological monitoring to ensure the safety of the subject. We find short breath-hold and alternate-breath protocols to be safe procedures for use in hyperpolarized noble gas MRI experiments. Copyright 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Physiological response of rats to delivery of helium and xenon: implications for hyperpolarized noble gas imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramirez, M. P.; Sigaloff, K. C.; Kubatina, L. V.; Donahue, M. A.; Venkatesh, A. K.; Albert, M. S.; ALbert, M. S. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    The physiological effects of various hyperpolarized helium and xenon MRI-compatible breathing protocols were investigated in 17 Sprague-Dawley rats, by continuous monitoring of blood oxygen saturation, heart rate, EKG, temperature and endotracheal pressure. The protocols included alternating breaths of pure noble gas and oxygen, continuous breaths of pure noble gas, breath-holds of pure noble gas for varying durations, and helium breath-holds preceded by two helium rinses. Alternate-breath protocols up to 128 breaths caused a decrease in oxygen saturation level of less than 5% for either helium or xenon, whereas 16 continuous-breaths caused a 31.5% +/- 2.3% decrease in oxygen saturation for helium and a 30.7% +/- 1. 3% decrease for xenon. Breath-hold protocols up to 25 s did not cause the oxygen saturation to fall below 90% for either of the noble gases. Oxygen saturation values below 90% are considered pathological. At 30 s of breath-hold, the blood oxygen saturation dropped precipitously to 82% +/- 0.6% for helium, and to 76.5% +/- 7. 4% for xenon. Breath-holds longer than 10 s preceded by pre-rinses caused oxygen saturation to drop below 90%. These findings demonstrate the need for standardized noble gas inhalation procedures that have been carefully tested, and for continuous physiological monitoring to ensure the safety of the subject. We find short breath-hold and alternate-breath protocols to be safe procedures for use in hyperpolarized noble gas MRI experiments. Copyright 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. SU-E-J-120: Comparing 4D CT Computed Ventilation to Lung Function Measured with Hyperpolarized Xenon-129 MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Neal, B; Chen, Q

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To correlate ventilation parameters computed from 4D CT to ventilation, profusion, and gas exchange measured with hyperpolarized Xenon-129 MRI for a set of lung cancer patients. Methods: Hyperpolarized Xe-129 MRI lung scans were acquired for lung cancer patients, before and after radiation therapy, measuring ventilation, perfusion, and gas exchange. In the standard clinical workflow, these patients also received 4D CT scans before treatment. Ventilation was computed from 4D CT using deformable image registration (DIR). All phases of the 4D CT scan were registered using a B-spline deformable registration. Ventilation at the voxel level was then computed for each phase based on a Jacobian volume expansion metric, yielding phase sorted ventilation images. Ventilation based upon 4D CT and Xe-129 MRI were co-registered, allowing qualitative visual comparison and qualitative comparison via the Pearson correlation coefficient. Results: Analysis shows a weak correlation between hyperpolarized Xe-129 MRI and 4D CT DIR ventilation, with a Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.17 to 0.22. Further work will refine the DIR parameters to optimize the correlation. The weak correlation could be due to the limitations of 4D CT, registration algorithms, or the Xe-129 MRI imaging. Continued development will refine parameters to optimize correlation. Conclusion: Current analysis yields a minimal correlation between 4D CT DIR and Xe-129 MRI ventilation. Funding provided by the 2014 George Amorino Pilot Grant in Radiation Oncology at the University of Virginia.

  15. Open-Source Automated Parahydrogen Hyperpolarizer for Molecular Imaging Using (13)C Metabolic Contrast Agents.

    PubMed

    Coffey, Aaron M; Shchepin, Roman V; Truong, Milton L; Wilkens, Ken; Pham, Wellington; Chekmenev, Eduard Y

    2016-08-16

    An open-source hyperpolarizer producing (13)C hyperpolarized contrast agents using parahydrogen induced polarization (PHIP) for biomedical and other applications is presented. This PHIP hyperpolarizer utilizes an Arduino microcontroller in conjunction with a readily modified graphical user interface written in the open-source processing software environment to completely control the PHIP hyperpolarization process including remotely triggering an NMR spectrometer for efficient production of payloads of hyperpolarized contrast agent and in situ quality assurance of the produced hyperpolarization. Key advantages of this hyperpolarizer include: (i) use of open-source software and hardware seamlessly allowing for replication and further improvement as well as readily customizable integration with other NMR spectrometers or MRI scanners (i.e., this is a multiplatform design), (ii) relatively low cost and robustness, and (iii) in situ detection capability and complete automation. The device performance is demonstrated by production of a dose (∼2-3 mL) of hyperpolarized (13)C-succinate with %P13C ∼ 28% and 30 mM concentration and (13)C-phospholactate at %P13C ∼ 15% and 25 mM concentration in aqueous medium. These contrast agents are used for ultrafast molecular imaging and spectroscopy at 4.7 and 0.0475 T. In particular, the conversion of hyperpolarized (13)C-phospholactate to (13)C-lactate in vivo is used here to demonstrate the feasibility of ultrafast multislice (13)C MRI after tail vein injection of hyperpolarized (13)C-phospholactate in mice.

  16. Hyperpolarized Magnetic Resonance as a Sensitive Detector of Metabolic Function

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Hyperpolarized magnetic resonance allows for noninvasive measurements of biochemical reactions in vivo. Although this technique provides a unique tool for assaying enzymatic activities in intact organs, the scope of its application is still elusive for the wider scientific community. The purpose of this review is to provide key principles and parameters to guide the researcher interested in adopting this technology to address a biochemical, biomedical, or medical issue. It is presented in the form of a compendium containing the underlying essential physical concepts as well as suggestions to help assess the potential of the technique within the framework of specific research environments. Explicit examples are used to illustrate the power as well as the limitations of hyperpolarized magnetic resonance. PMID:25369537

  17. Sampling Hyperpolarized Molecules Utilizing a 1 Tesla Permanent Magnetic Field

    PubMed Central

    Tee, Sui Seng; DiGialleonardo, Valentina; Eskandari, Roozbeh; Jeong, Sangmoo; Granlund, Kristin L.; Miloushev, Vesselin; Poot, Alex J.; Truong, Steven; Alvarez, Julio A.; Aldeborgh, Hannah N.; Keshari, Kayvan R.

    2016-01-01

    Hyperpolarized magnetic resonance spectroscopy (HP MRS) using dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is a technique that has greatly enhanced the sensitivity of detecting 13C nuclei. However, the HP MRS polarization decays in the liquid state according to the spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) of the nucleus. Sampling of the signal also destroys polarization, resulting in a limited temporal ability to observe biologically interesting reactions. In this study, we demonstrate that sampling hyperpolarized signals using a permanent magnet at 1 Tesla (1T) is a simple and cost-effective method to increase T1s without sacrificing signal-to-noise. Biologically-relevant information may be obtained with a permanent magnet using enzyme solutions and in whole cells. Of significance, our findings indicate that changes in pyruvate metabolism can also be quantified in a xenograft model at this field strength. PMID:27597137

  18. Sampling Hyperpolarized Molecules Utilizing a 1 Tesla Permanent Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tee, Sui Seng; Digialleonardo, Valentina; Eskandari, Roozbeh; Jeong, Sangmoo; Granlund, Kristin L.; Miloushev, Vesselin; Poot, Alex J.; Truong, Steven; Alvarez, Julio A.; Aldeborgh, Hannah N.; Keshari, Kayvan R.

    2016-09-01

    Hyperpolarized magnetic resonance spectroscopy (HP MRS) using dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is a technique that has greatly enhanced the sensitivity of detecting 13C nuclei. However, the HP MRS polarization decays in the liquid state according to the spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) of the nucleus. Sampling of the signal also destroys polarization, resulting in a limited temporal ability to observe biologically interesting reactions. In this study, we demonstrate that sampling hyperpolarized signals using a permanent magnet at 1 Tesla (1T) is a simple and cost-effective method to increase T1s without sacrificing signal-to-noise. Biologically-relevant information may be obtained with a permanent magnet using enzyme solutions and in whole cells. Of significance, our findings indicate that changes in pyruvate metabolism can also be quantified in a xenograft model at this field strength.

  19. Hyperpolarized 13C MR Markers of Renal Tumor Aggressiveness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    such measures in order to distinguish between benign and RCC tumors in patients using the non - invasive rapid hyperpolarized 13C MRI. Review of...using RCC human cells to capture a range of aggressive renal tumors. And have shown using such a model several approaches to non -invasively assess...recent study reported that CHKA forms a complex with EGF receptor (EGFR) in a c-Src– dependent manner, and functions cooper- atively with EGFR and c-Src

  20. Following Metabolism in Living Microorganisms by Hyperpolarized (1)H NMR.

    PubMed

    Dzien, Piotr; Fages, Anne; Jona, Ghil; Brindle, Kevin M; Schwaiger, Markus; Frydman, Lucio

    2016-09-21

    Dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (dDNP) is used to enhance the sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), enabling monitoring of metabolism and specific enzymatic reactions in vivo. dDNP involves rapid sample dissolution and transfer to a spectrometer/scanner for subsequent signal detection. So far, most biologically oriented dDNP studies have relied on hyperpolarizing long-lived nuclear spin species such as (13)C in small molecules. While advantages could also arise from observing hyperpolarized (1)H, short relaxation times limit the utility of prepolarizing this sensitive but fast relaxing nucleus. Recently, it has been reported that (1)H NMR peaks in solution-phase experiments could be hyperpolarized by spontaneous magnetization transfers from bound (13)C nuclei following dDNP. This work demonstrates the potential of this sensitivity-enhancing approach to probe the enzymatic process that could not be suitably resolved by (13)C dDNP MR. Here we measured, in microorganisms, the action of pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC) and pyruvate formate lyase (PFL)-enzymes that catalyze the decarboxylation of pyruvate to form acetaldehyde and formate, respectively. While (13)C NMR did not possess the resolution to distinguish the starting pyruvate precursor from the carbonyl resonances in the resulting products, these processes could be monitored by (1)H NMR at 500 MHz. These observations were possible in both yeast and bacteria in minute-long kinetic measurements where the hyperpolarized (13)C enhanced, via (13)C → (1)H cross-relaxation, the signals of protons binding to the (13)C over the course of enzymatic reactions. In addition to these spontaneous heteronuclear enhancement experiments, single-shot acquisitions based on J-driven (13)C → (1)H polarization transfers were also carried out. These resulted in higher signal enhancements of the (1)H resonances but were not suitable for multishot kinetic studies. The potential of these (1)H-based approaches for

  1. Hyperpolarized 13C MR Markers of Renal Tumor Aggressiveness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    Chen, A. P., Hurd, R. E. & Cunningham, C. H. Spectral-spatial excitation for rapid imaging of DNP compounds. NMR Biomed. 24, 988–996 (2011). 19...biochemistry. Kidney Int 29, 131–141 (1986). 6. Keshari, K. R. et al. Hyperpolarized [2-13C]-fructose: a hemiketal DNP substrate for in vivo metabolic...imaging. J Am Chem Soc 131, 17591–17596 (2009). 7. Wilson, D. M. et al. Multi-compound polarization by DNP allows simultaneous assessment of

  2. Optical hyperpolarization of 13C nuclear spins in nanodiamond ensembles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Q.; Schwarz, I.; Jelezko, F.; Retzker, A.; Plenio, M. B.

    2015-11-01

    Dynamical nuclear polarization holds the key for orders of magnitude enhancements of nuclear magnetic resonance signals which, in turn, would enable a wide range of novel applications in biomedical sciences. However, current implementations of DNP require cryogenic temperatures and long times for achieving high polarization. Here we propose and analyze in detail protocols that can achieve rapid hyperpolarization of 13C nuclear spins in randomly oriented ensembles of nanodiamonds at room temperature. Our protocols exploit a combination of optical polarization of electron spins in nitrogen-vacancy centers and the transfer of this polarization to 13C nuclei by means of microwave control to overcome the severe challenges that are posed by the random orientation of the nanodiamonds and their nitrogen-vacancy centers. Specifically, these random orientations result in exceedingly large energy variations of the electron spin levels that render the polarization and coherent control of the nitrogen-vacancy center electron spins as well as the control of their coherent interaction with the surrounding 13C nuclear spins highly inefficient. We address these challenges by a combination of an off-resonant microwave double resonance scheme in conjunction with a realization of the integrated solid effect which, together with adiabatic rotations of external magnetic fields or rotations of nanodiamonds, leads to a protocol that achieves high levels of hyperpolarization of the entire nuclear-spin bath in a randomly oriented ensemble of nanodiamonds even at room temperature. This hyperpolarization together with the long nuclear-spin polarization lifetimes in nanodiamonds and the relatively high density of 13C nuclei has the potential to result in a major signal enhancement in 13C nuclear magnetic resonance imaging and suggests functionalized and hyperpolarized nanodiamonds as a unique probe for molecular imaging both in vitro and in vivo.

  3. Production of nitrogen-free, hyperpolarized 129Xe gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruth, U.; Hof, T.; Schmidt, J.; Fick, D.; Jänsch, H. J.

    129Xe with a nuclear polarization far above the thermal equilibrium value (hyperpolarized) is used in NMR studies to increase sensitivity. Gaseous, adsorbed, or dissolved xenon is utilized in physical, chemical, and medical applications. With the aim in mind to study single-crystal surfaces by NMR of adsorbed hyperpolarized 129Xe, three problems have to be solved. The reliable production of 129Xe with highest nuclear polarization possible, the separation of the xenon gas from the necessary quench gas nitrogen without polarization loss, and the dosing/delivery of small amounts of polarized xenon gas to a sample surface. Here we describe an optical pumping setup that regularly produces xenon gas with a 129Xe nuclear polarization of 0.7(+/-0.07). We show that a freeze-pump-thaw separation of xenon and nitrogen is feasible without a significant loss in xenon polarization. The nitrogen partial pressure can be suppressed by a factor of 400 in a single separation cycle. Dosing is achieved by using the low vapor pressure of a frozen hyperpolarized xenon sample.

  4. Time resolved spectroscopic NMR imaging using hyperpolarized 129Xe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, S.; Kühn, H.; Häsing, F. W.; Münnemann, K.; Blümich, B.; Appelt, S.

    2004-04-01

    We have visualized the melting and dissolution processes of xenon (Xe) ice into different solvents using the methods of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, imaging, and time resolved spectroscopic imaging by means of hyperpolarized 129Xe. Starting from the initial condition of a hyperpolarized solid Xe layer frozen on top of an ethanol (ethanol/water) ice block we measured the Xe phase transitions as a function of time and temperature. In the pure ethanol sample, pieces of Xe ice first fall through the viscous ethanol to the bottom of the sample tube and then form a thin layer of liquid Xe/ethanol. The xenon atoms are trapped in this liquid layer up to room temperature and keep their magnetization over a time period of 11 min. In the ethanol/water mixture (80 vol%/20%), most of the polarized Xe liquid first stays on top of the ethanol/water ice block and then starts to penetrate into the pores and cracks of the ethanol/water ice block. In the final stage, nearly all the Xe polarization is in the gas phase above the liquid and trapped inside the pores. NMR spectra of homogeneous samples of pure ethanol containing thermally polarized Xe and the spectroscopic images of the melting process show that very high concentrations of hyperpolarized Xe (about half of the density of liquid Xe) can be stored or delivered in pure ethanol.

  5. The Spin-Lattice Relaxation of Hyperpolarized 89Y Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jindal, Ashish; Lumata, Lloyd; Xing, Yixun; Merritt, Matthew; Zhao, Piyu; Malloy, Craig; Sherry, Dean; Kovacs, Zoltan

    2011-03-01

    The low sensitivity of NMR can be overcome by dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP). However, a limitation to the use of hyperpolarized materials is the signal decay due to T1 relaxation. Among NMR-active nuclei, 89 Y is potentially valuable in medical imaging because in chelated form, pH-sensitive agents can be developed. 89 Y also offers many attractive features -- 100 % abundance, a 1/2 spin, and a long T1 , up to 10 min. Yet, developing new 89 Y complexes with even longer T1 values is desirable. Designing such complexes relies upon understanding the mechanism(s) responsible for T1 relaxation. We report an approach to hyperpolarized T1 measurements that enabled an analysis of relaxation mechanisms by selective deuteration of the ligand backbone, the solvent or both. Hyperpolarized 89 Y -- DTPA, DOTA, EDTA, and deuterated EDTA complexes were studied. Results suggest that substitution of low-gamma nuclei on the ligand backbone as opposed to that of the solvent most effectively increase the 89 Y T1 . These results are encouraging for in vivo applications as the presence of bound water may not dramatically affect the T1 .

  6. Improving the Hyperpolarization of 31P Nuclei by Synthetic Design

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Traditional 31P NMR or MRI measurements suffer from low sensitivity relative to 1H detection and consequently require longer scan times. We show here that hyperpolarization of 31P nuclei through reversible interactions with parahydrogen can deliver substantial signal enhancements in a range of regioisomeric phosphonate esters containing a heteroaromatic motif which were synthesized in order to identify the optimum molecular scaffold for polarization transfer. A 3588-fold 31P signal enhancement (2.34% polarization) was returned for a partially deuterated pyridyl substituted phosphonate ester. This hyperpolarization level is sufficient to allow single scan 31P MR images of a phantom to be recorded at a 9.4 T observation field in seconds that have signal-to-noise ratios of up to 94.4 when the analyte concentration is 10 mM. In contrast, a 12 h 2048 scan measurement under standard conditions yields a signal-to-noise ratio of just 11.4. 31P-hyperpolarized images are also reported from a 7 T preclinical scanner. PMID:25811635

  7. Extending the Lifetime of Hyperpolarized Propane Gas through Reversible Dissolution.

    PubMed

    Burueva, Dudari B; Romanov, Alexey S; Salnikov, Oleg G; Zhivonitko, Vladimir V; Chen, Yu-Wen; Barskiy, Danila A; Chekmenev, Eduard Y; Hwang, Dennis W; Kovtunov, Kirill V; Koptyug, Igor V

    2017-03-02

    Hyperpolarized (HP) propane produced by the parahydrogen-induced polarization (PHIP) technique has been recently introduced as a promising contrast agent for functional lung magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. However, its short lifetime due to a spin-lattice relaxation time T1 of less than 1 s in the gas phase is a significant translational challenge for its potential biomedical applications. The previously demonstrated approach for extending the lifetime of the HP propane state through long-lived spin states allows the HP propane lifetime to be increased by a factor of ∼3. Here, we demonstrate that a remarkable increase in the propane hyperpolarization decay time at high magnetic field (7.1 T) can be achieved by its dissolution in deuterated organic solvents (acetone-d6 or methanol-d4). The approximate values of the HP decay time for propane dissolved in acetone-d6 are 35.1 and 28.6 s for the CH2 group and the CH3 group, respectively (similar values were obtained for propane dissolved in methanol-d4), which are ∼50 times larger than the gaseous propane T1 value. Furthermore, we show that it is possible to retrieve HP propane from solution to the gas phase with the preservation of hyperpolarization.

  8. Constant-variable flip angles for hyperpolarized media MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, He; Zhong, Jianping; Ruan, Weiwei; Chen, Xian; Sun, Xianping; Ye, Chaohui; Liu, Maili; Zhou, Xin

    2016-02-01

    The longitudinal magnetization of hyperpolarized media, such as hyperpolarized 129Xe, 3He, etc., is nonrenewable. When the MRI data acquisition begins at the k-domain center, a constant flip angle (CFA) results in an image of high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) but sacrifices the accuracy of spatial information. On the other hand, a variable flip angle (VFA) strategy results in high accuracy but suffers from a low SNR. In this paper, we propose a novel scheme to optimize both the SNR and accuracy, called constant-variable flip angles (CVFA). The proposed scheme suggests that hyperpolarized magnetic resonance signals are firstly acquired through a train of n∗ CFA excitation pulses, followed by a train of N-n∗ VFA excitation pulses. We simulate and optimize the flip angle used in the CFA section, the number of CFA excitation pulses, the number of VFA excitation pulses, and the initial and final variable flip angles adopted in the VFA section. Phantom and in vivo experiments demonstrate the good performance of the CVFA designs and their ability to maintain both high SNR and spatial resolution.

  9. A hyperpolarized equilibrium for magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Hövener, Jan-Bernd; Schwaderlapp, Niels; Lickert, Thomas; Duckett, Simon B; Mewis, Ryan E; Highton, Louise A R; Kenny, Stephen M; Green, Gary G R; Leibfritz, Dieter; Korvink, Jan G; Hennig, Jürgen; von Elverfeldt, Dominik

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging (MRI) play an indispensable role in science and healthcare but use only a tiny fraction of their potential. No more than ≈10 p.p.m. of all ¹H nuclei are effectively detected in a 3-Tesla clinical MRI system. Thus, a vast array of new applications lays dormant, awaiting improved sensitivity. Here we demonstrate the continuous polarization of small molecules in solution to a level that cannot be achieved in a viable magnet. The magnetization does not decay and is effectively reinitialized within seconds after being measured. This effect depends on the long-lived, entangled spin-order of parahydrogen and an exchange reaction in a low magnetic field of 10⁻³ Tesla. We demonstrate the potential of this method by fast MRI and envision the catalysis of new applications such as cancer screening or indeed low-field MRI for routine use and remote application.

  10. A hyperpolarized equilibrium for magnetic resonance

    PubMed Central

    Hövener, Jan-Bernd; Schwaderlapp, Niels; Lickert, Thomas; Duckett, Simon B.; Mewis, Ryan E.; Highton, Louise A. R.; Kenny, Stephen M.; Green, Gary G. R.; Leibfritz, Dieter; Korvink, Jan G.; Hennig, Jürgen; von Elverfeldt, Dominik

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging (MRI) play an indispensable role in science and healthcare but use only a tiny fraction of their potential. No more than ≈10 p.p.m. of all 1H nuclei are effectively detected in a 3-Tesla clinical MRI system. Thus, a vast array of new applications lays dormant, awaiting improved sensitivity. Here we demonstrate the continuous polarization of small molecules in solution to a level that cannot be achieved in a viable magnet. The magnetization does not decay and is effectively reinitialized within seconds after being measured. This effect depends on the long-lived, entangled spin-order of parahydrogen and an exchange reaction in a low magnetic field of 10−3 Tesla. We demonstrate the potential of this method by fast MRI and envision the catalysis of new applications such as cancer screening or indeed low-field MRI for routine use and remote application. PMID:24336292

  11. Flow-type electroporation chips for gene transfection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yu-Cheng; Jen, Chung-Min; Huang, Ming-Yuan; Lin, Xi-Zhang

    2000-08-01

    Electroporation is a technique with which DNA molecules can be delivered into cells in a chamber using high electric field pulses. The limited amount of target cells and the potential risk from the high voltage are the two drawbacks in this technique. This study aimed to fabricate an electroporation chip to manage large amount of cells continuously with a lower applied voltage. The electroporation chip, consisting of a micro-channel with thin film electrodes made of gold or platinum wire electrodes on both sides, was fabricated on PMMA material using evaporation, photolithography, wet- etching, lift-off, and fusion-bonding methods. The suspension fluid of Huh-7 cell lines (1 x 106 cells/ml) mixed with 10 micrometers plasmids equipped with lacZ genes in a volume of 500 (mu) l flowed through the channel with a variety of flow rates under a series of square pulses. The transfection rate was evaluated with blue-staining cells under X-Gal stain 24 hours later. The dimensions of the channel were 5 mm wide, 0.2 mm high, and 25 mm long. Two types of electrodes, parallel-plate type and parallel-line type electrodes, were fabricated and tested in these experiments. The fabricated microchip can deliver genes into the flowing of cells. The electric pulse frequency that determines the shock number for each cell for a fixed flow rate can be optimized for better transfection and survival rates.

  12. Hyperpolarized 129Xe MRI: A Viable Functional Lung Imaging Modality?

    PubMed Central

    Patz, Samuel; Hersman, F. William; Muradian, Iga; Hrovat, Mirko I.; Ruset, Iulian C.; Ketel, Stephen; Jacobson, Francine; Topulos, George P.; Hatabu, Hiroto; Butler, James P.

    2008-01-01

    The majority of researchers investigating hyperpolarized gas MRI as a candidate functional lung imaging modality have used 3He as their imaging agent of choice rather than 129Xe. This preference has been predominantly due to, 3He providing stronger signals due to higher levels of polarization and higher gyromagnetic ratio, as well as its being easily available to more researchers due to availability of polarizers (USA) or ease of gas transport (Europe). Most researchers agree, however, that hyperpolarized 129Xe will ultimately emerge as the imaging agent of choice due to its unlimited supply in nature and its falling cost. Our recent polarizer technology delivers vast improvements in hyperpolarized 129Xe output. Using this polarizer, we have demonstrated the unique property of xenon to measure alveolar surface area noninvasively. In this article, we describe our human protocols and their safety, and our results for the measurement of the partial pressure of pulmonary oxygen (pO2) by observation of 129Xe signal decay. We note that the measurement of pO2 by observation of 129Xe signal decay is more complex than that for 3He because of an additional signal loss mechanism due to interphase diffusion of 129Xe from alveolar gas spaces to septal tissue. This results in measurements of an equivalent pO2 that accounts for both traditional T1 decay from pO2 and that from interphase diffusion. We also provide an update on new technological advancements that form the foundation for an improved compact design polarizer as well as improvements that provide another order-of-magnitude scale-up in xenon polarizer output. PMID:17890035

  13. Astrocytic mitochondrial membrane hyperpolarization following extended oxygen and glucose deprivation.

    PubMed

    Korenić, Andrej; Boltze, Johannes; Deten, Alexander; Peters, Myriam; Andjus, Pavle; Radenović, Lidija

    2014-01-01

    Astrocytes can tolerate longer periods of oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) as compared to neurons. The reasons for this reduced vulnerability are not well understood. Particularly, changes in mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψ(m)) in astrocytes, an indicator of the cellular redox state, have not been investigated during reperfusion after extended OGD exposure. Here, we subjected primary mouse astrocytes to glucose deprivation (GD), OGD and combinations of both conditions varying in duration and sequence. Changes in Δψ(m), visualized by change in the fluorescence of JC-1, were investigated within one hour after reconstitution of oxygen and glucose supply, intended to model in vivo reperfusion. In all experiments, astrocytes showed resilience to extended periods of OGD, which had little effect on Δψ(m) during reperfusion, whereas GD caused a robust Δψ(m) negativation. In case no Δψ(m) negativation was observed after OGD, subsequent chemical oxygen deprivation (OD) induced by sodium azide caused depolarization, which, however, was significantly delayed as compared to normoxic group. When GD preceded OD for 12 h, Δψ(m) hyperpolarization was induced by both GD and subsequent OD, but significant interaction between these conditions was not detected. However, when GD was extended to 48 h preceding OGD, hyperpolarization enhanced during reperfusion. This implicates synergistic effects of both conditions in that sequence. These findings provide novel information regarding the role of the two main substrates of electron transport chain (glucose and oxygen) and their hyperpolarizing effect on Δψ(m) during substrate deprivation, thus shedding new light on mechanisms of astrocyte resilience to prolonged ischemic injury.

  14. Noradrenaline hyperpolarizes identified rat mesopontine cholinergic neurons in vitro.

    PubMed

    Williams, J A; Reiner, P B

    1993-09-01

    Inhibition of brainstem cholinergic neurons by noradrenergic neurons of the locus ceruleus has long been suggested as a key mechanism of behavioral state control. In particular, the commonly held view is that noradrenaline (NA) plays a permissive role in rapid eye movement (REM) sleep generation by disinhibiting brainstem cholinergic neurons. While this notion has been supported by numerous investigations, the inhibition of cholinergic neurons by NA has never been directly demonstrated. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of NA upon identified cholinergic neurons in the rat mesopontine tegmentum. Using whole-cell patch-clamp recordings in slices, 175 cells were studied during bath application of 50 microM NA. Cholinergic neurons were positively identified by intracellular labeling with biocytin and subsequent staining with NADPH-diaphorase, a reliable marker for brainstem cholinergic neurons (Vincent et al., 1983). Successful intracellular labeling was obtained in 96 cells. Ninety-two percent (36 of 39) of cholinergic neurons hyperpolarized in response to NA, while noncholinergic cells (n = 57) exhibited mixed responses. Application of NA in a low-Ca2+, high-Mg2+ solution elicited the same hyperpolarizing effect as in normal solution, which indicated that the effect of NA on cholinergic neurons was direct. The noradrenergic hyperpolarization was mimicked by the alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonist UK-14,304, and was blocked by the alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonist idazoxan, which suggested an alpha 2-mediated response. Finally, voltage-clamp experiments revealed that NA activates the inwardly rectifying potassium current, IKG.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. The Efficiency Limits of Spin Exchange Optical Pumping Methods of 129Xe Hyperpolarization: Implications for in vivo MRI Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, Matthew S.

    Since the inception of hyperpolarized 129Xe MRI, the field has yearned for more efficient production of more highly polarized 129Xe. For nearly all polarizers built to date, both peak 129Xe polarization and production rate fall far below theoretical predictions. This thesis sought to develop a fundamental understanding of why the observed performance of large-scale 129Xe hyperpolarization lagged so badly behind theoretical predictions. This is done by thoroughly characterizing a high-volume, continuous-flow polarizer using optical cells having three different internal volumes, and employing two different laser sources. For each of these 6 combinations, 129Xe polarization was carefully measured as a function of production rate across a range of laser absorption levels. The resultant peak polarizations were consistently a factor of 2-3 lower than predicted across a range of absorption levels, and scaling of production rates deviated badly from predictions based on spin exchange efficiency. To bridge this gap, we propose that paramagnetic, activated Rb clusters form during spin exchange optical pumping (SEOP), and depolarize Rb and 129Xe, while unproductively scattering optical pumping light. When a model was built that incorporated the effects of clusters, its predictions matched observations for both polarization and production rate for all 6 systems studied. This permits us to place a limit on cluster number density of <2 x 109 cm-3. The work culminates with deploying this framework to identify methods to improve polarization to above 50%, leaving the SEOP cell. Combined with additional methods of preserving polarization, the polarization of a 300-mL batch of 129Xe increased from an average of 9%, before this work began, to a recent value of 34%. We anticipate that these developments will lay the groundwork for continued advancement and scaling up of SEOP-based hyperpolarization methods that may one day permit real-time, on-demand 129Xe MRI to become a reality.

  16. Inhibition of the production of endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor by cannabinoid receptor agonists

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, I; Schermer, B; Popp, R; Busse, R

    1999-01-01

    The endogenous cannabinoid, anandamide, has been reported to induce an 'endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF)-like' relaxation in vitro. We therefore investigated the effects of cannabinoid CB1 receptor agonists; HU 210, Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC) and anandamide, and a CB1 antagonist/inverse agonist, SR 141716A, on nitric oxide (NO) and EDHF-mediated relaxation in precontracted rings of porcine coronary, rabbit carotid and mesenteric arteries. In rings of mesenteric artery HU 210 and Δ9-THC induced endothelium- and cyclo-oxygenase-independent relaxations which were sensitive to SR 141716A. Anandamide (0.03–30 μM) induced a slowly developing, endothelium-independent relaxation which was abolished by diclofenac and was therefore mediated by cyclo-oxygenase product(s). None of the CB1 agonists tested affected the tone of precontracted rings of rabbit carotid or porcine coronary artery. In endothelium-intact segments, HU 210, Δ9-THC and anandamide did not affect NO-mediated responses but under conditions of continuous NO synthase/cyclo-oxygenase blockade, significantly inhibited acetylcholine and bradykinin-induced relaxations which are attributed to the production of EDHF. The effects of HU 210 and Δ9-THC were not observed when experiments were performed in the presence of SR 141716A suggesting the involvement of the CB1 receptor. In a patch clamp bioassay of EDHF production, HU 210 decreased the EDHF-mediated hyperpolarization of detector smooth muscle cells when applied to the donor segment but was without effect on the membrane potential of detector cells. The inhibition of EDHF production was unrelated to alterations in Ca2+-signalling or cytochrome P450 activity. These results suggest that the activation of endothelial CB1 receptors appears to be negatively coupled to the production of EDHF. PMID:10193775

  17. Biochemical phosphates observed using hyperpolarized (31)P in physiological aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Nardi-Schreiber, Atara; Gamliel, Ayelet; Harris, Talia; Sapir, Gal; Sosna, Jacob; Gomori, J Moshe; Katz-Brull, Rachel

    2017-08-24

    The dissolution-dynamic nuclear polarization technology had previously enabled nuclear magnetic resonance detection of various nuclei in a hyperpolarized state. Here, we show the hyperpolarization of (31)P nuclei in important biological phosphates (inorganic phosphate and phosphocreatine) in aqueous solutions. The hyperpolarized inorganic phosphate showed an enhancement factor >11,000 (at 5.8 T, 9.3% polarization) in D2O (T1 29.4 s). Deuteration and the solution composition and pH all affected the lifetime of the hyperpolarized state. This capability opens up avenues for real-time monitoring of phosphate metabolism, distribution, and pH sensing in the live body without ionizing radiation. Immediate changes in the microenvironment pH have been detected here in a cell-free system via the chemical shift of hyperpolarized inorganic phosphate. Because the (31)P nucleus is 100% naturally abundant, future studies on hyperpolarized phosphates will not require expensive isotope labeling as is usually required for hyperpolarization of other substrates.Real-time monitoring of phosphate metabolism and distribution in the live body without ionizing radiation is highly desirable. Here, the authors show dissolution-dynamic nuclear polarization technology can enable nuclear magnetic resonance detection of hyperpolarized (31)P of important biological phosphates in aqueous solutions.

  18. Glial hyperpolarization upon nerve root stimulation in the leech Hirudo medicinalis.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, J; Prinz, P; Deitmer, J W

    1999-07-01

    Hyperpolarizing responses in neuropil glial cells evoked by nerve root stimulation were studied in the central nervous system of the leech Hirudo medicinalis using intracellular recording and extracellular stimulation techniques. From a mean resting potential of -60.5 +/- 1.0, the glial membrane was hyperpolarized by -8.6 +/- 0.8 mV, via stimulation of the dorsal posterior nerve root in an isolated ganglion. Nerve root stimulation evoked biphasic or depolarizing responses in glial cells with resting potentials around -70 mV (Rose CR, Deitmer JW. J. Neurophysiol. 73:125-131, 1995). The hyperpolarizing response was reduced by the ionotropic glutamate receptor antagonist CNQX (50 microM) to 58% of its initial amplitude. In 15 mM Ca2+/15 mM Mg(2+)-saline the hyperpolarization was reduced by 44%. The hyperpolarization that persisted in high-divalent cation saline was not affected by CNQX. Bath-applied glutamate (500 microM) and kainate (2 microM) elicited glial hyperpolarizations that were sensitive to CNQX and 10 mM Mg2+/1 mM Ca(2+)-saline. The 5-HT-antagonist methysergide did not affect the hyperpolarizations evoked by nerve root stimulation. The results show that in the leech glial membrane responses to neuronal activity include not only depolarizations, as shown previously, but also hyperpolarizations, which are mediated by direct and indirect neuron-glial communication pathways. In the indirect pathway, glutamate is a transmitter between neurons.

  19. Fast Padé Transform Accelerated CSI for Hyperpolarized MRS

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Esben Szocska Søvsø; Kim, Sun; Miller, Jack J.; Geferath, Marcus; Morrell, Glen; Laustsen, Christoffer

    2016-01-01

    The fast Padé transform (FPT) is a method of spectral analysis that can be used to reconstruct nuclear magnetic resonance spectra from truncated free induction decay signals with superior robustness and spectral resolution compared with conventional Fourier analysis. The aim of this study is to show the utility of FPT in reducing of the scan time required for hyperpolarized 13C chemical shift imaging (CSI) without sacrificing the ability to resolve a full spectrum. Simulations, phantom, and in vivo hyperpolarized [1-13C] pyruvate CSI data were processed with FPT and compared with conventional analysis methods. FPT shows improved stability and spectral resolution on truncated data compared with the fast Fourier transform and shows results that are comparable to those of the model-based fitting methods, enabling a reduction in the needed acquisition time in 13C CSI experiments. Using FPT can reduce the readout length in the spectral dimension by 2–6 times in 13C CSI compared with conventional Fourier analysis without sacrificing the spectral resolution. This increased speed is crucial for 13C CSI because T1 relaxation considerably limits the available scan time. In addition, FPT can also yield direct quantification of metabolite concentration without the additional peak analysis required in conventional Fourier analysis. PMID:28018967

  20. Measurement of hyperpolarized gas diffusion at very short time scales

    PubMed Central

    Carl, Michael; Wilson Miller, G.; Mugler, John P.; Rohrbaugh, Scott; Tobias, William A.; Cates, Gordon D.

    2007-01-01

    We present a new pulse sequence for measuring very-short-time-scale restricted diffusion of hyperpolarized noble gases. The pulse sequence is based on concatenating a large number of bipolar diffusion-sensitizing gradients to increase the diffusion attenuation of the MR signal while maintaining a fundamentally short diffusion time. However, it differs in several respects from existing methods that use oscillating diffusion gradients for this purpose. First, a wait time is inserted between neighboring pairs of gradient pulses; second, consecutive pulse pairs may be applied along orthogonal axes; and finally, the diffusion-attenuated signal is not simply read out at the end of the gradient train but is periodically sampled during the wait times between neighboring pulse pairs. The first two features minimize systematic differences between the measured (apparent) diffusion coefficient and the actual time-dependent diffusivity, while the third feature optimizes the use of the available MR signal to improve the precision of the diffusivity measurement in the face of noise. The benefits of this technique are demonstrated using theoretical calculations, Monte-Carlo simulations of gas diffusion in simple geometries, and experimental phantom measurements in a glass sphere containing hyperpolarized 3He gas. The advantages over the conventional single-bipolar approach were found to increase with decreasing diffusion time, and thus represent a significant step toward making accurate surface-to-volume measurements in the lung airspaces. PMID:17936048

  1. Genetically encoded reporters for hyperpolarized xenon magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, Mikhail G.; Ramirez, R. Matthew; Sperling, Lindsay J.; Sun, George; Sun, Jinny; Pines, Alexander; Schaffer, David V.; Bajaj, Vikram S.

    2014-07-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) enables high-resolution non-invasive observation of the anatomy and function of intact organisms. However, previous MRI reporters of key biological processes tied to gene expression have been limited by the inherently low molecular sensitivity of conventional 1H MRI. This limitation could be overcome through the use of hyperpolarized nuclei, such as in the noble gas xenon, but previous reporters acting on such nuclei have been synthetic. Here, we introduce the first genetically encoded reporters for hyperpolarized 129Xe MRI. These expressible reporters are based on gas vesicles (GVs), gas-binding protein nanostructures expressed by certain buoyant microorganisms. We show that GVs are capable of chemical exchange saturation transfer interactions with xenon, which enables chemically amplified GV detection at picomolar concentrations (a 100- to 10,000-fold improvement over comparable constructs for 1H MRI). We demonstrate the use of GVs as heterologously expressed indicators of gene expression and chemically targeted exogenous labels in MRI experiments performed on living cells.

  2. Switchable resonant hyperpolarization transfer to 29Si spins in natural silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dluhy, Phillip; Salvail, Jeff Z.; Saeedi, Kamyar; Thewalt, Mike L. W.; Simmons, Stephanie

    2015-05-01

    Silicon nano- and microparticles containing polarized 29Si spins are promising inexpensive and biocompatible medical imaging agents, particularly for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Maximizing out-of-equilibrium polarization (i.e., hyperpolarization) of the 29Si nuclear spins as efficiently as possible is critical for such an application. Here we identify and exploit a frequency-matched resonant transfer process between easily hyperpolarized bulk 31P and otherwise insensitive 29Si nuclear spins in natural silicon, boosting the 29Si signal to over 200 times its thermal equilibrium signal. This technique could be used in tandem with microwave-based hyperpolarization schemes for even higher efficiencies. Lastly, this hyperpolarization buildup process does not necessarily introduce an additional source of decoherence; after hyperpolarization the resonant transfer process can be switched off to recover the ultralong lifetimes of 29Si spins for in vivo imaging.

  3. Observing and preventing rubidium runaway in a direct-infusion xenon-spin hyperpolarizer optimized for high-resolution hyper-CEST (chemical exchange saturation transfer using hyperpolarized nuclei) NMR.

    PubMed

    Witte, C; Kunth, M; Rossella, F; Schröder, L

    2014-02-28

    Xenon is well known to undergo host-guest interactions with proteins and synthetic molecules. As xenon can also be hyperpolarized by spin exchange optical pumping, allowing the investigation of highly dilute systems, it makes an ideal nuclear magnetic resonance probe for such host molecules. The utility of xenon as a probe can be further improved using Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer using hyperpolarized nuclei (Hyper-CEST), but for highly accurate experiments requires a polarizer and xenon infusion system optimized for such measurements. We present the design of a hyperpolarizer and xenon infusion system specifically designed to meet the requirements of Hyper-CEST measurements. One key element of this design is preventing rubidium runaway, a chain reaction induced by laser heating that prevents efficient utilization of high photon densities. Using thermocouples positioned along the pumping cell we identify the sources of heating and conditions for rubidium runaway to occur. We then demonstrate the effectiveness of actively cooling the optical cell to prevent rubidium runaway in a compact setup. This results in a 2-3-fold higher polarization than without cooling, allowing us to achieve a polarization of 25% at continuous flow rates of 9 ml/min of (129)Xe. The simplicity of this design also allows it to be retrofitted to many existing polarizers. Combined with a direction infusion system that reduces shot-to-shot noise down to 0.56% we have captured Hyper-CEST spectra in unprecedented detail, allowing us to completely resolve peaks separated by just 1.62 ppm. Due to its high polarization and excellent stability, our design allows the comparison of underlying theories of host-guest systems with experiment at low concentrations, something extremely difficult with previous polarizers.

  4. Observing and preventing rubidium runaway in a direct-infusion xenon-spin hyperpolarizer optimized for high-resolution hyper-CEST (chemical exchange saturation transfer using hyperpolarized nuclei) NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Witte, C.; Kunth, M.; Rossella, F.; Schröder, L.

    2014-02-28

    Xenon is well known to undergo host-guest interactions with proteins and synthetic molecules. As xenon can also be hyperpolarized by spin exchange optical pumping, allowing the investigation of highly dilute systems, it makes an ideal nuclear magnetic resonance probe for such host molecules. The utility of xenon as a probe can be further improved using Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer using hyperpolarized nuclei (Hyper-CEST), but for highly accurate experiments requires a polarizer and xenon infusion system optimized for such measurements. We present the design of a hyperpolarizer and xenon infusion system specifically designed to meet the requirements of Hyper-CEST measurements. One key element of this design is preventing rubidium runaway, a chain reaction induced by laser heating that prevents efficient utilization of high photon densities. Using thermocouples positioned along the pumping cell we identify the sources of heating and conditions for rubidium runaway to occur. We then demonstrate the effectiveness of actively cooling the optical cell to prevent rubidium runaway in a compact setup. This results in a 2–3-fold higher polarization than without cooling, allowing us to achieve a polarization of 25% at continuous flow rates of 9 ml/min of {sup 129}Xe. The simplicity of this design also allows it to be retrofitted to many existing polarizers. Combined with a direction infusion system that reduces shot-to-shot noise down to 0.56% we have captured Hyper-CEST spectra in unprecedented detail, allowing us to completely resolve peaks separated by just 1.62 ppm. Due to its high polarization and excellent stability, our design allows the comparison of underlying theories of host-guest systems with experiment at low concentrations, something extremely difficult with previous polarizers.

  5. Observing and preventing rubidium runaway in a direct-infusion xenon-spin hyperpolarizer optimized for high-resolution hyper-CEST (chemical exchange saturation transfer using hyperpolarized nuclei) NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witte, C.; Kunth, M.; Rossella, F.; Schröder, L.

    2014-02-01

    Xenon is well known to undergo host-guest interactions with proteins and synthetic molecules. As xenon can also be hyperpolarized by spin exchange optical pumping, allowing the investigation of highly dilute systems, it makes an ideal nuclear magnetic resonance probe for such host molecules. The utility of xenon as a probe can be further improved using Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer using hyperpolarized nuclei (Hyper-CEST), but for highly accurate experiments requires a polarizer and xenon infusion system optimized for such measurements. We present the design of a hyperpolarizer and xenon infusion system specifically designed to meet the requirements of Hyper-CEST measurements. One key element of this design is preventing rubidium runaway, a chain reaction induced by laser heating that prevents efficient utilization of high photon densities. Using thermocouples positioned along the pumping cell we identify the sources of heating and conditions for rubidium runaway to occur. We then demonstrate the effectiveness of actively cooling the optical cell to prevent rubidium runaway in a compact setup. This results in a 2-3-fold higher polarization than without cooling, allowing us to achieve a polarization of 25% at continuous flow rates of 9 ml/min of 129Xe. The simplicity of this design also allows it to be retrofitted to many existing polarizers. Combined with a direction infusion system that reduces shot-to-shot noise down to 0.56% we have captured Hyper-CEST spectra in unprecedented detail, allowing us to completely resolve peaks separated by just 1.62 ppm. Due to its high polarization and excellent stability, our design allows the comparison of underlying theories of host-guest systems with experiment at low concentrations, something extremely difficult with previous polarizers.

  6. Construction and (13) C hyperpolarization efficiency of a 180 GHz dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization system.

    PubMed

    Kiswandhi, Andhika; Niedbalski, Peter; Parish, Christopher; Ferguson, Sarah; Taylor, David; McDonald, George; Lumata, Lloyd

    2017-09-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) via the dissolution method has become one of the rapidly emerging techniques to alleviate the low signal sensitivity in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and imaging. In this paper, we report on the development and (13) C hyperpolarization efficiency of a homebuilt DNP system operating at 6.423 T and 1.4 K. The DNP hyperpolarizer system was assembled on a wide-bore superconducting magnet, equipped with a standard continuous-flow cryostat, and a 180 GHz microwave source with 120 mW power output and wide 4 GHz frequency tuning range. At 6.423 T and 1.4 K, solid-state (13) C polarization P levels of 64% and 31% were achieved for 3 M [1-(13) C] sodium acetate samples in 1 : 1 v/v glycerol:water glassing matrix doped with 15 mM trityl OX063 and 40 mM 4-oxo-TEMPO, respectively. Upon dissolution, which takes about 15 s to complete, liquid-state (13) C NMR signal enhancements as high as 240 000-fold (P=21%) were recorded in a nearby high resolution (13) C NMR spectrometer at 1 T and 297 K. Considering the relatively lower cost of our homebuilt DNP system and the relative simplicity of its design, the dissolution DNP setup reported here could be feasibly adapted for in vitro or in vivo hyperpolarized (13) C NMR or magnetic resonance imaging at least in the pre-clinical setting. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Molecular hydrogen and catalytic combustion in the production of hyperpolarized 83Kr and 129Xe MRI contrast agents

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Nicola J.; Hill-Casey, Fraser; Stupic, Karl F.; Six, Joseph S.; Lesbats, Clémentine; Rigby, Sean P.; Fraissard, Jacques; Pavlovskaya, Galina E.; Meersmann, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Hyperpolarized (hp) 83Kr is a promising MRI contrast agent for the diagnosis of pulmonary diseases affecting the surface of the respiratory zone. However, the distinct physical properties of 83Kr that enable unique MRI contrast also complicate the production of hp 83Kr. This work presents a previously unexplored approach in the generation of hp 83Kr that can likewise be used for the production of hp 129Xe. Molecular nitrogen, typically used as buffer gas in spin-exchange optical pumping (SEOP), was replaced by molecular hydrogen without penalty for the achievable hyperpolarization. In this particular study, the highest obtained nuclear spin polarizations were P = 29% for 83Kr and P = 63% for 129Xe. The results were reproduced over many SEOP cycles despite the laser-induced on-resonance formation of rubidium hydride (RbH). Following SEOP, the H2 was reactively removed via catalytic combustion without measurable losses in hyperpolarized spin state of either 83Kr or 129Xe. Highly spin-polarized 83Kr can now be purified for the first time, to our knowledge, to provide high signal intensity for the advancement of in vivo hp 83Kr MRI. More generally, a chemical reaction appears as a viable alternative to the cryogenic separation process, the primary purification method of hp 129Xe for the past 2 1/2 decades. The inherent simplicity of the combustion process will facilitate hp 129Xe production and should allow for on-demand continuous flow of purified and highly spin-polarized 129Xe. PMID:26961001

  8. Molecular hydrogen and catalytic combustion in the production of hyperpolarized 83Kr and 129Xe MRI contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Nicola J; Hill-Casey, Fraser; Stupic, Karl F; Six, Joseph S; Lesbats, Clémentine; Rigby, Sean P; Fraissard, Jacques; Pavlovskaya, Galina E; Meersmann, Thomas

    2016-03-22

    Hyperpolarized (hp) (83)Kr is a promising MRI contrast agent for the diagnosis of pulmonary diseases affecting the surface of the respiratory zone. However, the distinct physical properties of (83)Kr that enable unique MRI contrast also complicate the production of hp (83)Kr. This work presents a previously unexplored approach in the generation of hp (83)Kr that can likewise be used for the production of hp (129)Xe. Molecular nitrogen, typically used as buffer gas in spin-exchange optical pumping (SEOP), was replaced by molecular hydrogen without penalty for the achievable hyperpolarization. In this particular study, the highest obtained nuclear spin polarizations were P =29% for(83)Kr and P= 63% for (129)Xe. The results were reproduced over many SEOP cycles despite the laser-induced on-resonance formation of rubidium hydride (RbH). Following SEOP, the H2 was reactively removed via catalytic combustion without measurable losses in hyperpolarized spin state of either (83)Kr or (129)Xe. Highly spin-polarized (83)Kr can now be purified for the first time, to our knowledge, to provide high signal intensity for the advancement of in vivo hp (83)Kr MRI. More generally, a chemical reaction appears as a viable alternative to the cryogenic separation process, the primary purification method of hp(129)Xe for the past 2 1/2 decades. The inherent simplicity of the combustion process will facilitate hp (129)Xe production and should allow for on-demand continuous flow of purified and highly spin-polarized (129)Xe.

  9. Molecular hydrogen and catalytic combustion in the production of hyperpolarized 83Kr and 129Xe MRI contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Nicola J.; Hill-Casey, Fraser; Stupic, Karl F.; Six, Joseph S.; Lesbats, Clémentine; Rigby, Sean P.; Fraissard, Jacques; Pavlovskaya, Galina E.; Meersmann, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    Hyperpolarized (hp) 83Kr is a promising MRI contrast agent for the diagnosis of pulmonary diseases affecting the surface of the respiratory zone. However, the distinct physical properties of 83Kr that enable unique MRI contrast also complicate the production of hp 83Kr. This work presents a previously unexplored approach in the generation of hp 83Kr that can likewise be used for the production of hp 129Xe. Molecular nitrogen, typically used as buffer gas in spin-exchange optical pumping (SEOP), was replaced by molecular hydrogen without penalty for the achievable hyperpolarization. In this particular study, the highest obtained nuclear spin polarizations were P = 29% for 83Kr and P = 63% for 129Xe. The results were reproduced over many SEOP cycles despite the laser-induced on-resonance formation of rubidium hydride (RbH). Following SEOP, the H2 was reactively removed via catalytic combustion without measurable losses in hyperpolarized spin state of either 83Kr or 129Xe. Highly spin-polarized 83Kr can now be purified for the first time, to our knowledge, to provide high signal intensity for the advancement of in vivo hp 83Kr MRI. More generally, a chemical reaction appears as a viable alternative to the cryogenic separation process, the primary purification method of hp 129Xe for the past 2 1/2 decades. The inherent simplicity of the combustion process will facilitate hp 129Xe production and should allow for on-demand continuous flow of purified and highly spin-polarized 129Xe.

  10. NITRIC OXIDE, MITOCHONDRIAL HYPERPOLARIZATION AND T-CELL ACTIVATION

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Gyorgy; Koncz, Agnes; Fernandez, David; Perl, Andras

    2007-01-01

    T lymphocyte activation is associated with nitric oxide (NO) production that plays an essential role in multiple T cell functions. NO acts as a messenger, activating soluble guanyl cyclase and participating in the transduction signaling pathways involving cyclic GMP. NO modulates mitochondrial events that are involved in apoptosis and regulates mitochondrial membrane potential and mitochondrial biogenesis in many cell types, including lymphocytes. Mitochondrial hyperpolarization (MHP), an early and reversible event during both T lymphocyte activation and apoptosis, is regulated by NO. Here, we discuss recent evidence that NO-induced MHP represents a molecular switch in multiple T cell signaling pathways. Overproduction of NO in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) induces mitochondrial biogenesis and alters Ca2+ signaling. Thus, while NO plays a physiological role in lymphocyte cell signaling, its overproduction may disturb normal T cell function, contributing to the pathogenesis of autoimmunity. PMID:17462531

  11. Hyperpolarized cesium ions doped in a glass material.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Kiyoshi

    2014-10-17

    Hyperpolarized (HP) (133)Cs nuclear magnetic resonance signals were measured from borosilicate glass cell walls during optical pumping of cesium vapor at high magnetic field (9.4T). Significant signal enhancements were observed when additional heating of the cell wall was provided by intense but non-resonant laser irradiation, with integrated HP (133)Cs NMR signals and line widths varying as a function of heating laser power (and hence glass temperature). Given that virtually no Cs ions would originally be present in the glass, absorbed HP Cs atoms rarely met thermally-polarized Cs ions already at the surface; thus, spin-exchange via nuclear dipole interaction cannot be the primary mechanism for injecting spin polarization into the glass. Instead, it is concluded that the absorption and transport of HP atoms into the glass material itself is the dominant mechanism of nuclear spin injection at high temperatures-the first reported experimental demonstration of such a mechanism.

  12. Perspectives of hyperpolarized noble gas MRI beyond 3He

    PubMed Central

    Lilburn, David M.L.; Pavlovskaya, Galina E.; Meersmann, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) studies with hyperpolarized (hp) noble gases are at an exciting interface between physics, chemistry, materials science and biomedical sciences. This paper intends to provide a brief overview and outlook of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with hp noble gases other than hp 3He. A particular focus are the many intriguing experiments with 129Xe, some of which have already matured to useful MRI protocols, while others display high potential for future MRI applications. Quite naturally for MRI applications the major usage so far has been for biomedical research but perspectives for engineering and materials science studies are also provided. In addition, the prospects for surface sensitive contrast with hp 83Kr MRI is discussed. PMID:23290627

  13. Optical pumping system design for large production of hyperpolarized.

    PubMed

    Ruset, I C; Ketel, S; Hersman, F W

    2006-02-10

    We present a design for a spin-exchange optical pumping system to produce large quantities of highly polarized 129Xe. Low xenon concentrations in the flowing gas mixture allow the laser to maintain high Rb polarization. The large spin-exchange rate between Rb and 129Xe through the long-lived van der Waals molecules at low pressure, combined with a high flow rate, results in large production rates of hyperpolarized xenon. We report a maximum polarization of 64% achieved for a 0.3 l/h Xe flow rate, and maximum magnetization output of 6 l/h at 22% polarization. Our findings regarding the polarization dependence on temperature, nitrogen partial pressure, and gas mixture flow velocity are also reported.

  14. Perspectives of hyperpolarized noble gas MRI beyond 3He.

    PubMed

    Lilburn, David M L; Pavlovskaya, Galina E; Meersmann, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) studies with hyperpolarized (hp) noble gases are at an exciting interface between physics, chemistry, materials science and biomedical sciences. This paper intends to provide a brief overview and outlook of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with hp noble gases other than hp (3)He. A particular focus are the many intriguing experiments with (129)Xe, some of which have already matured to useful MRI protocols, while others display high potential for future MRI applications. Quite naturally for MRI applications the major usage so far has been for biomedical research but perspectives for engineering and materials science studies are also provided. In addition, the prospects for surface sensitive contrast with hp (83)Kr MRI is discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Affinity Screening Using Competition with Fluorine-19 Hyperpolarized Ligands**

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yaewon; Hilty, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Fluorine-19 NMR and hyperpolarization form a powerful combination for drug screening. Under a competitive equilibrium with a selected fluorinated reporter ligand, the dissociation constant (KD) of other ligands of interest is measurable using a single-scan Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) experiment, without the need for a titration. This method is demonstrated by characterizing the binding of three ligands with different affinities for the serine protease trypsin. Monte Carlo simulations show that the highest accuracy is obtained when about one-half of the bound reporter ligand is displaced in the binding competition. Such conditions can be achieved over a wide range of affinities, allowing for rapid screening of non-fluorinated compounds when a single fluorinated ligand to the binding pocket of interest is known. PMID:25703090

  16. [Microstructure of the lung: diffusion measurement of hyperpolarized 3Helium].

    PubMed

    Morbach, Andreas E; Gast, Klaus K; Schmiedeskamp, Jörg; Herweling, Annette; Windirsch, Michael; Dahmen, Anja; Ley, Sebastian; Heussel, Claus-Peter; Heil, Werner; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Schreiber, Wolfgang G

    2006-01-01

    Imaging methods to study the lung are traditionally based on x-ray or on radioactive contrast agents. Conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has only limited applications for lung imaging because of the low tissue density of protons concentration of hydrogen atoms, which are usually the basis for the imaging. The introduction of hyperpolarized noble gases as a contrast agent in MRI has opened new possibilities for lung diagnosis. The present paper describes this new technique. Diffusion-weighted MRI for assessment of the lung microstructure is presented here as an example of the new possibilities of functional imaging. Studies to determine the sensitivity of the diffusion measurement and regarding the correlation with traditionally established methods are also presented, along with results of the measurement of the reproducibility determined in a clinical pilot study on healthy volunteers and patients. Furthermore, a pilot measurement of the 3He diffusion tensor in the lung is presented.

  17. Affinity screening using competitive binding with fluorine-19 hyperpolarized ligands.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yaewon; Hilty, Christian

    2015-04-13

    Fluorine-19 NMR and hyperpolarization form a powerful combination for drug screening. Under a competitive equilibrium with a selected fluorinated reporter ligand, the dissociation constant (K(D)) of other ligands of interest is measurable using a single-scan Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) experiment, without the need for a titration. This method is demonstrated by characterizing the binding of three ligands with different affinities for the serine protease trypsin. Monte Carlo simulations show that the highest accuracy is obtained when about one-half of the bound reporter ligand is displaced in the binding competition. Such conditions can be achieved over a wide range of affinities, allowing for rapid screening of non-fluorinated compounds when a single fluorinated ligand for the binding pocket of interest is known. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. NMR/MRI with hyperpolarized gas and high Tc SQUID

    DOEpatents

    Schlenga, Klaus; de Souza, Ricardo E.; Wong-Foy, Annjoe; Clarke, John; Pines, Alexander

    2000-01-01

    A method and apparatus for the detection of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals and production of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) from samples combines the use of hyperpolarized inert gases to enhance the NMR signals from target nuclei in a sample and a high critical temperature (Tc) superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) to detect the NMR signals. The system operates in static magnetic fields of 3 mT or less (down to 0.1 mT), and at temperatures from liquid nitrogen (77K) to room temperature. Sample size is limited only by the size of the magnetic field coils and not by the detector. The detector is a high Tc SQUID magnetometer designed so that the SQUID detector can be very close to the sample, which can be at room temperature.

  19. Perspectives of hyperpolarized noble gas MRI beyond 3He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lilburn, David M. L.; Pavlovskaya, Galina E.; Meersmann, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) studies with hyperpolarized (hp) noble gases are at an exciting interface between physics, chemistry, materials science and biomedical sciences. This paper intends to provide a brief overview and outlook of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with hp noble gases other than hp 3He. A particular focus are the many intriguing experiments with 129Xe, some of which have already matured to useful MRI protocols, while others display high potential for future MRI applications. Quite naturally for MRI applications the major usage so far has been for biomedical research but perspectives for engineering and materials science studies are also provided. In addition, the prospects for surface sensitive contrast with hp 83Kr MRI is discussed.

  20. New insights into lung diseases using hyperpolarized gas MRI.

    PubMed

    Flors, L; Altes, T A; Mugler, J P; de Lange, E E; Miller, G W; Mata, J F; Ruset, I C; Hersman, F W

    2015-01-01

    Hyperpolarized (HP) gases are a new class of contrast agents that permit to obtain high temporal and spatial resolution magnetic resonance images (MRI) of the lung airspaces. HP gas MRI has become important research tool not only for morphological and functional evaluation of normal pulmonary physiology but also for regional quantification of pathologic changes occurring in several lung diseases. The purpose of this work is to provide an introduction to MRI using HP noble gases, describing both the basic principles of the technique and the new information about lung disease provided by clinical studies with this method. The applications of the technique in normal subjects, smoking related lung disease, asthma, and cystic fibrosis are reviewed. Copyright © 2014 SERAM. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Hyperpolarized 13C Metabolic Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy and Imaging.

    PubMed

    Kubala, Eugen; Muñoz-Álvarez, Kim A; Topping, Geoffrey; Hundshammer, Christian; Feuerecker, Benedikt; Gómez, Pedro A; Pariani, Giorgio; Schilling, Franz; Glaser, Steffen J; Schulte, Rolf F; Menzel, Marion I; Schwaiger, Markus

    2016-12-30

    In the past decades, new methods for tumor staging, restaging, treatment response monitoring, and recurrence detection of a variety of cancers have emerged in conjunction with the state-of-the-art positron emission tomography with (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ([(18)F]-FDG PET). (13)C magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging ((13)CMRSI) is a minimally invasive imaging method that enables the monitoring of metabolism in vivo and in real time. As with any other method based on (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), it faces the challenge of low thermal polarization and a subsequent low signal-to-noise ratio due to the relatively low gyromagnetic ratio of (13)C and its low natural abundance in biological samples. By overcoming these limitations, dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) with subsequent sample dissolution has recently enabled commonly used NMR and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems to measure, study, and image key metabolic pathways in various biological systems. A particularly interesting and promising molecule used in (13)CMRSI is [1-(13)C]pyruvate, which, in the last ten years, has been widely used for in vitro, preclinical, and, more recently, clinical studies to investigate the cellular energy metabolism in cancer and other diseases. In this article, we outline the technique of dissolution DNP using a 3.35 T preclinical DNP hyperpolarizer and demonstrate its usage in in vitro studies. A similar protocol for hyperpolarization may be applied for the most part in in vivo studies as well. To do so, we used lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and catalyzed the metabolic reaction of [1-(13)C]pyruvate to [1-(13)C]lactate in a prostate carcinoma cell line, PC3, in vitro using (13)CMRSI.

  2. Hyperpolarization of rabbit superior cervical ganglion cells due to activity of an electrogenic sodium pump

    PubMed Central

    Lees, G.M.; Wallis, D.I.

    1974-01-01

    1 The mechanisms underlying the hyperpolarization which follows depolarization of rabbit superior cervical ganglion cells by acetylcholine, have been investigated and compared with the mechanisms responsible for the hyperpolarizations induced by orthodromic stimulation of the ganglion. 2 The amplitude of the drug-induced hyperpolarization (after-hyperpolarization) was diminished when [Na+]0 and the duration of the preceding depolarization were reduced. 3 In K+-free solutions, the amplitude of the after-hyperpolarization was often diminished and its rate of development was reduced. In 12.5 mM K+-Krebs solutions, the amplitude and rate of development of the after-hyperpolarization were increased; the potential was still present when the resting potential was at or close to EK. 4 Ouabain (10 μM) prevented or greatly diminished the after-hyperpolarization. The rates of onset and decay of the after-hyperpolarization were reduced in glucose-free solutions. 5 It is, therefore, concluded that the after-hypolarization is due to the activity of an electrogenic sodium pump. 6 The positive after-potential associated with the ganglionic action potential was increased in K+-free solutions and diminished when the resting potential approached EK, indicating that it is due to a period of increased K+ conductance. In the presence of high concentrations of hexamethonium (276 μM), the P wave was not selectively depressed by ouabain and has been shown by other workers to be due to a mechanism not involving an increased potassium conductance. It is concluded, therefore, that the positive after-potential, the P wave and the after-hyperpolarization are due to different mechanisms. PMID:4823465

  3. Mechanisms of long-lasting hyperpolarizations underlying slow sleep oscillations in cat corticothalamic networks.

    PubMed Central

    Contreras, D; Timofeev, I; Steriade, M

    1996-01-01

    1. To explore the nature of the long-lasting hyperpolarizations that characterize slow oscillations in corticothalamic circuits in vivo, intracellular recordings were obtained under ketamine-xylazine anaesthesia from cortical (Cx) cells of the cat precruciate motor cortex, thalamic reticular (RE) cells from the rostrolateral sector, and thalamocortical (TC) cells from the ventrolateral (VL) nucleus. 2. Measurements in the three cell types showed input resistance (Rin) to be highest during the long-lasting hyperpolarizations that correspond to depth-positive waves of the cortical EEG. Rin was lowest during the early phase of high-amplitude depth-negative EEG waves and increased thereafter until the next cycle of the slow oscillation. 3. Spontaneous long-lasting hyperpolarizations were compared with those evoked by dorsal thalamic stimulation. Voltage versus current (V-I) plots showed similar membrane potential (Vm) ranges and slopes for spontaneous and evoked hyperpolarizations in both Cx and RE cells. V-I plots from TC cells had similar slopes, but Vm during evoked hyperpolarizations was displaced towards more negative values. 4. Intracellular injection of constant hyperpolarizing current in Cx cells increased the amplitude of the initial part of the depolarizing plateau of the slow oscillation, but decreased the amplitude of the last part. 5. These results suggest disfacilitation to be the dominant mechanism in the membrane of cortical and thalamic cells during the spontaneous long-lasting hyperpolarizations, which shape and synchronize slow oscillations in corticothalamic networks. In Cx and RE cells, the same mechanism underlies thalamically evoked long-lasting hyperpolarizations. By contrast, evoked responses in TC cells show a strong additional hyperpolarizing factor. We propose that GABAB processes are stronger in TC than in Cx neurones, thus rendering the thalamus an easier target for absence-type epileptic phenomena through potentiation of thalamic rebound

  4. Prolonged hyperpolarizing potentials precede spindle oscillations in the thalamic reticular nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Fuentealba, Pablo; Timofeev, Igor; Steriade, Mircea

    2004-01-01

    The thalamic reticular (RE) nucleus is a key structure in the generation of spindles, a hallmark bioelectrical oscillation during early stages of sleep. Intracellular recordings of RE neurons in vivo revealed the presence of prolonged hyperpolarizing potentials preceding spindles in a subgroup (30%) of neurons. These hyperpolarizations (6-10 mV) lasted for 200-300 ms and were present just before the onset of spontaneously occurring spindle waves. Corticothalamic volleys also were effective in generating such hyperpolarizations followed by spindles in RE neurons. A drop of up to 40% in the apparent input resistance (Rin) was associated with these hyperpolarizing potentials, suggesting an active process rather than disfacilitation. Accordingly, the reversal potential was approximately -100 mV for both spontaneous and cortically elicited hyperpolarizations, consistent with the activation of slow K+ conductances. QX-314 in the recording pipettes decreased both the amplitude and incidence of prolonged hyperpolarizations, suggesting the participation of G protein-dependent K+ currents in the generation of hyperpolarizations. Simultaneous extracellular and intracellular recordings in the RE nucleus demonstrated that some RE neurons discharged during the hyperpolarizations and, thus, may be implicated in their generation. The prolonged hyperpolarizations preceding spindles may play a role in the transition from tonic to bursting firing of RE neurons within a range of membrane potential (-60 to -65 mV) at which they set favorable conditions for the generation of low-threshold spike bursts that initiate spindle sequences. These data are further arguments for the generation of spindles within the thalamic RE nucleus. PMID:15210981

  5. Apparatus for preparing a solution of a hyperpolarized noble gas for NMR and MRI analysis

    DOEpatents

    Pines, Alexander; Budinger, Thomas; Navon, Gil; Song, Yi-Qiao; Appelt, Stephan; Bifone, Angelo; Taylor, Rebecca; Goodson, Boyd; Seydoux, Roberto; Room, Toomas; Pietrass, Tanja

    2008-06-10

    The present invention relates generally to nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques for both spectroscopy and imaging. More particularly, the present invention relates to methods in which hyperpolarized noble gases (e.g., Xe and He) are used to enhance and improve NMR and MRI. Additionally, the hyperpolarized gas solutions of the invention are useful both in vitro and in vivo to study the dynamics or structure of a system. When used with biological systems, either in vivo or in vitro, it is within the scope of the invention to target the hyperpolarized gas and deliver it to specific regions within the system.

  6. Enhancement of NMR and MRI in the presence of hyperpolarized noble gases

    DOEpatents

    Pines, Alexander; Budinger, Thomas; Navon, Gil; Song, Yi-Qiao; Appelt, Stephan; Bifone, Angelo; Taylor, Rebecca; Goodson, Boyd; Seydoux, Roberto; Room, Toomas; Pietrass, Tanja

    2004-11-16

    The present invention relates generally to nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques for both spectroscopy and imaging. More particularly, the present invention relates to methods in which hyperpolarized noble gases (e.g., Xe and He) are used to enhance and improve NMR and MRI. Additionally, the hyperpolarized gas solutions of the invention are useful both in vitro and in vivo to study the dynamics or structure of a system. When used with biological systems, either in vivo or in vitro, it is within the scope of the invention to target the hyperpolarized gas and deliver it to specific regions within the system.

  7. Modulation of the isoprenaline-induced membrane hyperpolarization of mouse skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    van Mil, H. G.; Kerkhof, C. J.; Siegenbeek van Heukelom, J.

    1995-01-01

    1. The hyperpolarization of the resting membrane potential, Vm, induced by isoprenaline in the lumbrical muscle fibres of the mouse, was investigated by use of intracellular microelectrodes. 2. In normal Krebs-Henseleit solution (potassium concentration: K+o = 5.7 mM, 'control'), Vm was -7.40 +/- 0.2 mV; lowering K+o to 0.76 mM ('low K+o') resulted in either a hyperpolarization (Vm = -95.7 +/- 2.9 mV), or a depolarization (Vm = -52.0 +/- 0.3 mV). 3. Isoprenaline (> or = 200 nM) induced a hyperpolarization of Vm by delta Vm = -5.6 +/- 0.4 mV in control solution. 4. When Vm hyperpolarized after switching to low K+o, the addition of isoprenaline resulted in increased hyperpolarization Vm: delta Vm = -16.3 +/- 3.2 mV to a final Vm = -110.1 +/- 3.4 mV. Adding iso-prenaline when Vm depolarized in low K+o, leads to a hyperpolarization of either by -11.6 +/- 0.5 mV to -63.6 +/- 0.8 mV or by -51.7 +/- 2.7 mV to -106.9 +/- 3.9 mV. 5. Ouabain (0.1 to 1 mM) did not suppress the hyperpolarization by isoprenaline in 5.7 mM K+o (delta Vm = -6.7 +/- 0.4 mV) or the hyperpolarization of the depolarized cells in low K+- (delta Vm = -9.7 +/- 1.5 mV). 6. The hyperpolarization is a logarithmically decreasing function of K+o in the range between 2 and 20 mM (12 mV/decade). 7.IBMX and 8Br-cyclic AMP mimicked the response to isoprenaline whereas forskolin (FSK) induced in low K+o a hyperpolarization of -7.0 +/- 0.7 mV that could be augmented by addition of isoprenaline (delta Vm = -8.2 +/- 1.8 mV). 8. In control and low K+o, Ba2+ (0.6 mM) inhibited the hyperpolarization induced by isoprenaline, IBMX or 8Br-cyclic AMP. Other blockers of the potassium conductance such as TEA (5 mM) and apamin (0.4 microM) had no effect. 9. We conclude that in the lumbrical muscle of the mouse the isoprenaline-induced hyperpolarization is primarily due to an increase in potassium permeability. PMID:8680720

  8. Separation of extra- and intracellular metabolites using hyperpolarized 13C diffusion weighted MR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koelsch, Bertram L.; Sriram, Renuka; Keshari, Kayvan R.; Leon Swisher, Christine; Van Criekinge, Mark; Sukumar, Subramaniam; Vigneron, Daniel B.; Wang, Zhen J.; Larson, Peder E. Z.; Kurhanewicz, John

    2016-09-01

    This work demonstrates the separation of extra- and intracellular components of glycolytic metabolites with diffusion weighted hyperpolarized 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Using b-values of up to 15,000 s mm-2, a multi-exponential signal response was measured for hyperpolarized [1-13C] pyruvate and lactate. By fitting the fast and slow asymptotes of these curves, their extra- and intracellular weighted diffusion coefficients were determined in cells perfused in a MR compatible bioreactor. In addition to measuring intracellular weighted diffusion, extra- and intracellular weighted hyperpolarized 13C metabolites pools are assessed in real-time, including their modulation with inhibition of monocarboxylate transporters. These studies demonstrate the ability to simultaneously assess membrane transport in addition to enzymatic activity with the use of diffusion weighted hyperpolarized 13C MR. This technique could be an indispensible tool to evaluate the impact of microenvironment on the presence, aggressiveness and metastatic potential of a variety of cancers.

  9. Pulmonary MRI contrast using Surface Quadrupolar Relaxation (SQUARE) of hyperpolarized (83)Kr.

    PubMed

    Six, Joseph S; Hughes-Riley, Theodore; Lilburn, David M L; Dorkes, Alan C; Stupic, Karl F; Shaw, Dominick E; Morris, Peter G; Hall, Ian P; Pavlovskaya, Galina E; Meersmann, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Hyperpolarized (83)Kr has previously been demonstrated to enable MRI contrast that is sensitive to the chemical composition of the surface in a porous model system. Methodological advances have lead to a substantial increase in the (83)Kr hyperpolarization and the resulting signal intensity. Using the improved methodology for spin exchange optical pumping of isotopically enriched (83)Kr, internal anatomical details of ex vivo rodent lung were resolved with hyperpolarized (83)Kr MRI after krypton inhalation. Different (83)Kr relaxation times were found between the main bronchi and the parenchymal regions in ex vivo rat lungs. The T1 weighted hyperpolarized (83)Kr MRI provided a first demonstration of surface quadrupolar relaxation (SQUARE) pulmonary MRI contrast.

  10. Design of a 15N Molecular Unit to Achieve Long Retention of Hyperpolarized Spin State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nonaka, Hiroshi; Hirano, Masashi; Imakura, Yuki; Takakusagi, Yoichi; Ichikawa, Kazuhiro; Sando, Shinsuke

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear hyperpolarization is a phenomenon that can be used to improve the sensitivity of magnetic resonance molecular sensors. However, such sensors typically suffer from short hyperpolarization lifetime. Herein we report that [15N, D14]trimethylphenylammonium (TMPA) has a remarkably long spin-lattice relaxation time (1128 s, 14.1 T, 30 °C, D2O) on its 15N nuclei and achieves a long retention of the hyperpolarized state. [15N, D14]TMPA-based hyperpolarized sensor for carboxylesterase allowed the highly sensitive analysis of enzymatic reaction by 15N NMR for over 40 min in phophate-buffered saline (H2O, pH 7.4, 37 °C).

  11. Design of a 15N Molecular Unit to Achieve Long Retention of Hyperpolarized Spin State

    PubMed Central

    Nonaka, Hiroshi; Hirano, Masashi; Imakura, Yuki; Takakusagi, Yoichi; Ichikawa, Kazuhiro; Sando, Shinsuke

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear hyperpolarization is a phenomenon that can be used to improve the sensitivity of magnetic resonance molecular sensors. However, such sensors typically suffer from short hyperpolarization lifetime. Herein we report that [15N, D14]trimethylphenylammonium (TMPA) has a remarkably long spin–lattice relaxation time (1128 s, 14.1 T, 30 °C, D2O) on its 15N nuclei and achieves a long retention of the hyperpolarized state. [15N, D14]TMPA-based hyperpolarized sensor for carboxylesterase allowed the highly sensitive analysis of enzymatic reaction by 15N NMR for over 40 min in phophate-buffered saline (H2O, pH 7.4, 37 °C). PMID:28067292

  12. Distal airways in humans: dynamic hyperpolarized 3He MR imaging--feasibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tooker, Angela C.; Hong, Kwan Soo; McKinstry, Erin L.; Costello, Philip; Jolesz, Ferenc A.; Albert, Mitchell S.

    2003-01-01

    Dynamic hyperpolarized helium 3 (3He) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the human airways is achieved by using a fast gradient-echo pulse sequence during inhalation. The resulting dynamic images show differential contrast enhancement of both distal airways and the lung periphery, unlike static hyperpolarized 3He MR images on which only the lung periphery is seen. With this technique, up to seventh-generation airway branching can be visualized. Copyright RSNA, 2003.

  13. Discovery of Hyperpolarized Molecular Imaging Biomarkers in a Novel Prostate Tissue Slice Culture Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    Ronen’s report) above the rotor and pushing the tissues out the sample tube into the rotor using a small plastic rod. Following the insertion of each...for pathology and LDH enzyme activity. Two pathologists used a five-point scale (1= excellent, 5 = poor) to quantify the quality of the pathology of...AUC), time to maximum hyperpolarized lactate, maximum hyperpolarized lactate peak, and LDH activity were statistically compared between benign and

  14. Discovery of Hyperpolarized Molecular Imaging Biomarkers in a Novel Prostate Tissue Slice Culture Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    compatible bioreactor and that hyperpolarized 13C spectroscopy could be employed to study real-time metabolism of normal and malignant tissues. The...function of prostate tissue slice cultures (TCSs) in an nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-compatible, 3-dimensional tissue culture bioreactor , (2) to use...the TSC/NMR bioreactor model to identify hyperpolarized metabolic biomarkers of prostate cancer presence and aggressiveness, and (3) to use the TSC

  15. Discovery of Hyperpolarized Molecular Imaging Biomarkers in a Novel Prostate Tissue Slice Culture Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    compatible bioreactor optimized in year 1 to identify hyperpolarized metabolic biomarkers of prostate cancer presence and aggressiveness. To...accomplish this goal my group finished the engineering of a 5 mm bioreactor and acquired hyperpolarized [1-13C]pyruvate data indicating that similar signal...to noise and quality data can be achieved with 4 to 5 prostate tissue slices in the 5 mm bioreactor as was acquired from 30-40 tissue slices in the

  16. Vascular hyperpolarization in human physiology and cardiovascular risk conditions and disease.

    PubMed

    Schinzari, F; Tesauro, M; Cardillo, C

    2017-01-01

    Hyperpolarization causing smooth muscle relaxation contributes to the maintenance of vascular homeostasis, particularly in small-calibre arteries and arterioles. It may also become a compensatory vasodilator mechanism upregulated in states with impaired nitric oxide (NO) availability. Bioassay of vascular hyperpolarization in the human circulation has been hampered by the complexity of mechanisms involved and the limited availability of investigational tools. Firm evidence, however, supports the notion that hyperpolarization participates in the regulation of resting vasodilator tone and vascular reactivity in healthy subjects. In addition, an enhanced endothelium-derived hyperpolarization contributes to both resting and agonist-stimulated vasodilation in a variety of cardiovascular risk conditions and disease. Thus, hyperpolarization mediated by epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) and H2 O2 has been observed in coronary arterioles of patients with coronary artery disease. Similarly, ouabain-sensitive and EETs-mediated hyperpolarization has been observed to compensate for NO deficiency in patients with essential hypertension. Moreover, in non-hypertensive patients with multiple cardiovascular risk factors and in hypercholesterolaemia, KCa channel-mediated vasodilation appears to be activated. A novel paradigm establishes that perivascular adipose tissue (PVAT) is an additional regulator of vascular tone/function and endothelium is not the only agent in vascular hyperpolarization. Indeed, some PVAT-derived relaxing substances, such as adiponectin and angiotensin 1-7, may exert anticontractile and vasodilator actions by the opening of KCa channels in smooth muscle cells. Conversely, PVAT-derived factors impair coronary vasodilation via differential inhibition of some K(+) channels. In view of adipose tissue abnormalities occurring in human obesity, changes in PVAT-dependent hyperpolarization may be relevant for vascular dysfunction also in this condition.

  17. Distal airways in humans: dynamic hyperpolarized 3He MR imaging--feasibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tooker, Angela C.; Hong, Kwan Soo; McKinstry, Erin L.; Costello, Philip; Jolesz, Ferenc A.; Albert, Mitchell S.

    2003-01-01

    Dynamic hyperpolarized helium 3 (3He) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the human airways is achieved by using a fast gradient-echo pulse sequence during inhalation. The resulting dynamic images show differential contrast enhancement of both distal airways and the lung periphery, unlike static hyperpolarized 3He MR images on which only the lung periphery is seen. With this technique, up to seventh-generation airway branching can be visualized. Copyright RSNA, 2003.

  18. Local Anesthetic Inhibits Hyperpolarization-Activated Cationic Currents

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Qing-tao; Xia, Zhong-yuan; Liu, Jin; Bayliss, Douglas A.

    2011-01-01

    Systemic administration of local anesthetics has beneficial perioperative properties and an anesthetic-sparing and antiarrhythmic effect, although the detailed mechanisms of these actions remain unclear. In the present study, we investigated the effects of a local anesthetic, lidocaine, on hyperpolarization-activated and cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels that contribute to the pacemaker currents in rhythmically oscillating cells of the heart and brain. Voltage-clamp recordings were used to examine the properties of cloned HCN subunit currents expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes and human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells under control condition and lidocaine administration. Lidocaine inhibited HCN1, HCN2, HCN1-HCN2, and HCN4 channel currents at 100 μM in both oocytes and/or HEK 293 cells; it caused a decrease in both tonic and maximal current (∼30–50% inhibition) and slowed current activation kinetics for all subunits. In addition, lidocaine evoked a hyperpolarizing shift in half-activation voltage (ΔV1/2 of ∼−10 to −14 mV), but only for HCN1 and HCN1-HCN2 channels. By fitting concentration-response data to logistic functions, we estimated half-maximal (EC50) concentrations of lidocaine of ∼30 to 40 μM for the shift in V1/2 observed with HCN1 and HCN1-HCN2; for inhibition of current amplitude, calculated EC50 values were ∼50 to 70 μM for HCN1, HCN2, and HCN1-HCN2 channels. A lidocaine metabolite, monoethylglycinexylidide (100 μM), had similar inhibitory actions on HCN channels. These results indicate that lidocaine potently inhibits HCN channel subunits in dose-dependent manner over a concentration range relevant for systemic application. The ability of local anesthetics to modulate Ih in central neurons may contribute to central nervous system depression, whereas effects on If in cardiac pacemaker cells may contribute to the antiarrhythmic and/or cardiovascular toxic action. PMID:21303986

  19. Site specific polarization transfer from a hyperpolarized ligand of dihydrofolate reductase

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yunyi; Ragavan, Mukundan; Hilty, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Protein–ligand interaction is often characterized using polarization transfer by the intermolecular nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE). For such NOE experiments, hyperpolarization of nuclear spins presents the opportunity to increase the spin magnetization, which is transferred, by several orders of magnitude. Here, folic acid, a ligand of dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), was hyperpolarized on 1H spins using dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (D-DNP). Mixing hyperpolarized ligand with protein resulted in observable increases in protein 1H signal predominantly in the methyl group region of the spectra. Using 13C single quantum selection in a series of one-dimensional spectra, the carbon chemical shift ranges of the corresponding methyl groups can be elucidated. Signals observed in these hyperpolarized spectra could be confirmed using 3D isotope filtered NOESY spectra, although the hyperpolarized spectra were obtained in single scans. By further correlating the signal intensities observed in the D-DNP experiments with the occurrence of short distances in the crystal structure of the protein–ligand complex, the observed methyl proton signals could be matched to the chemical shifts of six amino acids in the active site of DHFR-folic acid binary complex. These data demonstrate that 13C chemical shift selection of protein resonances, combined with the intrinsic selectivity towards magnetization originating from the initially hyperpolarized spins, can be used for site specific characterization of protein–ligand interactions. PMID:27189223

  20. Signal-to-noise ratio comparison of encoding methods for hyperpolarized noble gas MRI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, L.; Venkatesh, A. K.; Albert, M. S.; Panych, L. P.

    2001-01-01

    Some non-Fourier encoding methods such as wavelet and direct encoding use spatially localized bases. The spatial localization feature of these methods enables optimized encoding for improved spatial and temporal resolution during dynamically adaptive MR imaging. These spatially localized bases, however, have inherently reduced image signal-to-noise ratio compared with Fourier or Hadamad encoding for proton imaging. Hyperpolarized noble gases, on the other hand, have quite different MR properties compared to proton, primarily the nonrenewability of the signal. It could be expected, therefore, that the characteristics of image SNR with respect to encoding method will also be very different from hyperpolarized noble gas MRI compared to proton MRI. In this article, hyperpolarized noble gas image SNRs of different encoding methods are compared theoretically using a matrix description of the encoding process. It is shown that image SNR for hyperpolarized noble gas imaging is maximized for any orthonormal encoding method. Methods are then proposed for designing RF pulses to achieve normalized encoding profiles using Fourier, Hadamard, wavelet, and direct encoding methods for hyperpolarized noble gases. Theoretical results are confirmed with hyperpolarized noble gas MRI experiments. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  1. Flow Cytometry Analysis Reveals That Only a Subpopulation of Mouse Sperm Undergoes Hyperpolarization During Capacitation1

    PubMed Central

    Escoffier, Jessica; Navarrete, Felipe; Haddad, Doug; Santi, Celia M.; Darszon, Alberto; Visconti, Pablo E.

    2015-01-01

    To gain fertilizing capacity, mammalian sperm should reside in the female tract for a period of time. The physiological changes that render the sperm able to fertilize are known as capacitation. Capacitation is associated with an increase in intracellular pH, an increase in intracellular calcium, and phosphorylation of different proteins. This process is also accompanied by the hyperpolarization of the sperm plasma membrane potential (Em). In the present work, we used flow cytometry to analyze changes in sperm Em during capacitation in individual cells. Our results indicate that a subpopulation of hyperpolarized mouse sperm can be clearly distinguished by sperm flow cytometry analysis. Using sperm bearing green fluorescent protein in their acrosomes, we found that this hyperpolarized subpopulation is composed of sperm with intact acrosomes. In addition, we show that the capacitation-associated hyperpolarization is blocked by high extracellular K+, by PKA inhibitors, and by SLO3 inhibitors in CD1 mouse sperm, and undetectable in Slo3 knockout mouse sperm. On the other hand, in sperm incubated in conditions that do not support capacitation, sperm membrane hyperpolarization can be induced by amiloride, high extracellular NaHCO3, and cAMP agonists. Altogether, our observations are consistent with a model in which sperm Em hyperpolarization is downstream of a cAMP-dependent pathway and is mediated by the activation of SLO3 K+ channels. PMID:25855261

  2. Hyperpolarized [2-13C]-Fructose: A Hemiketal DNP Substrate for In Vivo Metabolic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Keshari, Kayvan R.; Wilson, David M.; Chen, Albert P.; Bok, Robert; Larson, Peder E. Z.; Hu, Simon; Van Criekinge, Mark; Macdonald, Jeffrey M.; Vigneron, Daniel B.; Kurhanewicz, John

    2009-01-01

    Hyperpolarized 13C labelled molecular probes have been used to investigate metabolic pathways of interest as well as facilitate in vivo spectroscopic imaging by taking advantage of the dramatic signal enhancement provided by DNP. Due to the limited lifetime of the hyperpolarized nucleus, with signal decay dependant on T1 relaxation, carboxylate carbons have been the primary targets for development of hyperpolarized metabolic probes. The use of these carbon nuclei makes it difficult to investigate upstream glycolytic processes, which have been related to both cancer metabolism as well as other metabolic abnormalities, such as fatty liver disease and diabetes. Glucose carbons have very short T1s (< 1 sec) and therefore cannot be used as an in vivo hyperpolarized metabolic probe of glycolysis. However, the pentose analogue fructose can also enter glycolysis through its phosphorylation by hexokinase and yield complimentary information. The C2 of fructose is a hemiketal that has a relatively longer relaxation time (≈ 16 s at 37° C) and high solution state polarization (≈ 12%). Hyperpolarized [2-13C]-fructose was also injected into a transgenic model of prostate cancer (TRAMP) and demonstrated difference in uptake and metabolism in regions of tumor relative to surrounding tissue. Thus, this study demonstrates the first hyperpolarization of a carbohydrate carbon with a sufficient T1 and solution state polarization for ex vivo spectroscopy and in vivo spectroscopic imaging studies. PMID:19860409

  3. Hyperpolarized [2-13C]-fructose: a hemiketal DNP substrate for in vivo metabolic imaging.

    PubMed

    Keshari, Kayvan R; Wilson, David M; Chen, Albert P; Bok, Robert; Larson, Peder E Z; Hu, Simon; Van Criekinge, Mark; Macdonald, Jeffrey M; Vigneron, Daniel B; Kurhanewicz, John

    2009-12-09

    Hyperpolarized (13)C labeled molecular probes have been used to investigate metabolic pathways of interest as well as facilitate in vivo spectroscopic imaging by taking advantage of the dramatic signal enhancement provided by DNP. Due to the limited lifetime of the hyperpolarized nucleus, with signal decay dependent on T(1) relaxation, carboxylate carbons have been the primary targets for development of hyperpolarized metabolic probes. The use of these carbon nuclei makes it difficult to investigate upstream glycolytic processes, which have been related to both cancer metabolism as well as other metabolic abnormalities, such as fatty liver disease and diabetes. Glucose carbons have very short T(1)s (<1 s) and therefore cannot be used as an in vivo hyperpolarized metabolic probe of glycolysis. However, the pentose analogue fructose can also enter glycolysis through its phosphorylation by hexokinase and yield complementary information. The C(2) of fructose is a hemiketal that has a relatively longer relaxation time (approximately 16 s at 37 degrees C) and high solution state polarization (approximately 12%). Hyperpolarized [2-(13)C]-fructose was also injected into a transgenic model of prostate cancer (TRAMP) and demonstrated difference in uptake and metabolism in regions of tumor relative to surrounding tissue. Thus, this study demonstrates the first hyperpolarization of a carbohydrate carbon with a sufficient T(1) and solution state polarization for ex vivo spectroscopy and in vivo spectroscopic imaging studies.

  4. In Situ and Ex Situ Low-Field NMR Spectroscopy and MRI Endowed by SABRE Hyperpolarization**

    PubMed Central

    Barskiy, Danila A.; Kovtunov, Kirill V.; Koptyug, Igor V.; He, Ping; Groome, Kirsten A.; Best, Quinn A.; Shi, Fan; Goodson, Boyd M.; Shchepin, Roman V.; Truong, Milton L.; Coffey, Aaron M.; Waddell, Kevin W.; Chekmenev, Eduard Y.

    2015-01-01

    By using 5.75 and 47.5 mT nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, up to 105-fold sensitivity enhancement through signal amplification by reversible exchange (SABRE) was enabled, and subsecond temporal resolution was used to monitor an exchange reaction that resulted in the buildup and decay of hyperpolarized species after parahydrogen bubbling. We demonstrated the high-resolution low-field proton magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of pyridine in a 47.5 mT magnetic field endowed by SABRE. Molecular imaging (i.e. imaging of dilute hyperpolarized substances rather than the bulk medium) was conducted in two regimes: in situ real-time MRI of the reaction mixture (in which pyridine was hyperpolarized), and ex situ MRI (in which hyperpolarization decays) of the liquid hyperpolarized product. Low-field (milli-Tesla range, e.g. 5.75 and 47.5 mT used in this study) parahydrogen-enhanced NMR and MRI, which are free from the limitations of high-field magnetic resonance (including susceptibility-induced gradients of the static magnetic field at phase interfaces), potentially enables new imaging applications as well as differentiation of hyperpolarized chemical species on demand by exploiting spin manipulations with static and alternating magnetic fields. PMID:25367202

  5. Signal-to-noise ratio comparison of encoding methods for hyperpolarized noble gas MRI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, L.; Venkatesh, A. K.; Albert, M. S.; Panych, L. P.

    2001-01-01

    Some non-Fourier encoding methods such as wavelet and direct encoding use spatially localized bases. The spatial localization feature of these methods enables optimized encoding for improved spatial and temporal resolution during dynamically adaptive MR imaging. These spatially localized bases, however, have inherently reduced image signal-to-noise ratio compared with Fourier or Hadamad encoding for proton imaging. Hyperpolarized noble gases, on the other hand, have quite different MR properties compared to proton, primarily the nonrenewability of the signal. It could be expected, therefore, that the characteristics of image SNR with respect to encoding method will also be very different from hyperpolarized noble gas MRI compared to proton MRI. In this article, hyperpolarized noble gas image SNRs of different encoding methods are compared theoretically using a matrix description of the encoding process. It is shown that image SNR for hyperpolarized noble gas imaging is maximized for any orthonormal encoding method. Methods are then proposed for designing RF pulses to achieve normalized encoding profiles using Fourier, Hadamard, wavelet, and direct encoding methods for hyperpolarized noble gases. Theoretical results are confirmed with hyperpolarized noble gas MRI experiments. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  6. Using hyperpolarized (129)Xe MRI to quantify regional gas transfer in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jennifer M; Robertson, Scott H; Wang, Ziyi; He, Mu; Virgincar, Rohan S; Schrank, Geoffry M; Smigla, Rose Marie; O'Riordan, Thomas G; Sundy, John; Ebner, Lukas; Rackley, Craig R; McAdams, Page; Driehuys, Bastiaan

    2017-08-31

    Assessing functional impairment, therapeutic response and disease progression in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) continues to be challenging. Hyperpolarized (129)Xe MRI can address this gap through its unique capability to image gas transfer three-dimensionally from airspaces to interstitial barrier tissues to red blood cells (RBCs). This must be validated by testing the degree to which it correlates with pulmonary function tests (PFTs) and CT scores, and its spatial distribution reflects known physiology and patterns of disease. 13 healthy individuals (33.6±15.7 years) and 12 patients with IPF (66.0±6.4 years) underwent (129)Xe MRI to generate three-dimensional quantitative maps depicting the (129)Xe ventilation distribution, its uptake in interstitial barrier tissues and its transfer to RBCs. For each map, mean values were correlated with PFTs and CT fibrosis scores, and their patterns were tested for the ability to depict functional gravitational gradients in healthy lung and to detect the known basal and peripheral predominance of disease in IPF. (129)Xe MRI depicted functional impairment in patients with IPF, whose mean barrier uptake increased by 188% compared with the healthy reference population. (129)Xe MRI metrics correlated poorly and insignificantly with CT fibrosis scores but strongly with PFTs. Barrier uptake and RBC transfer both correlated significantly with diffusing capacity of the lungs for carbon monoxide (r=-0.75, p<0.01 and r=0.72, p<0.01), while their ratio (RBC/barrier) correlated most strongly (r=0.94, p<0.01). RBC transfer exhibited significant anterior-posterior gravitational gradients in healthy volunteers, but not in IPF, where it was significantly impaired in the basal (p=0.02) and subpleural (p<0.01) lung. Hyperpolarized(129)Xe MRI is a rapid and well-tolerated exam that provides region-specific quantification of interstitial barrier thickness and RBC transfer efficiency. With further development, it could become

  7. Real-Time MRI-Guided Catheter Tracking Using Hyperpolarized Silicon Particles

    PubMed Central

    Whiting, Nicholas; Hu, Jingzhe; Shah, Jay V.; Cassidy, Maja C.; Cressman, Erik; Zacharias Millward, Niki; Menter, David G.; Marcus, Charles M.; Bhattacharya, Pratip K.

    2015-01-01

    Visualizing the movement of angiocatheters during endovascular interventions is typically accomplished using x-ray fluoroscopy. There are many potential advantages to developing magnetic resonance imaging-based approaches that will allow three-dimensional imaging of the tissue/vasculature interface while monitoring other physiologically-relevant criteria, without exposing the patient or clinician team to ionizing radiation. Here we introduce a proof-of-concept development of a magnetic resonance imaging-guided catheter tracking method that utilizes hyperpolarized silicon particles. The increased signal of the silicon particles is generated via low-temperature, solid-state dynamic nuclear polarization, and the particles retain their enhanced signal for ≥40 minutes—allowing imaging experiments over extended time durations. The particles are affixed to the tip of standard medical-grade catheters and are used to track passage under set distal and temporal points in phantoms and live mouse models. With continued development, this method has the potential to supplement x-ray fluoroscopy and other MRI-guided catheter tracking methods as a zero-background, positive contrast agent that does not require ionizing radiation. PMID:26239953

  8. Real-Time MRI-Guided Catheter Tracking Using Hyperpolarized Silicon Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whiting, Nicholas; Hu, Jingzhe; Shah, Jay V.; Cassidy, Maja C.; Cressman, Erik; Zacharias Millward, Niki; Menter, David G.; Marcus, Charles M.; Bhattacharya, Pratip K.

    2015-08-01

    Visualizing the movement of angiocatheters during endovascular interventions is typically accomplished using x-ray fluoroscopy. There are many potential advantages to developing magnetic resonance imaging-based approaches that will allow three-dimensional imaging of the tissue/vasculature interface while monitoring other physiologically-relevant criteria, without exposing the patient or clinician team to ionizing radiation. Here we introduce a proof-of-concept development of a magnetic resonance imaging-guided catheter tracking method that utilizes hyperpolarized silicon particles. The increased signal of the silicon particles is generated via low-temperature, solid-state dynamic nuclear polarization, and the particles retain their enhanced signal for ≥40 minutes—allowing imaging experiments over extended time durations. The particles are affixed to the tip of standard medical-grade catheters and are used to track passage under set distal and temporal points in phantoms and live mouse models. With continued development, this method has the potential to supplement x-ray fluoroscopy and other MRI-guided catheter tracking methods as a zero-background, positive contrast agent that does not require ionizing radiation.

  9. Regional fractional ventilation mapping in spontaneously breathing mice using hyperpolarized ¹²⁹Xe MRI.

    PubMed

    Imai, Hirohiko; Matsumoto, Hironobu; Miyakoshi, Erika; Okumura, Shintaro; Fujiwara, Hideaki; Kimura, Atsuomi

    2015-01-01

    The feasibility of ventilation imaging with hyperpolarized (HP) (129) Xe MRI has been investigated for quantitative and regional assessment of ventilation in spontaneously breathing mice. The multiple breath ventilation imaging technique was modified to the protocol of spontaneous inhalation of HP (129) Xe delivered continuously from a (129) Xe polarizer. A series of (129) Xe ventilation images was obtained by varying the number of breaths before the (129) Xe lung imaging. The fractional ventilation, r, was successfully evaluated for spontaneously breathing mice. An attempt was made to detect ventilation dysfunction in the emphysematous mouse lung induced by intratracheal administration of porcine pancreatic elastase (PPE). As a result, the distribution of fractional ventilation could be visualized by the r map. Significant dysfunction of ventilation was quantitatively identified in the PPE-treated group. The whole-lung r value of 0.34 ± 0.01 for control mice (N = 4) was significantly reduced, to 0.25 ± 0.07, in PPE-treated mice (N = 4) (p = 0.038). This study is the first application of multiple breath ventilation imaging to spontaneously breathing mice, and shows that this methodology is sensitive to differences in the pulmonary ventilation. This methodology is expected to improve simplicity as well as noninvasiveness when assessing regional ventilation in small rodents.

  10. Ventilation imaging of the lung: comparison of hyperpolarized helium-3 MR imaging with Xe-133 scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Altes, Talissa A; Rehm, Patrice K; Harrell, Frank; Salerno, Michael; Daniel, Thomas M; De Lange, Eduard E

    2004-07-01

    To compare hyperpolarized helium-3 (HHe) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the lung with standard Xe-133 lung ventilation scintigraphy. We performed a retrospective review of 15 subjects who underwent HHe MRI and Xe-133 lung ventilation imaging. Coronal MRI sections were acquired after a single inhalation of HHe gas, and standard posterior planar lung ventilation scintigraphy was performed during continuous breathing of Xe-133 gas. The first breath scintigram of each patient was compared with a composite MR image composed of the sum of the individual MR images and with the individual helium-3 MR images. Ventilation defects on the two imaging modalities were compared for size, conspicuity, and concordance in presence and location. Assessment was done separately for each of four lung quadrants. Comparing the composite HHe MR images with Xe-133 scintigraphy, ventilation defect size, conspicuity and concordance were the same in 67% (40/60), 63% (38/60), and 62% (37/60) quadrants, respectively. Comparing the individual HHe MR image sections with the Xe-133 ventilation scan, there was concordance between the ventilation defects in 27% (16/60) of quadrants. More defects were identified on the individual HHe MR images in 62% (37/60) of quadrants. There was good agreement between composite HHe MR image and first breath Xe-133 scintigraphic images, supporting the widely held assumption that HHe MRI likely depicts first breath lung ventilation.

  11. Is my lung function really that good? Flow-type spirometer problems that elevate test results.

    PubMed

    Townsend, Mary C; Hankinson, John L; Lindesmith, Larry A; Slivka, William A; Stiver, Gregg; Ayres, Gerald T

    2004-05-01

    Most spirometry errors reduce test results, and it is widely assumed that measurement accuracy is guaranteed by frequent spirometer calibrations or calibration checks. However, zero errors and changes in flow-type spirometer sensors may occur during testing that significantly elevate test results, even though the spirometer was calibrated recently. To draw attention to these often-unrecognized problems, this report presents anomalous spirograms and test results obtained from occupational medicine clinics and hospital pulmonary function laboratories during quality assurance spirogram reviews. The spurious results appear to have been caused by inaccurate zeroing of the flow sensor, or by condensation, mucus deposition, or unstable calibration of various flow-type spirometers. These errors elevated some FVCs to 144 to 204% of predicted and probably caused 40% of 121 middle-aged working men in respirator medical clearance programs to record both FVC and FEV1 > 120% of predicted. Since spirometers report the largest values from a test, these errors must be recognized and deleted to avoid false-negative interpretations. Flow-type spirometer users at all levels, from the technician to the interpreter of test results, should be aware of the potential for and the appearance of these errors in spirograms.

  12. Exploring hyperpolarized 83Kr by remotely detected NMR relaxometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleveland, Zackary I.; Pavlovskaya, Galina E.; Stupic, Karl F.; LeNoir, Catherine F.; Meersmann, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    For the first time, a hyperpolarized (hp) noble gas with a nuclear electric quadrupole moment is available for high-field nuclear-magnetic-resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and magnetic-resonance imaging. Hp Kr83 (I=9/2) is generated by spin-exchange optical pumping and separated from the rubidium vapor used in the pumping process. Optical pumping occurs under the previously unstudied condition of high krypton gas densities. Signal enhancements of more than three orders of magnitude compared to the thermal equilibrium Kr83 signal at 9.4T magnetic-field strength are obtained. The spin-lattice relaxation of Kr83 is caused primarly by quadrupolar couplings during the brief adsorption periods of the krypton atoms on the surrounding container walls and significantly limits the currently obtained spin polarization. Measurements in macroscopic glass containers and in desiccated canine lung tissue at field strengths between 0.05 and 3T using remotely detected hp Kr83 NMR spectroscopy reveal that the longitudinal relaxation dramatically accelerates as the magnetic-field strength decreases.

  13. Detection of tobacco smoke deposition by hyperpolarized krypton-83 MRI.

    PubMed

    Cleveland, Zackary I; Pavlovskaya, Galina E; Stupic, Karl F; Wooten, Jan B; Repine, John E; Meersmann, Thomas

    2008-02-01

    Despite the importance of the tobacco smoke particulate matter in the lungs to the etiology of pulmonary disease in cigarette smokers, little is currently known about the spatial distribution of particle deposition or the persistence of the resulting deposits in humans, and no satisfactory technique currently exists to directly observe tobacco smoke condensate in airways. In this proof-of-principle work, hyperpolarized (hp) 83Kr MRI and NMR spectroscopy are introduced as probes for tobacco smoke deposition in porous media. A reduction in the hp-83Kr longitudinal (T1) relaxation of up to 95% under near-ambient humidity, pressure and temperature conditions was observed when the krypton gas was brought into contact with surfaces that had been exposed to cigarette smoke. This smoke-induced acceleration of the 83Kr self-relaxation was observed for model glass surfaces that, in some experiments, were coated with bovine lung surfactant extract. However, a similar effect was not observed with hp-(129)Xe indicating that the 83Kr sensitivity to smoke deposition was not caused by paramagnetic species but rather by quadrupolar relaxation due to high adsorption affinity for the smoke deposits. The 83Kr T1 differences between smoke-treated and untreated surfaces were sufficient to produce a strong contrast in variable flip angle FLASH hp-83Kr MRI, suggesting that hp-83Kr may be a promising contrast agent for in vivo pulmonary MRI.

  14. Hyperpolarized xenon NMR and MRI signal amplification by gas extraction

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xin; Graziani, Dominic; Pines, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    A method is reported for enhancing the sensitivity of NMR of dissolved xenon by detecting the signal after extraction to the gas phase. We demonstrate hyperpolarized xenon signal amplification by gas extraction (Hyper-SAGE) in both NMR spectra and magnetic resonance images with time-of-flight information. Hyper-SAGE takes advantage of a change in physical phase to increase the density of polarized gas in the detection coil. At equilibrium, the concentration of gas-phase xenon is ≈10 times higher than that of the dissolved-phase gas. After extraction the xenon density can be further increased by several orders of magnitude by compression and/or liquefaction. Additionally, being a remote detection technique, the Hyper-SAGE effect is further enhanced in situations where the sample of interest would occupy only a small proportion of the traditional NMR receiver. Coupled with targeted xenon biosensors, Hyper-SAGE offers another path to highly sensitive molecular imaging of specific cell markers by detection of exhaled xenon gas. PMID:19805177

  15. T cells display mitochondria hyperpolarization in human type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Chernatynskaya, Anna V; Li, Jian-Wei; Kimbrell, Matthew R; Cassidy, Richard J; Perry, Daniel J; Muir, Andrew B; Atkinson, Mark A; Brusko, Todd M; Mathews, Clayton E

    2017-09-07

    T lymphocytes constitute a major effector cell population in autoimmune type 1 diabetes. Despite essential functions of mitochondria in regulating activation, proliferation, and apoptosis of T cells, little is known regarding T cell metabolism in the progression of human type 1 diabetes. In this study, we report, using two independent cohorts, that T cells from patients with type 1 diabetes exhibited mitochondrial inner-membrane hyperpolarization (MHP). Increased MHP was a general phenotype observed in T cell subsets irrespective of prior antigen exposure, and was not correlated with HbA1C levels, subject age, or duration of diabetes. Elevated T cell MHP was not detected in subjects with type 2 diabetes. T cell MHP was associated with increased activation-induced IFNγ production, and activation-induced IFNγ was linked to mitochondria-specific ROS production. T cells from subjects with type 1 diabetes also exhibited lower intracellular ATP levels. In conclusion, intrinsic mitochondrial dysfunction observed in type 1 diabetes alters mitochondrial ATP and IFNγ production; the latter is correlated with ROS generation. These changes impact T cell bioenergetics and function.

  16. Relaxation of hyperpolarized 129 Xe in a deflating polymer bag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möller, Harald E.; Cleveland, Zackary I.; Driehuys, Bastiaan

    2011-09-01

    In magnetic resonance imaging with hyperpolarized (HP) noble gases, data is often acquired during prolonged gas delivery from a storage reservoir. However, little is known about the extent to which relaxation within the reservoir will limit the useful acquisition time. For quantitative characterization, 129Xe relaxation was studied in a bag made of polyvinyl fluoride (Tedlar). Particular emphasis was on wall relaxation, as this mechanism is expected to dominate. The HP 129Xe magnetization dynamics in the deflating bag were accurately described by a model assuming dissolution of Xe in the polymer matrix and dipolar relaxation with neighboring nuclear spins. In particular, the wall relaxation rate changed linearly with the surface-to-volume ratio and exhibited a relaxivity of κ = 0.392 ± 0.008 cm/h, which is in reasonable agreement with κ = 0.331 ± 0.051 cm/h measured in a static Tedlar bag. Estimates for the bulk gas-phase 129Xe relaxation yielded T1bulk=2.55±0.22 h, which is dominated by intrinsic Xe-Xe relaxation, with small additional contributions from magnetic field inhomogeneities and oxygen-induced relaxation. Calculations based on these findings indicate that relaxation may limit HP 129Xe experiments when slow gas delivery rates are employed as, for example, in mouse imaging or vascular infusion experiments.

  17. Reducing Relaxation of Hyperpolarized ^129 Xe during Cryogenic Separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patton, B.; Kuzma, N. N.; Happer, W.

    2004-05-01

    Recent experimental results^1 indicate that the T1 relaxation time of solid ^129Xe is much shorter than previous models had predicted^2 near the xenon melting point of 161 K and at low magnetic fields. This enhanced relaxation is detrimental to commercial xenon polarizers, which cryogenically distill hyperpolarized ^129Xe from a buffer gas mixture. We have measured the fraction of xenon polarization lost during a typical cryogenic collection, using different permanent magnets to vary the holding field from 700 gauss to over a tesla. The results indicate that using a stronger permanent magnet around the cryo-trap is a simple way to increase the final polarization of the pure xenon gas. An additional experiment was conducted in order to determine whether the majority of the xenon relaxation occurs throughout accumulation (possibly as a result of temperature inhomogeneities within the frozen sample) or during the brief thawing time. In pinpointing the polarization loss, this research may suggest new designs for xenon polarizers. 1. Kuzma et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 147602 (2002). 2. Fitzgerald et al., Phys. Rev. B 59, 8795 (1999).

  18. Validating Excised Rodent Lungs for Functional Hyperpolarized Xenon-129 MRI

    PubMed Central

    Lilburn, David M. L.; Hughes-Riley, Theodore; Six, Joseph S.; Stupic, Karl F.; Shaw, Dominick E.; Pavlovskaya, Galina E.; Meersmann, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Ex vivo rodent lung models are explored for physiological measurements of respiratory function with hyperpolarized (hp) 129Xe MRI. It is shown that excised lung models allow for simplification of the technical challenges involved and provide valuable physiological insights that are not feasible using in vivo MRI protocols. A custom designed breathing apparatus enables MR images of gas distribution on increasing ventilation volumes of actively inhaled hp 129Xe. Straightforward hp 129Xe MRI protocols provide residual lung volume (RV) data and permit for spatially resolved tracking of small hp 129Xe probe volumes during the inhalation cycle. Hp 129Xe MRI of lung function in the excised organ demonstrates the persistence of post mortem airway responsiveness to intravenous methacholine challenges. The presented methodology enables physiology of lung function in health and disease without additional regulatory approval requirements and reduces the technical and logistical challenges with hp gas MRI experiments. The post mortem lung functional data can augment histological measurements and should be of interest for drug development studies. PMID:24023683

  19. Fluconazole treatment hyperpolarizes the plasma membrane of Candida cells.

    PubMed

    Elicharova, Hana; Sychrova, Hana

    2013-11-01

    Five pathogenic Candida species were compared in terms of their osmotolerance, tolerance to toxic sodium and lithium cations, and resistance to fluconazole. The species not only differed, in general, in their tolerance to high osmotic pressure (C. albicans and C. parapsilosis being the most osmotolerant) but exhibited distinct sensitivities to toxic sodium and lithium cations, with C. parapsilosis and C. tropicalis being very tolerant but C. krusei and C. dubliniensis sensitive to LiCl. The treatment of both fluconazole-susceptible (C. albicans and C. parapsilosis) and fluconazole-resistant (C. dubliniensis, C. krusei and C. tropicalis) growing cells with subinhibitory concentrations of fluconazole resulted in substantially elevated intracellular Na(+) levels. Using a diS-C3(3) assay, for the first time, to monitor the relative membrane potential (ΔΨ) of Candida cells, we show that the fluconazole treatment of growing cells of all five species results in a substantial hyperpolarization of their plasma membranes, which is responsible for an increased non-specific transport of toxic alkali metal cations and other cationic drugs (e.g., hygromycin B). Thus, the combination of relatively low doses of fluconazole and drugs, whose import into the tested Candida strains is driven by the cell membrane potential, might be especially potent in terms of its ability to inhibit the growth of or even kill various Candida species.

  20. Hyperpolarized 129Xe NMR signature of living biological cells.

    PubMed

    Boutin, Céline; Desvaux, Hervé; Carrière, Marie; Leteurtre, François; Jamin, Nadège; Boulard, Yves; Berthault, Patrick

    2011-12-01

    We show that the differentiation between internal and external compartments of various biological cells in suspension can be made via simple NMR spectra of hyperpolarized (129) Xe. The spectral separation between the signals of (129) Xe in these two compartments is already known for red blood cells, because of the strong interaction of the noble gas with hemoglobin. The observation of two separate peaks in the 200-ppm region can be seen with both eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells, some of which are not known to contain paramagnetic proteins in large quantities. Using different experiments in which the cells are lysed, swell or are blocked in G2 phase, we demonstrate that the low-field-shifted peak observed corresponds to xenon in the aqueous pool inside the cells and not in the membranes. The presence of this additional peak is a clear indication of cell integrity, and its integration allows the quantification of the total cell volume. The relaxation time of intracellular xenon is sufficiently long to open up promising perspectives for cell characterization. The exchange time between the inner and outer cell compartments (on the order of 30 ms) renders possible the targeting of intracellular receptors, whereas the observation of chemical shift variations represents a method of revealing the presence of toxic species in the cells.

  1. Hyperpolarized 3He diffusion MRI and histology in pulmonary emphysema.

    PubMed

    Woods, Jason C; Choong, Cliff K; Yablonskiy, Dmitriy A; Bentley, John; Wong, Jonathan; Pierce, John A; Cooper, Joel D; Macklem, Peter T; Conradi, Mark S; Hogg, James C

    2006-12-01

    Diffusion MRI of hyperpolarized (3)He shows that the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of (3)He gas is highly restricted in the normal lung and becomes nearly unrestricted in severe emphysema. The nature of this restricted diffusion provides information about lung structure; however, no direct comparison with histology in human lungs has been reported. The purpose of this study is to provide information about (3)He gas diffusivity in explanted human lungs, and describe the relationship between (3)He diffusivity and the surface area to lung volume ratio (SA/V) and mean linear intercept (L(m)) measurements--the gold standard for diagnosis of emphysema. Explanted lungs from patients who were undergoing lung transplantation for advanced COPD, and donor lungs that were not used for transplantation were imaged via (3)He diffusion MRI. Histological measurements were made on the same specimens after they were frozen in the position of study. There is an inverse correlation between diffusivity and SA/V (and a positive correlation between diffusivity and L(m)). An important result is that restricted (3)He diffusivity separated normal from emphysematous lung tissue more clearly than the morphometric analyses. This effect may be due to the smaller histologic sampling size compared to the MRI voxel sizes.

  2. A leucine zipper motif essential for gating of hyperpolarization-activated channels.

    PubMed

    Wemhöner, Konstantin; Silbernagel, Nicole; Marzian, Stefanie; Netter, Michael F; Rinné, Susanne; Stansfeld, Phillip J; Decher, Niels

    2012-11-23

    It is poorly understood how hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channels (HCNs) function. We have identified a leucine zipper in the S5 segment of HCNs, regulating hyperpolarization-activated and instantaneous current components. The leucine zipper is essential for HCN channel gating. The identification and functional characterization of the leucine zipper is an important step toward the understanding of HCN channel function. Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels are pacemakers in cardiac myocytes and neurons. Although their membrane topology closely resembles that of voltage-gated K(+) channels, the mechanism of their unique gating behavior in response to hyperpolarization is still poorly understood. We have identified a highly conserved leucine zipper motif in the S5 segment of HCN family members. In order to study the role of this motif for channel function, the leucine residues of the zipper were individually mutated to alanine, arginine, or glutamine residues. Leucine zipper mutants traffic to the plasma membrane, but the channels lose their sensitivity to open upon hyperpolarization. Thus, our data indicate that the leucine zipper is an important molecular determinant for hyperpolarization-activated channel gating. Residues of the leucine zipper interact with the adjacent S6 segment of the channel. This interaction is essential for voltage-dependent gating of the channel. The lower part of the leucine zipper, at the intracellular mouth of the channel, is important for stabilizing the closed state. Mutations at these sites increase current amplitudes or result in channels with deficient closing and increased min-P(o). Our data are further supported by homology models of the open and closed state of the HCN2 channel pore. Thus, we conclude that the leucine zipper of HCN channels is a major determinant for hyperpolarization-activated channel gating.

  3. Systematic T1 improvement for hyperpolarized 129xenon.

    PubMed

    Repetto, Maricel; Babcock, Earl; Blümler, Peter; Heil, Werner; Karpuk, Sergei; Tullney, Kathlynne

    2015-03-01

    The spin-lattice relaxation time T1 of hyperpolarized (HP)-(129)Xe was improved at typical storage conditions (i.e. low and homogeneous magnetic fields). Very long wall relaxation times T(1)(wall) of about 18 h were observed in uncoated, spherical GE180 glass cells of ∅=10 cm which were free of rubidium and not permanently sealed but attached to a standard glass stopcock. An "aging" process of the wall relaxation was identified by repeating measurements on the same cell. This effect could be easily removed by repeating the initial cleaning procedure. In this way, a constant wall relaxation was ensured. The Xe nuclear spin-relaxation rate 1/T1(Xe-Xe) due to van der Waals molecules was investigated too, by admixing three different buffer gases (N(2), SF(6) and CO(2)). Especially CO(2) exhibited an unexpected high efficiency (r) in shortening the lifetime of the Xe-Xe dimers and hence prolonging the total T1 relaxation even further. These measurements also yielded an improved accuracy for the van der Waals relaxation for pure Xe (with 85% (129)Xe) of T(1)(Xe-Xe)=(4.6±0.1)h. Repeating the measurements with HP (129)Xe in natural abundance in mixtures with SF6, a strong dependence of T(1)(Xe-Xe) and r on the isotopic enrichment was observed, uncovering a shorter T(1)(Xe-Xe) relaxation for the (129)Xe in natural composition as compared to the 85% isotopically enriched gas.

  4. Oxygen-dependent hyperpolarized (129) Xe brain MR.

    PubMed

    Li, Haidong; Zhang, Zhiying; Zhong, Jianping; Ruan, Weiwei; Han, Yeqing; Sun, Xianping; Ye, Chaohui; Zhou, Xin

    2016-03-01

    Hyperpolarized (HP) (129) Xe MR offers unique advantages for brain functional imaging (fMRI) because of its extremely high sensitivity to different chemical environments and the total absence of background noise in biological tissues. However, its advancement and applications are currently plagued by issues of signal strength. Generally, xenon atoms found in the brain after inhalation are transferred from the lung via the bloodstream. The longitudinal relaxation time (T1 ) of HP (129) Xe is inversely proportional to the pulmonary oxygen concentration in the lung because oxygen molecules are paramagnetic. However, the T1 of (129) Xe is proportional to the pulmonary oxygen concentration in the blood, because the higher pulmonary oxygen concentration will result in a higher concentration of diamagnetic oxyhemoglobin. Accordingly, there should be an optimal pulmonary oxygen concentration for a given quantity of HP (129) Xe in the brain. In this study, the relationship between pulmonary oxygen concentration and HP (129) Xe signal in the brain was analyzed using a theoretical model and measured through in vivo experiments. The results from the theoretical model and experiments in rats are found to be in good agreement with each other. The optimal pulmonary oxygen concentration predicted by the theoretical model was 21%, and the in vivo experiments confirmed the presence of such an optimal ratio by reporting measurements between 25% and 35%. These findings are helpful for improving the (129) Xe signal in the brain and make the most of the limited spin polarization available for brain experiments. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Brute-Force Hyperpolarization for NMR and MRI.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, Matthew L; Kalechofsky, Neal; Belzer, Avrum; Rosay, Melanie; Kempf, James G

    2015-07-08

    Hyperpolarization (HP) of nuclear spins is critical for ultrasensitive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We demonstrate an approach for >1500-fold enhancement of key small-molecule metabolites: 1-(13)C-pyruvic acid, 1-(13)C-sodium lactate, and 1-(13)C-acetic acid. The (13)C solution NMR signal of pyruvic acid was enhanced 1600-fold at B = 1 T and 40 °C by pre-polarizing at 14 T and ∼2.3 K. This "brute-force" approach uses only field and temperature to generate HP. The noted 1 T observation field is appropriate for benchtop NMR and near the typical 1.5 T of MRI, whereas high-field observation scales enhancement as 1/B. Our brute-force process ejects the frozen, solid sample from the low-T, high-B polarizer, passing it through low field (B < 100 G) to facilitate "thermal mixing". That equilibrates (1)H and (13)C in hundreds of milliseconds, providing (13)C HP from (1)H Boltzmann polarization attained at high B/T. The ejected sample arrives at a room-temperature, permanent magnet array, where rapid dissolution with 40 °C water yields HP solute. Transfer to a 1 T NMR system yields (13)C signals with enhancements at 80% of ideal for noted polarizing conditions. High-resolution NMR of the same product at 9.4 T had consistent enhancement plus resolution of (13)C shifts and J-couplings for pyruvic acid and its hydrate. Comparable HP was achieved with frozen aqueous lactate, plus notable enhancement of acetic acid, demonstrating broader applicability for small-molecule NMR and metabolic MRI. Brute-force avoids co-solvated free-radicals and microwaves that are essential to competing methods. Here, unadulterated samples obviate concerns about downstream purity and also exhibit slow solid-state spin relaxation, favorable for transporting HP samples.

  6. High-resolution low-field molecular magnetic resonance imaging of hyperpolarized liquids.

    PubMed

    Coffey, Aaron M; Kovtunov, Kirill V; Barskiy, Danila A; Koptyug, Igor V; Shchepin, Roman V; Waddell, Kevin W; He, Ping; Groome, Kirsten A; Best, Quinn A; Shi, Fan; Goodson, Boyd M; Chekmenev, Eduard Y

    2014-09-16

    We demonstrate the feasibility of microscale molecular imaging using hyperpolarized proton and carbon-13 MRI contrast media and low-field (47.5 mT) preclinical scale (38 mm i.d.) 2D magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Hyperpolarized proton images with 94 × 94 μm(2) spatial resolution and hyperpolarized carbon-13 images with 250 × 250 μm(2) in-plane spatial resolution were recorded in 4-8 s (largely limited by the electronics response), surpassing the in-plane spatial resolution (i.e., pixel size) achievable with micro-positron emission tomography (PET). These hyperpolarized proton and (13)C images were recorded using large imaging matrices of up to 256 × 256 pixels and relatively large fields of view of up to 6.4 × 6.4 cm(2). (13)C images were recorded using hyperpolarized 1-(13)C-succinate-d2 (30 mM in water, %P(13C) = 25.8 ± 5.1% (when produced) and %P(13C) = 14.2 ± 0.7% (when imaged), T1 = 74 ± 3 s), and proton images were recorded using (1)H hyperpolarized pyridine (100 mM in methanol-d4, %P(H) = 0.1 ± 0.02% (when imaged), T1 = 11 ± 0.1 s). Both contrast agents were hyperpolarized using parahydrogen (>90% para-fraction) in an automated 5.75 mT parahydrogen induced polarization (PHIP) hyperpolarizer. A magnetized path was demonstrated for successful transportation of a (13)C hyperpolarized contrast agent (1-(13)C-succinate-d2, sensitive to fast depolarization when at the Earth's magnetic field) from the PHIP polarizer to the 47.5 mT low-field MRI. While future polarizing and low-field MRI hardware and imaging sequence developments can further improve the low-field detection sensitivity, the current results demonstrate that microscale molecular imaging in vivo is already feasible at low (<50 mT) fields and potentially at low (~1 mM) metabolite concentrations.

  7. Noradrenaline hyperpolarizes cells of the canine coronary sinus by increasing their permeability to potassium ions.

    PubMed Central

    Boyden, P A; Cranefield, P F; Gadsby, D C

    1983-01-01

    The mechanism of the noradrenaline-induced hyperpolarization was investigated in small strips of coronary sinus tissue mounted in a fast-flow system. The recorded hyperpolarization was negligibly small in response to 10 nM-noradrenaline but was maximal at 10 microM (average amplitude 23 mV, in 4 mM-K solution). The hyperpolarization was unaffected by 1 microM-phentolamine but was abolished by 10 microM-propranolol and so is presumably mediated via beta-adrenoceptors. The noradrenaline-induced hyperpolarization became smaller when the extracellular K concentration ([K]o) was raised or when the extracellular Na concentration was lowered. These results are consistent with two general mechanisms: noradrenaline might cause hyperpolarization by stimulating the Na/K pump to generate more outward current, as previously suggested for other cell types. Alternatively, noradrenaline might lower the permeability ratio, PNa/PK, by reducing the permeability coefficient for Na (PNa) and/or increasing that for K (PK). The noradrenaline-induced hyperpolarization is not diminished during exposure to 5 microM-acetylstrophanthidin, or to K-free solution, or to K-free solution containing acetylstrophanthidin. We conclude that the hyperpolarization does not reflect enhanced electrogenic pump activity. Conductance measurements using two micro-electrodes in very small preparations revealed that, like the muscarinic agonist carbachol, noradrenaline caused an increase in membrane slope conductance. Steady-state current-voltage curves obtained in the presence of noradrenaline, in the presence of carbachol, and in the absence of both drugs all crossed each other at about the same level of membrane potential. During the maintained injection of sufficiently large hyperpolarizing current, application of either noradrenaline or carbachol causes depolarization instead of hyperpolarization. The cross-over or 'reversal' potentials of current-voltage curves, determined with and without the drugs, vary

  8. Modulation of voltage-gated sodium channels hyperpolarizes the voltage threshold for activation in spinal motoneurones.

    PubMed

    Power, Kevin E; Carlin, Kevin P; Fedirchuk, Brent

    2012-03-01

    Previous work has shown that motoneurone excitability is enhanced by a hyperpolarization of the membrane potential at which an action potential is initiated (V(th)) at the onset, and throughout brainstem-evoked fictive locomotion in the adult decerebrate cat and neonatal rat. Modeling work has suggested the modulation of Na(+) conductance as a putative mechanism underlying this state-dependent change in excitability. This study sought to determine whether modulation of voltage-gated sodium channels could induce V(th) hyperpolarization. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings were made from antidromically identified lumbar spinal motoneurones in an isolated neonatal rat spinal cord preparation. Recordings were made with and without the bath application of veratridine, a plant alkaloid neurotoxin that acts as a sodium channel modulator. As seen in HEK 293 cells expressing Nav1.2 channels, veratridine-modified channels demonstrated a hyperpolarizing shift in their voltage-dependence of activation and a slowing of inactivation that resulted in an enhanced inward current in response to voltage ramp stimulations. In the native rat motoneurones, veratridine-modified sodium channels induced a hyperpolarization of V(th) in all 29 neonatal rat motoneurones examined (mean hyperpolarization: -6.6 ± 4.3 mV). V(th) hyperpolarization was not due to the effects on Ca(2+) and/or K(+) channels as blockade of these currents did not alter V(th). Veratridine also significantly increased the amplitude of persistent inward currents (PICs; mean increase: 72.5 ± 98.5 pA) evoked in response to slow depolarizing current ramps. However, the enhancement of the PIC amplitude had a slower time course than the hyperpolarization of V(th), and the PIC onset voltage could be either depolarized or hyperpolarized, suggesting that PIC facilitation did not mediate the V(th) hyperpolarization. We therefore suggest that central neuronal circuitry in mammals could affect V(th) in a mechanism similar to that of

  9. Efficient Synthesis of Nicotinamide-1-15N for Ultrafast NMR Hyperpolarization Using Parahydrogen

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Nicotinamide (a vitamin B3 amide) is one of the key vitamins as well as a drug for treatment of M. tuberculosis, HIV, cancer, and other diseases. Here, an improved Zincke reaction methodology is presented allowing for straightforward and scalable synthesis of nicotinamide-1-15N with an excellent isotopic purity (98%) and good yield (55%). 15N nuclear spin label in nicotinamide-1-15N can be NMR hyperpolarized in seconds using parahydrogen gas. NMR hyperpolarization using the process of temporary conjugation between parahydrogen and to-be-hyperpolarized biomolecule on hexacoordinate iridium complex via the Signal Amplification By Reversible Exchange (SABRE) method significantly increases detection sensitivity (e.g., >20 000-fold for nicotinamide-1-15N at 9.4 T) as has been shown by Theis T. et al. (J. Am. Chem. Soc.2015, 137, 1404), and hyperpolarized in this fashion, nicotinamide-1-15N can be potentially used to probe metabolic processes in vivo in future studies. Moreover, the presented synthetic methodology utilizes mild reaction conditions, and therefore can also be potentially applied to synthesis of a wide range of 15N-enriched N-heterocycles that can be used as hyperpolarized contrast agents for future in vivo molecular imaging studies. PMID:26999571

  10. Developing hyperpolarized silicon particles for in vivo MRI targeting of ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Whiting, Nicholas; Hu, Jingzhe; Zacharias, Niki M.; Lokesh, Ganesh L. R.; Volk, David E.; Menter, David G.; Rupaimoole, Rajesha; Previs, Rebecca; Sood, Anil K.; Bhattacharya, Pratip

    2016-01-01

    Abstract. Silicon-based nanoparticles are ideally suited for use as biomedical imaging agents due to their biocompatibility, biodegradability, and simple surface chemistry that facilitates drug loading and targeting. A method of hyperpolarizing silicon particles using dynamic nuclear polarization, which increases magnetic resonance imaging signals by several orders-of-magnitude through enhanced nuclear spin alignment, has recently been developed to allow silicon particles to function as contrast agents for in vivo magnetic resonance imaging. The enhanced spin polarization of silicon lasts significantly longer than other hyperpolarized agents (tens of minutes, whereas <1  min for other species at room temperature), allowing a wide range of potential applications. We report our recent characterizations of hyperpolarized silicon particles, with the ultimate goal of targeted, noninvasive, and nonradioactive molecular imaging of various cancer systems. A variety of particle sizes (20 nm to 2  μm) were found to have hyperpolarized relaxation times ranging from ∼10 to 50 min. The addition of various functional groups to the particle surface had no effect on the hyperpolarization buildup or decay rates and allowed in vivo imaging over long time scales. Additional in vivo studies examined a variety of particle administration routes in mice, including intraperitoneal injection, rectal enema, and oral gavage. PMID:27547777

  11. Accommodation to hyperpolarizing currents: differences between motor and sensory nerves in mice.

    PubMed

    Nodera, Hiroyuki; Rutkove, Seward B

    2012-06-19

    Peripheral motor nerves have revealed variability in excitability by hyperpolarizing current at specific target response levels, likely reflecting differences in the hyperpolarization-activated current (Ih). Whether such variability in Ih exists in sensory axons is yet to be established. We performed nerve excitability testing in mouse tail motor and sensory nerves at 3 target response levels (20, 40, and 60% of the maximum amplitudes). Target-level dependent variability was present by long hyperpolarizing currents in motor and sensory nerves in which the recording at the low target level showed smaller threshold changes than at the high target level. Other excitability measures, however, showed no variability. Furthermore, the accommodation by long, strong hyperpolarization revealed smaller S3 accommodation (threshold change between the maximum and at the end of the 200 ms conditioning pulse) at the low target response level in sensory axons, but not in motor axons. Variation in the kinetics of the subtypes of the hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels in motor and sensory axons is the most likely explanation for these findings. The present study has proposed that nerve excitability testing may provide a non-invasive means for the assessment of the different types of Ih in neurological disorders where HCN subtypes play unique pathophysiological roles.

  12. Irreversible catalyst activation enables hyperpolarization and water solubility for NMR signal amplification by reversible exchange.

    PubMed

    Truong, Milton L; Shi, Fan; He, Ping; Yuan, Bingxin; Plunkett, Kyle N; Coffey, Aaron M; Shchepin, Roman V; Barskiy, Danila A; Kovtunov, Kirill V; Koptyug, Igor V; Waddell, Kevin W; Goodson, Boyd M; Chekmenev, Eduard Y

    2014-12-04

    Activation of a catalyst [IrCl(COD)(IMes)] (IMes = 1,3-bis(2,4,6-trimethylphenyl)imidazol-2-ylidene; COD = cyclooctadiene)] for signal amplification by reversible exchange (SABRE) was monitored by in situ hyperpolarized proton NMR at 9.4 T. During the catalyst-activation process, the COD moiety undergoes hydrogenation that leads to its complete removal from the Ir complex. A transient hydride intermediate of the catalyst is observed via its hyperpolarized signatures, which could not be detected using conventional nonhyperpolarized solution NMR. SABRE enhancement of the pyridine substrate can be fully rendered only after removal of the COD moiety; failure to properly activate the catalyst in the presence of sufficient substrate can lead to irreversible deactivation consistent with oligomerization of the catalyst molecules. Following catalyst activation, results from selective RF-saturation studies support the hypothesis that substrate polarization at high field arises from nuclear cross-relaxation with hyperpolarized (1)H spins of the hydride/orthohydrogen spin bath. Importantly, the chemical changes that accompanied the catalyst's full activation were also found to endow the catalyst with water solubility, here used to demonstrate SABRE hyperpolarization of nicotinamide in water without the need for any organic cosolvent--paving the way to various biomedical applications of SABRE hyperpolarization methods.

  13. Nitric oxide: Mediator of nonadrenergic noncholinergic hyperpolarization of opossum esophageal circular smooth muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Du, C.; Murray, J.; Conklin, J.L.; Bates, J.N. )

    1991-03-15

    The electromyogram recorded from circular smooth muscle (SM) of opossum esophagus, either during peristalsis or when the intrinsic esophageal nerves are stimulated by an electrical field (EFS), consists of a hyperpolarization followed by a depolarization. This membrane response results from the interaction of a nonadrenergic-noncholinergic (NANC) neurotransmitter with its receptors on SM membrane. N{sup G}-nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA), an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase, and nitric oxide (NO) were used to test the hypothesis that NO is a mediator of this NANC nerve-induced response. The transmembrane potential difference of circular SM cells of opossum esophagus was recorded with glass microelectrode. The nerve-mediated membrane response was evoked by EFS. L-NNA (50uM) abolished the initial hyperpolarization and reduced the amplitude of and the time to maximal depolarization. L-arginine (1mM), the substrate for NO synthase, antagonized the effect of L-NNA. Neither L-NNA nor L-arginine altered the resting membrane potential. Exogenous NO produced hyperpolarization of SM membrane potential and attenuated the amplitude of EFS-induced hyperpolarization and depolarization. Nitrosocysteine, a NO-containing compound, also hyperpolarized the membrane potential. Effect of NO was neither blocked by L-NNA nor by TTX. The data support the hypothesis that NO or an NO-containing compound mediates NANC nerve-induced responses of the esophageal SM membrane.

  14. Variable flip angle schedules in bSSFP imaging of hyperpolarized noble gases.

    PubMed

    Deppe, Martin H; Wild, Jim M

    2012-06-01

    Balanced steady-state free precession imaging sequences provide signal-to-noise ratio benefits for MRI of hyperpolarized nuclei. Hyperpolarized magnetization decays during the imaging sequence to thermal equilibrium, effectively necessitating imaging in a transient state characterized by nonconstant transverse magnetization and k-space filtering when using constant flip angles. This work presents an analytical method for calculation of variable flip angle schedules which maintain constant transverse magnetization in balanced steady-state free precession imaging of hyperpolarized nuclei. The approach is based on direct inversion of the Bloch equations and does not require any numerical optimization. Input parameters are pulse sequence timings and effective relaxation times, which take diffusion of hyperpolarized gas in imaging gradients into account. Provision of constant transverse magnetization is demonstrated in phantom experiments and human lung imaging using hyperpolarized (3) He. The benefit of a flat k-space filter is demonstrated by reduced blurring in (3) He and digital phantom data, and high quality (3) He ventilation images from human lungs are obtained. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Nuclear spin hyperpolarization of the solvent using signal amplification by reversible exchange (SABRE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, Karlos X.; Nasr, Khaled; Milne, Mark; Sherry, A. Dean; Goux, Warren J.

    2015-08-01

    Here we report the polarization of the solvent OH protons by SABRE using standard iridium-based catalysts under slightly acidic conditions. Solvent polarization was observed in the presence of a variety of structurally similar N-donor substrates while no solvent enhancement was observed in the absence of substrate or para-hydrogen (p-H2). Solvent polarization was sensitive to the polarizing field and catalyst:substrate ratio in a manner similar to that of substrate protons. SABRE experiments with pyridine-d5 suggest a mechanism where hyperpolarization is transferred from the free substrate to the solvent by chemical exchange while measured hyperpolarization decay times suggest a complimentary mechanism which occurs by direct coordination of the solvent to the catalytic complex. We found the solvent hyperpolarization to decay nearly 3 times more slowly than its characteristic spin-lattice relaxation time suggesting that the hyperpolarized state of the solvent may be sufficiently long lived (∼20 s) to hyperpolarize biomolecules having exchangeable protons. This route may offer future opportunities for SABRE to impact metabolic imaging.

  16. Concentric Rings K-Space Trajectory for Hyperpolarized 13C MR Spectroscopic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Wenwen; Lustig, Michael; Larson, Peder E.Z.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To develop a robust and rapid imaging technique for hyperpolarized 13C MR Spectroscopic Imaging (MRSI) and investigate its performance. Methods A concentric rings readout trajectory with constant angular velocity is proposed for hyperpolarized 13C spectroscopic imaging and its properties are analyzed. Quantitative analyses of design tradeoffs are presented for several imaging scenarios. The first application of concentric rings on 13C phantoms and in vivo animal hyperpolarized 13C MRSI studies were performed to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed method. Finally, a parallel imaging accelerated concentric rings study is presented. Results The concentric rings MRSI trajectory has the advantages of acquisition timesaving compared to echo-planar spectroscopic imaging (EPSI). It provides sufficient spectral bandwidth with relatively high SNR efficiency compared to EPSI and spiral techniques. Phantom and in vivo animal studies showed good image quality with half the scan time and reduced pulsatile flow artifacts compared to EPSI. Parallel imaging accelerated concentric rings showed advantages over Cartesian sampling in g-factor simulations and demonstrated aliasing-free image quality in a hyperpolarized 13C in vivo study. Conclusion The concentric rings trajectory is a robust and rapid imaging technique that fits very well with the speed, bandwidth, and resolution requirements of hyperpolarized 13C MRSI. PMID:25533653

  17. A Leucine Zipper Motif Essential for Gating of Hyperpolarization-activated Channels*

    PubMed Central

    Wemhöner, Konstantin; Silbernagel, Nicole; Marzian, Stefanie; Netter, Michael F.; Rinné, Susanne; Stansfeld, Phillip J.; Decher, Niels

    2012-01-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels are pacemakers in cardiac myocytes and neurons. Although their membrane topology closely resembles that of voltage-gated K+ channels, the mechanism of their unique gating behavior in response to hyperpolarization is still poorly understood. We have identified a highly conserved leucine zipper motif in the S5 segment of HCN family members. In order to study the role of this motif for channel function, the leucine residues of the zipper were individually mutated to alanine, arginine, or glutamine residues. Leucine zipper mutants traffic to the plasma membrane, but the channels lose their sensitivity to open upon hyperpolarization. Thus, our data indicate that the leucine zipper is an important molecular determinant for hyperpolarization-activated channel gating. Residues of the leucine zipper interact with the adjacent S6 segment of the channel. This interaction is essential for voltage-dependent gating of the channel. The lower part of the leucine zipper, at the intracellular mouth of the channel, is important for stabilizing the closed state. Mutations at these sites increase current amplitudes or result in channels with deficient closing and increased min-Po. Our data are further supported by homology models of the open and closed state of the HCN2 channel pore. Thus, we conclude that the leucine zipper of HCN channels is a major determinant for hyperpolarization-activated channel gating. PMID:23048023

  18. Cortical hyperpolarization-activated depolarizing current takes part in the generation of focal paroxysmal activities

    PubMed Central

    Timofeev, Igor; Bazhenov, Maxim; Sejnowski, Terrence; Steriade, Mircea

    2002-01-01

    During paroxysmal neocortical oscillations, sudden depolarization leading to the next cycle occurs when the majority of cortical neurons are hyperpolarized. Both the Ca2+-dependent K+ currents (IK(Ca)) and disfacilitation play critical roles in the generation of hyperpolarizing potentials. In vivo experiments and computational models are used here to investigate whether the hyperpolarization-activated depolarizing current (Ih) in cortical neurons also contributes to the generation of paroxysmal onsets. Hyperpolarizing current pulses revealed a depolarizing sag in ≈20% of cortical neurons. Intracellular recordings from glial cells indirectly indicated an increase in extracellular potassium concentration ([K+]o) during paroxysmal activities, leading to a positive shift in the reversal potential of K+-mediated currents, including Ih. In the paroxysmal neocortex, ≈20% of neurons show repolarizing potentials originating from hyperpolarizations associated with depth-electroencephalogram positive waves of spike-wave complexes. The onset of these repolarizing potentials corresponds to maximal [K+]o as estimated from dual simultaneous impalements from neurons and glial cells. Computational models showed how, after the increased [K+]o, the interplay between Ih, IK(Ca), and a persistent Na+ current, INa(P), could organize paroxysmal oscillations at a frequency of 2–3 Hz. PMID:12089324

  19. Decomposition of cumyl hydroperoxide in the presence of sulphonated silica in a flow-type system

    SciTech Connect

    Shelpakova, N.A.; Ioffa, A.F.

    1993-12-31

    An investigation has been made of the decomposition of cumyl hydroperoxide (CHP) in the presence of silica-based sulphocationites in a flow-type system. It was established that the given specimens are effective catalysts for the decomposition of CHP into phenol and acetone. It was shown that, in the course of the process, no irreversible poisoning of the surface of the catalyst by the products of CHP decomposition occurs. Data of chromatographic analysis of the products of CHP decomposition in the presence of sulphuric acid and silica-based sulphocationites are given.

  20. Multi-band frequency encoding method for metabolic imaging with hyperpolarized [1- 13C]pyruvate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Morze, Cornelius; Reed, Galen; Shin, Peter; Larson, Peder E. Z.; Hu, Simon; Bok, Robert; Vigneron, Daniel B.

    2011-08-01

    A new method was developed for simultaneous spatial localization and spectral separation of multiple compounds based on a single echo, by designing the acquisition to place individual compounds in separate frequency encoding bands. This method was specially designed for rapid and robust metabolic imaging of hyperpolarized 13C substrates and their metabolic products, and was investigated in phantom studies and studies in normal mice and transgenic models of prostate cancer to provide rapid metabolic imaging of hyperpolarized [1- 13C]pyruvate and its metabolic products [1- 13C]lactate and [1- 13C]alanine at spatial resolutions up to 3 mm in-plane. Elevated pyruvate and lactate signals in the vicinity of prostatic tissues were observed in transgenic tumor mice. The multi-band frequency encoding technique enabled rapid metabolic imaging of hyperpolarized 13C compounds with important advantages over prior approaches, including less complicated acquisition and reconstruction methods.

  1. Hyperpolarized 13C pyruvate mouse brain metabolism with absorptive-mode EPSI at 1 T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miloushev, Vesselin Z.; Di Gialleonardo, Valentina; Salamanca-Cardona, Lucia; Correa, Fabian; Granlund, Kristin L.; Keshari, Kayvan R.

    2017-02-01

    The expected signal in echo-planar spectroscopic imaging experiments was explicitly modeled jointly in spatial and spectral dimensions. Using this as a basis, absorptive-mode type detection can be achieved by appropriate choice of spectral delays and post-processing techniques. We discuss the effects of gradient imperfections and demonstrate the implementation of this sequence at low field (1.05 T), with application to hyperpolarized [1-13C] pyruvate imaging of the mouse brain. The sequence achieves sufficient signal-to-noise to monitor the conversion of hyperpolarized [1-13C] pyruvate to lactate in the mouse brain. Hyperpolarized pyruvate imaging of mouse brain metabolism using an absorptive-mode EPSI sequence can be applied to more sophisticated murine disease and treatment models. The simple modifications presented in this work, which permit absorptive-mode detection, are directly translatable to human clinical imaging and generate improved absorptive-mode spectra without the need for refocusing pulses.

  2. Real-time assessment of Krebs cycle metabolism using hyperpolarized 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Marie A; Atherton, Helen J; Ball, Daniel R; Cole, Mark A; Heather, Lisa C; Griffin, Julian L; Clarke, Kieran; Radda, George K; Tyler, Damian J

    2009-08-01

    The Krebs cycle plays a fundamental role in cardiac energy production and is often implicated in the energetic imbalance characteristic of heart disease. In this study, we measured Krebs cycle flux in real time in perfused rat hearts using hyperpolarized magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). [2-(13)C]Pyruvate was hyperpolarized and infused into isolated perfused hearts in both healthy and postischemic metabolic states. We followed the enzymatic conversion of pyruvate to lactate, acetylcarnitine, citrate, and glutamate with 1 s temporal resolution. The appearance of (13)C-labeled glutamate was delayed compared with that of other metabolites, indicating that Krebs cycle flux can be measured directly. The production of (13)C-labeled citrate and glutamate was decreased postischemia, as opposed to lactate, which was significantly elevated. These results showed that the control and fluxes of the Krebs cycle in heart disease can be studied using hyperpolarized [2-(13)C]pyruvate.

  3. Producing over 100 ml of highly concentrated hyperpolarized solution by means of dissolution DNP

    PubMed Central

    Comment, A.; Rentsch, J.; Kurdzesau, F.; Jannin, S.; Uffmann, K.; van Heeswijk, R. B.; Hautle, P.; Konter, J. A.; van den Brandt, B.; van der Klink, J. J.

    2008-01-01

    New low-temperature inserts compatible with an existing hyperpolarizer were developed to dynamically polarize nuclei in large samples. The performance of the system was tested on 8 ml glassy frozen solutions containing 13C-labeled molecules and doped with nitroxyl free radicals. The obtained 13C low-temperature polarization was comparable to the one measured on 20 times smaller sample volume with only 3–4 times higher microwave power. By using a dissolution insert that fits to the new design, it was possible to obtain about 120 ml of room-temperature hyperpolarized solution. The polarization as well as the molecule concentration was comparable to the values obtained in standard size hyperpolarized samples. Such large samples are interesting for future studies on larger animals and possibly for potential clinical applications. PMID:18595751

  4. Multi-point optimization of recirculation flow type casing treatment in centrifugal compressors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tun, Min Thaw; Sakaguchi, Daisaku

    2016-06-01

    High-pressure ratio and wide operating range are highly required for a turbocharger in diesel engines. A recirculation flow type casing treatment is effective for flow range enhancement of centrifugal compressors. Two ring grooves on a suction pipe and a shroud casing wall are connected by means of an annular passage and stable recirculation flow is formed at small flow rates from the downstream groove toward the upstream groove through the annular bypass. The shape of baseline recirculation flow type casing is modified and optimized by using a multi-point optimization code with a metamodel assisted evolutionary algorithm embedding a commercial CFD code CFX from ANSYS. The numerical optimization results give the optimized design of casing with improving adiabatic efficiency in wide operating flow rate range. Sensitivity analysis of design parameters as a function of efficiency has been performed. It is found that the optimized casing design provides optimized recirculation flow rate, in which an increment of entropy rise is minimized at grooves and passages of the rotating impeller.

  5. Field dependence of T1 for hyperpolarized [1-13C]pyruvate.

    PubMed

    Chattergoon, N; Martínez-Santiesteban, F; Handler, W B; Ardenkjaer-Larsen, J H; Scholl, T J

    2013-01-01

    In vivo metabolism of hyperpolarized pyruvate has been demonstrated to be an important probe of cellular glycolysis in diseases such as cancer. The usefulness of hyperpolarized (13)C imaging is dependent on the relaxation rates of the (13)C-enriched substrates, which in turn depend on chemical conformation and properties of the dissolution media such as buffer composition, solution pH, temperature and magnetic field. We have measured the magnetic field dependence of the spin-lattice relaxation time of hyperpolarized [1-(13)C]pyruvate using field-cycled relaxometry. [1-(13)C]pyruvate was hyperpolarized using dynamic nuclear polarization and then rapidly thawed and dissolved in a buffered solution to a concentration of 80 mmol l(-1) and a pH of ~7.8. The hyperpolarized liquid was transferred within 8 s to a fast field-cycling relaxometer with a probe tuned for detection of (13)C at a field strength of ~0.75 T. The magnetic field of the relaxometer was rapidly varied between relaxation and acquisition fields where the sample magnetization was periodically measured using a small flip angle. Data were recorded for relaxation fields varying between 0.237 mT and 0.705 T to map the T(1) dispersion of the C-1 of pyruvate. Using similar methods, we also determined the relaxivity of the triarylmethyl radical (OX063; used for dynamic nuclear polarization) on the C-1 of pyruvate at field strengths of 0.001, 0.01, 0.1 and 0.5 T using 0.075, 1.0 and 2.0 mmol l(-1) concentrations of OX063 in the hyperpolarized pyruvate solution. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Ion Permeabilities in Mouse Sperm Reveal an External Trigger for SLO3-Dependent Hyperpolarization

    PubMed Central

    Chávez, Julio C.; de la Vega-Beltrán, José L.; Escoffier, Jessica; Visconti, Pablo E.; Treviño, Claudia L.; Darszon, Alberto; Salkoff, Lawrence; Santi, Celia M.

    2013-01-01

    Unlike most cells of the body which function in an ionic environment controlled within narrow limits, spermatozoa must function in a less controlled external environment. In order to better understand how sperm control their membrane potential in different ionic conditions, we measured mouse sperm membrane potentials under a variety of conditions and at different external K+ concentrations, both before and after capacitation. Experiments were undertaken using both wild-type, and mutant mouse sperm from the knock-out strain of the sperm-specific, pH-sensitive, SLO3 K+ channel. Membrane voltage data were fit to the Goldman-Hodgkin-Katz equation. Our study revealed a significant membrane permeability to both K+ and Cl− before capacitation, as well as Na+. The permeability to both K+ and Cl− has the effect of preventing large changes in membrane potential when the extracellular concentration of either ion is changed. Such a mechanism may protect against undesired shifts in membrane potential in changing ionic environments. We found that a significant portion of resting membrane potassium permeability in wild-type sperm was contributed by SLO3 K+ channels. We also found that further activation of SLO3 channels was the essential mechanism producing membrane hyperpolarization under two separate conditions, 1) elevation of external pH prior to capacitation and 2) capacitating conditions. Both conditions produced a significant membrane hyperpolarization in wild-type which was absent in SLO3 mutant sperm. Hyperpolarization in both conditions may result from activation of SLO3 channels by raising intracellular pH; however, demonstrating that SLO3-dependent hyperpolarization is achieved by an alkaline environment alone shows that SLO3 channel activation might occur independently of other events associated with capacitation. For example sperm may undergo stages of membrane hyperpolarization when reaching alkaline regions of the female genital tract. Significantly, other

  7. Mouse Sperm Membrane Potential Hyperpolarization Is Necessary and Sufficient to Prepare Sperm for the Acrosome Reaction*

    PubMed Central

    De La Vega-Beltran, Jose Luis; Sánchez-Cárdenas, Claudia; Krapf, Darío; Hernandez-González, Enrique O.; Wertheimer, Eva; Treviño, Claudia L.; Visconti, Pablo E.; Darszon, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Mammalian sperm are unable to fertilize the egg immediately after ejaculation; they acquire this capacity during migration in the female reproductive tract. This maturational process is called capacitation and in mouse sperm it involves a plasma membrane reorganization, extensive changes in the state of protein phosphorylation, increases in intracellular pH (pHi) and Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i), and the appearance of hyperactivated motility. In addition, mouse sperm capacitation is associated with the hyperpolarization of the cell membrane potential. However, the functional role of this process is not known. In this work, to dissect the role of this membrane potential change, hyperpolarization was induced in noncapacitated sperm using either the ENaC inhibitor amiloride, the CFTR agonist genistein or the K+ ionophore valinomycin. In this experimental setting, other capacitation-associated processes such as activation of a cAMP-dependent pathway and the consequent increase in protein tyrosine phosphorylation were not observed. However, hyperpolarization was sufficient to prepare sperm for the acrosome reaction induced either by depolarization with high K+ or by addition of solubilized zona pellucida (sZP). Moreover, K+ and sZP were also able to increase [Ca2+]i in non-capacitated sperm treated with these hyperpolarizing agents but not in untreated cells. On the other hand, in conditions that support capacitation-associated processes blocking hyperpolarization by adding valinomycin and increasing K+ concentrations inhibited the agonist-induced acrosome reaction as well as the increase in [Ca2+]i. Altogether, these results suggest that sperm hyperpolarization by itself is key to enabling mice sperm to undergo the acrosome reaction. PMID:23095755

  8. Hyperpolarized Xenon-129 Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Functional Lung Microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dregely, Isabel

    Hyperpolarized 129Xe (HXe) is a non-invasive contrast agent for lung magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which upon inhalation follows the functional pathway of oxygen in the lung by dissolving into lung tissue structures and entering the blood stream. HXe MRI therefore provides unique opportunities for functional lung imaging of gas exchange which occurs from alveolar air spaces across the air-blood boundary into parenchymal tissue. However challenges in acquisition speed and signal-to-noise ratio have limited the development of a HXe imaging biomarker to diagnose lung disease. This thesis addresses these challenges by introducing parallel imaging to HXe MRI. Parallel imaging requires dedicated hardware. This work describes design, implementation, and characterization of a 32-channel phased-array chest receive coil with an integrated asymmetric birdcage transmit coil tuned to the HXe resonance on a 3 Tesla MRI system. Using the newly developed human chest coil, a functional HXe imaging method, multiple exchange time xenon magnetization transfer contrast (MXTC) is implemented. MXTC dynamically encodes HXe gas exchange into the image contrast. This permits two parameters to be derived regionally which are related to gas-exchange functionality by characterizing tissue-to-alveolar-volume ratio and alveolar wall thickness in the lung parenchyma. Initial results in healthy subjects demonstrate the sensitivity of MXTC by quantifying the subtle changes in lung microstructure in response to orientation and lung inflation. Our results in subjects with lung disease show that the MXTC-derived functional tissue density parameter exhibits excellent agreement with established imaging techniques. The newly developed dynamic parameter, which characterizes the alveolar wall, was elevated in subjects with lung disease, most likely indicating parenchymal inflammation. In light of these observations we believe that MXTC has potential as a biomarker for the regional quantification of 1

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging with hyperpolarized agents: methods and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamson, Erin B.; Ludwig, Kai D.; Mummy, David G.; Fain, Sean B.

    2017-07-01

    In the past decade, hyperpolarized (HP) contrast agents have been under active development for MRI applications to address the twin challenges of functional and quantitative imaging. Both HP helium (3He) and xenon (129Xe) gases have reached the stage where they are under study in clinical research. HP 129Xe, in particular, is poised for larger scale clinical research to investigate asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and fibrotic lung diseases. With advances in polarizer technology and unique capabilities for imaging of 129Xe gas exchange into lung tissue and blood, HP 129Xe MRI is attracting new attention. In parallel, HP 13C and 15N MRI methods have steadily advanced in a wide range of pre-clinical research applications for imaging metabolism in various cancers and cardiac disease. The HP [1-13C] pyruvate MRI technique, in particular, has undergone phase I trials in prostate cancer and is poised for investigational new drug trials at multiple institutions in cancer and cardiac applications. This review treats the methodology behind both HP gases and HP 13C and 15N liquid state agents. Gas and liquid phase HP agents share similar technologies for achieving non-equilibrium polarization outside the field of the MRI scanner, strategies for image data acquisition, and translational challenges in moving from pre-clinical to clinical research. To cover the wide array of methods and applications, this review is organized by numerical section into (1) a brief introduction, (2) the physical and biological properties of the most common polarized agents with a brief summary of applications and methods of polarization, (3) methods for image acquisition and reconstruction specific to improving data acquisition efficiency for HP MRI, (4) the main physical properties that enable unique measures of physiology or metabolic pathways, followed by a more detailed review of the literature describing the use of HP agents to study: (5) metabolic pathways in cancer and cardiac

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging with hyperpolarized agents: methods and applications.

    PubMed

    Adamson, Erin B; Ludwig, Kai D; Mummy, David G; Fain, Sean B

    2017-07-07

    In the past decade, hyperpolarized (HP) contrast agents have been under active development for MRI applications to address the twin challenges of functional and quantitative imaging. Both HP helium ((3)He) and xenon ((129)Xe) gases have reached the stage where they are under study in clinical research. HP (129)Xe, in particular, is poised for larger scale clinical research to investigate asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and fibrotic lung diseases. With advances in polarizer technology and unique capabilities for imaging of (129)Xe gas exchange into lung tissue and blood, HP (129)Xe MRI is attracting new attention. In parallel, HP (13)C and (15)N MRI methods have steadily advanced in a wide range of pre-clinical research applications for imaging metabolism in various cancers and cardiac disease. The HP [1-(13)C] pyruvate MRI technique, in particular, has undergone phase I trials in prostate cancer and is poised for investigational new drug trials at multiple institutions in cancer and cardiac applications. This review treats the methodology behind both HP gases and HP (13)C and (15)N liquid state agents. Gas and liquid phase HP agents share similar technologies for achieving non-equilibrium polarization outside the field of the MRI scanner, strategies for image data acquisition, and translational challenges in moving from pre-clinical to clinical research. To cover the wide array of methods and applications, this review is organized by numerical section into (1) a brief introduction, (2) the physical and biological properties of the most common polarized agents with a brief summary of applications and methods of polarization, (3) methods for image acquisition and reconstruction specific to improving data acquisition efficiency for HP MRI, (4) the main physical properties that enable unique measures of physiology or metabolic pathways, followed by a more detailed review of the literature describing the use of HP agents to study: (5) metabolic pathways

  11. Production of hyperpolarized xenon in a static pump cell: Numerical simulations and experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Fink, A.; Baumer, D.; Brunner, E.

    2005-11-15

    Hyperpolarized {sup 129}Xe finds numerous applications in NMR spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging. The production of hyperpolarized {sup 129}Xe by spin-exchange optical pumping is therefore an important experimental issue. We model the three-dimensional transport processes within a so-called batch mode pump cell via numerical finite element method simulations and compare the results with experimental data. In particular, the influence of different experimental parameters, such as temperature, xenon and nitrogen partial pressure, laser power, and radius-to-length ratio of a cylindrical pump cell, is evaluated. The developed numerical method is capable of describing the spin-exchange optical pumping process in a realistic manner.

  12. Characterization of a chloride conductance activated by hyperpolarization in Aplysia neurones.

    PubMed

    Chesnoy-Marchais, D

    1983-09-01

    A voltage-clamp study was made of some properties of the non-synaptic hyperpolarization-activated Cl- conductance recently described in Aplysia neurones loaded with Cl- ions (Chesnoy-Marchais, 1982). The experiments were performed on an identified family of neurones, which present cholinergic responses allowing an easy measurement of the equilibrium potentials of Cl- (ECl) and K+ ions (EK). The Cl- selectivity of the hyperpolarization-activated conductance was deduced from four observations: (1) the extrapolated reversal potential of the hyperpolarization-activated current, Er, was close to the reversal potential of the cholinergic Cl- response, which is the equilibrium potential for Cl- ions, ECl. (2) Modifications of the intracellular or extracellular Cl- concentration induced changes of the reversal potential Er. (3) A prolonged and intense activation of the current lowered the intracellular Cl- concentration. (4) The current persisted after complete substitution of intracellular and extracellular cations by CS+ ions, as well as after replacement of extracellular Na+ ions by Tris. The steady-state Cl- conductance (gss) increases steeply with hyperpolarization. The kinetics of activation and deactivation are exponential and are characterized by the same voltage-dependent time constant (tau), of the order of a few seconds or fractions of seconds. The curves gss(V) and tau (V) can both be fitted by a two-state model in which the rate constants are exponential functions of the membrane potential (e-fold change for 12-16 mV). The Cl- current is much more affected by changes of the intracellular Cl- concentration than predicted simply from the change in Cl- driving force. Both the conductance and the time constant of activation are strongly modified. Modifications of the extracellular Cl- concentration do not always alter the amplitude of the hyperpolarization-activated Cl- current, but systematically affect its kinetics. The hyperpolarization-activated current is

  13. Synthesis of Long-T1 Silicon Nanoparticles for Hyperpolarized 29Si Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Atkins, Tonya M.; Cassidy, Maja C.; Lee, Menyoung; Ganguly, Shreyashi; Marcus, Charles M.; Kauzlarich, Susan M.

    2013-01-01

    We describe the synthesis, materials characterization and dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) of amorphous and crystalline silicon nanoparticles for use as hyperpolarized magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) agents. The particles were synthesized by means of a metathesis reaction between sodium silicide (Na4Si4) and silicon tetrachloride (SiCl4) and were surface functionalized with a variety of passivating ligands. The synthesis scheme results in particles of diameter ~10 nm with long size-adjusted 29Si spin lattice relaxation (T1) times (> 600 s), which are retained after hyperpolarization by low temperature DNP. PMID:23350651

  14. Chemistry and biochemistry of 13C hyperpolarized magnetic resonance using dynamic nuclear polarization.

    PubMed

    Keshari, Kayvan R; Wilson, David M

    2014-03-07

    The study of transient chemical phenomena by conventional NMR has proved elusive, particularly for non-(1)H nuclei. For (13)C, hyperpolarization using the dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) technique has emerged as a powerful means to improve SNR. The recent development of rapid dissolution DNP methods has facilitated previously impossible in vitro and in vivo study of small molecules. This review presents the basics of the DNP technique, identification of appropriate DNP substrates, and approaches to increase hyperpolarized signal lifetimes. Also addressed are the biochemical events to which DNP-NMR has been applied, with descriptions of several probes that have met with in vivo success.

  15. Chemistry and biochemistry of 13C hyperpolarized magnetic resonance using dynamic nuclear polarization

    PubMed Central

    Keshari, Kayvan R.; Wilson, David M.

    2014-01-01

    The study of transient chemical phenomena by conventional NMR has proved elusive, particularly for non-1H nuclei. For 13C, hyperpolarization using the dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) technique has emerged as a powerful means to improve SNR. The recent development of rapid dissolution DNP methods has facilitated previously impossible in vitro and in vivo study of small molecules. This review presents the basics of the DNP technique, identification of appropriate DNP substrates, and approaches to increase hyperpolarized signal lifetimes. Also addressed are the biochemical events to which DNP-NMR has been applied, with descriptions of several probes that have met with in vivo success. PMID:24363044

  16. Synthesis of long T₁ silicon nanoparticles for hyperpolarized ²⁹Si magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Atkins, Tonya M; Cassidy, Maja C; Lee, Menyoung; Ganguly, Shreyashi; Marcus, Charles M; Kauzlarich, Susan M

    2013-02-26

    We describe the synthesis, materials characterization, and dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) of amorphous and crystalline silicon nanoparticles for use as hyperpolarized magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) agents. The particles were synthesized by means of a metathesis reaction between sodium silicide (Na₄Si₄) and silicon tetrachloride (SiCl₄) and were surface functionalized with a variety of passivating ligands. The synthesis scheme results in particles of diameter ∼10 nm with long size-adjusted ²⁹Si spin-lattice relaxation (T₁) times (>600 s), which are retained after hyperpolarization by low-temperature DNP.

  17. Developmental conditioning of endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor-mediated vasorelaxation.

    PubMed

    Stead, Rebecca; Musa, Moji G; Bryant, Claire L; Lanham, Stuart A; Johnston, David A; Reynolds, Richard; Torrens, Christopher; Fraser, Paul A; Clough, Geraldine F

    2016-03-01

    The endothelium maintains vascular homeostasis through the release of endothelium-derived relaxing factors (EDRF) and endothelium-derived hyperpolarization (EDH). The balance in EDH : EDRF is disturbed in cardiovascular disease and may also be susceptible to developmental conditioning through exposure to an adverse uterine environment to predispose to later risk of hypertension and vascular disease. Developmentally conditioned changes in EDH : EDRF signalling pathways were investigated in cremaster arterioles (18-32  μm diameter) and third-order mesenteric arteries of adult male mice offspring of dams fed either a fat-rich (high fat, HF, 45% energy from fat) or control (C, 10% energy from fat) diet. After weaning, offspring either continued on high fat or were placed on control diets to give four dietary groups (C/C, HF/C, C/HF, and HF/HF) and studied at 15 weeks of age. EDH via intermediate (IKCa) and small (SKca) conductance calcium-activated potassium channels contributed less than 10% to arteriolar acetylcholine-induced relaxation in in-situ conditioned HF/C offspring compared with ∼60% in C/C (P < 0.01). The conditioned reduction in EDH signalling in HF/C offspring was reversed in offspring exposed to a high-fat diet both before and after weaning (HF/HF, 55%, P < 0.01 vs. HF/C). EDH signalling was unaffected in arterioles from C/HF offspring. The changes in EDH : EDRF were associated with altered endothelial cell expression and localization of IKCa channels. This is the first evidence that EDH-mediated microvascular relaxation is susceptible to an adverse developmental environment through down-regulation of the IKCa signalling pathway. Conditioned offspring exposed to a 'second hit' (HF/HF) exhibit adaptive vascular mechanisms to preserve dilator function.

  18. Developmental conditioning of endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor-mediated vasorelaxation

    PubMed Central

    Stead, Rebecca; Musa, Moji G.; Bryant, Claire L.; Lanham, Stuart A.; Johnston, David A.; Reynolds, Richard; Torrens, Christopher; Fraser, Paul A.; Clough, Geraldine F.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The endothelium maintains vascular homeostasis through the release of endothelium-derived relaxing factors (EDRF) and endothelium-derived hyperpolarization (EDH). The balance in EDH : EDRF is disturbed in cardiovascular disease and may also be susceptible to developmental conditioning through exposure to an adverse uterine environment to predispose to later risk of hypertension and vascular disease. Methods: Developmentally conditioned changes in EDH : EDRF signalling pathways were investigated in cremaster arterioles (18–32 μm diameter) and third-order mesenteric arteries of adult male mice offspring of dams fed either a fat-rich (high fat, HF, 45% energy from fat) or control (C, 10% energy from fat) diet. After weaning, offspring either continued on high fat or were placed on control diets to give four dietary groups (C/C, HF/C, C/HF, and HF/HF) and studied at 15 weeks of age. Results: EDH via intermediate (IKCa) and small (SKca) conductance calcium-activated potassium channels contributed less than 10% to arteriolar acetylcholine-induced relaxation in in-situ conditioned HF/C offspring compared with ∼60% in C/C (P < 0.01). The conditioned reduction in EDH signalling in HF/C offspring was reversed in offspring exposed to a high-fat diet both before and after weaning (HF/HF, 55%, P < 0.01 vs. HF/C). EDH signalling was unaffected in arterioles from C/HF offspring. The changes in EDH : EDRF were associated with altered endothelial cell expression and localization of IKCa channels. Conclusion: This is the first evidence that EDH-mediated microvascular relaxation is susceptible to an adverse developmental environment through down-regulation of the IKCa signalling pathway. Conditioned offspring exposed to a ‘second hit’ (HF/HF) exhibit adaptive vascular mechanisms to preserve dilator function. PMID:26682783

  19. Effect of ionic interaction between a hyperpolarized magnetic resonance chemical probe and a gadolinium contrast agent for the hyperpolarized lifetime after dissolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takakusagi, Yoichi; Inoue, Kaori; Naganuma, Tatsuya; Hyodo, Fuminori; Ichikawa, Kazuhiro

    2016-09-01

    In hyperpolarization of 13C-enriched magnetic resonance chemical probes in the solid-state, a trace amount of gadolinium (Gd) contrast agent can be used to maximize polarization of the 13C nuclear spins. Here, we report systematic measurement of the spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) and enhancement level of 13C-enriched chemical probes in the presence of various Gd contrast agents in the liquid-state after dissolution. Using two different 13C probes having opposite electric charges at neutral pH, we clearly show the T1 of hyperpolarized 13C was barely affected by the use of a Gd complex that displays repulsive interaction with the 13C probe in solution, whilst T1 was drastically shortened when there was ionic attraction between probe and complex.

  20. Flow type barrier-discharge UV photoreactor for irradiating liquids and gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsvetkov, V. M.; Pikulev, A. A.

    2012-04-01

    A flow type barrier-discharge UV photoreactor intended for irradiation of liquids and gases has been developed. In the proposed reactor design, both the discharge region and processed medium occur inside the bulb of an excilamp and the electrodes are made of an UV-reflecting material. The UV radiation intensity in the photoreactor is determined using the photochemical reaction of acetic acid decomposition (CH3COOH + hν → CH4 + CO2) that takes place under the action of KrCl exciplex emission at 222 nm, and the UV exposure dose is evaluated by measuring the evolved gas volume. The experiments showed that the UV radiation intensity in the proposed photoreactor is higher by an order of magnitude than that at the surface of an excilamp with analogous geometry.

  1. Scalable control program for multiprecursor flow-type atomic layer deposition system

    SciTech Connect

    Selvaraj, Sathees Kannan; Takoudis, Christos G.

    2015-01-01

    The authors report the development and implementation of a scalable control program to control flow type atomic layer deposition (ALD) reactor with multiple precursor delivery lines. The program logic is written and tested in LABVIEW environment to control ALD reactor with four precursor delivery lines to deposit up to four layers of different materials in cyclic manner. The programming logic is conceived such that to facilitate scale up for depositing more layers with multiple precursors and scale down for using single layer with any one precursor in the ALD reactor. The program takes precursor and oxidizer exposure and purging times as input and controls the sequential opening and closing of the valves to facilitate the complex ALD process in cyclic manner. The program could be used to deposit materials from any single line or in tandem with other lines in any combination and in any sequence.

  2. Milli-tesla NMR and spectrophotometry of liquids hyperpolarized by dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yue; Chen, Chia-Hsiu; Wilson, Zechariah; Savukov, Igor; Hilty, Christian

    2016-09-01

    Hyperpolarization methods offer a unique means of improving low signal strength obtained in low-field NMR. Here, simultaneous measurements of NMR at a field of 0.7 mT and laser optical absorption from samples hyperpolarized by dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (D-DNP) are reported. The NMR measurement field closely corresponds to a typical field encountered during sample injection in a D-DNP experiment. The optical spectroscopy allows determination of the concentration of the free radical required for DNP. Correlation of radical concentration to NMR measurement of spin polarization and spin-lattice relaxation time allows determination of relaxivity and can be used for optimization of the D-DNP process. Further, the observation of the nuclear Overhauser effect originating from hyperpolarized spins is demonstrated. Signals from 1H and 19F in a mixture of trifluoroethanol and water are detected in a single spectrum, while different atoms of the same type are distinguished by J-coupling patterns. The resulting signal changes of individual peaks are indicative of molecular contact, suggesting a new application area of hyperpolarized low-field NMR for the determination of intermolecular interactions.

  3. In Vivo Lung Morphometry with Accelerated Hyperpolarized 3He Diffusion MRI: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yulin V.; Quirk, James D.; Yablonskiy, Dmitriy A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Parallel imaging can be used to reduce imaging time and to increase the spatial coverage in hyperpolarized gas MRI of the lung. In this proof-of-concept study we investigate the effects of parallel imaging on the morphometric measurement of lung microstructure using diffusion MRI with hyperpolarized 3He. Methods Fully sampled and under-sampled multi-b diffusion data were acquired from human subjects using an 8-channel 3He receive coil. A parallel imaging reconstruction technique (GRAPPA) was used to reconstruct under-sampled k-space data. The morphometric results of the GRAPPA-reconstructed data were compared with the results of fully sampled data for three types of subjects: healthy volunteers, mild, and moderate COPD patients. Results Morphometric measurements varied only slightly at mild acceleration factors. The results were largely well preserved compared to fully sampled data for different lung conditions. Conclusion Parallel imaging, given sufficient signal-to-noise ratio, provides a reliable means to accelerate hyperpolarized-gas MRI with no significant difference in the measurement of lung morphometry from the fully sampled images. GRAPPA is a promising technique to significantly reduce imaging time and/or to improve the spatial coverage for the morphometric measurement with hyperpolarized gases. PMID:24799044

  4. Hyperpolarization without persistent radicals for in vivo real-time metabolic imaging.

    PubMed

    Eichhorn, Tim R; Takado, Yuhei; Salameh, Najat; Capozzi, Andrea; Cheng, Tian; Hyacinthe, Jean-Noël; Mishkovsky, Mor; Roussel, Christophe; Comment, Arnaud

    2013-11-05

    Hyperpolarized substrates prepared via dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization have been proposed as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) agents for cancer or cardiac failure diagnosis and therapy monitoring through the detection of metabolic impairments in vivo. The use of potentially toxic persistent radicals to hyperpolarize substrates was hitherto required. We demonstrate that by shining UV light for an hour on a frozen pure endogenous substance, namely the glucose metabolic product pyruvic acid, it is possible to generate a concentration of photo-induced radicals that is large enough to highly enhance the (13)C polarization of the substance via dynamic nuclear polarization. These radicals recombine upon dissolution and a solution composed of purely endogenous products is obtained for performing in vivo metabolic hyperpolarized (13)C MRI with high spatial resolution. Our method opens the way to safe and straightforward preclinical and clinical applications of hyperpolarized MRI because the filtering procedure mandatory for clinical applications and the associated pharmacological tests necessary to prevent contamination are eliminated, concurrently allowing a decrease in the delay between preparation and injection of the imaging agents for improved in vivo sensitivity.

  5. Pomeranchuk cell for hyperpolarized 3He based on the brute force method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makino, Seiji; Tanaka, Masayoshi; Ueda, Kunihiro; Fujiwara, Mamoru; Fujimura, Hisako; Yosoi, Masaru; Ohta, Takeshi; Frossati, Giorgio; de Waard, Arlette; Rouille, Gerard

    2014-09-01

    MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) has been used for the medical diagnosis as a radiation-free imaging equipment. Since the proton has been mainly used for medical MRI, usefulness has been rather restrictive. As an example for expanding the range of applicability, MRI with hyperpolarized 3He gas has been used for the lung disease. Here, ``hyperpolarized'' means ``polarized higher than the thermal equilibrium polarization.'' For producing a large amount of hyperpolarized 3He gas at a time, we have been developing a hyperpolarization technique based on the brute force method which uses an ultralow temperature of a few mK and a strong magnetic field around 17 T in combination with the principle of the Pomeranchuk cooling. The Pomeranchuk cell made with non-metallic materials of small heat capacity is attached to the 3He/4He dilution refrigerator using a sintered silver allowing large heat conduction. After the sensors to monitor the temperature and pressure of 3He are calibrated and the Pomeranchuk cell is constructed, the system is tested. Then, the solidification of 3He and the measurement of NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) signals of 3He under the magnetic field of 17 T are carried out. The current status is reported in this talk.

  6. Imaging Renal Urea Handling in Rats at Millimeter Resolution using Hyperpolarized Magnetic Resonance Relaxometry

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Galen D.; von Morze, Cornelius; Verkman, Alan S.; Koelsch, Bertram L.; Chaumeil, Myriam M.; Lustig, Michael; Ronen, Sabrina M.; Bok, Robert A.; Sands, Jeff M.; Larson, Peder E. Z.; Wang, Zhen J.; Larsen, Jan Henrik Ardenkjær; Kurhanewicz, John; Vigneron, Daniel B.

    2016-01-01

    In vivo spin spin relaxation time (T2) heterogeneity of hyperpolarized [13C,15N2]urea in the rat kidney was investigated. Selective quenching of the vascular hyperpolarized 13C signal with a macromolecular relaxation agent revealed that a long-T2 component of the [13C,15N2]urea signal originated from the renal extravascular space, thus allowing the vascular and renal filtrate contrast agent pools of the [13C,15N2]urea to be distinguished via multi-exponential analysis. The T2 response to induced diuresis and antidiuresis was performed with two imaging agents: hyperpolarized [13C,15N2]urea and a control agent hyperpolarized bis-1,1-(hydroxymethyl)-1-13C-cyclopropane-2H8. Large T2 increases in the inner-medullar and papilla were observed with the former agent and not the latter during antidiuresis. Therefore, [13C,15N2]urea relaxometry is sensitive to two steps of the renal urea handling process: glomerular filtration and the inner-medullary urea transporter (UT)-A1 and UT-A3 mediated urea concentrating process. Simple motion correction and subspace denoising algorithms are presented to aid in the multi exponential data analysis. Furthermore, a T2-edited, ultra long echo time sequence was developed for sub-2 mm3 resolution 3D encoding of urea by exploiting relaxation differences in the vascular and filtrate pools. PMID:27570835

  7. Renal MR angiography and perfusion in the pig using hyperpolarized water.

    PubMed

    Wigh Lipsø, Kasper; Hansen, Esben Søvsø Szocska; Tougaard, Rasmus Stilling; Laustsen, Christoffer; Ardenkjaer-Larsen, Jan Henrik

    2017-09-01

    To study hyperpolarized water as an angiography and perfusion tracer in a large animal model. Protons dissolved in deuterium oxide (D2 O) were hyperpolarized in a SPINlab dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (dDNP) polarizer and subsequently investigated in vivo in a pig model at 3 Tesla (T). Approximately 15 mL of hyperpolarized water was injected in the renal artery by hand over 4-5 s. A liquid state polarization of 5.3 ± 0.9% of 3.8 M protons in 15 mL of deuterium oxide was achieved with a T1 of 24 ± 1 s. This allowed injection through an arterial catheter into the renal artery and subsequently high-contrast imaging of the entire kidney parenchyma over several seconds. The dynamic images allow quantification of tissue perfusion, with a mean cortical perfusion of 504 ± 123 mL/100 mL/min. Hyperpolarized water MR imaging was successfully demonstrated as a renal angiography and perfusion method. Quantitative perfusion maps of the kidney were obtained in agreement with literature and control experiments with gadolinium contrast. Magn Reson Med 78:1131-1135, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  8. Acetylcholine releases endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor and EDRF from rat blood vessels.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, G.; Suzuki, H.; Weston, A. H.

    1988-01-01

    1. The effects of haemoglobin and methylene blue on the acetylcholine (ACh)-induced electrical and mechanical responses of smooth muscle cells were investigated in rat aorta and rat main pulmonary artery. 2. When the endothelium was intact, ACh induced a transient hyperpolarization and sustained relaxation of tissues precontracted with noradrenaline. Both hyperpolarization and relaxation were absent in preparations without endothelium. 3. Haemoglobin and methylene blue inhibited the ACh-induced relaxation, but not the transient hyperpolarization. 4. In aorta with an intact endothelium, ACh produced an increase in both the rate of 86Rb efflux and tissue cyclic GMP levels. The changes in ion flux were unaffected by either haemoglobin or methylene blue in concentrations which almost abolished the increase in cyclic GMP concentrations. 5. In arteries with an intact endothelium, indomethacin had no effect on the ACh-induced electrical and mechanical responses or on the increase in 86Rb efflux and tissue cyclic GMP levels. 6. It is concluded that in the rat aorta and rat main pulmonary artery, ACh releases two different substances, an endothelium-derived relaxing factor (EDRF) and a hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF), from the endothelial cells. Neither substance appears to be derived from a pathway dependent on cyclo-oxygenase. EDHF seems to play a minor role in the relaxation of noradrenaline-induced contractions. PMID:2851359

  9. Application of Good's buffers to pH imaging using hyperpolarized (13)C MRI.

    PubMed

    Flavell, Robert R; von Morze, Cornelius; Blecha, Joseph E; Korenchan, David E; Van Criekinge, Mark; Sriram, Renuka; Gordon, Jeremy W; Chen, Hsin-Yu; Subramaniam, Sukumar; Bok, Robert A; Wang, Zhen J; Vigneron, Daniel B; Larson, Peder E; Kurhanewicz, John; Wilson, David M

    2015-09-25

    N-(2-Acetamido)-2-aminoethanesulfonic acid (ACES), one of Good's buffers, was applied to pH imaging using hyperpolarized (13)C magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Rapid NMR- and MRI-based pH measurements were obtained by exploiting the sensitive pH-dependence of its (13)C chemical shift within the physiologic range.

  10. Application of Good's buffers to pH imaging using hyperpolarized 13C MRI

    PubMed Central

    Flavell, Robert R; von Morze, Cornelius; Blecha, Joseph E.; Korenchan, David; Van Criekinge, Mark; Sriram, Renuka; Gordon, Jeremy; Chen, Hsin-Yu; Subramaniam, Sukumar; Bok, Robert; Wang, Zhen J.; Vigneron, Daniel; Larson, Peder; Kurhanewicz, John; Wilson, David M

    2016-01-01

    N-(2-Acetamido)-2-aminoethanesulfonic acid (ACES), one of Good's buffers, was applied to pH imaging using hyperpolarized 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Rapid NMR- and MRI-based pH measurements were obtained by exploiting the sensitive pH-dependence of its 13C chemical shift within the physiologic range. PMID:26257040

  11. An optimized microfabricated platform for the optical generation and detection of hyperpolarized 129Xe

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Daniel J.; Seltzer, Scott J.; Jiménez-Martínez, Ricardo; Ring, Hattie L.; Malecek, Nicolas S.; Knappe, Svenja; Donley, Elizabeth A.; Kitching, John; Bajaj, Vikram S.; Pines, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Low thermal-equilibrium nuclear spin polarizations and the need for sophisticated instrumentation render conventional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and imaging (MRI) incompatible with small-scale microfluidic devices. Hyperpolarized 129Xe gas has found use in the study of many materials but has required very large and expensive instrumentation. Recently a microfabricated device with modest instrumentation demonstrated all-optical hyperpolarization and detection of 129Xe gas. This device was limited by 129Xe polarizations less than 1%, 129Xe NMR signals smaller than 20 nT, and transport of hyperpolarized 129Xe over millimeter lengths. Higher polarizations, versatile detection schemes, and flow of 129Xe over larger distances are desirable for wider applications. Here we demonstrate an ultra-sensitive microfabricated platform that achieves 129Xe polarizations reaching 7%, NMR signals exceeding 1 μT, lifetimes up to 6 s, and simultaneous two-mode detection, consisting of a high-sensitivity in situ channel with signal-to-noise of 105 and a lower-sensitivity ex situ detection channel which may be useful in a wider variety of conditions. 129Xe is hyperpolarized and detected in locations more than 1 cm apart. Our versatile device is an optimal platform for microfluidic magnetic resonance in particular, but equally attractive for wider nuclear spin applications benefitting from ultra-sensitive detection, long coherences, and simple instrumentation. PMID:28266629

  12. A hyperpolarization-activated inward current alters swim frequency of the pteropod mollusk Clione limacina.

    PubMed

    Pirtle, Thomas J; Willingham, Kyle; Satterlie, Richard A

    2010-12-01

    The pteropod mollusk, Clione limacina, exhibits behaviorally relevant swim speed changes that occur within the context of the animal's ecology. Modulation of C. limacina swimming speed involves changes that occur at the network and cellular levels. Intracellular recordings from interneurons of the swim central pattern generator show the presence of a sag potential that is indicative of the hyperpolarization-activated inward current (I(h)). Here we provide evidence that I(h) in primary swim interneurons plays a role in C. limacina swimming speed control and may be a modulatory target. Recordings from central pattern generator swim interneurons show that hyperpolarizing current injection produces a sag potential that lasts for the duration of the hyperpolarization, a characteristic of cells possessing I(h). Following the hyperpolarizing current injection, swim interneurons also exhibit postinhibitory rebound (PIR). Serotonin enhances the sag potential of C. limacina swim interneurons while the I(h) blocker, ZD7288, reduces the sag potential. Furthermore, a negative correlation was found between the amplitude of the sag potential and latency to PIR. Because latency to PIR was previously shown to influence swimming speed, we hypothesize that I(h) has an effect on swimming speed. The I(h) blocker, ZD7288, suppresses swimming in C. limacina and inhibits serotonin-induced acceleration, evidence that supports our hypothesis.

  13. Compressed Sensing for Resolution Enhancement of Hyperpolarized 13C Flyback 3D-MRSI

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Simon; Lustig, Michael; Chen, Albert P.; Crane, Jason; Kerr, Adam; Kelley, Douglas A.C.; Hurd, Ralph; Kurhanewicz, John; Nelson, Sarah J.; Pauly, John M.; Vigneron, Daniel B.

    2008-01-01

    High polarization of nuclear spins in liquid state through dynamic nuclear polarization has enabled the direct monitoring of 13C metabolites in vivo at very high signal to noise, allowing for rapid assessment of tissue metabolism. The abundant SNR afforded by this hyperpolarization technique makes high resolution 13C 3D-MRSI feasible. However, the number of phase encodes that can be fit into the short acquisition time for hyperpolarized imaging limits spatial coverage and resolution. To take advantage of the high SNR available from hyperpolarization, we have applied compressed sensing to achieve a factor of 2 enhancement in spatial resolution without increasing acquisition time or decreasing coverage. In this paper, the design and testing of compressed sensing suited for a flyback 13C 3D-MRSI sequence are presented. The key to this design was the undersampling of spectral k-space using a novel blipped scheme, thus taking advantage of the considerable sparsity in typical hyperpolarized 13C spectra. Phantom tests validated the accuracy of the compressed sensing approach and initial mouse experiments demonstrated in vivo feasibility. PMID:18367420

  14. An optimized microfabricated platform for the optical generation and detection of hyperpolarized 129Xe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Daniel J.; Seltzer, Scott J.; Jiménez-Martínez, Ricardo; Ring, Hattie L.; Malecek, Nicolas S.; Knappe, Svenja; Donley, Elizabeth A.; Kitching, John; Bajaj, Vikram S.; Pines, Alexander

    2017-03-01

    Low thermal-equilibrium nuclear spin polarizations and the need for sophisticated instrumentation render conventional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and imaging (MRI) incompatible with small-scale microfluidic devices. Hyperpolarized 129Xe gas has found use in the study of many materials but has required very large and expensive instrumentation. Recently a microfabricated device with modest instrumentation demonstrated all-optical hyperpolarization and detection of 129Xe gas. This device was limited by 129Xe polarizations less than 1%, 129Xe NMR signals smaller than 20 nT, and transport of hyperpolarized 129Xe over millimeter lengths. Higher polarizations, versatile detection schemes, and flow of 129Xe over larger distances are desirable for wider applications. Here we demonstrate an ultra-sensitive microfabricated platform that achieves 129Xe polarizations reaching 7%, NMR signals exceeding 1 μT, lifetimes up to 6 s, and simultaneous two-mode detection, consisting of a high-sensitivity in situ channel with signal-to-noise of 105 and a lower-sensitivity ex situ detection channel which may be useful in a wider variety of conditions. 129Xe is hyperpolarized and detected in locations more than 1 cm apart. Our versatile device is an optimal platform for microfluidic magnetic resonance in particular, but equally attractive for wider nuclear spin applications benefitting from ultra-sensitive detection, long coherences, and simple instrumentation.

  15. Analysis of Cancer Metabolism by Imaging Hyperpolarized Nuclei: Prospects for Translation to Clinical Research

    PubMed Central

    Kurhanewicz, John; Vigneron, Daniel B; Brindle, Kevin; Chekmenev, Eduard Y; Comment, Arnaud; Cunningham, Charles H; DeBerardinis, Ralph J; Green, Gary G; Leach, Martin O; Rajan, Sunder S; Rizi, Rahim R; Ross, Brian D; Warren, Warren S; Malloy, Craig R

    2011-01-01

    A major challenge in cancer biology is to monitor and understand cancer metabolism in vivo with the goal of improved diagnosis and perhaps therapy. Because of the complexity of biochemical pathways, tracer methods are required for detecting specific enzyme-catalyzed reactions. Stable isotopes such as 13C or 15N with detection by nuclear magnetic resonance provide the necessary information about tissue biochemistry, but the crucial metabolites are present in low concentration and therefore are beyond the detection threshold of traditional magnetic resonance methods. A solution is to improve sensitivity by a factor of 10,000 or more by temporarily redistributing the populations of nuclear spins in a magnetic field, a process termed hyperpolarization. Although this effect is short-lived, hyperpolarized molecules can be generated in an aqueous solution and infused in vivo where metabolism generates products that can be imaged. This discovery lifts the primary constraint on magnetic resonance imaging for monitoring metabolism—poor sensitivity—while preserving the advantage of biochemical information. The purpose of this report was to briefly summarize the known abnormalities in cancer metabolism, the value and limitations of current imaging methods for metabolism, and the principles of hyperpolarization. Recent preclinical applications are described. Hyperpolarization technology is still in its infancy, and current polarizer equipment and methods are suboptimal. Nevertheless, there are no fundamental barriers to rapid translation of this exciting technology to clinical research and perhaps clinical care. PMID:21403835

  16. Hyperpolarized helium-3 mouse lung MRI: Studies of lung structure and function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dugas, Joseph Paul

    Hyperpolarized 3He magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of human and animal lungs has displayed promising and useful applications to studies of lung structure and function in both healthy and diseased lungs. Hyperpolarized 3He MRI allows the visualization of gas in the gas-exchange spaces of the lungs (as opposed to tissue) and has proven especially effective in studying diseases that are characterized by ventilation defects, such as emphysema. In particular, in-vivo measurements of the 3He apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) can quantify lung structure by measuring its restrictive effects on the motion of 3He spins. This allows for detection and longitudinal tracking of changes in micro-architecture that result from disease destruction of alveolar walls. Due, in part, to the difficulties inherent in administering and imaging hyperpolarized 3He within the small (0.5 cc volume) mouse lung, applications of hyperpolarized 3He MRI techniques to laboratory mice are scarce. We have been able to implement and improve the techniques of hyperpolarized 3He mouse lung MRI and subsequently apply them to studies of several mouse models of disease, including elastase-induced emphysema, smoking-induced emphysema, and lung cancer. Here we detail the design, development, and implementation of a versatile, electronically-controlled, small animal ventilator that is capable of delivering tiny volumes of hyperpolarized 3He, mixed with oxygen, to the mouse and is also compatible with both the easily depolarized 3He gas and the highly magnetic environment within and around an imaging magnet. Also described are NM techniques developed to improve the signal-to-noise ratio of our images and effectively utilize the gas hyperpolarization. Applications of these technologies and techniques to small animal models of disease are presented wherein we have measured up to a 35% increase in 3He ADC in mice with elastase-induced emphysema as compared to healthy mice. We also demonstrate the potential

  17. Enhanced Sensitivity to Hyperpolarizing Inhibition in Mesoaccumbal Relative to Nigrostriatal Dopamine Neuron Subpopulations

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Midbrain dopamine neurons recorded in vivo pause their firing in response to reward omission and aversive stimuli. While the initiation of pauses typically involves synaptic or modulatory input, intrinsic membrane properties may also enhance or limit hyperpolarization, raising the question of how intrinsic conductances shape pauses in dopamine neurons. Using retrograde labeling and electrophysiological techniques combined with computational modeling, we examined the intrinsic conductances that shape pauses evoked by current injections and synaptic stimulation in subpopulations of dopamine neurons grouped according to their axonal projections to the nucleus accumbens or dorsal striatum in mice. Testing across a range of conditions and pulse durations, we found that mesoaccumbal and nigrostriatal neurons differ substantially in rebound properties with mesoaccumbal neurons displaying significantly longer delays to spiking following hyperpolarization. The underlying mechanism involves an inactivating potassium (IA) current with decay time constants of up to 225 ms, and small-amplitude hyperpolarization-activated currents (IH), characteristics that were most often observed in mesoaccumbal neurons. Pharmacological block of IA completely abolished rebound delays and, importantly, shortened synaptically evoked inhibitory pauses, thereby demonstrating the involvement of A-type potassium channels in prolonging pauses evoked by GABAergic inhibition. Therefore, these results show that mesoaccumbal and nigrostriatal neurons display differential responses to hyperpolarizing inhibitory stimuli that favors a higher sensitivity to inhibition in mesoaccumbal neurons. These findings may explain, in part, observations from in vivo experiments that ventral tegmental area neurons tend to exhibit longer aversive pauses relative to SNc neurons. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Our study examines rebound, postburst, and synaptically evoked inhibitory pauses in subpopulations of midbrain dopamine

  18. Hyperpolarizing inhibition develops without trophic support by GABA in cultured rat midbrain neurons.

    PubMed

    Titz, Stefan; Hans, Michael; Kelsch, Wolfgang; Lewen, Andrea; Swandulla, Dieter; Misgeld, Ulrich

    2003-08-01

    During a limited period of early neuronal development, GABA is depolarizing and elevates [Ca2+]i, which mediates the trophic action of GABA in neuronal maturation. We tested the attractive hypothesis that GABA itself promotes the developmental change of its response from depolarizing to hyperpolarizing (Ganguly et al. 2001). In cultured midbrain neurons we found that the GABA response changed from depolarizing to hyperpolarizing, although GABAA receptors had been blocked throughout development. In immature neurons prolonged exposure of the cells to nanomolar concentrations of GABA or brief repetitive applications of GABA strongly diminished the elevation of [Ca+]i by GABA. As revealed by gramicidin perforated-patch recording, reduced [Ca2+]i responses were due to a diminished driving force for Cl-. This suggests that immature neurons do not have an efficient inward transport that can compensate the loss of cytosolic Cl-resulting from sustained GABAA receptor activation by ambient GABA. Transient increases in external K+, which can induce voltage-dependent Cl- entry, restored GABA-induced [Ca2+]i elevations. In mature neurons, GABA reduced [Ca2+]i provided that background [Ca2+]i was elevated by the application of an L-type Ca2+ channel agonist. This was probably due to a hyperpolarization of the membrane by Cl- currents. K(+)-Cl- cotransport maintained the gradient for hyperpolarizing Cl-currents. We conclude that in immature midbrain neurons an inward Cl- transport is not effective although the GABA response is depolarizing. Further, GABA itself is not required for the developmental switch of GABAergic responses from depolarizing to hyperpolarizing in cultured midbrain neurons.

  19. Hyperpolarized (13)C urea myocardial first-pass perfusion imaging using velocity-selective excitation.

    PubMed

    Fuetterer, Maximilian; Busch, Julia; Peereboom, Sophie M; von Deuster, Constantin; Wissmann, Lukas; Lipiski, Miriam; Fleischmann, Thea; Cesarovic, Nikola; Stoeck, Christian T; Kozerke, Sebastian

    2017-06-21

    A velocity-selective binomial excitation scheme for myocardial first-pass perfusion measurements with hyperpolarized (13)C substrates, which preserves bolus magnetization inside the blood pool, is presented. The proposed method is evaluated against gadolinium-enhanced (1)H measurements in-vivo. The proposed excitation with an echo-planar imaging readout was implemented on a clinical CMR system. Dynamic myocardial stress perfusion images were acquired in six healthy pigs after bolus injection of hyperpolarized (13)C urea with the velocity-selective vs. conventional excitation, as well as standard (1)H gadolinium-enhanced images. Signal-to-noise, contrast-to-noise (CNR) and homogeneity of semi-quantitative perfusion measures were compared between methods based on first-pass signal-intensity time curves extracted from a mid-ventricular slice. Diagnostic feasibility is demonstrated in a case of septal infarction. Velocity-selective excitation provides over three-fold reduction in blood pool signal with a two-fold increase in myocardial CNR. Extracted first-pass perfusion curves reveal a significantly reduced variability of semi-quantitative first-pass perfusion measures (12-20%) for velocity-selective excitation compared to conventional excitation (28-93%), comparable to that of reference (1)H gadolinium data (9-15%). Overall image quality appears comparable between the velocity-selective hyperpolarized and gadolinium-enhanced imaging. The feasibility of hyperpolarized (13)C first-pass perfusion CMR has been demonstrated in swine. Comparison with reference (1)H gadolinium data revealed sufficient data quality and indicates the potential of hyperpolarized perfusion imaging for human applications.

  20. Robust hyperpolarized (13)C metabolic imaging with selective non-excitation of pyruvate (SNEP).

    PubMed

    Chen, Way Cherng; Teo, Xing Qi; Lee, Man Ying; Radda, George K; Lee, Philip

    2015-08-01

    In vivo metabolic imaging using hyperpolarized [1-(13)C]pyruvate provides localized biochemical information and is particularly useful in detecting early disease changes, as well as monitoring disease progression and treatment response. However, a major limitation of hyperpolarized magnetization is its unrecoverable decay, due not only to T1 relaxation but also to radio-frequency (RF) excitation. RF excitation schemes used in metabolic imaging must therefore be able to utilize available hyperpolarized magnetization efficiently and robustly for the optimal detection of substrate and metabolite activities. In this work, a novel RF excitation scheme called selective non-excitation of pyruvate (SNEP) is presented. This excitation scheme involves the use of a spectral selective RF pulse to specifically exclude the excitation of [1-(13)C]pyruvate, while uniformly exciting the key metabolites of interest (namely [1-(13)C]lactate and [1-(13)C]alanine) and [1-(13)C]pyruvate-hydrate. By eliminating the loss of hyperpolarized [1-(13)C]pyruvate magnetization due to RF excitation, the signal from downstream metabolite pools is increased together with enhanced dynamic range. Simulation results, together with phantom measurements and in vivo experiments, demonstrated the improvement in signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and the extension of the lifetime of the [1-(13)C]lactate and [1-(13)C]alanine pools when compared with conventional non-spectral selective (NS) excitation. SNEP has also been shown to perform comparably well with multi-band (MB) excitation, yet SNEP possesses distinct advantages, including ease of implementation, less stringent demands on gradient performance, increased robustness to frequency drifts and B0 inhomogeneity as well as easier quantification involving the use of [1-(13)C]pyruvate-hydrate as a proxy for the actual [1-(13)C] pyruvate signal. SNEP is therefore a promising alternative for robust hyperpolarized [1-(13)C]pyruvate metabolic imaging with high

  1. In vivo single-shot 13C spectroscopic imaging of hyperpolarized metabolites by spatiotemporal encoding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Rita; Laustsen, Christoffer; Dumez, Jean-Nicolas; Kettunen, Mikko I.; Serrao, Eva M.; Marco-Rius, Irene; Brindle, Kevin M.; Ardenkjaer-Larsen, Jan Henrik; Frydman, Lucio

    2014-03-01

    Hyperpolarized metabolic imaging is a growing field that has provided a new tool for analyzing metabolism, particularly in cancer. Given the short life times of the hyperpolarized signal, fast and effective spectroscopic imaging methods compatible with dynamic metabolic characterizations are necessary. Several approaches have been customized for hyperpolarized 13C MRI, including CSI with a center-out k-space encoding, EPSI, and spectrally selective pulses in combination with spiral EPI acquisitions. Recent studies have described the potential of single-shot alternatives based on spatiotemporal encoding (SPEN) principles, to derive chemical-shift images within a sub-second period. By contrast to EPSI, SPEN does not require oscillating acquisition gradients to deliver chemical-shift information: its signal encodes both spatial as well as chemical shift information, at no extra cost in experimental complexity. SPEN MRI sequences with slice-selection and arbitrary excitation pulses can also be devised, endowing SPEN with the potential to deliver single-shot multi-slice chemical shift images, with a temporal resolution required for hyperpolarized dynamic metabolic imaging. The present work demonstrates this with initial in vivo results obtained from SPEN-based imaging of pyruvate and its metabolic products, after injection of hyperpolarized [1-13C]pyruvate. Multi-slice chemical-shift images of healthy rats were obtained at 4.7 T in the region of the kidney, and 4D (2D spatial, 1D spectral, 1D temporal) data sets were obtained at 7 T from a murine lymphoma tumor model.

  2. Hyperpolarizing Inhibition Develops without Trophic support by GABA in Cultured Rat Midbrain Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Titz, Stefan; Hans, Michael; Kelsch, Wolfgang; Lewen, Andrea; Swandulla, Dieter; Misgeld, Ulrich

    2003-01-01

    During a limited period of early neuronal development, GABA is depolarizing and elevates [Ca2+]i, which mediates the trophic action of GABA in neuronal maturation. We tested the attractive hypothesis that GABA itself promotes the developmental change of its response from depolarizing to hyperpolarizing (Ganguly et al. 2001). In cultured midbrain neurons we found that the GABA response changed from depolarizing to hyperpolarizing, although GABAA receptors had been blocked throughout development. In immature neurons prolonged exposure of the cells to nanomolar concentrations of GABA or brief repetitive applications of GABA strongly diminished the elevation of [Ca2+]i by GABA. As revealed by gramicidin perforated-patch recording, reduced [Ca2+]i responses were due to a diminished driving force for Cl−. This suggests that immature neurons do not have an efficient inward transport that can compensate the loss of cytosolic Cl− resulting from sustained GABAA receptor activation by ambient GABA. Transient increases in external K+, which can induce voltage-dependent Cl− entry, restored GABA-induced [Ca2+]i elevations. In mature neurons, GABA reduced [Ca2+]i provided that background [Ca2+]i was elevated by the application of an L-type Ca2+ channel agonist. This was probably due to a hyperpolarization of the membrane by Cl− currents. K+-Cl− cotransport maintained the gradient for hyperpolarizing Cl− currents. We conclude that in immature midbrain neurons an inward Cl− transport is not effective although the GABA response is depolarizing. Further, GABA itself is not required for the developmental switch of GABAergic responses from depolarizing to hyperpolarizing in cultured midbrain neurons. PMID:12938674

  3. Gain Modulation of Cholinergic Neurons in the Medial Septum-Diagonal Band of Broca Through Hyperpolarization.

    PubMed

    Melonakos, Eric D; White, John A; Fernandez, Fernando R

    2016-12-01

    Hippocampal network oscillations are important for learning and memory. Theta rhythms are involved in attention, navigation, and memory encoding, whereas sharp wave-ripple complexes are involved in memory consolidation. Cholinergic neurons in the medial septum-diagonal band of Broca (MS-DB) influence both types of hippocampal oscillations, promoting theta rhythms and suppressing sharp wave-ripples. They also receive frequency-dependent hyperpolarizing feedback from hippocamposeptal connections, potentially affecting their role as neuromodulators in the septohippocampal circuit. However, little is known about how the integration properties of cholinergic MS-DB neurons change with hyperpolarization. By potentially altering firing behavior in cholinergic neurons, hyperpolarizing feedback from the hippocampal neurons may, in turn, change hippocampal network activity. To study changes in membrane integration properties in cholinergic neurons in response to hyperpolarizing inputs, we used whole-cell patch-clamp recordings targeting genetically labeled, choline acetyltransferase-positive neurons in mouse brain slices. Hyperpolarization of cholinergic MS-DB neurons resulted in a long-lasting decrease in spike firing rate and input-output gain. Additionally, voltage-clamp measures implicated a slowly inactivating, 4-AP-insensitive, outward K(+) conductance. Using a conductance-based model of cholinergic MS-DB neurons, we show that the ability of this conductance to modulate firing rate and gain depends on the expression of an experimentally verified shallow intrinsic spike frequency-voltage relationship. Together, these findings point to a means through which negative feedback from hippocampal neurons can influence the role of cholinergic MS-DB neurons. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Towards Real-time Metabolic Profiling of Cancer with Hyperpolarized Succinate

    PubMed Central

    Zacharias, Niki M.; McCullough, Christopher R.; Wagner, Shawn; Sailasuta, Napapon; Chan, Henry R.; Lee, Youngbok; Hu, Jingzhe; Perman, William H.; Henneberg, Cameron; Ross, Brian D.; Bhattacharya, Pratip

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The energy-yielding mitochondrial Krebs cycle has been shown in many cancers and other diseases to be inhibited or mutated. In most cells, the Krebs cycle with oxidative phosphorylation generates approximately 90% of the adenosine triphosphate in the cell. We designed and hyperpolarized carbon-13 labeled succinate (SUC) and its derivative diethyl succinate (DES) to interrogate the Krebs cycle in real-time in cancer animal models. Procedures Using Parahydrogen Induced Polarization (PHIP), we generated hyperpolarized SUC and DES by hydrogenating their respective fumarate precursors. DES and SUC metabolism was studied in five cancer allograft animal models: breast (4T1), Renal Cell Carcinoma (RENCA), colon (CT26), lymphoma NSO, and lymphoma A20. Results The extent of hyperpolarization was 8 ± 2% for SUC and 2.1 ± 0.6% for DES. The metabolism of DES and SUC in the Krebs cycle could be followed in animals 5 s after tail vein injection. The biodistribution of the compounds was observed using 13C FISP imaging. We observed significant differences in uptake and conversion of both compounds in different cell types both in vivo and in vitro. Conclusion With hyperpolarized DES and SUC, we are able to meet many of the requirements for a useable in vivo metabolic imaging compound – high polarization, relatively long T1 values, low toxicity and high water solubility. However, succinate and its derivative DES are metabolized robustly by RENCA but not by the other cancer models. Our results underscore the heterogeneity of cancer cells and the role cellular uptake plays in hyperpolarized metabolic spectroscopy. PMID:27547490

  5. An evaluation of potassium ions as endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor in porcine coronary arteries

    PubMed Central

    Bény, Jean-Louis; Schaad, Olivier

    2000-01-01

    In the rat hepatic artery, the endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF) was identified as potassium. Potassium hyperpolarizes the smooth muscles by gating inward rectified potassium channels and by activating the sodium-potassium adenosine triphosphatase (Na+-K+ATPase). Our goal was to examine whether potassium could explain the EDHF in porcine coronary arteries. On coronary strips, the inhibition of calcium-dependent potassium channels with 100 nM apamin plus 100 μM charibdotoxin inhibited the endothelium-dependent relaxations, produced by 10 nM substance P and 300 nM bradykinin and resistant to nitro-L-arginine and indomethacin. The scavenging of potassium with 2 mM Kryptofix 2.2.2 abolished the endothelium-dependent relaxations produced by the kinins and resistant to nitro-L-arginine and indomethacin. Forty μM 18α glycyrrethinic acid or 50 μM palmitoleic acid, both uncoupling agents, did not inhibit these kinin relaxations. Therefore, EDHF does not result from an electrotonic spreading of an endothelial hyperpolarization. Barium (0.3 nM) did not inhibit the kinin relaxations resistant to nitro-L-arginine and indomethacin. Therefore, EDHF does not result from the activation of inward rectified potassium channels. Five hundred nM ouabain abolished the endothelium-dependent relaxations resistant to nitro-L-arginine and indomethacin without inhibiting the endothelium-derived NO relaxation. The perifusion of a medium supplemented with potassium depolarized and contracted a coronary strip; however, the short application of potassium hyperpolarized the smooth muscles. These results are compatible with the concept that, in porcine coronary artery, the EDHF is potassium released by the endothelial cells and that this ion hyperpolarizes and relaxes the smooth muscles by activating the Na+-K+ATPase. PMID:11053218

  6. Accommodation to hyperpolarization of human axons assessed in the frequency domain

    PubMed Central

    Bostock, Hugh; Burke, David

    2016-01-01

    Human axons in vivo were subjected to subthreshold currents with a threshold impedance amplitude profile to allow the use of frequency domain techniques to determine the propensity for resonant behavior and to clarify the relative contributions of different ion channels to their low-frequency responsiveness. Twenty-four studies were performed on the motor and sensory axons of the median nerve in six subjects. The response to oscillatory currents was tested between direct current (DC) and 16 Hz. A resonant peak at ∼2–2.5 Hz was found in the response of hyperpolarized axons, but there was only a small broad response in axons at resting membrane potential (RMP). A mathematical model of axonal excitability developed using DC pulses provided a good fit to the frequency response for human axons and indicated that the hyperpolarization-activated current Ih and the slow potassium current IKs are principally responsible for the resonance. However, the results indicate that if axons are hyperpolarized by more than −60% of resting threshold, the only conductances that are appreciably active are Ih and the leak conductance, i.e., that the activity of these conductances can be studied in vivo virtually in isolation at hyperpolarized membrane potentials. Given that the leak conductance dampens resonance, it is suggested that the −60% hyperpolarization used here is optimal for Ih. As expected, differences between the frequency responses of motor and sensory axons were present and best explained by reduced slow potassium conductance GKs, up-modulation of Ih, and increased persistent Na+ current INaP (due to depolarization of RMP) in sensory axons. PMID:27098023

  7. Flow-type landslides magnitude evaluation: the case study of the Campania Region (Southern Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santo, Antonio; De Falco, Melania; Di Crescenzo, Giuseppe

    2015-04-01

    In the last years studies concerning the triggering and the run-out susceptibility for different kind of landslides have become more and more precise. In the most of the cases the methodological approach involve the production of detailed thematic maps (at least 1:5000 scale) which represent a very useful tool for territorial planning, especially in urbanized areas. More recently these researches were accompanied by the growth of other studies dealing with landslide magnitude evaluation (especially in terms of volume and velocity estimate). In this paper the results of a flow-type landslides magnitude evaluation are presented. The study area is located in Southern Italy and is very wide (1,500 square kilometres) including all the Campania region. In this context flow type landslides represent the most frequent instabilities as shown by the large number of victims and the huge economic damage caused in the last few centuries. These shallow landslides involve thin cohesionless, unsaturated pyroclastic soils found over steep slopes around Somma-Vesuvio and Phlegrean district, affecting a wide area where over 100 towns are located. Since the potential volume of flow-type landslides is a measure of event magnitude we propose to estimate the potential volume at the scale of slope or basin for about 90 municipalities affecting 850 hierarchized drainage basins and 900 regular slopes. An empirical approach recently proposed in literature (De Falco et al., 2012), allows to estimate the volume of the pyroclastic cover that can be displaced along the slope. The method derives from the interpretation of numerous geological and geomorphological data gathered from a vast amount of case histories on landslides in volcanic and carbonatic contexts and it is based on determining the thickness of the pyroclastic cover and the width of the detachment and erosion-transport zone. Thickness can be evaluated with a good degree of approximation since, in these landslides, the failure

  8. Spreading dilatation in rat mesenteric arteries associated with calcium-independent endothelial cell hyperpolarization.

    PubMed

    Takano, Hiromichi; Dora, Kim A; Spitaler, Michaela M; Garland, Chris J

    2004-05-01

    Both ACh and levcromakalim evoke smooth muscle cell hyperpolarization and associated relaxation in rat mesenteric resistance arteries. We investigated if they could evoke conducted vasodilatation along isolated arteries, whether this reflected spreading hyperpolarization and the possible mechanism involved. Focal micropipette application of either ACh, to stimulate endothelial cell muscarinic receptors, or levcromakalim, to activate smooth muscle K(ATP) channels, each evoked a local dilatation (88 +/- 14%, n= 6 and 92 +/- 6% reversal of phenylephrine-induced tone, n= 11, respectively) that rapidly spread upstream (at 1.5 mm 46 +/- 19%, n= 6 and 57 +/- 13%, n= 9) to dilate the entire isolated artery. The local dilatation to ACh was associated with a rise in endothelial cell [Ca(2+)](i) (F/F(t = 0)= 1.22 +/- 0.33, n= 14) which did not spread beyond 0.5 mm (F/F(t = 0)= 1.01 +/- 0.01, n= 14), while the local dilatation to levcromakalim was not associated with any change in endothelial cell [Ca(2+)](i). In contrast, ACh and levcromakalim both stimulated local (12.7 +/- 1.2 mV, n= 10 and 13.5 +/- 4.7 mV, n= 10) and spreading (at 2 mm: 3.0 +/- 1.1 mV, n= 5 and 4.1 +/- 0.7 mV, n= 5) smooth muscle hyperpolarization. The spread of hyperpolarization could be prevented by cutting the artery, so was not due to a diffusible agent. Both the spreading dilatation and hyperpolarization were endothelium dependent. The injection of propidium iodide into either endothelial or smooth muscle cells revealed extensive dye coupling between the endothelial cells, but limited coupling between the smooth muscle cells. Some evidence for heterocellular spread of dye was also evident. Together, these data show that vasodilatation can spread over significant distances in mesenteric resistance arteries, and suggest this reflects an effective coupling between the endothelial cells to facilitate [Ca(2+)](i)-independent spread of hyperpolarization.

  9. A modelling study of locomotion-induced hyperpolarization of voltage threshold in cat lumbar motoneurones

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Yue; Jones, Kelvin E; Fedirchuk, Brent; McCrea, David A; Jordan, Larry M

    2002-01-01

    During fictive locomotion the excitability of adult cat lumbar motoneurones is increased by a reduction (a mean hyperpolarization of ≈6.0 mV) of voltage threshold (Vth) for action potential (AP) initiation that is accompanied by only small changes in AP height and width. Further examination of the experimental data in the present study confirms that Vth lowering is present to a similar degree in both the hyperpolarized and depolarized portions of the locomotor step cycle. This indicates that Vth reduction is a modulation of motoneurone membrane currents throughout the locomotor state rather than being related to the phasic synaptic input within the locomotor cycle. Potential ionic mechanisms of this locomotor-state-dependent increase in excitability were examined using three five-compartment models of the motoneurone innervating slow, fast fatigue resistant and fast fatigable muscle fibres. Passive and active membrane conductances were set to produce input resistance, rheobase, afterhyperpolarization (AHP) and membrane time constant values similar to those measured in adult cat motoneurones in non-locomoting conditions. The parameters of 10 membrane conductances were then individually altered in an attempt to replicate the hyperpolarization of Vth that occurs in decerebrate cats during fictive locomotion. The goal was to find conductance changes that could produce a greater than 3 mV hyperpolarization of Vth with only small changes in AP height (< 3 mV) and width (< 1.2 ms). Vth reduction without large changes in AP shape could be produced either by increasing fast sodium current or by reducing delayed rectifier potassium current. The most effective Vth reductions were achieved by either increasing the conductance of fast sodium channels or by hyperpolarizing the voltage dependency of their activation. These changes were particularly effective when localized to the initial segment. Reducing the conductance of delayed rectifier channels or depolarizing their

  10. Novel Imaging Contrast Methods for Hyperpolarized 13 C Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Galen Durant

    Magnetic resonance imaging using hyperpolarized 13C-labeled small molecules has emerged as an extremely powerful tool for the in vivo monitoring of perfusion and metabolism. This work presents methods for improved imaging, parameter mapping, and image contrast generation for in vivo hyperpolarized 13C MRI. Angiography using hyperpolarized urea was greatly improved with a highly T2-weighted acquisition in combination with 15N labeling of the urea amide groups. This is due to the fact that the T2 of [13C]urea is strongly limited by the scalar coupling to the neighboring quadrupolar 14N. The long in vivo T2 values of [13C, 15N2]urea were utilized for sub-millimeter projection angiography using a contrast agent that could be safely injected in concentrations of 10-100 mM while still tolerated in patients with renal insufficiency. This study also presented the first method for in vivo T2 mapping of hyperpolarized 13C compounds. The in vivo T2 of urea was short in the blood and long within the kidneys. This persistent signal component was isolated to the renal filtrate, thus enabling for the first time direct detection of an imaging contrast agent undergoing glomerular filtration. While highly T2-weighted acquisitions select for molecules with short rotational correlation times, high diffusion weighting selects for those with the long translational correlation times. A specialized spin-echo EPI sequence was developed in order to generate highly diffusion-weighted hyperpolarized 13C images on a clinical MRI system operating within clinical peak- RF and gradient amplitude constraints. Low power adiabatic spin echo pulses were developed in order to generate a sufficiently large refocused bandwidth while maintaining low nominal power. This diffusion weighted acquisition gave enhanced tumor contrast-to-noise ratio when imaging [1-13C]lactate after infusion of [1-13C]pyruvate. Finally, the first in-man hyperpolarized 13C MRI clinical trial is discussed.

  11. Spreading dilatation in rat mesenteric arteries associated with calcium-independent endothelial cell hyperpolarization

    PubMed Central

    Takano, Hiromichi; Dora, Kim A; Spitaler, Michaela M; Garland, Chris J

    2004-01-01

    Both ACh and levcromakalim evoke smooth muscle cell hyperpolarization and associated relaxation in rat mesenteric resistance arteries. We investigated if they could evoke conducted vasodilatation along isolated arteries, whether this reflected spreading hyperpolarization and the possible mechanism involved. Focal micropipette application of either ACh, to stimulate endothelial cell muscarinic receptors, or levcromakalim, to activate smooth muscle KATP channels, each evoked a local dilatation (88 ± 14%, n= 6 and 92 ± 6% reversal of phenylephrine-induced tone, n= 11, respectively) that rapidly spread upstream (at 1.5 mm 46 ± 19%, n= 6 and 57 ± 13%, n= 9) to dilate the entire isolated artery. The local dilatation to ACh was associated with a rise in endothelial cell [Ca2+]i (F/Ft = 0= 1.22 ± 0.33, n= 14) which did not spread beyond 0.5 mm (F/Ft = 0= 1.01 ± 0.01, n= 14), while the local dilatation to levcromakalim was not associated with any change in endothelial cell [Ca2+]i. In contrast, ACh and levcromakalim both stimulated local (12.7 ± 1.2 mV, n= 10 and 13.5 ± 4.7 mV, n= 10) and spreading (at 2 mm: 3.0 ± 1.1 mV, n= 5 and 4.1 ± 0.7 mV, n= 5) smooth muscle hyperpolarization. The spread of hyperpolarization could be prevented by cutting the artery, so was not due to a diffusible agent. Both the spreading dilatation and hyperpolarization were endothelium dependent. The injection of propidium iodide into either endothelial or smooth muscle cells revealed extensive dye coupling between the endothelial cells, but limited coupling between the smooth muscle cells. Some evidence for heterocellular spread of dye was also evident. Together, these data show that vasodilatation can spread over significant distances in mesenteric resistance arteries, and suggest this reflects an effective coupling between the endothelial cells to facilitate [Ca2+]i-independent spread of hyperpolarization. PMID:14966304

  12. Density fluctuations in solar wind flow types at 1 AU: Comparison to Doppler scintillation measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huddleston, D. E.; Woo, R.; Neugebauer, M.

    1995-01-01

    Density fluctuations with periods 10 minutes to 1 hour have been investigated in ISEE 3 plasma measurements of solar wind flows at l AU. Coronal hole, interstream, plasma sheet, coronal mass ejection, and interaction region flow types are considered. The ISEE 3 results support the interpretation of the large-scale variations in density fluctuations observed by Doppler scintillation measurement techniques inside 0.2 AU. The highest absolute and relative density fluctuations occur ahead of and within the plasma from coronal mass ejections, with the maximum values occurring between the associated interplanetary shocks and the driver gas. For the quasi-stationary solar wind, density and relative density fluctuations are highest around the heliospheric current sheet and lowest in the high-speed coronal flow. Superposed epoch analysis shows that the region of enhanced density fluctuations and its abrupt boundaries observed in the vicinity of the heliospheric current sheet near the Sun persists to l AU, providing further support for the filamentary nature of the extensions of coronal streamers. The results of this study confirm the advantages of using density fluctuations rather than density as a tracer of solar wind flows with differing origins at the Sun and as a detector of propagating interplanetary disturbances.

  13. Continuous-flow DNP polarizer for MRI applications at 1.5 T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denysenkov, V.; Terekhov, M.; Maeder, R.; Fischer, S.; Zangos, S.; Vogl, T.; Prisner, T. F.

    2017-03-01

    Here we describe a new hyperpolarization approach for magnetic resonance imaging applications at 1.5 T. Proton signal enhancements of more than 20 were achieved with a newly designed multimode microwave resonator situated inside the bore of the imager and used for Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization of the water proton signal. Different from other approaches in our setup the hyperpolarization is achieved continuously by liquid water flowing through the polarizer under continuous microwave excitation. With an available flow rate of up to 1.5 ml/min, which should be high enough for DNP MR angiography applications in small animals like mice and rats. The hyperpolarized liquid cooled to physiological temperature can be routed by a mechanical switch to a quartz capillary for injection into the blood vessels of the target object. This new approach allows hyperpolarization of protons without the need of an additional magnet and avoids the losses arising from the transfer of the hyperpolarized solution between magnets. The signal-to-noise improvement of this method is demonstrated on two- and three-dimensional phantoms of blood vessels.

  14. Continuous-flow DNP polarizer for MRI applications at 1.5 T.

    PubMed

    Denysenkov, V; Terekhov, M; Maeder, R; Fischer, S; Zangos, S; Vogl, T; Prisner, T F

    2017-03-14

    Here we describe a new hyperpolarization approach for magnetic resonance imaging applications at 1.5 T. Proton signal enhancements of more than 20 were achieved with a newly designed multimode microwave resonator situated inside the bore of the imager and used for Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization of the water proton signal. Different from other approaches in our setup the hyperpolarization is achieved continuously by liquid water flowing through the polarizer under continuous microwave excitation. With an available flow rate of up to 1.5 ml/min, which should be high enough for DNP MR angiography applications in small animals like mice and rats. The hyperpolarized liquid cooled to physiological temperature can be routed by a mechanical switch to a quartz capillary for injection into the blood vessels of the target object. This new approach allows hyperpolarization of protons without the need of an additional magnet and avoids the losses arising from the transfer of the hyperpolarized solution between magnets. The signal-to-noise improvement of this method is demonstrated on two- and three-dimensional phantoms of blood vessels.

  15. Continuous-flow DNP polarizer for MRI applications at 1.5 T

    PubMed Central

    Denysenkov, V.; Terekhov, M.; Maeder, R.; Fischer, S.; Zangos, S.; Vogl, T.; Prisner, T. F.

    2017-01-01

    Here we describe a new hyperpolarization approach for magnetic resonance imaging applications at 1.5 T. Proton signal enhancements of more than 20 were achieved with a newly designed multimode microwave resonator situated inside the bore of the imager and used for Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization of the water proton signal. Different from other approaches in our setup the hyperpolarization is achieved continuously by liquid water flowing through the polarizer under continuous microwave excitation. With an available flow rate of up to 1.5 ml/min, which should be high enough for DNP MR angiography applications in small animals like mice and rats. The hyperpolarized liquid cooled to physiological temperature can be routed by a mechanical switch to a quartz capillary for injection into the blood vessels of the target object. This new approach allows hyperpolarization of protons without the need of an additional magnet and avoids the losses arising from the transfer of the hyperpolarized solution between magnets. The signal-to-noise improvement of this method is demonstrated on two- and three-dimensional phantoms of blood vessels. PMID:28290535

  16. Endothelium-dependent relaxation and hyperpolarization of canine coronary artery smooth muscles in relation to the electrogenic Na-K pump.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, G.; Hashitani, H.; Suzuki, H.

    1989-01-01

    1 In the smooth muscle cells of canine coronary artery, acetylcholine (ACh) produced a transient, endothelium-dependent hyperpolarization of the membrane. A similar hyperpolarization was also elicited by exposure to Krebs solution after incubation of the artery in K-free solution for 30 min. 2 A hyperpolarization of reproducible amplitude was generated when ACh was applied at intervals greater than 30 min. Repetitive application of ACh at 15 min intervals caused a successive reduction in the amplitude of hyperpolarization. 3 The reduction in the amplitude of relaxation during five successive applications of ACh at 15 min intervals was less than 10% of the first relaxation. 4 The ACh-induced hyperpolarization was blocked by atropine but not by ouabain, whereas the K-free induced hyperpolarization was blocked by ouabain. In low Na (Li-substituted) solution, ACh still induced a hyperpolarization but the K-free induced hyperpolarization was absent. 5 In coronary artery precontracted by high-K solution, ACh produced an endothelium-dependent relaxation, without membrane hyperpolarization. The associated relaxation was resistant to ouabain but sensitive to atropine. 6 It is concluded that in the canine coronary artery, the electrogenic Na-K pump does not contribute to the endothelium-dependent hyperpolarization or relaxation. The results are consistent with the release of two different inhibitory factors from the vascular endothelium. PMID:2590775

  17. Light-evoked hyperpolarization and silencing of neurons by conjugated polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feyen, Paul; Colombo, Elisabetta; Endeman, Duco; Nova, Mattia; Laudato, Lucia; Martino, Nicola; Antognazza, Maria Rosa; Lanzani, Guglielmo; Benfenati, Fabio; Ghezzi, Diego

    2016-03-01

    The ability to control and modulate the action potential firing in neurons represents a powerful tool for neuroscience research and clinical applications. While neuronal excitation has been achieved with many tools, including electrical and optical stimulation, hyperpolarization and neuronal inhibition are typically obtained through patch-clamp or optogenetic manipulations. Here we report the use of conjugated polymer films interfaced with neurons for inducing a light-mediated inhibition of their electrical activity. We show that prolonged illumination of the interface triggers a sustained hyperpolarization of the neuronal membrane that significantly reduces both spontaneous and evoked action potential firing. We demonstrate that the polymeric interface can be activated by either visible or infrared light and is capable of modulating neuronal activity in brain slices and explanted retinas. These findings prove the ability of conjugated polymers to tune neuronal firing and suggest their potential application for the in-vivo modulation of neuronal activity.

  18. NMR spectroscopy of hyperpolarized ^129Xe at high fields: Maintaining spin polarization after optical pumping.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patton, Brian; Kuzma, Nicholas N.; Lisitza, Natalia V.; Happer, William

    2003-05-01

    Spin-polarized ^129Xe has become an invaluable tool in nuclear magnetic resonance research, with applications ranging from medical imaging to high-resolution spectroscopy. High-field NMR studies using hyperpolarized xenon as a spectroscopic probe benefit from the high signal-to-noise ratios and large chemical shifts typical of optically-pumped noble gases. The experimental sensitivity is ultimately determined by the absolute polarization of the xenon in the sample, which can be substantially decreased during purification and transfer. NMR of xenon at high fields (9.4 Tesla) will be discussed, and potential mechanisms of spin relaxation during the distillation, storage(N. N. Kuzma, B. Patton, K. Raman, and W. Happer, Phys. Rev. Lett. 88), 147602 (2002)., and delivery of hyperpolarized xenon will be analyzed.

  19. Population diversity and function of hyperpolarization-activated current in olfactory bulb mitral cells

    PubMed Central

    Angelo, Kamilla; Margrie, Troy W.

    2011-01-01

    Although neurons are known to exhibit a broad array of intrinsic properties that impact critically on the computations they perform, very few studies have quantified such biophysical diversity and its functional consequences. Using in vivo and in vitro whole-cell recordings here we show that mitral cells are extremely heterogeneous in their expression of a rebound depolarization (sag) at hyperpolarized potentials that is mediated by a ZD7288-sensitive current with properties typical of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide gated (HCN) channels. The variability in sag expression reflects a functionally diverse population of mitral cells. For example, those cells with large amplitude sag exhibit more membrane noise, a lower rheobase and fire action potentials more regularly than cells where sag is absent. Thus, cell-to-cell variability in sag potential amplitude reflects diversity in the integrative properties of mitral cells that ensures a broad dynamic range for odor representation across these principal neurons. PMID:22355569

  20. Liquid-state carbon-13 hyperpolarization generated in an MRI system for fast imaging

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, A. B.; Berner, S.; Schimpf, W.; Müller, C.; Lickert, T.; Schwaderlapp, N.; Knecht, S.; Skinner, J. G.; Dost, A.; Rovedo, P.; Hennig, J.; von Elverfeldt, D.; Hövener, J. -B.

    2017-01-01

    Hyperpolarized (HP) tracers dramatically increase the sensitivity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to monitor metabolism non-invasively and in vivo. Their production, however, requires an extra polarizing device (polarizer) whose complexity, operation and cost can exceed that of an MRI system itself. Furthermore, the lifetime of HP tracers is short and some of the enhancement is lost during transfer to the application site. Here, we present the production of HP tracers in water without an external polarizer: by Synthesis Amid the Magnet Bore, A Dramatically Enhanced Nuclear Alignment (SAMBADENA) is achieved within seconds, corresponding to a hyperpolarization of ∼20%. As transfer of the tracer is no longer required, SAMBADENA may permit a higher polarization at the time of detection at a fraction of the cost and complexity of external polarizers. This development is particularly promising in light of the recently extended portfolio of biomedically relevant para-hydrogen-tracers and may lead to new diagnostic applications. PMID:28262691

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging of pH in vivo using hyperpolarized 13C-labelled bicarbonate.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Ferdia A; Kettunen, Mikko I; Day, Sam E; Hu, De-En; Ardenkjaer-Larsen, Jan Henrik; Zandt, René in 't; Jensen, Pernille R; Karlsson, Magnus; Golman, Klaes; Lerche, Mathilde H; Brindle, Kevin M

    2008-06-12

    As alterations in tissue pH underlie many pathological processes, the capability to image tissue pH in the clinic could offer new ways of detecting disease and response to treatment. Dynamic nuclear polarization is an emerging technique for substantially increasing the sensitivity of magnetic resonance imaging experiments. Here we show that tissue pH can be imaged in vivo from the ratio of the signal intensities of hyperpolarized bicarbonate (H(13)CO(3)(-)) and (13)CO(2) following intravenous injection of hyperpolarized H(13)CO(3)(-). The technique was demonstrated in a mouse tumour model, which showed that the average tumour interstitial pH was significantly lower than the surrounding tissue. Given that bicarbonate is an endogenous molecule that can be infused in relatively high concentrations into patients, we propose that this technique could be used clinically to image pathological processes that are associated with alterations in tissue pH, such as cancer, ischaemia and inflammation.

  2. Light-evoked hyperpolarization and silencing of neurons by conjugated polymers

    PubMed Central

    Feyen, Paul; Colombo, Elisabetta; Endeman, Duco; Nova, Mattia; Laudato, Lucia; Martino, Nicola; Antognazza, Maria Rosa; Lanzani, Guglielmo; Benfenati, Fabio; Ghezzi, Diego

    2016-01-01

    The ability to control and modulate the action potential firing in neurons represents a powerful tool for neuroscience research and clinical applications. While neuronal excitation has been achieved with many tools, including electrical and optical stimulation, hyperpolarization and neuronal inhibition are typically obtained through patch-clamp or optogenetic manipulations. Here we report the use of conjugated polymer films interfaced with neurons for inducing a light-mediated inhibition of their electrical activity. We show that prolonged illumination of the interface triggers a sustained hyperpolarization of the neuronal membrane that significantly reduces both spontaneous and evoked action potential firing. We demonstrate that the polymeric interface can be activated by either visible or infrared light and is capable of modulating neuronal activity in brain slices and explanted retinas. These findings prove the ability of conjugated polymers to tune neuronal firing and suggest their potential application for the in-vivo modulation of neuronal activity. PMID:26940513

  3. NOTE: MR imaging of the lungs with hyperpolarized helium-3 gas transported by air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wild, J. M.; Schmiedeskamp, J.; Paley, M. N. J.; Filbir, F.; Fichele, S.; Kasuboski, L.; Knitz, F.; Woodhouse, N.; Swift, A.; Heil, W.; Mills, G. H.; Wolf, M.; Griffiths, P. D.; Otten, E.; van Beek, E. J. R.

    2002-07-01

    Hyperpolarized noble gas MRI shows promise in the functional imaging of the pulmonary air spaces. The production of hyperpolarized (HP) gas requires specialized laser optical pumping apparatus, which is not likely to be home built in the majority of clinical MRI radiology centres. There are two routes through which HP gas will be made available to hospitals for clinical use: either the apparatus will be installed locally at a considerable expense to the centre, or a central facility will produce the gas and then deliver it to remote MRI sites as and when required. In this study, the feasibility of transporting large quantities of HP gas for in vivo MR imaging from a remote production facility in Mainz, Germany, by airfreight to Sheffield, UK, was successfully demonstrated.

  4. Stimulus-evoked outer segment changes occur before the hyperpolarization of retinal photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yiming; Wang, Benquan; Pepperberg, David R.; Yao, Xincheng

    2016-01-01

    Transient retinal phototropism (TRP) has been predominantly observed in rod photoreceptors activated by oblique visible light stimulation. Dynamic confocal microscopy and optical coherence tomography (OCT) have revealed rod outer segment (ROS) movement as the physical source of TRP. However, the physiological source of ROS movement is still not well understood. In this study, concurrent near-infrared imaging of TRP and electroretinogram (ERG) measurement of retinal electrophysiology revealed that ROS movement occurs before the onset of the ERG a-wave, which is known to reflect the hyperpolarization of retinal photoreceptors. Moreover, substitution of normal superfusing medium with low-sodium medium reversibly blocked the photoreceptor ERG a-wave, but largely preserved the stimulus-evoked ROS movements. Our experimental results and theoretical analysis indicate that early, disc-based stages of the phototransduction cascade, which occur before the hyperpolarization of retinal photoreceptors, contribute to the TRP associated ROS movement. PMID:28101399

  5. Electron and nuclear spin polarization in Rb-Xe spin-exchange optical hyperpolarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanni, Matti; Lantto, Perttu; Repiský, Michal; Mareš, Jiří; Saam, Brian; Vaara, Juha

    2017-03-01

    Spin-exchange optical hyperpolarization of 129Xe gas enhances the signal-to-noise ratio in nuclear magnetic resonance experiments. The governing parameter of the Rb-Xe spin-exchange process, the so-called enhancement factor, was recently reevaluated experimentally. However, the underlying hyperfine coupling and atomic interaction potential as functions of the internuclear distance of the open-shell Rb-Xe dimer have not been accurately determined to date. We present a piecewise approximation based on first-principles calculations of these parameters contributing to the NMR and EPR frequency shifts in the low-density Rb-Xe gas mixture of relevance to hyperpolarization experiments. Both Rb electron and 129Xe nuclear spin polarizations are estimated based on a combination of electronic-structure calculations, observed frequency shifts, and an estimate of the Rb number density. Finally, an expression for the enhancement factor in terms of modern electronic-structure theory is obtained.

  6. Cell uptake of a biosensor detected by hyperpolarized 129Xe NMR: the transferrin case.

    PubMed

    Boutin, Céline; Stopin, Antoine; Lenda, Fatimazohra; Brotin, Thierry; Dutasta, Jean-Pierre; Jamin, Nadège; Sanson, Alain; Boulard, Yves; Leteurtre, François; Huber, Gaspard; Bogaert-Buchmann, Aurore; Tassali, Nawal; Desvaux, Hervé; Carrière, Marie; Berthault, Patrick

    2011-07-01

    For detection of biological events in vitro, sensors using hyperpolarized (129)Xe NMR can become a powerful tool, provided the approach can bridge the gap in sensitivity. Here we propose constructs based on the non-selective grafting of cryptophane precursors on holo-transferrin. This biological system was chosen because there are many receptors on the cell surface, and endocytosis further increases this density. The study of these biosensors with K562 cell suspensions via fluorescence microscopy and (129)Xe NMR indicates a strong interaction, as well as interesting features such as the capacity of xenon to enter the cryptophane even when the biosensor is endocytosed, while keeping a high level of polarization. Despite a lack of specificity for transferrin receptors, undoubtedly due to the hydrophobic character of the cryptophane moiety that attracts the biosensor into the cell membrane, these biosensors allow the first in-cell probing of biological events using hyperpolarized xenon.

  7. Detection of brown adipose tissue and thermogenic activity in mice by hyperpolarized xenon MRI

    PubMed Central

    Branca, Rosa Tamara; He, Ting; Zhang, Le; Floyd, Carlos S.; Freeman, Matthew; White, Christian; Burant, Alex

    2014-01-01

    The study of brown adipose tissue (BAT) in human weight regulation has been constrained by the lack of a noninvasive tool for measuring this tissue and its function in vivo. Existing imaging modalities are nonspecific and intrinsically insensitive to the less active, lipid-rich BAT of obese subjects, the target population for BAT studies. We demonstrate noninvasive imaging of BAT in mice by hyperpolarized xenon gas MRI. We detect a greater than 15-fold increase in xenon uptake by BAT during stimulation of BAT thermogenesis, which enables us to acquire background-free maps of the tissue in both lean and obese mouse phenotypes. We also demonstrate in vivo MR thermometry of BAT by hyperpolarized xenon gas. Finally, we use the linear temperature dependence of the chemical shift of xenon dissolved in adipose tissue to directly measure BAT temperature and to track thermogenic activity in vivo. PMID:25453088

  8. Liquid-state carbon-13 hyperpolarization generated in an MRI system for fast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, A. B.; Berner, S.; Schimpf, W.; Müller, C.; Lickert, T.; Schwaderlapp, N.; Knecht, S.; Skinner, J. G.; Dost, A.; Rovedo, P.; Hennig, J.; von Elverfeldt, D.; Hövener, J.-B.

    2017-03-01

    Hyperpolarized (HP) tracers dramatically increase the sensitivity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to monitor metabolism non-invasively and in vivo. Their production, however, requires an extra polarizing device (polarizer) whose complexity, operation and cost can exceed that of an MRI system itself. Furthermore, the lifetime of HP tracers is short and some of the enhancement is lost during transfer to the application site. Here, we present the production of HP tracers in water without an external polarizer: by Synthesis Amid the Magnet Bore, A Dramatically Enhanced Nuclear Alignment (SAMBADENA) is achieved within seconds, corresponding to a hyperpolarization of ~20%. As transfer of the tracer is no longer required, SAMBADENA may permit a higher polarization at the time of detection at a fraction of the cost and complexity of external polarizers. This development is particularly promising in light of the recently extended portfolio of biomedically relevant para-hydrogen-tracers and may lead to new diagnostic applications.

  9. Efficient production of hyperpolarized bicarbonate by chemical reaction on a DNP precursor to measure pH.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Rajat K; Kadlecek, Stephen J; Pourfathi, Mehrdad; Rizi, Rahim R

    2015-11-01

    To produce hyperpolarized bicarbonate indirectly via chemical reaction from a hyperpolarized precursor and utilize it for the simultaneous regional measurement of metabolism and pH. Alpha keto carboxylic acids are first hyperpolarized by dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP). These precursor molecules are rapidly reacted with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) to decarboxylate the species, resulting in new target molecules. Unreacted H2O2 is removed from the system by reaction with sulfite. Interrogation of the ratio of dissolved carbon dioxide (CO2) to bicarbonate can be used to determine pH. Conversion of hyperpolarized alpha keto acids to bicarbonate and CO2 results in a minimal loss of the spin order. The reaction can be conducted to completion within seconds and preserves the nuclear spin polarization. Through a rapid chemical reaction, we can conserve the nuclear spin order of a DNP precursor to generate multiple hyperpolarized bioprobes otherwise unamenable to polarization. This indirect technique for the production of hyperpolarized agents can be applied to different precursor compounds to generate additional novel probes. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Screening and Monitoring Response to Treatment Using Subsecond Molecular Imaging and Hyperpolarized Contrast Agents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-01

    Magnetization transfer MRI in multiple sclerosis . J Neuroimaging. 2007;17 Suppl 1:S22–S26. 82. Filippi M, Rocca MA. Magnetization transfer magnetic resonance... multiple sclerosis . Neuroimaging Clin N Am. 2009;19(1):27–36. 84. Lundbom N. Determination of magnetization transfer contrast in tissue: an MR... multiple RF coils intended for optimal direct and indirect detection of hyperpolarized contrast agents in vivo. 4.b. Y1Q3-Y1Q4. Low field MRI: pre

  11. The prolonged hyperpolarizing afterpotential in an invertebrate photoreceptor: wavelength and ionic dependence.

    PubMed

    Cornwall, M C; Gorman, A L

    1982-05-13

    A single electrode voltage clamp was used to examine the prolonged hyperpolarizing afterpotential (PHA) which accompanies photoconversion of a substantial fraction of rhodopsin (lambda max = 500 nM) to metarhodopsin (lambda max = 575 nM) in distal photoreceptor cells in the retina of the bay scallop, Pecten irradians. The PHA appears to result from a persistent light-activated outward K+ current passing through the same channels responsible for the normal receptor potential in these cells.

  12. Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channels in mouse vomeronasal sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Dibattista, Michele; Mazzatenta, Andrea; Grassi, Francesca; Tirindelli, Roberto; Menini, Anna

    2008-08-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated currents (Ih) are present in several neurons of the central and peripheral nervous system. However, Ih in neurons of the vomeronasal organ (VNO) is not well characterized. We studied the properties of Ih in sensory neurons from acute slices of mouse VNO. In voltage-clamp studies, Ih was identified by the characteristic kinetics of activation, voltage dependence, and blockage by Cs+ or ZD-7288, two blockers of the Ih. Forskolin, an activator of adenylyl cyclase, shifted the activation curve for Ih to less negative potentials. A comparison of Ih properties in VNO neurons with those of heterologously expressed hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels, together with RT-PCR experiments in VNO, indicate that Ih is caused by HCN2 and/or HCN4 subunits. In current-clamp recordings, blocking Ih with ZD-7288 induced a hyperpolarization of 5.1 mV, an increase in input resistance, a decrease in the sensitivity to elicit action potentials in response to small current injections, and did not modify the frequency of action potentials elicited by a large current injection. It has been shown that in VNO neurons some pheromones induce a decrease in cAMP concentration, but the physiological role of cAMP is unknown. After application of blockers of adenylyl cyclase, we measured a hyperpolarization of 5.1 mV in 11 of 14 neurons, suggesting that basal levels of cAMP could modulate the resting potential. In conclusion, these results show that mouse VNO neurons express HCN2 and/or HCN4 subunits and that Ih contributes to setting the resting membrane potential and to increase excitability at stimulus threshold.

  13. Local anaesthetics block hyperpolarization-activated inward current in rat small dorsal root ganglion neurones

    PubMed Central

    Bischoff, Ulrike; Bräu, Michael E; Vogel, Werner; Hempelmann, Gunter; Olschewski, Andrea

    2003-01-01

    Hyperpolarizing voltage steps evoke slowly activating inward currents in a variety of neurones and in cardiac cells. This hyperpolarization-activated inward current (Ih) is thought to play a significant role in cell excitability, firing frequency, or in setting of the resting membrane potential in these cells. We studied the effects of lidocaine, mepivacaine, QX-314 and bupivacaine as well as its enantiomers on Ih in the membrane of dorsal root ganglion neurones (DRG). The patch-clamp technique was applied to small dorsal root ganglion neurones identified in 200 μM thin slices of young rat DRGs. Under voltage-clamp conditions, the whole-cell Ih current was recorded in the presence of different concentrations of the local anaesthetics. In current-clamp mode the resting membrane potential and the voltage response of DRG neurones to injected current pulses were investigated. Ih was reversibly blocked by bupivacaine, lidocaine and mepivacaine applied externally in clinically relevant concentrations. Concentration–response curves gave half-maximum inhibiting concentrations of 55, 99 and 190 μM, respectively. Bupivacaine block of the Ih current was not stereoselective. No significant effect was observed when QX-314 was applied to the external surface of the membrane. In current-clamp experiments 60 μM bupivacaine slightly hyperpolarized the membrane. The membrane stimulation by low-amplitude current pulses in the presence of bupivacaine showed an increase of the hyperpolarizing responses. Our findings suggest an important role of the Ih-block by local anaesthetics in the complex mechanism of drug action during epidural and spinal anaesthesia. PMID:12890706

  14. DTG and (+)-3-PPP inhibit a ligand-activated hyperpolarization in mammalian neurons.

    PubMed

    Bobker, D H; Shen, K Z; Surprenant, A; Williams, J T

    1989-12-01

    The effects of three compounds with high affinity for the haloperidol-sensitive alpha-binding site were studied with intracellular recordings in the vitro neuronal preparations of the rat locus ceruleus, rat dorsal raphe and the guinea pig submucous plexus. Both (+)-3-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-N-(1-propyl)piperidine [(+)-3-PPP] and 1,3-di-o-tolylguanidine (DTG) inhibited the hyperpolarization induced by a ligand-activated potassium conductance. In the locus ceruleus, (+)-3-PPP and DTG produced a maximal 40 to 45% inhibition of the [Met5]enkephalin hyperpolarization, and had EC50 values of 6.6 and 2.2 microM, respectively. In the submucous plexus, the two compounds had a similar action on the alpha-2 adrenoceptor agonist UK14304 hyperpolarization, producing a maximal 50% inhibition with EC50 values of 140 and 32 nM, respectively. In addition, DTG inhibited the alpha-2-mediated inhibitory postsynaptic potential in both preparations. In contrast, (+)-3-PPP increased and prolonged the inhibitory postsynaptic potential. This action is qualitatively similar to the actions of cocaine on locus ceruleus and submucous plexus neurons. Haloperidol (1-10 microM) shared none of these actions. It is concluded that DTG and (+)-3-PPP are inhibitors of the opiate and alpha-2-mediated hyperpolarization at a postreceptor site, possibly the potassium channel. In addition, (+)-3-PPP, but not DTG, inhibits norepinephrine reuptake. None of these effects appear to be related to the sigma -binding site, because haloperidol acted as neither an agonist nor an antagonist.

  15. A Bacterial Toxin with Analgesic Properties: Hyperpolarization of DRG Neurons by Mycolactone.

    PubMed

    Song, Ok-Ryul; Kim, Han-Byul; Jouny, Samuel; Ricard, Isabelle; Vandeputte, Alexandre; Deboosere, Nathalie; Marion, Estelle; Queval, Christophe J; Lesport, Pierre; Bourinet, Emmanuel; Henrion, Daniel; Oh, Seog Bae; Lebon, Guillaume; Sandoz, Guillaume; Yeramian, Edouard; Marsollier, Laurent; Brodin, Priscille

    2017-07-18

    Mycolactone, a polyketide molecule produced by Mycobacterium ulcerans, is the etiological agent of Buruli ulcer. This lipid toxin is endowed with pleiotropic effects, presents cytotoxic effects at high doses, and notably plays a pivotal role in host response upon colonization by the bacillus. Most remarkably, mycolactone displays intriguing analgesic capabilities: the toxin suppresses or alleviates the pain of the skin lesions it inflicts. We demonstrated that the analgesic capability of mycolactone was not attributable to nerve damage, but instead resulted from the triggering of a cellular pathway targeting AT₂ receptors (angiotensin II type 2 receptors; AT₂R), and leading to potassium-dependent hyperpolarization. This demonstration paves the way to new nature-inspired analgesic protocols. In this direction, we assess here the hyperpolarizing properties of mycolactone on nociceptive neurons. We developed a dedicated medium-throughput assay based on membrane potential changes, and visualized by confocal microscopy of bis-oxonol-loaded Dorsal Root Ganglion (DRG) neurons. We demonstrate that mycolactone at non-cytotoxic doses triggers the hyperpolarization of DRG neurons through AT₂R, with this action being not affected by known ligands of AT₂R. This result points towards novel AT₂R-dependent signaling pathways in DRG neurons underlying the analgesic effect of mycolactone, with the perspective for the development of new types of nature-inspired analgesics.

  16. Ultra-sensitive atomic magnetometer for studying magnetization fields produced by hyperpolarized helium-3

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, Sheng; Zhang, Hong; Fang, Jian-cheng; Chen, Xi-yuan; Chen, Yao; Lu, Ji-xi; Hu, Zhao-hui; Shan, Guang-cun; Quan, Wei

    2016-04-14

    An ingenious approach to acquire the absolute magnetization fields produced by polarized atoms has been presented in this paper. The method was based on detection of spin precession signal of the hyperpolarized helium-3 with ultra-sensitive atomic magnetometer of potassium by referring to time-domain analysis. At first, dynamic responses of the mixed spin ensembles in the presence of variant external magnetic fields have been analyzed by referring to the Bloch equation. Subsequently, the relevant equipment was established to achieve the functions of hyperpolarizing helium-3 and detecting the precession of spin-polarized noble gas. By analyzing the transient response of the magnetometer in time domain, we obtained the relevant damping ratio and natural frequency. When the value of damping ratio reached the maximum value of 0.0917, the combined atomic magnetometer was in equilibrium. We draw a conclusion from the steady response: the magnetization fields of the polarized electrons and the hyperpolarized nuclei were corresponding 16.12 nT and 90.74 nT. Under this situation, the nuclear magnetization field could offset disturbing magnetic fields perpendicular to the orientation of the electronic polarization, and it preserved the electronic spin staying in a stable axis. Therefore, the combined magnetometer was particularly attractive for inertial measurements.

  17. Hyperpolarization of resting membrane potential causes retraction of spontaneous transients during mouse embryonic circuit development

    PubMed Central

    Watari, Hirofumi; Tose, Amanda J; Bosma, Martha M

    2013-01-01

    Spontaneous activity supports developmental processes in many brain regions during embryogenesis, and the spatial extent and frequency of the spontaneous activity are tightly regulated by stage. In the developing mouse hindbrain, spontaneous activity propagates widely and the waves can cover the entire hindbrain at E11.5. The activity then retracts to waves that are spatially restricted to the rostral midline at E13.5, before disappearing altogether by E15.5. However, the mechanism of retraction is unknown. We studied passive membrane properties of cells that are spatiotemporally relevant to the pattern of retraction in mouse embryonic hindbrain using whole-cell patch clamp and imaging techniques. We find that membrane excitability progressively decreases due to hyperpolarization of resting membrane potential and increased resting conductance density between E11.5 and E15.5, in a spatiotemporal pattern correlated with the retraction sequence. Retraction can be acutely reversed by membrane depolarization at E15.5, and the induced events propagate similarly to spontaneous activity at earlier stages, though without involving gap junctional coupling. Manipulation of [K+]o or [Cl−]o reveals that membrane potential follows EK more closely than ECl, suggesting a dominant role for K+ conductance in the membrane hyperpolarization. Reducing membrane excitability by hyperpolarization of the resting membrane potential and increasing resting conductance are effective mechanisms to desynchronize spontaneous activity in a spatiotemporal manner, while allowing information processing to occur at the synaptic and cellular level. PMID:23165771

  18. High field hyperpolarization-EXSY experiment for fast determination of dissociation rates in SABRE complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermkens, Niels K. J.; Feiters, Martin C.; Rutjes, Floris P. J. T.; Wijmenga, Sybren S.; Tessari, Marco

    2017-03-01

    SABRE (Signal Amplification By Reversible Exchange) is a nuclear spin hyperpolarization technique based on the reversible concurrent binding of small molecules and para-hydrogen (p-H2) to an iridium metal complex in solution. At low magnetic field, spontaneous conversion of p-H2 spin order to enhanced longitudinal magnetization of the nuclear spins of the other ligands occurs. Subsequent complex dissociation results in hyperpolarized substrate molecules in solution. The lifetime of this complex plays a crucial role in attained SABRE NMR signal enhancements. Depending on the ligands, vastly different dissociation rates have been previously measured using EXSY or selective inversion experiments. However, both these approaches are generally time-consuming due to the long recycle delays (up to 2 min) necessary to reach thermal equilibrium for the nuclear spins of interest. In the cases of dilute solutions, signal averaging aggravates the problem, further extending the experimental time. Here, a new approach is proposed based on coherent hyperpolarization transfer to substrate protons in asymmetric complexes at high magnetic field. We have previously shown that such asymmetric complexes are important for application of SABRE to dilute substrates. Our results demonstrate that a series of high sensitivity EXSY spectra can be collected in a short experimental time thanks to the NMR signal enhancement and much shorter recycle delay.

  19. Nondisruptive Dissolution of Hyperpolarized 129 Xe into Viscous Aqueous and Organic Liquid Crystalline Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Truxal, Ashley E.; Slack, Clancy C.; Gomes, Muller D.; Vassiliou, Christophoros C.; Wemmer, David E.; Pines, Alexander

    2016-03-08

    Studies of hyperpolarized xenon-129 in media such as liquid crystals and cell suspensions are in demand for applications ranging from biomedical imaging to materials engineering but have been hindered by the inability to bubble Xe through the desired media as a result of viscosity or perturbations caused by bubbles. This research reports on a device that can be reliably used to dissolve hp- 129 Xe into viscous aqueous and organic samples without bubbling. This method is robust, requires small sample volumes ( < 60 μL), is compatible with existing NMR hardware, and is made from readily available materials. Experiments show that Xe can be introduced into viscous and aligned media without disrupting molecular order. We detected dissolved xenon in an aqueous liquid crystal that is disrupted by the shear forces of bubbling, and we observed liquid-crystal phase transitions in (MBBA). This tool allows an entirely new class of samples to be investigated by hyperpolarized-gas NMR spectroscopy. Blending into the crowd: A new device that facilitates the direct dissolution of hyperpolarized 129 Xe into viscous liquid-crystalline media is presented. 129 Xe and 2 H NMR spectra show the nondisruptive dissolution of xenon, the presence of ordered phases, and, in the case of the thermotropic liquid crystal N-(4-methoxybenzylidene)-4-butylaniline, a nematic-isotropic phase transition.

  20. Hyperpolarized 13C dehydroascorbate as an endogenous redox sensor for in vivo metabolic imaging.

    PubMed

    Keshari, Kayvan R; Kurhanewicz, John; Bok, Robert; Larson, Peder E Z; Vigneron, Daniel B; Wilson, David M

    2011-11-15

    Reduction and oxidation (redox) chemistry is involved in both normal and abnormal cellular function, in processes as diverse as circadian rhythms and neurotransmission. Intracellular redox is maintained by coupled reactions involving NADPH, glutathione (GSH), and vitamin C, as well as their corresponding oxidized counterparts. In addition to functioning as enzyme cofactors, these reducing agents have a critical role in dealing with reactive oxygen species (ROS), the toxic products of oxidative metabolism seen as culprits in aging, neurodegenerative disease, and ischemia/ reperfusion injury. Despite this strong relationship between redox and human disease, methods to interrogate a redox pair in vivo are limited. Here we report the development of [1-(13)C] dehydroascorbate [DHA], the oxidized form of Vitamin C, as an endogenous redox sensor for in vivo imaging using hyperpolarized (13)C spectroscopy. In murine models, hyperpolarized [1-(13)C] DHA was rapidly converted to [1-(13)C] vitamin C within the liver, kidneys, and brain, as well as within tumor in a transgenic prostate cancer mouse. This result is consistent with what has been previously described for the DHA/Vitamin C redox pair, and points to a role for hyperpolarized [1-(13)C] DHA in characterizing the concentrations of key intracellular reducing agents, including GSH. More broadly, these findings suggest a prognostic role for this new redox sensor in determining vulnerability of both normal and abnormal tissues to ROS.

  1. Room-temperature in situ nuclear spin hyperpolarization from optically pumped nitrogen vacancy centres in diamond

    SciTech Connect

    King, Jonathan P.; Jeong, Keunhong; Vassiliou, Christophoros C.; Shin, Chang S.; Page, Ralph H.; Avalos, Claudia E.; Wang, Hai-Jing; Pines, Alexander

    2015-12-07

    Low detection sensitivity stemming from the weak polarization of nuclear spins is a primary limitation of magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging. Methods have been developed to enhance nuclear spin polarization but they typically require high magnetic fields, cryogenic temperatures or sample transfer between magnets. Here we report bulk, room-temperature hyperpolarization of 13C nuclear spins observed via high-field magnetic resonance. The technique harnesses the high optically induced spin polarization of diamond nitrogen vacancy centres at room temperature in combination with dynamic nuclear polarization. We observe bulk nuclear spin polarization of 6%, an enhancement of ~170,000 over thermal equilibrium. The signal of the hyperpolarized spins was detected in situ with a standard nuclear magnetic resonance probe without the need for sample shuttling or precise crystal orientation. In conclusion, hyperpolarization via optical pumping/dynamic nuclear polarization should function at arbitrary magnetic fields enabling orders of magnitude sensitivity enhancement for nuclear magnetic resonance of solids and liquids under ambient conditions.

  2. Room-temperature in situ nuclear spin hyperpolarization from optically pumped nitrogen vacancy centres in diamond

    DOE PAGES

    King, Jonathan P.; Jeong, Keunhong; Vassiliou, Christophoros C.; ...

    2015-12-07

    Low detection sensitivity stemming from the weak polarization of nuclear spins is a primary limitation of magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging. Methods have been developed to enhance nuclear spin polarization but they typically require high magnetic fields, cryogenic temperatures or sample transfer between magnets. Here we report bulk, room-temperature hyperpolarization of 13C nuclear spins observed via high-field magnetic resonance. The technique harnesses the high optically induced spin polarization of diamond nitrogen vacancy centres at room temperature in combination with dynamic nuclear polarization. We observe bulk nuclear spin polarization of 6%, an enhancement of ~170,000 over thermal equilibrium. The signal ofmore » the hyperpolarized spins was detected in situ with a standard nuclear magnetic resonance probe without the need for sample shuttling or precise crystal orientation. In conclusion, hyperpolarization via optical pumping/dynamic nuclear polarization should function at arbitrary magnetic fields enabling orders of magnitude sensitivity enhancement for nuclear magnetic resonance of solids and liquids under ambient conditions.« less

  3. Cardiac perfusion imaging using hyperpolarized (13)C urea using flow sensitizing gradients.

    PubMed

    Lau, Angus Z; Miller, Jack J; Robson, Matthew D; Tyler, Damian J

    2016-04-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility of imaging the first passage of a bolus of hyperpolarized (13)C urea through the rodent heart using flow-sensitizing gradients to reduce signal from the blood pool. A flow-sensitizing bipolar gradient was optimized to reduce the bright signal within the cardiac chambers, enabling improved contrast of the agent within the tissue capillary bed. The gradient was incorporated into a dynamic golden angle spiral (13)C imaging sequence. Healthy rats were scanned during rest (n = 3) and under adenosine stress-induced hyperemia (n = 3). A two-fold increase in myocardial perfusion relative to rest was detected during adenosine stress-induced hyperemia, consistent with a myocardial perfusion reserve of two in rodents. The new pulse sequence was used to obtain dynamic images of the first passage of hyperpolarized (13)C urea in the rodent heart, without contamination from bright signal within the neighboring cardiac lumen. This probe of myocardial perfusion is expected to enable new hyperpolarized (13)C studies in which the cardiac metabolism/perfusion mismatch can be identified. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance. © 2015 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  4. Hybrid polarizing solids for pure hyperpolarized liquids through dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization

    PubMed Central

    Gajan, David; Bornet, Aurélien; Vuichoud, Basile; Milani, Jonas; Melzi, Roberto; van Kalkeren, Henri A.; Veyre, Laurent; Thieuleux, Chloé; Conley, Matthew P.; Grüning, Wolfram R.; Schwarzwälder, Martin; Lesage, Anne; Copéret, Christophe; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey; Emsley, Lyndon; Jannin, Sami

    2014-01-01

    Hyperpolarization of substrates for magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and imaging (MRI) by dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (D-DNP) usually involves saturating the ESR transitions of polarizing agents (PAs; e.g., persistent radicals embedded in frozen glassy matrices). This approach has shown enormous potential to achieve greatly enhanced nuclear spin polarization, but the presence of PAs and/or glassing agents in the sample after dissolution can raise concerns for in vivo MRI applications, such as perturbing molecular interactions, and may induce the erosion of hyperpolarization in spectroscopy and MRI. We show that D-DNP can be performed efficiently with hybrid polarizing solids (HYPSOs) with 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-piperidine-1-oxyl radicals incorporated in a mesostructured silica material and homogeneously distributed along its pore channels. The powder is wetted with a solution containing molecules of interest (for example, metabolites for MRS or MRI) to fill the pore channels (incipient wetness impregnation), and DNP is performed at low temperatures in a very efficient manner. This approach allows high polarization without the need for glass-forming agents and is applicable to a broad range of substrates, including peptides and metabolites. During dissolution, HYPSO is physically retained by simple filtration in the cryostat of the DNP polarizer, and a pure hyperpolarized solution is collected within a few seconds. The resulting solution contains the pure substrate, is free from any paramagnetic or other pollutants, and is ready for in vivo infusion. PMID:25267650

  5. High field hyperpolarization-EXSY experiment for fast determination of dissociation rates in SABRE complexes.

    PubMed

    Hermkens, Niels K J; Feiters, Martin C; Rutjes, Floris P J T; Wijmenga, Sybren S; Tessari, Marco

    2017-03-01

    SABRE (Signal Amplification By Reversible Exchange) is a nuclear spin hyperpolarization technique based on the reversible concurrent binding of small molecules and para-hydrogen (p-H2) to an iridium metal complex in solution. At low magnetic field, spontaneous conversion of p-H2 spin order to enhanced longitudinal magnetization of the nuclear spins of the other ligands occurs. Subsequent complex dissociation results in hyperpolarized substrate molecules in solution. The lifetime of this complex plays a crucial role in attained SABRE NMR signal enhancements. Depending on the ligands, vastly different dissociation rates have been previously measured using EXSY or selective inversion experiments. However, both these approaches are generally time-consuming due to the long recycle delays (up to 2min) necessary to reach thermal equilibrium for the nuclear spins of interest. In the cases of dilute solutions, signal averaging aggravates the problem, further extending the experimental time. Here, a new approach is proposed based on coherent hyperpolarization transfer to substrate protons in asymmetric complexes at high magnetic field. We have previously shown that such asymmetric complexes are important for application of SABRE to dilute substrates. Our results demonstrate that a series of high sensitivity EXSY spectra can be collected in a short experimental time thanks to the NMR signal enhancement and much shorter recycle delay.

  6. A Bacterial Toxin with Analgesic Properties: Hyperpolarization of DRG Neurons by Mycolactone

    PubMed Central

    Song, Ok-Ryul; Kim, Han-Byul; Jouny, Samuel; Ricard, Isabelle; Vandeputte, Alexandre; Deboosere, Nathalie; Marion, Estelle; Queval, Christophe J.; Lesport, Pierre; Henrion, Daniel; Oh, Seog Bae; Lebon, Guillaume; Sandoz, Guillaume; Yeramian, Edouard; Marsollier, Laurent; Brodin, Priscille

    2017-01-01

    Mycolactone, a polyketide molecule produced by Mycobacterium ulcerans, is the etiological agent of Buruli ulcer. This lipid toxin is endowed with pleiotropic effects, presents cytotoxic effects at high doses, and notably plays a pivotal role in host response upon colonization by the bacillus. Most remarkably, mycolactone displays intriguing analgesic capabilities: the toxin suppresses or alleviates the pain of the skin lesions it inflicts. We demonstrated that the analgesic capability of mycolactone was not attributable to nerve damage, but instead resulted from the triggering of a cellular pathway targeting AT2 receptors (angiotensin II type 2 receptors; AT2R), and leading to potassium-dependent hyperpolarization. This demonstration paves the way to new nature-inspired analgesic protocols. In this direction, we assess here the hyperpolarizing properties of mycolactone on nociceptive neurons. We developed a dedicated medium-throughput assay based on membrane potential changes, and visualized by confocal microscopy of bis-oxonol-loaded Dorsal Root Ganglion (DRG) neurons. We demonstrate that mycolactone at non-cytotoxic doses triggers the hyperpolarization of DRG neurons through AT2R, with this action being not affected by known ligands of AT2R. This result points towards novel AT2R-dependent signaling pathways in DRG neurons underlying the analgesic effect of mycolactone, with the perspective for the development of new types of nature-inspired analgesics. PMID:28718822

  7. Characterization of Chemical Exchange Using Relaxation Dispersion of Hyperpolarized Nuclear Spins.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mengxiao; Kim, Yaewon; Hilty, Christian

    2017-09-05

    Chemical exchange phenomena are ubiquitous in macromolecules, which undergo conformational change or ligand complexation. NMR relaxation dispersion (RD) spectroscopy based on a Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill pulse sequence is widely applied to identify the exchange and measure the lifetime of intermediate states on the millisecond time scale. Advances in hyperpolarization methods improve the applicability of NMR spectroscopy when rapid acquisitions or low concentrations are required, through an increase in signal strength by several orders of magnitude. Here, we demonstrate the measurement of chemical exchange from a single aliquot of a ligand hyperpolarized by dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (D-DNP). Transverse relaxation rates are measured simultaneously at different pulsing delays by dual-channel (19)F NMR spectroscopy. This two-point measurement is shown to allow the determination of the exchange term in the relaxation rate expression. For the ligand 4-(trifluoromethyl)benzene-1-carboximidamide binding to the protein trypsin, the exchange term is found to be equal within error limits in neutral and acidic environments from D-DNP NMR spectroscopy, corresponding to a pre-equilibrium of trypsin deprotonation. This finding illustrates the capability for determination of binding mechanisms using D-DNP RD. Taking advantage of hyperpolarization, the ligand concentration in the exchange measurements can reach on the order of tens of μM and protein concentration can be below 1 μM, i.e., conditions typically accessible in drug discovery.

  8. Niflumic acid reduces the hyperpolarization-activated current (I(h)) in rod photoreceptor cells.

    PubMed

    Satoh, T O; Yamada, M

    2001-08-01

    We examined the effects of niflumic acid (NFA), a chloride channel blocker, on the hyperpolarization-activated current (I(h)) in newt rod photoreceptors. At 100 microM, NFA delayed the activation of I(h) induced by hyperpolarizing voltage pulses to -83 mV from a holding potential of -43 mV, and reduced the steady-state current. However, reduction by NFA was weakened when I(h) was activated by hyperpolarizing steps to -123 mV, suggesting that these effects were voltage-dependent. The suppressive effects of NFA on I(h) were accompanied by a negative shift in activation voltage. NFA also delayed the relaxation of I(h) tail currents, showing that this drug also inhibited deactivation of the current. The reversal potential and the fully activated conductance were not affected. These observations suggest that NFA reduces I(h) by modifying the gating kinetics of the underlying channels. The suppressive actions of NFA remained when intracellular Ca2+ was strongly chelated, and the failure of suppression by NFA in inside-out patches suggests that the agent may act on the I(h) channel from the extracellular side. These results, obtained in rod photoreceptors, are consistent with similar effects of NFA on I(f) in cardiac myocytes, suggesting that both currents share similar pharmacological properties.

  9. Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated 2 (HCN2) ion channels drive pain in mouse models of diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Tsantoulas, Christoforos; Laínez, Sergio; Wong, Sara; Mehta, Ishita; Vilar, Bruno; McNaughton, Peter A

    2017-09-27

    Diabetic patients frequently suffer from continuous pain that is poorly treated by currently available analgesics. We used mouse models of type 1 and type 2 diabetes to investigate a possible role for the hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated 2 (HCN2) ion channels as drivers of diabetic pain. Blocking or genetically deleting HCN2 channels in small nociceptive neurons suppressed diabetes-associated mechanical allodynia and prevented neuronal activation of second-order neurons in the spinal cord in mice. In addition, we found that intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), a positive HCN2 modulator, is increased in somatosensory neurons in an animal model of painful diabetes. We propose that the increased intracellular cAMP drives diabetes-associated pain by facilitating HCN2 activation and consequently promoting repetitive firing in primary nociceptive nerve fibers. Our results suggest that HCN2 may be an analgesic target in the treatment of painful diabetic neuropathy. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  10. Evaluation of hyperpolarized [1-¹³C]-pyruvate by magnetic resonance to detect ionizing radiation effects in real time.

    PubMed

    Sandulache, Vlad C; Chen, Yunyun; Lee, Jaehyuk; Rubinstein, Ashley; Ramirez, Marc S; Skinner, Heath D; Walker, Christopher M; Williams, Michelle D; Tailor, Ramesh; Court, Laurence E; Bankson, James A; Lai, Stephen Y

    2014-01-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) cytotoxicity is primarily mediated through reactive oxygen species (ROS). Since tumor cells neutralize ROS by utilizing reducing equivalents, we hypothesized that measurements of reducing potential using real-time hyperpolarized (HP) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) can serve as a surrogate marker of IR induced ROS. This hypothesis was tested in a pre-clinical model of anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC), an aggressive head and neck malignancy. Human ATC cell lines were utilized to test IR effects on ROS and reducing potential in vitro and [1-¹³C] pyruvate HP-MRS/MRSI imaging of ATC orthotopic xenografts was used to study in vivo effects of IR. IR increased ATC intra-cellular ROS levels resulting in a corresponding decrease in reducing equivalent levels. Exogenous manipulation of cellular ROS and reducing equivalent levels altered ATC radiosensitivity in a predictable manner. Irradiation of ATC xenografts resulted in an acute drop in reducing potential measured using HP-MRS, reflecting the shunting of reducing equivalents towards ROS neutralization. Residual tumor tissue post irradiation demonstrated heterogeneous viability. We have adapted HP-MRS/MRSI to non-invasively measure IR mediated changes in tumor reducing potential in real time. Continued development of this technology could facilitate the development of an adaptive clinical algorithm based on real-time adjustments in IR dose and dose mapping.

  11. Investigation of Lung Structure-Function Relationships Using Hyperpolarized Noble Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomen, Robert P.

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is an application of the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) phenomenon to non-invasively generate 3D tomographic images. MRI is an emerging modality for the lung, but it suffers from low sensitivity due to inherent low tissue density and short T(*/2) . Hyperpolarization is a process by which the nuclear contribution to NMR signal is greatly enhanced to more than 100,000 times that of samples in thermal equilibrium. The noble gases 3He and 129Xe are most often hyperpolarized by transfer of light angular momentum through the electron of a vaporized alkali metal to the noble gas nucleus (called Spin Exchange Optical Pumping). The enhancement in NMR signal is so great that the gas itself can be imaged via MRI, and because noble gases are chemically inert, they can be safely inhaled by a subject, and the gas distribution within the interior of the lung can be imaged. The mechanics of respiration is an elegant physical process by which air is is brought into the distal airspaces of the lungs for oxygen/carbon dioxide gas exchange with blood. Therefore proper description of lung function is intricately related to its physical structure , and the basic mechanical operation of healthy lungs -- from pressure driven airflow, to alveolar airspace gas kinetics, to gas exchange by blood/gas concentration gradients, to elastic contraction of parenchymal tissue -- is a process decidedly governed by the laws of physics. This dissertation will describe experiments investigating the relationship of lung structure and function using hyperpolarized (HP) noble gas MRI. In particular HP gases will be applied to the study of several pulmonary diseases each of which demonstrates unique structure-function abnormalities: asthma, cystic fibrosis, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Successful implementation of an HP gas acquisition protocol for pulmonary studies is an involved and stratified undertaking which requires a solid theoretical foundation in NMR

  12. Design of a hyperpolarized (15)N NMR probe that induces a large chemical-shift change upon binding of calcium ions.

    PubMed

    Hata, Ryunosuke; Nonaka, Hiroshi; Takakusagi, Yoichi; Ichikawa, Kazuhiro; Sando, Shinsuke

    2015-08-07

    Ca(2+) is a fundamental metal ion for physiological functioning. Therefore, molecular probes for Ca(2+) analysis are required. Recently, a hyperpolarized NMR probe has emerged as a promising tool. Here, we report a new design of a hyperpolarized NMR probe for Ca(2+), which showed a large chemical shift change upon binding to Ca(2+) and was applied for Ca(2+) sensing in a hyperpolarized state.

  13. Hyperpolarized [1-13C] glutamate: a metabolic imaging biomarker of IDH1 mutational status in glioma.

    PubMed

    Chaumeil, Myriam M; Larson, Peder E Z; Woods, Sarah M; Cai, Larry; Eriksson, Pia; Robinson, Aaron E; Lupo, Janine M; Vigneron, Daniel B; Nelson, Sarah J; Pieper, Russell O; Phillips, Joanna J; Ronen, Sabrina M

    2014-08-15

    Mutations of the isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) gene are among the most prevalent in low-grade glioma and secondary glioblastoma, represent an early pathogenic event, and are associated with epigenetically driven modulations of metabolism. Of particular interest is the recently uncovered relationship between the IDH1 mutation and decreased activity of the branched-chain amino acid transaminase 1 (BCAT1) enzyme. Noninvasive imaging methods that can assess BCAT1 activity could therefore improve detection of mutant IDH1 tumors and aid in developing and monitoring new targeted therapies. BCAT1 catalyzes the transamination of branched-chain amino acids while converting α-ketoglutarate (α-KG) to glutamate. Our goal was to use (13)C magnetic resonance spectroscopy to probe the conversion of hyperpolarized [1-(13)C] α-KG to hyperpolarized [1-(13)C] glutamate as a readout of BCAT1 activity. We investigated two isogenic glioblastoma lines that differed only in their IDH1 status and performed experiments in live cells and in vivo in rat orthotopic tumors. Following injection of hyperpolarized [1-(13)C] α-KG, hyperpolarized [1-(13)C] glutamate production was detected both in cells and in vivo, and the level of hyperpolarized [1-(13)C] glutamate was significantly lower in mutant IDH1 cells and tumors compared with their IDH1-wild-type counterparts. Importantly however, in our cells the observed drop in hyperpolarized [1-(13)C] glutamate was likely mediated not only by a drop in BCAT1 activity, but also by reductions in aspartate transaminase and glutamate dehydrogenase activities, suggesting additional metabolic reprogramming at least in our model. Hyperpolarized [1-(13)C] glutamate could thus inform on multiple mutant IDH1-associated metabolic events that mediate reduced glutamate production. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  14. Hyperpolarized [1-13C] glutamate: a metabolic imaging biomarker of IDH1 mutational status in glioma

    PubMed Central

    Chaumeil, Myriam M.; Larson, Peder E.Z.; Woods, Sarah M.; Cai, Larry; Eriksson, Pia; Robinson, Aaron E.; Lupo, Janine M.; Vigneron, Daniel B.; Nelson, Sarah J.; Pieper, Russell O.; Phillips, Joanna J.; Ronen, Sabrina M.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations of the isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) gene are among the most prevalent in low-grade glioma and secondary glioblastoma, represent an early pathogenic event, and are associated with epigenetically-driven modulations of metabolism. Of particular interest is the recently uncovered relationship between the IDH1 mutation and decreased activity of the branched-chain amino acid transaminase 1 (BCAT1) enzyme. Non-invasive imaging methods that can assess BCAT1 activity could therefore improve detection of mutant IDH1 tumors and aid in developing and monitoring new targeted therapies. BCAT1 catalyzes the transamination of branched-chain amino acids while converting α-ketoglutarate (α-KG) to glutamate. Our goal was to use 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy to probe the conversion of hyperpolarized [1-13C] α-KG to hyperpolarized [1-13C] glutamate as a readout of BCAT1 activity. We investigated two isogenic glioblastoma lines that differed only in their IDH1 status, and performed experiments in live cells and in vivo in rat orthotopic tumors. Following injection of hyperpolarized [1-13C] α-KG, hyperpolarized [1-13C] glutamate production was detected both in cells and in vivo, and the level of hyperpolarized [1-13C] glutamate was significantly lower in mutant IDH1 cells and tumors compared to their IDH1-wild-type counterparts. Importantly however, in our cells the observed drop in hyperpolarized [1-13C] glutamate was likely mediated not only by a drop in BCAT1 activity, but also by reductions in aspartate transaminase and glutamate dehydrogenase activities, suggesting additional metabolic reprogramming at least in our model. Hyperpolarized [1-13C] glutamate could thus inform on multiple mutant IDH1-associated metabolic events that mediate reduced glutamate production. PMID:24876103

  15. SUMOylation of the Hyperpolarization-Activated Cyclic Nucleotide-Gated Channel 2 Increases Surface Expression and the Maximal Conductance of the Hyperpolarization-Activated Current

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Anna R.; Welch, Meghyn A.; Forster, Lori A.; Tasneem, Sarah M.; Dubhashi, Janhavi A.; Baro, Deborah J.

    2017-01-01

    Small Ubiquitin-like Modifier (SUMO) is a ∼10 kDa peptide that can be post-translationally added to a lysine (K) on a target protein to facilitate protein–protein interactions. Recent studies have found that SUMOylation can be regulated in an activity-dependent manner and that ion channel SUMOylation can alter the biophysical properties and surface expression of the channel. Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channel surface expression can be regulated in an activity-dependent manner through unknown processes. We hypothesized that SUMOylation might influence the surface expression of HCN2 channels. In this manuscript, we show that HCN2 channels are SUMOylated in the mouse brain. Baseline levels of SUMOylation were also observed for a GFP-tagged HCN2 channel stably expressed in Human embryonic kidney (Hek) cells. Elevating GFP-HCN2 channel SUMOylation above baseline in Hek cells led to an increase in surface expression that augmented the hyperpolarization-activated current (Ih) mediated by these channels. Increased SUMOylation did not alter Ih voltage-dependence or kinetics of activation. There are five predicted intracellular SUMOylation sites on HCN2. Site-directed mutagenesis indicated that more than one K on the GFP-HCN2 channel was SUMOylated. Enhancing SUMOylation at one of the five predicted sites, K669, led to the increase in surface expression and Ih Gmax. The role of SUMOylation at additional sites is currently unknown. The SUMOylation site at K669 is also conserved in HCN1 channels. Aberrant SUMOylation has been linked to neurological diseases that also display alterations in HCN1 and HCN2 channel expression, such as seizures and Parkinson’s disease. This work is the first report that HCN channels can be SUMOylated and that this can regulate surface expression and Ih. PMID:28127275

  16. Demonstration of Heterogeneous Parahydrogen Induced Polarization Using Hyperpolarized Agent Migration from Dissolved Rh(I) Complex to Gas Phase

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Parahydrogen-induced polarization (PHIP) was used to demonstrate the concept that highly polarized, catalyst-free fluids can be obtained in a catalysis-free regime using a chemical reaction with molecular addition of parahydrogen to a water-soluble Rh(I) complex carrying a payload of compound with unsaturated (C=C) bonds. Hydrogenation of norbornadiene leads to formation of norbornene, which is eliminated from the Rh(I) complex and, therefore, leaves the aqueous phase and becomes a gaseous hyperpolarized molecule. The Rh(I) metal complex resides in the original liquid phase, while the product of hydrogen addition is found exclusively in the gaseous phase based on the affinity. Hyperpolarized norbornene 1H NMR signals observed in situ were enhanced by a factor of approximately 10 000 at a static field of 47.5 mT. High-resolution 1H NMR at a field of 9.4 T was used for ex situ detection of hyperpolarized norbornene in the gaseous phase, where a signal enhancement factor of approximately 160 was observed. This concept of stoichiometric as opposed to purely catalytic use of PHIP-available complexes with an unsaturated payload precursor molecule can be extended to other contrast agents for both homogeneous and heterogeneous PHIP. The Rh(I) complex was employed in aqueous medium suitable for production of hyperpolarized contrast agents for biomedical use. Detection of PHIP hyperpolarized gas by low-field NMR is demonstrated here for the first time. PMID:24918975

  17. Detection of inflammatory cell function using 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy of hyperpolarized [6-13C]-arginine

    PubMed Central

    Najac, Chloé; Chaumeil, Myriam M.; Kohanbash, Gary; Guglielmetti, Caroline; Gordon, Jeremy W.; Okada, Hideho; Ronen, Sabrina M.

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are highly prevalent inflammatory cells that play a key role in tumor development and are considered therapeutic targets. MDSCs promote tumor growth by blocking T-cell-mediated anti-tumoral immune response through depletion of arginine that is essential for T-cell proliferation. To deplete arginine, MDSCs express high levels of arginase, which catalyzes the breakdown of arginine into urea and ornithine. Here, we developed a new hyperpolarized 13C probe, [6-13C]-arginine, to image arginase activity. We show that [6-13C]-arginine can be hyperpolarized, and hyperpolarized [13C]-urea production from [6-13C]-arginine is linearly correlated with arginase concentration in vitro. Furthermore we show that we can detect a statistically significant increase in hyperpolarized [13C]-urea production in MDSCs when compared to control bone marrow cells. This increase was associated with an increase in intracellular arginase concentration detected using a spectrophotometric assay. Hyperpolarized [6-13C]-arginine could therefore serve to image tumoral MDSC function and more broadly M2-like macrophages. PMID:27507680

  18. Demonstration of heterogeneous parahydrogen induced polarization using hyperpolarized agent migration from dissolved Rh(I) complex to gas phase.

    PubMed

    Kovtunov, Kirill V; Barskiy, Danila A; Shchepin, Roman V; Coffey, Aaron M; Waddell, Kevin W; Koptyug, Igor V; Chekmenev, Eduard Y

    2014-07-01

    Parahydrogen-induced polarization (PHIP) was used to demonstrate the concept that highly polarized, catalyst-free fluids can be obtained in a catalysis-free regime using a chemical reaction with molecular addition of parahydrogen to a water-soluble Rh(I) complex carrying a payload of compound with unsaturated (C═C) bonds. Hydrogenation of norbornadiene leads to formation of norbornene, which is eliminated from the Rh(I) complex and, therefore, leaves the aqueous phase and becomes a gaseous hyperpolarized molecule. The Rh(I) metal complex resides in the original liquid phase, while the product of hydrogen addition is found exclusively in the gaseous phase based on the affinity. Hyperpolarized norbornene (1)H NMR signals observed in situ were enhanced by a factor of approximately 10,000 at a static field of 47.5 mT. High-resolution (1)H NMR at a field of 9.4 T was used for ex situ detection of hyperpolarized norbornene in the gaseous phase, where a signal enhancement factor of approximately 160 was observed. This concept of stoichiometric as opposed to purely catalytic use of PHIP-available complexes with an unsaturated payload precursor molecule can be extended to other contrast agents for both homogeneous and heterogeneous PHIP. The Rh(I) complex was employed in aqueous medium suitable for production of hyperpolarized contrast agents for biomedical use. Detection of PHIP hyperpolarized gas by low-field NMR is demonstrated here for the first time.

  19. Unmyelinated axons in the rat hippocampus hyperpolarize and activate an H current when spike frequency exceeds 1 Hz

    PubMed Central

    Soleng, A F; Chiu, K; Raastad, M

    2003-01-01

    The mammalian cortex is densely populated by extensively branching, thin, unmyelinated axons that form en passant synapses. Some thin axons in the peripheral nervous system hyperpolarize if action potential frequency exceeds 1-5 Hz. To test the hypothesis that cortical axons also show activity-induced hyperpolarization, we recorded extracellularly from individual CA3 pyramidal neurons while activating their axon with trains consisting of 30 electrical stimuli. Synaptic excitation was blocked by kynurenic acid. We observed a positive correlation between stimulation strength and the number of consecutive axonal stimuli that resulted in soma spikes, suggesting that the threshold increased as a function of the number of spikes. During trains without response failures there was always a cumulative increase in the soma response latency. Intermittent failures, however, decreased the latency of the subsequent response. At frequencies of > 1 Hz, the threshold and latency increases were enhanced by blocking the hyperpolarization-activated H current (Ih)by applying the specific Ih blocker ZD7288 (25 μM) or 2 mM Cs+. Under these conditions, response failures occurred after 15–25 stimuli, independent of the stimulation strength. Adding GABA receptor blockers (saclofen and bicuculline) and a blocker of metabotropic glutamate receptors did not change the activity-induced latency increase in recordings of the compound action potential. We interpret these results as an activity-induced hyperpolarization that is partly counteracted by Ih. Such a hyperpolarization may influence transmitter release and the conduction reliability of these axons. PMID:14561829

  20. A Large Volume Double Channel 1H-X RF Probe for Hyperpolarized Magnetic Resonance at 0.0475 Tesla

    PubMed Central

    Coffey, Aaron M.; Shchepin, Roman V.; Wilkens, Ken; Waddell, Kevin W.; Chekmenev, Eduard Y.

    2012-01-01

    In this work we describe a large volume 340 mL 1H-X magnetic resonance (MR) probe for studies of hyperpolarized compounds at 0.0475 T. 1H/13C and 1H/15N probe configurations are demonstrated with the potential for extension to 1H/129Xe. The primary applications of this probe are preparation and quality assurance of 13C and 15N hyperpolarized contrast agents using PASADENA (parahydrogen and synthesis allow dramatically enhanced nuclear alignment) and other parahydrogen-based methods of hyperpolarization. The probe is efficient and permits 62 μs 13C excitation pulses at 5.3 Watts, making it suitable for portable operation. The sensitivity and detection limits of this probe, tuned to 13C, are compared with a commercial radio frequency (RF) coil operating at 4.7 T. We demonstrate that low field MR of hyperpolarized contrast agents could be as sensitive as conventional high field detection and outline potential improvements and optimization of the probe design for preclinical in vivo MRI. PASADENA application of this low-power probe is exemplified with 13C hyperpolarized 2-hydroxyethyl propionate-1-13C,2,3,3-d3. PMID:22706029

  1. Long-Lived (13)C2 Nuclear Spin States Hyperpolarized by Parahydrogen in Reversible Exchange at Microtesla Fields.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zijian; Yu, Jin; Colell, Johannes F P; Laasner, Raul; Logan, Angus; Barskiy, Danila A; Shchepin, Roman V; Chekmenev, Eduard Y; Blum, Volker; Warren, Warren S; Theis, Thomas

    2017-07-06

    Parahydrogen is an inexpensive and readily available source of hyperpolarization used to enhance magnetic resonance signals by up to four orders of magnitude above thermal signals obtained at ∼10 T. A significant challenge for applications is fast signal decay after hyperpolarization. Here we use parahydrogen-based polarization transfer catalysis at microtesla fields (first introduced as SABRE-SHEATH) to hyperpolarize (13)C2 spin pairs and find decay time constants of 12 s for magnetization at 0.3 mT, which are extended to 2 min at that same field, when long-lived singlet states are hyperpolarized instead. Enhancements over thermal at 8.5 T are between 30 and 170 fold (0.02 to 0.12% polarization). We control the spin dynamics of polarization transfer by choice of microtesla field, allowing for deliberate hyperpolarization of either magnetization or long-lived singlet states. Density functional theory calculations and experimental evidence identify two energetically close mechanisms for polarization transfer: First, a model that involves direct binding of the (13)C2 pair to the polarization transfer catalyst and, second, a model transferring polarization through auxiliary protons in substrates.

  2. Crizotinib Inhibits Hyperpolarization-activated Cyclic Nucleotide-Gated Channel 4 Activity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhushan; Huang, Tai-Qin; Nepliouev, Igor; Zhang, Hengtao; Barnett, Adam S.; Rosenberg, Paul B.; Ou, Sai-Hong I.; Stiber, Jonathan A.

    2017-01-01

    Background Sinus bradycardia is frequently observed in patients treated with crizotinib, a receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor used for the treatment of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-rearranged non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We investigated whether crizotinib could influence heart rate (HR) through direct cardiac effects. Methods The direct effect of crizotinib on HR was studied using ECG analysis of Langendorff-perfused mouse hearts. The whole-cell patch clamp technique was used to measure the effects of crizotinib on the hyperpolarization-activated funny current, If, in mouse sinoatrial node cells (SANCs) and hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channel 4 (HCN4) activity in HEK-293 cells stably expressing human HCN4. Results Crizotinib resulted in a dose-dependent reduction in HR in isolated intact mouse hearts with a half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 1.7 ± 0.4 μmol/L. Because ECG analysis revealed that crizotinib (0–5 μmol/L) resulted in significant reductions in HR in isolated mouse hearts without changes in PR, QRS, or QT intervals, we performed whole-cell patch clamp recordings of SANCs which showed that crizotinib inhibited If which regulates cardiac pacemaker activity. Crizotinib resulted in diminished current density of HCN4, the major molecular determinant of If, with an IC50 of 1.4 ± 0.3 μmol/L. Crizotinib also slowed HCN4 activation and shifted the activation curve to the left towards more hyperpolarized potentials. Conclusions Our results suggest that crizotinib’s effects on HCN4 channels play a significant role in mediating its observed effects on HR. PMID:28217366

  3. Cardiac perfusion imaging using hyperpolarized 13c urea using flow sensitizing gradients

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Jack J.; Robson, Matthew D.; Tyler, Damian J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To demonstrate the feasibility of imaging the first passage of a bolus of hyperpolarized 13C urea through the rodent heart using flow‐sensitizing gradients to reduce signal from the blood pool. Methods A flow‐sensitizing bipolar gradient was optimized to reduce the bright signal within the cardiac chambers, enabling improved contrast of the agent within the tissue capillary bed. The gradient was incorporated into a dynamic golden angle spiral 13C imaging sequence. Healthy rats were scanned during rest (n = 3) and under adenosine stress‐induced hyperemia (n = 3). Results A two‐fold increase in myocardial perfusion relative to rest was detected during adenosine stress‐induced hyperemia, consistent with a myocardial perfusion reserve of two in rodents. Conclusion The new pulse sequence was used to obtain dynamic images of the first passage of hyperpolarized 13C urea in the rodent heart, without contamination from bright signal within the neighboring cardiac lumen. This probe of myocardial perfusion is expected to enable new hyperpolarized 13C studies in which the cardiac metabolism/perfusion mismatch can be identified. Magn Reson Med, 2015. © 2015 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Magn Reson Med 75:1474–1483, 2016. © 2015 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance. PMID:25991580

  4. A comparison of quantitative methods for clinical imaging with hyperpolarized (13)C-pyruvate.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Charlie J; McLean, Mary A; Schulte, Rolf F; Robb, Fraser J; Gill, Andrew B; McGlashan, Nicholas; Graves, Martin J; Schwaiger, Markus; Lomas, David J; Brindle, Kevin M; Gallagher, Ferdia A

    2016-04-01

    Dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) enables the metabolism of hyperpolarized (13)C-labelled molecules, such as the conversion of [1-(13)C]pyruvate to [1-(13)C]lactate, to be dynamically and non-invasively imaged in tissue. Imaging of this exchange reaction in animal models has been shown to detect early treatment response and correlate with tumour grade. The first human DNP study has recently been completed, and, for widespread clinical translation, simple and reliable methods are necessary to accurately probe the reaction in patients. However, there is currently no consensus on the most appropriate method to quantify this exchange reaction. In this study, an in vitro system was used to compare several kinetic models, as well as simple model-free methods. Experiments were performed using a clinical hyperpolarizer, a human 3 T MR system, and spectroscopic imaging sequences. The quantitative methods were compared in vivo by using subcutaneous breast tumours in rats to examine the effect of pyruvate inflow. The two-way kinetic model was the most accurate method for characterizing the exchange reaction in vitro, and the incorporation of a Heaviside step inflow profile was best able to describe the in vivo data. The lactate time-to-peak and the lactate-to-pyruvate area under the curve ratio were simple model-free approaches that accurately represented the full reaction, with the time-to-peak method performing indistinguishably from the best kinetic model. Finally, extracting data from a single pixel was a robust and reliable surrogate of the whole region of interest. This work has identified appropriate quantitative methods for future work in the analysis of human hyperpolarized (13)C data.

  5. Metabolism of hyperpolarized [1‐13C]pyruvate through alternate pathways in rat liver

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Karlos X.; Wang, Jian‐Xiong; Fidelino, Leila; Merritt, Matthew E.; Sherry, A. Dean; Malloy, Craig R.

    2016-01-01

    The source of hyperpolarized (HP) [13C]bicarbonate in the liver during metabolism of HP [1‐13C]pyruvate is uncertain and likely changes with physiology. Multiple processes including decarboxylation through pyruvate dehydrogenase or pyruvate carboxylase followed by subsequent decarboxylation via phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (gluconeogenesis) could play a role. Here we tested which metabolic fate of pyruvate contributed to the appearance of HP [13C]bicarbonate during metabolism of HP [1‐13C]pyruvate by the liver in rats after 21 h of fasting compared to rats with free access to food. The 13C NMR of HP [13C]bicarbonate was observed in the liver of fed rats, but not in fasted rats where pyruvate carboxylation and gluconeogenesis was active. To further explore the relative fluxes through pyruvate carboxylase versus pyruvate dehydrogenase in the liver under typical conditions of hyperpolarization studies, separate parallel experiments were performed with rats given non‐hyperpolarized [2,3‐13C]pyruvate. 13C NMR analysis of glutamate isolated from the liver of rats revealed that flux from injected pyruvate through pyruvate dehydrogenase was dominant under fed conditions whereas flux through pyruvate carboxylase dominated under fasted conditions. The NMR signal of HP [13C]bicarbonate does not parallel pyruvate carboxylase activity followed by subsequent decarboxylation reaction leading to glucose production. In the liver of healthy well‐fed rats, the appearance of HP [13C]bicarbonate exclusively reflects decarboxylation of HP [1‐13C]pyruvate via pyruvate dehydrogenase. © 2016 The Authors. NMR in Biomedicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:26836042

  6. Metabolism of hyperpolarized [1-(13)C]pyruvate through alternate pathways in rat liver.

    PubMed

    Jin, Eunsook S; Moreno, Karlos X; Wang, Jian-Xiong; Fidelino, Leila; Merritt, Matthew E; Sherry, A Dean; Malloy, Craig R

    2016-04-01

    The source of hyperpolarized (HP) [(13)C]bicarbonate in the liver during metabolism of HP [1-(13)C]pyruvate is uncertain and likely changes with physiology. Multiple processes including decarboxylation through pyruvate dehydrogenase or pyruvate carboxylase followed by subsequent decarboxylation via phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (gluconeogenesis) could play a role. Here we tested which metabolic fate of pyruvate contributed to the appearance of HP [(13)C]bicarbonate during metabolism of HP [1-(13)C]pyruvate by the liver in rats after 21 h of fasting compared to rats with free access to food. The (13)C NMR of HP [(13)C]bicarbonate was observed in the liver of fed rats, but not in fasted rats where pyruvate carboxylation and gluconeogenesis was active. To further explore the relative fluxes through pyruvate carboxylase versus pyruvate dehydrogenase in the liver under typical conditions of hyperpolarization studies, separate parallel experiments were performed with rats given non-hyperpolarized [2,3-(13)C]pyruvate. (13)C NMR analysis of glutamate isolated from the liver of rats revealed that flux from injected pyruvate through pyruvate dehydrogenase was dominant under fed conditions whereas flux through pyruvate carboxylase dominated under fasted conditions. The NMR signal of HP [(13)C]bicarbonate does not parallel pyruvate carboxylase activity followed by subsequent decarboxylation reaction leading to glucose production. In the liver of healthy well-fed rats, the appearance of HP [(13)C]bicarbonate exclusively reflects decarboxylation of HP [1-(13)C]pyruvate via pyruvate dehydrogenase.

  7. Hyperpolarized 13C Metabolic MRI of the Human Heart: Initial Experience.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Charles H; Lau, Justin Y C; Chen, Albert P; Geraghty, Benjamin J; Perks, William J; Roifman, Idan; Wright, Graham A; Connelly, Kim A

    2016-11-11

    Altered cardiac energetics is known to play an important role in the progression toward heart failure. A noninvasive method for imaging metabolic markers that could be used in longitudinal studies would be useful for understanding therapeutic approaches that target metabolism. To demonstrate the first hyperpolarized (13)C metabolic magnetic resonance imaging of the human heart. Four healthy subjects underwent conventional proton cardiac magnetic resonance imaging followed by (13)C imaging and spectroscopic acquisition immediately after intravenous administration of a 0.1 mmol/kg dose of hyperpolarized [1-(13)C]pyruvate. All subjects tolerated the procedure well with no adverse effects reported ≤1 month post procedure. The [1-(13)C]pyruvate signal appeared within the chambers but not within the muscle. Imaging of the downstream metabolites showed (13)C-bicarbonate signal mainly confined to the left ventricular myocardium, whereas the [1-(13)C]lactate signal appeared both within the chambers and in the myocardium. The mean (13)C image signal:noise ratio was 115 for [1-(13)C]pyruvate, 56 for (13)C-bicarbonate, and 53 for [1-(13)C]lactate. These results represent the first (13)C images of the human heart. The appearance of (13)C-bicarbonate signal after administration of hyperpolarized [1-(13)C]pyruvate was readily detected in this healthy cohort (n=4). This shows that assessment of pyruvate metabolism in vivo in humans is feasible using current technology. URL: https://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT02648009. © 2016 The Authors.

  8. Characteristics and physiological role of hyperpolarization activated currents in mouse cold thermoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Orio, Patricio; Madrid, Rodolfo; de la Peña, Elvira; Parra, Andrés; Meseguer, Víctor; Bayliss, Douglas A; Belmonte, Carlos; Viana, Félix

    2009-01-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated currents (Ih) are mediated by the expression of combinations of hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channel subunits (HCN1–4). These cation currents are key regulators of cellular excitability in the heart and many neurons in the nervous system. Subunit composition determines the gating properties and cAMP sensitivity of native Ih currents. We investigated the functional properties of Ih in adult mouse cold thermoreceptor neurons from the trigeminal ganglion, identified by their high sensitivity to moderate cooling and responsiveness to menthol. All cultured cold-sensitive (CS) neurons expressed a fast activating Ih, which was fully blocked by extracellular Cs+ or ZD7288 and had biophysical properties consistent with those of heteromeric HCN1–HCN2 channels. In CS neurons from HCN1(−/−) animals, Ih was greatly reduced but not abolished. We find that Ih activity is not essential for the transduction of cold stimuli in CS neurons. Nevertheless, Ih has the potential to shape the excitability of CS neurons. First, Ih blockade caused a membrane hyperpolarization in CS neurons of about 5 mV. Furthermore, impedance power analysis showed that all CS neurons had a prominent subthreshold membrane resonance in the 5–7 Hz range, completely abolished upon blockade of Ih and absent in HCN1 null mice. This frequency range matches the spontaneous firing frequency of cold thermoreceptor terminals in vivo. Behavioural responses to cooling were reduced in HCN1 null mice and after peripheral pharmacological blockade of Ih with ZD7288, suggesting that Ih plays an important role in peripheral sensitivity to cold. PMID:19273581

  9. [The role of hyperpolarization and depolarization of the membrane of the human spermatozoon].

    PubMed

    Salazar, E L; Macías, H; Calzada, L

    1991-10-01

    The electric potential across the membrane (psi) is evaluated through the accumulation of the lipophilic, radiolabelled, triphenylmethylphosphonium (3H-TPMP+), cation on membrane human sperm. The washed sperm cells, were incubated in presence of 3H-TPMP+ in low-K+ medium or high-K+ and allowed to take up the cation to steady-state (ie; 20 min at 37 degrees C). By using this differential, the value obtained was inserted in the Nernst equation, this value yielded a psi of -69 +/- 2 mV. The presence of divalent cations Zn++ and Mg++ in the incubation medium both induced a hyperpolarization of 10% and 8.6%, respectively. The addition of specific reagents such as p-chloromercuribenzene-sulfonate and ethylene-diamine-tetraacetic acid sodium salt both decreased the psi 35% and 58% respectively. The agents to act upon the components of the sperm cell membrane such as the dithiothreitol and progesterone induced hyperpolarization and depolarization of the membrane 16% and 40%, respectively. The presence of propranolol and L-alpha-lysophosphatidylcholine, which affect the ionic gradients present across the plasma membrane, both induced a depolarization from 43% and 92% respectively. Finally, the addition of tetraphenylboron (TPB-) on the incubation medium, enhanced the value of the psi 75%. These studies are transcendent because with the utilization of agents depolarizing, or hyperpolarizing we obtain changes in the psi from -80 +/- 0.6 mV, until -6 +/- 0.6 mV changes of 74 +/- 1.5 mV across of the sperm cell membrane.

  10. Inhibition of the hyperpolarization-activated current (if) of rabbit SA node myocytes by niflumic acid.

    PubMed

    Accili, E A; DiFrancesco, D

    1996-03-01

    The effects of the amphiphilic substance niflumic acid (NFA) were examined in myocytes isolated from the sino-atrial node of the rabbit heart. NFA (50 and 500 microM), for 30-60 s, produced a reversible negative chronotropic effect by reducing the rate of diastolic depolarization, suggesting an inhibitory effect on the hyperpolarization-activated pacemaker current (if). NFA (from 0.05 to 500 microM) inhibited if by modifying the current kinetics, without alteration of the conductance. This was shown by evidence indicating that: (1) NFA inhibited if during hyperpolarizing pulses to the mid-point of if activation but not at fully activating voltages; (2) the slope and reversal potential of the fully activated current/voltage (I/V) relation were not altered by NFA, indicating no change in slope conductance or ion selectivity; and (3) hyperpolarizing ramp protocols confirmed the lack of action of 50 microM NFA on the fully activated current and a shift of approximately -8 mV. Although similar to inhibition by acetylcholine (ACh), inhibition by NFA was only partly additive with the action of ACh and was not altered by atropine or pertussis toxin, both of which eliminated the action of ACh. The effect of NFA was present after stimulation of adenylate cyclase by forskolin and after inhibition of phosphodiesterase by isobutylmethylxanthine (IBMX). In cell-attached patch measurements, NFA applied externally did not affect if measured in the patch. Finally, application of NFA to the cytoplasmic side of excised patches did not alter the current in the absence or presence of adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP). These results suggest an external, membrane-delimited action of NFA on if.

  11. Hyperpolarized (3) He and (129) Xe MRI: differences in asthma before bronchodilation.

    PubMed

    Svenningsen, Sarah; Kirby, Miranda; Starr, Danielle; Leary, Del; Wheatley, Andrew; Maksym, Geoffrey N; McCormack, David G; Parraga, Grace

    2013-12-01

    To compare hyperpolarized helium-3 ((3) He) and xenon-129 ((129) Xe) MRI in asthmatics before and after salbutamol inhalation. Seven asthmatics provided written informed consent and underwent spirometry, plethysmography, and MRI before and after salbutamol inhalation. (3) He and (129) Xe ventilation defect percent (VDP) and ventilation coefficient of variation (COV) were measured. To characterize the airways spatially related to ventilation defects, wall area percent (WA%) and lumen area (LA) were evaluated for two subjects who had thoracic x-ray computed tomography (CT) acquired 1 year before MRI. Before salbutamol inhalation, (129) Xe VDP (8 ± 5%) was significantly greater than (3) He VDP (6 ± 5%, P = 0.003). Post-salbutamol, there was a significant improvement in both (129) Xe (5 ± 4%, P < 0.0001) and (3) He (4 ± 3%, P = 0.001) VDP, and the improvement in (129) Xe VDP was significantly greater (P = 0.008). (129) Xe MRI COV (Pre: 0.309 ± 0.028, Post: 0.296 ± 0.036) was significantly greater than (3) He MRI COV (Pre: 0.282 ± 0.018, Post: 0.269 ± 0.024), pre- (P < 0.0001) and post-salbutamol (P < 0.0001) and the decrease in COV post-salbutamol was significant ((129) Xe, P = 0.002; (3) He, P < 0.0001). For a single asthmatic, a sub-segmental (129) Xe MRI ventilation defect that was visible only before salbutamol inhalation but not visible using (3) He MRI was spatially related to a remodeled fourth generation sub-segmental airway (WA% = 78%, LA = 2.9 mm(2) ). In asthma, hyperpolarized (129) Xe MRI may help reveal ventilation abnormalities before bronchodilation that are not observed using hyperpolarized (3) He MRI. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Nuclear spin imaging with hyperpolarized nuclei created by brute force method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Masayoshi; Kunimatsu, Takayuki; Fujiwara, Mamoru; Kohri, Hideki; Ohta, Takeshi; Utsuro, Masahiko; Yosoi, Masaru; Ono, Satoshi; Fukuda, Kohji; Takamatsu, Kunihiko; Ueda, Kunihiro; Didelez, Jean-P.; Prossati, Giorgio; de Waard, Arlette

    2011-05-01

    We have been developing a polarized HD target for particle physics at the SPring-8 under the leadership of the RCNP, Osaka University for the past 5 years. Nuclear polarizaton is created by means of the brute force method which uses a high magnetic field (~17 T) and a low temperature (~ 10 mK). As one of the promising applications of the brute force method to life sciences we started a new project, "NSI" (Nuclear Spin Imaging), where hyperpolarized nuclei are used for the MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging). The candidate nuclei with spin ½hslash are 3He, 13C, 15N, 19F, 29Si, and 31P, which are important elements for the composition of the biomolecules. Since the NMR signals from these isotopes are enhanced by orders of magnitudes, the spacial resolution in the imaging would be much more improved compared to the practical MRI used so far. Another advantage of hyperpolarized MRI is that the MRI is basically free from the radiation, while the problems of radiation exposure caused by the X-ray CT or PET (Positron Emission Tomography) cannot be neglected. In fact, the risk of cancer for Japanese due to the radiation exposure through these diagnoses is exceptionally high among the advanced countries. As the first step of the NSI project, we are developing a system to produce hyperpolarized 3He gas for the diagnosis of serious lung diseases, for example, COPD (Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease). The system employs the same 3He/4He dilution refrigerator and superconducting solenoidal coil as those used for the polarized HD target with some modification allowing the 3He Pomeranchuk cooling and the following rapid melting of the polarized solid 3He to avoid the depolarization. In this report, the present and future steps of our project will be outlined with some latest experimental results.

  13. Hyperpolarized 129Xe magnetic resonance imaging of a rat model of transient Ischemic Stroke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walvick, Ronn P.; Bastan, Birgul; Reno, Austin; Mansour, Joey; Sun, Yanping; Zhou, Xin; Mazzani, Mary; Fisher, Marc; Sotak, Christopher H.; Albert, Mitchell S.

    2009-02-01

    Ischemic stroke accounts for nearly 80% of all stroke cases. Although proton diffusion and perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are the gold standards in ischemic stroke diagnostics, the use of hyperpolarized 129Xe MRI has a potential role to contribute to the diagnostic picture. The highly lipophilic hyperpolarized 129Xe can be non-invasively delivered via inhalation into the lungs where it is dissolved into the blood and delivered to other organs such as the brain. As such, we expect hyperpolarized 129Xe to act as a perfusion tracer which will result in a signal deficit in areas of blood deprived tissue. In this work, we present imaging results from an animal model of transient ischemic stroke characterized through 129Xe MRI. In this model, a suture is used to occlude the middle cerebral artery (MCA) in the rat brain, thus causing an ischemic event. After a period of MCA occlusion, the suture can then be removed to reperfuse the ischemic area. During the ischemic phase of the stroke, a signal void was observed in the MCA territory; which was subsequently restored by normal 129Xe MRI signal once perfusion was reinstated. Further, a higher resolution one-dimensional chemical shift image shows a sharp signal drop in the area of ischemia. Validation of ischemic damage was shown through both proton diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) and by 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazoliumchloride (TTC) staining. The results show the potential of 129Xe to act as a perfusion tracer; information that may add to the diagnostic and prognostic utility of the clinical picture of stroke.

  14. Boron Induces Hyperpolarization of Sunflower Root Cell Membranes and Increases Membrane Permeability to K+1

    PubMed Central

    Schon, Mary K.; Novacky, Anton; Blevins, Dale G.

    1990-01-01

    Although many studies have alluded to a role for boron (B) in membrane function, there is little evidence for a direct effect of B on the plasmalemma of higher plant cells. These studies were conducted to demonstrate, by electrophysiological techniques, a direct effect of B on the membrane potential (Em) of sunflower (Helianthus annuus [L.], cv Mammoth Grey Stripe) root tip cells and to determine if the response to B occurs rapidly enough to account for the previously observed effects of B on ion uptake. By inserting a glass microelectrode into an individual cell in the root tip, the Em of the cell was determined in basal salt medium (BSM), pH 6.0. The perfusion solution surrounding the root tissue was then changed to BSM + 50 micromolar H3BO3, pH 6.0. The exposure to B induced a significant plasmalemma hyperpolarization in sunflower root cells within 20 minutes. After just 3 minutes of exposure to B, the change in Em was already significantly different from the negligible change in Em observed over time in root cells never exposed to B. Membrane hyperpolarization could be caused by a stimulation of the proton pump or by a change in the conductance of one or more permeable ions. Since B has been shown to affect K+ uptake by plants, the electrophysiological techniques described above were used to determine if B has an effect on membrane permeability to K+, and could thereby lead to an increased diffusion potential. When sunflower root tips were pretreated in 50 micromolar B for 2 hours, cell membranes exhibited a significantly greater depolarization with each 10-fold increase in external [K+] than minus-B cells. Subsequent studies demonstrated that the depolarization due to increased external [K+] was also significantly greater when tissue was exposed to B at the same time as the 10-fold increase in [K+], indicating that the effect of B on K+ permeability was immediate. Analysis of sunflower root tips demonstrated that treatment in 50 micromolar B caused a

  15. Rapid longitudinal relaxation measurement of hyperpolarized 129Xe by a highly sensitive atomic magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yingying; Wang, Zhiguo; Jin, Shilong; Yuan, Jie; Zhao, Hongchang; Luo, Hui

    2017-02-01

    A fast and accurate determination of longitudinal relaxation time is put forward for hyperpolarized 129Xe. The theoretical framework for the method is developed. Measurement of the longitudinal relaxation time is by the determination of a close-loop response of 129Xe magnetization to the external magnetic fields and is implemented with a highly sensitive Rb magnetometer. The indirect measurement dramatically reduces the time consuming than the conventional inversion-recovery method and is more suitable for the samples with long longitudinal relaxation time.

  16. T1 nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion of hyperpolarized sodium and cesium hydrogencarbonate-(13) C.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Santiesteban, Francisco M; Dang, Thien Phuoc; Lim, Heeseung; Chen, Albert P; Scholl, Timothy J

    2017-09-01

    In vivo pH mapping in tissue using hyperpolarized hydrogencarbonate-(13) C has been proposed as a method to study tumor growth and treatment and other pathological conditions related to pH changes. The finite spin-lattice relaxation times (T1 ) of hyperpolarized media are a significant limiting factor for in vivo imaging. Relaxation times can be measured at standard magnetic fields (1.5 T, 3.0 T etc.), but no such data are available at low fields, where T1 values can be significantly shorter. This information is required to determine the potential loss of polarization as the agent is dispensed and transported from the polarizer to the MRI scanner. The purpose of this study is to measure T1 dispersion from low to clinical magnetic fields (0.4 mT to 3.0 T) of different hyperpolarized hydrogencarbonate formulations previously proposed in the literature for in vivo pH measurements. (13) C-enriched cesium and sodium hydrogencarbonate preparations were hyperpolarized using dynamic nuclear polarization, and the T1 values of different samples were measured at different magnetic field strengths using a fast field-cycling relaxometer and a 3.0 T clinical MRI system. The effects of deuterium oxide as a dissolution medium for sodium hydrogencarbonate were also analyzed. This study finds that the cesium formulation has slightly shorter T1 values compared with the sodium preparation. However, the higher solubility of cesium hydrogencarbonate-(13) C means it can be polarized at greater concentration, using less trityl radical than sodium hydrogencarbonate-(13) C. This study also establishes that the preparation and handling of sodium hydrogencarbonate formulations in relation to cesium hydrogencarbonate is more difficult, due to the higher viscosity and lower achievable concentrations, and that deuterium oxide significantly increases the T1 of sodium hydrogencarbonate solutions. Finally, this work also investigates the influence of pH on the spin-lattice relaxation of cesium

  17. Development and testing of hyperpolarized 13C MR calibrationless parallel imaging

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yesu; Gordon, Jeremy W.; Shin, Peter J.; von Morze, Cornelius; Lustig, Michael; Larson, Peder E.Z.; Ohliger, Michael A.; Carvajal, Lucas; Tropp, James; Pauly, John M.; Vigneron, Daniel B.

    2016-01-01

    A calibrationless parallel imaging technique developed previously for 1H MRI was modified and tested for hyperpolarized 13C MRI for applications requiring large FOV and high spatial resolution. The technique was demonstrated with both retrospective and prospective under-sampled data acquired in phantom and in vivo rat studies. A 2-fold acceleration was achieved using a 2D symmetric EPI readout equipped with random blips on the phase encode dimension. Reconstructed images showed excellent qualitative agreement with fully sampled data. Further acceleration can be achieved using acquisition schemes that incorporate multi-dimensional under-sampling. PMID:26679288

  18. Hyperpolarized (3)He pulmonary functional magnetic resonance imaging prior to radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Lindsay; Vandyk, Jake; Etemad-Rezai, Roya; Rodrigues, George; Parraga, Grace

    2012-07-01

    Radiation-induced lung injury (RILI) is the primary dose-limiting toxicity for radiation therapy of the lung, and although the effects of radiation dose on RILI development have been well characterized, the influence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) on the development of RILI and other outcomes is not well understood. The purpose of this small pilot study was to evaluate the relationship between hyperpolarized (3)He magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurements of COPD with RILI and 12-month survival in lung cancer patients undergoing radical radiotherapy and to evaluate the feasibility of pulmonary functional MRI as an image guidance∕planning tool for radiation therapy. Fifteen non-small cell and small cell lung cancer patients underwent pulmonary function tests, x-ray computed tomography (CT), and hyperpolarized (3)He MRI prior to radical radiation therapy (≥60 Gy). Conventional thoracic (1)H and hyperpolarized (3)He MRI were acquired to generate ventilation defect percent and the apparent diffusion coefficient for the ipsilateral and contralateral lungs independently. CT was acquired postradiation therapy and qualitatively evaluated for radiological evidence of RILI and 12-month survival was reported. Hyperpolarized (3)He MRI measurements of COPD classified 10∕15 subjects with contralateral lung COPD (CLC), and five subjects without COPD [contralateral lung normal (CLN)]. Of the 10 subjects with CLC, only four had a previous clinical diagnosis of COPD. CT images were acquired postradiation therapy for 13 subjects, and for eight (62%) of these there was qualitative evidence of RILI, including 5∕9 CLC and 3∕4 CLN subjects. The one-year survival was 2∕10 for CLC and 3∕5 for CLN subjects. In this small pilot study, we report the use of (3)He MRI to stratify lung cancer patients based on MRI evidence of COPD and showed that comorbid COPD was present in the majority of lung cancer subjects stratified for radiation therapy. Lung cancer

  19. In vivo detection of cucurbit[6]uril, a hyperpolarized xenon contrast agent for a xenon magnetic resonance imaging biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hane, Francis T.; Li, Tao; Smylie, Peter; Pellizzari, Raiili M.; Plata, Jennifer A.; Deboef, Brenton; Albert, Mitchell S.

    2017-01-01

    The Hyperpolarized gas Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer (HyperCEST) Magnetic Resonance (MR) technique has the potential to increase the sensitivity of a hyperpolarized xenon-129 MRI contrast agent. Signal enhancement is accomplished by selectively depolarizing the xenon within a cage molecule which, upon exchange, reduces the signal in the dissolved phase pool. Herein we demonstrate the in vivo detection of the cucurbit[6]uril (CB6) contrast agent within the vasculature of a living rat. Our work may be used as a stepping stone towards using the HyperCEST technique as a molecular imaging modality.

  20. In vivo detection of cucurbit[6]uril, a hyperpolarized xenon contrast agent for a xenon magnetic resonance imaging biosensor

    PubMed Central

    Hane, Francis T.; Li, Tao; Smylie, Peter; Pellizzari, Raiili M.; Plata, Jennifer A.; DeBoef, Brenton; Albert, Mitchell S.

    2017-01-01

    The Hyperpolarized gas Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer (HyperCEST) Magnetic Resonance (MR) technique has the potential to increase the sensitivity of a hyperpolarized xenon-129 MRI contrast agent. Signal enhancement is accomplished by selectively depolarizing the xenon within a cage molecule which, upon exchange, reduces the signal in the dissolved phase pool. Herein we demonstrate the in vivo detection of the cucurbit[6]uril (CB6) contrast agent within the vasculature of a living rat. Our work may be used as a stepping stone towards using the HyperCEST technique as a molecular imaging modality. PMID:28106110

  1. BI-07HYPERPOLARIZED [1-13C] GLUTAMATE: A METABOLIC IMAGING BIOMARKER OF IDH1 MUTATIONAL STATUS IN GLIOMA

    PubMed Central

    Chaumeil, Myriam; Larson, Peder; Woods, Sarah; Cai, Larry; Eriksson, Pia; Robinson, Aaron; Lupo, Janine; Vigneron, Daniel; Nelson, Sarah; Pieper, Russell; Phillips, Joanna; Ronen, Sabrina

    2014-01-01

    Mutations of the isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) gene are among the most prevalent in low-grade glioma and secondary glioblastoma, represent an early pathogenic event and are being considered a promising therapeutic target. Consequently, non-invasive imaging methods are needed to monitor IDH1 status. Amongst these, we previously demonstrated the use of 13C MR spectroscopic imaging of hyperpolarized [1-13C] α-ketoglutarate (α-KG) to non-invasively assess IDH1 status through the detection of the conversion of hyperpolarized α-ketoglutarate to 2-hydroxyglutarate (2-HG) catalyzed by mutant IDH1. Importantly, in addition to its oncogenic role, IDH1 mutation is also associated with global modulations in metabolism. Interestingly, a study recently uncovered a relationship between presence of IDH1 mutation and decreased activity of the branched chained amino acid transaminase 1 (BCAT1) enzyme, which transaminates amino acids while converting α-KG to glutamate. Given this new study, we decided to expand on our previous findings and investigated the potential of hyperpolarized α-KG as an imaging probe to monitor BCAT1-driven α-KG-to-glutamate conversion and its modulation in the presence of IDH1 mutation. We investigated two isogenic glioblastoma lines that differed only in their IDH1 status, and performed experiments in live cells and in vivo in rat orthotopic tumors. Following injection of hyperpolarized α-KG, hyperpolarized glutamate production was detected both in cells and in vivo, and the level of hyperpolarized glutamate was significantly lower in mutant IDH1 cells and tumors compared to their IDH1-wild-type counterparts. Importantly however, the observed drop in hyperpolarized glutamate was likely mediated not only by a drop in BCAT1 activity, but also by reductions in aspartate transaminase and glutamate dehydrogenase activities, suggesting additional metabolic reprogramming at least in our model. Hyperpolarized glutamate could thus inform on multiple

  2. Alterations in endothelium-dependent hyperpolarization and relaxation in mesenteric arteries from streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Fukao, Mitsuhiro; Hattori, Yuichi; Kanno, Morio; Sakuma, Ichiro; Kitabatake, Akira

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether endothelium-dependent hyperpolarization and relaxation are altered during experimental diabetes mellitus. Membrane potentials were recorded in mesenteric arteries from rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes and age-matched controls. The resting membrane potentials were not significantly different between control and diabetic mesenteric arteries (−55.3±0.5 vs −55.6±0.4 mV). However, endothelium-dependent hyperpolarization produced by acetylcholine (ACh; 10−8–10−5 M) was significantly diminished in amplitude in diabetic arteries compared with that in controls (maximum −10.4±1.1 vs −17.2±0.8 mV). Furthermore, the hyperpolarizing responses of diabetic arteries were more transient. ACh-induced hyperpolarization observed in control and diabetic arteries remained unaltered even after treatment with 3×10−4 M NG-nitro-L-arginine (L-NOARG), 10−5 M indomethacin or 60 u ml−1 superoxide dismutase. Endothelium-dependent hyperpolarization with 10−6 M A23187, a calcium ionophore, was also decreased in diabetic arteries compared to controls (−8.3±1.4 vs −18.0±1.9 mV). However, endothelium-independent hyperpolarizing responses to 10−6 M pinacidil, a potassium channel opener, were similar in control and diabetic arteries (−20.0±1.4 vs −19.2±1.1 mV). The altered endothelium-dependent hyperpolarizations in diabetic arteries were almost completely prevented by insulin therapy. Endothelium-dependent relaxations by ACh in the presence of 10−4 M L-NOARG and 10−5 M indomethacin in diabetic arteries were also reduced and more transient compared to controls. These data indicate that endothelium-dependent hyperpolarization is reduced by diabetes, and this would, in part, account for the impaired endothelium-dependent relaxations in mesenteric arteries from diabetic rats. PMID:9257918

  3. Sensory deprivation regulates the development of the hyperpolarization-activated current in auditory brainstem neurons.

    PubMed

    Hassfurth, Benjamin; Magnusson, Anna K; Grothe, Benedikt; Koch, Ursula

    2009-10-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated and cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels are highly expressed in the superior olivary complex, the primary locus for binaural information processing. This hyperpolarization-activated current (I(h)) regulates the excitability of neurons and enhances the temporally precise analysis of the binaural acoustic cues. By using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique, we examined the properties of I(h) current in neurons of the lateral superior olive (LSO) and the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB) before and after hearing onset. Moreover, we tested the hypothesis that I(h) currents are actively regulated by sensory input activity by performing bilateral and unilateral cochlear ablations before hearing onset, resulting in a chronic auditory deprivation. The results show that after hearing onset, I(h) currents are rapidly upregulated in LSO neurons, but change only marginally in neurons of the MNTB. We also found a striking difference in maximal current density, voltage dependence and activation time constant between the LSO and the MNTB in mature-like animals. Following bilateral cochlear ablations before hearing onset, the I(h) currents were scaled up in the LSO and scaled down in the MNTB. Consequently, in the LSO this resulted in a depolarized resting membrane potential and a lower input resistance of these neurons. This type of activity-dependent homeostatic change could thus result in an augmented response to the remaining inputs.

  4. Hyperpolarization induces a long-term increase in the spontaneous firing rate of cerebellar Golgi cells.

    PubMed

    Hull, Court A; Chu, YunXiang; Thanawala, Monica; Regehr, Wade G

    2013-04-03

    Golgi cells (GoCs) are inhibitory interneurons that influence the cerebellar cortical response to sensory input by regulating the excitability of the granule cell layer. While GoC inhibition is essential for normal motor coordination, little is known about the circuit dynamics that govern the activity of these cells. In particular, although GoC spontaneous spiking influences the extent of inhibition and gain throughout the granule cell layer, it is not known whether this spontaneous activity can be modulated in a long-term manner. Here we describe a form of long-term plasticity that regulates the spontaneous firing rate of GoCs in the rat cerebellar cortex. We find that membrane hyperpolarization, either by mGluR2 activation of potassium channels, or by somatic current injection, induces a long-lasting increase in GoC spontaneous firing. This spike rate plasticity appears to result from a strong reduction in the spike after hyperpolarization. Pharmacological manipulations suggest the involvement of calcium-calmodulin-dependent kinase II and calcium-activated potassium channels in mediating these firing rate increases. As a consequence of this plasticity, GoC spontaneous spiking is selectively enhanced, but the gain of evoked spiking is unaffected. Hence, this plasticity is well suited for selectively regulating the tonic output of GoCs rather than their sensory-evoked responses.

  5. Optimizing water hyperpolarization and dissolution for sensitivity-enhanced 2D biomolecular NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, Greg; Markhasin, Evgeny; Szekely, Or; Bretschneider, Christian; Frydman, Lucio

    2016-03-01

    A recent study explored the use of hyperpolarized water, to enhance the sensitivity of nuclei in biomolecules thanks to rapid proton exchanges with labile amide backbone and sidechain groups. Further optimizations of this approach have now allowed us to achieve proton polarizations approaching 25% in the water transferred into the NMR spectrometer, effective water T1 times approaching 40 s, and a reduction in the dilution demanded for the cryogenic dissolution process. Further hardware developments have allowed us to perform these experiments, repeatedly and reliably, in 5 mm NMR tubes. All these ingredients - particularly the ⩾3000× 1H polarization enhancements over 11.7 T thermal counterparts, long T1 times and a compatibility with high-resolution biomolecular NMR setups - augur well for hyperpolarized 2D NMR studies of peptides, unfolded proteins and intrinsically disordered systems undergoing fast exchanges of their protons with the solvent. This hypothesis is here explored by detailing the provisions that lead to these significant improvements over previous reports, and demonstrating 1D coherence transfer experiments and 2D biomolecular HMQC acquisitions delivering NMR spectral enhancements of 100-500× over their optimized, thermally-polarized, counterparts.

  6. Hyperpolarized noble gas magnetic resonance imaging of the animal lung: Approaches and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santyr, Giles E.; Lam, Wilfred W.; Parra-Robles, Juan M.; Taves, Timothy M.; Ouriadov, Alexei V.

    2009-05-01

    Hyperpolarized noble gas (HNG) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is a very promising noninvasive tool for the investigation of animal models of lung disease, particularly to follow longitudinal changes in lung function and anatomy without the accumulated radiation dose associated with x rays. The two most common noble gases for this purpose are H3e (helium 3) and X129e (xenon 129), the latter providing a cost-effective approach for clinical applications. Hyperpolarization is typically achieved using spin-exchange optical pumping techniques resulting in ˜10 000-fold improvement in available magnetization compared to conventional Boltzmann polarizations. This substantial increase in polarization allows high spatial resolution (<1 mm) single-slice images of the lung to be obtained with excellent temporal resolution (<1 s). Complete three-dimensional images of the lungs with 1 mm slice thickness can be obtained within reasonable breath-hold intervals (<20 s). This article provides an overview of the current methods used in HNG MR imaging with an emphasis on ventilation studies in animals. Special MR hardware and software considerations are described in order to use the strong but nonrecoverable magnetization as efficiently as possible and avoid depolarization primarily by molecular oxygen. Several applications of HNG MR imaging are presented, including measurement of gross lung anatomy (e.g., airway diameters), microscopic anatomy (e.g., apparent diffusion coefficient), and a variety of functional parameters including dynamic ventilation, alveolar oxygen partial pressure, and xenon diffusing capacity.

  7. Dynamic UltraFast 2D EXchange SpectroscopY (UF-EXSY) of hyperpolarized substrates

    PubMed Central

    Swisher, Christine Leon; Koelsch, Bertram; Sukumar, Subramianam; Sriram, Renuka; Santos, Romelyn Delos; Wang, Zhen Jane; Kurhanewicz, John; Vigneron, Daniel; Larson, Peder

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we present a new ultrafast method for acquiring dynamic 2D EXchange SpectroscopY (EXSY) within a single acquisition. This technique reconstructs two-dimensional EXSY spectra from one-dimensional spectra based on the phase accrual during echo times. The Ultrafast-EXSY acquisition overcomes long acquisition times typically needed to acquire 2D NMR data by utilizing sparsity and phase dependence to dramatically undersample in the indirect time dimension. This allows for the acquisition of the 2D spectrum within a single shot. We have validated this method in simulations and hyperpolarized enzyme assay experiments separating the dehydration of pyruvate and lactate-to-pyruvate conversion. In a renal cell carcinoma cell (RCC) line, bidirectional exchange was observed. This new technique revealed decreased conversion of lactate-to-pyruvate with high expression of monocarboxylate transporter 4 (MCT4), known to correlate with aggressive cancer phenotypes. We also showed feasibility of this technique in vivo in a RCC model where bidirectional exchange was observed for pyruvate–lactate, pyruvate–alanine, and pyruvate–hydrate and were resolved in time. Broadly, the technique is well suited to investigate the dynamics of multiple exchange pathways and applicable to hyperpolarized substrates where chemical exchange has shown great promise across a range of disciplines. PMID:26117655

  8. Quantification of rate constants for successive enzymatic reactions with DNP hyperpolarized MR.

    PubMed

    Allouche-Arnon, Hyla; Hovav, Yonatan; Friesen-Waldner, Lanette; Sosna, Jacob; Moshe Gomori, J; Vega, Shimon; Katz-Brull, Rachel

    2014-06-01

    A kinetic model is provided to obtain reaction rate constants in successive enzymatic reactions that are monitored using NMR spectroscopy and hyperpolarized substrates. The model was applied for simulation and analysis of the successive oxidation of choline to betaine aldehyde, and further to betaine, by the enzyme choline oxidase. This enzymatic reaction was investigated under two different sets of conditions: two different choline molecular probes were used, [1,1,2,2-D4 , 1-(13) C]choline chloride and [1,1,2,2-D4 , 2-(13) C]choline chloride, in different MR systems (clinical scanner and high-resolution spectrometer), as well as in different reactors and reaction volumes (4.8 and 0.7 mL). The kinetic analysis according to the model yielded similar results in both set-ups, supporting the robustness of the model. This was achieved despite the complex and negating influences of reaction kinetics and polarization decay, and in the presence of uncontrolled mixing characteristics, which may introduce uncertainties in both effective timing and effective pulses. The ability to quantify rate constants using hyperpolarized MR in the first seconds of consecutive enzyme activity is important for further development of the utilization of dynamic nuclear polarization-MR for biological determinations.

  9. Pathological impact of hyperpolarization-activated chloride current peculiar to rat pulmonary vein cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Yosuke; Kawamura, Koichi; Nakamura, Yuta; Ono, Kyoichi

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary veins (PVs) are believed to be a crucial origin of atrial fibrillation. We recently reported that rat PV cardiomyocytes exhibit arrhythmogenic automaticity in response to norepinephrine. Herein, we further characterized the electrophysiological properties underlying the potential arrhythmogenicity of PV cardiomyocytes. Patch clamping studies revealed a time dependent hyperpolarization-activated inward current in rat PV cardiomyocytes, but not in left atrial (LA) myocytes. The current was Cs(+) resistant, and was not affected by removal of external Na(+) or K(+). The current was inhibited with Cd(2+), and the reversal potential was sensitive to changes in [Cl(-)] on either side of the membrane in a manner consistent with a Cl(-) selective channel. Cl(-) channel blockers attenuated the current, and slowed or completely inhibited the norepinephrine-induced automaticity. The biophysical properties of the hyperpolarization-activated Cl(-) current in rat PVs were different from those of ClC-2 currents previously reported: (i) the voltage-dependent activation of the Cl(-) current in rat PVs was shifted to negative potentials as [Cl(-)]i increased, (ii) the Cl(-) current was enhanced by extracellular acidification, and (iii) extracellular hyper-osmotic stress increased the current, whereas hypo-osmotic cell swelling suppressed the current. qPCR analysis revealed negligible ClC-2 mRNA expression in the rat PV. These findings suggest that rat PV cardiomyocytes possess a peculiar voltage-dependent Cl(-) channel, and that the channel may play a functional role in norepinephrine-induced automaticity.

  10. Hyperpolarization-Activated Current, I f, in Mathematical Models of Rabbit Sinoatrial Node Pacemaker Cells

    PubMed Central

    Verkerk, Arie O.

    2013-01-01

    A typical feature of sinoatrial (SA) node pacemaker cells is the presence of an ionic current that activates upon hyperpolarization. The role of this hyperpolarization-activated current, I f, which is also known as the “funny current” or “pacemaker current,” in the spontaneous pacemaker activity of SA nodal cells remains a matter of intense debate. Whereas some conclude that I f plays a fundamental role in the generation of pacemaker activity and its rate control, others conclude that the role of I f is limited to a modest contribution to rate control. The ongoing debate is often accompanied with arguments from computer simulations, either to support one's personal view or to invalidate that of the antagonist. In the present paper, we review the various mathematical descriptions of I f that have been used in computer simulations and compare their strikingly different characteristics with our experimental data. We identify caveats and propose a novel model for I f based on our experimental data. PMID:23936852

  11. High-throughput hyperpolarized (13)C metabolic investigations using a multi-channel acquisition system.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jaehyuk; Ramirez, Marc S; Walker, Christopher M; Chen, Yunyun; Yi, Stacey; Sandulache, Vlad C; Lai, Stephen Y; Bankson, James A

    2015-11-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy of hyperpolarized (HP) compounds such as [1-(13)C]-pyruvate have shown tremendous potential for offering new insight into disease and response to therapy. New applications of this technology in clinical research and care will require extensive validation in cells and animal models, a process that may be limited by the high cost and modest throughput associated with dynamic nuclear polarization. Relatively wide spectral separation between [1-(13)C]-pyruvate and its chemical endpoints in vivo are conducive to simultaneous multi-sample measurements, even in the presence of a suboptimal global shim. Multi-channel acquisitions could conserve costs and accelerate experiments by allowing acquisition from multiple independent samples following a single dissolution. Unfortunately, many existing preclinical MRI systems are equipped with only a single channel for broadband acquisitions. In this work, we examine the feasibility of this concept using a broadband multi-channel digital receiver extension and detector arrays that allow concurrent measurement of dynamic spectroscopic data from ex vivo enzyme phantoms, in vitro anaplastic thyroid carcinoma cells, and in vivo in tumor-bearing mice. Throughput and the cost of consumables were improved by up to a factor of four. These preliminary results demonstrate the potential for efficient multi-sample studies employing hyperpolarized agents. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Heteronuclear Cross-Relaxation Effects in the NMR Spectroscopy of Hyperpolarized Targets

    PubMed Central

    Donovan, Kevin J.; Lupulescu, Adonis; Frydman, Lucio

    2016-01-01

    Dissolution DNP enables high-sensitivity solution phase NMR experiments on long-lived nuclear spin species such as 15N and 13C. This report explores certain features arising in solution-state 1H NMR, upon polarizing low-γ nuclear species. Following solid state hyperpolarization of both 13C and 1H, solution-phase 1H NMR experiments on dissolved samples revealed transient effects whereby peaks arising from protons bonded to the naturally-occurring 13C nuclei, appeared larger than the typically dominant 12C-bonded 1H resonances. This enhancement of the satellite-peaks was examined in detail, with respect to a variety of mechanisms that could potentially originate it. Both two- and three-spin phenomena active in the solid state could lead to this kind of effect; still, experimental observations revealed that the enhancement originates from 13C→1H polarization transfer processes active in the liquid state. Kinetic equations based on modified heteronuclear cross-relaxation models were examined, and found to describe well the distinct patterns of growth and decay shown by the 13C-bound 1H NMR satellite resonances. The dynamics of these novel cross-relaxation phenomena were determined, and their potential usefulness as tools for investigating hyperpolarized ensembles and for obtaining enhanced-sensitivity 1H NMR traces, is explored. PMID:24403222

  13. Effects of N-glycosylation on hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels.

    PubMed

    Li, Mo; Tonggu, Lige; Tang, Lan; Wang, Liguo

    2015-02-15

    Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels are activated by membrane hyperpolarization and conduct an inward cation current, which contributes to rhythmic electrical activity of neural and cardiac pacemaker cells. HCN channels have been shown to undergo N-linked glycosylation, and the N-glycosylation has been shown to be required for membrane trafficking and possibly function. In this study, recombinant wild-type (WT) and glycosylation-defective N380Q HCN2 channels were individually or co-expressed in HEK-293 cells. We demonstrate that glycosylation is required for trafficking to the plasma membrane and for the stability of HCN channels in the cell. Interestingly, the heteromeric HCN2 channels of WT and glycosylation-defective N380Q have been observed on cell membranes, indicating that not all four subunits of a tetrameric HCN2 channel need to be glycosylated for HCN2 channels to traffic to plasma membranes. Subsequently, we investigate the effect of N-glycosylation on the function of HCN2 channels. We developed a fluorescence-based flux assay, which makes it possible to establish a negative potential inside liposomes to open HCN2 channels. Using this flux assay, we demonstrate that glycosylation-defective N380Q HCN2 channels reconstituted into liposomes function similarly to WT HCN2 channels. This suggests that N-glycosylation is not required for HCN2 channels to function.

  14. Hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide-gated cation channels in Aplysia: Contribution to classical conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qizong; Kuzyk, Pavlo; Antonov, Igor; Bostwick, Caleb J.; Kohn, Andrea B.; Moroz, Leonid L.; Hawkins, Robert D.

    2015-01-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide-gated cation (HCN) channels are critical regulators of neuronal excitability, but less is known about their possible roles in synaptic plasticity and memory circuits. Here, we characterized the HCN gene organization, channel properties, distribution, and involvement in associative and nonassociative forms of learning in Aplysia californica. Aplysia has only one HCN gene, which codes for a channel that has many similarities to the mammalian HCN channel. The cloned acHCN gene was expressed in Xenopus oocytes, which displayed a hyperpolarization-induced inward current that was enhanced by cGMP as well as cAMP. Similarly to its homologs in other animals, acHCN is permeable to K+ and Na+ ions, and is selectively blocked by Cs+ and ZD7288. We found that acHCN is predominantly expressed in inter- and motor neurons, including LFS siphon motor neurons, and therefore tested whether HCN channels are involved in simple forms of learning of the siphon-withdrawal reflex in a semiintact preparation. ZD7288 (100 μM) significantly reduced an associative form of learning (classical conditioning) but had no effect on two nonassociative forms of learning (intermediate-term sensitization and unpaired training) or baseline responses. The HCN current is enhanced by nitric oxide (NO), which may explain the postsynaptic role of NO during conditioning. HCN current in turn enhances the NMDA-like current in the motor neurons, suggesting that HCN channels contribute to conditioning through this pathway. PMID:26668355

  15. On-target Inhibition of Tumor Fermentative Glycolysis as Visualized by Hyperpolarized Pyruvate1

    PubMed Central

    Seth, Pankaj; Grant, Aaron; Tang, Jian; Vinogradov, Elena; Wang, Xioaen; Lenkinski, Robert; Sukhatme, Vikas P

    2011-01-01

    Many cancer cells display the Warburg effect, that is, enhanced glycolysis followed by fermentation (conversion of pyruvate to lactate). Recently, the molecular basis for these effects has started to be elucidated, and the up-regulation of the lactate dehydrogenase A (LDH-A) isoform of lactate dehydrogenase is felt to be a major molecular mediator of this phenomenon. Moreover, LDH-A expression in tumor tissue and LDH-A levels in blood portend a bad prognosis, and LDH-A blockade can lead to tumor growth inhibition in tumor transplant models. We have extended existing data (some of which were published during the time when we were carrying out our studies) in two important ways: 1) inhibition of LDH-A in a glycolytic lung cancer cell line results in reactive oxygen species-mediated apoptosis and increased sensitivity to the chemotherapeutic drug paclitaxel and 2) inhibition of fermentative glycolysis can also be accomplished by activation of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex by the drug dichloroacetate, now undergoing clinical trials, and that this phenomenon can be monitored in vivo in a noninvasive real-time manner through magnetic resonance spectroscopy using hyperpolarized pyruvate. Collectively, these data suggest that in vivo effects of drugs that redirect the fate of pyruvate, and hence are aimed at reversing the Warburg effect, could be monitored through the use of hyperpolarized magnetic resonance spectroscopy, a method that is scalable to human use. PMID:21245941

  16. Inductive Measurement of Optically Hyperpolarized Phosphorous Donor Nuclei in an Isotopically Enriched Silicon-28 Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gumann, P.; Patange, O.; Ramanathan, C.; Haas, H.; Moussa, O.; Thewalt, M. L. W.; Riemann, H.; Abrosimov, N. V.; Becker, P.; Pohl, H.-J.; Itoh, K. M.; Cory, D. G.

    2014-12-01

    We experimentally demonstrate the first inductive readout of optically hyperpolarized phosphorus-31 donor nuclear spins in an isotopically enriched silicon-28 crystal. The concentration of phosphorus donors in the crystal was 1.5 ×1 015 cm-3 , 3 orders of magnitude lower than has previously been detected via direct inductive detection. The signal-to-noise ratio measured in a single free induction decay from a 1 cm3 sample (≈1015 spins) was 113. By transferring the sample to an X -band ESR spectrometer, we were able to obtain a lower bound for the nuclear spin polarization at 1.7 K of ˜64 % . The 31P -T2 measured with a Hahn echo sequence was 420 ms at 1.7 K, which was extended to 1.2 s with a Carr Purcell cycle. The T1 of the 31P nuclear spins at 1.7 K is extremely long and could not be determined, as no decay was observed even on a time scale of 4.5 h. Optical excitation was performed with a 1047 nm laser, which provided above-band-gap excitation of the silicon. The buildup of the hyperpolarization at 4.2 K followed a single exponential with a characteristic time of 577 s, while the buildup at 1.7 K showed biexponential behavior with characteristic time constants of 578 and 5670 s.

  17. Direct Measurement of Lung Motion Using Hyperpolarized Helium-3 MR Tagging

    SciTech Connect

    Cai Jing; Miller, G. Wilson; Altes, Talissa A.; Read, Paul W.; Benedict, Stanley H.; Lange, Eduard E. de; Cates, Gordon D.; Brookeman, James R.; Mugler, John P.; Sheng Ke . E-mail: ks2mc@virginia.edu

    2007-07-01

    Purpose: To measure lung motion between end-inhalation and end-exhalation using a hyperpolarized helium-3 (HP {sup 3}He) magnetic resonance (MR) tagging technique. Methods and Materials: Three healthy volunteers underwent MR tagging studies after inhalation of 1 L HP {sup 3}He gas diluted with nitrogen. Multiple-slice two-dimensional and volumetric three-dimensional MR tagged images of the lungs were obtained at end-inhalation and end-exhalation, and displacement vector maps were computed. Results: The grids of tag lines in the HP {sup 3}He MR images were well defined at end-inhalation and remained evident at end-exhalation. Displacement vector maps clearly demonstrated the regional lung motion and deformation that occurred during exhalation. Discontinuity and differences in motion pattern between two adjacent lung lobes were readily resolved. Conclusions: Hyperpolarized helium-3 MR tagging technique can be used for direct in vivo measurement of respiratory lung motion on a regional basis. This technique may lend new insights into the regional pulmonary biomechanics and thus provide valuable information for the deformable registration of lung.

  18. A Molecular Imaging Approach to Mercury Sensing Based on Hyperpolarized (129)Xe Molecular Clamp Probe.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qianni; Zeng, Qingbin; Jiang, Weiping; Zhang, Xiaoxiao; Luo, Qing; Zhang, Xu; Bouchard, Louis-S; Liu, Maili; Zhou, Xin

    2016-03-14

    Mercury pollution, in the form of mercury ions (Hg(2+)), is a major health and environmental hazard. Commonly used sensors are invasive and limited to point measurements. Fluorescence-based sensors do not provide depth resolution needed to image spatial distributions. Herein we report a novel sensor capable of yielding spatial distributions by MRI using hyperpolarized (129)Xe. A molecular clamp probe was developed consisting of dipyrrolylquinoxaline (DPQ) derivatives and twocryptophane-A cages. The DPQ derivatives act as cation receptors whereas cryptophane-A acts as a suitable host molecule for xenon. When the DPQ moiety interacts with mercury ions, the molecular clamp closes on the ion. Due to overlap of the electron clouds of the two cryptophane-A cages, the shielding effect on the encapsulated Xe becomes important. This leads to an upfield change of the chemical shift of the encapsulated Xe. This sensor exhibits good selectivity and sensitivity toward the mercury ion. This mercury-activated hyperpolarized (129)Xe-based chemosensor is a new concept method for monitoring Hg(2+) ion distributions by MRI.

  19. Different functions of hyperpolarization-activated cation channels for hippocampal sharp waves and ripples in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kranig, S A; Duhme, N; Waldeck, C; Draguhn, A; Reichinnek, S; Both, M

    2013-01-03

    Hyperpolarization-activated currents (I(h)) affect multiple neuronal functions including membrane potential, intrinsic firing properties, synaptic integration and frequency-dependent resonance behavior. Consistently, I(h) plays a key role for oscillations at the cellular and network level, including theta and gamma oscillations in rodent hippocampal circuits. Little is known, however, about the contribution of I(h) to a prominent memory-related pattern of network activity called sharp-wave-ripple complexes (SPW-R). Here we report that pharmacological suppression of I(h) induces specific changes in SPW-R in mouse hippocampal slices depending on the specific drug used and the region analyzed. Spontaneous generation of the events was reduced by blocking I(h) whereas the amplitude was unaffected or increased. Interestingly, the superimposed ripple oscillations at ∼200 Hz persisted with unchanged frequency, indicating that I(h) is not critical for generating this rhythmic pattern. Likewise, coupling between field oscillations and units was unchanged, showing unaltered recruitment of neurons into oscillating assemblies. Control experiments exclude a contribution of T-type calcium channels to the observed effects. Together, we report a specific contribution of hyperpolarization-activated cation currents to the generation of sharp waves in the hippocampus. Copyright © 2012 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Quantified pH imaging with hyperpolarized (13) C-bicarbonate.

    PubMed

    Scholz, David Johannes; Janich, Martin A; Köllisch, Ulrich; Schulte, Rolf F; Ardenkjaer-Larsen, Jan H; Frank, Annette; Haase, Axel; Schwaiger, Markus; Menzel, Marion I

    2015-06-01

    Because pH plays a crucial role in several diseases, it is desirable to measure pH in vivo noninvasively and in a spatially localized manner. Spatial maps of pH were quantified in vitro, with a focus on method-based errors, and applied in vivo. In vitro and in vivo (13) C mapping were performed for various flip angles for bicarbonate (BiC) and CO2 with spectral-spatial excitation and spiral readout in healthy Lewis rats in five slices. Acute subcutaneous sterile inflammation was induced with Concanavalin A in the right leg of Buffalo rats. pH and proton images were measured 2 h after induction. After optimizing the signal to noise ratio of the hyperpolarized (13) C-bicarbonate, error estimation of the spectral-spatial excited spectrum reveals that the method covers the biologically relevant pH range of 6 to 8 with low pH error (< 0.2). Quantification of pH maps shows negligible impact of the residual bicarbonate signal. pH maps reflect the induction of acute metabolic alkalosis. Inflamed, infected regions exhibit lower pH. Hyperpolarized (13) C-bicarbonate pH mapping was shown to be sensitive in the biologically relevant pH range. The mapping of pH was applied to healthy in vivo organs and interpreted within inflammation and acute metabolic alkalosis models. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Spin Noise Detection of Nuclear Hyperpolarization at 1.2 K

    PubMed Central

    Pöschko, Maria Theresia; Vuichoud, Basile; Milani, Jonas; Bornet, Aurélien; Bechmann, Matthias; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey; Jannin, Sami; Müller, Norbert

    2015-01-01

    We report proton spin noise spectra of a hyperpolarized solid sample of commonly used “DNP (dynamic nuclear polarization) juice” containing TEMPOL (4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine N-oxide) and irradiated by a microwave field at a temperature of 1.2 K in a magnetic field of 6.7 T. The line shapes of the spin noise power spectra are sensitive to the variation of the microwave irradiation frequency and change from dip to bump, when the electron Larmor frequency is crossed, which is shown to be in good accordance with theory by simulations. Small but significant deviations from these predictions are observed, which can be related to spin noise and radiation damping phenomena that have been reported in thermally polarized systems. The non-linear dependence of the spin noise integral on nuclear polarization provides a means to monitor hyperpolarization semi-quantitatively without any perturbation of the spin system by radio frequency irradiation. PMID:26477605

  2. Hyperpolarization-independent maturation and refinement of GABA/glycinergic connections in the auditory brain stem

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hanmi; Bach, Eva; Noh, Jihyun; Delpire, Eric

    2015-01-01

    During development GABA and glycine synapses are initially excitatory before they gradually become inhibitory. This transition is due to a developmental increase in the activity of neuronal potassium-chloride cotransporter 2 (KCC2), which shifts the chloride equilibrium potential (ECl) to values more negative than the resting membrane potential. While the role of early GABA and glycine depolarizations in neuronal development has become increasingly clear, the role of the transition to hyperpolarization in synapse maturation and circuit refinement has remained an open question. Here we investigated this question by examining the maturation and developmental refinement of GABA/glycinergic and glutamatergic synapses in the lateral superior olive (LSO), a binaural auditory brain stem nucleus, in KCC2-knockdown mice, in which GABA and glycine remain depolarizing. We found that many key events in the development of synaptic inputs to the LSO, such as changes in neurotransmitter phenotype, strengthening and elimination of GABA/glycinergic connection, and maturation of glutamatergic synapses, occur undisturbed in KCC2-knockdown mice compared with wild-type mice. These results indicate that maturation of inhibitory and excitatory synapses in the LSO is independent of the GABA and glycine depolarization-to-hyperpolarization transition. PMID:26655825

  3. Spin Noise Detection of Nuclear Hyperpolarization at 1.2 K.

    PubMed

    Pöschko, Maria Theresia; Vuichoud, Basile; Milani, Jonas; Bornet, Aurélien; Bechmann, Matthias; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey; Jannin, Sami; Müller, Norbert

    2015-12-21

    We report proton spin noise spectra of a hyperpolarized solid sample of commonly used "DNP (dynamic nuclear polarization) juice" containing TEMPOL (4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine N-oxide) and irradiated by a microwave field at a temperature of 1.2 K in a magnetic field of 6.7 T. The line shapes of the spin noise power spectra are sensitive to the variation of the microwave irradiation frequency and change from dip to bump, when the electron Larmor frequency is crossed, which is shown to be in good accordance with theory by simulations. Small but significant deviations from these predictions are observed, which can be related to spin noise and radiation damping phenomena that have been reported in thermally polarized systems. The non-linear dependence of the spin noise integral on nuclear polarization provides a means to monitor hyperpolarization semi-quantitatively without any perturbation of the spin system by radio frequency irradiation. © 2015 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  4. Inductive measurement of optically hyperpolarized phosphorous donor nuclei in an isotopically enriched silicon-28 crystal.

    PubMed

    Gumann, P; Patange, O; Ramanathan, C; Haas, H; Moussa, O; Thewalt, M L W; Riemann, H; Abrosimov, N V; Becker, P; Pohl, H-J; Itoh, K M; Cory, D G

    2014-12-31

    We experimentally demonstrate the first inductive readout of optically hyperpolarized phosphorus-31 donor nuclear spins in an isotopically enriched silicon-28 crystal. The concentration of phosphorus donors in the crystal was 1.5×10(15)  cm(-3), 3 orders of magnitude lower than has previously been detected via direct inductive detection. The signal-to-noise ratio measured in a single free induction decay from a 1  cm(3) sample (≈10(15) spins) was 113. By transferring the sample to an X-band ESR spectrometer, we were able to obtain a lower bound for the nuclear spin polarization at 1.7 K of ∼64%. The (31)P-T2 measured with a Hahn echo sequence was 420 ms at 1.7 K, which was extended to 1.2 s with a Carr Purcell cycle. The T1 of the (31)P nuclear spins at 1.7 K is extremely long and could not be determined, as no decay was observed even on a time scale of 4.5 h. Optical excitation was performed with a 1047 nm laser, which provided above-band-gap excitation of the silicon. The buildup of the hyperpolarization at 4.2 K followed a single exponential with a characteristic time of 577 s, while the buildup at 1.7 K showed biexponential behavior with characteristic time constants of 578 and 5670 s.

  5. Dynamic UltraFast 2D EXchange SpectroscopY (UF-EXSY) of hyperpolarized substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leon Swisher, Christine; Koelsch, Bertram; Sukumar, Subramianam; Sriram, Renuka; Santos, Romelyn Delos; Wang, Zhen Jane; Kurhanewicz, John; Vigneron, Daniel; Larson, Peder

    2015-08-01

    In this work, we present a new ultrafast method for acquiring dynamic 2D EXchange SpectroscopY (EXSY) within a single acquisition. This technique reconstructs two-dimensional EXSY spectra from one-dimensional spectra based on the phase accrual during echo times. The Ultrafast-EXSY acquisition overcomes long acquisition times typically needed to acquire 2D NMR data by utilizing sparsity and phase dependence to dramatically undersample in the indirect time dimension. This allows for the acquisition of the 2D spectrum within a single shot. We have validated this method in simulations and hyperpolarized enzyme assay experiments separating the dehydration of pyruvate and lactate-to-pyruvate conversion. In a renal cell carcinoma cell (RCC) line, bidirectional exchange was observed. This new technique revealed decreased conversion of lactate-to-pyruvate with high expression of monocarboxylate transporter 4 (MCT4), known to correlate with aggressive cancer phenotypes. We also showed feasibility of this technique in vivo in a RCC model where bidirectional exchange was observed for pyruvate-lactate, pyruvate-alanine, and pyruvate-hydrate and were resolved in time. Broadly, the technique is well suited to investigate the dynamics of multiple exchange pathways and applicable to hyperpolarized substrates where chemical exchange has shown great promise across a range of disciplines.

  6. Cortical activation of accumbens hyperpolarization-active NMDARs mediates aversion-resistant alcohol intake

    PubMed Central

    Seif, Taban; Chang, Shao-Ju; Simms, Jeffrey A; Gibb, Stuart L; Dadgar, Jahan; Chen, Billy T; Harvey, Brandon K; Ron, Dorit; Messing, Robert O; Bonci, Antonello; Hopf, F Woodward

    2014-01-01

    Compulsive drinking despite serious adverse medical, social and economic consequences is a characteristic of alcohol use disorders in humans. Although frontal cortical areas have been implicated in alcohol use disorders, little is known about the molecular mechanisms and pathways that sustain aversion-resistant intake. Here, we show that nucleus accumbens core (NAcore) NMDA-type glutamate receptors and medial prefrontal (mPFC) and insula glutamatergic inputs to the NAcore are necessary for aversion-resistant alcohol consumption in rats. Aversion-resistant intake was associated with a new type of NMDA receptor adaptation, in which hyperpolarization-active NMDA receptors were present at mPFC and insula but not amygdalar inputs in the NAcore. Accordingly, inhibition of Grin2c NMDA receptor subunits in the NAcore reduced aversion-resistant alcohol intake. None of these manipulations altered intake when alcohol was not paired with an aversive consequence. Our results identify a mechanism by which hyperpolarization-active NMDA receptors under mPFC- and insula-to-NAcore inputs sustain aversion-resistant alcohol intake. PMID:23817545

  7. High-throughput hyperpolarized 13C metabolic investigations using a multi-channel acquisition system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jaehyuk; Ramirez, Marc S.; Walker, Christopher M.; Chen, Yunyun; Yi, Stacey; Sandulache, Vlad C.; Lai, Stephen Y.; Bankson, James A.

    2015-11-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy of hyperpolarized (HP) compounds such as [1-13C]-pyruvate have shown tremendous potential for offering new insight into disease and response to therapy. New applications of this technology in clinical research and care will require extensive validation in cells and animal models, a process that may be limited by the high cost and modest throughput associated with dynamic nuclear polarization. Relatively wide spectral separation between [1-13C]-pyruvate and its chemical endpoints in vivo are conducive to simultaneous multi-sample measurements, even in the presence of a suboptimal global shim. Multi-channel acquisitions could conserve costs and accelerate experiments by allowing acquisition from multiple independent samples following a single dissolution. Unfortunately, many existing preclinical MRI systems are equipped with only a single channel for broadband acquisitions. In this work, we examine the feasibility of this concept using a broadband multi-channel digital receiver extension and detector arrays that allow concurrent measurement of dynamic spectroscopic data from ex vivo enzyme phantoms, in vitro anaplastic thyroid carcinoma cells, and in vivo in tumor-bearing mice. Throughput and the cost of consumables were improved by up to a factor of four. These preliminary results demonstrate the potential for efficient multi-sample studies employing hyperpolarized agents.

  8. Hyperpolarized Helium-3 MRI of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction during challenge and therapy.

    PubMed

    Kruger, Stanley J; Niles, David J; Dardzinski, Bernard; Harman, Amy; Jarjour, Nizar N; Ruddy, Marcella; Nagle, Scott K; Francois, Christopher J; Sorkness, Ronald L; Burton, Ryan M; Munoz del Rio, Alejandro; Fain, Sean B

    2014-05-01

    To investigate the utility of hyperpolarized He-3 MRI for detecting regional lung ventilated volume (VV) changes in response to exercise challenge and leukotriene inhibitor montelukast, human subjects with exercise induced bronchoconstriction (EIB) were recruited. This condition is described by airway constriction following exercise leading to reduced forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) coinciding with ventilation defects on hyperpolarized He-3 MRI. Thirteen EIB subjects underwent spirometry and He-3 MRI at baseline, postexercise, and postrecovery at multiple visits. On one visit montelukast was given and on two visits placebo was given. Regional VV was calculated in the apical/basilar dimension, in the anterior/posterior dimension, and for the entire lung volume. The whole lung VV was used as an end-point and compared with spirometry. Postchallenge FEV1 dropped with placebo but not with treatment, while postchallenge VV dropped more with placebo than treatment. Sources of variability for VV included region (anterior/posterior), scan, and treatment. VV correlated with FEV1/ forced vital capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory flow between 25 and 75% of FVC and showed gravitational dependence after exercise challenge. A paradigm testing the response of ventilation to montelukast revealed both a whole-lung and regional response to exercise challenge and therapy in EIB subjects. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Large dose hyperpolarized water with dissolution-DNP at high magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipsø, Kasper Wigh; Bowen, Sean; Rybalko, Oleksandr; Ardenkjær-Larsen, Jan Henrik

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate a method for the preparation of hyperpolarized water by dissolution Dynamic Nuclear Polarization at high magnetic field. Protons were polarized at 6.7 T and 1.1 K to >70% with frequency modulated microwave irradiation at 188G Hz. 97.2 ± 0.7% of the radical was extracted from the sample in the dissolution in a two-phase system. 16 ± 1 mL of 5.0 M 1H in D2O with a polarization of 13.0 ± 0.9% in the liquid state was obtained, corresponding to an enhancement factor of 4000 ± 300 compared to the thermal equilibrium at 9.4 T and 293 K. A longitudinal relaxation time constant of 16 ± 1 s was measured. The sample was polarized and dissolved in a fluid path compatible with clinical polarizers. The volume of hyperpolarized water produced by this method enables angiography and perfusion measurements in large animals, as well as NMR experiments for studies of e.g. proton exchange and polarization transfer to other nuclei.

  10. Correlation of measures of regional lung ventilation from 4DCT vs. hyperpolarized helium-3 MR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Kai; Cao, Kunlin; Miller, Wilson; Christensen, Gary; Reinhardt, Joseph; Benedict, Stanley; Libby, Bruce; Sheng, Ke

    2012-03-01

    Radiation induced pulmonary diseases can change the tissue material properties of lung parenchyma and the mechanics of the respiratory system. Recent advances in multi-detector-row CT (MDCT), 4DCT respiratory gating methods, and image processing techniques enable us to follow and measure those changes noninvasively during radiation therapy at a regional level. This study compares the 4DCT based ventilation measurement with the results from hyperpolarized helium-3 MR using the cumulative distribution function maps and the relative overlap (RO) statistic. We show that the similarity between the two measurements increases as the increase of the B-Spline grid spacing and Laplacian weighting which result a smoother ventilation map. The best similarity is found with weighting of 0.5 for linear elasticity and B-Spline grid spacing of 32 mm. Future work is to improve the lung image registration algorithm by incorporating hyperpolarized helium-3 MR information so as to improve its physiological modeling of the lung tissue deformation.

  11. Incorporation of prior knowledge in compressed sensing for faster acquisition of hyperpolarized gas images.

    PubMed

    Ajraoui, S; Parra-Robles, J; Wild, J M

    2013-02-01

    Adding prior knowledge to compressed sensing reconstruction can improve image reconstruction. In this work, two approaches are investigated to improve reconstruction of two-dimensional hyperpolarized (3)He lung ventilation images using prior knowledge. When compared against a standard compressed sensing reconstruction, the proposed methods allowed acquisition of images with higher under-sampling factors and reduction of the blurring effects that increase with higher reduction factors when fixed flip angles are used. These methods incorporate the prior knowledge of polarization decay of hyperpolarized (3)He and the mutual anatomical information from a registered (1)H image acquired in the same breath. Three times accelerated two-dimensional images reconstructed with compressed sensing and prior knowledge gave lower root-mean square error, than images reconstructed without introduction of any prior information. When introducing the polarization decay as prior knowledge, a significant improvement was achieved in the lung region, the root mean square value decreased by 45% and from the whole image by 36%. When introducing the mutual anatomical information as prior knowledge, the root mean square decreased by 21% over the lung region and by 15% over the whole image. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Noradrenergic and serotonergic modulation of a hyperpolarization-activated cation current in thalamic relay neurones.

    PubMed

    McCormick, D A; Pape, H C

    1990-12-01

    1. Modulation of the hyperpolarization-activated cation current, Ih, by noradrenaline (NA) and serotonin (5-HT) was examined in guinea-pig and cat medial and lateral geniculate relay neurones using the in vitro slice technique. 2. In the absence of pharmacological antagonists, local application of NA resulted in a slow depolarization and decrease in apparent input conductance, a response which was blocked by local or bath application of the alpha 1-adrenoceptor antagonist prazosin. Application of NA after pharmacological block of alpha 1- and alpha 2-adrenoceptors, or application of 5-HT in all conditions, induced a 1-3 mV slow depolarization which was associated with a pronounced increase in apparent input conductance. This response to NA and 5-HT persisted during blocked synaptic transmission and was present in both the guinea-pig and cat medial and lateral geniculate nuclei. 3. The increase in membrane conductance elicited by NA was mimicked by the beta-specific agonist isoprenaline and blocked by the beta-antagonists propranolol and atenolol, indicating that it is mediated by beta-adrenoceptors. The response to 5-HT was blocked by the 5-HT1 and 5-HT2 antagonist methysergide, but not by the 5-HT2 antagonist ritanserin. Applications of either the 5-HT1A agonist ipsapirone or the partial agonist 8-hydroxy-dipropylaminotetralin (8-OHDPAT) were without effect. 4. Current versus voltage relationships obtained under voltage clamp revealed NA and 5-HT to cause a voltage-dependent inward shift at membrane potentials negative to approximately -60 mV. This response appeared to be shared by NA and 5-HT since maximal application of 5-HT greatly reduced or abolished the response to NA. 5. Application of NA and/or 5-HT during hyperpolarizing voltage steps in voltage clamp resulted in a marked increase in amplitude of the hyperpolarization-activated cation current, Ih. In addition, the rate of activation of Ih was strongly increased during activation of beta-adrenoceptors. 6

  13. Performance of 4600-pound-thrust centrifugal-flow-type turbojet engine with water-alcohol injection at inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glasser, Philip W

    1950-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the effects of injecting a water-alcohol mixture of 2:1 at the compressor inlet of a centrifugal-flow type turbojet engine was conducted in an altitude test chamber at static sea-level conditions and at an altitude of 20,000 feet with a flight Mach number of 0.78 with an engine operating at rated speed. The net thrust was augmented by 0.16 for both flight conditions with a ratio of injected liquid to air flow of 0.05. Further increases in the liquid-air ratio did not give comparable increases in thrust.

  14. Producing Radical-Free Hyperpolarized Perfusion Agents for In Vivo Magnetic Resonance Using Spin-Labeled Thermoresponsive Hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Tian; Mishkovsky, Mor; Junk, Matthias J N; Münnemann, Kerstin; Comment, Arnaud

    2016-07-01

    Dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) provides a way to tremendously improve the sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance experiments. Once the spins are hyperpolarized by dissolution DNP, the radicals used as polarizing agents become undesirable since their presence is an additional source of nuclear spin relaxation and their toxicity might be an issue. This study demonstrates the feasibility of preparing a hyperpolarized [1-(13) C]2-methylpropan-2-ol (tert-butanol) solution free of persistent radicals by using spin-labeled thermoresponsive hydrophilic polymer networks as polarizing agents. The hyperpolarized (13) C signal can be detected for up to 5 min before the spins fully relax to their thermal equilibrium. This approach extends the applicability of spin-labeled thermoresponsive hydrogel to the dissolution DNP field and highlights its potential as polarizing agent for preparing neat slowly relaxing contrast agents. The hydrogels are especially suited to hyperpolarize deuterated alcohols which can be used for in vivo perfusion imaging. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Imaging oxygen metabolism with hyperpolarized magnetic resonance: a novel approach for the examination of cardiac and renal function

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Every tissue in the body critically depends on meeting its energetic demands with sufficient oxygen supply. Oxygen supply/demand imbalances underlie the diseases that inflict the greatest socio-economic burden globally. The purpose of this review is to examine how hyperpolarized contrast media, used in combination with MR data acquisition methods, may advance our ability to assess oxygen metabolism non-invasively and thus improve management of clinical disease. We first introduce the concept of hyperpolarization and how hyperpolarized contrast media have been practically implemented to achieve translational and clinical research. We will then analyse how incorporating hyperpolarized contrast media could enable realization of unmet technical needs in clinical practice. We will focus on imaging cardiac and renal oxygen metabolism, as both organs have unique physiological demands to satisfy their requirements for tissue oxygenation, their dysfunction plays a fundamental role in society’s most prevalent diseases, and each organ presents unique imaging challenges. It is our aim that this review attracts a multi-disciplinary audience and sparks collaborations that utilize an exciting, emergent technology to advance our ability to treat patients adversely affected by an oxygen supply/demand mismatch. PMID:27899435

  16. Use of a Multi-compartment Dynamic Single Enzyme Phantom for Studies of Hyperpolarized Magnetic Resonance Agents.

    PubMed

    Walker, Christopher M; Merritt, Matthew; Wang, Jian-Xiong; Bankson, James A

    2016-04-15

    Imaging of hyperpolarized substrates by magnetic resonance shows great clinical promise for assessment of critical biochemical processes in real time. Due to fundamental constraints imposed by the hyperpolarized state, exotic imaging and reconstruction techniques are commonly used. A practical system for characterization of dynamic, multi-spectral imaging methods is critically needed. Such a system must reproducibly recapitulate the relevant chemical dynamics of normal and pathological tissues. The most widely utilized substrate to date is hyperpolarized [1-(13)C]-pyruvate for assessment of cancer metabolism. We describe an enzyme-based phantom system that mediates the conversion of pyruvate to lactate. The reaction is initiated by injection of the hyperpolarized agent into multiple chambers within the phantom, each of which contains varying concentrations of reagents that control the reaction rate. Multiple compartments are necessary to ensure that imaging sequences faithfully capture the spatial and metabolic heterogeneity of tissue. This system will aid the development and validation of advanced imaging strategies by providing chemical dynamics that are not available from conventional phantoms, as well as control and reproducibility that is not possible in vivo.

  17. Toward Biocompatible Nuclear Hyperpolarization Using Signal Amplification by Reversible Exchange: Quantitative in Situ Spectroscopy and High-Field Imaging

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Signal amplification by reversible exchange (SABRE) of a substrate and parahydrogen at a catalytic center promises to overcome the inherent insensitivity of magnetic resonance. In order to apply the new approach to biomedical applications, there is a need to develop experimental equipment, in situ quantification methods, and a biocompatible solvent. We present results detailing a low-field SABRE polarizer which provides well-controlled experimental conditions, defined spins manipulations, and which allows in situ detection of thermally polarized and hyperpolarized samples. We introduce a method for absolute quantification of hyperpolarization yield in situ by means of a thermally polarized reference. A maximum signal-to-noise ratio of ∼103 for 148 μmol of substance, a signal enhancement of 106 with respect to polarization transfer field of SABRE, or an absolute 1H-polarization level of ≈10–2 is achieved. In an important step toward biomedical application, we demonstrate 1H in situ NMR as well as 1H and 13C high-field MRI using hyperpolarized pyridine (d3) and 13C nicotinamide in pure and 11% ethanol in aqueous solution. Further increase of hyperpolarization yield, implications of in situ detection, and in vivo application are discussed. PMID:24397559

  18. A Bloch-McConnell simulator with pharmacokinetic modeling to explore accuracy and reproducibility in the measurement of hyperpolarized pyruvate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Christopher M.; Bankson, James A.

    2015-03-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of hyperpolarized (HP) agents has the potential to probe in-vivo metabolism with sensitivity and specificity that was not previously possible. Biological conversion of HP agents specifically for cancer has been shown to correlate to presence of disease, stage and response to therapy. For such metabolic biomarkers derived from MRI of hyperpolarized agents to be clinically impactful, they need to be validated and well characterized. However, imaging of HP substrates is distinct from conventional MRI, due to the non-renewable nature of transient HP magnetization. Moreover, due to current practical limitations in generation and evolution of hyperpolarized agents, it is not feasible to fully experimentally characterize measurement and processing strategies. In this work we use a custom Bloch-McConnell simulator with pharmacokinetic modeling to characterize the performance of specific magnetic resonance spectroscopy sequences over a range of biological conditions. We performed numerical simulations to evaluate the effect of sequence parameters over a range of chemical conversion rates. Each simulation was analyzed repeatedly with the addition of noise in order to determine the accuracy and reproducibility of measurements. Results indicate that under both closed and perfused conditions, acquisition parameters can affect measurements in a tissue dependent manner, suggesting that great care needs to be taken when designing studies involving hyperpolarized agents. More modeling studies will be needed to determine what effect sequence parameters have on more advanced acquisitions and processing methods.

  19. Use of a Multi-compartment Dynamic Single Enzyme Phantom for Studies of Hyperpolarized Magnetic Resonance Agents

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Christopher M.; Merritt, Matthew; Wang, Jian-Xiong; Bankson, James A.

    2016-01-01

    Imaging of hyperpolarized substrates by magnetic resonance shows great clinical promise for assessment of critical biochemical processes in real time. Due to fundamental constraints imposed by the hyperpolarized state, exotic imaging and reconstruction techniques are commonly used. A practical system for characterization of dynamic, multi-spectral imaging methods is critically needed. Such a system must reproducibly recapitulate the relevant chemical dynamics of normal and pathological tissues. The most widely utilized substrate to date is hyperpolarized [1-13C]-pyruvate for assessment of cancer metabolism. We describe an enzyme-based phantom system that mediates the conversion of pyruvate to lactate. The reaction is initiated by injection of the hyperpolarized agent into multiple chambers within the phantom, each of which contains varying concentrations of reagents that control the reaction rate. Multiple compartments are necessary to ensure that imaging sequences faithfully capture the spatial and metabolic heterogeneity of tissue. This system will aid the development and validation of advanced imaging strategies by providing chemical dynamics that are not available from conventional phantoms, as well as control and reproducibility that is not possible in vivo. PMID:27166971

  20. Imaging oxygen metabolism with hyperpolarized magnetic resonance: a novel approach for the examination of cardiac and renal function.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Marie; Laustsen, Christoffer

    2017-02-28

    Every tissue in the body critically depends on meeting its energetic demands with sufficient oxygen supply. Oxygen supply/demand imbalances underlie the diseases that inflict the greatest socio-economic burden globally. The purpose of this review is to examine how hyperpolarized contrast media, used in combination with MR data acquisition methods, may advance our ability to assess oxygen metabolism non-invasively and thus improve management of clinical disease. We first introduce the concept of hyperpolarization and how hyperpolarized contrast media have been practically implemented to achieve translational and clinical research. We will then analyse how incorporating hyperpolarized contrast media could enable realization of unmet technical needs in clinical practice. We will focus on imaging cardiac and renal oxygen metabolism, as both organs have unique physiological demands to satisfy their requirements for tissue oxygenation, their dysfunction plays a fundamental role in society's most prevalent diseases, and each organ presents unique imaging challenges. It is our aim that this review attracts a multi-disciplinary audience and sparks collaborations that utilize an exciting, emergent technology to advance our ability to treat patients adversely affected by an oxygen supply/demand mismatch. © 2017 The Author(s).

  1. Hyperpolarized 13C NMR lifetimes in the liquid-state: relating structures and T1 relaxation times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parish, Christopher; Niedbalski, Peter; Hashami, Zohreh; Fidelino, Leila; Kovacs, Zoltan; Lumata, Lloyd

    Among the various attempts to solve the insensitivity problem in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), the physics-based technique dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is probably the most successful method of hyperpolarization or amplifying NMR signals. Using this technique, liquid-state NMR signal enhancements of several thousand-fold are expected for low-gamma nuclei such as carbon-13. The lifetimes of these hyperpolarized 13C NMR signals are directly related to their 13C spin-lattice relaxation times T1. Depending upon the 13C isotopic location, the lifetimes of hyperpolarized 13C compounds can range from a few seconds to minutes. In this study, we have investigated the hyperpolarized 13C NMR lifetimes of several 13C compounds with various chemical structures from glucose, acetate, citric acid, naphthalene to tetramethylallene and their deuterated analogs at 9.4 T and 25 deg C. Our results show that the 13C T1s of these compounds can range from a few seconds to more than 60 s at this field. Correlations between the chemical structures and T1 relaxation times will be discussed and corresponding implications of these results on 13C DNP experiments will be revealed. US Dept of Defense Award No. W81XWH-14-1-0048 and Robert A. Welch Foundation Grant No. AT-1877.

  2. Thermal annihilation of photo-induced radicals following dynamic nuclear polarization to produce transportable frozen hyperpolarized 13C-substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capozzi, Andrea; Cheng, Tian; Boero, Giovanni; Roussel, Christophe; Comment, Arnaud

    2017-06-01

    Hyperpolarization via dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is pivotal for boosting magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sensitivity and dissolution DNP can be used to perform in vivo real-time 13C MRI. The type of applications is however limited by the relatively fast decay time of the hyperpolarized spin state together with the constraint of having to polarize the 13C spins in a dedicated apparatus nearby but separated from the MRI magnet. We herein demonstrate that by polarizing 13C with photo-induced radicals, which can be subsequently annihilated using a thermalization process that maintains the sample temperature below its melting point, hyperpolarized 13C-substrates can be extracted from the DNP apparatus in the solid form, while maintaining the enhanced 13C polarization. The melting procedure necessary to transform the frozen solid into an injectable solution containing the hyperpolarized 13C-substrates can therefore be performed ex situ, up to several hours after extraction and storage of the polarized solid.

  3. Erythromelalgia mutation L823R shifts activation and inactivation of threshold sodium channel Nav1.7 to hyperpolarized potentials.

    PubMed

    Lampert, Angelika; Dib-Hajj, Sulayman D; Eastman, Emmanuella M; Tyrrell, Lynda; Lin, Zhimiao; Yang, Yong; Waxman, Stephen G

    2009-12-11

    Erythromelalgia (also termed erythermalgia) is a neuropathic pain syndrome, characterized by severe burning pain combined with redness in the extremities, triggered by mild warmth. The inherited form of erythromelalgia (IEM) has recently been linked to mutations in voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.7, which is expressed in peripheral nociceptors. Here, we used whole-cell voltage-clamp recordings in HEK293 cells to characterize the IEM mutation L823R, which introduces an additional positive charge into the S4 voltage sensor of domain II. The L823R mutation produces an approximately 15mV hyperpolarizing shift in the midpoint of activation and also affects the activation slope factor. Closing of the channel from the open state (deactivation) is slowed, increasing the likelihood of the channel remaining in the open state. The L823R mutation induces a approximately 10mV hyperpolarizing shift in fast-inactivation. L823R is the only naturally-occurring IEM mutation studied thus far to shift fast-inactivation to more negative potentials. We conclude that introduction of an additional charge into the S4 segment of domain II of Nav1.7 leads to a pronounced hyperpolarizing shift of activation, a change that is expected to increase nociceptor excitability despite the hyperpolarizing shift in fast-inactivation, which is unique among the IEM mutations.

  4. In vivo and in vitro liver cancer metabolism observed with hyperpolarized [5-13C]glutamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabella, C.; Karlsson, M.; Canapè, C.; Catanzaro, G.; Colombo Serra, S.; Miragoli, L.; Poggi, L.; Uggeri, F.; Venturi, L.; Jensen, P. R.; Lerche, M. H.; Tedoldi, F.

    2013-07-01

    Glutamine metabolism is, with its many links to oncogene expression, considered a crucial step in cancer metabolism and it is thereby a key target for alteration in cancer development. In particular, strong correlations have been reported between oncogene expression and expression and activity of the enzyme glutaminase. This mitochondrial enzyme, which is responsible for the deamidation of glutamine to form glutamate, is overexpressed in many tumour tissues. In animal models, glutaminase expression is correlated with tumour growth rate and it is readily possible to limit tumour growth by suppression of glutaminase activity. In principle, hyperpolarized 13C MR spectroscopy can provide insight to glutamine metabolism and should hence be a valuable tool to study changes in glutaminase activity as tumours progress. However, no such successful in vivo studies have been reported, even though several good biological models have been tested. This may, at least partly, be due to problems in preparing glutamine for hyperpolarization. This paper reports a new and improved preparation of hyperpolarized [5-13C]glutamine, which provides a highly sensitive 13C MR marker. With this preparation of hyperpolarized [5-13C]glutamine, glutaminase activity in vivo in a rat liver tumour was investigated. Moreover, this marker was also used to measure response to drug treatment in vitro in cancer cells. These examples of [5-13C]glutamine used in tumour models warrant the new preparation to allow metabolic studies with this conditionally essential amino acid.

  5. Excitatory postsynaptic potentials trigger a plateau potential in rat subthalamic neurons at hyperpolarized states.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, T; Murakami, F; Song, W J

    2001-10-01

    The subthalamic nucleus (STN) directly innervates the output structures of the basal ganglia, playing a key role in basal ganglia function. It is therefore important to understand the regulatory mechanisms for the activity of STN neurons. In the present study, we aimed to investigate how the intrinsic membrane properties of STN neurons interact with their synaptic inputs, focusing on their generation and the properties of the long-lasting, plateau potential. Whole cell recordings were obtained from STN neurons in slices prepared from postnatal day 14 (P14) to P20 rats. We found that activation of glutamate receptor-mediated excitatory synaptic potentials (EPSPs) evoked a plateau potential in a subpopulation of STN neurons (n = 13/22), in a voltage-dependent manner. Plateau potentials could be induced only when the cell was hyperpolarized to more negative than about -75 mV. Plateau potentials, evoked with a depolarizing current pulse, again only from a hyperpolarized state, were observed in about half of STN neurons tested (n = 162/327). Only in neurons in which a plateau potential could be evoked by current injection did EPSPs evoke plateau potentials. L-type Ca(2+) channels, Ca(2+)-dependent K(+) channels, and TEA-sensitive K(+) channels were found to be involved in the generation of the potential. The stability of the plateau potential, tested by the injection of a negative pulse current during the plateau phase, was found to be robust at the early phase of the potential, but decreased toward the end. As a result the early part of the plateau potential was resistant to membrane potential perturbations and would be able to support a train of action potentials. We conclude that excitatory postsynaptic potentials, evoked in a subpopulation of STN neurons at a hyperpolarized state, activate L-type Ca(2+) and other channels, leading to the generation of a plateau potential. Thus about half of STN neurons can transform short-lasting synaptic excitation into a long

  6. Hyperpolarized (3)He magnetic resonance imaging: comparison with four-dimensional x-ray computed tomography imaging in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Lindsay; Wheatley, Andrew; Castillo, Richard; Castillo, Edward; Rodrigues, George; Guerrero, Thomas; Parraga, Grace

    2012-12-01

    Pulmonary functional imaging using four-dimensional x-ray computed tomographic (4DCT) imaging and hyperpolarized (3)He magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides regional lung function estimates in patients with lung cancer in whom pulmonary function measurements are typically dominated by tumor burden. The aim of this study was to evaluate the quantitative spatial relationship between 4DCT and hyperpolarized (3)He MRI ventilation maps. Eleven patients with lung cancer provided written informed consent to 4DCT imaging and MRI performed within 11 ± 14 days. Hyperpolarized (3)He MRI was acquired in breath-hold after inhalation from functional residual capacity of 1 L hyperpolarized (3)He, whereas 4DCT imaging was acquired over a single tidal breath of room air. For hyperpolarized (3)He MRI, the percentage ventilated volume was generated using semiautomated segmentation; for 4DCT imaging, pulmonary function maps were generated using the correspondence between identical tissue elements at inspiratory and expiratory phases to generate percentage ventilated volume. After accounting for differences in image acquisition lung volumes ((3)He MRI: 1.9 ± 0.5 L ipsilateral, 2.3 ± 0.7 L contralateral; 4DCT imaging: 1.2 ± 0.3 L ipsilateral, 1.3 ± 0.4 L contralateral), there was no significant difference in percentage ventilated volume between hyperpolarized (3)He MRI (72 ± 11% ipsilateral, 79 ± 12% contralateral) and 4DCT imaging (74 ± 3% ipsilateral, 75 ± 4% contralateral). Spatial correspondence between 4DCT and (3)He MRI ventilation was evaluated using the Dice similarity coefficient index (ipsilateral, 86 ± 12%; contralateral, 88 ± 12%). Despite rather large differences in image acquisition breathing maneuvers, good spatial and significant quantitative agreement was observed for ventilation maps on hyperpolarized (3)He MRI and 4DCT imaging, suggesting that pulmonary regions with good lung function are similar between modalities in this small group of patients with

  7. Fast Dynamic 3D MRSI with Compressed Sensing and Multiband Excitation Pulses for Hyperpolarized 13C Studies

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Peder E. Z.; Hu, Simon; Lustig, Michael; Kerr, Adam B.; Nelson, Sarah J.; Kurhanewicz, John; Pauly, John M.; Vigneron, Daniel B.

    2010-01-01

    Hyperpolarized 13C MRSI can detect not only the uptake of the pre-polarized molecule but also its metabolic products in vivo, thus providing a powerful new method to study cellular metabolism. Imaging the dynamic perfusion and conversion of these metabolites provides additional tissue information but requires methods for efficient hyperpolarization usage and rapid acquisitions. In this work, we have developed a time-resolved 3D MRSI method for acquiring hyperpolarized 13C data by combining compressed sensing methods for acceleration and multiband excitation pulses to efficiently use the magnetization. This method achieved a 2 sec temporal resolution with full volumetric coverage of a mouse, and metabolites were observed for up to 60 sec following injection of hyperpolarized [1-13C]-pyruvate. The compressed sensing acquisition used random phase encode gradient blips to create a novel random undersampling pattern tailored to dynamic MRSI with sampling incoherency in four (time, frequency and two spatial) dimensions. The reconstruction was also tailored to dynamic MRSI by applying a temporal wavelet sparsifying transform in order to exploit the inherent temporal sparsity. Customized multiband excitation pulses were designed with a lower flip angle for the [1-13C]-pyruvate substrate given its higher concentration than its metabolic products ([1-13C]-lactate and [1-13C]-alanine), thus using less hyperpolarization per excitation. This approach has enabled the monitoring of perfusion and uptake of the pyruvate, and the conversion dynamics to lactate and alanine throughout a volume with high spatial and temporal resolution. PMID:20939089

  8. Remodeling of Hyperpolarization-Activated Current, Ih, in Ah-Type Visceral Ganglion Neurons Following Ovariectomy in Adult Rats

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wen-Xiao; Yan, Zhen-Yu; Liu, Yang; Zhou, Jia-Ying; Zhang, Hao-Cheng; Wang, Li-Juan; Pan, Xiao-Dong; Fu, Yili

    2013-01-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated currents (Ih) mediated by hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels modulate excitability of myelinated A− and Ah-type visceral ganglion neurons (VGN). Whether alterations in Ih underlie the previously reported reduction of excitability of myelinated Ah-type VGNs following ovariectomy (OVX) has remained unclear. Here we used the intact nodose ganglion preparation in conjunction with electrophysiological approaches to examine the role of Ih remodeling in altering Ah-type neuron excitability following ovariectomy in adult rats. Ah-type neurons were identified based on their afferent conduction velocity. Ah-type neurons in nodose ganglia from non-OVX rats exhibited a voltage ‘sag’ as well as ‘rebound’ action potentials immediately following hyperpolarizing current injections, which both were suppressed by the Ih blocker ZD7288. Repetitive spike activity induced afterhyperpolarizations lasting several hundreds of milliseconds (termed post-excitatory membrane hyperpolarizations, PEMHs), which were significantly reduced by ZD7288, suggesting that they resulted from transient deactivation of Ih during the preceding spike trains. Ovariectomy reduced whole-cell Ih density, caused a hyperpolarizing shift of the voltage-dependence of Ih activation, and slowed Ih activation. OVX-induced Ih remodeling was accompanied by a flattening of the stimulus frequency/response curve and loss of PEMHs. Also, HCN1 mRNA levels were reduced by ∼30% in nodose ganglia from OVX rats compared with their non-OVX counterparts. Acute exposure of nodose ganglia to 17beta-estradiol partly restored Ih density and accelerated Ih activation in Ah-type cells. In conclusion, Ih plays a significant role in modulating the excitability of myelinated Ah-type VGNs in adult female rats. PMID:23951107

  9. Fast Volumetric Spatial-Spectral MR Imaging of Hyperpolarized 13C-Labeled Compounds using Multiple Echo 3D bSSFP

    PubMed Central

    Perman, William H.; Bhattacharya, Pratip; Leupold, Jochen; Lin, Alexander P.; Harris, Kent C.; Norton, Valerie A.; Hovener, Jan B.; Ross, Brian D.

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE The goal of this work was to develop a fast 3D chemical shift imaging technique for the non-invasive measurement of hyperpolarized 13C-labeled substrates and metabolic products at low concentration. MATERIALS AND METHODS Multiple echo 3D balanced steady state MR imaging (ME-3DbSSFP) was performed in vitro on a syringe containing hyperpolarized [1,3,3-2H3; 1-13C]2-hydroxyethylpropionate (HEP) adjacent to a 13C-enriched acetate phantom, and in vivo on a rat before and after IV injection of hyperpolarized HEP at 1.5 T. Chemical shift images of the hyperpolarized HEP were derived from the multiple echo data by Fourier transformation along the echoes on a voxel by voxel basis for each slice of the 3D data set. RESULTS ME-3DbSSFP imaging was able to provide chemical shift images of hyperpolarized HEP in vivo, and in a rat with isotropic 7 mm spatial resolution, 93 Hz spectral resolution and 16 second temporal resolution for a period greater than 45 seconds. CONCLUSION Multiple echo 3D bSSFP imaging can provide chemical shift images of hyperpolarized 13C-labeled compounds in vivo with relatively high spatial resolution and moderate spectral resolution. The increased signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of this 3D technique will enable the detection of hyperpolarized 13C-labeled metabolites at lower concentrations as compared to a 2D technique. PMID:20171034

  10. Hyperpolarized 83Kr magnetic resonance imaging of alveolar degradation in a rat model of emphysema.

    PubMed

    Lilburn, David M L; Lesbats, Clémentine; Six, Joseph S; Dubuis, Eric; Yew-Booth, Liang; Shaw, Dominick E; Belvisi, Maria G; Birrell, Mark A; Pavlovskaya, Galina E; Meersmann, Thomas

    2015-06-06

    Hyperpolarized (83)Kr surface quadrupolar relaxation (SQUARE) generates MRI contrast that was previously shown to correlate with surface-to-volume ratios in porous model surface systems. The underlying physics of SQUARE contrast is conceptually different from any other current MRI methodology as the method uses the nuclear electric properties of the spin I = 9/2 isotope (83)Kr. To explore the usage of this non-radioactive isotope for pulmonary pathophysiology, MRI SQUARE contrast was acquired in excised rat lungs obtained from an elastase-induced model of emphysema. A significant (83)Kr T1 relaxation time increase in the SQUARE contrast was found in the elastase-treated lungs compared with the baseline data from control lungs. The SQUARE contrast suggests a reduction in pulmonary surface-to-volume ratio in the emphysema model that was validated by histology. The finding supports usage of (83)Kr SQUARE as a new biomarker for surface-to-volume ratio changes in emphysema.

  11. Quadrupolar relaxation of hyperpolarized krypton-83 as a probe for surfaces.

    PubMed

    Stupic, Karl F; Cleveland, Zackary I; Pavlovskaya, Galina E; Meersmann, Thomas

    2006-02-01

    This work reports the first systematic study of relaxation experienced by the hyperpolarized (hp) noble gas isotope (83)Kr (I=9/2) in contact with surfaces. The spin-lattice relaxation of (83)Kr is found to depend strongly on the chemical composition of the surfaces in the vicinity of the gas. This effect is caused by quadrupolar interactions during brief periods of surface adsorption that are the dominating source of longitudinal spin relaxation in the (83)Kr atoms. Simple model systems of closest packed glass beads with uniform but variable bead sizes are used for the relaxation measurements. The observed relaxation rates depend strongly on the chemical treatment of the glass surfaces and on the surface to volume ratio. Hp (83)Kr NMR relaxation measurements of porous polymers with pore sizes of 70-250 microm demonstrate the potential use of this new technique for material sciences applications.

  12. Hyperpolarized krypton-83 as a contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Pavlovskaya, Galina E; Cleveland, Zackary I; Stupic, Karl F; Basaraba, Randall J; Meersmann, Thomas

    2005-12-20

    For the first time, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with hyperpolarized (hp) krypton-83 (83Kr) has become available. The relaxation of the nuclear spin of 83Kr atoms (I = 9/2) is driven by quadrupolar interactions during brief adsorption periods on surrounding material interfaces. Experiments in model systems reveal that the longitudinal relaxation of hp 83Kr gas strongly depends on the chemical composition of the materials. The relaxation-weighted contrast in hp 83Kr MRI allows for the distinction between hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces. The feasibility of hp 83Kr MRI of airways is tested in canine lung tissue by using krypton gas with natural abundance isotopic distribution. Additionally, the influence of magnetic field strength and the presence of a breathable concentration of molecular oxygen on longitudinal relaxation are investigated.

  13. MRI of the lung gas-space at very low-field using hyperpolarized noble gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatesh, Arvind K.; Zhang, Adelaide X.; Mansour, Joey; Kubatina, Lyubov; Oh, Chang Hyun; Blasche, Gregory; Selim Unlu, M.; Balamore, Dilip; Jolesz, Ferenc A.; Goldberg, Bennett B.; hide

    2003-01-01

    In hyperpolarized (HP) noble-gas magnetic resonance imaging, large nuclear spin polarizations, about 100,000 times that ordinarily obtainable at thermal equilibrium, are created in 3He and 129Xe. The enhanced signal that results can be employed in high-resolution MRI studies of void spaces such as in the lungs. In HP gas MRI the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) depends only weakly on the static magnetic field (B(0)), making very low-field (VLF) MRI possible; indeed, it is possible to contemplate portable MRI using light-weight solenoids or permanent magnets. This article reports the first in vivo VLF MR images of the lungs in humans and in rats, obtained at a field of only 15 millitesla (150 Gauss).

  14. In vivo detection of brain Krebs cycle intermediate by hyperpolarized magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Mishkovsky, Mor; Comment, Arnaud; Gruetter, Rolf

    2012-12-01

    The Krebs (or tricarboxylic acid (TCA)) cycle has a central role in the regulation of brain energy regulation and metabolism, yet brain TCA cycle intermediates have never been directly detected in vivo. This study reports the first direct in vivo observation of a TCA cycle intermediate in intact brain, namely, 2-oxoglutarate, a key biomolecule connecting metabolism to neuronal activity. Our observation reveals important information about in vivo biochemical processes hitherto considered undetectable. In particular, it provides direct evidence that transport across the inner mitochondria membrane is rate limiting in the brain. The hyperpolarized magnetic resonance protocol designed for this study opens the way to direct and real-time studies of TCA cycle kinetics.

  15. Real-time Detection of Polymerization Reactions with Hyperpolarized Xenon at Low Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glöggler, Stefan; Blümich, Bernhard; Appelt, Stephan

    2011-03-01

    For process control it is desirable to develop simple devices for studying polymerization reactions in real-time and in-situ. We are demonstrating an approach using NMR at fields as low as 35 G and hyperpolarized xenon, which allows us to observe polymerization reactions in real-time. The investigated reaction is a free radical polymerization with the initiator azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN) and the monomer methyl methacrylate (MMA). AIBN and MMA are mixed together in a sample tube under noble gas atmosphere, and the reaction is started by irradiation with UV light (360 nm). As the reaction goes on, xenon NMR spectra are acquired. They show increasing line broadening and a variation of the chemical shift depending on the state of polymerization. This observation gives rise to the idea that a single-sided high resolution NMR sensor can be developed with which at least light induced polymerization reactions can be studied in-situ and in real-time.

  16. In vivo NMR of hyperpolarized 3He in the human lung at very low magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bidinosti, Christopher P.; Choukeife, Jamal; Nacher, Pierre-Jean; Tastevin, Geneviève

    2003-05-01

    We present NMR measurements of the diffusion of hyperpolarized 3He in the human lung performed at fields much lower than those of conventional MRI scanners. The measurements were made on standing subjects using homebuilt apparatus operating at 3 mT. O 2-limited transverse relaxation ( T2 up to 15-35 s) could be measured in vivo. Accurate global diffusion measurements have been performed in vivo and in a plastic bag; the average apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) in vivo was 14.2±0.6 mm2/ s, whereas the diffusion coefficient in the bag ( 3He diluted in N 2) was 79.5±1 mm2/ s. 1D ADC mapping with high SNR (˜200-300) demonstrates the real possibility of performing quality lung imaging at extremely low fields.

  17. In vivo NMR of hyperpolarized 3He in the human lung at very low magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Bidinosti, Christopher P; Choukeife, Jamal; Nacher, Pierre Jean; Tastevin, Geneviève

    2003-05-01

    We present NMR measurements of the diffusion of hyperpolarized 3He in the human lung performed at fields much lower than those of conventional MRI scanners. The measurements were made on standing subjects using homebuilt apparatus operating at 3mT. O(2)-limited transverse relaxation (T(2) up to 15-35s) could be measured in vivo. Accurate global diffusion measurements have been performed in vivo and in a plastic bag; the average apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) in vivo was 14.2+/-0.6mm(2)/s, whereas the diffusion coefficient in the bag (3He diluted in N(2)) was 79.5+/-1mm(2)/s. 1D ADC mapping with high SNR ( approximately 200-300) demonstrates the real possibility of performing quality lung imaging at extremely low fields.

  18. Efficient room-temperature nuclear spin hyperpolarization of a defect atom in a semiconductor.

    PubMed

    Puttisong, Y; Wang, X J; Buyanova, I A; Geelhaar, L; Riechert, H; Ptak, A J; Tu, C W; Chen, W M

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear spin hyperpolarization is essential to future solid-state quantum computation using nuclear spin qubits and in highly sensitive magnetic resonance imaging. Though efficient dynamic nuclear polarization in semiconductors has been demonstrated at low temperatures for decades, its realization at room temperature is largely lacking. Here we demonstrate that a combined effect of efficient spin-dependent recombination and hyperfine coupling can facilitate strong dynamic nuclear polarization of a defect atom in a semiconductor at room temperature. We provide direct evidence that a sizeable nuclear field (~150 Gauss) and nuclear spin polarization (~15%) sensed by conduction electrons in GaNAs originates from dynamic nuclear polarization of a Ga interstitial defect. We further show that the dynamic nuclear polarization process is remarkably fast and is completed in <5 μs at room temperature. The proposed new concept could pave a way to overcome a major obstacle in achieving strong dynamic nuclear polarization at room temperature, desirable for practical device applications.

  19. Parameterization of hyperpolarized (13)C-bicarbonate-dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization.

    PubMed

    Scholz, David Johannes; Otto, Angela M; Hintermair, Josef; Schilling, Franz; Frank, Annette; Köllisch, Ulrich; Janich, Martin A; Schulte, Rolf F; Schwaiger, Markus; Haase, Axel; Menzel, Marion I

    2015-12-01

    (13)C metabolic MRI using hyperpolarized (13)C-bicarbonate enables preclinical detection of pH. To improve signal-to-noise ratio, experimental procedures were refined, and the influence of pH, buffer capacity, temperature, and field strength were investigated. Bicarbonate preparation was investigated. Bicarbonate was prepared and applied in spectroscopy at 1, 3, 14 T using pure dissolution, culture medium, and MCF-7 cell spheroids. Healthy rats were imaged by spectral-spatial spiral acquisition for spatial and temporal bicarbonate distribution, pH mapping, and signal decay analysis. An optimized preparation technique for maximum solubility of 6 mol/L and polarization levels of 19-21% is presented; T1 and SNR dependency on field strength, buffer capacity, and pH was investigated. pH mapping in vivo is demonstrated. An optimized bicarbonate preparation and experimental procedure provided improved T1 and SNR values, allowing in vitro and in vivo applications.

  20. MRI of the lung gas-space at very low-field using hyperpolarized noble gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatesh, Arvind K.; Zhang, Adelaide X.; Mansour, Joey; Kubatina, Lyubov; Oh, Chang Hyun; Blasche, Gregory; Selim Unlu, M.; Balamore, Dilip; Jolesz, Ferenc A.; Goldberg, Bennett B.; Albert, Mitchell S.

    2003-01-01

    In hyperpolarized (HP) noble-gas magnetic resonance imaging, large nuclear spin polarizations, about 100,000 times that ordinarily obtainable at thermal equilibrium, are created in 3He and 129Xe. The enhanced signal that results can be employed in high-resolution MRI studies of void spaces such as in the lungs. In HP gas MRI the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) depends only weakly on the static magnetic field (B(0)), making very low-field (VLF) MRI possible; indeed, it is possible to contemplate portable MRI using light-weight solenoids or permanent magnets. This article reports the first in vivo VLF MR images of the lungs in humans and in rats, obtained at a field of only 15 millitesla (150 Gauss).

  1. Hyperpolarization of Frozen Hydrocarbon Gases by Dynamic Nuclear Polarization at 1.2 K.

    PubMed

    Vuichoud, Basile; Canet, Estel; Milani, Jonas; Bornet, Aurélien; Baudouin, David; Veyre, Laurent; Gajan, David; Emsley, Lyndon; Lesage, Anne; Copéret, Christophe; Thieuleux, Chloé; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey; Koptyug, Igor; Jannin, Sami

    2016-08-18

    We report a simple and general method for the hyperpolarization of condensed gases by dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP). The gases are adsorbed in the pores of structured mesoporous silica matrices known as HYPSOs (HYper Polarizing SOlids) that have paramagnetic polarizing agents covalently bound to the surface of the mesopores. DNP is performed at low temperatures and moderate magnetic fields (T = 1.2 K and B0 = 6.7 T). Frequency-modulated microwave irradiation is applied close to the electron spin resonance frequency (f = 188.3 GHz), and the electron spin polarization of the polarizing agents of HYPSO is transferred to the nuclear spins of the frozen gas. A proton polarization as high as P((1)H) = 70% can be obtained, which can be subsequently transferred to (13)C in natural abundance by cross-polarization, yielding up to P((13)C) = 27% for ethylene.

  2. Pulmonary hyperpolarized noble gas MRI: recent advances and perspectives in clinical application.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zaiyi; Araki, Tetsuro; Okajima, Yuka; Albert, Mitchell; Hatabu, Hiroto

    2014-07-01

    The invention of hyperpolarized (HP) noble gas MRI using helium-3 ((3)He) or xenon-129 ((129)Xe) has provided a new method to evaluate lung function. Using HP (3)He or (129)Xe for inhalation into the lung air spaces as an MRI contrast agent significantly increases MR signal and makes pulmonary ventilation imaging feasible. This review focuses on important aspects of pulmonary HP noble gas MRI, including the following: (1) functional imaging types, (2) applications for major pulmonary diseases, (3) safety considerations, and (4) future directions. Although it is still challenging to use pulmonary HP noble gas MRI clinically, the technology offers promise for the investigation of the microstructure and function of the lungs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Reaction monitoring using hyperpolarized NMR with scaling of heteronuclear couplings by optimal tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guannan; Schilling, Franz; Glaser, Steffen J.; Hilty, Christian

    2016-11-01

    Off-resonance decoupling using the method of Scaling of Heteronuclear Couplings by Optimal Tracking (SHOT) enables determination of heteronuclear correlations of chemical shifts in single scan NMR spectra. Through modulation of J-coupling evolution by shaped radio frequency pulses, off resonance decoupling using SHOT pulses causes a user-defined dependence of the observed J-splitting, such as the splitting of 13C peaks, on the chemical shift offset of coupled nuclei, such as 1H. Because a decoupling experiment requires only a single scan, this method is suitable for characterizing on-going chemical reactions using hyperpolarization by dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (D-DNP). We demonstrate the calculation of [13C, 1H] chemical shift correlations of the carbanionic active sites from hyperpolarized styrene polymerized using sodium naphthalene as an initiator. While off resonance decoupling by SHOT pulses does not enhance the resolution in the same way as a 2D NMR spectrum would, the ability to obtain the correlations in single scans makes this method ideal for determination of chemical shifts in on-going reactions on the second time scale. In addition, we present a novel SHOT pulse that allows to scale J-splittings 50% larger than the respective J-coupling constant. This feature can be used to enhance the resolution of the indirectly detected chemical shift and reduce peak overlap, as demonstrated in a model reaction between p-anisaldehyde and isobutylamine. For both pulses, the accuracy is evaluated under changing signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) of the peaks from reactants and reaction products, with an overall standard deviation of chemical shift differences compared to reference spectra of 0.02 ppm when measured on a 400 MHz NMR spectrometer. Notably, the appearance of decoupling side-bands, which scale with peak intensity, appears to be of secondary importance.

  4. Hyperpolarization-Activated Currents and Subthreshold Resonance in Granule Cells of the Olfactory Bulb

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Ruilong; Ferguson, Katie A.; Meijer, Dimphna H.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract An important contribution to neural circuit oscillatory dynamics is the ongoing activation and inactivation of hyperpolarization-activated currents (Ih). Network synchrony dynamics play an important role in the initial processing of odor signals by the main olfactory bulb (MOB) and accessory olfactory bulb (AOB). In the mouse olfactory bulb, we show that Ih is present in granule cells (GCs), the most prominent inhibitory neuron in the olfactory bulb, and that Ih underlies subthreshold resonance in GCs. In accord with the properties of Ih, the currents exhibited sensitivity to changes in extracellular K+ concentration and ZD7288 (4-ethylphenylamino-1,2-dimethyl-6-methylaminopyrimidin chloride), a blocker of Ih. ZD7288 also caused GCs to hyperpolarize and increase their input resistance, suggesting that Ih is active at rest in GCs. The inclusion of cAMP in the intracellular solution shifted the activation of Ih to less negative potentials in the MOB, but not in the AOB, suggesting that channels with different subunit composition mediate Ih in these regions. Furthermore, we show that mature GCs exhibit Ih-dependent subthreshold resonance in the theta frequency range (4–12 Hz). Another inhibitory subtype in the MOB, the periglomerular cells, exhibited Ih-dependent subthreshold resonance in the delta range (1–4 Hz), while principal neurons, the mitral cells, do not exhibit Ih-dependent subthreshold resonance. Importantly, Ih size, as well as the strength and frequency of resonance in GCs, exhibited a postnatal developmental progression, suggesting that this development of Ih in GCs may differentially contribute to their integration of sensory input and contribution to oscillatory circuit dynamics. PMID:27844056

  5. Hyperpolarized Functional Magnetic Resonance of Murine Skeletal Muscle Enabled by Multiple Tracer-Paradigm Synchronizations

    PubMed Central

    Leftin, Avigdor; Roussel, Tangi; Frydman, Lucio

    2014-01-01

    Measuring metabolism's time- and space-dependent responses upon stimulation lies at the core of functional magnetic resonance imaging. While focusing on water's sole resonance, further insight could arise from monitoring the temporal responses arising from the metabolites themselves, in what is known as functional magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Performing these measurements in real time, however, is severely challenged by the short functional timescales and low concentrations of natural metabolites. Dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization is an emerging technique that can potentially alleviate this, as it provides a massive sensitivity enhancement allowing one to probe low-concentration tracers and products in a single-scan. Still, conventional implementations of this hyperpolarization approach are not immediately amenable to the repeated acquisitions needed in real-time functional settings. This work proposes a strategy for functional magnetic resonance of hyperpolarized metabolites that bypasses this limitation, and enables the observation of real-time metabolic changes through the synchronization of stimuli-triggered, multiple-bolus injections of the metabolic tracer 13C1-pyruvate. This new approach is demonstrated with paradigms tailored to reveal in vivo thresholds of murine hind-limb skeletal muscle activation, involving the conversion of 13C1-pyruvate to 13C1-lactate and 13C1-alanine. These functional hind-limb studies revealed that graded skeletal muscle stimulation causes commensurate increases in glycolytic metabolism in a frequency- and amplitude-dependent fashion, that can be monitored on the seconds/minutes timescale using dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization. Spectroscopic imaging further allowed the in vivo visualization of uptake, transformation and distribution of the tracer and products, in fast-twitch glycolytic and in slow-twitch oxidative muscle fiber groups. While these studies open vistas in time and sensitivity for metabolic

  6. Hyperpolarized [(13)C]ketobutyrate, a molecular analog of pyruvate with modified specificity for LDH isoforms.

    PubMed

    von Morze, Cornelius; Bok, Robert A; Ohliger, Michael A; Zhu, Zihan; Vigneron, Daniel B; Kurhanewicz, John

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate (13) C hyperpolarization of α-ketobutyrate (αKB), an endogenous molecular analog of pyruvate, and its in vivo enzymatic conversion via lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) using localized MR spectroscopy. Hyperpolarized (HP) (13) C MR experiments were conducted using [(13) C]αKB with rats in vivo and with isolated LDH enzyme in vitro, along with comparative experiments using [(13) C]pyruvate. Based on differences in the kinetics of its reaction with individual LDH isoforms, HP [(13) C]αKB was investigated as a novel MR probe, with added specificity for activity of LDHB-expressed H ("heart"-type) subunits of LDH (e.g., constituents of LDH-1 isoform). Comparable T1 and polarization values to pyruvate were attained (T1  = 52 s at 3 tesla [T], polarization = 10%, at C1 ). MR experiments showed rapid enzymatic conversion with substantially increased specificity. Formation of product HP [(13) C]α-hydroxybutyrate (αHB) from αKB in vivo was increased 2.7-fold in cardiac slabs relative to liver and kidney slabs. In vitro studies resulted in 5.0-fold higher product production from αKB with bovine heart LDH-1, as compared with pyruvate. HP [(13) C]αKB may be a useful MR probe of cardiac metabolism and other applications where the role of H subunits of LDH is significant (e.g., renal cortex and brain). © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Simultaneous in vivo assessment of cardiac and hepatic metabolism in the diabetic rat using hyperpolarized MRS

    PubMed Central

    Ball, Daniel R.; Ball, Vicky; Dodd, Michael S.; Miller, Jack J.; Heather, Lisa C.; Tyler, Damian J.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding and assessing diabetic metabolism is vital for monitoring disease progression and improving treatment of patients. In vivo assessments, using MRI and MRS, provide non‐invasive and accurate measurements, and the development of hyperpolarized 13C spectroscopy in particular has been demonstrated to provide valuable metabolic data in real time. Until now, studies have focussed on individual organs. However, diabetes is a systemic disease affecting multiple tissues in the body. Therefore, we have developed a technique to simultaneously measure metabolism in both the heart and liver during a single acquisition. A hyperpolarized 13C MRS protocol was developed to allow acquisition of metabolic data from the heart and liver during a single scan. This protocol was subsequently used to assess metabolism in the heart and liver of seven control male Wistar rats and seven diabetic rats (diabetes was induced by three weeks of high‐fat feeding and a 30 mg/kg injection of streptozotocin). Using our new acquisition, we observed decreased cardiac and hepatic pyruvate dehydrogenase flux in our diabetic rat model. These diabetic rats also had increased blood glucose levels, decreased insulin, and increased hepatic triglycerides. Decreased production of hepatic [1‐13C]alanine was observed in the diabetic group, but this change was not present in the hearts of the same diabetic animals. We have demonstrated the ability to measure cardiac and hepatic metabolism simultaneously, with sufficient sensitivity to detect metabolic alterations in both organs. Further, we have non‐invasively observed the different reactions of the heart and liver to the metabolic challenge of diabetes. PMID:27779334

  8. Mis-estimation and bias of hyperpolarized apparent diffusion coefficient measurements due to slice profile effects.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Jeremy W; Milshteyn, Eugene; Marco-Rius, Irene; Ohliger, Michael; Vigneron, Daniel B; Larson, Peder E Z

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this work was to explore the impact of slice profile effects on apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) mapping of hyperpolarized (HP) substrates. Slice profile effects were simulated using a Gaussian radiofrequency (RF) pulse with a variety of flip angle schedules and b-value ordering schemes. A long T1 water phantom was used to validate the simulation results, and ADC mapping of HP [(13) C,(15) N2 ]urea was performed on the murine liver to assess these effects in vivo. Slice profile effects result in excess signal after repeated RF pulses, causing bias in HP measurements. The largest error occurs for metabolites with small ADCs, resulting in up to 10-fold overestimation for metabolites that are in more-restricted environments. A mixed b-value scheme substantially reduces this bias, whereas scaling the slice-select gradient can mitigate it completely. In vivo, the liver ADC of hyperpolarized [(13) C,(15) N2 ]urea is nearly 70% lower (0.99 ± 0.22 vs 1.69 ± 0.21 × 10(-3) mm(2) /s) when slice-select gradient scaling is used. Slice profile effects can lead to bias in HP ADC measurements. A mixed b-value ordering scheme can reduce this bias compared to sequential b-value ordering. Slice-select gradient scaling can also correct for this deviation, minimizing bias and providing more-precise ADC measurements of HP substrates. Magn Reson Med 78:1087-1092, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  9. Components of after-hyperpolarization in magnocellular neurones of the rat supraoptic nucleus in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Greffrath, Wolfgang; Martin, Erich; Reuss, Stefan; Boehmer, Gerd

    1998-01-01

    The pharmacological sensitivity of hyperpolarizing components of spike train after-potentials was examined in sixty-one magnocellular neurones of the rat supraoptic nucleus using intracellular recording techniques in a brain slice preparation.In 26 % of all neurones a slow after-hyperpolarization (AHP) was observed in addition to a fast AHP. In 31 % of all neurones a depolarizing after-potential (DAP) was observed.The fast AHP was blocked by apamin whereas the slow AHP was blocked by charybdotoxin (ChTX). The DAP was enhanced by ChTX or a DAP was unmasked if not present during the control period.Low concentrations of TEA (0.15–1.5 mm) induced effects on the slow AHP and the DAP essentially resembling those of ChTX. The same was true for the effects of CoCl2 (1 mm).Spike train after-potentials were not affected by either iberiotoxin (IbTX), a selective high-conductance potassium (BK) channel antagonist, or margatoxin (MgTX), a Kv1.3 α-subunit antagonist.Kv1.3 α-subunit immunohistochemistry revealed that these units are not expressed in the somato-dendritic region of supraoptic neurones.The effects of ChTX, IbTX, MgTX, TEA, CoCl2 and CdCl2 on spike train after-potentials are interpreted in terms of an induction of the slow AHP by the activation of calcium-dependent potassium channels of intermediate single channel conductance (IK channels).The results suggest that at least the majority of supraoptic magnocellular neurones share the capability of generating both a slow AHP and a DAP. The slow AHP may act to control the expression of the DAP, thus regulating the excitability of magnocellular neurones. The interaction of the slow AHP and the DAP may be important for the control of phasic discharge. PMID:9806998

  10. Reaction monitoring using hyperpolarized NMR with scaling of heteronuclear couplings by optimal tracking.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guannan; Schilling, Franz; Glaser, Steffen J; Hilty, Christian

    2016-11-01

    Off-resonance decoupling using the method of Scaling of Heteronuclear Couplings by Optimal Tracking (SHOT) enables determination of heteronuclear correlations of chemical shifts in single scan NMR spectra. Through modulation of J-coupling evolution by shaped radio frequency pulses, off resonance decoupling using SHOT pulses causes a user-defined dependence of the observed J-splitting, such as the splitting of (13)C peaks, on the chemical shift offset of coupled nuclei, such as (1)H. Because a decoupling experiment requires only a single scan, this method is suitable for characterizing on-going chemical reactions using hyperpolarization by dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (D-DNP). We demonstrate the calculation of [(13)C, (1)H] chemical shift correlations of the carbanionic active sites from hyperpolarized styrene polymerized using sodium naphthalene as an initiator. While off resonance decoupling by SHOT pulses does not enhance the resolution in the same way as a 2D NMR spectrum would, the ability to obtain the correlations in single scans makes this method ideal for determination of chemical shifts in on-going reactions on the second time scale. In addition, we present a novel SHOT pulse that allows to scale J-splittings 50% larger than the respective J-coupling constant. This feature can be used to enhance the resolution of the indirectly detected chemical shift and reduce peak overlap, as demonstrated in a model reaction between p-anisaldehyde and isobutylamine. For both pulses, the accuracy is evaluated under changing signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) of the peaks from reactants and reaction products, with an overall standard deviation of chemical shift differences compared to reference spectra of 0.02ppm when measured on a 400MHz NMR spectrometer. Notably, the appearance of decoupling side-bands, which scale with peak intensity, appears to be of secondary importance.

  11. Regional anisotropy of airspace orientation in the lung as assessed with hyperpolarized helium-3 diffusion MRI.

    PubMed

    Komlosi, Peter; Altes, Talissa A; Qing, Kun; Mooney, Karen E; Miller, G Wilson; Mata, Jaime F; de Lange, Eduard E; Tobias, William A; Cates, Gordon D; Brookeman, James R; Mugler, John P

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate regional anisotropy of lung-airspace orientation by assessing the dependence of helium-3 ((3) He) apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values on the direction of diffusion sensitization at two field strengths. Hyperpolarized (3) He diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the lung was performed at 0.43T and 1.5T in 12 healthy volunteers. A gradient-echo pulse sequence was used with a bipolar diffusion-sensitization gradient applied separately along three orthogonal directions. ADC maps, median ADC values, and signal-to-noise ratios were calculated from the diffusion-weighted images. Two readers scored the ADC maps for increased values at lung margins, major fissures, or within focal central regions. ADC values were found to depend on the direction of diffusion sensitization (P < 0.01, except for craniocaudal vs. anteroposterior directions at 1.5T) and were increased at the lateral and medial surfaces for left-right diffusion sensitization (12 of 12 subjects); at the apex and base (9 of 12), and along the major fissure (8 of 12), for craniocaudal diffusion sensitization; and at the most anterior and posterior lung (10 of 12) for anteroposterior diffusion sensitization. Median ADC values at 0.43T (0.201 ± 0.017, left-right; 0.193 ± 0.019, craniocaudal; and 0.187 ± 0.017 cm(2) /s, anteroposterior) were slightly lower than those at 1.5T (0.205 ± 0.017, 0.197 ± 0.017 and 0.194 ± 0.016 cm(2) /s, respectively; P < 0.05). These findings indicate that diffusion-weighted hyperpolarized (3) He MRI can detect regional anisotropy of lung-airspace orientation, including that associated with preferential orientation of terminal airways near pleural surfaces. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Regional Anisotropy of Airspace Orientation in the Lung as Assessed with Hyperpolarized Helium-3 Diffusion MRI

    PubMed Central

    Komlosi, Peter; Altes, Talissa A.; Qing, Kun; Mooney, Karen E.; Miller, G. Wilson; Mata, Jaime F.; de Lange, Eduard E.; Tobias, William A.; Cates, Gordon D.; Brookeman, James R.; Mugler, John P.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate regional anisotropy of lung-airspace orientation by assessing the dependence of helium-3 (3He) apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values on the direction of diffusion sensitization at two field strengths. Materials and Methods Hyperpolarized 3He diffusion-weighted MRI of the lung was performed at 0.43T and 1.5T in 12 healthy volunteers. A gradient-echo pulse sequence was used with a bipolar diffusion-sensitization gradient applied separately along three orthogonal directions. ADC maps, median ADC values and signal-to-noise ratios were calculated from the diffusion-weighted images. Two readers scored the ADC maps for increased values at lung margins, major fissures, or within focal central regions. Results ADC values were found to depend on the direction of diffusion sensitization (p < 0.01, except for craniocaudal versus anteroposterior directions at 1.5T) and were increased at the lateral and medial surfaces for left-right diffusion sensitization (12 of 12 subjects); at the apex and base (9 of 12), and along the major fissure (8 of 12), for craniocaudal diffusion sensitization; and at the most anterior and posterior lung (10 of 12) for anteroposterior diffusion sensitization. Median ADC values at 0.43T (0.201 ± 0.017, left-right; 0.193 ± 0.019, craniocaudal; and 0.187 ± 0.017 cm2/s, anteroposterior) were slightly lower than those at 1.5T (0.205 ± 0.017, 0.197 ± 0.017 and 0.194 ± 0.016 cm2/s, respectively; p < 0.05). Conclusion These findings indicate that diffusion-weighted hyperpolarized 3He MRI can detect regional anisotropy of lung-airspace orientation, including that associated with preferential orientation of terminal airways near pleural surfaces. PMID:26012720

  13. Hyperpolarized functional magnetic resonance of murine skeletal muscle enabled by multiple tracer-paradigm synchronizations.

    PubMed

    Leftin, Avigdor; Roussel, Tangi; Frydman, Lucio

    2014-01-01

    Measuring metabolism's time- and space-dependent responses upon stimulation lies at the core of functional magnetic resonance imaging. While focusing on water's sole resonance, further insight could arise from monitoring the temporal responses arising from the metabolites themselves, in what is known as functional magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Performing these measurements in real time, however, is severely challenged by the short functional timescales and low concentrations of natural metabolites. Dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization is an emerging technique that can potentially alleviate this, as it provides a massive sensitivity enhancement allowing one to probe low-concentration tracers and products in a single-scan. Still, conventional implementations of this hyperpolarization approach are not immediately amenable to the repeated acquisitions needed in real-time functional settings. This work proposes a strategy for functional magnetic resonance of hyperpolarized metabolites that bypasses this limitation, and enables the observation of real-time metabolic changes through the synchronization of stimuli-triggered, multiple-bolus injections of the metabolic tracer 13C1-pyruvate. This new approach is demonstrated with paradigms tailored to reveal in vivo thresholds of murine hind-limb skeletal muscle activation, involving the conversion of 13C1-pyruvate to 13C1-lactate and 13C1-alanine. These functional hind-limb studies revealed that graded skeletal muscle stimulation causes commensurate increases in glycolytic metabolism in a frequency- and amplitude-dependent fashion, that can be monitored on the seconds/minutes timescale using dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization. Spectroscopic imaging further allowed the in vivo visualization of uptake, transformation and distribution of the tracer and products, in fast-twitch glycolytic and in slow-twitch oxidative muscle fiber groups. While these studies open vistas in time and sensitivity for metabolic

  14. Endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor contributes to hypoxia-induced skeletal muscle vasodilation in humans.

    PubMed

    Spilk, Samson; Herr, Michael D; Sinoway, Lawrence I; Leuenberger, Urs A

    2013-12-01

    Systemic hypoxia causes skeletal muscle vasodilation, thereby preserving O2 delivery to active tissues. Nitric oxide (NO), adenosine, and prostaglandins contribute to this vasodilation, but other factors may also play a role. We tested the hypothesis that regional inhibition of endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor with the cytochrome P-450 2C9 antagonist fluconazole, alone or combined with the NO synthase antagonist N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA), attenuates hypoxia-induced vasodilation. We compared forearm blood flow (FBF) and skin blood flow before and during brachial artery infusion of fluconazole (0.3 mg/min; trial 1) or fluconazole + L-NMMA (50 mg over 10 min; trial 2) and during systemic hypoxia (10 min, arterial Po2 ~37 mmHg) in infused (experimental) and control forearms of 12 healthy humans. During normoxia, fluconazole and fluconazole + L-NMMA reduced (P < 0.05) forearm vascular conductance (FVC) by ~10% and ~18%, respectively. During hypoxia and fluconazole (trial 1), FVC increased by 1.76 ± 0.37 and 0.95 ± 0.35 units in control and experimental forearms, respectively (P < 0.05). During hypoxia and fluconazole + L-NMMA (trial 2), FVC increased by 2.32 ± 0.51 and 0.72 ± 0.22 units in control and experimental forearms, respectively (P < 0.05). Similarly, during hypoxia with L-NMMA alone (trial 3; n = 8) FVC increased by 1.51 ± 0.46 and 0.45 ± 0.32 units in control and experimental forearms, respectively (P < 0.05). These effects were not due to altered skin blood flow. We conclude that endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor contributes to basal vascular tone and to hypoxia-induced skeletal muscle vasodilation and could be particularly relevant when other vasodilator systems are impaired.

  15. Endothelial-derived hyperpolarization contributes to acetylcholine-mediated vasodilation in human skin in a dose-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Brunt, Vienna E; Fujii, Naoto; Minson, Christopher T

    2015-11-01

    Cutaneous acetylcholine (ACh)-mediated dilation is commonly used to assess microvascular function, but the mechanisms of dilation are poorly understood. Depending on dose and method of administration, nitric oxide (NO) and prostanoids are involved to varying extents and the roles of endothelial-derived hyperpolarizing factors (EDHFs) are unclear. In the present study, five incremental doses of ACh (0.01-100 mM) were delivered either as a 1-min bolus (protocol 1, n = 12) or as a ≥20-min continuous infusion (protocol 2, n = 10) via microdialysis fibers infused with 1) lactated Ringer, 2) tetraethylammonium (TEA) [a calcium-activated potassium channel (KCa) and EDHF inhibitor], 3) L-NNA+ketorolac [NO synthase (NOS) and cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitors], and 4) TEA+L-NNA+Ketorolac. The hyperemic response was characterized as peak and area under the curve (AUC) cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) for bolus infusions or plateau CVC for continuous infusions, and reported as %maximal CVC. In protocol 1, TEA, alone and combined with NOS+COX inhibition, attenuated peak CVC (100 mM Ringer 59 ± 6% vs. TEA 43 ± 5%, P < 0.05; L-NNA+ketorolac 35 ± 4% vs. TEA+L-NNA+ketorolac 25 ± 4%, P < 0.05) and AUC (Ringer 25,414 ± 3,528 vs. TEA 21,403 ± 3,416%·s, P < 0.05; L-NNA+ketorolac 25,628 ± 3,828%(.)s vs. TEA+L-NNA+ketorolac 20,772 ± 3,711%·s, P < 0.05), although these effects were only significant at the highest dose of ACh. At lower doses, TEA lengthened the total time of the hyperemic response (10 mM Ringer 609 ± 78 s vs. TEA 860 ± 67 s, P < 0.05). In protocol 2, TEA alone did not affect plateau CVC, but attenuated plateau in combination with NOS+COX inhibition (100 mM 50.4 ± 6.6% vs. 30.9 ± 6.3%, P < 0.05). Therefore, EDHFs contribute to cutaneous ACh-mediated dilation, but their relative contribution is altered by the dose and infusion procedure.

  16. Modulation of endothelial cell KCa3.1 channels during endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor signaling in mesenteric resistance arteries.

    PubMed

    Dora, Kim A; Gallagher, Nicola T; McNeish, Alister; Garland, Christopher J

    2008-05-23

    Arterial hyperpolarization to acetylcholine (ACh) reflects coactivation of K(Ca)3.1 (IK(Ca)) channels and K(Ca)2.3 (SK(Ca)) channels in the endothelium that transfers through myoendothelial gap junctions and diffusible factor(s) to affect smooth muscle relaxation (endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor [EDHF] response). However, ACh can differentially activate K(Ca)3.1 and K(Ca)2.3 channels, and we investigated the mechanisms responsible in rat mesenteric arteries. K(Ca)3.1 channel input to EDHF hyperpolarization was enhanced by reducing external [Ca(2+)](o) but blocked either with forskolin to activate protein kinase A or by limiting smooth muscle [Ca(2+)](i) increases stimulated by phenylephrine depolarization. Imaging [Ca(2+)](i) within the endothelial cell projections forming myoendothelial gap junctions revealed increases in cytoplasmic [Ca(2+)](i) during endothelial stimulation with ACh that were unaffected by simultaneous increases in muscle [Ca(2+)](i) evoked by phenylephrine. If gap junctions were uncoupled, K(Ca)3.1 channels became the predominant input to EDHF hyperpolarization, and relaxation was inhibited with ouabain, implicating a crucial link through Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase. There was no evidence for an equivalent link through K(Ca)2.3 channels nor between these channels and the putative EDHF pathway involving natriuretic peptide receptor-C. Reconstruction of confocal z-stack images from pressurized arteries revealed K(Ca)2.3 immunostain at endothelial cell borders, including endothelial cell projections, whereas K(Ca)3.1 channels and Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase alpha(2)/alpha(3) subunits were highly concentrated in endothelial cell projections and adjacent to myoendothelial gap junctions. Thus, extracellular [Ca(2+)](o) appears to modify K(Ca)3.1 channel activity through a protein kinase A-dependent mechanism independent of changes in endothelial [Ca(2+)](i). The resulting hyperpolarization links to arterial relaxation largely through Na

  17. [Use of laser flow-type fluorescence aerosol particle counter to evaluate the concentration of microbes in the surface air under high dust content].

    PubMed

    Kalinin, Iu T; Vorob'ev, S A; Khramov, E N; Vorob'eva, E A; Kuznetsov, A P; Kiselev, O S

    2000-01-01

    The paper deals with the use of a laser flow-type fluorescence aerosol particle counter to evaluate the concentrations of microbes in the surface air under high dust content. Various circuits of flow-type optic aerosol recorders are analyzed. Flow spectral luminescence analysis of some particles flow while exciting the fourth harmonics of a pulse laser on yttrium-aluminium garnet with neodymium by ultraviolet radiation is shown to be the most optimum method for indication of individual aerosol particles. Experiments were conducted on the authors' model of a pilot plant based on this method. The model of a laser flow-type optic analyzer was developed for experimental studies that give a clear display of biological aerosols in complex aerosols. The laser flow-type analyzer-based unit developed may provide a fluorescence signal of aerosol particles in the flow of a sample and that light diffusion signal from them at an exciting light wavelength of 266 nm. Experiments with BVC aerosols and soil dust particles were conducted in different regions of Russia. They showed it possible to detect and to rapidly calculate soil microorganisms by laser flow-type fluorescence assay of individual particles when excited by ultraviolet radiation.

  18. Fast volumetric imaging of ethanol metabolism in rat liver with hyperpolarized [1-13C]-pyruvate

    PubMed Central

    Josan, Sonal; Spielman, Daniel; Yen, Yi-Fen; Hurd, Ralph; Pfefferbaum, Adolf; Mayer, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    Rapid, volumetric imaging of hyperpolarized 13C compounds allows the real time measurement of metabolic activity and can be useful in distinguishing between normal and diseased tissues. This work extends a fast 2D under-sampled spiral magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) sequence to provide volumetric coverage, acquiring a 16×16×12 matrix with a nominal 5 mm isotropic resolution in 4.5 s. The rapid acquisition enables a high temporal resolution for dynamic imaging. This dynamic 3D MRSI method was used to investigate hyperpolarized [1-13C]-pyruvate metabolism modulated by the administration of ethanol in rat liver. A significant increase in the pyruvate to lactate conversion was observed in the liver due to the greater availability of NADH from ethanol metabolism. PMID:22331837

  19. Dipolar cross-relaxation modulates signal amplitudes in the 1H NMR spectrum of hyperpolarized [ 13C]formate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merritt, Matthew E.; Harrison, Crystal; Mander, William; Malloy, Craig R.; Dean Sherry, A.

    2007-12-01

    The asymmetry in the doublet of a spin coupled to hyperpolarized 13C has been used previously to measure the initial polarization of 13C. We tested the hypothesis that a single observation of the 1H NMR spectrum of hyperpolarized 13C formate monitors 13C polarization. Depending on the microwave frequency during the polarization process, in-phase or out-of-phase doublets were observed in the 1H NMR spectrum. Even in this simple two-spin system, 13C polarization was not reflected in the relative area of the JCH doublet components due to strong heteronuclear cross-relaxation. The Solomon equations were used to model the proton signal as a function of time after polarization and to estimate 13C polarization from the 1H NMR spectra.

  20. Hyperpolarized [1,4-13C]-Diethylsuccinate: A Potential DNP Substrate for In Vivo Metabolic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Billingsley, Kelvin L.; Josan, Sonal; Park, Jae Mo; Tee, Sui Seng; Spielman-Sun, Eleanor; Hurd, Ralph; Mayer, Dirk; Spielman, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) performs an essential role in the regulation of energy and metabolism, and deficiencies in this pathway are commonly correlated with various diseases. However, the development of non-invasive techniques for the assessment of the cycle in vivo has remained challenging. In this work, the applicability of a novel imaging agent, [1,4-13C]-diethylsuccinate, for hyperpolarized 13C metabolic imaging of the TCA cycle was explored. In vivo spectroscopic studies were conducted in conjunction with in vitro analyses to determine the metabolic fate of the imaging agent. Contrary to previous reports (Zacharias, N. M. et. al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2012, 134, 934-943), [13C]-labeled diethylsuccinate was primarily metabolized to succinate-derived products not originating from TCA cycle metabolism. These results illustrate potential issues of utilizing dialkyl ester analogs of TCA cycle intermediates as molecular probes for hyperpolarized 13C metabolic imaging. PMID:24421249

  1. Facilitated Anion Transport Induces Hyperpolarization of the Cell Membrane That Triggers Differentiation and Cell Death in Cancer Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Soto-Cerrato, Vanessa; Manuel-Manresa, Pilar; Hernando, Elsa; Calabuig-Fariñas, Silvia; Martínez-Romero, Alicia; Fernández-Dueñas, Víctor; Sahlholm, Kristoffer; Knöpfel, Thomas; García-Valverde, María; Rodilla, Ananda M; Jantus-Lewintre, Eloisa; Farràs, Rosa; Ciruela, Francisco; Pérez-Tomás, Ricardo; Quesada, Roberto

    2015-12-23

    Facilitated anion transport potentially represents a powerful tool to modulate various cellular functions. However, research into the biological effects of small molecule anionophores is still at an early stage. Here we have used two potent anionophore molecules inspired in the structure of marine metabolites tambjamines to gain insight into the effect induced by these compounds at the cellular level. We show how active anionophores, capable of facilitating the transmembrane transport of chloride and bicarbonate in model phospholipid liposomes, induce acidification of the cytosol and hyperpolarization of plasma cell membranes. We demonstrate how this combined effect can be used against cancer stem cells (CSCs). Hyperpolarization of cell membrane induces cell differentiation and loss of stemness of CSCs leading to effective elimination of this cancer cell subpopulation.

  2. Hyperfine structure and nuclear hyperpolarization observed in the bound exciton luminescence of Bi donors in natural Si.

    PubMed

    Sekiguchi, T; Steger, M; Saeedi, K; Thewalt, M L W; Riemann, H; Abrosimov, N V; Nötzel, N

    2010-04-02

    As the deepest group-V donor in Si, Bi has by far the largest hyperfine interaction and also a large I = 9/2 nuclear spin. At zero field this splits the donor ground state into states having total spin 5 and 4, which are fully resolved in the photoluminescence spectrum of Bi donor bound excitons. Under a magnetic field, the 60 expected allowed transitions cannot be individually resolved, but the effects of the nuclear spin distribution, -9/2 < or = I(z) < or = 9/2, are clearly observed. A strong hyperpolarization of the nuclear spin towards I(z) = -9/2 is observed to result from the nonresonant optical excitation. This is very similar to the recently reported optical hyperpolarization of P donors observed by EPR at higher magnetic fields. We introduce a new model to explain this effect, and predict that it may be very fast.

  3. Whole lung morphometry with 3D multiple b-value hyperpolarized gas MRI and compressed sensing.

    PubMed

    Chan, Ho-Fung; Stewart, Neil J; Parra-Robles, Juan; Collier, Guilhem J; Wild, Jim M

    2017-05-01

    To demonstrate three-dimensional (3D) multiple b-value diffusion-weighted (DW) MRI of hyperpolarized (3) He gas for whole lung morphometry with compressed sensing (CS). A fully-sampled, two b-value, 3D hyperpolarized (3) He DW-MRI dataset was acquired from the lungs of a healthy volunteer and retrospectively undersampled in the ky and kz phase-encoding directions for CS simulations. Optimal k-space undersampling patterns were determined by minimizing the mean absolute error between reconstructed and fully-sampled (3) He apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps. Prospective three-fold, undersampled, 3D multiple b-value (3) He DW-MRI datasets were acquired from five healthy volunteers and one chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patient, and the mean values of maps of ADC and mean alveolar dimension (LmD ) were validated against two-dimensional (2D) and 3D fully-sampled (3) He DW-MRI experiments. Reconstructed undersampled datasets showed no visual artifacts and good preservation of the main image features and quantitative information. A good agreement between fully-sampled and prospective undersampled datasets was found, with a mean difference of +3.4% and +5.1% observed in mean global ADC and LmD values, respectively. These differences were within the standard deviation range and consistent with values reported from healthy and COPD lungs. Accelerated CS acquisition has facilitated 3D multiple b-value (3) He DW-MRI scans in a single breath-hold, enabling whole lung morphometry mapping. Magn Reson Med 77:1916-1925, 2017. © 2016 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. © 2016 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals

  4. XeNA: An automated ‘open-source’ 129Xe hyperpolarizer for clinical use

    PubMed Central

    Nikolaou, Panayiotis; Coffey, Aaron M.; Walkup, Laura L.; Gust, Brogan M.; Whiting, Nicholas; Newton, Hayley; Muradyan, Iga; Dabaghyan, Mikayel; Ranta, Kaili; Moroz, Gregory D.; Rosen, Matthew S.; Patz, Samuel; Barlow, Michael J.; Chekmenev, Eduard Y.; Goodson, Boyd M.

    2014-01-01

    Here we provide a full report on the construction, components, and capabilities of our consortium’s “open-source” large-scale (~1 L/hr) 129Xe hyperpolarizer for clinical, pre-clinical, and materials NMR/MRI (Nikolaou et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 110, 14150 (2013)). The ‘hyperpolarizer’ is automated and built mostly of off-the-shelf components; moreover, it is designed to be cost-effective and installed in both research laboratories and clinical settings with materials costing less than $125,000. The device runs in the xenon-rich regime (up to 1800 Torr Xe in 0.5 L) in either stopped-flow or single-batch mode—making cryo-collection of the hyperpolarized gas unnecessary for many applications. In-cell 129Xe nuclear spin polarization values of ~30-90% have been measured for Xe loadings of ~300-1600 Torr. Typical 129Xe polarization build-up and T1 relaxation time constants were ~8.5 min and ~1.9 hr respectively under our SEOP conditions; such ratios, combined with near-unity Rb electron spin polarizations enabled by the high resonant laser power (up to ~200 W), permits such high PXe values to be achieved despite the high in-cell Xe densities. Importantly, most of the polarization is maintained during efficient HP gas transfer to other containers, and ultra-long 129Xe relaxation times (up to nearly 6 hr) were observed in Tedlar bags following transport to a clinical 3 T scanner for MR spectroscopy and imaging as a prelude to in vivo experiments. The device has received FDA IND approval for a clinical study of COPD subjects. The primary focus of this paper is on the technical / engineering development of the polarizer, with the explicit goals of facilitating the adaptation of design features and operative modes into other laboratories, and of spurring the further advancement of HP-gas MR applications in biomedicine. PMID:24631715

  5. HCN hyperpolarization-activated cation channels strengthen virtual nicotinic EPSPs and thereby elevate synaptic amplification in rat sympathetic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Kullmann, Paul H. M.; Sikora, Kristine M.; Clark, K. Lyles; Arduini, Irene; Springer, Mitchell G.

    2016-01-01

    The influence of hyperpolarization-activated cation current (h-current; Ih) upon synaptic integration in paravertebral sympathetic neurons was studied together with expression of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) subunit isoforms. All four HCN subunits were detected in homogenates of the rat superior cervical ganglion (SCG) using the PCR to amplify reverse-transcribed messenger RNAs (RT-PCR) and using quantitative PCR. Voltage clamp recordings from dissociated SCG neurons at 35°C detected Ih in all cells, with a maximum hyperpolarization-activated cation conductance of 1.2 ± 0.1 nS, half-maximal activation at −87.6 mV, and reversal potential of −31.6 mV. Interaction between Ih and synaptic potentials was tested with virtual fast nicotinic excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) created with dynamic clamp. The blocking of Ih with 15 μM ZD7288 hyperpolarized cells by 4.7 mV and increased the virtual synaptic conductance required to stimulate an action potential from 7.0 ± 0.9 nS to 12.1 ± 0.9 nS. In response to stimulation with 40 s long trains of virtual EPSPs, ZD7288 reduced postsynaptic firing from 2.2 to 1.7 Hz and the associated synaptic amplification from 2.2 ± 0.1 to 1.7 ± 0.2. Cyclic nucleotide binding to HCN channels was simulated by blocking native Ih with ZD7288, followed by reconstitution with virtual Ih using a dynamic clamp model of the voltage clamp data. Over a 30-mV range, shifting the half-activation voltage for Ih in 10 mV depolarizing increments always increased synaptic gain. These results indicate that Ih, in sympathetic neurons, can strengthen nicotinic EPSPs and increase synaptic amplification, while also working as a substrate for cyclic nucleotide-dependent modulation. PMID:27146984

  6. HYPERPOLARIZED 13C MAGNETIC RESONANCE AND ITS USE IN METABOLIC ASSESSMENT OF CULTURED CELLS AND PERFUSED ORGANS

    PubMed Central

    Lumata, Lloyd; Yang, Chendong; Ragavan, Mukundan; Carpenter, Nicholas; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.; Merritt, Matthew E.

    2016-01-01

    Diseased tissue is often characterized by abnormalities in intermediary metabolism. Observing these alterations in situ may lead to an improved understanding of pathological processes and novel ways to monitor these processes non-invasively in human patients. Although 13C is a stable isotope safe for use in animal models of disease as well as human subjects, its utility as a metabolic tracer has largely been limited to ex vivo analyses employing analytical techniques like mass spectrometry or nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Neither of these techniques is suitable for non-invasive metabolic monitoring, and the low abundance and poor gyromagnetic ratio of conventional 13C make it a poor nucleus for imaging. However, the recent advent of hyperpolarization methods, particularly dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP), make it possible to enhance the spin polarization state of 13C by many orders of magnitude, resulting in a temporary amplification of the signal sufficient for monitoring kinetics of enzyme-catalyzed reactions in living tissue through magnetic resonance spectroscopy or magnetic resonance imaging. Here we review DNP techniques to monitor metabolism in cultured cells, perfused hearts, and perfused livers, focusing on our experiences with hyperpolarized [1-13C]pyruvate. We present detailed approaches to optimize the DNP procedure, streamline biological sample preparation, and maximize detection of specific metabolic activities. We also discuss practical aspects in the choice of metabolic substrates for hyperpolarization studies, and outline some of the current technical and conceptual challenges in the field, including efforts to use hyperpolarization to quantify metabolic rates in vivo. PMID:26358902

  7. Deuteration of a molecular probe for DNP hyperpolarization--a new approach and validation for choline chloride.

    PubMed

    Allouche-Arnon, Hyla; Lerche, Mathilde H; Karlsson, Magnus; Lenkinski, Robert E; Katz-Brull, Rachel

    2011-01-01

    The promising dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) for hyperpolarized (13)C-MRI/MRS of real-time metabolism in vivo is challenged by the limited number of agents with the required physical and biological properties. The physical requirement of a liquid-state T(1) of tens of seconds is mostly found for (13)C-carbons in small molecules that have no direct protons attached, i.e. carbonyl, carboxyl and certain quaternary carbons. Unfortunately, such carbon positions do not exist in a large number of metabolic agents, and chemical shift dispersion often limits detection of their chemical evolution. We have previously shown that direct deuteration of protonated carbon positions significantly prolongs the (13)C T(1) in the liquid state and provides potential (13)C-labeled agents with differential chemical shift with respect to metabolism. The Choline Molecular Probe [1,1,2,2-D(4), 2-(13)C]choline chloride (CMP2) has recently been introduced as a means of studying choline metabolism in a hyperpolarized state. Here, the biophysical properties of CMP2 were characterized and compared with those of [1-(13)C]pyruvate to evaluate the impact of molecular probe deuteration. The CMP2 solid-state polarization build-up time constant (30 min) and polarization level (24%) were comparable to those of [1-(13)C]pyruvate. Both compounds' liquid state T(1) increased with temperature. The high-field T(1) of CMP2 compared favorably with [1-(13)C]pyruvate. Thus, a deuterated agent demonstrated physical properties comparable to a hyperpolarized compound of already proven value, whereas both showed chemical shift dispersion that allowed monitoring of their metabolism. It is expected that the use of deuterated carbon-13 positions as reporting hyperpolarized nuclei will substantially expand the library of agents for DNP-MR.

  8. A novel slow hyperpolarization-activated potassium current (IK(SHA)) from a mouse hippocampal cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Wischmeyer, E; Karschin, A

    1997-01-01

    1. A slow hyperpolarization-activated inwardly rectifying K+ current (IK(SHA)) with novel characteristics was identified from the mouse embryonic hippocampus x neuroblastoma cell line HN9.10e. 2. The non-inactivating current activated negative to a membrane potential of -80 mV with slow and complex activation kinetics (tau act approximately 1-7 s) and a characteristic delay of 1-10 s (-80 to -140 mV) that was linearly dependent on the membrane potential. 3. Tail currents and instantaneous open channel currents determined through fast voltage ramps reversed at the K+ equilibrium potential (EK) indicating that primarily K+, but not Na+, permeated the channels. 4. IK(SHA) was unaffected by altering the intracellular Ca2+ concentration between approximately 0 and 10 microM, but was susceptible to block by 5 mM extracellular Ca2+, Ba2+ (Ki = 0.42 mM), and Cs+ (Ki = 2.77 mM) 5. In cells stably transformed with M2 muscarinic receptors, IK(SHA) was rapidly, but reversibly, suppressed by application of micromolar concentrations of muscarine. 6. At the single channel level K(SHA) channel openings were observed with the characteristic delay upon membrane hyperpolarization. Analysis of unitary currents revealed an inwardly rectifying I-V profile and a channel slope conductance of 7 pS. Channel activity persisted in the inside-out configuration for many minutes. 7. It is concluded that IK(SHA) in HN9.10e cells represents a novel K+ current, which is activated upon membrane hyperpolarization. It is functionally different from both classic inwardly rectifying IKir currents and other cationic hyperpolarization-activated IH currents that have been previously described in neuronal or glial cells. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:9401967

  9. Hyperpolarization of the Membrane Potential Caused by Somatostatin in Dissociated Human Pituitary Adenoma Cells that Secrete Growth Hormone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Naohide; Shibuya, Naohiko; Ogata, Etsuro

    1986-08-01

    Membrane electrical properties and the response to somatostatin were examined in dissociated human pituitary adenoma cells that secrete growth hormone (GH). Under current clamp condition with a patch electrode, the resting potential was -52.4 ± 8.0 mV, and spontaneous action potentials were observed in 58% of the cells. Under voltage clamp condition an outward K+ current, a tetrodotoxin-sensitive Na+ current, and a Ca2+ current were observed. Cobalt ions suppressed the Ca2+ current. The threshold of Ca2+ current activation was about -60 mV. Somatostatin elicited a membrane hyperpolarization associated with increased membrane permeability in these cells. The reversal potential of somatostatin-induced hyperpolarization was -78.4 ± 4.3 mV in 6 mM K+ medium and -97.2 ± 6.4 mV in 3 mM K+ medium. These reversal potential values and a shift with the external K+ concentration indicated that membrane hyperpolarization was caused by increased permeability to K+. The hyperpolarized membrane potential induced by somatostatin was -63.6 ± 5.9 mV in the standard medium. This level was subthreshold for Ca2+ and Na+ currents and was sufficient to inhibit spontaneous action potentials. Hormone secretion was significantly suppressed by somatostatin and cobalt ions. Therefore, we suggest that Ca2+ entering the cell through voltage-dependent channels are playing an important role for GH secretion and that somatostatin suppresses GH secretion by blocking Ca2+ currents. Finally, we discuss other possibilities for the inhibitory effect of somatostatin on GH secretion.

  10. Continuous flow Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization of water in the fringe field of a clinical magnetic resonance imaging system for authentic image contrast

    PubMed Central

    Lingwood, Mark D.; Siaw, Ting Ann; Sailasuta, Napapon; Ross, Brian D.; Bhattacharya, Pratip; Han, Songi

    2016-01-01

    We describe and demonstrate a system to generate hyperpolarized water in the 0.35 T fringe field of a clinical 1.5 T whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) magnet. Once generated, the hyperpolarized water is quickly and continuously transferred from the 0.35 T fringe to the 1.5 T center field of the same magnet for image acquisition using standard MRI equipment. The hyperpolarization is based on Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP), which effectively and quickly transfers the higher spin polarization of free radicals to nuclear spins at ambient temperatures. We visualize the dispersion of hyperpolarized water as it flows through water-saturated systems by utilizing an observed −15 fold DNP signal enhancement with respect to the unenhanced 1H MRI signal of water at 1.5 T. The experimental DNP apparatus presented here is readily portable and can be brought to and used with any conventional unshielded MRI system. A new method of immobilizing radicals to gel beads via polyelectrolyte linker arms is described, which led to superior flow Overhauser DNP performance compared to previously presented gels. We discuss the general applicability of Overhauser DNP hyperpolarization of water and aqueous solutions in the fringe field of commercially available magnets with central fields up to 4.7 Tesla. PMID:20541445

  11. The Relationship between NMR Chemical Shifts of Thermally Polarized and Hyperpolarized (89) Y Complexes and Their Solution Structures.

    PubMed

    Xing, Yixun; Jindal, Ashish K; Regueiro-Figueroa, Martín; Le Fur, Mariane; Kervarec, Nelly; Zhao, Piyu; Kovacs, Zoltan; Valencia, Laura; Pérez-Lourido, Paulo; Tripier, Raphaël; Esteban-Gómez, David; Platas-Iglesias, Carlos; Sherry, A Dean

    2016-11-07

    Recently developed dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) technology offers the potential of increasing the NMR sensitivity of even rare nuclei for biological imaging applications. Hyperpolarized (89) Y is an ideal candidate because of its narrow NMR linewidth, favorable spin quantum number (I=1/2 ), and long longitudinal relaxation times (T1 ). Strong NMR signals were detected in hyperpolarized (89) Y samples of a variety of yttrium complexes. A dataset of (89) Y NMR data composed of 23 complexes with polyaminocarboxylate ligands was obtained using hyperpolarized (89) Y measurements or (1) H,(89) Y-HMQC spectroscopy. These data were used to derive an empirical equation that describes the correlation between the (89) Y chemical shift and the chemical structure of the complexes. This empirical correlation serves as a guide for the design of (89) Y sensors. Relativistic (DKH2) DFT calculations were found to predict the experimental (89) Y chemical shifts to a rather good accuracy. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Multidimensional Mapping of Spin-Exchange Optical Pumping in Clinical-Scale Batch-Mode 129Xe Hyperpolarizers

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We present a systematic, multiparameter study of Rb/129Xe spin-exchange optical pumping (SEOP) in the regimes of high xenon pressure and photon flux using a 3D-printed, clinical-scale stopped-flow hyperpolarizer. In situ NMR detection was used to study the dynamics of 129Xe polarization as a function of SEOP-cell operating temperature, photon flux, and xenon partial pressure to maximize 129Xe polarization (PXe). PXe values of 95 ± 9%, 73 ± 4%, 60 ± 2%, 41 ± 1%, and 31 ± 1% at 275, 515, 1000, 1500, and 2000 Torr Xe partial pressure were achieved. These PXe polarization values were separately validated by ejecting the hyperpolarized 129Xe gas and performing low-field MRI at 47.5 mT. It is shown that PXe in this high-pressure regime can be increased beyond already record levels with higher photon flux and better SEOP thermal management, as well as optimization of the polarization dynamics, pointing the way to further improvements in hyperpolarized 129Xe production efficiency. PMID:24731261

  13. Endothelium-derived hyperpolarization and coronary vasodilation: diverse and integrated roles of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids, hydrogen peroxide and gap junctions

    PubMed Central

    Ellinsworth, David C.; Sandow, Shaun L.; Shukla, Nilima; Liu, Yanping; Jeremy, Jamie Y.; Gutterman, David D.

    2015-01-01

    Myocardial perfusion and coronary vascular resistance are regulated by signalling metabolites released from the local myocardium that act either directly on the vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) or indirectly via stimulation of the endothelium. A prominent mechanism of vasodilation is endothelium-derived hyperpolarization (EDH) of the arteriolar smooth muscle, with epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) playing important roles in EDH in the coronary microcirculation. In some cases, EETs and H2O2 are released as transferable hyperpolarizing factors (EDHFs) that act directly on the VSMCs. By contrast, EETs and H2O2 can also promote endothelial Ca2+-activated K+ channel activity secondary to the amplification of extracellular Ca2+ influx and Ca2+ mobilization from intracellular stores, respectively. The resulting endothelial hyperpolarization may subsequently conduct to the media via myoendothelial gap junctions, or potentially lead to the release of a chemically-distinct factor(s). Furthermore, in human isolated coronary arterioles dilator signalling involving EETs and H2O2 may be integrated; being either complimentary or inhibitory depending on the stimulus. With an emphasis on the human coronary microcirculation, this review addresses the diverse and integrated mechanisms by which EETs and H2O2 regulate vessel tone, and also examines the hypothesis that myoendothelial microdomain signalling facilitates EDH activity in the human heart. PMID:26541094

  14. Hyperpolarized 13C allows a direct measure of flux through a single enzyme-catalyzed step by NMR

    PubMed Central

    Merritt, Matthew E.; Harrison, Crystal; Storey, Charles; Jeffrey, F. Mark; Sherry, A. Dean; Malloy, Craig R.

    2007-01-01

    13C NMR is a powerful tool for monitoring metabolic fluxes in vivo. The recent availability of automated dynamic nuclear polarization equipment for hyperpolarizing 13C nuclei now offers the potential to measure metabolic fluxes through select enzyme-catalyzed steps with substantially improved sensitivity. Here, we investigated the metabolism of hyperpolarized [1-13C1]pyruvate in a widely used model for physiology and pharmacology, the perfused rat heart. Dissolved 13CO2, the immediate product of the first step of the reaction catalyzed by pyruvate dehydrogenase, was observed with a temporal resolution of ≈1 s along with H13CO3−, the hydrated form of 13CO2 generated catalytically by carbonic anhydrase. In hearts presented with the medium-chain fatty acid octanoate in addition to hyperpolarized [1-13C1]pyruvate, production of 13CO2 and H13CO3− was suppressed by ≈90%, whereas the signal from [1-13C1]lactate was enhanced. In separate experiments, it was shown that O2 consumption and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle flux were unchanged in the presence of added octanoate. Thus, the rate of appearance of 13CO2 and H13CO3− from [1-13C1]pyruvate does not reflect production of CO2 in the TCA cycle but rather reflects flux through pyruvate dehydrogenase exclusively. PMID:18056642

  15. Endothelial-Derived Hyperpolarization Factor (EDHF) Contributes to PlGF-Induced Dilation of Mesenteric Resistance Arteries from Pregnant Rats

    PubMed Central

    Mandalà, Maurizio; Gokina, Natalia; Barron, Carolyn; Osol, George

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the cellular mechanism involved in the potent vasodilatory action of PlGF on mesenteric resistance arteries from pregnant rats. PlGF (3 nM) induced a vasodilation of 64 ± 3.8% that was completely abolished by endothelial denudation. Significant dilation (28 ± 4.0%) remained, however, in the presence of nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase inhibition, and was associated with significant reductions in vascular smooth muscle cell calcium. Absence of dilation in potassium-depolarizing solution (30 mM) confirmed its dependence on endothelial-derived hyperpolarization factor. Subsequent studies established that vasodilation was abolished by pharmacologic inhibition of SKCa (apamin) and BKCa (iberiotoxin) but not IKCa (tram-34) potassium channels. In summary, PlGF acts through the release of a combination of endothelium-derived relaxation factors. Based on the results of potassium channel blockade, we suggest that it induces endothelial hyperpolarization via SKCa channel activation; this, in turn, leads to the release of a diffusible mediator that activates vascular smooth muscle BKCa channels, hyperpolarization and vasodilation. This is the first study to identify the mechanism for PlGF/VEGFR-1 resistance artery dilation in the pregnant state, whose attenuation likely contributes to the systemic hypertension characteristic of pre-eclampsia. PMID:21985802

  16. Reproducibility study for free-breathing measurements of pyruvate metabolism using hyperpolarized (13) C in the heart.

    PubMed

    Lau, Angus Z; Chen, Albert P; Barry, Jennifer; Graham, John J; Dominguez-Viqueira, William; Ghugre, Nilesh R; Wright, Graham A; Cunningham, Charles H

    2013-04-01

    Spatially resolved images of hyperpolarized (13) C substrates and their downstream products provide insight into real-time metabolic processes occurring in vivo. Recently, hyperpolarized (13) C pyruvate has been used to characterize in vivo cardiac metabolism in the rat and pig, but accurate and reproducible measurements remain challenging due to the limited period available for imaging as well as physiological motion. In this article, time-resolved cardiac- and respiratory-gated images of [1-(13) C] pyruvate, [1-(13) C] lactate, and (13) C bicarbonate in the heart are acquired without the need for a breathhold. The robustness of these free-breathing measurements is demonstrated using the time-resolved data to produce a normalized metric of pyruvate dehydrogenase and lactate dehydrogenase activity in the heart. The values obtained are reproducible in a controlled metabolic state. In a 60-min ischemia/reperfusion model, significant differences in hyperpolarized bicarbonate and lactate, normalized using the left ventricular pyruvate signal, were detected between scans performed at baseline and 45 min after reperfusion. The sequence is anticipated to improve quantitative measurements of cardiac metabolism, leading to feasible validation studies using fewer subjects, and potentially improved diagnosis, serial monitoring, and treatment of cardiac disease in patients.

  17. Multidimensional mapping of spin-exchange optical pumping in clinical-scale batch-mode 129Xe hyperpolarizers.

    PubMed

    Nikolaou, Panayiotis; Coffey, Aaron M; Ranta, Kaili; Walkup, Laura L; Gust, Brogan M; Barlow, Michael J; Rosen, Matthew S; Goodson, Boyd M; Chekmenev, Eduard Y

    2014-05-08

    We present a systematic, multiparameter study of Rb/(129)Xe spin-exchange optical pumping (SEOP) in the regimes of high xenon pressure and photon flux using a 3D-printed, clinical-scale stopped-flow hyperpolarizer. In situ NMR detection was used to study the dynamics of (129)Xe polarization as a function of SEOP-cell operating temperature, photon flux, and xenon partial pressure to maximize (129)Xe polarization (PXe). PXe values of 95 ± 9%, 73 ± 4%, 60 ± 2%, 41 ± 1%, and 31 ± 1% at 275, 515, 1000, 1500, and 2000 Torr Xe partial pressure were achieved. These PXe polarization values were separately validated by ejecting the hyperpolarized (129)Xe gas and performing low-field MRI at 47.5 mT. It is shown that PXe in this high-pressure regime can be increased beyond already record levels with higher photon flux and better SEOP thermal management, as well as optimization of the polarization dynamics, pointing the way to further improvements in hyperpolarized (129)Xe production efficiency.

  18. Presynaptic hyperpolarization induces a fast analogue modulation of spike-evoked transmission mediated by axonal sodium channels

    PubMed Central

    Rama, Sylvain; Zbili, Mickaël; Bialowas, Andrzej; Fronzaroli-Molinieres, Laure; Ankri, Norbert; Carlier, Edmond; Marra, Vincenzo; Debanne, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    In the mammalian brain, synaptic transmission usually depends on presynaptic action potentials (APs) in an all-or-none (or digital) manner. Recent studies suggest, however, that subthreshold depolarization in the presynaptic cell facilitates spike-evoked transmission, thus creating an analogue modulation of a digital process (or analogue–digital (AD) modulation). At most synapses, this process is slow and not ideally suited for the fast dynamics of neural networks. We show here that transmission at CA3–CA3 and L5–L5 synapses can be enhanced by brief presynaptic hyperpolarization such as an inhibitory postsynaptic potential (IPSP). Using dual soma–axon patch recordings and live imaging, we find that this hyperpolarization-induced AD facilitation (h-ADF) is due to the recovery from inactivation of Nav channels controlling AP amplitude in the axon. Incorporated in a network model, h-ADF promotes both pyramidal cell synchrony and gamma oscillations. In conclusion, cortical excitatory synapses in local circuits display hyperpolarization-induced facilitation of spike-evoked synaptic transmission that promotes network synchrony. PMID:26657943

  19. Fast Determination of Flip Angle and T1 in Hyperpolarized Gas MRI During a Single Breath-Hold

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Jianping; Ruan, Weiwei; Han, Yeqing; Sun, Xianping; Ye, Chaohui; Zhou, Xin

    2016-01-01

    MRI of hyperpolarized media, such as 129Xe and 3He, shows great potential for clinical applications. The optimal use of the available spin polarization requires accurate flip angle calibrations and T1 measurements. Traditional flip angle calibration methods are time-consuming and suffer from polarization losses during T1 relaxation. In this paper, we propose a method to simultaneously calibrate flip angles and measure T1 in vivo during a breath-hold time of less than 4 seconds. We demonstrate the accuracy, robustness and repeatability of this method and contrast it with traditional methods. By measuring the T1 of hyperpolarized gas, the oxygen pressure in vivo can be calibrated during the same breath hold. The results of the calibration have been applied in variable flip angle (VFA) scheme to obtain a stable steady-state transverse magnetization. Coupled with this method, the ultra-short TE (UTE) and constant VFA (CVFA) schemes are expected to give rise to new applications of hyperpolarized media. PMID:27169670

  20. Presynaptic hyperpolarization induces a fast analogue modulation of spike-evoked transmission mediated by axonal sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Rama, Sylvain; Zbili, Mickaël; Bialowas, Andrzej; Fronzaroli-Molinieres, Laure; Ankri, Norbert; Carlier, Edmond; Marra, Vincenzo; Debanne, Dominique

    2015-12-10

    In the mammalian brain, synaptic transmission usually depends on presynaptic action potentials (APs) in an all-or-none (or digital) manner. Recent studies suggest, however, that subthreshold depolarization in the presynaptic cell facilitates spike-evoked transmission, thus creating an analogue modulation of a digital process (or analogue-digital (AD) modulation). At most synapses, this process is slow and not ideally suited for the fast dynamics of neural networks. We show here that transmission at CA3-CA3 and L5-L5 synapses can be enhanced by brief presynaptic hyperpolarization such as an inhibitory postsynaptic potential (IPSP). Using dual soma-axon patch recordings and live imaging, we find that this hyperpolarization-induced AD facilitation (h-ADF) is due to the recovery from inactivation of Nav channels controlling AP amplitude in the axon. Incorporated in a network model, h-ADF promotes both pyramidal cell synchrony and gamma oscillations. In conclusion, cortical excitatory synapses in local circuits display hyperpolarization-induced facilitation of spike-evoked synaptic transmission that promotes network synchrony.

  1. Hydrogen sulfide induces hyperpolarization and decreases the exocytosis of secretory granules of rat GH3 pituitary tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Mustafina, Alsu N; Yakovlev, Aleksey V; Gaifullina, Aisylu Sh; Weiger, Thomas M; Hermann, Anton; Sitdikova, Guzel F

    2015-10-02

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) on the membrane potential, action potential discharge and exocytosis of secretory granules in neurosecretory pituitary tumor cells (GH3). The H2S donor - sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS) induced membrane hyperpolarization, followed by truncation of spontaneous electrical activity and decrease of the membrane resistance. The NaHS effect was dose-dependent with an EC50 of 152 μM (equals effective H2S of 16-19 μM). NaHS effects were not altered after inhibition of maxi conductance calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels by tetraethylammonium or paxilline, but were significantly reduced after inhibition or activation of ATP-dependent potassium channels (KATP) by glibenclamide or by diazoxide, respectively. In whole-cell recordings NaHS increased the amplitude of KATP currents, induced by hyperpolarizing pulses and subsequent application of glibenclamide decreased currents to control levels. Using the fluorescent dye FM 1-43 exocytosis of secretory granules was analyzed in basal and stimulated conditions (high K(+) external solution). Prior application of NaHS decreased the fluorescence of the cell membrane in both conditions which links with activation of KATP currents (basal secretion) and activation of KATP currents and BK-currents (stimulated exocytosis). We suggest that H2S induces hyperpolarization of GH3 cells by activation of KATP channels which results in a truncation of spontaneous action potentials and a decrease of hormone release.

  2. Determination of Intermolecular Interactions Using Polarization Compensated Heteronuclear Overhauser Effect of Hyperpolarized Spins.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jihyun; Liu, Mengxiao; Chen, Hsueh-Ying; Hilty, Christian

    2015-11-03

    The nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) has long been used as a selective indicator for intermolecular interactions. Due to relatively small changes of signal intensity, often on the order of several percent, quantitative NOE measurements can be challenging. Hyperpolarization of nuclear spins can dramatically increase the NOE intensity by increasing population differences, but poses its own challenge in quantifying the original polarization level. Here, we demonstrate a method for the accurate measurement of intermolecular heteronuclear cross-relaxation rates by simultaneous acquisition of signals from both nuclei. Using this method, we measure cross-relaxation rates between water protons and (19)F of trifluoroacetic acid at concentrations ranging from 23 to 72 mM. A concentration-independent value of 2.46 × 10(-4) ± 1.02 × 10(-5) s(-1) M(-1) is obtained at a temperature of 301 K and validated using a nonhyperpolarized measurement. In a broader context, accurate measurement of heteronuclear cross-relaxation rates may enable the study of intermolecular interactions including those involving macromolecules where (19)F atoms can be introduced as site-selective labels.

  3. Evaluation of oxygen sensitivity of hyperpolarized helium imaging for the detection of pulmonary ischemia.

    PubMed

    Walvick, Ronn P; Roche, John P; Reno, Austin L; Gounis, Matthew J; Albert, Mitchell S

    2016-05-01

    In this study, a new model of pulmonary embolism in rats was developed and tested, to examine if hyperpolarized (HP) (3) He MR images can measure impairment of the exchange of oxygen from the airspaces to the blood during pulmonary embolism. HP (3) He MRI was used to image six treatment-group rats in which a branch of the pulmonary artery was embolized, and six control-group rats. HP (3) He MR images were used to calculate the initial partial pressure of oxygen (pO ) and the rate of oxygen depletion (R) in rat lungs. The pO was significantly higher in the ischemic lung than in the contralateral normal side, and pO was significantly higher in the ischemic lung than in both sides of the control lungs. Mean R in ischemic lungs was significantly lower than in the contralateral lungs, and mean R in ischemic lungs was also significantly lower than in both control lungs. These results demonstrate that pO and R, as measured by the T1 decay of HP (3) He, are sensitive to pulmonary ischemia in rats, confirming the findings in studies performed in large animal models of pulmonary ischemia. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Effects of pulmonary inhalation on hyperpolarized krypton-83 magnetic resonance T1 relaxation.

    PubMed

    Stupic, K F; Elkins, N D; Pavlovskaya, G E; Repine, J E; Meersmann, T

    2011-07-07

    The (83)Kr magnetic resonance (MR) relaxation time T(1) of krypton gas in contact with model surfaces was previously found to be highly sensitive to surface composition, surface-to-volume ratio, and surface temperature. The work presented here explored aspects of pulmonary (83)Kr T(1) relaxation measurements in excised lungs from healthy rats using hyperpolarized (hp) (83)Kr with approximately 4.4% spin polarization. MR spectroscopy without spatial resolution was applied to the ex vivo lungs that actively inhale hp (83)Kr through a custom designed ventilation system. Various inhalation schemes were devised to study the influence of anatomical dead space upon the measured (83)Kr T(1) relaxation times. The longitudinal (83)Kr relaxation times in the distal airways and the respiratory zones were independent of the lung inhalation volume, with T(1) = 1.3 s and T(1) = 1.0 s, depending only on the applied inhalation scheme. The obtained data were highly reproducible between different specimens. Further, the (83)Kr T(1) relaxation times in excised lungs were unaffected by the presence of up to 40% oxygen in the hp gas mixture. The results support the possible importance of (83)Kr as a biomarker for evaluating lung function.

  5. Endothelial hyperpolarizing factor increases acetylcholine-induced vasodilatation in pulmonary hypertensive broilers arterial rings.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Medina, Diana I; Hernandez, Aureliano; Orozco, Camilo

    2012-02-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) develops as result of imbalances between endothelium derived vasoconstrictors and vasodilators. Pulmonary hypertensive broiler chickens (PHBs) are deficient in NO production and endothelin-1 (ET-1) excess. With respect to prostacyclin, it appears that it does not alter vascular pulmonary tone in broilers. However, the role of Endothelium-Derived Hyperpolarizing Factor (EDHF) in PAH in broilers has not been determined. The possible involvement of EDHF in acetylcholine (Ach) induced vasodilatation was studied in pulmonary arterial rings taken from PHB and non-pulmonary hypertensive broilers (NPHBs). Ach induced higher vasodilatation in PHB than in NPHB. This dilatation seems to be directly related to the degree of PAH. Ach derived vasodilatation was inhibited, in PBH but not in NPHB, by blocking EDHF action with K(+) or Apamin plus Charybdotoxin. It is proposed EDHF as an important vasodilator in the pulmonary arteries of PHB, which may play a compensatory role in PAH pathophysiology. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Membrane potential hyperpolarization in Mammalian cardiac cells by synchronization modulation of Na/K pumps.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Dando, Robin

    2008-02-01

    In previously reported work, we developed a new technique, synchronization modulation, to electrically activate Na/K pump molecules. The fundamental mechanism involved in this technique is a dynamic entrainment procedure of the pump molecules, carried out in a stepwise pattern. The entrainment procedure consists of two steps: synchronization and modulation. We theoretically predicted that the pump functions can be activated exponentially as a function of the membrane potential. We have experimentally demonstrated synchronization of the Na/K pump molecules and acceleration of their pumping rates by many fold through use of voltage-clamp techniques, directly monitoring the pump currents. We further applied this technique to intact skeletal muscle fibers from amphibians and found significant effects on the membrane resting potential. Here, we extend our study to intact mammalian cardiomyocytes. We employed a noninvasive confocal microscopic fluorescent imaging technique to monitor electric field-induced changes in ionic concentration gradient and membrane resting potential. Our results further confirm that the well-designed synchronization modulation electric field can effectively accelerate the Na/K pumping rate, increasing the ionic concentration gradient across the cell membrane and hyperpolarizing the membrane resting potential.

  7. HP-Xe to go: Storage and transportation of hyperpolarized 129Xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Repetto, M.; Zimmer, S.; Allmendinger, F.; Blümler, P.; Doll, M.; Grasdijk, J. O.; Heil, W.; Jungmann, K.; Karpuk, S.; Krause, H.-J.; Offenhäusser, A.; Schmidt, U.; Sobolev, Y.; Willmann, L.

    2016-04-01

    Recently the spin-lattice relaxation time T1 of hyperpolarized (HP)-129Xe was significantly improved by using uncoated and Rb-free storage vessels of GE180 glass. For these cells, a simple procedure was established to obtain reproducible wall relaxation times of about 18 h. Then the limiting relaxation mechanism in pure Xe is due to the coupling between the nuclear spins and the angular momentum of the Xe-Xe van-der-Waals-molecules. This mechanism can be significantly reduced by using different buffer gases of which CO2 was discovered to be the most efficient so far. From these values, it was estimated that for a 1:1 mixture of HP-Xe with CO2 a longitudinal relaxation time of about 7 h can be expected, sufficient to transport HP-Xe from a production to a remote application site. This prediction was verified for such a mixture at a total pressure of about 1 bar in a 10 cm glass cell showing a storage time of T1 ≈ 9 h (for T1wall = (34 ± 9) h) which was transported inside a magnetic box over a distance of about 200 km by car.

  8. Electrophysiological characterization of Grueneberg ganglion olfactory neurons: spontaneous firing, sodium conductance, and hyperpolarization-activated currents.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cambrian Y; Xiao, Cheng; Fraser, Scott E; Lester, Henry A; Koos, David S

    2012-09-01

    Mammals rely on their acute olfactory sense for their survival. The most anterior olfactory subsystem in the nose, the Grueneberg ganglion (GG), plays a role in detecting alarm pheromone, cold, and urinary compounds. GG neurons respond homogeneously to these stimuli with increases in intracellular [Ca(2+)] or transcription of immediate-early genes. In this electrophysiological study, we used patch-clamp techniques to characterize the membrane properties of GG neurons. Our results offer evidence of functional heterogeneity in the GG. GG neurons fire spontaneously and independently in several stable patterns, including phasic and repetitive single-spike modes of discharge. Whole cell recordings demonstrated two distinct voltage-gated fast-inactivating Na(+) currents with different steady-state voltage dependencies and different sensitivities to tetrodotoxin. Hodgkin-Huxley simulations showed that these Na(+) currents confer dual mechanisms of action potential generation and contribute to different firing patterns. Additionally, GG neurons exhibited hyperpolarization-activated inward currents that modulated spontaneous firing in vitro. Thus, in GG neurons, the heterogeneity of firing patterns is linked to the unusual repertoire of ionic currents. The membrane properties described here will aid the interpretation of chemosensory function in the GG.

  9. Hyperpolarization-activated current (I(h)) in ganglion-cell photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Van Hook, Matthew J; Berson, David M

    2010-12-20

    Intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) express the photopigment melanopsin and serve as the primary retinal drivers of non-image-forming visual functions such as circadian photoentrainment, the pupillary light reflex, and suppression of melatonin production in the pineal. Past electrophysiological studies of these cells have focused on their intrinsic photosensitivity and synaptic inputs. Much less is known about their voltage-gated channels and how these might shape their output to non-image-forming visual centers. Here, we show that rat ipRGCs retrolabeled from the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) express a hyperpolarization-activated inwardly-rectifying current (I(h)). This current is blocked by the known I(h) blockers ZD7288 and extracellular cesium. As in other systems, including other retinal ganglion cells, I(h) in ipRGCs is characterized by slow kinetics and a slightly greater permeability for K(+) than for Na(+). Unlike in other systems, however, I(h) in ipRGCs apparently does not actively contribute to resting membrane potential. We also explore non-specific effects of the common I(h) blocker ZD7288 on rebound depolarization and evoked spiking and discuss possible functional roles of I(h) in non-image-forming vision. This study is the first to characterize I(h) in a well-defined population of retinal ganglion cells, namely SCN-projecting ipRGCs.

  10. Hyperpolarization-Activated Current Induces Period-Doubling Cascades and Chaos in a Cold Thermoreceptor Model.

    PubMed

    Xu, Kesheng; Maidana, Jean P; Caviedes, Mauricio; Quero, Daniel; Aguirre, Pablo; Orio, Patricio

    2017-01-01

    In this article, we describe and analyze the chaotic behavior of a conductance-based neuronal bursting model. This is a model with a reduced number of variables, yet it retains biophysical plausibility. Inspired by the activity of cold thermoreceptors, the model contains a persistent Sodium current, a Calcium-activated Potassium current and a hyperpolarization-activated current (Ih) that drive a slow subthreshold oscillation. Driven by this oscillation, a fast subsystem (fast Sodium and Potassium currents) fires action potentials in a periodic fashion. Depending on the parameters, this model can generate a variety of firing patterns that includes bursting, regular tonic and polymodal firing. Here we show that the transitions between different firing patterns are often accompanied by a range of chaotic firing, as suggested by an irregular, non-periodic firing pattern. To confirm this, we measure the maximum Lyapunov exponent of the voltage trajectories, and the Lyapunov exponent and Lempel-Ziv's complexity of the ISI time series. The four-variable slow system (without spiking) also generates chaotic behavior, and bifurcation analysis shows that this is often originated by period doubling cascades. Either with or without spikes, chaos is no longer generated when the Ih is removed from the system. As the model is biologically plausible with biophysically meaningful parameters, we propose it as a useful tool to understand chaotic dynamics in neurons.

  11. Hyperpolarized 83Kr magnetic resonance imaging of alveolar degradation in a rat model of emphysema

    PubMed Central

    Lilburn, David M. L.; Lesbats, Clémentine; Six, Joseph S.; Dubuis, Eric; Yew-Booth, Liang; Shaw, Dominick E.; Belvisi, Maria G.; Birrell, Mark A.; Pavlovskaya, Galina E.; Meersmann, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Hyperpolarized 83Kr surface quadrupolar relaxation (SQUARE) generates MRI contrast that was previously shown to correlate with surface-to-volume ratios in porous model surface systems. The underlying physics of SQUARE contrast is conceptually different from any other current MRI methodology as the method uses the nuclear electric properties of the spin I = 9/2 isotope 83Kr. To explore the usage of this non-radioactive isotope for pulmonary pathophysiology, MRI SQUARE contrast was acquired in excised rat lungs obtained from an elastase-induced model of emphysema. A significant 83Kr T1 relaxation time increase in the SQUARE contrast was found in the elastase-treated lungs compared with the baseline data from control lungs. The SQUARE contrast suggests a reduction in pulmonary surface-to-volume ratio in the emphysema model that was validated by histology. The finding supports usage of 83Kr SQUARE as a new biomarker for surface-to-volume ratio changes in emphysema. PMID:25994296

  12. Exchange facilitated indirect detection of hyperpolarized 15ND 2-amido-glutamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barb, A. W.; Hekmatyar, S. K.; Glushka, J. N.; Prestegard, J. H.

    2011-10-01

    Hyperpolarization greatly enhances opportunities to observe in vivo metabolic processes in real time. Accessible timescales are, however, limited by nuclear spin relaxation times, and sensitivity is limited by magnetogyric ratios of observed nuclei. The majority of applications to date have involved direct 13C observation of metabolites with non-protonated carbons at sites of interest ( 13C enriched carbonyls, for example), a choice that extends relaxation times and yields moderate sensitivity. Interest in 15N containing metabolites is equally high but non-protonated sites are rare and direct 15N observation insensitive. Here an approach is demonstrated that extends applications to protonated 15N sites with high sensitivity. The normally short relaxation times are lengthened by initially replacing protons (H) with deuterons (D) and low sensitivity detection of 15N is avoided by indirect detection through protons reintroduced by H/D exchange. A pulse sequence is presented that periodically samples 15N polarization at newly protonated sites by INEPT transfer to protons while returning 15N magnetization of deuterated sites to the + Z axis to preserve polarization for subsequent samplings. Applications to 15ND 2-amido-glutamine are chosen for illustration. Glutamine is an important regulator and a direct donor of nitrogen in cellular metabolism. Potential application to in vivo observation is discussed.

  13. (1) H-(13) C independently tuned radiofrequency surface coil applied for in vivo hyperpolarized MRI.

    PubMed

    Cao, Peng; Zhang, Xiaoliang; Park, Ilwoo; Najac, Chloe; Nelson, Sarah J; Ronen, Sabrina; Larson, Peder E Z

    2016-11-01

    To develop a lump-element double-tuned common-mode-differential-mode (CMDM) radiofrequency (RF) surface coil with independent frequency tuning capacity for MRS and MRI applications. The presented design has two modes that can operate with different current paths, allowing independent frequency adjustment. The coil prototype was tested on the bench and then examined in phantom and in vivo experiments. Standard deviations of frequency and impedance fluctuations measured in one resonator, while changing the tuning capacitor of another resonator, were less than 13 kHz and 0.55 Ω. The unloaded S21 was -36 dB and -41 dB, while the unloaded Q factor was 260 and 287, for (13) C and (1) H, respectively. In vivo hyperpolarized (13) C MR spectroscopy data demonstrated the feasibility of using the CMDM coil to measure the dynamics of lactate, alanine, pyruvate and bicarbonate signal in a normal rat head along with acquiring (1) H anatomical reference images. Independent frequency tuning capacity was demonstrated in the presented lump-element double-tuned CMDM coil. This CMDM coil maintained intrinsically decoupled magnetic fields, which provided sufficient isolation between the two resonators. The results from in vivo experiments demonstrated high sensitivity of both the (1) H and (13) C resonators. Magn Reson Med 76:1612-1620, 2016. © 2015 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2015 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  14. Hyperpolarized (129) Xe imaging of the rat lung using spiral IDEAL.

    PubMed

    Doganay, Ozkan; Wade, Trevor; Hegarty, Elaine; McKenzie, Charles; Schulte, Rolf F; Santyr, Giles E

    2016-08-01

    To implement and optimize a single-shot spiral encoding strategy for rapid 2D IDEAL projection imaging of hyperpolarized (Hp) (129) Xe in the gas phase, and in the pulmonary tissue (PT) and red blood cells (RBCs) compartments of the rat lung, respectively. A theoretical and experimental point spread function analysis was used to optimize the spiral k-space read-out time in a phantom. Hp (129) Xe IDEAL images from five healthy rats were used to: (i) optimize flip angles by a Bloch equation analysis using measured kinetics of gas exchange and (ii) investigate the feasibility of the approach to characterize the exchange of Hp (129) Xe. A read-out time equal to approximately 1.8 × T2* was found to provide the best trade-off between spatial resolution and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Spiral IDEAL approaches that use the entire dissolved phase magnetization should give an SNR improvement of a factor of approximately three compared with Cartesian approaches with similar spatial resolution. The IDEAL strategy allowed imaging of gas, PT, and RBC compartments with sufficient SNR and temporal resolution to permit regional gas exchange measurements in healthy rats. Single-shot spiral IDEAL imaging of gas, PT and RBC compartments and gas exchange is feasible in rat lung using Hp (129) Xe. Magn Reson Med 76:566-576, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Essential Role of CFTR in PKA-Dependent Phosphorylation, Alkalinization, and Hyperpolarization During Human Sperm Capacitation.

    PubMed

    Puga Molina, Lis C; Pinto, Nicolás A; Torres Rodríguez, Paulina; Romarowski, Ana; Vicens Sanchez, Alberto; Visconti, Pablo E; Darszon, Alberto; Treviño, Claudia L; Buffone, Mariano G

    2017-06-01

    Mammalian sperm require to spend a limited period of time in the female reproductive tract to become competent to fertilize in a process called capacitation. It is well established that HCO3(-) is essential for capacitation because it activates the atypical soluble adenylate cyclase ADCY10 leading to cAMP production, and promotes alkalinization of cytoplasm, and membrane hyperpolarization. However, how HCO3(-) is transported into the sperm is not well understood. There is evidence that CFTR activity is involved in the human sperm capacitation but how this channel is integrated in the complex signaling cascades associated with this process remains largely unknown. In the present work, we have analyzed the extent to which CFTR regulates different events in human sperm capacitation. We observed that inhibition of CFTR affects HCO3(-) -entrance dependent events resulting in lower PKA activity. CFTR inhibition also affected cAMP/PKA-downstream events such as the increase in tyrosine phosphorylation, hyperactivated motility, and acrosome reaction. In addition, we demonstrated for the first time, that CFTR and PKA activity are essential for the regulation of intracellular pH, and membrane potential in human sperm. Addition of permeable cAMP partially recovered all the PKA-dependent events altered in the presence of inh-172 which is consistent with a role of CFTR upstream of PKA activation. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 1404-1414, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Effects of Diffusion Time on Short-Range Hyperpolarized 3He Diffusivity Measurements in Emphysema

    SciTech Connect

    Gierada, David S.; Woods, Jason C.; Bierhals, Andrew J.; Bartel, Seth T.; Ritter, Jon H.; Choong, Cliff K.; Das, Nitin A.; Hong, Cheng; Pilgram, Thomas K.; Chang, Yulin V.; Jacob, Rick E.; Hogg, James C.; Battafarano, Richard J.; Cooper, Joel D.; Meyers, Bryan F.; Patterson, G Alexander; Yablonskiy, Dmitriy A.; Conradi, Mark S.

    2009-09-28

    Purpose: To characterize the effect of diffusion time on short-range hyperpolarized 3He MR diffusion measurements across a wide range of emphysema severity. Materials and Methods: 3He diffusion MR imaging was performed on 19 lungs or lobes resected from 18 subjects with varying degrees of emphysema using 3 diffusion times (1.6 msec, 5 msec, and 10 msec) at constant b value. Emphysema severity was quantified as the mean apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and as the percentage of pixels with ADC higher than multiple thresholds from 0.30-0.55 cm2/sec (ADC index). Quantitative histology (mean linear intercept) was obtained in 10 of the lung specimens from 10 of the subjects. Results: The mean ADCs with diffusion times of 1.6, 5.0, and 10.0 msec were 0.46, 0.40, and 0.37 cm2/sec, respectively (P <0.0001, ANOVA). There was no relationship between the ADC magnitude and the effect of diffusion time on ADC values. Mean linear intercept correlated with ADC (r=0.91-0.94, P<0.001) and ADC index (r=0.78-0.92, P<0.01) at all diffusion times.

  17. 3D hyperpolarized He-3 MRI of ventilation using a multi-echo projection acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, James H.; O’Halloran, Rafael L.; Brodsky, Ethan K.; Jung, Youngkyoo; Block, Walter F.; Fain, Sean B.

    2010-01-01

    A method is presented for high resolution 3D imaging of the whole lung using inhaled hyperpolarized (HP) He-3 MR with multiple half-echo radial trajectories that can accelerate imaging through undersampling. A multiple half-echo radial trajectory can be used to reduce the level of artifact for undersampled 3D projection reconstruction (PR) imaging by increasing the amount of data acquired per unit time for HP He-3 lung imaging. The point spread functions (PSFs) for breath-held He-3 MRI using multiple half-echo trajectories were evaluated using simulations to predict the effects of T2* and gas diffusion on image quality. Results from PSF simulations were consistent with imaging results in volunteer studies showing improved image quality with increasing number of echoes using up to 8 half-echoes. The 8 half-echo acquisition is shown to accommodate lost breath-holds as short as 6 s using a retrospective reconstruction at reduced resolution as well as to allow reduced breath-hold time compared to an equivalent Cartesian trajectory. Furthermore, preliminary results from a 3D dynamic inhalation-exhalation maneuver are demonstrated using the 8 half-echo trajectory. Results demonstrate the first high resolution 3D PR imaging of ventilation and respiratory dynamics in humans using HP He-3 MR. PMID:18429034

  18. Hyperpolarized 3He functional magnetic resonance imaging of bronchoscopic airway bypass in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Lindsay; Kirby, Miranda; Farquhar, Donald; Licskai, Christopher; Santyr, Giles; Etemad-Rezai, Roya; Parraga, Grace; McCormack, David G

    2012-01-01

    A 73-year-old exsmoker with Global initiative for chronic Obstructive Lung Disease stage III chronic obstructive pulmonary disease underwent airway bypass (AB) as part of the Exhale Airway Stents for Emphysema (EASE) trial, and was the only EASE subject to undergo hyperpolarized 3He magnetic resonance imaging for evaluation of lung function pre- and post-AB. 3He magnetic resonance imaging was acquired twice previously (32 and eight months pre-AB) and twice post-AB (six and 12 months post-AB). Six months post-AB, his increase in forced vital capacity was <12% predicted, and he was classified as an AB nonresponder. However, post-AB, he also demonstrated improvements in quality of life scores, 6 min walk distance and improvements in 3He gas distribution in the regions of stent placement. Given the complex relationship between well-established pulmonary function and quality of life measurements, the present case provides evidence of the value-added information functional imaging may provide in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease interventional studies. PMID:22332133

  19. Hyperpolarized xenon-based molecular sensors for label-free detection of analytes.

    PubMed

    Garimella, Praveena D; Meldrum, Tyler; Witus, Leah S; Smith, Monica; Bajaj, Vikram S; Wemmer, David E; Francis, Matthew B; Pines, Alexander

    2014-01-08

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) can reveal the chemical constituents of a complex mixture without resorting to chemical modification, separation, or other perturbation. Recently, we and others have developed magnetic resonance agents that report on the presence of dilute analytes by proportionately altering the response of a more abundant or easily detected species, a form of amplification. One example of such a sensing medium is xenon gas, which is chemically inert and can be optically hyperpolarized, a process that enhances its NMR signal by up to 5 orders of magnitude. Here, we use a combinatorial synthetic approach to produce xenon magnetic resonance sensors that respond to small molecule analytes. The sensor responds to the ligand by producing a small chemical shift change in the Xe NMR spectrum. We demonstrate this technique for the dye, Rhodamine 6G, for which we have an independent optical assay to verify binding. We thus demonstrate that specific binding of a small molecule can produce a xenon chemical shift change, suggesting a general approach to the production of xenon sensors targeted to small molecule analytes for in vitro assays or molecular imaging in vivo.

  20. Universal Long-Time Behavior of Nuclear Spin Decays in Solid Hyperpolarized Xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saam, Brian; Morgan, Steven W.; Fine, Boris V.

    2009-05-01

    We have observed a universal long-time behavior of ^129Xe FIDs and solid echoes in polycrystalline hyperpolarized xenon at 77 K. In all cases, a decay of the form F(t) = Ae^-γt(φt + φ) sets in after just a few times T2; the behavior is universal in the sense that the decay constant γ and the beat frequency φ, which together characterize the long-time decay are the same for the FID and for solid echoes having different interpulse delay times τ. These findings reveal a fundamental property of nuclear spin dynamics and are thus relevant to theoretical efforts that have been ongoing for decades to understand NMR lineshapes in solids. Moreover, the functional form and universality of this behavior were previously predicted on the basis of analogy with resonances in classical chaotic systems [2]. While we expect this behavior to be characteristic of nuclear-spin solids in general, ^129Xe is an ideal system to examine it with high precision because of the relatively long T2 1 ms and because spin-exchange optical pumping can be used to achieve greatly enhanced magnetization, allowing precise examination of the decay over 3-4 orders of magnitude. [1] S.W. Morgan, et al., PRL 101, 067601 (2008). [2] B.V. Fine, PRL 94, 247601 (2005).

  1. Direct Measurement of Lung Motion using Hyperpolarized Helium-3 MR Tagging

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Jing; Miller, G. Wilson; Altes, Talissa A.; Read, Paul W.; Benedict, Stanley H.; de Lange, Eduard E.; Cates, Gordon D.; Brookeman, James R.; Mugler, John P.; Sheng, Ke

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To measure lung motion between end-inhalation and end-exhalation using a hyperpolarized helium-3 (HP 3He) magnetic resonance (MR) tagging technique. Methods and material Three healthy volunteers underwent MR tagging studies after inhalation of 1L HP 3He gas diluted with nitrogen. Multiple-slice 2D and volumetric 3D MR tagged images of the lungs were obtained at end-inhalation and end-exhalation, and displacement vector maps were computed. Results The grids of tag lines in the HP 3He MR images were well defined at end-inhalation and remained evident at end-exhalation. Displacement vector maps clearly demonstrated the regional lung motion and deformation that occurred during exhalation. Discontinuity and differences in motion pattern between two adjacent lung lobes were readily resolved. Conclusions HP 3He MR tagging technique can be used for direct in vivo measurement of respiratory lung motion on a regional basis. This technique may lend new insights into the regional pulmonary biomechanics and thus provide valuable information for the deformable registration of lung. PMID:17445997

  2. [Therapeutic target for endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor signaling in diabetic vascular complication].

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Takayuki

    2010-06-01

    Vascular tone is tightly regulated by endothelium-derived factors. These include relaxing factors (EDRFs) such as nitric oxide (NO), hyperpolarizing factors (EDHFs), and contracting factors (EDCFs). Although EDHF is a prominent vasodilator, particularly in smaller arteries, little attention has been paid to the potential role of EDHF responses in diabetes. EDHF signaling may involve various factors, including several diffusible factors and non-diffusible factors (e.g., gap junctions). It has been demonstrated that the alterations in EDHF relaxation seen in mesenteric arteries from diabetic rats may be attributable to an increase in phosphodiesterase 3 (PDE3) activity, leading to a reduction in the action of adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP), and consequently the activity of protein kinase A (PKA) is decreased in such arteries. Moreover, it has been suggested that the imbalance between EDRFs and EDCFs is present in mesenteric arteries from type 2 diabetic rats and the EDHF relaxation can be partly reversed by suppression of EDCF signaling. Indeed, chronic treatment with metformin, eicosapentaenoic acid, or thromboxane synthase inhibitor can reduce EDCF signaling and normalize EDHF signaling in mesenteric arteries from type 2 diabetic rats. Although the improvement or restoration of EDHF responses has not been the direct subject of any pharmaceutical effort, increasing cAMP/PKA signaling (e.g., by inhibiting PDE3 activity) or reducing EDCFs signaling has potential as an interesting therapeutic target in diabetic vasculopathy.

  3. Effects of Diffusion Time on Short-Range Hyperpolarized 3He Diffusivity Measurements in Emphysema

    PubMed Central

    Gierada, David S.; Woods, Jason C.; Bierhals, Andrew J.; Bartel, Seth T.; Ritter, Jon H.; Choong, Cliff K.; Das, Nitin A.; Hong, Cheng; Pilgram, Thomas K.; Chang, Yulin V.; Jacob, Richard E.; Hogg, James C.; Battafarano, Richard J.; Cooper, Joel D.; Meyers, Bryan F.; Patterson, G. Alexander; Yablonskiy, Dmitriy A.; Conradi, Mark S.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To characterize the effect of diffusion time on short-range hyperpolarized 3He MR diffusion measurements across a wide range of emphysema severity. Materials and Methods 3He diffusion MR imaging was performed on 19 lungs or lobes resected from 18 subjects with varying degrees of emphysema using 3 diffusion times (1.6 msec, 5 msec, and 10 msec) at constant b value. Emphysema severity was quantified as the mean apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and as the percentage of pixels with ADC higher than multiple thresholds from 0.30–0.55 cm2/sec (ADC index). Quantitative histology (mean linear intercept) was obtained in 10 of the lung specimens from 10 of the subjects. Results The mean ADCs with diffusion times of 1.6, 5.0, and 10.0 msec were 0.46, 0.40, and 0.37 cm2/sec, respectively (P <0.0001, ANOVA). There was no relationship between the ADC magnitude and the effect of diffusion time on ADC values. Mean linear intercept correlated with ADC (r=0.91–0.94, P<0.001) and ADC index (r=0.78–0.92, P<0.01) at all diffusion times. Conclusion Decreases in ADC with longer diffusion time were unrelated to emphysema severity. The strong correlations between the ADC at all diffusion times tested and quantitative histology demonstrate that the ADC is a robust measure of emphysema. PMID:19787725

  4. Cryogenics free production of hyperpolarized 129Xe and 83Kr for biomedical MRI applications☆

    PubMed Central

    Hughes-Riley, Theodore; Six, Joseph S.; Lilburn, David M.L.; Stupic, Karl F.; Dorkes, Alan C.; Shaw, Dominick E.; Pavlovskaya, Galina E.; Meersmann, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    As an alternative to cryogenic gas handling, hyperpolarized (hp) gas mixtures were extracted directly from the spin exchange optical pumping (SEOP) process through expansion followed by compression to ambient pressure for biomedical MRI applications. The omission of cryogenic gas separation generally requires the usage of high xenon or krypton concentrations at low SEOP gas pressures to generate hp 129Xe or hp 83Kr with sufficient MR signal intensity for imaging applications. Two different extraction schemes for the hp gasses were explored with focus on the preservation of the nuclear spin polarization. It was found that an extraction scheme based on an inflatable, pressure controlled balloon is sufficient for hp 129Xe handling, while 83Kr can efficiently be extracted through a single cycle piston pump. The extraction methods were tested for ex vivo MRI applications with excised rat lungs. Precise mixing of the hp gases with oxygen, which may be of interest for potential in vivo applications, was accomplished during the extraction process using a piston pump. The 83Kr bulk gas phase T1 relaxation in the mixtures containing more than approximately 1% O2 was found to be slower than that of 129Xe in corresponding mixtures. The experimental setup also facilitated 129Xe T1 relaxation measurements as a function of O2 concentration within excised lungs. PMID:24135800

  5. Mitochondria Targeted and Intracellular Biothiol Triggered Hyperpolarized (129)Xe Magnetofluorescent Biosensor.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Qingbin; Guo, Qianni; Yuan, Yaping; Yang, Yuqi; Zhang, Bin; Ren, Lili; Zhang, Xiaoxiao; Luo, Qing; Liu, Maili; Bouchard, Louis-S; Zhou, Xin

    2017-02-21

    Biothiols such as gluthathione (GSH), cysteine (Cys), homocysteine (Hcy), and thioredoxin (Trx) play vital roles in cellular metabolism. Various diseases are associated with abnormal cellular biothiol levels. Thus, the intracellular detection of biothiol levels could be a useful diagnostic tool. A number of methods have been developed to detect intracellular thiols, but sensitivity and specificity problems have limited their applications. To address these limitations, we have designed a new biosensor based on hyperpolarized xenon magnetic resonance detection, which can be used to detect biothiol levels noninvasively. The biosensor is a multimodal probe that incorporates a cryptophane-A cage as (129)Xe NMR reporter, a naphthalimide moiety as fluorescence reporter, a disulfide bond as thiol-specific cleavable group, and a triphenylphosphonium moiety as mitochondria targeting unit. When the biosensor interacts with biothiols, disulfide bond cleavage leads to enhancements in the fluorescence intensity and changes in the (129)Xe chemical shift. Using Hyper-CEST (chemical exchange saturation transfer) NMR, our biosensor shows a low detection limit at picomolar (10(-10) M) concentration, which makes a promise to detect thiols in cells. The biosensor can detect biothiol effectively in live cells and shows good targeting ability to the mitochondria. This new approach not only offers a practical technique to detect thiols in live cells, but may also present an excellent in vivo test platform for xenon biosensors.

  6. Gas cells for 3He hyperpolarized via spin-exchange optical pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, W.; Stepanyan, S. S.; Kim, A.; Tan, J. A.; Woo, S.

    2016-01-01

    We present a device for the production of hyperpolarized 3He, which is widely used in spinrelated nuclear physics research. Spin-exchange optical pumping (SEOP) is employed to polarize 3He enclosed in a circular borosilicate glass cell suitable not only for the production of polarized gas but also for its storage. The portable glass cell can, thus, be transported to any other research facility. The glass cell can be refilled several times. Special attention is given to the preparation and the filling of the cell to minimize the impurities on its walls and in the gas. We employ glass tubes with shorter lengths and larger diameters in the gas-filling system to achieve the improvement in the air flow necessary to obtain purer polarized 3He samples. The cell is prepared, and after it has been filled with rubidium (Rb) and 3He-N2 mixture, it is sealed under high vacuum conditions. The cell containing the mixture is exposed to circularly-polarized laser light with a wavelength of 795 nm at temperatures of 180 - 220 °C for SEOP. The polarization of 3He is measured via nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). We obtained 40% polarized 3He in less than 15 hours and 50% in about 25 hours. The longitudinal relaxation time T 1 of the polarized 3He we measured was about 58 hours.

  7. Cryogenics free production of hyperpolarized 129Xe and 83Kr for biomedical MRI applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes-Riley, Theodore; Six, Joseph S.; Lilburn, David M. L.; Stupic, Karl F.; Dorkes, Alan C.; Shaw, Dominick E.; Pavlovskaya, Galina E.; Meersmann, Thomas

    2013-12-01

    As an alternative to cryogenic gas handling, hyperpolarized (hp) gas mixtures were extracted directly from the spin exchange optical pumping (SEOP) process through expansion followed by compression to ambient pressure for biomedical MRI applications. The omission of cryogenic gas separation generally requires the usage of high xenon or krypton concentrations at low SEOP gas pressures to generate hp 129Xe or hp 83Kr with sufficient MR signal intensity for imaging applications. Two different extraction schemes for the hp gasses were explored with focus on the preservation of the nuclear spin polarization. It was found that an extraction scheme based on an inflatable, pressure controlled balloon is sufficient for hp 129Xe handling, while 83Kr can efficiently be extracted through a single cycle piston pump. The extraction methods were tested for ex vivo MRI applications with excised rat lungs. Precise mixing of the hp gases with oxygen, which may be of interest for potential in vivo applications, was accomplished during the extraction process using a piston pump. The 83Kr bulk gas phase T1 relaxation in the mixtures containing more than approximately 1% O2 was found to be slower than that of 129Xe in corresponding mixtures. The experimental setup also facilitated 129Xe T1 relaxation measurements as a function of O2 concentration within excised lungs.

  8. Multiprobe Spectroscopic Evidence for "Hyperpolarity" within 1-Butyl-3-methylimidazolium Hexafluorophosphate Mixtures with Tetraethylene Glycol

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkar, Abhra; Trivedi, Shruti; Baker, Gary A; Pandey, Siddharth

    2008-01-01

    A hybrid, potentially green solvent system composed of tetraethylene glycol (TEG) and the ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([bmim][PF6]) was investigated across all mole fractions with regard to the solvent properties of the mixture. For this purpose, a suite of absorbance- and fluorescence-based solvatochromic probes were utilized to explore solute-solvent and solvent-solvent interactions existing within the [bmim][PF6] + TEG system. These studies revealed an interesting and unusual synergistic solvent effect. In particular, a remarkable hyperpolarity was observed in which the ET value, comprising dipolarity/polarizability and hydrogen bond donor (HBD) acidity contributions, at intermediate mole fractions of the binary mixture well exceeded that of the most polar pure component (i.e., [bmim][PF6]). Independently determined dipolarity/polarizability ( *) and HBD acidity (R) Kamlet-Taft values for the [bmim][PF6] + TEG mixtures were also observed to be anomalously high at intermediate mole fractions, whereas hydrogen bond acceptor (HBA) basicities ( values) were much more in line with the ideal arithmetic values predicted on a mole fraction basis.

  9. Optimizing Flip Angles for Metabolic Rate Estimation in Hyperpolarized Carbon-13 MRI.

    PubMed

    Maidens, John; Gordon, Jeremy W; Arcak, Murat; Larson, Peder E Z

    2016-11-01

    Hyperpolarized carbon-13 magnetic resonance imaging has enabled the real-time observation of perfusion and metabolism in vivo. These experiments typically aim to distinguish between healthy and diseased tissues based on the rate at which they metabolize an injected substrate. However, existing approaches to optimizing flip angle sequences for these experiments have focused on indirect metrics of the reliability of metabolic rate estimates, such as signal variation and signal-to-noise ratio. In this paper we present an optimization procedure that focuses on maximizing the Fisher information about the metabolic rate. We demonstrate through numerical simulation experiments that flip angles optimized based on the Fisher information lead to lower variance in metabolic rate estimates than previous flip angle sequences. In particular, we demonstrate a 20% decrease in metabolic rate uncertainty when compared with the best competing sequence. We then demonstrate appropriateness of the mathematical model used in the simulation experiments with in vivo experiments in a prostate cancer mouse model. While there is no ground truth against which to compare the parameter estimates generated in the in vivo experiments, we demonstrate that our model used can reproduce consistent parameter estimates for a number of flip angle sequences.

  10. Effects of pulmonary inhalation on hyperpolarized krypton-83 magnetic resonance T1 relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stupic, K. F.; Elkins, N. D.; Pavlovskaya, G. E.; Repine, J. E.; Meersmann, T.

    2011-07-01

    The 83Kr magnetic resonance (MR) relaxation time T1 of krypton gas in contact with model surfaces was previously found to be highly sensitive to surface composition, surface-to-volume ratio, and surface temperature. The work presented here explored aspects of pulmonary 83Kr T1 relaxation measurements in excised lungs from healthy rats using hyperpolarized (hp) 83Kr with approximately 4.4% spin polarization. MR spectroscopy without spatial resolution was applied to the ex vivo lungs that actively inhale hp 83Kr through a custom designed ventilation system. Various inhalation schemes were devised to study the influence of anatomical dead space upon the measured 83Kr T1 relaxation times. The longitudinal 83Kr relaxation times in the distal airways and the respiratory zones were independent of the lung inhalation volume, with T1 = 1.3 s and T1 = 1.0 s, depending only on the applied inhalation scheme. The obtained data were highly reproducible between different specimens. Further, the 83Kr T1 relaxation times in excised lungs were unaffected by the presence of up to 40% oxygen in the hp gas mixture. The results support the possible importance of 83Kr as a biomarker for evaluating lung function.

  11. Dopamine and baclofen inhibit the hyperpolarization-activated cation current in rat ventral tegmental neurones.

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Z G; Pessia, M; North, R A

    1993-01-01

    1. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings were made from dopamine-containing ventral tegmental area neurones in slices of rat midbrain. An inward current (Ih) was activated by hyperpolarization from -60 mV. 2. Dopamine (30 microM) reduced the amplitude of Ih by 10-30% at potentials from -70 to -120 mV. The effect was concentration dependent, mimicked by the D2 agonist quinpirole, and prevented by the D2 antagonist (-)-sulpiride. Baclofen (0.3-3 microM) also inhibited Ih; this action was antagonized by 2-hydroxysaclofen but not by (-)-sulpiride. The decrease in Ih resulted from a reduction in the maximal current with no change in the voltage dependence. 3. The action of dopamine was unaffected by cadmium (200 microM), forskolin (10 microM), the adenylyl cyclase inhibitor 2',3'-dideoxyadenosine (100 microM), or by intracellular solution containing cyclic AMP (2 mM). 4. Ih was progressively reduced during the first 5-10 min of recording with electrodes containing guanosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate); after this time, dopamine had no further effect. 5. It is concluded that agonists acting at D2 receptors and GABAB receptors reduce Ih in ventral tegmental neurones. PMID:8392580

  12. Hyperpolarized 3He functional magnetic resonance imaging of bronchoscopic airway bypass in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Lindsay; Kirby, Miranda; Farquhar, Donald; Licskai, Christopher; Santyr, Giles; Etemad-Rezai, Roya; Parraga, Grace; McCormack, David G

    2012-01-01

    A 73-year-old exsmoker with Global initiative for chronic Obstructive Lung Disease stage III chronic obstructive pulmonary disease underwent airway bypass (AB) as part of the Exhale Airway Stents for Emphysema (EASE) trial, and was the only EASE subject to undergo hyperpolarized 3He magnetic resonance imaging for evaluation of lung function pre- and post-AB. 3He magnetic resonance imaging was acquired twice previously (32 and eight months pre-AB) and twice post-AB (six and 12 months post-AB). Six months post-AB, his increase in forced vital capacity was <12% predicted, and he was classified as an AB nonresponder. However, post-AB, he also demonstrated improvements in quality of life scores, 6 min walk distance and improvements in 3He gas distribution in the regions of stent placement. Given the complex relationship between well-established pulmonary function and quality of life measurements, the present case provides evidence of the value-added information functional imaging may provide in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease interventional studies.

  13. Improved Technique for Measurement of Regional Fractional Ventilation by Hyperpolarized 3He MRI

    PubMed Central

    Emami, Kiarash; Kadlecek, Stephen J.; Woodburn, John M.; Zhu, Jianliang; Yu, Jiangsheng; Vahdat, Vahid; Pickup, Stephen; Ishii, Masaru; Rizi, Rahim R.

    2012-01-01

    Quantitative measurement of regional lung ventilation is of great significance in assessment of lung function in many obstructive and restrictive pulmonary diseases. A new technique for regional measurement of fractional ventilation using hyperpolarized 3He MRI is proposed, addressing the shortcomings of an earlier approach that limited its use to small animals. The new approach allows for the acquisition of similar quantitative maps over a shortened period and requires substantially less 3He gas. This technique is therefore a better platform for implementation in large species, including humans. The measurements using the two approaches were comparable to a great degree, as verified in a healthy rat lung, and are very reproducible. Preliminary validation is performed in a lung phantom system. Volume dependency of measurements was assessed both in vivo and in vitro. A scheme for selecting an optimum flip angle is proposed. In addition, a dead space modeling approach is proposed to yield more accurate measurements of regional fractional ventilation using either method. Finally, sensitivity of the new technique to model parameters, noise, and number of included images were assessed numerically. As a prelude to application in humans, the technique was implemented in a large animal study successfully. PMID:19877277

  14. Hyperpolarization-Activated Current Induces Period-Doubling Cascades and Chaos in a Cold Thermoreceptor Model

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Kesheng; Maidana, Jean P.; Caviedes, Mauricio; Quero, Daniel; Aguirre, Pablo; Orio, Patricio

    2017-01-01

    In this article, we describe and analyze the chaotic behavior of a conductance-based neuronal bursting model. This is a model with a reduced number of variables, yet it retains biophysical plausibility. Inspired by the activity of cold thermoreceptors, the model contains a persistent Sodium current, a Calcium-activated Potassium current and a hyperpolarization-activated current (Ih) that drive a slow subthreshold oscillation. Driven by this oscillation, a fast subsystem (fast Sodium and Potassium currents) fires action potentials in a periodic fashion. Depending on the parameters, this model can generate a variety of firing patterns that includes bursting, regular tonic and polymodal firing. Here we show that the transitions between different firing patterns are often accompanied by a range of chaotic firing, as suggested by an irregular, non-periodic firing pattern. To confirm this, we measure the maximum Lyapunov exponent of the voltage trajectories, and the Lyapunov exponent and Lempel-Ziv's complexity of the ISI time series. The four-variable slow system (without spiking) also generates chaotic behavior, and bifurcation analysis shows that this is often originated by period doubling cascades. Either with or without spikes, chaos is no longer generated when the Ih is removed from the system. As the model is biologically plausible with biophysically meaningful parameters, we propose it as a useful tool to understand chaotic dynamics in neurons. PMID:28344550

  15. Cryogenics free production of hyperpolarized 129Xe and 83Kr for biomedical MRI applications.

    PubMed

    Hughes-Riley, Theodore; Six, Joseph S; Lilburn, David M L; Stupic, Karl F; Dorkes, Alan C; Shaw, Dominick E; Pavlovskaya, Galina E; Meersmann, Thomas

    2013-12-01

    As an alternative to cryogenic gas handling, hyperpolarized (hp) gas mixtures were extracted directly from the spin exchange optical pumping (SEOP) process through expansion followed by compression to ambient pressure for biomedical MRI applications. The omission of cryogenic gas separation generally requires the usage of high xenon or krypton concentrations at low SEOP gas pressures to generate hp (129)Xe or hp (83)Kr with sufficient MR signal intensity for imaging applications. Two different extraction schemes for the hp gasses were explored with focus on the preservation of the nuclear spin polarization. It was found that an extraction scheme based on an inflatable, pressure controlled balloon is sufficient for hp (129)Xe handling, while (83)Kr can efficiently be extracted through a single cycle piston pump. The extraction methods were tested for ex vivo MRI applications with excised rat lungs. Precise mixing of the hp gases with oxygen, which may be of interest for potential in vivo applications, was accomplished during the extraction process using a piston pump. The (83)Kr bulk gas phase T1 relaxation in the mixtures containing more than approximately 1% O2 was found to be slower than that of (129)Xe in corresponding mixtures. The experimental setup also facilitated (129)Xe T1 relaxation measurements as a function of O2 concentration within excised lungs. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Contribution of endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor to exercise-induced vasodilation in health and hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Ozkor, Muhiddin A; Hayek, Salim S; Rahman, Ayaz M; Murrow, Jonathan R; Kavtaradze, Nino; Lin, Ji; Manatunga, Amita; Quyyumi, Arshed A

    2015-02-01

    The role of endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF) in either the healthy circulation or in those with hypercholesterolemia is unknown. In healthy and hypercholesterolemic subjects, we measured forearm blood flow (FBF) using strain-gauge plethysmography at rest, during graded handgrip exercise, and after sodium nitroprusside infusion. Measurements were repeated after l-NMMA, tetraethylammonium (TEA), and combined infusions. At rest, l-NMMA infusion reduced FBF in healthy but not hypercholesterolemic subjects. At peak exercise, vasodilation was lower in hypercholesterolemic compared to healthy subjects (274% vs 438% increase in FBF, p=0.017). TEA infusion reduced exercise-induced vasodilation in both healthy and hypercholesterolemic subjects (27%, p<0.0001 and -20%, p<0.0001, respectively). The addition of l-NMMA to TEA further reduced FBF in healthy (-14%, p=0.012) but not in hypercholesterolemic subjects, indicating a reduced nitric oxide and greater EDHF-mediated contribution to exercise-induced vasodilation in hypercholesterolemia. In conclusion, exercise-induced vasodilation is impaired and predominantly mediated by EDHF in hypercholesterolemic subjects. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION IDENTIFIER NCT00166166: © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. Hyperpolarization induces a long-term increase in the spontaneous firing rate of cerebellar Golgi cells

    PubMed Central

    Hull, Court; Chu, YunXiang; Thanawala, Monica; Regehr, Wade G.

    2013-01-01

    Golgi cells (GoCs) are inhibitory interneurons that influence the cerebellar cortical response to sensory input by regulating the excitability of the granule cell layer. While GoC inhibition is essential for normal motor coordination, little is known about the circuit dynamics that govern the activity of these cells. In particular, while GoC spontaneous spiking influences the extent of inhibition and gain throughout the granule cell layer, it is not known whether this spontaneous activity can be modulated in a long-term manner. Here we describe a form of long-term plasticity that regulates the spontaneous firing rate of GoCs in the rat cerebellar cortex. We find that membrane hyperpolarization, either by mGluR2 activation of potassium channels, or by somatic current injection, induces a long-lasting increase in GoC spontaneous firing. This spike rate plasticity appears to result from a strong reduction in the spike afterhyperpolarization (AHP). Pharmacological manipulations suggest the involvement of calcium-calmodulin dependent kinase II (CaMKII) and calcium-activated potassium channels in mediating these firing rate increases. As a consequence of this plasticity, GoC spontaneous spiking is selectively enhanced, but the gain of evoked spiking is unaffected. Hence this plasticity is well-suited for selectively regulating the tonic output of GoCs rather than their sensory-evoked responses. PMID:23554471

  18. Applying non-uniform grids to evaluating susceptibility from flow-type phenomena: an example of application to Mount Etna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bongolan, Vena Pearl; Lupiano, Valeria; D'Ambrosio, Donato; Rongo, Rocco; Spataro, William; Iovine, Giulio

    2013-04-01

    The hazard induced by dangerous flow-type phenomena - e.g. lava flows, earth flows, debris flows, and debris avalanches - can be assessed by analysing a proper set of simulations of hypothetical events. Non-uniform grids are commonly used to study particular areas of interest in computational domains. Examples of application concern, for instance, the turbulence in a boundary layer. While non-uniform grids frequently appear in adaptive methods, they may also be used in a "static" environment. A purposive sampling method, based on a non-uniform grid of sources coupled with numerical simulations of independent events, has recently been employed to evaluate the hazard induced by flow-type phenomena. An example of application to lava-flows at Mount Etna (Italy) is described in this study. The method aims at refining the spatial distribution of hypothetical eruptive vents with respect to an original uniform grid. The density of eruptive vents has been determined by considering the historical distribution of lateral and eccentric vents, and the distribution of the main faults/structures on the volcano. A higher number of sources marks higher-probability zones of vent opening, based on classes of activation: the number of vents in each class has been set proportionally to the probability of activation of the class. By considering the different types of eruption expected from the considered volcano, based on the historical activity of the past 400 years, a set of simulations per each vent has been performed. The employed model is SCIARA-fv2, a Cellular Automata numerical code recently applied to the same study area for preliminary hazard analyses. In this work, calibration could therefore be skipped, by taking advantage from such experience of tuning of the parameters. Performed simulations have been analysed by a GIS, to verify the number of events affecting each cell of the domain. A probability of occurrence could be assigned to each simulation, based on statistics of

  19. Removal efficiency of radioactive cesium and iodine ions by a flow-type apparatus designed for electrochemically reduced water production.

    PubMed

    Hamasaki, Takeki; Nakamichi, Noboru; Teruya, Kiichiro; Shirahata, Sanetaka

    2014-01-01

    The Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident on March 11, 2011 attracted people's attention, with anxiety over possible radiation hazards. Immediate and long-term concerns are around protection from external and internal exposure by the liberated radionuclides. In particular, residents living in the affected regions are most concerned about ingesting contaminated foodstuffs, including drinking water. Efficient removal of radionuclides from rainwater and drinking water has been reported using several pot-type filtration devices. A currently used flow-type test apparatus is expected to simultaneously provide radionuclide elimination prior to ingestion and protection from internal exposure by accidental ingestion of radionuclides through the use of a micro-carbon carboxymethyl cartridge unit and an electrochemically reduced water production unit, respectively. However, the removability of radionuclides from contaminated tap water has not been tested to date. Thus, the current research was undertaken to assess the capability of the apparatus to remove radionuclides from artificially contaminated tap water. The results presented here demonstrate that the apparatus can reduce radioactivity levels to below the detection limit in applied tap water containing either 300 Bq/kg of 137Cs or 150 Bq/kg of 125I. The apparatus had a removal efficiency of over 90% for all concentration ranges of radio-cesium and -iodine tested. The results showing efficient radionuclide removability, together with previous studies on molecular hydrogen and platinum nanoparticles as reactive oxygen species scavengers, strongly suggest that the test apparatus has the potential to offer maximum safety against radionuclide-contaminated foodstuffs, including drinking water.

  20. Removal Efficiency of Radioactive Cesium and Iodine Ions by a Flow-Type Apparatus Designed for Electrochemically Reduced Water Production

    PubMed Central

    Hamasaki, Takeki; Nakamichi, Noboru; Teruya, Kiichiro; Shirahata, Sanetaka

    2014-01-01

    The Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident on March 11, 2011 attracted people’s attention, with anxiety over possible radiation hazards. Immediate and long-term concerns are around protection from external and internal exposure by the liberated radionuclides. In particular, residents living in the affected regions are most concerned about ingesting contaminated foodstuffs, including drinking water. Efficient removal of radionuclides from rainwater and drinking water has been reported using several pot-type filtration devices. A currently used flow-type test apparatus is expected to simultaneously provide radionuclide elimination prior to ingestion and protection from internal exposure by accidental ingestion of radionuclides through the use of a micro-carbon carboxymethyl cartridge unit and an electrochemically reduced water production unit, respectively. However, the removability of radionuclides from contaminated tap water has not been tested to date. Thus, the current research was undertaken to assess the capability of the apparatus to remove radionuclides from artificially contaminated tap water. The results presented here demonstrate that the apparatus can reduce radioactivity levels to below the detection limit in applied tap water containing either 300 Bq/kg of 137Cs or 150 Bq/kg of 125I. The apparatus had a removal efficiency of over 90% for all concentration ranges of radio–cesium and –iodine tested. The results showing efficient radionuclide removability, together with previous studies on molecular hydrogen and platinum nanoparticles as reactive oxygen species scavengers, strongly suggest that the test apparatus has the potential to offer maximum safety against radionuclide-contaminated foodstuffs, including drinking water. PMID:25029447

  1. Action potential repolarization and a fast after-hyperpolarization in rat hippocampal pyramidal cells.

    PubMed

    Storm, J F

    1987-04-01

    1. The repolarization of the action potential, and a fast after-hyperpolarization (a.h.p.) were studied in CA1 pyramidal cells (n = 76) in rat hippocampal slices (28-37 degrees C). Single spikes were elicited by brief (1-3 ms) current pulses, at membrane potentials close to rest (-60 to -70 mV). 2. Each action potential was followed by four after-potentials: (a) the fast a.h.p., lasting 2-5 ms; (b) an after-depolarization; (c) a medium a.h.p., (50-100 ms); and (d) a slow a.h.p. (1-2 s). Both the fast a.h.p. and the slow a.h.p. (but not the medium a.h.p.) were inhibited by Ca2+-free medium or Ca2+-channel blockers (Co2+, Mn2+ or Cd2+); but tetraethylammonium (TEA; 0.5-2 nM) blocked only the fast a.h.p., and noradrenaline (2-5 microM) only the slow a.h.p. This suggests that two Ca2+-activated K+ currents were involved: a fast, TEA-sensitive one (IC) underlying the fast a.h.p., and a slow noradrenaline-sensitive one (IAHP) underlying the slow a.h.p. 3. Like the fast a.h.p., spike repolarization seems to depend on a Ca2+-dependent K+ current of the fast, TEA-sensitive kind (IC). The repolarization was slowed by Ca2+-free medium, Co2+, Mn2+, Cd2+, or TEA, but not by noradrenaline. Charybdotoxin (CTX; 30 nM), a scorpion toxin which blocks the large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channel in muscle, had a similar effect to TEA. The effects of TEA and Cd2+ (or Mn2+) showed mutual occlusion. Raising the external K+ concentration reduced the fast a.h.p. and slowed the spike repolarization, whereas Cl- loading of the cell was ineffective. 4. The transient K+ current, IA, seems also to contribute to spike repolarization, because: (a) 4-aminopyridine (4-AP; 0.1 mM), which blocks IA, slowed the spike repolarization; (b) depolarizing pre-pulses, which inactivate IA, had a similar effect; (c) hyperpolarizing pre-pulses speeded up the spike repolarization; (d) the effects of 4-AP and pre-pulses persisted during Ca2+ blockade (like IA); and (e) depolarizing pre-pulses reduced the

  2. Continuous Problem of Function Continuity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jayakody, Gaya; Zazkis, Rina

    2015-01-01

    We examine different definitions presented in textbooks and other mathematical sources for "continuity of a function at a point" and "continuous function" in the context of introductory level Calculus. We then identify problematic issues related to definitions of continuity and discontinuity: inconsistency and absence of…

  3. Continuous Problem of Function Continuity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jayakody, Gaya; Zazkis, Rina

    2015-01-01

    We examine different definitions presented in textbooks and other mathematical sources for "continuity of a function at a point" and "continuous function" in the context of introductory level Calculus. We then identify problematic issues related to definitions of continuity and discontinuity: inconsistency and absence of…

  4. Clcn2 encodes the hyperpolarization-activated chloride channel in the ducts of mouse salivary glands

    PubMed Central

    Romanenko, Victor G.; Nakamoto, Tetsuji; Catalán, Marcelo A.; Gonzalez-Begne, Mireya; Schwartz, George J.; Jaramillo, Yasna; Sepúlveda, Francisco V.; Figueroa, Carlos D.; Melvin, James E.

    2008-01-01

    Transepithelial Cl− transport in salivary gland ducts is a major component of the ion reabsorption process, the final stage of saliva production. It was previously demonstrated that a Cl− current with the biophysical properties of ClC-2 channels dominates the Cl− conductance of unstimulated granular duct cells in the mouse submandibular gland. This inward-rectifying Cl− current is activated by hyperpolarization and elevated intracellular Cl− concentration. Here we show that ClC-2 immunolocalized to the basolateral region of acinar and duct cells in mouse salivary glands, whereas its expression was most robust in granular and striated duct cells. Consistent with this observation, nearly 10-fold larger ClC-2-like currents were observed in granular duct cells than the acinar cells obtained from submandibular glands. The loss of inward-rectifying Cl− current in cells from Clcn2−/− mice confirmed the molecular identity of the channel responsible for these currents as ClC-2. Nevertheless, both in vivo and ex vivo fluid secretion assays failed to identify significant changes in the ion composition, osmolality, or salivary flow rate of Clcn2−/− mice. Additionally, neither a compensatory increase in Cftr Cl− channel protein expression nor in Cftr-like Cl− currents were detected in Clcn2 null mice, nor did it appear that ClC-2 was important for blood-organ barrier function. We conclude that ClC-2 is the inward-rectifying Cl− channel in duct cells, but its expression is not apparently required for the ion reabsorption or the barrier function of salivary ductal epithelium. PMID:18801913

  5. Src tyrosine kinase alters gating of hyperpolarization-activated HCN4 pacemaker channel through Tyr531.

    PubMed

    Li, Chen-Hong; Zhang, Qi; Teng, Bunyen; Mustafa, S Jamal; Huang, Jian-Ying; Yu, Han-Gang

    2008-01-01

    We recently discovered that the constitutively active Src tyrosine kinase can enhance hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) 4 channel activity by binding to the channel protein. To investigate the mechanism of modulation by Src of HCN channels, we studied the effects of a selective inhibitor of Src tyrosine kinase, 4-amino-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-7-(t-butyl)pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidine (PP2), on HCN4 and its mutant channels expressed in HEK 293 cells by using a whole cell patch-clamp technique. We found that PP2 can inhibit HCN4 currents by negatively shifting the voltage dependence of channel activation, decreasing the whole cell channel conductance, and slowing activation and deactivation kinetics. Screening putative tyrosine residues subject to phosphorylation yielded two candidates: Tyr(531) and Tyr(554). Substituting HCN4-Tyr(531) with phenylalanine largely abolished the effects of PP2 on HCN4 channels. Replacing HCN4-Tyr(554) with phenylalanine did not abolish the effects of PP2 on voltage-dependent activation but did eliminate PP2-induced slowing of channel kinetics. The inhibitory effects of HCN channels associated with reduced Src tyrosine activity is confirmed in HL-1 cardiomyocytes. Finally, we found that PP2 can decrease the heart rate in a mouse model. These results demonstrate that Src tyrosine kinase enhances HCN4 currents by shifting their activation to more positive potentials and increasing the whole cell channel conductance as well as speeding the channel kinetics. The tyrosine residue that mediates most of Src's actions on HCN4 channels is Tyr(531).

  6. Pathway to cryogen free production of hyperpolarized Krypton-83 and Xenon-129.

    PubMed

    Six, Joseph S; Hughes-Riley, Theodore; Stupic, Karl F; Pavlovskaya, Galina E; Meersmann, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Hyperpolarized (hp) (129)Xe and hp (83)Kr for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are typically obtained through spin-exchange optical pumping (SEOP) in gas mixtures with dilute concentrations of the respective noble gas. The usage of dilute noble gases mixtures requires cryogenic gas separation after SEOP, a step that makes clinical and preclinical applications of hp (129)Xe MRI cumbersome. For hp (83)Kr MRI, cryogenic concentration is not practical due to depolarization that is caused by quadrupolar relaxation in the condensed phase. In this work, the concept of stopped flow SEOP with concentrated noble gas mixtures at low pressures was explored using a laser with 23.3 W of output power and 0.25 nm linewidth. For (129)Xe SEOP without cryogenic separation, the highest obtained MR signal intensity from the hp xenon-nitrogen gas mixture was equivalent to that arising from 15.5±1.9% spin polarized (129)Xe in pure xenon gas. The production rate of the hp gas mixture, measured at 298 K, was 1.8 cm(3)/min. For hp (83)Kr, the equivalent of 4.4±0.5% spin polarization in pure krypton at a production rate of 2 cm(3)/min was produced. The general dependency of spin polarization upon gas pressure obtained in stopped flow SEOP is reported for various noble gas concentrations. Aspects of SEOP specific to the two noble gas isotopes are discussed and compared with current theoretical opinions. A non-linear pressure broadening of the Rb D(1) transition was observed and taken into account for the qualitative description of the SEOP process.

  7. Strategies for the Hyperpolarization of Acetonitrile and Related Ligands by SABRE

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We report on a strategy for using SABRE (signal amplification by reversible exchange) for polarizing 1H and 13C nuclei of weakly interacting ligands which possess biologically relevant and nonaromatic motifs. We first demonstrate this via the polarization of acetonitrile, using Ir(IMes)(COD)Cl as the catalyst precursor, and confirm that the route to hyperpolarization transfer is via the J-coupling network. We extend this work to the polarization of propionitrile, benzylnitrile, benzonitrile, and trans-3-hexenedinitrile in order to assess its generality. In the 1H NMR spectrum, the signal for acetonitrile is enhanced 8-fold over its thermal counterpart when [Ir(H)2(IMes)(MeCN)3]+ is the catalyst. Upon addition of pyridine or pyridine-d5, the active catalyst changes to [Ir(H)2(IMes)(py)2(MeCN)]+ and the resulting acetonitrile 1H signal enhancement increases to 20- and 60-fold, respectively. In 13C NMR studies, polarization transfers optimally to the quaternary 13C nucleus of MeCN while the methyl 13C is hardly polarized. Transfer to 13C is shown to occur first via the 1H–1H coupling between the hydrides and the methyl protons and then via either the 2J or 1J couplings to the respective 13Cs, of which the 2J route is more efficient. These experimental results are rationalized through a theoretical treatment which shows excellent agreement with experiment. In the case of MeCN, longitudinal two-spin orders between pairs of 1H nuclei in the three-spin methyl group are created. Two-spin order states, between the 1H and 13C nuclei, are also created, and their existence is confirmed for Me13CN in both the 1H and 13C NMR spectra using the Only Parahydrogen Spectroscopy protocol. PMID:25539423

  8. Linking Ventilation Heterogeneity Quantified via Hyperpolarized 3He MRI to Dynamic Lung Mechanics and Airway Hyperresponsiveness.

    PubMed

    Lui, Justin K; Parameswaran, Harikrishnan; Albert, Mitchell S; Lutchen, Kenneth R

    2015-01-01

    Advancements in hyperpolarized helium-3 MRI (HP 3He-MRI) have introduced the ability to render and quantify ventilation patterns throughout the anatomic regions of the lung. The goal of this study was to establish how ventilation heterogeneity relates to the dynamic changes in mechanical lung function and airway hyperresponsiveness in asthmatic subjects. In four healthy and nine mild-to-moderate asthmatic subjects, we measured dynamic lung resistance and lung elastance from 0.1 to 8 Hz via a broadband ventilation waveform technique. We quantified ventilation heterogeneity using a recently developed coefficient of variation method from HP 3He-MRI imaging. Dynamic lung mechanics and imaging were performed at baseline, post-challenge, and after a series of five deep inspirations. AHR was measured via the concentration of agonist that elicits a 20% decrease in the subject's forced expiratory volume in one second compared to baseline (PC20) dose. The ventilation coefficient of variation was correlated to low-frequency lung resistance (R = 0.647, P < 0.0001), the difference between high and low frequency lung resistance (R = 0.668, P < 0.0001), and low-frequency lung elastance (R = 0.547, P = 0.0003). In asthmatic subjects with PC20 values <25 mg/mL, the coefficient of variation at baseline exhibited a strong negative trend (R = -0.798, P = 0.02) to PC20 dose. Our findings were consistent with the notion of peripheral rather than central involvement of ventilation heterogeneity. Also, the degree of AHR appears to be dependent on the degree to which baseline airway constriction creates baseline ventilation heterogeneity. HP 3He-MRI imaging may be a powerful predictor of the degree of AHR and in tracking the efficacy of therapy.

  9. Assessment of repeatability of hyperpolarized gas MR ventilation functional imaging in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, Brian; Couch, Marcus; Roche, John P; Walvick, Ronn; Zheng, Shaokuan; Baker, Dawn; Johnson, Mac; Botfield, Martyn; Albert, Mitchell S

    2014-12-01

    Hyperpolarized (HP) gas magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an advanced imaging technique that provides high-resolution regional information on lung function without using ionizing radiation. Before this modality can be considered for assessing clinical or investigational interventions, baseline repeatability needs to be established. We assessed repeatability of lung function measurement using HP helium-3 MRI (HP (3)He MRI) in a small cohort of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). We examined repeatability of HP (3)He MR images of five patients with CF in four scanning sessions over a 4-week period. We acquired images on a Philips 3.0 Tesla Achieva MRI scanner using a quadrature, flexible, wrap-around, (3)He radiofrequency coil with a fast gradient-echo pulse sequence. We determined ventilation volume and ventilation defect volume using an advanced semiautomatic segmentation algorithm and also quantified ventilation heterogeneity. There were no significant differences in total ventilation volume, ventilation defect volume, ventilation defect percentage, or mean ventilation heterogeneity (repeated-measures analysis of variance, P = .2116, P = .2825, P = .2871, and P = .7265, respectively) in the patients across the four scanning sessions. Our results indicate that total ventilation volume, ventilation defect volume, ventilation defect percentage, and mean ventilation heterogeneity as assessed by HP gas MRI in CF patients with stable health are reproducible over time. This repeatability and the technique's capability to provide noninvasive high-resolution data on regional lung function without ionizing radiation make (3)He MRI a potentially useful outcome measure for CF-related clinical trials. Copyright © 2014 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Hyperpolarized Gas Diffusion MRI for the Study of Atelectasis and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Cereda, Maurizio; Xin, Yi; Kadlecek, Stephen; Hamedani, Hooman; Rajaei, Jennia; Clapp, Justin; Rizi, Rahim R.

    2014-01-01

    Considerable uncertainty remains about the best ventilator strategies for the mitigation of atelectasis and associated airspace stretch in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). In addition to several immediate physiological effects, atelectasis increases the risk of ventilator-associated lung injury (VALI), which has been shown to significantly worsen ARDS outcomes. A number of lung imaging techniques have made substantial headway in clarifying the mechanisms of atelectasis. This paper reviews the contributions of CT, PET, and conventional MRI to understanding this phenomenon. In doing so, it also reveals several important shortcomings inherent to each of these approaches. Once these shortcomings have been made apparent, we describe how hyperpolarized gas magnetic resonance imaging (HP MRI)—a technique that is uniquely able to assess responses to mechanical ventilation and lung injury in peripheral airspaces—is poised to fill several of these knowledge gaps. The HP-MRI-derived apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) quantifies the restriction of 3He diffusion by peripheral airspaces, thereby obtaining pulmonary structural information at an extremely small scale. Lastly, this paper reports the results of a series of experiments that measured ADC in mechanically ventilated rats in order to investigate (i) the effect of atelectasis on ventilated airspaces; (ii) the relationship between positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP), hysteresis, and the dimensions of peripheral airspaces; and (iii) the ability of PEEP and surfactant to reduce airspace dimensions after lung injury. An increase in ADC was found to be a marker of atelectasis-induced overdistension. With recruitment, higher airway pressures were shown to reduce stretch rather than worsen it. Moving forward, HP MRI has significant potential to shed further light on the atelectatic processes that occur during mechanical ventilation. PMID:24920074

  11. Hyperpolarized gas diffusion MRI for the study of atelectasis and acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cereda, Maurizio; Xin, Yi; Kadlecek, Stephen; Hamedani, Hooman; Rajaei, Jennia; Clapp, Justin; Rizi, Rahim R

    2014-12-01

    Considerable uncertainty remains about the best ventilator strategies for the mitigation of atelectasis and associated airspace stretch in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). In addition to several immediate physiological effects, atelectasis increases the risk of ventilator-associated lung injury, which has been shown to significantly worsen ARDS outcomes. A number of lung imaging techniques have made substantial headway in clarifying the mechanisms of atelectasis. This paper reviews the contributions of computed tomography, positron emission tomography, and conventional MRI to understanding this phenomenon. In doing so, it also reveals several important shortcomings inherent to each of these approaches. Once these shortcomings have been made apparent, we describe how hyperpolarized (HP) gas MRI--a technique that is uniquely able to assess responses to mechanical ventilation and lung injury in peripheral airspaces--is poised to fill several of these knowledge gaps. The HP-MRI-derived apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) quantifies the restriction of (3) He diffusion by peripheral airspaces, thereby obtaining pulmonary structural information at an extremely small scale. Lastly, this paper reports the results of a series of experiments that measured ADC in mechanically ventilated rats in order to investigate (i) the effect of atelectasis on ventilated airspaces, (ii) the relationship between positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP), hysteresis, and the dimensions of peripheral airspaces, and (iii) the ability of PEEP and surfactant to reduce airspace dimensions after lung injury. An increase in ADC was found to be a marker of atelectasis-induced overdistension. With recruitment, higher airway pressures were shown to reduce stretch rather than worsen it. Moving forward, HP MRI has significant potential to shed further light on the atelectatic processes that occur during mechanical ventilation. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Impaired in vivo mitochondrial Krebs cycle activity after myocardial infarction assessed using hyperpolarized magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Dodd, Michael S; Atherton, Helen J; Carr, Carolyn A; Stuckey, Daniel J; West, James A; Griffin, Julian L; Radda, George K; Clarke, Kieran; Heather, Lisa C; Tyler, Damian J

    2014-11-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) is one of the leading causes of heart failure. An increasing body of evidence links alterations in cardiac metabolism and mitochondrial function with the progression of heart disease. The aim of this work was to, therefore, follow the in vivo mitochondrial metabolic alterations caused by MI, thereby allowing a greater understanding of the interplay between metabolic and functional abnormalities. Using hyperpolarized carbon-13 ((13)C)-magnetic resonance spectroscopy, in vivo alterations in mitochondrial metabolism were assessed for 22 weeks after surgically induced MI with reperfusion in female Wister rats. One week after MI, there were no detectable alterations in in vivo cardiac mitochondrial metabolism over the range of ejection fractions observed (from 28% to 84%). At 6 weeks after MI, in vivo mitochondrial Krebs cycle activity was impaired, with decreased (13)C-label flux into citrate, glutamate, and acetylcarnitine, which correlated with the degree of cardiac dysfunction. These changes were independent of alterations in pyruvate dehydrogenase flux. By 22 weeks, alterations were also seen in pyruvate dehydrogenase flux, which decreased at lower ejection fractions. These results were confirmed using in vitro analysis of enzyme activities and metabolomic profiles of key intermediates. The in vivo decrease in Krebs cycle activity in the 6-week post-MI heart may represent an early maladaptive phase in the metabolic alterations after MI in which reductions in Krebs cycle activity precede a reduction in pyruvate dehydrogenase flux. Changes in mitochondrial metabolism in heart disease are progressive and proportional to the degree of cardiac impairment. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. In vivo lung morphometry with hyperpolarized 3He diffusion MRI: Theoretical background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukstanskii, A. L.; Yablonskiy, D. A.

    2008-02-01

    MRI-based study of 3He gas diffusion in lungs may provide important information on lung microstructure. Lung acinar airways can be described in terms of cylinders covered with alveolar sleeve [Haefeli-Bleuer, Weibel, Anat. Rec. 220 (1988) 401]. For relatively short diffusion times (on the order of a few ms) this geometry allows description of the 3He diffusion attenuated MR signal in lungs in terms of two diffusion coefficients—longitudinal (D) and transverse (D) with respect to the individual acinar airway axis [Yablonskiy et al., PNAS 99 (2002) 3111]. In this paper, empirical relationships between D and D and the geometrical parameters of airways and alveoli are found by means of computer Monte Carlo simulations. The effects of non-Gaussian signal behavior (dependence of D and D on b-value) are also taken into account. The results obtained are quantitatively valid in the physiologically important range of airway parameters characteristic of healthy lungs and lungs with mild emphysema. In lungs with advanced emphysema, the results provide only "apparent" characteristics but still could potentially be used to evaluate emphysema progression. This creates a basis for in vivo lung morphometry—evaluation of the geometrical parameters of acinar airways from hyperpolarized 3He diffusion MRI, despite the airways being too small to be resolved by direct imaging. These results also predict a rather substantial dependence of 3He ADC on the experimentally-controllable diffusion time, Δ. If Δ is decreased from 3 ms to 1 ms, the ADC in normal human lungs may increase by almost 50%. This effect should be taken into account when comparing experimental data obtained with different pulse sequences.

  14. Pathway to Cryogen Free Production of Hyperpolarized Krypton-83 and Xenon-129

    PubMed Central

    Six, Joseph S.; Hughes-Riley, Theodore; Stupic, Karl F.; Pavlovskaya, Galina E.; Meersmann, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Hyperpolarized (hp) 129Xe and hp 83Kr for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are typically obtained through spin-exchange optical pumping (SEOP) in gas mixtures with dilute concentrations of the respective noble gas. The usage of dilute noble gases mixtures requires cryogenic gas separation after SEOP, a step that makes clinical and preclinical applications of hp 129Xe MRI cumbersome. For hp 83Kr MRI, cryogenic concentration is not practical due to depolarization that is caused by quadrupolar relaxation in the condensed phase. In this work, the concept of stopped flow SEOP with concentrated noble gas mixtures at low pressures was explored using a laser with 23.3 W of output power and 0.25 nm linewidth. For 129Xe SEOP without cryogenic separation, the highest obtained MR signal intensity from the hp xenon-nitrogen gas mixture was equivalent to that arising from 15.5±1.9% spin polarized 129Xe in pure xenon gas. The production rate of the hp gas mixture, measured at 298 K, was 1.8 cm3/min. For hp 83Kr, the equivalent of 4.4±0.5% spin polarization in pure krypton at a production rate of 2 cm3/min was produced. The general dependency of spin polarization upon gas pressure obtained in stopped flow SEOP is reported for various noble gas concentrations. Aspects of SEOP specific to the two noble gas isotopes are discussed and compared with current theoretical opinions. A non-linear pressure broadening of the Rb D1 transition was observed and taken into account for the qualitative description of the SEOP process. PMID:23209620

  15. Endothelium-Derived Hyperpolarizing Factor Mediates Bradykinin Stimulated Tissue Plasminogen Activator Release In Humans

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Ayaz M.; Murrow, Jonathan R.; Ozkor, Muhiddin A.; Kavtaradze, Nino; Lin, Ji; De Staercke, Christine; Hooper, W. Craig; Manatunga, Amita; Hayek, Salim; Quyyumi, Arshed A.

    2014-01-01

    Aims Bradykinin stimulates tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) release from human endothelium. Although bradykinin stimulates both nitric oxide and endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF) release, the role of EDHF in t-PA release remains unexplored. This study sought to determine the mechanisms of bradykinin-stimulated t-PA release in the forearm vasculature of healthy human subjects. Methods In 33 healthy subjects (age 40.3±1.9 years) forearm blood flow (FBF) and t-PA release were measured at rest, and after intra-arterial infusions of bradykinin (400ng/min) and sodium nitroprusside (3.2 mg/min). Measurements were repeated after intra-arterial infusion of TEA (1 μmol/min), fluconazole (0.4 μmol.min-1.L-1), and NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA, 8 μmol/min) to block nitric oxide, and their combination in separate studies. Results Bradykinin significantly increased net t-PA release across the forearm (P<0.0001). Fluconazole attenuated both bradykinin-mediated vasodilation (-23.3±2.7% FBF, P<0.0001) and t-PA release (from 50.9±9.0 to 21.3±8.9 ng/min/100ml, P=0.02). TEA attenuated FBF (-14.7±3.2%, P=0.002) and abolished bradykinin-stimulated t-PA release (from 22.9+5.7 to - 0.8±3.6 ng/min/100ml, P=0.0002). L-NMMA attenuated FBF (P<0.0001), but did not inhibit bradykinin-induced t-PA release (P=NS). Conclusion Bradykinin-stimulated t-PA release is partly due to cytochrome P450-derived epoxides, and is inhibited by K+ca channel blockade. Thus, bradykinin stimulates both EDHF-dependent vasodilation and t-PA release. PMID:24925526

  16. Strategies for the hyperpolarization of acetonitrile and related ligands by SABRE.

    PubMed

    Mewis, Ryan E; Green, Richard A; Cockett, Martin C R; Cowley, Michael J; Duckett, Simon B; Green, Gary G R; John, Richard O; Rayner, Peter J; Williamson, David C

    2015-01-29

    We report on a strategy for using SABRE (signal amplification by reversible exchange) for polarizing (1)H and (13)C nuclei of weakly interacting ligands which possess biologically relevant and nonaromatic motifs. We first demonstrate this via the polarization of acetonitrile, using Ir(IMes)(COD)Cl as the catalyst precursor, and confirm that the route to hyperpolarization transfer is via the J-coupling network. We extend this work to the polarization of propionitrile, benzylnitrile, benzonitrile, and trans-3-hexenedinitrile in order to assess its generality. In the (1)H NMR spectrum, the signal for acetonitrile is enhanced 8-fold over its thermal counterpart when [Ir(H)2(IMes)(MeCN)3](+) is the catalyst. Upon addition of pyridine or pyridine-d5, the active catalyst changes to [Ir(H)2(IMes)(py)2(MeCN)](+) and the resulting acetonitrile (1)H signal enhancement increases to 20- and 60-fold, respectively. In (13)C NMR studies, polarization transfers optimally to the quaternary (13)C nucleus of MeCN while the methyl (13)C is hardly polarized. Transfer to (13)C is shown to occur first via the (1)H-(1)H coupling between the hydrides and the methyl protons and then via either the (2)J or (1)J couplings to the respective (13)Cs, of which the (2)J route is more efficient. These experimental results are rationalized through a theoretical treatment which shows excellent agreement with experiment. In the case of MeCN, longitudinal two-spin orders between pairs of (1)H nuclei in the three-spin methyl group are created. Two-spin order states, between the (1)H and (13)C nuclei, are also created, and their existence is confirmed for Me(13)CN in both the (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra using the Only Parahydrogen Spectroscopy protocol.

  17. Hyperpolarized 13C NMR observation of lactate kinetics in skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae Mo; Josan, Sonal; Mayer, Dirk; Hurd, Ralph E.; Chung, Youngran; Bendahan, David; Spielman, Daniel M.; Jue, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The production of glycolytic end products, such as lactate, usually evokes a cellular shift from aerobic to anaerobic ATP generation and O2 insufficiency. In the classical view, muscle lactate must be exported to the liver for clearance. However, lactate also forms under well-oxygenated conditions, and this has led investigators to postulate lactate shuttling from non-oxidative to oxidative muscle fiber, where it can serve as a precursor. Indeed, the intracellular lactate shuttle and the glycogen shunt hypotheses expand the vision to include a dynamic mobilization and utilization of lactate during a muscle contraction cycle. Testing the tenability of these provocative ideas during a rapid contraction cycle has posed a technical challenge. The present study reports the use of hyperpolarized [1-13C]lactate and [2-13C]pyruvate in dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) NMR experiments to measure the rapid pyruvate and lactate kinetics in rat muscle. With a 3 s temporal resolution, 13C DNP NMR detects both [1-13C]lactate and [2-13C]pyruvate kinetics in muscle. Infusion of dichloroacetate stimulates pyruvate dehydrogenase activity and shifts the kinetics toward oxidative metabolism. Bicarbonate formation from [1-13C]lactate increases sharply and acetyl-l-carnitine, acetoacetate and glutamate levels also rise. Such a quick mobilization of pyruvate and lactate toward oxidative metabolism supports the postulated role of lactate in the glycogen shunt and the intracellular lactate shuttle models. The study thus introduces an innovative DNP approach to measure metabolite transients, which will help delineate the cellular and physiological role of lactate and glycolytic end products. PMID:26347554

  18. Hyperpolarized 13C NMR observation of lactate kinetics in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae Mo; Josan, Sonal; Mayer, Dirk; Hurd, Ralph E; Chung, Youngran; Bendahan, David; Spielman, Daniel M; Jue, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    The production of glycolytic end products, such as lactate, usually evokes a cellular shift from aerobic to anaerobic ATP generation and O2 insufficiency. In the classical view, muscle lactate must be exported to the liver for clearance. However, lactate also forms under well-oxygenated conditions, and this has led investigators to postulate lactate shuttling from non-oxidative to oxidative muscle fiber, where it can serve as a precursor. Indeed, the intracellular lactate shuttle and the glycogen shunt hypotheses expand the vision to include a dynamic mobilization and utilization of lactate during a muscle contraction cycle. Testing the tenability of these provocative ideas during a rapid contraction cycle has posed a technical challenge. The present study reports the use of hyperpolarized [1-(13)C]lactate and [2-(13)C]pyruvate in dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) NMR experiments to measure the rapid pyruvate and lactate kinetics in rat muscle. With a 3 s temporal resolution, (13)C DNP NMR detects both [1-(13)C]lactate and [2-(13)C]pyruvate kinetics in muscle. Infusion of dichloroacetate stimulates pyruvate dehydrogenase activity and shifts the kinetics toward oxidative metabolism. Bicarbonate formation from [1-(13)C]lactate increases sharply and acetyl-l-carnitine, acetoacetate and glutamate levels also rise. Such a quick mobilization of pyruvate and lactate toward oxidative metabolism supports the postulated role of lactate in the glycogen shunt and the intracellular lactate shuttle models. The study thus introduces an innovative DNP approach to measure metabolite transients, which will help delineate the cellular and physiological role of lactate and glycolytic end products. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  19. Directly detected (55)Mn MRI: application to phantoms for human hyperpolarized (13)C MRI development.

    PubMed

    von Morze, Cornelius; Carvajal, Lucas; Reed, Galen D; Swisher, Christine Leon; Tropp, James; Vigneron, Daniel B

    2014-12-01

    In this work we demonstrate for the first time directly detected manganese-55 ((55)Mn) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using a clinical 3T MRI scanner designed for human hyperpolarized (13)C clinical studies with no additional hardware modifications. Due to the similar frequency of the (55)Mn and (13)C resonances, the use of aqueous permanganate for large, signal-dense, and cost-effective "(13)C" MRI phantoms was investigated, addressing the clear need for new phantoms for these studies. Due to 100% natural abundance, higher intrinsic sensitivity, and favorable relaxation properties, (55)Mn MRI of aqueous permanganate demonstrates dramatically increased sensitivity over typical (13)C phantom MRI, at greatly reduced cost as compared with large (13)C-enriched phantoms. A large sensitivity advantage (22-fold) was demonstrated. A cylindrical phantom (d=8 cm) containing concentrated aqueous sodium permanganate (2.7 M) was scanned rapidly by (55)Mn MRI in a human head coil tuned for (13)C, using a balanced steady state free precession acquisition. The requisite penetration of radiofrequency magnetic fields into concentrated permanganate was investigated by experiments and high frequency electromagnetic simulations, and found to be sufficient for (55)Mn MRI with reasonably sized phantoms. A sub-second slice-selective acquisition yielded mean image signal-to-noise ratio of ~60 at 0.5 cm(3) spatial resolution, distributed with minimum central signal ~40% of the maximum edge signal. We anticipate that permanganate phantoms will be very useful for testing HP (13)C coils and methods designed for human studies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Calcium dobesilate potentiates endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor-mediated relaxation of human penile resistance arteries

    PubMed Central

    Angulo, Javier; Cuevas, Pedro; Fernández, Argentina; Gabancho, Sonia; Videla, Sebastián; Tejada, Iñigo Sáenz de

    2003-01-01

    We have evaluated the participation of endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF) in the endothelium-dependent relaxation of isolated human penile resistance arteries (HPRA) and human corpus cavernosum (HCC) strips. In addition, the effect of the angioprotective agent, calcium dobesilate (DOBE), on the endothelium-dependent relaxation of these tissues was investigated. Combined inhibition of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and cyclooxygenase (COX) nearly abolished the endothelium-dependent relaxation to acetylcholine (ACh) in HCC, while 60% relaxation of HPRA was observed under these conditions. Endothelium-dependent relaxation of HPRA resistant to NOS and COX inhibition was prevented by raising the extracellular concentration of K+ (35 mM) or by blocking Ca2+-activated K+ channels, with apamin (APA; 100 nM) and charybdotoxin (CTX; 100 nM), suggesting the involvement of EDHF in these responses. Endothelium-dependent relaxation to ACh was markedly enhanced by DOBE (10 μM) in HPRA but not in HCC. The potentiating effects of DOBE on ACh-induced responses in HPRA, remained after NOS and COX inhibition, were reduced by inhibition of cytochrome P450 oxygenase with miconazole (0.3 mM) and were abolished by high K+ or a combination of APA and CTX. In vivo, DOBE (10 mg kg−1 i.v.) significantly potentiated the erectile responses to cavernosal nerve stimulation in male rats. EDHF plays an important role in the endothelium-dependent relaxation of HPRA but not in HCC. DOBE significantly improves endothelium-dependent relaxation of HPRA mediated by EDHF and potentiates erectile responses in vivo. Thus, EDHF becomes a new therapeutic target for the treatment of erectile dysfunction (ED) and DOBE could be considered a candidate for oral therapy for ED. PMID:12813009

  1. Hyperpolarized gas diffusion MRI of biphasic lung inflation in short- and long-term emphysema models.

    PubMed

    Xin, Yi; Cereda, Maurizio; Kadlecek, Stephen; Emami, Kiarash; Hamedani, Hooman; Duncan, Ian; Rajaei, Jennia; Hughes, Liam; Meeder, Natalie; Naji, Joseph; Profka, Harrilla; Bolognese, Brian J; Foley, Joseph P; Podolin, Patricia L; Rizi, Rahim R

    2017-08-01

    During lung inflation, airspace dimensions are affected nonlinearly by both alveolar expansion and recruitment, potentially confounding the identification of emphysematous lung by hyperpolarized helium-3 diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (HP MRI). This study aimed to characterize lung inflation over a broad range of inflation volume and pressure values in two different models of emphysema, as well as in normal lungs. Elastase-treated rats (n = 7) and healthy controls (n = 7) were imaged with HP MRI. Gradual inflation was achieved by incremental changes to both inflation volume and airway pressure. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) was measured at each level of inflation and fitted to the corresponding airway pressures as the second-order response equation, with minimizing residue (χ(2) < 0.001). A biphasic ADC response was detected, with an initial ADC increase followed by a decrease at airway pressures >18 cmH2O. Discrimination between treated and control rats was optimal when airway pressure was intermediate (between 10 and 11 cmH2O). Similar findings were confirmed in mice following long-term exposure to cigarette smoke, where optimal discrimination between treated and healthy mice occurred at a similar airway pressure as in the rats. We subsequently explored the evolution of ADC measured at the intermediate inflation level in mice after prolonged smoke exposure and found a significant increase (P < 0.01) in ADC over time. Our results demonstrate that measuring ADC at intermediate inflation enhances the distinction between healthy and diseased lungs, thereby establishing a model that may improve the diagnostic accuracy of future HP gas diffusion studies. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  2. Novel blockers of hyperpolarization-activated current with isoform selectivity in recombinant cells and native tissue.

    PubMed

    Del Lungo, Martina; Melchiorre, Michele; Guandalini, Luca; Sartiani, Laura; Mugelli, Alessandro; Koncz, Istvan; Szel, Tamas; Varro, Andras; Romanelli, Maria Novella; Cerbai, Elisabetta

    2012-05-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Selective hyperpolarization activated, cyclic nucleotide-gated channel (HCN) blockers represent an important therapeutic goal due to the wide distribution and multiple functions of these proteins, representing the molecular correlate of f- and h-current (I(f) or I(h) ). Recently, new compounds able to block differentially the homomeric HCN isoforms expressed in HEK293 have been synthesized. In the present work, the electrophysiological and pharmacological properties of these new HCN blockers were characterized and their activities evaluated on native channels. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH HEK293 cells expressing mHCN1, mHCN2 and hHCN4 isoforms were used to verify channel blockade. Selected compounds were tested on native guinea pig sinoatrial node cells and neurons from mouse dorsal root ganglion (DRG) by patch-clamp recordings and on dog Purkinje fibres by intracellular recordings. KEY RESULTS In HEK293 cells, EC18 was found to be significantly selective for HCN4 and MEL57A for HCN1 at physiological membrane potential. When tested on guinea pig sinoatrial node cells, EC18 (10 µM) maintained its activity, reducing I(f) by 67% at -120 mV, while MEL57A (3 µM) reduced I(f) by 18%. In contrast, in mouse DRG neurons, only MEL57A (30 and 100 µM) significantly reduced I(h) by 60% at -80 mV. In dog cardiac Purkinje fibres, EC18, but not MEL57A, reduced the amplitude and slowed the slope of the spontaneous diastolic depolarization. CONCLUSIONS Our results have identified novel and highly selective HCN isoform blockers, EC18 and MEL57A; the selectivity found in recombinant system was maintained in various tissues expressing different HCN isoforms.