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Sample records for continuous insulin infusion

  1. Safety of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion: metabolic deterioration and glycaemic autoregulation after deliberate cessation of infusion.

    PubMed

    Pickup, J C; Viberti, G C; Bilous, R W; Keen, H; Alberti, K G; Home, P D; Binder, C

    1982-03-01

    To assess the rate of metabolic deterioration and potential risks of failure of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion during basal insulin delivery, we deliberately stopped infusion in nine insulin dependent diabetics. Plasma glucose, blood 3-hydroxybutyrate and plasma free insulin were measured for 9 h whilst the patients remained supine and fasting. Mean plasma glucose remained unchanged at normal fasting levels for the first hour, then rose to plateau at about 10 mmol/l until the end of the experiment. The final plateau level of glucose varied from patient to patient; two C-peptide secreting diabetics plateaued at low glucose levels. In contrast, blood 3-hydroxybutyrate rose progressively, without plateauing. PLasma free insulin concentrations fell during the withdrawal period and there was a highly significant negative correlation between free insulin and 3-hydroxybutyrate. No patient was more than mildly unwell after 9 h of insulin deprivation. We conclude that under these experimental conditions there is glycaemic autoregulation and that ketones may sometimes be a more appropriate monitor of insulin deficiency or loss of diabetic control than is glucose. Accidental failure of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion and interruption of basal delivery in resting and fasting diabetics will probably not cause dangerous metabolic or clinical deterioration.

  2. Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion during general anesthesia: a case report.

    PubMed

    White, William A; Montalvo, Helen; Monday, Joshua M

    2004-10-01

    Care of the patient with diabetes mellitus presents numerous challenges to the anesthesia practitioner. There is no perfect way to care for these patients nor are any 2 patients with diabetes exactly alike. With the advent of subcutaneous insulin pumps, the anesthesia practitioner has another tool to assist him or her in giving high quality care. This case study describes the anesthesia care provided to a patient with type 1 diabetes who wore his continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) pump during general anesthesia for surgical repair of a herniated lumbar disk. Importantly, the anesthesia plan involved a collaborative effort with the patient. Blood glucose levels were stable throughout the perioperative period. Little or no extra work was required of the CRNA. This case showed that the CSII could be used to minimize perioperative fluctuations in blood sugar. Postoperatively, the patient expressed a high degree of satisfaction with the anesthetic.

  3. Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion in diabetes: patient populations, safety, efficacy, and pharmacoeconomics.

    PubMed

    Pozzilli, Paolo; Battelino, Tadej; Danne, Thomas; Hovorka, Roman; Jarosz-Chobot, Przemyslawa; Renard, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The level of glycaemic control necessary to achieve optimal short-term and long-term outcomes in subjects with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) typically requires intensified insulin therapy using multiple daily injections or continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion. For continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion, the insulins of choice are the rapid-acting insulin analogues, insulin aspart, insulin lispro and insulin glulisine. The advantages of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion over multiple daily injections in adult and paediatric populations with T1DM include superior glycaemic control, lower insulin requirements and better health-related quality of life/patient satisfaction. An association between continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion and reduced hypoglycaemic risk is more consistent in children/adolescents than in adults. The use of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion is widely recommended in both adult and paediatric T1DM populations but is limited in pregnant patients and those with type 2 diabetes mellitus. All available rapid-acting insulin analogues are approved for use in adult, paediatric and pregnant populations. However, minimum patient age varies (insulin lispro: no minimum; insulin aspart: ≥2 years; insulin glulisine: ≥6 years) and experience in pregnancy ranges from extensive (insulin aspart, insulin lispro) to limited (insulin glulisine). Although more expensive than multiple daily injections, continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion is cost-effective in selected patient groups. This comprehensive review focuses on the European situation and summarises evidence for the efficacy and safety of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion, particularly when used with rapid-acting insulin analogues, in adult, paediatric and pregnant populations. The review also discusses relevant European guidelines; reviews issues that surround use of this technology; summarises the effects of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion on patients

  4. Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion in diabetes: patient populations, safety, efficacy, and pharmacoeconomics

    PubMed Central

    Battelino, Tadej; Danne, Thomas; Hovorka, Roman; Jarosz‐Chobot, Przemyslawa; Renard, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Summary The level of glycaemic control necessary to achieve optimal short‐term and long‐term outcomes in subjects with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) typically requires intensified insulin therapy using multiple daily injections or continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion. For continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion, the insulins of choice are the rapid‐acting insulin analogues, insulin aspart, insulin lispro and insulin glulisine. The advantages of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion over multiple daily injections in adult and paediatric populations with T1DM include superior glycaemic control, lower insulin requirements and better health‐related quality of life/patient satisfaction. An association between continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion and reduced hypoglycaemic risk is more consistent in children/adolescents than in adults. The use of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion is widely recommended in both adult and paediatric T1DM populations but is limited in pregnant patients and those with type 2 diabetes mellitus. All available rapid‐acting insulin analogues are approved for use in adult, paediatric and pregnant populations. However, minimum patient age varies (insulin lispro: no minimum; insulin aspart: ≥2 years; insulin glulisine: ≥6 years) and experience in pregnancy ranges from extensive (insulin aspart, insulin lispro) to limited (insulin glulisine). Although more expensive than multiple daily injections, continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion is cost‐effective in selected patient groups. This comprehensive review focuses on the European situation and summarises evidence for the efficacy and safety of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion, particularly when used with rapid‐acting insulin analogues, in adult, paediatric and pregnant populations. The review also discusses relevant European guidelines; reviews issues that surround use of this technology; summarises the effects of continuous subcutaneous insulin

  5. Patient reactions to long-term outpatient treatment with continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion.

    PubMed Central

    Pickup, J C; Keen, H; Viberti, G C; Bilous, R W

    1981-01-01

    Fourteen of the first 15 insulin-dependent diabetics to be treated in our unit by three weeks or more of outpatient continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion with a portable syringe pump completed a questionnaire about their reactions to the system. Motivation was more important to a favourable response than occupation or intelligence. Most patients thought that diabetic control was better with the pump than conventional injection treatment and several felt subjectively better. Features such as the greater flexibility of diet and insulin delivery rates during continuous subcutaneous infusion were appreciated. The most consistent adverse criticism was about the size of the device used, nearly all patients thinking that smaller and lighter infusion systems should be developed. Psychological reactions to the infusion and difficulties with interpersonal relationships were identified; these must be clearly appreciated and discussed with patients and family before and during treatment. Nine of the 14 patients said they would undertake continuous subcutaneous infusion for one year and a further two said they would do so if the infuser was smaller. These results provide guidance on future technological development of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion and indicate that the major constraint to long-term trials of the present system is the size of the pump. PMID:6783163

  6. Pascal's wager: combining continuous glucose monitoring and continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion.

    PubMed

    Kerr, David; Olateju, Tolu

    2010-06-01

    Pascal's Wager is a suggestion posed by the French Philosopher, Blaise Pascal, that even though the existence of God cannot be determined through reason, a person should wager that God exists because he or she has everything to gain and nothing to lose. In the area of consideration here, the optimum experimental trial of the combined use of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion and real-time continuous glucose monitoring in free-living individuals with type 1 diabetes providing rock-solid evidence of clinical benefit has not been performed. Nevertheless, there is considerable enthusiasm for combining the technologies among healthcare professionals, patients, and manufacturers based on the belief that this approach to diabetes care must be beneficial beyond the available evidence (i.e., reason).

  7. The Experiences of School Nurses Caring for Students Receiving Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darby, Wendy

    2006-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is the most common metabolic disorder in childhood. Today, children with diabetes are receiving new technologically advanced treatment options, such as continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) therapy. School nurses are the primary health caregivers of children with diabetes during school hours. Therefore, it is important…

  8. Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion with short-acting insulin analogues or human regular insulin: efficacy, safety, quality of life, and cost-effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Radermecker, Régis Pierre; Scheen, André Jacques

    2004-01-01

    Portable insulin infusion devices are effective and safe insulin delivery systems for managing diabetes mellitus, especially type 1 diabetes. Rapidly absorbed insulin analogues, such as insulin lispro or insulin aspart, may offer an advantage over regular human insulin for insulin pumps. Several open-label randomised crossover trials demonstrated that continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) with insulin lispro provided a better control of postprandial hyperglycaemia and a slightly but significantly lower glycated haemoglobin level, with lower daily insulin requirement and similar or even less hypoglycaemic episodes. A CSII study comparing insulin lispro and insulin aspart demonstrated similar results with the two analogues, and better results than those with regular insulin. Because these analogues have a quicker onset and a shorter duration of action than regular insulin, one might expect an earlier and greater metabolic deterioration in case of CSII interruption, but a more rapid correction of metabolic abnormalities after insulin boluses when reactivating the pump. These expectations were confirmed in randomised protocols comparing the metabolic changes occurring during and after CSII interruption of various durations when the pump infused either insulin lispro or regular insulin. The extra cost resulting from the use of CSII and insulin analogues in diabetes management should be compensated for by better metabolic control and quality of life. In conclusion, CSII delivering fast-acting insulin analogues may be considered as one of the best methods to replace insulin in a physiological manner by mimicking meal and basal insulin requirements, without higher risk of hypoglycaemia or ketoacidosis in well-educated diabetic patients.

  9. [Treatment of diabetic coma and precoma with continuous low-dose insulin infusions (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Luft, D; Schubert, W R; Reichenmiller, H E

    1976-11-26

    13 patients, nine women and four men, aged 22 to 83 years, were treated for diabetic coma or precoma between September 1974 and January 1976. Ten patients were known diabetics and six of them had been treated with insulin. On admission blood sugar was 32.4 +/- 3.3 mmol/l (5.84 +/- 0.6 g/l). The capillary blood pH was 7.15 +/- 0.06 (n = 13). Treatment consisted of continuous insulin infusion (6 IU soluble insulin/hour), physiological saline, potassium substitution and sodium bicarbonate (if the pH was below 7.15). In the first hours of treatment 98 +/- 12IU of insulin, 6.5 +/- 0.5 litres of fluid, 168 +/- 22 mmol of potassium and 237 +/- 55 mmol NaHCO3 were required. During the first 4 hours of the insulin infusion the blood sugar decrease per hour was 3.55 mmol/l (0.64 g/l). Hypokalaemia during treatment occurred in one case, hypoglycaemia was not observed. A preceding treatment with insulin and severe acidosis did not influence therapeutic success. Twelve patients were treated successfully, one patient died 6 hours after admission following mesenteric arterial embolism.

  10. Specification and simulation of behavior of the Continuous Infusion Insulin Pump system.

    PubMed

    Babamir, Seyed Morteza; Dehkordi, Mehdi Borhani

    2014-01-01

    Continuous Infusion Insulin Pump (CIIP) system is responsible for monitoring diabetic blood sugar. In this paper, we aim to specify and simulate the CIIP software behavior. To this end, we first: (1) presented a model consisting of the CIIP system behavior in response to its environment (diabetic) behavior and (2) we formally defined the safety requirements of the system environment (diabetic) in the Z formal modeling language. Such requirements should be satisfied by the CIIP software. Finally, we programmed the model and requirements.

  11. [Consensus document on continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) treatment in paediatrics with type I diabetes].

    PubMed

    Barrio Castellanos, R; García Cuartero, B; Gómez Gila, A; González Casado, I; Hermoso López, F; Luzuriaga Tomás, C; Oyarzabal Irigoyen, M; Rica Etxebarria, I; Rodríguez Rigual, M; Torres Lacruz, M

    2010-05-01

    This article reports on the Spanish Position Statement for the Diabetes Pediátric Group for the Spanish Pediatric Endocrinology Society (SEEP) on continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes. The practical issues about their indications, appropriate candidates, feasibility, and limits are outlined. The conclusions are based on the comprehensive review and balanced assessment of the evidence base on the international consensus and consensual answers to these questions for the participants.

  12. Assessment of implantable infusion pumps for continuous infusion of human insulin in rats: potential for group housing.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Vivi Flou Hjorth; Mølck, Anne-Marie; Mårtensson, Martin; Strid, Mette Aagaard; Chapman, Melissa; Lykkesfeldt, Jens; Bøgh, Ingrid Brück

    2016-07-27

    Group housing is considered to be important for rats, which are highly sociable animals. Single housing may impact behaviour and levels of circulating stress hormones. Rats are typically used in the toxicological evaluation of insulin analogues. Human insulin (HI) is frequently used as a reference compound in these studies, and a comparator model of persistent exposure by HI infusion from external pumps has recently been developed to support toxicological evaluation of long-acting insulin analogues. However, this model requires single housing of the animals. Developing an insulin-infusion model which allows group housing would therefore greatly improve animal welfare. The aim of the present study was to investigate the suitability of implantable infusion pumps for HI infusion in group-housed rats. Group housing of rats implanted with a battery-driven pump proved to be possible. Intravenous infusion of HI lowered blood glucose levels persistently for two weeks, providing a comparator model for use in two-week repeated-dose toxicity studies with new long-acting insulin analogues, which allows group housing, and thereby increasing animal welfare compared with an external infusion model.

  13. Effect of carbohydrate counting using bolus calculators on glycemic control in type 1 diabetes patients during continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Eijiro; Okada, Shuichi; Nakajima, Yasuyo; Bastie, Claire C; Tagaya, Yuko; Osaki, Aya; Shimoda, Yoko; Shibusawa, Ryo; Saito, Tsugumichi; Ozawa, Atsushi; Yamada, Masanobu

    2016-11-29

    The present study examined the long-term efficacy of insulin pump therapy for type 1 diabetes patients when carried out using carbohydrate counting with bolus calculators for 1 year. A total of 22 type 1 diabetes patients who had just started continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion were examined and divided into two groups: one that was educated about carbohydrate counting using bolus calculators (n = 14); and another that did not use bolus calculators (n = 8). After 1 year, the hemoglobin A1c levels of the patient group that used bolus calculators decreased persistently and significantly (P = 0.0297), whereas those of the other group did not. The bodyweight, total daily dose of insulin and bolus percentage of both groups did not change. Carbohydrate counting using bolus calculators is necessary to achieve optimal and persistent glycemic control in patients undergoing continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion.

  14. Opinions and Satisfaction Regarding Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion Therapy in Adult Patients with Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Nishio, Ikuko; Chujo, Masami; Ohkura, Tsuyoshi; Kataoka, Hideyuki

    2015-01-01

    Background This study examined the treatment satisfaction of type 1 diabetic patients undergoing continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) therapy, and patients’ thoughts regarding CSII. Methods We provided a self-administered questionnaire survey over the internet. Participants were 106 individuals with type-one diabetes aged 20 years or older, undergoing CSII. The survey examined patients’ treatment satisfaction, and their thoughts regarding CSII. Descriptive statistics were calculated. We compared relationships between treatment satisfaction and other variables using the Kruskal-Wallis rank sum test, and performed content analysis on participants’ thoughts regarding CSII. Results Regarding treatment satisfaction, the response, “neither of them” was the most frequent. Comparing relationships between treatment satisfaction and other variables, significant differences were found for the variables “age,” “presence of dissatisfaction regarding doctors’ response,” and “presence of a significant medical expense burden.” Participants’ thoughts regarding CSII were classified into 10 categories. Conclusion Participants expressed positive evaluations, such as that their blood sugar control had improved due to CSII, and that they perceived improvement in their health. Participants also expressed negative evaluations, however, such as that medical expenses resulting from CSII were high, and that these expenses may cause distress and future economic insecurity. In future, patients may benefit from nursing support that allows patients to confidently continue with CSII. PMID:26538796

  15. Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion versus multiple daily injections in individuals with type 1 diabetes: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Benkhadra, Khalid; Alahdab, Fares; Tamhane, Shrikant U; McCoy, Rozalina G; Prokop, Larry J; Murad, Mohammad Hassan

    2017-01-01

    The relative efficacy of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion and multiple daily injections in individuals with type 1 diabetes is unclear. We sought to synthesize the existing evidence about the effect of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion on glycosylated hemoglobin, hypoglycemic events, and time spent in hypoglycemia compared to multiple daily injections. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and Database of Systematic Reviews, and Scopus from January 2008 through November 2015 for randomized controlled trials that enrolled children or adults with type 1 diabetes. Trials identified in a previous systematic review and published prior to 2008 were also included. We included 25 randomized controlled trials at moderate risk of bias. Meta-analysis showed a significant reduction in glycosylated hemoglobin in patients treated with continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion compared to multiple daily injections (mean difference 0.37; 95 % confidence interval, 0.24-0.51). This effect was demonstrated in both children and adults. There was no significant difference in minor or severe hypoglycemic events. Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion was associated with lower incidence of nocturnal hypoglycemia. There was no significant difference in the time spent in hypoglycemia. In children and adults with type 1 diabetes and compared to multiple daily injections, continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion is associated with a modest reduction in glycosylated hemoglobin. There was no difference in severe or minor hypoglycemia, but likely a lower incidence of nocturnal hypoglycemia with continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion.

  16. Fields of application of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion in the treatment of diabetes and implications in the use of rapid-acting insulin analogues.

    PubMed

    Pitocco, D; Rizzi, A; Scavone, G; Tanese, L; Zaccardi, F; Manto, A; Ghirlanda, G

    2013-09-01

    In western countries, diabetes mellitus, because of macrovascular and microvascular complications related to it, is still an important cause of death. Patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) have a six-time higher risk of mortality than healthy patients. Since the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT) established how an intensive therapy is necessary to prevent diabetes mellitus complications, many studies have been conducted to understand which method is able to reach an optimal metabolic control. In the past 30 years continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion established/introduced as a validate alternative to multiple daily injections. Several trials demonstrated that, when compared to MDI, CSII brings to a better metabolic control, in terms of a reduction of glycated hemoglobin and blood glucose variability, hypoglycemic episodes and improvement in quality of life. Because of their pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic characteristics, rapid-action insulin analogues are imposed as best insulin to be used in CSII. The rapid onset and the fast reached peak make them better mimic the way how pancreas secretes insulin. CSII by pump is not free from issues. Catheter occlusions, blockages, clogs can arrest insulin administration. The consequent higher levels of glycemic values, can easily bring to the onset of ketoacidosis, with an high risk for patients' life. Aspart is a rapid analogue obtained by aminoacidic substitution. It is as effective as lispro and glulisine in gaining a good metabolic control and even better in reducing glucose variability. Some studies tried to compare rapid analogues in terms of stability. Obtained data are controversial. An in vivo study evidenced higher stability or glulisine, while studies in vitro highlighted a higher safety of aspart. Nowadays it is not possible to assess which analogues is safer. When the infusion set is changed every 48 hours equivalent rates of occlusions have been observed.

  17. Effectiveness of multiple daily injections or continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion for children with type 1 diabetes mellitus in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Gong, Chun-Xiu; Wei, Li-Ya; Wu, Di; Cao, Bing-Yan; Meng, Xi; Wang, Lin-Lin

    2014-01-01

    Aims. To determine whether multiple daily injections (MDIs) or continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) contributes to better glucose control in children with different type 1 diabetes duration. Methods. Subjects were grouped according to early (≤1 year after disease onset; 1A) or late (1-3 years after onset; 2A) MDIs/CSII treatment initiation. Corresponding control groups (1B, 2B) received insulin injections twice daily. Results. HbA1c levels were consistently lower in group 1A than in group 1B (6 months (T2): 7.37% versus 8.21%; 12 months (T3): 7.61% versus 8.41%; 24/36 months (T4/T5): 7.61% versus 8.72%; all P < 0.05), but were lower in group 2A than in group 2B only at T2 (8.36% versus 9.19%; P = 0.04). Levels were lower in group 1A than in group 2A when disease duration was matched (7.61% versus 8.49%; P < 0.05). Logistic regression revealed no correlation between HbA1c level and MDIs/CSII therapy. HbA1c levels were only negatively related to insulin dosage. Conclusions. Blood glucose control was better in patients receiving MDIs/CSII than in those receiving conventional treatment. Early MDIs/CSII initiation resulted in prolonged maintenance of low HbA1c levels compared with late initiation. MDIs/CSII therapy should be combined with comprehensive management.

  18. Designing the modern pump: engineering aspects of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion software.

    PubMed

    Welsh, John B; Vargas, Steven; Williams, Gary; Moberg, Sheldon

    2010-06-01

    Insulin delivery systems attracted the efforts of biological, mechanical, electrical, and software engineers well before they were commercially viable. The introduction of the first commercial insulin pump in 1983 represents an enduring milestone in the history of diabetes management. Since then, pumps have become much more than motorized syringes and have assumed a central role in diabetes management by housing data on insulin delivery and glucose readings, assisting in bolus estimation, and interfacing smoothly with humans and compatible devices. Ensuring the integrity of the embedded software that controls these devices is critical to patient safety and regulatory compliance. As pumps and related devices evolve, software engineers will face challenges and opportunities in designing pumps that are safe, reliable, and feature-rich. The pumps and related systems must also satisfy end users, healthcare providers, and regulatory authorities. In particular, pumps that are combined with glucose sensors and appropriate algorithms will provide the basis for increasingly safe and precise automated insulin delivery-essential steps to developing a fully closed-loop system.

  19. Improved Postprandial Glycemic Control with Faster-Acting Insulin Aspart in Patients with Type 1 Diabetes Using Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Joseph A.; Hyveled, Liselotte; Tamer, Søren C.; Demissie, Marek

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Faster aspart is insulin aspart (IAsp) in a new formulation, which in continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) in subjects with type 1 diabetes has shown a faster onset and offset of glucose-lowering effect than IAsp. Methods: This double-blind, randomized, crossover active-controlled trial compared 2-h postprandial plasma glucose (PPG) response, following 2 weeks of CSII with faster aspart or IAsp. Primary endpoint: mean change in PPG 2 h after a standardized meal test (ΔPGav,0–2h). Subjects (n = 43) had masked continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) throughout. Results: Faster aspart provided a statistically significantly greater glucose-lowering effect following the meal versus IAsp: ΔPGav,0–2h: 3.03 mmol/L versus 4.02 mmol/L (54.68 mg/dL vs. 72.52 mg/dL); estimated treatment difference (ETD) [95% CI]: −0.99 mmol/L [–1.95; −0.03] (−17.84 mg/dL [–35.21; −0.46]; P = 0.044). One hour postmeal, PG levels were −1.64 mmol/L (−29.47 mg/dL) lower with faster aspart versus IAsp (P = 0.006). Interstitial glucose (IG) profiles supported these findings; the largest differences were observed at breakfast: 9.08 versus 9.56 mmol/L (163.57 vs. 172.19 mg/dL; ETD [95% CI]: −0.48 mmol/L [–0.97; 0.01]; −8.62 mg/dL [–17.49; 0.24]; P = 0.057). Duration of low IG levels (≤3.9 mmol/L [70 mg/dL] per 24 h) was statistically significantly shorter for faster aspart versus IAsp (2.03 h vs. 2.45 h; ETD [95% CI]: −0.42 [–0.72; −0.11]; P = 0.008). No unexpected safety findings were observed. Conclusions: CSII delivery of faster aspart had a greater glucose-lowering effect than IAsp after a meal test. CGM results recorded throughout all meals supported this finding, with less time spent with low IG levels. PMID:28055230

  20. Comparison of high-dose and low-dose insulin by continuous intravenous infusion in the treatment of diabetic ketoacidosis in children.

    PubMed

    Burghen, G A; Etteldorf, J N; Fisher, J N; Kitabchi, A Q

    1980-01-01

    We studied the efficacy of low-dose (0.1 U/kg/h) and high-dose (1..0 U/kg/h) insulin, given randomly to children with diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) by continuous intravenous infusion without a loading dose. Plasma glucose reached 250 mg/dl in 3.4 +/- 0.4 h with the high-dose insulin group compared with 5.4 +/- 0.5 h with the low-dose insulin group (P < 0.01). During the first 12 h of therapy, plasma glucose fell below 100 mg/dl in 2 of 16 in the low-dose compared with 12 of 16 in the high-dose patients. The decrement of ketone bodies, cortisol, and glucagon was similar in both groups. The number of hours required for HCO3(-) greater than or equal to meq/l and arterial blood pH greater than or equal to 7.30 were not significantly different in the two groups. Hypokalemia (K < 3.4 meq/L) occurred in 3 of 16 low-dose and 10 of 16 high-dose patients. The data show that low-dose insulin, with a slower rate of glucose decrease, is as effective as a high dose for the treatment of DKA in children with less incidence of hypokalemia and decreased potential for hypoglycemia.

  1. Effect of one year continuous subcutaneous infusion of a somatostatin analogue, octreotide, on early retinopathy, metabolic control and thyroid function in Type I (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Kirkegaard, C; Nørgaard, K; Snorgaard, O; Bek, T; Larsen, M; Lund-Andersen, H

    1990-06-01

    Growth hormone is assumed to be involved in the development of diabetic retinopathy. In a randomized study we evaluated the possible effects of one year treatment with a somatostatin (SRIH) analogue, octreotide, on early retinopathy and on metabolism in Type I (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus. Eleven patients were allocated to treatment with a continuous sc infusion of 400 micrograms octreotide per day and 9 served as controls. Only 7 patients from each group completed the study. Three octreotide-treated patients left the study owing to severe diarrhea. The subjects were evaluated at entry, after 2, 6 and 12 months treatment, and 2 months after withdrawal. Octreotide induced a decrease in GH secretion, expressed as the area under the 24 h serum GH profiles (p less than 0.05), and of the serum levels of IGF-I (p less than 0.05). The entire decline in GH levels occurred during the daytime, whereas the nocturnal levels were unaffected. Retinopathy, as assessed by determination of the blood retina barrier permeability, by colour fundus photography, and flurescein angiography was unchanged in both groups. Apart from a decline in insulin requirements, octreotide had no major effect on glycemic control, but induced a mild transient pituitary hypothyroidism, not clinically relevant. We conclude that treatment with octreotide for one year has modest effects on GH, IGF-I, and glucose metabolism, but has no significant effect on early retinopathy in Type I (insulin-dependent) diabetes.

  2. Continuous insulin therapy versus multiple insulin injections in the management of type 1 diabetes: a longitutinal study

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Maria Estela Bellini; Liberatore, Raphael Del Roio; Custodio, Rodrigo; Martinelli, Carlos Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To compare multiple doses of insulin and continuous insulin infusion therapy as treatment for type 1 diabetes mellitus. Methods: 40 patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (21 female) with ages between 10 and 20 years (mean=14.2) and mean duration of diabetes of 7 years used multiple doses of insulin for at least 6 months and after that, continuous insulin infusion therapy for at least 6 months. Each one of the patients has used multiple doses of insulin and continuous insulin infusion therapy. For analysis of HbA1c, mean glycated hemoglobin levels (mHbA1c) were obtained during each treatment period (multiple doses of insulin and continuous insulin infusion therapy period). Results: Although mHbA1c levels were lower during continuous insulin infusion therapy the difference was not statistically significant. During multiple doses of insulin, 14.2% had mHbA1c values below 7.5% vs. 35.71% while on continuous insulin infusion therapy; demonstrating better glycemic control with the use of continuous insulin infusion therapy. During multiple doses of insulin, 15–40 patients have severe hypoglycemic events versus 5–40 continuous insulin infusion therapy. No episodes of ketoacidosis events were recorded. Conclusions: This is the first study with this design comparing multiple doses of insulin and continuous insulin infusion therapy in Brazil showing no significant difference in HbA1c; hypoglycemic events were less frequent during continuous insulin infusion therapy than during multiple doses of insulin and the percentage of patients who achieved a HbA1c less than 7.5% was greater during continuous insulin infusion therapy than multiple doses of insulin therapy. PMID:26826879

  3. An Audit of Clinical Practice in a Single Centre in Kuwait: Management of Children on Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion and Cardiovascular Risk Factors Screening

    PubMed Central

    Omar, Dina; Alsanae, Hala; Al Khawari, Mona; Abdulrasoul, Majedah; Rahme, Zahraa; Al Refaei, Faisal; Behbehani, Kazem; Shaltout, Azza

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To audit the current clinical practice of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) for the treatment of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D) in children and adolescents attending a single centre in Kuwait. Methods: A one year retrospective audit was performed in children and adolescents with T1D on CSII, who attended the paediatric diabetes clinic, Dasman Diabetes Institute during 2012. The primary outcome measure was glycaemic control as evidenced by glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) level and the secondary outcome measures were the frequency of monitoring of the risk for microvascular complications and occurrence of acute complications and adverse events. Results: 58 children and adolescents (mean age ± SD: 12.6 ± 4.1 years) were included. Mean HbA1c at baseline was 8.8% (72.7 mmol/mol) and 8.9% (73.8 mmol/mol) at the end of a 12 months observation period. Children with poor control (HbA1c >9.5% (80 mmol/mol) had a significant 1.4% reduction in HbA1c compared with the overall reduction of 0.1% (p=0.7). Rate of screening for cardiovascular risk factors and for long term complications were well documented. However, there was underreporting of acute complications such as severe hypoglycaemia and diabetic ketoacidosis. Only 1.7% of patients discontinued the pump. Conclusion: There was no significant change in HbA1c values at the end of 12 months follow up. However, HbA1c values in poorly controlled children improved. CSII requires care by skilled health professionals as well as education and selection of motivated parents and children.

  4. A Review of the Security of Insulin Pump Infusion Systems

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Nathanael; Kohno, Tadayoshi; Klonoff, David C

    2011-01-01

    Insulin therapy has enabled patients with diabetes to maintain blood glucose control to lead healthier lives. Today, rather than injecting insulin manually using syringes, a patient can use a device such as an insulin pump to deliver insulin programmatically. This allows for more granular insulin delivery while attaining blood glucose control. Insulin pump system features have increasingly benefited patients, but the complexity of the resulting system has grown in parallel. As a result, security breaches that can negatively affect patient health are now possible. Rather than focus on the security of a single device, we concentrate on protecting the security of the entire system. In this article, we describe the security issues as they pertain to an insulin pump system that includes an embedded system of components, which include the insulin pump, continuous glucose management system, blood glucose monitor, and other associated devices (e.g., a mobile phone or personal computer). We detail not only the growing wireless communication threat in each system component, but also describe additional threats to the system (e.g., availability and integrity). Our goal is to help create a trustworthy infusion pump system that will ultimately strengthen pump safety, and we describe mitigating solutions to address identified security issues. PMID:22226278

  5. A review of the security of insulin pump infusion systems.

    PubMed

    Paul, Nathanael; Kohno, Tadayoshi; Klonoff, David C

    2011-11-01

    Insulin therapy has enabled patients with diabetes to maintain blood glucose control to lead healthier lives. Today, rather than injecting insulin manually using syringes, a patient can use a device such as an insulin pump to deliver insulin programmatically. This allows for more granular insulin delivery while attaining blood glucose control. Insulin pump system features have increasingly benefited patients, but the complexity of the resulting system has grown in parallel. As a result, security breaches that can negatively affect patient health are now possible. Rather than focus on the security of a single device, we concentrate on protecting the security of the entire system. In this article, we describe the security issues as they pertain to an insulin pump system that includes an embedded system of components, which include the insulin pump, continuous glucose management system, blood glucose monitor, and other associated devices (e.g., a mobile phone or personal computer). We detail not only the growing wireless communication threat in each system component, but also describe additional threats to the system (e.g., availability and integrity). Our goal is to help create a trustworthy infusion pump system that will ultimately strengthen pump safety, and we describe mitigating solutions to address identified security issues.

  6. A Review of the Security of Insulin Pump Infusion Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Klonoff, David C.; Paul, Nathanael R; Kohno, Tadayoshi

    2011-01-01

    Insulin therapy has enabled diabetic patients to maintain blood glucose control to lead healthier lives. Today, rather than manually injecting insulin using syringes, a patient can use a device, such as an insulin pump, to programmatically deliver insulin. This allows for more granular insulin delivery while attaining blood glucose control. The insulin pump system features have increasingly benefited patients, but the complexity of the resulting system has grown in parallel. As a result security breaches that can negatively affect patient health are now possible. Rather than focus on the security of a single device, we concentrate on protecting the security of the entire system. In this paper we describe the security issues as they pertain to an insulin pump system that includes an embedded system of components including the insulin pump, continuous glucose management system, blood glucose monitor, and other associated devices (e.g., a mobile phone or personal computer). We detail not only the growing wireless communication threat in each system component, but we also describe additional threats to the system (e.g., availability and integrity). Our goal is to help create a trustworthy infusion pump system that will ultimately strengthen pump safety, and we describe mitigating solutions to address identified security issues both for now and in the future.

  7. Factors associated with improved glycemic control following continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes uncontrolled with bolus-basal insulin regimens: an analysis from the OpT2mise randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Metzger, Muriel; Castañeda, Javier; Reznik, Yves; Giorgino, Francesco; Conget, Ignacio; Aronson, Ronnie; de Portu, Simona; Runzis, Sarah; Lee, Scott W; Cohen, Ohad

    2017-04-04

    This analysis investigated factors associated with the decrease in HbA1c in patients receiving continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) in the OpT2mise randomized trial. In this study, patients with type 2 diabetes and HbA1C >8% following multiple daily injections (MDI) optimization were randomized to receive CSII (n = 168) or MDI (n = 163) for 6 months. Patient-related and treatment-related factors associated with decreased HbA1c in the CSII arm were identified by univariate and multivariate analyses. CSII produced a significantly greater reduction in HbA1c than MDI, and the treatment difference increased with baseline HbA1c . In the CSII arm, the only factors significantly associated with decreased HbA1C were higher baseline HbA1C (P<0.001), geographical region (P<0.001), higher educational level (P=0.012), higher total cholesterol level (P=0.002), lower variability of baseline glucose values on continuous glucose monitoring (P<0.001), and the decrease in average fasting self-monitored blood glucose at 6 months (P<0.001). These findings suggest that CSII offers an option to improve glycemic control in a broad range of type 2 diabetes patients in whom control cannot be achieved with MDI. OpT2mise ClinicalTrials.gov number: NCT01182493 (https://clinicaltrials.gov/).

  8. Evaluation of a Novel Continuous Glucose Monitoring-Based Method for Mealtime Insulin Dosing—the iBolus—in Subjects with Type 1 Diabetes Using Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion Therapy: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ampudia-Blasco, F. Javier; Laguna, Alejandro; Revert, Ana; Vehì, Josep; Ascaso, Juan F.; Bondia, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective Prandial insulin dosing is an empirical practice associated frequently with poor reproducibility in postprandial glucose response. Based on continuous glucose monitoring (CGM), a method for prandial insulin administration (iBolus) is presented and evaluated for people with type 1 diabetes using CSII therapy. Subjects and Methods An individual patient's model for a 5-h postprandial period was obtained from 6-day ambulatory CGM and used for iBolus calculation in 12 patients with type 1 diabetes. In a double-blind, crossover study each patient underwent four meal tests with 40 g or 100 g of carbohydrates (CHOs), both on two occasions. For each meal, the iBolus or the traditional bolus (tBolus) was given before mealtime (t0) in a randomized order. We measured the postprandial glycemic response as the area under the curve of plasma glucose (AUC-PG0–5h) and variability as the individual coefficient of variation (CV) of AUC-PG0–5h. The contribution of the insulin-to-CHO ratio, CHO, plasma glucose at t0 (PGt0), and insulin dose to AUC-PG0–5h and its CV was also investigated. Results AUC-PG0–5h was similar with either bolus for 40-g (iBolus vs. tBolus, 585.5±127.5 vs. 689.2±180.7 mg/dL·h) or 100-g (752.1±237.7 vs. 760.0±263.2 mg/dL·h) CHO meals. A multiple regression analysis revealed a significant model only for the tBolus, with PGt0 being the best predictor of AUC-PG0–5h explaining approximately 50% of the glycemic response. Observed variability was greater with the iBolus (CV, 16.7±15.3% vs. 10.1±12.5%) but independent of the factors studied. Conclusions A CGM-based algorithm for calculation of prandial insulin is feasible, although it does not reduce unpredictability of individual glycemic responses. Causes of variability need to be identified and analyzed for further optimization of postprandial glycemic control. PMID:23003329

  9. Effects of Liraglutide Combined with Short-Term Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion on Glycemic Control and Beta Cell Function in Patients with Newly Diagnosed Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Ke, Weijian; Liu, Liehua; Liu, Juan; Chen, Ailing; Deng, Wanping; Zhang, Pengyuan; Cao, Xiaopei; Liao, Zhihong; Xiao, Haipeng; Liu, Jianbin; Li, Yanbing

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to investigate the effects of liraglutide in combination with short-term continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) therapy on glycemic control and beta cell function in patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Thirty-nine eligible newly diagnosed T2DM patients were recruited and randomized to receive either of two therapies: short-term CSII alone (CSII alone group) or CSII in combination with liraglutide (CSII + Lira group) for 12 weeks. Blood glucose control, homeostasis model assessment (HOMA) indices, and acute insulin response (AIR) were compared between the two groups. The patients in CSII + Lira group achieved euglycemia with equivalent insulin dosage in shorter time (1 (0) versus 2 (3) days, P = 0.039). HbA1c at the end of study was comparable between two groups (6.3 ± 0.7% versus 6.0 ± 0.5%, for CSII alone group and CSII + Lira group, resp., P = 0.325). The increment of AIR was higher in CSII + Lira group (177.58 (351.57) μU · min/mL versus 58.15 (51.30) μU · min/mL, P < 0.001). However, after stopping liraglutide, its effect on beta cell function disappeared completely. Liraglutide combined with short-term CSII was effective in further improving beta cell function, but the beneficial effects did not sustain after suspension of the therapy.

  10. [Performance of a portable continuous infusion pump (SUREFUSER A) in continuous infusion of 5-FU].

    PubMed

    Kimata, Tsukasa; Sakamoto, Eiji; Kawachi, Aya; Takahashi, Yayoi; Kuroki, Asako; Nakamura, Masashi; Kawade, Yoshihiro; Tokui, Kenji; Suzuki, Tatsuya; Oyama, Takashi; Uchida, Toshiki; Yamada, Tomonori; Kondoh, Masahiro; Ogura, Michinori

    2010-08-01

    Therapy with mFOLFOX6/FOLFIRI used in treating colorectal cancer is typical of the regimens performed in outpatient settings. In this therapy, 46-h continuous infusion of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) with concomitant oxaliplatin and irinotecan hydrochloride is conducted. The portable continuous infusion pump that makes continuous infusion possible has a non-electric structure, so variation in the infusion rate is seen. There are known effects of 5-FU concentration and temperature, and many studies have reported on the precision. In our hospital, we have experienced many cases of incomplete infusion and delays for the above reasons. We changed the specifications of the infusion pump to correspond to the kinematic viscosity of 5-FU and made all drug solution amounts uniform. We measured the time required to administer the drug solution from the time the infusion was started (recorded by a nurse) and the time it was completed (recorded by the patient), and confirmed the precision of the pump after the changes were made. It was found that while there was a decrease in the infusion rate at which the effect of the kinematic viscosity of 5-FU is seen, the mean infusion time was kept to within 46+/-10% hours in more than 90% of patients. There were no effects from concentration differences in 5-FU, and the completion time was reduced. The management and lifestyles of individual patients are potential factors in precision errors, and it is important to explain in advance to patients the necessity of secure fixation and infusion pump problems that might occur.

  11. Insulin-mediated glucose disposal in type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetic subjects treated by continuous subcutaneous or intraperitoneal insulin fusion.

    PubMed

    Beylot, M; Khalfallah, Y; Laville, M; Sautot, G; Dechaud, H; Serusclat, P; Berthezene, F; Riou, J P; Mornex, R

    1987-01-01

    In order to determine if intraperitoneal insulin infusion could improve the insulin resistance of type 1 diabetic patients we have used the englycaemic insulin clamp technique in order to study the effects of insulin on glucose disposal in four C peptide negative type 1 diabetic patients treated by continuous subcutaneous or intraperitoneal insulin infusion and in five control subjects. Compared to control subjects, the diabetic patients treated by subcutaneous insulin infusion had a decreased maximal capacity of glucose utilization (diabetics: 12.6 +/- 0.3 mg.kg-1.min-1; controls: 15.7 +/- 0.7 mg/kg-1.min-1, p less than 0.01) and a trend towards higher half-maximally effective insulin concentrations (diabetics: 70 +/- 11 mU/l-1, controls: 48 +/- 4 mU/l-1). Treatment of the diabetic patients by intraperitoneal insulin infusion for 2 months decreased their mean peripheral free insulin levels (during subcutaneous infusion: 23.5 +/- 2.2 mU/l-1; during intraperitoneal infusion: 18.4 +/- 1.4 mU/l-1, p less than 0.05). However, mean daily insulin requirements were not decreased (during subcutaneous infusion: 0.59 +/- 0.05 U/kg-1.day-1; during intraperitoneal infusion: 0.57 +/- 0.03 U/kg-1.min-1). Moreover, the diabetic patients had a consistently lower maximal capacity of glucose utilization (12.6 +/- 0.7 mg kg-1.min-1) than control subjects (p less than 0.01) without modification of the half-maximally effective insulin concentration (62 +/- 10 mU.l-1). In conclusion, the only benefit of intraperitoneal insulin infusion was a reduction of peripheral free insulin levels; this decrease of peripheral insulinaemia was not associated with an improvement in the insulin resistance of diabetic patients.

  12. Induction of hyperlipidemia by intravenous infusion of tallow emulsion causes insulin resistance in Holstein cows.

    PubMed

    Pires, J A A; Souza, A H; Grummer, R R

    2007-06-01

    The objective was to test whether the induction of elevated blood nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA) by i.v. infusion of a tallow emulsion altered glucose tolerance and responsiveness to insulin in Holstein cows. Six non-lactating, nongestating Holstein cows were assigned to a crossover design. One cow was excluded before initiation of the experiment because of complications from mastitis. Treatments consisted of 11-h i.v. infusions of saline (control) or a 20% (wt/vol) triacylglycerol (TG) emulsion derived from tallow (tallow) to elevate plasma NEFA. Each period consisted of two 11-h infusions (INF1 and INF2), separated by 1 d in which cows were not infused. Intravenous glucose tolerance tests (IVGTT) and insulin challenges (IC) were performed 8 h after initiation of INF1 and INF2, respectively. The infusion of treatments continued during the 3 h of sampling for IVGTT and IC. Cows were fed every 4 h at a rate to meet energy requirements for 5 d prior to each period, and every 2 h during the first 8 h of infusions. Infusion of tallow induced hyperlipidemia by increasing plasma NEFA (295 +/- 9 vs. 79 +/- 7 microEq/L), serum TG (41.0 +/- 6 vs. 11.4 +/- 4.4 mg/dL), and glycerol (0.81 +/- 0.09 vs. 0.23 +/- 0.1 mg/dL) concentrations during INF1. During INF2, tallow treatment increased plasma NEFA (347 vs. 139 +/- 18 microEq/L), serum TG (20.8 +/- 4.6 vs. 13.1 +/- 2.3 mg/dL), and glycerol (0.88 +/- 0.04 vs. 0.31 +/- 0.02 mg/dL) concentrations. Induction of hyperlipidemia impaired glucose clearance during IVGTT, despite the greater endogenous insulin response to the glucose infusion, leading to a lower insulin sensitivity index [0.29 vs. 1.88 +/- 0.31 x 10(-4) min(-1)/(microIU/mL)]. Accordingly, hyperlipidemia impaired glucose clearance during IC (1.58 vs. 2.72 %/min), reflecting lower responsiveness to insulin. These data show that induction of hyperlipidemia causes insulin resistance in Holstein cows by impairing both sensitivity and maximum responsiveness to insulin. The

  13. A Hazard Analysis for a Generic Insulin Infusion Pump

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi; Jones, Paul L.; Jetley, Raoul

    2010-01-01

    Background Researchers at the Food and Drug Administration (FDA)/Center for Device and Radiological Health/Office of Science and Engineering Laboratories have been exploring the concept of model-based engineering as a means for improving the quality of medical device software. Insulin pumps were chosen as a research subject because their design provides the desired degree of research complexity and these types of devices present an ongoing regulatory challenge. Methods Insulin pump hazards and their contributing factors are considered in the context of a highly abstract generic insulin infusion pump (GIIP) model. Hazards were identified by consulting with manufacturers, pump users, and clinicians; by reviewing national and international standards and adverse event reports collected by the FDA; and from workshops sponsored by Diabetes Technology Society. This information has been consolidated in tabular form to facilitate further community analysis and discussion. Results A generic insulin infusion pump model architecture has been established. A fairly comprehensive hazard analysis document, corresponding to the GIIP model, is presented in this article. Conclusions We believe that this work represents the genesis of an insulin pump safety reference standard upon which future insulin pump designs can be based to help ensure a basic level of safety. More interaction with the diabetes community is needed to assure the quality of this safety modeling process. PMID:20307387

  14. Determining starting basal rates of insulin infusion for insulin pump users: a comparison between methods

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Nelson; Shearer, Daniel; Tildesley, Hamish G; Aydin Plaa, Jessica; Pottinger, Betty; Pawlowska, Monika; White, Adam; Priestman, Anne; Ross, Stuart A; Tildesley, Hugh D

    2016-01-01

    Objective We aimed to assess the accuracy and safety of presently available methods of estimating starting basal insulin rates for patients with type 1 and 2 diabetes, and to compare them against an empirically derived standard basal rate and a newly developed regression formula. Research design and methods Data on 61 patients with type 1 diabetes on continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) therapy and 34 patients with type 2 diabetes on CSII were reviewed. Patient data were first analyzed for correlations between initial patient parameters and final basal rates. Starting basal rates were then retrospectively calculated for these patients according to the weight-based method (WB-M), the total daily dose (TDD) of insulin method (TDD-M), a flat empiric value, and a new formula developed by regression analysis of clinical data. These 4 methods were subsequently compared in their accuracy and potential risk of hypoglycemia. Results For type 1 diabetes, patient weight and TDD of long-acting insulin correlated with final basal rates. Both the regression formula and the TDD-M appeared safer than the WB-M and empirical estimates. For type 2 diabetes, only patient TDD of long-acting insulin correlated with final basal rates. The regression formula was significantly more accurate for patients with type 2 diabetes overall, but the TDD-M estimate was marginally safer. Conclusions The pre-existing TDD-M was found to be the safest presently recommended estimate of initial basal rates for pump initiation in both type 1 and 2 diabetes. The best-fit regression was found to have potential use for type 2 CSII initiation. PMID:26977305

  15. Administration of growth hormone (GH), but not insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), by continuous infusion can induce the formation of the 150-kilodalton IGF-binding protein-3 complex in GH-deficient rats.

    PubMed

    Gargosky, S E; Tapanainen, P; Rosenfeld, R G

    1994-05-01

    In the adult circulation, 70-90% of the serum insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) are carried by IGF-binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3), which exists as part of a 150-kilodalton (kDa) ternary complex including IGF and an acid-labile subunit (ALS). We have examined the hormonal regulation and molecular distribution of IGFBP-3 in the circulation of a uniquely GH-deficient (GHD) rat model. For 7 days, GHD rats were given GH by either twice daily injections (1 mg/kg) or continuous infusion (2.4 mg/kg.day) or IGF-I by continuous infusion (1.4 mg/kg.day). Each day, weight and feed and water intake were monitored, and on day 7, liver, kidney, spleen, heart, and lung were weighted, and sera were collected. Serum IGF-I was analyzed by immunoassay, and the molecular distribution of the IGFBPs was determined by neutral size-exclusion chromatography combined with Western ligand blot and Western immunoblot. The GHD rats were 40-60% lighter than their normal littermates, and all organs examined were proportionately smaller. Serum IGF-I and IGFBP-3 levels were less than 10% of those in normal rats. Incubation of serum from GHD rats with [125I]IGF-II showed that radiolabel was incorporated only into a 44-kDa IGFBP region that contained the smaller IGFBPs. IGFBP-3 eluted around 60 kDa. No 150-kDa IGFBP region was detected. The administration of GH or IGF-I to GHD rats resulted in significant increases in weight gained, although food and water intake remained unaltered. Weight gain was observed in all three treatments groups. Both GH treatment regimens significantly increased liver, spleen, and lung weight, whereas IGF-I therapy increased spleen, kidney, and heart. Administration of GH twice daily did not increase serum IGF-I or IGFBP-3 concentrations, and the molecular distribution of IGFBP-3 remained unchanged. In contrast, continuous infusion of GH resulted in 5-fold increases in serum IGF-I and increases in IGFBP-3 levels. Size-exclusion chromatography combined with Western ligand blot

  16. Intraperitoneal insulin infusion: treatment option for type 1 diabetes resulting in beneficial endocrine effects beyond glycaemia.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, P R; Logtenberg, S J J; Gans, R O B; Bilo, H J G; Kleefstra, N

    2014-10-01

    Continuous intraperitoneal insulin infusion (CIPII) is a treatment option for patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus who fail to reach adequate glycaemic control despite intensive subcutaneous (SC) insulin therapy. CIPII has clear advantages over SC insulin administration in terms of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties and has been shown to improve glycaemic regulation. Due to the delivery of insulin predominantly in the portal vein, as opposed to systemically, CIPII offers a unique research model to investigate the effects of insulin on endocrine and metabolic parameters in vivo. The aim of the present article is to provide an overview of the literature with respect to the effects of CIPII on glucose management, quality of life, complications and costs, with additional focus on metabolic and endocrine aspects. Finally, future use and research objectives are discussed.

  17. The direct cost of intravenous insulin infusions to the NHS in England and Wales.

    PubMed

    Rajendran, Rajesh; Scott, Anne; Rayman, Gerry

    2015-08-01

    The cost of intravenous insulin infusion to the NHS is unknown. The aim of this study was to estimate the direct cost of insulin infusions to the NHS in England and Wales in the first 24-hour period of infusion. Data from the National Inpatient Diabetes Audit 2013 in the UK were used to estimate the number of insulin infusions in use across England and Wales. Costs were calculated for six models for setting up and maintenance of insulin infusions, depending on the extent of involvement of different healthcare professionals in the UK. In this study, the direct costs of intravenous insulin infusions to the NHS in England and Wales have been estimated to vary from £6.4-8.5 million in the first 24-hour period on infusion. More appropriate use of these infusions could result in substantial cost savings.

  18. Effects of glucosamine infusion on insulin secretion and insulin action in humans.

    PubMed

    Monauni, T; Zenti, M G; Cretti, A; Daniels, M C; Targher, G; Caruso, B; Caputo, M; McClain, D; Del Prato, S; Giaccari, A; Muggeo, M; Bonora, E; Bonadonna, R C

    2000-06-01

    Glucose toxicity (i.e., glucose-induced reduction in insulin secretion and action) may be mediated by an increased flux through the hexosamine-phosphate pathway. Glucosamine (GlcN) is widely used to accelerate the hexosamine pathway flux, independently of glucose. We tested the hypothesis that GlcN can affect insulin secretion and/or action in humans. In 10 healthy subjects, we sequentially performed an intravenous glucose (plus [2-3H]glucose) tolerance test (IVGTT) and a euglycemic insulin clamp during either a saline infusion or a low (1.6 micromol x min(-1) x kg(-1)) or high (5 micromol x min(-1) x kg(-1) [n = 5]) GlcN infusion. Beta-cell secretion, insulin (SI*-IVGTT), and glucose (SG*) action on glucose utilization during the IVGTT were measured according to minimal models of insulin secretion and action. Infusion of GlcN did not affect readily releasable insulin levels, glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS), or the time constant of secretion, but it increased both the glucose threshold of GSIS (delta approximately 0.5-0.8 mmol/l, P < 0.03-0.01) and plasma fasting glucose levels (delta approximately 0.3-0.5 mmol/l, P < 0.05-0.02). GlcN did not change glucose utilization or intracellular metabolism (glucose oxidation and glucose storage were measured by indirect calorimetry) during the clamp. However, high levels of GlcN caused a decrease in SI*-IVGTT (delta approximately 30%, P < 0.02) and in SG* (delta approximately 40%, P < 0.05). Thus, in humans, acute GlcN infusion recapitulates some metabolic features of human diabetes. It remains to be determined whether acceleration of the hexosamine pathway can cause insulin resistance at euglycemia in humans.

  19. Cognitively impaired elderly exhibit insulin resistance and no memory improvement with infused insulin.

    PubMed

    Morris, Jill K; Vidoni, Eric D; Mahnken, Jonathan D; Montgomery, Robert N; Johnson, David K; Thyfault, John P; Burns, Jeffrey M

    2016-03-01

    Insulin resistance is a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD), although its role in AD etiology is unclear. We assessed insulin resistance using fasting and insulin-stimulated measures in 51 elderly subjects with no dementia (ND; n = 37) and with cognitive impairment (CI; n = 14). CI subjects exhibited either mild CI or AD. Fasting insulin resistance was measured using the homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). Insulin-stimulated glucose disposal was assessed using the hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp to calculate glucose disposal rate into lean mass, the primary site of insulin-stimulated glucose disposal. Because insulin crosses the blood-brain barrier, we also assessed whether insulin infusion would improve verbal episodic memory compared to baseline. Different but equivalent versions of cognitive tests were administered in counterbalanced order in the basal and insulin-stimulated state. Groups did not differ in age or body mass index. Cognitively impaired subjects exhibited greater insulin resistance as measured at fasting (HOMA-IR; ND: 1.09 [1.1] vs. CI: 2.01 [2.3], p = 0.028) and during the hyperinsulinemic clamp (glucose disposal rate into lean mass; ND: 9.9 (4.5) vs. AD 7.2 (3.2), p = 0.040). Cognitively impaired subjects also exhibited higher fasting insulin compared to ND subjects, (CI: 8.7 [7.8] vs. ND: 4.2 [3.8] μU/mL; p = 0.023) and higher fasting amylin (CI: 24.1 [39.1] vs. 8.37 [14.2]; p = 0.050) with no difference in fasting glucose. Insulin infusion elicited a detrimental effect on one test of verbal episodic memory (Free and Cued Selective Reminding Test) in both groups (p < 0.0001) and no change in performance on an additional task (delayed logical memory). In this study, although insulin resistance was observed in cognitively impaired subjects compared to ND controls, insulin infusion did not improve memory. Furthermore, a significant correlation between HOMA-IR and glucose disposal rate was present only in ND

  20. Proportional Insulin Infusion in Closed-Loop Control of Blood Glucose

    PubMed Central

    Grasman, Johan

    2017-01-01

    A differential equation model is formulated that describes the dynamics of glucose concentration in blood circulation. The model accounts for the intake of food, expenditure of calories and the control of glucose levels by insulin and glucagon. These and other hormones affect the blood glucose level in various ways. In this study only main effects are taken into consideration. Moreover, by making a quasi-steady state approximation the model is reduced to a single nonlinear differential equation of which parameters are fit to data from healthy subjects. Feedback provided by insulin plays a key role in the control of the blood glucose level. Reduced β-cell function and insulin resistance may hamper this process. With the present model it is shown how by closed-loop control these defects, in an organic way, can be compensated with continuous infusion of exogenous insulin. PMID:28060898

  1. Insulin Infusion Set Use: European Perspectives and Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Adolfsson, Peter; Alkemade-van Zomeren, Marije; Bolli, Geremia B.; Charpentier, Guillaume; Cobelli, Claudio; Danne, Thomas; Girelli, Angela; Mueller, Heiko; Verderese, Carol A.; Renard, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Insulin pump users worldwide depend on insulin infusion sets (IISs) for predictable delivery of insulin to the subcutaneous tissue. Yet emerging data indicates that IISs are associated with many pump-related adverse events and may contribute to potentially life-threatening problem of unexplained hyperglycemia. The relative scarcity of published research on IISs to date, the heterogeneity of regional IIS practices, and the increasing demand for international standards guiding their use prompted convening of a panel of diabetologists and diabetes nurse educators last February, in Milan, Italy, to discuss a framework for optimizing IIS practice in Europe. The multinational panel was tasked, first, with identifying the often-overlooked IIS issues that can affect patients' experience of pump therapy—e.g., partial or complete blockage of the cannula, skin pathologies, unpredictable variations in insulin absorption, dislodgment, and the demands of site rotation and set changes—and, second, with establishing direction for developing cohesive protocols to assure long-term success. As reported in this article, the panel examined IIS-related complications of pump therapy encountered in clinical practice, considered country-wide policies to prevent and mitigate such complications, and updated priorities for improving IIS education on issues of device selection, skin care, and troubleshooting unexplained hyperglycemia. These recommendations may be more relevant with the possibility of closed-loop systems available in the near future. PMID:27526329

  2. Clinical applications of continuous infusion chemotherapy ahd concomitant radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenthal, C.J.; Rotman, M.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents information on the following topics: theoretical basis and clinical applications of 5-FU as a radiosensitizer; treatment of hepatic metastases from gastro intestingal primaries with split course radiation therapy; combined modality therapy with 5-FU, Mitomycin-C and radiation therapy for sqamous cell cancers; treatment of bladder carcinoma with concomitant infusion chemotherapy and irradiation; a treatment of invasiv bladder cancer by the XRT/5FU protocol; concomitant radiation therapy and doxorubicin by continuous infusion in advanced malignancies; cis platin by continuous infusion with concurrent radiation therapy in malignant tumors; combination of radiation with concomitant continuous adriamycin infusion in a patient with partially excised pleomorphic soft tissue sarcoma of the lower extremeity; treatment of recurrent carcinoma of the paranasal sinuses using concomitant infusion cis-platinum and radiation therapy; hepatic artery infusion for hepatic metastases in combination with hepatic resection and hepatic radiation; study of simultaneous radiation therapy, continuous infusion, 5FU and bolus mitomycin-C; cancer of the esophagus; continuous infusion VP-16, bolus cis-platinum and simultaneous radiation therapy as salvage therapy in small cell bronchogenic carcinoma; and concomitant radiation, mitomycin-C and 5-FU infusion in gastro intestinal cancer.

  3. The relationship between the frequency of self-monitoring of blood glucose and glycemic control in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus on continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion or on multiple daily injections

    PubMed Central

    Murata, Takashi; Tsuzaki, Kokoro; Yoshioka, Fumi; Okada, Hiroshi; Kishi, Junichiro; Yamada, Kazunori; Sakane, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    Aims/Introduction We investigated the relationship between the frequency of self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) and glycemic control in type 1 diabetes mellitus patients on continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) or on multiple daily injections (MDI) using data management software. Materials and Methods We recruited 148 adult type 1 diabetes mellitus patients (CSII n = 42, MDI n = 106) and downloaded their SMBG records to the MEQNET™ SMBG Viewer software (Arkray Inc., Kyoto, Japan). The association between the SMBG frequency and the patients' hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels was analyzed using the χ2-test and linear regression analysis was carried out to clarify their relationship. Results The odds ratio of achieving a target HbA1c level of <8% (63.9 mmol/mol) was significantly higher in subjects with SMBG frequencies of ≥3.5 times/day compared with those with SMBG frequencies of <3.5 times/day in the CSII group (odds ratio 7.00, 95% confidence interval 1.72–28.54), but not in the MDI group (odds ratio 1.35, 95% CI 0.62–2.93). A significant correlation between SMBG frequency and the HbA1c level was detected in the CSII group (HbA1c [%] = –0.24 × SMBG frequency [times/day] + 8.60 [HbA1c {mmol/L} = –2.61 × SMBG frequency {times/day} + 70.5], [r = –0.384, P = 0.012]), but not in the MDI group. Conclusions A SMBG frequency of <3.5 times per day appeared to be a risk factor for poor glycemic control (HbA1c ≥8%) in type 1 diabetes mellitus patients on CSII. PMID:26543543

  4. Is continuous infusion of imipenem always the best choice?

    PubMed

    Suchánková, Hana; Lipš, Michal; Urbánek, Karel; Neely, Michael N; Strojil, Jan

    2017-03-01

    Monte Carlo simulations allow prediction and comparison of concentration-time profiles arising from different dosing regimens in a defined population, provided a population pharmacokinetic model has been established. The aims of this study were to evaluate the population pharmacokinetics of imipenem in critically ill patients with hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP) and to assess the probability of target attainment (PTA) and cumulative fraction of response (CFR) using EUCAST data. A two-compartment model based on a data set of 19 subjects was employed. Various dosage regimens at 0.5-h and 3-h infusion rates and as continuous infusion were evaluated against the pharmacodynamic targets of 20%fT>MIC, 40%fT>MIC and 100%fT>MIC. For the target of 40%fT>MIC, all 0.5-h infusion regimens achieved optimal exposures (CFR ≥ 90%) against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus, with nearly optimal exposure against Klebsiella pneumoniae (CFR ≥ 89.4%). The 3-h infusions and continuous infusion exceeded 97% CFR against all pathogens with the exception of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp., where the maximum CFRs were 85.5% and 88.4%, respectively. For the 100%fT>MIC target, only continuous infusion was associated with nearly optimal exposures. Higher PTAs for the targets of 40%fT>MIC and 100%fT>MIC were achieved with 3-h infusions and continuous infusion in comparison with 0.5-h infusions; however, continuous infusion carries a risk of not reaching the MIC of less susceptible pathogens in a higher proportion of patients. In critically ill patients with HAP with risk factors for Gram-negative non-fermenting bacteria, maximum doses administered as extended infusions may be necessary.

  5. Continuous Glucose Monitoring Enables the Detection of Losses in Infusion Set Actuation (LISAs)

    PubMed Central

    Howsmon, Daniel P.; Cameron, Faye; Baysal, Nihat; Ly, Trang T.; Forlenza, Gregory P.; Maahs, David M.; Buckingham, Bruce A.; Hahn, Juergen; Bequette, B. Wayne

    2017-01-01

    Reliable continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) enables a variety of advanced technology for the treatment of type 1 diabetes. In addition to artificial pancreas algorithms that use CGM to automate continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII), CGM can also inform fault detection algorithms that alert patients to problems in CGM or CSII. Losses in infusion set actuation (LISAs) can adversely affect clinical outcomes, resulting in hyperglycemia due to impaired insulin delivery. Prolonged hyperglycemia may lead to diabetic ketoacidosis—a serious metabolic complication in type 1 diabetes. Therefore, an algorithm for the detection of LISAs based on CGM and CSII signals was developed to improve patient safety. The LISA detection algorithm is trained retrospectively on data from 62 infusion set insertions from 20 patients. The algorithm collects glucose and insulin data, and computes relevant fault metrics over two different sliding windows; an alarm sounds when these fault metrics are exceeded. With the chosen algorithm parameters, the LISA detection strategy achieved a sensitivity of 71.8% and issued 0.28 false positives per day on the training data. Validation on two independent data sets confirmed that similar performance is seen on data that was not used for training. The developed algorithm is able to effectively alert patients to possible infusion set failures in open-loop scenarios, with limited evidence of its extension to closed-loop scenarios. PMID:28098839

  6. Continuous Glucose Monitoring Enables the Detection of Losses in Infusion Set Actuation (LISAs).

    PubMed

    Howsmon, Daniel P; Cameron, Faye; Baysal, Nihat; Ly, Trang T; Forlenza, Gregory P; Maahs, David M; Buckingham, Bruce A; Hahn, Juergen; Bequette, B Wayne

    2017-01-15

    Reliable continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) enables a variety of advanced technology for the treatment of type 1 diabetes. In addition to artificial pancreas algorithms that use CGM to automate continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII), CGM can also inform fault detection algorithms that alert patients to problems in CGM or CSII. Losses in infusion set actuation (LISAs) can adversely affect clinical outcomes, resulting in hyperglycemia due to impaired insulin delivery. Prolonged hyperglycemia may lead to diabetic ketoacidosis-a serious metabolic complication in type 1 diabetes. Therefore, an algorithm for the detection of LISAs based on CGM and CSII signals was developed to improve patient safety. The LISA detection algorithm is trained retrospectively on data from 62 infusion set insertions from 20 patients. The algorithm collects glucose and insulin data, and computes relevant fault metrics over two different sliding windows; an alarm sounds when these fault metrics are exceeded. With the chosen algorithm parameters, the LISA detection strategy achieved a sensitivity of 71.8% and issued 0.28 false positives per day on the training data. Validation on two independent data sets confirmed that similar performance is seen on data that was not used for training. The developed algorithm is able to effectively alert patients to possible infusion set failures in open-loop scenarios, with limited evidence of its extension to closed-loop scenarios.

  7. Insulin secretion and cellular glucose metabolism after prolonged low-grade intralipid infusion in young men.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Christine B; Storgaard, Heidi; Holst, Jens J; Dela, Flemming; Madsbad, Sten; Vaag, Allan A

    2003-06-01

    We examined the simultaneous effects of a 24-h low-grade Intralipid infusion on peripheral glucose disposal, intracellular glucose partitioning and insulin secretion rates in twenty young men, by 2-step hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp [low insulin clamp (LI), 10 mU/m(2) x min; high insulin clamp (HI), 40 mU/m(2) x min], 3-(3)H-glucose, indirect calorimetry, and iv glucose tolerance test. Free fatty acid concentrations were similar during basal steady state but 3.7- to 13-fold higher during clamps. P-glucagon increased and the insulin/glucagon ratio decreased at both LI and HI during Intralipid infusion. At LI, glucose oxidation decreased by 10%, whereas glucose disposal, glycolytic flux, glucose storage, and glucose production were not significantly altered. At HI, glucose disposal, and glucose oxidation decreased by 12% and 24%, respectively, during Intralipid infusion. Glycolytic flux, glucose storage, and glucose production were unchanged. Insulin secretion rates increased in response to Intralipid infusion, but disposition indices (DI = insulin action.insulin secretion) were unchanged. In conclusion, a 24-h low-grade Intralipid infusion caused insulin resistance in the oxidative (but not in the nonoxidative) glucose metabolism in young healthy men. Moreover, insulin hypersecretion perfectly countered the free-fatty acid-induced insulin resistance. Future studies are needed to determine the role of a prolonged moderate lipid load in subjects at increased risk of developing diabetes.

  8. Continuous ampicillin infusion as an alternative to intermittent infusion for adult inpatients: a case series.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Taku; Kasahara, Kei; Ikawa, Kazuro; Shigeta, Junichi; Komatsu, Yuko; Kuruno, Noriko; Uno, Kenji; Maeda, Koichi; Mikasa, Keiichi

    2014-10-01

    Intravenous ampicillin has been extensively used for various kinds of infections for more than fifty years. This drug is administered intermittently, which can result in missed or delayed drug administration and sleep interruption that can have a negative impact on the quality of life during hospitalization. Continuous infusion may solve these concerns. We reviewed the cases of five patients who were treated with continuous ampicillin infusions in our hospital. The ampicillin serum concentrations were from 11.3 to 32.8 μg/mL, which was above the ampicillin MICs of the causative organisms, ≤0.06 to 4 μg/mL. Although the dosages given of ampicillin varied in each case, the serum concentrations showed a strong correlation with creatinine clearance (r(2) = 0.91). All the patients improved at the time of discharge, or transfer to another hospital, with no significant complications during the continuous infusion. Continuous ampicillin infusion could be a better alternative for frequent intermittent infusion for adult inpatients with infections due to ampicillin-susceptible organisms.

  9. [Treatment of diabetic ketoacidosis and hyperosmolality with low dose insulin infusion (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Duclos, F; François, P; Dumon, P; Altmann, J J

    1978-06-03

    Fifteen patients were treated with low-dose (5 u/hour) insulin infusion, including 10 cases of ketoacidosis, 3 cases of hyperglycemia without acidosis in severely affected diabetics, and 2 cases with hyperosmolality. The treatment was successful in all cases. Insulin was infused at a constant rate, during 12 hours as a mean value. Blood glucose fell regularly and no hypoglycemia occured. Serum potassium varied within narrow limits, and no accident related to hypokalemia was observed. The correction of ketoacidosis was delayed, as compared to that of hyperglycemia. The two elderly patients with hyperosmolality recovered quickly and completely. The method of low-dose insulin infusion seems thus effective and easily applicable, at least in an intensive care unit. Our experience prompted us to increase (10 u/h) rather than to decrease the insulin infusion rate, with the aim to obtain a faster correction of ketoacidosis.

  10. [Reflections on betalactam antibiotics administered by continuous infusion].

    PubMed

    López, Ester; Soy, Dolors; Miana, M Teresa; Codina, Carles; Ribas, Josep

    2006-01-01

    Numerous studies on continuous intravenous infusion of betalactam antibiotics have indicated that this could be a useful strategy for treating nosocomial infections as well as exacerbations of pulmonary infections in patients with cystic fibrosis and episodes of febrile neutropenia. From the pharmacodynamic viewpoint, betalactam antibiotics have a time-dependent behavior. Thus, the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic index that best correlates with therapeutic efficacy appears to be the time during which free antibiotic concentrations remain above the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the infecting microorganism. Continuous infusion of betalactams successfully optimizes this pharmacokinetic/ pharmacodynamic index. Furthermore, some studies have shown that this therapeutic strategy may be favorable economically.

  11. Continuous infusion of factor VIII for surgery and major bleeding.

    PubMed

    Hay, C R; Doughty, H I; Savidge, G F

    1996-03-01

    In a clinical trial, 24 patients with haemophilia A who needed surgery or had suffered severe bleeding were treated by continuous infusion of Monoclate P, a factor VIII concentrate that is immunopurified by monoclonal antibodies. Continuous infusion of Monoclate P began with a dose of 2 U/kg per h that was adjusted according to the results of factor VIII assays to achieve a factor VIII target level of 100 IU/dl for 2 days and then 80 IU/dl for 5 days. The safety, efficacy, and economics of this approach were assessed. No haemorrhagic episodes were observed. The continuous infusion was convenient and had the advantage of producing steady-state levels of factor VIII. With a single-compartment model, we found median factor VIII clearance values of 3.11 (range 1.79-7.78) x 10(3) litres/kg per h, elimination rates of 5.0-19.4 x 10(-2)/h and a median half-life of 9.9 h (range 4.8-20.0 h). Clearance and the elimination rate appeared to decline over the infusion period, as judged by the decreasing infusion rate required to maintain the target concentration of factor VIII. An economic comparison with bolus therapy, using theoretically derived bolus dosages, indicated that the potential saving was related inversely to the factor VIII half-life. Potential savings of 75% were predicted on the first postoperative day, averaging 35% over the full course of therapy.

  12. Continuous intravenous infusions of bromodeoxyuridine as a clinical radiosensitizer

    SciTech Connect

    Kinsella, T.J.; Mitchell, J.B.; Russo, A.; Aiken, M.; Morstyn, G.; Hsu, S.M.; Rowland, J.; Glatstein, E.

    1984-10-01

    Twelve patients were treated with continuous intravenous (24-hour) infusions of bromodeoxyuridine (BUdR) at 650 or 1000 mg/m2/d for up to two weeks. Myelosuppression, especially thrombocytopenia, was the major systemic toxicity and limited the infusion period to nine to 14 days. However, bone marrow recovery occurred within seven to ten days, allowing for a second infusion in most patients. Local toxicity (within the radiation field) was minimal, with the exception of one of four patients, who underwent abdominal irradiation. Pharmacology studies revealed a steady-state arterial plasma level of 6 x 10(-7) mol/L and 1 x 10(-6) mol/L during infusion of 650 and 1000 mg/m2/d, respectively. In vivo BUdR uptake into normal bone marrow was evaluated in two patients by comparison of preinfusion and postinfusion in vitro radiation survival curves of marrow CFUc with enhancement ratios (D0-pre/D0-post) of 1.8 (with 650 mg/m2/d) and 2.5 (with 1000 mg/m2/d). In vivo BUdR incorporation into normal skin and tumor cells using an anti-BUdR monoclonal antibody and immunohistochemistry was demonstrated in biopsies from three patients revealing substantially less cellular incorporation into normal skin (less than 10%) compared with tumor (up to 50% to 70%). The authors conclude that local and systemic toxicity of continuous infusion of BUdR at 1000 mg/m2/d for approximately two weeks is tolerable. The observed normal tissue toxicity is comparable with previous clinical experience with intermittent (12 hours every day for two weeks) infusions of BUdR. Theoretically, a constant infusion should allow for greater incorporation of BUdR into cycling tumor cells and thus, for further enhancement of radiosensitization.

  13. Continuous infusion of enzyme replacement therapy is inferior to weekly infusions in MPS I dogs

    PubMed Central

    Passage, M.B.; Krieger, A.W.; Peinovich, M.C.; Lester, T.; Le, S.Q.; Dickson, P.I.; Kakkis, E.D.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Intravenous enzyme replacement therapy with recombinant human α-l-iduronidase (rhIDU) is used weekly to treat mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) I. We tested continuous administration of rhIDU at two dosing levels (0.58 mg/kg/week and 2 mg/kg/week) in MPS I dogs, and compared the efficacy of continuous to the clinically-used 0.58 mg/kg weekly three-hour infusion. Peak plasma concentrations of rhIDU were much higher in weekly-treated dogs (mean 256 units/ml) than steady-state concentrations in dogs treated with continuous infusion (mean 1.97 units/ml at 0.58 mg/kg/week; 10.1 units/ml at 2 mg/kg/week). Dogs receiving continuous IV rhIDU, even at a higher (2 mg/kg/week) dose, had consistently lower iduronidase levels in tissues than dogs receiving a weekly (0.58 mg/kg/week) dose. GAG storage was also less improved by continuous intravenous infusion. Adverse events were similar in all dosing groups. We found that continuous administration of 2 mg/kg/week rhIDU to MPS I dogs was insufficient to achieve GAG storage reduction comparable to 0.58 mg/kg weekly dosing. PMID:19562502

  14. Electronic flow rate controller for a portable insulin infusion pump.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, R T; Zinman, B; Marliss, E B; Albisser, A M

    1980-01-01

    An electronic controller is described that regulates the flow of infusate by controlling the fraction of time that a pump is energized. Using the integral programming capability of the device, any one of 256 possible basal rates between 0 and 49.6% of the maximum rate can be chosen. An externally triggerable single meal-associated pulse can also be configured. The rate during the meal pulse can be any one of the 255 equally spaced rates in the range of 0--99.7%. The duration of this pulse can be chosen in 3-min steps to a maximum of 12.75 h, after which the rate automatically returns to the basal value. The controller consumes a minimum amount of power and can continuously operate a dc motor-driven pump at 3.0 V for 36 h. It drives the pump in an on-off mode in order to control the average flow rate digitally. In this way a significant reduction in the power requirements is realized and the system can be run for many days using small rechargeable batteries. One year of experience with 20 of these controllers was obtained in the research laboratory and clinical investigation unit. The results of this experience indicated the reliability and precision of these controllers, gave insight into their modes of failure, and provided valuable biomedical data for their improvement.

  15. Novel therapy for insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus: infusion of in vitro-generated insulin-secreting cells.

    PubMed

    Dave, S D; Vanikar, A V; Trivedi, H L; Thakkar, U G; Gopal, S C; Chandra, T

    2015-02-01

    Insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) is a metabolic disease usually resulting from autoimmune-mediated β-cell destruction requiring lifetime exogenous insulin replacement. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) hold promising therapy. We present our experience of treating IDDM with co-infusion of in vitro autologous adipose tissue-derived MSC-differentiated insulin-secreting cells (ISC) with hematopoietic stem cells (HSC). This was an Institutional Review Board approved prospective non-randomized open-labeled clinical trial after informed consent from ten patients. ISC were differentiated from autologous adipose tissue-derived MSC and were infused with bone marrow-derived HSC in portal, thymic circulation by mini-laparotomy and in subcutaneous circulation. Patients were monitored for blood sugar levels, serum C-peptide levels, glycosylated hemoglobin (Hb1Ac) and glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) antibodies. Insulin administration was made on sliding scale with an objective of maintaining FBS < 150 mg/dL and PPBS around 200 mg/dL. Mean 3.34 mL cell inoculums with 5.25 × 10(4) cells/μL were infused. No untoward effects were observed. Over a mean follow-up of 31.71 months, mean serum C-peptide of 0.22 ng/mL before infusion had sustained rise of 0.92 ng/mL with decreased exogenous insulin requirement from 63.9 international units (IU)/day to 38.6 IU/day. Improvement in mean Hb1Ac was observed from 10.99 to 6.72%. Mean GAD antibodies were positive in all patients with mean of 331.10 IU/mL, which decreased to mean of 123 IU/mL. Co-infusion of autologous ISC with HSC represents a viable novel therapeutic option for IDDM.

  16. Regional blood flow during continuous low-dose endotoxin infusion

    SciTech Connect

    Fish, R.E.; Lang, C.H.; Spitzer, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    Escherichia coli endotoxin (ET) was administered to adult rats by continuous IV infusion from a subcutaneously implanted osmotic pump (Alzet). Cardiac output and regional blood flow were determined by the radiolabeled microsphere method after 6 and 30 hr of ET or saline infusion. Cardiac output (CO) of ET rats was not different from time-matched controls, whereas arterial pressure was 13% lower after 30 hr of infusion. After both 6 and 30 hr of ET, pancreatic blood flow and percentage of cardiac output were lower than in controls. Estimated portal venous flow was decreased at each time point, and an increased hepatic arterial flow (significant after 30 hr) resulted in an unchanged total hepatic blood flow. Blood flow to most other tissues, including epididymal fat, muscle, kidneys, adrenals, and gastrointestinal tract, was similar between treatments. Maintenance of blood flow to metabolically important tissues indicates that the previously reported alterations in in vitro cellular metabolism are not due to tissue hypoperfusion. Earlier observations of in vitro myocardial dysfunction, coexistent with the significant impairment in pancreatic flow, raise the possibility that release of a myocardial depressant factor occurs not only in profound shock but also under less severe conditions of sepsis and endotoxemia.

  17. Metabolic response of normal man and insulin-infused diabetics to postprandial exercise.

    PubMed

    Nelson, J D; Poussier, P; Marliss, E B; Albisser, A M; Zinman, B

    1982-05-01

    Physical exercise is often performed during absorption of meals. We have characterized the metabolic response to 45 min of moderate exercise (approximately 55% of estimated maximal oxygen uptake) beginning 30 min after breakfast in seven healthy controls. Nine insulin-dependent diabetes were studied in an identical manner, with glycemia controlled by a closed-loop "artificial endocrine pancreas" controlled by a closed-loop "artificial endocrine pancreas" (AEP). Responses were compared to those during breakfast without exercise. In the controls, onset of exercise rapidly reversed the rise in both glycemia and insulin (IRI) that occurred with breakfast alone, both returning to fasting levels (glycemia, 80 +/- 3 mg/dl; IRI, 0.38 +/- 0.10 ng/ml). After exercise, small and transient increments occurred (glycemia, 33 +/- 6 mg/dl; IRI, 0.81 +/- 0.15 ng/ml). In the diabetics, prior overnight intravenous insulin normalized fasting glycemia (98 +/- 4 mg/dl), and its postbreakfast excursion was identical to that of controls, as were those of most measured substrates. Similarly, with exercise, glycemia returned rapidly to fasting levels, accompanied by an appropriate decrease in insulin infusion rates. "Free" IRI levels mirrored changes in infusion rates by the AEP, with a decrease in insulin requirement of 30% during exercise as compared to breakfast alone (P less than 0.05). Thus, in both diabetics treated with the AEP and in normals, the responses to postprandial exercise required rapid modulation of insulin delivery. To demonstrate the effect of postprandial exercise on preprogrammed open-loop insulin replacement, four diabetic subjects were studied during breakfast with and without exercise while receiving a fixed open-loop insulin infusion pattern (6.1 +/- 0.7 U over 140 +/- 8 min). The glycemic response to breakfast alone was entirely normalized. However, symptomatic hypoglycemia occurred in all subjects when exercise was initiated 30 min after breakfast. The diabetic

  18. The regulatory system for diabetes mellitus: Modeling rates of glucose infusions and insulin injections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jin; Tang, Sanyi; Cheke, Robert A.

    2016-08-01

    Novel mathematical models with open and closed-loop control for type 1 or type 2 diabetes mellitus were developed to improve understanding of the glucose-insulin regulatory system. A hybrid impulsive glucose-insulin model with different frequencies of glucose infusions and insulin injections was analyzed, and the existence and uniqueness of the positive periodic solution for type 1 diabetes, which is globally asymptotically stable, was studied analytically. Moreover, permanence of the system for type 2 diabetes was demonstrated which showed that the glucose concentration level is uniformly bounded above and below. To investigate how to prevent hyperinsulinemia and hyperglycemia being caused by this system, we developed a model involving periodic intakes of glucose with insulin injections applied only when the blood glucose level reached a given critical glucose threshold. In addition, our numerical analysis revealed that the period, the frequency and the dose of glucose infusions and insulin injections are crucial for insulin therapies, and the results provide clinical strategies for insulin-administration practices.

  19. Percutaneous catheter-based intracoronary infusion of insulin--a dose finding study in the porcine model.

    PubMed

    Slettom, Grete; Jonassen, Anne K; Tuseth, Vegard; Pettersen, Reidar J; Larsen, Terje H; Seifert, Reinhard; Nordrehaug, Jan E

    2011-06-01

    Insulin given at immediate reperfusion reduces myocardial infarct size in the in vitro and the ex vivo rat heart. In vivo, insulin may cause hypoglycaemia, hypokalaemia and elevation of catecholamines, potentially harmful during an acute myocardial infarction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate tolerance and safety of intracoronary insulin infusions in a porcine model applying percutaneous intervention techniques.

  20. Continuous infusion of antibiotics in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Smuszkiewicz, Piotr; Szałek, Edyta; Tomczak, Hanna; Grześkowiak, Edmund

    2013-02-01

    Antibiotics are the most commonly used drugs in intensive care unit patients and their supply should be based on pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic rules. The changes that occur in septic patients who are critically ill may be responsible for subtherapeutic antibiotic concentrations leading to poorer clinical outcomes. Evolving in time the disturbed pathophysiology in severe sepsis (high cardiac output, glomerular hyperfiltration) and therapeutic interventions (e.g. haemodynamically active drugs, mechanical ventilation, renal replacement therapy) alters antibiotic pharmacokinetics mainly through an increase in the volume of distribution and altered drug clearance. The lack of new and efficacious drugs and increased bacterial resistance are current problems of contemporary antibiotic therapy. Although intermittent administration is a standard clinical practice, alternative methods of antibiotic administration are sought, which may potentialise effects and reduce toxicity as well as contribute to inhibition of bacterial resistance. A wide range of studies prove that the application of continuous infusion of time-dependent antibiotics (beta-lactams, glycopeptides) is more rational than standard intermittent administration. However, there are also studies which do not confirm the advantage of one method over the other. In spite of controversy the continuous administration of this group of antibiotics is common practice, because the results of both studies point to the higher efficacy of this method in critically ill patients. Authors reviewed the literature to determine whether any clinical benefits exist for administration of time-dependent antibiotics by continuous infusion. Definite specification of the clinical advantage of administration this way over standard dosage requires a large-scale multi-centre randomised controlled trial.

  1. Lipid and insulin infusion-induced skeletal muscle insulin resistance is likely due to metabolic feedback and not changes in IRS-1, Akt, or AS160 phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Hoy, Andrew J; Brandon, Amanda E; Turner, Nigel; Watt, Matthew J; Bruce, Clinton R; Cooney, Gregory J; Kraegen, Edward W

    2009-07-01

    Type 2 diabetes is characterized by hyperlipidemia, hyperinsulinemia, and insulin resistance. The aim of this study was to investigate whether acute hyperlipidemia-induced insulin resistance in the presence of hyperinsulinemia was due to defective insulin signaling. Hyperinsulinemia (approximately 300 mU/l) with hyperlipidemia or glycerol (control) was produced in cannulated male Wistar rats for 0.5, 1 h, 3 h, or 5 h. The glucose infusion rate required to maintain euglycemia was significantly reduced by 3 h with lipid infusion and was further reduced after 5 h of infusion, with no difference in plasma insulin levels, indicating development of insulin resistance. Consistent with this finding, in vivo skeletal muscle glucose uptake (31%, P < 0.05) and glycogen synthesis rate (38%, P < 0.02) were significantly reduced after 5 h compared with 3 h of lipid infusion. Despite the development of insulin resistance, there was no difference in the phosphorylation state of multiple insulin-signaling intermediates or muscle diacylglyceride and ceramide content over the same time course. However, there was an increase in cumulative exposure to long-chain acyl-CoA (70%) with lipid infusion. Interestingly, although muscle pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 protein content was decreased in hyperinsulinemic glycerol-infused rats, this decrease was blunted in muscle from hyperinsulinemic lipid-infused rats. Decreased pyruvate dehydrogenase complex activity was also observed in lipid- and insulin-infused animals (43%). Overall, these results suggest that acute reductions in muscle glucose metabolism in rats with hyperlipidemia and hyperinsulinemia are more likely a result of substrate competition than a significant early defect in insulin action or signaling.

  2. Effect of dexamethasone, feeding time, and insulin infusion on leptin concentrations in stallions.

    PubMed

    Cartmill, J A; Thompson, D L; Storer, W A; Crowley, J C; Huff, N K; Waller, C A

    2005-08-01

    Three experiments tested the hypotheses that daily cortisol rhythm, feeding time, and/or insulin infusion affect(s) leptin secretion in stallions. Ten mature stallions received ad libitum hay and water and were fed a grain concentrate once daily at 0700. In Exp. 1, stallions received either a single injection of dexamethasone (125 microg/kg BW i.m.; n = 5) or vehicle (controls; n = 5) at 0700 on d -1. Starting 24 h later, blood samples were collected every 2 h for 36 h via jugular venipuncture. Cortisol in control stallions varied (P < 0.01) with time, with a morning peak and evening nadir; dexamethasone suppressed (P < 0.01) cortisol concentrations. Leptin and insulin were greater (P < 0.01) in the treated stallions, as was the insulin response to feeding (P < 0.01). Leptin in control stallions varied (P < 0.01) in a diurnal pattern, peaking approximately 10 h after onset of eating. This pattern of leptin secretion was similar, although of greater magnitude (P < 0.01), in treated stallions. In Exp. 2, five stallions were fed the concentrate portion of their diet daily at 0700 and five were switched to feeding at 1900. After 14 d on these regimens, blood samples were collected every 4 h for 48 h and then twice daily for 5 d. Cortisol varied diurnally (P = 0.02) and was not altered (P = 0.21) by feeding time. Insulin and leptin increased (P < 0.01) after feeding, and the peaks in insulin and leptin were shifted 12 h by feeding at 1900. In Exp. 3, six stallions were used in two 3 x 3 Latin square experiments. Treatments were 1) normal daily meal at 0700; 2) no feed for 24 h; and 3) no feed and a bolus injection of insulin (0.4 mIU/kg BW i.v.) followed by infusion of insulin (1.2 mIU.kg BW(-1).min(-1)) for 180 min, which was gradually decreased to 0 by 240 min; sufficient glucose was infused to maintain euglycemia. Plasma insulin increased (P < 0.01) in stallions when they were meal-fed (to approximately 150 microIU/mL) or infused with insulin and glucose (to

  3. Prospective randomised study of intensive insulin treatment on long term survival after acute myocardial infarction in patients with diabetes mellitus. DIGAMI (Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin Glucose Infusion in Acute Myocardial Infarction) Study Group.

    PubMed Central

    Malmberg, K.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To test the hypothesis that intensive metabolic treatment with insulin-glucose infusion followed by multidose insulin treatment in patients with diabetes mellitus and acute myocardial infarction improves the prognosis. DESIGN: Patients with diabetes mellitus and acute myocardial infarction were randomly allocated standard treatment plus insulin-glucose infusion for at least 24 hours followed by multidose insulin treatment or standard treatment (controls). SUBJECTS: 620 patients were recruited, of whom 306 received intensive insulin treatment and 314 served as controls. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Long term all cause mortality. RESULTS: The mean (range) follow up was 3.4 (1.6-5.6) years. There were 102 (33%) deaths in the treatment group compared with 138 (44%) deaths in the control group (relative risk (95% confidence interval) 0.72 (0.55 to 0.92); P = 0.011). The effect was most pronounced among the predefined group that included 272 patients without previous insulin treatment and at a low cardiovascular risk (0.49 (0.30 to 0.80); P = 0.004). CONCLUSION: Insulin-glucose infusion followed by intensive subcutaneous insulin in diabetic patients with acute myocardial infarction improves long term survival, and the effect seen at one year continues for at least 3.5 years, with an absolute reduction in mortality of 11%. This means that one life was saved for nine treated patients. The effect was most apparent in patients who had not previously received insulin treatment and who were at a low cardiovascular risk. PMID:9169397

  4. No improvement of pancreas transplant endocrine function by exogenous insulin infusion (islet rest) in the postoperative period.

    PubMed

    Dafoe, D C; Campbell, D A; Rosenberg, L; Merion, R M; Ucros, I; Vinik, A I; Klandorf, H; Turcotte, J G

    1989-07-01

    The concept of islet exhaustion maintains that exposure of pancreatic islets to hyperglycemia and other stresses leads to islet dysfunction and irreparable damage. The process of pancreatic transplantation places many stresses on islets (e.g., counter-regulatory hormones, steroids, cyclosporine toxicity). As practiced by some centers, it may be important to administer exogenous insulin in the postoperative period to provide islet rest. Using a porcine pancreas transplant model that simulates clinical transplantation, we studied 2 groups: 1 group (n = 8) received constant insulin infusion for 7 days after transplantation; the control group (n = 5) received vehicle only. The islets in the insulin infusion group were rested as evidenced by a significantly decreased mean C-peptide level (0.27 +/- 0.04 ng/ml) as compared to the control group (0.66 +/- 0.08 ng/ml) (P less than 0.05). After insulin infusion was discontinued, intravenous glucose tolerance testing found insulin, C-peptide and glucagon responses were not different between groups. Glucose clearance was also comparable; K values were -1.79 and -1.60 in the insulin infusion and control groups, respectively. In conclusion, islet rest by insulin infusion for 7 postoperative days did not improve subsequent pancreas transplant endocrine function.

  5. Continuous infusion of beta-lactam antibiotics in severe infections: a review of its role.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Jason A; Paratz, Jennifer; Paratz, Elizabeth; Krueger, Wolfgang A; Lipman, Jeffrey

    2007-07-01

    Continuous infusion of beta-lactam antibiotics has been widely promoted to optimise their time-dependent activity. Increasing evidence is emerging suggesting potential benefits in patient populations with altered pathophysiology, such as seriously ill patients. From a pharmacokinetic viewpoint, much information supports higher trough concentrations of beta-lactam antibiotics when administered by continuous infusion. This advantage of continuous infusion translates into a superior ability to achieve pharmacodynamic targets, particularly when the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the pathogen is >or=4 mg/L. One drawback of continuous infusion may be limited physicochemical stability. This issue exists particularly for carbapenem antibiotics whereby prolonged infusions (i.e. >3h) can be used to improve the time above the MIC compared with conventional bolus dosing. Few studies have examined clinical outcomes of bolus and continuous dosing of beta-lactam antibiotics in seriously ill patients. No statistically significant differences have been shown for: mortality; time to normalisation of leukocytosis or pyrexia; or duration of mechanical ventilation, intensive care unit stay or hospital stay. Some evidence suggests improved clinical cure and resolution of illness with continuous infusion in seriously ill patients. Pharmacoeconomic advantages of continuous infusion of beta-lactam antibiotics are well characterised. Available data suggest that seriously ill patients with severe infections requiring significant antibiotic courses (>or=4 days) may be the subgroup that will achieve better outcomes with continuous infusion.

  6. Effects of intraruminal infusion of propionate on the concentrations of ammonia and insulin in peripheral blood of cows receiving an intraruminal infusion of urea.

    PubMed

    Choung, J J; Chamberlain, D G

    1995-11-01

    To test the hypothesis that propionate can reduce hepatic capacity to detoxify ammonia, effects of the inclusion of propionate in intraruminal infusions of urea on the concentrations of ammonia, other metabolites and insulin in peripheral blood were investigated in two experiments with non-lactating dairy cows. Both experiments were of a 4 x 4 Latin square design with four animals, four treatments and four experimental periods of 7 d; feed was given in two equal meals each day, all intraruminal infusions were given for 1 h at the time of the morning feed, and propionic acid was partly neutralized with NaOH. In Expt 1, the treatments were a basal diet of pelleted lucerne and chopped hay alone or with the following infusions (g/d): urea 80, propionic acid 350, urea 80 plus propionic acid 350. The inclusion of propionate in the urea infusion markedly increased (P < 0.001) the concentration of ammonia in plasma compared with infusion of urea alone. Moreover, the inclusion of urea with the propionate infusion abolished (P < 0.01) the increase in blood insulin level seen with the infusion of propionate alone. In Expt 2, less severe treatments were imposed, the aim being to reproduce metabolic loads of propionate and ammonia that might be expected from a diet of high-protein grass silage rich in lactic acid. The treatments were a basal diet of grass silage alone or with the following infusions (g/d): NaCl 145, NaCl 145 plus urea 50, propionic acid 200, urea 50 plus propionic acid 200. Effects were less pronounced than in Expt 1 but, in the period immediately after infusion, similar effects were seen. It is concluded that propionate-ammonia interactions may have potentially important effects on milk production especially for diets with high proportions of grass silage containing high levels of protein and lactic acid.

  7. Serum concentrations of amoxicillin in neonates during continuous intravenous infusion.

    PubMed

    van Boekholt, A; Fleuren, H; Mouton, J; Kramers, C; Sprong, T; Gerrits, P; Semmekrot, B

    2016-06-01

    Amoxicillin is commonly used for the treatment of neonatal bacterial infection with intermittent dosing (ID) regimens. However, increasing bacterial resistance, in addition to a lack of new antimicrobial agents, urges the optimization of current therapeutic options. Clinical studies in adults suggest continuous infusion (CI) regimens of beta-lactam antibiotics to be superior to ID. There are as yet no guidelines concerning the CI dosing of amoxicillin. The present study was developed to describe the CI pharmacokinetics and -dynamics of amoxicillin during the first 3 days of life in search of the optimal dosing regimen. Neonates with a gestational age above 34 weeks, at risk of neonatal infection and requiring amoxicillin therapy, were included. Serum concentrations of amoxicillin were measured during CI on days 1 and 3 in the steady state. Twenty-two serum samples of 11 patients were collected. All patients reached and retained serum concentrations of amoxicillin within the therapeutic range without exceeding the toxic concentration (serum concentrations on day 1 mean 55.4 mg/l, range 30.9-69.5, SD 10.5, and on day 3 48.8 mg/l, range 25.5-92.4, SD 18.4). There was no significant decrease in concentration from day 1 to day 3 (p = 0.38). This study showed therapeutic, nontoxic concentrations of amoxicillin in neonates on CI of amoxicillin in the first 3 days of life. Randomized controlled trials should reveal whether the clinical benefits of the CI of amoxicillin exceed those of ID regimens.

  8. Food image-induced brain activation is not diminished by insulin infusion

    PubMed Central

    Belfort-DeAguiar, Renata; Seo, Dongju; Naik, Sarita; Hwang, Janice; Lacadie, Cheryl; Schmidt, Christian; Constable, R. Todd; Sinha, Rajita; Sherwin, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Background/Objective The obesity epidemic appears to be driven in large part by our modern environment inundated by food cues, which may influence our desire to eat. While insulin decreases food intake in both animals and humans, the effect of insulin on motivation for food in the presence of food cues is not known. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of an intravenous insulin infusion on the brain response to visual food cues, hunger and food craving in non-obese human subjects. Subjects/Methods Thirty-four right-handed healthy non-obese subjects (19F/15M, age: 29±8 yrs.; BMI: 23.1±2.1 kg/m2) were divided in two groups matched by age, and BMI: the Insulin Group (18 subjects) underwent a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic-clamp, and the control group (16 subjects) received an intravenous saline infusion, while viewing high and low-calorie food and non-food pictures during a functional MRI scan. Motivation for food was determined via analogue scales for hunger, wanting and liking ratings. Results Food images induced brain responses in the hypothalamus, striatum, amygdala, insula, ventromedial prefrontal cortex (PFC), dorsolateral PFC, and occipital lobe (whole brain correction, P<0.05). Wanting (P<0.001) and liking (P<0.001) ratings were significantly higher for the food than the non-food images, but not different between insulin and saline infusion groups. Hunger ratings increased throughout the MRI scan and correlated with preference for high-calorie food pictures (r=0.70; P<0.001). However neither brain activity nor food craving were affected by hyperinsulinemia or hormonal status (leptin and ghrelin levels) (P=NS). Conclusion Our data demonstrate that visual food cues induce a strong response in motivation/reward and cognitive-executive control brain regions in non-obese subjects, but that these responses are not diminished by hyperinsulinemia per se. These findings suggest that our modern food cue saturated environment may be sufficient to

  9. Use of a two-stage insulin infusion study to assess the relationship between insulin suppression of lipolysis and insulin-mediated glucose uptake in overweight/obese, nondiabetic women.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Tracey; Yee, Gail; Glassford, Alec; Lamendola, Cindy; Reaven, Gerald

    2011-12-01

    Differences in insulin regulation of free fatty acids (FFAs) are not readily apparent at the same insulin concentrations used to differentiate relative insulin-mediated glucose disposal. Resistance to insulin-mediated glucose disposal and higher daylong FFA concentrations occur more commonly in obese individuals. However, the relationship between the ability of insulin to suppress FFA release from adipose tissue and stimulate glucose disposal in muscle has not been clearly defined in this population. The current study was initiated to test the hypothesis that these 2 facets of insulin action are related, with greater defects in insulin-mediated glucose disposal associated with less effective insulin inhibition of FFA release from adipose tissue. Subjects included 56 healthy nondiabetic overweight/moderately obese women classified as insulin resistant or insulin sensitive based on whole-body glucose disposal. All underwent a modified 240-minute 2-stage insulin infusion with basal (∼15 µU/mL) and physiologically elevated (∼80 µU/mL) steady-state insulin concentrations. Plasma glucose, insulin, FFA, and glycerol were measured throughout. Whereas plasma glucose differed most during physiological hyperinsulinemia in insulin-resistant vs insulin-sensitive subjects, plasma FFA/glycerol differed most during basal insulin concentrations. The FFA concentrations during the basal insulin steady state correlated highly (r = 0.85, P < .001) with glucose concentrations during the hyperinsulinemic steady state. Overweight/moderately obese women exhibit dramatic differences in the ability of insulin to suppress plasma FFA, which correlate highly with differences in insulin-mediated glucose disposal. Variability in insulin regulation of FFA is most apparent at basal insulin concentrations, whereas differences in glucose disposal are most apparent during physiologic hyperinsulinemia. Both can be quantified using a simple 2-stage insulin infusion study, with first-stage FFA

  10. Chronic central leptin infusion modulates the glycemia response to insulin administration in male rats through regulation of hepatic glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Burgos-Ramos, Emma; Canelles, Sandra; Rodríguez, Amaia; Gómez-Ambrosi, Javier; Frago, Laura M; Chowen, Julie A; Frühbeck, Gema; Argente, Jesús; Barrios, Vicente

    2015-11-05

    Leptin and insulin use overlapping signaling mechanisms to modify hepatic glucose metabolism, which is critical in maintaining normal glycemia. We examined the effect of an increase in central leptin and insulin on hepatic glucose metabolism and its influence on serum glucose levels. Chronic leptin infusion increased serum leptin and reduced hepatic SH-phosphotyrosine phosphatase 1, the association of suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 to the insulin receptor in liver and the rise in glycemia induced by central insulin. Leptin also decreased hepatic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase levels and increased insulin's ability to phosphorylate insulin receptor substrate-1, Akt and glycogen synthase kinase on Ser9 and to stimulate glucose transporter 2 and glycogen levels. Peripheral leptin treatment reproduced some of these changes, but to a lesser extent. Our data indicate that leptin increases the hepatic response to a rise in insulin, suggesting that pharmacological manipulation of leptin targets may be of interest for controlling glycemia.

  11. Continuous infusion of piperacillin/tazobactam in patients with severe infections: A possible pharmacokinetic optimisation?

    PubMed

    Attivi, D; Gibaud, S

    2014-05-01

    Piperacillin/Tazobactam is a time-dependent antimicrobial combination (beta-lactam/beta-lactamase inhibitor) commonly used in the treatment of severe Gram-negative infections. The optimisation of its time-dependent bactericidal activity via continuous infusion could improve clinical outcomes. Several studies have been realized on the relevance of a continuous infusion, but, to date, no definitive position can be adopted on the matter and a well-designed randomized controlled trial is warranted. In other articles, continuous infusion regimens are also more cost efficient. This article is an update, including the most recent trials about this subject.

  12. Integrated insulin pump therapy with continuous glucose monitoring for improved adherence: technology update.

    PubMed

    Tumminia, Andrea; Sciacca, Laura; Frittitta, Lucia; Squatrito, Sebastiano; Vigneri, Riccardo; Le Moli, Rosario; Tomaselli, Letizia

    2015-01-01

    Insulin pump therapy combined with real-time continuous glucose monitoring, known as sensor-augmented pump (SAP) therapy, has been shown to improve metabolic control and to reduce the rate of hypoglycemia in adults with type 1 diabetes compared to multiple daily injections or standard continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion. Glycemic variability is also reduced in patients on SAP therapy. This approach allows patients to monitor their glucose levels being informed of glycemic concentration and trend. Trained diabetic patients, therefore, can appropriately modify insulin infusion and/or carbohydrate intake in order to prevent hypo- or hyperglycemia. For these reasons, SAP therapy is now considered the gold standard for type 1 diabetes treatment. To be clinically effective, however, devices and techniques using advanced technology should not only have the potential to theoretically ameliorate metabolic control, but also be well accepted by patients in terms of satisfaction and health-related quality of life, because these factors will improve treatment adherence and consequently overall outcome. SAP therapy is generally well tolerated by patients; however, many clinical trials have identified significant noncompliance in the use of this device, most notably in the pediatric and adolescent populations. In this review we aim to analyze the main reasons for good or poor adherence to SAP therapy and to provide useful tips in order to fully benefit from this kind of novel therapeutic approach.

  13. Bolus versus continuous infusion of microbubble contrast agent for liver US: initial experience.

    PubMed

    Okada, Masahiro; Hoffmann, Christian W; Wolf, Karl J; Albrecht, Thomas

    2005-12-01

    Institutional review board approval and informed consent were obtained. To prospectively assess if continuous infusion of galactose-palmitic acid can prolong the duration of hepatic enhancement at ultrasonography over bolus injection, 11 patients received two injections--one bolus injection (2 mL/sec) and one continuous infusion (1.5 mL/min)--with the same dose of galactose-palmitic acid (4 g, 300 mg/dL). Two unenhanced baseline sweep scans (mechanical index of 0.7 and 1.3) of the relevant liver lobe were acquired followed by contrast-enhanced sweeps after bolus injection and continuous infusion. Each sweep was saved as cine loops and analyzed with a personal computer. Duration of enhancement more than 3 dB was prolonged by continuous infusion from 4.3 minutes +/- 2.4 (+/-standard deviation) at bolus injection to 10.1 minutes +/- 3.0 (P < .005). Maximal parenchymal enhancement was 11.0 dB +/- 3.2 (bolus injection) and 9.2 dB +/- 3.8 (infusion, P < .05). Peak liver-to-lesion contrast was 14.2 dB +/- 6.3 (bolus injection) and 13.2 dB +/- 7.1 (infusion, not significant). Continuous infusion of galactose-palmitic acid markedly prolongs but slightly diminishes hepatic enhancement; liver-to-lesion contrast remains unchanged.

  14. Therapeutic Drug Monitoring of Continuous Infusion Doripenem in a Pediatric Patient on Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Wayne S.; Conley, Susan B.; Shea, Paul; Enache, Adela; Chopra, Arun

    2017-01-01

    An 11-year-old African American male with severe combined immunodeficiency variant, non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis, pancreatic insufficiency, chronic mycobacterium avium-intracellulare infection, chronic sinusitis, and malnutrition presented with a 1-week history of fevers. He subsequently developed respiratory decompensation and cefepime was discontinued and doripenem was initiated. Doripenem was the carbapenem used due to a national shortage of meropenem. By day 7 the patient (24.7 kg) had a positive fluid balance of 6925 mL (28% FO), and on days 7 into 8 developed acute kidney injury evidenced by an elevated serum creatinine of 0.68 mg/dL, an increase from the baseline of 0.28 mg/dL. On day 9, the patient was initiated on continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) and the doripenem dosing was changed to a continuous infusion of 2.5 mg/kg/hr (60 mg/kg/day). Approximately 12.5 hours after the start of the doripenem a serum concentration was obtained, which was 4.01 mg/L corresponding to a clearance of 10.5 mL/min/kg. The pediatric dosing and pharmacokinetic data available for doripenem suggest a clearance estimate of 4.4 to 4.8 mL/min/kg, and the adult clearance estimate is 2.4 to 3.78 mL/min/kg. The calculated clearance in our patient of 10.5 mL/min/kg is over double the highest clearance estimate in the pediatric literature. This case demonstrates that doripenem clearance is significantly increased with CRRT in comparison with the published pediatric and adult data. An appropriate pharmacodynamic outcome (time that free drug concentration > minimum inhibitory concentration) can be achieved by continuous infusion doripenem with concurrent therapeutic drug monitoring.

  15. Use of Continuous Infusion Pumps During Radiation Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Bak, Kate; Gutierrez, Eric; Lockhart, Elizabeth; Sharpe, Michael; Green, Esther; Costa, Sarah; Hertz, Sherrie; Kaizer, Leonard; Whitton, Anthtony; Warde, Padraig

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Despite increasing chemoradiotherapy treatment, there is a paucity of information regarding the effects of radiation exposure on ambulatory infusion pumps used to deliver chemotherapy or other essential medications. The aim of this overview is to present the available evidence on this subject, heighten awareness within the clinical community, provide considerations for minimizing possible negative effects on patient care, and encourage the monitoring of infusion devices after exposure to radiation or electromagnetic interference. Methods: Published literature was systematically searched using MEDLINE and EMBASE; gray literature was searched using Google and an environmental scan of relevant Web sites. A multidisciplinary working group reviewed the compiled evidence, and a draft of the document was sent to health professionals from various disciplines for an external review. Results: Four reports and three manufacturer device alerts were identified that suggest a risk of pump malfunction as a result of radiation exposure. The estimated cumulative dose at which pump failure has been reported ranges from 28.5 to 42 Gy; however, additional clinical investigations should be undertaken. Pump relocation, pump shielding, and assessment of the pump after radiation exposure are most commonly suggested to minimize pump malfunction related to radiation exposure. A list of additional considerations is offered for those developing institution specific policies and procedures based on the available evidence and expert consensus. Conclusion: The varied and unpredictable results of radiation exposure on infusion devices suggest that additional testing should be carried out to determine the limits of dose exposure and to raise awareness around this patient safety issue. PMID:23814520

  16. Effect of intravenous infusion of recombinant ovine leptin on feed intake and serum concentrations of GH, LH, insulin, IGF-1, cortisol, and thyroxine in growing prepubertal ewe lambs.

    PubMed

    Morrison, C D; Wood, R; McFadin, E L; Whitley, N C; Keisler, D H

    2002-04-01

    In sheep, serum concentrations of leptin change congruently with increases or decreases in nutritional status, while intracerebroventricular infusions of leptin dramatically suppress feed intake in well-fed lambs, and may also increase growth hormone (GH), and/or luteinizing hormone (LH) in undernourished lambs. The objective of the present study was to determine the effects of peripherally delivered ovine leptin, via intravenous infusions, on feed intake and serum concentrations of GH, LH, insulin, IGF-1, cortisol, and thyroxine. Twelve ewe lambs weighing 29.4 +/- 0.7 kg were infused intravenously with a linearly increasing dose of leptin or saline (n = 6 per group) for 10 days, reaching a maximum dose delivered of 0.5mg/h on day 10. Feed intake was assessed twice daily, and blood samples were collected every 10 min for 6 h on days 0, 2, 5, 8, and 10. Serum concentrations of leptin increased in leptin-treated lambs by day 2 (P = 0.05), and continued to increase to concentrations 9-fold greater than saline-infused lambs by day 10 (P < 0.001). Despite the substantial increase in serum leptin, feed intake did not differ between leptin and saline-infused lambs except on day 3.5 (P = 0.01). Furthermore, intravenous infusions of leptin did not significantly influence serum concentrations of insulin, cortisol, IGF-1, thyroxine, LH, or GH. Collectively, these observations contrast with the potent hypophagic effects of leptin when delivered intracerebroventricularly into well-fed lambs. The reasons for the disparate response of lambs treated intravenously with leptin, versus that reported for lambs treated intracerebroventricularly with leptin are not known, but may provide insight into the mechanism(s) of leptin resistance.

  17. Pilot experience with continuous infusion alemtuzumab in patients with fludarabine-refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Wierda, William G; LaPushin, Ruth; O'Brien, Susan M; Faderl, Stefan; Browning, Mary L; Keating, Michael J

    2008-04-01

    We evaluated the activity and tolerability of alemtuzumab given as a continuous infusion for 7 d followed by subcutaneous administration for 11 wk as salvage therapy for 10 patients with fludarabine-refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia. The continuous infusion of alemtuzumab was well tolerated. The typical infusion reaction seen with intravenous alemtuzumab was abolished. Two patients achieved a partial response with an overall response rate of 20%. Alemtuzumab levels were measured in four patients and detectable levels were obtained in three. Clinical activity needs to be confirmed in a larger patient population.

  18. Use of Continuous Infusion Hydralazine in a Pediatric Patient on Mechanical Circulatory Support

    PubMed Central

    Dillman, Nicholas O.; Anders, Marc M.

    2016-01-01

    Hydralazine is a direct peripheral arterial vasodilator used for acute hypertension. Usually administered as a bolus dose, continuous infusion has been described during pregnancy for preeclampsia and eclampsia and in limited reports in cardiac surgeries for afterload reduction. This case describes the use of continuous infusion hydralazine for afterload reduction in an infant receiving extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) post–cardiac surgery. Postsurgery, the patient's mean arterial pressures (MAPs) could not be controlled despite escalating doses of vasodilatory medications including nitroprusside, nicardipine, and milrinone; hence, continuous infusion hydralazine was initiated. Although the initiation of a hydralazine infusion produced a decrease in MAP, the response was unsustainable. This case highlights an alternative method for managing systemic vascular resistance and cardiac output to allow for myocardial recovery after cardiac surgery and use of extracorporeal support. At the time of this writing, this is the first published case describing hydralazine administration via continuous infusion in pediatric patients. The use of continuous infusion hydralazine for afterload reduction provided a brief, non-sustained reduction in MAP in a post–cardiac surgery infant managed on ECMO support. PMID:27453704

  19. Use of Continuous Infusion Hydralazine in a Pediatric Patient on Mechanical Circulatory Support.

    PubMed

    Dillman, Nicholas O; Anders, Marc M; Moffett, Brady S

    2016-01-01

    Hydralazine is a direct peripheral arterial vasodilator used for acute hypertension. Usually administered as a bolus dose, continuous infusion has been described during pregnancy for preeclampsia and eclampsia and in limited reports in cardiac surgeries for afterload reduction. This case describes the use of continuous infusion hydralazine for afterload reduction in an infant receiving extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) post-cardiac surgery. Postsurgery, the patient's mean arterial pressures (MAPs) could not be controlled despite escalating doses of vasodilatory medications including nitroprusside, nicardipine, and milrinone; hence, continuous infusion hydralazine was initiated. Although the initiation of a hydralazine infusion produced a decrease in MAP, the response was unsustainable. This case highlights an alternative method for managing systemic vascular resistance and cardiac output to allow for myocardial recovery after cardiac surgery and use of extracorporeal support. At the time of this writing, this is the first published case describing hydralazine administration via continuous infusion in pediatric patients. The use of continuous infusion hydralazine for afterload reduction provided a brief, non-sustained reduction in MAP in a post-cardiac surgery infant managed on ECMO support.

  20. Low-dose continuous infusion of factor VIII in patients with haemophilia A

    PubMed Central

    Prelog, Tomaž; Dolničar, Majda Benedik; Kitanovski, Lidija

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients with haemophilia A (HA) or B (HB) can be given prophylactic or on-demand treatment administered by continuous infusion or bolus injections of factor VIII (FVIII) or IX (FIX). In this study we evaluated the efficacy and safety of low-dose continuous infusion of FVIII or FIX. Material and methods We studied all eligible patients with HA or HB treated with continuous infusion of factor concentrates over an 18-year period in a single Slovenian Haemophilia Comprehensive Care Centre. Treatment started with a bolus injection of FVIII or FIX, followed by continuous infusion at the initial rate of 2 IU/kg/h of FVIII in HA patients and 4.5 IU/kg/h of FIX in HB patients. The infusion rate was subsequently adjusted according to the indication for therapy. Results A total of 66 continuous infusions (40 in major surgery, 10 in minor surgery and 16 with bleeding episode) in 46 HA patients and 16 (15 in severe and 1 in mild HA) in eight HB patients were included in the study. During the first week of treatment, the median continuous infusion rates in HA patients undergoing major surgery, minor surgery and a bleeding event were 2.18 (0.75–3.68), 1.48 (1.0–2.54) and 2.24 (1.33–3.93) IU/kg/h, respectively. The median FVIII activities were 0.69 (0.37–1.19), 0.47 (0.39–0.84) and 0.52 (0.36–1.06) IU/mL. After the first week of treatment, even lower doses of FVIII were needed. Red blood cell transfusions had to be administered to three patients (2 with severe and 1 with moderate HA) during the continuous infusion and inhibitors developed in five patients. In HB patients, the median continuous infusion rate was 1.85 (1.07–2.94) IU/kg/h and the median FIX activity was 0.62 (0.30–1.04) IU/mL. Red blood cell transfusions were not required, and thrombophlebitis and inhibitors did not appear. Discussion Overall, low-dose continuous infusion was shown to be an effective and safe way of treating patients with HA. The protocol used also proved efficient and

  1. Acute hypoglycemic, hypocholesterolemic and hypotriglyceridemic effects of continuous intravenous infusion of a lyophilised aqueous extract of Ajuga iva L. Schreber whole plant in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    El-Hilaly, Jaouad; Tahraoui, Adil; Israili, Zafar H; Lyoussi, Badiâa

    2007-10-01

    The hypoglycemic and hypolipidemic effect of continuous intravenous infusion of a lyophilised aqueous extract of the whole plant Ajuga iva (L.) Schreber (Labiatae) (AI-extract) was investigated in anesthetized normal and streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. The AI-extract was administered to a group of rats by continuous intravenous infusion for 4 h at a dose of 4.2 microg/min/100 g body weight; another group was infused with taurine, the reference compound, at the same dose. In normal rats, AI-extract infusion had no effect on plasma glucose or triglycerides, but plasma cholesterol levels were significantly decreased (22%; P<0.05). However, taurine infusion produced significant hypoglycemic, hypocholesterolemic and hypotriglyceridemic effects (all changes, P<0.05). In STZ-diabetic rats, AI-extract infusion reduced plasma levels of glucose by 24 % (P<0.05), cholesterol by 35% (P<0.01) and triglycerides by 13% (P<0.05). Infusion with taurine produced a greater fall in plasma glucose (72%, P<0.01), cholesterol (54%; P<0.001) and triglyceride (24%; P<0.001) levels. Our results indicate that intravenously administered AI-extract exerts hypoglycemic and hypolipidemic effects in diabetic rats by mechanism(s) which appear to be similar to that of taurine, which involve insulin sensitization or an insulin-like effect. The identity and the exact mechanism(s) of action of the active component(s) of the AI-extract are not known. Ajuga iva appears to be a useful plant in the therapy of diabetes, a condition in which hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia coexist quite often.

  2. Combined Pioglitazone and Metformin Treatment Maintains the Beneficial Effect of Short-Term Insulin Infusion in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes: Results from a Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Musholt, Petra B.; Schöndorf, Thomas; Pfützner, Andreas; Hohberg, Cloth; Kleine, Iris; Fuchs, Winfried; Hehenwarter, Silvia; Dikta, Gerhard; Kerschgens, Benedikt; Forst, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Background The aim of our study was to examine the efficacy of short-term intravenous insulin intervention followed by oral pioglitazone/metformin therapy to prevent patients from continuous insulin application. Methods This prospective, open-label, 4-month pilot study comprised of 14 diabetes patients (5 female, 9 male; age 60 ± 2 years; body mass index 29 ± 3.2 kg/m2; hemoglobin A1c [HbA1c] 7.6 ± 1.1%) with (1) insufficient glycemic control under a dose of metformin ≥1700 mg/day and/or metformin plus additional oral antidiabetes drugs (OADs) and (2) appropriate residual β-cell function. Initially, an inpatient 34 h continuous intravenous insulin infusion was performed, and metformin was given (2x 850 mg/day). Insulin was stopped, and pioglitazone 30 mg/day was added at the second inpatient day. Patients were followed for four months. Efficacy parameters [change of HbA1c, fasting blood glucose [FBG], intact proinsulin, adiponectin, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP)] were assessed after initial normalization of blood glucose values by intravenous insulin and at the study end point. Results During the acute insulin intervention, FBG levels were stabilized in all study subjects. In the following OAD treatment period, five patients showed an improvement of HbA1c > 0.5% [35.7%; seven patients remained stable (50.0%), two patients were nonresponders (14.3%)]. Fasting glucose values dropped after insulin infusion (-17.7%; p < .001). This effect was maintained during the consecutive OAD treatment period (glucose +0.3%, not significant (NS); HbA1c -6.0%; p < .05). The initial decrease in fasting intact proinsulin levels was also maintained during the study (end value -41%, p < .05). Improvements in hsCRP values (postinsulin value, -15%, NS; end value -37%; p < .05) and adiponectin values (postinsulin value +15%, NS; end value +128%; p < .001) were demonstrated at end point only after continued glitazone intake. Conclusions Our pilot study demonstrated

  3. Performance and acceptability of a combined device for insulin infusion and glucose sensing in the home setting.

    PubMed

    Nørgaard, Kirsten; Shin, John; Welsh, John B; Gjessing, Hans

    2015-03-01

    The use of sensor-augmented insulin pump (SAP) therapy is increasing. Currently, glucose sensors and insulin infusion cannulas are inserted separately. A new device, MiniMed Duo, combines sensing and infusion capabilities on the same platform and is intended to simplify device insertion and site management. We evaluated the device's performance with respect to insulin delivery and glucose sensing, and its acceptability with patients. Forty-five patients (mean ± SD age, 45.5 ± 10.9 years, 48% female) with type 1 diabetes and previous use of SAP participated. Each subject was to wear 5 devices connected to insulin pumps over 15 days (3 days/device) and test capillary blood glucose (SMBG) 7 times/day. The primary endpoint was the percentage of sensor-SMBG paired values within 20% of one another. Subject experiences were assessed via questionnaires. Overall, 74.8% of sensor-SMBG paired values were within 20%, meeting the primary accuracy endpoint, and the mean absolute relative difference was 15.5 ± 17.1%. Consensus error grid analysis showed that >95% of points were within the A+B zones, exceeding the threshold for adequate clinical accuracy. Insulin dosage and SMBG values did not change significantly compared to prestudy values. The functional survival of the device entering day 3 was 90.5%. There were no serious adverse events. Mean questionnaire results indicated overall satisfaction with the device. Duo provided insulin infusion and glucose sensing capabilities in a single device, which provided accurate glucose readings during routine use, was safe to wear, and was acceptable to most patients. It may improve satisfaction and convenience for patients using sensor-augmented insulin pumps.

  4. Deregulation of Hepatic Insulin Sensitivity Induced by Central Lipid Infusion in Rats Is Mediated by Nitric Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Marsollier, Nicolas; Kassis, Nadim; Mezghenna, Karima; Soty, Maud; Fioramonti, Xavier; Lacombe, Amélie; Joly, Aurélie; Pillot, Bruno; Zitoun, Carine; Vilar, José; Mithieux, Gilles; Gross, René; Lajoix, Anne-Dominique; Routh, Vanessa; Magnan, Christophe; Cruciani-Guglielmacci, Céline

    2009-01-01

    Background Deregulation of hypothalamic fatty acid sensing lead to hepatic insulin-resistance which may partly contribute to further impairment of glucose homeostasis. Methodology We investigated here whether hypothalamic nitric oxide (NO) could mediate deleterious peripheral effect of central lipid overload. Thus we infused rats for 24 hours into carotid artery towards brain, either with heparinized triglyceride emulsion (Intralipid, IL) or heparinized saline (control rats). Principal Findings Lipids infusion led to hepatic insulin-resistance partly related to a decreased parasympathetic activity in the liver assessed by an increased acetylcholinesterase activity. Hypothalamic nitric oxide synthases (NOS) activities were significantly increased in IL rats, as the catalytically active neuronal NOS (nNOS) dimers compared to controls. This was related to a decrease in expression of protein inhibitor of nNOS (PIN). Effect of IL infusion on deregulated hepatic insulin-sensitivity was reversed by carotid injection of non selective NOS inhibitor NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA) and also by a selective inhibitor of the nNOS isoform, 7-Nitro-Indazole (7-Ni). In addition, NO donor injection (L-arginine and SNP) within carotid in control rats mimicked lipid effects onto impaired hepatic insulin sensitivity. In parallel we showed that cultured VMH neurons produce NO in response to fatty acid (oleic acid). Conclusions/Significance We conclude that cerebral fatty acid overload induces an enhancement of nNOS activity within hypothalamus which is, at least in part, responsible fatty acid increased hepatic glucose production. PMID:19680547

  5. Continuous infusion of porcine factor VIII: stability, microbiological safety and clinical experience.

    PubMed

    DiMichele, D M; Gorman, P O; Kasper, C K; Mannucci, P M; Santagostino, E; Hay, C R M

    2002-01-01

    Porcine factor VIII (pFVIII) is an effective haemostatic treatment for bleeding in selected patients with FVIII inhibitors. Its use is sometimes associated with a transient fall in platelet count and transfusion reactions, the risk of which may be related to the rate of administration. Theoretical considerations suggest that the administration of pFVIII by continuous infusion should be effective, and could have pharmacokinetic advantages that lead to an improvement in the side-effect profile. The results of a retrospective survey of continuous infusion of pFVIII with respect to clinical safety and efficacy are reported. Porcine FVIII stability and microbiological studies are included. It is concluded that pFVIII given by continuous infusion is safe and effective. The risk of transfusion reactions and fall in platelet count appears to be reduced, compared with bolus administration. Stability studies showed that pFVIII activity declined at room temperature, most rapidly in the dilute solution (5-10 U mL(-1)). More concentrated mixtures showed acceptable stability for up to 24 h using a variety of infusion devices. Various concentrations of pFVIII did not support the growth of Escherichia coli or Staphylococcus aureus. These observations suggest that the porcine factor is suitable for continuous infusion (CI).

  6. A comparison of continuous infusion of vecuronium and atracurium in midline and paramedian laparotomies.

    PubMed

    Chaudhari, L S; Shetty, A N; Buddhi, M; Krishnan, G

    1999-01-01

    This was a study to compare continuous intravenous infusion of atracurium with continuous intravenous infusion of vecuronium for intraoperative muscle relaxation in 62 ASA I / II patients. Scheduled for laparotomies and pelvic surgeries under general anaesthesia. They were randomly allocated in two groups to receive either vecuronium infusion of 50 microg/kg/hour following a bolus dose of 0.1 microg/kg, or atracurium infusion of 400 microg/kg/hour following a bolus dose of 0.5 microg/kg. The mean infusion dose of atracurium was 478 +/- 44.11 microg/kg/hour and that of vecuronium was 63.2 +/- 74 microg/kg/hour for adequate muscle relaxation. The depth of neuromuscular blockade was monitored by using peripheral nerve stimulator so that only one twitch of train of four was present, resistance to ventilation, surgical relaxation and haemodynamic changes. Vecuronium infusions produced more haemodynamic stability than atracurium infusions. Vecuronium produced lesser change in systolic blood pressure (mean change of 3. 46 +/- 3.33%) from baseline values as compared to atracurium (mean change of 5.81 +/- 3.73%) from baseline values ( p < 0.01) which was statistically significant. The difference in mean pulse rate change from baseline value in the atracurium group (4.78 +/- 2.745%) was less than that in the vecuronium group (5.99 +/- 2.67%), which was not statistically significant. Spontaneous recovery was faster with vecuronium (540.94 +/- 76.46 seconds) as compared to atracurium (596. 33 +/- 72.48 seconds). 84.4% of patients who received vecuronium fell within good to very good category of muscle relaxation as compared to 63.3% in atracurium group. There were no cost benefits when either agents were used in infusion form.

  7. Radiofrequency Thermal Ablation: Increase in Lesion Diameter with Continuous Acetic Acid Infusion

    SciTech Connect

    Lubienski, Andreas Duex, Markus; Lubienski, Katrin; Grenacher, Lars; Kauffmann, Guenter

    2005-12-15

    Purpose. To evaluate the influence of continuous infusion of acetic acid 50% during radiofrequency ablation (RFA) on the size of the thermal lesion produced. Methods. Radiofrequency (RF) was applied to excised bovine liver by using an expandable needle electrode with 10 retractable tines (LeVeen Needle Electrode, RadioTherapeutics, Sunnyvale, CA) connected to a commercially available RF generator (RF 2000, RadioTherapeutics, Sunnyvale, CA). Experiments were performed using three different treatment modalities: RF only (n = 15), RF with continuous saline 0.9% infusion (n = 15), and RF with continuous acetic acid 50% infusion (n = 15). RF duration, power output, tissue impedance, and time to a rapid rise in impedance were recorded. The ablated lesions were evaluated both macroscopically and histologically. Results. The ablated lesions appeared as spherical or ellipsoid, well-demarcated pale areas with a surrounding brown rim with both RF only and RF plus saline 0.9% infusion. In contrast, thermolesions generated with RF in combination with acetic acid 50% infusion were irregular in shape and the central portion was jelly-like. Mean diameter of the coagulation necrosis was 22.3 {+-} 2.1 mm (RF only), 29.2 {+-} 4.8 mm (RF + saline 0.9%) and 30.7 {+-} 5.7 mm (RF + acetic acid 50%), with a significant increase in the RF plus saline 0.9% and RF plus acetic acid 50% groups compared with RF alone. Time to a rapid rise in impedance was significantly prolonged in the RF plus saline 0.9% and RF plus acetic acid 50% groups compared with RF alone. Conclusions. A combination of RF plus acetic acid 50% infusion is able to generate larger thermolesions than RF only or RF combined with saline 0.9% infusion.

  8. Analysis of 72-Hour Sterility of Common Pediatric Continuous Intravenous Infusions

    PubMed Central

    Piro, Christina C.; Davis, Jennifer; Frelix, Arlesia; Grisso, Alison G.; Sinclair-Pingel, Julie; Willingham, Harold; Wright, Lorianne; Potts, Amy L.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Patient morbidity and mortality associated with contaminated and improperly prepared sterile products has captured national attention. In response, both the United States Pharmacopeia (USP) and Centers for Disease Control (CDC) have published recommendations in an effort to minimize the risk of infection. While the CDC recommends that administration sets are not changed more frequently than every 72 hours, the USP recommends a maximum beyond use date of 48 hours. Neither organization provides specific guidance on expiration dating once the intravenous drug is dispensed. Likewise, neither addresses the length of time that a bag containing medication for continuous infusion may hang once administration to the patient has begun. We evaluated the sterility of medications that are commonly administered by continuous infusion to pediatric patients. Because frequent manipulation of infusion and administration sets may predispose the patient to adverse events, we evaluated sterility for extended beyond use dating up to 72 hours. METHODS Thirty-five common intravenous (IV) continuous infusions using 94 standard concentrations and diluents were identified. IV solutions were mixed using sterile technique in the laminar flow hood in accordance with USP guidelines. Medications were excluded for short stability, short durations of use or high cost. A sample from each solution was tested for contamination or bacterial growth at 72 hours. Any visible discoloration suggesting physical instability was also evaluated. RESULTS None of the syringes or chambers resulted in contamination, bacterial growth or discoloration after 72 hours. CONCLUSIONS This study provides sufficient data that these compounded sterile products may be stored using a beyond use date up to 72 hours for a number of commonly used continuous IV infusions in pediatric patients. In our institution, this allows for a more convenient and consistent change of both administration sets and continuous infusions

  9. A mathematical model describing the glycemic response of diabetic patients to meal and i.v. infusion of insulin.

    PubMed

    Fabietti, P G; Calabrese, G; Iorio, M; Bistoni, S; Brunetti, P; Sarti, E; Benedetti, M M

    2001-10-01

    Nine type 1 diabetic patients were studied for 24 hours. During this period they were given three calibrated meals. The glycemia was feedback-controlled by means of an artificial pancreas. The blood concentration of glucose and the infusion speed of the insulin were measured every minute. The experimental data referring to each of the three meals were used to estimate the parameters of a mathematical model suitable for describing the glycemic response of diabetic patients at meals and at the i.v. infusion of exogenous insulin. From the estimate a marked dispersion of the parameters was found, both interindividual and intraindividual. Nevertheless the models thus obtained seem to be usable for the synthesis of a feedback controller, especially in view of creating a portable artificial pancreas that now seems possible owing to the realization (so far experimental) of sufficiently reliable glucose concentration sensors.

  10. Vancomycin-associated nephrotoxicity: A meta-analysis of administration by continuous versus intermittent infusion.

    PubMed

    Hanrahan, Timothy; Whitehouse, Tony; Lipman, Jeffrey; Roberts, Jason A

    2015-09-01

    Vancomycin is a glycopeptide antibiotic widely used in the management of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Guidelines currently recommend vancomycin be administered by intermittent infusion, despite recent research suggesting that continuous infusion (CI) may be associated with lower rates of vancomycin-associated nephrotoxicity. In 2012, Cataldo et al. presented a meta-analysis supporting the use of CI. Here we present an updated meta-analysis, inclusive of a recently published large-scale retrospective study. PubMed, EMBASE and Cochrane Reviews databases were searched using the keywords 'vancomycin' and 'continuous' or 'intermittent' or 'infusion' or 'discontinuous' or 'administration'. Seven studies were included in the final analysis. Using a random-effects model, a non-significant trend of reduced nephrotoxicity in those who received vancomycin by CI (risk ratio=0.799, 95% confidence interval 0.523-1.220; P=0.299) was identified. A large, randomised controlled trial is necessary to confirm these results.

  11. Circulating leptin response to feeding and exogenous infusion of insulin in sheep exposed to thermoneutral and cold environments.

    PubMed

    Asakuma, S; Morishita, H; Sugino, T; Kurose, Y; Kobayashi, S; Terashima, Y

    2003-02-01

    Leptin has been shown to regulate feed intake and energy expenditure. Insulin stimulates leptin secretion in rodents, but its action on leptin secretion is still obscure in ruminants. If insulin stimulates leptin secretion in ruminants, circulating leptin concentrations may change during exposure to cold, because of fluctuating insulin secretion and action in the cold environment. The present experiment was designed to determine whether feeding or exogenous administration of insulin affects circulating leptin levels in sheep exposed to thermoneutral and cold environments. Suffolk rams that were shorn and fed a diet once daily were subjected to a thermoneutral (20 degrees C) or cold (0 degrees C) environment for at least 1 week. Overall mean concentrations of plasma leptin in the feeding experiment were lower (P<0.05) in the cold environment than in the thermoneutral environment. Plasma leptin levels remained relatively unchanged after feeding in both environments, though plasma insulin response to feeding in both environments increased (P<0.01). The euglycemic clamps (insulin infusion rate: 4 mUkgBW(-1)min(-1) for 2 h) increased (P<0.01) circulating leptin concentrations in the thermoneutral, but not in the cold environment. These results suggest that lower circulating leptin levels in ruminants exposed to the cold environment could be partly due to the depressed insulin action on leptin secretion.

  12. [A Case of HPN, In Which QOL Improvement Was Achieved by Combining Continuous Infusion with Once-Weekly Intermittent Infusion - Contribution of Pharmacists to Health Promotion among Home Patients Receiving Infusion Therapy].

    PubMed

    Takeda, Namihiro; Hamana, Tomoko; Oka, Toyoka; Hirohara, Masayoshi; Kushida, Kazuki

    2016-12-01

    Patients receiving parenteral nutrition at home have the following two options: 24-h continuous or intermittent infusion. To date, for patients with impaired glucose tolerance and/or other metabolic disorders or for those with decreased cardiac/ pulmonary/renal function, it is desirable to opt for continuous infusion to minimize the variance in the body's metabolic rate as much as possible. Furthermore, it should be noted that continuous infusion evokes a stronger feeling among patients of being constrained because it restricts their everyday activities. This case witnesses collaborations among the patient's doctor, dispensary's pharmacy, and patient's family. Because ofthe use ofintermittent infusion more or less once per week in addition to continuous infusion, significant improvement in quality of life was achieved, and the patient was able to enjoy taking a short trip. To assist a home patient receiving infusion therapy, it is essential that the pharmacist be equipped with skills to manage risks associated with infusion therapy and have knowledge about insurance to cover incidents concerning infusion fluids or medical materials. It will certainly depend on the degree ofindependence ofpatients and the level ofcare their families can provide; however, should we manage to use a similar medical procedure in at least a few cases in the future, we may be able to contribute to "joie de vivre" in home patients receiving infusion therapy.

  13. Effects of insulin infusion on glucose homeostasis and glucose metabolism in rainbow trout fed a high-carbohydrate diet.

    PubMed

    Polakof, S; Moon, T W; Aguirre, P; Skiba-Cassy, S; Panserat, S

    2010-12-15

    The origin for the poor glucose utilization in carnivorous fish species fed high carbohydrate diets remains under debate. In the present study, we have fed rainbow trout a diet containing 30% carbohydrate for 1 or 5 days. In both cases, fish were implanted with mini-osmotic pumps releasing 0.7 i.u. kg(-1) day(-1) bovine insulin, and mRNA transcripts and the protein phosphorylation status of proteins controlling glycemia and glucose-related metabolism were studied in fish killed 6 h after the last meal. We demonstrate that when the exposure occurs over a short term (30 h), insulin exerts beneficial actions on trout glucose homeostasis, including a lowered glycemia and increased hepatic lipogenic and glycogenic potentials. However, when trout were fed for 5 days, these beneficial actions of insulin infusion were no longer observed. Thus, the increased lipogenic potential observed after one single meal was not present, and this together with the increased glycogenesis and the decreased glucose exported to the blood from the liver explains the lack of hypoglycemic action of insulin. The fact that insulin improved glucose homeostasis when administrated over a short time period implies that endogenous insulin secretion is inadequate in trout to deal with this amount of dietary carbohydrates. Moreover, the fact that a longer exposure to insulin resulted in a reduced response indicates that the rainbow trout is sensitive to insulin, re-enforcing the hypothesis that the hyperglycemia observed following a high carbohydrate meal is an insulin secretion issue rather an insulin action issue.

  14. The Effect of Insulin Infusion on the Metabolites in Cerebral Tissues Assessed With Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy in Young Healthy Subjects With High and Low Insulin Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Karczewska-Kupczewska, Monika; Tarasów, Eugeniusz; Nikołajuk, Agnieszka; Stefanowicz, Magdalena; Matulewicz, Natalia; Otziomek, Elżbieta; Górska, Maria; Strączkowski, Marek; Kowalska, Irina

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Insulin may play important roles in brain metabolism. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) of the central nervous system gives information on neuronal viability, cellular energy, and membrane status. To elucidate the specific role of insulin action in the brain, we estimated neurometabolites with 1H-MRS and assessed their regulation by insulin infusion and their relationship with insulin sensitivity. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We studied 16 healthy young men. 1H-MRS was performed at baseline and after 240 min of euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp. Voxels were positioned in the left frontal lobe, left temporal lobe, and left thalamus. The ratios of N-acetylaspartate (NAA), choline-containing compounds (Cho), myo-inositol, and glutamate/glutamine/γ-aminobutyric acid complex (Glx) to creatine (Cr) and nonsuppressed water signal were determined. The participants were divided into subgroups of high (high IS) and low (low IS) insulin sensitivity. RESULTS Baseline neurometabolic substrates were not different between the groups. Insulin infusion resulted in an increase in frontal NAA/Cr and NAA/H2O and frontal and temporal Glx/Cr and Glx/H2O and a decrease in frontal Cho/Cr and temporal Cho/H2O and myo-inositol/H2O (all P < 0.05, except temporal Glx/H2O, P = 0.054, NS) in the high-IS, but not in the low-IS, group. Insulin sensitivity correlated positively with frontal NAA/Cr and NAA/H2O and temporal Glx/H2O and negatively with temporal myo-inositol/Cr and myo-inositol/H2O assessed during the second 1H-MRS (all P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS Insulin might influence cerebral metabolites, and this action is impaired in subjects with low whole-body insulin sensitivity. Thus, our results provide a potential link between insulin resistance and altered metabolism of the central nervous system. PMID:23596182

  15. Vascular Access System for Continuous Arterial Infusion of a Protease Inhibitor in Acute Necrotizing Pancreatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Ganaha, Fumikiyo; Yamada, Tetsuhisa; Yorozu, Naoya; Ujita, Masuo; Irie, Takeo; Fukuda, Yasushi; Fukuda, Kunihiko; Tada, Shimpei

    1999-09-15

    We used a vascular access system (VAS) for continuous arterial infusion (CAI) of a protease inhibitor in two patients with acute necrotizing pancreatitis. The infusion catheter was placed into the dorsal pancreatic artery in the first patient and into the gastroduodenal artery in the second, via a femoral artery approach. An implantable port was then connected to the catheter and was secured in a subcutaneous pocket prepared in the right lower abdomen. No complications related to the VAS were encountered. This system provided safe and uncontaminated vascular access for successful CAI for acute pancreatitis.

  16. Phase I trial of 96-hour continuous infusion of dexrazoxane in patients with advanced malignancies.

    PubMed

    Tetef, M L; Synold, T W; Chow, W; Leong, L; Margolin, K; Morgan, R; Raschko, J; Shibata, S; Somlo, G; Yen, Y; Groshen, S; Johnson, K; Lenz, H J; Gandara, D; Doroshow, J H

    2001-06-01

    Dexrazoxane is a bidentate chelator of divalent cations. Pretreatment with short infusions of dexrazoxane prior to bolus doxorubicin has been shown to lessen the incidence and severity of anthracycline-associated cardiac toxicity. However, because of rapid, diffusion-mediated cellular uptake and the short plasma half-life of dexrazoxane, combined with prolonged cellular retention of doxorubicin, dexrazoxane may be more effective when administered as a continuous infusion. Thus, a Phase I pharmacokinetic trial of a 96-h infusion of dexrazoxane was performed. Dexrazoxane doses were escalated in cohorts of 3 to 6 patients per dose level. All patients received granulocyte-colony stimulating factor at a dose of 5 microg/kg/day starting 24 h after completion of the dexrazoxane infusion. Plasma samples were collected and analyzed for dexrazoxane by high-performance liquid chromatography. Urine collections were performed at baseline and during the infusion to determine the renal clearance of dexrazoxane and the excretion rate of divalent cations. Twenty-two patients were enrolled at doses ranging from 125 to 250 mg/m(2)/day. Grade 3 and 4 toxicities included grade 4 thrombocytopenia in 2 patients treated at 250 mg/m(2)/day, grade 3 thrombocytopenia and grade 4 nausea and vomiting in 1 patient treated at 221 mg/m(2)/day, grade 4 diarrhea and grade 3 nausea and vomiting in 1 patient treated at 221 mg/m(2)/day, and grade 3 hypertension in 1 patient treated at 166.25 mg/m(2)/day. Steady-state dexrazoxane levels ranged from 496 microg/l (2.2 microM) to 1639 microg/l (7.4 microM). Dexrazoxane plasma CL(ss) and elimination t(1/2) were 7.2 +/- 1.6 l/h/m(2) and 2.0 +/- 0.8 h, respectively. The mean percentage of administered dexrazoxane recovered in the urine at steady state was 30% (range, 10-66%). Urinary iron and zinc excretion during the dexrazoxane infusion increased in 12 of 18 and 19 of 19 patients by a median of 3.7- and 2.4-fold, respectively. These results suggest that

  17. Continuous subcutaneous infusion of lidocaine for persistent hiccup in advanced cancer.

    PubMed

    Kaneishi, Keisuke; Kawabata, Masahiro

    2013-03-01

    Persistent hiccup can cause anorexia, weight loss, disabling sleep deprivation, anxiety, and depression. Therefore, relief of persistent hiccup is important for advanced cancer patients and their family. Most reports on this condition are case series reports advocating the use of baclofen, haloperidol, gabapentin, and midazolam. However, these medications are occasionally ineffective or accompanied by intolerable side effects. The sodium channel blocker lidocaine has been shown to be effective in treating a variety of disorders thought to involve neuropathic mechanisms. Intravenous administration of lidocaine is common but efficacy has also been reported for subcutaneous infusion. In advanced cancer patients, subcutaneous infusion is easy, advantageous, and accompanied by less discomfort. We report a case of severe and sustained hiccup caused by gastric cancer that was successfully treated with a continuous subcutaneous infusion of lidocaine (480 mg (24 ml)/day) without severe side effects.

  18. Modification of the effects of continuous low dose rate irradiation by concurrent chemotherapy infusion

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, K.K.; Rayner, P.A.; Lam, K.N.

    1984-08-01

    The combined effects of continuous low dose rate irradiation (CLDRI) and concurrent infusion of bleomycin, cyclophosphamide, cis-platinum, 5-fluorouracil, actinomycin D, and mitomycin C were studied in the SCC VII/SF tumor, a squamous cell carcinoma and the jejunal crypt cells in the mouse. For the SCC VII/SF tumor, enhanced cell killing was seen with each of the six drugs when infused concurrently with CLDRI; the greatest enhancement was seen with mitomycin C and cis-platinum. For the jejunal crypt cells, enhanced cell killing was seen primarily with bleomycin. The authors results suggest a therapeutic gain with concurrent CLDRI and chemotherapy infusion for five of the six chemotherapeutic drugs studied with the exception of bleomycin.

  19. Continuous infusion of levodopa-carbidopa intestinal gel in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Guthikonda, Lalitha N; Lyons, Kelly E; Pahwa, Rajesh

    2014-07-01

    Evaluation of: Olanow CW, Kieburtz K, Odin P et al. Continuous intrajejunal infusion of levodopa-carbidopa intestinal gel for patients with advanced Parkinson's disease: a randomised, controlled, double-blind, double-dummy study. Lancet Neurol. 13(2), 141-149 (2014). Levodopa-induced motor complications, including motor fluctuations and dyskinesia, can be a major source of disability for Parkinson's disease patients. The development of levodopa-induced motor complications has been attributed to the pulsatile dopaminergic stimulation characteristic of conventional oral levodopa regimens. This is a review of a 12-week, randomized, controlled, double-blind, double-dummy study of continuous jejunal infusion of levodopa-carbidopa intestinal gel to determine if the continuous infusion of levodopa reduces motor complications in Parkinson's disease. Results demonstrated that levodopa-carbidopa intestinal gel significantly reduced off-time without increasing troublesome dyskinesia compared with standard oral levodopa therapy. Adverse effects were common in both the levodopa-carbidopa intestinal gel and placebo groups and were related primarily to the infusion hardware.

  20. Continuous-Infusion Etomidate in a Patient Receiving Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation.

    PubMed

    LaRochelle, Joseph M; Desselle, Bonnie; Rossi, Janet L

    2017-01-01

    We describe a 16-year-old, 65-kg male deployed on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) for refractory respiratory failure secondary to ingestion of multiple substances. During his ECMO course, standard sedative and analgesic strategies failed and alternative medications were used. The patient received various dosages of fentanyl, morphine, hydromorphone, clonidine patches, dexmedetomidine, lorazepam, methadone, pentobarbital, olanzapine, and propofol. Despite administration of multiple agents, on day 29 of ECMO the patient experienced elevated blood pressures due to agitation, and continuous infusion etomidate was started. At the time of etomidate initiation, the osmolar gap was 8 mOsm/kg. During etomidate therapy, the blood pressure remained normal, sedative agents were slowly weaned, and the patient required few PRN medications. On day 6 of etomidate, the osmolar gap increased to 127 mOsm/kg and etomidate was discontinued. Continuous-infusion ketamine was started, but the blood pressure was not controlled. Metabolic acidosis is a known side effect of etomidate due to inclusion of propylene glycol as a pharmaceutical solvent in the formulation. Despite high-dose etomidate (20 mcg/kg/min) for approximately 6 days, our patient did not experience metabolic acidosis. Absence of this adverse effect caused us to question the role of the ECMO circuit. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the use of continuous-infusion etomidate during ECMO. Etomidate infusion could be considered in difficult-to-manage patients after other alternatives have failed.

  1. Continuous-Infusion Etomidate in a Patient Receiving Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation

    PubMed Central

    Desselle, Bonnie; Rossi, Janet L.

    2017-01-01

    We describe a 16-year-old, 65-kg male deployed on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) for refractory respiratory failure secondary to ingestion of multiple substances. During his ECMO course, standard sedative and analgesic strategies failed and alternative medications were used. The patient received various dosages of fentanyl, morphine, hydromorphone, clonidine patches, dexmedetomidine, lorazepam, methadone, pentobarbital, olanzapine, and propofol. Despite administration of multiple agents, on day 29 of ECMO the patient experienced elevated blood pressures due to agitation, and continuous infusion etomidate was started. At the time of etomidate initiation, the osmolar gap was 8 mOsm/kg. During etomidate therapy, the blood pressure remained normal, sedative agents were slowly weaned, and the patient required few PRN medications. On day 6 of etomidate, the osmolar gap increased to 127 mOsm/kg and etomidate was discontinued. Continuous-infusion ketamine was started, but the blood pressure was not controlled. Metabolic acidosis is a known side effect of etomidate due to inclusion of propylene glycol as a pharmaceutical solvent in the formulation. Despite high-dose etomidate (20 mcg/kg/min) for approximately 6 days, our patient did not experience metabolic acidosis. Absence of this adverse effect caused us to question the role of the ECMO circuit. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the use of continuous-infusion etomidate during ECMO. Etomidate infusion could be considered in difficult-to-manage patients after other alternatives have failed. PMID:28337083

  2. Nutrient infusion bypassing duodenum-jejunum improves insulin sensitivity in glucose-tolerant and diabetic obese subjects.

    PubMed

    Salinari, Serenella; Carr, Richard D; Guidone, Caterina; Bertuzzi, Alessandro; Cercone, Stefania; Riccioni, Maria E; Manto, Andrea; Ghirlanda, Giovanni; Mingrone, Geltrude

    2013-07-01

    The mechanisms of type 2 diabetes remission after bariatric surgery is still not fully elucidated. In the present study, we tried to simulate the Roux-en-Y gastric bypass with a canonical or longer biliary limb by infusing a liquid formula diet into different intestinal sections. Nutrients (Nutrison Energy) were infused into mid- or proximal jejunum and duodenum during three successive days in 10 diabetic and 10 normal glucose-tolerant subjects. Plasma glucose, insulin, C-peptide, glucagon, incretins, and nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA) were measured before and up to 360 min following. Glucose rate of appearance (Ra) and insulin sensitivity (SI), secretion rate (ISR), and clearance were assessed by mathematical models. SI increased when nutrients were delivered in mid-jejunum vs. duodenum (SI × 10⁴ min⁻¹·pM⁻¹: 1.11 ± 0.44 vs. 0.62 ± 0.22, P < 0.015, in controls and 0.79 ± 0.34 vs. 0.40 ± 0.20, P < 0.05, in diabetic subjects), whereas glucose Ra was not affected. In controls, Sensitivity of NEFA production was doubled in mid-jejunum vs. duodenum (2.80 ± 1.36 vs. 1.13 ± 0.78 × 10⁶, P < 0.005) and insulin clearance increased in mid-jejunum vs. duodenum (2.05 ± 1.05 vs. 1.09 ± 0.38 l/min, P < 0.03). Bypass of duodenum and proximal jejunum by nutrients enhances insulin sensitivity, inhibits lipolysis, and increases insulin clearance. These results may further our knowledge of the effects of bariatric surgery on both insulin resistance and diabetes.

  3. Insulin Infusion on Postoperative Complications of Coronary Artery Bypass Graft in Patients With Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Masoumi, Gholamreza; Frasatkhish, Rasoul; Bigdelian, Hamid; Ziyaefard, Mohsen; Sadeghpour-Tabae, Ali; Mansouri, Mojtaba; Jalali, Alireza

    2014-01-01

    Background: Cardiovascular events are common in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM), which make coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) a highly demanded surgery in this population. Tight control of blood glucose in patients with DM is beneficial in reducing postoperative complications; however, the adequate range has not been determined yet. Objectives: This study aimed to investigate the effect of semi-tight (moderate) control of DM on complications and serum glucose levels during and after CABG. Patients and Methods: In this prospective clinical trial, 18 and 31 patients with and without DM, respectively, who were referred to Shahid Chamran Hospital, Isfahan, Iran, for elective CABG surgery, were enrolled. For DM group, patients with controlled DM (i.e. glycosylated hemoglobin levels [HgA1C] ≤ 7%) were recruited. Blood glucose level (blood sugar, BS) was measured after anesthesia, during pumping, warming, off pumping, six and 12 hours after Intensive Care Unit (ICU) admission, and at discharging from the hospital. The hemodynamic state of the patients, bleeding, need of blood transfusion, infection, and duration of hospitalization were also monitored and recorded. Results: None of the BS measurements (FBS, after anesthesia, on-pump, warming, off pump, six and 12 hours after ICU admission, and at discharge) were significantly different between study groups (P > 0.05). Frequency of surgery site bleeding and blood transfusion need were not significantly different between these groups (P > 0.05). Conclusions: Semi-tight control of DM with insulin infusion during operation did not led to any difference in the type and rate of CABG complications between patients with well-controlled and those without DM; however, BS levels in patients with well-controlled DM could be more easily controlled. PMID:25478540

  4. Continuous intrathecal fluid infusions elevate nerve growth factor levels and prevent functional deficits after spinal cord ischemia.

    PubMed

    Bowes, M; Tuszynski, M H; Conner, J; Zivin, J A

    2000-11-17

    Continuous intracerebroventricular or intrathecal infusions of neurotrophic factors have been reported to prevent neuronal degeneration, stimulate axonal sprouting and ameliorate behavioral deficits in various models of CNS injury and aging. In the present study, the ability of intrathecal infusions of recombinant human nerve growth factor (NGF) to reduce functional deficits following spinal cord ischemia was investigated. Adult rabbits underwent intrathecal cannulation and continuous infusions of either 300 microg/ml recombinant human NGF or artificial CSF (vehicle) at a rate of 143 microl/day for 7 days prior to induction of spinal cord ischemia. Continuous infusions were maintained after induction of ischemia. Four days later, both NGF-treated and vehicle-infused subjects showed a significant amelioration of functional motor deficits compared to lesioned, non-infused subjects (P<0.05). The average duration of tolerated ischemia increased from 23.4+/-1.8 min in lesioned, non-infused subjects to 35.5+/-3.1 min in lesioned, artificial CSF-infused subjects and 35.6+/-4.7 min in NGF-infused subjects (mean+/-S.E.M.). Significantly elevated NGF protein levels were attained within the spinal cords of both NGF-treated subjects and artificial CSF-infused subjects, although levels were substantially higher in NGF-treated subjects (9.8+/-3.8 ng/g in NGF-infused vs. 2.0+/-0.4 ng/g in vehicle-infused and only 0.4+/-0.2 ng/g in lesioned, non-infused animals). These findings indicate that the process of intrathecal cannulation and fluid infusion elicits alterations in the spinal cord environment that are neuroprotective, including spontaneous elevations in NGF levels.

  5. Continuous infusion vs. bolus dosing: implications for beta-lactam antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Mohd Hafiz, Abdul-Aziz; Staatz, C E; Kirkpatrick, C M J; Lipman, J; Roberts, J A

    2012-01-01

    Beta-lactam antibiotics display time-dependant pharmacodynamics whereby constant antibiotic concentrations rather than high peak concentrations are most likely to result in effective treatment of infections caused by susceptible bacteria. Continuous administration has been suggested as an alternative strategy, to conventional intermittent dosing, to optimise beta-lactam pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) properties. With the availability of emerging data, we elected to systematically investigate the published literature describing the comparative PK/PD and clinical outcomes of beta-lactam antibiotics administered by continuous or intermittent infusion. We found that the studies have been performed in various patient populations including critically ill, cancer and cystic fibrosis patients. Available in vitro PK/PD data conclusively support the administration of beta-lactams via continuous infusion for maximizing bacterial killing from consistent attainment of pharmacodynamic end-points. In addition, clinical outcome data supports equivalence, even with the use of a lower dose by continuous infusion. However, the present clinical data is limited with small sample sizes common with insufficient power to detect advantages in favour of either dosing strategy. With abundant positive pre-clinical data as well as document in vivo PK/PD advantages, large multi-centre trials are needed to describe whether continuous administration of beta-lactams is truly more effective than intermittent dosing.

  6. The effect of intravenous insulin infusion on renal blood flow in conscious sheep is partially mediated by nitric oxide but not by prostaglandins.

    PubMed

    Tebot, I; Bonnet, J-M; Paquet, C; Ayoub, J-Y; Da Silva, S M; Louzier, V; Cirio, A

    2012-04-01

    To test the effect of insulin on renal perfusion and the participation of NO and PG as mediators of this response, renal blood flow (RBF) was measured in sheep (n = 8) implanted with ultrasonic flow probes around renal arteries and with a systemic arterial pressure (SAP, n = 4) telemetry device. Three protocols were performed: 1) RBF and SAP were recorded (0800 to 1800 h) in fed and fasted sheep, with the latter receiving intravenous (i.v.) infusions (0.5 mL/min) of insulin at 2 or 6 mU/(kg·min); 2) fasted sheep received i.v. infusions of either an inhibitor of NO synthesis (N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, L-NAME) alone [0.22 mg/(kg·min), 1000 to 1200 h] or L-NAME (1000 to 1200 h) + insulin during the second hour (6 mU/(kg·min), 1100 to 1200 h); and 3) the same protocol was followed as in protocol 2, substituting L-NAME with ketoprofen [0.2 mg/(kg·min)], a cyclooxygenase inhibitor. In all protocols, plasma insulin and glucose were determined. During insulin administration, euglycemia was maintained and hypokalemia was prevented by infusing glucose and KCl solutions. After the onset of meals, a long-lasting 18% increase in RBF and a 48% insulin increase were observed (P < 0.05), without changes in SAP. Low- and high-dose insulin infusions increased RBF by 19 and 40%, respectively (P < 0.05). As after meals, the increases in RBF lasted longer than the insulin increase (P < 0.05). The L-NAME infusion decreased RBF by 15% (P < 0.05); when insulin was added, RBF increased to preinfusion values. Ketoprofen decreased RBF by 9% (P < 0.05); when insulin was added, RBF increased to 13% above preinfusion values (P < 0.05). In no case was a modification in SAP or glucose noted during the RBF changes. In conclusion, insulin infusion mimics the meal-dependent increase in RBF, independent of SAP, and lasts longer than the blood insulin plateau. The RBF increase induced by insulin was only partially prevented by L-NAME. Ketoprofen failed to prevent the insulin

  7. Dodecanedioic acid infusion induces a sparing effect on whole-body glucose uptake, mainly in non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Mingrone, G; De Gaetano, A; Greco, A V; Capristo, E; Benedetti, G; Castagneto, M; Gasbarrini, G

    1997-11-01

    Even-numbered dicarboxylic acids (DA) have been proposed as an alternative fuel substrate in parenteral nutrition. In particular, dodecanedioic acid (C12) shows a rapid plasma clearance from tissues, a very low urinary excretion compared with other DA and a high oxidation rate. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of C12 infusion on insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) compared with healthy volunteers. A primed-constant infusion of C12 (0.39 mmol/min) was administered over 240 min, and at 120 min a 2 h euglycaemic hyperinsulinaemic clamp was performed. Blood specimens were sampled every 30 min and fractioned urines were collected over 24 h. The levels of C12 were measured by HPLC. Indirect calorimetry was performed continuously during the entire session. Body composition was assessed in all subjects studied to obtain fat-free mass (FFM) values. Whole-body glucose uptake decreased significantly during C12 infusion in both groups, although this effect was much more evident (P < 0.01) in NIDDM patients (52.4 (SD 15.8) % decrease compared with saline) than in controls (25.9 (SD 12.1) % decrease). The M value (mumol/kgFFM per min) was reduced by C12 to lower levels in NIDDM patients than in normal controls (12.6 (SD 3.9) v. 25.9 (SD 4.5), P < 0.01). Urinary excretion of C12 over 24 h was significantly lower in NIDDM patients than in controls (4.26 (SD 0.30) mmol v. 5.43 (SD 0.48), P < 0.01), corresponding to less than 3% of the administered dose. The infusion of C12 decreased non-protein RQ significantly in both groups of patients. In conclusion, this study shows, for the first time, that C12 significantly reduces glucose uptake in both normal controls and NIDDM patients, although this sparing effect on glucose uptake is much more pronounced in diabetic patients. These data suggest that C12 decreases glucose uptake and oxidation, mainly through a mechanism of substrate competition. Thus

  8. Postoperative seroma formation after abdominoplasty with placement of continuous infusion local anesthetic pain pump

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Melissa M; Lin, Michael P; Hovsepian, Raffi V; Wood, David; Nguyen, Trung; Evans, Gregory RD; Wirth, Garrett A

    2009-01-01

    The most common complication after abdominoplasty is seroma formation. The incidence of seroma formation in abdominal procedures as a whole, including abdominoplasty, panniculectomy and transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap abdominal donor sites, ranges from 1% to 38%. A recent concern among surgeons is the possibility of a causal relationship between the use of continuous infusion devices such as local anesthetic pain pumps and the development of seromas. A case of postoperative, persistent, recurrent seroma formation after abdominoplasty with the use of continuous infusion local anesthetic pain pump is presented. After several attempts at aspiration and drain catheter placement, only open surgical excision of the seroma cavity was found to be definitively effective in treating the development of seroma. PMID:21119843

  9. Continuously Infusing Hyperpolarized 129Xe into Flowing Aqueous Solutions Using Hydrophobic Gas Exchange Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Cleveland, Zackary I.; Möller, Harald E.; Hedlund, Laurence W.; Driehuys, Bastiaan

    2009-01-01

    Hyperpolarized (HP) 129Xe yields high signal intensities in magnetic resonance (MR) and, through its large chemical shift range of ∼300 ppm, provides detailed information about the local chemical environment. To exploit these properties in aqueous solutions and living tissues requires the development of methods for efficiently dissolving HP 129Xe over an extended time period. To this end, we have used commercially available gas exchange modules to continuously infuse concentrated HP 129Xe into flowing liquids, including rat whole blood, for periods as long as one hour, and have demonstrated the feasibility of dissolved-phase MR imaging with sub-millimeter resolution within minutes. These modules, which exchange gases using hydrophobic microporous polymer membranes, are compatible with a variety of liquids and are suitable for infusing HP 129Xe into the bloodstream in vivo. Additionally, we have developed a detailed mathematical model of the infused HP 129Xe signal dynamics that should be useful in designing improved infusion systems that yield even higher dissolved HP 129Xe signal intensities. PMID:19702286

  10. Population pharmacokinetics of meropenem during continuous infusion in surgical ICU patients.

    PubMed

    Kees, Martin G; Minichmayr, Iris K; Moritz, Stefan; Beck, Stefanie; Wicha, Sebastian G; Kees, Frieder; Kloft, Charlotte; Steinke, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    Continuous infusion of meropenem is a candidate strategy for optimization of its pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic profile. However, plasma concentrations are difficult to predict in critically ill patients. Steady-state concentrations of meropenem were determined prospectively during continuous infusion in 32 surgical ICU patients (aged 21-85 years, body weight 55-125 kg, APACHE II 5-29, measured creatinine clearance 22.7-297 mL/min). Urine was collected for the quantification of renal clearance of meropenem and creatinine. Cystatin C was measured as an additional marker of renal function. Population pharmacokinetic models were developed using NONMEM(®) , which described total meropenem clearance and its relationship with several estimates of renal function (measured creatinine clearance CLCR , Cockcroft-Gault formula CLCG , Hoek formula, 1/plasma creatinine, 1/plasma cystatin C) and other patient characteristics. Any estimate of renal function improved the model performance. The strongest association of clearance was found with CLCR (typical clearance = 11.3 L/h × [1 + 0.00932 × (CLCR  - 80 mL/min)]), followed by 1/plasma cystatin C; CLCG was the least predictive covariate. Neither age, weight, nor sex was found to be significant. These models can be used to predict dosing requirements or meropenem concentrations during continuous infusion. The covariate CLCR offers the best predictive performance; if not available, cystatin C may provide a promising alternative to plasma creatinine.

  11. [Continuous infusion versus bolus injection of loop diuretics in acute heart failure: a literature review].

    PubMed

    Leto, Laura; Aspromonte, Nadia; Feola, Mauro

    2012-04-01

    Intravenous loop diuretics are increasingly used to treat symptoms and signs of fluid overload in acute heart failure, a clinical condition associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. Although diuretic therapy is widely used and strongly recommended by most recent clinical guidelines, prospective studies and randomized clinical trials are lacking and hence there is no reliable evidence regarding the best therapy in terms of doses, ways and methods of administration. With heart failure progression, the efficacy of loop diuretics is impaired by diuretic resistance characterized by a decreased diuretic and natriuretic effect of drugs. This review focuses on the current management of acute heart failure with diuretic therapy. Continuous diuretic infusion seems to be a good choice, from a pharmacokinetic point of view, when fluid overload is refractory to conventional therapy. Several available studies comparing bolus injection to continuous infusion of loop diuretics proved the latter to be an effective and safe method of administration. Continuous infusion seems to produce a constant plasma drug concentration with a more uniform daily diuretic and natriuretic effect and a greater safety profile (fewer adverse events such as worsening renal failure, electrolyte imbalance, ototoxicity). In addition, the analysis of available literature data did not provide conclusive evidence about the effects on clinical outcomes (mortality, rehospitalization rates, adverse events).

  12. Clinical cure of ventilator-associated pneumonia treated with piperacillin/tazobactam administered by continuous or intermittent infusion.

    PubMed

    Lorente, Leonardo; Jiménez, Alejandro; Martín, María M; Iribarren, José Luis; Jiménez, Juan José; Mora, María L

    2009-05-01

    The standard mode of administration of piperacillin treatment is by intermittent infusion. However, continuous infusion may be advantageous as beta-lactam antibiotics exhibit time-dependent antibacterial activity. In previous studies, we found a higher rate of clinical cure of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) by continuous infusion rather than intermittent infusion of meropenem and ceftazidime. Therefore, the objective of this historical cohort study was to establish the clinical efficacy of piperacillin/tazobactam (PIP/TAZ) administered by continuous and intermittent infusion in the treatment of VAP in patients without renal failure. Logistic regression analysis showed a higher probability of clinical cure of VAP by continuous compared with intermittent infusion when the microorganism responsible for VAP had a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 8 microg/mL [8/9 (88.9%) vs. 6/15 (40.0%); odds ratio (OR)=10.79, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.01-588.24; P=0.049] or 16 microg/mL [7/8 (87.5%) vs. 1/6 (16.7%); OR=22.89, 95% CI 1.19-1880.78; P=0.03]. Thus, administration of PIP/TAZ by continuous infusion may be considered more effective than intermittent infusion for the treatment of VAP caused by Gram-negative bacteria when the MIC of the microorganism responsible for VAP is 8-16 microg/mL in patients without renal failure.

  13. Responses of plasma glucose metabolism to exogenous insulin infusion in sheep-fed forage herb plantain and exposed to heat.

    PubMed

    Al-Mamun, M; Shibuya, K; Kajita, M; Tamura, Y; Sano, H

    2017-01-16

    The use of herbal plants as traditional medicines has a century long history. Plantain (Plantago lanceolata L.) is a perennial herb containing bioactive components with free radical scavenging activities. An isotope dilution technique using [U-13C]glucose was conducted to determine the effect of plantain on the responses of plasma glucose metabolism to exogenous insulin infusion in sheep. Six crossbred sheep (three wethers and three ewes; mean initial BW=40±2 kg) were fed either a mixed hay of orchardgrass (Dactylis glomerata) and reed canarygrass (Phalaris arundinacea) (MH-diet) or mixed hay and fresh plantain (1 : 1 ratio, dry matter basis, PL-diet) and exposed to a thermoneutral (TN, 20°C; 70% relative humidity (RH)) environment or a heat exposure (HE, 30°C; 70% RH) for 5 days using a crossover design for two 23-day periods. The isotope dilution was conducted on days 18 and 23 of the experimental period during TN and HE, respectively. Plasma concentration of α-tocopherol was greater (P<0.0001) for the PL-diet than the MH-diet and remained comparable between environmental treatments. Plasma glucose concentration before isotope dilution technique was reduced for sheep (P=0.05) during HE compared with TN and remained comparable between diets. Plasma glucose turnover rate during the preinfusion period of insulin did not differ (P=0.10) between dietary treatments and between environments (P=0.65). The response of plasma glucose utilization to exogenous insulin administration was lower (P=0.04) for the PL-diet than the MH-diet. Under present experimental conditions, the plantain group was found to be resistant to the effects of insulin infusion.

  14. Continuous infusion or bolus injection of loop diuretics for congestive heart failure?

    PubMed

    Zepeda, Patricio; Rain, Carmen; Sepúlveda, Paola

    2016-04-22

    Loop diuretics are widely used in acute heart failure. However, there is controversy about the superiority of continuous infusion over bolus administration. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified four systematic reviews including 11 pertinent randomized controlled trials overall. We combined the evidence using meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings following the GRADE approach. We concluded continuous administration of loop diuretics probably reduces mortality and length of stay compared to intermittent administration in patients with acute heart failure.

  15. The use of dexmedetomidine continuous rate infusion for horses undergoing transvenous electrical cardioversion — A case series

    PubMed Central

    Marly-Voquer, Charlotte; Schwarzwald, Colin C.; Bettschart-Wolfensberger, Regula

    2016-01-01

    Five horses were presented for treatment of atrial fibrillation by transvenous electrical cardioversion (TVEC). A dexmedetomidine infusion was administered for sedation during positioning of the cardioversion catheters, and continued during general anesthesia. Shocks were applied until return to sinus rhythm. Dexmedetomidine infusion provided excellent conditions for TVEC catheter placement and procedure. PMID:26740702

  16. A Novel Technique for Split-Thickness Skin Donor Site Pain Control: Subcutaneous Catheters for Continuous Local Anesthetic Infusion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    catheters are primed with 2 ml of 1⁄4% bupivacaine and attached to the ON-Q Pain Pump device, which infuses at a rate of 4 ml/hr. The use of either 0.2...ropivacaine or 1⁄4% bupivacaine for continuous infusion has been de- scribed; but due to the bacteriostatic properties of the latter, this is the

  17. Effect of Continuous Propofol Infusion in Rat on Tau Phosphorylation with or without Temperature Control.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chunxia; Ng, Olivia Tsz-Wa; Ho, Yuen-Shan; Irwin, Michael Garnet; Chang, Raymond Chuen-Chung; Wong, Gordon Tin-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Several studies suggest a relationship between anesthesia-induced tau hyperphosphorylation and the development of postoperative cognitive dysfunction. This study further characterized the effects of continuous propofol infusion on tau protein phosphorylation in rats, with or without temperature control. Propofol was administered intravenously to 8-10-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats and infused to the loss of the righting reflex for 2 h continuously. Proteins from cortex and hippocampus were examined by western blot and immunohistochemistry. Rectal temperature was significantly decreased during propofol infusion. Propofol with hypothermia significantly increased phosphorylation of tau at AT8, AT180, Thr205, and Ser199 in cortex and hippocampus except Ser396. With temperature maintenance, propofol still induced significant elevation of AT8, Thr205, and Ser199 in cortex and hippocampus; however, increase of AT180 and Ser396 was only found in hippocampus and cortex, respectively. Differential effects of propofol with or without hypothermia on multiple tau related kinases, such as Akt/GSK3β, MAPK pathways, or phosphatase (PP2A), were demonstrated in region-specific manner. These findings indicated that propofol increased tau phosphorylation under both normothermic and hypothermic conditions, and temperature control could partially attenuate the hyperphosphorylation of tau. Further studies are warranted to determine the long-term impact of propofol on the tau pathology and cognitive functions.

  18. Continuous versus intermittent infusion of vancomycin in adult patients: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Hao, Jing-Jing; Chen, Han; Zhou, Jian-Xin

    2016-01-01

    Continuous infusion of vancomycin (CIV) and intermittent infusion of vancomycin (IIV) are two major administration strategies in clinical settings. However, previous articles comparing the efficacy and safety of CIV versus IIV showed inconsistent results. Therefore, a meta-analysis was conducted to compare the efficacy and safety of CIV and IIV. PubMed, the Cochrane Library and Web of Science up to June 2015 were searched using the keywords 'vancomycin', 'intravenous', 'parenteral', 'continuous', 'intermittent', 'discontinuous', 'infusion', 'administration' and 'dosing'. Eleven studies were included in the meta-analysis. Neither heterogeneity nor publication bias were observed. Patients treated with CIV had a significantly lower incidence of nephrotoxicity compared with patients receiving IIV [risk ratio (RR)=0.61, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.47-0.80; P<0.001]. No significant difference in treatment failure between the two groups was detected. Mortality between patients receiving CIV and patients receiving IIV was similar (RR=1.15, 95% CI 0.85-1.54; P=0.365). This meta-analysis showed that CIV had superior safety compared with IIV, whilst the clinical efficacy was not significantly different. A further multicentre, randomised controlled trial is required to confirm these results.

  19. Pilot study of interaction of radiation therapy with doxorubicin by continuous infusion

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenthal, C.J.; Rotman, M.

    1988-01-01

    Doxorubicin was initially administered alone by continuous infusion for 5 days every 3 weeks in escalating doses to 13 patients with advanced metastatic and/or recurrent malignancies. The maximum tolerable dosage was 13 mg/m2 per day for 5 days. Kinetic data showed a steady level of 60 ng/ml for 4 days and a biphasic disappearance curve. Radiation therapy (150-200 cGy per session) was then administered in 5-day cycles, every 3 weeks, concomitantly with continuous infusion of doxorubicin (12 mg/m2 per day) to 21 patients with various advanced unresectable recurrent or metastatic malignancies. Four of 9 patients with soft tissue sarcomas achieved complete response after a radiation dose of 2,206 +/- 590 (SD) cGy and 3 had partial response; the median durations of the response were 142 +/- 65 (SD) weeks for complete response and 28 +/- 10 weeks for partial response. Of 4 patients with primary hepatoma, 2 achieved partial response after 1,290 +/- 210 cGy. No response was seen in any of the 7 patients with adenocarcinoma of the gastrointestinal tract or breast. Complications of this regimen included moderate leukopenia and thrombocytopenia, mucositis, skin erythema, and decrease of the ventricular ejection fraction at a cumulative doxorubicin dose of 840 mg/m2. We conclude that doxorubicin given by protracted infusion can be safely administered with concomitant radiation and appears to enhance the effects of radiation on most soft tissue sarcomas and on some hepatocellular carcinomas.

  20. Severe methemoglobinemia caused by continuous lidocaine infusion in a term neonate.

    PubMed

    Bohnhorst, Bettina; Hartmann, Hans; Lange, Matthias

    2016-12-28

    Neonates and young infants are especially prone to develop drug-induced methemoglobinemia. Therefore, lidocaine is not licensed as local anesthetic in children below the age of 3 months. However, its systemic use is advocated for neonatal seizures. Cardiac arrhythmia has been reported as sole major side effect. Here we report a case of severe methemoglobinemia caused by continuous infusion of lidocaine in a term neonate with neonatal seizures. The increase of methemoglobin up to 13.8% was accompanied by hypoxemia and cyanosis, necessitating additional inspired oxygen and CPAP ventilation. After stopping lidocaine infusion methemoglobin levels fell and the neonate could be weaned from ventilation. Neonates treated with lidocaine for seizures must be monitored for the occurrence of methemoglobinemia.

  1. A regular meal and insulin infusion regimen: its use in the treatment of acute-onset ketotic diabetes and in stabilization of poorly controlled established diabetic subjects.

    PubMed

    Davis, T M; Holman, R R; Eaton, P M; Turner, R C

    1982-01-01

    A simple regimen, consisting of a constant intravenous insulin infusion at either a basal, nocturnal rate or at a daytime rate matched by seven small, isocaloric meals taken every 2 h, has been applied to two clinical situations requiring optimal blood glucose control. In eight poorly controlled established diabetic subjects, quantitative estimates of daily insulin requirements were possible, with consequent improved control upon reinstitution of twice-daily subcutaneous insulin. In five acute-onset, ketotic diabetic subjects first treated by intravenous saline and low-dose intramuscular insulin, the regimen was used to achieve and maintain basal and postprandial normoglycemia. Ketonuria was abolished quickly in these patients, and falling insulin requirements and large doses of insulin were handled easily. In both clinical situations, subsequent subcutaneous insulin doses required little adjustment. The regimen is cheap, convenient to use, and widely applicable.

  2. The role of ranitidine infusion on glucose, insulin and C-peptide serum levels induced by oral glucose tolerance test in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Gentile, S; Marmo, R; Costume, A; Orlando, C; D'Alessandro, R; De Bellis, G; Porcellini, M; Coltorti, M

    1986-01-01

    In 9 healthy subjects we evaluated the effect of a constant ranitidine infusion (100 mg) on glucose (mg/dl), insulin (microU/ml) and C-peptide (ng/ml) serum levels promoted by oral glucose tolerance test (75 g). Ranitidine significantly increased the area under concentration/time curves for glucose and insulin but not that of C-peptide. Our data indicate that ranitidine does not affect pancreatic insulin release nor peripheral glucose utilization and are consistent with the hypothesis that ranitidine influences the hepatic clearance of glucose and insulin both of which undergo high first-pass liver extraction.

  3. Pharmacokinetics of continuous-infusion meropenem in a pediatric patient receiving extracorporeal life support.

    PubMed

    Cies, Jeffrey J; Moore, Wayne S; Dickerman, Mindy J; Small, Christine; Carella, Dominick; Chopra, Arun; Parker, Jason

    2014-10-01

    Meropenem, a broad-spectrum carbapenem, is commonly used for empirical and definitive therapy in the pediatric intensive care unit (ICU). Pharmacokinetic data to guide dosing in children, however, are limited to healthy volunteers or patients who are not in the ICU. Adult data demonstrate that pharmacokinetic parameters such as the volume of distribution and clearance can be significantly altered in individuals receiving extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). Alterations in the volume of distribution and clearance of antimicrobials in patients with sepsis and septic shock have also been documented, and these patients have demonstrated lower than expected antimicrobial serum concentrations based on standard dosing regimens. Therefore, an understanding of the pharmacokinetic changes in critically ill children receiving ECMO is crucial to determining the most appropriate dose and dosing interval selection for any antimicrobial therapy. In this case report, we describe the pharmacokinetics of a continuous infusion of meropenem in a pediatric cardiac ICU patient who was receiving concurrent extracorporeal life support. The patient was an 8-month-old male infant who underwent a Glenn procedure and pulmonary artery reconstruction. Postoperatively, he required ECMO with a total run of 21 days. On day 11 of ECMO, a bronchoalveolar lavage was performed, and blood cultures from days 11 and 12 of ECMO grew Pseudomonas aeruginosa, with a meropenem minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 0.5 μg/ml. On ECMO day 13, meropenem was initiated with a loading dose of 40 mg/kg and infused over 30 minutes, followed by a continuous infusion of 200 mg/kg/day. A meropenem serum concentration measured 8 hours after the start of the infusion was 46 μg/ml. Repeat levels were measured on days 3 and 9 of meropenem therapy and were 39 and 42 μg/ml, respectively. Repeat blood and respiratory cultures remained negative. This meropenem regimen (40-mg/kg bolus followed by a

  4. Effect of Heparin on Coagulation Tests: A Comparison of Continuous and Bolus Infusion in Haemodialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Nasiri, Ali Akbar; Ahmadidarrehsima, Sudabeh; Balouchi, Abbas; Moghadam, Mahdiye Poodine

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Haemodialysis is one of the most conventional treatments of chronic renal failure. The risk of clot formation is high during haemodialysis due to regular contact of blood with the surfaces of foreign objects such as catheters, dialyzers’ membrane, and other materials used for dialysis. Therefore, to prevent clot formation during haemodialysis, the dialysis system requires anticoagulation; this is usually done by heparin. Aim The present study aimed to compare two heparinization methods and determine the proper impacts of these methods. Materials and Methods In this quasi-experimental study, 80 haemodialysis patients covered by the dialysis center of Amir-al-momenin Hospital of Zabol were studied in two 40-member groups of heparin therapy methods of bolus injection and continuous infusion. PT and PTT were measured in blood samples collected from all patients before starting haemodialysis. The first group received 3000 units of heparin once the haemodialysis machine started to work and 2000 units of heparin two hours later as bolus injection. In the second group, 1500 units of heparin was injected at the start of dialysis after then, 5000 units of heparin (one mL) were mixed with 11 mL of distilled water and infused using a heparin injection pump up to half an hour before the end of dialysis. At 30 minutes after starting dialysis and at the end of 4 hours of haemodialysis, PT and PTT were measured and compared between the two groups. Results According to the results, the mean partial thromboplastin time in the bolus and continuous heparin-receiving group was 41.75±6.29 and 37.90±4.77, respectively, which was statistically significant (p=0.036). But PT was 14.45±1.82 in the bolus heparin group and 13.95±1.39 in the continuous heparin group, which was not significant according to the results of independent t-test (p=0.336). Conclusion The results indicated a statistically significant difference between the bolus heparin injection and the continuous

  5. Effects of continuous infusion of cholinergic drugs on memory impairment in rats with basal forebrain lesions.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, M; Narumi, S; Nagaoka, A; Coyle, J T

    1989-02-01

    The effects of continuous infusion of cholinergic drugs on behavior in normal rats and on impaired acquisition and retention of several behavioral tasks in rats with basal forebrain (BF) lesions were investigated. Physostigmine and oxotremorine were infused continuously with a miniosmotic pump for 3 weeks, and the performance on several different behavioral tasks was examined during the infusion. In normal rats high doses of physostigmine (4 and 8 mg/kg/day s.c.) produced significant changes in general behavior and impaired performance in the Morris water maze. Oxotremorine (0.25-2 mg/kg/day s.c.) had no significant effects on general behavior or cognitive performance in normal rats, although severe cataracts developed at the high dose (4 mg/kg/day). A deficit in motor habituation in rats with BF lesions produced by bilateral injections of ibotenic acid (30 nmol on each side) was improved markedly by the chronic administration of physostigmine (2 mg/kg/day) and oxotremorine (1 mg/kg/day). BF lesions produced severe impairments in acquisition and retention in a passive avoidance task, an active avoidance and the Morris water maze, which was characterized by a marked disruption of retention. The impairment was also ameliorated markedly by the cholinergic drugs, whereas other behavioral impairments were not affected by the drugs. These results indicate that the continuous administration of cholinergic drugs produces a marked improvement of acquisition and retention in rats with BF lesions, and suggest that the impairment in cognitive performance, especially with regard to retention, caused by BF lesions is due to the disruption of the BF-cortical cholinergic pathway.

  6. Epidural analgesia during labor: continuous infusion or patient-controlled administration?

    PubMed

    Benhamou, D

    1995-05-01

    Patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) has several advantages over continuous epidural infusion of bupivacaine during labor: it produces a good analgesia with a limited sensory spread; generally, less bupivacaine is administered and maternal satisfaction with pain control is increased. However, the quality of analgesia is similar to that obtained with other forms of epidural administration. Moreover, PCEA is only a particular form of epidural and, as such, has the same safety requirements. PCEA does not appear to reduce the workload of the anesthetic team. The cost of the PCA pump will need to be included in future evaluation of the cost/benefit ratio.

  7. Effects of abomasal infusion of tallow or camelina oil on responses to glucose and insulin in dairy cows during late pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Salin, S; Taponen, J; Elo, K; Simpura, I; Vanhatalo, A; Boston, R; Kokkonen, T

    2012-07-01

    Late pregnancy is associated with moderate insulin resistance in ruminants. Reduced suppression of lipolysis by insulin facilitates mobilization of nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA) from adipose tissue, resulting in elevated plasma NEFA concentrations. Decrease in dry matter intake (DMI) before parturition leads to accelerated lipomobilization and increases plasma NEFA, which may further impair insulin sensitivity. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of elevation of plasma NEFA concentration by abomasal infusions tallow (TAL) or camelina oil (CAM) on whole-body responses to exogenous glucose and insulin. We further assessed whether CAM, rich in C18:3n-3, enhances whole-body insulin sensitivity compared with TAL. Six late-pregnant, second-parity, rumen-cannulated dry Ayrshire dairy cows fed grass silage to meet 95% of metabolizable energy requirements were used in a replicated 3 × 3 Latin square with 5-d periods and 5 recovery days between each period. Treatments consisted of abomasal infusion of 500 mL/d (430 g of lipids/d) of water (control), TAL, or CAM administered in 10 equal doses daily. Intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT) and i.v. insulin challenge (IC) were performed on d 5 after 98 and 108 h of treatment infusions, respectively. Infusion of lipids increased basal plasma NEFA concentrations on d 5 (CAM: 0.25; TAL: 0.28; control: 0.17 mmol/L). Following glucose injection, the rate of glucose clearance (CR) was lower in lipid-treated cows (CAM: 1.34; TAL: 1.48; control: 1.74%/min) and time to reach half-maximal glucose concentration (T(1/2)) was longer (CAM: 54; TAL: 47; control: 42 min). Similar responses were observed after insulin injection. Increased plasma NEFA concentration tended to decrease insulin secretion in IVGTT. Infusion of CAM increased plasma C18:3n-3 content (CAM: 26.4; TAL: 16.1; control: 20.9 g/100g of fatty acids). Data suggest that CAM had an insulin-sensitizing effect, because the disposition index and insulin

  8. [Postoperative analgesia with tramal in newborn children using the method of continuous intravenous infusion].

    PubMed

    Mikhel'son, V A; Zhirkova, Iu V; Beliaeva, I D; Stepanenko, S M; Manerova, A F; Butyleva, O Iu

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the efficiency of postoperative analgesia with tramal in the newborns. Analgesia with tramal (5% solution for injections, "Gruonental GmbH", Germany) was administered postoperatively in 20 newborn children. Thirteen children were operated for congenital malformations in the gastrointestinal and urinary tracts, three children were operated for purulent-septic diseases and four children were operated for neoplasms. Hemodynamics indices, i.e. heart rate (HR) and arterial pressure, as well as SaO2, respiratory rate (RR), acid-base condition and behavioral reactions were assessed. Analgesia was implemented by the method of continuous intravenous infusion of tramal, 0.1-0.2 mg/kg.h combined with boluses, 1-2 mg/kg. The newborns were asleep for a major part of time during analgesia with tamal; the stable indices of hemodynamics, acid-base balance, glycemia and of the cortisol level were registered. Arterial hypertension, caused by several factors including the effect produced by tamal, was noted in 70% of children. Dose-dependent hypercapnia was registered in 80% of tests in children at unassisted respiration during the infusion of tamal, which is indicative of that tamal affects the respiratory center during the neonatal period and that it is necessary to monitor thoroughly the respiratory functions, i.e. RR, SatO2, pO2, pCO2, and to choose accurately a preparation dose. The continuous infusion of tamal ensures a sufficient analgesia after different operations and especially after medium-traumatic operations.

  9. Pharmacokinetics of Continuous Infusion Meropenem With Concurrent Extracorporeal Life Support and Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Wayne S.; Conley, Susan B.; Dickerman, Mindy J.; Small, Christine; Carella, Dominick; Shea, Paul; Parker, Jason; Chopra, Arun

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic parameters can be significantly altered for both extracorporeal life support (ECLS) and continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT). This case report describes the pharmacokinetics of continuous-infusion meropenem in a patient on ECLS with concurrent CRRT. A 2.8-kg, 10-day-old, full-term neonate born via spontaneous vaginal delivery presented with hypothermia, lethargy, and a ~500-g weight loss from birth. She progressed to respiratory failure on hospital day 2 (HD 2) and developed sepsis, disseminated intravascular coagulation, and liver failure as a result of disseminated adenoviral infection. By HD 6, acute kidney injury was evident, with progressive fluid overload >1500 mL (+) for the admission. On HD 6 venoarterial ECLS was instituted for lung protection and fluid removal. On HD 7 she was initiated on CRRT. On HD 12, a blood culture returned positive and subsequently grew Pseudomonas aeruginosa with a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) for meropenem of 0.25 mg/L. She was started on vancomycin, meropenem, and amikacin. A meropenem bolus of 40 mg/kg was given, followed by a continuous infusion of 10 mg/kg/hr (240 mg/kg/day). On HD 15 (ECLS day 9) a meropenem serum concentration of 21 mcg/mL was obtained, corresponding to a clearance of 7.9 mL/kg/min. Repeat cultures from HDs 13 to 15 (ECLS days 7–9) were sterile. This meropenem regimen was successful in providing a target attainment of 100% for serum concentrations above the MIC for ≥40% of the dosing interval and was associated with a sterilization of blood in this complex patient on concurrent ECLS and CRRT circuits. PMID:26997934

  10. Qualitative and quantitative contrast enhanced ultrasonography of the pancreas using bolus injection and continuous infusion methods in normal dogs.

    PubMed

    Lim, Sue Yee; Nakamura, Kensuke; Morishita, Keitaro; Sasaki, Noboru; Murakami, Masahiro; Osuga, Tatsuyuki; Ohta, Hiroshi; Yamasaki, Masahiro; Takiguchi, Mitsuyoshi

    2013-12-30

    Quantitative contrast enhanced ultrasound is a major breakthrough for ultrasound imaging in recent years. However, contrast enhancement of the pancreas is brief with bolus injection. To assess if continuous infusion of Sonazoid(®) can prolong the duration of pancreatic enhancement over bolus injections, eight adult dogs received bolus injection and continuous infusion of Sonazoid(®) on separate days. Contrast enhanced ultrasound of the pancreatic parenchyma and proximal descending duodenum was performed, and time intensity curves reflecting tissue perfusions were generated. Perfusion parameters- time to initial upslope, peak time, time to wash-out and peak intensity were calculated and evaluated. Fast wash-in to intense peak, followed by rapid wash-out was observed for time intensity curves of bolus injection. With continuous infusion, contrast wash-in to peak intensity was gradual, followed by long plateau and slow wash-out. Median contrast enhancement durations of the pancreas and duodenum were significantly prolonged by continuous infusion from 11 sec (range, 10 to 23 sec) and 16 sec (range, 3 to 43 sec) at bolus injection to 205 sec (range, 170 to 264 sec, P<0.01) and 193 sec (range, 169 to 216 sec, P<0.05), respectively. Median peak intensity of the pancreas was 100.9 MPV (range, 80.2 to 124.3 MPV) at bolus injection and 77.6 MPV (range, 58.2 to 99.5 MPV, P<0.05) at continuous infusion. Prolonged continuous imaging is afforded by continuous infusion of contrast agent. Peak intensity of the pancreas was slightly diminished in continuous infusion, but offered adequate imaging subjectively.

  11. Response of rat model of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia to continuous infusion of deferoxamine.

    PubMed Central

    Merali, S; Chin, K; Grady, R W; Weissberger, L; Clarkson, A B

    1995-01-01

    The iron-chelating drug deferoxamine mesylate (DFO) is active against Pneumocystis carinii in vitro and in rat and mouse models of P. carinii pneumonia. Because DFO has a short half-life, daily divided or continuous dosage was expected to improve the dose response, as is the case with DFO treatment of malaria. Therefore, results of single daily intraperitoneal injections were compared with results of an evenly divided four-times-daily dosage and the efficacy of delivery with implanted infusion pumps. The highest bolus dosage (1,000 mg kg-1 of body weight day-1) was as effective as the standard combination of trimethoprim with sulfamethoxazole. Unexpectedly, very little improvement was observed with the divided or continuous dosage, and several mechanisms that could account for this are discussed. PMID:7492082

  12. Changes in fat concentration of human milk during delivery by intermittent bolus and continuous mechanical pump infusion.

    PubMed

    Greer, F R; McCormick, A; Loker, J

    1984-11-01

    The changes in fat concentration and cumulative fat losses that occur during the delivery of human milk using two different continuous infusion systems were compared with the changes in fat concentration during simulated intermittent gavage or bolus feedings. With both mechanical pumps the largest cumulative fat losses and the greatest decreases in fat concentrations occurred at the slowest infusion rates. State of homogenization of the milk generally made little difference in the changes in fat concentration using the syringe pump, whereas homogenizing the milk increased the fat concentration significantly with the roller pump. With the syringe pump the positioning of the syringe tip (horizontal or vertical) made no difference in fat concentration at an infusion rate of 1 ml/hr, whereas at 4 and 7 ml/hr the fat concentration was increased significantly by keeping the syringe tip vertical. With either mechanical pump a large fat bolus was delivered during the eighth and final hour of infusion if the milk remaining in the tubing was recovered by using air infusion at the same infusion rate. Intermittent bolus delivery of human milk resulted in no significant loss of human milk fat, no changes in fat concentration, and no terminal delivery of a large fat load. Thus intermittent bolus feedings are preferred over continuous mechanical pump infusion systems for the delivery of human milk to low-birth-weight infants.

  13. Continuous Regional Arterial Infusion Therapy for Acute Necrotizing Pancreatitis Due to Mycoplasma pneumoniae Infection in a Child

    SciTech Connect

    Nakagawa, Motoo Ogino, Hiroyuki; Shimohira, Masashi; Hara, Masaki; Shibamoto, Yuta

    2009-05-15

    A case of acute necrotizing pancreatitis due to Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection was treated in an 8-year-old girl. She experienced acute pancreatitis during treatment for M. pneumoniae. Contrast-enhanced computed tomographic scan revealed necrotizing pancreatitis. The computed tomographic severity index was 8 points (grade E). A protease inhibitor, ulinastatin, was provided via intravenous infusion but was ineffective. Continuous regional arterial infusion therapy was provided with gabexate mesilate (FOY-007, a protease inhibitor) and meropenem trihydrate, and the pancreatitis improved. This case suggests that infusion therapy is safe and useful in treating necrotizing pancreatitis in children.

  14. Pharmacokinetics of intravenous continuous rate infusions of sodium benzylpenicillin and ceftiofur sodium in adult horses.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Scott H; Khalfan, Shahid A; Jacobson, Glenn A; Pirie, Adam D; Raidal, Sharanne L

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine plasma drug concentrations after IV administration of a bolus followed by continuous rate infusion (CRI) of sodium benzylpenicillin and ceftiofur sodium to healthy adult horses. ANIMALS 6 Thoroughbred mares (3 to 9 years old; mean ± SD body weight, 544 ± 55 kg) with no history of recent antimicrobial treatment. PROCEDURES Horses were used in 2 experiments conducted 14 days apart. For each experiment, horses were housed individually in stables, and catheters were placed bilaterally in both jugular veins for drug administration by CRI (left catheter) and for intermittent collection of blood samples (right catheter). Synovial fluid samples were obtained from carpal joints following ceftiofur administration to evaluate drug diffusion into articular spaces. RESULTS Plasma concentrations above accepted minimum inhibitory concentrations for common pathogens of horses were achieved within 1 minute after bolus administration and remained above the minimum inhibitory concentration for 48 (ceftiofur) or 12 (benzylpenicillin) hours (ie, the duration of the CRI). Mean synovial fluid ceftiofur free acid equivalent concentrations were approximately 46% (range, 25.4% to 59.8%) of plasma concentrations at the end of infusion. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Compared with intermittent bolus administration, the loading dose and CRI used less drug but maintained high plasma concentrations for the duration of infusion. By use of pharmacological parameters derived in this study, a loading dose of 2.5 mg/kg and CRI of 200 μg/kg/h should achieve plasma ceftiofur concentrations of 4 μg/mL; a loading dose and CRI of 1.3 mg/kg and 2.5 μg/kg/h, respectively, should achieve plasma benzylpenicillin concentrations of 2 μg/mL.

  15. Continuous Infusion of Ketamine for Out-of-hospital Isolated Orthopedic Injuries Secondary to Trauma: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Wiel, Eric; Zitouni, Djamel; Assez, Nathalie; Sebilleau, Quentin; Lys, Sébastien; Duval, Audrey; Mauriaucourt, Patrick; Hubert, Hervé

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective. Although ketamine has recently been demonstrated to provide a morphine-sparing effect, no previous study reports the effect of continuous infusion of ketamine for analgesia in out-of-hospital environments. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of a continuous infusion of ketamine (IK group) vs. a continuous infusion of saline (IS group) on morphine requirements in out-of-hospital trauma patients suffering from severe acute pain. Methods. In this prospective, multicenter, randomized, single-blind clinical study, patients suffering from isolated orthopedic injuries secondary to trauma with severe acute pain received a low-dose intravenous (IV) bolus of ketamine (0.2 mg·kg(-1)) combined with an IV bolus of morphine (0.1 mg·kg(-1)) and were randomized either in the IK group (IV continuous infusion of ketamine 0.2 mg·kg(-1)·h(-1)), or in the IS group (IV continuous infusion of saline at the same volume). The primary endpoint was morphine requirements in terms of total dose of morphine (excluding the baseline bolus) injected at the end of prehospital emergency care at hospital admission (final time, Tf). The secondary endpoint was evaluation of pain with visual analogic scale (VAS). Results. Sixty-six patients were enrolled. Total morphine dose was not significantly reduced with continuous infusion of ketamine (0.048 [0.000; 0.150] vs. 0.107 [0.052; 0.150] in IK and IS groups), with similar mean duration of care (median 35.0 min). Analgesia was as efficient without any significant difference in VAS at Tf between groups (3.1 ± 2.3 (IK group) vs. 3.7 ± 2.7 (IS group), p = 0.5). Conclusions. Continuous ketamine infusion did not reduce morphine requirements in severe acute pain trauma patients in the out-of-hospital emergency settings.

  16. Infection risk and stability of a continuous 8-h 250 mL rFVIII infusion.

    PubMed

    Lambing, A; Kuriakose, P; Mueller, L M

    2014-03-01

    This study seeks to identify the delivery method of continuous infusion using a 250 cc IV bag via pump, change every 8 h. Additionally, the study will examine the infection risk with the use of 8 h infusions. Ten hemophilia A patients were identified for the study. Each patient received a bolus factorVIII (FVIII) infusion with a pre FVIII level and 1 h post FVIII level to determine recovery levels for optimal dosing. On the day of 8-h continuous infusion, the pt received a bolus VIII (Kogenate FS (™)) for correction to 100% followed by individually calculated continuous infusion (Kogenate FS (™)) FVIII. FVIII levels were drawn from the IV bag and peripherally from the patient in the opposite arm at time points: pre infusion, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 and 8 h. Additionally, blood cultures were drawn from the IV bag and from the IV tubing at time points pre infusion, 4 and 8 h. Fourteen subjects agreed to participate in the study; 4 failed to follow up, hence 10 subjects were included in the analysis of data; 7 severe, 2 moderate, and 1 mild hemophilia A. Age range was 26-62 years. Ethnic breakdown included 5 African American, 4 Caucasian, 1 Hispanic. With all infusions, the range of FVIII was 65-135% (blood) and 62-200% (bag). After the start of infusion, there were no significant differences noted between the hourly FVIII levels in the subjects and the IV values (P-value range 0.36-0.9). Additionally, given three time points with six cultures per patient, totaling 60 points of cultures drawn for the study, all cultures from the IV bag and patient were negative. The effective delivery method and safety of an 8-h continuous infusion of FVIII (Kogenate FS (™)) has been confirmed. This method can be helpful given that many hospitals may not carry the required mini-pumps, allowing a standard safe delivery of FVIII (Kogenate FS (™)) continuous infusion by available means.

  17. Continuous Infusion of 20-Hydroxyecdysone Increased Mass of Triceps Brachii in C57BL/6 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Diana M.; Kutzler, Louis W.; Boler, Dustin D.; Drnevich, Jenny; Killefer, John; Lila, Mary Ann

    2012-01-01

    Phytoecdysteroids have been attributed with numerous pharmacological properties in animals, including increasing muscle mass, and 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) is one of the most abundant phytoecdysteroids produced by plants. In this study, the physiological and gene expression effects of 20E were analyzed in C57BL/6 mice given a continuous infusion of saline or 20E (5 mg/kg/day) for 5 or 15 d using subcutaneously implanted Alzet® osmotic pumps. The masses of the total body, muscle groups and organs were determined. There was a significant increase (p = 0.01) in the mass of triceps brachii in mice treated with 20E for 5 d (115 +/− 8 mg) compared to mice treated with saline for 5 d (88 +/− 3 mg), however, there were no differences in the other measured parameters. To determine potential mechanisms of 20E in skeletal muscle, Illumina’s Mouse Whole Genome-6 v2.0 Expression BeadChips were used to evaluate changes in gene expression of the triceps brachii after 20E infusion. Ingenuity Pathways Analysis was used to identify genes with the most evidence for differential expression, of which, 16 genes involved in the skeletal and muscular system were identified. Overall, the data suggests that 20E does not have potent anabolic properties, however, a muscle-specific increase was observed and genes were identified to provide an explanation for the muscle accretion. PMID:22495969

  18. A low dose euglycemic infusion of recombinant human insulin-like growth factor I rapidly suppresses fasting-enhanced pulsatile growth hormone secretion in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Hartman, M L; Clayton, P E; Johnson, M L; Celniker, A; Perlman, A J; Alberti, K G; Thorner, M O

    1993-01-01

    To determine if insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) inhibits pulsatile growth hormone (GH) secretion in man, recombinant human IGF-I (rhIGF-I) was infused for 6 h at 10 micrograms.kg-1.h-1 during a euglycemic clamp in 10 normal men who were fasted for 32 h to enhance GH secretion. Saline alone was infused during an otherwise identical second admission as a control. As a result of rhIGF-I infusion, total and free IGF-I concentrations increased three- and fourfold, respectively. Mean GH concentrations fell from 6.3 +/- 1.6 to 0.59 +/- 0.07 micrograms/liter after 120 min. GH secretion rates, calculated by a deconvolution algorithm, decreased with a t 1/2 of 16.6 min and remained suppressed thereafter. Suppression of GH secretion rates occurred within 60 min when total and free IGF-I concentrations were 1.6-fold and 2-fold above baseline levels, respectively, and while glucose infusion rates were < 1 mumol.kg-1.min-1. During saline infusion, GH secretion rates remained elevated. Infusion of rhIGF-I decreased the mass of GH secreted per pulse by 84% (P < 0.01) and the number of detectable GH secretory pulses by 32% (P < 0.05). Plasma insulin and glucagon decreased to nearly undetectable levels after 60 min of rhIGF-I. Serum free fatty acids, beta-hydroxybutyrate, and acetoacetate were unaffected during the first 3 h of rhIGF-I but decreased thereafter to 52, 32, and 50% of levels observed during saline. We conclude that fasting-enhanced GH secretion is rapidly suppressed by a low-dose euglycemic infusion of rhIGF-I. This effect of rhIGF-I is likely mediated through IGF-I receptors independently of its insulin-like metabolic actions. PMID:8514857

  19. A wearable optical device for continuous monitoring during neoadjuvant chemotherapy infusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, Fei; Cormier, Timothy; Sauer-Budge, Alexis; Roblyer, Darren M.

    2016-03-01

    We present a new continuous-wave (CW) wearable diffuse optical device aimed at investigating the hemodynamic response of locally advanced breast cancer patients during a patient's first neoadjuvant chemotherapy infusion. The system consists of a flexible substrate that supports an array of surface-mount LED and photodiode pairs (i.e. optodes). Probe performance was evaluated using solid tissue-simulating phantoms. Measurements revealed high SNR (65dB), low source-detector crosstalk (-59 dB), high measurement precision (0.17%), and good thermal stability (0.2% Vrms/°C). A cuff occlusion experiment was performed on the forearm of a healthy volunteer to demonstrate the ability to track rapid hemodynamic changes.

  20. Stability and Compatibility of Ceftazidime Administered by Continuous Infusion to Intensive Care Patients

    PubMed Central

    Servais, Hélène; Tulkens, Paul M.

    2001-01-01

    The stability and compatibility of ceftazidime have been examined in the context of its potential use in concentrated solutions for continuous infusion in patients suffering from severe nosocomial pneumonia and receiving other intravenous medications by the same route. Ceftazidime stability in 4 to 12% solutions was found satisfactory (<10% degradation) for 24 h if kept at a temperature of 25°C (77°F) maximum. Studies mimicking the simultaneous administration of ceftazidime and other drugs as done in clinics showed physical incompatibilities with vancomycin, nicardipine, midazolam, and propofol and a chemical incompatibility with N-acetylcystein. Concentrated solutions (50 mg/ml) of erythromycin or clarithromycin caused the appearance of a precipitate, whereas gentamicin, tobramycin, amikacin, isepamicin, fluconazole, ketamine, sufentanil, valproic acid, furosemide, uradipil, and a standard amino acid solution were physically and chemically compatible. PMID:11502544

  1. Effects of an overnight intravenous lipid infusion on intramyocellular lipid content and insulin sensitivity in African-American versus Caucasian adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Lee, SoJung; Boesch, Chris; Kuk, Jennifer L.; Arslanian, Silva

    2012-01-01

    Objective To explain the predisposition for insulin resistance among African American (AA) adolescents, this study aimed to: 1) examine changes in intramyocellular lipid content (IMCL), and insulin sensitivity with intralipid (IL) infusion; and 2) determine whether the increase in IMCL is comparable between AA and Caucasian adolescents. Materials and Methods Thirteen AA and 15 Caucasian normal-weight adolescents (BMI <85th) underwent a 3-h hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp, on two occasions in random order, after an overnight 12-hr infusion of: 1) 20% IL and 2) normal saline (NS). IMCL was quantified by 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy in tibialis anterior muscle before and after IL infusion. Results During IL infusion, plasma TG, glycerol, FFA and fat oxidation increased significantly, with no race differences. Hepatic insulin sensitivity decreased with IL infusion with no difference between the groups. IL infusion was associated with a significant increase in IMCL, which was comparable between AA (Δ 105%; NS: 1.9 ± 0.8 vs. IL: 3.9 ± 1.6 mmol/kg wet weight) and Caucasian (Δ 86%; NS: 2.8 ± 2.1 vs. IL: 5.2 ± 2.4 mmol/kg wet weight), with similar reductions (P<0.01) in insulin sensitivity between the groups (Δ −44%: NS: 9.1 ± 3.3 vs. IL: 5.1 ± 1.8 mg/kg/min per µU/ml in AA) and (Δ−39%: NS: 12.9 ± 6.0 vs. IL: 7.9 ± 3.8 mg/kg/min per µU/ml in Caucasian) adolescents. Conclusions In healthy adolescents, an acute elevation in plasma FFA with IL infusion is accompanied by significant increases in IMCL and reductions in insulin sensitivity with no race differential. Our findings suggest that AA normal-weight adolescents are not more susceptible than Caucasians to FFA-induced IMCL accumulation and insulin resistance. PMID:23122836

  2. Antimicrobial effect of continuous lidocaine infusion in a Staphylococcus aureus-induced wound infection in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Lu, Cheng-Wei; Lin, Tzu-Yu; Shieh, Jiann-Shing; Wang, Ming-Jiuh; Chiu, Kuan-Ming

    2014-11-01

    Continuous infusion of local anesthetics in surgical wounds has been shown to be an effective technique for postoperative analgesia. To investigate the potential antimicrobial effect of continuous local anesthetic infusion, we adapted a mouse model of surgical wound infection to examine effects on antibacterial response. Forty male BALB/c mice were randomized into 2 groups. An incision wound was made over the dorsal flank and instilled with Staphylococcus aureus. An osmotic pump was then implanted to deliver either 0.9% NaCl or 2% lidocaine continuously. Each wound was cultured postoperatively at 2 days, and the colony count of S. aureus was determined. Results showed that the number of colony-forming units of S. aureus measured in wounds treated with lidocaine displayed a nearly 10-fold reduction compared to the wounds in the saline group (P=0.009). The demonstrated antibacterial activity indicates that local anesthetic infusion may play a role in prophylaxis for surgical wound infections.

  3. Continuous bilateral infusion of vigabatrin into the subthalamic nucleus: Effects on seizure threshold and GABA metabolism in two rat models.

    PubMed

    Gey, Laura; Gernert, Manuela; Löscher, Wolfgang

    2016-07-01

    The subthalamic nucleus (STN) plays a crucial role as a regulator of basal ganglia outflow but also influences the activity of cortical and limbic structures, so that it is widely used as a therapeutic target in different brain diseases, including epilepsy. In addition to electrical stimulation of the STN, targeted delivery of anti-seizure drugs to the STN may constitute an alternative treatment approach in patients with pharmacoresistant epilepsy. In the present experimental study, we investigated the anti-seizure and adverse effects of chronic infusion of vigabatrin into the STN of rats. Vigabatrin is a clinically approved anti-seizure drug, which acts by increasing brain GABA levels by irreversibly inhibiting GABA-aminotransferase (GABA-T). Based on functional and neurochemical effects of acute STN microinjection, doses for continuous infusion were calculated and administered, using an innovative drug infusion technology. Bilateral infusion of only 10μg/day vigabatrin over 3weeks into the STN resulted in an almost complete inhibition of GABA-T and 4-fold increase in GABA in the target region, which was associated with a significant increase in seizure threshold, determined once weekly by i.v. infusion of pentylenetetrazole (PTZ). Lower doses or unilateral infusion were less effective, both on PTZ seizures and on kindled seizures. Bilateral infusion into substantia nigra pars reticulata was less effective and more toxic than STN infusion. In part of the rats, tolerance to the anti-seizure effect developed. The data demonstrate that chronic administration of very low, nontoxic doses of vigabatrin into STN is an effective means of increasing local GABA concentrations and seizure threshold.

  4. Wearable near-infrared optical probe for continuous monitoring during breast cancer neoadjuvant chemotherapy infusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, Fei; Cormier, Timothy; Sauer-Budge, Alexis; Chaudhury, Rachita; Pera, Vivian; Istfan, Raeef; Chargin, David; Brookfield, Samuel; Ko, Naomi Yu; Roblyer, Darren M.

    2017-01-01

    We present a new continuous-wave wearable diffuse optical probe aimed at investigating the hemodynamic response of locally advanced breast cancer patients during neoadjuvant chemotherapy infusions. The system consists of a flexible printed circuit board that supports an array of six dual wavelength surface-mount LED and photodiode pairs. The probe is encased in a soft silicone housing that conforms to natural breast shape. Probe performance was evaluated using tissue-simulating phantoms and in vivo normal volunteer measurements. High SNR (71 dB), low source-detector crosstalk (-60 dB), high measurement precision (0.17%), and good thermal stability (0.22% Vrms/°C) were achieved in phantom studies. A cuff occlusion experiment was performed on the forearm of a healthy volunteer to demonstrate the ability to track rapid hemodynamic changes. Proof-of-principle normal volunteer measurements were taken to demonstrate the ability to collect continuous in vivo breast measurements. This wearable probe is a first of its kind tool to explore prognostic hemodynamic changes during chemotherapy in breast cancer patients.

  5. Efficacy of different doses of sugammadex after continuous infusion of rocuronium

    PubMed Central

    Soto Mesa, Diego; Fayad Fayad, Mounir; Pérez Arviza, Laura; Del Valle Ruiz, Verónica; Cosío Carreño, Fernando; Arguelles Tamargo, Luis; Amorín Díaz, Manuel; Fernández-Pello Montes, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effects of two different doses of sugammadex after maintenance anesthesia with sevofluorane and remifentanil and deep rocuronium-induced neuromuscular blockade (NMB). METHODS: Patients between 20 and 65 years of age, with American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status classification I-II, undergoing gynecological surgery were included in a prospective, comparative and randomized study. NMB was induced with an injection of 0.6 mg/kg of rocuronium followed by continuous infusion of 0.3-0.6 mg/kg per hour to maintain a deep block. Anesthesia was maintained with sevofluorane and remifentanil. Finally, when surgery was finished, a bolus of 2 mg/kg (group A) or 4 mg/kg (group B) of sugammadex was applied when the NMB first response in the train-of-four was reached. The primary clinical endpoint was time to recovery to a train-of-four ratio of 0.9. Other variables recorded were the time until recovery of train-of-four ratio of 0.7, 0.8, hemodynamic variables (arterial blood pressure and heart rate at baseline, starting sugammadex, and minutes 2, 5 and 10) and adverse events were presented after one hour in the post-anesthesia care unit. RESULTS: Thirty-two patients were included in the study: 16 patients in group A and 16 patients in group B. Only 14 patients each group were recorded because arterial pressure values were lost in two patients from each group in minute 10. The two groups were comparable. Median recovery time from starting of sugammadex administration to a train-of-four ratio of 0.9 in group A and B was 129 and 110 s, respectively. The estimated difference in recovery time between groups was 24 s (95%CI: 0 to 45 s, Hodges-Lehmann estimator), entirely within the predefined equivalence interval. Times to recovery to train-of-four ratios of 0.8 (group A: 101 s; group B: 82.5 s) and 0.7 (group A: 90 s; group B: 65 s) from start of sugammadex administration were not equivalent between groups. There was not a significant variation in

  6. Intraperitoneal Continuous-Rate Infusion for the Maintenance of Anesthesia in Laboratory Mice (Mus musculus)

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, Rebecca L; Terzi, Matthew C; Jaber, Samer M; Hankenson, F Claire; McKinstry-Wu, Andrew; Kelz, Max B; Marx, James O

    2016-01-01

    Intraperitoneal injectable anesthetics are often used to achieve surgical anesthesia in laboratory mice. Because bolus redosing of injectable anesthetics can cause unacceptably high mortality, we evaluated intraperitoneal continuous-rate infusion (CRI) of ketamine with or without xylazine for maintaining surgical anesthesia for an extended period of time. Anesthesia was induced in male C57BL/6J mice by using ketamine (80 mg/kg) and xylazine (8 mg/kg) without or with acepromazine at 0.1 mg/kg or 0.5 mg/kg. At 10 min after induction, CRI for 90 min was initiated and comprised 25%, 50%, or 100% of the initial ketamine dose per hour or 50% of the initial doses of both ketamine and xylazine. Anesthetic regimens were compared on the basis of animal immobility, continuous surgical depth of anesthesia as determined by the absence of a pedal withdrawal reflex, and mortality. Consistent with previous studies, the response to anesthetics was highly variable. Regimens that provided the longest continuous surgical plane of anesthesia with minimal mortality were ketamine–xylazine–acepromazine (0.1 mg/kg) with CRI of 100% of the initial ketamine dose and ketamine–xylazine–acepromazine (0.5 mg/kg) with CRI of 50% of the initial ketamine and xylazine doses. In addition, heart rate and respiratory rate did not increase consistently in response to a noxious stimulus during CRI anesthesia, even when mice exhibited a positive pedal withdrawal reflex, suggesting that these parameters are unreliable indicators of anesthetic depth during ketamine–xylazine anesthesia in mice. We conclude that intraperitoneal CRI anesthesia in mice prolongs injectable anesthesia more consistently and with lower mortality than does bolus redosing. PMID:27657709

  7. Controlled Study of the Effects of Continuous Intrathecal Baclofen Infusion in Non-Ambulant Children with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morton, Richard E.; Gray, Natalie; Vloeberghs, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To measure changes in children with severe spastic cerebral palsy (CP) after continuous intrathecal baclofen (ITB) infusion over 18 months and to compare the results with those of a comparison group awaiting treatment. Method: Thirty-eight children with severe spastic CP considered suitable for ITB were assessed when first seen, just before…

  8. Characterization of a model of systemic inflammation in humans in vivo elicited by continuous infusion of endotoxin

    PubMed Central

    Kiers, D.; Koch, R. M.; Hamers, L.; Gerretsen, J.; Thijs, E. J. M.; van Ede, L.; Riksen, N. P.; Kox, M.; Pickkers, P.

    2017-01-01

    Investigating the systemic inflammatory response in patients with critical illness such as sepsis, trauma and burns is complicated due to uncertainties about the onset, duration and severity of the insult. Therefore, in vivo models of inflammation are essential to study the pathophysiology and to evaluate immunomodulatory therapies. Intravenous bolus administration of endotoxin to healthy volunteers is a well-established model of a short-lived systemic inflammatory response, characterized by increased plasma cytokine levels, flu-like symptoms and fever. In contrast, patients suffering from systemic inflammation are often exposed to inflammatory stimuli for an extended period of time. Therefore, continuous infusion of endotoxin may better reflect the kinetics of the inflammatory response encountered in these patients. Herein, we characterize a novel model of systemic inflammation elicited by a bolus infusion of 1 ng/kg, followed by a 3hr continuous infusion of 1 ng/kg/h of endotoxin in healthy volunteers, and compared it with models of bolus administrations of 1 and 2 ng/kg of endotoxin. The novel model was well-tolerated and resulted in a more pronounced increase in plasma cytokine levels with different kinetics and more prolonged symptoms and fever compared with the bolus-only models. Therefore, the continuous endotoxin infusion model provides novel insights into kinetics of the inflammatory response during continuous inflammatory stimuli and accommodates a larger time window to evaluate immunomodulating therapies. PMID:28054645

  9. Effects of continuous glucocorticoid infusion on the progression of dentinal caries in growing rats.

    PubMed

    Huumonen, S; Larmas, M

    1998-10-01

    This study was undertaken to test the effects of a low dose of continuous glucocorticoid infusion on the rate of progression of dentinal caries in molars of young rats. Forty-seven rats were inoculated in the mouth with Streptococcus sobrinus and fed ad libitum a cariogenic diet and 10% sweetened water. After 10 days of caries initiation ten animals were killed to serve as a reference group. In the rest of the animals the cortisone or placebo pellet was implanted subcutaneously in the back of the neck. The daily release of cortisone was 0.42 mg per rat. Sweetened water was changed to pure water, and the diet was the same cariogenic diet. After 6 weeks of medication the areas of dentinal caries were quantified planimetrically. Schiff's staining was used to classify caries. Although cortisone medication slightly increased the number of carious lesions, statistical significance was not reached. However, compared with the placebo group, the rats receiving cortisone medication showed significantly increased dentinal caries progression and severity of lesions. This study suggests that glucocorticoids with a cariogenic diet reduce the intrinsic modulation or response of the odontoblasts to caries attack.

  10. New Regimen for Continuous Infusion of Vancomycin in Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Cristallini, Stefano; Hites, Maya; Kabtouri, Hakim; Roberts, Jason A.; Beumier, Marjorie; Cotton, Frederic; Lipman, Jeffrey; Jacobs, Frédérique; Vincent, Jean-Louis; Creteur, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Despite the development of new agents with activity against Gram-positive bacteria, vancomycin remains one of the primary antibiotics for critically ill septic patients. Because sepsis can alter antimicrobial pharmacokinetics, the development of an appropriate dosing strategy to provide adequate concentrations is crucial. The aim of this study was to prospectively validate a new dosing regimen of vancomycin given by continuous infusion (CI) to septic patients. We included all adult septic patients admitted to a mixed intensive care unit (ICU) between January 2012 and May 2013, who were treated with a new vancomycin CI regimen consisting of a loading dose of 35 mg/kg of body weight given as a 4-h infusion, followed by a daily CI dose adapted to creatinine clearance (CrCL), as estimated by the Cockcroft-Gault formula (median dose, 2,112 [1,500 to 2,838] mg). Vancomycin concentrations were measured at the end of the loading dose (T1), at 12 h (T2), at 24 h (T3), and the day after the start of therapy (T4). Vancomycin concentrations of 20 to 30 mg/liter at T2, T3, and T4 were considered adequate. A total of 107 patients (72% male) were included. Median age, weight, and CrCL were 59 (interquartile range [IQR], 48 to 71) years, 75 (IQR, 65 to 85) kg, and 94 (IQR, 56 to 140) ml/min, respectively. Vancomycin concentrations were 44 (IQR, 37 to 49), 25 (IQR, 21 to 32), 22 (IQR, 19 to 28), and 26 (IQR, 22 to 29) mg/liter at T1, T2, T3, and T4, respectively. Concentrations were adequate in 56% (60/107) of patients at T2, in 54% (57/105) at T3, and in 73% (41/56) at T4. This vancomycin regimen permitted rapid attainment of target concentrations in serum for most patients. Concentrations were insufficient in only 16% of patients at 12 h of treatment. PMID:27216073

  11. Continuous versus intermittent infusion of cefepime in neurosurgical patients with post-operative intracranial infections.

    PubMed

    Huang, Huawei; Huang, Shengyue; Zhu, Pengli; Xi, Xiuming

    2014-01-01

    Cefepime is administered as an intermittent infusion (II); however, continuous infusion (CI) may be advantageous because β-lactam antibiotics exhibit time-dependent antibacterial activity. This retrospective, non-randomised, comparative study included 68 neurosurgical patients with post-operative intracranial infections treated with 4g/day cefepime over 24h as a CI (n=34) or 2g every 12h as II (n=34). CI controlled the intracranial infection more rapidly and effectively than II (6.6±1.9 days vs. 7.8±2.6 days; P=0.036). By considering the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) to be 4μg/mL and 8μg/mL, the percentage of time when the cefepime plasma or CSF concentrations were higher than the MIC (%T>MIC) was calculated for each patient. For plasma cefepime concentrations, the %T(>MIC) in the CI group was higher than in the II group (for MICs of 8μg/mL, 100% vs. 75%, respectively). The mean calculated area under the curve (AUC) in the CI group was similar to the II group (1197.99±72.15μgh/mL vs. 890.84±140.78μgh/mL; P=0.655). For CSF cefepime concentrations, the %T(>MIC) in the CI group was higher than in the II group (for MICs of 4μg/mL and 8μg/mL, 83.3% and 75% vs. 25% and 0%, respectively). The mean calculated AUC for the CI group was higher than the II group (220.56±13.59μgh/mL vs. 86.34±5.69μgh/mL; P=0.003). Therefore, CI of cefepime significantly enhanced the antibacterial effect and reduced the treatment duration in neurosurgical patients with post-operative intracranial infections.

  12. Infusion of long-chain fatty acid anions by continuous-flow centrifugation

    PubMed Central

    Greenough, William B.; Crespin, Stephen R.; Steinberg, Daniel

    1969-01-01

    We have developed a method for the rapid infusion into plasma of large amounts of long-chain free fatty acids (FFA). Unanesthetized dogs were connected by a peripheral artery to a closed, continuousflow centrifuge from which cells and plasma emerged in separate lines. Sodium oleate was infused directly into the plasma line before cells and plasma were recombined and returned to the animal through a peripheral vein. The centrifugation procedure itself produced only small changes in circulating levels of glucose, FFA, and electrolytes. Plasma flow rates as high as 100 ml/min could be maintained, and centrifugations of 12 hr were accomplished without complications. During centrifugation, sodium oleate was infused at rates up to 80 μEq/kg per min for 2.5 hr; the maximum molar ratio of FFA to albumin without hemolysis was 10:1. Plasma FFA levels rose rapidly after infusions were started and reached constant elevated levels within 15-20 min. Oleate infusion at 10-50 μEq/kg per min produced a rise in plasma FFA proportional to the infusion rate. The maximum increment in plasma FFA above control values was 1.66 μEq/ml. When infusions ended, plasma FFA declined rapidly to control levels. Oleate infusion at rates below 30 μEq/kg per min did not reduce levels of other plasma FFA. Infusion at high rates was accompanied by a marked fall in blood glucose. This method permits adminsitration of long-chain fatty acids in sufficient quantities to study their individual metabolic effects, and provides a new way to supply lipid calories parenterally. PMID:5822596

  13. Comparison of continuous infusion with intermittent bolus administration of cefotaxime on blood and cavity fluid drug concentrations in neonatal foals.

    PubMed

    Hewson, J; Johnson, R; Arroyo, L G; Diaz-Mendez, A; Ruiz-López, J A; Gu, Y; del Castillo, J R E

    2013-02-01

    Healthy neonatal foals were treated with cefotaxime by bolus (40 mg/kg i.v. q6h for 12 doses; n=10) or by infusion (loading dose of 40 mg/kg i.v. followed by continuous infusion of a total daily dose of 160 mg/kg per 24 h for 3 days; n=5). Population pharmacokinetics was determined, and concentrations in cavity fluids were measured at steady state (72 h). Highest measured serum drug concentration in the bolus group was 88.09 μg/mL and minimum drug concentration (C(min)) was 0.78 μg/mL at 6-h postadministration (immediately before each next dose), whereas infusion resulted in a steady-state concentration of 16.10 μg/mL in the infusion group. Mean cefotaxime concentration in joint fluid at 72 h was higher (P=0.051) in the infusion group (5.02 μg/mL) compared to the bolus group (0.78 μg/mL). Drug concentration in CSF at 72 h was not different between groups (P=0.243) and was substantially lower than serum concentrations in either group. Insufficient data on pulmonary epithelial lining fluid were available to compare the methods of administration for cefotaxime in this cavity fluid. Results support continuous drug infusion over bolus dosing in the treatment for neonatal foal septicemia to optimize time that cefotaxime concentration exceeds the minimum inhibitory concentration of common equine pathogens.

  14. Development and Evaluation of a Guideline for Monitoring Propylene Glycol Toxicity in Pediatric Intensive Care Unit Patients Receiving Continuous Infusion Lorazepam

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Rebecca; Gupta, Sameer

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To develop and determine the safety of a guideline, by using osmol gap as an indicator of propylene glycol toxicity for pediatric patients receiving continuous infusion lorazepam. METHODS: From existing adult data, a guideline was developed for the use of continuous infusion lorazepam in pediatric critical care patients with recommendations for using osmol gap as an indicator of propylene glycol toxicity. A retrospective medical chart review was performed of patients receiving continuous infusion lorazepam from February 2012 to September 2012 for whom the guideline was used. RESULTS: Twenty-one patients received continuous infusion lorazepam for sedation in the pediatric intensive care unit during the 9-month study period for a total of 23 infusions. Eight patients (34.8%) had an osmol gap of ≥ 12 mOsm/kg during lorazepam infusion, and 7 patients (30.4%) did not have an elevated osmol gap at any point during the infusion. Two patients (8.6%) had clinical toxicity as indicated by elevated anion gap or lactate in addition to an osmol gap ≥ 12 mOsm/kg, while no patients experienced clinical toxicity with an osmol gap < 12 mOsm/kg. CONCLUSIONS: A guideline for the use of lorazepam infusion in pediatric critical care patients was developed and evaluated for safety. Lorazepam continuous infusions appeared to be associated with minimal toxicity in pediatric intensive care unit patients when the osmol gap monitoring guideline was used. PMID:26472950

  15. Increased incidence of acute graft-versus-host disease with the continuous infusion of cyclosporine A compared to twice-daily infusion.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, N; Kanda, Y; Matsubara, M; Asano, Y; Nakagawa, M; Sakata-Yanagimoto, M; Kandabashi, K; Izutsu, K; Imai, Y; Hangaishi, A; Kurokawa, M; Tsujino, S; Ogawa, S; Aoki, K; Chiba, S; Motokura, T; Hirai, H

    2004-03-01

    We retrospectively compared the incidence of acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) before and after September 1999, when we changed the mode of cyclosporine A (CsA) administration from twice-daily infusions (TD) (n=58) to continuous infusion (CIF) (n=71). The incidence of grade II-IV acute GVHD in the CIF group (56%) was significantly higher than that in the TD group (27%, P=0.00022). Multivariate analysis identified only two independent significant risk factors for the development of grade II-IV acute GVHD; CIF of CsA (relative risk 2.59, 95% CI 1.46-4.60, P=0.0011) and the presence of HLA mismatch (2.01, 95% CI 1.15-3.53, P=0.014). The incidence of relapse was significantly lower in the CIF group when adjusted for disease status before transplantation (0.41, 95% CI 0.18-0.95, P=0.038), which resulted in better disease-free survival in high-risk patients (43 vs 16% at 2 years, P=0.039), but not in standard-risk patients (72 vs 80%, P=0.45). CIF of CsA with a target level of 250-400 ng/ml may not be appropriate for GVHD prophylaxis in standard-risk patients.

  16. Continuous infusion of porcine factor VIII in patients with haemophilia A and high-responding inhibitors: stability and clinical experience.

    PubMed

    O'Gorman, P; Dimichele, D M; Kasper, C K; Mannucci, P M; Santagostini, E; Hay, C R

    2001-11-01

    A multicentre retrospective survey was conducted to assess the efficacy and side-effect profile of porcine factor VIII (pFVIII:C) given by continuous infusion (CI) to patients with congenital haemophilia A and inhibitors. Twenty-nine episodes in 18 patients were treated by CI of pFVIII:C. Efficacy was graded as good in 79% of infusions and fair in 17%. There was a failed response in only one episode. Fourteen percent of patients experienced transfusion reactions with bolus doses, but no reactions were observed in patients given CI. There were no severe reactions. All the reactions resolved following interruption of the infusion and administration of steroids. Premedication did not prevent reactions. In this series the median decrease in platelet count after bolus injection of pFVIII:C was -67 X 10(9) L(-1) compared with a median decrease of -2 x 109 L(-1) during the course of CI, thus, continuous infusion of pFVIII:C appears to have less effect on platelet count than bolus injection. An anamnestic response was associated with 77% of infusions. This high rate of anamnesis reflects patient selection, in that they were all known to have high-level high-responding FVIII inhibitors with cross-reactivity to pFVIII. After reconstitution, the pFVIII:C showed little loss in factor VIII activity in solution over a 24-h period. We conclude that pFVIII:C may be effectively administered by CI to patients with haemophilia A and high-responding FVIII inhibitors. CI is the probably the mode of administration of choice for intensive replacement therapy with pFVIII.

  17. Oxalate Nephropathy After Continuous Infusion of High-Dose Vitamin C as an Adjunct to Burn Resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Pamplin, Jeremy; Studer, Lynette; Hughes, Rhome L.; King, Booker T.; Graybill, John C.; Chung, Kevin K.

    2016-01-01

    Fluid resuscitation is the foundation of management in burn patients and is the topic of considerable research. One adjunct in burn resuscitation is continuous, high-dose vitamin C (ascorbic acid) infusion, which may reduce fluid requirements and thus decrease the risk for over resuscitation. Research in preclinical studies and clinical trials has shown continuous infusions of high-dose vitamin C to be beneficial with decrease in resuscitative volumes and limited adverse effects. However, high-dose and low-dose vitamin C supplementation has been shown to cause secondary calcium oxalate nephropathy, worsen acute kidney injury, and delay renal recovery in non-burn patients. To the best of our knowledge, the authors present the first case series in burn patients in whom calcium oxalate nephropathy has been identified after high-dose vitamin C therapy. PMID:25812044

  18. Continuous controlled-infusion of hypertonic saline solution in traumatic brain-injured patients: a 9-year retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Description of a continuous hypertonic saline solution (HSS) infusion using a dose-adaptation of natremia in traumatic brain injured (TBI) patients with refractory intracranial hypertension (ICH). Methods We performed a single-center retrospective study in a surgical intensive care unit of a tertiary hospital. Fifty consecutive TBI patients with refractory ICH treated with continuous HSS infusion adapted to a target of natremia. In brief, a physician set a target of natremia adapted to the evolution of intracranial pressure (ICP). Flow of NaCl 20% was a priori calculated according to natriuresis, and the current and target natremia that were assessed every 4 hours. Results The HSS infusion was initiated for a duration of 7 (5 to 10) (8 ± 4) days. ICP decreased from 29 (26 to 34) (31 ± 9) mm Hg at H0 to 20 (15 to 26) (21 ± 8) mm Hg at H1 (P < 0.05). Cerebral perfusion pressure increased from 61 (50 to 70) (61 ± 13) mm Hg at H0 up to 67 (60 to 79) (69 ± 12) mm Hg at H1 (P < 0.05). No rebound of ICH was reported after stopping continuous HSS infusion. Natremia increased from 140 (138 to 143) (140 ± 4) at H0 up to 144 (141 to 148) (144 ± 4) mmol/L at H4 (P < 0.05). Plasma osmolarity increased from 275 (268 to 281) (279 ± 17) mmol/L at H0 up to 290 (284 to 307) (297 ± 17) mmol/L at H24 (P < 0.05). The main side effect observed was an increase in chloremia from 111 (107 to 119) (113 ± 8) mmol/L at H0 up to 121 (117 to 124) (121 ± 6) mmol/L at H24 (P < 0.05). Neither acute kidney injury nor pontine myelinolysis was recorded. Conclusions Continuous HSS infusion adapted to close biologic monitoring enables long-lasting control of natremia in TBI patients along with a decreased ICP without any rebound on infusion discontinuation. PMID:22035596

  19. A continuous infusion of a minor histocompatibility antigen-immunodominant peptide induces a delay of male skin graft rejection.

    PubMed

    Sireci, Guido; Barera, Annalisa; Macaluso, Pasquale; Di Sano, Caterina; Bonanno, Cesira T; Pio La Manna, Marco; Di Liberto, Diana; Dieli, Francesco; Salerno, Alfredo

    2009-01-01

    We previously reported that an inhibition of antigen-specific Interferon-gamma release and cytotoxicity occurs after a continuous infusion of an HY immunodominant peptide although this treatment is not able to cause a significant delay of male skin grafts rejection. In vivo administration of high doses of an HY peptide, through mini-osmotic pumps, in naïve female mice was used to study the effects on the male skin grafts rejection. A continuous infusion of 1mg of an HY peptide induces a significant delay of male skin graft rejection. In vitro HY-specific Interferon-gamma release was inhibited adding peptide-specific suppressor cells: the ability to inhibit Interferon-gamma release was evident when two HY peptides were present on the same dendritic cells indicating that the suppressor cells exert "linked-suppression". The phenotype of the suppressor cells is CD8(+)CD28(-) and these cells express more CD62 ligand and FOXP3 than controls. Suppressor cells were able to cause a significant delay of rejection of male skin grafts when injected in naive female mice. The inhibitory effects of these suppressor cells seem to be due to the impairment of antigen presentation; down-regulation of B7 molecules on dendritic cells occurred. Taken all together, our data demonstrate that a continuous infusion of an immunodominant HY peptide induces a T CD8 suppressor subset able to inhibit immune responses to male tissues and cells.

  20. DNA alkylation and tumor induction in regenerating rat liver after cell cycle-related continuous N-nitrosodimethylamine infusion

    SciTech Connect

    Rabes, H.M.; Kerler, R.; Wilhelm, R.

    1983-01-01

    Synchronized regenerating rat liver after partial hepatectomy was used to study cell cycle-related DNA base alkylation and liver carcinogenesis. A continuous iv infusion of (/sup 14/C)N-nitrosodimethylamine (DMN) at a dose of 0.5 mg/kg/hour was given to inbred male Wistar Af/Han rats over a period of 8 hours either during the G1 phase, hydroxyurea-synchronized DNA synthesis, or the G2+M-phase of regenerating liver or to untreated rats (G0-phase liver--carcinogen dose, 1.5 mg/kg/hour). Two hours after the end of the infusion, the amount of 7-methylguanine was highest in the G0-phase liver, with a decrease in the G1 phase, the S-phase, and the G2+M-phase. After continuous DMN exposure, the O6-methylguanine:7-methylguanine ratio was lower in the S-phase and G2+M-phase livers than in the G0-phase and G1-phase livers, indicating an increased O6-methylguanine repair during DNA synthesis and the G2+M-phase. Liver tumors in rats treated by continuous DMN infusion either during the G0 phase or the S-phase developed only after carcinogen exposure during DNA synthesis.

  1. Insulin therapy in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Tamborlane, William V; Sikes, Kristin A

    2012-03-01

    Insulin therapy is the mainstay of treatment in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and is a key component in the treatment of type 2 diabetes (T2D) in this population as well. A major aim of current insulin replacement therapy is to simulate the normal pattern of insulin secretion as closely as possible. This aim can best be achieved with basal-bolus therapy using multiple daily injections (MDI) or continuous insulin infusion (CSII) pump therapy. Only a few years ago, options for insulin formulations were limited. There are now more than 10 varieties of biosynthetic human and analogue insulin.

  2. Efficacy of Continuous S(+)-Ketamine Infusion for Postoperative Pain Control: A Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Miziara, Luiz Eduardo de Paula Gomes; Simoni, Ricardo Francisco; Esteves, Luís Otávio; Cangiani, Luis Henrique; Grillo-Filho, Gil Fernando Ribeiro; Paula, Anderson Garcia Lima E

    2016-01-01

    Aim. A double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial was designed to evaluate the efficacy of continuous intraoperative infusion of S(+)-ketamine under intravenous anesthesia with target-controlled infusion of remifentanil and propofol for postoperative pain control. Methods. Forty-eight patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy were assigned to receive continuous S(+)-ketamine infusion at a rate of 0.3 mg·kg(-1)·h(-1) (n = 24, intervention group) or an equivalent volume of saline at the same rate (n = 24, placebo group). The same target-controlled intravenous anesthesia was induced in both groups. Pain was assessed using a 0 to 10 verbal numeric rating scale during the first 12 postoperative hours. Pain scores and morphine consumption were recorded in the postanesthesia care unit (PACU) and at 4 and 12 hours after surgery. Results. Pain scores were lower in the intervention group at all time points. Morphine consumption did not differ significantly between groups during PACU stay, but it was significantly lower in the intervention group at each time point after PACU discharge (P = 0.0061). At 12 hours after surgery, cumulative morphine consumption was also lower in the intervention group (5.200 ± 2.707) than in the placebo group (7.525 ± 1.872). Conclusions. Continuous S(+)-ketamine infusion during laparoscopic cholecystectomy under target-controlled intravenous anesthesia provided better postoperative pain control than placebo, reducing morphine requirement. Trial Registration. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02421913.

  3. Decreased incidence of acute graft-versus-host disease by continuous infusion of cyclosporine with a higher target blood level.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Kumi; Kanda, Yoshinobu; Nakasone, Hideki; Arai, Shunya; Nishimoto, Nahoko; Sato, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Takuro; Hosoya, Noriko; Izutsu, Koji; Asai, Takashi; Hangaishi, Akira; Motokura, Toru; Chiba, Shigeru; Kurokawa, Mineo

    2008-03-01

    Cyclosporine A (CsA) is the mainstay of pharmacologic prevention of acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). We previously reported that continuous infusion of CsA with a target blood level between 250 and 400 ng/ml significantly increased the incidence of acute GVHD compared to twice-daily infusion with a target trough level between 150 and 300 ng/ml. Thus, we raised the target level of CsA continuous infusion to 450-550 ng/ml. We treated 33 patients with the higher target level (CsA500) and compared the efficacy and toxicity with those in the 33 historical control patients (CsA300 group). Other transplantation procedures were not changed. The patients' characteristics were equivalent. The average CsA concentration was adjusted around 500 ng/ml and the actual daily dose was maintained at the initial dose (CsA 3mg/kg/day). Toxicities were equivalently observed among the two groups. The incidence of grades II-IV acute GVHD was significantly lower in the CsA500 group (27 vs. 52%, P = 0.033). The target level of CsA was identified as an independent significant risk factor for grades II-IV acute GVHD (P = 0.039), adjusted for the presence of HLA mismatch. The incidence of chronic GVHD was also decreased in the CsA500 group (47 vs. 73%, P = 0.016). We conclude that the toxicity of the continuous CsA infusion with a target level of 450-550 ng/ml is acceptable and the efficacy to prevent acute GVHD is significant. A larger comparative study is warranted to confirm these findings.

  4. Renal and segmental pancreatic grafting with draining of exocrine secretion and initial continuous intravenous cyclosporin A in a patient with insulin-dependent diabetes and renal failure

    PubMed Central

    Calne, R Y; White, D J G; Rolles, K; Duffy, T J; Kass, T

    1982-01-01

    A patient with renal failure and insulin-dependent diabetes received renal and segmental pancreatic allografts from the same donor, with exocrine drainage of the pancreas being directed into the bowel. An attempt was made to maintain the serum concentrations of cyclosporin A between 300 and 1000 μg/l to avoid serious nephrotoxicity and rejection. Considerable difficulty was experienced in controlling the serum concentrations even with continuous intravenous infusion. When the concentrations were maintained between 300 and 1000 μg/l function in both allografts was satisfactory. At seven months the patient required no insulin and had good renal function. He was not receiving corticosteroids. ImagesFIG 1 PMID:6809184

  5. Impact of the Type of Continuous Insulin Administration on Metabolism in a Diabetic Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Schaschkow, A.; Dal, S.; Langlois, A.; Seyfritz, E.; Sookhareea, C.; Bietiger, W.; Peronet, C.; Jeandidier, N.; Pinget, M.; Sigrist, S.

    2016-01-01

    Exogenous insulin is the only treatment available for type 1 diabetic patients and is mostly administered by subcutaneous (SC) injection in a basal and bolus scheme using insulin pens (injection) or pumps (preimplanted SC catheter). Some divergence exists between these two modes of administration, since pumps provide better glycaemic control compared to injections in humans. The aim of this study was to compare the impacts of two modes of insulin administration (single injections of long-acting insulin or pump delivery of rapid-acting insulin) at the same dosage (4 IU/200 g/day) on rat metabolism and tissues. The rat weight and blood glucose levels were measured periodically after treatment. Immunostaining for signs of oxidative stress and for macrophages was performed on the liver and omental tissues. The continuous insulin delivery by pumps restored normoglycaemia, which induced the reduction of both reactive oxygen species and macrophage infiltration into the liver and omentum. Injections controlled the glucose levels for only a short period of time and therefore tissue stress and inflammation were elevated. In conclusion, the insulin administration mode has a crucial impact on rat metabolic parameters, which has to be taken into account when studies are designed. PMID:27504460

  6. Enhancing the [13C]bicarbonate signal in cardiac hyperpolarized [1-13C]pyruvate MRS studies by infusion of glucose, insulin and potassium.

    PubMed

    Lauritzen, Mette Hauge; Laustsen, Christoffer; Butt, Sadia Asghar; Magnusson, Peter; Søgaard, Lise Vejby; Ardenkjær-Larsen, Jan Henrik; Åkeson, Per

    2013-11-01

    A change in myocardial metabolism is a known effect of several diseases. MRS with hyperpolarized (13)C-labelled pyruvate is a technique capable of detecting changes in myocardial pyruvate metabolism, and has proven to be useful for the evaluation of myocardial ischaemia in vivo. However, during fasting, the myocardial glucose oxidation is low and the fatty acid oxidation (β-oxidation) is high, which complicates the interpretation of pyruvate metabolism with the technique. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the infusion of glucose, insulin and potassium (GIK) could increase the myocardial glucose oxidation in the citric acid cycle, reflected as an increase in the [(13)C]bicarbonate signal in cardiac hyperpolarized [1-(13)C]pyruvate MRS measurements in fasted rats. Two groups of rats were infused with two different doses of GIK and investigated by MRS after injection of hyperpolarized [1-(13)C]pyruvate. No [(13)C]bicarbonate signal could be detected in the fasted state. However, a significant increase in the [(13)C]bicarbonate signal was observed by the infusion of a high dose of GIK. This study demonstrates that a high [(13)C]bicarbonate signal can be achieved by GIK infusion in fasted rats. The increased [(13)C]bicarbonate signal indicates an increased flux of pyruvate through the pyruvate dehydrogenase enzyme complex and an increase in myocardial glucose oxidation through the citric acid cycle.

  7. Should β-lactam antibiotics be administered by continuous infusion in critically ill patients? A survey of Australia and New Zealand intensive care unit doctors and pharmacists.

    PubMed

    Cotta, Menino O; Dulhunty, Joel M; Roberts, Jason A; Myburgh, John; Lipman, Jeffrey

    2016-06-01

    Although there is a biological precedent for administration of β-lactam antibiotics by continuous or extended infusion, there is no definitive evidence of a survival benefit compared with intermittent administration. The aim of this study was to explore clinician uncertainty with regard to the administration of β-lactam antibiotics by continuous infusion. Doctors and pharmacists in Australian and New Zealand intensive care units (ICUs) were surveyed to investigate current β-lactam antibiotic administration practices as well as the degree of uncertainty regarding the benefit of continuous infusion of two commonly used broad-spectrum β-lactams, namely meropenem and piperacillin/tazobactam (TZP). There were 111 respondents to the survey. Intermittent infusion was reported as standard practice for meropenem (73.9%) and TZP (82.0%). A greater proportion of pharmacists compared with doctors believed continuous infusion to be more effective than intermittent administration (85.4% vs. 34.3%, respectively; P <0.001). Both groups reported uncertainty as to whether administration by continuous infusion resulted in better patient outcomes (65.9% and 74.6%, respectively; P = 0.85). Overall, 91.0% of respondents were prepared to enrol eligible patients into a definitive randomised controlled trial on β-lactam antibiotic administration. In conclusion, there is equipoise among clinicians working in Australian and New Zealand ICUs as to whether administration by continuous infusion offers a survival benefit in critically ill patients.

  8. Continuous infusion of tracer norepinephrine may miscalculate unidirectional nerve uptake of norepinephrine in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Henriksen, J.H.; Christensen, N.J.; Ring-Larsen, H. )

    1989-08-01

    In order to evaluate uptake kinetics of norepinephrine (NE) in different tissues, a catheterization study was performed in control subjects (n = 6) and patients with enhanced sympathetic nervous activity (cirrhosis, n = 12) during constant intravenous infusion of L(3H)norepinephrine ((3H)NE) for 75 minutes. In spite of a higher NE spillover from kidneys in patients compared with controls (82 vs. 49 ng/min, p less than 0.01), renal extraction ratios of (3H)NE were similar in the two groups (0.33 vs. 0.32, NS), and no significant change was observed during the time of infusion. In contrast, liver-intestine extraction ratios of (3H)NE decreased significantly and equally with infusion time in patients (from 0.57 to 0.44, p less than 0.01) and controls (from 0.59 to 0.46, p less than 0.01). This was observed despite the fact that spillover of NE from this vascular bed was observed only in patients with cirrhosis and not in controls (41 vs. -5 ng/min, p less than 0.02). In the lower limb, net release of NE was similar in patients and controls, and extraction ratios of (3H)NE decreased almost equally with infusion time (from 0.35 to 0.30, p less than 0.01 and from 0.40 to 0.24, p less than 0.1, respectively). Whole-body clearance of (3H)NE decreased over time in patients (-6%, p less than 0.01) and controls (-20%, p less than 0.01), but significant difference was not observed between the groups. We conclude that failure to attain a steady state with respect to (3H)NE removal was demonstrated in areas of large tissue volume relative to blood flow.

  9. Lack of difference between continuous versus intermittent heparin infusion on maintenance of intra-arterial catheter in postoperative pediatric surgery: a randomized controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Witkowski, Maria Carolina; de Moraes, Maria Antonieta P.; Firpo, Cora Maria F.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare two systems of arterial catheters maintenance in postoperative pediatric surgery using intermittent or continuous infusion of heparin solution and to analyze adverse events related to the site of catheter insertion and the volume of infused heparin solution. METHODS: Randomized control trial with 140 patients selected for continuous infusion group (CIG) and intermittent infusion group (IIG). The variables analyzed were: type of heart disease, permanence time and size of the catheter, insertion site, technique used, volume of heparin solution and adverse events. The descriptive variables were analyzed by Student's t-test and the categorical variables, by chi-square test, being significant p<0.05. RESULTS: The median age was 11 (0-22) months, and 77 (55%) were females. No significant differences between studied variables were found, except for the volume used in CIG (12.0±1.2mL/24 hours) when compared to IIG (5.3±3.5mL/24 hours) with p<0.0003. CONCLUSIONS: The continuous infusion system and the intermittent infusion of heparin solution can be used for intra-arterial catheters maintenance in postoperative pediatric surgery, regardless of patient's clinical and demographic characteristics. Adverse events up to the third postoperative day occurred similarly in both groups. However, the intermittent infusion system usage in underweight children should be considered, due to the lower volume of infused heparin solution [ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01097031]. PMID:24473958

  10. Postoperative Pain Control with the Fentanyl Patch and Continuous Paravertebral Anesthetic Infusion after Posterior Occipitocervical Junction Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Sivakumar, Walavan; Karsy, Michael; Brock, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative pain is a significant concern for patients who undergo surgery via a midline posterior approach to the occipitocervical junction and spinal axis. The development of the disposable, ambulatory pain pump presents a novel alternative for treatment of postoperative pain. The authors describe a multimodal treatment algorithm for postoperative pain after posterior occipitocervical junction surgery that uses the On-Q pain catheter system (I-Flow Corp., Lake Forest, CA) and a fentanyl patch. The On-Q PainBuster catheter system is a disposable, ambulatory device that allows for continuous anesthetic delivery directly into or adjacent to the wound. On-Q catheters are placed in the nuchal musculature for continuous infusion of 0.5% bupivacaine. The On-Q catheter infusion is continued for three days, and the catheters are then withdrawn. Patients are also provided with a transdermal fentanyl patch at the start of surgery. In regards to complications at our facility, there have been no cases of respiratory depression or arrest postoperatively and no wound infections, but one case of inadvertent subdural placement. The technique described for the use of the fentanyl patch and a continuous anesthetic delivery device in surgery of the occipitocervical junction presents a novel alternative to the current standard of care in pain control after suboccipital decompression. PMID:27433423

  11. High-dose, continuous-infusion cyclophosphamide, cytarabine, vincristine, and prednisone for remission induction in refractory adult acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Guthrie, T H

    1987-04-01

    Fifteen consecutive patients with refractory adult acute leukemia (RAAL) were treated with a combination of high-dose, continuous-infusion cyclophosphamide, cytarabine, vincristine, and prednisone (Hi-COAP). The initial nine patients received cyclophosphamide 350 mg/m2 as a 24-hour intravenous (IV) infusion over 5 days; cytarabine, 100 mg/m2 IV bolus every 12 hours for ten doses; vincristine, 2.0 mg IV bolus on day 1; and prednisone, 100 mg orally for 7 days. The last six patients had the cyclophosphamide infusion lengthened to 7 days, and the cytarabine increased to 14 doses. All patients were evaluable for toxicity and response. Seven patients (47%) obtained a complete remission and six patients (40%) a partial remission. Median duration of all remissions has been 7.0 months with a range of 1 to 32 months. Toxicity has been limited to primarily myelosuppression with no hemorrhagic cystitis, central nervous system (CNS), hepatic, or pulmonary toxicity noted. Gastrointestinal toxicity was mild, with no effect on nutritional status noted. Median duration of complete responders was 8.5 months. Thus, Hi-COAP demonstrates promising efficacy with minimal toxicity in RAAL and warrants further exploration in multiinstitutional trials.

  12. A prospective evaluation of propylene glycol clearance and accumulation during continuous-infusion lorazepam in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Nelsen, Jamie L; Haas, Curtis E; Habtemariam, Bahru; Kaufman, David C; Partridge, Amy; Welle, Stephen; Forrest, Alan

    2008-01-01

    Propylene glycol is a commonly used diluent in several pharmaceutical preparations, including the sedative lorazepam. Fifty critically ill patients receiving continuous-infusion lorazepam for a minimum of 36 hours were prospectively evaluated to determine the extent of propylene glycol accumulation over time, characterize propylene glycol clearance in the presence of critical illness, and develop a pharmacokinetic model that would predict clearance based on patient-specific clinical, laboratory, and demographic factors. In this cohort, the median lorazepam infusion rate was 2.1 mg/h (0.5-18). Propylene glycol concentration correlated poorly with osmolality, osmol gap, and lactate. In all, 8 patients (16%) had significant propylene glycol accumulation (>25mg/dL). When propylene glycol concentrations were >25 mg/dL, the median lorazepam infusion rate before sample collection was higher, 6.4 (1.9-11.3) versus 2.0 (0.5-7.4) mg/h (P =.0003). A linear first-order model with interoccasion variability on clearance adjusted for total body weight and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score predicted propylene glycol concentration.

  13. Continuous infraclavicular perineural infusion with clonidine and ropivacaine compared with ropivacaine alone: a randomized, double-blinded, controlled study.

    PubMed

    Ilfeld, Brian M; Morey, Timothy E; Enneking, F Kayser

    2003-09-01

    Although clonidine has been shown to increase the duration of local anesthetic action and prolong postoperative analgesia when included in single-injection nerve blocks, a controlled investigation of the efficacy of this practice to improve analgesia for continuous perineural local anesthetic infusion has not been reported. In this study, ambulatory patients (n = 34) undergoing moderately painful upper extremity orthopedic surgery received an infraclavicular brachial plexus block (mepivacaine 1.5%, epinephrine 2.5 micro g/mL, and bicarbonate 0.1 mEq/mL) and a perineural catheter before surgery. After surgery, patients were discharged home with a portable infusion pump delivering either ropivacaine 0.2% or ropivacaine 0.2% plus clonidine 1 micro g/mL via the catheter for 3 days (basal, 8 mL/h; patient-controlled bolus, 2 mL every 20 min). Investigators and patients were blinded to random group assignment. Daily end-points included pain scores, patient-controlled bolus doses, oral analgesic use, sleep quality, and symptoms of catheter- or infusion-related complications. Adding clonidine to ropivacaine resulted in a statistically significant decrease in the number of self-administered 2-mL bolus doses on postoperative Days 0 and 1 (P < 0.02), but this decreased actual local anesthetic consumption by an average of only 2-7 mL/d (P < 0.02). There were no statistically significant differences between the two groups for any of the other variables investigated, including sleep quality or oral analgesic requirements. We conclude that adding 1 micro g/mL of clonidine to a ropivacaine infraclavicular perineural infusion does not provide clinically relevant improvements in analgesia, sleep quality, or oral analgesic requirements for ambulatory patients having moderately painful upper extremity surgery.

  14. Therapeutic drug monitoring of continuous-infusion acylovir for disseminated herpes simplex virus infection in a neonate receiving concurrent extracorporeal life support and continuous renal replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Cies, Jeffrey J; Moore, Wayne S; Miller, Kyle; Small, Christine; Carella, Dominick; Conley, Susan; Parker, Jason; Shea, Paul; Chopra, Arun

    2015-02-01

    Disseminated herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection in neonates represents a devastating entity that yields high mortality. Acyclovir is the primary antiviral agent used to treat life-threatening HSV infections in neonates; however, even though the agent has reduced morbidity overall from these infections, mortality with disseminated disease remains high. Currently, to our knowledge, no data exist regarding therapeutic drug monitoring of acyclovir in the setting of extracorporeal life support (ECLS) or continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) coupled with ECLS. We describe the case of a 14-day-old female with disseminated HSV-1 infection that progressed to fulminant hepatic and renal failure, necessitating the use of ECLS for hemodynamic support and CRRT as a treatment modality for hepatic and renal failure. The standard dosage of acyclovir 20 mg/kg/dose intravenously every 8 hours had been initiated, but after conversion to ECLS and CRRT, the patient's dosage was increased to 30 mg/kg/dose every 8 hours. After a repeat viral load remained unchanged from the initial viral load at 1 × 10(8)  copies/ml, the patient was transitioned from intermittent dosing to a continuous infusion of acyclovir added to the dialysate solution for CRRT at a concentration of 5.5 mg/L. To provide an optimal outcome, dosing was designed to maintain acyclovir plasma concentrations of at least 3 mg/L in order to maintain an acyclovir concentration of at least 1 mg/L in the cerebrospinal fluid. The patient's acyclovir serum concentrations measured at 24 and 72 hours after starting continuous-infusion acyclovir via the dialysate were 8.8 and 5.3 mg/L, respectively, allowing for a continuous serum concentration above 3 mg/L. Unfortunately, before a repeat viral load could be obtained to assess the efficacy of the continuous infusion acyclovir, the patient experienced an intracerebral hemorrhage as a complication related to ECLS after which technological support was withdrawn

  15. GBR12909 attenuates amphetamine-induced striatal dopamine release as measured by [(11)C]raclopride continuous infusion PET scans.

    PubMed

    Villemagne, V L; Wong, D F; Yokoi, F; Stephane, M; Rice, K C; Matecka, D; Clough, D J; Dannals, R F; Rothman, R B

    1999-09-15

    Major neurochemical effects of methamphetamine include release of dopamine (DA), serotonin (5-HT), and norepinephrine (NE) via a carrier-mediated exchange mechanism. Preclinical research supports the hypothesis that elevations of mesolimbic DA mediate the addictive and reinforcing effects of methamphetamine and amphetamine. This hypothesis has not been adequately tested in humans. Previous in vivo rodent microdialysis demonstrated that the high affinity DA uptake inhibitor, GBR12909, attenuates cocaine- and amphetamine-induced increases in mesolimbic DA. The present study determined the ability of GBR12909 to attenuate amphetamine-induced increases in striatal DA as measured by [(11)C]raclopride continuous infusion positron emission tomography (PET) scans in two Papio anubis baboons. [(11)C]Raclopride was given in a continuous infusion paradigm resulting in a flat volume of distribution vs. time for up to 45 min postinjection. At that time, a 1.5 mg/kg amphetamine i.v. bolus was administered which caused a significant (30.3%) reduction in the volume of distribution (V(3)"). The percent reduction in the volume of distribution and, hence, a measure of the intrasynaptic DA release ranged between 22-41%. GBR12909 (1 mg/kg, slow i.v. infusion) was administered 90 min before the administration of the radiotracer. The comparison of the volume of distribution before and after administration of GBR12909 showed that GBR12909 inhibited amphetamine-induced DA release by 74%. These experiments suggest that GBR12909 is an important prototypical medication to test the hypothesis that stimulant-induced euphoria is mediated by DA and, if the DA hypothesis is correct, a potential treatment agent for cocaine and methamphetamine abuse. Furthermore, this quantitative approach demonstrates a way of testing various treatment medications, including other forms of GBR12909 such as a decanoate derivative.

  16. Use of Glucose Rate of Change Arrows to Adjust Insulin Therapy Among Individuals with Type 1 Diabetes Who Use Continuous Glucose Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Pettus, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: This study was performed to understand and to compare differences in utilization of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) and the rate of change (ROC) arrow to adjust insulin therapy among individuals with type 1 diabetes (T1D), comparing those treated with multiple daily insulin injections (MDI) with those treated with continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII). Research Design and Methods: We surveyed 222 T1D individuals who regularly used real-time CGM to obtain information about general CGM use and response to glucose ROC arrows in managing their diabetes. Results: The survey was completed by 222 T1D individuals. Respondents included CSII (n = 166) and MDI (n = 56) users. MDI and CSII respondents reported similar substantial increases in correction dosages (from 220 mg/dL to 120 mg/dL) in response to increasing glucose (one ROC arrow up: rising 2–3 mg/dL/min): +120% and +108%, respectively (P = 0.13). MDI and CSII respondents reported similar substantial increases in correction dosages in response to rapidly increasing glucose (two arrows up: rising >3 mg/dL/min): +146% and +138%, respectively (P = 0.72). When correcting from 220 mg/dL to 120 mg/dL, MDI respondents reported larger correction dosage reductions than CSII respondents in response to decreasing glucose (one ROC down arrow: decreasing 2–3 mg/dL/min) and rapidly decreasing glucose (two ROC down arrows: decreasing >3 mg/dL/min): −50% versus −37%, respectively (P = 0.024) and −52% versus 38%, respectively (P = 0.034). Similar between-group differences were observed in mealtime dosage adjustments. Conclusions: CGM users often rely on ROC information when determining insulin doses and tend to make larger changes than current recommendations suggest regardless of insulin delivery method. PMID:26784128

  17. Use of telemedicine in subjects with type 1 diabetes equipped with an insulin pump and real-time continuous glucose monitoring.

    PubMed

    González-Molero, Inmaculada; Domínguez-López, Marta; Guerrero, Mercedes; Carreira, Mónica; Caballero, Felix; Rubio-Martín, Eleazara; Linares, Francisca; Cardona, Isabel; Anarte, Maria Teresa; de Adana, Maria Soledad Ruiz; Soriguer, Federico

    2012-09-01

    We evaluated a telemedicine system in patients with type 1 diabetes who had optimized treatment with an insulin pump and a real-time continuous glucose monitoring system. We conducted a prospective, one-year study of 15 subjects. Three medical visits took place: pre-baseline, baseline and at 6 months. Each month the subjects transmitted information from the glucose meter, glucose sensor and insulin pump. We adjusted the treatment and returned the information by email. We evaluated psychological and metabolic variables, including HbA(1c), hypoglycaemia, hyperglycaemia and glucose variability. At baseline the mean age of the subjects was 40 years and the mean duration of diabetes was 22 years. There was a significant reduction in HbA(1c) (7.50 to 6.97%) at 6 months, a significant increase in the number of self-monitoring blood glucose checks per day (5.2 to 6.2), and significant improvements in variability: MODD, mean of daily difference (67 to 53) and MAGE, mean amplitude of glycaemic excursions (136 to 102). There were significant improvements in quality of life (92 to 87), satisfaction with the treatment (34 to 32) and less fear of hypoglycaemia (36 to 32). Adult subjects with type 1 diabetes on treatment with a continuous insulin infusion system and a real time glucose sensor and who have acceptable metabolic control and optimized treatment can benefit from the addition of a telemetry system to their usual outpatient follow-up.

  18. Regional myocardial lidocaine concentration following continuous intravenous infusion early and later after myocardial infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Zito, R.A.; Caride, V.J.; Holford, T.; Zaret, B.L.

    1982-09-01

    The regional concentration of lidocaine using a double constant infusion technique (250 micrograms/kg/min x 15 minutes followed by 35 micrograms/kg/mg/min x 120 minutes) was studied immediately (2 hours) in seven dogs and 24 hours (six dogs) after myocardial infarction. Tissue levels were determined by gas chromatography and related to regional myocardial blood flow as determined by the radioactive microsphere technique in multiple samples. At 2 hours after infarction a significantly higher lidocaine concentration (4.1 +/- 0.42 micrograms/g) was found in zones with greatly reduced blood flow (regional myocardial blood flow less than 0.2 ml/min per g) when compared with that (2.6 +/- 0.19 micrograms/g) in zones with normal blood flow (regional myocardial blood flow greater than 0.8 ml/min per g) (p less than 0.01). In contrast, in the 24 hour model the opposite situation was observed. Although the concentration of lidocaine in the infarct zone was substantial, a significant decline in lidocaine tissue concentration was found in the zones of lowest blood flow (regional myocardial blood flow less than 0.2 ml/min per g) when compared with that in normal zones (1.76 +/- 0.21 versus 3.38 +/- 0.21 micrograms/g, p less than 0.001). In addition, no significant differences in lidocaine concentrations were found between endocardium and epicardium in any of the groups other than those related to regional myocardial blood flow. Thus, with the double constant infusion technique, lidocaine reached normal and ischemic myocardium in concentrations equivalent to therapeutic plasma concentrations, even in lower infarct blood flow zones, with no significant differences between endocardium and epicardium. Of perhaps greater significance, the age of the ischemic insult is an important determinant of lidocaine tissue distribution in infarcted myocardium.

  19. The pharmacokinetics of cytarabine in dogs when administered via subcutaneous and continuous intravenous infusion routes.

    PubMed

    Crook, K I; Early, P J; Messenger, K M; Muñana, K R; Gallagher, R; Papich, M G

    2013-08-01

    This crossover study compared the pharmacokinetics of cytarabine in six healthy dogs following intravenous constant rate infusion (CRI) and subcutaneous (SC) administrations, as these are two routes of administration commonly employed in the treatment of meningoencephalitis of unknown etiology. Each dog received a SC cytarabine injection of 50 mg/m(2) or an 8 h CRI of 25 mg/m(2) per hour, with a 7-day washout before receiving the alternative treatment. Blood samples were collected for 16 h after CRI initiation and for 8 h after SC injection. Plasma concentrations were measured by high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). Pharmacokinetic parameters were estimated using the best-fit compartmental analysis for both CRI and SC routes. Terminal half-life (T(1/2) ) of cytarabine was 1.35 ± 0.3 and 1.15 ± 0.13 h after SC administration and CRI, respectively. Mean peak concentration (Cmax ) was 2.88 and 2.80 μg/mL for SC and CRI administration, respectively. Volume of distribution was 0.66 ± 0.07 l/kg. The 8-h CRI produced steady-state plasma concentrations as determined by consecutive measurement that did not decline until the end of the infusion. The SC administration did not achieve steady-state concentrations because cytarabine administered by this route was rapidly absorbed and eliminated quickly. The steady state achieved with the cytarabine CRI may produce a more prolonged exposure of cytarabine at cytotoxic levels in plasma compared to the concentrations after SC administration.

  20. Continuous glucose monitoring, oral glucose tolerance, and insulin - glucose parameters in adolescents with simple obesity.

    PubMed

    El Awwa, A; Soliman, A; Al-Ali, M; Yassin, M; De Sanctis, V

    2012-09-01

    In obese adolescents pancreatic beta-cells may not be able to cope with insulin resistance leading to hyperglycemia and type2 diabetes (T2DM To assess oral glucose tolerance, 72-h continuous blood glucose concentrations (CGM) and calculate homeostatic model assessment (HOMA), and the quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI) in 13 adolescents with simple obesity (BMI SDS=4 ± 1.06). OGTT performed in 13 obese adolescents (13.47 ± 3 years) revealed 3 cases (23%) with impaired fasting glucose (IFG: fasting glucose >5.6 mmol/L), 4 cases (30%) with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT: 2h blood glucose >7.8 <11.1 mmol/L), and none with diabetes. Using the continuous glucose monitoring system ( CGMS), IFG was detected in 4 cases, the maximum serum blood glucose (BG : 2h or more after meal) was >7.8 and <11.1 mmol/L (IGT) in 9 children (69%) and >11.1 mmol/L (diabetes) in one case (7.6%). Five cases had a minimum BG recorded of <2.7 mmol/L (hypoglycemia). No glycemic abnormality was detected using HbA1C (5.7 ± 0.3%). 11/13 patients had HOMA values >2.6 and QUICKI values <0.35 denoting insulin resistance. Beta cell mass percent (B %) = 200 ± 94.8% and insulin sensitivity values (IS)=50.4 ± 45.5% denoted insulin resistance with hyper-insulinaemia and preserved beta cell mass. In obese adolescents, CGMS is superior to OGTT and HbA1C in detecting glycemic abnormalities, which appears to be secondary to insulin resistance.

  1. Continuous Regional Arterial Infusion of Protease Inhibitors Has No Efficacy in the Treatment of Severe Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Horibe, Masayasu; Sasaki, Mitsuhito; Sanui, Masamitsu; Sugiyama, Daisuke; Iwasaki, Eisuke; Yamagishi, Yoshiyuki; Sawano, Hirotaka; Goto, Takashi; Ikeura, Tsukasa; Hamada, Tsuyoshi; Oda, Takuya; Yasuda, Hideto; Shinomiya, Wataru; Miyazaki, Dai; Hirose, Kaoru; Kitamura, Katsuya; Chiba, Nobutaka; Ozaki, Tetsu; Yamashita, Takahiro; Koinuma, Toshitaka; Oshima, Taku; Yamamoto, Tomonori; Hirota, Morihisa; Moriya, Takashi; Shirai, Kunihiro; Mayumi, Toshihiko; Kanai, Takanori

    2017-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study is to assess the effectiveness of continuous regional arterial infusion (CRAI) of protease inhibitors in patients with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) including acute necrotizing pancreatitis. Methods This retrospective study was conducted among 44 institutions in Japan from 2009 to 2013. Patients 18 years or older diagnosed with SAP according to the criteria of the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare study group (2008) were consecutively enrolled. We evaluated the association between CRAI of protease inhibitors and mortality, incidence of infection, and the need for surgical intervention using multivariable logistic regression analysis. Results Of 1159 patients admitted, 1097 patients with all required data were included for analysis. Three hundred and seventy-four (34.1%) patients underwent CRAI of protease inhibitors and 723 (65.9%) did not. In multivariable analysis, CRAI of protease inhibitors was not associated with a reduction in mortality, infection rate, or need for surgical intervention (odds ratio [OR] 0.79, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.47–1.32, P = 0.36; OR 0.97, 95% CI 0.61–1.54, P = 0.89; OR 0.76, 95% CI 0.50–1.15, P = 0.19; respectively). Conclusions Continuous regional arterial infusion of protease inhibitors was not efficacious in the treatment of patients with SAP. PMID:27977624

  2. Continuous versus short-term infusion of cefuroxime: assessment of concept based on plasma, subcutaneous tissue, and bone pharmacokinetics in an animal model.

    PubMed

    Tøttrup, Mikkel; Bibby, Bo M; Hardlei, Tore F; Bue, Mats; Kerrn-Jespersen, Sigrid; Fuursted, Kurt; Søballe, Kjeld; Birke-Sørensen, Hanne

    2015-01-01

    The relatively short half-lives of most β-lactams suggest that continuous infusion of these time-dependent antimicrobials may be favorable compared to short-term infusion. Nevertheless, only limited solid-tissue pharmacokinetic data are available to support this theory. In this study, we randomly assigned 12 pigs to receive cefuroxime as either a short-term or continuous infusion. Measurements of cefuroxime were obtained every 30 min in plasma, subcutaneous tissue, and bone. For the measurements in solid tissues, microdialysis was applied. A two-compartment population model was fitted separately to the drug concentration data for the different tissues using a nonlinear mixed-effects regression model. Estimates of the pharmacokinetic parameters and time with concentrations above the MIC were derived using Monte Carlo simulations. Except for subcutaneous tissue in the short-term infusion group, the tissue penetration was incomplete for all tissues. For short-term infusion, the tissue penetration ratios were 0.97 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.67 to 1.39), 0.61 (95% CI, 0.51 to 0.73), and 0.45 (95% CI, 0.36 to 0.56) for subcutaneous tissue, cancellous bone, and cortical bone, respectively. For continuous infusion, they were 0.53 (95% CI, 0.33 to 0.84), 0.38 (95% CI, 0.23 to 0.57), and 0.27 (95% CI, 0.13 to 0.48) for the same tissues, respectively. The absolute areas under the concentration-time curve were also lower in the continuous infusion group. Nevertheless, a significantly longer time with concentrations above the MIC was found for continuous infusion up until MICs of 4, 2, 2, and 0.5 μg/ml for plasma and the same three tissues mentioned above, respectively. For drugs with a short half-life, like cefuroxime, continuous infusion seems to be favorable compared to short-term infusion; however, incomplete tissue penetration and high MIC strains may jeopardize the continuous infusion approach.

  3. Combination of Continuous Dexmedetomidine Infusion with Titrated Ultra-Low-Dose Propofol-Fentanyl for an Awake Craniotomy.

    PubMed

    Das, Samaresh; Al-Mashani, Ali; Suri, Neelam; Salhotra, Neeraj; Chatterjee, Nilay

    2016-08-01

    An awake craniotomy is a continuously evolving technique used for the resection of brain tumours from the eloquent cortex. We report a 29-year-old male patient who presented to the Khoula Hospital, Muscat, Oman, in 2016 with a two month history of headaches and convulsions due to a space-occupying brain lesion in close proximity with the left motor cortex. An awake craniotomy was conducted using a scalp block, continuous dexmedetomidine infusion and a titrated ultra-low-dose of propofolfentanyl. The patient remained comfortable throughout the procedure and the intraoperative neuropsychological tests, brain mapping and tumour resection were successful. This case report suggests that dexmedetomidine in combination with titrated ultra-low-dose propofolfentanyl are effective options during an awake craniotomy, ensuring optimum sedation, minimal disinhibition and a rapid recovery. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first awake craniotomy conducted successfully in Oman.

  4. Clinical outcomes with extended or continuous versus short-term intravenous infusion of carbapenems and piperacillin/tazobactam: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Falagas, Matthew E; Tansarli, Giannoula S; Ikawa, Kazuro; Vardakas, Konstantinos Z

    2013-01-01

    We sought to study whether the better pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) properties of carbapenems and piperacillin/tazobactam, when the duration of infusion is longer, were associated with lower mortality. PubMed and Scopus were searched for studies reporting on patients treated with extended (≥3 hours) or continuous (24 hours) versus short-term duration (20-60 minutes) infusions of carbapenems or piperacillin/tazobactam. Fourteen studies were included (1229 patients). Mortality was lower among patients receiving extended or continuous infusion of carbapenems or piperacillin/tazobactam compared to those receiving short-term (risk ratio [RR], 0.59; 95% confidence interval [CI], .41-.83). Patients with pneumonia who received extended or continuous infusion had lower mortality than those receiving short-term infusion (RR, 0.50; 95% CI, 0.26-0.96). Data for other specific infections were not available. The available evidence from mainly nonrandomized studies suggests that extended or continuous infusion of carbapenems or piperacillin/tazobactam was associated with lower mortality. Well-designed randomized controlled trials are warranted to confirm these findings before such approaches become widely used.

  5. Lung concentrations of ceftazidime administered by continuous versus intermittent infusion in patients with ventilator-associated pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Cousson, Joël; Floch, Thierry; Guillard, Thomas; Vernet, Véronique; Raclot, Pascal; Wolak-Thierry, Aurore; Jolly, Damien

    2015-04-01

    Ceftazidime is a beta-lactam compound that exerts a time-dependent bactericidal effect. Numerous arguments are in favor of continuous administration of ceftazidime, both for reasons of clinical efficacy and to preserve bacteriological mutation. We report a prospective, single-center, parallel-group, randomized, controlled trial comparing two modes of administration of ceftazidime, namely, continuous administration (loading dose of 20 mg/kg of body weight followed by 60 mg/kg/day) versus intermittent administration (20 mg/kg over 30 min every 8 h) in 34 patients with ventilator-associated pneumonia due to Gram-negative bacilli. The study was performed over 48 h with 13 and 18 assessments of serum ceftazidime in the continuous-infusion group (group A) and the intermittent-fusion group (group B), respectively. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was performed at steady state in both groups at 44 h to determine ceftazidime levels in the epithelial lining fluid. We chose a predefined threshold of 20 mg/liter for serum concentrations of ceftazidime because of ecological conditions in our center. The median time above 20 mg/liter (T>20 mg) was 100% in group A versus 46% in group B. In group A, 14/17 patients had 100% T>20 mg, versus only 1/17 patients in group B. In the epithelial lining fluid, the median concentration of ceftazidime was 12 mg/liter in group A versus 6 mg/liter in group B. A threshold of 8 mg/liter in the epithelial lining fluid was achieved twice as often in group A as in group B. This study of ceftazidime concentrations in the epithelial lining fluid indicates that continuous infusion presents advantages in terms of pharmacodynamics and predictable efficacy in patients presenting ventilator-associated pneumonia.

  6. Clonidine added to a continuous interscalene ropivacaine perineural infusion to improve postoperative analgesia: a randomized, double-blind, controlled study.

    PubMed

    Ilfeld, Brian M; Morey, Timothy E; Thannikary, Lisa J; Wright, Thomas W; Enneking, F Kayser

    2005-04-01

    Although clonidine has been shown to increase the duration of local anesthetic action and prolong postoperative analgesia when included in single-injection nerve blocks, the only controlled investigation of the efficacy of this practice to improve analgesia for continuous perineural local anesthetic infusion failed to discern any clinically relevant benefits. For this study, we used a larger dose of clonidine in an attempt to improve analgesia. Patients (n = 20) undergoing moderately painful orthopedic surgery of the shoulder received an interscalene brachial plexus block (40 mL of mepivacaine 1.5%, epinephrine 2.5 microg/mL, and clonidine 50 microg) and a perineural catheter before surgery. After surgery, ropivacaine 0.2% or ropivacaine 0.2% plus clonidine 2 microg/mL was delivered via the catheter for 3 days (basal rate, 5 mL/h; patient-controlled bolus, 5 mL; lockout, 1 h). Investigators and patients were blind to random group assignment. The primary outcome variable was designated as the most intense pain during the day after surgery. Secondary end-points included additional pain scores, patient-controlled bolus doses, oral analgesic use, sleep quality, and catheter- or infusion-related complications. There were no statistically significant differences between groups for any of the variables investigated. We conclude that adding clonidine 2 microg/mL to a ropivacaine interscalene perineural infusion does not decrease breakthrough pain intensity the day after surgery. For the additional end-points, our negative findings are only suggestive of a lack of effect and require further study for verification.

  7. Adipose Tissue Promotes a Serum Cytokine Profile Related to Lower Insulin Sensitivity after Chronic Central Leptin Infusion

    PubMed Central

    Burgos-Ramos, Emma; Canelles, Sandra; Perianes-Cachero, Arancha; Arilla-Ferreiro, Eduardo; Argente, Jesús; Barrios, Vicente

    2012-01-01

    Obesity is an inflammatory state characterized by an augment in circulating inflammatory factors. Leptin may modulate the synthesis of these factors by white adipose tissue decreasing insulin sensitivity. We have examined the effect of chronic central administration of leptin on circulating levels of cytokines and the possible relationship with cytokine expression and protein content as well as with leptin and insulin signaling in subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissues. In addition, we analyzed the possible correlation between circulating levels of cytokines and peripheral insulin resistance. We studied 18 male Wistar rats divided into controls (C), those treated icv for 14 days with a daily dose of 12 μg of leptin (L) and a pair-fed group (PF) that received the same food amount consumed by the leptin group. Serum leptin and insulin were measured by ELISA, mRNA levels of interferon-γ (IFN-γ), interleukin-2 (IL-2), IL-4, IL-6, IL-10 and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) by real time PCR and serum and adipose tissue levels of these cytokines by multiplexed bead immunoassay. Serum leptin, IL-2, IL-4, IFN-γ and HOMA-IR were increased in L and TNF-α was decreased in PF and L. Serum leptin and IL-2 levels correlate positively with HOMA-IR index and negatively with serum glucose levels during an ip insulin tolerance test. In L, an increase in mRNA levels of IL-2 was found in both adipose depots and IFN-γ only in visceral tissue. Activation of leptin signaling was increased and insulin signaling decreased in subcutaneous fat of L. In conclusion, leptin mediates the production of inflammatory cytokines by adipose tissue independent of its effects on food intake, decreasing insulin sensitivity. PMID:23056516

  8. [Hypoglycemia in patients treated with an external insulin pump].

    PubMed

    Laurent, Jean-Christophe; Waeber, Gerard; Ruiz, Juan; Carron, Pierre-Nicolas

    2011-01-19

    Hypoglycemia is a potentially serious complication of insulin therapy. Some insulin-dependent diabetic patients can benefit from continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion therapy (an "insulin pump"), which in most case improves glycemia control and decreases the occurrence of hypoglycemic episodes. However, such events may occur, particularly during initial treatment phases or pregnancy. Severe hypoglycemia is mainly managed by stopping the insulin pump and insuring an adequate carbohydrate intake. Patients with insulin pumps and their entourage should receive specific instruction in the adjustment of pump flow in the presence of dysglycemia-inducing circumstances (illness, physical exertion), as well as in anticipation of high-risk situations, such as motor-vehicle driving.

  9. Insulin continues to induce plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 gene expression in insulin-resistant mice and adipocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Samad, F.; Pandey, M.; Bell, P. A.; Loskutoff, D. J.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although the association between insulin resistance and cardiovascular risk is well established, the underlying molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. The antifibrinolytic molecule plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) is a cardiovascular risk factor that is consistently elevated in insulin-resistant states such as obesity and non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). The strong positive correlation between this elevated PAI-1 and the degree of hyperinsulinemia not only implicates insulin itself in this increase, but also suggests that PAI-1 is regulated by a pathway that does not become insulin resistant. The data in this report supports this hypothesis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We show that insulin stimulates PAI-1 gene expression in metabolically insulin-resistant ob/ob mice and in insulin-resistant 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Moreover, we provide evidence that glucose transport and PAI-1 gene expression are mediated by different insulin signaling pathways. These observations suggest that the compensatory hyperinsulinemia that is frequently associated with insulin-resistant states, directly contribute to the elevated PAI-1. CONCLUSIONS: These results provide a potential mechanism for the abnormal increases in cardiovascular risk genes in obesity, NIDDM, and polycystic ovary disease. PMID:11055587

  10. Combined radiotherapy, 5-fluorouracil continuous infusion and weekly oxaliplatin in advanced rectal cancer: a phase I study.

    PubMed

    François, Eric; Ychou, Marc; Ducreux, Michel; Bertheault-Cvitkovic, Frédérique; Giovannini, Marc; Conroy, Thierry; Lemanski, Claire; Thomas, Olivier; Magnin, Valérie

    2005-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the maximum-tolerated dose (MTD) of weekly oxaliplatin combined with 5-fluorouracil (5FU) continuous infusion administered concomitantly with fractionated radiotherapy in patients presenting advanced rectal cancer. Forty-three patients with rectal cancer (stage T3/T4 (n = 24), metastatic (n = 17) and 2 with local recurrence), were included. The radiotherapy dose delivered was 45 Gy over 5 weeks (1.8 Gy/fraction/day, 5 days per week). The initial weekly oxaliplatin dosage was 30 mg/m2 and the 5FU dosage 150 mg/m2/d. The oxaliplatin and 5FU doses were escalated. Eight dose levels were tested. At dose level 8 (oxaliplatin 80 mg/m2, 5FU 225 mg/m2/d), 2 patients out of 4 presented dose-limiting toxicity (severe diarrhoea with dehydration and fatal shock, rectovesical fistula). At dose level 7, 2 further patients presented with grade 3 diarrhoea. The main toxicity of the combination was diarrhoea. The hematological and neurological toxicities were not severe and were not dose-limiting. Out of the 30 patients undergoing surgery, 4 (13.3%) presented with pathological complete response and 4 (13.3%) only presented with microscopic residual disease. The results from this study enabled determination of the recommended weekly oxaliplatin dose (60 mg/m2) combined with 5FU continuous infusion (225 mg/m2) and fractionated radiotherapy (45 Gy) in the pre-operative treatment of advanced rectal cancer. The good safety profile of the regimen, associated with promising results in terms of histological response, suggest that the regimen could be developed in future phase II/III studies.

  11. Insulin

    MedlinePlus

    ... container that can be closed like a laundry detergent bottle. Check the expiration date on the insulin ... in a hard container like an empty laundry detergent bottle or a metal coffee can. Make sure ...

  12. Effectiveness of pre-peritoneal continuous wound infusion with lidocaine for pain control following ovariohysterectomy in dogs.

    PubMed

    Morgaz, Juan; Muñoz-Rascón, Pilar; Serrano-Rodríguez, Juan Manuel; Navarrete, Rocío; Domínguez, Juan Manuel; Fernández-Sarmiento, José Andrés; Gómez-Villamandos, Rafael J; Serrano, Juan Manuel; Granados, María Del Mar

    2014-12-01

    This study compared the post-operative analgesic efficacy of continuous lidocaine administration with that of intramuscular (IM) methadone in dogs undergoing ovariohysterectomy. Thirty-eight dogs were divided randomly into two groups. Following surgery, the lidocaine group (L) received a continuous lidocaine infusion (2 mg/kg/h) through a wound catheter inserted in the pre-peritoneal space; the control group (C) received methadone (0.2 mg/kg IM). A dynamic and interactive visual analogue scale (DIVAS), the Scale-Form Glasgow Composite Measure Scale (CMPS-SF), mechanical wound thresholds, heart rate, respiratory rate and blood pressure were assessed pre-operatively and 2, 4, 6, 18, and 24 h after surgery. The presence of the wound catheter prevented the evaluator from remaining blinded to group allocations. Plasma lidocaine and cortisol levels were measured 2, 6, 18, and 24 h after surgery. There were no intergroup differences in any pain assessment scale scores at any time point. Stable intravenous lidocaine levels were observed. Four animals in the control group but none in the lidocaine group required rescue analgesia. There were no differences in complication rates between groups. Continuous locoregional lidocaine delivered via a wound catheter between the parietal peritoneum and abdominal muscle offers effective analgesia in dogs during ovariohysterectomy and appears to be a promising analgesic option in veterinary surgery.

  13. Intramuscular injections of slow-release lanreotide (BIM 23014) in acromegalic patients previously treated with continuous subcutaneous infusion of octreotide (SMS 201-995).

    PubMed

    Caron, P; Cogne, M; Gusthiot-Joudet, B; Wakim, S; Catus, F; Bayard, F

    1995-03-01

    Nine acromegalic patients (five females and four males), mean age 50 +/- 4 years, presented macroadenomas (N = 7), microadenoma (N = 1) or normal computed tomography scans (N = 1). Patients were treated with continuous subcutaneous infusion of octreotide (range 200-600 micrograms/day). Following a washout period of 7 days, the patients were injected im with 30 mg slow-release lanreotide every 10 days for the first month and then twice monthly. In case of elevated growth hormone (GH) levels at 3 months, the patients were injected every 10 days for the next three months. Plasma GH and insulin-like growth factor I (IGH-I) decreased in all patients during octreotide treatment. After 6 months of octreotide treatment, seven patients were considered as well controlled (mean 8 h GH < 5 micrograms/l, IGF-I normal) whereas in two patients the mean 8-h GH and/or IGF-I levels remained increased. Serum GH and IGH-I increased after octreotide withdrawal. In one patient, serum GH and IGF-I increased during slow-release lanreotide administration and injections were stopped after 45 days. After 3 months of lanreotide, three patients were well controlled while in five patients GH or IGF-I levels were not normalized. At 6 months, five patients were injected twice monthly and three patients had one injection every 10 days. Six patients were well controlled and in two patients the mean 8-h GH level remained increased. The pituitary tumor volume decreased by 20-30% in two patients during octreotide, as well as in one other during slow-release lanreotide therapy.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Continuous Infusion Antiepileptic Medications for Refractory Status Epilepticus: A Review for Nurses.

    PubMed

    Wiss, Adam L; Samarin, Michael; Marler, Jacob; Jones, G Morgan

    Status epilepticus requires treatment with emergent initial therapy with a benzodiazepine and urgent control therapy with an additional antiepileptic drug (AED) to terminate clinical and/or electrographic seizure activity. However, nearly one-third of patients will prove refractory to the aforementioned therapies and are prone to a higher degree of neuronal injury, resistance to pharmacotherapy, and death. Current guidelines for refractory status epilepticus (RSE) recommend initiating a continuous intravenous (CIV) anesthetic over bolus dosing with a different AED. Continuous intravenous agents most commonly used for this indication include midazolam, propofol, and pentobarbital, but ketamine is an alternative option. Comparative studies illustrating the optimal agent are lacking, and selection is often based on adverse effect profiles and patient-specific factors. In addition, dosing and titration are largely based on small studies and expert opinion with continuous electroencephalogram monitoring used to guide intensity and duration of treatment. Nonetheless, the doses required to halt seizure activity are likely to produce profound adverse effects that clinicians should anticipate and combat. The purpose of this review was to summarize the available RSE literature focusing on CIV midazolam, pentobarbital, propofol, and ketamine, and to serve as a primer for nurses providing care to these patients.

  15. Effect of tachykinins on the need-free sodium intake of female rats: a continuous intracerebroventricular infusion study.

    PubMed

    Polidori, C; Ciccocioppo, R; Epstein, A N; de Caro, G; Massi, M

    1994-11-01

    The present study investigated the effect of 24-h continuous ICV infusion of four different tachykinins on the enhanced need-free sodium intake induced by previous repeated sodium depletions in female rats. Female rats were employed because, in response to sodium depletions, they develop a higher need-free sodium intake than male rats. The following tachykinins were used: eledoisin, substance P (SP), [Sar9,Met(O2)11]SP and [Asp5,6,MePhe8]SP(5-11), also referred to as NH2-senktide, all at the same doses of 300 or 600 ng/h x 24 h. Food pellets, water, and 3% NaCl sodium solution were freely available. Eledoisin and NH2-senktide were more potent than SP in reducing the need-free sodium intake. On the other hand, [Sar9,Met(O2)11]SP had no effect. None of the tachykinins employed completely blocked the intake. Water intake was reduced, but this reduction was apparently a consequence of reduced intake of hypertonic sodium chloride solution, because at the same doses TKs did not inhibit water intake in a single-bottle test. Food intake remained unchanged at either dose used. These findings confirm previous studies in which pulse injection of the same drugs potently inhibited sodium intake. They also demonstrate that tachykinins endowed with high affinity for the NK3 receptor are the most potent in inhibiting sodium intake. Furthermore, these findings indicate that the tachykinins reduce the need-free sodium intake only during the infusion period, indicating that in these conditions they do not evoke either aversion for salt, or toxic consequences in the follow-up period.

  16. Evaluation of the Efficacy of Combined Continuous Arterial Infusion and Systemic Chemotherapy for the Treatment of Advanced Pancreatic Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, O. Kusunoki, S.; Kudoh, K.; Takamori, H.; Tsuji, T.; Kanemitsu, K.; Yamashita, Y.

    2006-06-15

    Purpose. To evaluate the effects of combined continuous transcatheter arterial infusion (CTAI) and systemic chemotherapy in patients with advanced pancreatic carcinoma. Methods. CTAI was performed in 17 patients with stage IV pancreatic cancer with (n = 11) or without (n = 6) liver metastasis. The reservoir was transcutaneously implanted with the help of angiography. The inferior pancreatic artery (IPA) was embolized to achieve delivery of the pancreatic blood supply through only the celiac artery. The systemic administration of gemcitabine was combined with the infusion of 5-fluorouracil via the reservoir. Treatment effects were evaluated based on the primary tumor size, liver metastasis, and survival time and factors such as tumor size, tumor location, and stage of pancreatic carcinoma; the embolized arteries were analyzed with respect to treatment effects and prognosis. Results. A catheter was fixed in the gastroduodenal artery and splenic artery in 10 and 7 patients, respectively. Complete peripancreatic arterial occlusion was successful in 10 patients. CT showed a decrease in tumor size in 6 of 17 (35%) patients and a decrease in liver metastases in 6 of 11 (55%) patients. The survival time ranged from 4 to 18 months (mean {+-} SD, 8.8 {+-} 1.5 months). Complete embolization of arteries surrounding the pancreas was achieved in 10 patients; they manifested superior treatment effects and prognoses (p < 0.05). Conclusion. In patients with advanced pancreatic cancer, long-term CTAI with systemic chemotherapy appeared to be effective not only against the primary tumor but also against liver metastases. Patients with successfully occluded peripancreatic arteries tended to survive longer.

  17. Insulin Basics

    MedlinePlus

    ... long insulin continues to lower blood glucose. Insulin Strength All insulins come dissolved or suspended in liquids. The standard and most commonly used strength in the United States today is U-100, ...

  18. Continuous water infusion enhances atmospheric pressure chemical ionization of methyl chloroformate derivatives in gas chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry-based metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Wachsmuth, Christian J; Dettmer, Katja; Lang, Sven A; Mycielska, Maria E; Oefner, Peter J

    2014-09-16

    The effects of continuous water infusion on efficiency and repeatability of atmospheric pressure chemical ionization of both methyl chloroformate (MCF) and methoxime-trimethylsilyl (MO-TMS) derivatives of metabolites were evaluated using gas chromatography-time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Water infusion at a flow-rate of 0.4 mL/h yielded not only an average 16.6-fold increase in intensity of the quasimolecular ion for 20 MCF-derivatized metabolite standards through suppression of in-source fragmentation but also the most repeatable peak area integrals. The impact of water infusion was the greatest for dicarboxylic acids and the least for (hetero-) aromatic compounds. Water infusion also improved the ability to detect reliably fold changes as small as 1.33-fold for the same 20 MCF-derivatized metabolite standards spiked into a human serum extract. On the other hand, MO-TMS derivatives were not significantly affected by water infusion, neither in their fragmentation patterns nor with regard to the detection of differentially regulated compounds. As a proof of principle, we applied MCF derivatization and GC-APCI-TOFMS to the detection of changes in abundance of metabolites in pancreatic cancer cells upon treatment with 17-DMAG. Water infusion increased not only the number of metabolites identified via their quasimolecular ion but also the reproducibility of peak areas, thereby almost doubling the number of significantly regulated metabolites (false discovery rate < 0.05) to a total of 23.

  19. A Micro-PIV Study of the Pulsed Micro-Flows Driven by an Insulin Pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bing; Demuren, Ayodeji; Gyuricsko, Eric; Hu, Hui

    2009-11-01

    In recent years, there is a surge in the popularity of using insulin pump or continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion therapy, as opposed to multiple daily injections by insulin syringe or an insulin pen. Some case studies have suggested that insulin delivery failure may be caused by precipitation of insulin within the infusion set. Speculation also exists that the flow of insulin through an insulin infusion set may be reduced or inhibited by air bubbles entrained into the micro-sized tubing system since there are chances that air be introduced into the insulin reservoir during the filling process. In the present study, a microscopic Particle Image Velocimtry (micro-PIV) system was used to characterize the transient behavior of the pulsed micro-flows inside the micro-sized tubing system of an insulin infusion set with insulin pump operating in basal mode (i.e., pulsed insulin pumping). The effects of the air bubbles entrained into the micro-sized tubing system on the insulin delivery process were assessed based on the micro-PIV measurements.

  20. Insulin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The manipulation of organic materials--cells, tissues, and even living organisms--offers many exciting possibilities for the future from organic computers to improved aquaculture. Commercial researchers are using the microgravity environment to produce large near perfect protein crystals Research on insulin has yielded crystals that far surpass the quality of insulin crystals grown on the ground. Using these crystals industry partners are working to develop new and improved treatments for diabetes. Other researchers are exploring the possibility of producing antibiotics using plant cell cultures which could lead to both orbital production and the improvement of ground-based antibiotic production.

  1. A Two-Day Continuous Nicotine Infusion Is Sufficient to Demonstrate Nicotine Withdrawal in Rats as Measured Using Intracranial Self-Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Muelken, Peter; Schmidt, Clare E.; Shelley, David; Tally, Laura; Harris, Andrew C.

    2015-01-01

    Avoidance of the negative affective (emotional) symptoms of nicotine withdrawal (e.g., anhedonia, anxiety) contributes to tobacco addiction. Establishing the minimal nicotine exposure conditions required to demonstrate negative affective withdrawal signs in animals, as well as understanding moderators of these conditions, could inform tobacco addiction-related research, treatment, and policy. The goal of this study was to determine the minimal duration of continuous nicotine infusion required to demonstrate nicotine withdrawal in rats as measured by elevations in intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) thresholds (anhedonia-like behavior). Administration of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist mecamylamine (3.0 mg/kg, s.c.) on alternate test days throughout the course of a 2-week continuous nicotine infusion (3.2 mg/kg/day via osmotic minipump) elicited elevations in ICSS thresholds beginning on the second day of infusion. Magnitude of antagonist-precipitated withdrawal did not change with further nicotine exposure and mecamylamine injections, and was similar to that observed in a positive control group receiving mecamylamine following a 14-day nicotine infusion. Expression of a significant withdrawal effect was delayed in nicotine-infused rats receiving mecamylamine on all test days rather than on alternate test days. In a separate study, rats exhibited a transient increase in ICSS thresholds following cessation of a 2-day continuous nicotine infusion (3.2 mg/kg/day). Magnitude of this spontaneous withdrawal effect was similar to that observed in rats receiving a 9-day nicotine infusion. Our findings demonstrate that rats exhibit antagonist-precipitated and spontaneous nicotine withdrawal following a 2-day continuous nicotine infusion, at least under the experimental conditions studied here. Magnitude of these effects were similar to those observed in traditional models involving more prolonged nicotine exposure. Further development of these models

  2. Studies of embryotoxicity and the incidence of external malformations after continuous intravenous infusion of alpha-chaconine in pregnant rats.

    PubMed

    Hellenäs, K E; Cekan, E; Slanina, P; Bergman, K

    1992-05-01

    Embryotoxicity and effects on the incidence of external malformations of the major potato glycoalkaloid alpha-chaconine (alpha-cha) were studied in rats. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 17) were given a continuous intravenous infusion of alpha-cha via implanted osmotic minipumps (1.7 mg/kg/day), to maintain a stable blood concentration on days 6-13 of gestation. Control animals received physiological saline solution or were left untreated, respectively. Blood serum levels of alpha-cha were monitored at selected time intervals during the treatment using a specific HPLC method. The foetal body weights and the number of resorbed or dead foetuses per litter in the alpha-cha treated group were not significantly different from the control groups. No case of malformation was detected among 143 foetuses inspected in the treated group. The average maternal blood serum concentration of alpha-cha measured during the experiment was 340 ng/ml. This is more than 20 times the average peak serum level previously reported for human volunteers after intake of potatoes with a total glycoalkaloid content at the upper safe limit for acute adverse effects. The results support the view that potato glycoalkaloids, at levels normally found in potatoes, do not present a risk for teratogenicity in humans.

  3. Continuous infusion of proinflammatory cytokines into the brain to study brain cytokine induced local and systemic immune effects.

    PubMed

    Schöning, B; Elepfandt, P; Lanksch, W R; Volk, H D; Woiciechowsky, C

    1999-07-01

    Proinflammatory cytokines are produced in the brain after various kinds of insult (ischemia, trauma, infection). In this process interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha are most important. These cytokines are key mediators of inflammation. Furthermore, these cytokines can act as neurotransmitters and develop direct effects on the central nervous system (CNS) including fever, sleep and stimulation of the neuroendocrine as well as sympathetic nervous system. Moreover, IL-1beta and TNF-alpha may also be involved in brain repair and regenerating processes. However, most of the data about the role of cytokines in the brain have been obtained from either in vitro studies or bolus injections into the brain parenchyma or cerebroventricular system. On the other hand, it is known that cytokines are released continuously into the brain after a cerebral insult over a period of 24 to 48 h. In order to further complete the knowledge about the interactions between neural and immune cells to overcome the primary insult and initiate repair and regeneration in the CNS, a new animal model of local inflammation reaction was established using chronic intracerebral infusion of rat recombinant cytokines.

  4. Effects of continuous rate intravenous infusion of butorphanol on physiologic and outcome variables in horses after celiotomy.

    PubMed

    Sellon, Debra C; Roberts, Malcolm C; Blikslager, Anthony T; Ulibarri, Catherine; Papich, Mark G

    2004-01-01

    A randomized, controlled, blinded clinical trial was performed to determine whether butorphanol administered by continuous rate infusion (CRI) for 24 hours after abdominal surgery would decrease pain and surgical stress responses and improve recovery in horses. Thirty-one horses undergoing exploratory celiotomy for abdominal pain were randomly assigned to receive butorphanol CRI (13 microg/kg/h for 24 hours after surgery; treatment) or isotonic saline (control). All horses received flunixin meglumine (1.1 mg/kg IV q12h). There were no significant differences between treatment and control horses in preoperative or operative variables. Treatment horses had significantly lower plasma cortisol concentration compared with control horses at 2, 8, 12, 24, 36, and 48 hours after surgery. Mean weight loss while hospitalized was significantly less for treatment horses than control horses, whether expressed as total decrease in body weight (13.9+/-3.4 and 27.9+/-4.5 kg, respectively) or as a percentage decrease in body weight (2.6+/-0.7 and 6.3+/-1.1%, respectively). Treatment horses were significantly delayed in time to first passage of feces (median times of 15 and 4 hours, respectively). Treatment horses had significantly improved behavior scores during the first 24 hours after surgery, consistent with the conclusion that they experienced less pain during that time. Butorphanol CRI during the immediate postoperative period significantly decreased plasma cortisol concentrations and improved recovery characteristics in horses undergoing abdominal surgery.

  5. Embryo production in superovulated goats treated with insulin before or after mating or by continuous propylene glycol supplementation.

    PubMed

    Souza, A L; Galeati, G; Almeida, A P; Arruda, I J; Govoni, N; Freitas, V J F; Rondina, D

    2008-04-01

    Seventeen adult and cyclic Moxoto goats were synchronized using 60 mg MPA vaginal sponge for 11 days and 50 mug cloprostenol, 48 h before sponge removal, and superovulated with 120 mg pFSH i.m. in decreasing doses at 12 h intervals for three consecutive days. In seven goats, 0.2 IU/kg BW/day of long acting insulin was subcutaneously injected at same time as pFSH, and in the other five goats, the same dose of insulin was injected for three consecutive days starting 24 h after mating. Finally, five goats were supplemented with an oral dose of 80 ml/goat/day of propylene glycol continuously during the experiment. The animals were flushed at 7 days after mating and the embryos were classified based on International Embryo Transfer Society criteria. Blood samples were collected every 3 days for insulin assay. Administration of insulin raised the insulin levels of the goats (p < 0.05), whereas in the group treated with propylene glycol, insulin rate was different only between FSH treatment and after mating (p < 0.05). Similar rates of recovery for total (80.05 +/- 9.78%) or transferable structures (61.03 +/- 15.13%) were obtained. Treatment was not influenced (p > 0.05) by responsiveness to superovulation, which averaged 64%. By contrast, insulin treatments were shown to increase the number of embryos considered excellent with respect to goats supplemented with propylene glycol (p < 0.05). When insulin was given before mating, a strong relationship (r = 0. 90) (p < 0.05) between number of transferable embryo and ovulations was observed in the animals. In conclusion, superovulated goats treated with low doses of exogenous insulin resulted in an enhancement in embryo quality, which was related to changes in circulating insulin concentrations.

  6. Pharmacokinetics of piperacillin in critically ill patients receiving continuous venovenous haemofiltration: A randomised controlled trial of continuous infusion versus intermittent bolus administration.

    PubMed

    Jamal, Janattul-Ain; Roberts, Darren M; Udy, Andrew A; Mat-Nor, Mohd-Basri; Mohamad-Nor, Fariz-Safhan; Wallis, Steven C; Lipman, Jeffrey; Roberts, Jason A

    2015-07-01

    Here we describe the pharmacokinetics of piperacillin administered by continuous infusion (CI) versus intermittent bolus (IB) dosing in critically ill patients receiving continuous venovenous haemofiltration (CVVH) and compare the frequency of pharmacodynamic/pharmacokinetic (PK/PD) target attainment with each dosing strategy. This was a prospective pharmacokinetic trial in 16 critically ill patients with severe sepsis or septic shock undergoing CVVH and randomised to receive either CI or IB administration of a standard daily dose of piperacillin/tazobactam (11.25g/day on Day 1 followed by 9g/day). Serial blood samples were measured on two occasions. Piperacillin pharmacokinetics were calculated using a non-compartmental approach. Blood concentrations were compared with established PK/PD targets. On occasion 1 (Days 1-3 of therapy), IB administration resulted in significantly higher piperacillin peak concentrations (169 vs. 89mg/L; P=0.002), whereas significantly higher steady-state concentrations were observed in CI patients (83 vs. 57mg/L; P=0.04). Total clearance and clearance not mediated by CVVH were significantly higher with CI administration [median (interquartile range), 1.0 (0.7-1.1) and 0.8 (0.6-1.0)mL/kg/min; P=0.001 and 0.001, respectively]. The estimated unbound piperacillin concentrations were four times above the target susceptibility breakpoint (16mg/L) for the entire dosing interval (100%fT>4xMIC) in 87.5% of patients receiving CI administration (sampling occasion 1), compared with 62.5% of IB patients achieving the desired target (50%fT>4xMIC). Compared with IB dosing, and despite similar CVVH settings, CI administration of piperacillin results in a pharmacokinetic profile that may optimise outcomes for less susceptible pathogens.

  7. Continuous infusion versus intermittent administration of ceftazidime in critically ill patients with suspected gram-negative infections.

    PubMed Central

    Benko, A S; Cappelletty, D M; Kruse, J A; Rybak, M J

    1996-01-01

    The pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of ceftazidime administered by continuous infusion and intermittent bolus over a 4-day period were compared. We conducted a prospective, randomized, crossover study of 12 critically ill patients with suspected gram-negative infections. The patients were randomized to receive ceftazidime either as a 2-g intravenous (i.v.) loading dose followed by a 3-g continuous infusion (CI) over 24 h or as 2 g i.v. every 8 h (q8h), each for 2 days. After 2 days, the patients were crossed over and received the opposite regimen. Each regimen also included tobramycin (4 to 7 mg/kg of body weight, given i.v. q24h). Eighteen blood samples were drawn on study days 2 and 4 to evaluate the pharmacokinetics of ceftazidime and its pharmacodynamics against a clinical isolate of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (R288). The patient demographics (means +/- standard deviations) were as follows: age, 57 +/- 12 years; sex, nine males and three females; APACHE II score, 15 +/- 3; diagnosis, 9 of 12 patients with pneumonia. The mean pharmacokinetic parameters for ceftazidime given as an intermittent bolus (IB) (means +/- standard deviations) were as follows: maximum concentration of drug in serum, 124.4 +/- 52.6 micrograms/ml; minimum concentration in serum, 25.0 +/- 17.5 micrograms/ml; elimination constant, 0.268 +/- 0.205 h-1; half-life, 3.48 +/- 1.61 h; and volume of distribution, 18.9 +/- 9.0 liters. The steady-state ceftazidime concentration for CI was 29.7 +/- 17.4 micrograms/ml, which was not significantly different from the targeted concentrations. The range of mean steady-state ceftazidime concentrations for the 12 patients was 10.6 to 62.4 micrograms/ml. Tobramycin peak concentrations ranged between 7 and 20 micrograms/ml. As expected, the area under the curve for the 2-g q8h regimen was larger than that for CI (P = 0.003). For IB and CI, the times that the serum drug concentration was greater than the MIC were 92 and 100%, respectively, for each regimen

  8. Continuous epidural infusion of 0.0625% bupivacaine-0.0002% fentanyl during the second stage of labor.

    PubMed

    Chestnut, D H; Laszewski, L J; Pollack, K L; Bates, J N; Manago, N K; Choi, W W

    1990-04-01

    A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study was performed to evaluate the analgesic efficacy and influence of continuing an epidural infusion of 0.0625% bupivacaine-0.0002% fentanyl during the second stage of labor in nulliparous women. When the cervix was fully dilated, coded study solution was substituted for the known bupivacaine-fentanyl solution. The study solution for 29 patients was 0.0625% bupivacaine-0.0002% fentanyl; 34 patients received saline placebo. The two groups had similar pain scores during the first stage of labor. During the second stage, pain scores were significantly higher in the saline-placebo group at each 30-min interval between 60 and 150 min after the diagnosis of full cervical dilation. Similarly, there was a significant difference between the two groups in global assessment of analgesia quality during the second stage, but the difference occurred in those patients with a second-stage duration of greater than or equal to 60 min. Among the women who delivered vaginally, eleven of 28 (39%) women in the bupivacaine-fentanyl group, versus five of 34 (15%) in the saline-placebo group, had surgical perineal anesthesia for vaginal delivery (P less than .05). Six of 28 (21%) women in the bupivacaine-fentanyl group, and five of 34 (15%) in the saline-placebo group, underwent instrumental vaginal delivery (P = NS). The median duration of the second stage of labor was 53 min (range = 5-283) in the bupivacaine-fentanyl group, and 63 min (range = 16-181) in the saline-placebo group (P = NS).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Inhaled insulin: A “puff” than a “shot” before meals

    PubMed Central

    Brashier, Dick B. S.; Khadka, Anjan; Anantharamu, Tejus; Sharma, Ashok Kumar; Gupta, A. K.; Sharma, Sushil; Dahiya, N.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is a metabolic disorder characterized by relative or absolute deficiency of insulin, resulting in hyperglycemia. The main treatment of diabetes relies on subcutaneous insulin administration by injection or continuous infusion to control glucose levels, besides oral hypoglycemic agents for type 2 diabetes. Novel routes of insulin administration are an area of research in the diabetes field as insulin injection therapy is burdensome and painful for many patients. Inhalational insulin is a potential alternative to subcutaneous insulin in the management of diabetes. The large surface area, good vascularization, immense capacity for solute exchange and ultra-thinness of the alveolar epithelium facilitates systemic delivery of insulin via pulmonary administration. Inhaled insulin has been recently approved by Food and Drug Administration (FDA). It is a novel, rapid-acting inhaled insulin with a pharmacokinetic profile that is different from all other insulin products and comparatively safer than the previous failed inhaled insulin (Exubera). PMID:26311994

  10. IT infusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feather, M. S.

    2002-01-01

    Infusing IT technology is a perennial challenge. The Technology Infusion and Maturity Assessment approach of Cornford & Hicks is shown applied to an example of IT infusion: moedl-based V&V of spacecraft software.

  11. Continual Low-Dose Infusion of Sulfamidase Is Superior to Intermittent High-Dose Delivery in Ameliorating Neuropathology in the MPS IIIA Mouse Brain.

    PubMed

    Beard, Helen; Hassiotis, Sofia; Luck, Amanda J; Rozaklis, Tina; Hopwood, John J; Hemsley, Kim M

    2016-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis IIIA (MPS IIIA) is a neurodegenerative lysosomal storage disorder characterised by progressive loss of learned skills, sleep disturbance and behavioural problems. Reduced activity of lysosomal sulfamidase results in accumulation of heparan sulfate and secondary storage of glycolipids in the brain. Intra-cisternal sulfamidase infusions reduce disease-related neuropathology; however, repeated injections may subject patients to the risk of infection and tissue damage so alternative approaches are required. We undertook a proof-of-principle study comparing the ability of slow/continual or repeat/bolus infusion to ameliorate neuropathology in MPS IIIA mouse brain. Six-week-old MPS IIIA mice were implanted with subcutaneously located mini-osmotic pumps filled with recombinant human sulfamidase (rhSGSH) or vehicle, connected to lateral ventricle-directed cannulae. Pumps were replaced at 8 weeks of age. Additional MPS IIIA mice received intra-cisternal bolus infusions of the same amount of rhSGSH (or vehicle), at 6 and 8 weeks of age. Unaffected mice received vehicle via each strategy. All mice were euthanised at 10 weeks of age and the brain was harvested to assess the effect of treatment on neuropathology. Mice receiving pump-delivered rhSGSH exhibited highly significant reductions in lysosomal storage markers (lysosomal integral membrane protein-2, GM3 ganglioside and filipin-positive lipids) and neuroinflammation (isolectin B4-positive microglia, glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive astroglia). MPS IIIA mice receiving rhSGSH via bolus infusion displayed reductions in these markers, but the effectiveness of the strategy was inferior to that seen with slow/pump-based delivery. Continual low-dose infusion may therefore be a more effective strategy for enzyme delivery in MPS IIIA.

  12. How to minimize toxic exposure to pyridine during continuous infusion of ceftazidime in patients with cystic fibrosis?

    PubMed

    Bourget, P; Amin, A; Dupont, C; Abely, M; Desmazes-Dufeu, N; Dubus, J C; Jouani, B-L; Merlette, C; Nové-Josserand, R; Pages, J; Panzo, R; Vidal, F; Voge, F; Hubert, D

    2014-05-01

    Ceftazidime is particularly efficient against Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis patients. Thus, the spontaneous production of pyridine, which is a toxic product, raises some concern. Our aim was to examine the kinetics of degradation of ceftazidime in portable infusion pumps either at 4°C, 22°C, or 33°C and to propose some recommendations in order to reduce the pyridine exposure. Two administration models were studied in vitro. In model 1, we administered 12 g of ceftazidime infused over 23 h (once-daily infusion) compared to 6 g infused over 11.5 h in model 2 (twice-daily regimen). Samples were collected at 0 h and then every 4 and 2 h after the shaping of portable infusion pumps in models 1 and 2, respectively. Both ceftazidime and pyridine were analyzed using an ultraviolet high-performance liquid chromatograph. Production of pyridine is highly depending on the temperature. The in situ production of pyridine per day of treatment decreases at a ratio close to 1/6 and 1/3 between 33°C and 4°C in models 1 and 2, respectively. Regardless of the conditions, the production of pyridine is significantly lower in model 2, whereas the total delivery amount of ceftazidime is significantly higher at 4°C and 33°C compared to that in model 1. According to a the precautionary principle, these findings lead to three major recommendations: (i) exposing a solution of ceftazidime to over 22°C should be strictly avoided, (ii) a divided dose of 6 g over 11.5 h instead of a once-daily administration is preferred, and (iii) infusion should be administered immediately after reconstitution.

  13. How To Minimize Toxic Exposure to Pyridine during Continuous Infusion of Ceftazidime in Patients with Cystic Fibrosis?

    PubMed Central

    Amin, A.; Dupont, C.; Abely, M.; Desmazes-Dufeu, N.; Dubus, J. C.; Jouani, B.-L.; Merlette, C.; Nové-Josserand, R.; Pages, J.; Panzo, R.; Vidal, F.; Voge, F.; Hubert, D.

    2014-01-01

    Ceftazidime is particularly efficient against Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis patients. Thus, the spontaneous production of pyridine, which is a toxic product, raises some concern. Our aim was to examine the kinetics of degradation of ceftazidime in portable infusion pumps either at 4°C, 22°C, or 33°C and to propose some recommendations in order to reduce the pyridine exposure. Two administration models were studied in vitro. In model 1, we administered 12 g of ceftazidime infused over 23 h (once-daily infusion) compared to 6 g infused over 11.5 h in model 2 (twice-daily regimen). Samples were collected at 0 h and then every 4 and 2 h after the shaping of portable infusion pumps in models 1 and 2, respectively. Both ceftazidime and pyridine were analyzed using an ultraviolet high-performance liquid chromatograph. Production of pyridine is highly depending on the temperature. The in situ production of pyridine per day of treatment decreases at a ratio close to 1/6 and 1/3 between 33°C and 4°C in models 1 and 2, respectively. Regardless of the conditions, the production of pyridine is significantly lower in model 2, whereas the total delivery amount of ceftazidime is significantly higher at 4°C and 33°C compared to that in model 1. According to a the precautionary principle, these findings lead to three major recommendations: (i) exposing a solution of ceftazidime to over 22°C should be strictly avoided, (ii) a divided dose of 6 g over 11.5 h instead of a once-daily administration is preferred, and (iii) infusion should be administered immediately after reconstitution. PMID:24614367

  14. A Pilot Study of Continuous Infusion of Mycophenolate Mofetil for Prophylaxis of Graft-versus-Host-Disease in Pediatric Patients.

    PubMed

    Windreich, Randy M; Goyal, Rakesh K; Joshi, Rujuta; Kenkre, Tanya S; Howrie, Denise; Venkataramanan, Raman

    2016-04-01

    Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF), an ester prodrug of mycophenolic acid (MPA), is used increasingly for graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis. Empiric fixed-dose-escalation strategies in pediatric hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) recipients have failed to achieve target MPA exposure. We evaluated the safety and feasibility of a pharmacokinetics-based dosing approach using a novel continuous infusion (CI) method of administration of MMF in pediatric HCT recipients. All patients received a myeloablative conditioning with cyclosporine A and MMF for GVHD prophylaxis. MMF was initiated on day 0 at a dose of 15 mg/kg every 8 hours. Based on steady-state pharmacokinetics, MMF was converted to CI to target a total MPA AUC(0-24) of 40 to 80 μg·hour/mL. The MMF dose was adjusted to maintain a total MPA steady-state concentration (Css) of 1.7 to 3.3 μg/mL. During the CI schedule, MPA AUC(0-24) was maintained at a mean of 40.1 μg·hour/mL (range, 20.6 to 63.8), and 17 of 19 patients (89%) achieved MPA Css within target of 1.7 to 3.3 μg/mL. Eighteen of 19 patients (95%) achieved neutrophil engraftment at a median of 13 days (range, 8 to 41) post-transplant and platelet engraftment at 39 days (range, 17 to 298) days post-transplant. Six of 18 assessable patients (33%) developed stages II to IV acute GVHD and 2 of 15 (13%) developed chronic GVHD. The MMF dose was reduced in 9 patients due to gastrointestinal symptoms (n = 6), low blood counts (n = 4), and viral infection (n = 3). Five patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia relapsed, of whom 4 have died. Fifteen of 19 patients are alive with a median follow-up of 2.4 years (range, .4 to 4.9), with 3-year event-free and overall survival rates of 68% and 79%, respectively. In this pilot study of pharmacokinetically directed MMF dosing, we observed no toxic deaths, excellent engraftment, and low rates of grades III to IV acute and chronic GVHD. We found significantly lower half-life and higher drug clearance in

  15. Safety, Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacodynamics, and Plasma Lipoprotein Distribution of Eritoran (E5564) during Continuous Intravenous Infusion into Healthy Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Rossignol, Daniel P.; Wasan, Kishor M.; Choo, Eugene; Yau, Edwin; Wong, Nancy; Rose, Jeffrey; Moran, Jeffrey; Lynn, Melvyn

    2004-01-01

    Eritoran, a structural analogue of the lipid A portion of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), is an antagonist of LPS in animal and human endotoxemia models. Previous studies have shown that low doses (350 to 3,500 μg) of eritoran have demonstrated a long pharmacokinetic half-life but a short pharmacodynamic half-life. The present study describes the safety, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, and lipid distribution profile of eritoran during and after a 72-h intravenous infusion of 500, 2,000, or 3,500 μg/h into healthy volunteers. Except for the occurrence of phlebitis, eritoran administration over 72 h was safe and well tolerated. Eritoran demonstrated a slow plasma clearance (0.679 to 0.930 ml/h/kg of body weight), a small volume of distribution (45.6 to 49.8 ml/kg), and a relatively long half-life (50.4 to 62.7 h). In plasma, the majority (∼55%) of eritoran was bound to high-density lipoproteins. During infusion and for up to 72 h thereafter, ex vivo response of blood to 1- or 10-ng/ml LPS was inhibited by ≥85%, even when the lowest dose of eritoran (500 μg/h) was infused. Inhibition of response was dependent on eritoran dose and the concentration of LPS used as an agonist. Finally, in vitro analysis with purified lipoprotein and protein fractions from plasma obtained from healthy volunteers indicated that eritoran is inactivated by high-density but not low-density lipoproteins, very-low-density lipoproteins, or albumin. From these results, we conclude that up to 252 mg of eritoran can be safely infused into normal volunteers over 72 h and even though it associates extensively with high-density lipoproteins, antagonistic activity is maintained, even after infusion ceases. PMID:15328078

  16. Follow-up at the corrected age of 24 months of preterm newborns receiving continuous infusion of fentanyl for pain control during mechanical ventilation.

    PubMed

    Ancora, Gina; Lago, Paola; Garetti, Elisabetta; Pirelli, Anna; Merazzi, Daniele; Pierantoni, Luca; Ferrari, Fabrizio; Faldella, Giacomo

    2017-02-24

    The neurodevelopmental impact of fentanyl given to preterm newborns for pain control is still unknown. The aim of this study was to assess the neurodevelopmental impact of 2 regimens of fentanyl administration by a prospective follow-up evaluation. In our previous multicenter, double-blind, randomized controlled trial, 131 mechanically ventilated newborns (gestational age ≤32 weeks) were randomized to fentanyl (continuous infusion of fentanyl + open label boluses of fentanyl) or placebo (continuous infusion of placebo + open label boluses of fentanyl). Infant development was evaluated using Griffiths Mental Developmental Scales (Griffiths, 1996) until 24 months of corrected age by trained psychologists who were not aware of the group allocation. 106/131 infants survived at discharge; 3 died after discharge, 25 were lost to follow-up (12 in the fentanyl and 13 in the placebo group). Seventy-eight patients were evaluated at 2 years of corrected age. Children in the fentanyl group, compared with those in the placebo group, obtained significantly lower Griffiths general developmental quotient (mean [SD]: 89.95 [13.64] vs 97.18 [12.72], P = 0.024) together with the scores on the eye-hand coordination (mean [SD]: 89.09 [12.13] vs 99.19 [13.19], P = 0.002) and performance skills (mean [SD]: 79.71 [15.80] vs 90.09 [15.28], P = 0.009) scales. After adjustment for clinical confounders (gestational age, CRIB score, and sex) only eye-hand co-ordination was associated with fentanyl infusion. This study demonstrates that continuous infusion of fentanyl in very preterm infants, given at 1 mcg·kg·h during mechanical ventilation, is associated with a significant decrease in eye and hand co-ordination skills. Longer follow-up is needed to evaluate the impact on future motor, cognitive, and behavioral functions.

  17. [Indications for the use of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion in pediatric patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Espejel-Huerta, Diana; Antillón-Ferreira, Carlos Alberto; Iglesias-Leboreiro, José; Bernárdez-Zapata, Isabel; Martínez-Ramos Méndez, Angélica; Rendón-Macías, Mario Enrique

    2016-01-01

    Introducción: la diabetes es un problema serio de salud para la pediatría. En pacientes de ese grupo etario, el control depende de la adecuada administración de la insulina.Se buscó analizar las indicaciones para el uso de terapia de infusión continua subcutánea de insulina (ICSI) en niños y adolescentes con diabetes mellitus 1 (DM1). Métodos: estudio descriptivo en pacientes de 1 a 16 años con DM1, en quienes se propuso el inicio de la terapia con ICSI. Se analizó el motivo principal para justificar su inicio y si este fue diferente según edad, sexo y tiempo de evolución. Resultados: en 61 pacientes se aceptó el inicio de ICSI. La mediana de edad fue de 9 años al momento de la colocación y 43 pacientes (71.6 %) tuvieron más de un año de diagnóstico. Los motivos principales para su inicio fueron: 42.6 % (26 de 61) ante un deseo de mejorar su calidad de vida; 34.4 % (21 de 61) para reducir una variabilidad glucémica importante; 13.1 % (8 de 61) para controlar hipoglucemias recurrentes, y 9.8 % (6 de 61) para lograr metas de control en su valor de HbA1c. En los menores de 6 años (n = 14) se indicó más por hipoglucemias recurrentes y para mejorar su calidad de vida; para los de 6 a 12 años (n = 27) para mejorar su calidad de vida; y en los mayores de 12 años (n = 20) por variabilidad glucémica importante e hipoglucemias recurrentes. No hubo diferencias por sexos. Conclusión: los principales motivos que influyeron en la indicación de la ICSI en nuestros pacientes pediátricos fueron mejorar su calidad de vida y lograr un mejor control glucémico.

  18. Continuous Glucose Monitoring in Insulin-Treated Patients in Non-ICU Settings

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Ana Maria

    2014-01-01

    Inpatient hyperglycemia, in patients with and without a history of diabetes, is associated with increased risk of complications, mortality, and longer hospital stay in medicine and surgical patients. Bedside capillary point of care testing is widely recommended as the preferred method for glucose monitoring and for guiding glycemic management of individual patients; however, the accuracy of most handheld glucose meters is far from optimal. Recent studies in the hospital setting have reported that the use of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) can provide real-time information about glucose concentration, direction, and rate of change over a period of several days. Because it provides glucose values every 5-10 minutes 24 hours a day, CGM may have an advantage over point of care testing with respect to reducing the incidence of severe hypoglycemia in acute care. Real-time CGM technology may facilitate glycemic control and to reduce hypoglycemia in insulin-treated patients. Recent guidelines, however, have recommended deferring the use of CGM in the adult hospital setting until further data on accuracy and safety become available. In this study, we review the advantages and disadvantages of the use of real-time CGM in the management of dysglycemia in the hospital setting. PMID:25125454

  19. Continuous glucose monitoring in insulin-treated patients in non-ICU settings.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Ana Maria; Umpierrez, Guillermo E

    2014-09-01

    Inpatient hyperglycemia, in patients with and without a history of diabetes, is associated with increased risk of complications, mortality, and longer hospital stay in medicine and surgical patients. Bedside capillary point of care testing is widely recommended as the preferred method for glucose monitoring and for guiding glycemic management of individual patients; however, the accuracy of most handheld glucose meters is far from optimal. Recent studies in the hospital setting have reported that the use of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) can provide real-time information about glucose concentration, direction, and rate of change over a period of several days. Because it provides glucose values every 5-10 minutes 24 hours a day, CGM may have an advantage over point of care testing with respect to reducing the incidence of severe hypoglycemia in acute care. Real-time CGM technology may facilitate glycemic control and to reduce hypoglycemia in insulin-treated patients. Recent guidelines, however, have recommended deferring the use of CGM in the adult hospital setting until further data on accuracy and safety become available. In this study, we review the advantages and disadvantages of the use of real-time CGM in the management of dysglycemia in the hospital setting.

  20. Continuous intravenous infusion of ATP in humans yields large expansions of erythrocyte ATP pools but extracellular ATP pools are elevated only at the start followed by rapid declines.

    PubMed

    Rapaport, Eliezer; Salikhova, Anna; Abraham, Edward H

    2015-06-01

    The pharmacokinetics of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) was investigated in a clinical trial that included 15 patients with advanced malignancies (solid tumors). ATP was administered by continuous intravenous infusions of 8 h once weekly for 8 weeks. Three values of blood ATP levels were determined. These were total blood (erythrocyte) and blood plasma (extracellular) ATP pools along with the initial rate of release of ATP into the blood plasma. We found that values related to erythrocyte ATP pools showed great variability (diversity) among individuals (standard deviation of about 30-40% of mean at baseline). It was discovered that erythrocyte baseline ATP pool sizes are unique to each individual and that they fall within a narrow range in each individual. At the end of an 8 h continuous intravenous infusion of ATP, intracellular erythrocyte ATP pools were increased in the range of 40-60% and extracellular ATP declined from elevated levels achieved at the beginning and middle of the infusion, to baseline levels. The ability of erythrocytes to sequester exogenously administered ATP to this degree, after its initial conversion to adenosine in the blood plasma is unexpected, considering that some of the adenosine is likely to have been degraded by in vivo catabolic activities or taken up by organs. The data suggest that administration of ATP by short-term intravenous infusions, of up to 4 h, may be a favorable way for elevating extracellular ATP pools. A large fraction of the total exogenously administered ATP is sequestered into the intracellular compartments of the erythrocytes after an 8 h intravenous infusion. Erythrocytes loaded with ATP are known to release their ATP pools by the application of previously established agents or conditions applied locally or globally to circulating erythrocytes. Rapid degradation of intravenously administered ATP to adenosine and subsequent accumulation of ATP inside erythrocytes indicate the existence of very effective mechanisms

  1. Impact of Bolus dosing versus continuous infusion of Piperacillin and Tazobactam on the development of antimicrobial resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Felton, T W; Goodwin, J; O'Connor, L; Sharp, A; Gregson, L; Livermore, J; Howard, S J; Neely, M N; Hope, W W

    2013-12-01

    Management of nosocomial pneumonia is frequently complicated by bacterial resistance. Extended infusions of beta-lactams are increasingly being used to improve clinical outcomes. However, the impact of this strategy on the emergence of antimicrobial resistance is not known. A hollow-fiber infection model with Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PAO1) was used. Pharmacokinetic (PK) profiles of piperacillin-tazobactam similar to those in humans were simulated over 5 days. Three dosages of piperacillin-tazobactam were administered over 0.5 h or 4 h, with redosing every 8 h. Two initial bacterial densities were investigated (∼10(4) CFU/ml and ∼10(7) CFU/ml). The time courses of the total bacterial population and the resistant subpopulation were determined. All data were described using a mathematical model, which was then used to define the relationship between drug concentrations, bacterial killing, and emergence of piperacillin resistance. There was logarithmic growth in controls in the initial 24 h, reaching a plateau of ∼9 log10 CFU/ml. Bacterial killing following administration of piperacillin via bolus dosing and that after extended infusions were similar. For the lower initial bacterial density, trough total plasma piperacillin concentration/MIC ratios of 3.4 and 10.4 for bolus and extended-infusion regimens, respectively, were able to suppress the emergence of piperacillin resistance. For the higher initial bacterial density, all regimens were associated with progressive growth of a resistant subpopulation. A stratified approach, according to bacterial density, is required to treat patients with nosocomial pneumonia. Antimicrobial monotherapy may be sufficient for some patients. However, for patients with a high bacterial burden, alternative therapeutic strategies are required to maximize bacterial killing and prevent antimicrobial resistance.

  2. Pathology in Continuous Infusion Studies in Rodents and Non-Rodents and ITO (Infusion Technology Organisation)-Recommended Protocol for Tissue Sampling and Terminology for Procedure-Related Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Klaus; Mowat, Vasanthi; Hartmann, Elke; Razinger, Tanja; Chevalier, Hans-Jörg; Blumbach, Kai; Green, Owen P.; Kaiser, Stefan; Corney, Stephen; Jackson, Ailsa; Casadesus, Agustin

    2011-01-01

    Many variables may affect the outcome of continuous infusion studies. The results largely depend on the experience of the laboratory performing these studies, the technical equipment used, the choice of blood vessels and hence the surgical technique as well the quality of pathological evaluation. The latter is of major interest due to the fact that the pathologist is not involved until necropsy in most cases, i.e. not dealing with the complicated surgical or in-life procedures of this study type. The technique of tissue sampling during necropsy and the histology processing procedures may influence the tissues presented for evaluation, hence the pathologist may be a source of misinterpretation. Therefore, ITO proposes a tissue sampling procedure and a standard nomenclature for pathological lesions for all sites and tissues in contact with the port-access and/or catheter system. PMID:22272050

  3. Infusion Extractor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang-Diaz, Franklin R.

    1988-01-01

    Apparatus and method of removing desirable constituents from an infusible material by infusion extraction, where a piston operating in a first chamber draws a solvent into the first chamber where it may be heated, and then moves the heated solvent into a second chamber containing the infusible material, and where infusion extraction takes place. The piston then moves the solvent containing the extract through a filter into the first chamber, leaving the extraction residue in the second chamber.

  4. Clinical and biochemical characteristics of type 2 diabetic patients on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis: relationships with insulin requirement.

    PubMed

    Wong, T Y; Chan, J C; Szeto, C C; Leung, C B; Li, P K

    1999-09-01

    Although glycemic control has an important impact on the clinical outcomes of patients with diabetes undergoing dialysis, there is a paucity of data on the relationship between glucose metabolism and clinical parameters in these patients. In this study, we compared a cohort of 48 patients with type II diabetes undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) with 84 age- and sex-matched patients with type II diabetes with similar disease duration but normal renal function. Compared with those with normal renal function, patients with type 2 diabetes undergoing CAPD had greater serum angiotensin-converting enzyme activity (median, 57.4 U/L; range, 33.5 to 100.0 U/L v 46.9 U/L; range, 11.6 to 111.2 U/L; P < 0.005), fasting C-peptide (median, 9.1 ng/mL; range, 0.9 to 30.0 ng/mL v 2.2 ng/mL; range, 0.2 to 20.3 ng/mL; P < 0.0001) and triglyceride levels, and lower serum albumin concentrations. Among the patients undergoing CAPD, there was a preponderance of men in the insulin-treated group. Insulin-treated patients also had greater plasma albumin levels and body weights and lower fasting serum C-peptide levels (2.81 +/- 1.77 v 3.12 +/- 2.04 ng/mL; analysis of variance, P = 0.007 adjusted for fasting glucose concentration). Multivariate analysis showed duration of diabetes, hemoglobin A(1c) (HbA(1c)) level, and body weight were independent determinants of insulin requirement in patients undergoing CAPD. The daily insulin dosage required was related to the duration of diabetes (r = 0.5; P = 0.007). In summary, among patients with end-stage renal failure, insulin-treated patients had greater body weights and plasma albumin levels but lower cholesterol levels. Plasma C-peptide concentration and duration of diabetes were the main determinants of insulin requirement, reflecting a decrease in beta-cell reserve, whereas the daily insulin dose correlated mainly with body weight, HbA(1c) level, and duration of diabetes. Kt/V had no effect on insulin resistance or

  5. A comparison of continuous infusion and intermittent bolus administration of 0.1% ropivacaine with 0.0002% fentanyl for epidural labor analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Patkar, Chinmayi Surendra; Vora, Kalpana; Patel, Harshal; Shah, Veena; Modi, Manisha Pranjal; Parikh, Geeta

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims: Minimal consumption of local anesthetic and opioid for epidural labor analgesia has been advocated for safe obstetric outcome and superior maternal satisfaction. The primary objective of this study was to evaluate and compare the analgesic efficacy of mode of administration of epidural 0.1% ropivacaine with 0.0002% fentanyl via continuous infusion or intermittent boluses during labor. Material and Methods: Sixty term primi or second gravida healthy parturients in labor requesting epidural analgesia were recruited in this study. Lumbar epidural catheter was inserted, and analgesia initiated with 0.2% ropivacaine. Patients were randomized to receive ropivacaine 0.1% with fentanyl 0.0002% via either continuous infusion (Group A) or intermittent boluses (Group B) on an hourly basis. If the parturient complained of pain and visual analog scale (VAS) score was >3, an additional bolus of the study drug was given. VAS score, motor blockade, maternal hemodynamics and fetal heart sounds were frequently monitored. Side effects, mode of delivery and neonatal outcome were noted. Results: To achieve similar VAS, the mean total dose of ropivacaine was 18.78 ± 3.88 mg in Group A and 16.86 ± 4.3 mg in Group B, the difference being statistically significant (P = 0.04). Seventeen out of 30 patients in Group A that is, 56.6% and nine patients in Group B that is, 30% required additional top-ups, and this was significantly higher (P = 0.037). Side effects, mode of delivery and neonatal outcome were comparable in both groups. Conclusion: Intermittent bolus administration provides a more efficacious route of drug delivery when compared to continuous infusion by significantly decreasing the total amount of local anesthetic plus opioid without adversely affecting patient safety or maternal satisfaction. PMID:25948908

  6. Might real-time pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic optimisation of high-dose continuous-infusion meropenem improve clinical cure in infections caused by KPC-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae?

    PubMed

    Pea, Federico; Della Siega, Paola; Cojutti, Piergiorgio; Sartor, Assunta; Crapis, Massimo; Scarparo, Claudio; Bassetti, Matteo

    2017-02-01

    The effect of real-time pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) optimisation of high-dose continuous-infusion meropenem on the clinical outcome of patients receiving combination antimicrobial therapy for treatment of KPC-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae (KPC-Kp) infections was retrospectively assessed. Data for all patients with KPC-Kp-related infections who received antimicrobial combination therapy containing high-dose continuous-infusion meropenem optimised by means of therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) were retrieved. Optimal PK/PD exposure was considered a steady-state concentration to minimum inhibitory concentration ratio (Css/MIC) of 1-4. Univariate binary logistic regression analysis was performed to identify independent predictors of clinical outcome. Among the 30 eligible patients, 53.3% had infections caused by meropenem-resistant KPC-Kp (MIC ≥ 16 mg/L). Tigecycline and colistin were the two antimicrobials most frequently combined with meropenem. Mean doses of continuous-infusion meropenem ranged from 1.7 to 13.2 g/daily. The Css/MIC ratio was ≥1 in 73.3% of cases and ≥4 in 50.0%. Clinical outcome was successful in 73.3% of cases after a median treatment length of 14.0 days. In univariate analysis, a significant correlation with successful clinical outcome was found for a Css/MIC ratio ≥1 (OR = 10.556, 95% CI 1.612-69.122; P = 0.014), a Css/MIC ratio ≥4 (OR = 12.250, 95% CI 1.268-118.361; P = 0.030) and a Charlson co-morbidity index of ≥4 (OR = 0.158, 95% CI 0.025-0.999; P = 0.05). High-dose continuous-infusion meropenem optimised by means of real-time TDM may represent a valuable tool in improving clinical outcome when dealing with the treatment of infections caused by KPC-Kp with a meropenem MIC ≤ 64 mg/L.

  7. Insulin receptor changes in type 2 diabetes after short term insulin treatment.

    PubMed

    Rizkalla, S W; Weissbrodt, P; Tchobroutsky, G; Slama, G

    1985-10-01

    We have studied erythrocyte insulin receptor changes before and after 8 days of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion by a pump in 11 uncontrolled obese non-insulin-dependent diabetics (type 2), diet and drug resistant for at least three months previously. All the patients were hospitalized. On day 1 of the study, their oral hypoglycemic agents were stopped and hypocaloric diet (1000 Kcal/day) was maintained (strictly reinforced). This period of reinforced treatment was not accompanied by correction of hyperglycemia. On day 9 patients were placed for 12 hours on artificial pancreas in order to bring their fasting blood glucose levels down to normal values. Then they were submitted to a continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) for the following 8 days. There was a significant decrease in mean fasting plasma glucose (P less than 0.001) and a rise in insulin (P less than 0.05) levels after insulin treatment. Mean specific insulin binding was also significantly increased (P less than 0.01). The increase in binding (with insulin therapy) correlated with the fall in fasting hyperglycemia (r = 0.786, P less than 0.01). In addition, the increase in binding correlated negatively with changes in fasting plasma insulin levels (r = -0.867, P less than 0.01), under treatment, on one hand and with the dose of exogenous insulin administered (r = -0.681, P less than 0.05) on the other hand. There was no correlation between binding and fasting plasma insulin levels (before and after insulin therapy), or between diabetes duration and any of the previous parameters.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Two weeks of moderate intensity continuous training, but not high intensity interval training increases insulin-stimulated intestinal glucose uptake.

    PubMed

    Motiani, Kumail Kumar; Savolainen, Anna M; Eskelinen, Jari-Joonas; Toivanen, Jussi; Ishizu, Tamiko; Yli-Karjanmaa, Minna; Virtanen, Kirsi A; Parkkola, Riitta; Kapanen, Jukka; Gronroos, Tove J; Haaparanta-Solin, Merja; Solin, Olof; Savisto, Nina; Ahotupa, Markku; Löyttyniemi, Eliisa; Knuuti, Juhani; Nuutila, Pirjo; Kalliokoski, Kari K; Hannukainen, Jarna C

    2017-02-09

    Similar to muscles, the intestine is also insulin resistant in obese subjects and subjects with impaired glucose tolerance. Exercise training improves muscle insulin sensitivity, but its effects on intestinal metabolism are not known. We studied the effects of high intensity interval training (HIIT) and moderate intensity continuous training (MICT) on intestinal glucose and free fatty acid uptake from circulation in humans. Twenty-eight healthy middle-aged sedentary men were randomized for two weeks of HIIT or MICT. Intestinal insulin-stimulated glucose uptake and fasting free fatty acid uptake from circulation were measured using positron emission tomography and [(18)F]FDG and [(18)F]FTHA. In addition, effects of HIIT and MICT on intestinal Glut2 and CD36 protein expression were studied in rats. Training improved aerobic capacity (p=0.001) and whole-body insulin sensitivity (p=0.04), but not differently between HIIT and MICT. Insulin-stimulated glucose uptake increased only after the MICT in the colon [HIIT=0%; MICT=37%] (p=0.02 for time*training) and tended to increase in the jejunum [HIIT=-4%; MICT=13%] (p=0.08 for time*training). Fasting free fatty acid uptake decreased in the duodenum in both groups [HIIT=-6%; MICT=-48%] (p=0.001 time) and tended to decrease in the colon in the MICT group [HIIT=0%; MICT=-38%] (p=0.08 for time*training). In rats, both training groups had higher Glut2 and CD36 expression compared to control animals. This study shows that already two weeks of MICT enhances insulin-stimulated glucose uptake while both training modes reduce fasting free fatty acid uptake in the intestine in healthy middle-aged men, providing an additional mechanism by which exercise training can improve whole body metabolism.

  9. Direct effects of TNF-α on local fuel metabolism and cytokine levels in the placebo-controlled, bilaterally infused human leg: increased insulin sensitivity, increased net protein breakdown, and increased IL-6 release.

    PubMed

    Bach, Ermina; Nielsen, Roni R; Vendelbo, Mikkel H; Møller, Andreas B; Jessen, Niels; Buhl, Mads; K-Hafstrøm, Thomas; Holm, Lars; Pedersen, Steen B; Pilegaard, Henriette; Biensø, Rasmus S; Jørgensen, Jens O L; Møller, Niels

    2013-12-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) has widespread metabolic actions. Systemic TNF-α administration, however, generates a complex hormonal and metabolic response. Our study was designed to test whether regional, placebo-controlled TNF-α infusion directly affects insulin resistance and protein breakdown. We studied eight healthy volunteers once with bilateral femoral vein and artery catheters during a 3-h basal period and a 3-h hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp. One artery was perfused with saline and one with TNF-α. During the clamp, TNF-α perfusion increased glucose arteriovenous differences (0.91 ± 0.17 vs. 0.74 ± 0.15 mmol/L, P = 0.012) and leg glucose uptake rates. Net phenylalanine release was increased by TNF-α perfusion with concomitant increases in appearance and disappearance rates. Free fatty acid kinetics was not affected by TNF-α, whereas interleukin-6 (IL-6) release increased. Insulin and protein signaling in muscle biopsies was not affected by TNF-α. TNF-α directly increased net muscle protein loss, which may contribute to cachexia and general protein loss during severe illness. The finding of increased insulin sensitivity, which could relate to IL-6, is of major clinical interest and may concurrently act to provide adequate tissue fuel supply and contribute to the occurrence of systemic hypoglycemia. This distinct metabolic feature places TNF-α among the rare insulin mimetics of human origin.

  10. A phase I trial of c-Raf kinase antisense oligonucleotide ISIS 5132 administered as a continuous intravenous infusion in patients with advanced cancer.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, C C; Holmlund, J T; Schiller, J H; Geary, R S; Kwoh, T J; Dorr, A; Nemunaitis, J

    2000-05-01

    Raf proteins play a central role in the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway and hence are involved in oncogenic transformation and tumor cell proliferation. ISIS 5132 is a 20-base antisense phosphorothioate oligodeoxyribonucleotide that specifically down-regulates c-raf expression. We report here an initial study of the safety and tolerability of an i.v. infusion of ISIS 5132 in patients with advanced cancer. A continuous i.v. infusion of ISIS 5132 was administered for 21 days every 4 weeks to 34 patients with a variety of solid tumors refractory to standard therapy. The dose of ISIS 5132 was increased in sequential cohorts of patients, as toxicity allowed, until a final dose of 5.0 mg/kg body weight was reached. Toxicity was scored by common toxicity criteria, and tumor response was monitored. Pharmacokinetic studies were performed for 30 patients treated at doses of < or =4.0 mg/kg/day. The initial dose of ISIS 5132 was 0.5 mg/kg body weight and was successfully increased incrementally to 5.0 mg/kg body weight. Toxicities through the 4.0 mg/kg dose level were not dose limiting. Side effects were minimal and could not be specifically related to ISIS 5132. Two patients had prolonged stabilization of their disease, and one patient with ovarian carcinoma had a significant response with a 97% reduction in CA-125 levels. ISIS 5132, an antisense oligonucleotide against c-raf, was well tolerated at doses up to and including 4.0 mg/kg/day by 21-day continuous i.v. infusion and demonstrated antitumor activity at the doses tested.

  11. A double-blind randomized study comparing the effects of continuing or not continuing rosiglitazone + metformin therapy when starting insulin therapy in people with Type 2 diabetes1

    PubMed Central

    Home, P D; Bailey, C J; Donaldson, J; Chen, H; Stewart, M W

    2007-01-01

    Aims To compare the efficacy and safety of either continuing or discontinuing rosiglitazone + metformin fixed-dose combination when starting insulin therapy in people with Type 2 diabetes inadequately controlled on oral therapy. Methods In this 24-week double-blind study, 324 individuals with Type 2 diabetes inadequately controlled on maximum dose rosiglitazone + metformin therapy were randomly assigned to twice-daily premix insulin therapy (target pre-breakfast and pre-evening meal glucose ≤ 6.5 mmol/l) in addition to either rosiglitazone + metformin (8/2000 mg) or placebo. Results Insulin dose at week 24 was significantly lower with rosiglitazone + metformin (33.5 ± 1.5 U/day, mean ± se) compared with placebo [59.0 ± 3.0 U/day; model-adjusted difference −26.6 (95% CI −37.7, −15,5) U/day, P < 0.001]. Despite this, there was greater improvement in glycaemic control [HbA1c rosiglitazone + metformin vs. placebo 6.8 ± 0.1 vs. 7.5 ± 0.1%; difference −0.7 (−0.8, −0.5)%, P < 0.001] and more individuals achieved glycaemic targets (HbA1c < 7.0% 70 vs. 34%, P < 0.001). The proportion of individuals reporting at least one hypoglycaemic event during the last 12 weeks of treatment was similar in the two groups (rosiglitazone + metformin vs. placebo 25 vs. 27%). People receiving rosiglitazone + metformin in addition to insulin reported greater treatment satisfaction than those receiving insulin alone. Both treatment regimens were well tolerated but more participants had oedema [12 (7%) vs. 4 (3%)] and there was more weight gain [3.7 vs. 2.6 kg; difference 1.1 (0.2, 2.1) kg, P = 0.02] with rosiglitazone + metformin. Conclusions Addition of insulin to rosiglitazone + metformin enabled more people to reach glycaemic targets with less insulin, and was generally well tolerated. PMID:17403121

  12. Comparison of glucose tolerance tests to detect the insulin sensitizing effects of a bout of continuous exercise.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Juan Fernando; Hamouti, Nassim; Fernández-Elías, Valentín Emilio; Mora-Rodriguez, Ricardo

    2014-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine which of the available glucose tolerance tests (oral (OGTT) vs. intravenous (IVGTT)) could more readily detect the insulin sensitizing effects of a bout of continuous exercise. Ten healthy moderately fit young men (V̇O2peak of 45.4 ± 1.8 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1); age 27.5 ± 2.7 yr) underwent 4 OGTT and 4 IVGTT on different days following a standardized dinner and overnight fast. One test was performed immediately after 55 min of cycle-ergometer exercise at 60% V̇O2peak. Insulin sensitivity index was determined during a 50 min IVGTT according to Tura (CISI) and from a 120 min OGTT using the Matsuda composite index (MISI). After exercise, MISI improved 29 ± 10% without reaching statistical significance (p = 0.182) due to its low reproducibility (coefficient of variation 16 ± 3%; intra-class reliability 0.846). However, CISI significantly improved (50 ± 4%; p < 0.001) after exercise showing better reproducibility (coefficient of variation 13 ± 4%; intra-class reliability 0.955). Power calculation revealed that 6 participants were required for detecting the effects of exercise on insulin sensitivity when using IVGTT, whereas 54 were needed when using OGTT. The superior response of CISI compared with MISI suggests the preferential use of IVGTT to assess the effects of exercise on insulin sensitivity when using a glucose tolerance test.

  13. Analysis of the variable factors influencing tacrolimus blood concentration during the switch from continuous intravenous infusion to oral administration after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Suetsugu, Kimitaka; Ikesue, Hiroaki; Miyamoto, Toshihiro; Shiratsuchi, Motoaki; Yamamoto-Taguchi, Nanae; Tsuchiya, Yuichi; Matsukawa, Kumi; Uchida, Mayako; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Akashi, Koichi; Masuda, Satohiro

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to identify variable factors affecting tacrolimus blood concentration during the switch from continuous intravenous infusion to twice-daily oral administration in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients (n = 73). The blood concentration/dose ratio of tacrolimus immediately before the change from continuous infusion (C/Div) was compared with that between 3 and 5 days after the change to oral administration (C/Dpo). Median (C/Dpo)/(C/Div) was 0.21 (range 0.04-0.58). Multiple regression analysis showed that concomitant use of oral itraconazole or voriconazole significantly increased the (C/Dpo)/(C/Div) of tacrolimus (p = 0.002), probably owing to the inhibition of enterohepatic cytochrome P450 3A4. In addition, 5 of 18 (28%) patients who had the lowest quartile (C/Dpo)/(C/Div) values developed acute graft-versus-host-disease (GVHD), which was significantly higher than in others [5 of 55 (9%) patients, p = 0.045]. Although the switch from intravenous to oral administration at a ratio of 1:5 appeared to be appropriate, a lower conversion ratio was suitable in patients taking oral itraconazole or voriconazole. In patients whose blood concentration decreases after the switch, the development of GVHD should be monitored and tacrolimus dosage should be readjusted to maintain an appropriate blood concentration.

  14. Surgical treatment options for septic non-union of the tibia: two staged operation, Flow-through anastomosis of FVFG, and continuous local intraarterial infusion of heparin

    PubMed Central

    Kawakami, Ryoichi; Ejiri, Soichi; Hakozaki, Michiyuki; Hatashita, Satoshi; Sasaki, Nobuyuki; Kobayashi, Yoshitaka; Takahashi, Yoko; Konno, Shin-ichi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: The treatment of septic non-union of the tibia is a challenging area. The objective of this clinical study was to improve the treatment outcomes in patients with a highly active infection by the three strategies consisting of a two-staged operation, a flow-through technique for vascular anastomosis of a free vascularized fibular graft (FVFG), and continuous local intra-arterial infusion of heparin. Patients & Method: Five patients with septic non-union of the tibia who were treated with an FVFG (mean age: 52.8 years) were enrolled. The mean postoperative follow-up period was 47.2 months, and the mean length of the bone defect was 111 mm. A two-staged operation, in which polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) beads containing antibiotics were inserted into a bone defect followed by bone reconstruction performed with an FVFG later. Vascular anastomosis was performed with the flow-through technique in all patients. Immediately after FVFG, heparin was continuously infused through a femoral arterial catheter for 1 week. Result: Bone union was confirmed an average of 18.8 weeks after-surgery in all patients without reoperation for thrombus. Conclusion: Our attempt to apply the strategies appears to be a viable treatment option for septic non-union of the tibia. PMID:27477992

  15. Efficacy and Safety of Continuous Micro-Pump Infusion of 3% Hypertonic Saline combined with Furosemide to Control Elevated Intracranial Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuqian; Li, Zhihong; Li, Min; Yang, Yanlong; Wang, Bao; Gao, Li; Zhang, Xingye; Cheng, Hongyu; Fang, Wei; Zhao, Bo; Wang, Boliang; Gao, Guodong; Li, Lihong

    2015-01-01

    Background Elevated intracranial pressure is one of the most common problems in patients with diverse intracranial disorders, leading to increased morbidity and mortality. Effective management for increased intracranial pressure is based mainly on surgical and medical techniques with hyperosmolar therapy as one of the core medical treatments. The study aimed to explore the effects of continuous micro-pump infusions of 3% hypertonic saline combined with furosemide on intracranial pressure control. Material/Methods We analyzed data on 56 eligible participants with intracranial pressure >20 mmHg from March 2013 to July 2014. The target was to increase and maintain plasma sodium to a level between 145 and 155 mmol/L and osmolarity to a level of 310 to 320 mOsmol/kg. Results Plasma sodium levels significantly increased from 138±5 mmol/L at admission to 151±3 mmol/L at 24 h (P<0.01). Osmolarity increased from 282±11 mOsmol/kg at baseline to 311±8 mOsmol/kg at 24 h (P<0.01). Intracranial pressure significantly decreased from 32±7 mmHg to 15±6 mmHg at 24 h (P<0.01). There was a significant improvement in CPP (P<0.01). Moreover, central venous pressure, mean arterial pressure, and Glasgow Coma Scale slightly increased. However, these changes were not statistically significant. Conclusions Continuous infusion of 3% hypertonic saline + furosemide is effective and safe for intracranial pressure control. PMID:26082293

  16. Randomized Trial of the Effect of Magnesium Sulfate Continuous Infusion on IL-6 and CRP Serum Levels Following Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Mojtahedzadeh, Mojtaba; chelkeba, Legese; Ranjvar- Shahrivar, Mona; Najafi, Atabak; Moini, Majid; Najmeddin, Farhad; Sadeghi, Kourosh; Barkhordari, Khosro; Gheymati, Azin; Ahmadi, Arezoo

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is widely considered as the disease of elderly white men. Inflammation is one of the most well-known mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of AAA. Magnesium is one of the most important minerals in the body with established anti-inflammatory effects. In this study, we aimed to investigate the impact of Mg loading following AAA surgery on two inflammation markers, IL-6 and CRP, as well as patientʼs outcome. This study was conducted as a randomized clinical trial on 18 patients (divided into two groups) after surgical correction of Acute Aortic Aneurysm (AAA). All the patients admitted in ICU ward of Sina Hospital. In intervention group, 10 g of MgSO4 has been infused through 12 h. The control group has not received the intervention. IL-6 and CRP were measured and compared at times 0, 12, 24 and 36 h. The patients were monitored for 36 h. After intervention, the differences of heart rate and APACHE II score were not statistically significant between intervention and control groups (P = 0.097 and P = 0.472, respectively). IL-6 levels decreased consistently in both groups after inclusion in the study. However, IL-6 level was significantly less in intervention group early after the end of MgSO4 infusion comparing with control group (P = 0.01). Likewise, the CRP level decreased significantly after inclusion in the study (P = 0.005). However, these changes were not significant between intervention and control groups (P = 0.297). According to the results of this study, continuous infusion of MgSO4 after AAA surgery may provide IL-6 suppression. PMID:28243294

  17. Adding Once-Daily Lixisenatide for Type 2 Diabetes Inadequately Controlled With Newly Initiated and Continuously Titrated Basal Insulin Glargine

    PubMed Central

    Riddle, Matthew C.; Forst, Thomas; Aronson, Ronnie; Sauque-Reyna, Leobardo; Souhami, Elisabeth; Silvestre, Louise; Ping, Lin; Rosenstock, Julio

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE When oral therapy for type 2 diabetes is ineffective, adding basal insulin improves glycemic control. However, when glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) remains elevated because of postprandial hyperglycemia, the next therapeutic step is controversial. We examined the efficacy and safety of lixisenatide in patients with HbA1c still elevated after initiation of insulin glargine. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS This double-blind, parallel-group trial enrolled patients with HbA1c 7–10% despite oral therapy. Insulin glargine was added and systematically titrated during a 12-week run-in, after which candidates with fasting glucose ≤7.8 mmol/L and HbA1c 7–9% were randomized to lixisenatide 20 µg or placebo for 24 weeks while insulin titration continued. The primary end point was HbA1c change after randomization. RESULTS The randomized population (n = 446) had mean diabetes duration of 9.2 years, BMI 31.8 kg/m2, and daily glargine dosage of 44 units. HbA1c had decreased during run-in from 8.6 to 7.6%; adding lixisenatide further reduced HbA1c by 0.71 vs. 0.40% with placebo (least squares mean difference, –0.32%; 95% CI, –0.46 to –0.17; P < 0.0001). More participants attained HbA1c <7% with lixisenatide (56 vs. 39%; P < 0.0001). Lixisenatide reduced plasma glucose 2 h after a standardized breakfast (difference vs. placebo –3.2 mmol/L; P < 0.0001) and had a favorable effect on body weight (difference vs. placebo –0.89 kg; P = 0.0012). Nausea, vomiting, and symptomatic hypoglycemia <3.3 mmol/L were more common with lixisenatide. CONCLUSIONS Adding lixisenatide to insulin glargine improved overall and postprandial hyperglycemia and deserves consideration as an alternative to prandial insulin for patients not reaching HbA1c goals with recently initiated basal insulin. PMID:23564915

  18. Continuous administration of an elemental diet induces insulin resistance in neonatal pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We previously showed that total parenteral nutrition (TPN) compared to intermittent enteral feeding of a milk-based formula induces insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis in neonatal pigs. We hypothesized that intravenous (IV) feeding rather than the nature of the diet (elemental vs polymeric) or ...

  19. Infusion extractor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang-Diaz, Franklin R. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    This invention relates to an apparatus and method of removing desirable constituents from an infusible material by infusion extraction. A piston operating in a first chamber draws a solvent into the first chamber where it may be heated, and then moves the heated solvent into a second chamber containing the infusible material, where infusion extraction takes place. The piston then moves the solvent containing the extract through a filter into the first chamber, leaving the extraction residue in the second chamber. The method is applicable to operation in low or micro-gravity environments.

  20. Professional continuous glucose monitoring for the identification of type 1 diabetes mellitus among subjects with insulin therapy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yin-Chun; Huang, Yu-Yao; Li, Hung-Yuan; Liu, Shih-Wei; Hsieh, Sheng-Hwu; Lin, Chia-Hung

    2015-01-01

    The identification of type 1 diabetes in diabetic subjects receiving insulin therapy is sometimes difficult. The purpose of this study is to evaluate whether results of professional continuous glucose monitoring can improve the identification of type 1 diabetes.From 2007 to 2012, 119 adults receiving at least twice-daily insulin therapy and professional continuous glucose monitoring were recruited. Type 1 diabetes was diagnosed by endocrinologists according to American Diabetes Association standards, including a very low C-peptide level (<0.35  pg/mL) or the presence of diabetic ketoacidosis. Continuous glucose monitoring was applied for 3 days.Among 119 subjects, 86 were diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. Subjects with type 1 diabetes were younger (33.8 vs 52.3 years old, P < 0.001), had lower body mass index (BMI, 21.95 vs 24.42, P = 0.003), lower serum creatinine (61.77  vs 84.65 μmol/L, P = 0.001), and higher estimated glomerular filtration rate (108.71 vs 76.48 mg/mL/min/1.73m2, P < 0.001) than subjects with type 2 diabetes. Predictive scores for identification of type 1 diabetes were constructed, including age, BMI, average mean amplitude of glucose excursion in days 2 and 3, and the area under the curve of nocturnal hyperglycemic and hypoglycemic states. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.90. With the cutoff of 0.58, the sensitivity was 86.7% and the specificity was 80.8%. The good performance was validated by the leave-one-out method (sensitivity 83.3%, specificity 73.1%).Professional continuous glucose monitoring is a useful tool that improves identification of type 1 diabetes among diabetic patients receiving insulin therapy.

  1. Urinary C-peptide measurements in patients receiving continuous and cyclic total parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Wood, R J; Bengoa, J M; Rosenberg, I H

    1985-02-01

    Urinary C-peptide excretion has been found to be an accurate index of insulin secretion under a variety of physiologic conditions, such as acute starvation and exercise, and after oral and intravenous glucose administration. We investigated urinary C-peptide responses in a group of patients who were receiving all of their nutrient intake by intravenous administration. In these patients receiving total parenteral nutrition (TPN), we were able to monitor changes in insulin secretion when the same nutrients were infused at different rates, for example, during cyclic vs. continuous TPN administration, and to observe changes in the insulin secretory response as the pattern of nutrient delivery was altered in the same individual. We found that increasing the TPN infusion rate by 50% during cyclic TPN caused a 65% increase in serum insulin levels over levels observed during continuous TPN administration (93 vs. 60 microU/ml), whereas a 100% increase in the cyclic TPN infusion rate above the continuous TPN rate increased insulin levels by 147% (147 vs. 60 microU/ml). The molar ratio of insulin to C-peptide was increased by increasing rates of TPN infusion, from 0.116 during fasting periods to 0.151 during maximum rates of TPN administration. An additional finding of this study is that 24-hour insulin secretion, estimated by urinary C-peptide measurements, was equivalent in all treatments regardless of the pattern of insulin response elicited.

  2. Elective surgery on factor VIII inhibitor patients using continuous infusion of recombinant activated factor VII: plasma factor VII activity of 10 IU/ml is associated with an increased incidence of bleeding.

    PubMed

    Smith, M P; Ludlam, C A; Collins, P W; Hay, C R; Wilde, J T; Grigeri, A; Melsen, T; Savidge, G F

    2001-10-01

    We examined recombinant activated factor VII (rVIIa) administered by continuous infusion to eight patients with inhibitors to factor VIII, undergoing elective surgery. rVIIa was infused at a fixed rate of 16.5 microg/kg/h for a median of 13.5 days (range 1-26). There was effective haemostasis at this infusion rate in only one of two minor procedures and two of six major operations. Three patients experienced excessive bleeding despite plasma factor VII activity around 10 IU/ml. Serious bleeding occurred in two other patients caused by procedural errors unrelated to rVIIa and required re-operation. The median rVIIa clearance on day 1 was 57 ml/h/kg (range 18-100) and on day 3 was 100 ml/h/kg (range 61-200). Clearance on the final infusion day was not significantly different from day 3. The infusion did not induce pathological activation of the coagulation mechanism. The only thrombotic adverse events were two episodes of superficial thrombophlebitis of the infused vein in one subject. In conclusion, the 16.5 microg/kg/h infusion rate reliably achieves plasma factor VII activity levels of 10 IU/ml, but this level does not provide reliable haemostasis.

  3. Use of insulin in diabetes: a century of treatment.

    PubMed

    Shahani, Savita; Shahani, Lokesh

    2015-12-01

    Insulin is a key player in the control of hyperglycaemia for patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and selected patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. There have been many advances in insulin drug delivery from its first administration as a crude pancreatic extract till today. The traditional and most predictable method for administration of insulin is by subcutaneous injection. Currently available insulin delivery systems include insulin syringes, infusion pumps, jet injectors, and pens. The major drawback of insulin therapy is its invasive nature. Non-invasive delivery of insulin has long been a major goal for the treatment of diabetes mellitus. Although there have been improvements in insulin therapy since it was first conceived, it is still far from mimicking the physiological secretion of pancreatic β-cells, and research to find new insulin formulations and new routes of administration continues. This article reviews the emerging technologies, including insulin inhalers, insulin buccal spray, insulin pill, islet cell transplant, and stem cell therapy, as treatment options for diabetes mellitus.

  4. Double-Blind, Double-Dummy, Randomized Study of Continuous Intrajejunal Infusion of Levodopa-Carbidopa Intestinal Gel in Advanced Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Olanow, C. Warren; Kieburtz, Karl; Odin, Per; Espay, Alberto J.; Standaert, David G.; Fernandez, Hubert H.; Vanagunas, Arvydas; Othman, Ahmed A.; Widnell, Katherine L.; Robieson, Weining Z.; Pritchett, Yili; Chatamra, Krai; Benesh, Janet; Lenz, Robert A.; Antonini, Angelo

    2015-01-01

    Background Levodopa is the most effective therapy for Parkinson's disease (PD), but chronic treatment is associated with the development of potentially disabling motor complications. Experimental studies suggest that motor complications are due to non-physiologic, intermittent administration of the drug, and can be reduced with continuous delivery. Levodopa-carbidopa intestinal gel (LCIG) is a form of levodopa that can be delivered continuously through an intrajejunal percutaneous tube. Methods We performed a 12-week double-blind, double-dummy, double-titration, multi-center trial to evaluate the efficacy and safety of LCIG compared to optimized, oral, immediate-release levodopa-carbidopa (LC-IR) in advanced PD patients with motor complications. The primary endpoint was change from baseline to final visit in motor “Off” time. Motor “On” time without troublesome dyskinesia was the key secondary endpoint. Findings 71 patients with advanced PD were randomized to receive continuous LCIG infusion plus placebo LC-IR capsules (n=37) or to receive LC-IR capsules plus continuous placebo LCIG infusion (n=34). Both groups were titrated to optimal effect. 93% of subjects (n=66) completed the trial. In comparison to LC-IR, LCIG significantly reduced “Off” time by a mean (±SE) of 1·91±0·57 hours (P=0·0015) and increased “On” time without troublesome dyskinesia by a mean of 1·86±0·65 hours (P=0·006). Adverse events were primarily related to the surgical procedure and the device, and while potentially serious, were not associated with residual deficit or mortality. Interpretation In comparison to standard oral LC-IR, LCIG significantly reduced “Off” time and increased “On” time without troublesome dyskinesia in patients with advanced PD. Adverse events were largely due to the procedure and the device. Benefits are of greater magnitude than have been obtained with medical therapies to date, and represent the first demonstration of the benefit of

  5. The Initial Assessment of Daily Insulin Dose in Chinese Newly Diagnosed Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Huan; Xu, Hua; Chen, Xie; Teng, Xiangyu; Liu, Qianjing; Liu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Background. It has been well accepted that insulin therapy is the ideal treatment for newly diagnosed diabetic patients. However, there was no study about assessment of the initial insulin dosage in new onset Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes. Research Design and Methods. 65 newly diagnosed patients with type 2 diabetes (39 males/26 females; HbA1c ≥ 11.80 ± 0.22%) were investigated. All patients had random hyperglycaemia (at 21.8 ± 3.9 mmol/L) on the first day of admission and received insulin infusion intravenously (5 U/per hour). When the blood glucose level dropped to around 10 mmol/L, patients were then transferred to continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII). The reduction of blood glucose levels in response to per unit of insulin (RBG/RI) was recorded. The target glucose level was achieved in about 3 days. The total daily insulin dose (TDD) and basal insulin dose (TBD) were calculated. Results. TDD was 45.97 ± 1.28 units and TBD was 19.00 ± 0.54 units. TBD was about 40% of the total daily insulin requirement. There was a negative correlation between the ratio of RBG/RI and TDD. Conclusions. TDD was correlated with blood glucose reduction in response to intravenous insulin infusion in Chinese new onset patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:26697503

  6. Pharmacokinetics of perfluorobutane following intravenous bolus injection and continuous infusion of sonazoid in healthy volunteers and in patients with reduced pulmonary diffusing capacity.

    PubMed

    Landmark, Kristin Eitrem; Johansen, Per Wiik; Johnson, Judith A; Johansen, Bjørn; Uran, Steinar; Skotland, Tore

    2008-03-01

    The ultrasound contrast agent Sonazoidtrade mark was administered as an i.v. bolus injection of 0.6 microL microbubbles/kg body weight or as a continuous infusion over 30 min at a rate of 1.2 microL microbubbles/kg body weight to healthy volunteers and patients with reduced pulmonary diffusing capacity. Expired air and blood samples were collected from 32 subjects and perfluorobutane (PFB) gas was analyzed using validated gas chromatography mass spectrometry methods. Blood concentrations of PFB declined biphasicly with a distribution half-life (t(0.5 to 15)) of 2 to 3 min and an elimination half-life (t(15 to 120)) of 30 to 45 min. Area under the curve (AUC) values in patients with impaired gas diffusion were significantly larger than those in healthy volunteers. The exhalation kinetics were somewhat variable with a PFB elimination half-life (t(15 to 120)) of 28 to 111 min. Clearance of PFB was independent of study population and mode of administration. There were no deaths and no serious adverse events that resulted in the withdrawal of a subject from the study. With the exception that arthralgia predominated in healthy volunteers, healthy volunteers and diseased subjects did not show a different adverse event profile whether Sonazoid was administered as a bolus injection or as an infusion. Assessment of laboratory parameters (serum biochemistry, haematology and urinalysis), vital signs, oxygen saturation and electrocardiograms (ECGs) showed no changes which caused safety concern. (E-mail: Kristin.Landmark@ge.com).

  7. Human insulin B24 (Phe----Ser). Secretion and metabolic clearance of the abnormal insulin in man and in a dog model.

    PubMed Central

    Shoelson, S E; Polonsky, K S; Zeidler, A; Rubenstein, A H; Tager, H S

    1984-01-01

    We have already demonstrated that a hyperinsulinemic, diabetic subject secreted an abnormal insulin in which serine replaced phenylalanine B24 (Shoelson S., M. Fickova, M. Haneda, A. Nahum, G. Musso, E. T. Kaiser, A. H. Rubenstein, and H. Tager. 1983. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 80:7390-7394). High performance liquid chromatography analysis now shows that the circulating insulin in several other family members also consists of a mixture of the abnormal human insulin B24 (Phe----Ser) and normal human insulin in a ratio of approximately 9.5:1 during fasting. Although all affected subjects show fasting hyperinsulinemia, only the propositus and her father are overtly diabetic. Analysis of the serum insulin from two nondiabetic siblings revealed that normal insulin increased from approximately 2 to 15% of total serum insulin after the ingestion of glucose and that the proportion of the normal hormone plateaued or fell while the level of total insulin continued to rise. Animal studies involving the graded intraportal infusion of equimolar amounts of semisynthetic human [SerB24]-insulin and normal human insulin in pancreatectomized dogs (to simulate the secretion of insulin due to oral glucose in man) also showed both a rise in the fraction of normal insulin that reached the periphery and the attainment of a brief steady state in this fraction while total insulin levels continued to rise. Separate experiments documented a decreased hepatic extraction, a decreased metabolic clearance rate, and an increased plasma half-life of human [SerB24]-insulin within the same parameters as those determined for normal human insulin. These results form a basis for considering (a) the differential clearance of low activity abnormal insulins and normal insulin from the circulation in vivo, and (b) the causes of hyperinsulinemia in both diabetic and nondiabetic individuals who secrete abnormal human insulins. PMID:6371057

  8. Real life cost and quality of life associated with continuous intraduodenal levodopa infusion compared with oral treatment in Parkinson patients.

    PubMed

    Lundqvist, Christofer; Beiske, Antonie Giæver; Reiertsen, Ola; Kristiansen, Ivar Sønbø

    2014-12-01

    Advanced-stage Parkinson's disease (PD) strongly affects quality of life (QoL). Continuous intraduodenal administration of levodopa (IDL) is efficacious, but entails high costs. This study aims to estimate these costs in routine care. 10 patients with advanced-PD who switched from oral medication to IDL were assessed at baseline, and subsequently at 3, 6, 9 and 12 months follow-up. We used the Unified PD Rating Scale (UPDRS) for function and 15D for Quality of Life (QoL). Costs were assessed using quarterly structured patient questionnaires and hospital registries. Costs per quality adjusted life year (QALY) were estimated for conventional treatment prior to switch and for 1-year treatment with IDL. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis was based on bootstrapping. IDL significantly improved functional scores and was safe to use. One-year conventional oral treatment entailed 0.63 QALY while IDL entailed 0.68 (p > 0.05). The estimated total 1-year treatment cost was NOK419,160 on conventional treatment and NOK890,920 on IDL, representing a cost of NOK9.2 million (€1.18 mill) per additional QALY. The incremental cost per unit UPDRS improvement was NOK25,000 (€3,250). Medication was the dominant cost during IDL (45% of total costs), it represented only 6.4% of the total for conventional treatment. IDL improves function but is not cost effective using recommended thresholds for cost/QALY in Norway.

  9. Optimal Dose and Method of Administration of Intravenous Insulin in the Management of Emergency Hyperkalemia: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Harel, Ziv; Kamel, Kamel S.

    2016-01-01

    given as a continuous intravenous infusion over 60 minutes in patients with severe hyperkalemia (i.e., serum K+ concentration > 6.5 mmol/L) and those with marked EKG changes related to hyperkalemia (e.g., prolonged PR interval, wide QRS complex) as an alternative to 10 units of short acting insulin. Because the risk of hypoglycemia is increased with using large insulin doses, sufficient glucose (60 grams with the administration of 20 units of insulin and 50 grams with the administration of 10 units) should be given to prevent hypoglycemia, and plasma glucose should be frequently monitored. PMID:27148740

  10. Study protocol for a double blind, randomised, placebo-controlled trial of continuous subpectoral local anaesthetic infusion for pain and shoulder function following mastectomy: SUB-pectoral Local anaesthetic Infusion following MastEctomy (SUBLIME) study

    PubMed Central

    Langford, R; Brown, I; Vickery, J; Mitchell, K; Pritchard, C; Creanor, S

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Over 16 000 mastectomies are performed in England and Wales annually. Acute postoperative pain and nausea are common. The most frequently occurring long-term complications are chronic pain (up to 50%) and reduced shoulder function (reported at 35%). Regional techniques that improve acute postoperative pain relief may reduce the incidence of these complications. This study assesses the effectiveness of a 24-hour continuous local anaesthetic in the subpectoral plane in improving postoperative pain and quality of life in patients undergoing mastectomy. Methods and analysis This is a randomised, double blind, placebo-controlled, two-centre, parallel group trial in women undergoing mastectomy with or without axillary involvement. One hundred and sixty participants will be randomised in a 1:1 ratio to receive either 0.25% levobupivacaine or 0.9% saline by subpectoral infusion postoperatively for 24 h. All participants will be provided with an intravenous morphine patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) system. Participants will be followed-up for 24 h in hospital and at approximately 14 days and 6 months postoperatively. Joint primary outcome measures are total morphine consumption and total pain score (captured via patient-recorded visual analogue scale (VAS) 4 hourly) during the first 24 h postoperatively. Primary statistical analysis of total pain is based on the area under the curve of pain versus time graph. Secondary outcomes include PCA attempts in first 24 h; VAS pain scores and shoulder function by goniometry at 24 h, 14 days (approximately) and 6 months; Verbal Rating Scale pain scores in first 24 h; Brief Pain Inventory and Oxford Shoulder Score at 6 months; duration of hospital stay; incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting; cost-effectiveness. Ethics and dissemination The study is approved by the South West England Research Ethics Committee (12/SW/0149). Results will be published in a peer-reviewed journal and presented

  11. Effect of short-term intralipid infusion on the immune response during low-dose endotoxemia in humans.

    PubMed

    Krogh-Madsen, Rikke; Plomgaard, Peter; Akerstrom, Thorbjorn; Møller, Kirsten; Schmitz, Ole; Pedersen, Bente Klarlund

    2008-02-01

    Novel anti-inflammatory effects of insulin have recently been described, and insulin therapy to maintain euglycemia suppresses the plasma levels of free fatty acids (FFA) and increases the survival of critically ill patients. We aimed to explore the effect of short-term high levels of plasma FFA on the inflammatory response to a low dose of endotoxin. Fourteen healthy male volunteers underwent the following two trials in a randomized crossover design: 1) continuous infusion of 20% Intralipid [0.7 ml.kg(-1).h(-1) (1.54 g/kg)] for 11 h, and 2) infusion of isotonic saline for 11 h (control). In each trial, heparin was given to activate lipoprotein lipase, and an intravenous bolus of endotoxin (0.1 ng/kg) was given after 6 h of Intralipid/saline infusion. Blood samples and muscle and fat biopsies were obtained before the Intralipid/saline infusion and before as well as after infusion of an endotoxin bolus. Plasma levels of FFA, triglycerides, and glycerol were markedly increased during the Intralipid infusion. Endotoxin exposure induced an increase in plasma levels of TNF-alpha, IL-6, and neutrophils and further stimulated gene expression of TNF-alpha and IL-6 in both skeletal muscle and adipose tissue. The systemic inflammatory response to endotoxin was significantly pronounced during Intralipid infusion. Short-term hyperlipidemia enhances the inflammatory response to endotoxin, and skeletal muscle and adipose tissue are capable of producing essential inflammatory mediators after endotoxin stimulation.

  12. Exploring drug delivery for the DOT1L inhibitor pinometostat (EPZ-5676): Subcutaneous administration as an alternative to continuous IV infusion, in the pursuit of an epigenetic target.

    PubMed

    Waters, Nigel J; Daigle, Scott R; Rehlaender, Bruce N; Basavapathruni, Aravind; Campbell, Carly T; Jensen, Tyler B; Truitt, Brett F; Olhava, Edward J; Pollock, Roy M; Stickland, Kim A; Dovletoglou, Angelos

    2015-12-28

    Protein methyltransferases are emerging as promising drug targets for therapeutic intervention in human cancers. Pinometostat (EPZ-5676) is a small molecule inhibitor of the DOT1L enzyme, a histone methyltransferase that methylates lysine 79 of histone H3. DOT1L activity is dysregulated in the pathophysiology of rearranged mixed lineage leukemia (MLL-r). Pinometostat is currently in Phase 1 clinical trials in relapsed refractory acute leukemia patients and is administered as a continuous IV infusion (CIV). The studies herein investigated alternatives to CIV administration of pinometostat to improve patient convenience. Various sustained release technologies were considered, and based on the required dose size as well as practical considerations, subcutaneous (SC) bolus administration of a solution formulation was selected for further evaluation in preclinical studies. SC administration offered improved exposure and complete bioavailability of pinometostat relative to CIV and oral administration. These findings warranted further evaluation in rat xenograft models of MLL-r leukemia. SC dosing in xenograft models demonstrated inhibition of MLL-r tumor growth and inhibition of pharmacodynamic markers of DOT1L activity. However, a dosing frequency of thrice daily (t.i.d) was required in these studies to elicit optimal inhibition of DOT1L target genes and tumor growth inhibition. Development of an extended release formulation may prove useful in the further optimization of the SC delivery of pinometostat, moving towards a more convenient dosing paradigm for patients.

  13. Clearance of vancomycin during continuous infusion in Intensive Care Unit patients: correlation with measured and estimated creatinine clearance and serum cystatin C.

    PubMed

    Kees, Martin G; Hilpert, Justus W; Gnewuch, Carsten; Kees, Frieder; Voegeler, Stephan

    2010-12-01

    Vancomycin (VAN) dosing requires adjustment to renal function, which is often estimated using the Cockcroft-Gault formula; however, its precision is poor in Intensive Care Unit (ICU) patients. VAN clearance (CL(Van)) during continuous infusion was prospectively determined in 25 ICU patients [14 male, 11 female; age range 31-82 years; body mass index (BMI) 16.5-41.5 kg/m²; Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score at admission 8-36; creatinine clearance 25-195 mL/min] and its correlation with measured creatinine clearance (CL(Crea)), estimated creatinine clearance using the Cockcroft-Gault formula (CL(CG)) and estimated glomerular filtration rate according to Hoek's formula based on serum cystatin C (GFR(Hoek)) was investigated. The correlation between CL(Van) and CL(Crea) was very good (r²=0.88), but it was rather poor with CL(CG) (r² = 0.37) and was acceptable with GFR(Hoek) (r² = 0.70). For VAN dose adjustments in ICU patients, determination of cystatin C may be an interesting and practical alternative to measured CL(Crea), whereas the Cockcroft-Gault formula should be used with caution.

  14. Six-month overnight intraperitoneal amino-acid infusion in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) patients--no effect on nutritional status.

    PubMed

    Dombros, N V; Prutis, K; Tong, M; Anderson, G H; Harrison, J; Sombolos, K; Digenis, G; Pettit, J; Oreopoulos, D G

    1990-01-01

    The long-term effect of an AA solution based on Travasol, a solution for total parenteral nutrition, given intraperitoneally over a 6-month period was studied in 5 patients 22 to 75 years old, having been on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) for 3 to 57 months. A low oral protein intake (less than 0.8 g/kg bw/day) and/or a low serum albumin (less than 35 g/L) were used as inclusion criteria. Two liters of 1% AA solution were infused overnight, while a glucose Dianeal was used for the other exchanges. During the study, BUN increased from 22.04 mM/L to 28.06 mM/L the first month and remained at these levels, indicating the increased protein intake. However, average oral total energy and protein intake, body weight (bw), serum creatinine, cholesterol, triglycerides, total proteins, albumin, transferrin, skinfold thickness, total body potassium, and plasma AA levels remained basically unchanged. The average total body nitrogen decreased from 1.746 to 1.554 Kg, but this decrease did not reach statistical significance (p greater than 0.05). We conclude that intraperitoneal overnight administration of 2 L of 1% AA based on Travasol over 6 months did not improve the nutritional status of CAPD patients. This ineffectiveness might be due to the AA composition of the solution, the timing of administration, or to a low caloric intake and/or that our patients were not severely malnourished.

  15. Effects of feed restriction and cold exposure on glucose metabolism in response to feeding and insulin in sheep.

    PubMed

    Sano, H; Takebayashi, A; Kodama, Y; Nakamura, K; Ito, H; Arino, Y; Fujita, T; Takahashi, H; Ambo, K

    1999-09-01

    The effects of feed restriction, cold exposure, and the initiation of feeding on blood glucose metabolism, other blood metabolites, hormones, and tissue responsiveness and sensitivity to insulin were measured in sheep. The sheep consumed orchardgrass hay ad libitum (AL) or were restricted to 82% of the ME requirement for maintenance (RE) and were exposed to a thermoneutral (20 degrees C) or a cold environment (2 degrees C). An isotope dilution method and a glucose clamp approach were applied to determine blood glucose metabolism and insulin action, respectively. Plasma NEFA and insulin concentrations were influenced by feed restriction. Concentrations of plasma glucose, NEFA, insulin, and glucagon were influenced by cold exposure. Plasma NEFA concentration for RE decreased after the initiation of feeding and plasma insulin concentration increased transiently for all treatments. [U-13C]Glucose was continuously infused for 8 or 7 h after a priming injection starting 3 h before the initiation of either feeding or insulin infusion, respectively. When responses to feeding were studied, blood glucose turnover rate was less (P < .001) for RE than for AL, and it was greater (P < .001) during cold exposure than in the thermoneutral environment. The rate changed little after the initiation of feeding. For the glucose clamp approach, insulin was infused over four sequential 1-h periods at rates from .64 to 10 mU x kg BW(-1) x min(-1), with concomitant glucose infusion to maintain preinfusion plasma glucose concentrations. The rates of glucose infusion and blood glucose turnover increased (P < .001) dose-dependently with insulin infusion rate. The maximal glucose infusion rate was greater (P < .05) for RE than for AL and was greater (P < .001) during cold exposure than in the thermoneutral environment. The plasma insulin concentration at half-maximal glucose infusion rate was lower (P < .1) during cold exposure. Blood glucose turnover rate tended to be greater (P = .10) for RE

  16. Therapeutics of Diabetes Mellitus: Focus on Insulin Analogues and Insulin Pumps

    PubMed Central

    Valla, Vasiliki

    2010-01-01

    Aim. Inadequately controlled diabetes accounts for chronic complications and increases mortality. Its therapeutic management aims in normal HbA1C, prandial and postprandial glucose levels. This review discusses diabetes management focusing on the latest insulin analogues, alternative insulin delivery systems and the artificial pancreas. Results. Intensive insulin therapy with multiple daily injections (MDI) allows better imitation of the physiological rhythm of insulin secretion. Longer-acting, basal insulin analogues provide concomitant improvements in safety, efficacy and variability of glycaemic control, followed by low risks of hypoglycaemia. Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) provides long-term glycaemic control especially in type 1 diabetic patients, while reducing hypoglycaemic episodes and glycaemic variability. Continuous subcutaneous glucose monitoring (CGM) systems provide information on postprandial glucose excursions and nocturnal hypo- and/or hyperglycemias. This information enhances treatment options, provides a useful tool for self-monitoring and allows safer achievement of treatment targets. In the absence of a cure-like pancreas or islets transplants, artificial “closed-loop” systems mimicking the pancreatic activity have been also developed. Conclusions. Individualized treatment plans for insulin initiation and administration mode are critical in achieving target glycaemic levels. Progress in these fields is expected to facilitate and improve the quality of life of diabetic patients. PMID:20589066

  17. Comparison of concentrations of sulbactam-ampicillin administered by bolus injections or bolus plus continuous infusion in tissues of patients undergoing colorectal surgery.

    PubMed

    Martin, C; Cotin, A; Giraud, A; Beccani-Argème, M; Alliot, P; Mallet, M N; Argème, M

    1998-05-01

    The concentrations of sulbactam and ampicillin were determined in sera and different abdominal tissues of 16 patients who underwent elective colorectal surgery. Patients were randomly allocated to two groups. At the time of induction of anesthesia, patients in group 1 (eight patients) were given 1,000 mg of sulbactam with 2,000 mg of ampicillin by intravenous bolus injection (3 min). This dose was administered again after 2 h by bolus injection by the same route. Patients in group 2 (eight patients) were given the same initial dose of sulbactam-ampicillin by bolus injection (3 min). Then, a continuous infusion of 1,000 mg of sulbactam with 2,000 mg of ampicillin in normal saline was immediately started and was administered over a 4-h period. Blood samples were collected to determine peak (10 min) and trough (end of surgery) antibiotic levels. Serial blood samples were also collected at predetermined periods (at the time of opening and closing of the abdominal cavity and at the time of surgical anastomosis). Abdominal wall fat, epiploic fat, and colonic wall tissue samples were collected simultaneously. Antibiotic concentrations were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. Similar levels of the drugs in serum were observed for the two regimens of administration, with trough sulbactam levels of 33 +/- 16 and 37 +/- 22 microg/ml in groups 1 and 2, respectively, and trough ampicillin levels of 72 +/- 55 and 79 +/- 47 microg/ml in groups 1 and 2, respectively. Similar sulbactam concentrations were observed in abdominal tissues whichever regimen of administration was used; in fatty tissues the sulbactam concentrations ranged from 2.7 to 3.8 microg/g for group 1 and from 1.7 to 4.0 microg/g for group 2, and sulbactam concentrations in the colonic wall were 5.6 +/- 7.7 and 6.8 +/- 3.2 microg/g in groups 1 and 2, respectively (not significant). Again, no influence of the regimen of administration was observed on tissue ampicillin concentrations; in fatty

  18. Effects of continuous triiodothyronine infusion on the tricarboxylic acid cycle in the normal immature swine heart under extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kajimoto, Masaki; Priddy, Colleen M O'Kelly; Ledee, Dolena R; Xu, Chun; Isern, Nancy; Olson, Aaron K; Portman, Michael A

    2014-04-15

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is frequently used in infants with postoperative cardiopulmonary failure. ECMO also suppresses circulating triiodothyronine (T3) levels and modifies myocardial metabolism. We assessed the hypothesis that T3 supplementation reverses ECMO-induced metabolic abnormalities in the immature heart. Twenty-two male Yorkshire pigs (age: 25-38 days) with ECMO received [2-(13)C]lactate, [2,4,6,8-(13)C4]octanoate (medium-chain fatty acid), and [U-(13)C]long-chain fatty acids as metabolic tracers either systemically (totally physiological intracoronary concentration) or directly into the coronary artery (high substrate concentration) for the last 60 min of each protocol. NMR analysis of left ventricular tissue determined the fractional contribution of these substrates to the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Fifty percent of the pigs in each group received intravenous T3 supplement (bolus at 0.6 μg/kg and then continuous infusion at 0.2 μg·kg(-1)·h(-1)) during ECMO. Under both substrate loading conditions, T3 significantly increased the fractional contribution of lactate with a marginal increase in the fractional contribution of octanoate. Both T3 and high substrate provision increased the myocardial energy status, as indexed by phosphocreatine concentration/ATP concentration. In conclusion, T3 supplementation promoted lactate metabolism to the tricarboxylic acid cycle during ECMO, suggesting that T3 releases the inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase. Manipulation of substrate utilization by T3 may be used therapeutically during ECMO to improve the resting energy state and facilitate weaning.

  19. Effects of Continuous Triiodothyronine Infusion on Citric Acid Cycle in the Normal Immature Swine Heart under Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Kajimoto, Masaki; O'Kelly-Priddy, Colleen M.; Ledee, Dolena R.; Xu, Chun; Isern, Nancy G.; Olson, Aaron; Portman, Michael A.

    2014-02-13

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is frequently used in infants with postoperative cardiopulmonary failure. ECMO also suppresses circulating triiodothyronine (T3) levels and modifies myocardial metabolism. We assessed the hypothesis that T3 supplementation reverses ECMO induced metabolic abnormalities in the immature heart. Twenty-two male Yorkshire pigs (age 25-38 days) with ECMO were received [2-13C]lactate, [2,4,6,8-13C]octanoate (medium chain fatty acid) and [U-13C]long-chain fatty acids as metabolic tracers either systemically (totally physiological intracoronary concentration) or directly into the coronary artery (high substrate concentration) for the last 60 minutes of each protocol. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis of left ventricular tissue determined the fractional contribution (Fc) of these substrates to the citric acid cycle (CAC). Fifty percent of the pigs in each group received intravenous T3 supplement (bolus at 0.6 μg/kg and then continuous infusion at 0.2 μg/kg/hour) during ECMO. Under both substrate loading conditions T3 significantly increased lactate-Fc with a marginal increase in octanoate-Fc. Both T3 and high substrate provision increased myocardial energy status indexed by [Phosphocreatine]/[ATP]. In conclusion, T3 supplementation promoted lactate metabolism to the CAC during ECMO suggesting that T3 releases inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase. Manipulation of substrate utilization by T3 may be used therapeutically during ECMO to improve resting energy state and facilitate weaning.

  20. Continuous sequential infusion of fludarabine and cytarabine for elderly patients with acute myeloid leukaemia secondary to a previously diagnosed myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ferrara, Felicetto; Palmieri, Salvatore; Izzo, Tiziana; Criscuolo, Clelia; Riccardi, Cira

    2010-12-01

    Acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) secondary to myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is characterized by poor prognosis, namely in older patients. The combination of fludarabine (F) with cytarabine (ARA-C) ± G-CSF was proven as effective in patients with poor risk AML. The efficacy and toxicity of a regimen including F + ARA-C as sequential continuous infusion (CI-FLA) in 64 untreated patients aged >60 years, in which AML arose after a previous MDS, was investigated. Median age was 67 years (61-81). In patients achieving CR, an additional course, followed by G-CSF to mobilize CD34+ cells and subsequent autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) were programmed. Overall, 43 patients (67%) achieved complete remission (CR). There were 10 induction deaths (16%), while 11 patients (17%) were refractory to induction treatment. Thirty-four patients (79% of remitters) were eligible for the consolidation and 30 were monitorized for the mobilization of CD34+ cells, collection being successful in 20 of them (67%). Median number of CD34+ cells/kg collected was 6.8 × 10E6. Thirteen patients (20% of the whole population) received ASCT. Median disease free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) were 10 and 9 months, respectively. Survival at 5 years is projected to 15%. The only parameter significantly related to either DFS duration or OS duration was unfavourable cytogenetics, which did significantly influence also CR achievement. CI-FLA is effective in elderly patients with AML secondary to previously diagnosed MDS. Best results are achievable in the subgroup of patients with diploid karyotype.

  1. Efficacy of subpleural continuous infusion of local anesthetics after thoracoscopic pulmonary resection for primary lung cancer compared to intravenous patient-controlled analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Joonho; Haam, Seokjin

    2016-01-01

    Background This study compared the efficacy and side effects of intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IV-PCA) with those of a subpleural continuous infusion of local anesthetic (ON-Q system) in patients undergoing thoracoscopic pulmonary resection for primary lung cancer. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 66 patients who underwent thoracoscopic pulmonary resection for primary lung cancer from January 2014 to August 2015 (36 in the IV-PCA group and 30 in the ON-Q group). The numeric pain intensity scale (NPIS), additional IV injections for pain control, side effects, and early discontinuation of the pain control device were compared. Results There were no differences in the general characteristics of the two groups. The NPIS scores gradually decreased with time (P<0.001), but the two groups had differences in pattern of NPIS scores (P=0.111). There were no differences in the highest NPIS score during admission (4.75±2.35 vs. 5.27±1.87, P=0.334) or the number of additional IV injections for pain control in the same period (0.72±0.94 for IV-PCA vs. 0.83±0.65 for ON-Q; P=0.575). Side effects such as nausea, dizziness, and drowsiness were significantly more frequent with IV-PCA (36.1% vs. 10.0%, P=0.014), and early discontinuation of the pain control device was more frequent in the IV-PCA group (33.3% vs. 6.7%, P=0.008). Conclusions The ON-Q system was equivalent to the IV-PCA for postoperative pain control after thoracoscopic pulmonary resection for primary lung cancer, and it also had fewer effects and early discontinuations. PMID:27499973

  2. Therapeutics in pediatric diabetes: insulin and non-insulin approaches. Part of a series on Pediatric Pharmacology, guest edited by Gianvincenzo Zuccotti, Emilio Clementi, and Massimo Molteni.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jongoh; Kim, Se Min; Nguyen, Ha Cam Thuy; Redondo, Maria Jose

    2012-01-01

    Treatment of pediatric diabetes can be challenging. Strict glucose control can be accompanied by hypoglycemia and weight gain. Recently, there have been many developments in insulin preparations and delivery methods which make insulin levels more close to a physiologic pattern. Newly developed rapid/long acting analogues and delivery devices such as continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII, insulin pump) may reduce hypoglycemia and improve glycemic control. CSII combined with continuous glucose monitoring can achieve even better glycemic control. The closed-loop system is rapidly evolving and an artificial pancreas will be available in the near future. It is now recognized that several hormones other than insulin such as glucagon, amylin, and incretins contribute to glucose homeostasis. The role of co-adjuncts such as metformin, amylin analogues, and incretin based therapy is now emerging. Immunotherapy in a high risk population or patients in the early phase of type 1 diabetes may prevent further destruction of pancreatic β cells.

  3. Relationships between antimicrobial effect and area under the concentration-time curve as a basis for comparison of modes of antibiotic administration: meropenem bolus injections versus continuous infusions.

    PubMed Central

    Firsov, A A; Mattie, H

    1997-01-01

    In comparative studies of different modes of administration (MAs) simulated in in vitro dynamic models, only one dose of antibiotic is usually mimicked. Such an experimental design can provide a prediction of the antimicrobial effect (AME) of a given combination of drug, clinical isolate, and infection site, but may be inappropriate for accurate comparison of MAs. An alternative design providing comparison of different MAs with various antibiotic doses in a wide range and with evaluation of the respective relationships between AME and the AUC was proposed and examined. Two series of meropenem pharmacokinetic profiles, i.e., monoexponentially decreasing concentrations (bolus doses) and constant concentrations (6-h continuous infusion), were in vitro simulated. The simulated initial concentrations (Co[from 0.62 to 48 micrograms/ml]) and steady-state concentrations (Css[from 0.016 to 8 micrograms/ml]) were chosen to provide similar AUC for 0 to 6 h (AUC0-6) ranges for both MAs (from 0.070 to 50.0 micrograms.h/ml and from 0.09 to 48.0 micrograms.h/ml, respectively). The AME of meropenem on Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923 (MIC, 0.06 micrograms/ml) was determined at each time (t) point as a difference (E) between the logarithms of viable counts (N) in the control cultures without antibiotic (NC) and in cultures exposed to antibiotics (NA). Time courses of E observed at different Co of Css levels were compared in terms of the areas under the E-t curves (ABBCt). The finite values of the ABBCt observed by the end of the 6 -h observation period, which are equivalent to the area between bacterial count-time curves observed in the absence and presence of antibiotic (ABBC), were plotted versus the respective AUCs produced by each of the MAs. The ABBC versus AUC curves had a similar pattern: a plateau achieved at high AUCs followed by a steep rise in ABBC at relatively low AUCs was inherent in both of the MAs. The superiority of bolus dosing over the infusions could be

  4. Insulin administration: present strategies and future directions for a noninvasive (possibly more physiological) delivery

    PubMed Central

    Matteucci, Elena; Giampietro, Ottavio; Covolan, Vera; Giustarini, Daniela; Fanti, Paolo; Rossi, Ranieri

    2015-01-01

    Insulin is a life-saving medication for people with type 1 diabetes, but traditional insulin replacement therapy is based on multiple daily subcutaneous injections or continuous subcutaneous pump-regulated infusion. Nonphysiologic delivery of subcutaneous insulin implies a rapid and sustained increase in systemic insulin levels due to the loss of concentration gradient between portal and systemic circulations. In fact, the liver degrades about half of the endogenous insulin secreted by the pancreas into the venous portal system. The reverse insulin distribution has short- and long-term effects on glucose metabolism. Thus, researchers have explored less-invasive administration routes based on innovative pharmaceutical formulations, which preserve hormone stability and ensure the therapeutic effectiveness. This review examines some of the recent proposals from clinical and material chemistry point of view, giving particular attention to patients’ (and diabetologists’) ideal requirements that organic chemistry could meet. PMID:26124635

  5. Glucose tolerance, blood lipid, insulin and glucagon concentration after single or continuous administration of aspartame in diabetics.

    PubMed

    Okuno, G; Kawakami, F; Tako, H; Kashihara, T; Shibamoto, S; Yamazaki, T; Yamamoto, K; Saeki, M

    1986-04-01

    A nutritive sweetener, aspartame (L-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methylester) was administered orally to normal controls and diabetic patients in order to evaluate effects on blood glucose, lipids and pancreatic hormone secretion. An oral glucose tolerance test was also performed in the same subjects as a control study of aspartame administration. In 7 normal controls and 22 untreated diabetics, a single dose of 500 mg aspartame, equivalent to 100 g glucose in sweetness, induced no increase in blood glucose concentration. Rather, a small but significant decrease in blood glucose was noticed 2 or 3 h after administration. The decrease in blood glucose was found to be smallest in the control and became greater as the diabetes increased in severity. No significant change in blood insulin or glucagon concentration during a 3-h period was observed in either the controls or the diabetics. The second study was designed to determine the effects of 2 weeks' continuous administration of 125 mg aspartame, equal in sweetness to the mean daily consumption of sugar (20-30 g) in Japan, to 9 hospitalized diabetics with steady-state glycemic control. The glucose tolerance showed no significant change after 2 weeks' administration. Fasting, 1 h and 2 h postprandial blood glucose, blood cholesterol, triglyceride and HDL-cholesterol were also unaffected. From these and other published results, aspartame would seem to be a useful alternative nutrient sweetener for patients with diabetes mellitus.

  6. Continuous infusion of neurotrophin-3 triggers sprouting, decreases the levels of TrkA and TrkC, and inhibits epileptogenesis and activity-dependent axonal growth in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Xu, B; Michalski, B; Racine, R J; Fahnestock, M

    2002-01-01

    Neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), a member of the neurotrophin family of neurotrophic factors, is important for cell survival, axonal growth and neuronal plasticity. Epileptiform activation can regulate the expression of neurotrophins, and increases or decreases in neurotrophins can affect both epileptogenesis and seizure-related axonal growth. Interestingly, the expression of nerve growth factor and brain-derived neurotrophic factor is rapidly up-regulated following seizures, while NT-3 mRNA remains unchanged or undergoes a delayed down-regulation, suggesting that NT-3 might have a different function in epileptogenesis. In the present study, we demonstrate that continuous intraventricular infusion of NT-3 in the absence of kindling triggers mossy fiber sprouting in the inner molecular layer of the dentate gyrus and the stratum oriens of the CA3 region. Furthermore, despite this NT-3-related sprouting effect, continuous infusion of NT-3 retards the development of behavioral seizures and inhibits kindling-induced mossy fiber sprouting in the inner molecular layer of the dentate gyrus. We also show that prolonged infusion of NT-3 leads to a decrease in kindling-induced Trk phosphorylation and a down-regulation of the high-affinity Trk receptors, TrkA and TrkC, suggesting an involvement of both cholinergic nerve growth factor receptors and hippocampal NT-3 receptors in these effects. Our results demonstrate an important inhibitory role for NT-3 in seizure development and seizure-related synaptic reorganization.

  7. Continuing EGFR-TKI treatment in combination with super-selective arterial infusion chemotherapy beyond disease progression for patients with advanced EGFR-mutant non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Qi, Huiwei; Jiang, Sen; Yu, Dong; Ni, Huijuan; Hu, Qiong; Zhang, Jie

    2015-12-01

    Regional therapy has shown promising results in patients with an oligo-metastasis after the occurrence of resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs). This study evaluated the efficacy and safety of continuing EGFR-TKI therapy concurrently with arterial infusion chemotherapy in 6 patients (median age 55.9 years) with advanced EGFR-mutant non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who had a locally progressive, centrally located lung lesion after EGFR-TKI therapy. The patients received a super-selective arterial infusion of docetaxel (75 mg/m(2)) every 28 days concurrently with EGFR-TKI therapy until further progressive disease (PD) or unacceptable adverse effects (AEs) occurred. Treatment outcomes were assessed via progression-free survival (PFS) times (PFS-1: time to PD after EGFR-TKI therapy; PFS-2: time to further PD after arterial infusion chemotherapy with EGFR-TKI therapy), the occurrence of treatment-related AEs, and patient responses to the QLQ-LC13 quality-of-life questionnaire. Three of the 6 patients achieved partial responses, and three had stable disease. The median PFS-1 was 10.42 months, and the median PFS-2 was 4.1 months (range, 2.1-5.7 months). The median overall survival (OS) was 28.6 months (range, 24.1-32.9 months). All AEs were either grade 1 or grade 2 in severity, and no unexpected AEs were observed. One patient died of lung cancer. The patients reported significant reductions from baseline in symptoms of cough, chest pain, dyspnea, and hemoptysis (P < 0.05 for all comparisons). Thus, continuing EGFR-TKI therapy in combination with super-selective arterial infusion chemotherapy beyond PD for patients with advanced EGFR-mutant NSCLC is feasible, and this approach warrants further investigation.

  8. An Asian Indian woman with Wolfram syndrome on insulin pump: successful pregnancy and beyond.

    PubMed

    Kesavadev, Jothydev; Kumar, Anupam; Shankar, Arun; Gopalakrishnan, Gopikakrishnan; Permutt, Marshall A; Wasson, Jon; Jothydev, Sunitha

    2011-07-01

    Wolfram syndrome (WS), or DIDMOAD (diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, and deafness), is a rare autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder with a median life expectancy of 30 years and occurs in one in 770,000 live births. To date only five successful pregnancies have been reported among WS subjects worldwide. Here we describe the sixth report of successful pregnancy in a WS patient and the first from India. The subject is still on an insulin pump, now 31 years old and doing well. She developed diabetes at 5 years of age, optic atrophy at 14 years, and diabetes insipidus at 25 years and had a successful delivery in 2007 while on an insulin pump. Sequencing of exonic regions of the WFS1 gene showed five changes, two of which were pathogenic (exon 8). Magnetic resonance imaging of brain showed generalized neurodegenerative changes. The benefits of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion and that of tight metabolic control in prevention of abortions and fetal malformations in diabetes associated with pregnancy are well documented. The impression of probable pleiotropic action of insulin pumps over and above that of glycemic reduction is gaining momentum. Recent evidence supports use of insulin pumps in alleviating neuropathic pain in diabetes, probably by virtue of its action in minimizing mean amplitude of glycemic excursions not possible with conventional insulin shots. WS is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder, which will probably help us in understanding the positive impact of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion in prolonging the life span and retarding neuronal damage in WS.

  9. Insulin therapy in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Malik, Faisal S; Taplin, Craig E

    2014-04-01

    Treatment of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) requires lifelong administration of exogenous insulin. The primary goal of treatment of T1DM in children and adolescents is to maintain near-normoglycemia through intensive insulin therapy, avoid acute complications, and prevent long-term microvascular and macrovascular complications, while facilitating as close to a normal life as possible. Effective insulin therapy must, therefore, be provided on the basis of the needs, preferences, and resources of the individual and the family for optimal management of T1DM. To achieve target glycemic control, the best therapeutic option for patients with T1DM is basal-bolus therapy either with multiple daily injections (MDI) or continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII). Many formulations of insulin are available to help simulate endogenous insulin secretion as closely as possible in an effort to eliminate the symptoms and complications of hyperglycemia, while minimizing the risk of hypoglycemia secondary to therapy. When using MDI, basal insulin requirements are given as an injection of long- or intermediate-acting insulin analogs, while meal-related glucose excursions are controlled with bolus injections of rapid-acting insulin analogs. Alternatively, CSII can be used, which provides a 24-h preselected but adjustable basal rate of rapid-acting insulin, along with patient-activated mealtime bolus doses, eliminating the need for periodic injections. Both MDI treatment and CSII therapy must be supported by comprehensive education that is appropriate for the individual needs of the patient and family before and after initiation. Current therapies still do not match the endogenous insulin profile of pancreatic β-cells, and all still pose risks of suboptimal control, hypoglycemia, and ketosis in children and adolescents. The safety and success of a prescribed insulin regimen is, therefore, dependent on self-monitoring of blood glucose and/or a continuous glucose monitoring system

  10. Continuation or discontinuation of pioglitazone when starting bedtime insulin in patients with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes in an inner-city population

    PubMed Central

    Mojtahedzadeh, Mona; Lee, Martin L.; Friedman, Theodore C.

    2016-01-01

    Objective We studied the impact of continuing versus discontinuing pioglitazone on hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), fasting plasma glucose (FPG), and weight when starting bedtime insulin in patients with poor glycemic control. Methods We retrospectively analyzed data from a 13-month randomized control trial on 77 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM), who despite maximum doses of three oral diabetes medications (metformin, sulfonylurea and pioglitazone) had HbA1C levels above 7.5%. Patients were randomized to either continuing or discontinuing pioglitazone in addition to starting and up-titrating bedtime insulin. HbA1C, FPG, and weight were assessed at baseline, 3 months, 7 months and 13 months with the differences from baseline for the two groups compared at each of the three time points using the Wilcoxon rank sum test. Results We found that HbA1c was significantly lower at the 7-month (p=0.01) and 13-month time points (p=0.036) and FPG was significantly lower at all three time points in the group continuing pioglitazone compared with those discontinuing pioglitazone. Continuing pioglitazone resulted in a greater increase in weight at the 3-month (p=0.002), 7-month (P=0.0001) and 13-month (P=0.00003) time points. Patients with the lowest HbA1c (< 8.2%) at baseline were more likely to benefit from continuing pioglitazone than those with higher baseline HbA1c. Patients who started insulin and discontinued pioglitazone had similar HbA1c, FPG and weight at the three time points as at baseline, suggesting that pioglitazone and bedtime insulin has similar glycemic effect in this population. Conclusions We conclude that in patients with uncontrolled type 2 DM, continuing pioglitazone while concurrently starting bedtime insulin within a 13-month period led to a significant decrease in both HbA1c and FPG levels compared with those who did not receive pioglitazone; however weight increased during this period. PMID:26215435

  11. Continuous human metastin 45-54 infusion desensitizes G protein-coupled receptor 54-induced gonadotropin-releasing hormone release monitored indirectly in the juvenile male Rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta): a finding with therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Seminara, Stephanie B; Dipietro, Meloni J; Ramaswamy, Suresh; Crowley, William F; Plant, Tony M

    2006-05-01

    The effect of continuous administration of the C-terminal fragment of metastin, the ligand for the G protein-coupled receptor, GPR54, on GnRH-induced LH secretion was examined in three agonadal, juvenile male monkeys whose responsiveness to GnRH was heightened by pretreatment with a chronic pulsatile iv infusion of synthetic GnRH. After bolus injection of 10 microg human (hu) metastin 45-54 (equivalent to kisspeptin 112-121), the GPR54 agonist was infused continuously at a dose of 100 microg/h and elicited a brisk LH response for approximately 3 h. This rise was then followed by a precipitous drop in LH despite continuous exposure of GPR54 to metastin 45-54. On d 4, during the final 3 h of the infusion, single boluses of hu metastin 45-54 (10 microg), N-methyl-DL-aspartic acid (NMDA) (10 mg/kg) and GnRH (0.3 microg) were administered to interrogate each element of the metastin-GPR54-GnRH-GnRH receptor cascade. Although the NMDA and GnRH boluses were able to elicit LH pulses, that of hu metastin 45-54 was not, demonstrating functional integrity of GnRH neurons (NMDA) and GnRH receptors (NMDA and GnRH) but desensitization of GPR54. The desensitization of GPR54 by continuous hu metastin 45-54 administration has therapeutic implications for a variety of conditions currently being treated by GnRH and its analogs, including restoration of fertility in patients with abnormal GnRH secretion (i.e. idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and hypothalamic amenorrhea) and selective, reversible suppression of the pituitary-gonadal axis to achieve suppression of gonadal steroids (i.e. precocious puberty, endometriosis, uterine fibroids, and prostate cancer).

  12. Beta-endorphin-induced inhibition and stimulation of insulin secretion in normal humans is glucose dependent.

    PubMed

    Giugliano, D; Cozzolino, D; Salvatore, T; Torella, R; D'Onofrio, F

    1988-09-01

    This study evaluated the effect of human beta-endorphin on pancreatic hormone levels and their responses to nutrient challenges in normal subjects. Infusion of 0.5 mg/h beta-endorphin caused a significant rise in plasma glucose concentrations preceded by a significant increase in peripheral glucagon levels. No changes occurred in the plasma concentrations of insulin and C-peptide. Acute insulin and C-peptide responses to intravenous pulses of different glucose amounts (0.33 g/kg and 5 g) and arginine (3 g) were significantly reduced by beta-endorphin infusion (P less than .01). This effect was associated with a significant reduction of the glucose disappearance rates, suggesting that the inhibition of insulin was of biological relevance. beta-Endorphin also inhibited glucose suppression of glucagon levels and augmented the glucagon response to arginine. To verify whether the modification of prestimulus glucose level could be important in these hormonal responses to beta-endorphin, basal plasma glucose concentrations were raised by a primed (0.5 g/kg) continuous (20 mg kg-1.min-1) glucose infusion. After stabilization of plasma glucose levels (350 +/- 34 mg/dl, t = 120 min), beta-endorphin infusion caused an immediate and marked increase in plasma insulin level (peak response 61 +/- 9 microU/ml, P less than .01), which remained elevated even after the discontinuation of opioid infusion. Moreover, the acute insulin response to a glucose pulse (0.33 g/kg i.v.) given during beta-endorphin infusion during hyperglycemia was significantly higher than the response obtained during euglycemia (171 +/- 32 vs. 41 +/- 7 microU/ml, P less than .01).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. The effect of systemic hyperinsulinemia with concomitant amino acid infusion on skeletal muscle protein turnover in the human forearm.

    PubMed

    Newman, E; Heslin, M J; Wolf, R F; Pisters, P W; Brennan, M F

    1994-01-01

    In vitro, insulin has been shown to increase skeletal muscle (SM) protein synthesis and decrease SM protein breakdown. Whether these same effects are found in vivo in man is less clear. The study of the effect of hyperinsulinemia (INS) on SM protein turnover (SMPT) is complicated by hypoaminoacidemia, which can obviate the true effect of insulin on SMPT. To prevent this, we studied the effect of INS on SMPT in the human forearm with amino acid (AA) infusion to ensure adequate substrate for full evaluation of insulin's effect. Twelve healthy volunteers (aged 53 +/- 3 years) were studied. Steady-state AA kinetics were measured across the forearm after a systemic 2-hour primed continuous infusion of 3H-phenylalanine (3H-Phe) and 14C-leucine (14C-Leu) in the postabsorptive (PA) state and in response to systemic INS (71 +/- 5 microU/mL). AAs were infused during INS as 10% Travasol (Travenol Laboratories, Deerfield, IL) at .011 mL/kg/min to maintain PA branched-chain AA (BCAA) levels, known regulators of SMPT, and to mildly elevate total AA levels. The negative PA net balance of both Phe and total Leu carbons (LeuC) became positive with INS + AA infusion (Phe from -16 +/- 2 to 12 +/- 3 nmol/min/100 g [P < .01]; LeuC from -26 +/- 6 to 24 +/- 7 nmol/min/100 g [P < .01]).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Continuous administration of insulin-like growth factor-I and basic fibroblast growth factor does not affect left ventricular geometry after acute myocardial infarction in rats.

    PubMed

    Scheinowitz, M; Abramov, D; Kotlyar, A; Savion, N; Eldar, M

    1998-02-28

    We examined the long-term effect of exogenous administration of bFGF and IGF-I on myocardial geometry in 72 Sprague-Dawley male rats subjected to AMI. A preloaded miniature osmotic pump subsequently implanted in the peritoneum for continuous infusion (1 week) of IGF-I, bFGF, IGF-I+bFGF or rat albumin. Six weeks following AMI the rats were killed and cross-section slices were analyzed for left ventricular geometry. No differences were observed between IGF-I-treated, bFGF-treated, IGF-I+bFGF-treated and control groups in all parameters of the left ventricle.

  15. Real-Time Model-Based Fault Detection of Continuous Glucose Sensor Measurements.

    PubMed

    Turksoy, Kamuran; Roy, Anirban; Cinar, Ali

    2016-02-25

    Faults in subcutaneous glucose concentration readings with a continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) may affect the computation of insulin infusion rates that can lead to hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia in artificial pancreas control systems for patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D).

  16. Insulin pumps in pregnancy: using technology to achieve normoglycemia in women with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Castorino, Kristin; Paband, Rashid; Zisser, Howard; Jovanovič, Lois

    2012-02-01

    Poorly controlled diabetes before conception and during pregnancy among women with pre-existing diabetes can cause major birth defects and spontaneous abortions, as wells as abnormal fetal growth and development including an offspring who is small or large for gestational age, or predisposed to obesity, type 2 diabetes, and metabolic syndrome in his/her lifetime. Conversely, for a woman with pre-existing diabetes, optimizing blood glucose levels before and during early pregnancy can reduce these risks dramatically. As insulin pump technology has evolved, continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion has become a safe and reliable method for treating diabetes during pregnancy. Although pump therapy is often preferred by patients and some experts, insulin pumps have not yet been shown to be superior to multiple daily injections of insulin during pregnancy. In this review of the literature we focus on the use of insulin pumps in the management of diabetes in pregnancy.

  17. Efficacy of Postoperative Pain Management Using Continuous Local Anesthetic Infusion at the Iliac Crest Bone Graft Site in Patients with Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis: A Parallel, Double-Blinded, Randomized Controlled Pilot Trial.

    PubMed

    Samartzis, Dino; Bow, Cora; Cheung, Jason Pui Yin; Sham, Phoebe; Mak, Kin-Cheung; Cheung, Wai-Yuen; Wong, Yat-Wa; Luk, Keith D K; Cheung, Kenneth M C; Lawmin, Jean-Claude

    2016-05-01

    Study Design Randomized controlled trial. Objective Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) is a common spinal deformity that affects every population. In severe deformity, surgical intervention is performed. Autogenous iliac crest bone graft (ICBG) harvesting remains a common procedure worldwide for scoliosis surgery. Postoperative pain at the ICBG donor site is a major concern in patients undergoing spine surgery that affects postoperative functional outcome and consumes health care resources. Previous studies have noted a decrease in pain and postoperative analgesic use with the application of continuous infusion of anesthetic at the ICBG site in comparison with placebo. However, there is lack of evidence addressing the efficacy of continuous anesthetic infusion at the ICBG site in young patients and in particular those with spinal deformity, such as AIS. As such, this parallel, double-blinded, randomized controlled trial addressed the pain management efficacy of continuous anesthetic infusion versus saline at the ICBG site in patients with AIS during the immediate postoperative period. Methods Participants were randomized into two groups. Group A (control subjects) received 3 mL per hour of saline locally at the ICBG site, and group B (treatment subjects) received a constant rate of infusion of 3 mL per hour of 0.25% levobupivacaine. Both groups received their postoperative intervention for 47 hours. All subjects and outcome assessors were blinded to the type of intervention. Utilizing the visual analog pain scale, pain was assessed at the primary spine surgical site, ICBG site, and contralateral ICBG site. Overall physical pain was assessed by the McGill Pain Questionnaire. The degree of analgesic use and complications were also evaluated. All outcomes were assessed up until the fourth day of the patients' hospitalization following surgery. Results Twelve subjects were recruited (five in group A; seven in group B). No difference was noted at baseline

  18. Postoperative continuous wound infusion of ropivacaine has comparable analgesic effects and fewer complications as compared to traditional patient-controlled analgesia with sufentanil in patients undergoing non-cardiac thoracotomy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fang-Fang; Liu, Xiao-Ming; Liu, Xiao-Yu; Tang, Jun; Jin, Li; Li, Wei-Yan; Zhang, Li-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To compare the postoperative analgesic effects of continuous wound infusion of ropivacaine with traditional patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) with sufentanil after non-cardiac thoracotomy. Methods: One hundred and twenty adult patients undergoing open thoracotomy were recruited into this assessor-blinded, randomized study. Patients were randomly assigned to receive analgesia through a wound catheter placed below the fascia and connected to a 2 ml/h ropivacaine 0.5% (RWI group) or sufentanil PCA (SPCA group). Analgesia continued for 48 h. Visual analogue scores (VAS) at rest and movement, Ramsay scores and adverse effects were recorded at 2, 8, 12, 24, 36 and 48 h after surgery. Three months after discharge, patient’s satisfaction, residual pain and surgical wound complications were assessed. Results: General characteristics of patients were comparable between two groups. There were no statistical differences in the VAS scores and postoperative pethidine consumption between two groups (P > 0.05). However, when compared with SPCA group, the incidences of drowsiness, dizziness and respiratory depression, ICU stay and hospital expenditure reduced significantly in RWI group (P < 0.05). Patients’ satisfaction with pain management was also improved markedly in RWI group (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Continuous wound infusion with ropivacaine is effective for postoperative analgesia and has comparable effects to traditional PCA with sufentanil. Furthermore, this therapy may also reduce the incidences of drowsiness, dizziness, respiratory depression and decrease the ICU stay and hospital expenditure. PMID:26131121

  19. Missed Insulin Boluses for Snacks in Youth With Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    VanderWel, Brandon W.; Messer, Laurel H.; Horton, Lauren A.; McNair, Bryan; Cobry, Erin C.; McFann, Kim K.; Chase, H. Peter

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the effects of missed insulin boluses for snacks in youth with type 1 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Three months of simultaneous continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion and continuous glucose monitoring data from nine subjects were retrospectively evaluated. Glucose excursions between 1330 and 1700 h were defined as relating to snacks with insulin or snacks with no insulin administered. Area under the curve >180 mg/dl (AUC >180), average Δ glucose, and rate of change were analyzed and compared within and between groups. RESULTS A total of 94 snacks without insulin and 101 snacks with insulin were analyzed. Snacks without insulin had significantly higher log (AUC >180 + 1) (1.26 vs. 0.44 mg/dl per event; P < 0.001), Δ glucose (114 vs. 52 mg/dl; P < 0.001), and average rate of change (1.3 vs. 1.1 mg/dl per minute; P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS This study shows that afternoon snacks without insulin boluses are common and result in significantly higher glucose excursions than snacks with insulin administration. PMID:20032279

  20. Drug Infusion Systems: Technologies, Performance, and Pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Kim, Uoo R; Peterfreund, Robert A; Lovich, Mark A

    2017-02-16

    This review aims to broadly describe drug infusion technologies and raise subtle but important issues arising from infusion therapy that can potentially lead to patient instability and morbidity. Advantages and disadvantages of gravity-dependent drug infusion are described and compared with electromechanical approaches for precise control of medication infusion, including large-volume peristaltic and syringe pumps. This review discusses how drugs and inert carriers interact within infusion systems and outlines several complexities and potential sources of drug error. Major topics are (1) the importance of the infusion system dead volume; (2) the quantities of coadministered fluid and the concept of microinfusion; and (3) future directions for drug infusion.The infusion system dead volume resides between the point where drug and inert carrier streams meet and the patient's blood. The dead volume is an often forgotten reservoir of drugs, especially when infusion flows slow or stop. Even with medications and carriers flowing, some mass of drug always resides within the dead volume. This reservoir of drug can be accidentally delivered into patients. When dose rate is changed, there can be a significant lag between intended and actual drug delivery. When a drug infusion is discontinued, drug delivery continues until the dead volume is fully cleared of residual drug by the carrier. When multiple drug infusions flow together, a change in any drug flow rate transiently affects the rate of delivery of all the others. For all of these reasons, the use of drug infusion systems with smaller dead volumes may be advantageous.For critically ill patients requiring multiple infusions, the obligate amount of administered fluid can contribute to volume overload. Recognition of the risk of overload has given rise to microinfusion strategies wherein drug solutions are highly concentrated and infused at low rates. However, potential risks associated with the dead volume may be magnified

  1. All about Insulin Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    Toolkit No. 2 All About Insulin Resistance Insulin resistance is a condition that raises your risk for type 2 diabetes and heart disease. ... Diabetes Association, Inc. 1/15 Toolkit No. 2: All About Insulin Resistance continued J Order the smallest ...

  2. Algorithms for intravenous insulin delivery.

    PubMed

    Braithwaite, Susan S; Clement, Stephen

    2008-08-01

    This review aims to classify algorithms for intravenous insulin infusion according to design. Essential input data include the current blood glucose (BG(current)), the previous blood glucose (BG(previous)), the test time of BG(current) (test time(current)), the test time of BG(previous) (test time(previous)), and the previous insulin infusion rate (IR(previous)). Output data consist of the next insulin infusion rate (IR(next)) and next test time. The classification differentiates between "IR" and "MR" algorithm types, both defined as a rule for assigning an insulin infusion rate (IR), having a glycemic target. Both types are capable of assigning the IR for the next iteration of the algorithm (IR(next)) as an increasing function of BG(current), IR(previous), and rate-of-change of BG with respect to time, each treated as an independent variable. Algorithms of the IR type directly seek to define IR(next) as an incremental adjustment to IR(previous). At test time(current), under an IR algorithm the differences in values of IR(next) that might be assigned depending upon the value of BG(current) are not necessarily continuously dependent upon, proportionate to, or commensurate with either the IR(previous) or the rate-of-change of BG. Algorithms of the MR type create a family of IR functions of BG differing according to maintenance rate (MR), each being an iso-MR curve. The change of IR(next) with respect to BG(current) is a strictly increasing function of MR. At test time(current), algorithms of the MR type use IR(previous) and the rate-of-change of BG to define the MR, multiplier, or column assignment, which will be used for patient assignment to the right iso-MR curve and as precedent for IR(next). Bolus insulin therapy is especially effective when used in proportion to carbohydrate load to cover anticipated incremental transitory enteral or parenteral carbohydrate exposure. Specific distinguishing algorithm design features and choice of parameters may be important to

  3. 21 CFR 526.1130 - Hetacillin infusion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hetacillin infusion. 526.1130 Section 526.1130 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... infusion. (a) Specifications. Each 10 milliliter syringe contains hetacillin potassium equivalent of...

  4. A primer on the use of insulin pumps in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Boland, E; Ahern, J; Grey, M

    1998-01-01

    Optimal metabolic control to minimize long-term complications is a major treatment goal for adolescents with diabetes mellitus. Reaching this goal is extremely challenging in this population due to unique physiological changes and psychosocial variables that affect metabolic control. Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) may be an excellent treatment alternative for selected adolescents to help overcome some of these challenges. CSII allows for minute insulin changes at variable times throughout the day, providing greater lifestyle flexibility. The purpose of this paper is to review the use of insulin pump therapy in adolescents. Specific strategies regarding screening, initiation, and maintenance of this therapy are described, and case examples are used for illustration. Implications for nursing practice and diabetes education are discussed.

  5. Expression analysis of key somatotropic axis and liporegulatory genes in ghrelin- and obestatin-infused dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Grala, T M; Kay, J K; Walker, C G; Sheahan, A J; Littlejohn, M D; Lucy, M C; Roche, J R

    2010-07-01

    Ghrelin, an orexigenic hormone, is the endogenous ligand for the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR). Obestatin is produced from the same precursor peptide as ghrelin, and although obestatin was initially thought to promote actions opposite to those of ghrelin, many studies have failed to confirm this hypothesis. In the current study, multiparous cows were continuously infused with ghrelin (n = 10) or obestatin (n = 10) for 8 wk and compared to an untreated group (n = 10) to examine the effects of these hormones on somatotropic and liporegulatory gene expression. The expression of key genes was measured by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Growth hormone secretagogue receptor mRNA expression was altered in ghrelin- and obestatin-infused cows in a similar manner, as expression was increased at 4 wk, however it had decreased by 8 wk. Obestatin-infused cows presented with a significant decrease in the expression of ATP-binding cassette A1 (ABCA1) in adipose tissue, suggesting changes in cholesterol transport. Liver insulin-like growth factor (IGF) binding protein-3 mRNA displayed a week-by-treatment interaction, as expression was increased in control and obestatin-infused cows; however, expression decreased in ghrelin-infused cows. Adipose expression of hormone sensitive lipase (LIPE) mRNA was not altered by treatment or time, suggesting hormone infusion is not initiating lipolysis. The expression of lipogenic genes in adipose tissue increased with time in all groups, consistent with the general lactational profile of lipogenesis in dairy cows. These data indicate that continuous infusion of ghrelin or obestatin does not alter the expression of key somatotropic or liporegulatory genes in the lactating dairy cow, although obestatin infusion may alter cholesterol transport.

  6. Insulin and Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    As obesity and diabetes reach epidemic proportions in the developed world, the role of insulin resistance and its consequences are gaining prominence. Understanding the role of insulin in wide-ranging physiological processes and the influences on its synthesis and secretion, alongside its actions from the molecular to the whole body level, has significant implications for much chronic disease seen in Westernised populations today. This review provides an overview of insulin, its history, structure, synthesis, secretion, actions and interactions followed by a discussion of insulin resistance and its associated clinical manifestations. Specific areas of focus include the actions of insulin and manifestations of insulin resistance in specific organs and tissues, physiological, environmental and pharmacological influences on insulin action and insulin resistance as well as clinical syndromes associated with insulin resistance. Clinical and functional measures of insulin resistance are also covered. Despite our incomplete understanding of the complex biological mechanisms of insulin action and insulin resistance, we need to consider the dramatic social changes of the past century with respect to physical activity, diet, work, socialisation and sleep patterns. Rapid globalisation, urbanisation and industrialisation have spawned epidemics of obesity, diabetes and their attendant co-morbidities, as physical inactivity and dietary imbalance unmask latent predisposing genetic traits. PMID:16278749

  7. Continuous Intrathecal Infusion of Ziconotide for Treatment of Chronic Malignant and Nonmalignant Pain Over 12 Months: A Prospective, Open-label Study.

    PubMed

    Ellis, David J; Dissanayake, Sanjeeva; McGuire, Dawn; Charapata, Steven G; Staats, Peter S; Wallace, Mark S; Grove, Gene W; Vercruysse, Piet

    2008-01-01

    Objectives.  This study aims to assess the safety and efficacy of long-term intrathecal (IT) ziconotide infusion. Materials and Methods.  In this prospective study, 155 patients with severe chronic pain (48 with malignant pain, 107 with nonmalignant pain) who had been responsive to short-term IT ziconotide in a double-blind, placebo-controlled study received long-term, open-label IT ziconotide monotherapy. Efficacy assessments included the mean percentage change on the visual analog scale of pain intensity from baseline in the study of origin; safety was monitored by adverse event (AE) reports, periodic laboratory tests, and vital sign measurements. Results.  At the last available observation, the visual analog scale of pain intensity scores had decreased by a mean of 36.9% from baseline in the short-term trial (N = 144; 95% CI: 30.1-43.7%; p < 0.0001). The mean IT ziconotide dose remained stable over 12 months in the 31 patients who participated in the study for ≥ one year. Ziconotide-related AEs were reported in 147 out of 155 patients (94.8%); 39.4% of patients discontinued treatment because of AEs, the majority of which were considered ziconotide related. Conclusions.  Ziconotide IT monotherapy provided patients with analgesia for 12 months in this open-label study, with an acceptable benefit/risk profile and no evidence of tolerance.

  8. Effectiveness and tolerability of rosiglitazone on insulin resistance and body composition in nondiabetic Thai patients undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis: A 12-week pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Aramwit, Pornanong; Bunmee, Panipat; Supasyndh, Ouppatham

    2009-01-01

    Background: Patients with chronic renal insufficiency, especially those undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD), normally have insulin resistance due to deficiencies in insulin secretion and degradation, as well as tissue resistance to insulin at both receptor and postreceptor levels. Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness and tolerability of rosiglitazone on insulin resistance and body composition in patients without diabetes mellitus (DM) undergoing CAPD. Methods: This pilot study included a pretest and posttest with a repeated-measure design in a small number of patients. CAPD patients without DM received rosiglitazone 2-mg tablets BID for 12 weeks. Homeostasis Model Assessment Index of Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR) and bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) were used to assess insulin resistance and body composition, respectively. Tolerability was assessed using laboratory analyses as well as physical examination findings to evaluate peripheral edema. Peripheral edema was assessed by the study investigators. Results: Thirteen Thai patients (mean [SD] age, 54.17 [11.42] years [range, 35–85 years]; body mass index [BMI], >20 to <30 kg/m2; fasting blood glucose [FBG] concentration, <5.39 mmol/L) were included in the study. One patient was withdrawn due to illness unrelated to the study. No significant difference was found in FBG concentration between baseline and posttreatment (after 12 weeks of treatment) (5.45 [0.59] vs 5.24 [0.51] mmol/L), but fasting plasma insulin concentrations (28.50 [23.70] vs 10.15 [4.22] μIU/mL; P = 0.005) and HOMA-IR score (6.70 [5.23] vs 2.40 [1.15]; P = 0.011) were significantly lower. There were no significant changes in weight or BMI from baseline to posttreatment. Seven subjects (58.3%) experienced weight gain at week 4, while 2 patients (16.7%) still had weight gain after 12 weeks of treatment. A significant increase was found between baseline and posttreatment in total body

  9. Optimizing insulin therapy in pregnant women with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, Peter A; Frias, Juan P; Peters, Kelly A; Chillara, Bhavani; Garg, Satish K

    2002-01-01

    Pregnancy complicated by type 1 diabetes mellitus is associated with an increased risk of complications in the mother and infant. Normal or near normal glycemic control prior to and during pregnancy reduces many of these risks to levels observed in the general population. This degree of glycemic control is generally achievable only with intensive insulin therapy: multiple daily injections (MDI) or continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) via an insulin pump. These therapeutic regimens have been found to result in comparable glycemic control, although CSII provides increased flexibility in terms of patient lifestyle, and may reduce the incidence of hypoglycemia. Frequent home blood glucose monitoring is imperative during pregnancy in order to optimize glycemic control and reduce the risk of hypoglycemia. Furthermore, insulin requirements change significantly over the course of pregnancy. The new short-acting insulin analogs, insulin lispro and insulin aspart, have pharmacodynamic properties which make them ideal for use during pregnancy. Although the number of published studies evaluating the use of insulin lispro during pregnancy is limited, the majority support its safety. No studies of insulin aspart in pregnancy have been published in full. In addition to optimization of glycemic control, frequent assessment for development and/or progression of microvascular complications is necessary during pregnancy.

  10. Influence of vancomycin infusion methods on endothelial cell toxicity.

    PubMed

    Drouet, Maryline; Chai, Feng; Barthélémy, Christine; Lebuffe, Gilles; Debaene, Bertrand; Décaudin, Bertrand; Odou, Pascal

    2015-02-01

    Peripheral intravenous therapy is frequently used in routine hospital practice and, due to various factors, its most common side effect is phlebitis. The infusion of vancomycin is particularly associated with phlebitis despite its widespread use. French guidelines recommend central intravenous infusion for high concentrations of vancomycin, but peripheral intravenous therapy is often preferred in intensive care units. Methods of vancomycin infusion are either intermittent infusion or continuous infusion. A comparison of these methods under in vitro conditions simulating clinical use could result in better infusion efficacy. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were therefore challenged with clinical doses of vancomycin over a 24- to 72-h period using these infusion methods. Cell death was measured with the alamarBlue test. Concentration-dependent and time-dependent vancomycin toxicity on HUVECs was noted with a 50% lethal dose at 5 mg/ml after 24 h, reaching 2.5 mg/ml after 72 h of infusion, simulating long-term infusion. This toxicity does not seem to be induced by acidic pH. In comparing infusion methods, we observed that continuous infusion induced greater cell toxicity than intermittent infusion at doses higher than 1 g/day. The increasing use of vancomycin means that new guidelines are required to avoid phlebitis. If peripheral intravenous therapy is used to reduce infusion time, along with intermittent infusion, vein irritation and localized phlebitis may be reduced. Further studies have to be carried out to explore the causes of vancomycin endothelial toxicity.

  11. Influence of Vancomycin Infusion Methods on Endothelial Cell Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Drouet, Maryline; Chai, Feng; Barthélémy, Christine; Lebuffe, Gilles; Debaene, Bertrand; Odou, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral intravenous therapy is frequently used in routine hospital practice and, due to various factors, its most common side effect is phlebitis. The infusion of vancomycin is particularly associated with phlebitis despite its widespread use. French guidelines recommend central intravenous infusion for high concentrations of vancomycin, but peripheral intravenous therapy is often preferred in intensive care units. Methods of vancomycin infusion are either intermittent infusion or continuous infusion. A comparison of these methods under in vitro conditions simulating clinical use could result in better infusion efficacy. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were therefore challenged with clinical doses of vancomycin over a 24- to 72-h period using these infusion methods. Cell death was measured with the alamarBlue test. Concentration-dependent and time-dependent vancomycin toxicity on HUVECs was noted with a 50% lethal dose at 5 mg/ml after 24 h, reaching 2.5 mg/ml after 72 h of infusion, simulating long-term infusion. This toxicity does not seem to be induced by acidic pH. In comparing infusion methods, we observed that continuous infusion induced greater cell toxicity than intermittent infusion at doses higher than 1 g/day. The increasing use of vancomycin means that new guidelines are required to avoid phlebitis. If peripheral intravenous therapy is used to reduce infusion time, along with intermittent infusion, vein irritation and localized phlebitis may be reduced. Further studies have to be carried out to explore the causes of vancomycin endothelial toxicity. PMID:25421476

  12. Chronic intrarenal insulin replacement reverses diabetes mellitus-induced natriuresis and diuresis.

    PubMed

    Manhiani, M Marlina; Duggan, A Daniel; Wilson, Hunter; Brands, Michael W

    2012-02-01

    We showed recently that sustained natriuresis in type 1 diabetic dogs was attributed to the decrease in insulin rather than the hyperglycemia alone. The sodium-retaining action of insulin appeared to require hyperglycemia, and it completely reversed the diabetic natriuresis and diuresis. This study tested whether the sodium-retaining effect was attributed to direct intrarenal actions of insulin. Alloxan-treated dogs (D; n=7) were maintained normoglycemic using 24-h/d IV insulin replacement. After control measurements, IV insulin was decreased to begin a 6-day diabetic period. Blood glucose increased from 84±6 mg/dL to an average of 428 mg/dL on days 5 and 6, sodium excretion increased from 74±8 to 98±7 meq/d over the 6 days, and urine volume increased from 1645±83 to 2198±170 mL/d. Dir dogs (n=7) were subjected to the same diabetic regimen, but, in addition, insulin was infused continuously into the renal artery at 0.3 mU/kg per minute during the 6-day period. This did not affect plasma insulin. Blood glucose increased from 94±10 mg/dL to an average of 380 mg/dL on days 5 and 6, but sodium excretion averaged 76±5 and 69±8 meq/d during control and diabetes mellitus, respectively. The diuresis also was prevented. Glomerular filtration rate increased only in Dir dogs, and there was no change in mean arterial pressure in either group. This intrarenal insulin infusion had no effect on sodium or volume excretion in normal dogs. Intrarenal insulin replacement in diabetic dogs caused a sustained increase in tubular reabsorption that completely reversed diabetic natriuresis. Insulin plus glucose may work to prevent salt wasting in uncontrolled type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  13. External Beam Radiotherapy Plus 24-Hour Continuous Infusion of Gemcitabine in Unresectable Pancreatic Carcinoma: Long-Term Results of a Phase II Study

    SciTech Connect

    Mattiucci, Gian C.; Morganti, Alessio G.; Valentini, Vincenzo; Ippolito, Edy; Alfieri, Sergio; Antinori, Armando; Crucitti, Antonio; D'Agostino, Giuseppe R.; Di Lullo, Liberato; Luzi, Stefano; Mantini, Giovanna; Smaniotto, Daniela; Doglietto, Gian B.; Cellini, Numa

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of gemcitabine-based chemoradiation (CT-RT) in treating patients (pts) affected by locally advanced pancreatic cancers (LAPC). Methods and Materials: Weekly gemcitabine (100 mg/m{sup 2}) was given as a 24-hour infusion during the course of three-dimensional radiotherapy (50.4 Gy to the tumor, 39.6 Gy to the nodes). After CT-RT, pts received five cycles of sequential chemotherapy with gemcitabine (1000 mg/m{sup 2}; 1, 8, q21). Response rate was assessed according to World Health Organization criteria 6 weeks after the end of CT-RT. Local control (LC), time to progression (TTP), metastases-free survival (MFS), and overall survival (OS) were analyzed by the Kaplan Meier method. Results: Forty pts (male/female 22/18; median age 62 years, range, 36-76) were treated from 2000 to 2005. The majority had T4 tumour (n = 34, 85%), six pts (15%) had T3 tumour. Sixteen pts (40%) were node positive at diagnosis. Grade 3-4 acute toxicity was observed in 21 pts (52.5%). Thirty pts (75%) completed the treatment schedule. A clinical response was achieved in 12 pts (30%). With a median follow-up of 76 months (range, 32-98), 2-year LC was 39.6% (median, 12 months), 2-year TTP was 18.4% (median, 10 months), and 2-year MFS was 29.7% (median, 10 months). Two-year OS (25%; median, 15.5 months) compared with our previous study on 5-fluorouracil-based CT-RT (2.8%) was significantly improved (p <0.001). Conclusions: Gemcitabine CT-RT seems correlated with improved outcomes. Healthier patients who are likely to complete the treatment schedule may benefit most from this therapy.

  14. Method of infusion extraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang-Diaz, Franklin R. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Apparatus and method of removing desirable constituents from an infusible material by infusion extraction, where a piston operating in a first chamber draws a solvent into the first chamber where it may be heated, and then moves the heated solvent into a second chamber containing the infusible material, and where infusion extraction takes place. The piston then moves the solvent containing the extract through a filter into the first chamber, leaving the extraction residue in the second chamber.

  15. Effect of Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Therapy on Glycemic Excursions and Insulin Sensitivity in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea-hypopnea Syndrome and Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Li-Xin; Zhao, Xin; Pan, Qi; Sun, Xue; Li, Hui; Wang, Xiao-Xia; Zhang, Li-Na; Wang, Yao

    2015-01-01

    Background: For patients with obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), the night sleep interruption and intermittent hypoxia due to apnea or hypopnea may induce glycemic excursions and reduce insulin sensitivity. This study aimed to investigate the effect of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy in patients with OSAHS and T2DM. Methods: Continuous glucose monitoring system (CGMS) was used in 40 patients with T2DM and newly diagnosed OSAHS. The measurements were repeated after 30 days of CPAP treatment. Subsequently, insulin sensitivity and glycohemoglobin (HbA1c) were measured and compared to the pretreatment data. Results: After CPAP therapy, the CGMS indicators showed that the 24-h mean blood glucose (MBG) and the night time MBG were significantly reduced (P < 0.05 and P = 0.03, respectively). The mean ambulatory glucose excursions (MAGEs) and the mean of daily differences were also significantly reduced (P < 0.05 and P = 0.002, respectively) compared to pretreatment levels. During the night, MAGE also significantly decreased (P = 0.049). The differences between the highest and lowest levels of blood glucose over 24 h and during the night were significantly lower than prior to CPAP treatment (P < 0.05 and P = 0.024, respectively). The 24 h and night time durations of high blood glucose (>7.8 mmol/L and > 11.1 mmol/L) decreased (P < 0.05 and P < 0.05, respectively) after the treatment. In addition, HbA1c levels were also lower than those before treatment (P < 0.05), and the homeostasis model assessment index of insulin resistance was also significantly lower than before CPAP treatment (P = 0.034). Conclusions: CPAP therapy may have a beneficial effect on improving not only blood glucose but also upon insulin sensitivity in T2DM patients with OSAHS. This suggests that CPAP may be an effective treatment for T2DM in addition to intensive diabetes management. PMID:26315076

  16. Prolonged continuous intravenous infusion of the dipeptide L-alanine- L-glutamine significantly increases plasma glutamine and alanine without elevating brain glutamate in patients with severe traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Low plasma glutamine levels are associated with worse clinical outcome. Intravenous glutamine infusion dose- dependently increases plasma glutamine levels, thereby correcting hypoglutaminemia. Glutamine may be transformed to glutamate which might limit its application at a higher dose in patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). To date, the optimal glutamine dose required to normalize plasma glutamine levels without increasing plasma and cerebral glutamate has not yet been defined. Methods Changes in plasma and cerebral glutamine, alanine, and glutamate as well as indirect signs of metabolic impairment reflected by increased intracranial pressure (ICP), lactate, lactate-to-pyruvate ratio, electroencephalogram (EEG) activity were determined before, during, and after continuous intravenous infusion of 0.75 g L-alanine-L-glutamine which was given either for 24 hours (group 1, n = 6) or 5 days (group 2, n = 6) in addition to regular enteral nutrition. Lab values including nitrogen balance, urea and ammonia were determined daily. Results Continuous L-alanine-L-glutamine infusion significantly increased plasma and cerebral glutamine as well as alanine levels, being mostly sustained during the 5 day infusion phase (plasma glutamine: from 295 ± 62 to 500 ± 145 μmol/ l; brain glutamine: from 183 ± 188 to 549 ± 120 μmol/ l; plasma alanine: from 327 ± 91 to 622 ± 182 μmol/ l; brain alanine: from 48 ± 55 to 89 ± 129 μmol/ l; p < 0.05, ANOVA, post hoc Dunn’s test). Plasma glutamate remained unchanged and cerebral glutamate was decreased without any signs of cerebral impairment. Urea and ammonia were significantly increased within normal limits without signs of organ dysfunction (urea: from 2.7 ± 1.6 to 5.5 ± 1.5 mmol/ l; ammonia: from 12 ± 6.3 to 26 ± 8.3 μmol/ l; p < 0.05, ANOVA, post hoc Dunn’s test). Conclusions High dose L-alanine-L-glutamine infusion (0

  17. Insulin Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... 3 hours and lasts 12 to 16 hours.Long-acting insulin (such as insulin glargine and insulin detemir) ... hard to time their meals around regular insulin injections. Sometimes they end up eating too soon or ...

  18. Insulin clearance is different in men and women

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Michael D.; Nielsen, Soren; Gupta, Nidhi; Basu, Rita; Rizza, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Objective Insulin is often infused based upon total body weight (TBW) or fat free mass (FFM)for glucose clamp protocols. We observed greater insulin concentrations in men than women using this approach and examined whether splanchnic insulin extraction accounts for the differences. Materials/Methods Whole body insulin clearance was measured during a pancreatic clamp study (somatostatin to inhibit islet hormone secretion) including 13 adults (6 men) and whole body insulin clearance was measured during a euglycemic, hyperinsulinemic clamp study including 27 adults (13 men). Femoral artery and hepatic vein blood samples were collected to measure splanchnic insulin balance. For the pancreatic clamp study insulin was infused at rates of 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 mU•kgTBW−1•min−1 and for the euglycemic, hyperinsulinemic clamp study insulin was infused at 2.5 mU•kg FFM−1•min−1. Results Significantly greater arterial insulin concentrations were found in men than women. Splanchnic plasma flow was similar in men and women in both protocols. Splanchnic insulin extraction and the fraction of infused insulin removed by splanchnic bed were significantly greater in men than in women. However, whole body insulin clearance was greater in women than men. Conclusions Infusing insulin per body weight or FFM results in higher plasma insulin concentrations in men than women. Splanchnic insulin extraction is greater in men, indicating greater peripheral insulin clearance in women accounts for the sex differences we observed. This finding has implications for insulin clamp study design and raises the question of which tissues take up more insulin in women. PMID:22000585

  19. Comparison of rechargeable versus battery-operated insulin pumps: temperature fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Vereshchetin, Paul; McCann, Thomas W; Ojha, Navdeep; Venugopalan, Ramakrishna; Levy, Brian L

    2016-01-01

    The role of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (insulin pumps) has become increasingly important in diabetes management, and many different types of these systems are currently available. This exploratory study focused on the reported heating issues that lithium-ion battery-powered pumps may have during charging compared with battery-operated pumps. It was found that pump temperature increased by 6.4°C during a long charging cycle of a lithiumion battery-operated pump under ambient temperatures. In an environmental-chamber kept at 35°C, the pump temperature increased by 4.4°C, which indicates that the pump temperature was above that of the recommended safety limit for insulin storage of 37°C. When designing new pumps, and when using currently available rechargeable pumps in warmer climates, the implications of these temperature increases should be taken into consideration. Future studies should also further examine insulin quality after charging.

  20. Comparison of rechargeable versus battery-operated insulin pumps: temperature fluctuations

    PubMed Central

    Vereshchetin, Paul; McCann, Thomas W; Ojha, Navdeep; Venugopalan, Ramakrishna; Levy, Brian L

    2016-01-01

    The role of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (insulin pumps) has become increasingly important in diabetes management, and many different types of these systems are currently available. This exploratory study focused on the reported heating issues that lithium-ion battery-powered pumps may have during charging compared with battery-operated pumps. It was found that pump temperature increased by 6.4°C during a long charging cycle of a lithiumion battery-operated pump under ambient temperatures. In an environmental-chamber kept at 35°C, the pump temperature increased by 4.4°C, which indicates that the pump temperature was above that of the recommended safety limit for insulin storage of 37°C. When designing new pumps, and when using currently available rechargeable pumps in warmer climates, the implications of these temperature increases should be taken into consideration. Future studies should also further examine insulin quality after charging. PMID:27789976

  1. Intravenous glucagon in a deliberate insulin overdose in an adolescent with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    White, Mary; Zacharin, Margaret R; Werther, George A; Cameron, Fergus J

    2016-02-01

    Massive insulin overdose may be associated with unpredictable and prolonged hypoglycemia. Concerns surrounding the potential provocation of insulin release from beta cells have previously prevented the use of intravenous glucagon as an adjunct to infusion of dextrose in this situation. We describe the case of a 15-yr-old boy with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) who presented with profound hypoglycemia following an overdose of an unknown quantity of premixed insulin. Owing to an increasing dextrose requirement and a dependence on hourly intramuscular glucagon injections, a continuous intravenous infusion of glucagon was commenced which successfully avoided the requirement for central venous access or concentrated dextrose infusion. Nausea was managed with anti-emetics. Intramuscular and subcutaneous glucagon is effective in the management of refractory and severe hypoglycemia in youth with both T1DM and hyperinsulinism. Concerns regarding the precipitation of rebound hypoglycemia with the use of intravenous glucagon do not relate to those with T1DM. This treatment option may be a useful adjunct in the management of insulin overdose in youth with T1DM and may avoid the requirement for invasive central venous access placement.

  2. Continuous cervical intrathecal administration of morphine with a new infusion pump, the Anschütz IP 35.1: a case report.

    PubMed

    Van Melkebeke, S; Wostyn, L; Gellens, P; Camu, F

    1995-01-01

    The continuous intrathecal administration of low-dose morphine is an effective treatment for chronic neuropathic pain. Several implantable devices can be used for such treatments but they all have limitations. In this case report we opted for a new type of implantable pump, the Anschütz, for the combined cervical intrathecal administration of morphine and clonidine in a patient with severe cervicobrachialgia.

  3. Determinants of intensive insulin therapeutic regimens in patients with type 1 diabetes: data from a nationwide multicenter survey in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To evaluate the determinants of intensive insulin regimens (ITs) in patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D). Methods This multicenter study was conducted between December 2008 and December 2010 in 28 public clinics in 20 Brazilian cities. Data were obtained from 3,591 patients (56.0% female, 57.1% Caucasian). Insulin regimens were classified as follows: group 1, conventional therapy (CT) (intermediate human insulin, one to two injections daily); group 2 (three or more insulin injections of intermediate plus regular human insulin); group 3 (three or more insulin injections of intermediate human insulin plus short-acting insulin analogues); group 4, basal-bolus (one or two insulin injections of long-acting plus short-acting insulin analogues or regular insulin); and group 5, basal-bolus with continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII). Groups 2 to 5 were considered IT groups. Results We obtained complete data from 2,961 patients. Combined intermediate plus regular human insulin was the most used therapeutic regimen. CSII was used by 37 (1.2%) patients and IT by 2,669 (90.2%) patients. More patients on IT performed self-monitoring of blood glucose and were treated at the tertiary care level compared to CT patients (p < 0.001). The majority of patients from all groups had HbA1c levels above the target. Overweight or obesity was not associated with insulin regimen. Logistic regression analysis showed that economic status, age, ethnicity, and level of care were associated with IT (p < 0.001). Conclusions Given the prevalence of intensive treatment for T1D in Brazil, more effective therapeutic strategies are needed for long term-health benefits. PMID:24920963

  4. Migration and turnover of entero-endocrine and caveolated cells in the epithelium of the descending colon, as shown by radioautography after continuous infusion of 3H-thymidine into mice.

    PubMed

    Tsubouchi, S; Leblond, C P

    1979-12-01

    Adult male mice were given a continuous infusion of about 0.5 muCi of 3H-thymidine per gram body weight per day for periods varying from 1 to 60 days. Semithin sections of descending colon were cut from/plastic-embedded blocks and stained by a method combining silver impregnation and iron hematoxylin, by which argentaffin entero-endocrine cells and caveolated cells could be identified. From radioautographs, the labeling index of these cells was determined. One to three days after the beginning of 3H-thymidine infusion, label is observed in some of the stained entero-endocrine cells in the bottom of the crypts; the apices of these cells reach the crypt lumen and are joined to neighboring cells by terminal bars (junctional complexes). After five to seven days, labeled entero-endocrine cells are seen on the sides of the crypts, where their base stretches along the basement membrane and their apex has lost its terminal bar connections to neighboring cells. Finally, by 13 and 24 days, labeled cells are observed within the epithelium at the mucosal surface. The turnover time, which is taken to be equal to the mean time required for migration from site of origin to site of loss on the mucosal surface, has been estimated at 23.3 days. This is much longer than the 4.6 days required by the two main cell types of the epithelium -- vacuolated-columnar and mucous cells -- to travel the same route. It is likely that, after entero-endocrine cells lose their terminal bar attachment to other epithelial cells, they migrate independently and very slowly. Labeled caveolated cells are first seen in the crypt bottom one day after the beginning of 3H-thymidine infusion. By three to five days, they are on the sides of the crypts; their base is stretched along the basement membrane, but their apex retains its attachment to neighboring cells by terminal bars. By seven days, labeled caveolated cells are on the mucosal surface. Their turnover time has been assessed at 8.2 days. This is, again

  5. The U.S. home infusion market.

    PubMed

    Monk-Tutor, M R

    1998-10-01

    Medicare legislation stimulated the development of home care services but also resulted in fragmentation of service components. In the 1980s, prospective pricing and diagnosis-related groups, and resulting pressures to reduce inpatient length of stay, prompted additional growth of the industry. Even so, in 1995 home care represented only 3% of total national expenditures on health care. The annual growth rate of the home infusion industry dropped from 64% in 1982-86 to 24% in 1986-93. While revenue per patient for home infusion is expected to decrease under managed care, an increasing number of patients will support continued market growth. The home infusion market is highly competitive, with only a few large national providers and many small local providers. In 1996, 29% of acute care hospitals provided or were developing a home care program. Community pharmacists' options in the home infusion area include independent services, partnerships, joint ventures, contracts with hospitals, and franchises. The home infusion market is being integrated into alternative sites, such as ambulatory infusion centers (AICs), as providers attempt to diversify to maintain managed care contracts. AICs provide infusion therapy and nursing to noninstitutionalized, nonhome-bound patients. Untapped sources for future growth of the infusion market include long-term-care facilities. More consistent studies of the home care market are needed. Despite slowed growth in recent years, home care has a strong market in the United States.

  6. THE HYPOPHYSIS AND SECRETION OF INSULIN

    PubMed Central

    Houssay, B. A.; Foglia, V. G.; Smyth, F. S.; Rietti, C. T.; Houssay, A. B.

    1942-01-01

    The ability of the pancreas, from various types of dogs, to correct diabetic hyperglycemia has been studied (Table XI). The pancreas from one animal was united by a vascular union with the neck blood vessels of another dog which had been pancreatectomized for 20 hours. The time necessary to reduce the blood sugar level to 120 mg. per cent was determined. 1. Pancreas from 6 hypophysectomized dogs produced a normal insulin secretion, showing that an anterior pituitary hormone is not necessary for its production or maintenance. 2. In 14 of 17 normal dogs given anterior pituitary extract for 3 or more consecutive days and presenting diabetes (fasting blood sugar 150 mg. per cent or more) the pancreas showed diminished insulin production. 3. In animals which remained diabetic after discontinuing the injections of hypophyseal extract, the pancreas islands were markedly pathologic and the insulin secretion was practically nil. 4. When hyperglycemia existed on the 2nd to 5th day but fell later, the insulin secretion of 5 dogs was normal in 2, supernormal in 1, and less than normal in 2. Histologic examination showed a restoration of beta cells. 5. In 14 dogs resistant to the diabetogenic action of anterior pituitary extract, as shown by little or no change in blood sugar, the pancreatic secretion of insulin was normal in 6 cases, supernormal in 3, and subnormal in 5 cases. Clear signs of hyperfunction of B cells were observed. In 6 resistant animals a high blood sugar (150 mg. per cent) appeared shortly before transplanting, but insulin secretion was normal in 4, supernormal in 1, and subnormal in 1 case. 6. With one injection of extract and 1 day of hyperglycemia the capacity of the pancreas to secrete insulin was not altered. 7. A high blood sugar level lasting 4 days does not alter the islets. The hypophyseal extract acts, therefore, by some other mechanism. In normal dogs, the continuous intravenous infusion of glucose for 4 days maintained the blood sugar at levels as

  7. Enhanced insulin secretion responsiveness and islet adrenergic desensitization after chronic norepinephrine suppression is discontinued in fetal sheep

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaochuan; Green, Alice S.; Macko, Antoni R.; Yates, Dustin T.; Kelly, Amy C.

    2013-01-01

    Intrauterine growth-restricted (IUGR) fetuses experience prolonged hypoxemia, hypoglycemia, and elevated norepinephrine (NE) concentrations, resulting in hypoinsulinemia and β-cell dysfunction. Previously, we showed that acute adrenergic blockade revealed enhanced insulin secretion responsiveness in the IUGR fetus. To determine whether chronic exposure to NE alone enhances β-cell responsiveness afterward, we continuously infused NE into fetal sheep for 7 days and, after terminating the infusion, evaluated glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) and glucose-potentiated arginine-induced insulin secretion (GPAIS). During treatment, NE-infused fetuses had greater (P < 0.05) plasma NE concentrations and exhibited hyperglycemia (P < 0.01) and hypoinsulinemia (P < 0.01) compared with controls. GSIS during the NE infusion was also reduced (P < 0.05) compared with pretreatment values. GSIS and GPAIS were approximately fourfold greater (P < 0.01) in NE fetuses 3 h after the 7 days that NE infusion was discontinued compared with age-matched controls or pretreatment GSIS and GPAIS values of NE fetuses. In isolated pancreatic islets from NE fetuses, mRNA concentrations of adrenergic receptor isoforms (α1D, α2A, α2C, and β1), G protein subunit-αi-2, and uncoupling protein 2 were lower (P < 0.05) compared with controls, but β-cell regulatory genes were not different. Our findings indicate that chronic exposure to elevated NE persistently suppresses insulin secretion. After removal, NE fetuses demonstrated a compensatory enhancement in insulin secretion that was associated with adrenergic desensitization and greater stimulus-secretion coupling in pancreatic islets. PMID:24253046

  8. Oral Insulin Reloaded

    PubMed Central

    Heinemann, Lutz; Plum-Mörschel, Leona

    2014-01-01

    Optimal coverage of insulin needs is the paramount aim of insulin replacement therapy in patients with diabetes mellitus. To apply insulin without breaking the skin barrier by a needle and/or to allow a more physiological provision of insulin are the main reasons triggering the continuous search for alternative routes of insulin administration. Despite numerous attempts over the past 9 decades to develop an insulin pill, no insulin for oral dosing is commercially available. By way of a structured approach, we aim to provide a systematic update on the most recent developments toward an orally available insulin formulation with a clear focus on data from clinical-experimental and clinical studies. Thirteen companies that claim to be working on oral insulin formulations were identified. However, only 6 of these companies published new clinical trial results within the past 5 years. Interestingly, these clinical data reports make up a mere 4% of the considerably high total number of publications on the development of oral insulin formulations within this time period. While this picture clearly reflects the rising research interest in orally bioavailable insulin formulations, it also highlights the fact that the lion’s share of research efforts is still allocated to the preclinical stages. PMID:24876606

  9. Insulin reverses ammonia-induced anorexia and experimental cancer anorexia.

    PubMed

    Chance, W T; Thomas, I; Fischer, J E

    1994-01-01

    Previous experiments suggest that experimental cancer-induced anorexia is associated with hyperammonemia and that daily injections of insulin may attenuate the anorexia for several days. In the present study, we determined whether similar daily insulin treatments would correct anorexia induced by the infusion of ammonium salts and compared this feeding response with that of insulin-treated tumor-bearing (TB) rats. Daily treatment of control and anorectic TB rats with systemically administered insulin for six days increased feeding in all control rats and 40% of the TB rats. All insulin-treated groups exhibited equal degrees of hypoglycemia irrespective of anorexia. Basal concentrations of lactate and glucagon were elevated in saline-treated TB rats. Plasma lactate levels were normalized by insulin treatment, whereas glucagon was normalized only in the TB rats that fed to insulin and increased further in TB rats that did not feed to insulin. Elevated hypothalamic tyrosine was reduced in insulin-treated TB rats that ate, and 5-hydroxy-indoleacetic acid was increased further when the rats did not eat. Insulin also blocked anorexia resulting from the intravenous infusion of ammonium salts. Hypothalamic concentrations of tyrosine and tryptophan were increased by the ammonia infusion and reduced significantly in insulin-treated infused rats. These results indicate that insulin treatment can reverse experimental cancer-induced anorexia and hyperammonemia-induced anorexia. Neurochemical changes associated with these treatments are also similar, but not identical.

  10. Reduced Silent Occlusions with a Novel Catheter Infusion Set (BD FlowSmart): Results from Two Open-Label Comparative Studies

    PubMed Central

    Gibney, Michael; Xue, Zhenyi; Swinney, Monica; Bialonczyk, Damian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Insulin pump users experience periods of unexplained hyperglycemia. In some cases these may be due to insulin flow interruptions termed “silent occlusions,” which occur without activating the pump alarm and may require set replacement. Materials and Methods: In-line pressure profiles of a novel infusion set with a 6-mm, 28-gauge polymer, dual-ported catheter (BD FlowSmart™; Becton Dickinson and Co., Franklin Lakes, NJ) were compared with those of an existing infusion set (Quick-set®; Medtronic MiniMed, Northridge, CA) in two separate studies involving insulin diluent infusions over 2.5–4.5-h periods in healthy adults without diabetes. Study 1, a pilot study (n = 25), compared the occurrence of flow interruption events (silent occlusions and/or occlusion alarms) between the two infusion sets and between manual or device-assisted insertion methods. Study 2 (n = 60) was designed to show ≥50% reduction in flow interruption events with the BD set after manual insertions. (Silent occlusions were defined by a continuous pressure rise for ≥30 min.) Results: In Study 1, significantly fewer silent occlusions were seen with BD FlowSmart versus Quick-set infusion sets for both manual (three of 22 [13.6%] vs. 12 of 24 [50%]; P = 0.012) and mechanical (two of 24 [8.3%] vs. nine of 25 [36%]; P = 0.037) insertions, yielding risk reductions of 73% (95% confidence interval [CI], 25–91%) and 77% (95% CI, 17–94%), respectively. In Study 2, flow interruption events occurred in three of 117 (2.6%) and 12 of 118 (10.2%) BD FlowSmart and Quick-set infusion sets, respectively, yielding a 75% risk reduction (95% CI, 20–92%; P = 0.030). Percentage of time with flow interruption was significantly lower with BD sets in both studies (P < 0.02). Leakage (>0.5 IU or 5 μL) occurred infrequently and did not differ between sets. Conclusions: A novel side-ported insulin infusion set demonstrated significant reductions in flow

  11. Defective insulin secretion by chronic glucagon receptor activation in glucose intolerant mice.

    PubMed

    Ahlkvist, Linda; Omar, Bilal; Valeur, Anders; Fosgerau, Keld; Ahrén, Bo

    2016-03-01

    Stimulation of insulin secretion by short-term glucagon receptor (GCGR) activation is well characterized; however, the effect of long-term GCGR activation on β-cell function is not known, but of interest, since hyperglucagonemia occurs early during development of type 2 diabetes. Therefore, we examined whether chronic GCGR activation affects insulin secretion in glucose intolerant mice. To induce chronic GCGR activation, high-fat diet fed mice were continuously (2 weeks) infused with the stable glucagon analog ZP-GA-1 and challenged with oral glucose and intravenous glucose±glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP1). Islets were isolated to evaluate the insulin secretory response to glucose±GLP1 and their pancreas were collected for immunohistochemical analysis. Two weeks of ZP-GA-1 infusion reduced insulin secretion both after oral and intravenous glucose challenges in vivo and in isolated islets. These inhibitory effects were corrected for by GLP1. Also, we observed increased β-cell area and islet size. We conclude that induction of chronic ZP-GA-1 levels in glucose intolerant mice markedly reduces insulin secretion, and thus, we suggest that chronic activation of the GCGR may contribute to the failure of β-cell function during development of type 2 diabetes.

  12. Stimulation of body weight increase and epiphyseal cartilage growth by insulin like growth factor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, S.

    1981-01-01

    The ability of insulin-like growth factor (IGF) to induce growth in hypophysectomized immature rats was tested by continuous infusion of the partially purified factor at daily doses of 6, 21, and 46 mU for an 8-day period. A dose-dependent growth of the proximal epiphyseal cartilage of the tibia and an associated stimulation of the primary spongiosa were produced by these amounts of IGF. The two highest doses of IGF also resulted in dose-dependent increases of body weight. Gel permeation of the sera at neutrality showed that the large-molecular-weight IGF binding protein was not induced by the infusion of IGF, whereas it ws generated in the sera of hypophysectomized rats that were infused with daily doses of 86 mU of human growth hormone.

  13. Sodium retention by insulin may depend on decreased plasma potassium.

    PubMed

    Friedberg, C E; Koomans, H A; Bijlsma, J A; Rabelink, T J; Dorhout Mees, E J

    1991-02-01

    Evidence is accumulating that insulin is a hypertensive factor in humans. The involved mechanism may be its sodium-retaining effect. We examined whether insulin causes sodium retention through a direct action on the kidney, as is generally assumed, or indirectly through hypokalemia. Insulin was infused (euglycemic clamp technique) with and without potassium infusion to prevent hypokalemia in six healthy subjects. Without potassium infusion, insulin caused a marked decrease in plasma potassium (-0.75 mmol/L), and decreased urinary sodium and potassium excretions by, approximately 38% and 65%, respectively. Simultaneous potassium infusion largely prevented the decrease in plasma potassium, as well as the decrease in urinary sodium and potassium excretions. These data suggest that the acute antinatriuretic effect of insulin may be largely mediated in an indirect way, ie, through hypokalemia.

  14. Moving toward the ideal insulin for insulin pumps.

    PubMed

    Cengiz, Eda; Bode, Bruce; Van Name, Michelle; Tamborlane, William V

    2016-01-01

    Advances in insulin formulations have been important for diabetes management and achieving optimal glycemic control. Rapid-acting insulin analogs provide a faster time-action profile than regular insulin and are approved for use in pumps. However, the need remains for therapy to deliver a more physiologic insulin profile. New insulin formulations and delivery methods are in development, with the aim of accelerating insulin absorption to accomplish ultra-fast-acting insulin time-action profiles. Furthermore, the integration of continuous glucose monitoring with insulin pump therapy enables on-going adjustment of insulin delivery to optimize glycemic control throughout the day and night. These technological and pharmacological advances are likely to facilitate the development of closed-loop pump systems (i.e., artificial pancreas), and improve glycemic control and quality of life for patients with diabetes.

  15. The use of subcutaneous infusion in medication administration.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, Janice

    The subcutaneous administration of medications is an area that receives little attention compared with other types of parenteral therapy. Parenteral administration is used by many thousands of patients who self-administer their medication on a daily basis-for example, those using insulin to manage diabetes, recipients of some types of hormone therapy and so on. It is also an effective route for the continuous administration of medication(s) in individuals who are terminally ill. Patients approaching the end of their life may be unable to tolerate the administration of oral medication to control their symptoms and make them more comfortable. This paper will discuss how subcutaneous infusion can be used to deliver these medications, but at the same time how important the selection of the most appropriate subcutaneous infusion device is to the overall comfort of the patient, and to reduce the potential for sharps-related injuries to healthcare workers. Appropriate device selection, together with its management, is an important contributing factor to patient safety and comfort. It will diminish the potential for premature device loss, which can lead to repeated insertion procedures for the patient, as well as delaying their medication. There is also a resource implication for the NHS, as the replacement of any device involves the use of additional equipment and staff time. Additionally, the use of any infusion device poses a risk to healthcare workers of acquiring a bloodborne infection should they experience a percutaneous injury. Knowledge of what equipment is available will reduce the potential risk to these staff.

  16. Programmable physiological infusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, W. H.; Young, D. R.; Adachi, R. R. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A programmable physiological infusion device and method are provided wherein a program source, such as a paper tape, is used to actuate an infusion pump in accordance with a desired program. The system is particularly applicable for dispensing calcium in a variety of waveforms.

  17. Comparison of Intrahepatic and Pancreatic Perfusion on Fusion Images Using a Combined SPECT/CT System and Assessment of Efficacy of Combined Continuous Arterial Infusion and Systemic Chemotherapy in Advanced Pancreatic Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Osama Tamura, Yoshitaka; Nakasone, Yutaka; Shiraishi, Shinya; Kawanaka, Kouichi; Tomiguchi, Seiji; Yamashita, Yasuyuki; Takamori, Hiroshi; Kanemitsu, Keiichiro; Baba, Hideo

    2007-09-15

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to compare intrahepatic and pancreatic perfusion on fusion images using a combined single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT system and to evaluate the efficacy of combined continuous transcatheter arterial infusion (CTAI) and systemic chemotherapy in the treatment of advanced pancreatic carcinoma. Materials and Methods. CTAI was performed in 33 patients (22 men, 11 women; age range, 35-77 years; mean age, 60 years) with stage IV pancreatic cancer with liver metastasis. The reservoir was transcutaneously implanted with the help of angiography. The systemic administration of gemcitabine was combined with the infusion of 5-fluorouracil via the reservoir. In all patients we obtained fusion images using a combined SPECT/CT system. Pancreatic perfusion on fusion images was classified as perfusion presence or as perfusion absent in the pancreatic cancer. Using WHO criteria we recorded the tumor response after 3 months on multislice helical CT scans. Treatment effects were evaluated based on the pancreatic cancer, liver metastasis, and factors such as intrahepatic and pancreatic perfusion on fusion images. For statistical analysis we used the chi-square test; survival was evaluated by the Kaplan Meier method (log-rank test). Results. On fusion images, pancreatic and intrahepatic perfusion was recorded as hot spot and as homogeneous distribution, respectively, in 18 patients (55%) and as cold spot and heterogeneous distribution, respectively, in 15 (45%). Patients with hot spot in the pancreatic tumor and homogeneous distribution in the liver manifested better treatment results (p < 0.05 and p < 0.01, respectively). Patients with hot spot both in the pancreatic cancer and in the liver survived longer than those with cold spot in the pancreatic cancer and heterogeneous distribution in the liver (median {+-} SD, 16.0 {+-} 3.7 vs. 8.0 {+-} 1.4 months; p < 0.05). Conclusions. We conclude that in patients with advanced

  18. High-dose insulin therapy in beta-blocker and calcium channel-blocker poisoning.

    PubMed

    Engebretsen, Kristin M; Kaczmarek, Kathleen M; Morgan, Jenifer; Holger, Joel S

    2011-04-01

    -DOSE INSULIN. Animal models have shown high-dose insulin to be superior to calcium salts, glucagon, epinephrine, and vasopressin in terms of survival. Currently, there are no published controlled clinical trials in humans, but a review of case reports and case series supports the use of high-dose insulin as an initial therapy. HIGH-DOSE INSULIN TREATMENT PROTOCOLS. When first introduced, insulin doses were cautiously initiated at 0.5 U/kg bolus followed by a 0.5-1 U/kg/h continuous infusion due to concern for hypoglycemia and electrolyte imbalances. With increasing clinical experience and the publication of animal studies, high-dose insulin dosing recommendations have been increased to 1 U/kg insulin bolus followed by a 1-10 U/kg/h continuous infusion. Although the optimal regimen is still to be determined, bolus doses up to 10 U/kg and continuous infusions as high as 22 U/kg/h have been administered with good outcomes and minimal adverse events. ADVERSE EFFECTS OF HIGH-DOSE INSULIN. The major anticipated adverse events associated with high-dose insulin are hypoglycemia and hypokalemia. Glucose concentrations must be monitored regularly and supplementation of glucose will likely be required throughout therapy and for up to 24 h after discontinuation of high-dose insulin. The change in serum potassium concentrations reflects a shifting of potassium from the extracellular to intracellular space rather than a decrease in total body stores. CONCLUSIONS. While more clinical data are needed, animal studies and human case reports demonstrate that high-dose insulin (1-10 U/kg/hour) is a superior treatment in terms of safety and survival in both beta-blocker and calcium-channel blocker poisoning. High-dose insulin should be considered initial therapy in these poisonings.

  19. Intentional overdose with insulin glargine and insulin aspart.

    PubMed

    Tofade, Toyin S; Liles, E Allen

    2004-10-01

    Reports of intentional massive overdoses of insulin are infrequent. A review of the literature revealed no reports of overdose attempts with either insulin glargine or insulin aspart. We report the case of a 33-year-old woman without diabetes mellitus who intentionally injected herself with an overdose of both products, which belonged to her husband. She arrived at the emergency department 15 hours after her suicide attempt, which took place the night before. Her husband had checked her blood glucose level throughout the night and had given her high-carbohydrate drinks and foods. The patient had a history of obsessive-compulsive disorder, major depression, and numerous suicide attempts. She recovered from the resulting hypoglycemia after 40 hours of dextrose infusion and was transferred to a mental health facility. The main danger associated with insulin overdose is the resultant hypoglycemia and its effects on the central nervous system; hypokalemia, hypophosphatemia, and hypomagnesemia also can develop with excess insulin administration. Dextrose infusion, with liberal oral intake when possible, and monitoring for electrolyte changes, making adjustments as needed, are recommended for the treatment of intentional insulin overdose.

  20. At the same hepatic amino acid load, portal infusion of amino acids is more efficient than peripheral infusion in stimulating liver protein synthesis in the dog

    PubMed Central

    Dardevet, Dominique; Kimball, Scot R; Jefferson, Leonard S; Cherrington, Alan D; Rémond, Didier; DiCostanzo, Catherine A; Moore, Mary Courtney

    2009-01-01

    Background Hepatic glucose uptake is enhanced by portal delivery of glucose which creates a negative arterio-portal substrate gradient. Hepatic amino acid (AA) utilization may be regulated by the same phenomenon, but this has not been proven. Objective We aimed to assess hepatic AA balance and protein synthesis with or without a negative arterio-portal AA gradient. Design Somatostatin was infused IV, and insulin and glucagon were replaced intraportally at 4- and 3-fold basal rates, respectively, in 3 groups (n=9 each) of conscious dogs with catheters for hepatic balance measurement. Arterial glucose concentrations were clamped at 9 mM. An AA mixture was infused IV to maintain basal concentrations (EuAA), intraportally to mimic the post-meal AA increase (PoAA), or IV (PeAA) to match the hepatic AA load in PoAA. Protein synthesis was assessed with a primed, continuous [14C]leucine infusion. Results Net hepatic glucose uptake in PoAA was ≤50% of that in EuAA and PeAA (P<0.05). The hepatic intracellular leucine concentration was 2- to 2.5-fold greater in PoAA and PeAA than EuAA (P<0.05); net hepatic leucine uptake and 14C leucine utilization were ≈2-fold greater (P<0.05) and albumin synthesis was 30% greater (P<0.05) in PoAA than EuAA and PeAA, Phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 (downstream of the mammalian target of Rapamycin complex 1 [mTORC1]) was significantly increased in PoAA, but not PeAA, vs EuAA. Conclusions Portal, but not peripheral, AA delivery significantly enhanced hepatic protein synthesis under conditions where AA, glucose, insulin and glucagon did not differ at the liver, an effect apparently mediated by mTORC1 signalling. PMID:18842785

  1. External insulin pump treatment in the day-to-day management of diabetes: benefits and future prospectives.

    PubMed

    Hanaire, H

    2011-12-01

    The aim of diabetes treatment is to achieve tight glucose control to avoid the development of chronic diabetes complications while reducing the frequency of hypoglycaemic episodes. The main clinical indications of pump therapy in type 1 diabetes are persistently elevated HbA(1c) in spite of the best attempts of intensified insulin therapy with multiple daily injections (MDI) and/or frequent, disabling or severe hypoglycaemia. Several trials have demonstrated the superiority of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) over MDI, and highlighted the benefits of using short-acting insulin analogues. However, new MDI regimens with long-acting insulin analogues challenge insulin pump therapy in some indications, thus indicating the need for precise selection of those patients who will benefit the most from CSII. In type 2 diabetes, pump therapy may be an invaluable tool in selected patients characterized by chronic elevation of HbA(1c), obesity and high insulin requirements. In addition, in any case, specific education, training and ongoing evaluation of the benefit/risk ratio of the treatment are mandatory. Furthermore, there is continuing progress in the development of pump and catheter features, and insulin kinetics can still be improved. These technical advances are part of the work in progress towards developing closed-loop systems.

  2. Fluid infusion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Performance testing carried out in the development of the prototype zero-g fluid infusion system is described and summarized. Engineering tests were performed in the course of development, both on the original breadboard device and on the prototype system. This testing was aimed at establishing baseline system performance parameters and facilitating improvements. Acceptance testing was then performed on the prototype system to verify functional performance. Acceptance testing included a demonstration of the fluid infusion system on a laboratory animal.

  3. Effects of Intraduodenal Administration of HCl and Glucose on Circulating Immunoreactive Secretin and Insulin Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Boden, Guenther; Essa, Noorjehan; Owen, Oliver E.; Reichle, Frederick A.; Saraga, Walter

    1974-01-01

    . The metabolic clearance rate was 730±34 ml/min, volume of distribution was 17.4±0.8% of body weight, and the half-life of disappearance was 2.8±0.1 min. It could be calculated that 1.38 U/kg-h-1 of endogenous secretin was released into the peripheral circulation during the steady state period of the HCl infusion experiments. The data indicated that immunoreactive secretin was released rapidly after intestinal acidification, continued to be secreted throughout the duration of HCl infusion, and was promptly distributed in the extracellular compartment. Furthermore, they suggested that endogenously released secretin could stimulate insulin secretion. The HCl-mediated insulinogenic effect of immunoreactive secretin, however, was too weak to influence peripheral immunoreactive insulin, glucose, and free fatty acid concentrations. The failure of intraduodenal glucose to stimulate secretin release suggests that secretin is not the insulin-stimulatory factor released from the gastrointestinal tract in response to glucose. Images PMID:4815082

  4. Association between augmented renal clearance and clinical outcomes in patients receiving β-lactam antibiotic therapy by continuous or intermittent infusion: a nested cohort study of the BLING-II randomised, placebo-controlled, clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Udy, Andrew A; Dulhunty, Joel M; Roberts, Jason A; Davis, Joshua S; Webb, Steven A R; Bellomo, Rinaldo; Gomersall, Charles; Shirwadkar, Charudatt; Eastwood, Glenn M; Myburgh, John; Paterson, David L; Starr, Therese; Paul, Sanjoy K; Lipman, Jeffrey

    2017-03-09

    Augmented renal clearance (ARC) is known to influence β-lactam antibiotic pharmacokinetics. This substudy of the BLING-II trial aimed to explore the association between ARC and patient outcomes in a large randomised clinical trial. BLING-II enrolled 432 participants with severe sepsis randomised to receive β-lactam therapy by continuous or intermittent infusion. An 8-h creatinine clearance (CLCr) measured on Day 1 was used to identify ARC, defined as CLCr ≥ 130 mL/min. Patients receiving any form of renal replacement therapy were excluded. Primary outcome was alive ICU-free days at Day 28. Secondary outcomes included 90-day mortality and clinical cure at 14 days following antibiotic cessation. A total of 254 patients were included, among which 45 (17.7%) manifested ARC [median (IQR) CLCr 165 (144-198) mL/min]. ARC patients were younger (P <0.001), more commonly male (P = 0.04) and had less organ dysfunction (P <0.001). There was no difference in ICU-free days at Day 28 [ARC, 21 (12-24) days; no ARC, 21 (11-25) days; P = 0.89], although clinical cure was significantly greater in the unadjusted analysis in those manifesting ARC [33/45 (73.3%) vs. 115/209 (55.0%) P = 0.02]. This was attenuated in the multivariable analysis. No difference was noted in 90-day mortality. There were no statistically significant differences in clinical outcomes in ARC patients according to the dosing strategy employed. In this substudy of a large clinical trial of β-lactam antibiotics in severe sepsis, ARC was not associated with any differences in outcomes, regardless of dosing strategy.

  5. Insulin signaling and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Beale, Elmus G

    2013-01-01

    Insulin resistance or its sequelae may be the common etiology of maladies associated with metabolic syndrome (eg, hypertension, type 2 diabetes, atherosclerosis, heart attack, stroke, and kidney failure). It is thus important to understand those factors that affect insulin sensitivity. This review stems from the surprising discovery that interference with angiotensin signaling improves insulin sensitivity, and it provides a general overview of insulin action and factors that control insulin sensitivity.

  6. 21 CFR 870.1800 - Withdrawal-infusion pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Withdrawal-infusion pump. 870.1800 Section 870.1800 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... pump. (a) Identification. A withdrawal-infusion pump is a device designed to inject accurately...

  7. 21 CFR 870.1800 - Withdrawal-infusion pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Withdrawal-infusion pump. 870.1800 Section 870.1800 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... pump. (a) Identification. A withdrawal-infusion pump is a device designed to inject accurately...

  8. 21 CFR 870.1800 - Withdrawal-infusion pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Withdrawal-infusion pump. 870.1800 Section 870.1800 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... pump. (a) Identification. A withdrawal-infusion pump is a device designed to inject accurately...

  9. 21 CFR 870.1800 - Withdrawal-infusion pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Withdrawal-infusion pump. 870.1800 Section 870.1800 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... pump. (a) Identification. A withdrawal-infusion pump is a device designed to inject accurately...

  10. 21 CFR 870.1800 - Withdrawal-infusion pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Withdrawal-infusion pump. 870.1800 Section 870.1800 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... pump. (a) Identification. A withdrawal-infusion pump is a device designed to inject accurately...

  11. Fluid infusion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammond, J. C.

    1975-01-01

    Development of a fluid infusion system was undertaken in response to a need for an intravenous infusion device operable under conditions of zero-g. The initial design approach, pursued in the construction of the first breadboard instrument, was to regulate the pressure of the motive gas to produce a similar regulated pressure in the infusion liquid. This scheme was not workable because of the varying bag contact area, and a major design iteration was made. A floating sensor plate in the center of the bag pressure plate was made to operate a pressure regulator built into the bellows assembly, effectively making liquid pressure the directly controlled variable. Other design changes were made as experience was gained with the breadboard. Extensive performance tests were conducted on both the breadboard and the prototype device; accurately regulated flows from 6 m1/min to 100 m1/min were achieved. All system functions were shown to operate satisfactorily.

  12. Insulin Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... ovarian syndrome (PCOS) , prediabetes or heart disease , or metabolic syndrome . A health practitioner also may order insulin and ... such as appears in type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome Decreased insulin levels are seen with: Diabetes Hypopituitarism ...

  13. 21 CFR 880.6990 - Infusion stand.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Infusion stand. 880.6990 Section 880.6990 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL HOSPITAL AND PERSONAL USE DEVICES General Hospital and Personal Use Miscellaneous Devices §...

  14. 21 CFR 880.6990 - Infusion stand.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Infusion stand. 880.6990 Section 880.6990 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL HOSPITAL AND PERSONAL USE DEVICES General Hospital and Personal Use Miscellaneous Devices §...

  15. Efficacy and safety of switching to insulin glulisine from other rapid-acting insulin analogs in children with type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Urakami, Tatsuhiko; Kuwabara, Remi; Habu, Masako; Okuno, Misako; Suzuki, Junichi; Takahashi, Shori

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the efficacy and safety of switching to insulin glulisine (GLU) from other rapid-acting insulin analogs (Ra) in children with type 1 diabetes treated with multiple daily injections of insulin or continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion. A total of 26 children with type 1 diabetes were included. Ra in all of these patients was changed to GLU, and they were observed for a 6-month period after having previously finished treatment with other Ra. The mean glycated hemoglobin value decreased from 7.6 ± 1.0 to 7.4 ± 0.9% (P = 0.0034), and mean plasma glucose values after breakfast and supper also improved from 183 ± 50 to 153 ± 32 mg/dL (P = 0.0035), and from 203 ± 29 to 164 ± 23 mg/dL (P < 0.0001), respectively. Furthermore, the mean frequency of hypoglycemia was reduced from 7 ± 6 to 4 ± 4/month (P = 0.0004), while insulin doses and obesity degree were stable with statistically non-significant differences. In conclusion, switching to GLU might be a good treatment option for improving glycemic control in children with type 1 diabetes. PMID:25621137

  16. A Novel Insulin/Glucose Model after a Mixed-Meal Test in Patients with Type 1 Diabetes on Insulin Pump Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Marchetti, Luca; Reali, Federico; Dauriz, Marco; Brangani, Corinna; Boselli, Linda; Ceradini, Giulia; Bonora, Enzo; Bonadonna, Riccardo C.; Priami, Corrado

    2016-01-01

    Current closed-loop insulin delivery methods stem from sophisticated models of the glucose-insulin (G/I) system, mostly based on complex studies employing glucose tracer technology. We tested the performance of a new minimal model (GLUKINSLOOP 2.0) of the G/I system to characterize the glucose and insulin dynamics during multiple mixed meal tests (MMT) of different sizes in patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D) on insulin pump therapy (continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion, CSII). The GLUKINSLOOP 2.0 identified the G/I system, provided a close fit of the G/I time-courses and showed acceptable reproducibility of the G/I system parameters in repeated studies of identical and double-sized MMTs. This model can provide a fairly good and reproducible description of the G/I system in T1D patients on CSII, and it may be applied to create a bank of “virtual” patients. Our results might be relevant at improving the architecture of upcoming closed-loop CSII systems. PMID:27824066

  17. Insulin Resistance, Defective Insulin-Mediated Fatty Acid Suppression, and Coronary Artery Calcification in Subjects With and Without Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Schauer, Irene E.; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K.; Bergman, Bryan C.; Maahs, David M.; Kretowski, Adam; Eckel, Robert H.; Rewers, Marian

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess insulin action on peripheral glucose utilization and nonesterified fatty acid (NEFA) suppression as a predictor of coronary artery calcification (CAC) in patients with type 1 diabetes and nondiabetic controls. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Insulin action was measured by a three-stage hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp (4, 8, and 40 mU/m2/min) in 87 subjects from the Coronary Artery Calcification in Type 1 Diabetes cohort (40 diabetic, 47 nondiabetic; mean age 45 ± 8 years; 55% female). RESULTS Peripheral glucose utilization was lower in subjects with type 1 diabetes compared with nondiabetic controls: glucose infusion rate (mg/kg FFM/min) = 6.19 ± 0.72 vs. 12.71 ± 0.66, mean ± SE, P < 0.0001, after adjustment for age, sex, BMI, fasting glucose, and final clamp glucose and insulin. Insulin-induced NEFA suppression was also lower in type 1 diabetic compared with nondiabetic subjects: NEFA levels (μM) during 8 mU/m2/min insulin infusion = 370 ± 27 vs. 185 ± 25, P < 0.0001, after adjustment for age, sex, BMI, fasting glucose, and time point insulin. Lower glucose utilization and higher NEFA levels, correlated with CAC volume (r = −0.42, P < 0.0001 and r = 0.41, P < 0.0001, respectively) and predicted the presence of CAC (odds ratio [OR] = 0.45, 95% CI = 0.22–0.93, P = 0.03; OR = 2.4, 95% CI = 1.08–5.32, P = 0.032, respectively). Insulin resistance did not correlate with GHb or continuous glucose monitoring parameters. CONCLUSIONS Type 1 diabetic patients are insulin resistant compared with nondiabetic subjects, and the degree of resistance is not related to current glycemic control. Insulin resistance predicts the extent of coronary artery calcification and may contribute to the increased risk of cardiovascular disease in patients with type 1 diabetes as well as subjects without diabetes. PMID:20978091

  18. Moving Toward a Unified Platform for Insulin Delivery and Sensing of Inputs Relevant to an Artificial Pancreas.

    PubMed

    Graf, Anneke; McAuley, Sybil A; Sims, Catriona; Ulloa, Johanna; Jenkins, Alicia J; Voskanyan, Gayane; O'Neal, David N

    2017-03-01

    Advances in insulin pump and continuous glucose monitoring technology have primarily focused on optimizing glycemic control for people with type 1 diabetes. There remains a need to identify ways to minimize the physical burden of this technology. A unified platform with closely positioned or colocalized interstitial fluid glucose sensing and hormone delivery components is a potential solution. Present challenges to combining these components are interference of glucose sensing from proximate insulin delivery and the large discrepancy between the life span of current insulin infusion sets and glucose sensors. Addressing these concerns is of importance given that the future physical burden of this technology is likely to be even greater with the ongoing development of the artificial pancreas, potentially incorporating multiple hormone delivery, glucose sensing redundancy, and sensing of other clinically relevant nonglucose biochemical inputs.

  19. Comparative effects of continuous infusion of mCPP, Ro 60-0175 and d-fenfluramine on food intake, water intake, body weight and locomotor activity in rats.

    PubMed

    Vickers, S P; Benwell, K R; Porter, R H; Bickerdike, M J; Kennett, G A; Dourish, C T

    2000-07-01

    1. The aim of the study was to compare the effects of 14 day subcutaneous infusion of the 5-HT(2C) receptor agonists, m-chlorophenylpiperazine (mCPP, 12 mg kg(-1) day(-1)) and Ro 60-0175 (36 mg kg(-1) day(-1)) and the 5-HT releasing agent and re-uptake inhibitor, d-fenfluramine (6 mg kg(-1) day(-1)), on food and water intake, body weight gain and locomotion in lean male Lister hooded rats. 2. Chronic infusion of all three drugs significantly reduced food intake and attenuated body weight gain. In contrast, drug infusion did not lead to significant reductions in locomotor activity in animals assessed 2 and 13 days after pump implantation. 3. In a subsequent 14 day study that was designed to identify possible tolerance during days 7 - 14, animals were given a subcutaneous infusion of mCPP (12 mg kg(-1) day(-1)) or d-fenfluramine (6 mg kg(-1) day(-1)) for either 7 or 14 days. During the first 7 days both drugs significantly reduced body weight gain compared to saline-infused controls; however, from day 7 onwards animals withdrawn from drug treatment exhibited an increase in body weight such that by day 14 they were significantly heavier than their 14-day drug-treated counterparts. 4. Both mCPP and d-fenfluramine reduced daily food intake throughout the infusion periods. For 14-day treated animals this hypophagia was marked during the initial week of the study but only minor during the second week. In light of the sustained drug effect on body weight, the data suggest that weight loss by 5-HT(2C) receptor stimulation may be only partly dependent on changes in food consumption and that 5-HT(2C) receptor agonists may have effects on thermogenesis. 5. These data suggest tolerance does not develop to the effects of d-fenfluramine, mCPP and Ro 60-0175 on rat body weight gain.

  20. Obesity/insulin resistance is associated with endothelial dysfunction. Implications for the syndrome of insulin resistance.

    PubMed Central

    Steinberg, H O; Chaker, H; Leaming, R; Johnson, A; Brechtel, G; Baron, A D

    1996-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that obesity/insulin resistance impairs both endothelium-dependent vasodilation and insulin-mediated augmentation of endothelium-dependent vasodilation, we studied leg blood flow (LBF) responses to graded intrafemoral artery infusions of methacholine chloride (MCh) or sodium nitroprusside (SNP) during saline infusion and euglycemic hyperinsulinemia in lean insulin-sensitive controls (C), in obese insulin-resistant subjects (OB), and in subjects with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). MCh induced increments in LBF were approximately 40% and 55% lower in OB and NIDDM, respectively, as compared with C (P < 0.05). Euglycemic hyperinsulinemia augmented the LBF response to MCh by - 50% in C (P < 0.05 vs saline) but not in OB and NIDDM. SNP caused comparable increments in LBF in all groups. Regression analysis revealed a significant inverse correlation between the maximal LBF change in response to MCh and body fat content. Thus, obesity/insulin resistance is associated with (a) blunted endothelium-dependent, but normal endothelium-independent vasodilation and (b) failure of euglycemic hyperinsulinemia to augment endothelium-dependent vasodilation. Therefore, obese/insulin-resistant subjects are characterized by endothelial dysfunction and endothelial resistance to insulin's effect on enhancement of endothelium-dependent vasodilation. This endothelial dysfunction could contribute to the increased risk of atherosclerosis in obese insulin-resistant subjects. PMID:8647954

  1. Insulin delivery route for the artificial pancreas: subcutaneous, intraperitoneal, or intravenous? Pros and cons.

    PubMed

    Renard, Eric

    2008-07-01

    Insulin delivery is a crucial component of a closed-loop system aiming at the development of an artificial pancreas. The intravenous route, which has been used in the bedside artificial pancreas model for 30 years, has clear advantages in terms of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, but cannot be used in any ambulatory system so far. Subcutaneous (SC) insulin infusion benefits from the broad expansion of insulin pump therapy that promoted the availability of constantly improving technology and fast-acting insulin analog use. However, persistent delays of insulin absorption and action, variability and shortterm stability of insulin infusion from SC-inserted catheters generate effectiveness and safety issues in view of an ambulatory, automated, glucose-controlled, artificial beta cell. Intraperitoneal insulin delivery, although still marginally used in diabetes care, may offer an interesting alternative because of its more-physiological plasma insulin profiles and sustained stability and reliability of insulin delivery.

  2. Continuous fat oxidation in acetyl–CoA carboxylase 2 knockout mice increases total energy expenditure, reduces fat mass, and improves insulin sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Cheol Soo; Savage, David B.; Abu-Elheiga, Lutfi; Liu, Zhen-Xiang; Kim, Sheene; Kulkarni, Ameya; Distefano, Alberto; Hwang, Yu-Jin; Reznick, Richard M.; Codella, Roberto; Zhang, Dongyan; Cline, Gary W.; Wakil, Salih J.; Shulman, Gerald I.

    2007-01-01

    Acetyl–CoA carboxylase 2 (ACC)2 is a key regulator of mitochondrial fat oxidation. To examine the impact of ACC2 deletion on whole-body energy metabolism, we measured changes in substrate oxidation and total energy expenditure in Acc2−/− and WT control mice fed either regular or high-fat diets. To determine insulin action in vivo, we also measured whole-body insulin-stimulated liver and muscle glucose metabolism during a hyperinsulinemic–euglycemic clamp in Acc2−/− and WT control mice fed a high-fat diet. Contrary to previous studies that have suggested that increased fat oxidation might result in lower glucose oxidation, both fat and carbohydrate oxidation were simultaneously increased in Acc2−/− mice. This increase in both fat and carbohydrate oxidation resulted in an increase in total energy expenditure, reductions in fat and lean body mass and prevention from diet-induced obesity. Furthermore, Acc2−/− mice were protected from fat-induced peripheral and hepatic insulin resistance. These improvements in insulin-stimulated glucose metabolism were associated with reduced diacylglycerol content in muscle and liver, decreased PKCθ activity in muscle and PKCε activity in liver, and increased insulin-stimulated Akt2 activity in these tissues. Taken together with previous work demonstrating that Acc2−/− mice have a normal lifespan, these data suggest that Acc2 inhibition is a viable therapeutic option for the treatment of obesity and type 2 diabetes. PMID:17923673

  3. Intrahippocampal Insulin Improves Memory in a Passive-Avoidance Task in Male Wistar Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babri, Shirin; Badie, Hamid Gholamipour; Khamenei, Saeed; Seyedlar, Mehdi Ordikhani

    2007-01-01

    The main impacts of insulin favor the peripheral organs. Although it functions as a neuropeptide, insulin possesses also some central effects. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of intrahippocampal infusion of insulin on passive avoidance learning in healthy male rats. Thirty male wistar rats were divided into three groups (n = 10…

  4. Insulin allergy.

    PubMed

    Ghazavi, Mohammad K; Johnston, Graham A

    2011-01-01

    Insulin reactions occur rarely but are of tremendous clinical importance. The first was reported in 1922 as a callus reaction at the injection site of insufficiently purified bovine insulin. Porcine insulin was subsequently found to be less allergenic than bovine insulin. Increasingly pure insulins have decreased the risk of adverse reactions, and the production of recombinant insulin with the same amino sequence as human insulin saw a large decrease in adverse reactions. Currently, the prevalence of allergic reactions to insulin products appears to be approximately 2%, and less than one-third of these events have been considered related to the insulin itself. Other reactions occur due to the preservatives added to insulin, including zinc, protamine, and meta-cresol. Allergic reactions can be type I or immunoglobulin E-mediated, type III or Arthus, and type IV or delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions. Type I reactions are the most common and can, rarely, cause anaphylaxis. In contrast, type IV reactions can occur after a delay of several days. Investigations include skin prick testing, patch testing, intradermal testing, and occasionally, skin biopsy.

  5. [The effect of nerobol and ecdysterone on insulin-dependent processes linked normally and in insulin resistance].

    PubMed

    Kosovskiĭ, M I; Syrov, V N; Mirakhmedov, M M; Katkova, S P; Khushbaktova, Z A

    1989-01-01

    The effect of substances with anabolic activity (metandienone and ecdysterone phytoecdysteroid) on the manifestation of insulin effects was studied on a model of insulin resistance in rats induced by injections of hydrocortisone or by insulin insufficiency caused by alloxan. The sensitivity of the body to i. v. infusion of insulin and the reactivity of isolated fatty tissue to the hormone were increased after administration of these substances to test animals. The above effects of steroids were determined by nonspecific synthesis of total proteins in cells rather than by an increase in insulin secretion.

  6. [The effect of air within the infusion syringe on drug delivery of syringe pump infusion systems] .

    PubMed

    Schulz, G; Fischer, J; Neff, T; Bänziger, O; Weiss, M

    2000-12-01

    Application of highly concentrated short-acting vasoactive drugs in the critically ill patient requires precisely working syringe pump systems for continuous intravenous drug delivery. We performed a bench study to investigate the consequences of small amounts of air entrapped within a 50-ml infusion syringe. In particular we studied the effect of entrapped air on drug delivery after moderate vertical displacement of the pump by 50 cm (e.g. in preparation for transport) and the effect on the time required to trigger the pressure alarm after occlusion of the infusion line. At a flow rate of 1 ml/h, lowering the syringe pump prolonged the zero-drug delivery time from (mean +/- SD) 4.1 +/- 0.8 min (without air) to 6.2 +/- 0.9 (with 1 ml air) and to 13.1 +/- 0.9 min (with 2 ml of air, p < 0.001 for all comparisons). Entrapping of 2 ml of air within the syringe resulted in a 2.6-fold prolongation of the occlusion alarm time after accidental occlusion of the infusion line and a 3-fold increase of the resulting infusion bolus after occlusion. Enclosed air within infusion syringes considerably affects the syringe compliance. It increases the susceptibility of constant drug delivery to vertical displacement of syringe pumps and impairs the occlusion alarm function. Therefore, any air in syringe of infusion pump systems should be carefully removed. To avoid infusion boluses of short-acting vasoactive drugs after accidental occlusions, the occluded infusion line should be released to ambient pressure first.

  7. Hepatic Artery Infusion Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Schüller, J.; Kroiss, A.; Dinstl, K.

    1990-01-01

    Hepatic artery chemotherapy was given to 36 patients, using totally implantable devices consisting of a port and external pump. Twenty-seven patients had inoperable liver metastases of colorectal origin. The infusion system was inserted by laparotomy into the hepatic artery via the gastroduodenal artery. There was no operative mortality. Thirteen infusion systems could not be used for chemotherapy due to dislodgement, early death and lack of follow-up. FUdR was infused every two weeks. There were minor local complications like thrombosis of the system and dislodgement of the port. Toxic effects could be managed by reducing the dose. Response to chemotherapy was evaluated by survival, clinical condition, CEA, ultrasound and CT six months after onset of arterial chemotherapy. Ten/twenty-three patients (43%) responded to therapy, eight of them died on the average 19 months after initial chemotherapy. Six patients were non-responders, seven had stable disease. Five/ten patients developed extrahepatic metastases. Mean survival time was 13.1 months, mean interval until relapse 10.6 months. PMID:2149279

  8. Comparison of effects of amphotericin B deoxycholate infused over 4 or 24 hours: randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Eriksson, Urs; Seifert, Burkhard; Schaffner, Andreas

    2001-01-01

    Objective To test the hypothesis that amphotericin B deoxycholate is less toxic when given by continuous infusion than by conventional rapid infusion. Design Randomised, controlled, non-blinded, single centre study. Setting University hospital providing tertiary clinical care. Patients 80 mostly neutropenic patients with refractory fever and suspected or proved invasive fungal infections. Intervention Patients were randomised to receive 0.97 mg/kg amphotericin B by continuous infusion over 24 hours or 0.95 mg/kg by rapid infusion over four hours. Main outcome measures Patients were evaluated for side effects related to infusion, nephrotoxicity, and mortality up to three months after treatment. Analysis was on an intention to treat basis. Results Patients in the continuous infusion group had fewer side effects and significantly reduced nephrotoxicity than those in the rapid infusion group. Overall mortality was higher during treatment and after three months' follow up in the rapid infusion than in the continuous infusion group. Conclusion Continuous infusions of amphotericin B reduce nephrotoxicity and side effects related to infusion without increasing mortality. PMID:11238151

  9. Insulin pump risks and benefits: a clinical appraisal of pump safety standards, adverse event reporting, and research needs: a joint statement of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes and the American Diabetes Association Diabetes Technology Working Group.

    PubMed

    Heinemann, Lutz; Fleming, G Alexander; Petrie, John R; Holl, Reinhard W; Bergenstal, Richard M; Peters, Anne L

    2015-04-01

    Insulin pump therapy, also known as continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII), is an important and evolving form of insulin delivery, which is mainly used for people with type 1 diabetes. However, even with modern insulin pumps, errors of insulin infusion can occur due to pump failure, insulin infusion set (IIS) blockage, infusion site problems, insulin stability issues, user error, or a combination of these. Users are therefore exposed to significant and potentially fatal hazards: interruption of insulin infusion can result in hyperglycemia and ketoacidosis; conversely, delivery of excessive insulin can cause severe hypoglycemia. Nevertheless, the available evidence on the safety and efficacy of CSII remains limited. The European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) and the American Diabetes Association (ADA) have therefore joined forces to review the systems in place for evaluating the safety of pumps from a clinical perspective. We found that useful information held by the manufacturing companies is not currently shared in a sufficiently transparent manner. Public availability of adverse event (AE) reports on the US Food and Drug Administration's Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience (MAUDE) database is potentially a rich source of safety information but is insufficiently utilized due to the current configuration of the system; the comparable database in Europe (European Databank on Medical Devices [EUDAMED]) is not publicly accessible. Many AEs appear to be attributable to human factors and/or user error, but the extent to which manufacturing companies are required by regulators to consider the interactions of users with the technical features of their products is limited. The clinical studies required by regulators prior to marketing are small and over-reliant on bench testing in relation to "predicate" products. Once a pump is available on the market, insufficient data are made publicly available on its long-term use in a real

  10. Insulin pump risks and benefits: a clinical appraisal of pump safety standards, adverse event reporting and research needs. A joint statement of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes and the American Diabetes Association Diabetes Technology Working Group.

    PubMed

    Heinemann, Lutz; Fleming, G Alexander; Petrie, John R; Holl, Reinhard W; Bergenstal, Richard M; Peters, Anne L

    2015-05-01

    Insulin pump therapy, also known as continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII), is an important and evolving form of insulin delivery, which is mainly used for people with type 1 diabetes. However, even with modern insulin pumps, errors of insulin infusion can occur due to pump failure, insulin infusion set (IIS) blockage, infusion site problems, insulin stability issues, user error or a combination of these. Users are therefore exposed to significant and potentially fatal hazards: interruption of insulin infusion can result in hyperglycaemia and ketoacidosis; conversely, delivery of excessive insulin can cause severe hypoglycaemia. Nevertheless, the available evidence on the safety and efficacy of CSII remains limited. The European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) and American Diabetes Association (ADA) have therefore joined forces to review the systems in place for evaluating the safety of pumps from a clinical perspective. We found that useful information held by the manufacturing companies is not currently shared in a sufficiently transparent manner. Public availability of adverse event (AE) reports on the US Food and Drug Administration's Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience (MAUDE) database is potentially a rich source of safety information but is insufficiently utilised due to the current configuration of the system; the comparable database in Europe (European Databank on Medical Devices, EUDAMED) is not publicly accessible. Many AEs appear to be attributable to human factors and/or user error, but the extent to which manufacturing companies are required by regulators to consider the interactions of users with the technical features of their products is limited. The clinical studies required by regulators prior to marketing are small and over-reliant on bench testing in relation to 'predicate' products. Once a pump is available on the market, insufficient data are made publicly available on its long-term use in a real

  11. Scalable fabrication of size-controlled chitosan nanoparticles for oral delivery of insulin.

    PubMed

    He, Zhiyu; Santos, Jose Luis; Tian, Houkuan; Huang, Huahua; Hu, Yizong; Liu, Lixin; Leong, Kam W; Chen, Yongming; Mao, Hai-Quan

    2017-06-01

    Controlled delivery of protein would find diverse therapeutic applications. Formulation of protein nanoparticles by polyelectrolyte complexation between the protein and a natural polymer such as chitosan (CS) is a popular approach. However, the current method of batch-mode mixing faces significant challenges in scaling up while maintaining size control, high uniformity, and high encapsulation efficiency. Here we report a new method, termed flash nanocomplexation (FNC), to fabricate insulin nanoparticles by infusing aqueous solutions of CS, tripolyphosphate (TPP), and insulin under rapid mixing condition (Re > 1600) in a multi-inlet vortex mixer. In comparison with the bulk-mixing method, the optimized FNC process produces CS/TPP/insulin nanoparticles with a smaller size (down to 45 nm) and narrower size distribution, higher encapsulation efficiency (up to 90%), and pH-dependent nanoparticle dissolution and insulin release. The CS/TPP/insulin nanoparticles can be lyophilized and reconstituted without loss of activity, and produced at a throughput of 5.1 g h(-1) when a flow rate of 50 mL min(-1) is used. Evaluated in a Type I diabetes rat model, the smaller nanoparticles (45 nm and 115 nm) control the blood glucose level through oral administration more effectively than the larger particles (240 nm). This efficient, reproducible and continuous FNC technique is amenable to scale-up in order to address the critical barrier of manufacturing for the translation of protein nanoparticles.

  12. Brain glucagon-like peptide–1 increases insulin secretion and muscle insulin resistance to favor hepatic glycogen storage

    PubMed Central

    Knauf, Claude; Cani, Patrice D.; Perrin, Christophe; Iglesias, Miguel A.; Maury, Jean François; Bernard, Elodie; Benhamed, Fadilha; Grémeaux, Thierry; Drucker, Daniel J.; Kahn, C. Ronald; Girard, Jean; Tanti, Jean François; Delzenne, Nathalie M.; Postic, Catherine; Burcelin, Rémy

    2005-01-01

    Intestinal glucagon-like peptide–1 (GLP-1) is a hormone released into the hepatoportal circulation that stimulates pancreatic insulin secretion. GLP-1 also acts as a neuropeptide to control food intake and cardiovascular functions, but its neural role in glucose homeostasis is unknown. We show that brain GLP-1 controlled whole-body glucose fate during hyperglycemic conditions. In mice undergoing a hyperglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp, icv administration of the specific GLP-1 receptor antagonist exendin 9–39 (Ex9) increased muscle glucose utilization and glycogen content. This effect did not require muscle insulin action, as it also occurred in muscle insulin receptor KO mice. Conversely, icv infusion of the GLP-1 receptor agonist exendin 4 (Ex4) reduced insulin-stimulated muscle glucose utilization. In hyperglycemia achieved by i.v. infusion of glucose, icv Ex4, but not Ex9, caused a 4-fold increase in insulin secretion and enhanced liver glycogen storage. However, when glucose was infused intragastrically, icv Ex9 infusion lowered insulin secretion and hepatic glycogen levels, whereas no effects of icv Ex4 were observed. In diabetic mice fed a high-fat diet, a 1-month chronic i.p. Ex9 treatment improved glucose tolerance and fasting glycemia. Our data show that during hyperglycemia, brain GLP-1 inhibited muscle glucose utilization and increased insulin secretion to favor hepatic glycogen stores, preparing efficiently for the next fasting state. PMID:16322793

  13. Brain glucagon-like peptide-1 increases insulin secretion and muscle insulin resistance to favor hepatic glycogen storage.

    PubMed

    Knauf, Claude; Cani, Patrice D; Perrin, Christophe; Iglesias, Miguel A; Maury, Jean François; Bernard, Elodie; Benhamed, Fadilha; Grémeaux, Thierry; Drucker, Daniel J; Kahn, C Ronald; Girard, Jean; Tanti, Jean François; Delzenne, Nathalie M; Postic, Catherine; Burcelin, Rémy

    2005-12-01

    Intestinal glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is a hormone released into the hepatoportal circulation that stimulates pancreatic insulin secretion. GLP-1 also acts as a neuropeptide to control food intake and cardiovascular functions, but its neural role in glucose homeostasis is unknown. We show that brain GLP-1 controlled whole-body glucose fate during hyperglycemic conditions. In mice undergoing a hyperglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp, icv administration of the specific GLP-1 receptor antagonist exendin 9-39 (Ex9) increased muscle glucose utilization and glycogen content. This effect did not require muscle insulin action, as it also occurred in muscle insulin receptor KO mice. Conversely, icv infusion of the GLP-1 receptor agonist exendin 4 (Ex4) reduced insulin-stimulated muscle glucose utilization. In hyperglycemia achieved by i.v. infusion of glucose, icv Ex4, but not Ex9, caused a 4-fold increase in insulin secretion and enhanced liver glycogen storage. However, when glucose was infused intragastrically, icv Ex9 infusion lowered insulin secretion and hepatic glycogen levels, whereas no effects of icv Ex4 were observed. In diabetic mice fed a high-fat diet, a 1-month chronic i.p. Ex9 treatment improved glucose tolerance and fasting glycemia. Our data show that during hyperglycemia, brain GLP-1 inhibited muscle glucose utilization and increased insulin secretion to favor hepatic glycogen stores, preparing efficiently for the next fasting state.

  14. Mathematical model of glucose-insulin homeostasis in healthy rats.

    PubMed

    Lombarte, Mercedes; Lupo, Maela; Campetelli, German; Basualdo, Marta; Rigalli, Alfredo

    2013-10-01

    According to the World Health Organization there are over 220 million people in the world with diabetes and 3.4 million people died in 2004 as a consequence of this pathology. Development of an artificial pancreas would allow to restore control of blood glucose by coupling an infusion pump to a continuous glucose sensor in the blood. The design of such a device requires the development and application of mathematical models which represent the gluco-regulatory system. Models developed by other research groups describe very well the gluco-regulatory system but have a large number of mathematical equations and require complex methodologies for the estimation of its parameters. In this work we propose a mathematical model to study the homeostasis of glucose and insulin in healthy rats. The proposed model consists of three differential equations and 8 parameters that describe the variation of: blood glucose concentration, blood insulin concentration and amount of glucose in the intestine. All parameters were obtained by setting functions to the values of glucose and insulin in blood obtained after oral glucose administration. In vivo and in silico validations were performed. Additionally, a qualitative analysis has been done to verify the aforementioned model. We have shown that this model has a single, biologically consistent equilibrium point. This model is a first step in the development of a mathematical model for the type I diabetic rat.

  15. Angiotensin II induces differential insulin action in rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Surapongchai, Juthamard; Prasannarong, Mujalin; Bupha-Intr, Tepmanas; Saengsirisuwan, Vitoon

    2017-03-01

    Angiotensin II (ANGII) is reportedly involved in the development of skeletal muscle insulin resistance. The present investigation evaluated the effects of two ANGII doses on the phenotypic characteristics of insulin resistance syndrome and insulin action and signaling in rat skeletal muscle. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were infused with either saline (SHAM) or ANGII at a commonly used pressor dose (100 ng/kg/min; ANGII-100) or a higher pressor dose (500 ng/kg/min; ANGII-500) via osmotic minipumps for 14 days. We demonstrated that ANGII-100-infused rats exhibited the phenotypic features of non-obese insulin resistance syndrome, including hypertension, impaired glucose tolerance and insulin resistance of glucose uptake in the soleus muscle, whereas ANGII-500-treated rats exhibited diabetes-like symptoms, such as post-prandial hyperglycemia, impaired insulin secretion and hypertriglyceridemia. At the cellular level, insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in the soleus muscle of the ANGII-100 group was 33% lower (P < 0.05) than that in the SHAM group and was associated with increased insulin-stimulated IRS-1 Ser(307) and decreased Akt Ser(473) and AS160 Thr(642) phosphorylation and GLUT-4 expression. However, ANGII-500 infusion did not induce skeletal muscle insulin resistance or impair insulin signaling elements as initially anticipated. Moreover, we found that insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in the ANGII-500 group was accompanied by the enhanced expression of ACE2 and MasR proteins, which are the key elements in the non-classical pathway of the renin-angiotensin system. Collectively, this study demonstrates for the first time that chronic infusion with these two pressor doses of ANGII induced differential metabolic responses at both the systemic and skeletal muscle levels.

  16. Glucose intolerance in uremic patients: the relative contributions of impaired beta-cell function and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Alvestrand, A; Mujagic, M; Wajngot, A; Efendic, S

    1989-04-01

    Glucose tolerance and tissue sensitivity to insulin were examined in 19 renal failure patients on chronic regular hemodialysis (group U) and in 6 matched control subjects with normal renal function (group A). Based on glucose tolerance as assessed by an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), glucose tolerance was normal in 5 (group U:N), borderline in 5 (group U:BL) and decreased in 9 uremic subjects (group U:D). Compared with group A the uremics demonstrated significantly (p less than 0.01) impaired insulin sensitivity as assessed by a continuous mixed infusion of somatostatin, insulin and glucose (SIGIT). In addition 19 non-diabetic subjects with normal fasting blood glucose and normal renal function, matching the uremic patients with respect to glucose tolerance as assessed by OGTT, were studied (group B). In group B impairments in both insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity tended to be more pronounced in subjects with decreased OGTT as compared with those with borderline OGTT. In contrast, insulin resistance was present to a similar degree in uremic subjects of group U:N, U:BL and U:D. During SIGIT endogenous insulin, glucagon and growth hormone (GH) were suppressed in both uremic and control subjects. This implies that insulin resistance in uremia is most likely not due to hyperglucagonemia or abnormal GH metabolism. During OGTT subjects of group U:N had significantly higher insulin response than subjects of group U:BL (p less than 0.02) and group U:D (p less than 0.01). Insulinogenic index was significantly higher in group U:N than in group U:BL (p less than 0.02) and group U:D (p = 0.01) and was higher in group U:BL than in group U:D (p less than 0.02).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Multiple Intravenous Infusions Phase 2a: Ontario Survey

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Mark; Koczmara, Christine; Masino, Caterina; Cassano-Piché, Andrea; Trbovich, Patricia; Easty, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    Background Research conducted in earlier phases of this study prospectively identified a number of concerns related to the safe administration of multiple intravenous (IV) infusions in Ontario hospitals. Objective To investigate the potential prevalence of practices or policies that may contribute to the patient safety risks identified in Phase 1b of this study. Data Sources and Review Methods Sixty-four survey responses were analyzed from clinical units where multiple IV infusions may occur (e.g., adult intensive care units). Survey questions were organized according to the topics identified in Phase 1b as potential contributors to patient harm (e.g., labelling practices, patient transfer practices, secondary infusion policies). Results Survey results indicated suboptimal practices and policies in some clinical units, and variability in a number of infusion practices. Key areas of concern included the following: use of primary IV tubing without back check valves when administering secondary infusions administration of secondary infusions with/as high-alert continuous IV medications potential confusion about how IV tubing should be labelled to reflect replacement date and time interruptions to IV therapy due to IV pump and/or tubing changes when patients are transferred between clinical units coadministration of continuous or intermittent infusions on central venous pressure monitoring ports variability in respondents’ awareness of the infusion pump's bolus capabilities Limitations Due to the limited sample size, survey responses may not be representative of infusion practices across Ontario. Answers to some questions indicated that the intent of the questions might have been misunderstood. Due to a design error, 1 question about bolus administration methods was not shown to as many respondents as appropriate. Conclusions The Ontario survey revealed variability in IV infusion practice across the province and potential opportunities to improve safety. PMID

  18. 48-h glucose infusion in humans: effect on hormonal responses, hunger and food intake.

    PubMed

    Teff, Karen L; Petrova, Maja; Havel, Peter J; Townsend, Raymond R

    2007-04-23

    Experimentally-induced hyperglycemia by prolonged glucose infusion allows investigation of the effects of sustained stimulation of the pancreatic beta-cell on insulin secretion and sensitivity. Hormonal responses to a meal following prolonged glucose infusions have not been investigated. To determine if a 48-h glucose infusion alters hormonal responses to a test meal as well as food intake and hunger in normal weight individuals, 16 subjects (8 men, 8 women, age 18-30 years, mean BMI=21.7+/-1.6 kg/m2) were infused for 48 h with either saline (50 ml/h) or 15% glucose (200 mg/m2/min). Subjects ingested a 600 kcal mixed nutrient meal 3 h after infusion termination. Blood samples were taken during the 48 h and for 4 h following food ingestion. The 48-h glucose infusion elicited a metabolic profile of a glucose intolerant obese subjects, with increased plasma glucose, insulin and leptin (all P<0.01) and increased HOMA-IR (P<0.001). During meal ingestion, early insulin secretion was increased (P<0.05) but post-prandial glucose (P<0.01) and insulin (P<0.01) excursions were lower following the glucose infusion. Post-prandial plasma triglyceride concentrations were increased after glucose compared with saline. Food intake and hunger ratings were not different between the two conditions. Plasma leptin levels were inversely correlated with hunger (P<0.03) in both conditions and with food intake (P<0.003) during the glucose condition only. Thus, a 48-h glucose infusion does not impair post-prandial hormonal responses, alter food intake or hunger in normal weight subjects. The glucose-induced increases in plasma leptin result in a stronger inverse relationship between plasma leptin and hunger as well as food intake. These data are the first to demonstrate a relationship between leptin and hunger in normal weight, non-calorically restricted human subjects.

  19. Studies on the mechanism of salicylate-induced increase of insulin secretion in man.

    PubMed

    Giugliano, D; Cozzolino, D; Ceriello, A; Cerciello, T; Varano, R; Saccomanno, F; Torella, R

    1988-01-01

    Salicylate compounds are known to increase basal and stimulated insulin secretion in man. In our studies, infusion of lysine acetylsalicylate (72 mg/min) increased basal insulin levels and amplified insulin responses to glucose (5 g i.v.), arginine (5 g i.v.) and tolbutamide (1 g i.v.). Verapamil, an organic calcium antagonist, did not modify LAS-induced increase of basal insulin levels, but reduced the effect of LAS on glucose-induced insulin secretion. Calcitonin and somatostatin, two agents that inhibit basal and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, inhibited the insulin response to glucose in presence of LAS infusion. The ability of salicylate compounds to augment insulin secretion might be due to multiple sites of action in the Beta-cells.

  20. Personalized State-space Modeling of Glucose Dynamics for Type 1 Diabetes Using Continuously Monitored Glucose, Insulin Dose, and Meal Intake: An Extended Kalman Filter Approach.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian; Molenaar, Peter; Harsh, Saurabh; Freeman, Kenneth; Xie, Jinyu; Gold, Carol; Rovine, Mike; Ulbrecht, Jan

    2014-03-01

    An essential component of any artificial pancreas is on the prediction of blood glucose levels as a function of exogenous and endogenous perturbations such as insulin dose, meal intake, and physical activity and emotional tone under natural living conditions. In this article, we present a new data-driven state-space dynamic model with time-varying coefficients that are used to explicitly quantify the time-varying patient-specific effects of insulin dose and meal intake on blood glucose fluctuations. Using the 3-variate time series of glucose level, insulin dose, and meal intake of an individual type 1 diabetic subject, we apply an extended Kalman filter (EKF) to estimate time-varying coefficients of the patient-specific state-space model. We evaluate our empirical modeling using (1) the FDA-approved UVa/Padova simulator with 30 virtual patients and (2) clinical data of 5 type 1 diabetic patients under natural living conditions. Compared to a forgetting-factor-based recursive ARX model of the same order, the EKF model predictions have higher fit, and significantly better temporal gain and J index and thus are superior in early detection of upward and downward trends in glucose. The EKF based state-space model developed in this article is particularly suitable for model-based state-feedback control designs since the Kalman filter estimates the state variable of the glucose dynamics based on the measured glucose time series. In addition, since the model parameters are estimated in real time, this model is also suitable for adaptive control.

  1. General-purpose infusion pumps.

    PubMed

    1998-01-01

    General-purpose infusion pumps deliver liquid medications to patients through intravenous or epidural routes at specified flows. They are most often used in hospitals and alternative care settings (e.g., physician' offices, patients' homes) when liquid medications need to be administered with greater accuracy or at higher flows than can be provided through a manually adjusted gravity administration set. In this Update of our February 1997 Evaluation of infusion pumps (Health Devices 26[2]), we tested 3 additional pumps from 3 suppliers. We also rated and ranked them in comparison with the 16 units from the February 1997 study that are still being produced. With a few exceptions, we tested the new pumps against the same criteria and using the same test methods as those in the previous Evaluation. However, for this Update, the focus of our findings has broadened: although we continue to place strong emphasis on the pumps' protection against gravity free-flow, we also give significant weight to their overall safety, performance, and human factors design. As a result, our ratings and rankings scheme has changed, affecting the rankings of some of the previously evaluated units. Of the 19 currently available units that have been evaluated to date, we rated 13 units Acceptable, with 5 of those units ranked above the other 8. A further 5 units were rated Conditionally Acceptable; we consider them Acceptable if they are used with the available free-flow protection. And 1 unit had performance problems that caused us to rate it Unacceptable (this unit has been recalled by its supplier; see the inset on page 162). As always, we caution readers not to base selection and purchasing decisions on our conclusions alone, but on a thorough understanding of the issues behind those conclusions, which can be gained by reading this Evaluation in its entirety and carefully reviewing the February 1997 issue.

  2. Intraarterial infusion chemotherapy for head and neck cancer using a totally implantable infusion pump.

    PubMed

    Baker, S R; Wheeler, R H; Ensminger, W D; Niederhuber, J E

    1981-01-01

    Intraarterial infusion chemotherapy has not been widely accepted for the treatment of head and neck cancer due to the high rate of complications it involves. To avoid these complications, a totally implantable infusion pump has been developed to achieve continuous low-level drug delivery for long periods of time. The pump is implanted in a subcutaneous pocket and connected to a permanent, indwelling, arterial catheter. It can be repeatedly refilled with chemotherapeutic agents by hypodermic needle injection through the skin and through a self-sealing septum located at the entry to the pump. Refilling the pump recharges an inexhaustible power source for the next delivery cycle. Preliminary results suggest that long term intraarterial infusion chemotherapy for the treatment of head and neck cancer is practical for outpatients.

  3. Intractable Polyuria Mimicking Diabetes Insipidus-Source Traced to Vecuronium Infusion.

    PubMed

    Haldar, Rudrashish; Samanta, Sukhen; Singla, Ankush

    2016-01-01

    Continuous infusion of vecuronium is a commonly used technique for patients requiring prolonged neuromuscular blockade for mechanical ventilation. As compared with older neuromuscular blocking agents, it confers the advantages of rapid excretion and intermediate duration of action. Prolongation of neuromuscular blockade and muscle weakness are the known complications of continuous vecuronium infusion. This report attempts to describe polyuria, as a hitherto unknown complication of vecuronium infusion, which can occur due to the mannitol present in commercially available preparation of vecuronium bromide.

  4. Multiple Intravenous Infusions Phase 2b: Laboratory Study

    PubMed Central

    Pinkney, Sonia; Fan, Mark; Chan, Katherine; Koczmara, Christine; Colvin, Christopher; Sasangohar, Farzan; Masino, Caterina; Easty, Anthony; Trbovich, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Background Administering multiple intravenous (IV) infusions to a single patient via infusion pump occurs routinely in health care, but there has been little empirical research examining the risks associated with this practice or ways to mitigate those risks. Objectives To identify the risks associated with multiple IV infusions and assess the impact of interventions on nurses’ ability to safely administer them. Data Sources and Review Methods Forty nurses completed infusion-related tasks in a simulated adult intensive care unit, with and without interventions (i.e., repeated-measures design). Results Errors were observed in completing common tasks associated with the administration of multiple IV infusions, including the following (all values from baseline, which was current practice): setting up and programming multiple primary continuous IV infusions (e.g., 11.7% programming errors) identifying IV infusions (e.g., 7.7% line-tracing errors) managing dead volume (e.g., 96.0% flush rate errors following IV syringe dose administration) setting up a secondary intermittent IV infusion (e.g., 11.3% secondary clamp errors) administering an IV pump bolus (e.g., 11.5% programming errors) Of 10 interventions tested, 6 (1 practice, 3 technology, and 2 educational) significantly decreased or even eliminated errors compared to baseline. Limitations The simulation of an adult intensive care unit at 1 hospital limited the ability to generalize results. The study results were representative of nurses who received training in the interventions but had little experience using them. The longitudinal effects of the interventions were not studied. Conclusions Administering and managing multiple IV infusions is a complex and risk-prone activity. However, when a patient requires multiple IV infusions, targeted interventions can reduce identified risks. A combination of standardized practice, technology improvements, and targeted education is required. PMID:26316919

  5. Factors associated with glycemic control in adult type 1 diabetes patients treated with insulin pump therapy.

    PubMed

    Matejko, Bartłomiej; Skupien, Jan; Mrozińska, Sandra; Grzanka, Małgorzata; Cyganek, Katarzyna; Kiec-Wilk, Beata; Malecki, Maciej T; Klupa, Tomasz

    2015-02-01

    Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) by insulin pump seems to improve glycemia and quality of life as compared to conventional insulin therapy in type 1 diabetes (T1DM). However, while many T1DM subjects achieve excellent glycemic control, some others cannot reach recommended goals. In a retrospective analysis, we searched for factors associated with glycemic control in T1DM patients treated with insulin pump therapy. Data from 192 patients (133 women and 59 men) treated with personal insulin pumps at the Department of Metabolic Diseases, University Hospital, Krakow, Poland were analyzed. Sources of information included medical records, memory read-outs from insulin pumps and data from glucose meters. Univariate, multivariate linear and logistic regression analysis for the association with hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) level were performed. The mean age of the subjects was 28.9 (±11.2) years, the mean duration of T1DM-14.6 (±7.6) years, mean body mass index-23.5 (±3.1) kg/m2. The mean HbA1c level in the entire study group was 7.4% (57 mmol/mol). In the multivariate linear regression analysis, HbA1c correlated with the mean number of daily blood glucose measurements, number of hypoglycemic episodes per 100 blood glucose measurements, age at the examination, and continuous glucose monitoring system use. Multivariate logistic regression analysis for reaching the therapeutic target of HbA1c<7.0% (53 mmol/mol) showed that the independent predictors of achieving this goal included the same four variables. In a large clinical observation, we identified that patient-related and technological factors associated with glycemic control in adult pump-treated T1DM subjects.

  6. Intravenous infusions in chronic pain management.

    PubMed

    Kosharskyy, Boleslav; Almonte, Wilson; Shaparin, Naum; Pappagallo, Marco; Smith, Howard

    2013-01-01

    In the United States, millions of Americans are affected by chronic pain, which adds heavily to national rates of morbidity, mortality, and disability, with an ever-increasing prevalence. According to a 2011 report titled Relieving Pain in America: A Blueprint for Transforming Prevention, Care, Education, and Research by the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies, pain not only exacts its toll on people's lives but also on the economy with an estimated annual economic cost of at least $560 - 635 billion in health care costs and the cost of lost productivity attributed to chronic pain. Intravenous infusions of certain pharmacologic agents have been known to provide substantial pain relief in patients with various chronic painful conditions. Some of these infusions are better, and although not necessarily the first therapeutic choice, have been widely used and extensively studied. The others show promise, however are in need of further investigations. This article will focus on non-opiate intravenous infusions that have been utilized for chronic painful disorders such as fibromyalgia, neuropathic pain, phantom limb pain, post-herpetic neuralgia, complex regional pain syndromes (CRPS), diabetic neuropathy, and central pain related to stroke or spinal cord injuries. The management of patients with chronic pain conditions is challenging and continues to evolve as new treatment modalities are explored and tested. The following intravenous infusions used to treat the aforementioned chronic pain conditions will be reviewed: lidocaine, ketamine, phentolamine, dexmedetomidine, and bisphosphonates. This overview is intended to familiarize the practitioner with the variety of infusions for patients with chronic pain. It will not, however, be able to provide guidelines for their use due to the lack of sufficient evidence.

  7. Effects of High-Intensity Interval Exercise versus Moderate Continuous Exercise on Glucose Homeostasis and Hormone Response in Patients with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus Using Novel Ultra-Long-Acting Insulin

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Alexander; Groeschl, Werner; Pieber, Thomas R.; Obermayer-Pietsch, Barbara; Koehler, Gerd; Hofmann, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Introduction We investigated blood glucose (BG) and hormone response to aerobic high-intensity interval exercise (HIIE) and moderate continuous exercise (CON) matched for mean load and duration in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Material and Methods Seven trained male subjects with T1DM performed a maximal incremental exercise test and HIIE and CON at 3 different mean intensities below (A) and above (B) the first lactate turn point and below the second lactate turn point (C) on a cycle ergometer. Subjects were adjusted to ultra-long-acting insulin Degludec (Tresiba/ Novo Nordisk, Denmark). Before exercise, standardized meals were administered, and short-acting insulin dose was reduced by 25% (A), 50% (B), and 75% (C) dependent on mean exercise intensity. During exercise, BG, adrenaline, noradrenaline, dopamine, cortisol, glucagon, and insulin-like growth factor-1, blood lactate, heart rate, and gas exchange variables were measured. For 24 h after exercise, interstitial glucose was measured by continuous glucose monitoring system. Results BG decrease during HIIE was significantly smaller for B (p = 0.024) and tended to be smaller for A and C compared to CON. No differences were found for post-exercise interstitial glucose, acute hormone response, and carbohydrate utilization between HIIE and CON for A, B, and C. In HIIE, blood lactate for A (p = 0.006) and B (p = 0.004) and respiratory exchange ratio for A (p = 0.003) and B (p = 0.003) were significantly higher compared to CON but not for C. Conclusion Hypoglycemia did not occur during or after HIIE and CON when using ultra-long-acting insulin and applying our methodological approach for exercise prescription. HIIE led to a smaller BG decrease compared to CON, although both exercises modes were matched for mean load and duration, even despite markedly higher peak workloads applied in HIIE. Therefore, HIIE and CON could be safely performed in T1DM. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02075567 http

  8. SGK1 dependence of insulin induced hypokalemia.

    PubMed

    Boini, Krishna M; Graf, Dirk; Kuhl, Dietmar; Häussinger, Dieter; Lang, Florian

    2009-02-01

    Insulin stimulates cellular K+ uptake leading to hypokalemia. Cellular K+ uptake is accomplished by parallel stimulation of Na+/H+ exchange, Na+,K+,2Cl- co-transport, and Na+/K+ ATPase and leads to cell swelling, a prerequisite for several metabolic effects of the hormone. Little is known about underlying signaling. Insulin is known to activate the serum and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase SGK1, which in turn enhances the activity of all three transport proteins. The present study thus explored the contribution of SGK1 to insulin-induced hypokalemia. To this end, gene-targeted mice lacking SGK1 (sgk1-/-) and their wild-type littermates (sgk1+/+) have been infused with insulin (2 mU kg(-1) min(-1)) and glucose at rates leaving the plasma glucose concentration constant. Moreover, isolated liver perfusion experiments have been performed to determine stimulation of cellular K+ uptake by insulin (100 nM). As a result, combined glucose and insulin infusion significantly decreased plasma K+ concentration despite a significant decrease of urinary K+ excretion in sgk1+/+ but not in sgk1-/- mice. Accordingly, the plasma K+ concentration was within 60 min significantly lower in sgk1+/+ than in sgk1-/- mice. In isolated liver perfusion experiments, cellular K+ uptake was stimulated by insulin (100 nM), an effect blunted by 72% in sgk1-/- mice as compared to sgk1+/+ mice. Accordingly, insulin-induced cell hydration was 63% lower in sgk1-/- mice than in sgk1+/+ mice. Moreover, volume regulatory K+ release was 31% smaller in sgk1-/- mice than in sgk1+/+ mice. In conclusion, the serum and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase SGK1 participates in the signaling mediating the hypokalemic effect of insulin.

  9. Heat stress increases insulin sensitivity in pigs

    PubMed Central

    Sanz Fernandez, M Victoria; Stoakes, Sara K; Abuajamieh, Mohannad; Seibert, Jacob T; Johnson, Jay S; Horst, Erin A; Rhoads, Robert P; Baumgard, Lance H

    2015-01-01

    Proper insulin homeostasis appears critical for adapting to and surviving a heat load. Further, heat stress (HS) induces phenotypic changes in livestock that suggest an increase in insulin action. The current study objective was to evaluate the effects of HS on whole-body insulin sensitivity. Female pigs (57 ± 4 kg body weight) were subjected to two experimental periods. During period 1, all pigs remained in thermoneutral conditions (TN; 21°C) and were fed ad libitum. During period 2, pigs were exposed to: (i) constant HS conditions (32°C) and fed ad libitum (n = 6), or (ii) TN conditions and pair-fed (PFTN; n = 6) to eliminate the confounding effects of dissimilar feed intake. A hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp (HEC) was conducted on d3 of both periods; and skeletal muscle and adipose tissue biopsies were collected prior to and after an insulin tolerance test (ITT) on d5 of period 2. During the HEC, insulin infusion increased circulating insulin and decreased plasma C-peptide and nonesterified fatty acids, similarly between treatments. From period 1 to 2, the rate of glucose infusion in response to the HEC remained similar in HS pigs while it decreased (36%) in PFTN controls. Prior to the ITT, HS increased (41%) skeletal muscle insulin receptor substrate-1 protein abundance, but did not affect protein kinase B or their phosphorylated forms. In adipose tissue, HS did not alter any of the basal or stimulated measured insulin signaling markers. In summary, HS increases whole-body insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. PMID:26243213

  10. Treatment of Diabetic Ketoacidosis With Intravenous U-500 Insulin in a Patient With Rabson-Mendenhall Syndrome: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Moore, Megan M; Bailey, Abby M; Flannery, Alexander H; Baum, Regan A

    2016-04-24

    Rabson-Mendenhall syndrome is a rare genetic disorder resulting from mutations in the insulin receptor and is associated with high degrees of insulin resistance. These patients are prone to complications secondary to their hyperglycemia including diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). We report the case of a 19-year-old male with Rabson-Mendenhall syndrome presenting with DKA who required doses of up to 500 U/h (10.6 U/kg/h) of insulin. The patient's insulin infusion was originally compounded with U-100 regular insulin, although to minimize volume, the product was compounded with U-500 insulin. The DKA eventually resolved requiring infusion rates ranging from 400 to 500 U/h. Although numerous opportunities for medication errors exist with the use of U-500 insulin, this case outlines the safe use of concentrated intravenous insulin when clinically indicated for patients requiring extremely high doses of insulin to control blood glucose.

  11. 21 CFR 880.6990 - Infusion stand.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Infusion stand. 880.6990 Section 880.6990 Food and....6990 Infusion stand. (a) Identification. The infusion stand is a stationary or movable stand intended to hold infusion liquids, infusion accessories, and other medical devices. (b) Classification....

  12. 21 CFR 880.6990 - Infusion stand.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Infusion stand. 880.6990 Section 880.6990 Food and....6990 Infusion stand. (a) Identification. The infusion stand is a stationary or movable stand intended to hold infusion liquids, infusion accessories, and other medical devices. (b) Classification....

  13. 21 CFR 880.6990 - Infusion stand.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Infusion stand. 880.6990 Section 880.6990 Food and....6990 Infusion stand. (a) Identification. The infusion stand is a stationary or movable stand intended to hold infusion liquids, infusion accessories, and other medical devices. (b) Classification....

  14. Central but not systemic lipid infusion augments the counterregulatory response to hypoglycemia

    PubMed Central

    Haywood, Samuel C.; Bree, Adam J.; Puente, Erwin C.; Daphna-Iken, Dorit; Fisher, Simon J.

    2009-01-01

    This study tests the hypothesis that lipids could act as an alternative fuel source in the brain during insulin-induced hypoglycemia. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to hyperinsulinemic (5 mU·kg−1·min−1) hypoglycemic (∼50 mg/dl) clamps. In protocol 1, intralipid (IL), a fat emulsion, was infused intravenously to prevent the fall in free fatty acid levels that occurs in response to hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia. Intravenous lipid infusion did not alter the counterregulatory responses to hypoglycemia. To test whether IL could have central effects in mediating the counterregulatory response to hypoglycemia, in protocol 2 the brains of precannulated rats were intracerebroventricularly (icv) infused with IL or artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF) as control. Unexpectedly, the epinephrine and glucagon response to hypoglycemia was significantly augmented with icv IL infusion. To determine whether central IL infusion could restore defective counterregulation, in protocol 3 rats were made recurrently hypoglycemic (RH) for 3 days and on the 4th day underwent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemic clamps with icv IL or aCSF infusion. RH rats had the expected impaired epinephrine response to hypoglycemia, and icv IL infusion again significantly augmented the epinephrine response in RH rats to normal. With regard to our experimental model of hypoglycemic counterregulation, we conclude that 1) systemic lipid infusion did not alter the counterregulatory response to hypoglycemia, 2) the icv infusion of lipids markedly increased CSF FFA levels and paradoxically augmented the epinephrine and glucagon responses, and 3) the blunted sympathoadrenal response in recurrently hypoglycemic rats was completely normalized with the icv lipid infusion. It is concluded that, in the setting of insulin-induced hypoglycemia, increased brain lipids can enhance the sympathoadrenal response. PMID:19417126

  15. Evaluation of propylene glycol and glycerol infusions as treatments for ketosis in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Piantoni, P; Allen, M S

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate propylene glycol (PG) and glycerol (G) as potential treatments for ketosis, we conducted 2 experiments lasting 4 d each in which cows received one bolus infusion per day. Blood was collected before infusion, over 240min postinfusion, as well as 24 h postinfusion. Experiment 1 used 6 ruminally cannulated cows (26±7 d in milk) randomly assigned to 300-mL infusions of PG or G (both ≥99.5% pure) in a crossover design experiment with 2 periods. Within each period, cows were assigned randomly to infusion site sequence: abomasum (A)-cranial reticulorumen (R) or the reverse, R-A. Glucose precursors were infused into the R to simulate drenching and the A to prevent metabolism by ruminal microbes. Glycerol infused in the A increased plasma glucose concentration the most (15.8mg/dL), followed by PG infused in the R (12.6mg/dL), PG infused in the A (9.11mg/dL), and G infused in the R (7.3mg/dL). Infusion of PG into the R increased plasma insulin and insulin area under the curve (AUC) the most compared with all other treatments (7.88 vs. 2.13μIU/mL and 321 vs. 31.9min×μIU/mL, respectively). Overall, PG decreased plasma BHBA concentration after infusion (-6.46 vs. -4.55mg/dL) and increased BHBA AUC (-1,055 vs. -558min ×mg/dL) compared with G. Plasma NEFA responses were not different among treatments. Experiment 2 used 8 ruminally cannulated cows (22±5 d in milk) randomly assigned to treatment sequence in a Latin square design experiment balanced for carryover effects. Treatments were 300mL of PG, 300mL of G, 600mL of G (2G), and 300mL of PG + 300mL of G (GPG), all infused into the R. Treatment contrasts compared PG with each treatment containing glycerol (G, 2G, and GPG). Propylene glycol increased plasma glucose (14.0 vs. 5.35mg/dL) and insulin (7.59 vs. 1.11μIU/mL) concentrations compared with G, but only tended to increase glucose and insulin concentrations compared with 2G. Propylene glycol increased AUC for glucose (1,444 vs. 94.3mg/dL) and insulin (326

  16. Paradoxical glucose-induced hyperkalemia. Combined aldosterone-insulin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Goldfarb, S; Strunk, B; Singer, I; Goldberg, M

    1975-11-01

    Severe hyperkalemia associated with spontaneous hyperglycemia as well as with the intravenous infusions of glucose occurred in an insulin-requiring diabetic patient in the absence of potassium administration, the use of diuretics which inhibit urinary potassium excretion or acidemia. Metabolic balance studies revealed, in addition to diabets, the presence of isolated aldosterone deficiency of the hyporeninemic type. Intravenous glucose infusions (0.5 g/kg body weight) produced significant hyperkalemia but desoxycortisone acetate (DOCA) therapy (10 mg/day) prevented the glucose-induced hyperkalemia. In this patient, the serum potassium concentration increases after the intravenous infusions of glucose because there is insufficient aldosterone and insulin to reverse the transfer of potassium to the extracellular fluid which normally occurs after hypertonic infusions of glucose. Although DOCA replacement modifies the distribution of potassium in the extracellular fluid and blunts the hyperkalemic effect of intravenous infusions of glucose, a rise in the insulin level is required for the usual hypokalemic response to intravenously administered glucose. These studies illustrate the risk of raising blood glucose levels in patients with combined aldosterone and insulin deficiency and the tendency towards hyperkalemia in diabetic patients under certain clinical conditions.

  17. Insulin Lispro Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... unless it is used in an external insulin pump. In patients with type 2 diabetes, insulin lispro ... also can be used with an external insulin pump. Before using insulin lispro in a pump system, ...

  18. Effect of intensive insulin therapy on first-phase insulin secretion in newly diagnosed type 2 diabetic patients with a family history of the disease

    PubMed Central

    LI, QING; WANG, LUAN; XIAO, LIN; WANG, ZHONGCHAO; WANG, FANG; YU, XIAOLONG; YAN, SHENGLI; WANG, YANGANG

    2015-01-01

    Intensive insulin treatment is known to improve β-cell function in the majority of patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and family history (FH) is known to be an important independent risk factor for T2DM. Thus, the aim of the present study was to investigate the difference in first-phase insulin secretion and the effect of intensive insulin therapy on the improvement of β-cell function between T2DM patients with and without a FH of diabetes. Patients with newly diagnosed T2DM and healthy controls were divided into groups according to their FH of diabetes. Improvement in β-cell function was evaluated with an arginine stimulation test after two weeks of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII). Compared with the control group, the level of fasting insulin and the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA2-IR) were higher in the DM group, while the homeostasis model assessment of β-cell insulin secretion (HOMA2-%β) and the first-phase peak ratio were lower (P<0.05). In addition, the first-phase peak ratio in the FH- control group was higher compared with that in the FH+ control group (P=0.023). Following CSII, all the patients achieved excellent blood glucose control in 6.2±3.6 days, without severe adverse effects. In the DM groups, the fasting insulin level and HOMA2-IR were lower, while the HOMA2-%β and first-phase peak ratio were higher, when compared with the values prior to treatment, particularly in the FH- DM group. The HOMA2-%β in the FH+ DM group was lower compared with the FH- DM group (P=0.027). Therefore, T2DM patients with and without a FH of the disease were shown to have a good response to CSII in the improvement of insulin resistance and β-cell function; however, the improvements were less significant in patients with a FH compared with patients without a FH of diabetes. PMID:25574243

  19. Association of low birth weight with beta cell function in the adult first degree relatives of non-insulin dependent diabetic subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Cook, J T; Levy, J C; Page, R C; Shaw, J A; Hattersley, A T; Turner, R C

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To examine the relation between birth weight and beta cell function in the first degree relatives of non-insulin dependent diabetic subjects. DESIGN--Cross sectional study of 101 adults of known birth weight from 47 families which had at least one member with non-insulin dependent diabetes. SUBJECTS--101 white adults aged mean 43 (SD 7) years. SETTING--Oxfordshire, England. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Glucose tolerance was measured by continuous infusion glucose tolerance test. beta cell function and insulin sensitivity were calculated from the fasting plasma glucose and insulin concentrations with homeostasis model assessment. beta cell function was standardised to allow for the confounding effects of age and obesity. RESULTS--Twenty seven subjects had non-insulin dependent diabetes, 32 had impaired glucose tolerance, and 42 were normoglycaemic. Birth weight correlated with the beta cell function of the complete cohort (rs = 0.29, p = 0.005), the non-insulin dependent diabetic subjects (rs = 0.50, p = 0.023), and the non-diabetic subjects (rs = 0.29, p = 0.013). The non-insulin dependent diabetic (n = 27) and the non-diabetic (n = 74) subjects had similar mean (inter-quartile range) centile birth weight 50% (19%-91%), and 53% (30%-75%) respectively. Non-insulin dependent diabetic subjects had significantly lower beta function than the non-diabetic subjects: 69% (48%-83%) v 97% (86%-120%), p < 0.001. CONCLUSIONS--The cause of the association between low birth weight and reduced beta cell function in adult life is uncertain. Impaired beta cell function in non-insulin dependent diabetic subjects was not accounted for by low birth weight, and genetic or environmental factors are likely to be necessary for development of diabetes. PMID:8461648

  20. Insulin Pump and CGM Usage in the United States and Germany

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, John; Roberts, Ruth; Weber, Dietmar; Faber-Heinemann, Gabriele; Heinemann, Lutz

    2015-01-01

    Background: This survey collected and evaluated user responses about routine tasks and preferences regarding insulin pumps and infusion sets (IIS) with comparison of intercountry differences between the United States (US) and Germany (GER), chosen for their large insulin pump populations. Methods: A total of 985 subjects (534 US, 451 GER; 60% female) with type 1 diabetes on pump therapy anonymously answered 20 pump-related questions. US subjects also answered 11 questions about continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) usage. Results: Length of use of insulin cartridges is shorter in US than in GER, mean (SD) 4.3 (5.0) versus 5.3 (3.2) days (P < .001), while the IIS is used longer: 3.3 (1.0) versus 2.7 (1.1) days (P < .001). Lower self-reported HbA1c levels were associated with longer use of insulin cartridges (7.3% for >3 days vs 7.7% for <3 days; P < .01), and with use of an auto-insertion device (vs manual IIS insertion) in the US (7.2% vs 6.9%), but not in GER (7.7% vs 7.9%). Only 47% of pump wearers stated that they were “very satisfied” with their pump (49% US vs 45% GER, ns). However, 98% would recommend the pump to others (95% vs 93%, ns). Analysis of CGM questions showed that 297 (60%) of 496 US responders currently wore one. Of these, 84% said they would recommend CGM to others. CGM wearers who stated they were “very satisfied” with their CGM had lower HbA1c than those who said they were “partly satisfied” (6.9% vs 7.2%). Conclusions: This survey shows interesting differences in real-world use of insulin pumps in 2 large markets, and suggests areas where insulin pumps and CGMs might be improved. PMID:26071425

  1. Simulation Environment to Evaluate Closed-Loop Insulin Delivery Systems in Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Wilinska, Malgorzata E.; Chassin, Ludovic J.; Acerini, Carlo L.; Allen, Janet M.; Dunger, David B.; Hovorka, Roman

    2010-01-01

    Background Closed-loop insulin delivery systems linking subcutaneous insulin infusion to real-time continuous glucose monitoring need to be evaluated in humans, but progress can be accelerated with the use of in silico testing. We present a simulation environment designed to support the development and testing of closed-loop insulin delivery systems in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Methods The principal components of the simulation environment include a mathematical model of glucose regulation representing a virtual population with T1DM, the glucose measurement model, and the insulin delivery model. The simulation environment is highly flexible. The user can specify an experimental protocol, define a population of virtual subjects, choose glucose measurement and insulin delivery models, and specify outcome measures. The environment provides graphical as well as numerical outputs to enable a comprehensive analysis of in silico study results. The simulation environment is validated by comparing its predictions against a clinical study evaluating overnight closed-loop insulin delivery in young people with T1DM using a model predictive controller. Results The simulation model of glucose regulation is described, and population values of 18 synthetic subjects are provided. The validation study demonstrated that the simulation environment was able to reproduce the population results of the clinical study conducted in young people with T1DM. Conclusions Closed-loop trials in humans should be preceded and concurrently guided by highly efficient and resource-saving computer-based simulations. We demonstrate validity of population-based predictions obtained with our simulation environment. PMID:20167177

  2. Responses to Starch Infusion on Milk Synthesis in Low Yield Lactating Dairy Cows

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Yang; Yang, Zhanshan; Guo, Yongqing; Li, Shengli; Cao, Zhijun

    2015-01-01

    The effect of starch infusion on production, metabolic parameters and relative mRNA abundance was investigated in low yield lactating cows from 86 days in milk. Six Holstein cows fitted with permanent ruminal cannulas were arranged into one of two complete 3×3 Latin squares and infused with a starch solution containing 800 grams starch for 16 days. The three treatments were: i) ruminal and abomasal infusion with water (Control); ii) ruminal infusion with cornstarch solution and abomasal infusion with water (Rumen); iii) ruminal infusion with water and abomasal infusion with cornstarch solution (Abomasum). There were no significant differences (p>0.05) among the three treatments with low yield lactating cows in feed and energy intake, milk yield and composition, plasma metabolism, or even on gene expression. However, cows receiving starch through rumen performed better than directly through the abomasum during the glucose tolerance test procedure with a higher area under the curve (AUC; p = 0.08) and shorter half-time (t1/2; p = 0.11) of plasma insulin, therefore, it increased glucose disposal, which stated a lipid anabolism other than mobilization after energy supplementation. In conclusion, extra starch infusion at concentration of 800 g/d did not enhance energy supplies to the mammary gland and improve the lactating performance in low yield lactating cows. PMID:26194224

  3. Responses to Starch Infusion on Milk Synthesis in Low Yield Lactating Dairy Cows.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yang; Yang, Zhanshan; Guo, Yongqing; Li, Shengli; Cao, Zhijun

    2015-09-01

    The effect of starch infusion on production, metabolic parameters and relative mRNA abundance was investigated in low yield lactating cows from 86 days in milk. Six Holstein cows fitted with permanent ruminal cannulas were arranged into one of two complete 3×3 Latin squares and infused with a starch solution containing 800 grams starch for 16 days. The three treatments were: i) ruminal and abomasal infusion with water (Control); ii) ruminal infusion with cornstarch solution and abomasal infusion with water (Rumen); iii) ruminal infusion with water and abomasal infusion with cornstarch solution (Abomasum). There were no significant differences (p>0.05) among the three treatments with low yield lactating cows in feed and energy intake, milk yield and composition, plasma metabolism, or even on gene expression. However, cows receiving starch through rumen performed better than directly through the abomasum during the glucose tolerance test procedure with a higher area under the curve (AUC; p = 0.08) and shorter half-time (t(1/2); p = 0.11) of plasma insulin, therefore, it increased glucose disposal, which stated a lipid anabolism other than mobilization after energy supplementation. In conclusion, extra starch infusion at concentration of 800 g/d did not enhance energy supplies to the mammary gland and improve the lactating performance in low yield lactating cows.

  4. Evidence that the brain of the conscious dog is insulin sensitive.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, S N; Colburn, C; Dobbins, R; Nadeau, S; Neal, D; Williams, P; Cherrington, A D

    1995-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether a selective increase in the level of insulin in the blood perfusing the brain is a determinant of the counterregulatory response to hypoglycemia. Experiments were carried out on 15 conscious 18-h-fasted dogs. Insulin was infused (2 mU/kg per min) in separate, randomized studies into a peripheral vein (n = 7) or both carotid and vertebral arteries (n = 8). This resulted in equivalent systemic insulinemia (84 +/- 6 vs. 86 +/- 6 microU/ml) but differing insulin levels in the head (84 +/- 6 vs. 195 +/- 5 microU/ml, respectively). Glucose was infused during peripheral insulin infusion to maintain the glucose level (56 +/- 2 mg/dl) at a value similar to that seen during head insulin infusion (58 +/- 2 mg/dl). Despite equivalent peripheral insulin levels and similar hypoglycemia; steady state plasma epinephrine (792 +/- 198 vs. 2394 +/- 312 pg/ml), norepinephrine (404 +/- 33 vs. 778 +/- 93 pg/ml), cortisol (6.8 +/- 1.8 vs. 9.8 +/- 1.6 micrograms/dl) and pancreatic polypeptide (722 +/- 273 vs. 1061 +/- 255 pg/ml) levels were all increased to a greater extent during head insulin infusion (P < 0.05). Hepatic glucose production, measured with [3-3H]glucose, rose from 2.6 +/- 0.2 to 4.3 +/- 0.4 mg/kg per min (P < 0.01) in response to head insulin infusion but remained unchanged (2.6 +/- 0.5 mg/kg per min) during peripheral insulin infusion. Similarly, gluconeogenesis, lipolysis, and ketogenesis were increased twofold (P < 0.001) during head compared with peripheral insulin infusion. Cardiovascular parameters were also significantly higher (P < 0.05) during head compared with peripheral insulin infusion. We conclude that during hypoglycemia in the conscious dog (a) the brain is directly responsive to physiologic elevations of insulin and (b) the response includes a profound stimulation of the autonomic nervous system with accompanying metabolic and cardiovascular changes. PMID:7860743

  5. [Transitory hyperbilirubinemia and oxytocin infusion].

    PubMed

    Quoss, I

    1978-01-01

    Serum bilirubin levels at 5th day of life was compared between 100 mature newborns with oxytocin infusion to the mother during labour and 100 mature newborns without oxytocin. Newborns, whose mothers received more than 5 IU oxytocin had significant higher bilirubin values than the controll group without oxytocin and the cases with oxytocin administration under 5 U. Hyperbilirubinaemie was also present in babies after vacuum extraction and oxytocin infusion.

  6. High Insulin Combined With Essential Amino Acids Stimulates Skeletal Muscle Mitochondrial Protein Synthesis While Decreasing Insulin Sensitivity in Healthy Humans

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Matthew M.; Soop, Mattias; Sohn, Tae Seo; Morse, Dawn M.; Schimke, Jill M.; Klaus, Katherine A.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Insulin and essential amino acids (EAAs) regulate skeletal muscle protein synthesis, yet their independent effects on mitochondrial protein synthesis (MiPS) and oxidative function remain to be clearly defined. Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of high or low insulin with or without EAAs on MiPS. Design: Thirty participants were randomized to 3 groups of 10 each with each participant studied twice. Study groups comprised (1) low and high insulin, (2) low insulin with and without EAAs, and (3) high insulin with and without EAAs. Setting: The study was conducted in an in-patient clinical research unit. Participants: Eligible participants were 18 to 45 years old, had a body mass index of <25 kg/m2, and were free of diseases and medications that might impair mitochondrial function. Intervention: Low (∼6 μU/mL) and high (∼40 μU/mL) insulin levels were maintained by iv insulin infusion during a somatostatin clamp while maintaining euglycemia (4.7–5.2 mM) and replacing GH and glucagon. The EAA infusion was 5.4% NephrAmine. l-[ring-13C6]Phenylalanine was infused, and muscle needle biopsies were performed. Main Outcomes: Muscle MiPS, oxidative enzymes, and plasma amino acid metabolites were measured. Results: MiPS and oxidative enzyme activities did not differ between low and high insulin (MiPS: 0.07 ± 0.009 vs 0.07 ± 0.006%/h, P = .86) or between EAAs and saline during low insulin (MiPS: 0.05 ± 0.01 vs 0.07 ± 0.01, P = .5). During high insulin, EAAs in comparison with saline increased MiPS (0.1 ± 0.01 vs 0.06 ± 0.01, P < .05) and cytochrome c oxidase activity (P < .05) but not citrate synthase (P = .27). EAA infusion decreased (P < .05) the glucose infusion rates needed to maintain euglycemia during low (∼40%) and high insulin (∼24%). Conclusion: EAAs increased MiPS and oxidative enzyme activity only with high insulin concentrations. PMID:25222757

  7. Influence of circulating epinephrine on absorption of subcutaneously injected insulin

    SciTech Connect

    Fernqvist, E.; Gunnarsson, R.; Linde, B.

    1988-06-01

    Effects of epinephrine (Epi) infusion on the absorption of subcutaneously injected 125I-labeled soluble human insulin (10 U) from the thigh or the abdomen were studied in 16 healthy subjects and from the thigh in 10 insulin-dependent diabetic (IDDM) patients. Epi was infused at 0.3 (high dose) or 0.1 (low dose; healthy subjects) nmol.kg-1.min-1 i.v., resulting in arterial plasma Epi levels of approximately 6 and 2 nM, respectively. Saline was infused on a control day. Insulin absorption was measured as disappearance of radioactivity from the injection site and as appearance of plasma immunoreactive insulin (IRI). Adipose tissue blood flow was measured with the 133Xe clearance technique. First-order disappearance rate constants of 125I from the thigh depot decreased approximately 40-50% during the high dose of Epi compared with control (P less than .001). The corresponding decrease from the abdominal depot was approximately 40% (P less than .001), whereas no significant change was found during the low Epi dose. IRI fell compared with control in all groups at the high Epi dose. The Epi-induced depression of insulin absorption occurred despite unaltered or even slightly increased subcutaneous blood flow. The results indicate that circulating Epi at levels seen during moderate physical stress depresses the absorption of soluble insulin from subcutaneous injection sites to an extent that might be important for glycemic control in IDDM patients. Furthermore, dissociation is found between changes in insulin absorption and subcutaneous blood flow during Epi infusion, suggesting that factors other than blood flow may also influence the absorption of subcutaneously injected insulin.

  8. Chronic Low Dose Fructose infusion Does Not Reverse Glucagon-Mediated Decrease in Hepatic Glucose Utilization

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Paulette M.; Chen, Sheng-Song; Santomango, Tammy S.; Williams, Phillip E; Lacy, D. Brooks; McGuinness, Owen P.

    2013-01-01

    Objective An adaptation to chronic total parenteral nutrition (TPN; 75% of non protein calories as glucose) is the liver becomes a major consumer of glucose with lactate release as a by-product. The liver is able to further increase liver glucose uptake when a small dose of fructose is acutely infused via the portal system. Glucagon, commonly elevated during inflammatory stress, is a potent inhibitor of glucose uptake by the liver during TPN. The aim was to determine if chronic fructose infusion could overcome the glucagon-mediated decrease in hepatic glucose uptake. Material/methods Studies were performed in conscious insulin-treated chronically catheterized pancreatectomized dogs that adapted to TPN for 33 h. They were then assigned to one of 4 groups: TPN (C), TPN + fructose (4.4 μmol·kg−1·min−1, F), TPN+ glucagon (0.2 pmol·kg−1·min−1, GGN), or a TPN + fructose and glucagon (F+GGN) for an additional 63h (33–96h). Insulin, fructose and glucagon were infused into the portal vein. During that period all animals received a fixed insulin infusion 0.4mU· kg−1·min−1 (33–96h) and the glucose infusion rates were adjusted to maintain euglycemia (6.6 mM). Results Chronic fructose infusion was unable to further enhance net hepatic glucose uptake (NHGU; μmol·kg−1·min−1) (31.1±2.8 vs. 36.1±5.0; C vs. F) nor was it able to overcome glucagon-mediated decrease in NHGU (10.0±4.4 vs. 12.2±3.9; GGN vs. F+GGN). Conclusion In summary, chronic fructose infusion cannot augment liver glucose uptake during TPN nor can it overcome the inhibitory effects of glucagon. PMID:20940071

  9. Inconsistencies in the Hypophagic Action of Intracerebroventricular Insulin in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Allister, Eugenia Mc; Pacheco-Lopez, Gustavo; Woods, Stephen C.; Langhans, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Insulin inhibits eating after its intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration in multiple species and under a variety of conditions. Nevertheless, the results across reports are inconsistent in that ICV insulin does not always reduce food intake. The reasons for this variability are largely unknown. Using mice as a model, we performed several crossover trials with insulin vs. vehicle when infused into the third cerebral ventricle (i3vt) to test the hypothesis that recent experience with the i3vt procedure contributes to the variability in the effect of ICV insulin on food intake. Using a cross-over design with two days between injections, we found that insulin (0.4 µU/mouse) significantly reduced food intake relative to vehicle in mice that received vehicle on the first and insulin on the second trial, whereas this effect was absent in mice that received insulin on the first and vehicle on the second trial. Higher doses (i3vt 4.0 and 40.0 µU/mouse) had no effect on food intake in this paradigm. When injections were spaced 7 days apart, insulin reduced food intake with no crossover effect. Mice that did not reduce food intake in response to higher doses of i3vt insulin did so in response to i3vt infusion of the melanocortin receptor agonist melanotan-II (MT-II), indicating that the function of the hypothalamic melanocortin system, which mediates the effect of insulin on eating, was not impaired by whatever interfered with the insulin effect, and that this interference occurred upstream of the melanocortin receptors. Overall, our findings suggest that associative effects based on previous experience with the experimental situation can compromise the eating inhibition elicited by i3vt administered insulin. PMID:26344647

  10. Inconsistencies in the hypophagic action of intracerebroventricular insulin in mice.

    PubMed

    Mc Allister, Eugenia; Pacheco-Lopez, Gustavo; Woods, Stephen C; Langhans, Wolfgang

    2015-11-01

    Insulin inhibits eating after its intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration in multiple species and under a variety of conditions. Nevertheless, the results across reports are inconsistent in that ICV insulin does not always reduce food intake. The reasons for this variability are largely unknown. Using mice as a model, we performed several crossover trials with insulin vs. vehicle when infused into the third cerebral ventricle (i3vt) to test the hypothesis that recent experience with the i3vt procedure contributes to the variability in the effect of ICV insulin on food intake. Using a cross-over design with two days between injections, we found that insulin (0.4 μU/mouse) significantly reduced food intake relative to vehicle in mice that received vehicle on the first and insulin on the second trial, whereas this effect was absent in mice that received insulin on the first and vehicle on the second trial. Higher doses (i3vt 4.0 and 40.0 μU/mouse) had no effect on food intake in this paradigm. When injections were spaced 7 days apart, insulin reduced food intake with no crossover effect. Mice that did not reduce food intake in response to higher doses of i3vt insulin did so in response to i3vt infusion of the melanocortin receptor agonist melanotan-II (MT-II), indicating that the function of the hypothalamic melanocortin system, which mediates the effect of insulin on eating, was not impaired by whatever interfered with the insulin effect, and that this interference occurred upstream of the melanocortin receptors. Overall, our findings suggest that associative effects based on previous experience with the experimental situation can compromise the eating inhibition elicited by i3vt administered insulin.

  11. Insulin stimulates muscle protein synthesis in neonates during endotoxemia despite repression of translation initiation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Skeletal muscle protein synthesis is reduced in neonatal pigs in response to endotoxemia. To examine the role of insulin in this response, neonatal pigs were infused with endotoxin (LPS, 0 and 10 µg•kg(-1)•h(-1)), whereas glucose and amino acids were maintained at fasting levels and insulin was clam...

  12. Proteins and insulin release: A dual role of amino-acids and intestinal hormones

    PubMed Central

    Jarrett, R. J.; Graver, H. J.; Cohen, N. M.

    1969-01-01

    In two subjects concurrent infusion of amino-acids and the hormones secretin and pancreozymin provoked much higher plasma insulin levels than did administration of amino-acids or hormones individually. It is suggested that this may be a physiological phenomenon, augmenting the release of insulin from the pancreas after a meal containing protein. PMID:5356549

  13. Anti-insulin antibody test

    MedlinePlus

    Insulin antibodies - serum; Insulin Ab test; Insulin resistance - insulin antibodies; Diabetes - insulin antibodies ... Normally, there are no antibodies against insulin in your blood. ... different laboratories. Some labs use different measurements or ...

  14. PROXIMITY TO DELIVERY ALTERS INSULIN SENSITIVITY AND GLUCOSE METABOLISM IN PREGNANT MICE

    PubMed Central

    Musial, Barbara; Fernandez-Twinn, Denise S.; Vaughan, Owen R.; Ozanne, Susan E.; Voshol, Peter; Sferruzzi-Perri, Amanda N.; Fowden, Abigail L.

    2016-01-01

    In late pregnancy, maternal insulin resistance occurs to support fetal growth but little is known about insulin-glucose dynamics close to delivery. This study measured insulin sensitivity in mice in late pregnancy, day (D) 16, and near term, D19, (term 20.5D). Non-pregnant (NP) and pregnant mice were assessed for metabolite and hormone concentrations, body composition by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry, tissue insulin signalling protein abundance by Western blotting, glucose tolerance and utilisation, and insulin sensitivity using acute insulin administration and hyperinsulinaemic-euglycaemic clamps with 3H-glucose infusion. Whole body insulin resistance occurred in D16 pregnant dams in association with basal hyperinsulinaemia, insulin-resistant endogenous glucose production and downregulation of several proteins in hepatic and skeletal muscle insulin signalling pathways relative to NP and D19 values. Insulin resistance was less pronounced at D19 with restoration of NP insulin concentrations, improved hepatic insulin sensitivity and increased abundance of hepatic insulin signalling proteins. At D16, insulin resistance at whole body, tissue and molecular levels will favour fetal glucose acquisition while improved D19 hepatic insulin sensitivity will conserve glucose for maternal use in anticipation of lactation. Tissue sensitivity to insulin, therefore, alters differentially with proximity to delivery in pregnant mice with implications for human and other species. PMID:26740602

  15. The rate and pattern of urea infusion into the rumen of wethers alters nitrogen balance and plasma ammonia.

    PubMed

    Recavarren, M I; Milano, G D

    2014-12-01

    Changes in N balance, urinary excretion of purine derivative (PD), urea, creatinine and ammonia and plasma ammonia, glucose, urea, insulin and IGF-1 were examined in four wethers (37 ± 2.6 kg BW). The animals were fitted with permanent ruminal catheters, fed lucerne hay (9.4 MJ/day; 23 g N/day; 7 g soluble N/day, 6 equal meals/day) and treated with contrasting rates of urea infusion into the rumen: first, a continuous infusion (CT), at 3.2 mg urea-N/min for 10 days and then a discontinuous infusion (DT) at 156 mg urea-N/min for 4 min; in 6 daily doses with the meals for 7 days. N balance was calculated from pooled samples of faeces and urine. Jugular blood samples were collected before and 1.5 h after the morning meal (M1) on days CT10, DT2, DT4 and DT6. N retention decreased during DT (p = 0.01) due to a significant increase of N excretion in urine (4 g/day; p = 0.009) and faeces (1 g/day; p = 0.02). Dry matter (p < 0.001) and N digestibility in vivo (p = 0.01) decreased significantly during DT. Urinary urea and PD excretion were not altered by treatment. Significant linear (p = 0.004) and quadratic (p = 0.001) effects were observed for plasma ammonia in M1 (from 170 CT10 to 235 μm DT2 and returned to 120 μm DT6). No changes were observed in plasma glucose, urea, insulin and IGF-1. Results indicate that changes from CT to DT reduced N retention in sheep due to enhanced urinary N excretion, but it was not associated with changes in urinary urea or PD excretion; or plasma concentrations of insulin and IGF-1. As the dry matter (DM) an N digestibility could account a 0.23 of the decrease in N retention; the largest fraction of the reduction in N retention remained unexplained by the results.

  16. Insulin sensitivity of muscle protein metabolism is altered in patients with chronic kidney disease and metabolic acidosis

    PubMed Central

    Garibotto, Giacomo; Sofia, Antonella; Russo, Rodolfo; Paoletti, Ernesto; Bonanni, Alice; Parodi, Emanuele L; Viazzi, Francesca; Verzola, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    An emergent hypothesis is that a resistance to the anabolic drive by insulin may contribute to loss of strength and muscle mass in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). We tested whether insulin resistance extends to protein metabolism using the forearm perfusion method with arterial insulin infusion in 7 patients with CKD and metabolic acidosis (bicarbonate 19 mmol/l) and 7 control individuals. Forearm glucose balance and protein turnover (2H-phenylalanine kinetics) were measured basally and in response to insulin infused at different rates for 2 h to increase local forearm plasma insulin concentration by approximately 20 and 50 μU/ml. In response to insulin, forearm glucose uptake was significantly increased to a lesser extent (−40%) in patients with CKD than controls. In addition, whereas in the controls net muscle protein balance and protein degradation were decreased by both insulin infusion rates, in patients with CKD net protein balance and protein degradation were sensitive to the high (0.035 mU/kg per min) but not the low (0.01 mU/kg per min) insulin infusion. Besides blunting muscle glucose uptake, CKD and acidosis interfere with the normal suppression of protein degradation in response to a moderate rise in plasma insulin. Thus, alteration of protein metabolism by insulin may lead to changes in body tissue composition which may become clinically evident in conditions characterized by low insulinemia. PMID:26308671

  17. Fluctuations of Hyperglycemia and Insulin Sensitivity Are Linked to Menstrual Cycle Phases in Women With T1D

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Sue A.; Jiang, Boyi; McElwee-Malloy, Molly; Wakeman, Christian; Breton, Marc D.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Factors influencing glycemic variability in type 1 diabetes (T1D) may play a significant role in the refinement of closed loop insulin administration. Phase of menstrual cycle is one such factor that has been inadequately investigated. We propose that unique individual patterns can be constructed and used as parameters of closed loop systems. Method: Women with T1D on continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion and continuous glucose monitoring were studied for 3 consecutive menstrual cycles. Ovulation prediction kits and labs were used to confirm phase of menstrual cycle. Glycemic risks were assessed using the low- and high blood glucose indices (LBGI and HBGI). Insulin sensitivity (SI) was estimated using a Kalman filtering method from meal and insulin data. Overall change significance for glycemic risks was assessed by repeated measures ANOVA, with specific phases emphasized using contrasts. Results: Ovulation was confirmed in 33/36 cycles studied in 12 subjects (age = 33.1 ± 7.0 years, BMI = 25.7 ± 2.9 kg/m2, A1c = 6.8 ± 0.7%). Risk for hyperglycemia changed significantly during the cycle (P = .023), with HBGI increasing until early luteal phase and returning to initial levels thereafter. LBGI was steady in the follicular phase, decreasing thereafter but not significantly. SI was depressed during the luteal phase when compared to the early follicular phase (P ≤ .05). Total daily insulin, carbohydrates, or calories did not show any significant fluctuations. Conclusions: Women with T1D have glycemic variability changes that are specific to the individual and are linked to phase of cycle. An increased risk of hyperglycemia was observed during periovulation and early luteal phases compared to the early follicular phase; these changes appear to be associated with decreased insulin sensitivity during the luteal phase. PMID:26468135

  18. Interactions of glucagon and free fatty acids with insulin in control of glucose metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Chambrier, C.; Picard, S.; Vidal, H.; Cohen, R.; Riou, J.P.; Beylot, M. )

    1990-09-01

    To study the interactions of physiological glucagon and free fatty acids (FFA) concentrations with insulin in the control of glucose metabolism, we determined in normal subjects the response of endogenous glucose production (EGP) and glucose utilization (Rd) to a progressive and moderate increase of insulinemia in the presence of glucagon and FFA levels either decreased (somatostatin (SRIF) and insulin infusion, C test) or maintained to normal postabsorptive values isolated (SRIF + insulin + glucagon infusion, G test; SRIF + insulin + Intralipid infusion, IL test) or in association (SRIF + insulin + glucagon + Intralipid infusion, IL + G test). Compared with the C test, maintenance of glucagon level had only small and inconsistent effects on glucose Rd, but induced a shift to the right of the dose-response curve to insulin of EGP (apparent ED50: C test, 10.9 mU.L-1; G test, 15.2 mU.L-1). Intralipid infusion resulted, whether glucagon was substituted or not, in a near total suppression of the insulin-induced increase of glucose Rd (Rd at the end of the tests: C test, 6.13 +/- 0.85 mg.kg-1.min-1; G test, 7.29 +/- 0.87 mg.kg-1.min-1; IL test, 3.30 +/- 0.65 mg.kg-1.min-1; IL + G test, 3.57 +/- 0.42 mg.kg-1.min-1). In the absence of glucagon, substitution Intralipid infusion also antagonized the action of insulin on EGP. However, this effect was no longer apparent when glucagon was replaced (dose-response curve to insulin of EGP during the G and the IL + G test were comparable).

  19. Breadboard development of a fluid infusion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, R. W.

    1974-01-01

    A functional breadboard of a zero gravity Intravenous Infusion System (IVI) is presented. Major components described are: (1) infusate pack pressurizers; (2) pump module; (3) infusion set; and (4) electronic control package. The IVI breadboard was designed to demonstrate the feasibility of using the parallel solenoid pump and spring powered infusate source pressurizers for the emergency infusion of various liquids in a zero gravity environment. The IVI was tested for flow rate and sensitivity to back pressure at the needle. Results are presented.

  20. Selective Insulin Resistance in the Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Horita, Shoko; Nakamura, Motonobu; Suzuki, Masashi; Satoh, Nobuhiko; Suzuki, Atsushi; Seki, George

    2016-01-01

    Insulin resistance has been characterized as attenuation of insulin sensitivity at target organs and tissues, such as muscle and fat tissues and the liver. The insulin signaling cascade is divided into major pathways such as the PI3K/Akt pathway and the MAPK/MEK pathway. In insulin resistance, however, these pathways are not equally impaired. For example, in the liver, inhibition of gluconeogenesis by the insulin receptor substrate (IRS) 2 pathway is impaired, while lipogenesis by the IRS1 pathway is preserved, thus causing hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia. It has been recently suggested that selective impairment of insulin signaling cascades in insulin resistance also occurs in the kidney. In the renal proximal tubule, insulin signaling via IRS1 is inhibited, while insulin signaling via IRS2 is preserved. Insulin signaling via IRS2 continues to stimulate sodium reabsorption in the proximal tubule and causes sodium retention, edema, and hypertension. IRS1 signaling deficiency in the proximal tubule may impair IRS1-mediated inhibition of gluconeogenesis, which could induce hyperglycemia by preserving glucose production. In the glomerulus, the impairment of IRS1 signaling deteriorates the structure and function of podocyte and endothelial cells, possibly causing diabetic nephropathy. This paper mainly describes selective insulin resistance in the kidney, focusing on the proximal tubule. PMID:27247938

  1. Insulin pumps and their use in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Wollitzer, Adrienne D; Zisser, Howard; Jovanovic, Lois

    2010-06-01

    The prevalence of diabetes in pregnancy has continued to increase, both as obesity drives up the rate of glucose intolerance itself and as improvements in diabetes and infertility treatments allow more women with diabetes to become and remain pregnant into the third trimester. With this increase has come a concomitant increase in the number of pregnant women using insulin to control their blood glucose in pregnancy. This review seeks to identify advantages and disadvantages of insulin pump use in pregnancy, as compared to a more traditional multiple daily injection (MDI) insulin regimen. Insulin pumps have not yet been shown to offer superior glucose control compared to MDI insulin, and thus many healthcare practitioners and health insurance companies are hesitant to adopt such a practice; however, insulin pumps often facilitate ease of usage of insulin and promote postpartum insulin use when indicated. Although only a small percentage of pregnant women with diabetes in the United States currently use insulin pumps, we believe that insulin pumps may represent a superior mode of insulin delivery for many women with diabetes in pregnancy.

  2. Continuous infusion of the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonist EVP-6124 produces no signs of tolerance at memory-enhancing doses in rats: a pharmacokinetic and behavioral study.

    PubMed

    van Goethem, Nick P; Prickaerts, Jos; Welty, Devin; Flood, Dorothy G; Koenig, Gerhard

    2015-06-01

    We investigated whether the effects of acutely administered EVP-6124, an α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7 nAChR) agonist, on cognition were maintained after 6-day continuous minipump administration. Performance in a delay-dependent forgetting test was measured in the object recognition task after single-oral doses of 0.3 or 1 mg/kg, or at plasma steady-state concentrations (Css) of 0.6 or 2 ng/ml, which were similar to the efficacious plasma concentrations after single-oral dosing. The 0.3 mg/kg acute dose enhanced memory at a total plasma concentration of ∼0.3 ng/ml at 1-4 h after dosing. Continuous treatment produced total plasma Css values of 0.48 and 1.93 ng/ml on day 6 and enhanced memory. At EVP-6124 plasma concentrations that optimally enhance memory in the object recognition task, tolerance did not develop after 6 days of continuous treatment.

  3. The insulin receptor concept and its relation to the treatment of diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ward, G M

    1987-02-01

    The initial step in insulin action is binding to specific receptors. Two covalent receptor modifications possibly involved in producing pharmacodynamic effects as a result of insulin receptor binding are autophosphorylation and disulphide insulin binding. Insulin receptor numbers are 'down regulated' by insulin, but this effect may be minimised by pulsatile insulin secretion. Insulin receptor affinity is modulated rapidly by fasting, exercise and dietary composition. In non-insulin-dependent diabetes coupling of receptor binding to bioeffects is impaired. Binding is also reduced in those subjects with hyperinsulinaemia and non-insulin-dependent diabetes. Insulin-dependent diabetics have reduced insulin sensitivity, which is only partially reversed by conventional insulin therapy. 'Post-binding defects' in some diabetics could be related to defective covalent receptor modifications resulting from genetic receptor defects. High carbohydrate diets improve diabetes control through effects on the binding and coupling defects. In addition to stimulating insulin secretion, oral hypoglycaemics stimulate post-binding insulin action in vivo and in vitro. Insulin therapy in diabetes also tends to reverse post-binding defects. Pulsatile insulin delivery is more effective in lowering blood sugar than continuous administration, and produces less 'down regulation' of receptors. Combined insulin and sulphonylurea drugs reduce insulin requirements only in insulin-dependent diabetics with some endogenous insulin secretion, whereas metformin reduces insulin requirement in C-peptide negative insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

  4. [Usefulness of Bolus Administration Using the FLEX Mode(Bolus Infusion Mode)for Baclofen Tolerance].

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Kazunori

    2017-02-01

    Intrathecal baclofen(ITB)is used to treat intractable spasticity of various etiologies and can provide better control of spasticity through the adjustment of the dose administered through the pump. However, in patients who develop tolerance to baclofen with the standard simple continuous mode, a sharp increase in dose becomes necessary, and spasticity can become harder to control. We investigated whether switching from the simple continuous mode to the bolus infusion mode was effective in controlling spasticity in patients with baclofen tolerance. We reported four patients undergoing ITB therapy at our facility who were considered to have developed baclofen tolerance. We observed the number of bolus infusions and total dose suitable for maintaining spasticity control after switching from the simple continuous mode to the bolus infusion mode. After switching to the bolus infusion mode, the total dose could be reduced in the short term; however, in the long term, the frequency of bolus infusions had to be increased to maintain spasticity control. Two years after changing to bolus infusion six times a day, the total dose was higher than that in the simple continuous mode for two of the four patients, and was the same level in the other two patients. Our four cases suggest that bolus infusion is effective in patients with baclofen tolerance during ITB therapy. Therefore, the conditions of bolus infusion should be further investigated.

  5. The intriguing effects of time to glycemic goal in newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes after short-term intensive insulin therapy.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Lin; Xu, Mingtong; Lin, Xiuhong; Tang, Juying; Qi, Yiqin; Wan, Yan; Pan, Xiaofang; Chen, Xiaoyun; Ren, Meng; Yan, Li

    2016-08-31

    Short-term intensive insulin therapy is effective for type 2 diabetes because it offers the potential to achieve excellent glycemic control and improve β-cell function. We observed that the time to glycemic goal (TGG) was adjustable. Original data of 138 newly diagnosed type 2 diabetic patients received intensive insulin therapy by continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion for 2-3 weeks were retrospectively collected. Subjects underwent an intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT) and an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) pre and post treatment. The glycemic goal was achieved within 6 (4-8) days. Patients were divided into two groups by TGG above (TGG-slow) and below (TGG-fast) the median value. Patients in both groups had significantly better glycemic control. Compared with TGG-fast, TGG-slow required a few more total insulin and performed more improvement of HOMA-β and IVGTT-AUCIns, but less improvement of HOMA-IR and QUICKI. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that TGG was always an explanatory variable for the changes (HOMA-β, IVGTT-AUCIns, HOMA-IR and QUICKI). The hypoglycemia prevalence was lower in TGG-slow (1.48% vs. 3.40%, P<0.01). Multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated that individuals in TGG-slow had a lower risk of hypoglycemia (adjusted OR, 0.700; 95% CI, 0.567-0.864; P<0.05). Multiple linear regression analysis confirmed that the ratio of the incremental insulin to glucose responses over the first 30 min during OGTT (ΔIns30/ΔG30), average insulin dose before achieving targets, initial insulin dose and LDL-c were independent predictors for TGG. It is intriguing to hypothesize that patients with fast time to glycemic goal benefit more in improving insulin sensitivity, but patients with slow time benefit more in improving β-cell function and reducing the risk of hypoglycemia.

  6. Effect of combined application insulin and insulin detemir on continous glucose monitor in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiao-Yun; Dong, Qing; Li, Gui-Mei

    2015-01-01

    Insulin detemir is a soluble long-acting human insulin analogue at neutral pH with a unique mechanism of action, which could strengthen the effects of insulin. This study aims to explore the effects of insulin combined with insulin detemir on the continous glucose in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus. In this study, 150 patients with type 1 diabetes enrolled were included and randomly divided into 3 groups: insulin group (group A), insulin detemir group (group B) and insulin combined with insulin detemir group (group C). Each subject underwent 72 h of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM). MAGE, HbA1c and Noctumal Hypoglycemia levels were examined by using the ELISA kits. The body weight changes were also detected in this study. The results indicated that the information including age, body weight, disease duration and glucose level and HbA1c percentage on the start time point among three groups indicated no statistical differences. Insulin combined with insulin detemir decrease MAGE and HbA1c level in Group C compared to Group A and Group A (P < 0.05). Insulin combined with insulin detemir decreas noctumal hypoglycemia levels and body weight changes (P < 0.05). In conclusion, this study confirmed efficacy of insulin detemir by demonstrating non-inferiority of insulin detemir compared with insulin with respect to HbA1c, with an improved safety profile including significantly fewer hypoglycaemic episodes and less undesirable weight gain in children. PMID:26064343

  7. Circulating obestatin concentration is lowered by insulin in rats.

    PubMed

    Huang, J; Zhang, Y; Yu, S; Gan, X; Su, Y; Yuan, J; An, R

    2012-01-01

    Circulating obestatin is lowered by food intake, but factors involved in obestatin regulation remain unclear. The aim of this study was to determine whether intravenous glucose or insulin infusion lowers obestatin. Rats were infused over 3 h with either A. saline (controls); B. dextrose to steady state blood glucose ~16.7 mM, or C. insulin 7.5 mU/kg.min, plus dextrose as needed to clamp to euglycemic basal concentrations. During 3 h of infusion, group B had significantly greater (P<0.01) glucose, 18.75±1.27 mM, than groups A (6.10±0.33 mM) or C (6.19±0.18 mM). Groups B and C had hyperinsulinemia at the end of the 3 h infusion (1.02±0.03 ng/ml, 1.07±0.02 ng/ml) compared with saline-infused (0.38±0.01 ng/ml, P<0.01). Obestatin concentrations were significantly reduced (P<0.01) in both hyperinsulinemic groups and (B=0.95±0.06 ng/ml; C=0.87±0.04 ng/ml) versus controls (1.56±0.13 ng/ml). These data suggest that insulin can decrease the plasma obestatin levels.

  8. Insulin amyloid at injection sites of patients with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Melanie R

    2016-09-01

    The formation of insulin amyloid can dramatically impact glycemic control in patients with diabetes, making it an important therapeutic consideration. In addition, the cost associated with the excess insulin required by patients with amyloid is estimated to be $3K per patient per year, which adds to the growing financial burden of this disease. Insulin amyloid has been observed with every mode of therapeutic insulin administration (infusion, injection and inhalation), and the number of reported cases has increased significantly since 2002. The new cases represent a much broader demographic, and include many patients who have used exclusively human insulin and human insulin analogs. The reason for the increase in case reports is unknown, but this review explores the possibility that changes in patient care, improved differential diagnosis and/or changes in insulin type and insulin delivery systems may be important factors. The goal of this review is to raise key questions that will inspire proactive measures to prevent, identify and treat insulin amyloid. Furthermore, this comprehensive examination of insulin amyloid can provide insight into important considerations for other injectable drugs that are prone to form amyloid deposits.

  9. The use of a volumetric infusion pump for the intra-arterial infusion of drugs.

    PubMed

    Cooper, A M; Lilliman, M

    1985-01-01

    Volumetric infusion pumps are widely used for intravenous infusions. We have extended their use to the intra-arterial infusion of drugs. An in vitro evaluation of the performance of such devices, under experimental conditions comparable to an intra-arterial infusion, was carried out. The results obtained confirmed the accuracy of volumetric infusion pumps for intra-arterial infusions. The system was found to be safe, reliable and simple in clinical practice.

  10. 21 CFR 522.1160 - Insulin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Insulin. 522.1160 Section 522.1160 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.1160 Insulin....

  11. 21 CFR 522.1160 - Insulin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Insulin. 522.1160 Section 522.1160 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.1160 Insulin....

  12. Acyl Ghrelin Induces Insulin Resistance Independently of GH, Cortisol, and Free Fatty Acids

    PubMed Central

    Vestergaard, Esben T.; Jessen, Niels; Møller, Niels; Jørgensen, Jens Otto Lunde

    2017-01-01

    Ghrelin produced in the gut stimulates GH and ACTH secretion from the pituitary and also stimulates appetite and gastric emptying. We have shown that ghrelin also induces insulin resistance via GH-independent mechanisms, but it is unknown if this effect depends on ambient fatty acid (FFA) levels. We investigated the impact of ghrelin and pharmacological antilipolysis (acipimox) on insulin sensitivity and substrate metabolism in 8 adult hypopituitary patients on stable replacement with GH and hydrocortisone using a 2 × 2 factorial design: Ghrelin infusion, saline infusion, ghrelin plus short-term acipimox, and acipimox alone. Peripheral and hepatic insulin sensitivity was determined with a hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp in combination with a glucose tracer infusion. Insulin signaling was assayed in muscle biopsies. Peripheral insulin sensitivity was reduced by ghrelin independently of ambient FFA concentrations and was increased by acipimox independently of ghrelin. Hepatic insulin sensitivity was increased by acipimox. Insulin signaling pathways in skeletal muscle were not consistently regulated by ghrelin. Our data demonstrate that ghrelin induces peripheral insulin resistance independently of GH, cortisol, and FFA. The molecular mechanisms remain elusive, but we speculate that ghrelin is a hitherto unrecognized direct regulator of substrate metabolism. We also suggest that acipimox per se improves hepatic insulin sensitivity. PMID:28198428

  13. Meal-induced enhancement in insulin sensitivity is not triggered by hyperinsulinemia in rats.

    PubMed

    Peitl, Barna; Döbrönte, Róbert; Németh, József; Pankucsi, Csaba; Sári, Réka; Varga, Angelika; Szilvássy, Zoltán

    2009-03-01

    Several reports confirmed the phenomenon of postprandial increase in whole-body insulin sensitivity. Although the initial step of this process is unknown, the pivotal role of postprandial hyperinsulinemia has strongly been suggested. The aim of the present study was to determine whether hyperinsulinemia per se induces insulin sensitization in healthy male Wistar rats. Rapid insulin sensitivity test (RIST) were performed in fasted, anesthetized rats before and during stable hyperinsulinemia achieved by hyperinsulinemic euglycemic glucose clamping (HEGC) with insulin infused either through the jugular vein (systemic HEGC) or into the portal circulation (portal HEGC) at a rate of 3 mU/(kg min). Insulin sensitivity expressed by the rapid insulin sensitivity (RIST) index (in milligrams per kilogram) was characterized by the total amount of glucose needed to maintain prestudy blood glucose level succeeding an intravenous bolus infusion of 50 mU/kg insulin over 5 minutes. In fasted animals, the RIST index was 37.4 +/- 3.1 mg/kg. When hyperinsulinemia mimicking the postprandial state was achieved by systemic HEGC, the RIST index (39.7 +/- 10.6 mg/kg) showed no significant changes as compared with the pre-HEGC values. Hyperinsulinemia achieved by portal insulin infusion also failed to modify the RIST index (35.7 +/- 4.3 mg/kg). The results demonstrate that acute hyperinsulinemia, no matter how induced, does not yield any sensitization to the hypoglycemic effect of insulin.

  14. [The intraosseous infusion in adult].

    PubMed

    Plancade, D; Rüttimann, M; Wagnon, G; Landy, C; Schaeffer, E; Gagnon, N; Nadaud, J; Favier, J-C

    2013-05-01

    Intraosseous infusion is an old knowledge, abandoned in the 1950s in favor of the peripheral vein, and it was essentially described in pediatrics and military medicine. Since 2005, this way is experiencing a resurgence of interest in emergency medicine particularly in adults after the failure's installation of a peripheral vein in order not to waste the time of care and administration of treatment. New devices that allow intraosseous infusion are currently used in humans. We propose to review the different kind of catheters used, to know the main technical characteristics, indications, contraindications and potential complications. We propose a comparison with the peripheral vein and a comparison between the different catheters.

  15. [Inadvertent epidural infusion of paracetamol].

    PubMed

    Charco Roca, L M; Ortiz Sánchez, V E; del Pino Moreno, A L

    2014-10-01

    A 45-year-old woman was accidentally administered an epidural infusion of paracetamol instead of levobupivacaine for postoperative pain therapy during the postoperative period of abdominal hysterectomy under general anesthesia combined with epidural analgesia. The patient had no neurological symptoms at any time, although a slight tendency to arterial hypotension that did not require treatment was observed. No rescue analgesia was necessary until 8h after the start of epidural infusion. The incidence of these types of errors is probably underestimated, although there are several cases reported with various drugs.

  16. Clinical Efficacy of Two Different Methods to Initiate Sensor-Augmented Insulin Pumps: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Gómez, Francisco Javier; Gálvez Moreno, Maria Ángeles; Castaño, Justo P.

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To analyze clinical effect of a novel approach to initiate sensor-augmented insulin pumps in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) patients through early real-time continuous glucose monitoring (RT-CGM) initiation. Methods. A 26-week pilot study with T1DM subjects randomized (1 : 1) to start RT-CGM three weeks before continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CGM pre-CSII) or adding RT-CGM three weeks after continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CGM post-CSII). Results. Twenty-two patients were enrolled with a mean age of 36.6 yr. (range 19–59 yr.) and T1DM duration of 16.8 ± 10.6 yr. Higher adherence in CGM pre-CSII patients was confirmed at study end (84.6 ± 11.1% versus 64.0 ± 25.4%; P = 0.01). The two intervention groups had similar HbA1c reduction at study end of −0.6% (P = 0.9). Hypoglycemic event frequency reduction was observed from baseline to study end only in CGM pre-CSII group (mean difference in change, −6.3%; 95% confidence interval, −12.0 to −0.5; P = 0.04). Moreover, no severe hypoglycemia was detected among CGM pre-CSII subjects during the study follow-up (0.0 ± 0.0 events versus 0.63 ± 1.0 events; P = 0.03). CGM pre-CSII patients showed better satisfaction than CGM post-CSII patients at the end of the study (27.3 ± 9.3 versus 32.9 ± 7.2; P = 0.04). Conclusions. CGM pre-CSII is a novel approach to improve glycemic control and satisfaction in type 1 diabetes sensor-augmented pump treated patients. PMID:28004007

  17. The impact of a pure protein load on the glucose levels in type 1 diabetes patients treated with insulin pumps.

    PubMed

    Klupa, Tomasz; Benbenek-Klupa, Teresa; Matejko, Bartlomiej; Mrozinska, Sandra; Malecki, Maciej T

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to estimate the impact of ingestion of a pure protein load on the glucose levels in T1DM patients treated with insulin pumps. We examined 10 T1DM patients (6 females, mean age-32.3 years, mean HbA1c-6.8%) treated with insulin pumps equipped with a continuous glucose monitoring system (CGMS). In Phase I, baseline insulin infusion was optimized to minimize the differences in fasting glucose levels to less than 30 mg/dL between any two time points between 9 a.m. and 3 p.m. In Phase II, the patients were exposed to single pure protein load. CGMS record was performed and the glucose pattern was defined for 6 hours of each phase. The maximal glucose level increment was similar for the entire duration of the fasting and the protein load test (26.6 versus 27.6 mg/dL, resp., P < 0.78). There was only a borderline difference in change between baseline versus 6th hour glucose (12.5 and 19.0 mg/dL, P = 0.04). Glucose variability, assessed by standard deviation of mean glucose levels, was 36.4 and 37.9 mg/dL, respectively (P = 0.01). The administration of a pure protein load does not seem to have a clinically significant impact on glucose levels in T1DM patients treated with insulin pumps.

  18. The Impact of a Pure Protein Load on the Glucose Levels in Type 1 Diabetes Patients Treated with Insulin Pumps

    PubMed Central

    Klupa, Tomasz; Benbenek-Klupa, Teresa; Matejko, Bartlomiej; Mrozinska, Sandra; Malecki, Maciej T.

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to estimate the impact of ingestion of a pure protein load on the glucose levels in T1DM patients treated with insulin pumps. We examined 10 T1DM patients (6 females, mean age—32.3 years, mean HbA1c—6.8%) treated with insulin pumps equipped with a continuous glucose monitoring system (CGMS). In Phase I, baseline insulin infusion was optimized to minimize the differences in fasting glucose levels to less than 30 mg/dL between any two time points between 9 a.m. and 3 p.m. In Phase II, the patients were exposed to single pure protein load. CGMS record was performed and the glucose pattern was defined for 6 hours of each phase. The maximal glucose level increment was similar for the entire duration of the fasting and the protein load test (26.6 versus 27.6 mg/dL, resp., P < 0.78). There was only a borderline difference in change between baseline versus 6th hour glucose (12.5 and 19.0 mg/dL, P = 0.04). Glucose variability, assessed by standard deviation of mean glucose levels, was 36.4 and 37.9 mg/dL, respectively (P = 0.01). The administration of a pure protein load does not seem to have a clinically significant impact on glucose levels in T1DM patients treated with insulin pumps. PMID:25767510

  19. Effect of N-acetyl-l-cysteine on insulin resistance caused by prolonged free fatty acid elevation.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Sandra; Shah, Anu; George Fantus, I; Joseph, Jamie W; Giacca, Adria

    2015-04-01

    Circulating free fatty acids (FFAs) are elevated in obesity and cause insulin resistance. The objective of the current study was to determine whether the antioxidant N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) prevented hepatic and peripheral insulin resistance caused by prolonged elevation of plasma FFAs. Chronically cannulated Wistar rats received saline (SAL), Intralipid plus heparin (IH), IH plus NAC, or NAC i.v. infusion for 48 h. Insulin sensitivity was determined using the hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp with tritiated glucose tracer. IH induced hepatic and peripheral insulin resistance (P<0.05). NAC co-infusion did not prevent insulin resistance in the liver, although it was able to prevent peripheral insulin resistance. Prolonged IH infusion did not appear to induce oxidative stress in the liver because hepatic content of protein carbonyl, malondialdehyde, and reduced to oxidized glutathione ratio did not differ across treatment groups. In alignment with our insulin sensitivity results, IH augmented skeletal muscle protein carbonyl content and this was prevented by NAC co-infusion. Taken together, our results indicate that oxidative stress mediates peripheral, but not hepatic, insulin resistance resulting from prolonged plasma FFA elevation. Thus, in states of chronic plasma FFA elevation, such as obesity, antioxidants may protect against peripheral but not hepatic insulin resistance.

  20. Theophylline prevents the inhibitory effect of prostaglandin E2 on glucose-induced insulin secretion in man.

    PubMed

    Giugliano, D; Cozzolino, D; Salvatore, T; Giunta, R; Torella, R

    1988-06-01

    This study was undertaken to assess the mechanism by which prostaglandins of the E series inhibit glucose-induced insulin secretion in man. Acute insulin response (mean change 3-10 min) to iv glucose (0.33 g/kg) was decreased by 40% during the infusion of prostaglandin E2 (10 micrograms/min) and glucose disappearance rates were reduced (P less than 0.05). Insulin response to arginine (5 g iv) and tolbutamide (1 g iv) were not affected by the same rate of prostaglandin E2 infusion. The inhibitory effect of prostaglandin E2 on glucose-induced insulin secretion was prevented by theophylline (100 mg as a loading dose followed by a 5 mg/min infusion), a drug that increases the intracellular cAMP concentrations by inhibiting phosphodiesterase activity. Our data suggest the involvement of the adenylate cyclase system in the inhibitory action of prostaglandin E2 on glucose-induced insulin secretion in man.

  1. Giving an insulin injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... want. Put the needle into and through the rubber top of the insulin bottle. Push the plunger ... longer-acting insulin. Put the needle into the rubber top of that insulin bottle. Push the plunger ...

  2. Insulin acts in the arcuate nucleus to increase lumbar sympathetic nerve activity and baroreflex function in rats

    PubMed Central

    Cassaglia, Priscila A; Hermes, Sam M; Aicher, Sue A; Brooks, Virginia L

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Although the central effects of insulin to activate the sympathetic nervous system and enhance baroreflex gain are well known, the specific brain site(s) at which insulin acts has not been identified. We tested the hypotheses that (1) the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) and the arcuate nucleus (ArcN) are necessary brain sites and (2) insulin initiates its effects directly in the PVN and/or the ArcN. In α-chloralose anaesthetised female Sprague–Dawley rats, mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR) and lumbar sympathetic nerve activity (LSNA) were recorded continuously, and baroreflex gain of HR and LSNA were measured before and during a hyperinsulinaemic–euglycaemic clamp. After 60 min, intravenous infusion of insulin (15 mU kg−1 min−1), but not saline, significantly increased (P < 0.05) basal LSNA (to 228 ± 28% control) and gain of baroreflex control of LSNA (from 3.8 ± 1.1 to 7.4 ± 2.4% control mmHg−1). These effects were reversed (P < 0.05) by local inhibition (bilateral microinjection of musimol) of the PVN (LSNA to 124 ± 8.8% control; LSNA gain to 3.9 ± 1.7% control mmHg−1) or of the ArcN (LSNA in % control: from 100 ± 0 to 198 ± 24 (insulin), then 133 ± 23 (muscimol) LSNA gain in % control mmHg−1: from 3.9 ± 0.3 to 8.9 ± 0.9 (insulin), then 5.1 ± 0.5 (muscimol)). While insulin receptor immunoreactivity was identified in neurons in pre-autonomic PVN subnuclei, microinjection of insulin (0.6, 6 and 60 nU) into the PVN failed to alter LSNA or LSNA gain. However, ArcN insulin increased (P < 0.05) basal LSNA (in % control to 162 ± 19, 0.6 nU; 193 ± 19, 6 nU; and 205 ± 28, 60 nU) and LSNA baroreflex gain (in % control mmHg−1 from 4.3 ± 1.2 to 6.9 ± 1.0, 0.6 nU; 7.7 ± 1.2, 6 nU; and 7.8 ± 1.3, 60 nU). None of the treatments altered MAP, HR, or baroreflex control of HR. Our findings identify the ArcN as the site at which insulin acts to activate the sympathetic nervous system and increase baroreflex

  3. Beyond the era of NPH insulin--long-acting insulin analogs: chemistry, comparative pharmacology, and clinical application.

    PubMed

    Owens, D R; Bolli, G B

    2008-10-01

    duration >or=24 h, (2) a single subcutaneous dose of glargine/detemir was used, and (3) area under the curve for insulin concentrations or glucose infusion rates were calculated.

  4. Insulin management of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Petznick, Allison

    2011-07-15

    Insulin therapy is recommended for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and an initial A1C level greater than 9 percent, or if diabetes is uncontrolled despite optimal oral glycemic therapy. Insulin therapy may be initiated as augmentation, starting at 0.3 unit per kg, or as replacement, starting at 0.6 to 1.0 unit per kg. When using replacement therapy, 50 percent of the total daily insulin dose is given as basal, and 50 percent as bolus, divided up before breakfast, lunch, and dinner. Augmentation therapy can include basal or bolus insulin. Replacement therapy includes basal-bolus insulin and correction or premixed insulin. Glucose control, adverse effects, cost, adherence, and quality of life need to be considered when choosing therapy. Metformin should be continued if possible because it is proven to reduce all-cause mortality and cardiovascular events in overweight patients with diabetes. In a study comparing premixed, bolus, and basal insulin, hypoglycemia was more common with premixed and bolus insulin, and weight gain was more common with bolus insulin. Titration of insulin over time is critical to improving glycemic control and preventing diabetes-related complications.

  5. Clinical utility of insulin and insulin analogs

    PubMed Central

    Sanlioglu, Ahter D.; Altunbas, Hasan Ali; Balci, Mustafa Kemal; Griffith, Thomas S.; Sanlioglu, Salih

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes is a pandemic disease characterized by autoimmune, genetic and metabolic abnormalities. While insulin deficiency manifested as hyperglycemia is a common sequel of both Type-1 and Type-2 diabetes (T1DM and T2DM), it does not result from a single genetic defect—rather insulin deficiency results from the functional loss of pancreatic β cells due to multifactorial mechanisms. Since pancreatic β cells of patients with T1DM are destroyed by autoimmune reaction, these patients require daily insulin injections. Insulin resistance followed by β cell dysfunction and β cell loss is the characteristics of T2DM. Therefore, most patients with T2DM will require insulin treatment due to eventual loss of insulin secretion. Despite the evidence of early insulin treatment lowering macrovascular (coronary artery disease, peripheral arterial disease and stroke) and microvascular (diabetic nephropathy, neuropathy and retinopathy) complications of T2DM, controversy exists among physicians on how to initiate and intensify insulin therapy. The slow acting nature of regular human insulin makes its use ineffective in counteracting postprandial hyperglycemia. Instead, recombinant insulin analogs have been generated with a variable degree of specificity and action. Due to the metabolic variability among individuals, optimum blood glucose management is a formidable task to accomplish despite the presence of novel insulin analogs. In this article, we present a recent update on insulin analog structure and function with an overview of the evidence on the various insulin regimens clinically used to treat diabetes. PMID:23584214

  6. Infusing Technology throughout Teacher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maliski, Susanne; Bartell, Carol; Gathercoal, Paul

    This paper reports on overall accomplishments in meeting goals for technology infusion at California Lutheran University's School of Education, using evaluation data collected over 3 years. Data came from surveys completed by administrators, faculty, and students about their experiences using technology at baseline (1997) and over the next 3…

  7. Cerebral oxygenation following epinephrine infusion.

    PubMed

    Steinback, Craig D; Zubin, Petra; Breskovic, Toni; Bakovic, Darija; Pivac, Nediljko; Dujic, Zeljko

    2012-10-15

    Evidence suggests that the autonomic nervous system may actively regulate the cerebral vasculature. In this study, central hemodynamics and brain oxy-hemoglobin, deoxy-hemoglobin and total hemoglobin changes (bO₂Hb, bdHb and bTHb) were monitored during infusion of epinephrine (0.06 μg/kg/min over 6 min, and 0.12 μg/kg/min for 3 min) in 12 men. Epinephrine decreased mean arterial pressure (MAP) and total peripheral resistance (TPR), while heart rate (HR), stroke volume (SV) and cardiac output (CO) increased, but did not affect bO₂Hb, bdHb or bTHb. However, upon the cessation of epinephrine infusion an increase in both Oxy- and Total Hb occurred which peaked at 3 min post infusion (+6.0±4.6 and +4.9±4.8 μmol/L respectively, P<0.05) and persisted for 20 min post infusion (+1.5±2.2 and +1.8±2.7 μmol/L respectively, P<0.05). No evidence was found for reduction in cerebral oxygenation during a cold-pressor test. The results of the present study demonstrated that clinical doses of epinephrine result in a delayed increase in cortical blood volume due to an increase in Oxy-Hb, consistent with vasodilation.

  8. Infusing Culture in Career Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arthur, Nancy; Collins, Sandra

    2011-01-01

    This article introduces the culture-infused career counselling (CICC) model. Six principles are foundational to a tripartite model emphasizing cultural self-awareness, awareness of client cultural identities, and development of a culturally sensitive working alliance. The core competencies ensure the cultural validity and relevance of career…

  9. Microcomputer Infusion Project: A Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossberg, Stephen A.; Bitter, Gary G.

    1988-01-01

    Describes the Microcomputer Infusion Project (MIP), which was developed at Arizona State University to provide faculty with the necessary hardware, software, and training to become models of computer use in both lesson development and presentation for preservice teacher education students. Topics discussed include word processing; database…

  10. High-dose insulin therapy for neurogenic-stunned myocardium after stroke

    PubMed Central

    Devos, Justine; Peeters, André; Wittebole, Xavier; Hantson, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    A 44-year-old woman with a history of complicated type 2 diabetes mellitus presented with a diagnosis of right-hemispheric ischaemic stroke. She developed acute respiratory distress with radiological evidence of pulmonary oedema. The ECG showed poorly significant ST-segment changes, with a minimal increase of cardiac biomarkers. Echocardiography showed a severely depressed left ventricular function, with also low values of cardiac output at invasive monitoring. The possibility of neurogenic-stunned myocardium was discussed and a metabolic resuscitation with high-dose insulin was proposed. An intravenous bolus of 80 units of insulin (0.72 IU/kg) was followed by a continuous infusion at the rate of 160 IU/h (1.45 IU/kg/h). The treatment led to a rapid and sustained improvement of the haemodynamic condition and was well tolerated. In comparison with dobutamine, insulin had significant inotropic effects without tachycardia. The patient unfortunately died on day 35, from respiratory complications after poor neurological recovery. PMID:23175002

  11. Inhibition of MEK1 Signaling Pathway in the Liver Ameliorates Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Ueyama, Atsunori; Ban, Nobuhiro; Fukazawa, Masanori; Hirayama, Tohru; Takeda, Minako; Yata, Tatsuo; Muramatsu, Hiroyasu; Hoshino, Masaki; Yamamoto, Marii; Matsuo, Masao; Kawashima, Yuka; Iwase, Tatsuhiko; Kitazawa, Takehisa; Kushima, Youichi; Yamada, Yuichiro; Kawabe, Yoshiki

    2016-01-01

    Although mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) is a key signaling molecule and a negative regulator of insulin action, it is still uncertain whether MEK can be a therapeutic target for amelioration of insulin resistance (IR) in type 2 diabetes (T2D) in vivo. To clarify whether MEK inhibition improves T2D, we examined the effect of continuous MEK inhibition with two structurally different MEK inhibitors, RO5126766 and RO4987655, in mouse models of T2D. RO5126766 and RO4987655 were administered via dietary admixture. Both compounds decreased blood glucose and improved glucose tolerance in doses sufficient to sustain inhibition of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 phosphorylation downstream of MEK in insulin-responsive tissues in db/db mice. A hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp test showed increased glucose infusion rate (GIR) in db/db mice treated with these compounds, and about 60% of the increase was attributed to the inhibition of endogenous glucose production, suggesting that the liver is responsible for the improvement of IR. By means of adenovirus-mediated Mek1 shRNA expression, we confirmed that blood glucose levels are reduced by suppression of MEK1 expression in the liver of db/db mice. Taken together, these results suggested that the MEK signaling pathway could be a novel therapeutic target for novel antidiabetic agents. PMID:26839898

  12. The effect of carbohydrate availability following exercise on whole-body insulin action.

    PubMed

    Holtz, Kaila A; Stephens, Brooke R; Sharoff, Carrie G; Chipkin, Stuart R; Braun, Barry

    2008-10-01

    One bout of exercise enhances insulin-stimulated glucose uptake (insulin action), but the effect is blunted by consumption of carbohydrate-containing food after exercise. The independent roles of energy and carbohydrate in mediating post-exercise insulin action have not been systematically evaluated in humans. The purpose of this study was to determine if varying carbohydrate availability, with energy intake held constant, mediates post-exercise insulin action. Ten young (21 +/- 2 y, overweight (body fat 37% +/- 3%) men and women completed 3 conditions in random order: (i) no-exercise (BASE), (ii) exercise with energy balance but carbohydrate deficit (C-DEF), and (iii) exercise with energy and carbohydrate balance (C-BAL). In the exercise conditions, subjects expended 30% of total daily energy expenditure on a cycle ergometer at 70% VO2 peak. Following exercise, subjects consumed a meal that replaced expended energy (~3000 kJ) and was either balanced (intake = expenditure) or deficient (-100 g) in carbohydrate. Twelve hours later, insulin action was measured by continuous infusion of glucose with stable isotope tracer (CIG-SIT). Changes in insulin action were evaluated using a one-way ANOVA with repeated measures. During CIG-SIT, non-oxidative glucose disposal (i.e., glucose storage) was higher in C-DEF than in BASE (27.2 +/- 3.2 vs. 16.9 +/- 3.5 micromol.L-1.kg-1.min-1, p < 0.05). Conversely, glucose oxidation was lower in C-DEF (8.6 +/- 1.3 micromol.L-1.kg-1.min-1) compared with C-BAL (12.2 +/- 1.2 micromol.L-1.kg-1.min-1), and BASE (17.1 +/- 2.2 micromol.L-1.kg-1.min-1), p < 0.05). Fasting fat oxidation was higher in C-DEF than in BASE (109.8 +/- 10.5 vs. 80.7 +/- 9.6 mg.min-1, p < 0.05). In C-DEF, enhanced insulin action was correlated with the magnitude of the carbohydrate deficit (r = 0.82, p < 0.01). Following exercise, re-feeding expended energy, but not carbohydrate, increased fasting fat oxidation, and shifted insulin-mediated glucose disposal toward

  13. Anesthesia with propofol induces insulin resistance systemically in skeletal and cardiac muscles and liver of rats

    SciTech Connect

    Yasuda, Yoshikazu; Fukushima, Yuji; Kaneki, Masao; Martyn, J.A. Jeevendra

    2013-02-01

    Highlights: ► Propofol, as a model anesthetic drug, induced whole body insulin resistance. ► Propofol anesthesia decreased glucose infusion rate to maintain euglycemia. ► Propofol decreased insulin-mediated glucose uptake in skeletal and cardiac muscles. ► Propofol increased hepatic glucose output confirming hepatic insulin resistance. -- Abstract: Hyperglycemia together with hepatic and muscle insulin resistance are common features in critically ill patients, and these changes are associated with enhanced inflammatory response, increased susceptibility to infection, muscle wasting, and worsened prognosis. Tight blood glucose control by intensive insulin treatment may reduce the morbidity and mortality in intensive care units. Although some anesthetics have been shown to cause insulin resistance, it remains unknown how and in which tissues insulin resistance is induced by anesthetics. Moreover, the effects of propofol, a clinically relevant intravenous anesthetic, also used in the intensive care unit for sedation, on insulin sensitivity have not yet been investigated. Euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp study was performed in rats anesthetized with propofol and conscious unrestrained rats. To evaluate glucose uptake in tissues and hepatic glucose output [{sup 3}H]glucose and 2-deoxy[{sup 14}C]glucose were infused during the clamp study. Anesthesia with propofol induced a marked whole-body insulin resistance compared with conscious rats, as reflected by significantly decreased glucose infusion rate to maintain euglycemia. Insulin-stimulated tissue glucose uptake was decreased in skeletal muscle and heart, and hepatic glucose output was increased in propofol anesthetized rats. Anesthesia with propofol induces systemic insulin resistance along with decreases in insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in skeletal and heart muscle and attenuation of the insulin-mediated suppression of hepatic glucose output in rats.

  14. Short-term prednisone use antagonizes insulin's anabolic effect on muscle protein and glucose metabolism in young healthy people