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Sample records for continuous no-till management

  1. Integrating a complex rotation with no-till improves weed management in organic farming

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    No-till practices are restoring and protecting soil health, and are considered critical for achieving sustainability of global agriculture. Organic producers in the United States would like to no-till, but are concerned about managing weeds without tillage. In conventional agriculture, no-till imp...

  2. Conversion to No-Till Improves Maize Nitrogen Use Efficiency in a Continuous Cover Cropping System.

    PubMed

    Habbib, Hazzar; Verzeaux, Julien; Nivelle, Elodie; Roger, David; Lacoux, Jérôme; Catterou, Manuella; Hirel, Bertrand; Dubois, Frédéric; Tétu, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    A two-year experiment was conducted in the field to measure the combined impact of tilling and N fertilization on various agronomic traits related to nitrogen (N) use efficiency and to grain yield in maize cultivated in the presence of a cover crop. Four years after conversion to no-till, a significant increase in N use efficiency N harvest index, N remobilization and N remobilization efficiency was observed both under no and high N fertilization conditions. Moreover, we observed that grain yield and grain N content were higher under no-till conditions only when N fertilizers were applied. Thus, agronomic practices based on continuous no-till appear to be a promising for increasing N use efficiency in maize.

  3. Conversion to No-Till Improves Maize Nitrogen Use Efficiency in a Continuous Cover Cropping System

    PubMed Central

    Habbib, Hazzar; Verzeaux, Julien; Nivelle, Elodie; Roger, David; Lacoux, Jérôme; Catterou, Manuella; Hirel, Bertrand; Dubois, Frédéric; Tétu, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    A two-year experiment was conducted in the field to measure the combined impact of tilling and N fertilization on various agronomic traits related to nitrogen (N) use efficiency and to grain yield in maize cultivated in the presence of a cover crop. Four years after conversion to no-till, a significant increase in N use efficiency N harvest index, N remobilization and N remobilization efficiency was observed both under no and high N fertilization conditions. Moreover, we observed that grain yield and grain N content were higher under no-till conditions only when N fertilizers were applied. Thus, agronomic practices based on continuous no-till appear to be a promising for increasing N use efficiency in maize. PMID:27711154

  4. Effects of Long-Term Nitrogen Management on Nitrogen Budgets of Irrigated No-till Corn

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Effects of nitrogen management on irrigated no-till (NT) corn (Zea Mays L) yields were studied from the 1999 to 2015 growing seasons in a Fort Collins clay loam soil at the CSU ARDEC near Fort Collins, CO. The NT N fertilizer rates averaged 0, 34, 67, 134, 202 and 246 kg N ha-1. Fifteen corn plants...

  5. Bacterial indicator of agricultural management for soil under no-till crop production.

    PubMed

    Figuerola, Eva L M; Guerrero, Leandro D; Rosa, Silvina M; Simonetti, Leandro; Duval, Matías E; Galantini, Juan A; Bedano, José C; Wall, Luis G; Erijman, Leonardo

    2012-01-01

    The rise in the world demand for food poses a challenge to our ability to sustain soil fertility and sustainability. The increasing use of no-till agriculture, adopted in many areas of the world as an alternative to conventional farming, may contribute to reduce the erosion of soils and the increase in the soil carbon pool. However, the advantages of no-till agriculture are jeopardized when its use is linked to the expansion of crop monoculture. The aim of this study was to survey bacterial communities to find indicators of soil quality related to contrasting agriculture management in soils under no-till farming. Four sites in production agriculture, with different soil properties, situated across a west-east transect in the most productive region in the Argentinean pampas, were taken as the basis for replication. Working definitions of Good no-till Agricultural Practices (GAP) and Poor no-till Agricultural Practices (PAP) were adopted for two distinct scenarios in terms of crop rotation, fertilization, agrochemicals use and pest control. Non-cultivated soils nearby the agricultural sites were taken as additional control treatments. Tag-encoded pyrosequencing was used to deeply sample the 16S rRNA gene from bacteria residing in soils corresponding to the three treatments at the four locations. Although bacterial communities as a whole appeared to be structured chiefly by a marked biogeographic provincialism, the distribution of a few taxa was shaped as well by environmental conditions related to agricultural management practices. A statistically supported approach was used to define candidates for management-indicator organisms, subsequently validated using quantitative PCR. We suggest that the ratio between the normalized abundance of a selected group of bacteria within the GP1 group of the phylum Acidobacteria and the genus Rubellimicrobium of the Alphaproteobacteria may serve as a potential management-indicator to discriminate between sustainable vs. non

  6. Bacterial Indicator of Agricultural Management for Soil under No-Till Crop Production

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Silvina M.; Simonetti, Leandro; Duval, Matías E.; Galantini, Juan A.; Bedano, José C.; Wall, Luis G.; Erijman, Leonardo

    2012-01-01

    The rise in the world demand for food poses a challenge to our ability to sustain soil fertility and sustainability. The increasing use of no-till agriculture, adopted in many areas of the world as an alternative to conventional farming, may contribute to reduce the erosion of soils and the increase in the soil carbon pool. However, the advantages of no-till agriculture are jeopardized when its use is linked to the expansion of crop monoculture. The aim of this study was to survey bacterial communities to find indicators of soil quality related to contrasting agriculture management in soils under no-till farming. Four sites in production agriculture, with different soil properties, situated across a west-east transect in the most productive region in the Argentinean pampas, were taken as the basis for replication. Working definitions of Good no-till Agricultural Practices (GAP) and Poor no-till Agricultural Practices (PAP) were adopted for two distinct scenarios in terms of crop rotation, fertilization, agrochemicals use and pest control. Non-cultivated soils nearby the agricultural sites were taken as additional control treatments. Tag-encoded pyrosequencing was used to deeply sample the 16S rRNA gene from bacteria residing in soils corresponding to the three treatments at the four locations. Although bacterial communities as a whole appeared to be structured chiefly by a marked biogeographic provincialism, the distribution of a few taxa was shaped as well by environmental conditions related to agricultural management practices. A statistically supported approach was used to define candidates for management-indicator organisms, subsequently validated using quantitative PCR. We suggest that the ratio between the normalized abundance of a selected group of bacteria within the GP1 group of the phylum Acidobacteria and the genus Rubellimicrobium of the Alphaproteobacteria may serve as a potential management-indicator to discriminate between sustainable vs. non

  7. Potential effect of No-till management on carbon in the agricultural soils of the former Soviet Union

    SciTech Connect

    Gaston, G.G.; Kolchugina, T.; Vinson, T.S.

    1993-01-01

    Agricultural soils act as both a source and a sink for atmospheric carbon. Since the onset of cultivation, the 211.5 million ha of agricultural soils in the former Soviet Union (FSU) have lost 10.2 Gt of carbon. No-till management represents a promising option to increase the amount of carbon sequestered in the agricultural soil of the FSU. No-till management reduces erosion and sequesters additional carbon in the soil by lowering the soil temperature and raising soil moisture. To determine the carbon sequestered under no-till management, a data base containing precultivation estimates of soil carbon for the seven major classes of soil found in the agricultural areas of the FSU was used to establish an equilibrium carbon content for each soil. Other published data provided a method to quantify the change in soil carbon brought about by converting to no-till management. Soils suitable for no-till management were analyzed and estimates of changes in carbon storage were made. No-till management is not suitable in areas where crop production is limited by cold, wet soils. (Copyright (c) 1993 Elsevier Science Publishers B.V.)

  8. Using experimental and geospatial data to estimate regional carbon sequestration potential under no-till management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tan, Z.; Lal, R.; Liu, S.

    2006-01-01

    Conservation management of croplands at the plot scale has demonstrated a great potential to mitigate the greenhouse effect through sequestration of atmospheric carbon (C) into soil. This study estimated the potential of soil to sequester C through the conversion of croplands from conventional tillage (CT) to no-till (NT) in the East Central United States between 1992 and 2012. This study used the baseline soil organic C (SOC) pool (SOCP) inventory and the empirical models that describe the relationships of the SOCP under CT and NT, respectively, to their baseline SOCP in the upper 30-cm depth of soil. The baseline SOCP were obtained from the State Soil Geographic database, and the cropland distribution map was generated from the 1992 National Land Cover Database. The results indicate that if all the croplands under CT in 1992 were converted to NT, the SOCP would increase by 16.8% by 2012, which results in a total C sink of 136 Tg after 20 years. A greater sequestration rate would occur in soils with lower baseline SOCP, but the sink strength would be weaker with increasing SOCP levels. The CT-induced C sources tend to become larger in soils with higher baseline levels, which can be significantly reduced by adopting NT. We conclude that baseline SOC contents are an indicator of C sequestration potential with NT practices. ?? 2006 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.

  9. Managing cover crops in no-till organic systems using rolling technology

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In recent years use of cover crops in no-till organic production systems without incorporating them into the soil has been steadily increasing. This increase is associated with important benefits from cover crops left on the soil surface which improve soil properties and enhance main crop growth. Ro...

  10. Rye and vetch management for no-till snap bean production.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Planting no-till into cover crop residues left on the soil surface offers benefits of suppressing weeds, reducing soil erosion, and eliminating trips through the field. Adequate suppression of cover crops to prevent competition with the main crop can be challenging, particularly in organic systems w...

  11. Effects of a custom cover crop residue manager in a no-till cotton system

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cover crops are an important part of no-till conservation agriculture, and these crops must produce optimum biomass amounts to effectively protect the soil surface from erosion and runoff, conserve soil water, and provide a physical barrier against weeds. Because of the large amount of residue produ...

  12. Long-term no-till and stover retention each decrease the global warming potential of irrigated continuous corn.

    PubMed

    Jin, Virginia L; Schmer, Marty R; Stewart, Catherine E; Sindelar, Aaron J; Varvel, Gary E; Wienhold, Brian J

    2017-07-01

    Over the last 50 years, the most increase in cultivated land area globally has been due to a doubling of irrigated land. Long-term agronomic management impacts on soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks, soil greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, and global warming potential (GWP) in irrigated systems, however, remain relatively unknown. Here, residue and tillage management effects were quantified by measuring soil nitrous oxide (N2 O) and methane (CH4 ) fluxes and SOC changes (ΔSOC) at a long-term, irrigated continuous corn (Zea mays L.) system in eastern Nebraska, United States. Management treatments began in 2002, and measured treatments included no or high stover removal (0 or 6.8 Mg DM ha(-1)  yr(-1) , respectively) under no-till (NT) or conventional disk tillage (CT) with full irrigation (n = 4). Soil N2 O and CH4 fluxes were measured for five crop-years (2011-2015), and ΔSOC was determined on an equivalent mass basis to ~30 cm soil depth. Both area- and yield-scaled soil N2 O emissions were greater with stover retention compared to removal and for CT compared to NT, with no interaction between stover and tillage practices. Methane comprised <1% of total emissions, with NT being CH4 neutral and CT a CH4 source. Surface SOC decreased with stover removal and with CT after 14 years of management. When ΔSOC, soil GHG emissions, and agronomic energy usage were used to calculate system GWP, all management systems were net GHG sources. Conservation practices (NT, stover retention) each decreased system GWP compared to conventional practices (CT, stover removal), but pairing conservation practices conferred no additional mitigation benefit. Although cropping system, management equipment/timing/history, soil type, location, weather, and the depth to which ΔSOC is measured affect the GWP outcomes of irrigated systems at large, this long-term irrigated study provides valuable empirical evidence of how management decisions can impact soil GHG emissions and surface SOC

  13. Cover crops and crop residue management under no-till systems improve soils and environmental quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sandeep; Wegner, Brianna; Vahyala, Ibrahim; Osborne, Shannon; Schumacher, Thomas; Lehman, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Crop residue harvest is a common practice in the Midwestern USA for the ethanol production. However, excessive removal of crop residues from the soil surface contributes to the degradation of important soil quality indicators such as soil organic carbon (SOC). Addition of a cover crop may help to mitigate these negative effects. The present study was set up to assess the impacts of corn (Zea mays L.) residue removal and cover crops on various soil quality indicators and surface greenhouse gas (GHG) fluxes. The study was being conducted on plots located at the North Central Agricultural Research Laboratory (NCARL) in Brookings, South Dakota, USA. Three plots of a corn and soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) rotation under a no-till (NT) system are being monitored for soils and surface gas fluxes. Each plot has three residue removal (high residue removal, HRR; medium residue removal, MRR; and low residue removal, LRR) treatments and two cover crops (cover crops and no cover crops) treatments. Both corn and soybean are represented every year. Gas flux measurements were taken weekly using a closed static chamber method. Data show that residue removal significantly impacted soil quality indicators while more time was needed for an affect from cover crop treatments to be noticed. The LRR treatment resulted in higher SOC concentrations, increased aggregate stability, and increased microbial activity. The LRR treatment also increased soil organic matter (SOM) and particulate organic matter (POM) concentrations. Cover crops used in HRR (high corn residue removal) improved SOC (27 g kg-1) by 6% compared to that without cover crops (25.4 g kg-1). Cover crops significantly impacted POM concentration directly after the residue removal treatments were applied in 2012. CO2 fluxes were observed to increase as temperature increased, while N2O fluxes increased as soil moisture increased. CH4 fluxes were responsive to both increases in temperature and moisture. On average, soils under

  14. Effects of cover crop management and planting operations on cotton establishment and yield in a no-till system

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    One method to save resources while positively impacting the environment is combining agricultural field operations. In no-till systems, for example, termination of cover crops and planting of the cash crop can be performed simultaneously utilizing a tractor as a single power source. A no-till field ...

  15. Effect of 25 years of no till management on soil microbial community structure

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Archived soil samples from three Colorado dryland sites under wheat-corn-fallow rotations were analyzed by qPCR and pyrosequencing to analyze the effect of 25-years of no tillage management of soil microbial community structure and composition. No tillage significantly increased bacteria abundance...

  16. High-residue cultivation timing impact on organic no-till soybean weed management

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A cereal rye cover crop mulch can suppress summer annual weeds early in the soybean growing season. However, a multi-tactic weed management approach is required when annual weed seedbanks are large or perennial weeds are present. In such situations, the weed suppression from a cereal rye mulch can b...

  17. Starter fertilizer for managing cover crop-based organic rotational no-till corn yields

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Weed control and N availability limit yield in organic corn production. Grass and legume cover crops are combined in mixtures to provide both weed and fertility management; however, additional fertility may be required to maximize corn yield. Research was conducted at Beltsville, MD, Kinston, NC, an...

  18. Overcoming weed management challenges in cover crop-based organic rotational no-till soybean production in the Eastern US

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cover crop-based, organic rotational no-till soybean production has been gaining traction in the Eastern region of the United States because of the ability of this new system to enhance soil conservation, reduce labor requirements, and decrease diesel fuel use compared to traditional organic product...

  19. Cultural strategies for managing weeds and soil moisture in cover crop based no-till soybean production

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A four site-year study was conducted in North Carolina to evaluate the effects of soybean planting timing and row spacing on soil moisture, weed density, soybean lodging, and yield in a cover crop-based no-till organic soybean production system. Soybean planting timing included roll-kill/planting a...

  20. Long-term no-till and stover retention each decrease the global warming potential of irrigated continuous corn

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Over twenty-two million hectares of U.S. croplands are irrigated, but the impacts of continuous crop residue removal and tillage on soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks, soil greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, and global warming potential (GWP) in irrigated cropping systems are relatively unknown. Residue...

  1. Crop rotations with annual and perennial forages under no-till soil management: soil attributes, soybean mineral nutrition, and yield

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Extensive use of sustainable and intensive agricultural systems would result in profitable farms producing greater yields while maintaining or enhancing natural resources. Development of sustainable crop and soil management systems depends on understanding complex relationships between soil managem...

  2. Carbon dioxide emissions in conventional and no-till corn production systems under different fertilizer management practices

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soil management practices such as tillage and fertilizer application methods affect soil emissions of greenhouse gases which impacts agricultural contributions of greenhouse gases. It is important to develop and evaluate strategies for reducing soil emissions of greenhouse gases such as carbon diox...

  3. Effects of irrigation, cover crop, and manure on soil greenhouse gas emissions after stover removal in no-till continuous corn

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Corn stover is used widely for livestock co-feed and is targeted as a near-term feedstock for the developing cellulosic ethanol industry. High biomass production in intensely managed systems, such as irrigated continuous corn, may have a greater potential to provide stover for either livestock or bi...

  4. No-till spring barley to control wind erosion

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Wind erosion is a major concern for growers and communities in the Pacific Northwest. Wind erosion not only degrades the soil resource which can affect the long-term productivity of agricultural lands, but it also degrades air quality in the region. Continuous no-till spring cereal cropping systems ...

  5. Biosolids application to no-till dryland agroecosytems

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Dryland agroecosystems are generally ideal environments for recycling biosolids. However, what is the efficacy of biosolids addition to a no-till dryland management agroecosystem? From 2000 to 2010, we studied application of biosolids from the Littleton/Englewood, CO Wastewater Treatment Plant ver...

  6. No-till: The Quiet Revolution

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In the past several decades, an increasing number of farmers have been adopting no-till farming to capture efficiencies in crop production, saving money, time and energy; to stop the loss of valuable topsoil by erosion; and to curb the runoff of sediment, fertilizers, and pesticides into rivers, lak...

  7. Curve numbers for long-term no-till corn and agricultural practices with high watershed infiltration

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The Curve Number (CN) method is an engineering and land management tool for estimating surface runoff from rainstorms. There are few watershed runoff records available during which a no-till crop was growing and hence there are few field-measured CN values. We investigated CN under continuous long-...

  8. Soil carbon sequestration with continuous no-till management of grain cropping systems in the Virginia coastal plain

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Carbon sequestration in agroecosystems represents a significant opportunity to offset a portion of anthropogenic CO2 emissions. Climatic conditions in the Virginia coastal plain and modern production practices make it possible for high annual photosynthetic CO2 fixation. There is potential to seques...

  9. Runoff losses of sediment and phosphorus from no-till and cultivated soils receiving dairy manure.

    PubMed

    Verbree, David A; Duiker, Sjoerd W; Kleinman, Peter J A

    2010-01-01

    Managing manure in no-till systems is a water quality concern because surface application of manure can enrich runoff with dissolved phosphorus (P), and incorporation by tillage increases particulate P loss. This study compared runoff from well-drained and somewhat poorly drained soils under corn (Zea mays, L.) production that had been in no-till for more than 10 yr. Dairy cattle (Bos taurus L.) manure was broadcast into a fall planted cover crop before no-till corn planting or incorporated by chisel/disk tillage in the absence of a cover crop. Rainfall simulations (60 mm h(-1)) were performed after planting, mid-season, and post-harvest in 2007 and 2008. In both years and on both soils, no-till yielded significantly less sediment than did chisel/disking. Relative effects of tillage on runoff and P loss differed with soil. On the well-drained soil, runoff depths from no-till were much lower than with chisel/disking, producing significantly lower total P loads (22-50% less). On the somewhat poorly drained soil, there was little to no reduction in runoff depth with no-till, and total P loads were significantly greater than with chisel/disking (40-47% greater). Particulate P losses outweighed dissolved P losses as the major concern on the well-drained soil, whereas dissolved P from surface applied manure was more important on the somewhat poorly drained soil. This study confirms the benefit of no-till to erosion and total P runoff control on well-drained soils but highlights trade-offs in no-till management on somewhat poorly drained soils where the absence of manure incorporation can exacerbate total P losses.

  10. Biological aspects of weed dynamics in no-till systems

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Scientists and producers in the Eurasian steppe are interested in no-till crop production, but are concerned that, without tillage, weed density will escalate in croplands. In the United States, producers have used no-till systems for several decades and weed density has not increased. In this pap...

  11. Surprising yields with no-till cropping systems

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Producers using no-till systems have found that crop yields often exceed their expectation based on nutrient and water supply. For example, corn yields 7% higher in a no-till system in central South Dakota than in a tilled system in eastern South Dakota. This is surprising because rainfall is 5 in...

  12. Application of manure to no-till soils: Phosphorus losses by sub-surface and surface pathways

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Concern over the acceleration of eutrophication by agricultural runoff has focused attention on manure management in no-till. We evaluated losses of phosphorus (P) in sub-surface and surface flow as a function of dairy manure application to no-till soils on a dairy farm in north-central Pennsylvania...

  13. One-time tillage of no-till: Effects on nutrients, mycorrhizae, and phosphorus uptake

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Stratification of nutrient availability, especially of P, that develops with continuous no-till (NT) can affect runoff nutrient concentration and possibly nutrient uptake. The effects of composted manure application and one-time tillage of NT on the distribution of soil chemical properties, root co...

  14. Stover removal affects no-till irrigated corn yields, soil C and N

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Corn (Zea mays L.) stover removal can increase yields under no-till (NT) in climates where cold spring soil temperatures delay emergence and plant growth. Partial stover removal (PR) effects on continuous corn grain and stover yields, N uptake, and changes in soil organic C (SOC) and total soil N (...

  15. Nitrogen Source Effects on Soil Nitrous Oxide Emissions from No-Till Corn

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The effect of N fertilizer source on soil nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from a no-till, irrigated continuous corn field was evaluated near Fort Collins, CO in 2009 and 2010. Five N sources (urea, ESN, SuperU, UAN, UAN+AgrotainPlus) were surface band applied at 202 kg N/ha at corn emergence, includi...

  16. Cover Crops Can Improve Soil Quality Under No-till Corn Silage

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Continuous corn silage production, even with no-till, can degrade soil quality because of nutrient depletion and minimal organic matter (OM) additions. This can reduce productivity and worsen environmental problems such as nutrient runoff and soil erosion. A study was conducted to evaluate effects o...

  17. When does no-till produce more? A global meta-analysis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Feeding a growing world population while protecting environmental quality and enhancing the natural resource base represents a major challenge for the agricultural research and development community. No-till agriculture is a widely adopted management system with the aims of reducing soil erosion, de...

  18. Rye termination by different rollers/crimpers developed for no-till small-scale farms

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The expansion of fresh food production by local small vegetable farms must be associated with sustainable practices that include no-till systems with proper cover crop management. When cover crops are terminated at an appropriate growth stage, the unincorporated residue protects the soil from erosio...

  19. Farm-level economic impact of no-till farming in the Fort Cobb reservoir watershed

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Survey data from the Fort Cobb Reservoir watershed (FCRW) in southwestern Oklahoma were used to evaluate farm-level management practices for no-till and conventional tillage. The Farm-level Economic Model (FEM), an annual economic simulation model, was used to determine impacts of alternative tilla...

  20. No-till corn response and soil nutrient concentrations from subsurface banding of poultry litter

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Nitrogen fertilizer management is vital to no-till corn (Zea mays) production from financial and environmental perspectives. Poultry litter as a nutrient source in this cropping system is generally land applied by surface broadcast, potentially causing volatilization of ammonia (NH3)-N. Recently a...

  1. No-till corn response to subsurface application of poultry litter

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Nitrogen fertilizer management is vital to no-till corn (Zea mays) production from financial and environmental perspectives. Poultry litter as a nutrient source in this cropping system is generally land applied by surface broadcast, potentially causing volatilization of ammonia (NH3)-N. Recently a...

  2. Surprising yields with no-till cropping systems

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Producers using no-till practices have observed that crop yields can greatly exceed expectations based on nutrient and water supply. For example, Ralph Holzwarth, who farms near Gettysburg, SD, has averaged 150 bu/ac of corn on his farm for the past 6 years. We were surprised with this yield, as c...

  3. Biogeophysical benefits of no-till agriculture for mitigating heat wave impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davin, Edouard; Seneviratne, Sonia; Ciais, Philippe; Olioso, Albert; Wang, Tao

    2014-05-01

    Changes in agricultural practices are considered a possible option to mitigate climate change[1]. In particular, reducing or suppressing tillage (no-till) may have the potential to sequester carbon in soils, which could help slow global warming[1]. On the other hand, such practices also have a direct effect on regional climate by altering the physical properties of the land surface[2]. These biogeophysical effects, however, are still poorly known. Here we show that no-till management increases the surface albedo of croplands in summer and that the resulting cooling effect is amplified during hot extremes, thus attenuating peak temperatures reached during heatwaves. Using a regional climate model accounting for the observed effects of no-till farming on surface albedo, as well as possible reductions in soil evaporation, we investigate the potential consequences of a full conversion to no-till agriculture in Europe. We find that the summer cooling from cropland albedo increase is strongly amplified during hot summer days, when surface albedo has more impact on the Earth's radiative balance due to clear-sky conditions. The reduced evaporation associated with the crop residue cover tends to counteract the albedo-induced cooling, but during hot days the albedo effect is the dominating factor. For heatwave summer days the local cooling effect gained from no-till practice is of the order of 2 degrees. The identified asymmetric impact of surface albedo change on summer temperature opens new avenues for climate engineering measures targeting high impact events rather than mean climate properties. References: [1] Smith, P., D. Martino, Z. Cai, D. Gwary, H. Janzen, P. Kumar, B. McCarl, S. Ogle, F. O'Mara, C. Rice, B. Scholes, O. Sirotenko (2007): Agriculture. In Climate Change 2007: Mitigation. Contribution of Working Group III to the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change [B. Metz, O.R. Davidson, P.R. Bosch, R. Dave, L.A. Meyer (eds

  4. Grazing and no-till cropping impacts on nitrogen retention in dryland agroecosystems.

    PubMed

    Mobley, Megan L; McCulley, Rebecca L; Burke, Ingrid C; Peterson, Gary; Schimel, David S; Cole, C Vernon; Elliott, Edward T; Westfall, Dwayne G

    2014-11-01

    As the world's population increases, marginal lands such as drylands are likely to become more important for food production. One proven strategy for improving crop production in drylands involves shifting from conventional tillage to no-till to increase water use efficiency, especially when this shift is coupled with more intensive crop rotations. Practices such as no-till that reduce soil disturbance and increase crop residues may promote C and N storage in soil organic matter, thus promoting N retention and reducing N losses. By sampling soils 15 yr after a N tracer addition, this study compared long-term soil N retention across several agricultural management strategies in current and converted shortgrass steppe ecosystems: grazed and ungrazed native grassland, occasionally mowed planted perennial grassland, and three cropping intensities of no-till dryland cropping. We also examined effects of the environmental variables site location and topography on N retention. Overall, the long-term soil N retention of >18% in these managed semiarid ecosystems was high compared with published values for other cropped or grassland ecosystems. Cropping practices strongly influenced long-term N retention, with planted perennial grass systems retaining >90% of N in soil compared with 30% for croplands. Grazing management, topography, and site location had smaller effects on long-term N retention. Estimated 15-yr N losses were low for intact and cropped systems. This work suggests that semiarid perennial grass ecosystems are highly N retentive and that increased intensity of semiarid land management can increase the amount of protein harvested without increasing N losses. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  5. A Multi-Year Comparison of No-Till Versus Conventional-Till Effects on the Carbon Balance in a Corn/Soybean Agro-Ecosystem Using Eddy Covariance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joo, E.; Slattery, R.; Meyers, T. P.; Bernacchi, C.

    2015-12-01

    Dramatic increases in atmospheric CO2 concentrations since the industrial revolution are in large part due to the release of carbon previously stored in the soil. No-till strategies have been proposed as a means to mitigate agricultural contributions to atmospheric carbon by decreasing emissions and sequestering carbon in agricultural soils while increasing water use efficiency and soil quality. However, the effects of no-till versus conventional-till practices on carbon sequestration often vary due to difficulty in quantifying soil carbon as soil properties change with management. Eddy covariance (EC) offers a more accurate method of continuously measuring the total carbon budget and does so without relying on physical soil carbon measurements. The majority of agricultural land in the Midwestern United States is farmed using the corn/soybean rotation, making it an ideal agro-ecosystem to examine the potential of adopting no-till practices on carbon and water balances. In this study, we use EC to compare carbon and water fluxes between continuous no-till and conventional-till corn/soybean sites over several years in east central Illinois. This allows the determination and comparison of 1) net ecosystem exchange (NEE) and net biome production (NEE after accounting for grain usage); 2) water use efficiency; and 3) response to climatic variation, both at short and long time scales, between the two tillage systems. We hypothesize that both carbon uptake and water use efficiency will improve with no-till practices, which in turn will improve crop responses to environmental factors such as drought and heat stress.

  6. Subsurface application of poultry litter in pasture and no-till soils.

    PubMed

    Pote, D H; Way, T R; Kleinman, P J A; Moore, P A; Meisinger, J J; Sistani, K R; Saporito, L S; Allen, A L; Feyereisen, G W

    2011-01-01

    Poultry litter provides a rich nutrient source for crops, but the usual practice of surface-applying litter can degrade water quality by allowing nutrients to be transported from fields in surface runoff while much of the ammonia (NH3)-N escapes into the atmosphere. Our goal was to improve on conventional titter application methods to decrease associated nutrient losses to air and water while increasing soil productivity. We developed and tested a knifing technique to directly apply dry poultry litter beneath the surface of pastures. Results showed that subsurface litter application decreased NH3-N volatilization and nutrient losses in runoff more than 90% (compared with surface-applied litter) to levels statistically as low as those from control (no litter) plots. Given this success, two advanced tractor-drawn prototypes were developed to subsurface apply poultry litter in field research. The two prototypes have been tested in pasture and no-till experiments and are both effective in improving nutrient-use efficiency compared with surface-applied litter, increasing crop yields (possibly by retaining more nitrogen in the soil), and decreasing nutrient losses, often to near background (control plot) levels. A paired-watershed study showed that cumulative phosphorus losses in runoff from continuously grazed perennial pastures were decreased by 55% over a 3-yr period if the annual poultry litter applications were subsurface applied rather than surface broadcast. Results highlight opportunities and challenges for commercial adoption of subsurface poultry litter application in pasture and no-till systems.

  7. No-till drill planting of Texas bluegrass on the Southern Plains

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Combining the use of a flail-vac harvester, a hammer mill, and the WW2000 cleaner, Texas bluegrass (Poa arachnifera Torr. [Poaceae]) seed was harvested, cleaned, and planted with a no-till drill at Woodward OK, USDA-ARS. Seeds were no-till drilled into clear ground or herbicide killed wheat stubble...

  8. The effects of combined cover crop termination and planting in a cotton no-till system

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    One method to save resources while positively impacting the environment is combining agricultural field operations. In no-till systems, cover crop termination and cash crop planting can be performed simultaneously utilizing a tractor as a single power source. A no-till field experiment merging cover...

  9. Effects of No-Till on Yields as Influenced by Crop and Environmental Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Toliver, Dustin K.; Larson, James A.; Roberts, Roland K.; English, B.C.; De La Torre Ugarte, D. G.; West, Tristram O.

    2012-02-07

    Th is research evaluated diff erences in yields and associated downside risk from using no-till and tillage practices. Yields from 442 paired tillage experiments across the United States were evaluated with respect to six crops and environmental factors including geographic location, annual precipitation, soil texture, and time since conversion from tillage to no-till. Results indicated that mean yields for sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench] and wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) with no-till were greater than with tillage. In addition, no-till tended to produce similar or greater mean yields than tillage for crops grown on loamy soils in the Southern Seaboard and Mississippi Portal regions. A warmer and more humid climate and warmer soils in these regions relative to the Heartland, Basin and Range, and Fruitful Rim regions appear to favor no-till on loamy soils. With the exception of corn (Zea mays L.) and cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) in the Southern Seaboard region, no-till performed poorly on sandy soils. Crops grown in the Southern Seaboard were less likely to have lower no-till yields than tillage yields on loamy soils and thus had lower downside yield risk than other farm resource regions. Consistent with mean yield results, soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] and wheat grown on sandy soils in the Southern Seaboard region using no-till had larger downside yield risks than when produced with no-till on loamy soils. Th e key fi ndings of this study support the hypothesis that soil and climate factors impact no-till yields relative to tillage yields and may be an important factor infl uencing risk and expected return and the adoption of the practice by farmers.

  10. Genetic Variation in Fusarium Section Liseola from No-Till Maize in Argentina†

    PubMed Central

    Chulze, S. N.; Ramirez, M. L.; Torres, A.; Leslie, J. F.

    2000-01-01

    Strains of Fusarium species belonging to section Liseola cause stalk and ear rot of maize and produce important mycotoxins, such as fumonisins. We isolated two species, Fusarium verticillioides (Gibberella fujikuroi mating population A) and Fusarium proliferatum (G. fujikuroi mating population D) from maize cultivated under no-till conditions at five locations in the Córdoba province of Argentina. We determined the effective population number for mating population A (Ne) and found that the Ne for mating type was 89% of the count (total population) and that the Ne for male or hermaphrodite status was 36%. Thus, the number of strains that can function as the female parent limits Ne, and sexual reproduction needs to occur only once every 54 to 220 asexual generations to maintain this level of sexual fertility. Our results indicate that the fungal populations isolated from no-till maize are similar to those recovered from maize managed with conventional tillage. We placed 36 strains from mating population A into 28 vegetative compatibility groups (VCGs). Of the 13 strains belonging to five multimember VCGs, only 2 isolates belonging to one VCG were clones based on amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) fingerprints. Members of the other four multimember VCGs had an average similarity index of 0.89, and members of one VCG were no more closely related to other members of the same VCG than they were to other members of the population as a whole. This finding suggests that the common assumption that strains in the same VCG are either clonal or very closely related needs to be examined in more detail. The variability observed with AFLPs and VCGs suggests that sexual reproduction may occur more frequently than estimated by Ne. PMID:11097907

  11. Genetic variation in Fusarium section Liseola from no-till maize in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Chulze, S N; Ramirez, M L; Torres, A; Leslie, J F

    2000-12-01

    Strains of Fusarium species belonging to section Liseola cause stalk and ear rot of maize and produce important mycotoxins, such as fumonisins. We isolated two species, Fusarium verticillioides (Gibberella fujikuroi mating population A) and Fusarium proliferatum (G. fujikuroi mating population D) from maize cultivated under no-till conditions at five locations in the Córdoba province of Argentina. We determined the effective population number for mating population A (N(e)) and found that the N(e) for mating type was 89% of the count (total population) and that the N(e) for male or hermaphrodite status was 36%. Thus, the number of strains that can function as the female parent limits N(e), and sexual reproduction needs to occur only once every 54 to 220 asexual generations to maintain this level of sexual fertility. Our results indicate that the fungal populations isolated from no-till maize are similar to those recovered from maize managed with conventional tillage. We placed 36 strains from mating population A into 28 vegetative compatibility groups (VCGs). Of the 13 strains belonging to five multimember VCGs, only 2 isolates belonging to one VCG were clones based on amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) fingerprints. Members of the other four multimember VCGs had an average similarity index of 0.89, and members of one VCG were no more closely related to other members of the same VCG than they were to other members of the population as a whole. This finding suggests that the common assumption that strains in the same VCG are either clonal or very closely related needs to be examined in more detail. The variability observed with AFLPs and VCGs suggests that sexual reproduction may occur more frequently than estimated by N(e).

  12. Soil microbial community analysis of between no-till and tillage in a controlled horticultural field.

    PubMed

    Yang, Seung Koo; Kim, Min Keun; Seo, Youn Won; Choi, Kyung Ju; Lee, Seong Tae; Kwak, Youn-Sig; Lee, Young Han

    2012-04-01

    The present study evaluated the changes of soil microbial communities that were subjected to no-till and compared the results to those subject to tillage for organic farming in a controlled horticultural field by fatty acid methyl ester. Fungi (P < 0.001), gram-positive bacteria (P < 0.001), arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (P < 0.01), and actinomycetes (P < 0.01) in the no-till soils were significantly larger than those in the tillage soils. The no-till in the subsoil had a significantly lower ratio of cy17:0 to 16:1ω7c compared to that of tillage, indicating that microbial stress decreased because the soils were not disturbed (P < 0.05). Fungi should be considered as a potential factor responsible for the obvious microbial community differentiation that was observed between the no-till and tillage areas in a controlled horticultural field.

  13. Business Continuity Management Plan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    13 B. BUSINESS IMPACT ANALYSIS ................................................................17 C. RECOVERY STRATEGY...Business Continuity Institute BCM business continuity management BCP business continuity plan BIA business impact analysis... environmental , health and safety ERP Enterprise Resource Planning FEMA Federal Emergency Management Agency FISMA Federal Information Security Management

  14. Increased Use of No-till Cropping Systems Improves Stream Ecosystem Quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yates, A. G.; Bailey, R. C.; Schwindt, J. A.

    2005-05-01

    Release of sediments to streams from tilled lands has been a significant stressor to streams in agro-ecosystems for decades and has been shown to impact aquatic biota in a variety of ways. To limit soil erosion from cultivated lands, conservation tillage techniques, including the use of no-till systems, have been developed and widely adopted throughout the region. However, there haves been no tests of the effects of no-till systems on stream quality at a watershed scale. We measured habitat and water quality and sampled the benthic macroinvertebrate (BMI) and fish communities in 32 small (100-1400 ha) subwatersheds along a gradient of the proportion of land under no-till cropping systems to determine relationships between the use of no-till and stream quality. Our results demonstrate that with increasing proportions of no-till, habitat scores improve, the quantities of sediment and sediment associated stressors in the water decline, the BMI community exhibits reduced dominance by Oligocheata and Sphaeriidae, as well as improved Family Biotic Index (FBI) scores, and fish species richness increases. We concluded that increased use of no-till cropping systems by farmers does contribute to improved quality of streams in agro-ecosystems.

  15. Wheat productivity responses in the rice-based system under different no-till techniques and nitrogen sources.

    PubMed

    Rafiq, Muhammad Hamid; Ahmad, Riaz; Jabbar, Abdul; Munir, Hassan; Hussain, Muzzammil

    2017-08-03

    No-till wheat is gaining popularity in rice-based cropping system as it provides a better chance for timely planting of wheat, management of crop residues, as well as environmental and soil sustainability. However, fertilizer application in no-tillage requires careful attention in order to optimize efficiency of fertilizer use by crops. The present study was conducted to develop the most favorable and economical no-till technique along with best blend of nitrogen for successful wheat production in residue-based cropping system. The experiment was composed of five no-till techniques viz., (1) even spreading of loose rice residue and wheat sowing with turbo seeder, (2) even spreading of loose rice residue and wheat sowing with happy seeder, (3) even spreading of loose rice residue and wheat sowing with zone disc tiller, (4) wheat sowing with conventional zero tillage drill after manual removal of rice residues, and (5) wheat sowing with conventional zero tillage drill after burning of rice residues. There were five blends of nitrogen (N) including (1) 100% N from urea, (2) 75% N from urea and 25% N from ammonium sulfate (AS), (3) 50% N from urea and 50% N from AS, (4) 25% N from urea and 75% N from AS, and (5) 100% N from AS. Different no-till techniques and N treatments significantly affected the stand establishment and yield-related traits of wheat during both growing seasons. Soil physical condition was improved by turbo seeder treatment, while it remained poor in residue burned field sown by conventional zero tillage drill. The results over the years revealed that turbo-seeded wheat with N fertilization in the form of 50% urea + 50% AS performed better in terms of productive tillers, grain yield and benefit cost ratio than other no-till techniques along different blends of nitrogen during both years of study. In crux, wheat sowing by turbo seeder along N fertilization in the form of 50% urea + 50% AS treatment is a viable and economical option to increase the

  16. Bromide transport in different soils under no till and conventional tillage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Elena; Costa, José Luis; Bedmar, Francisco

    2013-04-01

    Prediction and description of water and solute movement within different soil tillage systems is essential when investigating pesticide contamination of soils and groundwater resources. Tillage systems can modify the chemical and biological properties of soil, and furthermore it can alter the pore system and structure. Conservation tillage can accelerate leaching of non reactive solutes and pesticides. Alternatively, solute transport is reduced in conventional tillage by diminishing functional macropores. Our research focused on the study of bromide transport in undisturbed soil columns from three different soils of Argentina, from the provinces of Córdoba, Buenos Aires, and Paraná, managed under no till (NT) and conventional till (CT). Bromide was used as a tracer solute. Experimental data was fitted using the convection dispersion equation (CDE) with the program CXTFIT 2.0. The parameters pore water velocity (v) and hydrodynamic dispersion (D) where estimated. Both NT and CT soils from the province of Paraná had the highest v compared to the other examined soils. Paraná soil has the highest clay content, which may influence its structure (increasing the amount of macropores) and possibly decreasing lateral mass exchange. Additionally, this soil had a higher v under NT practices than CT, while no significant difference between NT and CT were found in soils from Córdoba and Buenos Aires. Dispersion was relatively high in all soils, particularly for Paraná soil under NT. Dispersion was considerably much higher with NT compared to CT columns of the same soil.

  17. Effects of high biomass cover crops and organic mulches on soil properties and collard yield three years after conversion to no-till

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Organic producers interested in the adoption of conservation tillage continue to face considerable challenges, particularly with regard to weed control. Previous work demonstrated that high biomass cover crops in conjunction with organic mulches can provide adequate weed control in a no-till system...

  18. Soil acidity amelioration in a no-till system in west Tennessee USA differs by cover crop type and nitrogen application rate

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Conservation soil management practices may influence the soil acidity. Surface application of lime may be required in no-till systems to ameliorate soil acidity and to improve crop yields. The application of lime may also increase microbial activity on soil. Specifically, the microbial activity of s...

  19. 17beta-Estradiol and testosterone in drainage and runoff from poultry litter applications to tilled and no-till crop land under irrigation.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Michael B; Endale, Dinku M; Schomberg, Harry H; Hartel, Peter G; Cabrera, Miguel L

    2009-06-01

    Thirteen million [corrected] metric tons of poultry litter are produced annually by poultry producers in the U.S. Poultry litter contains the sex hormones estradiol and testosterone, endocrine disruptors that have been detected in surface waters. The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential impact of poultry litter applications on estradiol and testosterone concentrations in subsurface drainage and surface runoff in irrigated crop land under no-till and conventional-till management. We conducted an irrigation study in fall of 2001 and spring of 2002. Four treatments, no-till plus poultry litter, conventional-till plus poultry litter, no-till plus conventional fertilizer, and conventional-till plus conventional fertilizer, were evaluated. Flow-weighted concentration and load ha(-1) of the two hormones were measured in drainage and runoff. Soil concentrations of estradiol and testosterone were measured. Based on comparisons to the conventional fertilizer (and control) treatments, poultry litter did not add to the flow-weighted concentration or load ha(-1) of either estradiol or testosterone in subsurface drainage or surface runoff. Significant differences were, however, observed between tillage treatments: flow-weighted concentrations of estradiol were greater for no-till than conventional-till plots of the June irrigation; and runoff loads of both estradiol and testosterone were less from no-till than conventional-till plots for the November irrigation. Although the differences between no-till and conventional-tillage appeared to affect the hydrologic transport of both hormones, the differences appeared to have inconsequential environmental impact.

  20. Farm-level economics of innovative tillage technologies: the case of no-till in the Altai Krai in Russian Siberia.

    PubMed

    Bavorova, Miroslava; Imamverdiyev, Nizami; Ponkina, Elena

    2017-06-01

    In the agricultural Altai Krai in Russian Siberia, soil degradation problems are prevalent. Agronomists recommend "reduced tillage systems," especially no-till, as a sustainable way to cultivate land that is threatened by soil degradation. In the Altai Krai, less is known about the technologies in practice. In this paper, we provide information on plant cultivation technologies used in the Altai Krai and on selected factors preventing farm managers in this region from adopting no-till technology based on our own quantitative survey conducted across 107 farms in 2015 and 2016. The results of the quantitative survey show that farm managers have high uncertainty regarding the use of no-till technology including its economics. To close this gap, we provide systematic analysis of factors influencing the economy of the plant production systems by using a farm optimization model (linear programming) for a real farm, together with expert estimations. The farm-specific results of the optimization model show that under optimal management and climatic conditions, the expert Modern Canadian no-till technology outperforms the farm min-till technology, but this is not the case for suboptimal conditions with lower yields.

  1. Multivariate analysis and visualization of soil quality data for no-till systems.

    PubMed

    Villamil, M B; Miguez, F E; Bollero, G A

    2008-01-01

    To evidence the multidimensionality of the soil quality concept, we propose the use of data visualization as a tool for exploratory data analyses, model building, and diagnostics. Our objective was to establish the best edaphic indicators for assessing soil quality in four no-till systems with regard to functioning as a medium for crop production and nutrient cycling across two Illinois locations. The compared situations were no-till corn-soybean rotations including either winter fallowing (C/S) or cover crops of rye (Secale cereale; C-R/S-R), hairy vetch (Vicia villosa; C-R/S-V), or their mixture (C-R/S-VR). The dataset included the variables bulk density (BD), penetration resistance (PR), water aggregate stability (WAS), soil reaction (pH), and the contents of soil organic matter (SOM), total nitrogen (TN), soil nitrates (NO(3)-N), and available phosphorus (P). Interactive data visualization along with canonical discriminant analysis (CDA) allowed us to show that WAS, BD, and the contents of P, TN, and SOM have the greatest potential as soil quality indicators in no-till systems in Illinois. It was more difficult to discriminate among WCC rotations than to separate these from C/S, considerably inflating the error rate associated with CDA. We predict that observations of no-till C/S will be classified correctly 51% of the time, while observations of no-till WCC rotations will be classified correctly 74% of the time. High error rates in CDA underscore the complexity of no-till systems and the need in this area for more long-term studies with larger datasets to increase accuracy to acceptable levels.

  2. Impact of earthworm Lumbricus terrestris living sites on the greenhouse gas balance of no-till arable soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieminen, M.; Hurme, T.; Mikola, J.; Regina, K.; Nuutinen, V.

    2015-09-01

    We studied the effect of the deep-burrowing earthworm Lumbricus terrestris on the greenhouse gas (GHG) fluxes and global warming potential (GWP) of arable no-till soil using both field measurements and a controlled 15-week laboratory experiment. In the field, the emissions of nitrous oxide (N2O) and carbon dioxide (CO2) were on average 43 and 32 % higher in areas occupied by L. terrestris (the presence judged by the surface midden) than in adjacent, unoccupied areas (with no midden). The fluxes of methane (CH4) were variable and had no consistent difference between the midden and non-midden areas. Removing the midden did not affect soil N2O and CO2 emissions. The laboratory results were consistent with the field observations in that the emissions of N2O and CO2 were on average 27 and 13 % higher in mesocosms with than without L. terrestris. Higher emissions of N2O were most likely due to the higher content of mineral nitrogen and soil moisture under the middens, whereas L. terrestris respiration fully explained the observed increase in CO2 emissions in the laboratory. In the field, the significantly elevated macrofaunal densities in the vicinity of middens likely contributed to the higher emissions from areas occupied by L. terrestris. The activity of L. terrestris increased the GWP of field and laboratory soil by 50 and 18 %, but only 6 and 2 % of this increase was due to the enhanced N2O emission. Our results suggest that high N2O emissions commonly observed in no-till soils can partly be explained by the abundance of L. terrestris under no-till management and that L. terrestris can markedly regulate the climatic effects of different cultivation practises.

  3. No-till Snap Bean performance and weed response following Cereal Rye and Vetch cover crops

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fall-planted cover crops offer many benefits including weed suppressive residues in spring sown crops when controlled and left on the soil surface. However, vegetable growers have been slow to adapt direct seeding (no-till) into cover crop residues. Field studies were conducted in 2009 and 2010 near...

  4. Eight Years of Annual No-Till Cropping in Washington's Winter Wheat- Summer Fallow Region

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The tillage-based winter wheat – summer fallow (WW-SF) cropping system has dominated dryland farming in the Pacific Northwest for 125 years. We conducted a large-scale multidisciplinary 8-year study of annual no-till cropping systems as an alternative to WW-SF. Soft white and hard white classes of w...

  5. Cover crop termination timing is critical in organic rotational no-till systems

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cover crop-based rotational no-till enables organic farmers to reduce labor and build soil health. In these systems, cover crops are terminated with a roller-crimper and cash crops are direct-seeded into the mulch. A cropping system experiment was conducted at three locations in the Mid-Atlantic t...

  6. Nutrient dynamics from broiler litter applied to no-till cotton in an upland soil

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Surface-applying broiler litter to a no-till cotton field increases the potential for loss of manure nutrients from the fields in runoff events and volitization of the NH4-N. An experiment was conducted on an upland Atwood silt loam soil (fine-silty, mixed, thermic Typic Paleududalfs) at the Pontoto...

  7. Effect of surface incorporation of broiler litter applied to no-till cotton on runoff quality

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A 2-yr field study was conducted on an Atwood silt loam (fine-silty, mixed, thermic Typic Paleudalfs) marginal upland soil to evaluate if incorporation of broiler litter into the soil surface in a no-till cotton affect runoff nutrient concentrations. The treatments consisted of 7.8 Mg ha-1 broiler l...

  8. Curve numbers for no-till: field data versus standard tables

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The Curve Number procedure developed by Soil Conservation Service (Now Natural Resources Conservation Service) in the mid-1950s for estimating direct runoff from rainstorms has not been extensively tested in cropping systems under no-till. Analysis of CNs using the frequency matching and asymptotic ...

  9. Long-Term No-Till and Conventional-Till Soybean Yields

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Annual crop yields of long-term no-till soybean (Glycine max) and conventional-till soybean at Holly Springs, Mississippi were summarized for a 16-year period, 1984 through 1999. This research report provides a complete data set of crop yields, cultural practices, and chemical applications used for...

  10. Subsurface application of dry poultry litter: Impacts on common bermudagrass and other no-till crops

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Poultry manure provides a rich organic nutrient source to fertilize crops and help neutralize soil acidity. However, the usual practice of broadcasting litter on the surface of pastures and other no-till systems can degrade water quality by allowing nutrients to be transported from fields in surfac...

  11. COMPARISON OF RUNOFF AND SOIL EROSION FROM NO-TILL AND INVERSION TILLAGE PRODUCTION SYSTEMS

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Conservation tillage systems that prevent soil erosion and maintain or increase soil carbon offer long-term benefits for producers in the inland Pacific Northwest (PNW) USA. Our objective was to compare conventional tillage and no-till for runoff and soil erosion. Two neighboring drainages in the 13...

  12. Greenhouse gas fluxes from no-till rotated corn in the Upper Midwest

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We determined soil surface fluxes of greenhouse gases (carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, methane) from no-till, dryland corn (Zea mays L.) in eastern South Dakota and tested the effect of rotation on greenhouse gas fluxes from corn. The corn was grown within a randomized, complete block study that incl...

  13. Preliminary Estimates of the Potential for Carbon Mitigation in European Soils Through No-Till Farming

    DOE Data Explorer

    Smith, P. [University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, UK; Powlson, D. [University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, UK; Glendining, M. [University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, UK; Smith, J. [University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, UK

    2003-01-01

    in this paper we estimate the European potential for carbon mitigation of no-till farming using results from European tillage experiments. Our calculations suggest some potential in terms of (a) reduced agricultural fossil fuel emissions, and (b) increased soil carbon sequestration. We estimate that 100% conversion to no-till farming would be likely to sequester about 23 Tg C y–11 in the European Union or about 43 Tg C y–1 in the wider Europe (excluding the former Soviet Union). In addition, up to 3.2 Tg C y–1 could be saved in agricultural fossil fuel emissions. Compared to estimates of the potential for carbon sequestration of other carbon mitigation options, no-till agriculture shows nearly twice the potential of scenarios whereby soils are amended with organic materials. Our calculations suggest that 100% conversion to no-till agriculture in Europe could mitigate all fossil fuel-carbon emissions from agriculture in Europe. However, this is equivalent to only about 4.1% of total anthropogenic CO2-carbon produced annually in Europe (excluding the former Soviet Union) which in turn is equivalent to about 0.8% of global annual anthropogenic CO2-carbon emissions.

  14. Runoff quality from no-till cotton fertilized with broiler litter in subsurface bands

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Surface broadcast of broiler litter to no-till row crops exposes broiler litter to the atmosphere and rain events, enhances the potential loss of nutrients to the air and surface runoff water and may limit benefit of litter to the crops. Subsurface banding of litter could alleviate these risks. A 2-...

  15. Functional and nutritional characteristics of soft wheat grown in no-till and conventional cropping systems

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The effects of no-till vs. conventional farming practices were evaluated on soft wheat functional and nutritional characteristics, including kernel physical properties, whole wheat composition, antioxidant activity and end-product quality. Soft white winter wheat cv. ORCF 102 was evaluated over a tw...

  16. Remediation of Stratified Soil Acidity Through Surface Application of Lime in No-Till Cropping Systems

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Yield reduction and reduced crop vigor, resulting from soil acidification, are of increasing concern in eastern Washington and northern Idaho. In this region, soil pH has been decreasing at an accelerated rate, primarily due to the long-term use of ammonium based fertilizers. In no-till systems, the...

  17. Forces and straw cutting performance of double disc furrow opener in no-till paddy soil.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Fiaz; Weimin, Ding; Qishuo, Ding; Hussain, Mubshar; Jabran, Khawar

    2015-01-01

    Conservation tillage is an energy efficient and low cost tillage system to improve soil environment compared with conventional tillage systems. However, the rice residue management becomes an "impossible to achieve" task due to high soil moisture content at harvest time and the thickness of rice straw. Disc type furrow openers are used for both seed drilling as well as straw cutting during no tillage sowing. A study was conducted to evaluate the draft requirement and straw cutting performances of different sized furrow openers in no-till paddy soil conditions. Double disc furrow opener was tested on an in-field traction bench for three working depths, i.e. 30, 60 and 90 mm, and three forwarding speeds, i.e. 0.1, 0.2 and 0.3 m/s. The draft and vertical forces on the disc were recorded with load cells. These sensors were connected to a data acquisition system developed with hardware and software. The results revealed that the size of the furrow opener, operating depth and the forwarding speed had significant effects (P<0.05) on the horizontal and vertical forces, and the straw cutting performance. Mean values of the draft were 648.9, 737.2 and 784.6 N for the opener with diameters of 330, 450 and 600 mm respectively, and the vertical forces for similar openers were 904.7, 1553.9 and 1620.4 N, respectively. Furthermore, the mean straw cutting efficiencies for the double disc opener with diameters of 330, 450 and 600 mm were 39.36, 78.47 and 65.46%, respectively. The opener with 450 mm diameter provided higher straw cutting efficiency as compared to 600 mm diameter disc, while lowest straw cutting efficiency was observed with 330 mm diameter disc. The 450 mm diameter opener provided the highest straw cutting efficiency (88.6%) at 90 mm working depth and expressed optimum performance compared with other furrow openers.

  18. Bromide transport under sprinkler and flood irrigation for no-till soil condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nachabe, M. H.; Ahuja, L. R.; Butters, G.

    1999-01-01

    Understanding the influence of irrigation methods on solute transport is essential to properly manage chemical use in agricultural soils. In this study, we compare the transport of a conservative solute (bromide) under sprinkler and flood irrigations on a sandy clay loam (mixed Ustollic Haplargid) under no-till condition. After spraying 148.8 kg/ha of KBr on the surface, ≈25 cm of irrigation water was applied in six increments over two months as flood irrigation on one plot and as sprinkler irrigation on another plot. The net applied water (NAW=irrigation+precipitation-evaporation) was similar for both plots, which allowed the comparison of the Br profiles for the two types of irrigation. Water content and Br concentration were sampled at 5, 19, 34, and 68 days after chemical application. The recovered mass of Br and the location of center of mass were comparable for the two types of irrigation. The spread around the center of mass, however, was higher for the flood-irrigated plot. On the flood-irrigated plot, more mass leached below the depth of 90 cm, with the differences being statistically significant. The velocity of the Br center of mass was consistently 10%-20% larger than the piston displacement velocity. Dispersion and velocity coefficients varied substantially between sampling time. A recent quasi-steady solution of the convection-dispersion equation [M.H. Nachabe, L.R. Ahuja, Quasi-analytical solution for predicting the redistribution of surface-applied chemicals. Trans. ASAE 39(5) (1996) 1659-1664], which accounts for variable flow and dispersion, simulates the Br profiles fairly well.

  19. Glyphosate Dissipation in Different Soils Under No-Till and Conventional Till

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Elena; Costa, Jose Luis; Francisco, Bedmar

    2017-04-01

    Glyphosate is the most used herbicide in Argentina, accounting for 62% of the commercialized pesticides in the market. It is used as a weed controller in chemical fallow under no-till systems, and it is also applied in various genetically modified crops (e.g. soybean, corn, cotton). Though it has a high solubility in water, it tends to adsorb and accumulate in agricultural soils. The description of glyphosate biodegradation in soils with a long term history under agricultural practices is of interest. The main objectives of this work were to compare the dissipation of glyphosate and the accumulation of its metabolite aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) over time in three soils from Argentina. The studied soils belong to areas of high agronomic land use and different edaphoclimatic conditions, situated in Manfredi (MAN), Pergamino (PER) and Paraná (PAR). Soil samples were taken from long-term field trials with a history of more than 16 years under no-till and conventional tillage management. To study glyphosate dissipation in soil under controlled laboratory conditions, 400 g of dry soil sample were placed in 1.5 L flasks. A dose corresponding to 6 L ha-1 of commercial glyphosate ATANOR II® (35.6 % a.i.) was applied on day 0. The dose applied was equivalent to a final concentration in soil of 4000 μg Kg-1 of active ingredient. The moisture of the soil samples was kept at 60 % of the field capacity. Samples were incubated in the dark at a constant temperature of 22°C ± 1°C. A sub-sample of 5 g was taken from each flask at day 0 (after application), 1, 3, 7, 15, 20, 28, 44 and 62. Glyphosate and AMPA in soil samples was extracted with a strong basic solution (100 mM Na2B4O7•10H2O/ 100 mM K3PO4, pH=9) and then derivitazed with FMOC-Cl. Detection and quantification of the compounds was performed by ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with a mass spectrometer (UPLC MS/MS). The results showed that forty percent of the applied glyphosate was degraded

  20. Changes in long-term no-till corn growth and yield under different rates of stover mulch

    SciTech Connect

    Blanco-Canqui, Dr. Humberto; Lal, Dr. Rattan; Post, Wilfred M; Owens, Lloyd

    2006-09-01

    Received for publication January 4, 2006. Removal of corn (Zea mays L.) stover for biofuel production may affect crop yields by altering soil properties. A partial stover removal may be feasible, but information on appropriate rates of removal is unavailable. We assessed the short-term impacts of stover management on long-term no-till (NT) continuous corn grown on a Rayne silt loam (fine loamy, mixed, active, mesic Typic Hapludults) at Coshocton, Hoytville clay loam (fine, illitic, mesic Mollic Epiaqualfs) at Hoytville, and Celina silt loam (fine, mixed, active, mesic Aquic Hapludalfs) at South Charleston in Ohio, and predicted corn yield from soil properties using principal component analysis (PCA). The study was conducted in 2005 on the ongoing experiments started in May 2004 under 0 (T0), 25 (T25), 50 (T50), 75 (T75), 100 (T100), and 200 (T200)% of stover corresponding to 0, 1.25, 2.50, 3.75, 5.00, and 10.00 Mg ha-1 of stover, respectively. Stover removal promoted early emergence and rapid seedling growth (P < 0.01). Early-emerging plants grew taller than late-emerging plants up to about 50 d, and then the heights reversed at Coshocton and were comparable at other two sites. Stover management affected corn yield only at the Coshocton site where average grain and stover yields in the T200, T100, T75, and T50 (10.8 and 10.3 Mg ha-1) were higher than those in the T0 and T25 treatments (8.5 and 6.5 Mg ha-1) (P < 0.01), showing that stover removal at rates as low as 50% (2.5 Mg ha-1) decreased crop yields. Soil properties explained 71% of the variability in grain yield and 33% of the variability in stover yield for the Coshocton site. Seventeen months after the start of the experiment, effects of stover management on corn yield and soil properties were site-specific.

  1. Changes in soil organic carbon contents and nitrous oxide emissions after introduction of no-till in Pampean agroecosystems.

    PubMed

    Steinbach, Haydée S; Alvarez, Roberto

    2006-01-01

    We reviewed published results to estimate no-till effects on SOC and denitrification in the Argentine Pampas and the potential of no-till to mitigate the global warming effect. On an equivalent mass basis, 42 paired data sets were used for SOC comparisons of no-till vs. plow till (moldboard plow or disk plow), 18 paired data for comparison of no-till vs. reduced till (chisel plow or harrow disk), and 20 paired data for comparison of plow till vs. reduced till. Twenty-six denitrification data sets were used for evaluation of tillage system and fertilization effects on N2O emission. Changes in SOC under no-till were not correlated to time since initiation of experiments. Averaged over years a 2.76 Mg ha(-1) SOC increase (P = 0.01) was observed in no-till systems compared with tilled systems, but no differences were detected between plow and reduced till. The SOC under tillage explained most of the SOC variation under no-till (R2= 0.94, P = 0.01). The model had a positive intercept and predicted a relatively higher increase of SOC in areas of low organic matter level. The conversion of the whole pampean cropping area to no-till would increase SOC by 74 Tg C, about twice the annual C emissions from fossil fuel consumption of Argentina. Emissions of N2O were greater under no-till with a mean increase of 1 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1) in denitrification rate for humid pampean scenarios. The increased emissions of N2O might overcome the mitigation potential of no-till due to C sequestration in about 35 yr, and therefore no-till might produce global warming.

  2. Corn Stover Impacts on Near-Surface Soil Properties of No-Till Corn In Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Blanco-Canqui, H; Lal, Rattan; Post, W M.; Izaurralde, R Cesar C.; Owens, L B.

    2006-01-06

    Corn stover is a primary biofuel feedstock and its expanded use could help reduce reliance on fossil fuels and net CO2 emissions. Excessive stover removal may, however, negatively impact near-surface soil properties within a short period after removal. We assessed changes in soil crust strength, bulk density, and water content over a 1-yr period following a systematic removal or addition of stover from three no-till soils under corn in Ohio.

  3. Rapid Changes in Soil Carbon and Structural Properties Due to Stover Removal from No-Till Corn Plots

    SciTech Connect

    Blanco-Canqui, H; Lal, Rattan; Post, W M.; Izaurralde, R Cesar C.; Owens, L B.

    2006-06-01

    Harvesting corn (Zea mays L.) stover for producing ethanol may be beneficial to palliate the dependence on fossil fuels and reduce CO2 emissions to the atmosphere, but stover harvesting may deplete soil organic carbon (SOC) and degrade soil structure. We investigated the impacts of variable rates of stover removal from no-till (NT) continuous corn systems on SOC and soil structural properties after 1 year of stover removal in three soils in Ohio: Rayne silt loam (fine-loamy, mixed, active, mesic Typic Hapludults) at Coshocton, Hoytville clay loam (fine, illitic, mesic Mollic Epiaqualfs) at Hoytville, and Celina silt loam (fine, mixed, active, mesic Aquic Hapludalfs) at South Charleston. This study also assessed relationships between SOC and soil structural properties as affected by stover management. Six stover treatments that consisted of removing 100, 75, 50, 25, and 0, and adding 100% of corn stover corresponding to 0 (T0), 1.25 (T1.25), 2.50 (T2.5), 3.75 (T3.75), 5.00 (T5), and 10.00 (T10) Mg haj1 of stover, respectively, were studied for their total SOC concentration, bulk density (>b), aggregate stability, and tensile strength (TS) of aggregates. Effects of stover removal on soil properties were rapid and significant in the 0- to 5-cm depth, although the magnitude of changes differed among soils after only 1 year of stover removal. The SOC concentration declined with increase in removal rates in silt loams but not in clay loam soils. It decreased by 39% at Coshocton and 30% at Charleston within 1 year of complete stover removal. At the same sites, macroaggregates contained 10% to 45% more SOC than microaggregates. Stover removal reduced 94.75-mm macroaggregates and increased microaggregates (P G 0.01). Mean weight diameter (MWD) and TS of aggregates in soils without stover (T0) were 1.7 and 3.3 times lower than those in soils with normal stover treatments (T5) across sites. The SOC concentration was negatively correlated with >b and positively with MWD and

  4. Forces and Straw Cutting Performance of Double Disc Furrow Opener in No-Till Paddy Soil

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Fiaz; Weimin, Ding; Qishuo, Ding; Hussain, Mubshar; Jabran, Khawar

    2015-01-01

    Conservation tillage is an energy efficient and low cost tillage system to improve soil environment compared with conventional tillage systems. However, the rice residue management becomes an “impossible to achieve” task due to high soil moisture content at harvest time and the thickness of rice straw. Disc type furrow openers are used for both seed drilling as well as straw cutting during no tillage sowing. A study was conducted to evaluate the draft requirement and straw cutting performances of different sized furrow openers in no-till paddy soil conditions. Double disc furrow opener was tested on an in-field traction bench for three working depths, i.e. 30, 60 and 90 mm, and three forwarding speeds, i.e. 0.1, 0.2 and 0.3 m/s. The draft and vertical forces on the disc were recorded with load cells. These sensors were connected to a data acquisition system developed with hardware and software. The results revealed that the size of the furrow opener, operating depth and the forwarding speed had significant effects (P<0.05) on the horizontal and vertical forces, and the straw cutting performance. Mean values of the draft were 648.9, 737.2 and 784.6 N for the opener with diameters of 330, 450 and 600 mm respectively, and the vertical forces for similar openers were 904.7, 1553.9 and 1620.4 N, respectively. Furthermore, the mean straw cutting efficiencies for the double disc opener with diameters of 330, 450 and 600 mm were 39.36, 78.47 and 65.46%, respectively. The opener with 450 mm diameter provided higher straw cutting efficiency as compared to 600 mm diameter disc, while lowest straw cutting efficiency was observed with 330 mm diameter disc. The 450 mm diameter opener provided the highest straw cutting efficiency (88.6%) at 90 mm working depth and expressed optimum performance compared with other furrow openers. PMID:25822984

  5. Cover crop residue and organic mulches provide weed control during limited-input no-till collard production

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Limited input producers may adopt no-till production if sufficient weed suppression can be achieved. High-biomass producing cover crops used in conjunction with organic mulches may provide sufficient weed control in no-till vegetable production. Our objective was to quantify weed suppression from a ...

  6. Cover crop residue and organic mulches provide weed control during limited-input no-till collard production

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Limited input producers may adopt no-till if sufficient weed suppression can be achieved. High-biomass producing cover crops used in conjunction with organic mulches may provide sufficient weed control in no-till vegetable production. Our objective was to quantify weed suppression from a summer co...

  7. Soil Hydraulic Properties Influenced by Corn Stover Removal from No-Till Corn in Ohio.

    SciTech Connect

    Blanco-Canqui, H.; Lal, Rattan; Post, W. M.; Izaurralde, R Cesar C.; Shipitalo, M. J.

    2007-01-01

    Corn (Zea mays L.) stover removal for biofuel production and other uses may alter soil hydraulic properties, but site-specific information needed to determine the threshold levels of removal for the U.S. Corn Belt region is limited. We quantified impacts of systematic removal of corn stover on soil hydraulic parameters after one year of stover management under no-till (NT) systems in three soils in Ohio including Rayne silt loam (fine-loamy, mixed, mesic Typic Hapludult) at Coshocton, Hoytville clay loam (fine, illitic, mesic Mollic Epiaqualfs) at Hoytville, and Celina silt loam (fine, mixed, active, mesic Aquic Hapludalfs) at South Charleston. Interrelationships among soil properties and saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ksat) predictions were also studied. Earthworm middens, Ksat, bulk density (ρb), soil-water retention (SWR), pore-size distribution, and air permeability (ka) were determined for six stover treatments including 0 (T0), 25 (T25), 50 (T50), 75 (T75), 100 (T100), and 200 (T200) % of corn stover corresponding to 0, 1.25, 2.50, 3.75, 5.00, and 10.00 Mg ha-1 of stover, respectively. Stover removal reduced the number of middens, Ksat, SWR, and ka at all sites (P<0.01). Complete stover removal reduced earthworm middens by 20-fold across sites, decreased geometric mean Ksat from 6.3 to 0.1 mm h-1 at Coshocton, 3.2 to 0.3 mm h-1 at Hoytville, and 5.8 to 0.6 mm h-1 at Charleston, and increased ρb in the 0- to 10-cm depth by about 15% relative to double stover plots. The SWR for T100 was 1.3 times higher than that for T0 at 0 to -6 kPa. The log ka for T200, T100, and T75 significantly exceeded that under T50, T25, and T0 at Coshocton and Charleston. Measured parameters were strongly correlated, and ka was a potential Ksat predictor. Stover harvesting at rates above 1.25 Mg ha-1 affects soil hydraulic properties and earthworm activity, but further monitoring is needed to ascertain the threshold levels of stover removal.Corn (Zea mays L.) stover removal for

  8. Grass pea as a nitrogen source for continuous no-till winter wheat

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sources of organic nitrogen (N) for crop production in the southern Great Plains (SGP) - and methods of their use - need evaluation to find ways to counter the rising cost of N fertilizer. This study examined N availability from the cool-season pulse grass pea (GP) (Lathyrus sativus.L.) for continuo...

  9. Runoff quality from no-till cotton fertilized with broiler litter in subsurface bands.

    PubMed

    Adeli, A; Tewolde, H; Shankle, M W; Way, T R; Brooks, J P; McLaughlin, M R

    2013-01-01

    Surface broadcast of broiler litter to no-till row crops exposes the litter and its nutrients to risks of loss in runoff water and volatilization and may limit the potential benefit of litter to the crops. Subsurface banding of litter could alleviate these risks. A field study was conducted in 2008 and 2009 on an upland Falkner silt loam soil to determine the effect of broiler litter placement on runoff nutrient losses from no-till cotton ( L.). Treatments included surface broadcast broiler litter applied manually, subsurface-banded litter applied by tractor-drawn equipment, and no broiler litter, all in combination with or without winter wheat ( L.) cover crop residue. Broiler litter rate was 5.6 Mg ha. The experimental design was a randomized complete block with a split-plot arrangement of treatments replicated three times. In 2008, simulated rainfall was used to generate runoff 27 d after litter application. Subsurface-banded litter reduced runoff total C, N, P, NH, NO, Cu, Zn and water-soluble P (WP) concentrations by 72, 64, 51, 49, 70, 36, 65, and 77%, respectively, compared with surface broadcast. The reductions were greater in 2009 where runoff occurred 1 d after litter application. Bacterial runoff was decreased by one log with subsurface-banded litter compared to surface broadcast. Except for C, NH, N, and WP, the presence of winter cover crop residue did not affect the load or runoff nutrient concentrations in either year. The results indicate that subsurface banding litter to no-till cotton substantially reduces nutrient and bacterial losses in runoff compared with surface broadcasting. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  10. Effects of water-saving irrigation practices and drought resistant rice variety on greenhouse gas emissions from a no-till paddy in the central lowlands of China.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ying; Ge, Junzhu; Tian, Shaoyang; Li, Shuya; Nguy-Robertson, Anthony L; Zhan, Ming; Cao, Cougui

    2015-02-01

    As pressure on water resources increases, alternative practices to conserve water in paddies have been developed. Few studies have simultaneously examined the effectiveness of different water regimes on conserving water, mitigating greenhouse gases (GHG), and maintaining yields in rice production. This study, which was conducted during the drought of 2013, examined all three factors using a split-plot experiment with two rice varieties in a no-till paddy managed under three different water regimes: 1) continuous flooding (CF), 2) flooded and wet intermittent irrigation (FWI), and 3) flooded and dry intermittent irrigation (FDI). The Methane (CH₄) and nitrous oxide (N₂O) emissions were measured using static chamber-gas measurements, and the carbon dioxide (CO₂) emissions were monitored using a soil CO₂ flux system (LI-8100). Compared with CF, FWI and FDI irrigation strategies reduced CH₄ emissions by 60% and 83%, respectively. In contrast, CO₂ and N₂O fluxes increased by 65% and 9%, respectively, under FWI watering regime and by 104% and 11%, respectively, under FDI managed plots. Although CO₂ and N₂O emissions increased, the global warming potential (GWP) and greenhouse gas intensity (GHGI) of all three GHG decreased by up to 25% and 29% (p<0.01), respectively, using water-saving irrigation strategies. The rice variety also affected yields and GHG emissions in response to different water regimes. The drought-resistance rice variety (HY3) was observed to maintain yields, conserve water, and reduce GHG under the FWI irrigation management compared with the typical variety (FYY299) planted in the region. The FYY299 only had significantly lower GWP and GHGI when the yield was reduced under FDI water regime. In conclusion, FWI irrigation strategy could be an effective option for simultaneously saving water and mitigating GWP without reducing rice yields using drought-resistant rice varieties, such as HY3. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  11. Effect of surface incorporation of broiler litter applied to no-till cotton on runoff quality.

    PubMed

    Adeli, A; Shankle, M W; Tewolde, H; Brooks, J P; Sistani, K R; McLaughlin, M R; Rowe, D E

    2011-01-01

    Surface application of broiler litter to no-till cotton could lead to degradation of water quality. Incorporation of broiler litter into the top surface soil (0.05 m) could alleviate this risk. A 2-yr field study was conducted on a silt loam upland soil to determine the effect of incorporation of broiler litter into the soil surface on nutrient and bacterial transport in runoff. The experimental design was a randomized complete block with four treatments and three replications. Treatments were (i) unfertilized control; (ii) surface-appliedbroiler litter at 7.8 Mg ha(-1) without incorporation; (iii) surface-applied broiler litter at 7.8 Mg ha(-1) with immediate incorporation; and (iv) inorganic fertilizer N (urea ammonium nitrate, 32% N) and inorganic fertilizer P (triple superphosphate) at the recommended rate. Phosphorus was surface appliedat 25 kg ha(-1) and N was injected at 101 kg ha(-1) into the soil using a commercial liquid fertilizer applicator. Runoff was collected from small runoff plots (2.4 m by 1.6 m) established at the bottom side of main plots (13.7 m by 6.0 m). Incorporation of broiler litter reduced total N (TN), NO3-N, water soluble P (WSP), and total P (TP) concentrations in runoffby 35, 25, 61, and 64%, respectively, and litter-associated bacteria by two to three orders of magnitude compared with unincorporated treatment. No significant difference in total suspended solids (TSS) in runoffwas obtained between incorporated and unincorporated treatments. Incorporation of broiler litter into the surface soil in the no-till system immediately after application minimized the potential risk for surface nutrient losses and bacteria transport in runoff.

  12. Continuous Risk Management Course. Revised

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammer, Theodore F.

    1999-01-01

    This document includes a course plan for Continuous Risk Management taught by the Software Assurance Technology Center along with the Continuous Risk Management Guidebook of the Software Engineering Institute of Carnegie Mellon University and a description of Continuous Risk Management at NASA.

  13. Cover crop root, shoot, and rhizodeposit contributions to soil carbon in a no- till corn bioenergy cropping system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, E.; Grandy, S.; Wickings, K.; McDaniel, M. D.; Robertson, P.

    2016-12-01

    Crop residues are potential biofuel feedstocks, but residue removal may result in reduced soil carbon (C). The inclusion of a cover crop in a corn bioenergy system could provide additional biomass and as well as help to mitigate the negative effects of residue removal by adding belowground C to stable soil C pools. In a no-till continuous corn bioenergy system in the northern portion of the US corn belt, we used 13CO2 pulse labeling to trace C in a winter rye (secale cereale) cover crop into different soil C pools for two years following rye termination. Corn stover contributed 66 (another 163 was in harvested corn stover), corn roots 57, rye shoot 61, rye roots 59, and rye rhizodeposits 27 g C m-2 to soil C. Five months following cover crop termination, belowground cover crop inputs were three times more likely to remain in soil C pools and much of the root-derived C was in mineral- associated soil fractions. Our results underscore the importance of cover crop roots vs. shoots as a source of soil C. Belowground C inputs from winter cover crops could substantially offset short term stover removal in this system.

  14. Grazing winter rye cover crop in a cotton no-till system: yield and economics

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Winter cover crop adoption in conservation management systems continues to be limited in the US but could be encouraged if establishment costs could be offset. A 4-yr field experiment was conducted near Watkinsville, Georgia in which a rye (Secale cereale L.) cover crop was either grazed by catt...

  15. Sunflower response to irrigation from limited water supplies with no-till management

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Limited irrigation necessitates maximizing economic returns by rotating crops, so we conducted a field study during 2005-2009 in southwest Kansas to determine the yield response of sunflower to irrigation and evapotranspiration (ETc) and to measure plant growth parameters and soil water use. Sunflow...

  16. Crop rotations with annual and perennial forages under no-till soil management

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Development of crop rotations that support sustainable agriculture depends on understanding complex relationships between soils, crops, and yield. Objectives were to measure how soil chemical and physical attributes as well as maize (Zea mays L.) and soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] stover dry weig...

  17. Nitrogen source and placement effects on soil nitrous oxide emissions from no-till corn.

    PubMed

    Halvorson, Ardell D; Del Grosso, Stephen J

    2012-01-01

    A nitrogen (N) source comparison study was conducted to further evaluate the effects of inorganic N source and placement on growing-season and non-crop period soil nitrous oxide (NO). Commercially available controlled-release N fertilizers were evaluated for their potential to reduce NO emissions from a clay loam soil compared with conventionally used granular urea and urea-ammonium nitrate (UAN) fertilizers in an irrigated no-till (NT) corn ( L.) production system. Controlled-release N fertilizers evaluated were: a polymer-coated urea (ESN), stabilized urea (SuperU), and UAN+AgrotainPlus (SuperU and AgrotainPlus contain nitrification and urease inhibitors). Each N source was surface band applied (202 kg N ha) near the corn row at emergence and watered into the soil the next day. Subsurface banded ESN (ESNssb) and check (no N applied) treatments were included. Nitrous oxide fluxes were measured during two growing seasons and after harvest using static, vented chambers. All N sources had significantly lower growing-season NO emissions than granular urea (0.7% of applied N), with UAN+AgrotainPlus (0.2% of applied N) and ESN (0.3% of applied N) having lower emissions than UAN (0.4% of applied N). Similar trends were observed when expressing NO emissions on a grain yield and N uptake basis. Corn grain yields were not different among N sources but were greater than the check. Selection of N fertilizer source can be a mitigation practice for reducing NO emissions in NT, irrigated corn in semiarid areas. In our study, UAN+AgrotainPlus consistently had the lowest level of NO emissions with no yield loss.

  18. Methane and nitrous oxide emissions under no-till farming in China: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xin; Liu, Sheng-Li; Pu, Chao; Zhang, Xiang-Qian; Xue, Jian-Fu; Zhang, Ran; Wang, Yu-Qiao; Lal, Rattan; Zhang, Hai-Lin; Chen, Fu

    2016-04-01

    No-till (NT) practices are among promising options toward adaptation and mitigation of climate change. However, the mitigation effectiveness of NT depends not only on its carbon sequestration potential but also on soil-derived CH4 and N2O emissions. A meta-analysis was conducted, using a dataset involving 136 comparisons from 39 studies in China, to identify site-specific factors which influence CH4 emission, CH4 uptake, and N2O emission under NT. Comparative treatments involved NT without residue retention (NT0), NT with residue retention (NTR), compared to plow tillage (PT) with residue removed (PT0). Overall, NT0 significantly decreased CH4 emission by ~30% (P < 0.05) compared to PT0 with an average emission 218.8 kg ha(-1) for rice paddies. However, the increase in N2O emission could partly offset the benefits of the decrease in CH4 emission under NT compared to PT0. NTR significantly enhanced N2O emission by 82.1%, 25.5%, and 20.8% (P < 0.05) compared to PT0 for rice paddies, acid soils, and the first 5 years of the experiments, respectively. The results from categorical meta-analysis indicated that the higher N2O emission could be mitigated by adopting NT within alkaline soils, for long-term duration, and with less N fertilization input when compared to PT0. In addition, the natural log (lnR) of response ratio of CH4 and N2O emissions under NT correlated positively (enhancing emission) with climate factors (temperature and precipitation) and negatively (reducing emission) with experimental duration, suggesting that avoiding excess soil wetness and using NT for a long term could enhance the benefits of NT. Therefore, a thorough understanding of the conditions favoring greenhouse gas(es) reductions is essential to achieving climate change mitigation and advancing food security in China.

  19. CARBON DIOXIDE AND NITROUS OXIDE FLUXES IN ORGANIC, NO-TILL, AND CHISEL-TILL CROPPING SYSTEMS

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Organic cropping systems may have the potential to increase soil C sequestration and reduce soil nitrous oxide (N2O) fluxes compared to conventional systems but organic systems are not well studied. We are measuring greenhouse gas fluxes and soil C sequestration in no-till, chisel-till and organic ...

  20. Long-term Annual No-Till Cropping in Washington’s Winter Wheat – Summer Fallow Region

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The tillage-based winter wheat – summer fallow (WW-SF) cropping system has dominated dryland farming in the Pacific Northwest for 125 years. We conducted a large-scale multidisciplinary 8-year study of annual no-till cropping systems as an alternative to WW-SF. Soft white and hard white classes of w...

  1. A diversified no-till crop rotation reduces nitrous oxide emissions, increases soybean yields, and promotes soil C accrual

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We evaluated the impact of crop rotational diversity on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, global warming potential (GWP), and crop yields. Under no-till, rain-fed conditions, a two-yr (corn (Zea mays L.)-soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.)) rotation and a four-yr (corn-field peas (Pisum sativum L.)-winte...

  2. Conservation tillage issues: cover crop-based organic rotational no-till grain production in the mid-atlantic region

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Organic producers in the mid-Atlantic region are interested in reducing tillage, labor, and time requirements for grain production. Cover crop-based organic rotational no-till grain production is one approach to accomplishing these goals. Advancements in a system for planting crops into a mat of cov...

  3. Allelopathic influence of a wheat or rye cover crop on growth and yield of no-till cotton

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    TECHNICAL ABSTRACT No-till planting cotton into small grain cover crops has many benefits including reducing soil erosion and allelopathic suppression of weeds. It is suggested that the potentials of allelopathy on cotton plants. Nevertheless, little is known about the actual effects of alleloche...

  4. Soil greenhouse gas emissions and carbon dynamics of a no-till, corn-based cellulosic ethanol production system

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Crop residues like corn stover perform important functions that promote soil health and provide ecosystem services that influence agricultural sustainability and global biogeochemical cycles. We evaluated the effect of corn residue removal from a no-till, corn-soybean rotation on greenhouse gas (GHG...

  5. Modeling hydrology, metribuzin degradation and metribuzin transport in macroporous tilled and no-till silt loam soil using RZWQM.

    PubMed

    Malone, Robert W; Ma, Liwang; Wauchope, R Don; Ahuja, Lajpat R; Rojas, Kenneth W; Ma, Qingli; Warner, Richard; Byers, Matt

    2004-03-01

    Due to the complex nature of pesticide transport, process-based models can be difficult to use. For example, pesticide transport can be effected by macropore flow, and can be further complicated by sorption, desorption and degradation occurring at different rates in different soil compartments. We have used the Root Zone Water Quality Model (RZWQM) to investigate these phenomena with field data that included two management conditions (till and no-till) and metribuzin concentrations in percolate, runoff and soil. Metribuzin degradation and transport were simulated using three pesticide sorption models available in RZWQM: (a) instantaneous equilibrium-only (EO); (b) equilibrium-kinetic (EK, includes sites with slow desorption and no degradation); (c) equilibrium-bound (EB, includes irreversibly bound sites with relatively slow degradation). Site-specific RZWQM input included water retention curves from four soil depths, saturated hydraulic conductivity from four soil depths and the metribuzin partition coefficient. The calibrated parameters were macropore radius, surface crust saturated hydraulic conductivity, kinetic parameters, irreversible binding parameters and metribuzin half-life. The results indicate that (1) simulated metribuzin persistence was more accurate using the EK (root mean square error, RMSE = 0.03 kg ha(-1)) and EB (RMSE = 0.03 kg ha(-1)) sorption models compared to the EO (RMSE = 0.08 kg ha(-1)) model because of slowing metribuzin degradation rate with time and (2) simulating macropore flow resulted in prediction of metribuzin transport in percolate over the simulation period within a factor of two of that observed using all three pesticide sorption models. Moreover, little difference in simulated daily transport was observed between the three pesticide sorption models, except that the EB model substantially under-predicted metribuzin transport in runoff and percolate >30 days after application when transported concentrations were relatively low

  6. Continuous Risk Management: An Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberg, Linda; Hammer, Theodore F.

    1999-01-01

    Software risk management is important because it helps avoid disasters, rework, and overkill, but more importantly because it stimulates win-win situations. The objectives of software risk management are to identify, address, and eliminate software risk items before they become threats to success or major sources of rework. In general, good project managers are also good managers of risk. It makes good business sense for all software development projects to incorporate risk management as part of project management. The Software Assurance Technology Center (SATC) at NASA GSFC has been tasked with the responsibility for developing and teaching a systems level course for risk management that provides information on how to implement risk management. The course was developed in conjunction with the Software Engineering Institute at Carnegie Mellon University, then tailored to the NASA systems community. This is an introductory tutorial to continuous risk management based on this course. The rational for continuous risk management and how it is incorporated into project management are discussed. The risk management structure of six functions is discussed in sufficient depth for managers to understand what is involved in risk management and how it is implemented. These functions include: (1) Identify the risks in a specific format; (2) Analyze the risk probability, impact/severity, and timeframe; (3) Plan the approach; (4) Track the risk through data compilation and analysis; (5) Control and monitor the risk; (6) Communicate and document the process and decisions.

  7. Continuing Education Courses in Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Herbert S.

    1987-01-01

    Examines issues of special library management and the emphases in SLA (Special Libraries Association) continuing education courses dealing with these issues. Five courses taught for SLA are described, including one-day courses on management communications, delegation, and effective supervisory skills, as well as seminars dealing with human…

  8. Synergistic effect of FGD by-product and broiler litter application on cotton yield, N utilization and soil nutrient concentrations in a no-till field

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In the Southeastern USA where much of the poultry litter is generated, cotton farmers are recognizing broiler litter’s value and are utilizing broiler litter in both tillage and no-till systems. However, surface application of broiler litter to no-till cotton without incorporation exposes broiler li...

  9. Simulating landscape catena effects in no-till dryland agroecosystems using GPFARM

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Alternative agricultural management systems in the semi-arid Great Plains are receiving increasing attention. GPFARM is a farm/ranch decision support system (DSS) designed to assist in strategic management planning for land units from the field to the whole-farm level. This study evaluated the site...

  10. Comparing carbon dioxide (CO2) flux between no-till and conventional tillage agriculture in Lesotho

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soil management practices can either sequester or emit carbon (C). Feeding seven billion people mandates that soils be used intensively for food production, but how these soils are managed greatly impacts soil fluxes of carbon dioxide (CO2). However, the lack of CO2 flux measurements on African subs...

  11. Long-term trends in nitrous oxide emissions, soil nitrogen, and crop yields of till and no-till cropping systems.

    PubMed

    Grandy, A Stuart; Loecke, Terrance D; Parr, Sara; Robertson, G Philip

    2006-01-01

    No-till cropping can increase soil C stocks and aggregation but patterns of long-term changes in N2O emissions, soil N availability, and crop yields still need to be resolved. We measured soil C accumulation, aggregation, soil water, N2O emissions, soil inorganic N, and crop yields in till and no-till corn-soybean-wheat rotations between 1989 and 2002 in southwestern Michigan and investigated whether tillage effects varied over time or by crop. Mean annual NO3- concentrations in no-till were significantly less than in conventional till in three of six corn years and during one year of wheat production. Yields were similar in each system for all 14 years but three, during which yields were higher in no-till, indicating that lower soil NO3- concentrations did not result in lower yields. Carbon accumulated in no-till soils at a rate of 26 g C m(-2) yr(-1) over 12 years at the 0- to 5-cm soil depth. Average nitrous oxide emissions were similar in till (3.27 +/- 0.52 g N ha d(-1)) and no-till (3.63 +/- 0.53 g N ha d(-1)) systems and were sufficient to offset 56 to 61% of the reduction in CO2 equivalents associated with no-till C sequestration. After controlling for rotation and environmental effects by normalizing treatment differences between till and no-till systems we found no significant trends in soil N, N2O emissions, or yields through time. In our sandy loam soils, no-till cropping enhances C storage, aggregation, and associated environmental processes with no significant ecological or yield tradeoffs.

  12. Soil sorptivity enhancement with crop residue accumulation in simiarid dryland no-till agroecosystems

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Water capture and precipitation use efficiency are of great importance in dryland cropping systems because the world’s dependence on food produced in dryland areas continues to increase. Growing season evapotranspiration potential greatly exceeds growing season precipitation rates in dryland areas,...

  13. Impact of crop rotation and soil amendments on long-term no-tilled soybean yields

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Continuous cropping systems without cover crops are perceived as unsustainable for long-term yield and soil health. To test this, cropping sequence and cover crop effects on soybean (Glycine max L.) yields were assessed. Main effects were 10 cropping sequences of soybean, corn (Zea mays L.), and co...

  14. Limited irrigation of corn-based no-till crop rotations in West Central Great Plains

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Due to numerous alternatives in crop sequence and changes in crop yield and price, finding the most profitable crop rotation for an area is a continuous research challenge. The objective of this study was to evaluate 1-, 2-, 3-, and 4-yr limited irrigation corn (Zea mays L.)-based crop rotations for...

  15. Limited irrigation of corn-based no-till crop rotations in west central Great Plains.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Identifying the most profitable crop rotation for an area is a continuous research challenge. The objective of this study was to evaluate 2, 3, and 4 yr. limited irrigation corn (Zea mays L.) based crop rotations for grain yield, available soil water, crop water productivity, and profitability in co...

  16. Hydrological Variables and Dissolved Phosphorus in the Runoff from No-tilled Soil after Application of Swine Liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbosa, F. T.; Bertol, I.; de Amaral, A. J.; Grahl dos Santos, P.; Ramos, R. R.; Werner, R. S.; Miras Avalos, J. M.

    2012-04-01

    Swine manure is used as a soil fertilizer in South Brazil. Commonly, it is applied continuously and in great amounts over surfaces with an important relief and without facilities that avoid water erosion. Thus, this manure is a potential risk of environmental pollution, mainly for the eutrophication of water bodies due to a runoff rich in nutrients. The aim of this work was to assess some soil hydrological parameters and to quantify the dissolved phosphorus losses in the runoff from no-tilled soils after the application of swine liquid manure. The experiment was carried out in the Highlands of Santa Catarina State, Brazil, in June 2009, over a Nitisol. On field plots, a 90-minute simulated rainfall test was performed with a rotating boom rainfall simulator and rainfall intensity of 70 mm h-1. Prior to the rainfall simulation, sowing was performed using a disk planter either with or without tines. Spacing between lines was 0.5 m. Swine liquid manure was applied at rates of 0.0, 30 and 60 m3ha-1 to the plots planted using tines; whereas it was applied at 15, 45 e 75 m3ha-1 to the plots were no tines were used for planting. During rainfall simulation, readings of runoff rate were taken each five minutes; total water loss was calculated by integrating all the 5-minute readings. Runoff samples were collected at 10 minutes intervals, and they were filtered through a 0.45 μm filter to determine dissolved phosphorus. Hydrological variables were significantly affected by the use of tines, which favoured infiltration and reduced runoff as compared to the non-use of tines. Runoff started at 28 and 11 minutes, water losses were 252 and 467 m3 ha-1, maximum runoff rate were 29 and 42 mm h-1 and constant rates of infiltration were 41 and 28 mm h-1, for treatments with and without tines, respectively. Dissolved phosphorus increased with the rate of swine liquid manure applied, with a trend to decrease from the beginning to the end of rainfall. The highest concentration was 0

  17. Long-term no-till: A major driver of fungal communities in dryland wheat cropping systems

    PubMed Central

    Sharma-Poudyal, Dipak; Schlatter, Daniel; Yin, Chuntao; Hulbert, Scot

    2017-01-01

    In the dryland Pacific Northwest wheat cropping systems, no-till is becoming more prevalent as a way to reduce soil erosion and fuel inputs. Tillage can have a profound effect on microbial communities and soilborne fungal pathogens, such as Rhizoctonia. We compared the fungal communities in long-term no-till (NT) plots adjacent to conventionally tilled (CT) plots, over three years at two locations in Washington state and one location in Idaho, US. We used pyrosequencing of the fungal ITS gene and identified 422 OTUs after rarefication. Fungal richness was higher in NT compared to CT, in two of the locations. Humicola nigrescens, Cryptococcus terreus, Cadophora spp. Hydnodontaceae spp., and Exophiala spp. were more abundant in NT, while species of Glarea, Coniochaetales, Mycosphaerella tassiana, Cryptococcus bhutanensis, Chaetomium perlucidum, and Ulocladium chartarum were more abundant in CT in most locations. Other abundant groups that did not show any trends were Fusarium, Mortierella, Penicillium, Aspergillus, and Macroventuria. Plant pathogens such as Rhizoctonia (Ceratobasidiaceae) were not abundant enough to see tillage differences, but Microdochium bolleyi, a weak root pathogen, was more abundant in NT. Our results suggest that NT fungi are better adapted at utilizing intact, decaying roots as a food source and may exist as root endophytes. CT fungi can utilize mature plant residues that are turned into the soil with tillage as pioneer colonizers, and then produce large numbers of conidia. But a larger proportion of the fungal community is not affected by tillage and may be niche generalists. PMID:28898288

  18. Soil CO2 flux in response to wheel traffic in a no-till system

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Measurements of soil CO2 flux in the absence of living plants can be used to evaluate the effectiveness of soil management practices for C sequestration, but field CO2 flux is spatially variable and may be affected by soil compaction and percentage of total pore space filled with water (%WFPS). The ...

  19. Impact of corn stover removal on soil microbial communities in no-till and conventional till continuous corn

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Corn (Zea mays L.) residue, or stover, can be used as a dry forage replacement in beef cattle diets and is being considered as a feedstock for cellulosic biofuel production. The soil quality and crop productivity ramifications of removing stover, however, likely will depend on stover removal rate an...

  20. Riparian buffer zones as pesticide filters of no-till crops.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, Terencio R; Bortolozo, F R; Hansel, F A; Rasera, K; Ferreira, M T

    2015-07-01

    Several studies have pointed to the potential benefits of riparian vegetation as buffer zones for agricultural and industrial pollutants harmful to aquatic ecosystems. However, other studies have called into question its use as an ecological filter, questioning the widths and conditions for which they are effective as a filter. In this work, we have investigated the buffering capacity of the riparian one to retain pesticides in the water-saturated zone, on 27 sites composed by riparian buffer zones with different vegetation structure (woody, shrubs, or grass vegetation) and width (12, 36, and 60 m). Five pesticides were analyzed. The effectiveness of the filtering was largely influenced by the width and vegetation type of the buffer zone. In general, decreasing pesticide removal followed in this order wood > shrubs > grass. The 60 m woody buffer zone was the most effective in the removal of all the pesticides. Only atrazine was detected in this case (0.3 μg L(-1)). Furthermore, a linear correlation (R (2) > 0.97) was observed in their removal for all compounds and buffer zones studied. Thus, preserving the woody vegetation in the riparian zone is important for watershed management and groundwater quality in the no-tillage system in temperate climate.

  1. Soil physical and X-ray computed tomographic measurements to investigate small-scale structural differences under strip tillage compared to mulch till and no-till

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pöhlitz, Julia; Rücknagel, Jan; Schlüter, Steffen; Vogel, Hans-Jörg

    2017-04-01

    In recent years there has been an increasing application of conservation tillage techniques where the soil is no longer turned, but only loosened or left completely untilled. Dead plant material remains on the soil surface, which provides environmental and economic benefits such as the conservation of water, preventing soil erosion and saving time during seedbed preparation. There is a variety of conservation tillage systems, e.g. mulch till, no-till and strip tillage, which is a special feature. In strip tillage, the seed bed is divided into a seed zone (strip-till within the seed row: STWS) and a soil management zone (strip-till between the seed row: STBS). However, each tillage application affects physical soil properties and processes. Here, the combined application of classical soil mechanical and computed tomographic methods is used on a Chernozem (texture 0-30 cm: silt loam) to show small-scale structural differences under strip tillage (STWS, STBS) compared to no-till (NT) and mulch till (MT). In addition to the classical soil physical parameters dry bulk density and saturated conductivity (years: 2012, 2014, 2015) at soil depths 2-8 and 12-18 cm, stress-strain tests were carried out to map mechanical behavior. The stress-strain tests were performed for a load range from 5-550 kPa at 12-18 cm depth (year 2015). Mechanical precompression stress was determined on the stress-dry bulk density curves. Further, CT image cross sections and computed tomographic examinations (average pore size, porosity, connectivity, and anisotropy) were used from the same soil samples. For STBS and NT, a significant increase in dry bulk density was observed over the course of time compared to STWS and MT, which was more pronounced at 2-8 cm than at 12-18 cm depth. Despite higher dry bulk density, STBS displayed higher saturated conductivity in contrast to STWS, which can be attributed to higher earthworm abundance. In strip tillage, structural differences were identified

  2. Continuous Risk Management at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammer, Theodore F.; Rosenberg, Linda

    1999-01-01

    NPG 7120.5A, "NASA Program and Project Management Processes and Requirements" enacted in April, 1998, requires that "The program or project manager shall apply risk management principles..." The Software Assurance Technology Center (SATC) at NASA GSFC has been tasked with the responsibility for developing and teaching a systems level course for risk management that provides information on how to comply with this edict. The course was developed in conjunction with the Software Engineering Institute at Carnegie Mellon University, then tailored to the NASA systems community. This presentation will briefly discuss the six functions for risk management: (1) Identify the risks in a specific format; (2) Analyze the risk probability, impact/severity, and timeframe; (3) Plan the approach; (4) Track the risk through data compilation and analysis; (5) Control and monitor the risk; (6) Communicate and document the process and decisions. This risk management structure of functions has been taught to projects at all NASA Centers and is being successfully implemented on many projects. This presentation will give project managers the information they need to understand if risk management is to be effectively implemented on their projects at a cost they can afford.

  3. Effects of different roller/crimper designs and rolling speed on rye cover crop termination and seedcotton yield in A no-till system

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rollers/crimpers have been utilized in no-till systems to mechanically terminate cover crops as a substitute for chemical termination; however, excessive vibration generated by the original straight bar roller adopted from Brazil has delayed its adoption in the U.S. To reduce excessive vibration, pr...

  4. Effects of Poultry litter and dairy manure applications on forage yield and quality in conventional and no-till established tall fescue (Scheonourous phoenix [Scop.] Holub) sward.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    An endophyte-free tall fescue cultivar, ‘Bronson’ was seeded at a rate of 28kg per ha in the fall of 2010. Two establishment methods were utilized; conventional tillage and no-till establishment. Treatments included conventional fertilizer, poultry litter, and dairy manure along with an untreated co...

  5. Impact of no-till cover cropping of Italian ryegrass on above and below ground faunal communities inhabiting a soybean field with special emphasis on soybean cyst nematodes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Two field trials were conducted in Maryland to evaluate the ability of an Italian ryegrass (IR) (Lolium multiflorum) cover crop in a no-till soybean (Glycine max) planting to 1) reduce populations of plant-parasitic nematodes (i.e., the soybean cyst nematode, Heterodera glycines and lesion nematodes...

  6. Roller type and operating speed effects on rye termination rates, soil moisture and yield of sweet corn in a no-till system

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A field experiment was conducted in Cullman, Alabama to evaluate the effects of three different rollers/crimpers on the termination of a rye (Secale cereale L) winter cover crop, soil moisture, and yield of sweet corn (Zea mays L.) in a no-till system. The following roller types were tested: a strai...

  7. No-till with high biomass cover crops and invasive legume mulches increased total soil carbon after three years of collard production

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A great deal of literature has found that conversion to conservation tillage from conventional tillage does not increase total soil organic carbon (SOC) significantly in the short term (<5 yrs), particularly for limited-input producers. While no-till increases total SOC in the medium to long term, w...

  8. Water use and yields of no-till managed dryland grasspea and yellow pea under different planting configurations

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Grasspea (GP) (Lathyrus sativus) is a drought-tolerant legume that can be grown for forage and grain. It has potential value to be used as a nitrogen-fixing crop in dryland rotations with non-legume grain crops. However, the agronomics of GP for the Central Great Plains region have not been investi...

  9. Business continuity management in international organisations.

    PubMed

    Adamou, Christel

    2014-01-01

    In the area of business continuity management, a preliminary review of the literature reveals extensive knowledge, expertise and experience concerning organisations in the private and public sectors. It is interesting to note, however, that there is little literature about business continuity management in international organisations, although these entities are complex and particularly prone to threats. This apparent absence of literature suggests that business continuity management has not yet hit the agenda of international organisations. In recent years, member states have encouraged senior management to design and implement business continuity strategies to minimise the mishandling of an internal crisis and build organisational resilience, but very few of them have actually been able to design and implement comprehensive business continuity programmes. Based on actual experience working in international organisations, this paper outlines some of the challenges faced by international organisations in developing and implementing business continuity activities and attempts to make suggestions for further improvement.

  10. Bacterial and archaeal ammonia oxidizers respond differently to long-term tillage and fertilizer management at a continuous maize site

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fertilizer use and tillage affect both the general soil microbial community and speci'c N-utilizing microbial groups, but likely to varying degrees. To assess these impacts, soil was collected on three key dates from a long-term (26+ years), rainfed, continuous maize site where tillage (no-till and ...

  11. Hybrid Power Management Program Continued

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichenberg, Dennis J.

    2002-01-01

    Hybrid Power Management (HPM) is the innovative integration of diverse, state-of-the-art power devices in an optimal configuration for space and terrestrial applications. The appropriate application and control of the various power devices significantly improves overall system performance and efficiency. The advanced power devices include ultracapacitors and photovoltaics. HPM has extremely wide potential with applications including power-generation, transportation, biotechnology, and space power systems. It may significantly alleviate global energy concerns, improve the environment, and stimulate the economy.

  12. Potential of carbon accumulation in no-till soils with intensive use and cover crops in southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Amado, Telmo Jorge Carneiro; Bayer, Cimélio; Conceição, Paulo Cesar; Spagnollo, Evandro; de Campos, Ben-Hur Costa; da Veiga, Milton

    2006-01-01

    The area under no-till (NT) in Brazil reached 22 million ha in 2004-2005, of which approximately 45% was located in the southern states. From the 1970s to the mid-1980s, this region was a source of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere due to decrease of soil carbon (C) stocks and high consumption of fuel by intensive tillage. Since then, NT has partially restored the soil C lost and reduced the consumption of fossil fuels. To assess the potential of C accumulation in NT soils, four long-term experiments (7-19 yr) in subtropical soils (Paleudult, Paleudalf, and Hapludox) varying in soil texture (87-760 g kg(-1) of clay) in agroecologic southern Brazil zones (central region, northwest basaltic plateau in Rio Grande Sul, and west basaltic plateau in Santa Catarina) and with different cropping systems (soybean and maize) were investigated. The lability of soil organic matter (SOM) was calculated as the ratio of total organic carbon (TOC) to particulate organic carbon (POC), and the role of physical protection on stability of SOM was evaluated. In general, TOC and POC stocks in native grass correlated closely with clay content. Conversely, there was no clear effect of soil texture on C accumulation rates in NT soils, which ranged from 0.12 to 0.59 Mg ha(-1) yr(-1). The C accumulation was higher in NT than in conventional-till (CT) soils. The legume cover crops pigeon pea [Cajanus cajan (L.) Millsp] and velvet beans (Stizolobium cinereum Piper & Tracy) in NT maize cropping systems had the highest C accumulation rates (0.38-0.59 Mg ha(-1) yr(-1)). The intensive cropping systems also were effective in increasing the C accumulation rates in NT soils (0.25-0.34 Mg ha(-1) yr(-1)) when compared to the double-crop system used by farmers. These results stress the role of N fixation in improving the tropical and subtropical cropping systems. The physical protection of SOM within soil aggregates was an important mechanism of C accumulation in the sandy clay loam Paleudult under NT

  13. Initial nitrous oxide, carbon dioxide, and methane costs of converting conservation reserve program grassland to row crops under no-till vs. conventional tillage.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Leilei; Philip Robertson, G

    2013-08-01

    Around 4.4 million ha of land in USDA Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) contracts will expire between 2013 and 2018 and some will likely return to crop production. No-till (NT) management offers the potential to reduce the global warming costs of CO2 , CH4 , and N2 O emissions during CRP conversion, but to date there have been no CRP conversion tillage comparisons. In 2009, we converted portions of three 9-21 ha CRP fields in Michigan to conventional tillage (CT) or NT soybean production and reserved a fourth field for reference. Both CO2 and N2 O fluxes increased following herbicide application in all converted fields, but in the CT treatment substantial and immediate N2 O and CO2 fluxes occurred after tillage. For the initial 201-day conversion period, average daily N2 O fluxes (g N2 O-N ha(-1)  d(-1) ) were significantly different in the order: CT (47.5 ± 6.31, n = 6) ≫ NT (16.7 ± 2.45, n = 6) ≫ reference (2.51 ± 0.73, n = 4). Similarly, soil CO2 fluxes in CT were 1.2 times those in NT and 3.1 times those in the unconverted CRP reference field. All treatments were minor sinks for CH4 (-0.69 ± 0.42 to -1.86 ± 0.37 g CH4 -C ha(-1)  d(-1) ) with no significant differences among treatments. The positive global warming impact (GWI) of converted soybean fields under both CT (11.5 Mg CO2 e ha(-1) ) and NT (2.87 Mg CO2 e ha(-1) ) was in contrast to the negative GWI of the unconverted reference field (-3.5 Mg CO2 e ha(-1) ) with on-going greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation. N2 O contributed 39.3% and 55.0% of the GWI under CT and NT systems with the remainder contributed by CO2 (60.7% and 45.0%, respectively). Including foregone mitigation, we conclude that NT management can reduce GHG costs by ~60% compared to CT during initial CRP conversion.

  14. Initial nitrous oxide, carbon dioxide, and methane costs of converting conservation reserve program grassland to row crops under no-till vs. conventional tillage

    PubMed Central

    Ruan, Leilei; Philip Robertson, G

    2013-01-01

    Around 4.4 million ha of land in USDA Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) contracts will expire between 2013 and 2018 and some will likely return to crop production. No-till (NT) management offers the potential to reduce the global warming costs of CO2, CH4, and N2O emissions during CRP conversion, but to date there have been no CRP conversion tillage comparisons. In 2009, we converted portions of three 9–21 ha CRP fields in Michigan to conventional tillage (CT) or NT soybean production and reserved a fourth field for reference. Both CO2 and N2O fluxes increased following herbicide application in all converted fields, but in the CT treatment substantial and immediate N2O and CO2 fluxes occurred after tillage. For the initial 201-day conversion period, average daily N2O fluxes (g N2O-N ha−1 d−1) were significantly different in the order: CT (47.5 ± 6.31, n = 6) ≫ NT (16.7 ± 2.45, n = 6) ≫ reference (2.51 ± 0.73, n = 4). Similarly, soil CO2 fluxes in CT were 1.2 times those in NT and 3.1 times those in the unconverted CRP reference field. All treatments were minor sinks for CH4 (−0.69 ± 0.42 to −1.86 ± 0.37 g CH4–C ha−1 d−1) with no significant differences among treatments. The positive global warming impact (GWI) of converted soybean fields under both CT (11.5 Mg CO2e ha−1) and NT (2.87 Mg CO2e ha−1) was in contrast to the negative GWI of the unconverted reference field (−3.5 Mg CO2e ha−1) with on-going greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation. N2O contributed 39.3% and 55.0% of the GWI under CT and NT systems with the remainder contributed by CO2 (60.7% and 45.0%, respectively). Including foregone mitigation, we conclude that NT management can reduce GHG costs by ∼60% compared to CT during initial CRP conversion. PMID:23553929

  15. Business continuity 2014: From traditional to integrated Business Continuity Management.

    PubMed

    Ee, Henry

    As global change continues to generate new challenges and potential threats to businesses, traditional business continuity management (BCM) slowly reveals its limitations and weak points to ensuring 'business resiliency' today. Consequently, BCM professionals also face the challenge of re-evaluating traditional concepts and introducing new strategies and industry best practices. This paper points to why traditional BCM is no longer sufficient in terms of enabling businesses to survive in today's high-risk environment. It also looks into some of the misconceptions about BCM and other stumbling blocks to establishing effective BCM today. Most importantly, however, this paper provides tips based on the Business Continuity Institute's (BCI) Good Practices Guideline (GPG) and the latest international BCM standard ISO 22301 on how to overcome the issues and challenges presented.

  16. Management continuity in local health networks

    PubMed Central

    Breton, Mylaine; Haggerty, Jeannie; Roberge, Danièle; Freeman, George K

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Patients increasingly receive care from multiple providers in a variety of settings. They expect management continuity that crosses boundaries and bridges gaps in the healthcare system. To our knowledge, little research has been done to assess coordination across organizational and professional boundaries from the patients’ perspective. Our objective was to assess whether greater local health network integration is associated with management continuity as perceived by patients. Method We used the data from a research project on the development and validation of a generic and comprehensive continuity measurement instrument that can be applied to a variety of patient conditions and settings. We used the results of a cross-sectional survey conducted in 2009 with 256 patients in two local health networks in Quebec, Canada. We compared four aspects of management continuity between two contrasting network types (highly integrated vs. poorly integrated). Results The scores obtained in the highly integrated network are better than those of the poorly integrated network on all dimensions of management continuity (coordinator role, role clarity and coordination between clinics, and information gaps between providers) except for experience of care plan. Conclusion Some aspects of care coordination among professionals and organizations are noticed by patients and may be valid indicators to assess care coordination. PMID:22977427

  17. Creating meaningful business continuity management programme metrics.

    PubMed

    Strong, Brian

    2010-11-01

    The popular axiom, 'what gets measured gets done', is often applied in the quality management and continuous improvement disciplines. This truism is also useful to business continuity practitioners as they continually strive to prove the value of their organisation's investment in a business continuity management (BCM) programme. BCM practitioners must also remain relevant to their organisations as executives focus on the bottom line and maintaining stakeholder confidence. It seems that executives always find a way, whether in a hallway or elevator, to ask BCM professionals about the company's level of readiness. When asked, they must be ready with an informed response. The establishment of a process to measure business continuity programme performance and organisational readiness has emerged as a key component of US Department of Homeland Security 'Voluntary Private Sector Preparedness (PS-Prep) Program' standards where the overarching goal is to improve private sector preparedness for disasters and emergencies. The purpose of this paper is two-fold: to introduce continuity professionals to best practices that should be considered when developing a BCM metrics programme as well as providing a case study of how a large health insurance company researched, developed and implemented a process to measure BCM programme performance and company readiness.

  18. Crop yield and soil organic carbon in conventional and no-till organic systems on a claypan soil

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Organic crop production is dependent on tillage for weed control, but because tillage can lead to decreased levels of soil organic carbon (SOC), alternative management needs to be explored. This study was conducted in Boone County, MO in a Mexico silt loam soil (fine, smectitic, mesic Vertic Epiaqua...

  19. Responses of rice cultivars and elite lines to diseases in no-till organic production system, 2010

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The experiment was established in a field of League-type soil (3% sand, 32% silt, and 64% clay) under organic management for many years at the Texas A&M University System's Agrilife Research and Extension Center, Beaumont. Twenty rice cultivars and lines were arranged in a randomized complete block ...

  20. Impact of Amendments on the Physical Properties of Soil under Tropical Long-Term No Till Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Mooney, Sacha J.

    2016-01-01

    Tropical regions have been considered the world’s primary agricultural frontier; however, some physico-chemical deficiencies, such as low soil organic matter content, poor soil structure, high erodibility, soil acidity, and aluminum toxicity, have affected their productive capacity. Lime and gypsum are commonly used to improve soil chemical fertility, but no information exists about the long-term effects of these products on the physical attributes and C protection mechanisms of highly weathered Oxisols. A field trial was conducted in a sandy clay loam (kaolinitic, thermic Typic Haplorthox) under a no-tillage system for 12 years. The trial consisted of four treatments: a control with no soil amendment application, the application of 2.1 Mg ha-1 phosphogypsum, the application of 2.0 Mg ha-1 lime, and the application of lime + phosphogypsum (2.0 + 2.1 Mg ha-1, respectively). Since the experiment was established in 2002, the rates have been applied three times (2002, 2004, and 2010). Surface liming effectively increased water-stable aggregates > 2.0 mm at a depth of up to 0.2 m; however, the association with phosphogypsum was considered a good strategy to improve the macroaggregate stability in subsoil layers (0.20 to 0.40 m). Consequently, both soil amendments applied together increased the mean weight diameter (MWD) and geometric mean diameter (GMD) in all soil layers, with increases of up to 118 and 89%, respectively, according to the soil layer. The formation and stabilization of larger aggregates contributed to a higher accumulation of total organic carbon (TOC) on these structures. In addition to TOC, the MWD and aggregate stability index were positively correlated with Ca2+ and Mg2+ levels and base saturation. Consequently, the increase observed in the aggregate size class resulted in a better organization of soil particles, increasing the macroporosity and reducing the soil bulk density and penetration resistance. Therefore, adequate soil chemical management

  1. Impact of Amendments on the Physical Properties of Soil under Tropical Long-Term No Till Conditions.

    PubMed

    Carmeis Filho, Antonio C A; Crusciol, Carlos A C; Guimarães, Tiara M; Calonego, Juliano C; Mooney, Sacha J

    2016-01-01

    Tropical regions have been considered the world's primary agricultural frontier; however, some physico-chemical deficiencies, such as low soil organic matter content, poor soil structure, high erodibility, soil acidity, and aluminum toxicity, have affected their productive capacity. Lime and gypsum are commonly used to improve soil chemical fertility, but no information exists about the long-term effects of these products on the physical attributes and C protection mechanisms of highly weathered Oxisols. A field trial was conducted in a sandy clay loam (kaolinitic, thermic Typic Haplorthox) under a no-tillage system for 12 years. The trial consisted of four treatments: a control with no soil amendment application, the application of 2.1 Mg ha-1 phosphogypsum, the application of 2.0 Mg ha-1 lime, and the application of lime + phosphogypsum (2.0 + 2.1 Mg ha-1, respectively). Since the experiment was established in 2002, the rates have been applied three times (2002, 2004, and 2010). Surface liming effectively increased water-stable aggregates > 2.0 mm at a depth of up to 0.2 m; however, the association with phosphogypsum was considered a good strategy to improve the macroaggregate stability in subsoil layers (0.20 to 0.40 m). Consequently, both soil amendments applied together increased the mean weight diameter (MWD) and geometric mean diameter (GMD) in all soil layers, with increases of up to 118 and 89%, respectively, according to the soil layer. The formation and stabilization of larger aggregates contributed to a higher accumulation of total organic carbon (TOC) on these structures. In addition to TOC, the MWD and aggregate stability index were positively correlated with Ca2+ and Mg2+ levels and base saturation. Consequently, the increase observed in the aggregate size class resulted in a better organization of soil particles, increasing the macroporosity and reducing the soil bulk density and penetration resistance. Therefore, adequate soil chemical management

  2. The NASA Continuous Risk Management Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pokorny, Frank M.

    2004-01-01

    As an intern this summer in the GRC Risk Management Office, I have become familiar with the NASA Continuous Risk Management Process. In this process, risk is considered in terms of the probability that an undesired event will occur and the impact of the event, should it occur (ref., NASA-NPG: 7120.5). Risk management belongs in every part of every project and should be ongoing from start to finish. Another key point is that a risk is not a problem until it has happened. With that in mind, there is a six step cycle for continuous risk management that prevents risks from becoming problems. The steps are: identify, analyze, plan, track, control, and communicate & document. Incorporated in the first step are several methods to identify risks such as brainstorming and using lessons learned. Once a risk is identified, a risk statement is made on a risk information sheet consisting of a single condition and one or more consequences. There can also be a context section where the risk is explained in more detail. Additionally there are three main goals of analyzing a risk, which are evaluate, classify, and prioritize. Here is where a value is given to the attributes of a risk &e., probability, impact, and timeframe) based on a multi-level classification system (e.g., low, medium, high). It is important to keep in mind that the definitions of these levels are probably different for each project. Furthermore the risks can be combined into groups. Then, the risks are prioritized to see what risk is necessary to mitigate first. After the risks are analyzed, a plan is made to mitigate as many risks as feasible. Each risk should be assigned to someone in the project with knowledge in the area of the risk. Then the possible approaches to choose from are: research, accept, watch, or mitigate. Next, all risks, mitigated or not, are tracked either individually or in groups. As the plan is executed, risks are re-evaluated, and the attribute values are adjusted as necessary. Metrics

  3. The NASA Continuous Risk Management Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pokorny, Frank M.

    2004-01-01

    As an intern this summer in the GRC Risk Management Office, I have become familiar with the NASA Continuous Risk Management Process. In this process, risk is considered in terms of the probability that an undesired event will occur and the impact of the event, should it occur (ref., NASA-NPG: 7120.5). Risk management belongs in every part of every project and should be ongoing from start to finish. Another key point is that a risk is not a problem until it has happened. With that in mind, there is a six step cycle for continuous risk management that prevents risks from becoming problems. The steps are: identify, analyze, plan, track, control, and communicate & document. Incorporated in the first step are several methods to identify risks such as brainstorming and using lessons learned. Once a risk is identified, a risk statement is made on a risk information sheet consisting of a single condition and one or more consequences. There can also be a context section where the risk is explained in more detail. Additionally there are three main goals of analyzing a risk, which are evaluate, classify, and prioritize. Here is where a value is given to the attributes of a risk &e., probability, impact, and timeframe) based on a multi-level classification system (e.g., low, medium, high). It is important to keep in mind that the definitions of these levels are probably different for each project. Furthermore the risks can be combined into groups. Then, the risks are prioritized to see what risk is necessary to mitigate first. After the risks are analyzed, a plan is made to mitigate as many risks as feasible. Each risk should be assigned to someone in the project with knowledge in the area of the risk. Then the possible approaches to choose from are: research, accept, watch, or mitigate. Next, all risks, mitigated or not, are tracked either individually or in groups. As the plan is executed, risks are re-evaluated, and the attribute values are adjusted as necessary. Metrics

  4. Managing Parkinson's disease with continuous dopaminergic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Wolters, Erik; Lees, Andrew J; Volkmann, Jens; van Laar, Teus; Hovestadt, Ad

    2008-04-01

    The pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease is marked by the loss of dopaminergic neurons, which leads to striatal dopaminergic deficiency. This causes resting tremor, hypokinesia, rigidity, bradykinesia, and loss of postural reflexes. Most current treatments for Parkinson's disease aim to restore striatal dopamine signaling by increasing the supply of dopamine with oral levodopa (L-dopa), stimulating dopamine receptors directly using dopamine agonists, or inhibiting the reuptake of endogenous dopamine. L-dopa is standard therapy for patients with Parkinson's disease. However, with continued treatment and disease progression, the response to oral dopaminergic drugs becomes unstable and motor fluctuations emerge, including off periods and dyskinesia. Direct duodenal-administered infusible L-dopa/carbidopa is effective for the management of refractory motor fluctuations in some patient populations. However, enteral infusions cannot mimic the function of the normal dopaminergic brain, and around-the-clock constant-rate administration carries the risk of causing refractory off periods associated with severe immobility and hyperpyrexia. Subthalamic nucleus (STN) deep brain stimulation (DBS) is also a promising treatment. DBS passes a high-frequency electrical current into the target area, mimicking the effect of lesioning the stimulated area. However, this treatment requires invasive surgery and is appropriate for a limited segment of the patient population. This supplement provides a rationale for the use of continuous dopaminergic receptor stimulation and offers guidelines on the individualization of treatment decisions, with special focus on continuous L-dopa infusion and STN DBS. Erik Wolters, MD, PhD, offers an introduction to the impact of continuous L-dopa infusion. Andrew J. Lees, MD, FRCP, provides an overview of the physiologic response to L-dopa and reviews clinical pharmacologic studies of intravenous and intraduodenal L-dopa. Jens Volkmann, MD, discusses

  5. Injection of Dicyandiamide-Treated Pig Slurry Reduced Ammonia Volatilization without Enhancing Soil Nitrous Oxide Emissions from No-Till Corn in Southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Aita, Celso; Gonzatto, Rogério; Miola, Ezequiel C C; B, Daniela; Santos, Dos; Rochette, Philippe; Angers, Denis A; Chantigny, Martin H; Pujol, Stefen B; Giacomini, Diego A; Giacomini, Sandro J

    2014-05-01

    There is a lack of information on how placement in soil and nitrification inhibitors affects nitrous oxide (NO) and ammonia (NH) emissions from pig slurry (PS) applied under no-till (NT) conditions. Our objective was to determine the impact of injecting PS and treating it with the nitrification inhibitor dicyandiamide (DCD) on NH and NO emissions from soils under NT in subtropical southern Brazil. The emissions of these gases were compared for shallow (∼ 10 cm) injection and surface broadcasting of PS with and without DCD (8.1-10.0 kg ha; 6.5-8.4% of applied NH-N). Measurements were made at two sites during two summer growing seasons under NT corn crops. Injection reduced NH volatilization by 70% but increased NO emissions 2.4-fold (from 2628 to 6198 g NO N ha) compared with surface broadcast application. Adding DCD to PS inhibited nitrification and reduced NO emissions by an average of 28% (730 g NO-N ha) for surface broadcast and 66% (4105 g NO-N ha) for injection but did not increase NH volatilization. Consequently, NO emission factors were much higher for injection (3.6%) than for surface broadcast (1.3%) application and were reduced (0.9%) when DCD was added to injected PS. In conclusion, the injection of DCD-treated slurry is a recommendable practice for reducing NH and NO emissions when applying PS on NT corn in southern Brazil.

  6. Dynamics of mycotoxin and Aspergillus flavus levels in aging Bt and non-Bt corn residues under Mississippi no-till conditions.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Hamed K; Accinelli, Cesare; Zablotowicz, Robert M; Abel, Craig A; Bruns, H Arnold; Dong, Yanhong; Shier, W Thomas

    2008-08-27

    Mycotoxin and Aspergillus flavus levels in soil-surface corn debris left by no-till agriculture methods (stover, cobs, and cobs with grain) were determined during the December-March fallow period for near-isogenic Bt and non-Bt hybrid corn. By December, average mycotoxin levels in non-Bt corn were many times higher in cobs with grain than in grain harvested in September (total aflatoxins, 774 vs 211 ng/g; total fumonisins, 216 vs 3.5 microg/g; cyclopiazonic acid, 4102 vs 72.2 microg/g; zearalenone, 0.2 vs < 0.1 microg/g). No trichothecenes were detected. Levels of mycotoxins and A. flavus propagules were approximately 10- to 50-fold lower in cobs without grain and stover, respectively, for all mycotoxins except zearalenone. Mycotoxin levels in corn debris fractions decreased during winter but began to rise in March. Levels of all mycotoxins and A. flavus propagules were lower in harvested grain and debris from Bt than non-Bt corn, but differences were significant (p < 0.05) only for aflatoxins.

  7. Effects of Cover Crops to Offset Soil Carbon Changes Under No-till on an Ohio farm when Biomass is Harvested

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimble, J. M.; Everett, L. R.; Richards, W.

    2003-12-01

    The results of a long term experiment to look at the use of cover crops and there effect on soil organic carbon. No-till has been shown to increase SOC and improve the overall soil quality under conditions where the biomass has been returned to the field. However, biomass may be removed as silage or for use in biofuels. The removal will reduce the inputs to the field so to overcome the amount of biomass not returned to the soil different cover crops were used. This experiment was done on a working farm where the corn biomass was being removed as silage. Four cover crops were planted in early September of 2002: rye, oats, clover, and canola with two controls, one with no cover crop and one where corn stubble was left on the field. The soils were sampled soon after the crops were planted and again in the spring of 2003 before the cover crops were killed just prior to planting. The first results indicate that the most root biomass was produced by the rye followed by oats then canola and then clover.

  8. Impact of No-till Cover Cropping of Italian Ryegrass on Above and Below Ground Faunal Communities Inhabiting a Soybean Field with Emphasis on Soybean Cyst Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Hooks, Cerruti R. R.; Wang, Koon-Hui; Meyer, Susan L. F.; Lekveishvili, Mariam; Hinds, Jermaine; Zobel, Emily; Rosario-Lebron, Armando; Lee-Bullock, Mason

    2011-01-01

    Two field trials were conducted between 2008 and 2010 in Maryland to evaluate the ability of an Italian ryegrass (IR) (Lolium multiflorum) cover crop to reduce populations of plant-parasitic nematodes while enhancing beneficial nematodes, soil mites and arthropods in the foliage of a no-till soybean (Glycine max) planting. Preplant treatments were: 1) previous year soybean stubble (SBS); and 2) herbicide-killed IR cover crop + previous year soybean stubble (referred to as IR). Heterodera glycines population densities were very low and no significant difference in population densities of H. glycines or Pratylenchus spp. were observed between IR and SBS. Planting of IR increased abundance of bacterivorous nematodes in 2009. A reverse trend was observed in 2010 where SBS had higher abundance of bacterivorous nematodes and nematode richness at the end of the cover cropping period. Italian ryegrass also did not affect insect pests on soybean foliage. However, greater populations of spiders were found on soybean foliage in IR treatments during both field trials. Potential causes of these findings are discussed. PMID:23430284

  9. Management: A continuing literature survey with indexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    This bibliography lists 782 reports, articles, and other documents introduced into the NASA scientific and technical information system in 1977. The citations, and abstracts when available, are reproduced exactly as they appeared originally in IAA and STAR, including the original accession numbers from the respective announcement journals. Topics cover the management of research and development contracts, production, logistics, personnel, safety, reliability and quality control citations. Includes references on: program, project and systems management; management policy, philosophy, tools, and techniques; decisionmaking processes for managers; technology assessment; management of urban problems; and information for managers on Federal resources, expenditures, financing, and budgeting.

  10. A new perspective with weed management

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    No-till cropping systems are increasing land productivity. Herbicides are a crucial tool for weed management in no-till, but weed resistance is decreasing control efficacy and increasing input costs. Producers are seeking a broader perspective with weed management. One approach is to disrupt weed...

  11. Continuous Risk Management: A NASA Program Initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammer, Theodore F.; Rosenberg, Linda

    1999-01-01

    NPG 7120.5A, "NASA Program and Project Management Processes and Requirements" enacted in April, 1998, requires that "The program or project manager shall apply risk management principles..." The Software Assurance Technology Center (SATC) at NASA GSFC has been tasked with the responsibility for developing and teaching a systems level course for risk management that provides information on how to comply with this edict. The course was developed in conjunction with the Software Engineering Institute at Carnegie Mellon University, then tailored to the NASA systems community. This presentation will briefly discuss the six functions for risk management: (1) Identify the risks in a specific format; (2) Analyze the risk probability, impact/severity, and timeframe; (3) Plan the approach; (4) Track the risk through data compilation and analysis; (5) Control and monitor the risk; (6) Communicate and document the process and decisions.

  12. Continuing Education -- A Management Point of View.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, J. D.

    The needs for continuing engineering education to avoid technical obsolescence and the programs offered by one company to fill this need are discussed. Ten educational alternative programs of the Sandia Laboratories, Albuquerque (New Mexico) are described. (CP)

  13. Implementing Continuous Improvement Management (CIM) in the Public Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borgers, William E.; Thompson, Tommy A.

    This book traces the restructuring of a Texas school district that moved from management by coercion to continuous improvement for quality. In 1990, the Dickinson Independent School District (Texas) began implementation of Continuous Improvement Management (CIM), based on the teachings of W. Edwards Deming, William Glasser, and J. M. Juran.…

  14. Optimizing continuous cover forest management. Chapter 6.

    Treesearch

    Kari Hyytiäinen; Robert G. Haight

    2012-01-01

    The practice of silviculture involves the art and science of controlling the establishment, growth, composition, health, and quality of forests and woodlands to meet the diverse needs and values of landowners and society on a sustainable basis. Silvicultural practices are often divided into two broadly defined management systems, which in North America are usually...

  15. Municipal resilience: A paradigm shift in emergency and continuity management.

    PubMed

    Solecki, Greg; Luchia, Mike

    More than a decade of emergency and continuity management vision was instrumental in providing the unprecedented level of response and recovery from the great flood of 2013. Earlier assessments, planning and validation promulgated development of corporate continuity, emergency and contingency plans along with tactical, strategic and recovery operations centres that all led to a reliable emergency management model that will continue to provide the backbone for municipal resilience.

  16. Planting date impacts on soil water management, plant growth, and weeds in cover-crop-based no-till corn production

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Low input and organic farmers are increasingly utilizing cover crop mulches in maize production. Many farmers are delaying planting corn into these high residue environments to allow greater growth of the cover crop to maximize nitrogen fixation and improve mechanical termination with roller crimpe...

  17. Towards a no-till no-spray future? Introduction to a symposium on nonchemical weed management for reduced-tillage cropping systems

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Reduced-tillage systems including no-tillage and strip tillage have well-known benefits for conserving and improving soils, protecting vulnerable crops from extreme weather events, and reducing labor and fuel costs associated with full-width inversion tillage. Despite these benefits, reduced-tillage...

  18. Business continuity management and pandemic influenza.

    PubMed

    Dalton, Craig B

    2006-01-01

    Pandemic influenza planning presents challenges for both government and businesses. Effective cooperation and communication before and during a pandemic will help mitigate the major threats to societal function. The major challenges for government include communicating a realistic estimate of pandemic risk, managing community anxiety, communicating the need for rationing of vaccines and antiviral medications, setting standards for preparedness, and gaining the trust of essential service workers. For businesses the challenges are tailoring generic planning guides to local use, and making links with local and regional partners in pandemic planning.

  19. Managing weeds with a population dynamics approach

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    No-till cropping systems are increasing land productivity. A critical aspect of no-till is controlling weeds. Herbicides are a crucial tool for weed management, but weed resistance is decreasing control efficacy and increasing input costs. Scientists and producers are seeking a broader perspectiv...

  20. The strategic skills of business continuity managers: putting business continuity management into corporate long-term planning.

    PubMed

    Wong, Wei Ning Zechariah

    2009-11-01

    Despite its rapid development in the last two decades, business continuity management (BCM) as a discipline and a profession is still regarded by many as an operational entity of management. Two main issues are discussed in this paper: the role of BCM in strategic management and the strategic skills of business continuity managers. These issues are crucial as they represent the role of BCM in high-level corporate management. The paper discusses the importance of BCM in the long-term planning of organisational success and the preservation of future competitiveness. Finally, salient points that underpin the importance of its role in sustaining organisational performance are addressed.

  1. Agricultural policy environmental eXtender model simulation of climate change impacts on runoff from a small no-till watershed

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Long-term hydrologic data sets are required to quantify the impacts of management, and climate on runoff at the field scale where management practices are applied. This study was conducted to evaluate the impacts of long-term management and climate on runoff from a small watershed managed with no-ti...

  2. Managing Adult and Continuing Education Programs and Staff.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langerman, Philip D., Ed.; Smith, Douglas H., Ed.

    Developed to assist managers of adult and continuing education programs, this management guide contains thirteen chapters written by several authors selected for their expertise in their respective areas. These chapters are divided into three major sections. The first section includes three introductory chapters providing (1) an overview of this…

  3. Quality Management Plus: The Continuous Improvement of Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, Roger; Zahn, Douglas

    This book applies quality management, an organizational theory that has been successful in business and industry, to education. Chapter 1 describes the basic elements of quality management (QM)--continuous improvement, client satisfaction, positive return on investment, and doing it right the first and every time. Ways to implement Deming's 14…

  4. Anger in School Managers: Continuity, Direction, Control and Style

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koc, Mustafa; Iskender, Murat; Cardak, Mehmet; Dusunceli, Betul

    2012-01-01

    School managers undertake an important duty in structuring of education institutions. In the study carried out in this context; anger conditions, continuity, and direction of anger, anger control levels and anger styles of school managers who are the decision makers in schools were examined according to the ages, working periods, duty types, ways…

  5. Anger in School Managers: Continuity, Direction, Control and Style

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koc, Mustafa; Iskender, Murat; Cardak, Mehmet; Dusunceli, Betul

    2012-01-01

    School managers undertake an important duty in structuring of education institutions. In the study carried out in this context; anger conditions, continuity, and direction of anger, anger control levels and anger styles of school managers who are the decision makers in schools were examined according to the ages, working periods, duty types, ways…

  6. Continuous quality improvement, total quality management, and reengineering: one hospital's continuous quality improvement journey.

    PubMed

    Klein, D; Motwani, J; Cole, B

    1998-01-01

    In recent years, there has been significantly increasing interest in the application of continuous quality improvement (CQI) and total quality management (TQM) in the health care arena. This case analysis is designed to identify and assess the strategies and processes that led to the successful implementation of CQI in the Emergency Care Center at St. Mary's Hospital in Grand Rapids, MI.

  7. Precision Fluid Management in Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy.

    PubMed

    Murugan, Raghavan; Hoste, Eric; Mehta, Ravindra L; Samoni, Sara; Ding, Xiaoqiang; Rosner, Mitchell H; Kellum, John A; Ronco, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Fluid management during continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) in critically ill patients is a dynamic process that encompasses 3 inter-related goals: maintenance of the patency of the CRRT circuit, maintenance of plasma electrolyte and acid-base homeostasis and regulation of patient fluid balance. In this article, we report the consensus recommendations of the 2016 Acute Disease Quality Initiative XVII conference on 'Precision Fluid Management in CRRT'. We discuss the principles of fluid management, describe various prescription methods to achieve circuit integrity and introduce the concept of integrated fluid balance for tailoring fluid balance to the needs of the individual patient. We suggest that these recommendations could serve to develop the best clinical practice and standards of care for fluid management in patients undergoing CRRT. Finally, we identify and highlight areas of uncertainty in fluid management and set an agenda for future research. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Phosphorus and potassium cycling in a long-term no-till integrated soybean-beef cattle production system under different grazing intensities in subtropics

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Long-term crop-livestock integration enables constant and high nutrient cycling because animal, pasture and crop residues release nutrients at different rates. Therefore, appropriate management of these systems is needed to maximize the benefits of nutrient cycling. The objective of this study was t...

  9. Net Mineralization Response to Fertilizer Application and Site-Specific Setting in a No-Till Dryland Wheat Agroecosystem in the Pacific Northwest (USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruner, Emily A.; Brown, David J.; Carpenter-Boggs, Lynn

    2015-04-01

    Application of nitrogen (N) fertilizers is pivotal to maintaining agricultural productivity. Nutrient management is typically guided by a combined assessment of crop yield requirements, residual soil inorganic N concentration, and predicted N supply from organic matter. However, laboratory assays employed to forecast mineralization potential do not reflect in situ processes occurring in soils, processes that can vary spatially within a field. Furthermore, fertilizer application alters biogeochemical cycles through a variety of mechanisms including priming effects and microbial community alterations. This study investigates in-situ ammonification/nitrification rates utilizing mineralization cores as part of a five-year Site-Specific Climate-Friendly Farming (SCF) project. In-depth accounting of nitrate and ammonium production and flux was possible via a six bag mixed-bed ion exchange resin system. Soil cores (7.5 cm diameter by 15 cm deep) were isolated from the surrounding soil by three resin bags sealed in the top and bottom of individual plastic cylinders. Fifteen locations were selected across a commercial direct-seed wheat field based on statistical clustering of primary and secondary topographic variables. In each location surface soil-resin cores were installed in fertilized and unfertilized plots immediately after spring planting and removed before harvest. In situ ammonification/nitrification rates will be analyzed as a function of both fertilizer application and site-specific environmental characteristics as determined from soil moisture monitoring, soil characterization, and crop analysis at each measurement location. This site-specific information on N transformations and availability can then be used to guide site-specific crop management.

  10. Lean management systems: creating a culture of continuous quality improvement.

    PubMed

    Clark, David M; Silvester, Kate; Knowles, Simon

    2013-08-01

    This is the first in a series of articles describing the application of Lean management systems to Laboratory Medicine. Lean is the term used to describe a principle-based continuous quality improvement (CQI) management system based on the Toyota production system (TPS) that has been evolving for over 70 years. Its origins go back much further and are heavily influenced by the work of W Edwards Deming and the scientific method that forms the basis of most quality management systems. Lean has two fundamental elements--a systematic approach to process improvement by removing waste in order to maximise value for the end-user of the service and a commitment to respect, challenge and develop the people who work within the service to create a culture of continuous improvement. Lean principles have been applied to a growing number of Healthcare systems throughout the world to improve the quality and cost-effectiveness of services for patients and a number of laboratories from all the pathology disciplines have used Lean to shorten turnaround times, improve quality (reduce errors) and improve productivity. Increasingly, models used to plan and implement large scale change in healthcare systems, including the National Health Service (NHS) change model, have evidence-based improvement methodologies (such as Lean CQI) as a core component. Consequently, a working knowledge of improvement methodology will be a core skill for Pathologists involved in leadership and management.

  11. Improving Our Odds: Success through Continuous Risk Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenhalgh, Phillip O.

    2009-01-01

    Launching a rocket, running a business, driving to work and even day-to-day living all involve some degree of risk. Risk is ever present yet not always recognized, adequately assessed and appropriately mitigated. Identification, assessment and mitigation of risk are elements of the risk management component of the "continuous improvement" way of life that has become a hallmark of successful and progressive enterprises. While the application of risk management techniques to provide continuous improvement may be detailed and extensive, the philosophy, ideals and tools can be beneficially applied to all situations. Experiences with the use of risk identification, assessment and mitigation techniques for complex systems and processes are described. System safety efforts and tools used to examine potential risks of the Ares I First Stage of NASA s new Constellation Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV) presently being designed are noted as examples. Recommendations from lessons learned are provided for the application of risk management during the development of new systems as well as for the improvement of existing systems. Lessons learned and suggestions given are also examined for applicability to simple systems, uncomplicated processes and routine personal daily tasks. This paper informs the reader of varied uses of risk management efforts and techniques to identify, assess and mitigate risk for improvement of products, success of business, protection of people and enhancement of personal life.

  12. Improvements of the Profil Cultural Method for a better Low-tech Field Assessment of Soil Structure under no-till

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roger-Estrade, Jean; Boizard, Hubert; Peigné, Josephine; Sasal, Maria Carolina; Guimaraes, Rachel; Piron, Denis; Tomis, Vincent; Vian, Jean-François; Cadoux, Stephane; Ralisch, Ricardo; Filho, Tavares; Heddadj, Djilali; de Battista, Juan; Duparque, Annie

    2016-04-01

    In France, agronomists have studied the effects of cropping systems on soil structure, using a field method based on a visual description of soil structure. The "profil cultural" method (Manichon and Gautronneau, 1987) has been designed to perform a field diagnostic of the effects of tillage and compaction on soil structure dynamics. This method is of great use to agronomists improving crop management for a better preservation of soil structure. However, this method was developed and mainly used in conventional tillage systems, with ploughing. As several forms of reduced, minimum and no tillage systems are expanding in many parts of the world, it is necessary to re-evaluate the ability of this method to describe and interpret soil macrostructure in unploughed situations. In unploughed fields, soil structure dynamics of untilled layers is mainly driven by compaction and regeneration by natural agents (climatic conditions, root growth and macrofauna) and it is of major importance to evaluate the importance of these natural processes on soil structure regeneration. These concerns have led us to adapt the standard method and to propose amendments based on a series of field observations and experimental work in different situations of cropping systems, soil types and climatic conditions. We improved the description of crack type and we introduced an index of biological activity, based on the visual examination of clods. To test the improved method, a comparison with the reference method was carried out and the ability of the "profil cultural" method to make a diagnosis was tested on five experiments in France, Brazil and Argentina. Using the improved method, the impact of cropping systems on soil functioning was better assessed when natural processes were integrated into the description.

  13. Development and implementation of a business continuity management risk index.

    PubMed

    Kadar, Michael

    This paper will present the building blocks for developing and implementing the BCM risk index; whether it is used as a comprehensive metric for risk or preparedness. This paper introduces the concept of a business continuity management (BCM) risk index--a comprehensive metric that measures and reports the status of the primary 'intended outcome' of the BCM programme to top management. In addition to measuring the primary programme output,;the BCM risk index can be used to demonstrate the overall value of the BCM programme to executive management. This is accomplished because the BCM risk index allows quantitative measurement of current risk levels and their comparison with established risk tolerances. The BCM Risk Index can provide executive management with reports on the risk level of individual business units, departments, subsidiaries or the enterprise in a way that drives both risk management and BCM initiatives. The name 'risk index' can be misleading, however. The BCM risk index concept can also be used to measure preparedness levels. In fact, implementation at DTE Energy has resulted in calling it the 'preparedness index', which is used to measure and report preparedness levels rather than risk levels.

  14. Paediatric fever management: continuing education for clinical nurses.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Anne M; Edwards, Helen E; Courtney, Mary D; Wilson, Jenny E; Monaghan, Sarah J

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the influence of level of practice, additional paediatric education and length of paediatric and current experience on nurses' knowledge of and beliefs about fever and fever management. Fifty-one nurses from medical wards in an Australian metropolitan paediatric hospital completed a self-report descriptive survey. Knowledge of fever management was mediocre (Mean 12.4, SD 2.18 on 20 items). Nurses practicing at a higher level and those with between one and four years paediatric or current experience were more knowledgeable than novices or more experienced nurses. Negative beliefs that would impact nursing practice were identified. Interestingly, beliefs about fever, antipyretic use in fever management and febrile seizures were similar; they were not influenced by nurses' knowledge, experience, education or level of practice. Paediatric nurses are not expert fever managers. Knowledge deficits and negative attitudes influence their practice irrespective of additional paediatric education, paediatric or current experience or level of practice. Continuing education is therefore needed for all paediatric nurses to ensure the latest clear evidence available in the literature for best practice in fever management is applied.

  15. Acquisition and management of continuous data streams for crop water management

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Wireless sensor network systems for decision support in crop water management offer many advantages including larger spatial coverage and multiple types of data input. However, collection and management of multiple and continuous data streams for near real-time post analysis can be problematic. Thi...

  16. [Continuing training plan in a clinical management unit].

    PubMed

    Gamboa Antiñolo, Fernando Miguel; Bayol Serradilla, Elia; Gómez Camacho, Eduardo

    2011-01-01

    Continuing Care Unit (UCA) focused the attention of frail patients, polypathological patients and palliative care. UCA attend patients at home, consulting, day unit, telephone consulting and in two hospitals of the health area. From 2002 UCA began as a management unit, training has been a priority for development. Key elements include: providing education to the workplace, including key aspects of the most prevalent health care problems in daily work, directing training to all staff including organizational aspects of patient safety and the environment, improved working environment, development of new skills and knowledge supported by the evidence-based care for the development of different skills. The unit can be the ideal setting to undertake the reforms necessary conceptual training of professionals to improve the quality of care.

  17. Marketing a continuing education course for healthcare managers.

    PubMed

    Welnetz, K

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to elicit from the relevant literature the important considerations to make when planning to market continuing education (CE) within hospitals. References on marketing from both institutions of higher education and hospitals were reviewed. Based on this review, a strategic marketing plan was developed and initially implemented in the hospital. A 1-day course for healthcare managers, entitled "Successful Writing of Proposals and Reports," was offered twice and tested, using the steps outlined in the strategic marketing plan. The plan proved to be most beneficial in systematically guiding our first attempts at marketing CE to hospitals and other healthcare facilities. From this plan, efforts are currently being made to further develop curricula and determine other programs that might be marketable to these same target groups. In addition, closer links with nearby educational institutions or affiliated hospitals are being pursued to support and maintain our ongoing marketing endeavors.

  18. Business continuity management in emerging markets: the case of Jordan.

    PubMed

    Sawalha, Ihab H; Anchor, John R

    2012-01-01

    Despite their considerable growth in last few decades, emerging markets (EM) face numerous risks that have the potential to slow down or obstruct their development. Three main issues are discussed in this paper: first, the risks facing organisations operating in emerging markets and Jordan in particular; secondly, the role of business continuity management (BCM) in emerging markets; and thirdly, potential factors that underpin the role of BCM in emerging markets. These issues are significant, as they represent the role of BCM in highly dynamic and fast changing business environments. The paper provides a discussion of the significance of BCM in reducing or preventing risks facing organisations operating in emerging markets, especially those in Jordan.

  19. Patients' complaints as a management tool for continuous quality improvement.

    PubMed

    Javetz, R; Stern, Z

    1996-01-01

    Continuous quality improvement focuses on the customer and, therefore, requires attention to customers' feedback as a vital input. Customers' feedback in general hospitals includes utilization statistics of various services, patient satisfaction surveys and patients' complaints. The role of complaint data as a management tool, and particularly as applied to quality improvement, has received little attention in the literature. As a quality control tool, complaints are investigated on the individual, unit and organizational levels. Repeated complaints about the same units, procedures or individuals, are especially important for quality review. The role of the hospital administration is to draw on the human, technological and procedural resources at its disposal, along a solution time interval (immediate, short and long term), in designing its policy for quality improvement. Presents three examples of policy changes. The aggregate of complaint data serves, in addition, for follow-up of the effect of changes introduced by policy decisions.

  20. Linking Continuous Energy Management and Open Automated Demand Response

    SciTech Connect

    Piette, Mary Ann; Kiliccote, Sila; Ghatikar, Girish

    2008-10-03

    Advances in communications and control technology, the strengthening of the Internet, and the growing appreciation of the urgency to reduce demand side energy use are motivating the development of improvements in both energy efficiency and demand response (DR) systems. This paper provides a framework linking continuous energy management and continuous communications for automated demand response (Auto-DR) in various times scales. We provide a set of concepts for monitoring and controls linked to standards and procedures such as Open Automation Demand Response Communication Standards (Open Auto-DR or OpenADR). Basic building energy science and control issues in this approach begin with key building components, systems, end-uses and whole building energy performance metrics. The paper presents a framework about when energy is used, levels of services by energy using systems, granularity of control, and speed of telemetry. DR, when defined as a discrete event, requires a different set of building service levels than daily operations. We provide examples of lessons from DR case studies and links to energy efficiency.

  1. Model Hosting for continuous updating and transparent Water Resources Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jódar, Jorge; Almolda, Xavier; Batlle, Francisco; Carrera, Jesús

    2013-04-01

    Numerical models have become a standard tool for water resources management. They are required for water volume bookkeeping and help in decision making. Nevertheless, numerical models are complex and they can be used only by highly qualified technicians, which are often far from the decision makers. Moreover, they need to be maintained. That is, they require updating of their state, by assimilation of measurements, natural and anthropic actions (e.g., pumping and weather data), and model parameters. Worst, their very complexity implies that are they viewed as obscure and far, which hinders transparency and governance. We propose internet model hosting as an alternative to overcome these limitations. The basic idea is to keep the model hosted in the cloud. The model is updated as new data (measurements and external forcing) becomes available, which ensures continuous maintenance, with a minimal human cost (only required to address modelling problems). Internet access facilitates model use not only by modellers, but also by people responsible for data gathering and by water managers. As a result, the model becomes an institutional tool shared by water agencies to help them not only in decision making for sustainable management of water resources, but also in generating a common discussion platform. By promoting intra-agency sharing, the model becomes the common official position of the agency, which facilitates commitment in their adopted decisions regarding water management. Moreover, by facilitating access to stakeholders and the general public, the state of the aquifer and the impacts of alternative decisions become transparent. We have developed a tool (GAC, Global Aquifer Control) to address the above requirements. The application has been developed using Cloud Computing technologies, which facilitates the above operations. That is, GAC automatically updates the numerical models with the new available measurements, and then simulates numerous management options

  2. Clinical Governance: from clinical risk management to continuous quality improvement.

    PubMed

    Chiozza, Maria Laura; Plebani, Mario

    2006-01-01

    Reducing medical errors has become an international concern. Population-based studies from a number of nations around the world have consistently demonstrated unacceptably high rates of medical injury and preventable deaths. The introduction of effective reporting systems is a cornerstone of safe practice within hospitals and other healthcare organisations. Reporting can help to identify hazards and risks. However, reporting in itself does not improve safety. It is the response to reports that leads to change. Clinical teams must feel empowered to change the way in which they deliver their services, promoting effective clinical risk management. Process analysis, implementation of evidence-based practices, and a clear accountability system are effective tools not only for decreasing error rates, but also for improving effectiveness. Clinical Governance represents the context in which effective clinical risk management should be promoted and continuously improved. It should not be regarded as a separate activity, but should form part of the everyday practice of all healthcare professionals. It requires good multidisciplinary working and a willingness to reflect on and learn from errors to achieve a patient-centred and safer system.

  3. AmeriFlux US-Ne1 Mead - irrigated continuous maize site

    DOE Data Explorer

    Suyker, Andy [University of Nebraska - Lincoln

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Ne1 Mead - irrigated continuous maize site. Site Description - The study site is one of three fields (all located within 1.6 km of each other) at the University of Nebraska Agricultural Research and Development Center near Mead, Nebraska. This site is irrigated with a center pivot system. Prior to the initiation of the study, the irrigated site had a 10-yr history of maize-soybean rotation under no-till. A tillage operation (disking) was done just prior to the 2001 planting to homogenize the top 0.1 m of soil, incorporate P and K fertilizers, as well as previously accumulated surface residues. Since the tillage operation, the site has been under no-till management until the harvest of 2005. Following harvest, a conservation-plow tillage operation was initiated where a small amount of N fertilizer is sprayed on the residue immediately prior to the plow operation. Approximately 1/3 of the crop residue is left on the surface. The post-harvest conservation-plow operation continues as the current practice.

  4. 40 CFR 63.10420 - How do I demonstrate continuous compliance with the management practice requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES (CONTINUED) National Emission Standards for Hospital Ethylene Oxide Sterilizers Monitoring-Continuous Compliance Requirements § 63.10420 How do I demonstrate continuous compliance with the management practice requirements? For each sterilization unit not equipped...

  5. Management: A continuing literature survey with indexes, March 1976

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Management is a compilation of references to selected reports, journal articles, and other documents on the subject of management. This publication lists 368 documents originally announced in the 1975 issues of Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports (STAR) or International Aerospace Abstracts (IAA). It includes references on the management of research and development, contracts, production, logistics, personnel, safety, reliability and quality control. It also includes references on: program, project and systems management; management policy, philosophy, tools, and techniques; decisionmaking processes for managers; technology assessment; management of urban problems; and information for managers on Federal resources, expenditures, financing, and budgeting.

  6. Managers' role in maximising investment in continuing professional education.

    PubMed

    Draper, Jan; Clark, Liz; Rogers, Jill

    2016-02-01

    Healthcare organisations face the challenge of delivering care in increasingly complex environments. To do so they depend on competent professionals, and continuing professional education (CPE) plays a major part in ensuring that staff maintain and develop their knowledge and skills. However, there is limited evidence of the effect of CPE on healthcare outcomes, and an emphasis on outcomes has overlooked the contribution of the processes that underlie effective CPE. This article reports the results of a study that explored a range of stakeholders' perceptions of the processes that maximise the positive effects of CPE on practice. Analysis of results shows that CPE can help improve care when supported by positive organisational cultures, effective partnership working between stakeholders and supportive learning environments that enable individuals to maximise their learning. This article discusses how managers play a pivotal role in creating positive cultures in which CPE can flourish by being role models and change agents, ensuring organisational strategic objectives are aligned with personal development plans, and by working collaboratively with education colleagues to ensure that learning from CPE is embedded in practice.

  7. Management. A continuing bibliography with indexes. [March 1980

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    This bibliography cites 604 reports, articles, and other documents introduced into the NASA scientific and technical information system in 1979 covering the management of research and development, contracts, production, logistics, personnel, safety, reliability and quality control. Program, project, and systems management; management policy, philosophy, tools, and techniques; decision making processes for managers; technology assessment; management of urban problems; and information for managers on Federal resources, expenditures, financing, and budgeting are also covered. Abstracts are provided as well as subject, personal author, and corporate source indexes.

  8. DOD Financial Management: Effect of Continuing Weaknesses on Management and Operations and Status of Key Challenges

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-13

    6Pub. L. No. 101-576 (Nov. 15, 1990). 7Pub. L. No. 103 -356 (Oct. 13, 1994). 8Pub. L. No. 103 -62 (Aug. 3, 1993...example, we have continued to monitor the implementation of the Army’s Logistics Modernization Program ( LMP ) system, which supports both inventory...management and financial reporting.20 In November 2013, we reported that the Army’s LMP , which replaced two aging Army systems, is supporting the Army’s

  9. ECO-Report - Research-management-public partnership continues

    Treesearch

    Jane Kapler Smith; Greg Jones; Nan Christianson; Lucia Solorzano; Gloria Weisgerber; Steve Arno; Sallie J. Hejl; F. Jeremy Wheeler; Timothy S. Redman; Joshua J. Tewksbury; Tom DeLuca; K. Zouhar

    1998-01-01

    ECO-Report is an annual Rocky Mountain Research Station (RMRS) publication which contains a set of articles showcasing the Bitterroot Ecosystem Management Research Project (BEMRP) research projects and activities. The articles are concise, user-friendly, and designed to inform a broad range of audiences interested in ecosystem management. Articles featured in...

  10. Continuing Education Needs of Natural Resource Managers and Scientists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George, John L.; Dubin, Samuel S.

    Five thousand natural resource managers and scientists throughout the United States were asked to indicate their current education needs. It was concluded that, merely to keep abreast, they should spend one day a week or the equivalent in regularly scheduled study. Training is needed in environmental management, interrelationships of the…

  11. Adopting principles of mission-based management in continuing education administration.

    PubMed

    Cheramie, Kimberly V

    2013-07-01

    To align funding and resource management, academic medical centers have adopted variations of mission-based management and budgeting. Although the implementation of this management approach can be complex in its data collection and reporting, there are lessons that continuing education departments and provider units can take from the philosophy of mission-based management. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  12. Continuing Developments in PV Risk Management: Strategies, Solutions, and Implications

    SciTech Connect

    Lowder, T.; Mendelsohn, M.; Speer, B.; Hill, R.

    2013-02-01

    As the PV industry matures, successful risk management practices will become more imperative to ensure investor confidence, control costs, and facilitate further growth. This report discusses several key aspects of risk management during the commercial- and utility-scale project life cycle, from identification of risks, to the process of mitigating and allocating those risks among project parties, to transferring those risks through insurance. The report also explores novel techniques in PV risk management, options to offload risks onto the capital markets, and innovative insurance policies (namely warranty policies) that address risks unique to the PV sector. One of the major justifications for robust risk management in the PV industry is the cost-reduction opportunities it affords. If the PV industry can demonstrate the capability to successfully manage its risks, thereby inspiring confidence in financiers, it may be able to obtain a lower cost of capital in future transactions. A lower cost of capital translates to a lower cost of energy, which will in turn enhance PV?s competitiveness at a time when it will have to rely less on subsidies to support its market penetration.

  13. Training Women in Management: A Continuing Education Workshop Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dubin, Samuel S.

    The number of women occupying managerial positions in the U.S. is relatively small, but it rose 47% from 1,321,000 in 1970 to 1,942,000 in 1976. Circumstances contributing to this rise are enforcement of legal sanctions against discrimination and women's increased educational attainment. This report describes a continuing education workshop series…

  14. Training Women in Management: A Continuing Education Workshop Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dubin, Samuel S.

    The number of women occupying managerial positions in the U.S. is relatively small, but it rose 47% from 1,321,000 in 1970 to 1,942,000 in 1976. Circumstances contributing to this rise are enforcement of legal sanctions against discrimination and women's increased educational attainment. This report describes a continuing education workshop series…

  15. Liability and Risk Management for Continuing Education Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cote, Lawrence S.; And Others

    Areas of liability that relate to the daily practice of continuing education professionals are summarized. Areas of the law with the greatest potential for litigation involving the institution and its employees are identified, along with 16 preventive measures that protect the educational practitioner and institution from frivolous litigation yet…

  16. Management: A continuing literature survey with indexes, 1971

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    An annotated bibliography of selected reports, journal articles, and other documents on the subject of management is presented. There are 450 references to documents which were originally announced in the 1971 issues of Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports (STAR) or International Aerospace Abstracts (IAA). Subject, personal author, and corporate source indexes are included.

  17. Total Quality Management Continuous Improvement: Is the Philosophy a Reality?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Aidan; Hughes, Helen; Maddox, Daniel P.

    2002-01-01

    Responses from 72 Irish companies identified 51 using total quality management (TQM); second-survey responses from 28 of the latter showed that 57% of TQM initiatives were successful or very successful; most have a good understanding of comprehensive TQM and value long-term over short-term results. Benefits were experienced throughout…

  18. Total Quality Management Continuous Improvement: Is the Philosophy a Reality?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Aidan; Hughes, Helen; Maddox, Daniel P.

    2002-01-01

    Responses from 72 Irish companies identified 51 using total quality management (TQM); second-survey responses from 28 of the latter showed that 57% of TQM initiatives were successful or very successful; most have a good understanding of comprehensive TQM and value long-term over short-term results. Benefits were experienced throughout…

  19. An educational model to introduce staff nurses to continuous quality improvement/total quality management concepts.

    PubMed

    Kowal, C E; Kagen-Fishkind, J E; Sherlin, M M; Newell, G; McCaffrey, E; Gentes, J M

    1997-01-01

    A new healthcare reforms are implemented and as the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organization standards are revised, the demand for continuous quality improvement/total quality management in acute care settings continues to rise. In this article, the authors describe the process used to introduce nursing staff to continuous quality improvement/total quality management. A curriculum committee of staff nurses, nurse educators, and clinical specialists used the continuous quality improvement process to develop a 1-day program that included didactic and experiential activities geared toward assisting the staff nurse to participate actively in total quality management initiatives.

  20. Water management in the Senegal River Delta: a continuing uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mietton, M.; Dumas, D.; Hamerlynck, O.; Kane, A.; Coly, A.; Duvail, S.; Pesneaud, F.; Baba, M. L. O.

    2007-11-01

    Water management is the driving force behind the productivity of the ecosystems of the Senegal River Estuary and floodplains. It is dependent on human decision-making, but has been separated from the River's flooding since the building of the Diama Dam. The current objectives of the Office de Mise en Valeur du fleuve Sénégal (OMVS: Senegal River Development Agency) are mainly turned towards the development of irrigated agriculture on the former floodplains and since 2002 the production of hydroelectric power at Manantali. In October 2003, a four-metre-wide runoff canal, which quickly widened into a breach several hundred metres across, was dug in the Barbary Spit area to protect the city of Saint-Louis from heavy flooding. The hydraulic quality of the area downstream from the dam has improved to the extent that there is no longer any flooding there, but as the management of the dams concerns only the section of the river between Manantali and Diama, a certain amount of flood risk probably still persists. The intrusion of seawater into the estuary is also threatening ecosystems and fresh water supplies, and abruptly altering agricultural practices such as fruit and vegetable growing in the Gandiolais district. When added to the tentative efforts to coordinate the management of the two dams, with no management objective downstream from Diama, such permanent modifications impose serious constraints on the managers and residents of the lower delta. This paper presents an overview of the constraints and uncertainties at different levels and scales. This wholly human-wrought environment can be considered as a learning experience, where a large number of variables need to be monitored closely and an ongoing process of participatory analysis should be backed up by multidisciplinary research.

  1. Business process quality management: a step beyond continuous quality improvement.

    PubMed

    Ardabell, T R; Turjanica, M A; Mastorovich, M J; Hirschman, V

    1995-08-01

    Customer demands and financial pressures have forced hospitals to reassess the quality of their services and the efficiency with which they are delivered. A number of institutions have turned to continuous quality improvement methods to help streamline specific processes. For institutions to survive, however, they must look beyond specific processes to broader issues of scope of practice. One hospital's use of Juran's BPQM framework helped position the institution for future economic demands.

  2. Organization and Management of Continuing Education in German and Finnish Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zawacki-Richter, Olaf; Knust, Michaela; Hanft, Anke

    2009-01-01

    In 2006, an international comparison study investigated the organization and management of university continuing education (UCE). The Finnish continuing education system proved to be especially advanced in this study. On the other hand, it became clear that Germany was still lagging behind in continuing education. In this article, German and…

  3. Army Inventory Management: Inventory and Physical Security Problems Continue.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-10-01

    DOD management may not have complete and accurate infor- mation for making many important inventory decisions. P8ee 2 GAO/NSiAD4ui I Invmuwy Momkapmt...of earlier transactions and are not counted as adjustments for reporting purposes. GAO believes that all adjustments should be reported. GAO found...Indicator GAo inventoried a statistical sample of 330 items and found that the inventory records for about 56 percent of the items were inaccurate

  4. Sustainable dryland agroecosystems management

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The Dryland Agroecosystem Project with No-till management was established in the fall of 1985, with 1986 being the first harvest year. Grain and stover yields, crop residue amounts, soil water measurements, crop nutrient content and climate data have been reported annually in previously published t...

  5. Continuity in health care: lessons from supply chain management.

    PubMed

    Meijboom, Bert R; Bakx, Saskia J W G C; Westert, Gert P

    2010-01-01

    In health care, multidisciplinary collaboration is both indispensable and complicated. We discuss organizational problems that occur in situations where multiple health care providers are required to cooperate for patients with complex needs. Four problem categories, labelled as communication, patient safety, waiting times and integration are distinguished. Then we develop a supply chain perspective on these problems in the sense of discussing remedies according to supply chain management (SCM) literature. This perspective implies a business focus on inter-organizational conditions and requirements necessary for delivering health care and cure across organizational borders. We conclude by presenting some strategic and policy recommendations.

  6. Neonatal Hypoglycemia: A Continuing Debate in Definition and Management.

    PubMed

    Stomnaroska-Damcevski, Orhideja; Petkovska, Elizabeta; Jancevska, Snezana; Danilovski, Dragan

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal hypoglycemia (NH) is one of the most common abnormalities encountered in the newborn. Maintaining glucose homeostasis is one of the important physiological events during fetal-to-neonatal transition. Transient low blood glucose concentrations are frequently encountered in the majority of healthy newborns and are the reflections of normal metabolic adaptation processes. Nevertheless, there is a great concern that prolonged or recurrent low blood glucose levels may result in long-term neurological and developmental consequences. Strikingly, it was demonstrated that the incidence and timing of low glucose concentrations in the groups most at risk for asymptomatic neonatal hypoglycemia, did not find association between repetitive low glucose concentrations and poor neurodevelopmental outcomes. On the contrary, NH due to hyperinsulinism is strongly associated with brain injury. Fundamental issue of great professional controversy is concerning the best manner to manage asymptomatic newborns NH. Both, overtreating NH and undertreating NH are poles with significant potential disadvantages. Therefore, NH is one of the most important issues in the day-to-day practice. This article appraises the critical questions of definition (widely accepted blood glucose concentration: < 2.6 mmol/l or 47 mg/dl), follow-up ad management of NH.

  7. Chapter 5, "License Renewal and Aging Management for Continued Service

    SciTech Connect

    Naus, Dan J

    2013-01-01

    As of August 2011, there were 104 commercial nuclear power reactors licensed to operate in 31 states in the United States. Initial operating licenses in the United States are granted for a period of 40 years. In order to help assure an adequate energy supply, the USNRC has established a timely license renewal process and clear requirements that are needed to ensure safe plant operation for an extended plant life. The principals of license renewal and the basic requirements that address license renewal are identified as well as additional sources of guidance that can be utilized as part of the license renewal process. Aging management program inspections and operating experience related to the concrete and steel containment structures are provided. Finally, several lessons learned are provided based on containment operating experience.

  8. Frequency Management for Electromagnetic Continuous Wave Conductivity Meters

    PubMed Central

    Mazurek, Przemyslaw; Putynkowski, Grzegorz

    2016-01-01

    Ground conductivity meters use electromagnetic fields for the mapping of geological variations, like the determination of water amount, depending on ground layers, which is important for the state analysis of embankments. The VLF band is contaminated by numerous natural and artificial electromagnetic interference signals. Prior to the determination of ground conductivity, the meter’s working frequency is not possible, due to the variable frequency of the interferences. Frequency management based on the analysis of the selected band using track-before-detect (TBD) algorithms, which allows dynamical frequency changes of the conductivity of the meter transmitting part, is proposed in the paper. Naive maximum value search, spatio-temporal TBD (ST-TBD), Viterbi TBD and a new algorithm that uses combined ST-TBD and Viterbi TBD are compared. Monte Carlo tests are provided for the numerical analysis of the properties for a single interference signal in the considered band, and a new approach based on combined ST-TBD and Viterbi algorithms shows the best performance. The considered algorithms process spectrogram data for the selected band, so DFT (Discrete Fourier Transform) could be applied for the computation of the spectrogram. Real–time properties, related to the latency, are discussed also, and it is shown that TBD algorithms are feasible for real applications. PMID:27070608

  9. Frequency Management for Electromagnetic Continuous Wave Conductivity Meters.

    PubMed

    Mazurek, Przemyslaw; Putynkowski, Grzegorz

    2016-04-07

    Ground conductivity meters use electromagnetic fields for the mapping of geological variations, like the determination of water amount, depending on ground layers, which is important for the state analysis of embankments. The VLF band is contaminated by numerous natural and artificial electromagnetic interference signals. Prior to the determination of ground conductivity, the meter's working frequency is not possible, due to the variable frequency of the interferences. Frequency management based on the analysis of the selected band using track-before-detect (TBD) algorithms, which allows dynamical frequency changes of the conductivity of the meter transmitting part, is proposed in the paper. Naive maximum value search, spatio-temporal TBD (ST-TBD), Viterbi TBD and a new algorithm that uses combined ST-TBD and Viterbi TBD are compared. Monte Carlo tests are provided for the numerical analysis of the properties for a single interference signal in the considered band, and a new approach based on combined ST-TBD and Viterbi algorithms shows the best performance. The considered algorithms process spectrogram data for the selected band, so DFT (Discrete Fourier Transform) could be applied for the computation of the spectrogram. Real-time properties, related to the latency, are discussed also, and it is shown that TBD algorithms are feasible for real applications.

  10. Program/Project Management Resources: A collection of 50 bibliographies focusing on continual improvement, reinventing government, and successful project management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michaels, Jeffrey

    1994-01-01

    These Program/Project Management Resource Lists were originally written for the NASA project management community. Their purpose was to promote the use of the NASA Headquarters Library Program/Project Management Collection funded by NASA Headquarters Code FT, Training & Development Division, by offering introductions to the management topics studied by today's managers. Lists were also written at the request of NASA Headquarters Code T, Office of Continual improvements, and at the request of NASA members of the National Performance Review. This is the second edition of the compilation of these bibliographies; the first edition was printed in March 1994.

  11. Nurse managers' experiences in continuous quality improvement in resource-poor healthcare settings.

    PubMed

    Kakyo, Tracy Alexis; Xiao, Lily Dongxia

    2017-03-09

    Ensuring safe and quality care for patients in hospitals is an important part of a nurse manager's role. Continuous quality improvement has been identified as one approach that leads to the delivery of quality care services to patients and is widely used by nurse managers to improve patient care. Nurse managers' experiences in initiating continuous quality improvement activities in resource-poor healthcare settings remain largely unknown. Research evidence is highly demanded in these settings to address disease burden and evidence-based practice. This interpretive qualitative study was conducted to gain an understanding of nurse managers' Continuous Quality Improvement experiences in rural hospitals in Uganda. Nurse managers in rural healthcare settings used their role to prioritize quality improvement activities, monitor the Continuous Quality Improvement process, and utilize in-service education to support continuous quality improvement. The nurse managers in our sample encountered a number of barriers during the implementation of Continuous Quality Improvement, including: limited patient participation, lack of materials, and limited human resources. Efforts to address the challenges faced through good governance and leadership development require more attention.

  12. 14 CFR 91.1411 - Continuous airworthiness maintenance program use by fractional ownership program manager.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... airworthiness maintenance program use by fractional ownership program manager. Fractional ownership program aircraft may be maintained under a continuous airworthiness maintenance program (CAMP) under §§ 91.1413... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Continuous airworthiness maintenance...

  13. 14 CFR 91.1411 - Continuous airworthiness maintenance program use by fractional ownership program manager.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... airworthiness maintenance program use by fractional ownership program manager. Fractional ownership program aircraft may be maintained under a continuous airworthiness maintenance program (CAMP) under §§ 91.1413... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Continuous airworthiness maintenance...

  14. Continuous Improvement in the Industrial and Management Systems Engineering Programme at Kuwait University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aldowaisan, Tariq; Allahverdi, Ali

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the process employed by the Industrial and Management Systems Engineering programme at Kuwait University to continuously improve the programme. Using a continuous improvement framework, the paper demonstrates how various qualitative and quantitative analyses methods, such as hypothesis testing and control charts, have been…

  15. Continuous Improvement in the Industrial and Management Systems Engineering Programme at Kuwait University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aldowaisan, Tariq; Allahverdi, Ali

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the process employed by the Industrial and Management Systems Engineering programme at Kuwait University to continuously improve the programme. Using a continuous improvement framework, the paper demonstrates how various qualitative and quantitative analyses methods, such as hypothesis testing and control charts, have been…

  16. Antecedents of Continued Usage Intentions of Web-Based Learning Management System in Tanzania

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lwoga, Edda Tandi; Komba, Mercy

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine factors that predict students' continued usage intention of web-based learning management systems (LMS) in Tanzania, with a specific focus on the School of Business of Mzumbe University. Specifically, the study investigated major predictors of actual usage and continued usage intentions of…

  17. The Correlates and Influences of Career-Related Continuous Learning: Implications for Management Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuznia, Kevin D.; Kerno, Steven J., Jr.; Gilley, Ann

    2010-01-01

    Management personnel are increasingly aware that career success depends on the ability to continuously learn and adapt to the environment. However, scant attention has been paid to how learning activities contribute to managerial success. This study examines the degree to which involvement in career-related continuous learning affects managerial…

  18. Antecedents of Continued Usage Intentions of Web-Based Learning Management System in Tanzania

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lwoga, Edda Tandi; Komba, Mercy

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine factors that predict students' continued usage intention of web-based learning management systems (LMS) in Tanzania, with a specific focus on the School of Business of Mzumbe University. Specifically, the study investigated major predictors of actual usage and continued usage intentions of…

  19. The Correlates and Influences of Career-Related Continuous Learning: Implications for Management Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuznia, Kevin D.; Kerno, Steven J., Jr.; Gilley, Ann

    2010-01-01

    Management personnel are increasingly aware that career success depends on the ability to continuously learn and adapt to the environment. However, scant attention has been paid to how learning activities contribute to managerial success. This study examines the degree to which involvement in career-related continuous learning affects managerial…

  20. Use of continuous positive airway pressure in the acute management of laryngeal paralysis in a cat.

    PubMed

    Ticehurst, K; Zaki, S; Hunt, G B; Macpherson, C; Nicholson, H

    2008-10-01

    Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) has been is used widely in humans to manage obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome, but it has not been widely used in animals. A brachycephalic cat, with previously undiagnosed laryngeal paralysis, that developed acute upper respiratory tract obstruction on recovery from anaesthesia, is presented. The condition was managed by CPAP, delivered via a facial mask.

  1. Measuring and Managing Variables for Continuing Education Programs in a University Setting: An Econometric Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, Jacke; Waldron, Mark W.

    An econometric model is suggested for managing continuing education units in Canadian universities. The value of such a model would be to unify the various factors that are often considered in fragments in traditional ways of studying the problems of such units. Many difficulties exist in using such a model to discuss educational management, but…

  2. Continuity of Care to Optimize Chronic Disease Management in the Community Setting

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background This evidence-based analysis reviews relational and management continuity of care. Relational continuity refers to the duration and quality of the relationship between the care provider and the patient. Management continuity ensures that patients receive coherent, complementary, and timely care. There are 4 components of continuity of care: duration, density, dispersion, and sequence. Objective The objective of this evidence-based analysis was to determine if continuity of care is associated with decreased health resource utilization, improved patient outcomes, and patient satisfaction. Data Sources MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, the Cochrane Library, and the Centre for Reviews and Dissemination database were searched for studies on continuity of care and chronic disease published from January 2002 until December 2011. Review Methods Systematic reviews, randomized controlled trials, and observational studies were eligible if they assessed continuity of care in adults and reported health resource utilization, patient outcomes, or patient satisfaction. Results Eight systematic reviews and 13 observational studies were identified. The reviews concluded that there is an association between continuity of care and outcomes; however, the literature base is weak. The observational studies found that higher continuity of care was frequently associated with fewer hospitalizations and emergency department visits. Three systematic reviews reported that higher continuity of care is associated with improved patient satisfaction, especially among patients with chronic conditions. Limitations Most of the studies were retrospective cross-sectional studies of large administrative databases. The databases do not capture information on trust and confidence in the provider, which is a critical component of relational continuity of care. The definitions for the selection of patients from the databases varied across studies. Conclusions There is low quality evidence that: Higher

  3. Crossing our quality chasm: continuing the case for graduate preparation of nurse managers and leaders.

    PubMed

    Pawlak, Roberta P; Scott, Elaine S; Murphy, Lyn Stankiewicz

    2013-12-01

    The previous CGEAN Perspectives column compared the Baccalaureate Essentials document with American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) and American Organization of Nurse Executives (AONE) certification examination content for nurse managers and concluded that the baccalaureate curriculum lacks the depth of content needed for today's frontline nurse leaders. This article continues the discussion by comparing the Master's Essentials document with ANCC and AONE nurse manager-level certification content to evaluate if a master's graduate education prepares nurses for the competencies of these management roles.

  4. Total Quality Management and Organizational Behavior Management: An Integration for Continual Improvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mawhinney, Thomas C.

    1992-01-01

    The history and main features of organizational behavior management (OBM) are compared and integrated with those of total quality management (TQM), with emphasis on W.E. Deming's 14 points and OBM's operant-based approach to performance management. Interventions combining OBM, TQM, and statistical process control are recommended. (DB)

  5. Continuous cover forestry as part of sustainable forest management in the Pacific Northwest, USA

    Treesearch

    Robert L. Deal

    2017-01-01

    Continuous Cover forestry (CCF) is not a commonly recognized term in the USA, but the concept and objectives of CCF to “manage forests to provide structurally, visually and biologically diverse ecosystems and deliver multiple benefits to people” is an idea that resonates with both forest managers and the public in the USA. The concept of CCF (often referred to as...

  6. Teacher Characteristics and Perceptions of Pest Management Curricula: Clues to Adoption and Continuation.

    PubMed

    Mason, Makena; Aihara-Sasaki, Maria; Grace, J Kenneth

    2013-04-15

    Educate to Eradicate is a K-12 curriculum project using termite biology and control as the basis for science education that has been implemented in over 350 Hawaii public school classrooms. To encourage sustained implementation of the project, we aimed to identify factors that influence the adoption and continuation of pest management curricula in public school classrooms. Regression analysis of teacher survey data were used to create predictive models of teacher continuation. Teachers motivated by "exciting students about science", who perceived increases in "student understanding and comprehension of major termite knowledge concepts" and/or students as "more interested in termites after participating in this project" were more likely to continue curriculum. Teachers who had worked at their current school over 21 years at the time of curriculum adoption, and/or who identified having subject specialties not listed on the survey were less likely to continue curriculum. Additionally, teachers servicing lower socioeconomic level students were less likely to continue the curricula.

  7. A resource management tool for public health continuity of operations during disasters.

    PubMed

    Turner, Anne M; Reeder, Blaine; Wallace, James C

    2013-04-01

    We developed and validated a user-centered information system to support the local planning of public health continuity of operations for the Community Health Services Division, Public Health - Seattle & King County, Washington. The Continuity of Operations Data Analysis (CODA) system was designed as a prototype developed using requirements identified through participatory design. CODA uses open-source software that links personnel contact and licensing information with needed skills and clinic locations for 821 employees at 14 public health clinics in Seattle and King County. Using a web-based interface, CODA can visualize locations of personnel in relationship to clinics to assist clinic managers in allocating public health personnel and resources under dynamic conditions. Based on user input, the CODA prototype was designed as a low-cost, user-friendly system to inventory and manage public health resources. In emergency conditions, the system can run on a stand-alone battery-powered laptop computer. A formative evaluation by managers of multiple public health centers confirmed the prototype design's usefulness. Emergency management administrators also provided positive feedback about the system during a separate demonstration. Validation of the CODA information design prototype by public health managers and emergency management administrators demonstrates the potential usefulness of building a resource management system using open-source technologies and participatory design principles.

  8. Tribal Management Support Center: Training Services. Continuing Education System Catalog F. Y.-1980.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Public Health Service (DHEW), Washington, DC. Div. of Indian Health.

    A continuing education program in health systems management and administration, conducted for tribal and Indian Health Service (IHS) personnel, is described in this catalog. The first section states the goals of the program, which provides, on a national level, training to help tribes and tribal organizations administer health programs and to…

  9. Innovation, Entrepreneurship, and Strategic Planning: A Delicate Balance in Continuing Education Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broomall, James K.

    1987-01-01

    Recommends, for the management of community college adult/continuing education programs, strategic planning to determine the unit's niche within the educational marketplace and interorganizational "coupling" as a means of cooperating with other organizations to foster innovation. Offers a case study of "coupling" at Allegany…

  10. Productivity and Job Security: Case Studies of Continuing Education for Engineers, Technicians, and Managers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belitsky, A. Harvey

    This report, the third in a series on productivity and job security, presents three case studies which detail various forms of continuing education and training. Four important factors in the cases are identified: employment stability, management support for training, adaptation to changing job requirements, and training evaluation. The first case…

  11. Management of Hypertension in Private Practice: A Randomized Controlled Trial in Continuing Medical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gullion, David S.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    A randomized control trial was used to evaluate a physician education program designed to improve physician management of patients' hypertension, hypertension-related behaviors, and diastolic blood pressure. It was suggested that more intensive continuing medical education programs are needed to improve physician performance and patient outcome.…

  12. Management of Hypertension in Private Practice: A Randomized Controlled Trial in Continuing Medical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gullion, David S.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    A randomized control trial was used to evaluate a physician education program designed to improve physician management of patients' hypertension, hypertension-related behaviors, and diastolic blood pressure. It was suggested that more intensive continuing medical education programs are needed to improve physician performance and patient outcome.…

  13. Application of Risk Assessment Tools in the Continuous Risk Management (CRM) Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Paul S.

    2002-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is currently implementing the Continuous Risk Management (CRM) Program developed by the Carnegie Mellon University and recommended by NASA as the Risk Management (RM) implementation approach. The four most frequently used risk assessment tools in the center are: (a) Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA), Hazard Analysis (HA), Fault Tree Analysis (FTA), and Probabilistic Risk Analysis (PRA). There are some guidelines for selecting the type of risk assessment tools during the project formulation phase of a project, but there is not enough guidance as to how to apply these tools in the Continuous Risk Management process (CRM). But the ways the safety and risk assessment tools are used make a significant difference in the effectiveness in the risk management function. Decisions regarding, what events are to be included in the analysis, to what level of details should the analysis be continued, make significant difference in the effectiveness of risk management program. Tools of risk analysis also depends on the phase of a project e.g. at the initial phase of a project, when not much data are available on hardware, standard FMEA cannot be applied; instead a functional FMEA may be appropriate. This study attempted to provide some directives to alleviate the difficulty in applying FTA, PRA, and FMEA in the CRM process. Hazard Analysis was not included in the scope of the study due to the short duration of the summer research project.

  14. Application of Risk Assessment Tools in the Continuous Risk Management (CRM) Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Paul S.

    2002-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is currently implementing the Continuous Risk Management (CRM) Program developed by the Carnegie Mellon University and recommended by NASA as the Risk Management (RM) implementation approach. The four most frequently used risk assessment tools in the center are: (a) Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA), Hazard Analysis (HA), Fault Tree Analysis (FTA), and Probabilistic Risk Analysis (PRA). There are some guidelines for selecting the type of risk assessment tools during the project formulation phase of a project, but there is not enough guidance as to how to apply these tools in the Continuous Risk Management process (CRM). But the ways the safety and risk assessment tools are used make a significant difference in the effectiveness in the risk management function. Decisions regarding, what events are to be included in the analysis, to what level of details should the analysis be continued, make significant difference in the effectiveness of risk management program. Tools of risk analysis also depends on the phase of a project e.g. at the initial phase of a project, when not much data are available on hardware, standard FMEA cannot be applied; instead a functional FMEA may be appropriate. This study attempted to provide some directives to alleviate the difficulty in applying FTA, PRA, and FMEA in the CRM process. Hazard Analysis was not included in the scope of the study due to the short duration of the summer research project.

  15. Establishing ecological and social continuities: new challenges to optimize urban watershed management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitroi, V.; de Coninck, A.; Vinçon-Leite, B.; Deroubaix, J.-F.

    2014-09-01

    The (re)construction of the ecological continuity is stated as one of the main objectives of the European Water Framework Directive for watershed management in Europe. Analysing the social, political, technical and scientific processes characterising the implementation of different projects of ecological continuity in two adjacent peri-urban territories in Ile-de-France, we observed science-driven approaches disregarding the social contexts. We show that, in urbanized areas, ecological continuity requires not only important technical and ecological expertise, but also social and political participation to the definition of a common vision and action plan. Being a challenge for both, technical water management institutions and "classical" ecological policies, we propose some social science contributions to deal with ecological unpredictability and reconsider stakeholder resistance to this kind of project.

  16. Continuity of operations planning in college athletic programs: The case for incorporating Federal Emergency Management Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Hall, Stacey A; Allen, Brandon L; Phillips, Dennis

    2016-01-01

    College athletic departments have a responsibility to provide a safe environment for student-athletes; however, most colleges do not have a crisis management plan that includes procedures for displaced student-athletes or alternate facilities to perform athletic events. Continuity of operations planning ensures athletic programs are equipped to maintain essential functions during, or shortly after, a disruption of operations due to possible hazards. Previous studies have identified a lack of emergency preparedness and continuity planning in college athletic departments. The purpose of this article is to illustrate in detail one approach to disaster planning for college athletic departments, namely the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) continuity of operations framework. By adhering to FEMA guidelines and promoting a best practices model, athletic programs can effectively plan to address potential hazards, as well as protect the organization's brand, image, and financial sustainability after a crisis event.

  17. Management of chronic nonmalignant pain: a needs assessment in an internal medicine resident continuity clinic.

    PubMed

    Yanni, Leanne M; Weaver, Michael F; Johnson, Betty A; Morgan, Laura A; Harrington, Sarah E; Ketchum, Jessica M

    2008-01-01

    The authors hypothesized that Internal Medicine (IM) residents experience a lack of preparation, confidence, and reward when managing patients with chronic nonmalignant pain (CNMP) in their continuity clinic and that they exhibit deficiencies in CNMP management practices, particularly when opioids are prescribed. As part of a quality improvement project in the IM resident continuity clinic, the authors performed a needs assessment through a self-administered resident questionnaire and a retrospective chart review. Fifty-seven percent of respondents rated their CNMP preparation as "fair" or "poor," 89 percent reported that their experience was "much less" or "somewhat less" rewarding than managing patients with other chronic conditions, and 58 percent reported that CNMP management "negatively" or "very negatively" affected their view of primary care as a career. Twenty-eight charts of patients receiving opioids during a 1-year study period were reviewed. Although residents were likely to document pain diagnoses (93 percent) and pain scores (82 percent) as well as utilize medication agreements (82 percent), they were less likely to document illicit substance use (39 percent), document legal history (32 percent), or obtain prior medical records (39 percent). Few urine drug screens were ordered (18 percent) and 25 percent of patients had fewer than four face-to-face visits during the year. The questionnaire indicated that IM residents lack preparation in managing CNMP, which results in lack of confidence and reward. The chart review revealed management practice deficiencies in risk assessment and prescription drug misuse monitoring. As a result, the authors have implemented curricular interventions, integrated a pain clinic within the continuity clinic, optimized residency program clinic scheduling, and developed tools for consistency in management practices.

  18. The continuing care retirement community executive: a manager for all seasons.

    PubMed

    Hurley, R E; Brewer, K P

    1991-01-01

    The continuing care retirement community industry is a growing source of residential and health care services for the elderly population. It is also a relatively new and expanding career path for both health care and hospitality managers. Using in-depth interviews with executives in a sample of 26 communities, this study provides one of the most complete portraits to date of the nature of managing these communities. The findings indicate that these organizations are complex and multifaceted, demanding versatile skills and abilities. Most critical are those skills that enable a manager to interact effectively with residents and staff to build and maintain a hospitable, accommodating community environment. As competition in the industry intensifies, community viability may become synonymous with customer satisfaction. Management training and development will need to be highly attentive to the distinctive features of these intriguing organizations.

  19. Continuity of care, informed consent, and fiduciary responsibilities in for-profit managed care systems.

    PubMed

    Holleman, W L; Holleman, M C; Moy, J G

    2000-01-01

    The replacement of fee-for-service systems by managed care systems offers opportunities for cutting medical costs, integrating health care delivery systems, and improving communication among physicians. Before these benefits can be realized, however, a number of problems must be addressed. First, managed care systems must find ways to foster continuity of care in a market that has thus far proved unstable. Second, managed care systems must find ways to protect the patient's right to fully informed consent even while educating patients about the importance of cost-effectiveness and why certain treatments might not be included in their health plan. Third, managed care systems must find ways to promote physicians' fiduciary responsibilities to patients and to respect physicians' clinical judgments even while creating legitimate incentives to provide cost-effective health care.

  20. The use of integrated management systems assessments for continuous improvement of EHS programs

    SciTech Connect

    Wills, T.L.; Frew, J.; Hammond, D.R.; Rafn, C.L.S.

    1996-12-31

    Texaco`s Tartan Platform located in the British North Sea and the onshore support organization located in Aberdeen provide a case study illustrating how environment, health and safety (EHS) management systems assessments can provide an effective mechanism for continuous improvement of EHS programs. A baseline health and safety assessment of Tartan evaluated the degree of management control in place in 1992. A three-year improvement plan was prepared and implemented using the assessment format as a structure. In 1995, Texaco developed an integrated EHS management systems assessment (EHS MSA) program and conducted an environment, health and safety assessment of Tartan. The EHS MSA results documented the efforts made in the management of health and safety issues since 1992 and form the basis for ongoing improvement efforts that include environmental issues. A discussion of how the MSA methodology addresses the emerging ISO 14001 standard concludes the paper.

  1. 76 FR 12081 - Notice of Two-Year Continuation of Disease Management Demonstration Project for TRICARE Standard...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-04

    ... identified with the disease states of asthma, heart failure, and diabetes. TMA now intends to continue the... beneficiaries identified by the TRICARE Management Activity (TMA) for disease management of asthma,...

  2. Continuous improvement in the Industrial and Management Systems Engineering programme at Kuwait University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldowaisan, Tariq; Allahverdi, Ali

    2016-07-01

    This paper describes the process employed by the Industrial and Management Systems Engineering programme at Kuwait University to continuously improve the programme. Using a continuous improvement framework, the paper demonstrates how various qualitative and quantitative analyses methods, such as hypothesis testing and control charts, have been applied to the results of four assessment tools and other data sources to improve performance. Important improvements include the need to reconsider two student outcomes as they were difficult to implement in courses. In addition, through benchmarking and the engagement of Alumni and Employers, key decisions were made to improve the curriculum and enhance employability.

  3. Embracing technology? Using change management strategies to improve the use of continuous lateral rotation therapy.

    PubMed

    Cybulski, Pamela; Zantinge, Johanna; Abbott-McNeil, Deanna

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this quality improvement initiative was to improve the utilization of continuous lateral rotation therapy (CLRT) in a nine-bed community hospital ICU within the context of a nurse-driven protocol. Nursing focus groups, analyzed using a strength, weakness, opportunity, threat (SWOT) approach, resulted in the implementation of four interventions over seven weeks. Change management strategies guided all aspects of the project. Results showed a modest increase in the utilization of CLRT. This initiative demonstrates that change management strategies may assist with the incorporation of technology into nursing practice by increasing empowerment and creating an attachment to and responsibility for outcomes.

  4. Cyber crime: can a standard risk analysis help in the challenges facing business continuity managers?

    PubMed

    Vande Putte, Danny; Verhelst, Marc

    Risk management has never been easy. Finding efficient mitigating measures is not always straightforward. Finding measures for cyber crime, however, is a really huge challenge because cyber threats are changing all the time. As the sophistication of these threats is growing, their impact increases. Moreover, society and its economy have become increasingly dependent on information and communication technologies. Standard risk analysis methodologies will help to score the cyber risk and to place it in the risk tolerance matrix. This will allow business continuity managers to figure out if there is still a gap with the maximum tolerable outage for time-critical business processes and if extra business continuity measures are necessary to fill the gap.

  5. Quantitative research versus quality assurance, quality improvement, total quality management, and continuous quality improvement.

    PubMed

    Vogelsang, J

    1999-04-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a review of the scientific method used in the quantitative research studies for consumers, evaluators, and applied nurse researchers. The fundamental characteristics of the problem-solving/ performance-improvement processes of quality assurance, quality improvement, total quality management, and continuous quality improvement are described. Research is compared with these processes, and is followed by a discussion about the publication of quantitative research findings.

  6. How Visual Management for Continuous Improvement Might Guide and Affect Hospital Staff: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Ulhassan, Waqar; von Thiele Schwarz, Ulrica; Westerlund, Hugo; Sandahl, Christer; Thor, Johan

    2015-01-01

    Visual management (VM) tools such as whiteboards, often employed in Lean thinking applications, are intended to be helpful in improving work processes in different industries including health care. It remains unclear, however, how VM is actually applied in health care Lean interventions and how it might influence the clinical staff. We therefore examined how Lean-inspired VM using whiteboards for continuous improvement efforts related to the hospital staff's work and collaboration. Within a case study design, we combined semistructured interviews, nonparticipant observations, and photography on 2 cardiology wards. The fate of VM differed between the 2 wards; in one, it was well received by the staff and enhanced continuous improvement efforts, whereas in the other ward, it was not perceived to fit in the work flow or to make enough sense in order to be sustained. Visual management may enable the staff and managers to allow communication across time and facilitate teamwork by enabling the inclusion of team members who are not present simultaneously; however, its adoption and value seem contingent on finding a good fit with the local context. A combination of continuous improvement and VM may be helpful in keeping the staff engaged in the change process in the long run.

  7. Continuous high-pressure negative suction drain: new powerful tool for closed wound management: clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Shin, Seung Jun; Han, DaeHee; Song, Hyunsuk; Jang, Yu Jin; Park, Dong Ha; Park, Myong Chul

    2014-07-01

    Although various reconstructive flap surgeries have been successfully performed, there still are difficult wound complications, such as seroma formation, wound margin necrosis, delayed wound healing, and even flap failures. The negative-pressure wound therapy has been described in detail in the literature to assist open chronic/complex wound closure in reconstructive surgery. However, the negative-pressure wound therapy was difficult to be applied under the incisional closed wounds. A total of 23 patients underwent the various reconstructive flap surgeries with continuous high-pressure negative suction drain. Instead of using regular suction units, Barovac (50-90 mm Hg, Sewoon Medical, Seoul, Republic of Korea) drainage tubes were connected to the wall suction unit, providing continuous high-powered negative pressure. In addition, continuous subatmospheric suction pressure (100-300 mm Hg) was applied. Outcome of the measures was obtained from the incidence of seroma, volume of postoperative drainage, hospitalization period, and incidence of other typical wound complications. Dead space was evaluated postoperatively with ultrasonography. Using continuous high-pressure negative suction drain, successful management of seroma was obtained without any major complication such as wound infection, flap loss, and wound margin necrosis, except for only 1 case of seroma after discharge from the hospital. The indwelling time of the drain in the latissimus dorsi donor site was significantly reduced in comparison with the authors' previous data (P = 0.047). The volume of drainage and hospitalization period were also reduced; however, these were not statistically significant. The dead space with continuous high-pressure negative suction drain was more reduced than in the control group in the immediate postoperative period and confirmed with ultrasonography. Continuous high-pressure negative suction drain might be the simple and powerful solution in the management of challenging

  8. Managing conflicts of interest in continuing medical education: a comparison of policies.

    PubMed

    Lisi, Anthony J

    2009-01-01

    Altruism is a central underpinning of professional behavior; however physicians may face instances in which their secondary (financial) interest is in competition with their primary (patient health, research integrity, professional education) interests. Most medical institutions have developed policies to manage conflicts of interest, but chiropractic institutions, organizations and providers may not be well-acquainted with such policies. To compare the policies of the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) and the North American Spine Society (NASS) regarding management of conflicts of interest in continuing medical education (CME). A qualitative review of published policies of the VA and NASS was performed. The policies of each organization were retrieved and reviewed, and data were entered into a spreadsheet for comparison. Content experts at each organization were contacted to provide additional information. The VA and NASS provide explicit, similar policies to manage conflicts of interest in CME. Proposed speakers are required to disclose the nature and value of financial relationships relevant to content of their planned talk/presentation. Procedures for committee review, mitigation of conflict, or prohibiting the participation of a given speaker have been described. Disclosure must be made to the attendees of an educational activity in printed materials and at the time of presentation. The VA and NASS appear similar in their policies to manage conflicts of interest in CME. The policies of the VA and NASS may provide examples for the chiropractic profession to consider in relation to chiropractic continuing education.

  9. Does the continuation of warfarin change management outcomes in epistaxis patients?

    PubMed

    Bola, S; Marsh, R; Braggins, S; Potter, C; Hickey, S

    2016-03-01

    This study aimed to compare management, readmission rates and length of in-patient stay amongst warfarinised and non-warfarinised patients to ascertain future treatment protocols. A 12-month retrospective review was conducted of ENT epistaxis admissions. Admission details such as length of in-patient stay, clotting profile and management plan were recorded. Comparisons of management and outcome for warfarinised and non-warfarinised patients were made using the Fisher's exact paired t-test. Of 176 epistaxis patients admitted, 31 per cent were warfarinised, 18 per cent were on another form of anticoagulation or antiplatelet therapy, and 51 per cent were not on any medication that might impose a bleeding risk. The international normalised ratio at admission was high in 13 per cent of warfarinised patients; the remaining patients had therapeutic or sub-therapeutic international normalised ratios and so warfarin was continued. The mean in-patient stay was similar for all cohorts; however, warfarinised patients had a higher readmission rate. Warfarinised epistaxis patients may be safely managed without stopping their anticoagulation therapy, provided their international normalised ratio is at therapeutic or sub-therapeutic levels. By continuing regular anticoagulation therapy, warfarinised patients may be discharged without delay.

  10. Richness of Lichen Species, Especially of Threatened Ones, Is Promoted by Management Methods Furthering Stand Continuity

    PubMed Central

    Boch, Steffen; Prati, Daniel; Hessenmöller, Dominik; Schulze, Ernst-Detlef; Fischer, Markus

    2013-01-01

    Lichens are a key component of forest biodiversity. However, a comprehensive study analyzing lichen species richness in relation to several management types, extending over different regions and forest stages and including information on site conditions is missing for temperate European forests. In three German regions (Schwäbische Alb, Hainich-Dün, Schorfheide-Chorin), the so-called Biodiversity Exploratories, we studied lichen species richness in 631 forest plots of 400 m2 comprising different management types (unmanaged, selection cutting, deciduous and coniferous age-class forests resulting from clear cutting or shelterwood logging), various stand ages, and site conditions, typical for large parts of temperate Europe. We analyzed how lichen species richness responds to management and habitat variables (standing biomass, cover of deadwood, cover of rocks). We found strong regional differences with highest lichen species richness in the Schwäbische Alb, probably driven by regional differences in former air pollution, and in precipitation and habitat variables. Overall, unmanaged forests harbored 22% more threatened lichen species than managed age-class forests. In general, total, corticolous, and threatened lichen species richness did not differ among management types of deciduous forests. However, in the Schwäbische-Alb region, deciduous forests had 61% more lichen species than coniferous forests and they had 279% more threatened and 76% more corticolous lichen species. Old deciduous age classes were richer in corticolous lichen species than young ones, while old coniferous age-classes were poorer than young ones. Overall, our findings highlight the importance of stand continuity for conservation. To increase total and threatened lichen species richness we suggest (1) conserving unmanaged forests, (2) promoting silvicultural methods assuring stand continuity, (3) conserving old trees in managed forests, (4) promoting stands of native deciduous tree species

  11. Richness of lichen species, especially of threatened ones, is promoted by management methods furthering stand continuity.

    PubMed

    Boch, Steffen; Prati, Daniel; Hessenmöller, Dominik; Schulze, Ernst-Detlef; Fischer, Markus

    2013-01-01

    Lichens are a key component of forest biodiversity. However, a comprehensive study analyzing lichen species richness in relation to several management types, extending over different regions and forest stages and including information on site conditions is missing for temperate European forests. In three German regions (Schwäbische Alb, Hainich-Dün, Schorfheide-Chorin), the so-called Biodiversity Exploratories, we studied lichen species richness in 631 forest plots of 400 m(2) comprising different management types (unmanaged, selection cutting, deciduous and coniferous age-class forests resulting from clear cutting or shelterwood logging), various stand ages, and site conditions, typical for large parts of temperate Europe. We analyzed how lichen species richness responds to management and habitat variables (standing biomass, cover of deadwood, cover of rocks). We found strong regional differences with highest lichen species richness in the Schwäbische Alb, probably driven by regional differences in former air pollution, and in precipitation and habitat variables. Overall, unmanaged forests harbored 22% more threatened lichen species than managed age-class forests. In general, total, corticolous, and threatened lichen species richness did not differ among management types of deciduous forests. However, in the Schwäbische-Alb region, deciduous forests had 61% more lichen species than coniferous forests and they had 279% more threatened and 76% more corticolous lichen species. Old deciduous age classes were richer in corticolous lichen species than young ones, while old coniferous age-classes were poorer than young ones. Overall, our findings highlight the importance of stand continuity for conservation. To increase total and threatened lichen species richness we suggest (1) conserving unmanaged forests, (2) promoting silvicultural methods assuring stand continuity, (3) conserving old trees in managed forests, (4) promoting stands of native deciduous tree species

  12. Teacher Characteristics and Perceptions of Pest Management Curricula: Clues to Adoption and Continuation

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Makena; Aihara-Sasaki, Maria; Grace, J. Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    Educate to Eradicate is a K-12 curriculum project using termite biology and control as the basis for science education that has been implemented in over 350 Hawaii public school classrooms. To encourage sustained implementation of the project, we aimed to identify factors that influence the adoption and continuation of pest management curricula in public school classrooms. Regression analysis of teacher survey data were used to create predictive models of teacher continuation. Teachers motivated by “exciting students about science”, who perceived increases in “student understanding and comprehension of major termite knowledge concepts” and/or students as “more interested in termites after participating in this project” were more likely to continue curriculum. Teachers who had worked at their current school over 21 years at the time of curriculum adoption, and/or who identified having subject specialties not listed on the survey were less likely to continue curriculum. Additionally, teachers servicing lower socioeconomic level students were less likely to continue the curricula. PMID:26464383

  13. Patterns of inhaled corticosteroid use and asthma control in the Childhood Asthma Management Program Continuation Study.

    PubMed

    Sawicki, Gregory S; Strunk, Robert C; Schuemann, Brooke; Annett, Robert; Weiss, Scott; Fuhlbrigge, Anne L

    2010-01-01

    Daily controller medication use is recommended for children with persistent asthma to achieve asthma control. To examine patterns of inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) use and asthma control in an observational study of children and adolescents with mild-to-moderate asthma (the Childhood Asthma Management Program Continuation Study). We assessed patterns of ICS use during a 12-month period (consistent, intermittent, and none) and asthma control (well controlled vs poorly controlled). Multivariate logistic regression examined the association between pattern of ICS use and asthma control. Of 914 patients enrolled, 425 were recommended to continue receiving ICS therapy in the Childhood Asthma Management Program Continuation Study. Of these patients, 46% reported consistent ICS use and 20% reported no ICS use during year 1. By year 4, consistent ICS use decreased to 20%, whereas no ICS use increased to 57%; poorly controlled asthma was reported in 18% of encounters. In multivariate models controlling for age, sex, forced expiratory volume in 1 second, and asthma severity assessment, patients reporting consistent ICS use during a 12-month period were more likely to report poor asthma control (odds ratio, 1.6; 95% confidence interval, 1.2-2.1) compared with those reporting no ICS use. In this observational study of children and adolescents with mild-to-moderate asthma, most did not report continued use of ICS. Patients recommended to continue receiving ICS therapy and reporting consistent ICS use were less likely to report well-controlled asthma even after controlling for markers of asthma severity. Although residual confounding by severity cannot be ruled out, many children and adolescents may not achieve well-controlled asthma despite consistent use of ICS.

  14. Human resources management and firm performance: The differential role of managerial affective and continuance commitment.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yaping; Law, Kenneth S; Chang, Song; Xin, Katherine R

    2009-01-01

    In this study, the authors developed a dual-concern (i.e., maintenance and performance) model of human resources (HR) management. The authors identified commonly examined HR practices that apply to the middle manager level and classified them into the maintenance- and performance-oriented HR subsystems. The authors found support for the 2-factor model on the basis of responses from 2,148 managers from 463 firms operating in China. Regression results indicate that the performance-oriented HR subsystems had a positive relationship with firm performance and that the relationship was mediated by middle managers' affective commitment to the firm. The maintenance-oriented HR subsystems had a positive relationship with middle managers' continuance commitment but not with their affective commitment and firm performance. This study contributes to the understanding of how HR practices relate to firm performance and offers an improved test of the argument that valuable and firm-specific HR provide a source of competitive advantage. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2009 APA, all rights reserved).

  15. How Do Private Health Plans Manage Specialty Behavioral Health Treatment Entry and Continuing Care?

    PubMed

    Quinn, Amity E; Reif, Sharon; Merrick, Elizabeth L; Horgan, Constance M; Garnick, Deborah W; Stewart, Maureen T

    2017-09-01

    This study examined private health plans' arrangements for accessing and continuing specialty behavioral health treatment in 2010 as federal health reforms were being implemented. These management practices have historically been stricter in behavioral health care than in general medical care; however, the Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act of 2010 required parity in management policies. The data source was a nationally representative survey of private health plans' behavioral health treatment management approaches in 2010. Health plan executives were asked about activities for their plan's three products with highest enrollment (weighted N=8,427, 88% response rate). Prior authorization for outpatient behavioral health care was rarely required (4.7% of products), but 75% of products required authorization for ongoing care and over 90% required prior authorization for other levels of care. The most common medical necessity criteria were self-developed and American Society of Addiction Medicine criteria. Nearly all products had formal standards to limit waiting time for routine and urgent treatment, but almost 30% lacked such standards for detoxification services. A range of wait time-monitoring approaches was used. Health plans used a variety of methods to influence behavioral health treatment entry and continuing care. Few relied on prior authorization for outpatient care, but the use of other approaches to influence, manage, or facilitate access was common. Results provide a baseline for understanding the current management environment for specialty behavioral health care. Tracking health plans' approaches over time will be important to ensure that access to behavioral health care is not prohibitively restrictive.

  16. Innovating Conservation Agriculture: The Case of No-Till Cropping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coughenour, C. Milton

    2003-01-01

    The extensive sociological studies of conservation agriculture have provided considerable understanding of farmers' use of conservation practices, but attempts to develop predictive models have failed. Reviews of research findings question the utility of the conceptual and methodological perspectives of prior research. The argument advanced here…

  17. N response of no-till dryland winter triticale forage

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Triticale’s forage-yield response to fertilizer nitrogen (N) is impressive on soils testing low in available N. Our objective is to quantify the forage yield response of dryland winter triticale to applied N and to residual NO3-N. A second objective is to fit the yield data to a regression equation ...

  18. Innovating Conservation Agriculture: The Case of No-Till Cropping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coughenour, C. Milton

    2003-01-01

    The extensive sociological studies of conservation agriculture have provided considerable understanding of farmers' use of conservation practices, but attempts to develop predictive models have failed. Reviews of research findings question the utility of the conceptual and methodological perspectives of prior research. The argument advanced here…

  19. Simulations of Continuous Descent Operations with Arrival-management Automation and Mixed Flight-deck Interval Management Equipage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callantine, Todd J.; Kupfer, Michael; Martin, Lynne Hazel; Prevot, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Air traffic management simulations conducted in the Airspace Operations Laboratory at NASA Ames Research Center have addressed the integration of trajectory-based arrival-management automation, controller tools, and Flight-Deck Interval Management avionics to enable Continuous Descent Operations (CDOs) during periods of sustained high traffic demand. The simulations are devoted to maturing the integrated system for field demonstration, and refining the controller tools, clearance phraseology, and procedures specified in the associated concept of operations. The results indicate a variety of factors impact the concept's safety and viability from a controller's perspective, including en-route preconditioning of arrival flows, useable clearance phraseology, and the characteristics of airspace, routes, and traffic-management methods in use at a particular site. Clear understanding of automation behavior and required shifts in roles and responsibilities is important for controller acceptance and realizing potential benefits. This paper discusses the simulations, drawing parallels with results from related European efforts. The most recent study found en-route controllers can effectively precondition arrival flows, which significantly improved route conformance during CDOs. Controllers found the tools acceptable, in line with previous studies.

  20. Is emergency management an integrated element of business continuity management? A case study with security professionals in Western Australia.

    PubMed

    Frohde, Kenny; Brooks, David J

    2014-01-01

    Emergency management (EM) and business continuity management (BCM) frameworks incorporate various strategic and operational measures. Defined within a number of national and international standards and guidelines, such concepts may be integrated within one another to provide increased resilience to disruptive events. Nevertheless, there is a degree of dispute regarding concept integration among security and EM professionals and bodies of knowledge. In line with cognitive psychology exemplar-based concepts, such disputes may be associated with a lack of precision in communality in the approach to EM and BCM. This paper presents a two-stage study, where stage 1 critiqued national and international literature and stage 2 applied semi-structured interviews with security managers in Western Australia. Findings indicate the existence of contradictory views on EM and its integration within BCM. As such, this study concludes that EM is considered a vital component of BCM by the majority of security managers. However, there is broader dispute regarding its degree of integration. Understanding the underpinnings of such disputes will aid in raising the standards and application of professionalism within security, EM and BCM domains, supporting clarification and definition of professional boundaries.

  1. Implementing business continuity management systems and sharing best practices at a European bank.

    PubMed

    Aronis, Stelios; Stratopoulos, Georgios

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the methodology applied by the Alpha Bank Group in order to implement a business continuity management (BCM) programme to its parent company (Alpha Bank SA), as well as to its subsidiaries in Albania, Bulgaria, Cyprus, Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Greece, Romania, Serbia, UK and Ukraine. It also reviews the problems faced, how they were overcome and the lessons learned. When implementing a BCM programme in a large organisation, it is very important to follow the methodology described by BCM standard ISO 22301, otherwise the business continuity plan is unlikely to work efficiently or comply with the business recovery requirements, as well as with the requirements of other interested parties, such as customers, regulatory authorities, vendors, service providers, critical associates, etc.

  2. Continuous intraoperative OCT guided management of post-deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty descemet's membrane detachment.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Namrata; Aron, Neelima; Kakkar, Prateek; Titiyal, Jeewan S

    2016-01-01

    Continuous intraoperative optical coherence tomography (iOCT) integrated into the operating microscope is a new modification in the current operating microscope to aid in the surgical procedures involving both the anterior and the posterior segment. This helps in intraoperative planning, modification of the surgical steps if required and confirmation of the surgical endpoint in the operating room itself. iOCT was used for the successful management of descemet's membrane detachment (DMD) following deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty (DALK) with intracameral injection of 20% Sulphur hexafluoride. The gas was injected under direct visualization through the microscope with continuous real time monitoring of the change in height of the detached Descemet's membrane (DM). Additionally stab incisions were given through the anterior cornea due to the presence of residual fluid above the DM which was visible on continuous iOCT images. This led to the successful apposition of the DM which otherwise would have remained detached due to the residual fluid. This highlights the importance of continuous iOCT monitoring of the ophthalmic surgical procedures in order to produce a successful anatomical outcome of the surgery without disruption of the surgical procedure.

  3. Definition of Information Technology Architectures for Continuous Data Management and Medical Device Integration in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Hernando, M. Elena; Pascual, Mario; Salvador, Carlos H.; García-Sáez, Gema; Rodríguez-Herrero, Agustín; Martínez-Sarriegui, Iñaki; Gómez, Enrique J.

    2008-01-01

    The growing availability of continuous data from medical devices in diabetes management makes it crucial to define novel information technology architectures for efficient data storage, data transmission, and data visualization. The new paradigm of care demands the sharing of information in interoperable systems as the only way to support patient care in a continuum of care scenario. The technological platforms should support all the services required by the actors involved in the care process, located in different scenarios and managing diverse information for different purposes. This article presents basic criteria for defining flexible and adaptive architectures that are capable of interoperating with external systems, and integrating medical devices and decision support tools to extract all the relevant knowledge to support diabetes care. PMID:19885276

  4. [Case of spinal epidural abscess after continuous epidural block to manage the pain of herpes zoster].

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Tatsuhito; Nakatani, Toshihiko; Narai, Yasuhiro; Sakakibara, Manabu; Hashimoto, Tatsuya; Saito, Youji

    2014-03-01

    A woman in her 90's received continuous epidural block for the pain of herpes zoster. Four days after epidural catheterization, she was found with cellutitis. Fourteen days after epidural catheterization, spinal epidural abscess was pointed out on MRI. Since there were no neurological symptoms, we performed conservative medical management with antibiotics. She recovered without sequela When the symptoms of cellutitis appeared after epidural block (even if there are neither neurological symptoms nor infectious signs), there is a possibility of progressing into spinal epidural abscess.

  5. Management of severe obstructive sleep apnea using mandibular advancement devices with auto continuous positive airway pressures

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyay, Rashmi; Dubey, Abhishek; Kant, Surya; Singh, Balendra Pratap

    2015-01-01

    The use of continuous positive airway pressures (CPAP) is considered standard treatment of moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Treatment of the disease poses a great challenge not only for its diagnostic purpose but also for its treatment part. In about 29-83% of the patients, treatment is difficult because of non-compliance resulting due to high pressures, air leaks and other related issues. In such situations, alternative methods of treatment need to be looked for so as to ascertain better management. Mandibular advancement devices along with CPAP may show better treatment outcome in specific situations. PMID:25814802

  6. Supercontinuum generation using continuous-wave multiwavelength pumping and dispersion management.

    PubMed

    Sylvestre, Thibaut; Vedadi, Armand; Maillotte, Hervé; Vanholsbeeck, Frédérique; Coen, Stéphane

    2006-07-01

    We experimentally demonstrate that continuous-wave supercontinuum generation in optical fibers can be significantly enhanced by using both multiwavelength pumping and dispersion management. We show by detailed spectral analysis that continuum enhancement is achieved mainly through a combination of Raman-assisted modulation instabilities, soliton compression, and dispersive wave generation. With this technique, an 800 nm wide (from 1.2 to 2.0 microm) 2 W supercontinuum source is reported that uses a three-wavelength pump and a dispersion-tailored four-optical fibers arrangement.

  7. Management Continuity from the Patient Perspective: Comparison of Primary Healthcare Evaluation Instruments

    PubMed Central

    Haggerty, Jeannie L.; Burge, Frederick; Pineault, Raynald; Beaulieu, Marie-Dominique; Bouharaoui, Fatima; Beaulieu, Christine; Santor, Darcy A.; Lévesque, Jean-Frédéric

    2011-01-01

    Management continuity, operationally defined as “the extent to which services delivered by different providers are timely and complementary such that care is experienced as connected and coherent,” is a core attribute of primary healthcare. Continuity, as experienced by the patient, is the result of good care coordination or integration. Objective: To provide insight into how well management continuity is measured in validated coordination or integration subscales of primary healthcare instruments. Method: Relevant subscales from the Primary Care Assessment Survey (PCAS), the Primary Care Assessment Tool – Short Form (PCAT-S), the Components of Primary Care Instrument (CPCI) and the Veterans Affairs National Outpatient Customer Satisfaction Survey (VANOCSS) were administered to 432 adult respondents who had at least one healthcare contact with a provider other than their family physician in the previous 12 months. Subscales were examined descriptively, by correlation and factor analysis and item response theory analysis. Because the VANOCSS elicits coordination problems and is scored dichotomously, we used logistic regression to examine how evaluative subscales relate to reported problems. Results: Most responses to the PCAS, PCAT-S and CPCI subscales were positive, yet 83% of respondents reported having one or more problems on the VANOCSS Overall Coordination subscale and 41% on the VANOCSS Specialist Access subscale. Exploratory factor analysis suggests two distinct factors. The first (eigenvalue=6.98) is coordination actions by the primary care physician in transitioning patient care to other providers (PCAS Integration subscale and most of the PCAT-S Coordination subscale). The second (eigenvalue=1.20) is efforts by the primary care physician to create coherence between different visits both within and outside the regular doctor's office (CPCI Coordination subscale). The PCAS Integration subscale was most strongly associated with lower likelihood of

  8. Organisational performance and business continuity management: a theoretical perspective and a case study.

    PubMed

    Sawalha, Ihab Hanna Salman

    2013-01-01

    This paper seeks to extend the research relating to the strategic view of business continuity management (BCM) to the context of organisational performance (OP). It discusses potential performance consequences resulting from applying BCM aspects/elements within an organisation. The paper contributes to the understanding of the role of BCM in OP by discussing how deployment of BCM key aspects/elements can improve OP. Two main issues are discussed: first, background to performance and the elements of OP; and secondly, the role of BCM in achieving optimised OP. These issues are significant, as they go further than the extant literature relating to the significance of BCM and its potential influence on OP. The study focuses on Jordanian banks as a case study and as a way of illustrating how BCM helps improve OP for those organisations facing performance shortcomings or difficulties.

  9. Continuous subcutaneous levetiracetam in the management of seizures at the end of life: a case report.

    PubMed

    Wells, Geoffrey Howard; Mason, Louise D; Foreman, Emma; Chambers, John

    2016-03-01

    We report the case of a man who developed seizures on a background of recurrent metastatic squamous cell carcinoma with intracranial involvement. Initial seizure control with enteral levetiracetam was achieved, and when enteral and intravenous (i.v.) access was no longer available, a continuous subcutaneous infusion (CSCI) of levetiracetam successfully controlled his seizures without the need for sedating anticonvulsants. As a result, end-of-life care was able to be given with the patient retaining the ability to communicate with his family and healthcare staff. This report adds to the sparse but growing evidence base for the use of subcutaneous levetiracetam to manage seizures in palliative and end-of-life care.

  10. Continuing professional development in HIV chronic disease management for primary care providers.

    PubMed

    Kang, Helen; Yip, Benita; Chau, William; Nóhpal De La Rosa, Adriana; Hall, David; Barrios, Rolando; Montaner, Julio; Guillemi, Silvia

    2014-12-09

    Abstract Primary care providers need continuing professional development (CPD) in order to improve their knowledge and confidence in the care of patients with chronic conditions. We developed an intensive modular CPD program in the chronic disease management of HIV for primary care providers. The program combines self-directed learning, interactive tutorials with experts, small group discussions, case studies, clinical training, one-on-one mentoring and individualized learning objectives. We trained 27 family physicians and 7 nurse practitioners between 2011 and 2013. The trainees reported high levels of satisfaction with the program. There was a 136.76% increase in the number of distinct HIV-positive patients receiving HIV-related medication refills that were prescribed by the trainees.

  11. Considerations for Medication Management and Anticoagulation During Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Ashley; Li, Fanny; Gross, A Kendall

    2017-01-01

    Providing safe and high-quality care to critically ill patients receiving continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) includes adequate drug dosing and evaluation of patients' response to medications during therapy. Pharmacokinetic drug studies in acute kidney injury and CRRT are limited, considering the number of medications used in critical care. Therefore, it is important to understand the basic principles of drug clearance during CRRT by evaluating drug properties, CRRT modalities, and how they affect medication clearance. Few published studies have addressed drug disposition and clinical response during CRRT. Additionally, clotting in the CRRT circuit is a concern, so a few options for anticoagulation strategies are presented. This article reviews (1) the CRRT system and drug property factors that affect medication management, (2) the evidence available to guide drug dosing, and (3) anticoagulation strategies for critically ill patients receiving CRRT. ©2017 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  12. The presence of total quality management and continuous quality improvement processes in California public health clinics.

    PubMed

    Scutchfield, F D; Zúñiga de Nuncio, M L; Bush, R A; Fainstein, S H; LaRocco, M A; Anvar, N

    1997-05-01

    Total quality management (TQM) and continuous quality improvement (CQI) processes have not been fully integrated into public health practice. Current levels of participation and interest in TQM/CQI were assessed in California's 62 county departments of health services. Survey results indicated that only 18.5 percent of the 54 respondents were using TQM/CQI. Of those not using TQM/CQI, 75 percent were interested in these activities. Improvement of public health clinic ability to compete and to survive in a rapidly changing health care environment requires fostering this interest through public health decision-maker support, increased TQM/CQI training opportunities, and demonstration of TQM/CQI cost-effectiveness in public health.

  13. Performance evaluation of continuity of care records (CCRs): parsing models in a mobile health management system.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hung-Ming; Liou, Yong-Zan

    2014-10-01

    In a mobile health management system, mobile devices act as the application hosting devices for personal health records (PHRs) and the healthcare servers construct to exchange and analyze PHRs. One of the most popular PHR standards is continuity of care record (CCR). The CCR is expressed in XML formats. However, parsing is an expensive operation that can degrade XML processing performance. Hence, the objective of this study was to identify different operational and performance characteristics for those CCR parsing models including the XML DOM parser, the SAX parser, the PULL parser, and the JSON parser with regard to JSON data converted from XML-based CCR. Thus, developers can make sensible choices for their target PHR applications to parse CCRs when using mobile devices or servers with different system resources. Furthermore, the simulation experiments of four case studies are conducted to compare the parsing performance on Android mobile devices and the server with large quantities of CCR data.

  14. A knowledge continuity management program for the energy, infrastructure and knowledge systems center, Sandia National Laboratories.

    SciTech Connect

    Menicucci, David F.

    2006-07-01

    A growing recognition exists in companies worldwide that, when employees leave, they take with them valuable knowledge that is difficult and expensive to recreate. The concern is now particularly acute as the large ''baby boomer'' generation is reaching retirement age. A new field of science, Knowledge Continuity Management (KCM), is designed to capture and catalog the acquired knowledge and wisdom from experience of these employees before they leave. The KCM concept is in the final stages of being adopted by the Energy, Infrastructure, and Knowledge Systems Center and a program is being applied that should produce significant annual cost savings. This report discusses how the Center can use KCM to mitigate knowledge loss from employee departures, including a concise description of a proposed plan tailored to the Center's specific needs and resources.

  15. Environmental sensor networks and continuous data quality assurance to manage salinity within a highly regulated river basin

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, N.W.T.; Ortega, R.; Holm, L.

    2010-01-05

    This paper describes a new approach to environmental decision support for salinity management in the San Joaquin Basin of California that focuses on web-based data sharing using YSI Econet technology and continuous data quality management using a novel software tool, Aquarius.

  16. Efficacy of Continuing Education in Improving Pharmacists' Competencies for Providing Weight Management Service: Three-Arm Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarayani, Amir; Rashidian, Arash; Gholami, Kheirollah; Torkamandi, Hassan; Javadi, Mohammadreza

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Weight management is a new public health role for community pharmacists in many countries. Lack of expertise is one of the key barriers to counseling obese patients. We evaluated the comparative efficacy of three alternative continuing education (CE) meetings on weight management. Methods: We designed a randomized controlled trial…

  17. Efficacy of Continuing Education in Improving Pharmacists' Competencies for Providing Weight Management Service: Three-Arm Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarayani, Amir; Rashidian, Arash; Gholami, Kheirollah; Torkamandi, Hassan; Javadi, Mohammadreza

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Weight management is a new public health role for community pharmacists in many countries. Lack of expertise is one of the key barriers to counseling obese patients. We evaluated the comparative efficacy of three alternative continuing education (CE) meetings on weight management. Methods: We designed a randomized controlled trial…

  18. Regional Sediment Management Experiment Using the Visible/Infrared Imager/Radiometer Suite and the Landsat Data Continuity Mission Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estep, Leland; Spruce, Joseph P.

    2007-01-01

    The central aim of this RPC (Rapid Prototyping Capability) experiment is to demonstrate the use of VIIRS (Visible/Infrared Imager/ Radiometer Suite and LDCM (Landsat Data Continuity Mission) sensors as key input to the RSM (Regional Sediment Management) GIS (geographic information system) DSS (Decision Support System). The project affects the Coastal Management National Application.

  19. [Perioperative pain management in major reconstructive surgery in pediatric urology: a plea for continuous epidural anesthesia].

    PubMed

    Rubenwolf, P C; Koller, B; Rübben, I; Ebert, A-K; Pohl, F; Rösch, W H

    2011-05-01

    Regional analgesia is firmly established in modern pediatric anesthetic practice and its popularity continues to grow. In our department continuous epidural anesthesia (CEA) is a frequently used technique of pain management following major reconstructive procedures of the lower urinary tract. The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy, safety, and potential benefits of CEA over standard analgesics.We retrospectively reviewed the records of 21 infants who underwent single-stage bladder exstrophy repair in our department. In 15 children an epidural catheter was placed preoperatively for CEA; 6 patients treated without CEA served as controls. Total doses of narcotics and analgesics, length of intensive care unit (ICU) stay and ventilatory assistance, time to first bowel activity, anticholinergic requirements, and CEA-related side effects were documented and compared for both groups.Children given epidural anesthesia required six- to tenfold lower doses of morphine intra- and postoperatively compared to those without CEA; ventilatory support upon completion of surgery was remarkably shorter (59 versus 210 min) in the CEA group as well as ICU stay (1.1 versus 1.8 days). The total consumption of anticholinergics was twice as high as in patients without CEA. There were no relevant CEA-related complications.Being a retrospective audit of practice in our institution with a small number of patients, our results are in line with previously published data on CEA in pediatric patients. CEA has been shown to significantly reduce the need for anesthetics and morphine and allows early extubation with all subsequent advantages for a speedy recovery post surgery. Thus, the technique is to be recommended as a safe and efficacious method for pain management following major reconstructive surgery in pediatric urology. Importantly, this type of anesthesia should be performed only by experienced anesthesiologists in institutions where appropriate equipment, staff, and

  20. Development of an accurate fluid management system for a pediatric continuous renal replacement therapy device

    PubMed Central

    SANTHANAKRISHNAN, ARVIND; NESTLE, TRENT T.; MOORE, BRIAN L.; YOGANATHAN, AJIT P.; PADEN, MATTHEW L.

    2013-01-01

    Acute kidney injury is common in critically ill children and renal replacement therapies provide a life saving therapy to a subset of these children. However, there is no Food and Drug Administration approved device to provide pediatric continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT). Consequently, clinicians adapt approved adult CRRT devices for use in children due to lack of safer alternatives. Complications occur using adult CRRT devices in children due to inaccurate fluid balance (FB) between the volumes of ultrafiltrate (UF) removed and replacement fluid (RF) delivered. We demonstrate the design and validation of a pediatric fluid management system for obtaining accurate instantaneous and cumulative FB. Fluid transport was achieved via multiple novel pulsatile diaphragm pumps. The conservation of volume principle leveraging the physical property of fluid incompressibility along with mechanical coupling via a crankshaft was used for FB. Accuracy testing was conducted in vitro for 8-hour long continuous operation of the coupled UF and RF pumps. The mean cumulative FB error was <1% across filtration flows from 300 mL/hour to 3000 mL/hour. This approach of FB control in a pediatric specific CRRT device would represent a significant accuracy improvement over currently used clinical implementations. PMID:23644618

  1. [Management of pain from osteoporotic vertebral fractures with continuous intrathecal administration of morphine].

    PubMed

    Piva, Bruno; Shaladi, Ali; Crestani, Francesco; Saltari, Rita; Micheletto, Giuseppe; Pinato, Gianpaolo

    2007-04-01

    Vertebral fractures are the most common consequences of severe osteoporosis. The chronic pain from collapse of osteoporotic vertebrae affects quality of life and autonomy of patients. The management of pain with oral or transdermal opiates can cause severe side-effects. Continuous intrathecal administration of morphine with an implantable pump represents a good alternative therapy and has advantages in pain relief and quality of life. We report our experience in the treatment of refractory chronic pain due to vertebral fractures using pumps for intrathecal infusion of morphine in 24 patients. We administered the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and the Quality of Life Questionnaire of the European Foundation of Osteoporosis (QUALEFFO). A significant pain relief was obtained in all implanted patients. Using the QUALEFFO we observed significant improvements of all variables such as QDL (quality of life), DW (domestic work), ambulation and PHS (perception of health status), before and after 1 year from pump implantation. With intrathecal morphine infusion none of the patients required additional systemic analgesics. Our results show that intrathecal administration of morphine efficiently relieves the symptoms of pain and improve the quality of life. Continuous intrathecal administration of morphine represents a good alternative therapy and has advantages in those patients who suffer from severe side-effects with systemic administration.

  2. Quality management science in clinical chemistry: a dynamic framework for continuous improvement of quality.

    PubMed

    Westgard, J O; Burnett, R W; Bowers, G N

    1990-10-01

    Current quality assurance approaches will not be adequate to satisfy the needs for quality in the next decade. Quality management science (QMS), as evolving in industry today, provides the dynamic framework necessary to provide continuous improvement of quality. QMS emphasizes the importance of defining quality goals based on the needs and expectations (implied needs) of customers. The laboratory can develop customer-friendly goals and measures of quality by recognizing that customers' experiences are represented by a totality of results. Quality goals and measures are best communicated as "total performance" by specifying a limit and percentile of the distribution, rather than a mean and standard deviation. Application of quality goals within the laboratory will usually require partitioning the total performance goal into components and translating those components into specifications to guide the operation and management of production processes. QMS also extends beyond technical processes to people processes and provides guidance for improving the quality of worklife and caring for the laboratory's most essential resource--our people.

  3. The use of continuous glucose monitoring in the practical management of glycogen storage disorders.

    PubMed

    White, Fiona J; Jones, Simon A

    2011-06-01

    Continuous glucose monitoring systems (CGMS) are now in widespread use in diabetes management with an increasing evidence base. There are few reports of their use in GSD. Liver glycogen storage disorders (GSDs) are most often managed by intensive dietary regimens. Risks of over and under-treatment remain. We describe our use of CGMS in a cohort of GSD patients, the results obtained and the frequency of complications. Our experience is that CGM is a reliable, well accepted and valid tool in the monitoring of GSD patients and allows for assessment of blood sugar control in the 'real-life' setting, unlike hospital admissions. Combining CGM with urine ketone and / or blood lactate measurements, again at home, improves the investigation yet further. It is possible to perform CGM for periods including both schooldays and weekends, and also to change the dietary regimen during the period of monitoring to reduce the frequency of assessments. Risks of decreased reliability in the low range of blood sugars may be outweighed by the increased validity of the patient being in the home environment, with a normal diet and activity schedule.

  4. The corporate observatorium: Sustaining management communication and continuity in the age of complexity

    SciTech Connect

    Warfield, J.N.

    1996-12-31

    The prevalence of complexity is a fact of life in virtually all large organizations. However the ways in which organizations try to manage that complexity are largely out of touch with relevant scholarly results. Instead management actions are still overly-governed by fads. This phenomenon has been described by Russell Ackoff as {open_quotes}panacea overload{close_quotes}. The late Harold Lasswell recognized a critical aspect of the management of complexity (essentially ignored in academia and in the political scene), when he proposed the development of the {open_quotes}social planetarium{close_quotes}, and (later) the {open_quotes}urban planetarium{close_quotes} back in the days when cities were in turmoil through the USA. That proposal, with some modifications, is the basis for the concept of the {open_quotes}corporate observatorium{close_quotes}. It is a piece of real estate, whose building interior can be loosely compared with that of the Louvre, in that it contains a variety of rooms, and facilitates rapid familiarization with their contents by the persons who walk through that property. Further analogy comes from the recognition of the importance of wall displays (with electronic adjuncts), large enough in size to preclude any necessity to truncate communications; and tailored to help eradicate or minimize complexity in understanding, both broadly and in depth, the nature of the large organization, its problems, its vision, and its ongoing efforts to resolve its difficulties. Comparison with the planetarium for envisaging a broad swatch of the sky is self-evident. Seven critical forms of representation of complexity will be described briefly. Their significance in sustaining communication and organizational continuity via the corporate observatorium will be indicated. Potential application in higher education will also be briefly described.

  5. Improved growth and development in premature infants managed with nasal continuous positive airway pressure.

    PubMed

    Flesher, Susan Lee; Domanico, Renee S

    2014-01-01

    Our goal was to assess the association between the use of nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP) vs. conventional ventilation (CV) in premature infants and its effects on: 1) growth in the NICU and at follow up visits 2) neurodevelopmental outcomes measured by Bayley Infant Neurodevelopmental Screener (BINS) 3) the incidence of retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) and chronic lung disease (CLD). A retrospective chart review of two groups of NICU patients was conducted. The first group was from 1/1999-12/2000 (n = 140) and was managed by CV. The second group (n = 168) was from 1/2003-12/2004 and was managed primarily by NCPAP. Categorical variables were analyzed using Pearson Chi Square. Mean numerical values were analyzed with the student t-test. There was no statistical difference between the groups in regard to 15 demographic and interventional variables. There were significant differences between the two groups in CLD (p < 0.05) and ROP (p < 0.01), mean weight at one month (p < 0.05), 9-12 months (p < 0.01) and 15-18 months (p < 0.01), length at 4-6 months (p < 0.05), 9-12 months (p < 0.05), 15-18 months (p < 0.01), and 2 years (p = .05), and in BINS scores at 9-12 months (p < 0.01) and 15-18 months (p < 0.01). Managing babies with NCPAP therapy when compared with CV, significantly increased the weight at one month which was sustained at the 9-12 month and 15-18 month visits, increased length at all follow up visits, increased BINS scores at the 9-12 month and 15-18 month visits, and decreased the incidence of ROP and CLD.

  6. Estimating Soil Erosion and Carbon Mineralization by Rainfall Erosion for Select Management Practices in Corn-based Cropping Rotations: A Case Study for Iowa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, R. G.; Sheehan, J. J.; West, T. O.

    2005-12-01

    This paper presents estimates of changes in rainfall-induced soil erosion and soil carbon mineralization of individual land capability class I-VIII soil types in Iowa. Land management considered in this analysis includes various quantities of corn stover removal on continuous corn and corn-soybean rotations that are subject to conventional, reduced, and no-till tillage practices. For each rotation and tillage scenario, calculations of soil erosion and carbon mineralization were made for: 1) a ``baseline'' case (e.g., the annual quantity of rainfall-induced soil erosion (tons per acre) that would have occurred with no corn stover removal), 2) a minimum residue level at harvest such that the USDA-NRCS prescribed tolerable soil loss limit (T) is not exceeded for each individual soil type, and 3) a minimum residue at harvest set at 50 bushels corn stover equivalent. Results indicate a large variation in soil erosion and soil carbon mineralization, with this variation depending on rotation, tillage, residue level at harvest, stover removal, physical characteristics of individual soil types, field topology (average % slope), and localized climate. For each county, soil erosion and carbon mineralization increased within a set tillage practice in the corn-soybean rotation versus continuous corn with a range of 11.5% to nearly 600%. Also, an expected decrease in soil erosion and carbon mineralization occurred as tillage decreased in intensity from conventional to conservation/reduced to no-till. Moving from conventional to no-till in continuous corn and corn/soybean rotations with no stover removal, for example, resulted in average decreases of soil erosion of 60% and 88% respectively, and an average decrease of 0.084 tons of carbon dioxide efflux per acre between the two rotations. Allowing a minimum stover level at harvest based either on T or 50 bushels per acre stover equivalent resulted in average increases in soil erosion and carbon mineralization between 27% to over

  7. Continuity of care to optimize chronic disease management in the community setting: an evidence-based analysis.

    PubMed

    2013-01-01

    This evidence-based analysis reviews relational and management continuity of care. Relational continuity refers to the duration and quality of the relationship between the care provider and the patient. Management continuity ensures that patients receive coherent, complementary, and timely care. There are 4 components of continuity of care: duration, density, dispersion, and sequence. The objective of this evidence-based analysis was to determine if continuity of care is associated with decreased health resource utilization, improved patient outcomes, and patient satisfaction. MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, the Cochrane Library, and the Centre for Reviews and Dissemination database were searched for studies on continuity of care and chronic disease published from January 2002 until December 2011. Systematic reviews, randomized controlled trials, and observational studies were eligible if they assessed continuity of care in adults and reported health resource utilization, patient outcomes, or patient satisfaction. Eight systematic reviews and 13 observational studies were identified. The reviews concluded that there is an association between continuity of care and outcomes; however, the literature base is weak. The observational studies found that higher continuity of care was frequently associated with fewer hospitalizations and emergency department visits. Three systematic reviews reported that higher continuity of care is associated with improved patient satisfaction, especially among patients with chronic conditions. Most of the studies were retrospective cross-sectional studies of large administrative databases. The databases do not capture information on trust and confidence in the provider, which is a critical component of relational continuity of care. The definitions for the selection of patients from the databases varied across studies. There is low quality evidence that: Higher continuity of care is associated with decreased health service utilization.There is

  8. 40 CFR 63.11584 - What are my initial and continuous compliance management practice requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... pollution control equipment and monitoring equipment, in a manner consistent with safety and good air... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES (CONTINUED) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air...

  9. Continuous wound infiltration system for postoperative pain management in gynecologic oncology patients.

    PubMed

    Lee, Banghyun; Kim, Kidong; Ahn, Soyeon; Shin, Hyun-Jung; Suh, Dong Hoon; No, Jae Hong; Kim, Yong Beom

    2017-05-01

    Major open surgery for gynecologic cancer usually involves a long midline skin incision and induces severe postoperative surgical site pain (POSP) that may not be effectively controlled with the conventional management. We investigated whether combining a continuous wound infiltration system (CWIS, ON-Q PainBuster(®)) and intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IV PCA) effectively decreases POSP, compared with IV PCA alone, in gynecologic oncology patients. This retrospective study included 62 Korean patients who received a long midline skin incision during gynecologic cancer surgery. The combined therapy group (n = 31), which received CWIS (0.5% ropivacaine infused over 72 h) and IV PCA (fentanyl citrate), and the IV PCA only group (n = 31) were determined using 1:1 matching. POSP was assessed using resting numeric rating scale (NRS) scores measured for 96 h after surgery, which were analyzed using a linear mixed model. The slopes of the predicted NRS values from the linear mixed model were significantly different between the groups. Compared with the control group, the combined therapy group had lower predicted NRS scores for the first 72 h, but higher predicted scores between 72 and 96 h. Moreover, the mean NRS scores over the first 48 h postoperation were significantly lower in the combined therapy group than in the control group; the scores were similar in both groups during the remaining period. With the exception of a higher body mass index in the CWIS group, the other variables, such as the dosage and usage time of fentanyl citrate, use of additional painkillers, and side effects, including wound complications, did not differ between groups. Combined therapy using CWIS and IV PCA may be a useful strategy for POSP management in gynecologic oncology patients.

  10. Assessing the impact of continuous quality improvement/total quality management: concept versus implementation.

    PubMed Central

    Shortell, S M; O'Brien, J L; Carman, J M; Foster, R W; Hughes, E F; Boerstler, H; O'Connor, E J

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study examines the relationships among organizational culture, quality improvement processes and selected outcomes for a sample of up to 61 U. S. hospitals. DATA SOURCES AND STUDY SETTING: Primary data were collected from 61 U. S. hospitals (located primarily in the midwest and the west) on measures related to continuous quality improvement/total quality management (CQI/TQM), organizational culture, implementation approaches, and degree of quality improvement implementation based on the Baldrige Award criteria. These data were combined with independently collected data on perceived impact and objective measures of clinical efficiency (i.e., charges and length of stay) for six clinical conditions. STUDY DESIGN: The study involved cross-sectional examination of the named relationships. DATA COLLECTION/EXTRACTION METHODS: Reliable and valid scales for the organizational culture and quality improvement implementation measures were developed based on responses from over 7,000 individuals across the 61 hospitals with an overall completion rate of 72 percent. Independent data on perceived impact were collected from a national survey and independent data on clinical efficiency from a companion study of managed care. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A participative, flexible, risk-taking organizational culture was significantly related to quality improvement implementation. Quality improvement implementation, in turn, was positively associated with greater perceived patient outcomes and human resource development. Larger-size hospitals experienced lower clinical efficiency with regard to higher charges and higher length of stay, due in part to having more bureaucratic and hierarchical cultures that serve as a barrier to quality improvement implementation. CONCLUSIONS: What really matters is whether or not a hospital has a culture that supports quality improvement work and an approach that encourages flexible implementation. Larger-size hospitals face more difficult

  11. 75 FR 23582 - Federal Housing Administration: Continuation of FHA Reform-Strengthening Risk Management Through...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-04

    ... Reform-- Strengthening Risk Management Through Responsible FHA-Approved Lenders; Correction AGENCY... to strengthen FHA by improving its management of risk. Although the preamble to the final rule...

  12. A Study of Trends in the Continuing Development of Management Principles in the 1970S.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-09-01

    attention to the concepts of systems management, contingency management, and some of the more recent behavioral concepts such as job enrichment, expectancy theory, and behavior modification . (Author)

  13. Optimal Multi-scale Demand-side Management for Continuous Power-Intensive Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Sumit

    With the advent of deregulation in electricity markets and an increasing share of intermittent power generation sources, the profitability of industrial consumers that operate power-intensive processes has become directly linked to the variability in energy prices. Thus, for industrial consumers that are able to adjust to the fluctuations, time-sensitive electricity prices (as part of so-called Demand-Side Management (DSM) in the smart grid) offer potential economical incentives. In this thesis, we introduce optimization models and decomposition strategies for the multi-scale Demand-Side Management of continuous power-intensive processes. On an operational level, we derive a mode formulation for scheduling under time-sensitive electricity prices. The formulation is applied to air separation plants and cement plants to minimize the operating cost. We also describe how a mode formulation can be used for industrial combined heat and power plants that are co-located at integrated chemical sites to increase operating profit by adjusting their steam and electricity production according to their inherent flexibility. Furthermore, a robust optimization formulation is developed to address the uncertainty in electricity prices by accounting for correlations and multiple ranges in the realization of the random variables. On a strategic level, we introduce a multi-scale model that provides an understanding of the value of flexibility of the current plant configuration and the value of additional flexibility in terms of retrofits for Demand-Side Management under product demand uncertainty. The integration of multiple time scales leads to large-scale two-stage stochastic programming problems, for which we need to apply decomposition strategies in order to obtain a good solution within a reasonable amount of time. Hence, we describe two decomposition schemes that can be applied to solve two-stage stochastic programming problems: First, a hybrid bi-level decomposition scheme with

  14. Training experts in difficult airway management: Evaluation of a continuous professional development program.

    PubMed

    Brisard, Laurent; Péan, Didier; Bourgain, Jean-Louis; Winer, Arnaud; Combes, Xavier; Langeron, Olivier; Fischler, Marc; Lejus, Corinne

    2016-04-01

    The Formation de référents aux techniques d'intubation difficile (FRTID) is a French continuing medical education program on difficult airway management. Its objectives are to train experts in the task of training other physicians in their hospitals for better guideline compliance. Our aim was to describe the curriculum of the experts and to evaluate the program's efficacy via a prospective survey. Each participant was asked to complete a questionnaire before (T0), immediately (T1), 6 (T6) and 12 (T12) months after the course. The main criterion was the proportion of the participants who declared that they had implemented at least one action to improve difficult airway management in their institution at 6 months. Other criteria included the proportion of participants who declared that they had modified their own clinical practice and the frequency of use of specific devices assessed on modified Likert numerical rating scales. Two hundred and forty-four participants were included in the survey. One hundred and three, 91 and 62 participants responded to the T1 (immediately after the course), T6 (6 months later) and T12 (12 months later) questionnaires, respectively; 73 physicians (i.e. 30% of all participants and 80% of the survey responders) declared that they had implemented at least one action likely to optimize the management of difficult airways. On the T6 and T12 questionnaires, 91% and 97% of the responders respectively declared that they had changed their clinical practice. The course has resulted in increased use of transtracheal oxygenation with manual devices (Manujet(®), Enk(®)) and Seldinger cricothyroidotomy as well as paediatric difficult airway techniques such as paediatric sized elastic gum and Airtraq™ or fibrescopic intubation under general anaesthesia with spontaneous ventilation (through a laryngeal mask). These data encourage the training of experts in difficult airways. This curriculum is contributing to the dissemination of the

  15. Residue management, nitrogen, and carbon amendment effects on corn under full and limited irrigation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Corn residue is a suitable feedstock for livestock forage and cellulosic ethanol. However, information about the response of the subsequent corn crop to residue removal in irrigated no-till continuous corn rotations is lacking. Subsequently, little is known regarding its response under limited irrig...

  16. Continuous brain tissue oxygenation monitoring in the management of pediatric stroke.

    PubMed

    Allen, Baxter B; Hoffman, Caitlin E; Traube, Chani S; Weinstein, Steven L; Greenfield, Jeffrey P

    2011-12-01

    Direct invasive monitoring of brain tissue oxygenation (PbtO(2)) has been routinely utilized to predict cerebral ischemia and to prevent secondary injury in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and vasospasm secondary to subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). The safety and utility of these devices in the pediatric population have been examined in a few small studies. No studies, however, have examined the use of PbtO(2) monitoring in stroke patients. Retrospective chart review of the first two consecutive, critically ill pediatric patients in the pediatric intensive care unit requiring brain tissue oxygen monitoring for newly diagnosed cerebral ischemia. ICP, CPP, PbtO(2), SaO(2), BP, and RR were all continually monitored during their care and were retrospectively collected and reviewed. We present two pediatric stroke patients managed in a critical care setting with PbtO(2) monitoring in addition to ICP, MAP, CPP, and SaO(2). Both patients had multiple events of low brain tissue oxygen (PbtO(2) <20 torr), independent of abnormal values in other monitoring parameters, which required physician intervention. No new ischemic damage occurred after PbtO(2) monitoring began in either patient. There is currently inadequate data to support the application of PbtO(2) monitoring in children with stroke to prevent progressive ischemia and to improve outcome. However, the positive results for these two patients support the need for further study in this area.

  17. Management of metformin-associated lactic acidosis by continuous renal replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Keller, Geoffray; Cour, Martin; Hernu, Romain; Illinger, Julien; Robert, Dominique; Argaud, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    Metformin-associated lactic acidosis (MALA) is a severe metabolic failure with high related mortality. Although its use is controversial, intermittent hemodialysis is reported to be the most frequently used treatment in conjunction with nonspecific supportive measures. Our aim was to report the evolution and outcome of cases managed by continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT). Over a 3-year period, we retrospectively identified patients admitted to the intensive care unit for severe lactic acidosis caused by metformin. We included patients in our study who were treated with CRRT because of shock. We describe their clinical and biological features at admission and during renal support, as well as their evolution. We enrolled six patients with severe lactic acidosis; the mean pH and mean lactate was 6.92±0.20 and 14.4±5.1 mmol/l, respectively. Patients had high illness severity scores, including the Simplified Acute Physiology Score II (SAPS II) (average score 63±12 points). Early CRRT comprised either venovenous hemofiltration (n = 3) or hemodiafiltration (n = 3) with a mean effluent flow rate of 34±6 ml/kg/h. Metabolic acidosis control and metformin elimination was rapid and there was no rebound. Outcome was favorable in all cases. Standard use of CRRT efficiently treated MALA in association with symptomatic organ supportive therapies.

  18. Increasing quality and managing complexity in neuroinformatics software development with continuous integration

    PubMed Central

    Zaytsev, Yury V.; Morrison, Abigail

    2013-01-01

    High quality neuroscience research requires accurate, reliable and well maintained neuroinformatics applications. As software projects become larger, offering more functionality and developing a denser web of interdependence between their component parts, we need more sophisticated methods to manage their complexity. If complexity is allowed to get out of hand, either the quality of the software or the speed of development suffer, and in many cases both. To address this issue, here we develop a scalable, low-cost and open source solution for continuous integration (CI), a technique which ensures the quality of changes to the code base during the development procedure, rather than relying on a pre-release integration phase. We demonstrate that a CI-based workflow, due to rapid feedback about code integration problems and tracking of code health measures, enabled substantial increases in productivity for a major neuroinformatics project and additional benefits for three further projects. Beyond the scope of the current study, we identify multiple areas in which CI can be employed to further increase the quality of neuroinformatics projects by improving development practices and incorporating appropriate development tools. Finally, we discuss what measures can be taken to lower the barrier for developers of neuroinformatics applications to adopt this useful technique. PMID:23316158

  19. Position Statement on the management of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII): The Italian Lazio experience.

    PubMed

    Maurizi, Anna R; Suraci, Concetta; Pitocco, Dario; Schiaffini, Riccardo; Tubili, Claudio; Morviducci, Lelio; Giordano, Renato; Manfrini, Silvia; Lauro, Davide; Frontoni, Simona; Pozzilli, Paolo; Buzzetti, Raffaella

    2016-01-01

    This document has been developed by a group of Italian diabetologists with extensive experience in continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) therapy to provide indications for the clinical management of CSII in diabetic patients (both type 1 and type 2) based on delivery mode operating in Italy. Although the potential benefits of pump therapy in achieving glycemic goals is now accepted, such results cannot be obtained without specific knowledge and skills being conveyed to patients during ad hoc educational training. To ensure that these new technologies reach their full effectiveness, as demonstrated theoretically and clinically, a careful assessment of the overall therapeutic and educational process is required, in both qualitative and quantitative terms. Therefore, to ensure the cost-effectiveness of insulin pump therapy and to justify reimbursement of therapy costs by the National Health System in Italy, in this article we present a model for diabetes and healthcare centers to follow that provides for different levels of expertise in the field of CSII therapy. This model will guarantee the provision of excellent care during insulin pump therapies, thus representing the basis for a successful outcome and expansion of this form of insulin treatment in patients with diabetes while also keeping costs under control. © 2015 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  20. Who should manage continuous renal replacement in the intensive care setting? A nursing viewpoint.

    PubMed

    Martin, R K

    2002-01-01

    Since its inception, continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) has been performed in critical care units with or without the involvement of nephrology nursing support (1,2). It is apparent that the issue of providing care to patients requiring this therapy is not so much a debate on the nursing control of CRRT, but a focused discussion on the nursing management and delivery of care to the patient receiving CRRT in the intensive care setting. Although the choice of a nursing care model for CRRT is dependent on many clinical and organisational factors, the use of one nursing specialty to deliver CRRT care can leave gaps in practice. The Joint or Collaborative Nephrology/critical care nursing model brings the highest level of nursing expertise to the bedside. The joint model tends to promote collaboration between two distinct nursing specialties, with opportunities for setting joint standards and promoting research. With this in mind, this discussion will examine some of the factors affecting structuring of nursing care, describe nursing models currently in use, compare the attributes of each, and conclude which model is preferred for the delivery of nursing care for CRRT.

  1. Aggregate Carbon Pools after 13 Years of Integrated Crop-Livestock Management in Semiarid Soils

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Semi-arid regions have the potential to sequester soil organic carbon (SOC) but the magnitude and rate of sequestration is highly management specific. Integrated crop-livestock (ICL) systems that utilize perennial or high-residue no-till annual forage crops as part of the overall agronomic system ma...

  2. Case report: ultrasound-guided continuous thoracic paravertebral block for outpatient acute pain management of multilevel unilateral rib fractures.

    PubMed

    Murata, Hiroaki; Salviz, Emine Aysu; Chen, Stephanie; Vandepitte, Catherine; Hadzic, Admir

    2013-01-01

    A 61-year-old man with multiple unilateral rib fractures (T3-T8) gained the ability to breathe deeply and to ambulate after ultrasound-guided continuous thoracic paravertebral block and was discharged home after being observed for 15 hours after the block. The ultrasound guidance was helpful in determining the site of rib fractures and the optimal level for catheter placement. This report also discusses the management of analgesia using continuous paravertebral block in an outpatient with trauma.

  3. Continuous monitoring of an earth fissure in Chino, California, USA - a management tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, M. C.

    2015-11-01

    Continuous measurements of deformation have been made in Chino, California across an earth fissure and nearby unfissured soil since 2011 in two buried, horizontal, 150 mm pipes, 51 m long, which are connected by sealed boxes enclosing vertical posts at mostly 6 m intervals. Horizontal displacements and normal strain are measured in one line using nine end-to-end quartz tubes that are attached to posts and span fissured or unfissured soil. The free ends of the tubes are supported by slings and move relative to the attachment post of the next quartz tube. Linear variable differential transformer (LVDT) sensors measure the relative movements. Five biaxial tilt sensors were also attached to selected posts in that line. Relative vertical movement was measured at nine locations along the line in the second pipe using low-level differential pressure sensors. The second pipe is half full of water giving a free water surface along its length. Data are recorded on a Campbell CR10 using multiplexers. The quartz-tube horizontal extensometers have exhibited more than 3 mm of predominantly elastic opening and closing in response to about 32 m of seasonal drawdown and recovery, respectively, in an observation well 0.8 km to the south. The nearest production well is 1.6 km to the west. The horizontal strain was 5.9 × 10-5 or 30 % of the lowest estimate of strain-at-failure for alluvium. Maximum relative vertical movement was 4.8 mm. Maximum tilt in the fissure zone was 0.09 arcdeg while tilt at a separate sensor 100 m to the east was 0.86 arcdeg, indicating a wider zone of deformation than is spanned by the instrumentation. High correlation of horizontal displacements during drawdown, and especially recovery, with change in effective stress supports differential compaction as the mechanism for earth-fissure movement. The continuous measurements of horizontal strain coupled with water-level fluctuations and vertical borehole extensometry can provide a real-time adaptive management

  4. Effects of Neonicotinoids and Crop Rotation for Managing Wireworms in Wheat Crops.

    PubMed

    Esser, Aaron D; Milosavljević, Ivan; Crowder, David W

    2015-08-01

    Soil-dwelling insects are severe pests in many agroecosystems. These pests have cryptic life cycles, making sampling difficult and damage hard to anticipate. The management of soil insects is therefore often based on preventative insecticides applied at planting or cultural practices. Wireworms, the subterranean larvae of click beetles (Coleoptera: Elateridae), have re-emerged as problematic pests in cereal crops in the Pacific Northwestern United States. Here, we evaluated two management strategies for wireworms in long-term field experiments: 1) treating spring wheat seed with the neonicotinoid thiamethoxam and 2) replacing continuous spring wheat with a summer fallow and winter wheat rotation. Separate experiments were conducted for two wireworm species--Limonius californicus (Mannerheim) and Limonius infuscatus (Motschulsky). In the experiment with L. californicus, spring wheat yields and economic returns increased by 24-30% with neonicotinoid treatments. In contrast, in the experiment with L. infuscatus, spring wheat yields and economic returns did not increase with neonicotinoids despite an 80% reduction in wireworms. Thus, the usefulness of seed-applied neonicotinoids differed based on the wireworm species present. In experiments with both species, we detected significantly fewer wireworms with a no-till summer fallow and winter wheat rotation compared with continuous spring wheat. This suggests that switching from continuous spring wheat to a winter wheat and summer fallow rotation may aid in wireworm management. More generally, our results show that integrated management of soil-dwelling pests such as wireworms may require both preventative insecticide treatments and cultural practices.

  5. Rethinking business continuity: Emerging trends in the profession and the manager's role.

    PubMed

    Phelps, Regina

    2014-01-01

    Where is business continuity going in the future? What should continuity professionals be planning for in their programmes and in their career? This paper offers an in-depth look into both of these questions and provides the reader with eight activities for reinventing their continuity programme and career.

  6. Effectiveness of prehospital continuous positive airway pressure in the management of acute pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Hubble, Michael W; Richards, Michael E; Jarvis, Roger; Millikan, Tori; Young, Dwayne

    2006-01-01

    To compare the effectiveness of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) with standard pharmacologic treatment in the management of prehospital acute pulmonary edema. Using a nonrandomized control group design, all consecutive patients presenting to two participating emergency medical services (EMS) systems with a field impression of acute pulmonary edema between July 1, 2004, and June 30, 2005, were included in the study. The control EMS system patients received standard treatment with oxygen, nitrates, furosemide, morphine, and, if indicated, endotracheal intubation. The intervention EMS system patients received CPAP via face mask at 10 cm H2O in addition to standard therapy. Ninety-five patients received standard therapy, and 120 patients received CPAP and standard therapy. Intubation was required in 8.9% of CPAP-treated patients compared with 25.3% in the control group (p = 0.003), and mortality was lower in the CPAP group than in the control group (5.4% vs. 23.2%; p = 0.000). When compared with the control group, the CPAP group had more improvement in respiratory rate (-4.55 vs. -1.81; p = 0.001), pulse rate (-4.77 vs. 0.82; p = 0.013), and dyspnea score (-2.11 vs. -1.36; p = 0.008). Using logistic regression to control for potential confounders, patients receiving standard treatment were more likely to be intubated (odds ratio, 4.04; 95% confidence interval, 1.64 to 9.95) and more likely to die (odds ratio, 7.48; 95% confidence interval, 1.96 to 28.54) than those receiving standard therapy and CPAP. The prehospital use of CPAP is feasible, may avert the need for endotracheal intubation, and may reduce short-term mortality.

  7. Performance of the Medtronic Sentrino continuous glucose management (CGM) system in the cardiac intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Kosiborod, Mikhail; Gottlieb, Rebecca K; Sekella, Julie A; Peterman, Diane; Grodzinsky, Anna; Kennedy, Paul; Borkon, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    Maintaining glucose in the target range, while avoiding hypoglycemia, is challenging in critically ill patients. We investigated the performance and safety of Medtronic Sentrino, a newly developed continuous glucose management (CGM) system for critically ill adults. This was a prospective, single-center, single-arm, open-label study in adult patients with cardiac ICU admission. Sentrino subcutaneous glucose sensors were inserted into patients' thigh with planned study participation of 72 h. Sensor glucose results were displayed, and the system's alerts and alarms fully enabled. Reference blood glucose was collected from central venous catheter and analyzed with a blood gas analyzer. Treatment decisions were made independently of sensor glucose values, according to the existing standard of care. A total of 21 patients were enrolled; all successfully completed the study. Sensor glucose values were displayed 96% of the time, and 870 paired blood glucose-sensor glucose points were analyzed. Overall mean absolute relative difference (MARD) was 12.8% (95% CI 11.9% to 13.6%). No clinically significant differences in accuracy were seen within subgroups of hemodynamic status (MARD 12.3% and 13.1% for compromised vs stable hemodynamics). Consensus grid analysis showed >99% of sensor glucose values within A/B zones. No device or study-related adverse events were reported. 100% of clinicians found Sentrino easy to use after two patients. In our single-center experience, Sentrino CGM system demonstrated good accuracy and reliability, with no device-related adverse events in critically ill cardiac patients, and was easy to use and integrate in the cardiac ICU. NCT01763567.

  8. DOD Financial Management: Continued Actions Needed to Address Congressional Committee Panel Recommendations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    systems satisfy the computer control objectives established in GAO’s Federal Information System Control Audit Manua/.89 DOD Actions: According to the...strategy and methodology, (2) challenges to achieving financial management reform and auditability , (3) financial management workforce, and (4...implementing each of the 29 recommendations made by the House Armed Services Committee Panel on Defense Financial Management and Auditability Reform

  9. Upward Appraisal: A Tool for the Continuous Improvement of Library Managers' Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stein, Joan E.

    Effective management and the importance of feedback in relation to improvement are becoming critical issues for libraries. Upward appraisal evaluates managers' performance based on input from their staff, rather than the traditional top-down evaluation format in which a manager is evaluated solely by their superior. This paper discusses the…

  10. Organisation and Management of Continuing Higher Education: Findings of a Comparative Study in Six Countries from a German Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knust, Michaela; Zawacki-Richter, Olaf; Hanft, Anke

    2008-01-01

    An international comparison study investigated the organisation and management of continuing higher education (CHE) in Germany, Finland, France, the United Kingdom, Austria and the United States of America. CHE is compared on the system level (boundaries between traditional study programmes and CHE, linking of CHE and vocational training,…

  11. 75 FR 2463 - Continuing Contract for Civil Works Project Managed by the United States Army Corps of Engineers...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-15

    ... Department of the Army 48 CFR Parts 5132, 5136, and 5152 RIN 0710-AA69 Continuing Contract for Civil Works Project Managed by the United States Army Corps of Engineers Clauses AGENCY: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION: Proposed rule; request for comments. SUMMARY: The U.S. Army Corps...

  12. Organisation and Management of Continuing Higher Education: Findings of a Comparative Study in Six Countries from a German Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knust, Michaela; Zawacki-Richter, Olaf; Hanft, Anke

    2008-01-01

    An international comparison study investigated the organisation and management of continuing higher education (CHE) in Germany, Finland, France, the United Kingdom, Austria and the United States of America. CHE is compared on the system level (boundaries between traditional study programmes and CHE, linking of CHE and vocational training,…

  13. The development of a statewide continuous evaluation system for the Texas Children's Mental Health Plan: a total quality management approach.

    PubMed

    Rouse, L W; Toprac, M G; MacCabe, N A

    1998-05-01

    The article presents a description of processes involved in developing and implementing a statewide continuous evaluation system for the Texas Children's Mental Health Plan (TCMHP) and quality management tools used to approach implementation challenges. Implementation issues are discussed relating to stakeholder involvement, evaluation design evolution, measurement method modification, evaluation integration, staff training, data quality control, communication of results, and use of results in decision making. A review of implementation processes suggests evaluation design and activities should be seen as constantly evolving in response to ongoing stakeholder input. Involving stakeholders in design and implementation can result in increased data quality, data-informed decision making to improve service delivery, and increased public accountability. The TCMHP evaluation system development demonstrates that quality management tools can provide a useful framework to work through design and implementation problems, and a continuous evaluation system can provide an infrastructure for meeting data needs in a managed care environment.

  14. Sustainable MSD prevention: management for continuous improvement between prevention and production. Ergonomic intervention in two assembly line companies.

    PubMed

    Caroly, S; Coutarel, F; Landry, A; Mary-Cheray, I

    2010-07-01

    To increase output and meet customers' needs, companies have turned to the development of production management systems: Kaizen, one piece flow, Kanban, etc. The aim of such systems is to accelerate decisions, react to environmental issues and manage various productions. In the main, this type of management system has led to the continuous improvement of production performance. Consequently, such production management systems can have unexpected negative effects on operators' health and safety. Conversely, regulation and control systems focusing on work-related risks have obliged firms to implement health and safety management systems such as OHSAS 18001. The purpose of this type of system, also based on continuous improvement, is to reduce risks, facilitate work-related activities and identify solutions in terms of equipment and tools. However, the prevention actions introduced through health and safety systems often result in other unexpected and unwanted effects on production. This paper shows how companies can improve the way they are run by taking into account both types of management system.

  15. Nurses' and managers' perceptions of continuing professional development for older and younger nurses: a focus group study.

    PubMed

    Pool, Inge; Poell, Rob; ten Cate, Olle

    2013-01-01

    Continuing professional development of nurses is increasingly necessary to keep abreast of rapid changes in nursing care. Concurrently, the nursing workforce is growing older. Therefore, future strategies for continuing professional development should be directed at both younger and older nurses. Although there is some evidence that various personal, organisational and social factors result in lower participation of older workers in development activities, age-related differences in continuing professional development among nurses remain under-explored. This study explored nurses' and their managers' perceptions of the differences in continuing professional development between younger and older nurses. A qualitative study using focus groups. The interviews were analysed using a thematic analysis strategy. A large academic hospital in the Netherlands. 22 nurses in three age groups (20-34 years, 35-49 years and 50-65 years) and 10 nurse managers participated in four focus groups. Six themes regarding differences in continuing professional development for younger and older nurses emerged from the data: (1) level of focus, (2) creating possibilities to leave the bedside, (3) ambitious young nurses, (4) same resources, different requirements, (5) ceiling in courses for older nurses, and (6) social status and self esteem. Overall, participants seemed to conceptualise continuing professional development along three dimensions: purpose, level of formality of learning activities, and scope of development. The findings suggest that participants perceive differences in continuing professional development between younger and older nurses. Its purpose and the contributing learning activities are considered to change during the lifespan. When developing strategies for continuing professional development, the requirements and needs of different age groups need to be taken into account. Whether the scope of professional development is confined to "keeping up to date" or used more

  16. Preferential cooling of hot extremes from cropland albedo management

    PubMed Central

    Davin, Edouard L.; Seneviratne, Sonia I.; Ciais, Philippe; Olioso, Albert; Wang, Tao

    2014-01-01

    Changes in agricultural practices are considered a possible option to mitigate climate change. In particular, reducing or suppressing tillage (no-till) may have the potential to sequester carbon in soils, which could help slow global warming. On the other hand, such practices also have a direct effect on regional climate by altering the physical properties of the land surface. These biogeophysical effects, however, are still poorly known. Here we show that no-till management increases the surface albedo of croplands in summer and that the resulting cooling effect is amplified during hot extremes, thus attenuating peak temperatures reached during heat waves. Using a regional climate model accounting for the observed effects of no-till farming on surface albedo, as well as possible reductions in soil evaporation, we investigate the potential consequences of a full conversion to no-till agriculture in Europe. We find that the summer cooling from cropland albedo increase is strongly amplified during hot summer days, when surface albedo has more impact on the Earth’s radiative balance due to clear-sky conditions. The reduced evaporation associated with the crop residue cover tends to counteract the albedo-induced cooling, but during hot days the albedo effect is the dominating factor. For heatwave summer days the local cooling effect gained from no-till practice is of the order of 2 °C. The identified asymmetric impact of surface albedo change on summer temperature opens new avenues for climate-engineering measures targeting high-impact events rather than mean climate properties. PMID:24958872

  17. Preferential cooling of hot extremes from cropland albedo management.

    PubMed

    Davin, Edouard L; Seneviratne, Sonia I; Ciais, Philippe; Olioso, Albert; Wang, Tao

    2014-07-08

    Changes in agricultural practices are considered a possible option to mitigate climate change. In particular, reducing or suppressing tillage (no-till) may have the potential to sequester carbon in soils, which could help slow global warming. On the other hand, such practices also have a direct effect on regional climate by altering the physical properties of the land surface. These biogeophysical effects, however, are still poorly known. Here we show that no-till management increases the surface albedo of croplands in summer and that the resulting cooling effect is amplified during hot extremes, thus attenuating peak temperatures reached during heat waves. Using a regional climate model accounting for the observed effects of no-till farming on surface albedo, as well as possible reductions in soil evaporation, we investigate the potential consequences of a full conversion to no-till agriculture in Europe. We find that the summer cooling from cropland albedo increase is strongly amplified during hot summer days, when surface albedo has more impact on the Earth's radiative balance due to clear-sky conditions. The reduced evaporation associated with the crop residue cover tends to counteract the albedo-induced cooling, but during hot days the albedo effect is the dominating factor. For heatwave summer days the local cooling effect gained from no-till practice is of the order of 2 °C. The identified asymmetric impact of surface albedo change on summer temperature opens new avenues for climate-engineering measures targeting high-impact events rather than mean climate properties.

  18. [Managing a health research institute: towards research excellence through continuous improvement].

    PubMed

    Olmedo, Carmen; Buño, Ismael; Plá, Rosa; Lomba, Irene; Bardinet, Thierry; Bañares, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Health research institutes are a strategic commitment considered the ideal environment to develop excellence in translational research. Achieving quality research requires not only a powerful scientific and research structure but also the quality and integrity of management systems that support it. The essential instruments in our institution were solid strategic planning integrated into and consistent with the system of quality management, systematic evaluation through periodic indicators, measurement of key user satisfaction and internal audits, and implementation of an innovative information management tool. The implemented management tools have provided a strategic thrust to our institute while ensuring a level of quality and efficiency in the development and management of research that allows progress towards excellence in biomedical research.

  19. Defense Infrastructure: Continuing Challenges in Managing DOD Lodging Programs as Army Moves to Privatize Its Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-01

    4) develop and manage the lodging facilities, (5) assure sound financial management and accountability reflective of the hospitality industry , and...reflective of the hospitality industry , and (6) pursue efficiencies through interservice cooperative efforts. The DOD Lodging Program Standards task...goals. DOD lodging officials with work experience in private hotels told us that it is a common practice in the hospitality industry to use benchmarks

  20. General practitioners' clinical expertise in managing suicidal young people: implications for continued education.

    PubMed

    Michail, Maria; Tait, Lynda; Churchill, Dick

    2017-09-01

    Aim To examine general practitioners' (GPs) clinical expertise in assessing, communicating with, and managing suicidal young people aged 14-25 to inform the development of an educational intervention for GPs on youth suicide prevention. Suicide is the second leading cause of death for young people worldwide. GPs are ideally suited to facilitate early identification and assessment of suicide risk. However, GPs' levels of competence, knowledge, and attitudes towards suicidal young people have not yet been explored. A cross-sectional survey on GPs' levels of confidence in assessing and managing young people at risk of suicide; knowledge of risk factors and warning signs of suicide in young people; attitudes towards young suicidal people; and training preferences on managing suicide risk. Findings Seventy GPs completed the survey (30 males). The majority of GPs reported high levels of confidence in assessing and managing suicidality in young people. Experienced GPs demonstrated high levels of knowledge of suicide risk factors in young people but low levels of knowledge of warning signs that might indicate heightened risk. Although 48% of GPs disagreed that maintaining compassionate care is difficult with those who deliberately self-harm, GPs perceived communication with young people to be difficult, with one-third reporting frustration in managing those at risk of suicide. A total of 75% of GPs said they would be interested in receiving further training on assessing and managing young people at risk of suicide. The study has important implications for providing specialist training to support GPs in assessing and managing youth suicide risk and facilitating attitudinal change. GP education on youth suicide risk assessment and management should promote a holistic understanding and assessment of risk and its individual, social and contextual influences in line with clinical recommendations to facilitate therapeutic engagement and communication with young people.

  1. A Case Study of Factors Affecting Continuous Improvement in DoD activities Operating Under Total Quality Management

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-09-01

    basis of price tag. 5 . Improve constantly and forever the system of production and service, to improve quality and productivity, and thus decrease...that exists. Continuous improvement is a call to management to make quality the basis for doing business. Juran believes in a systematic approach to...review were the writings of: Deming; Juran; Crosby; Ishikawa; Feigenbaum ; Garvin ; Mondon; Leonard and Sasser; Adam, Herschauer and Ruch; and eleven

  2. [Successful management of neurosurgical procedures with continuous infusion of recombinant factor IX in a child with hemophilia B].

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Mariko; Nakadate, Hisaya; Iguchi, Umefumi; Masuda, Hiroshi; Sakai, Hirokazu; Ishiguro, Akira

    2013-03-01

    This report describes the successful management of neurosurgical procedures with continuous infusion of recombinant factor IX (rFIX). A 1-year-old boy with severe hemophilia B was administered prophylactic therapy with rFIX after intracranial bleeding. We found the enlargement of an arachnoid cyst in a follow-up CT scan. He underwent marsupialization of the cyst under the continuous infusion of rFIX. FIX levels were examined in our hospital and the rFIX infusion rate was adjusted in an attempt to keep FIX levels above 90% intraoperatively, and 70% until his 7th post-operative day. We studied the pharmacokinetic profile of rFIX and found a half-time of 25 hours and mean in vivo recovery of 0.69 IU/dl/IU/kg. Reconstituted rFIX also retained at least 95% activity after 72 hours at room temperature. This is the first report of the perioperative management of a child undergoing a neurosurgical procedure under the continuous infusion of rFIX in Japan. Further studies are required before the routine use of this product for continuous infusion.

  3. Monitoring Soil Carbon Inputs and Changes with Crop Type and Management Practice Using Pyrolysis-Molecular Beam Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leventhal, J.; Magrini-Bair, K. A.; Hoover, C. M.; Doyle, G. L.; Follett, R. L.; Kimble, J.; Davis, M. F.; Evans, R. J.

    2003-12-01

    With the increasing need to produce more renewable bioenergy products comes the need to assess the impacts of these agricultural cropping practices on soil carbon inputs and changes. In addition, the anticipated increased use of short rotation woody crops for biomass and bioenergy programs requires that we improve our understanding of the effects of management on soil quality and soil organic matter. We have developed an atmospheric pressure rapid pyrolysis technique that can analyze up to 150 samples per day with direct sampling molecular beam mass spectrometry (py-MBMS). The advantage of this technique is that complex biomaterials can be rapidly pyrolyzed and subsequent fragment condensation reduced which provides molecular data for both light and heavy pyrolysis products. Because of the chemical richness of the resultant mass spectra, we use multivariate statistical analysis techniques to provide efficient pattern recognition and identify major pyrolysis products. These products can then be used to characterize soil organic matter content and composition. Preliminary results from 0-5 cm soils cores taken from soils that were cropped with either continuous till or no till sorghum or soybeans show that we can easily distinguish between till and no till regardless of crop type. Analysis of depth increments of forest soils that experienced a chronosequence of wind disturbances showed that we could distinguish depth, location, and recent and older soil organic matter species of the soil cores with this technique. Analysis of well-characterized CRP (Conservation Reserve Program) soils again allowed us to distinguish depth and location and to accurately predict soil microbial biomass contents. We will present these results and discuss their implications for quantitatively assessing the impacts of bioenergy cropping on soil organic matter.

  4. Using community partners to deliver low-cost and effective emergency management and business continuity services.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Joan; Roggiero, Jean Paul; Silva, Brian

    2010-11-01

    Small to medium-sized organisations enhance their business mission as well as their communities by continuing to offer services in extreme circumstances. Developing emergency preparedness and business continuity plans that are cost-effective, comprehensive and operational for small to medium-sized organisations with limited resources requires a consistent, supportive, hands-on approach over time with professionals to create appropriate and sustainable strategies. Using a unique, multi-layered and applied approach to emergency preparedness training, organisations have successfully created plans that are effective and sustainable.

  5. Postoperative Pain Management after Spinal Fusion Surgery: An Analysis of the Efficacy of Continuous Infusion of Local Anesthetics

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Richard A. K.; Legakis, Julie E.; Tweedie, Jillian; Chung, YoungKey; Ren, Emily J.; BeVier, Patricia A.; Thomas, Ronald L.; Thomas, Suresh T.

    2013-01-01

    Spinal fusion surgery is a major surgery that results in severe postoperative pain, therefore pain reduction is a primary concern. New strategies for pain management are currently under investigation and include multimodal treatment. A 3-year retrospective analysis of patients with idiopathic scoliosis undergoing spinal fusion surgery was performed at our hospital, assessing patient pain scores, opioid use, and recovery. We evaluated the effect of adding continuous infusion of local anesthetics (CILA) to a postoperative pain management protocol that includes intraoperative intrathecal morphine, as well as postoperative patient-controlled analgesia and oral opioid/acetaminophen combination. The study compared 25 patients treated according to the standard protocol, with 62 patients treated with CILA in addition to the pain management protocol. Patients in the CILA group used nearly 0.5 mg/kg less opioid analgesics during the first 24 hours after surgery. PMID:24436846

  6. Lean management: innovative tools for engaging teams in continuous quality improvement.

    PubMed

    Perreault, Lucille; Vaillancourt, Lise; Filion, Catherine; Hadj, Camélia

    2014-01-01

    Lean management has proven to be a sustainable method to ensure a high level of patient care through innovation and teamwork. It involves a set of six tools that allow for visual management shared among team members. The team focuses their efforts on the improvement of organizational indicators in a standardized and engaging way, resulting in the sustainability of improvements. This article outlines the program's rollout at Montfort Hospital (l'Hôpital Montfort). In only a few months, two pilot units accomplished close to 50 improvements each. In addition, the organizational employee satisfaction questionnaire showed very positive results.

  7. How to Setup a Continuous Experimental Teaching System: Case Study on the Tourism Management Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hu, Jun; Zhang, Mu; Huang, Xiang

    2014-01-01

    Chinese higher tourism education witnesses 32-year continuous innovation and exploration since the reform and opening policies. And it has gained many successful experiences in the aspects of talents cultivation mentality, nurture target, subject construction, curriculum arrangement and training module. However, it suffers the shortage of tourism…

  8. Continuous water-quality monitoring to improve lake management at Lake Mattamuskeet National Wildlife Refuge

    Treesearch

    Michelle Moorman; Tom Augspurger

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has partnered with U.S. Geological Survey to establish 2 continuous water-quality monitoring stations at Lake Mattamuskeet. Stations on the east and west side of the lake measure water level, clarity, dissolved oxygen, pH, temperature, salinity, and conductivity.

  9. Nitrogen, stover and tillage management affect nitrogen use efficiency in continuous corn

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Improving nitrogen use efficiency (NUE) in corn (Zea mays L.) is critical for optimizing yield and reducing environmental impact. Stover removal in continuous corn (CC) for biofuel production, coupled with reduced-tillage systems, could alter NUE and residual soil nitrate-N. Experiments were conduct...

  10. Continuation and Completion Patterns of Management Distance Learners: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sivaswaroop, P.

    1999-01-01

    Presents a case study of continuation and completion patterns of distance-education students at the Bhopal Regional Center of Indira Gandhi National Open University. Findings revealed that the first semester of study is more crucial for distance learning and the distance-learning institute must provide more support to students during this period.…

  11. Continuous improvement in managing R&D: A TQM approach at SkogForsk, Sweden

    Treesearch

    Magnus Larsson

    1999-01-01

    Continuous improvement is an imperative process for any organization) even in the R&D field) who wants to stay competitive and alive. Our experience is that the most important ingredients in this process are engagement and participation by everybody) shared visions) and a holistic view of the organization. Structural changes and quick fixes cannot accomplish this....

  12. Practice Stories in Natural Resource Management Continuing Professional Education: Springboards for Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stummann, Cathy Brown

    2014-01-01

    The use of stories from professional experience in continuing professional education has been on the rise in many fields, often aimed at bolstering capacity through sharing professional knowledge and/or supporting reflective practice. Practice stories are also suggested to be beneficial in supporting professional learning of new concepts. These…

  13. Practice Stories in Natural Resource Management Continuing Professional Education: Springboards for Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stummann, Cathy Brown

    2014-01-01

    The use of stories from professional experience in continuing professional education has been on the rise in many fields, often aimed at bolstering capacity through sharing professional knowledge and/or supporting reflective practice. Practice stories are also suggested to be beneficial in supporting professional learning of new concepts. These…

  14. Plan Maintenance for Continuous Execution Management: Planning, Plan Repair, Execution Monitoring

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    Operations Unified Adaptive Replanning (JAGUAR), a semi -automated system targeted towards oversight and management of a large number of interdependent...and Plan Execution for Real-World Systems (Providence, Rhode Island), September 2007. [2] Abdelbaki Bouguerra, Lars Karlsson, and Alessandro

  15. CQESTR simulated changes in soil organic carbon under residue management practices in continuous corn systems

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) is an important soil property and strongly influenced by management. Changes in SOC stocks are difficult to measure through direct sampling, requiring both long time periods and intensive sampling to detect small changes in the large, highly variable pool. Models have the p...

  16. An Infrastructure for Continuous Intake Individualized Education [and] Infrastructure for Learning Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Don

    At Humber College (HC) in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, the Digital Electronics (DE) program utilizes a computerized learning infrastructure called Computer Managed Learning (CML). The program, which has been under development for several years, is flexible enough to build a unique program of studies for each individual student and allows for the…

  17. Urban Quality Development and Management: Capacity Development and Continued Education for the Sustainable City

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehmann, Martin; Fryd, Ole

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe and discuss the development and the structure of a new international master on the subject of urban quality development and management (UQDM), and explore the potential of the process and the outcome in serving as models adoptable by faculty at other universities. Design/methodology/approach: The…

  18. Reconsidering Social Science Theories in Natural Resource Management Continuing Professional Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stummann, C. B.; Gamborg, C.

    2014-01-01

    Over 25 years ago, the "wicked problems" concept was introduced into forestry to describe the increasingly complex work situations faced by many natural resource management (NRM) professionals and at the same time the demand and frequency of public involvement in NRM issues also grew. Research on the impact of these changes for NRM…

  19. Urban Quality Development and Management: Capacity Development and Continued Education for the Sustainable City

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehmann, Martin; Fryd, Ole

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe and discuss the development and the structure of a new international master on the subject of urban quality development and management (UQDM), and explore the potential of the process and the outcome in serving as models adoptable by faculty at other universities. Design/methodology/approach: The…

  20. Walking the Talk: Continuous Improvement of a Quality Management Field Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coy, Steven; Adams, Jeffery

    2012-01-01

    This article provides results from a three semester case study of the pedagogical efficacy of an innovative quality management field exercise. A series of direct and indirect measures were used to assess the extent to which the field exercise met a set of learning objectives. The results indicate that the assessment framework is useful in…

  1. Reconsidering Social Science Theories in Natural Resource Management Continuing Professional Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stummann, C. B.; Gamborg, C.

    2014-01-01

    Over 25 years ago, the "wicked problems" concept was introduced into forestry to describe the increasingly complex work situations faced by many natural resource management (NRM) professionals and at the same time the demand and frequency of public involvement in NRM issues also grew. Research on the impact of these changes for NRM…

  2. Managing Staff Development Effectively in Further Education. Discussion Paper in Continuing Education. Number 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheale, John

    A 1989 project provided models and ideas to help British further education colleges manage staff development more effectively. It examined the relationship between staff development and organizational development in colleges, found a common language for the two, and discovered ways of integrating their planning processes. A survey of literature…

  3. Walking the Talk: Continuous Improvement of a Quality Management Field Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coy, Steven; Adams, Jeffery

    2012-01-01

    This article provides results from a three semester case study of the pedagogical efficacy of an innovative quality management field exercise. A series of direct and indirect measures were used to assess the extent to which the field exercise met a set of learning objectives. The results indicate that the assessment framework is useful in…

  4. ThedaCare's business performance system: sustaining continuous daily improvement through hospital management in a lean environment.

    PubMed

    Barnas, Kim

    2011-09-01

    For 2003-2008, ThedaCare, a community health system in Wisconsin, achieved significant improvements in quality and the elimination of waste through the development of an improvement system, which included Value Stream analysis, rapid improvement events, and projects applied to specific processes. However, to meet its continuous daily improvement goals, particularly the goal of increasing productivity by 10% annually, ThedaCare needed to change the way its managers and leaders (in its hospital division) conduct and manage their daily work. Accordingly, it developed its Business Performance System (BPS) to achieve and sustain continuous daily improvement. BUILDING THE BPS: ThedaCare devised a multipart pilot project, consisting of "learning to see" and then, "problem solving." On completion of the 15-week alpha phase (6 units) in July 2009, the BPS was spread to the beta pilot (12 units; September 2009-January 2010) and then to cohort 3 (10 units; September 2010-January 2011). Each alpha unit improved performance on (1) the key driver metric of increasing productivity from 2008 to year-end 2009 (by 1%-11%) and (2) its respective safety/ quality drivers over the respective 2008 baselines. For 2010, improvements across the alpha, beta, and cohort 3 units were found for 11 of the 14 safety/quality drivers-85% of the 11 customer satisfaction drivers, 83% of 6 people engagement drivers; and 48% of 23 financial stewardship drivers. The tools developed for the BPS have enabled teams to see, prioritize, and pursue continuous daily improvement opportunities. Unit leaders now have a structured management reporting system to reduce variation in their management styles. Leaders all now follow leadership standard work, and their daily work is now consistently aligned with the hospital and system strategy.

  5. Monitoring Two Small Catchments to Evaluate Effects of No-Tillage Agricultural Management in São Paulo State, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueiredo, R. D. O.; Gonçalves, A. O.; Melo, A. D. S.; de Bona, F. D.; Hernani, L. C.

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, declines in water and soil quality have been observed in areas of Brazil where no-till agriculture had been previously implemented. Poor soil management associated with the absence of public policies has caused soil erosion, because many farmers are moving back from no-till to traditional cultivation for faster economic gains. A research project - SoloVivo Project - leaded by Embrapa (Brazilian Agricultural Research Corporation) in partnership with Itaipu Binacional aims to develop and validate, in a participatory way, tools to evaluate the technical performance of soil and water management at the rural properties that practice no-till agriculture. In this context we have selected two paired small (< 100 ha) catchments in the Paranapanema region, São Paulo State, where no-till management is practiced at two different degrees of effectiveness. In the figure bellow it can be seen a scene of one of the two studied catchments. For monitoring rainfall, soil solution and stream water, each catchment will be equipped with a programmable datalogger (with cell phone communication for data collection) linked to: a high intensity tipping bucket rain gage; a reflectometer to monitor soil volumetric water content, bulk electric conductivity and temperature; a radar water level sensor; a turbidity sensor; and an electric conductivity-temperature probe. We expect that stream flow and sediment generation, besides water quality (measured by conductivity) may serve as indicators of the benefits of no-tillage agriculture done more or less well. The results of this study will be used to stimulate discussions at workshops with the farmers who participate in a rural producers association in the region. In addition this and other results can be used to help the Brazilian National Water Agency (ANA) decide about applying no-till agricultural management systems in its programs of payment for environmental services.

  6. Management of peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC) in pediatric heart failure patients receiving continuous inotropic support.

    PubMed

    Giangregorio, Maeve; Mott, Sandra; Tong, Elizabeth; Handa, Sonia; Gauvreau, Kimberlee; Connor, Jean Anne

    2014-01-01

    The study aim was to evaluate present practice of maintaining PICC line patency in pediatric heart failure patients receiving continuous inotropes by comparing one cohort receiving low dose continuous heparin with one receiving no heparin. A case control retrospective chart review compared the two cohorts on duration of patency (measured in days) and need for thrombolytic agents. Median duration of patency for the heparin group was 24 days versus 16 days for the no heparin group (p=0.07). Use of thrombolytic agents was 28% in the heparin group compared to 50% in the no heparin group (p=0.08). Although not statistically significant, findings were clinically significant and supportive of current practice.

  7. Validation of Loss and Continuation Rate Models to Support Navy Community Management

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-02-01

    IMPACT model.)  Per discussion with BUPERS, at the E-8 level, AM and AME personnel may be advanced to AMCS (Senior Chief Aviation Structural...Mechanic). At the E-9 level, AMCS and ADCS (Senior Chief Aviation Machinist’s Mate) personnel look towards advancement to AFCM (Master Chief Aviation...Tennessee 38055-1000  www.nprst.navy.mil NPRST-TR-14-2 February 2014 Validation of Loss and Continuation Rate Models to Support Navy Community

  8. Homeland Defense: Continued Actions Needed to Improve Management of Air Sovereignty Alert Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    Better Outcomes, GAO-10-374T (Washington, D.C.: May 20, 2009); Aviation Security : DHS and TSA Have Researched, Developed and Begun Deploying Passenger... Security : TSA Has Made Progress, but Additional Efforts Are Needed to Improve Security. GAO-11-938T. Washington, D.C.: September 16, 2011. Aviation ...Washington, D.C.: October 23, 2009. Related GAO Products Homeland Defense DOD Tactical Aircraft Aviation Security Risk Management Related GAO

  9. Data storage for managing the health enterprise and achieving business continuity.

    PubMed

    Hinegardner, Sam

    2003-01-01

    As organizations move away from a silo mentality to a vision of enterprise-level information, more healthcare IT departments are rejecting the idea of information storage as an isolated, system-by-system solution. IT executives want storage solutions that act as a strategic element of an IT infrastructure, centralizing storage management activities to effectively reduce operational overhead and costs. This article focuses on three areas of enterprise storage: tape, disk, and disaster avoidance.

  10. Daily Management System of the Henry Ford Production System: QTIPS to Focus Continuous Improvements at the Level of the Work.

    PubMed

    Zarbo, Richard J; Varney, Ruan C; Copeland, Jacqueline R; D'Angelo, Rita; Sharma, Gaurav

    2015-07-01

    To support our Lean culture of continuous improvement, we implemented a daily management system designed so critical metrics of operational success were the focus of local teams to drive improvements. We innovated a standardized visual daily management board composed of metric categories of Quality, Time, Inventory, Productivity, and Safety (QTIPS); frequency trending; root cause analysis; corrective/preventive actions; and resulting process improvements. In 1 year (June 2013 to July 2014), eight laboratory sections at Henry Ford Hospital employed 64 unique daily metrics. Most assessed long-term (>6 months), monitored process stability, while short-term metrics (1-6 months) were retired after successful targeted problem resolution. Daily monitoring resulted in 42 process improvements. Daily management is the key business accountability subsystem that enabled our culture of continuous improvement to function more efficiently at the managerial level in a visible manner by reviewing and acting based on data and root cause analysis. Copyright© by the American Society for Clinical Pathology.

  11. The epileptic syndromes with continuous spikes and waves during slow sleep: definition and management guidelines.

    PubMed

    Van Bogaert, P; Aeby, A; De Borchgrave, V; De Cocq, C; Deprez, M; De Tiège, X; de Tourtchaninoff, M; Dubru, J M; Foulon, M; Ghariani, S; Grisar, T; Legros, B; Ossemann, M; Tugendhaft, P; van Rijckevorsel, K; Verheulpen, D

    2006-06-01

    The authors propose to define the epileptic syndromes with continuous spikes and waves during slow sleep (CSWS) as a cognitive or behavioral impairment acquired during childhood, associated with a strong activation of the interictal epileptiform discharges during NREM sleep--whatever focal or generalized--and not related to another factor than the presence of CSWS. The type of syndrome will be defined according to the neurological and neuropsychological deficit. These syndromes have to be classified among the localization-related epileptic syndromes. Some cases are idiopathic and others are symptomatic. Guidelines for work-up and treatment are proposed.

  12. Using activity-based costing and theory of constraints to guide continuous improvement in managed care.

    PubMed

    Roybal, H; Baxendale, S J; Gupta, M

    1999-01-01

    Activity-based costing and the theory of constraints have been applied successfully in many manufacturing organizations. Recently, those concepts have been applied in service organizations. This article describes the application of activity-based costing and the theory of constraints in a managed care mental health and substance abuse organization. One of the unique aspects of this particular application was the integration of activity-based costing and the theory of constraints to guide process improvement efforts. This article describes the activity-based costing model and the application of the theory of constraint's focusing steps with an emphasis on unused capacities of activities in the organization.

  13. Italian Contributions to the Development of Continuous Glucose Monitoring Sensors for Diabetes Management

    PubMed Central

    Sparacino, Giovanni; Zanon, Mattia; Facchinetti, Andrea; Zecchin, Chiara; Maran, Alberto; Cobelli, Claudio

    2012-01-01

    Monitoring glucose concentration in the blood is essential in the therapy of diabetes, a pathology which affects about 350 million people around the World (three million in Italy), causes more than four million deaths per year and consumes a significant portion of the budget of national health systems (10% in Italy). In the last 15 years, several sensors with different degree of invasiveness have been proposed to monitor glycemia in a quasi-continuous way (up to 1 sample/min rate) for relatively long intervals (up to 7 consecutive days). These continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) sensors have opened new scenarios to assess, off-line, the effectiveness of individual patient therapeutic plans from the retrospective analysis of glucose time-series, but have also stimulated the development of innovative on-line applications, such as hypo/hyper-glycemia alert systems and artificial pancreas closed-loop control algorithms. In this review, we illustrate some significant Italian contributions, both from industry and academia, to the growth of the CGM sensors research area. In particular, technological, algorithmic and clinical developments performed in Italy will be discussed and put in relation with the advances obtained in the field in the wider international research community. PMID:23202020

  14. Decision-making in crisis: Applying a healthcare triage methodology to business continuity management.

    PubMed

    Moore, Bethany; Bone, Eric A

    2017-01-01

    The concept of triage in healthcare has been around for centuries and continues to be applied today so that scarce resources are allocated according to need. A business impact analysis (BIA) is a form of triage in that it identifies which processes are most critical, which to address first and how to allocate limited resources. On its own, however, the BIA provides only a roadmap of the impacts and interdependencies of an event. When disaster strikes, organisational decision-makers often face difficult decisions with regard to allocating limited resources between multiple 'mission-critical' functions. Applying the concept of triage to business continuity provides those decision-makers navigating a rapidly evolving and unpredictable event with a path that protects the fundamental priorities of the organisation. A business triage methodology aids decision-makers in times of crisis by providing a simplified framework for decision-making based on objective, evidence-based criteria, which is universally accepted and understood. When disaster strikes, the survival of the organisation depends on critical decision-making and quick actions to stabilise the incident. This paper argues that organisations need to supplement BIA processes with a decision-making triage methodology that can be quickly applied during the chaos of an actual event.

  15. Action on AMD. Optimising patient management: act now to ensure current and continual delivery of best possible patient care

    PubMed Central

    Amoaku, W; Blakeney, S; Freeman, M; Gale, R; Johnston, R; Kelly, S P; McLaughlan, B; Sahu, D; Varma, D

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, there have been significant advances in the clinical management of patients with wet age-related macular degeneration (wet AMD)—a rapidly progressing and potentially blinding degenerative eye disease. Wet AMD is responsible for more than half of registered severe sight impairment (blindness) in the United Kingdom, and patients who are being treated for wet AMD require frequent and long-term follow-up for treatment to be most effective. The clinical workload associated with the frequent follow-up required is substantial. Furthermore, as more new patients are diagnosed and the population continues to age, the patient population will continue to increase. It is thus vital that clinical services continue to adapt so that they can provide a fast and efficient service for patients with wet AMD. This Action on AMDdocument has been developed by eye health-care professionals and patient representatives, the Action on AMDgroup. It is intended to highlight the urgent and continuing need for change within wet AMD services. This document also serves as a guide for eye health-care professionals, NHS commissioners, and providers to present possible solutions for improving NHS retinal and macular services. Examples of good practice and service development are considered and can be drawn upon to help services meet the recommended quality of care and achieve best possible outcomes. PMID:22302094

  16. Action on AMD. Optimising patient management: act now to ensure current and continual delivery of best possible patient care.

    PubMed

    Amoaku, W; Blakeney, S; Freeman, M; Gale, R; Johnston, R; Kelly, S P; McLaughlan, B; Sahu, D; Varma, D

    2012-02-01

    In recent years, there have been significant advances in the clinical management of patients with wet age-related macular degeneration (wet AMD)--a rapidly progressing and potentially blinding degenerative eye disease. Wet AMD is responsible for more than half of registered severe sight impairment (blindness) in the United Kingdom, and patients who are being treated for wet AMD require frequent and long-term follow-up for treatment to be most effective. The clinical workload associated with the frequent follow-up required is substantial. Furthermore, as more new patients are diagnosed and the population continues to age, the patient population will continue to increase. It is thus vital that clinical services continue to adapt so that they can provide a fast and efficient service for patients with wet AMD. This Action on AMD document has been developed by eye health-care professionals and patient representatives, the Action on AMD group. It is intended to highlight the urgent and continuing need for change within wet AMD services. This document also serves as a guide for eye health-care professionals, NHS commissioners, and providers to present possible solutions for improving NHS retinal and macular services. Examples of good practice and service development are considered and can be drawn upon to help services meet the recommended quality of care and achieve best possible outcomes.

  17. Developing Effective Continuous On-Line Monitoring Technologies to Manage Service Degradation of Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Ryan M.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Bond, Leonard J.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.

    2011-09-30

    Recently, there has been increased interest in using prognostics (i.e, remaining useful life (RUL) prediction) for managing and mitigating aging effects in service-degraded passive nuclear power reactor components. A vital part of this philosophy is the development of tools for detecting and monitoring service-induced degradation. Experience with in-service degradation has shown that rapidly-growing cracks, including several varieties of stress corrosion cracks (SCCs), can grow through a pipe in less than one fuel outage cycle after they initiate. Periodic inspection has limited effectiveness at detecting and managing such degradation requiring a more versatile monitoring philosophy. Acoustic emission testing (AET) and guided wave ultrasonic testing (GUT) are related technologies with potential for on-line monitoring applications. However, harsh operating conditions within NPPs inhibit the widespread implementation of both technologies. For AET, another hurdle is the attenuation of passive degradation signals as they travel though large components, relegating AET to targeted applications. GUT is further hindered by the complexity of GUT signatures limiting its application to the inspection of simple components. The development of sensors that are robust and inexpensive is key to expanding the use of AET and GUT for degradation monitoring in NPPs and improving overall effectiveness. Meanwhile, the effectiveness of AET and GUT in NPPs can be enhanced through thoughtful application of tandem AET-GUT techniques.

  18. Assessing the potential of reservoir outflow management to reduce sedimentation using continuous turbidity monitoring and reservoir modelling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Casey; Foster, Guy

    2013-01-01

    In-stream sensors are increasingly deployed as part of ambient water quality-monitoring networks. Temporally dense data from these networks can be used to better understand the transport of constituents through streams, lakes or reservoirs. Data from existing, continuously recording in-stream flow and water quality monitoring stations were coupled with the two-dimensional hydrodynamic CE-QUAL-W2 model to assess the potential of altered reservoir outflow management to reduce sediment trapping in John Redmond Reservoir, located in east-central Kansas. Monitoring stations upstream and downstream from the reservoir were used to estimate 5.6 million metric tons of sediment transported to John Redmond Reservoir from 2007 through 2010, 88% of which was trapped within the reservoir. The two-dimensional model was used to estimate the residence time of 55 equal-volume releases from the reservoir; sediment trapping for these releases varied from 48% to 97%. Smaller trapping efficiencies were observed when the reservoir was maintained near the normal operating capacity (relative to higher flood pool levels) and when average residence times were relatively short. An idealized, alternative outflow management scenario was constructed, which minimized reservoir elevations and the length of time water was in the reservoir, while continuing to meet downstream flood control end points identified in the reservoir water control manual. The alternative scenario is projected to reduce sediment trapping in the reservoir by approximately 3%, preventing approximately 45 000 metric tons of sediment from being deposited within the reservoir annually. This article presents an approach to quantify the potential of reservoir management using existing in-stream data; actual management decisions need to consider the effects on other reservoir benefits, such as downstream flood control and aquatic life.

  19. Rising burden of gout in the UK but continuing suboptimal management: a nationwide population study

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Chang-Fu; Grainge, Matthew J; Mallen, Christian; Zhang, Weiya; Doherty, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To describe trends in the epidemiology of gout and patterns of urate-lowering treatment (ULT) in the UK general population from 1997 to 2012. Methods We used the Clinical Practice Research Datalink to estimate the prevalence and incidence of gout for each calendar year from 1997 to 2012. We also investigated the pattern of gout management for both prevalent and incident gout patients. Results In 2012, the prevalence of gout was 2.49% (95% CI 2.48% to 2.51%) and the incidence was 1.77 (95% CI 1.73 to 1.81) per 1000 person-years. Prevalence and incidence both were significantly higher in 2012 than in 1997, with a 63.9% increase in prevalence and 29.6% increase in incidence over this period. Regions with highest prevalence and incidence were the North East and Wales. Among prevalent gout patients in 2012, only 48.48% (95% CI 48.08% to 48.89%) were being consulted specifically for gout or treated with ULT and of these 37.63% (95% CI 37.28% to 38.99%) received ULT. In addition, only 18.6% (95% CI 17.6% to 19.6%) of incident gout patients received ULT within 6 months and 27.3% (95% CI 26.1% to 28.5%) within 12 months of diagnosis. The management of prevalent and incident gout patients remained essentially the same during the study period, although the percentage of adherent patients improved from 28.28% (95% CI 27.33% to 29.26%) in 1997 to 39.66% (95% CI 39.11% to 40.22%) in 2012. Conclusions In recent years, both the prevalence and incidence of gout have increased significantly in the UK. Suboptimal use of ULT has not changed between 1997 and 2012. Patient adherence has improved during the study period, but it remains poor. PMID:24431399

  20. Continuous-feeding vermicomposting as a recycling management method to revalue tomato-fruit wastes from greenhouse crops.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Gómez, Manuel J; Nogales, Rogelio; Insam, Heribert; Romero, Esperanza; Goberna, Marta

    2010-12-01

    Huge quantities of discarded fruits generated from greenhouse crops represent a worldwide environmental problem. The aim of this work was to assess the efficiency of vermicomposting as a recycling management option for biotransforming tomato-fruit wastes from greenhouses into an organic nutrient-rich product available for agricultural purposes. A pilot vermireactor was constructed. It was provided with a manure layer, where an initial population of Eisenia fetida was introduced and fed continuously at a high organic loading rate (13.6 kg TOC m(-3)wk(-1)) for 150 days. Vermicompost chemical and enzymatic parameters as well as the bacterial and fungal community structure were determined for 210 days (vermicomposting plus a maturation period). Earthworm biomass increased after 90 days, and then declined due to increasing pH, electrical conductivity and ammonium concentration. The temporal patterns of dehydrogenase, β-glucosidase, protease and urease were related to earthworm growth and the stabilization of organic matter. Bacterial DGGE profiles differed between the period of degradation of labile substrates and the maturation step. Fungal communities at the stage of maximum earthworm biomass differed most, suggesting a gut passage effect. The end product was chemically stable and enriched in nutrients, demonstrating that tomato-fruit wastes can be successfully vermicomposted into a valuable soil amendment. We suggest continuous-feeding vermicomposting as an environmentally sound management option for greenhouse wastes. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Toxicity Persistence of Chlorpyrifos in Runoff from Experimental Soybean Plots to the Non-target Amphipod Hyalella curvispina: Effect of Crop Management.

    PubMed

    Mugni, Hernán; Paracampo, Ariel; Demetrio, Pablo; Pardi, Martín; Bulus, Gustavo; Ronco, Alicia; Bonetto, Carlos

    2016-02-01

    Toxicity persistence to the nontarget amphipod Hyalella curvispina in runoff events following chlorpyrifos applications to soy experimental plots was compared in conventional and no-till management. Two application scenarios were compared: an early-season application with the soil almost bare and a late-season application after the foliage had attained complete soil cover. H. curvispina was exposed to chlorpyrifos using two different test systems: a short-term (48 h) runoff water exposure and a long-term (10 days) soil exposure. Both commonly used crop management practices for soybean production resulted in runoff toxicity following pesticide applications and represent a toxicity risk for adjacent inland waters. Toxicity persistence was longer after the earlier than the late season application, likely because of higher volatilization and photodecomposition losses from the soy canopy than from the soil. For the early-season application, toxicity persisted longer in the no-till plots than in the conventional tillage plots. Suspended matter was higher in the conventional treatment. Chlorpyrifos sorption to suspended matter likely contributed to the shorter persistence. For the late-season application, toxicity persisted longer in the conventional treatment. The causes remain conjectural. The soil organic carbon content was higher in the no-till treatment. Sorption to organic matter might have contributed to the shorter chlorpyrifos toxicity persistence in no-till management. Late applications are more frequent and prevail longer throughout the soy growing season. Overall, the no-till management practice seems preferably because shorter toxicity persistence in runoff represents a lower environmental risk for the adjacent inland waters.

  2. Managing perceived conflicts of interest while ensuring the continued innovation of medical technology.

    PubMed

    Van Haute, Andrew

    2011-09-01

    If it were not for the ongoing collaboration between vascular surgeons and the medical technology industry, many of these advanced treatments used every day in vascular interventional surgery would not exist. The flip side of this coin is that these vital relationships create multiple roles for surgeons and must be appropriately managed. The dynamic process of innovation, along with factors such as product delivery technique refinement, education, testing and clinical trials, and product support, all make it necessary for ongoing and close collaboration between surgeons and the device industry. This unique relationship sometimes leads to the perception of conflicts of interest for physicians, in part because the competing pressures from the multiple, overlapping roles as clinician/caregiver/investigator/innovator/customer are significant. To address this issue, the Advanced Medical Technology Association (AdvaMed), the nation's largest medical technology association representing medical device and diagnostics companies, developed a Code of Ethics to guide medical technology companies in their interactions with health care professionals. First introduced in 1993, the AdvaMed Code strongly encourages both industry and physicians to commit to openness and high ethical standards in the conduct of their business interactions. The AdvaMed Code addresses many of the types of interactions that can occur between companies and health care professionals, including training, consulting agreements, the provision of demonstration and evaluation units, and charitable donations. By following the Code, companies send a strong message that treatment decisions must always be based on the best interest of the patient.

  3. Managing Widely Disparate Code Bases Through Automation of Continuous Integration and Deployment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaughlin, B. D.; Joshi, T.

    2013-12-01

    NASA EOSDIS tools, services, and service endpoints are widely dispersed across different sub-agencies and sub-organizations. Each of these entities has a different set of skills and widely varying codebases. Some produce sophisticated, well-tested, stable and deployable code, while others are struggling to meet stringent requirements with limited resources. This disparity makes the process of partnering with and deploying code onto the Earthdata platform (https://earthdata.nasa.gov) difficult, even at times impossible. The Earthdata Code Collaborative (ECC) is a project repository and code hosting facility that addresses this problem directly through a three-tiered approach: 1. Provide a standardized set of testing and automation tools for all hosted projects. 2. Regularly report on bugs and features as well as testing coverage and success through Web-based tools. 3. Directly pipeline projects from the ECC into the Earthdata production environment. This session will explain the architecture behind the ECC, including the custom software and 3rd party tools used. It will also detail the process by which decisions were and are being made to arrive at a fully-automated suite of tools and tests that allow any code base to quickly improve its quality and become a candidate for Earthdata inclusion. The session is oriented towards developers, managers, and team members involved in the process of developing, testing, deploying, and ensuring the quality of a code base, whether that code base be tens of millions of lines of code or simply hundreds.

  4. [The total-quality-management-analysis of the continuation and discontinuation of alcohol family treatment: a grassroots approach].

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, K; Tatsuki, S

    2001-06-01

    A family support/treatment program was provided to thirty-three cases where a drinking family member (identified patient) had shown alcohol related problems but not yet admitted the problem. After a period of between thirteen and twenty-one months of family treatment, fourteen (42.4%) identified patients started their own treatment. The only statistically significant factor that was related to the patients' treatment program participation was the continuation of family members' involvement in a family treatment program. Among the thirty-three cases, a little less than one half (48.5%) continued the family program. In order to increase the patients' participation, it is crucial to encourage family members to continue their family support/treatment program. In order to identify factors that contribute treatment continuation as well as dropouts, workshops were held with those who dropped out and those who continued the family treatment program. The Total-Quality-Management (TQM) affinity and arrow diagram techniques were employed to classify the participants' statements and to find cause-effect relationships among the identified factors, respectively. Five family treatment discontinuation factors were identified: 1) a lack of information about family support program, 2) resistance against a "family change" orientation in family treatment program, 3) family member burnout, 4) a misfit between family needs for immediate problem solutions and what family program offers, and 5) a temporal improvement of patients' drinking problems. While widely varied factors were found to contribute discontinuation, only a very few factors were identified to facilitate the treatment continuation. It was concluded that treatment discontinuation, rather than continuation, was the norm among the families of problem drinkers. Based on the above findings, three kaizen plans were proposed. First, in order to make sure that family members obtain necessary information about the family support

  5. Novel application of vacuum sealing drainage with continuous irrigation of potassium permanganate for managing infective wounds of gas gangrene.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ning; Wu, Xing-Huo; Liu, Rong; Yang, Shu-Hua; Huang, Wei; Jiang, Dian-Ming; Wu, Qiang; Xia, Tian; Shao, Zeng-Wu; Ye, Zhe-Wei

    2015-08-01

    Traumatic gas gangrene is a fatal infection mainly caused by Clostridium perfringens. It is a challenge to manage gas gangrene in open wounds and control infection after debridement or amputation. The aim of the present study was to use vacuum sealing drainage (VSD) with continuous irrigation of potassium permanganate to manage infective wounds of gas gangrene and observe its clinical efficacy. A total of 48 patients with open traumatic gas gangrene infection were included in this study. Amputations were done for 27 patients, and limb salvage procedures were performed for the others. After amputation or aggressive debridement, the VSD system, including polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) foam dressing and polyurethane (PU) film, with continuous irrigation of 1:5000 potassium permanganate solutions, was applied to the wounds. During the follow-up, all the patients healed without recurrence within 8-18 months. There were four complications. Cardiac arrest during amputation surgery occurred in one patient who suffered from severe septic shock. Emergent resuscitation was performed and the patient returned to stable condition. One patient suffered from mixed infection of Staphylococcal aureus, and a second-stage debridement was performed. One patient suffered from severe pain of the limb after the debridement. Exploratory operation was done and the possible reason was trauma of a local peripheral nerve. Three cases of crush syndrome had dialysis treatment for concomitant renal failure. In conclusion, VSD can convert open wound to closed wound, and evacuate necrotic tissues. Furthermore, potassium permanganate solutions help eliminate anaerobic microenvironment and achieve good therapeutic effect on gas gangrene and mixed infection. VSD with continuous irrigation of potassium permanganate is a novel, simple and feasible alternative for severe traumatic open wounds with gas gangrene infection.

  6. A dynamic process of health risk assessment for business continuity management during the World Exposition Shanghai, China, 2010.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaodong; Keim, Mark; Dong, Chen; Mahany, Mollie; Guo, Xiang

    2014-01-01

    Reports of health issues related to mass gatherings around the world have indicated a potential for public health and medical emergencies to occur on a scale that could place a significant impact on business continuity for national and international organisations. This paper describes a risk assessment process for business continuity management that was performed as part of the planning efforts related to the World Expo 2010 Shanghai China (Expo), the world's largest mass gathering to date. Altogether, 73 million visitors attended the Expo, generating over US$2bn of revenue. During 2008 to 2010, the Shanghai Municipal Center for Disease Control and Prevention performed a dynamic series of four disaster risk assessments before and during the Expo. The purpose of this assessment process was to identify, analyse and evaluate risks for public health security during different stages of the Expo. This paper describes an overview of the novel approach for this multiple and dynamic process of assessment of health security risk for ensuring business continuity.

  7. Tuberculosis management continues to utilize a large amount of hospital resources in the United States.

    PubMed

    Allareddy, Veerasathpurush; Rampa, Sankeerth; Allareddy, Veerajalandhar; Nalliah, Romesh P

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study is to examine longitudinal trends in hospital admissions attributed to tuberculosis and resulting hospitalization outcomes in the United States for the years 2000-2010. We used the Nationwide Inpatient Sample, which is the largest all-payer and nationally representative in-hospital dataset in the United States. All hospitalizations that had a primary diagnosis for tuberculosis were selected for analysis. Patient characteristics and outcomes including discharge status following hospitalization, length of stay in hospital and hospitalization charges were examined. During the study period, a total of 96 431 hospitalizations occurred due to tuberculosis. The mean age of hospitalizations was 48.6 years. Males comprised 64.2% of all hospitalizations; 24.8% were Whites, 25.5% Blacks, 26.5% Hispanics, 14.3% Asians/Pacific Islanders, 1% Native Americans, and 7.9% other/mixed races. Following hospitalization, 72.1% were discharged routinely, 3.4% were transferred to another acute-care hospital, 10.7% to long-term care facilities including skilled nursing facilities, 7.6% to home health care, and 2.1% were discharged against medical advice. There were 3815 patients who died (4% of hospitalizations). The total hospitalization charge for this cohort of patients admitted due to tuberculosis across the United States was $6.96 billion and the total hospitalization days over study period was 1 419 605 days. High-risk cohorts who are likely to be hospitalized due to tuberculosis included Blacks and Hispanics. Majority of hospitalization comprised of males. Even though the annual number of hospitalizations reduced over the study period, substantial amounts of resources are used in hospital settings to manage tuberculosis. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Information management flow for tele-homecare for the elderly; An emerging need for continuity of care

    PubMed Central

    Jeddi, Fatemeh Rangraz; Akbari, Hossein; Rasouli, Somayeh

    2017-01-01

    Background and objectives Tele-homecare methods can be used to provide home care for the elderly, if information management is provided. The aim of this study was to compare the places and methods of the data collection and media that use Tele-homecare for the elderly in selected countries in 2015. Methods A comparative-applied library study was conducted in 2015. The study population were five countries, including Canada, Australia, England, Denmark, and Taiwan. The data collection tool was a checklist based on the objectives of study. Persian and English papers from 1998 to 2014, related to the Electronic Health Record, home care and the elderly were extracted from authentic journals and reference books as well as academic and research websites. Data were collected by reviewing the papers. After collecting data, comparative tables were prepared and the weak and strong points of each case were investigated and analyzed in selected countries. Results Clinical, laboratory, imaging and pharmaceutical data were obtained from hospitals, physicians’ offices, clinics, pharmacies and long-term healthcare centers. Mobile and tablet-based technologies and personal digital assistants were used to collect data. Data were published via Internet, online and offline databanks, data exchange and dissemination via registries and national databases. Managed care methods were telehealth management systems and point of service. Conclusion For continuity of care, it is necessary to consider managed care and equipment with regard to obtaining data in various forms from various sources, sharing data with registries and national databanks as well as the Electronic Health Record. With regard to the emergence of wearable technology and its use in home care, it is suggested to study the integration of its data with Electronic Health Records. PMID:28848629

  9. DialysisNet: Application for Integrating and Management Data Sources of Hemodialysis Information by Continuity of Care Record.

    PubMed

    Ku, Ho Suk; Kim, Sungho; Kim, HyeHyeon; Chung, Hee-Joon; Park, Yu Rang; Kim, Ju Han

    2014-04-01

    Health Avatar Beans was for the management of chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease (ESRD). This article is about the DialysisNet system in Health Avatar Beans for the seamless management of ESRD based on the personal health record. For hemodialysis data modeling, we identified common data elements for hemodialysis information (CDEHI). We used ASTM continuity of care record (CCR) and ISO/IEC 11179 for the compliance method with a standard model for the CDEHI. According to the contents of the ASTM CCR, we mapped the CDHEI to the contents and created the metadata from that. It was transformed and parsed into the database and verified according to the ASTM CCR/XML schema definition (XSD). DialysisNet was created as an iPad application. The contents of the CDEHI were categorized for effective management. For the evaluation of information transfer, we used CarePlatform, which was developed for data access. The metadata of CDEHI in DialysisNet was exchanged by the CarePlatform with semantic interoperability. The CDEHI was separated into a content list for individual patient data, a contents list for hemodialysis center data, consultation and transfer form, and clinical decision support data. After matching to the CCR, the CDEHI was transformed to metadata, and it was transformed to XML and proven according to the ASTM CCR/XSD. DialysisNet has specific consideration of visualization, graphics, images, statistics, and database. We created the DialysisNet application, which can integrate and manage data sources for hemodialysis information based on CCR standards.

  10. Special Library and Information Centre Managers: Their Continuing Professional Development. Report of a Research Study Undertaken in 1985. Occasional Paper No. 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broadbent, Marianne; Grosser, Kerry

    This report summarizes a 1985 study during which 85 special library/information center managers from Melbourne, Australia, were interviewed to ascertain their continuing professional development activities, needs, and aspirations. Major areas of investigation included the extent and nature of organizational support for continuing professional…

  11. Neuroma-in-continuity of the median nerve managed by nerve expansion and direct suture with vein conduit.

    PubMed

    Jeudy, J; Raimbeau, G; Rabarin, F; Fouque, P A; Saint-Cast, Y; Césari, B; Bigorre, N

    2014-06-01

    Autologous nerve grafting is the current standard for bridging large gaps in major sensory and motor nerves. It allows both function and pain improvement with predictable results. Clinical observations of nerve elongation caused by tumours have prompted experimental animal studies of induced gradual elongation of the nerve stump proximal to the gap. This technique allows direct suturing of the two nerve ends to bridge the gap. Here, we describe a case of neuroma-in-continuity of the median nerve managed by resection and direct suture after nerve elongation with a tissue expander. We are not aware of similar reported cases. Secondary repair 3 years after the initial injury improved the pain and hypersensitivity and restored a modest degree of protective sensory function (grade S1). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Continuing to Confront COPD International Surveys: comparison of patient and physician perceptions about COPD risk and management

    PubMed Central

    Menezes, Ana M; Landis, Sarah H; Han, MeiLan K; Muellerova, Hana; Aisanov, Zaurbek; van der Molen, Thys; Oh, Yeon-Mok; Ichinose, Masakazu; Mannino, David M; Davis, Kourtney J

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Using data from the Continuing to Confront COPD International Physician and Patient Surveys, this paper describes physicians’ attitudes and beliefs regarding chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) prognosis, and compares physician and patient perceptions with respect to COPD. Methods In 12 countries worldwide, 4,343 patients with COPD were identified through systematic screening of population samples, and 1,307 physicians who regularly saw patients with COPD were sampled from in-country professional databases. Both patients and physicians completed surveys about their COPD knowledge, beliefs, and perceptions; physicians answered further questions about diagnostic methods and treatment choices for COPD. Results Most physicians (79%) responded that the long-term health outlook for patients with COPD has improved over the past decade, largely attributed to the introduction of better medications. However, patient access to medication remains an issue in many countries, and some physicians (39%) and patients (46%) agreed/strongly agreed with the statement “there are no truly effective treatments for COPD”. There was strong concordance between physicians and patients regarding COPD management practices, including the use of spirometry (86% of physicians and 76% of patients reporting they used/had undergone a spirometry test) and smoking cessation counseling (76% of physicians reported they counseled their smoking patients at every clinic visit, and 71% of smoking patients stated that they had received counseling in the past year). However, the groups differed in their perception about the role of smoking in COPD, with 78% of physicians versus 38% of patients strongly agreeing with the statement “smoking is the cause of most cases of COPD”. Conclusion The Continuing to Confront COPD International Surveys demonstrate that while physicians and patients largely agreed about COPD management practices and the need for more effective treatments for COPD

  13. Continuing to confront COPD International Surveys: comparison of patient and physician perceptions about COPD risk and management.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Ana M; Landis, Sarah H; Han, MeiLan K; Muellerova, Hana; Aisanov, Zaurbek; van der Molen, Thys; Oh, Yeon-Mok; Ichinose, Masakazu; Mannino, David M; Davis, Kourtney J

    2015-01-01

    Using data from the Continuing to Confront COPD International Physician and Patient Surveys, this paper describes physicians' attitudes and beliefs regarding chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) prognosis, and compares physician and patient perceptions with respect to COPD. In 12 countries worldwide, 4,343 patients with COPD were identified through systematic screening of population samples, and 1,307 physicians who regularly saw patients with COPD were sampled from in-country professional databases. Both patients and physicians completed surveys about their COPD knowledge, beliefs, and perceptions; physicians answered further questions about diagnostic methods and treatment choices for COPD. Most physicians (79%) responded that the long-term health outlook for patients with COPD has improved over the past decade, largely attributed to the introduction of better medications. However, patient access to medication remains an issue in many countries, and some physicians (39%) and patients (46%) agreed/strongly agreed with the statement "there are no truly effective treatments for COPD". There was strong concordance between physicians and patients regarding COPD management practices, including the use of spirometry (86% of physicians and 76% of patients reporting they used/had undergone a spirometry test) and smoking cessation counseling (76% of physicians reported they counseled their smoking patients at every clinic visit, and 71% of smoking patients stated that they had received counseling in the past year). However, the groups differed in their perception about the role of smoking in COPD, with 78% of physicians versus 38% of patients strongly agreeing with the statement "smoking is the cause of most cases of COPD". The Continuing to Confront COPD International Surveys demonstrate that while physicians and patients largely agreed about COPD management practices and the need for more effective treatments for COPD, a gap exists about the causal role of

  14. A comparative study of continuous versus pulsed radiofrequency discectomy for management of low backache: Prospective randomized, double-blind study

    PubMed Central

    Jena, Bhagya Ranjan; Paswan, Anil; Singh, Yashpal; Loha, Sandeep; Singh, Anil Prasad; Rastogi, Virendra

    2016-01-01

    Background: Radiofrequency (RF) is a minimally invasive target-selective technique that has been used with success for many years in the treatment of different pathologies, such as low back pain, trigeminal neuralgia, and others. Aim: The aim of this study is to compare different mode of RF - continuous RF (CRF) versus pulsed RF (PRF) along with steroid in the management of low back pain of discogenic origin. Setting and Design: Prospective, randomized, double-blind trial. Materials and Methods: Forty patients with chronic discogenic low back pain were randomized to receive CRF plus intradiscal triamcinolone 40 mg (Group 1) or to receive PRF plus intradiscal triamcinolone 40 mg (Group 2). Outcome measured includes immediate as well as long-term pain relief using visual analog scale, the Oswestry Disability Index and straight leg raising test. Statistical Analysis: The continuous variables were compared by one-way analysis of variance test. Discrete variables were compared by Fisher's exact test/Chi-square test/Student's t-test, whichever appropriate. The value of P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: There was a significant decrease in pain score after CRF without any added side effect. Pain relief after PRF was insignificant. Conclusion: CRF with steroid seems to be better for treatment of chronic discogenic low back pain than PRF with steroid. PMID:27746559

  15. High-Intensity Interval Training Versus Moderate-Intensity Continuous Training in the Prevention/Management of Cardiovascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Syed R; Macaluso, Andrea; Pearson, Stephen J

    Moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT) has long been considered the most effective exercise treatment modality for the prevention and management of cardiovascular disease (CVD), but more recently high-intensity interval training (HIIT) has been viewed as a potential alternative to MICT in accruing such benefits. HIIT was initially found to induce significant improvements in numerous physiological and health-related indices, to a similar if not superior extent to MICT. Since then, many studies have attempted to explore the potential clinical utility of HIIT, relative to MICT, with respect to treating numerous cardiovascular conditions, such as coronary artery disease, heart failure, stroke, and hypertension. Despite this, however, the efficacy of HIIT in reversing the specific symptoms and risk factors of these cardiovascular pathologies is not well understood. HIIT is often perceived as very strenuous, which could render it unsafe for those at risk of or afflicted with CVD, but these issues are also yet to be reviewed. Furthermore, the optimal HIIT protocol for each of the CVD cohorts has not been established. Thus, the purpose of this review article is to (1) evaluate the efficacy of HIIT relative to MICT in the prevention and management of cardiovascular conditions, and (2) explore any potential safety issues surrounding the suitability and/or tolerability of HIIT for patients with CVD, and the potential optimal prescriptive variables of HIIT for application in the clinical environment.

  16. A Predictive Safety Management System Software Package Based on the Continuous Hazard Tracking and Failure Prediction Methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quintana, Rolando

    2003-01-01

    The goal of this research was to integrate a previously validated and reliable safety model, called Continuous Hazard Tracking and Failure Prediction Methodology (CHTFPM), into a software application. This led to the development of a safety management information system (PSMIS). This means that the theory or principles of the CHTFPM were incorporated in a software package; hence, the PSMIS is referred to as CHTFPM management information system (CHTFPM MIS). The purpose of the PSMIS is to reduce the time and manpower required to perform predictive studies as well as to facilitate the handling of enormous quantities of information in this type of studies. The CHTFPM theory encompasses the philosophy of looking at the concept of safety engineering from a new perspective: from a proactive, than a reactive, viewpoint. That is, corrective measures are taken before a problem instead of after it happened. That is why the CHTFPM is a predictive safety because it foresees or anticipates accidents, system failures and unacceptable risks; therefore, corrective action can be taken in order to prevent all these unwanted issues. Consequently, safety and reliability of systems or processes can be further improved by taking proactive and timely corrective actions.

  17. Estimates of cost-effectiveness of prehospital continuous positive airway pressure in the management of acute pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Hubble, Michael W; Richards, Michael E; Wilfong, Denise A

    2008-01-01

    To estimate the cost-effectiveness of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) in managing prehospital acute pulmonary edema in an urban EMS system. Using estimates from published reports on prehospital and emergency department CPAP, a cost-effectiveness model of implementing CPAP in a typical urban EMS system was derived from the societal perspective as well as the perspective of the implementing EMS system. To assess the robustness of the model, a series of univariate and multivariate sensitivity analyses was performed on the input variables. The cost of consumables, equipment, and training yielded a total cost of $89 per CPAP application. The theoretical system would be expected to use CPAP 4 times per 1000 EMS patients and is expected to save 0.75 additional lives per 1000 EMS patients at a cost of $490 per life saved. CPAP is also expected to result in approximately one less intubation per 6 CPAP applications and reduce hospitalization costs by $4075 per year for each CPAP application. Through sensitivity analyses the model was verified to be robust across a wide range of input variable assumptions. Previous studies have demonstrated the clinical effectiveness of CPAP in the management of acute pulmonary edema. Through a theoretical analysis which modeled the costs and clinical benefits of implementing CPAP in an urban EMS system, prehospital CPAP appears to be a cost-effective treatment.

  18. [Online continuing medical education based on national disease management guidelines. The e-learning platform leitlinien-wissen.de].

    PubMed

    Vollmar, H C; Schürer-Maly, C-C; Lelgemann, M; Koneczny, N; Koch, M; Butzlaff, M

    2006-05-01

    Effective translation of relevant knowledge into clinical practice is essential for modern health care systems. National Disease Management Guidelines (NDMG) are considered relevant instruments to support this transfer. To implement NDMG Internet-based continuing medical education (CME), modules and online case-based learning objects were designed and published. To ensure high quality the contents are based on NDMG and subjected to multi-step review processes. Presentation on the web was realized through a modified content management system. To obtain a CME certificate, completing an online questionnaire using a four-point Likert scale was mandatory. Between June 2003 and April 2005, 3,105 physicians were registered and used the platform: 95% of the physicians expressed positive feedback in the evaluation questionnaire, and 35% actually used the corresponding NDMG in practice. This prompted the development of interactive medical case-based learning objects as a second learning pathway. An Internet platform for CME including case-based learning objects can be a helpful tool to assure the provision of scientific knowledge for patient care.

  19. Octreotide in the management of recurrent gastrointestinal bleed in patients supported by continuous flow left ventricular assist devices.

    PubMed

    Loyaga-Rendon, Renzo Y; Hashim, Taimoor; Tallaj, Jose A; Acharya, Deepak; Holman, William; Kirklin, James; Pamboukian, Salpy V

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding is the most common cause of readmission in patients supported by continuous flow left ventricular assist devices (CF-LVAD). We describe our experience in the off-label use of octreotide in the management of recurrent GI bleed in this population. Of 116 patients implanted with a CF-LVAD at our institution, seven had recurrent GI bleeding unresponsive to conventional management and were started in chronic octreotide injections. Hospitalizations due to GI bleeding, number of packed red blood cells transfused, and number of endoscopic procedures were compared 3 months before and after octreotide treatment. In the overall cohort, there were no differences in these three endpoints. When one patient with differing characteristics was excluded from the analysis there was a trend (p = 0.06) to a reduction of hospitalizations due to GI bleeding, number of blood transfusions, and number of endoscopic procedures. Octreotide exhibit a favorable trend in the frequency of admissions, blood transfusions, and endoscopic procedures in most patients with recurrent GI bleed. Further prospective studies are needed to clarify its benefits in this population.

  20. First aid and initial management for childhood burns in Vietnam--an appeal for public and continuing medical education.

    PubMed

    Lam, Nguyen Nhu; Dung, Nguyen Tien

    2008-02-01

    A prospective study to investigate first aid and initial management for 247 paediatric burn patients from 1 June, 2004 to 31 June, 2006 at the Burn Intensive Care Unit, National Institute of Burns (NIB), Hanoi. Data were collected from documents from referring hospitals and direct interview of patients, relative and transport team as guided by the International Society for Burn Injury (ISBI) and the World Health Organization (WHO). Results showed that cooling the burn surface by cold water was applied in 27.17%. Among 132 patients transferred from other hospitals, fluid resuscitation was given in 102 patients (77.28%) before transferring and over a half of these patients were not given intravenous fluid during the time of transfer, especially for children under 1 year of age (p<0.05). Dressings were applied in 36.36% of transferred patients. Burn surface area was accurately diagnosed in only 21.90% of total cases. In conclusion, first aid and initial management in Vietnam are still far from ideal. Further public education and continuing medical education should be applied in Vietnam.

  1. Young people with type 1 diabetes mellitus: Attitudes, perceptions, and experiences of diabetes management and continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion therapy.

    PubMed

    Perry, Lin; James, Steven; Steinbeck, Katharine; Dunbabin, Janet; Lowe, Julia

    2017-06-01

    Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII; insulin pump) use is increasing. However, there is little information about how this technology is used compared with other insulin delivery methods (ie, injections) by young people with type 1 diabetes mellitus in Australia. This study explored young people's attitudes, perceptions, and experiences with diabetes management comparing those using with those not using CSII, and proportions likely to transition to adult services requiring initiation and/or support for CSII use. A survey was undertaken of young people (aged 12 to 18 years) with type 1 diabetes mellitus and their parents/guardians living in Hunter New England, Australia, using a questionnaire designed to collect quantitative, descriptive, and demographic data. Most questions were based on previously developed and validated instruments. In total, 107 respondents returned partially or fully completed questionnaires. Respondents had positive attitudes and perceptions of their self-efficacy and diabetes management, but were moderately disturbed by their diabetes and reported experiencing suboptimal management outcomes. Patterns of associations were demonstrated between knowledge, attitudes, and experiences of diabetes modeled by regression analysis. There were no statistically significant differences in responses between users and nonusers of CSII. Over 40% indicated their intention to use the technology as adults. Opportunities for enhanced diabetes service support were clear, and CSII did not appear to be used to its full potential. Service redesign could enhance support for this young population using all preferred insulin delivery methods and should align to patients' goals and preferences to maximize service and patient gain. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. An ontology-based approach to patient follow-up assessment for continuous and personalized chronic disease management.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi-Fan; Gou, Ling; Zhou, Tian-Shu; Lin, De-Nan; Zheng, Jing; Li, Ye; Li, Jing-Song

    2017-08-01

    Chronic diseases are complex and persistent clinical conditions that require close collaboration among patients and health care providers in the implementation of long-term and integrated care programs. However, current solutions focus partially on intensive interventions at hospitals rather than on continuous and personalized chronic disease management. This study aims to fill this gap by providing computerized clinical decision support during follow-up assessments of chronically ill patients at home. We proposed an ontology-based framework to integrate patient data, medical domain knowledge, and patient assessment criteria for chronic disease patient follow-up assessments. A clinical decision support system was developed to implement this framework for automatic selection and adaptation of standard assessment protocols to suit patient personal conditions. We evaluated our method in the case study of type 2 diabetic patient follow-up assessments. The proposed framework was instantiated using real data from 115,477 follow-up assessment records of 36,162 type 2 diabetic patients. Standard evaluation criteria were automatically selected and adapted to the particularities of each patient. Assessment results were generated as a general typing of patient overall condition and detailed scoring for each criterion, providing important indicators to the case manager about possible inappropriate judgments, in addition to raising patient awareness of their disease control outcomes. Using historical data as the gold standard, our system achieved a rate of accuracy of 99.93% and completeness of 95.00%. This study contributes to improving the accessibility, efficiency and quality of current patient follow-up services. It also provides a generic approach to knowledge sharing and reuse for patient-centered chronic disease management. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Continuous Risk Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabelhaus, Phil

    2002-01-01

    Risk identification is an ongoing activity that takes place during the routine project work flow. Project activities such as programmatic and technical meetings, telecons, reviews, and other forms of communication often bring to light project risks. When this occurs, we record and analyze the risk on a Risk Information Sheet. This process helps the project team identify and cope with project risks throughout the life of the project.

  4. Management intensity alters decomposition via biological pathways

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wickings, Kyle; Grandy, A. Stuart; Reed, Sasha; Cleveland, Cory

    2011-01-01

    Current conceptual models predict that changes in plant litter chemistry during decomposition are primarily regulated by both initial litter chemistry and the stage-or extent-of mass loss. Far less is known about how variations in decomposer community structure (e.g., resulting from different ecosystem management types) could influence litter chemistry during decomposition. Given the recent agricultural intensification occurring globally and the importance of litter chemistry in regulating soil organic matter storage, our objectives were to determine the potential effects of agricultural management on plant litter chemistry and decomposition rates, and to investigate possible links between ecosystem management, litter chemistry and decomposition, and decomposer community composition and activity. We measured decomposition rates, changes in litter chemistry, extracellular enzyme activity, microarthropod communities, and bacterial versus fungal relative abundance in replicated conventional-till, no-till, and old field agricultural sites for both corn and grass litter. After one growing season, litter decomposition under conventional-till was 20% greater than in old field communities. However, decomposition rates in no-till were not significantly different from those in old field or conventional-till sites. After decomposition, grass residue in both conventional- and no-till systems was enriched in total polysaccharides relative to initial litter, while grass litter decomposed in old fields was enriched in nitrogen-bearing compounds and lipids. These differences corresponded with differences in decomposer communities, which also exhibited strong responses to both litter and management type. Overall, our results indicate that agricultural intensification can increase litter decomposition rates, alter decomposer communities, and influence litter chemistry in ways that could have important and long-term effects on soil organic matter dynamics. We suggest that future

  5. The Effect of Physician Continuing Medical Education on Patient-Reported Outcomes for Identifying and Optimally Managing Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Sara S.; Castle, Patricia H.; Van Marter, Deborah; Roc, Anne; Neubauer, David; Auerbach, Sanford; DeAguiar, Emma

    2015-01-01

    Study Objective: To evaluate the effect of continuing medical education (CME) activities on patient reported outcomes with regard to (1) screening for excessive sleepiness (ES) and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and (2) appropriate referral and treatment. Methods: A total of 725 patients were recruited from 75 providers who either participated or did not participate in Transtheoretical Model (TTM)-based OSA CME activities. Patient reported outcomes from participating (n = 36) and non-participating providers (n = 39) were compared using generalized estimating equations examining random effects of provider as unit of assignment. Results: Patients' reports demonstrate that participating physicians were 1.7 times more likely to initiate discussion of sleep problems than non-participating physicians (t1,411 = 3.71, p = 0.05) and 2.25–2.86 times more likely to administer validated measures for OSA (Epworth Sleepiness Scale and STOP-BANG). Patient reports also indicated that participating clinicians (79.9%) were significantly more likely to recommend seeing a sleep specialist compared to non-participating clinicians (60.7%; t1,348 = 9.1, p < 0.01, OR = 2.6). Furthermore, while 89.4% of participating clinicians recommended a sleep study, only 73.2% of the non-participating physicians recommended one (t1,363 = 11.46, p < 0.001, OR = 3.1). Conclusions: Participation in TTM-based OSA CME activities was associated with improved patient reported outcomes compared to the non-participating clinicians. Citation: Johnson SS, Castle PH, Van Marter D, Roc A, Neubauer D, Auerbach S, DeAguiar E. The effect of physician continuing medical education on patient-reported outcomes for identifying and optimally managing obstructive sleep apnea. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(3):197–204. PMID:25845903

  6. Management of acute postoperative pain with continuous intercostal nerve block after single port video-assisted thoracoscopic anatomic resection

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Ming-Ju; Wang, Kuo-Cheng; Liu, Hung-Pin; Gonzalez-Rivas, Diego; Wu, Ching-Yang; Liu, Yun-Hen; Wu, Yi-Cheng; Chao, Yin-Kai

    2016-01-01

    Background Effective postoperative pain control for thoracic surgery is very important, not only because it reduces pulmonary complications but also because it accelerates the pace of recovery. Moreover, it increases patients’ satisfaction with the surgery. In this study, we present a simple approach involving the safe placement of intercostal catheter (ICC) after single port video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) anatomic resection and we evaluate postoperative analgesic function with and without it. Methods We identified patients who underwent single port anatomic resection with ICC placed intraoperatively as a route for continuous postoperative levobupivacaine (0.5%) administration and retrospectively compared them with a group of single port anatomic resection patients without ICC. The operation time, postoperative day 0, 1, 2, 3 and discharge day pain score, triflow numbers, narcotic requirements, drainage duration and post-operative hospital stay were compared. Results In total, 78 patients were enrolled in the final analysis (39 patients with ICC and 39 without). We found patients with ICC had less pain sensation numerical rating scale (NRS) on postoperative day 0, 1 (P=0.023, <0.001) and better triflow performance on postoperative day 1 and 2 (P=0.015, 0.032). In addition, lower IV form morphine usage frequency and dosage (P=0.009, 0.017), shorter chest tube drainage duration (P=0.001) and postoperative stay (P=0.005) were observed in the ICC group. Conclusions Continuous intercostal nerve blockade by placing an ICC intraoperatively provides effective analgesia for patients undergoing single port VATS anatomic resection. This may be considered a viable alternative for postoperative pain management. PMID:28149550

  7. Inputs and losses by surface runoff and subsurface leaching for pastures managed by continuous or rotational stocking.

    PubMed

    Owens, L B; Barker, D J; Loerch, S C; Shipitalo, M J; Bonta, J V; Sulc, R M

    2012-01-01

    Pasture management practices can affect forage quality and production, animal health and production, and surface and groundwater quality. In a 5-yr study conducted at the North Appalachian Experimental Watershed near Coshocton, Ohio, we compared the effects of two contrasting grazing methods on surface and subsurface water quantity and quality. Four pastures, each including a small, instrumented watershed (0.51-1.09 ha) for surface runoff measurements and a developed spring for subsurface flow collection, received 112 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1) and were grazed at similar stocking rates (1.8-1.9 cows ha(-1)). Two pastures were continuously stocked; two were subdivided so that they were grazed with frequent rotational stocking (5-6 times weekly). In the preceding 5 yr, these pastures received 112 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1) after several years of 0 N fertilizer and were grazed with weekly rotational stocking. Surface runoff losses of N were minimal. During these two periods, some years had precipitation up to 50% greater than the long-term average, which increased subsurface flow and NO(3)-N transport. Average annual NO(3)-N transported in subsurface flow from the four watersheds during the two 5-yr periods ranged from 11.3 to 22.7 kg N ha(-1), which was similar to or less than the mineral-N received in precipitation. Flow and transport variations were greater among seasons than among watersheds. Flow-weighted seasonal NO(3)-N concentrations in subsurface flow did not exceed 7 mg L(-1). Variations in NO(3)-N leached from pastures were primarily due to variable precipitation rather than the effects of continuous, weekly rotational, or frequent rotational stocking practices. This suggests that there was no difference among these grazing practices in terms of NO(3)-N leaching. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  8. Continuous Lidocaine Infusions to Manage Opioid-Refractory Pain in a Series of Cancer Patients in a Pediatric Hospital.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, Kathleen; DeMonbrun, Andrea; Beckman, Elizabeth J; Keefer, Patricia; Wagner, Deb; Stewart, Margaret; Saul, D'Anna; Hakel, Stephanie; Liu, My; Niedner, Matthew

    2016-07-01

    Research on the safety and efficacy of continuous lidocaine infusions (CLIs) for the treatment of pain in the pediatric setting is limited. This article describes a series of pediatric oncology patients who received lidocaine infusions for refractory, longstanding, cancer-related pain. This is a retrospective review of patients who underwent lidocaine infusions to manage severe, opioid-refractory, cancer-related pain. Four patients ranging in age from 8 to 18 years were admitted to a pediatric hospital for their medical conditions and/or pain management. Structured chart review established demographic and diagnosis information, infusion rates, side effects, and efficacy of infusions in providing pain relief. Lidocaine bolus doses, infusion rates, serum concentrations, and subjective pain scores were analyzed. Median pain scores prior to lidocaine infusions were 8/10, falling to 2/10 at the infusion termination (P < 0.003), and rising to 3/10 in the first 24 hr after lidocaine (P < 0.029 compared to preinfusion pain). The infusions were generally well tolerated, with few side effects noted. In most cases, the improvement in pain scores persisted beyond termination of the infusion. CLIs were a helpful adjuvant in the four cases presented and may be an effective therapy for a more diverse array of refractory cancer pain. The majority of patients experienced pain relief well beyond the metabolic elimination of the lidocaine, corroborating a modulation effect on pain windup. Additional research regarding infusion rates, serum concentrations, side effects, and outpatient follow-up in a larger group of patients will provide additional insight into the role and safety of this therapy in children. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Continuing to Confront COPD International Physician Survey: physician knowledge and application of COPD management guidelines in 12 countries

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Kourtney J; Landis, Sarah H; Oh, Yeon-Mok; Mannino, David M; Han, MeiLan K; van der Molen, Thys; Aisanov, Zaurbek; Menezes, Ana M; Ichinose, Masakazu; Muellerova, Hana

    2015-01-01

    Aim Utilizing data from the Continuing to Confront COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) International Physician Survey, this study aimed to describe physicians’ knowledge and application of the GOLD (Global initiative for chronic Obstructive Lung Disease) Global Strategy for the Diagnosis, Management and Prevention of COPD diagnosis and treatment recommendations and compare performance between primary care physicians (PCPs) and respiratory specialists. Materials and methods Physicians from 12 countries were sampled from in-country professional databases; 1,307 physicians (PCP to respiratory specialist ratio three to one) who regularly consult with COPD, emphysema, or chronic bronchitis patients were interviewed online, by telephone or face to face. Physicians were questioned about COPD risk factors, prognosis, diagnosis, and treatment, including knowledge and application of the GOLD global strategy using patient scenarios. Results Physicians reported using spirometry routinely (PCPs 82%, respiratory specialists 100%; P<0.001) to diagnose COPD and frequently included validated patient-reported outcome measures (PCPs 67%, respiratory specialists 81%; P<0.001). Respiratory specialists were more likely than PCPs to report awareness of the GOLD global strategy (93% versus 58%, P<0.001); however, when presented with patient scenarios, they did not always perform better than PCPs with regard to recommending GOLD-concordant treatment options. The proportion of PCPs and respiratory specialists providing first- or second-choice treatment options concordant with GOLD strategy for a GOLD B-type patient was 38% versus 67%, respectively. For GOLD C and D-type patients, the concordant proportions for PCPs and respiratory specialists were 40% versus 38%, and 57% versus 58%, respectively. Conclusion This survey of physicians in 12 countries practicing in the primary care and respiratory specialty settings showed high awareness of COPD-management guidelines. Frequent use

  10. Continuing to Confront COPD International Physician Survey: physician knowledge and application of COPD management guidelines in 12 countries.

    PubMed

    Davis, Kourtney J; Landis, Sarah H; Oh, Yeon-Mok; Mannino, David M; Han, MeiLan K; van der Molen, Thys; Aisanov, Zaurbek; Menezes, Ana M; Ichinose, Masakazu; Muellerova, Hana

    2015-01-01

    Utilizing data from the Continuing to Confront COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) International Physician Survey, this study aimed to describe physicians' knowledge and application of the GOLD (Global initiative for chronic Obstructive Lung Disease) Global Strategy for the Diagnosis, Management and Prevention of COPD diagnosis and treatment recommendations and compare performance between primary care physicians (PCPs) and respiratory specialists. Physicians from 12 countries were sampled from in-country professional databases; 1,307 physicians (PCP to respiratory specialist ratio three to one) who regularly consult with COPD, emphysema, or chronic bronchitis patients were interviewed online, by telephone or face to face. Physicians were questioned about COPD risk factors, prognosis, diagnosis, and treatment, including knowledge and application of the GOLD global strategy using patient scenarios. Physicians reported using spirometry routinely (PCPs 82%, respiratory specialists 100%; P<0.001) to diagnose COPD and frequently included validated patient-reported outcome measures (PCPs 67%, respiratory specialists 81%; P<0.001). Respiratory specialists were more likely than PCPs to report awareness of the GOLD global strategy (93% versus 58%, P<0.001); however, when presented with patient scenarios, they did not always perform better than PCPs with regard to recommending GOLD-concordant treatment options. The proportion of PCPs and respiratory specialists providing first- or second-choice treatment options concordant with GOLD strategy for a GOLD B-type patient was 38% versus 67%, respectively. For GOLD C and D-type patients, the concordant proportions for PCPs and respiratory specialists were 40% versus 38%, and 57% versus 58%, respectively. This survey of physicians in 12 countries practicing in the primary care and respiratory specialty settings showed high awareness of COPD-management guidelines. Frequent use of guideline-recommended COPD diagnostic

  11. Recurrent laryngeal nerve management in thyroid surgery: consequences of routine visualization, application of intermittent, standardized and continuous nerve monitoring.

    PubMed

    Anuwong, Angkoon; Lavazza, Matteo; Kim, Hoon Yub; Wu, Che-Wei; Rausei, Stefano; Pappalardo, Vincenzo; Ferrari, Cesare Carlo; Inversini, Davide; Leotta, Andrea; Biondi, Antonio; Chiang, Feng-Yu; Dionigi, Gianlorenzo

    2016-12-01

    The objective is to compare the consequences of routine visualization (RV) and the application of intermitted (I-IONM), standardized (S-IONM), and continuous monitoring (C-IONM) of recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) management. RV includes that 698 RLNs managed solely with visual identification. In a second period 777, RLNs were handled by the I-IONM. The third period 768 RLNs monitoring was performed according to the standards. C-IONM via VN stimulation included 626 RLNs. The following issues were analyzed and compared per each period study: RLN identification rate, branching detection, assessment of NRLN, intraoperative recognizable nerve damage, stage thyroidectomy rate, transient or definitive lesions, bilateral nerve palsy, and recovery time. Significance for nerve identification rate was achieved (p = 0.03) when the statistical analysis was applied between RV vs. S-IONM and C-IONM. Extralaryngeal bifurcation was identified in 21, 44, 43, and 46 of RLN dissected, respectively, per period (p = 0.005). The incidence of paralysis in identified and unidentified RLN was 3.8 % (107/2806) and 82 % (52/63), respectively. Rates of temporary/permanent RLNP were 16.7/1.7, 5/1.1, 4.5/1, and 3.1/0 % per period study, respectively (p = 0.07). Recognizable intraoperatively nerve damage was, respectively, 15, 45, 100, and 100 % for period study (p = 0.03). The recovery of injured nerves was significantly faster in C-IONM group. S-IONM and C-IONM cumulate 40-stage procedures. The standardized technique, guidelines adherences, and C-IONM allowed to (1) increase RLN identification; (2) reduce the severity of injuries in terms of (a) reset bilateral RLNP, (b) faster recovery time, and

  12. The management of Convulsive Refractory Status Epilepticus in adults in the UK: No consistency in practice and little access to continuous EEG monitoring.

    PubMed

    Patel, Mitesh; Bagary, Manny; McCorry, Dougall

    2015-01-01

    Convulsive Status Epilepticus (CSE) is a common neurological emergency with patients presenting with prolonged epileptic activity. Sub-optimal management is coupled with high morbidity and mortality. Continuous electroencephalogram (EEG) monitoring is considered essential by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) in the management of Convulsive Refractory Status Epilepticus (CRSE). The aim of this research was to determine current clinical practice in the management of CRSE amongst adults in intensive care units (ICU) in the UK and establish if the use of a standardised protocol requires re-enforcement within trusts. 75 randomly selected UK NHS Trusts were contacted and asked to complete a questionnaire in addition to providing their protocol for CRSE management in ICU. 55 (73%) trusts responded. While 31 (56% of responders) had a protocol available in ICU for early stages of CSE, just 21 (38%) trusts had specific guidelines if CRSE occurred. Only 23 (42%) trusts involved neurologists at any stage of management and just 18 (33%) have access to continuous EEG monitoring. This study identifies significant inconsistency in the management of CSE in ICU's across the UK. A minority of ICU units have a protocol for CRSE or access to continuous EEG monitoring despite it being considered fundamental for management and supported by NICE guidance. Copyright © 2014 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The Arabic culture of Jordan and its impacts on a wider Jordanian adoption of business continuity management.

    PubMed

    Sawalha, Ihab H; Meaton, Julia

    2012-01-01

    Culture is important to individuals and societies, as well as organisations. Failing to address cultural aspects will hinder the wider adoption and development of business continuity management (BCM) and will subsequently increase the vulnerabilities of organisations to crises, disasters and business interruptions. Three main issues are discussed in this paper. The first is the background to culture and the characteristics of the Jordanian culture. Secondly, the influence of the Arab culture on the wider adoption and development of BCM in Jordan is considered. Thirdly, the paper looks at potential factors that underpin the role of culture in the BCM process in Jordan. These issues are significant, as they represent the characteristics and influence of the Arab culture. This paper contributes to the understanding of the significance of culture in the adoption and development of BCM for organisations operating in Jordan and in the Arab world more generally. It also highlights current cultural changes and trends taking place in the Arab world in a time of huge political instability in the Middle East and Arab countries.

  14. Revenue enhancement through total quality management/continuous quality improvement (TQM/CQI) in outpatient coding and billing.

    PubMed

    Dwore, R B; Murray, B P; Parsons, R J; Smith, P M; Vorderer, L H

    1995-01-01

    To survive and thrive, rural hospitals are seeking enhanced revenues. This study focuses on outpatient laboratory and radiology coding and billing accuracy in a nonrandom sample of seven rural hospitals in a Western state. Information was gathered on (1) procedures incorrectly coded, (2) potential revenue increases from correct coding and billing, (3) barriers to implementing changes, and (4) perceived audit value. The identified major source of potential revenue enhancement was increased fees from private payers. Correct coding and billing to Medicare and Medicaid offered the potential of additional revenue. Participating administrators appreciated the validation of coding and billing practices and identification of potential enhanced revenues. Five of seven hospitals (71.4%) selectively implemented recommended changes. Complete compliance with recommended changes was limited by barriers of tradition, competition, and reimbursement, which must be overcome to realize successful implementation. Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organization's (JCAHO) new Total Quality Management/Continuous Quality Improvement (TQM/CQI) emphasis provides an opportunity for revenue enhancement through coding/billing assessments and interdepartmental focus and coordination.

  15. Fall rice straw management and winter flooding treatment effects on a subsequent soybean crop

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anders, M.M.; Windham, T.E.; McNew, R.W.; Reinecke, K.J.

    2005-01-01

    The effects of fall rice (Oryza sativa L.) straw management and winter flooding on the yield and profitability of subsequent irrigated and dryland soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] crops were studied for 3 years. Rice straw treatments consisted of disking, rolling, or standing stubble. Winter flooding treatments consisted of maintaining a minimum water depth of 10 cm by pumping water when necessary, impounding available rainfall, and draining fields to prevent flooding. The following soybean crop was managed as a conventional-tillage system or no-till system. Tillage system treatments were further divided into irrigated or dryland. Results indicated that there were no significant effects from either fall rice straw management or winter flooding treatments on soybean seed yields. Soybean seed yields for, the conventional tillage system were significantly greater than those for the no-till system for the first 2 yrs and not different in the third year. Irrigated soybean seed yields were significantly greater than those from dryland plots for all years. Net economic returns averaged over the 3 yrs were greatest ($390.00 ha-1) from the irrigated no-till system.

  16. Continuous venovenous haemodialysis (CVVHD) and continuous peritoneal dialysis (CPD) in the acute management of 21 children with inborn errors of metabolism.

    PubMed

    Arbeiter, Anja K; Kranz, Birgitta; Wingen, Anne-Margret; Bonzel, Klaus-Eugen; Dohna-Schwake, Christian; Hanssler, Ludwig; Neudorf, Ulrich; Hoyer, Peter F; Büscher, Rainer

    2010-04-01

    Newborns with inborn errors of metabolism often present with hyperammonaemic coma, requiring prompt diagnosis and specific medical therapy, nutritional support and efficient toxin removal. Little information regarding the efficacy and safety of continuous venovenous haemodialysis (CVVHD) as an option for extracorporal ammonia detoxification in children is available. Twenty-one patients with hyperammonaemia [19 neonates (mean age 4.1 +/- 2.4 days) and two children 1 and 7 years of age, respectively] were admitted to our hospital for dialysis between 1996 and 2008. Seventeen children (15 neonates), received CVVHD. Four neonates received continuous peritoneal dialysis (CPD). All started medical treatment with sodium benzoate, l-arginine hydrochloride and carnitine as well as protein-restricted parenteral diets with high caloric intake before dialysis. Plasma ammonia levels (range 464-7267 microg/dl before dialysis and 27-3317 microg/dl after dialysis) were significantly reduced by 50% within 4.7 +/- 2.5 h with CVVHD compared with 13.5 +/- 6.2 h with CPD (P < 0.0001). Plasma ammonia levels <200 microg/dl critical range were achieved within 22.4 +/- 18.1 h in CVVHD patients compared with 35.0 +/- 24.1 h with CPD. Depending on the weight and blood pressure stability of the patients, mean blood flow velocities of 9.8 +/- 3.4 ml/kg/min and mean dialysate flow rates of 3925 +/- 2398 ml/min/1.73 m(2) were employed. Blood and dialysate flows significantly correlated with ammonia clearance and decay of ammonia in vivo. Because of the severe underlying disease, 18% of CVVHD patients died compared with 50% undergoing CPD. In total, 82% of CVVHD patients survived the first 6 months after dialysis. Among these, 43% were without sequelae, 43% developed moderate mental retardation, and two (14%) developed severe mental retardation. CVVHD effectively and quickly eliminates plasma ammonia. To optimize long-term mental outcome, rapid identification and appropriate treatment of the

  17. Analysis on Fungal Diversity in Rhizosphere Soil of Continuous Cropping Potato Subjected to Different Furrow-Ridge Mulching Managements.

    PubMed

    Qin, Shuhao; Yeboah, Stephen; Xu, Xuexue; Liu, Yuhui; Yu, Bin

    2017-01-01

    Knowledge about fungi diversity following different planting patterns could improve our understanding of soil processes and thus help us to develop sustainable management strategies. The objective of this study was to determine the impact of different furrow-ridge mulching techniques on fungal diversity in rhizosphere soil under continuous cropping system. The investigated treatments were: flat plot without mulch (CK); flat plot with mulch (T1); on-ridge planting with full mulch (T2); on-furrow planting with full mulch (T3); on-ridge planting with half mulch (T4); and on-furrow planting with half mulch (T5). NGS (Illumina) methods and ITS1 sequences were used in monitoring fungi diversity of the potato rhizosphere soil. The fungi diversity in the rhizosphere soil was ranked in the order T5 > T2 > T4 > T1 > CK at the early growth stage and T2 > T3 > T1 > T4 > CK at the late growth stage of potato. The fungal communities found in the rhizosphere soil were Ascomycota, Zygomycota, Basidiomycota, Chytridiomycota, and other unidentified fungal communities. Among the fungal community in the rhizosphere soil, Ascomycota was found to be dominant fungi population, with the highest percentage (89%) in the T5 soil whereas the T2 soils had the lowest percentage (67%). The Fusarium abundance in fully-mulched treated soils was higher than in half-mulched treated soil. The dominant genus in the T4 soil was Mortierella, whereas lower populations (1-2%) of Scutellinia, Cryphonectria, Acremonium, and Alternaria were found in that treatment. Among the eumycetes, the dominant fungal class in all treated soils was the Sordariomycetes, which ranged from 57 to 85% in T2 and T5 soils, respectively. The Fusarium percentages in half-mulched treated soils (T4 and T5) were 55 and 28% lower than that of complete mulched treated soils (T2 and T3), respectively. The cluster analysis results showed that, CK, T4, and T5 treated soils and T1, T2, and T3 treated soils had similarities in microbial

  18. Analysis on Fungal Diversity in Rhizosphere Soil of Continuous Cropping Potato Subjected to Different Furrow-Ridge Mulching Managements

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Shuhao; Yeboah, Stephen; Xu, Xuexue; Liu, Yuhui; Yu, Bin

    2017-01-01

    Knowledge about fungi diversity following different planting patterns could improve our understanding of soil processes and thus help us to develop sustainable management strategies. The objective of this study was to determine the impact of different furrow-ridge mulching techniques on fungal diversity in rhizosphere soil under continuous cropping system. The investigated treatments were: flat plot without mulch (CK); flat plot with mulch (T1); on-ridge planting with full mulch (T2); on-furrow planting with full mulch (T3); on-ridge planting with half mulch (T4); and on-furrow planting with half mulch (T5). NGS (Illumina) methods and ITS1 sequences were used in monitoring fungi diversity of the potato rhizosphere soil. The fungi diversity in the rhizosphere soil was ranked in the order T5 > T2 > T4 > T1 > CK at the early growth stage and T2 > T3 > T1 > T4 > CK at the late growth stage of potato. The fungal communities found in the rhizosphere soil were Ascomycota, Zygomycota, Basidiomycota, Chytridiomycota, and other unidentified fungal communities. Among the fungal community in the rhizosphere soil, Ascomycota was found to be dominant fungi population, with the highest percentage (89%) in the T5 soil whereas the T2 soils had the lowest percentage (67%). The Fusarium abundance in fully-mulched treated soils was higher than in half-mulched treated soil. The dominant genus in the T4 soil was Mortierella, whereas lower populations (1–2%) of Scutellinia, Cryphonectria, Acremonium, and Alternaria were found in that treatment. Among the eumycetes, the dominant fungal class in all treated soils was the Sordariomycetes, which ranged from 57 to 85% in T2 and T5 soils, respectively. The Fusarium percentages in half-mulched treated soils (T4 and T5) were 55 and 28% lower than that of complete mulched treated soils (T2 and T3), respectively. The cluster analysis results showed that, CK, T4, and T5 treated soils and T1, T2, and T3 treated soils had similarities in microbial

  19. Influences of Climate Warming and Facility Management on Continuous Permafrost at Matterhorn Glacier Paradise, Zermatt, Swiss Alps.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Lorenz; Duishonakunov, Murataly; Imbery, Stephan

    2014-05-01

    In many parts of the Alps, hazardous bedrock instabilities occur more often during the past 30 years. In many cases, permafrost degradation played a central role for instability (e.g. in 1987 the Val Pola rockslide, Italy). At other events, the role of permafrost degradation is more complex or unpredictable (e.g. in 1991 the Randa rockfall, Wallis, Swiss Alps). However, instabilities in perennially frozen bedrock may also be provoked by human influence. This is exemplarily shown at touristic facilities in the Alps. Human impact on permafrost is often underestimated, or even carelessly taken into account. The tourist resort Zermatt with more than 1.8 million overnight stays per year is located at 1600 m a.s.l. and is surrounded by high mountain ranges that often reach above 4000 m. The dry and sunny climate results in a high glacier equilibrium line thus leaving space for vast non-glaciated permafrost terrain. Numerous tourist facilities provide excellent logistics and easy access to permafrost sites, and the region is thus especially suitable for permafrost research. The infrastructure erected on permafrost consists of hotels, restaurants and mountain huts, station buildings of railways, funiculars, ski lifts and installations for artificial snowing the ski-runs. Some problems at these constructions due to permafrost degradation are shown. At the Matterhorn Glacier Paradise station at an altitude of 3820 meters, todays MAAT ranges between -6 °C and -8°C. During the construction of a tunnel in 1981 bedrock temperatures were at -12°C. Over the past 30 years, these bedrock temperatures have risen to -3 to -2°C, due to the heat brought into the tunnel by facilities and more than 490,000 visitors per year. In an elevator shaft, the temperature temporarily even rose above freezing point. Several new construction sites in continuous permafrost are described and new research data is presented. Another interesting site for permafrost and ice studies at Matterhorn

  20. The effectiveness of holistic diabetic management between Siriraj Continuity of Care clinic and medical out-patient department.

    PubMed

    Chalermsri, Chalobol; Paisansudhi, Supalerg; Kantachuvesiri, Pitchaporn; Pramyothin, Pornpoj; Washirasaksiri, Chaiwat; Srivanichakorn, Weerachai; Nopmaneejumruslers, Cherdchai; Chouriyagune, Charoen; Pandejpong, Denla; Phisalprapa, Pochamana

    2014-03-01

    Diabetes mellitus is one of the most common diseases in the Thai population, and it is well known that diabetic complications could be prevented with appropriate management. Despite published guidelines, most Thai patients with diabetes do not achieve treatment goals. Siriraj Continuity of Care clinic (CC clinic) was recently established in order to provide training for medical students and internal medicine residents. It is possible that the training component in the CC clinic may contribute to better overall outcomes in type 2 diabetes mellitus (type 2 DM) patients when compared with usual care at the medical out-patient department (OPD). To compare the effectiveness of diabetic management in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients who attended the CC clinic and the medical OPD. Retrospective chart review was performed in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients who were treated at either clinic at Siriraj Hospital in 2007-2011. Baseline demographics, treatment strategies and outcomes, and participation in an appropriate health maintenance program were assessed in both groups. Seven hundred and fifty seven medical records were reviewed, including 383 patients in the CC clinic group and 374 in the OPD group. Mean HbA1c was significantly lower in the CC clinic group compared with the OPD group (7.3 +/- 0.9% and 7.8 +/- 1.3%, respectively, < 0.001). The number of patients who achieved goal HbA1c of less than 7% in CC clinic group was 123 (32.1%) compared with 91 (24.3%) in the OPD group (p = 0.039). More patients were screened for diabetic complications in the CC clinic group compared with the OPD group, including screening for diabetic neuropathy (57.4% vs. 2.1%, p < 0.001), diabetic retinopathy (56.7% vs. 36.6%, p < 0.001), and diabetic nephropathy (80.9% vs. 36.9%, p < 0.001). Patients in the CC clinic group had a higher rate of age-appropriate cancer screening than those in the OPD group (54.2% vs. 13.3%, p < 0.001 for breast cancer; 24.0% vs. 0.9%, p < 0.001 for cervical

  1. DCS: A Case Study of Identification of Knowledge and Disposition Gaps Using Principles of Continuous Risk Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norcross, Jason; Steinberg, Susan; Kundrot, Craig; Charles, John

    2011-01-01

    The Human Research Program (HRP) is formulated around the program architecture of Evidence-Risk-Gap-Task-Deliverable. Review of accumulated evidence forms the basis for identification of high priority risks to human health and performance in space exploration. Gaps in knowledge or disposition are identified for each risk, and a portfolio of research tasks is developed to fill them. Deliverables from the tasks inform the evidence base with the ultimate goal of defining the level of risk and reducing it to an acceptable level. A comprehensive framework for gap identification, focus, and metrics has been developed based on principles of continuous risk management and clinical care. Research towards knowledge gaps improves understanding of the likelihood, consequence or timeframe of the risk. Disposition gaps include development of standards or requirements for risk acceptance, development of countermeasures or technology to mitigate the risk, and yearly technology assessment related to watching developments related to the risk. Standard concepts from clinical care: prevention, diagnosis, treatment, monitoring, rehabilitation, and surveillance, can be used to focus gaps dealing with risk mitigation. The research plan for the new HRP Risk of Decompression Sickness (DCS) used the framework to identify one disposition gap related to establishment of a DCS standard for acceptable risk, two knowledge gaps related to DCS phenomenon and mission attributes, and three mitigation gaps focused on prediction, prevention, and new technology watch. These gaps were organized in this manner primarily based on target for closure and ease of organizing interim metrics so that gap status could be quantified. Additional considerations for the knowledge gaps were that one was highly design reference mission specific and the other gap was focused on DCS phenomenon.

  2. Continuous-Time Semi-Markov Models in Health Economic Decision Making: An Illustrative Example in Heart Failure Disease Management.

    PubMed

    Cao, Qi; Buskens, Erik; Feenstra, Talitha; Jaarsma, Tiny; Hillege, Hans; Postmus, Douwe

    2016-01-01

    Continuous-time state transition models may end up having large unwieldy structures when trying to represent all relevant stages of clinical disease processes by means of a standard Markov model. In such situations, a more parsimonious, and therefore easier-to-grasp, model of a patient's disease progression can often be obtained by assuming that the future state transitions do not depend only on the present state (Markov assumption) but also on the past through time since entry in the present state. Despite that these so-called semi-Markov models are still relatively straightforward to specify and implement, they are not yet routinely applied in health economic evaluation to assess the cost-effectiveness of alternative interventions. To facilitate a better understanding of this type of model among applied health economic analysts, the first part of this article provides a detailed discussion of what the semi-Markov model entails and how such models can be specified in an intuitive way by adopting an approach called vertical modeling. In the second part of the article, we use this approach to construct a semi-Markov model for assessing the long-term cost-effectiveness of 3 disease management programs for heart failure. Compared with a standard Markov model with the same disease states, our proposed semi-Markov model fitted the observed data much better. When subsequently extrapolating beyond the clinical trial period, these relatively large differences in goodness-of-fit translated into almost a doubling in mean total cost and a 60-d decrease in mean survival time when using the Markov model instead of the semi-Markov model. For the disease process considered in our case study, the semi-Markov model thus provided a sensible balance between model parsimoniousness and computational complexity.

  3. Brief-interval telephone surveys of medication adherence and asthma symptoms in the Childhood Asthma Management Program Continuation Study.

    PubMed

    Bender, Bruce G; Rankin, Allison; Tran, Zung Vu; Wamboldt, Frederick S

    2008-10-01

    Although it is known that most patients do not consistently take controller medications every day, the impact of nonadherence on asthma control is not well documented. To establish the relationship between medication adherence and symptom control in adolescents and young adults with asthma. A total of 756 adolescents and young adults diagnosed as having mild to moderate asthma on entry into the original study underwent 6 monthly telephone interviews as an ancillary project to the Childhood Asthma Management Program Continuation Study. Participants were queried about medication use and symptom control within each 1-month interview window. Strategies adopted to improve self-report accuracy included use of repeated interviews, confidential reporting to staff unknown to the participants, and use of questions focused on recent behavior. Only participants who were consistently on inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs) for the entire 6-month study interval were included. Three groups of patients were contrasted: those not on ICSs (n = 420), those on ICSs with high adherence (> or = 75% of medication taken, n = 90), and those on ICSs with low/medium adherence (< 75% of medication taken, n = 148). Participants in the low/medium adherence group reported, on average, less symptom control and more variability in wheezing, awakening at night, missed activities, and beta2-agonist use during the 6-month period, although most in this group perceived their asthma to be under good control. Despite extensive patient education and support, diminished ICS adherence was frequent and undermined symptom control in this group of adolescents and young adults with mild to moderate asthma.

  4. Brief interval telephone surveys of medication adherence and asthma symptoms in the Childhood Asthma Management Program Continuation Study

    PubMed Central

    Bender, Bruce G.; Rankin, Allison; Tran, Zung Vu; Wamboldt, Frederick S.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To establish the relationship between adherence and symptom control in adolescents and young adults with asthma. Design This was a telephone-interview study conducted as an ancillary project to the Childhood Asthma Management Program Continuation Study (CAMPCS). Setting The six monthly interviews were conducted from a single calling center in Denver, Colorado. Participants Included were 756 adolescent and young adult participants in CAMPCS, who upon entry into the original study were diagnosed to have mild to moderate asthma. Outcome measures Participants were queried about medication use and symptom control within each one-month interview window. Strategies adopted to improve self-report accuracy included use of repeat interviews, confidential reporting to staff unknown to the participants, and use of questions focused on recent behavior. Results Only participants who were consistently on or off ICS medication for the entire six-month study interval were included. Three groups of patients were contrasted: those not on ICS medication (n=420), those on ICS with High Adherence (at least 75% of medication taken, n=90), and those on ICS with Low/Medium adherence (less than 75% taken, n=148). Participants in the Low/Medium adherence group reported on average less symptom control and more variability in wheezing, awakening at night, missed activities, and beta2 agonist use over the 6-month period, although most in this group perceived their asthma to be under good control. Conclusion Despite extensive patient education and support, diminished ICS adherence was frequent and undermined symptom control in this group of adolescents and young adults with mild to moderate asthma. PMID:18939726

  5. Abundance, diversity, and seasonal population dynamics of aquatic Coleoptera and Heteroptera in rice fields: effects of direct seeding management.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Kohei; Koji, Shinsaku; Hidaka, Kazumasa; Nakamura, Koji

    2013-10-01

    Recent introduction of modern drainage systems has produced intensely dry conditions in rice farmlands and has degraded habitats for aquatic animals. In this study, we compared water beetle (Coleoptera) and water bug (Heteroptera) communities within rice fields cultivated under different management regimes: V-furrow no-till direct-seeding (DS) and conventional regimes. In DS fields, rice is sown in well-drained fields, and flooding is performed a month later than in conventional rice fields. DS fields are then continuously flooded until harvesting; unlike in conventional fields, where midseason drainage is performed in summer. We observed that DS fields supported higher densities of water beetles and water bugs than conventional fields, probably because of the high compatibility between the flooding period and the reproductive season of the insects. The species richness of water beetles was higher in DS fields than in conventional fields. Overall, DS fields showed higher water beetle and water bug abundance, but the effect was variable for individual species: seven species were more abundant in DS than in conventional fields, whereas two species showed opposite tendencies. Considering the differential responses among species to the management regimes, a mosaic of DS and conventional fields is preferable to either field alone for the conservation of aquatic insects in rice agroecosystems.

  6. Numerical Simulation of the Issues Related to Uranium Mining and Tailings Management in Continuous Permafrost Zones in Nunavut, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, X.; Booshehrian, A.; Wan, R.

    2013-12-01

    In order to understand the potential environmental effects of a uranium mining and tailings management project in northern Canada, numerical simulations have been conducted on the Kiggavik project to investigate the issues of permafrost degradation, mine pit floor heave and slope deformation, and potential inflow into the mine pits during mining and tailings disposition. The project includes the development of three open pit mines, the Main Zone, the Centre Zone, and the East Zone at the Kiggavik site, and an open pit mine and an underground mine at the Sissons site. The mined ore will be milled at the Kiggavik site and the mill tailings will be disposed back into the three open pits at Kiggavik. The mining and milling operation of the project will last about 15 to 20 years. Permafrost at the Kiggavik site extends between 220 m to 240 m below ground surface, while permafrost at the Sissons site ranges from 260 m to 280 m below ground surface. The centre zone and the east zone will be excavated within permafrost, while the main zone and the open pit at Sissons will penetrate the permafrost layer. A high artesian pressure due to the permafrost constraint was measured at both Kiggavik and Sissons sites, and was found to be higher than the ground surface. The results of numerical simulations on the behavior of the continuous permafrost layer indicate that permafrost degradation around the pits or tailings management facilities is not significant during mine operation. No open talik would form below the excavated area as a result of depositing warm tailings in both East Zone and Centre Zone pits. A thin thawed zone of 3 to 5 m on the side of Centre Zone pit is developed, while the thawed area at the bottom of the pit extends to a depth of 10 to 15 m. For the Main Zone, where the excavation breaks through the permafrost, an open talik would remain following the operation period. The warm tailings would cause a 20 m thick thawed zone along the lower sides of the pit. With

  7. 40 CFR 63.11223 - How do I demonstrate continuous compliance with the work practice and management practice standards?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... compliance with the work practice and management practice standards? 63.11223 Section 63.11223 Protection of... management practice standards? (a) For affected sources subject to the work practice standard or the management practices of a tune-up, you must conduct a biennial performance tune-up according to paragraphs...

  8. Medical Management of Pediatric Malignant Bowel Obstruction in a Patient with Burkitt's Lymphoma and Ataxia Telangiectasia Using Continuous Ambulatory Drug Delivery System.

    PubMed

    Ghoshal, Arunangshu; Salins, Naveen; Damani, Anuja; Deodhar, Jayita; Muckaden, M A

    2016-01-01

    Malignant bowel obstruction (MBO) is commonly seen in patients with advanced abdominal cancers. The incidence of pediatric MBO in a patient with Burkitt's lymphoma and ataxia telangiectasia is rare, with no published case reports till now. Conservative management of inoperable MBO results in relief of symptoms and improves quality of life. An 11-year-old boy with Burkitt's lymphoma and ataxia telangiectasia was referred to pediatric palliative care with MBO. The objective of this report is to demonstrate conservative management of pediatric MBO using continuous ambulatory drug delivery system. The patient was initiated on continuous ambulatory drug delivery (CADD) system for symptom relief. MBO was reversed with conservative management and the child was discharged on self-collapsible portable elastomeric continuous infusion pump under the supervision of a local family physician. The child remained comfortable at home for 4 weeks until his death. His parents were satisfied with the child's symptom control, quality of life, and were able to care for the child at home. In a resource-limited setting, managing patients at home using elastomeric continuous infusion pumps instead of expensive automated CADD is a practical pharmacoeconomic approach.

  9. Continuous Positive Airway Pressure for Motion Management in Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy to the Lung: A Controlled Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, Jeffrey D.; Lawrence, Yaacov R.; Appel, Sarit; Landau, Efrat; Ben-David, Merav A.; Rabin, Tatiana; Benayun, Maoz; Dubinski, Sergey; Weizman, Noam; Alezra, Dror; Gnessin, Hila; Goldstein, Adam M.; Baidun, Khader; Segel, Michael J.; Peled, Nir; Symon, Zvi

    2015-10-01

    Objective: To determine the effect of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) on tumor motion, lung volume, and dose to critical organs in patients receiving stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for lung tumors. Methods and Materials: After institutional review board approval in December 2013, patients with primary or secondary lung tumors referred for SBRT underwent 4-dimensional computed tomographic simulation twice: with free breathing and with CPAP. Tumor excursion was calculated by subtracting the vector of the greatest dimension of the gross tumor volume (GTV) from the internal target volume (ITV). Volumetric and dosimetric determinations were compared with the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. CPAP was used during treatment if judged beneficial. Results: CPAP was tolerated well in 10 of the 11 patients enrolled. Ten patients with 18 lesions were evaluated. The use of CPAP decreased tumor excursion by 0.5 ± 0.8 cm, 0.4 ± 0.7 cm, and 0.6 ± 0.8 cm in the superior–inferior, right–left, and anterior–posterior planes, respectively (P≤.02). Relative to free breathing, the mean ITV reduction was 27% (95% confidence interval [CI] 16%-39%, P<.001). CPAP significantly augmented lung volume, with a mean absolute increase of 915 ± 432 cm{sup 3} and a relative increase of 32% (95% CI 21%-42%, P=.003), contributing to a 22% relative reduction (95% CI 13%-32%, P=.001) in mean lung dose. The use of CPAP was also associated with a relative reduction in mean heart dose by 29% (95% CI 23%-36%, P=.001). Conclusion: In this pilot study, CPAP significantly reduced lung tumor motion compared with free breathing. The smaller ITV, the planning target volume (PTV), and the increase in total lung volume associated with CPAP contributed to a reduction in lung and heart dose. CPAP was well tolerated, reproducible, and simple to implement in the treatment room and should be evaluated further as a novel strategy for motion management in radiation therapy.

  10. [Continuous insulin therapy versus multiple insulin injections in the management of type 1 diabetes: a longitutinal study].

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Maria Estela Bellini; Del Roio Liberatore Junior, Raphael; Custodio, Rodrigo; Martinelli Junior, Carlos Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    To compare multiple doses of insulin and continuous insulin infusion therapy as treatment for type 1 diabetes melito. 40 patients with type 1 diabetes melito (21 female) with ages between 10 and 20 years (mean=14.2) and mean duration of diabetes of 7 years used multiple doses of insulin for at least 6 months and after that, continuous insulin infusion therapy for at least 6 months. Each one of the patients has used multiple doses of insulin and continuous insulin infusion therapy. For analysis of HbA1c, mean glycated hemoglobin levels (mHbA1c) were obtained during each treatment period (multiple doses of insulin and continuous insulin infusion therapy period). Although mHbA1c levels were lower during continuous insulin infusion therapy the difference was not statistically significant. During multiple doses of insulin, 14.2% had mHbA1c values below 7.5% vs. 35.71% while on continuous insulin infusion therapy; demonstrating better glycemic control with the use of continuous insulin infusion therapy. During multiple doses of insulin, 15-40 patients have severe hypoglycemic events versus 5-40 continuous insulin infusion therapy. No episodes of ketoacidosis events were recorded. This is the first study with this design comparing multiple doses of insulin and continuous insulin infusion therapy in Brazil showing no significant difference in HbA1c; hypoglycemic events were less frequent during continuous insulin infusion therapy than during multiple doses of insulin and the percentage of patients who achieved a HbA1c less than 7.5% was greater during continuous insulin infusion therapy than multiple doses of insulin therapy. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade de Pediatria de São Paulo. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  11. Continuous insulin therapy versus multiple insulin injections in the management of type 1 diabetes: a longitutinal study

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Maria Estela Bellini; Liberatore, Raphael Del Roio; Custodio, Rodrigo; Martinelli, Carlos Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To compare multiple doses of insulin and continuous insulin infusion therapy as treatment for type 1 diabetes mellitus. Methods: 40 patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (21 female) with ages between 10 and 20 years (mean=14.2) and mean duration of diabetes of 7 years used multiple doses of insulin for at least 6 months and after that, continuous insulin infusion therapy for at least 6 months. Each one of the patients has used multiple doses of insulin and continuous insulin infusion therapy. For analysis of HbA1c, mean glycated hemoglobin levels (mHbA1c) were obtained during each treatment period (multiple doses of insulin and continuous insulin infusion therapy period). Results: Although mHbA1c levels were lower during continuous insulin infusion therapy the difference was not statistically significant. During multiple doses of insulin, 14.2% had mHbA1c values below 7.5% vs. 35.71% while on continuous insulin infusion therapy; demonstrating better glycemic control with the use of continuous insulin infusion therapy. During multiple doses of insulin, 15–40 patients have severe hypoglycemic events versus 5–40 continuous insulin infusion therapy. No episodes of ketoacidosis events were recorded. Conclusions: This is the first study with this design comparing multiple doses of insulin and continuous insulin infusion therapy in Brazil showing no significant difference in HbA1c; hypoglycemic events were less frequent during continuous insulin infusion therapy than during multiple doses of insulin and the percentage of patients who achieved a HbA1c less than 7.5% was greater during continuous insulin infusion therapy than multiple doses of insulin therapy. PMID:26826879

  12. Explaining Electronic Learning Management Systems (ELMS) Continued Usage Intentions among Facilitators in Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) in Tanzania

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muries, Bruckse; Masele, Juma James

    2017-01-01

    This study sought to explain ELMS continued usage intentions among HEIs in Tanzania. The study was guided by main research question, "What explains ELMS continued usage intentions among facilitators in HEIs in Tanzania?" The study used descriptive cross sectional design administered to 264 respondents drawn from five universities…

  13. [Progress in improvement of continuous monoculture cropping problem in Panax ginseng by controlling soil-borne disease management].

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui; Dong, Lin-Lin; Xu, Jiang; Chen, Jun-Wen; Li, Xi-Wen; Chen, Shi-Lin

    2016-11-01

    The continuous monoculture cropping problem severely has hindered the land resource of Panax ginseng cultivation and threatened the sustainable development of ginseng industry. There are comprehensive factors causing the continuous monoculture cropping problem, such as deterioration of soil physical and chemical properties, accumulation of allelochemical, increase of pesticide residue and heavy metal, imbalance of rhizospheric micro-ecosystem, and increase of soil-borne diseases. Among soil-borne disease was one of the key factors. More than 40 soil-borne diseases have been reported in the ginseng cultivation, especially, the diseases were more serious in the ginseng replanting land. Here main soil-borne diseases and their prevention way have been summarized, and we try to provide the effective improvement strategy of continuous monoculture cropping problem focusing on the disease control and offer reference for overcoming the ginseng continuous monoculture cropping problem. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  14. 12 CFR 225.83 - What are the consequences of failing to continue to meet applicable capital and management...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... either its composite rating or its rating for management is not at least satisfactory. (c) Execution of....S.C. 1831o). See 12 CFR 6.3(b)-(c), 208.42(b)-(c), and 325.102(b)-(c). (ii) Well managed. A company... paragraph (c)(1) of this section if the Board determines that granting additional time is appropriate...

  15. The Lower Sevier River Basin Crop Monitor and Forecast Decision Support System: Exploiting Landsat Imagery to Provide Continuous Information to Farmers and Water Managers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Rua, A. F.; Walker, W. R.; McKee, M.

    2013-12-01

    The last century has seen a large number of innovations in agriculture such as better policies for water control and management, upgraded water conveyance, irrigation, distribution, and monitoring systems, and better weather forecasting products. In spite of this, irrigation management and irrigation water deliveries by farmers/water managers is still based on factors like water share amounts, tradition, and past experience on irrigation. These factors are not necessarily related to the actual crop water use; they are followed because of the absence of related information provided in a timely manner at an affordable cost. Thus, it is necessary to develop means to deliver continuous and personalized information about crop water requirements to water users/managers at the field and irrigation system levels so managers at these levels can better quantify the required versus available water for irrigation during the irrigation season. This study presents a new decision support system (DSS) platform that addresses the absence of information on actual crop water requirements and crop performance by providing continuous updated farm-based crop water use along with other farm performance indicators such as crop yield and farm management to irrigators and water managers. This DSS exploits the periodicity of the Landsat Satellite Mission (8 to 16 days, depending on the period of interest) to provide remote monitoring at the individual field and irrigation system levels. The Landsat satellite images are converted into information about crop water use, yield performance and field management through application of state-of-the-art semi-physical and statistical algorithms that provide this information at a pixel basis that are ultimately aggregated to field and irrigation system levels. A version of the DSS has been implemented for the agricultural lands in the Lower Sevier River, Utah, and has been operational since the beginning of the 2013 irrigation season. The main goal of

  16. Ultrasound-guided continuous thoracic paravertebral catheter management of acute rib pain secondary to cystic fibrosis exacerbation in a pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Cutshall, Chad; Hutchins, Jacob

    2015-02-01

    An ultrasound-guided thoracic paravertebral catheter was placed at T8 in a 15-year-old girl with cystic fibrosis and right-sided chest pain from avulsion of the eighth rib, secondary to coughing. She was discharged home after respiratory stabilization and returned to school with the catheter in place. We report the effective use of an ultrasound-guided continuous thoracic paravertebral block in the management of acute rib pain in a pediatric patient with cystic fibrosis.

  17. Carbon and Phosphorus in soil particulate fraction: effect of continuous agriculture, tillage and fertilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyngaard, N.; Echeverrıa, H. E.; Vidaurreta, A.; Picone, L. I.; Divito, G. A.

    2012-04-01

    In Argentinean Pampas region, the practice of intensive agriculture has diminished total organic carbon (TOC) content in soil. This degradation process can impact over phosphorus (P) organic fractions associated to it, and therefore limit soil capacity to provide P through mineralization. Along this line, P content in soil particulate fraction (PF) has been proposed as an index to estimate this capacity. The aims of this work were to evaluate (1) the effect of continuous agriculture, tillage and P fertilization over TOC and P fractions content in soil and PF, and (2) the stability of P-PF as a mineralization index. To this end, a long term experiment initiated in 2001 in Balcarce, Argentina, under continuous agriculture, was analyzed. There, two tillage systems - conventional till (CT) and no till (NT) - and two fertilization treatments - nitrogen (N) and N + P (NP) - were evaluated. Phosphorus rate was 30 kg ha-1 year-1. In each plot, the following parameters were determined in 2002, 2005, 2008 and 2011: TOC, P Bray, total P (Pt), inorganic P (Pi), and organic P (Po) content in the whole soil and in the PF. Also, C supply by residues and P soil balance during the experiment were calculated, and the P sorption capacity was determined in samples from 2011. C supply was greater in CT (7% relative to NT) and in NP (14% relative to N). However, TOC in soil was not modified neither by tillage or fertilization. Even though, C in the PF decreased (3% annually) by the use of continuous agriculture. This reduction was positively associated to the one observed in other soil properties as Pt, Pi and Po in the PF. P fertilization lessened this reduction in Pt (18,9 mg kg-1 in N and 23,1 mg kg-1 in NP in 2011) and Pi (4,2 mg kg-1 in N and 6,2 mg kg-1 in NP in 2011), but not in Po. This indicates that, Po is affected by management practices and, contrary to Pt, is stable to fertilization. Therefore Po can be studied as a potential P mineralization index. The difference among P

  18. Comparisons of annual no-till spring cereal cropping systems in the Pacific Northwest

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) – summer fallow (WWF) has been the prevalent rotation in the low rainfall zone of the Pacific Northwest (PNW) for more than 130 years; however this rotation is characterized by poor soil health, poor environmental sustainability, and high pest incidence. A 6-year ...

  19. Response of carbon dioxide emissions to warming under no-till and conventional till systems

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    No-tillage (NT) tends to have greater soil organic carbon (SOC) stored in the surface soil layer relative to (conventional tillage) CT but few studies have addressed the stability of the SOC under conditions of global warming. An open warming experiment was conducted in situ by infrared heating of l...

  20. Steers grazing of a rye cover crop influences growth of rye and no-till cotton

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Small grain cover crops offer opportunities for grazing but effects on following row crops are not well understood. From 1999 through 2008, stocker steers sequence grazed small grains in a 2-paddock rye-cotton-wheat-fallow- rye rotation. Treatments imposed on rye included 1) zero-grazing from 1999; ...

  1. Effects of Subsurface Applying Poultry Litter in Pasture and No-Till Systems

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Poultry litter provides a rich nutrient source for crops, but the usual practice of surface-broadcasting litter can degrade water quality by allowing storm runoff to transport nutrients into streams and lakes, while much of the ammonia-N escapes into the atmosphere. We developed and tested a knifin...

  2. No-till corn productivity in a Southeastern United States ultisoil amended with poultry litter

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The emerging potential for large-scale renewable bio-energy production has substantially increased the price and demand of corn (Zea mays L.). In order to compete in the new corn market producers in the southeastern USA need to overcome the region’s soil and water limitations. One option is adopting...

  3. Nitrogen source and placement effects on soil nitrous oxide emissions from no-till corn

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Nitrogen (N) application generally results in increased nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from cropland. Commercially available controlled-release N fertilizers were evaluated for their potential to reduce N2O emissions from a clay loam soil compared to conventionally used granular urea and urea-ammoni...

  4. Residue harvest effects on irrigated, no-till corn yield and nitrogen response

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Corn (Zea mays L.) residue harvest is common in Nebraska, primarily for feeding of beef cattle. Applied N immobilization is expected to be less with residue harvest due to reduced microbial activity for digestion of high CN organic material. Residue reduction may affect subsequent crop yield and res...

  5. Continuing Education for the Health Professions. Developing, Managing, and Evaluating Programs for Maximum Impact on Patient Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Joseph S., Ed.; And Others

    Advice on making continuing education (CE) responsive to the practice needs of professionals in medicine, dentistry, nursing, pharmacy, allied health, and public health is provided in 16 chapters. Attention is directed to: establishing realistic goals, tailoring programs to specific needs, recruiting subject matter experts, evaluating programs and…

  6. Continuing Education for the Health Professions. Developing, Managing, and Evaluating Programs for Maximum Impact on Patient Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Joseph S., Ed.; And Others

    Advice on making continuing education (CE) responsive to the practice needs of professionals in medicine, dentistry, nursing, pharmacy, allied health, and public health is provided in 16 chapters. Attention is directed to: establishing realistic goals, tailoring programs to specific needs, recruiting subject matter experts, evaluating programs and…

  7. An Example of Continuous Information on the Basic Activities of a University. Programme on Institutional Management in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jadot, Jean

    The dangers in abstract management within the university setting are described and considered in terms of the development of techniques that would enable the university to fully comprehend the content of its activities. The "Report on Unit Activities" at the Catholic University of Louvain is reviewed, dealing with the two-yearly…

  8. A Study of the Continuing Education Needs and Interests of Managers and Professional People in South-Central Oregon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Easton, Edison E.

    Questionnaires were sent rendomly to 980 individuals to determine educational needs and interests of supervisors, managers, administrators, and professional people in south-central Oregon. The object was to determine the desired subject matter, time, place, approach, and instructor, and the influence of age, education, location, size of…

  9. Inputs and losses by surface runoff and subsurface leaching for pastures managed by continuous or rotational stocking

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pasture management practices can affect forage quality and production, and animal health and production as well as impacting surface and ground water quality. In a 5-yr study, conducted at the North Appalachian Experimental Watershed near Coshocton, Ohio, we compared the effects of two contrasting g...

  10. The efficacy of continuous fascia iliaca compartment block for pain management in burn patients undergoing skin grafting procedures.

    PubMed

    Cuignet, Olivier; Pirson, Jean; Boughrouph, Jenna; Duville, Diane

    2004-04-01

    Postoperative pain from split skin donor sites is often more intense than the pain at the grafted site. In this prospective, randomized, double-blind study we assessed the efficacy of a continuous fascia iliaca compartment block (FICB) in reducing the pain at the thigh donor site. Twenty patients, with a total burn surface area of 16% +/- 13% (mean +/- SD) were randomized 1:1 to receive either ropivacaine 0.2% or saline 0.9%. All patients received a general anesthesic followed by preincision continuous FICB with 40 mL of the randomized solution, then an infusion of 10 mL/h of either ropivacaine or saline until the first dressing change (72 h later). Postoperative analgesia consisted of propacetamol 2g/6h, IV patient-controlled analgesia of morphine chlorhydrate (2 mg/mL), and morphine hydrochlorate 0.5 mg/kg PO once 60 min before first dressing change. The visual analog scale (VAS) scores were compared using the Mann-Whitney U-test preoperatively, 24 and 48 h postoperatively, and during the first dressing change. The cumulative morphine consumption was compared with repeated-measures analysis of variance followed by Scheffé's method if indicated. Patients with continuous FICB had significantly reduced postoperative morphine consumption at all time points (23 +/- 20 versus 88 +/- 29 mg after 72 h, study versus control groups, respectively; P < 0.05). In both groups, VAS scores remained low but were only significantly lower for patients with continuous FICB during the first dressing change (3 [1] versus 7 [3]; median [interquartile range]; P < 0.05). We conclude that continuous FICB is an efficient method for diminishing pain at the thigh donor site. (250 words) Postoperative pain at the split skin donor sites is often more intense than the pain at the grafted site. This prospective, randomized, double-blind study assessed the efficacy of a continuous fascia iliaca compartment block in reducing the pain at the thigh donor site.

  11. Using evidence-integrated e-learning to enhance case management continuing education for psychiatric nurses: a randomised controlled trial with follow-up.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wen-I; Rong, Jiin-Ru; Liu, Chieh-Yu

    2014-11-01

    E-learning is a flexible strategy to improve nurses' knowledge of case management, but there are methodological limitations in previous research into the effectiveness of such programs. To describe the development and effectiveness of an evidence-integrated e-learning program in case management continuing education for Taiwanese psychiatric nurses. Multiple methods were adopted to develop the program and a randomised controlled trial with repeated measures was employed to evaluate it. The e-learning program was developed in four stages: (1) systematic review of literature; (2) needs assessment through a national survey and focus group; (3) development of learning materials; and (4) pilot test. Following program development, psychiatric nurses were recruited and randomly allocated into an experimental or comparison group. The experimental group participated in an e-learning continuing education program. The case management knowledge index with sufficient reliability and validity and a satisfaction survey were used to determine the outcomes. A generalised estimating equation was used to assess the difference between the 2 groups before, after, and at 3 months follow-up. The learning material comprised 5 simulated learning modules, self-assessment questions, learning cases, sharing experiences, and learning resources. A total of 200 participants completed the 3 measurements. Knowledge scores in the experimental group significantly exceeded those in the comparison group after the program and at the 3-month follow-up. Participants reported positive learning perceptions. The program provides an evidence-based educational resource for nursing continuing education in case management. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Continuity and change?: Exploring reactions to a guided self-management intervention in a randomised controlled trial for IBS with reference to prior experience of managing a long term condition

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Anne; Lee, Victoria; Kennedy, Anne

    2007-01-01

    Self-care interventions are promoted as effective strategies for improving the quality of life and health outcomes for individuals with long-term health conditions. Outcome measures used in evaluations using Randomised Controlled Trials (RCTs) are not designed to consider patients' prior management strategies and experience of illness. Yet the experience of illness literature suggests that adjusting to living with chronic illness, together with broader contextual influences, are likely to be relevant to understanding responses to self-management initiatives. Using group and individual interview data we attempt to illuminate the transposition of IBS from a condition unsatisfactorily managed by medicine to one successfully managed within the life worlds of individuals. If routine embedding of complex interventions depends on the accomplishment of integration and workability in patients' everyday lives then the design and evaluation of such interventions should view participation as part of a process of continuity as well as change. Responses to formal self-management can be extended beyond psychological and other quantitatively measured outcomes. A useful addendum to trial outcomes for self-management education is an understanding of change as being inextricably linked to people's previous attempts to, and experience of, managing long-term conditions. We suggest that the benefits of understanding the prior experience of managing illness and contact with health services include the acceptability and workability of complex interventions in patients' everyday lives. PMID:17316438

  13. Army Corps of Engineers. Recent Changes Have Reduced the Use of Continuing Contracts, but Management Processes Need to Be Improved

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    that were awarded during the 2-year time frame but were missing from the Corps’ quarterly reports by querying the Corps’ Primavera database.3 We did...not assess the reliability of the Primavera database, but we verified information from that... Primavera has an optional field to track continuing contracts that was added to the database in early 2007. Page 17 GAO-09-552 Army Corps of Engineers

  14. Effects of Crop Rotation, N Management, Tillage, and Controlled Drainage on nitrate-N Loss in Drain Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, L.; Malone, R.; Ahuja, L.; Kanwar, R. S.

    2007-12-01

    Accurate simulation of agricultural management effects on N loss in tile drainage is vitally important for understanding hypoxia in the Gulf of Mexico. An experimental study was initiated in 1978 at Nashua, Iowa of the USA to study long-term effects of tillage, crop rotation, and N management practices on subsurface drainage flow and associated N losses. The Root Zone Water Quality Model (RZWQM) was applied to evaluate management effects (tillage, crop rotation, N application, and controlled drainage) on N loss in drain flow. RZWQM simulated the observed increase in N concentration in drain flow with increasing tillage intensity from NT (no-till) to RT (ridge till) to CP (chisel plow) and to MP (moldboard plow). It also adequately simulated tillage effects on yearly drain flow and yearly N loss in drain flow. On the other hand, RZWQM adequately simulated lower yearly drain flow and lower flow-weighted N concentration in drain flow under CS (corn-soybean) and SC (soybean-corn) than under CC (continuous corn). The model also simulated higher N loss from fertilizer-N applications than from manure-N applications. Applying the newly suggested N management practice for the Midwest of controlled drainage, the model simulated a 30% reduction in drain flow and a 29% decrease in N losses in drain flow under controlled drainage (CD) compared to free drainage (FD). With most of the simulations in reasonably close agreement with observations, we concluded that RZWQM is a promising tool for quantifying the relative effects of tillage, crop rotation, N application, and controlled drainage on N loss in drainage flow. Further improvements on simulated management effects on N mineralization and plant N uptake are needed, however.

  15. 12 CFR 225.83 - What are the consequences of failing to continue to meet applicable capital and management...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... for purposes of section 38 of the Federal Deposit Insurance Act (12 U.S.C. 1831o). See 12 CFR 6.3(b)-(c), 208.42(b)-(c), and 325.102(b)-(c). (ii) Well managed. A company becomes aware that a depository... notice from the appropriate Federal or state banking agency that either its composite rating or...

  16. Continuity of clinical management and information across care levels: perceptions of users of different healthcare areas in the Catalan national health system.

    PubMed

    Waibel, Sina; Vargas, Ingrid; Aller, Marta-Beatriz; Coderch, Jordi; Farré, Joan; Vázquez, M Luisa

    2016-09-02

    The integration of health care has become a priority in most health systems, as patients increasingly receive care from several professionals in various different settings and institutions, particularly those with chronic conditions and multi-morbidities. Continuity of care is defined as one patient experiencing care over time as connected and coherent with his or her health needs and personal circumstances. The objective is to analyse perceptions of continuity of clinical management and information across care levels and the factors influencing it, from the viewpoint of users of the Catalan national health system. A descriptive-interpretative qualitative study was conducted using a phenomenological approach. A two-stage theoretical sample was selected: (i) the study contexts: healthcare areas in Catalonia with different services management models; (ii) users ≥ 18 years of age who were attended to at both care levels for the same health problem. Data were collected by means of individual semi-structured interviews with patients (n = 49). All interviews were recorded and transcribed. A thematic content analysis was conducted segmented by study area, with a mixed generation of categories and triangulation of analysts. Patients in all three areas generally perceived that continuity of clinical management across levels existed, on referring to consistent care (same diagnosis and treatment by doctors of both care levels, no incompatibilities of prescribed medications, referrals across levels when needed) and accessibility across levels (timeliness of appointments). In terms of continuity of information, patients in most areas mentioned the existence of information sharing via computer and its adequate usage. Only a few discontinuity elements were reported such as long waiting times for specific tests performed in secondary care or insufficient use of electronic medical records by locum doctors. Different factors influencing continuity were identified by

  17. The Care management Information system for the home Care Network (SI GESCAD): support for care coordination and continuity of care in the Brazilian Unified health system (SUS).

    PubMed

    Pires, Maria Raquel Gomes Maia; Gottems, Leila Bernarda Donato; Vasconcelos Filho, José Eurico; Silva, Kênia Lara; Gamarski, Ricardo

    2015-06-01

    The present article describes the development of the initial version of the Brazilian Care Management Information System for the Home Care Network (SI GESCAD). This system was created to enhance comprehensive care, care coordination and the continuity of care provided to the patients, family and caretakers of the Home Care (HC) program. We also present a reflection on the contributions, limitations and possibilities of the SI GESCAD within the scope of the Home Care Network of the Brazilian Unified Health System (RAS-AD). This was a study on technology production based on a multi-method protocol. It discussed software engineering and human-computer interaction (HCI) based on user-centered design, as well as evolutionary and interactive software process (prototyping and spiral). A functional prototype of the GESCAD was finalized, which allowed for the management of HC to take into consideration the patient's social context, family and caretakers. The system also proved to help in the management of activities of daily living (ADLs), clinical care and the monitoring of variables associated with type 2 HC. The SI GESCAD allowed for a more horizontal work process for HC teams at the RAS-AD/SUS level of care, with positive repercussions on care coordination and continuity of care.

  18. Continuing Professional Education of Insurance and Risk Management Practitioners: A Comparative Case Study of Customer Service Representatives, Insurance Agents and Risk Managers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krauss, George E.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to understand how selected insurance practitioners learn and developed in their practices setting. The selected insurance practitioners (collectively customer service representatives, insurance agents, and risk managers) are responsible for the counseling and placement of insurance products and the implementation of…

  19. Continuing Professional Education of Insurance and Risk Management Practitioners: A Comparative Case Study of Customer Service Representatives, Insurance Agents and Risk Managers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krauss, George E.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to understand how selected insurance practitioners learn and developed in their practices setting. The selected insurance practitioners (collectively customer service representatives, insurance agents, and risk managers) are responsible for the counseling and placement of insurance products and the implementation of…

  20. Defining the Continuing Education Professional.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    English, John K.

    1992-01-01

    A job description for continuing education practitioners includes 11 domains and the job responsibilities for each: client management, external marketing, internal marketing, strategic planning, administration, program development, technology management, adult learning, personal development, career management, and community and professional…

  1. Defining the Continuing Education Professional.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    English, John K.

    1992-01-01

    A job description for continuing education practitioners includes 11 domains and the job responsibilities for each: client management, external marketing, internal marketing, strategic planning, administration, program development, technology management, adult learning, personal development, career management, and community and professional…

  2. Engineering youth service system infrastructure: Hawaii's continued efforts at large-scale implementation through knowledge management strategies.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Brad J; Mueller, Charles W; Higa-McMillan, Charmaine; Okamura, Kelsie H; Chang, Jaime P; Slavin, Lesley; Shimabukuro, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Hawaii's Child and Adolescent Mental Health Division provides a unique illustration of a youth public mental health system with a long and successful history of large-scale quality improvement initiatives. Many advances are linked to flexibly organizing and applying knowledge gained from the scientific literature and move beyond installing a limited number of brand-named treatment approaches that might be directly relevant only to a small handful of system youth. This article takes a knowledge-to-action perspective and outlines five knowledge management strategies currently under way in Hawaii. Each strategy represents one component of a larger coordinated effort at engineering a service system focused on delivering both brand-named treatment approaches and complimentary strategies informed by the evidence base. The five knowledge management examples are (a) a set of modular-based professional training activities for currently practicing therapists, (b) an outreach initiative for supporting youth evidence-based practices training at Hawaii's mental health-related professional programs, (c) an effort to increase consumer knowledge of and demand for youth evidence-based practices, (d) a practice and progress agency performance feedback system, and (e) a sampling of system-level research studies focused on understanding treatment as usual. We end by outlining a small set of lessons learned and a longer term vision for embedding these efforts into the system's infrastructure.

  3. Continuous electroencephalogram detection of non-convulsive seizures in the pediatric intensive care unit: review of the utility and impact on management and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Non-convulsive seizures (NCS) are common among critically ill children with acute encephalopathy. Continuous electroencephalogram (CEEG) monitoring is an indispensable tool to detect NCS, which is essential to guiding management and assessing prognosis. Risk factors for NCS are highest in pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) patients with altered mental status (AMS) and a recently witnessed clinical seizure, acute changes on neuroimaging, and/or interictal abnormalities on CEEG. Screening for at least 24 hours in at risk pediatric populations is ideal, but around half of NCS may be detected within the first hour. Rapid treatment of prolonged seizures or status epilepticus is critical, as higher seizure burdens have been associated with poorer outcomes in critically ill children. This review integrates current information on critically ill children with AMS and the use of CEEGs, risk factors for NCS, duration of CEEG monitoring, and how the detection of NCS impacts management and outcomes. PMID:26835390

  4. Identifying professional education gaps and barriers in multiple myeloma patient care: findings of the Managing Myeloma Continuing Educational Initiative Advisory Committee.

    PubMed

    Raje, Noopur; Faiman, Beth; Harvey, R Donald; Kurtin, Sandra E; Lonial, Sagar; Kumar, Shaji K; Cohen, Adam D; Conde, Miguel A; Giralt, Sergio A; Recine, Marie Sabo; Tombler, Eugene R; Stadtmauer, Edward; Jagannath, Sundar; Anderson, Kenneth C

    2014-10-01

    Advances in the past decade and a half have led to unprecedented improved outcomes for patients with multiple myeloma (MM), and this disease appears to be transitioning to one more characteristic of a chronic disease in large part due to rapid translation of clinical insights into practice at the community level. Although evidence-based guidelines and consensus recommendations remain an important resource for managing cancer patients, they do not fill the gap between the principles of disease management today and the translation of tailoring treatment for individual patient needs. Thus, there is a continuing need for concise, focused educational activities and resources that facilitate improved knowledge and understanding of appropriate, individualized therapeutic strategies for assessing and caring for patients with MM. The next several years will truly be a time of shifting paradigms in the treatment of MM in which new agents will be approved, response criteria will be updated, and new approaches to risk assessment and monitoring minimal residual disease will evolve and enter practice. New groundbreaking therapeutic approaches, such as immunotherapy, might result in significant changes in how MM is treated and managed over the entire life cycle of the disease. Even the definition of the disease might be further amended as insights grow regarding who should be treated and who might benefit more from observation. As such, oncology clinicians will have to carefully review and update their management approaches accordingly even as they begin to focus even more on the survivorship needs of their MM patients.

  5. Retrospective evaluation of continuous rate infusion of regular insulin intravenously for the management of feline diabetic ketoacidosis.

    PubMed

    Bollinger, Pamela N; Moore, Lisa E

    2015-01-01

    The use and efficacy of continuous rate infusion (CRI) of regular insulin intravenously for the treatment of feline diabetic ketoacidosis was retrospectively evaluated. The study focused on the rate of glucose decline, time to resolution of inappetence, time to long-term injectable insulin, and length of hospital stay. Review of medical records from 2009 to 2011 identified 10 cases that met the inclusion criteria. Six cats were existing diabetics, 3 of whom had recent insulin changes. Five cats had concurrent diseases. The mean time to long-term injectable insulin was 55 hours. The mean length of hospitalization was 3.8 days. Five cats survived to discharge. In 5 patients, an insulin CRI permitted a short hospital stay and transition to long-term injectable insulin. Many cats with diabetic ketosis or diabetic ketoacidosis are prior diabetics with concurrent disease and/or a history of recent insulin changes.

  6. Cooling Trends from Agricultural Management Practices that Conserve Soil Carbon Resources in the North American Northern Great Plains: Important First Steps in the Transition toward a BECCS Economy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoy, P. C.; Gerken, T.; Bromley, G. T.; Tang Che Ing, A.; Morgan, M.; Wood, D.; Ahmed, S.; Brad, B.; Brookshire, J.; Haggerty, J.; Jarchow, M.; McVay, K.; Miller, P.; Peyton, B.; Rashford, B.; Spangler, L.; Swanson, D.; Taylor, S.; Torrion, J.; Poulter, B.

    2016-12-01

    The transition toward the Bio-energy with Carbon Capture and Storage (BECCS) economy may have unintended climate drawbacks, but also benefits. Parts of the North American northern Great Plains have experienced a remarkable 6 W m-2 decrease in summertime radiative forcing since the 1970s. Extreme temperature events now occur less frequently, maximum temperatures have decreased by some 2 °C, and precipitation has increased by 10 mm per decade in some areas. This regional trend toward a cooler and wetter summer climate has coincided with changes in agricultural management. Namely, the practice of keeping fields fallow during summer (hereafter `summerfallow') has declined from 15 Mha in the 1970s to 2 Mha at the present in the Canadian Prairie Provinces, and from 16 Mha to 6 Mha in the US, with the largest declines in the Northern Plains. In addition to potential climate impacts, replacing summerfallow with no-till cropping systems results in lesser soil carbon losses - or even gains - and usually confers economic benefits. In other words, replacing summerfallow with no-till cropping may have resulted in a `win-win-win' scenario for climate, soil carbon, and farm-scale economics. The interaction between carbon, climate, and the economy in this region - and the precise domain that has experienced cooling - are still unknown, which limits our ability to forecast the dynamics of the coupled human-climate system during the transition toward a BECCS economy. Here, we use eddy covariance measurements to demonstrate that summerfallow results in carbon losses during the growing season of the same magnitude (ca. 100 g C m-2 per growing season) as carbon uptake by dryland crops. We use surface-atmosphere energy flux measurements to model atmospheric boundary layer and lifted condensation level heights to demonstrate that observed regional changes in near-surface humidity (of up to 7%) are necessary to simulate observed increases in convective precipitation. We analyze climate

  7. Using disease-state management as the key to promoting employer sponsorship of medical nutrition therapy (continuing education credit).

    PubMed

    Israel, D A; McCabe, M

    1999-05-01

    The purpose of this project was to design, implement, and improve a nationwide medical nutrition therapy (MNT) intervention program for nutritionally at-risk employees and their dependents and retirees (hereinafter referred to as clients) with a Fortune 100 company (Texas Instruments, Dallas, Tex) with a dispersed population of 80,000. Preferred Nutrition Therapists (PNT), a network of registered dietitians, with the assistance of the Texas Instruments Health Promotion and Benefits Department, identified International Classification of Diseases, 9th ed (ICD-9), codes for which MNT intervention was appropriate. PNT then negotiated a contract with the Texas Instruments Health Promotion and Benefits Department and implemented clients' self-referral process. The main challenge was to promote utilization of a new service from an outside vendor (PNT) and to measure outcomes in meaningful ways. The goal was to use MNT as a tool to prevent the progression of clients' diseases to states that require more costly treatments. PNT used a continuous quality improvement process to refine the system and improve information gathering and reporting, by providing quarterly reports to the Health Promotion and Benefits Department. These reports summarized the outcomes for all clients seen at least 3 times during the quarter. The cost was less than $0.35 per member per month (less than the employer spent on advertising the program), and 0.5% of the population requested MNT during the first year of implementation (about what was expected for a new carveout benefit).

  8. [Continuous monitoring of oxygen saturation in the jugular vein bulb in severe head injuries. Management and case reviews].

    PubMed

    Larráyoz Iriarte, J M; Mariñelarena Huárriz, A C; Martínez de Losa Carvajal, S

    1999-01-01

    Since october 1996, the Intensive Care Unit of the Hospital of Navarra has carried out continuous monitoring of oxygen saturation in the bulb of the internal jugular vein (SjO2). This technique, used in patients with severe cranioencephalic trauma (SCET), is designed to facilitate care an ensure the use of adequate therapeutic measures in such patients. The present study has two parts: In the first part, SjO2 monitoring is defined and catheter insertion techniques, technical problems, and nursing care are described. In the second part, a retrospective review is made of patients admitted to the unit from october 1996 to october 1997 who underwent SjO2 monitoring. A total of 11 cases are included, the common features of which were: SCET, intracranial pressure over 20 mmHg, Glasgow score of 8 or less, and abnormal CAT study. This study provides a basis for developing a nursing protocol because familiarity with the technique allows problems to be prevented and/or resolved.

  9. Continuous reinfusion of succus entericus associated with fistuloclysis in the management of a complex jejunal fistula on the abdominal wall.

    PubMed

    Pflug, Adriano M; Utiyama, Edivaldo M; Fontes, Belchor; Faro, Mario; Rasslan, Samir

    2013-01-01

    Fistuloclysis is an alternative method for enteral nutrition infusion, and has been successfully employed for the management of patients with high output small bowel fistula. However it has some deficiencies also. A 42-year-old woman with multiple high output enterocutaneous fistula was submitted to fistuloclysis with reinfusion of chyme, after a period of several complications due to parenteral nutrition. Enteral nutrition provide better nutrition and fewer complications than parenteral nutrition. The enterocutaneous fistula usually does not allow enteral nutrition, however the use of fystuloclysis can fix this issue. The reinfusion of chyme provide the possibility of oral intake and better control of hydroeletrolitics disorders. More studies on the physiological effects of the chyme recirculation could add more data contributing to the clarification of this complex issue, but we believe that patients with high output and very proximal enterocutaneous fistula can be sucessfully treated with fistuloclysis and recirculation of chyme. Copyright © 2013 Surgical Associates Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Continued experience with physical examination alone for evaluation and management of penetrating zone 2 neck injuries: results of 145 cases.

    PubMed

    Sekharan, J; Dennis, J W; Veldenz, H C; Miranda, F; Frykberg, E R

    2000-09-01

    this approach, which is comparable to arteriography in accuracy but less costly and noninvasive. Long-term follow-up is needed to confirm this management option.

  11. Use of Continuous Plankton Recorder information in support of marine management: applications in fisheries, environmental protection, and in the study of ecosystem response to environmental change [review article

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brander, K. M.; Dickson, R. R.; Edwards, M.

    2003-08-01

    The Continuous Plankton Recorder (CPR) survey was conceived from the outset as a programme of applied research designed to assist the fishing industry. Its survival and continuing vigour after 70 years is a testament to its utility, which has been achieved in spite of great changes in our understanding of the marine environment and in our concerns over how to manage it. The CPR has been superseded in several respects by other technologies, such as acoustics and remote sensing, but it continues to provide unrivalled seasonal and geographic information about a wide range of zooplankton and phytoplankton taxa. The value of this coverage increases with time and provides the basis for placing recent observations into the context of long-term, large-scale variability and thus suggesting what the causes are likely to be. Information from the CPR is used extensively in judging environmental impacts and producing quality status reports (QSR); it has shown the distributions of fish stocks, which had not previously been exploited; it has pointed to the extent of ungrazed phytoplankton production in the North Atlantic, which was a vital element in establishing the importance of carbon sequestration by phytoplankton. The CPR continues to be the principal source of large-scale, long-term information about the plankton ecosystem of the North Atlantic. It has recently provided extensive information about the biodiversity of the plankton and about the distribution of introduced species. It serves as a valuable example for the design of future monitoring of the marine environment and it has been essential to the design and implementation of most North Atlantic plankton research.

  12. HTA decision support system for sustainable business continuity management in hospitals. The case of surgical activity at the University Hospital in Florence.

    PubMed

    Miniati, Roberto; Dori, Fabrizio; Cecconi, Giulio; Gusinu, Roberto; Niccolini, Fabrizio; Gentili, Guido Biffi

    2013-01-01

    A fundamental element of the social and safety function of a health structure is the need to guarantee continuity of clinical activity through the continuity of technology. This paper aims to design a Decision Support System (DSS) for medical technology evaluations based on the use of Key Performance Indicators (KPI) in order to provide a multi-disciplinary valuation of a technology in a health structure. The methodology used in planning the DSS followed the following key steps: the definition of relevant KPIs, the development of a database to calculate the KPIs, the calculation of the defined KPIs and the resulting study report. Finally, the clinical and economic validation of the system was conducted though a case study of Business Continuity applied in the operating department of the Florence University Hospital AOU Careggi in Italy. A web-based support system was designed for HTA in health structures. The case study enabled Business Continuity Management (BCM) to be implemented in a hospital department in relation to aspects of a single technology and the specific clinical process. Finally, an economic analysis of the procedure was carried out. The system is useful for decision makers in that it precisely defines which equipment to include in the BCM procedure, using a scale analysis of the specific clinical process in which the equipment is used. In addition, the economic analysis shows how the cost of the procedure is completely covered by the indirect costs which would result from the expenses incurred from a broken device, hence showing the complete auto-sustainability of the methodology.

  13. The effects of a team-based continuous quality improvement intervention on the management of primary care: a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Engels, Yvonne; van den Hombergh, Pieter; Mokkink, Henk; van den Hoogen, Henk; van den Bosch, Wil; Grol, Richard

    2006-01-01

    Aim To study the effects of a team-based model for continuous quality improvement (CQI) on primary care practice management. Design of study Randomised controlled trial. Setting Twenty-six intervention and 23 control primary care practices in the Netherlands. Method Practices interested in taking part in the CQI project were, after assessment of their practice organisation, randomly assigned to the intervention or control groups. During a total of five meetings, a facilitator helped the teams in the intervention group select suitable topics for quality improvement and follow a structured approach to achieve improvement objectives. Checklists completed by an outreach visitor, questionnaires for the GPs, staff and patients were used to assemble data on the number and quality of improvement activities undertaken and on practice management prior to the start of the intervention and 1 year later. Results Pre-test and post-test data were compared for the 26 intervention and 23 control practices. A significant intervention effect was found for the number of improvement objectives actually defined (93 versus 54, P<0.001) and successfully completed (80 versus 69% of the projects, P<0.001). The intervention group also improved on more aspects of practice management, as measured by our practice visit method, than the control group but none of these differences proved statistically significant. Conclusion The intervention exerted a significant effect on the number and quality of improvement projects undertaken and self-defined objectives met. Failure of the effects of the intervention on the other dimensions of practice management to achieve significance may be due to the topics selected for some of the improvement projects being only partly covered by the assessment instrument. PMID:17007709

  14. Safety Management of a Clinical Process Using Failure Mode and Effect Analysis: Continuous Renal Replacement Therapies in Intensive Care Unit Patients.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Izquierdo-Riera, Jose Angel; Molano-Alvarez, Esteban; Saez-de la Fuente, Ignacio; Maynar-Moliner, Javier; Marín-Mateos, Helena; Chacón-Alves, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    The failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA) may improve the safety of the continuous renal replacement therapies (CRRT) in the intensive care unit. We use this tool in three phases: 1) Retrospective observational study. 2) A process FMEA, with implementation of the improvement measures identified. 3) Cohort study after FMEA. We included 54 patients in the pre-FMEA group and 72 patients in the post-FMEA group. Comparing the risks frequencies per patient in both groups, we got less cases of under 24 hours of filter survival time in the post-FMEA group (31 patients 57.4% vs. 21 patients 29.6%; p < 0.05); less patients suffered circuit coagulation with inability to return the blood to the patient (25 patients [46.3%] vs. 16 patients [22.2%]; p < 0.05); 54 patients (100%) versus 5 (6.94%) did not get phosphorus levels monitoring (p < 0.05); in 14 patients (25.9%) versus 0 (0%), the CRRT prescription did not appear on medical orders. As a measure of improvement, we adopt a dynamic dosage management. After the process FMEA, there were several improvements in the management of intensive care unit patients receiving CRRT, and we consider it a useful tool for improving the safety of critically ill patients.

  15. The influence of intensively managed rotational grazing, traditional continuous grazing, and confinement housing on bulk tank milk quality and udder health.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, J J; Wildman, E E; Pankey, J W; Kunkel, J R; Howard, D B; Murphy, B M

    1992-01-01

    Monthly bulk tank milk samples and veterinary records were analyzed for 1 yr on 15 Vermont dairy farms. Data were evaluated using ANOVA to compare effects of grazing management systems on milk quality and udder health. Systems evaluated were intensively managed rotational grazing, traditional continuous grazing, and confinement housing. Bulk tank samples were evaluated for standard plate count, bacterial type counts on tryptose-blood-esculin agar, and SCC. Veterinary records were evaluated for incidence of clinical mastitis, udder edema, and teat injuries. Within- and between-treatment group analyses were conducted by season, herd size, and udder sanitation systems. Mean standard plate counts were lower in rotationally grazed herds than counts of confined herds during the grazing season. Similarly, rotationally grazed herds with fewer than 60 cows had lower standard plate counts than confined herds of similar size. Mean bulk tank counts of streptococci other than Streptococcus agalactiae during the grazing season differed among treatments. The lowest counts occurred in rotationally grazed herds. Among herd using predip products recognized as efficacious, fewer streptococci other than S. agalactiae were isolated from bulk tank milk of rotationally grazed herds than confined herds. Rotationally grazed herds using postdips recognized as efficacious had lower SCC than those using unrecognized postdips. No udder health differences were observed among grazing treatments.

  16. The impact of continuity of care on emergency room use in a health care system without referral management: an instrumental variable approach.

    PubMed

    Pu, Christy; Chou, Yiing-Jenq

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine whether continuity of care (COC) is beneficial in national health care systems without referral management by controlling for endogeneity of COC. We used National Health Insurance (Taiwan) claims data from 2008, encompassing approximately 23 million people, to determine whether COC is associated with reduced emergency room (ER) use by hypertension and diabetic patients in 2009. We used an instrumental variable approach to account for endogeneity associated with patients' COC levels. After controlling for endogeneity, the marginal effect of COC on ER use probability when the COC score increased from 0 to 1 was 7.6% (P < .001) and 14.8% (P < .001) for hypertension and diabetic patients, respectively. We determined that COC is more effective for reducing ER use than are models that assume that COC is exogenous. It has been argued that in many countries, health care systems without referral management encourage physician shopping and hinder physician-patient communication. However, there are benefits to disease-specific COC. Because current estimations have failed to take endogeneity biases into account, COC is more effective than is currently assumed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Computerised insulin dosing calculators for the management of continuous insulin infusions after cardiac surgery: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Higgs, Megan H; Fernandez, Ritin S

    2017-04-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of computerised insulin dosing calculators for the management of continuous insulin infusions in adult patients who underwent cardiac surgery. A systematic review was conducted. The CINAHL, MEDLINE and Cochrane databases were searched for primary studies that compared a computerised insulin dosing calculator to a paper protocol. The main outcome measures were mean Blood Glucose Level (BGL), time to achieve BGL target range, time spent within BGL target range, the incidence of hyperglycaemia and the incidence of hypoglycaemia. Five studies were included in the final review. Pooled data demonstrated significant improvements in mean BGL (MD -14.24, 95% CI -26.93 to -1.55), p=0.03 and significantly lower rates of hypoglycaemia (OR 0.038, 95% CI: 0.16-0.90), p=0.03 amongst the computer calculator groups in comparison to the paper protocol groups. No significant difference in the incidence of severe hypoglycaemia was demonstrated (OR 0.21, 95% CI 0.02-1.79), p=0.15. No difference was found in time (hours) to reach target blood glucose range (MD -1.47, 95% CI -3.75 to 0.81), p=0.21. There is some evidence to support the use of computerised insulin dosing calculators for insulin infusion management within critical care environments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Reducing glycaemic variability in type 1 diabetes self-management with a continuous glucose monitoring system based on wired enzyme technology.

    PubMed

    Danne, T; de Valk, H W; Kracht, T; Walte, K; Geldmacher, R; Sölter, L; von dem Berge, W; Welsh, Z K; Bugler, J R; Lange, K; Kordonouri, O

    2009-08-01

    This study was designed to investigate the use and impact of a continuous glucose monitoring system (the FreeStyle Navigator) under home-use conditions in the self-management of type 1 diabetes. A 20 day masked phase, when real-time data and alarms were not available, was compared with a subsequent 40 day unmasked phase for a number of specified measures of glycaemic variability. HbA(1c) (measured by DCA 2000) and a hypoglycaemia fear survey were recorded at the start and end of the study. The study included 48 patients with type 1 diabetes (mean age 35.7 +/- 10.9, range 18-61 years; diabetes duration 17.0 +/- 9.5 years). Two patients did not complete the study for personal reasons. Comparing masked (all 20 days) and unmasked (last 20 days) phases, the following reductions were seen: time outside euglycaemia from 11.0 to 9.5 h/day (p = 0.002); glucose SD from 3.5 to 3.2 mmol/l (p < 0.001); hyperglycaemic time (>10.0 mmol/l) from 10.3 to 8.9 h/day (p = 0.0035); mean amplitude of glycaemic excursions (peak to nadir) down by 10% (p < 0.001); high blood glucose index down by 18% (p = 0.0014); and glycaemic risk assessment diabetes equation score down by 12% (p = 0.0013). Hypoglycaemic time (<3.9 mmol/l) decreased from 0.70 to 0.64 h/day without statistical significance (p > 0.05). Mean HbA(1c) fell from 7.6 +/- 1.1% at baseline to 7.1 +/- 1.1% (p < 0.001). In the hypoglycaemia fear survey, the patients tended to take less snacks at night-time after wearing the sensor. Home use of a continuous glucose monitoring system has a positive effect on the self-management of diabetes. Thus, continuous glucose monitoring may be a useful tool to decrease glycaemic variability.

  19. Continuous Problem of Function Continuity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jayakody, Gaya; Zazkis, Rina

    2015-01-01

    We examine different definitions presented in textbooks and other mathematical sources for "continuity of a function at a point" and "continuous function" in the context of introductory level Calculus. We then identify problematic issues related to definitions of continuity and discontinuity: inconsistency and absence of…

  20. Continuous Problem of Function Continuity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jayakody, Gaya; Zazkis, Rina

    2015-01-01

    We examine different definitions presented in textbooks and other mathematical sources for "continuity of a function at a point" and "continuous function" in the context of introductory level Calculus. We then identify problematic issues related to definitions of continuity and discontinuity: inconsistency and absence of…

  1. Effects of stocking rate, forage management, and grazing management on performance and economics of cow-calf production in Southwest Arkansas.

    PubMed

    Beck, P A; Stewart, C B; Sims, M B; Gadberry, M S; Jennings, J A

    2016-09-01

    The objective this research was to determine the effect of application of multiple grazing management practices at 2 stocking rates (SR) on the productivity and economics of the cow-calf enterprise in the Southeastern United States over a 4-yr period. Pasture management systems included: continuous grazing management at a moderate SR (0.8 ha/cow; CG) without additional forage management, rotational grazing management at a moderate SR (0.8 ha/cow (MR) with addition of stockpiled bermudagrass [ (L.) Pers.] and complementary cool season annuals, and rotational grazing management similar to MR but with a high SR (0.4 ha/cow; HR). Stockpiling in MR and HR was managed by fertilization of 0.2 ha/cow of bermudagrass in early August with 168 kg ammonium nitrate and deferring grazing until November. Wheat (; 112 kg/ha) and annual ryegrass ( Lam.; 28 kg/ha) were interseeded (0.2 ha/cow) in HR and MR with a no-till drill in the fall. Cow and calf performance and economics data were analyzed by ANOVA using the MIXED procedure of SAS (SAS Inst. Inc., Cary, NC) and pregnancy percentage was analyzed using the GLIMMIX procedure of SAS; pasture was the experimental unit and year was the random block. Hay feeding days decreased ( < 0.01) from 107 ± 10.9 d for CG to 37 ± 10.9 d for HR, which was further reduced ( = 0.01) to 15 ± 10.9 d for MR. Pregnancy percentage did not differ ( = 0.20) among treatments. Weaning BW in CG (237 ± 7.3 kg) tended ( = 0.09) to be greater than in MR (227 ± 7.3 kg) and were greater ( < 0.01) than in HR (219 ± 7.3 kg). However, total weaning BW per hectare was 89% greater ( < 0.01) for HR compared with CG and MR, which did not differ ( = 0.31). With rotational stocking, there was the opportunity to harvest excess forage as hay in both MR and HR with a net value of US$52.90/ha ± 25.73 and $15.50/ha ± 25.73, respectively. Net returns per hectare did not differ ( = 0.30) between CG ($429 ± 63.0/ha) and MR ($479 ± 63.0/ha) but were increased ( < 0

  2. Applications of a simulation model to decisions in mallard management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cowardin, L.M.; Johnson, D.H.; Shaffer, T.L.; Sparling, D.W.

    1988-01-01

    A system comprising simulation models and data bases for habitat availability and nest success rates was used to predict results from a mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) management plan and to compare six management methods with a control. Individual treatments in the applications included land purchase for waterfowl production, wetland easement purchase, lease of uplands for waterfowl management, cropland retirement, use of no-till winter wheat, delayed cutting of alfalfa, installation of nest baskets, nesting island construction, and use of predator-resistant fencing.The simulations predicted that implementation of the management plan would increase recruits by 24%. Nest baskets were the most effective treatment, accounting for 20.4% of the recruits. No-till winter wheat was the second most effective, accounting for 5.9% of the recruits. Wetland loss due to drainage would cause an 11% loss of breeding population in 10 years.The models were modified to account for migrational homing. The modification indicated that migrational homing would enhance the effects of management. Nest success rates were critical contributions to individual management methods. The most effective treatments, such as nest baskets, had high success rates and affected a large portion of the breeding population.Economic analyses indicated that nest baskets would be the most economical of the three techniques tested. The applications indicated that the system is a useful tool to aid management decisions, but data are scarce for several important variables. Basic research will be required to adequately model the effect of migrational homing and density dependence on production. The comprehensive nature of predictions desired by managers will also require that production models like the one described here be extended to encompass the entire annual cycle of waterfowl.

  3. Modeling the CO2 and N2O Emissions From Stover Removal for Biofuel Production From Continuous Corn Production in Iowa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paustian, K.; Killian, K.; Brenner, J.

    2003-12-01

    Corn stover, an agricultural residue, can be used as feedstock for near term bioethanol production and is available today at levels that can significantly impact energy supply. We evaluated the environmental impact of such a large-scale change in agricultural practices on green house gas production, soil erosion and soil carbon using the Century model. Estimates of soil C changes and GHG emissions were performed for the 99 counties in Iowa where previous environmental, management and erosion data was available. We employed climate, soil and historical management databases from a separate USDA-funded project as input to Century. RUSLE estimates of the residue requirements for acceptable soil loss rates under continuous corn agriculture were available from a previous study done Dr. Richard Nelson (Enersol Resources). Two mulch tillage and a no-till systems, where erosion estimates were available, were used as the basis for the simulations. Century simulations of these systems were run under a variety of stover removal rates. For each soil type within each county the model was run for 15 years (1980-1995) under continuous corn with convention tillage, and full residue return. Model simulation of crop yields and residue production were then calibrated to match those used by the Polysys model team at Oak Ridge and the simulation was repeated with the addition of the three corn tillage regimes, and several residue removal rates. County-average soil C changes (and net CO2 emissions) were calculated as area-weighted averages of the individual soil types in each county. For this study, we have utilized the IPCC approach to estimate annual N2O emissions. At low or zero residue removal rates, county-averaged soil C stocks were predicted to increase (i.e. net CO2 emissions are negative). Where the allowable residue removal rates (based on erosion tolerance) for mulch-tillage are on the order of 40-50% or more, the reduced input of C is such that the soils no longer sequester C

  4. Continuous wound infiltration with 0.2% ropivacaine versus a single intercostal nerve block with 0.75% ropivacaine for postoperative pain management after reconstructive surgery for microtia.

    PubMed

    Niiyama, Yukitoshi; Yotsuyanagi, Takatoshi; Yamakage, Michiaki

    2016-10-01

    In reconstructive surgery for microtia during childhood, costal cartilage is used for pinna formation. Postoperative pain in the region from which the costal cartilage is taken is severe, which delays recovery after surgery. We evaluated prospectively whether continuous wound infiltration (CWI) of a local anesthetic (LA) reduces pain and enables rapid recovery compared with a single intercostal nerve block (ICNB). Forty-eight patients were randomly divided into two groups. In Group I, a single ICNB with 10 ml of 0.75% ropivacaine was performed at the end of surgery. In Group C, a catheter was inserted into the space between the abdominal external oblique muscle and the rectus abdominis muscle. Then, a 0.4-ml/kg bolus of 0.2% ropivacaine was administered, followed by continuous infusion at 2-4 ml/h for 48 h. Postoperative pain intensity evaluated using the Face Scale, dose of supplemental analgesics, and time until mobilization were evaluated. In Group C, the plasma concentrations of ropivacaine were analyzed. The pain intensity at rest was significantly lower in Group C than in Group I, but the values during coughing were comparable. The number of patients receiving a supplemental analgesic and the median number of doses were significantly larger in Group I than in Group C (P = 0.029, P = 0.0007, respectively). The plasma concentrations of ropivacaine were within the safe range over 48 h. The times until mobilization were comparable. CWI of 0.2% ropivacaine is a better and safe technique for postoperative pain management after costal cartilage graft harvest in children. Copyright © 2016 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Continuation Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fremont Unified School District, CA.

    The Fremont, California Unified School District organized a continuing education program through a workshop held in the summer of 1968. This paper presents the results of that workshop. Following a statement of philosophy, an outline of the characteristics of the continuation student, and an outline of the functions of the program, an overview of…

  6. Multinight Recording and Analysis of Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Airflow in the Home for Titration and Management of Sleep Disordered Breathing

    PubMed Central

    Callahan, Cynthia Y.; Norman, Robert G.; Taxin, Zachary; Mooney, Anne M.; Rapoport, David M.; Ayappa, Indu

    2013-01-01

    physiologic variability of SDB. Citation: Callahan CY; Norman RG; Taxin Z; Mooney AM; Rapoport DM; Ayappa I. Multinight recording and analysis of continuous positive airway pressure airflow in the home for titration and management of sleep disordered breathing. SLEEP 2013;36(4):535-545. PMID:23543909

  7. Draft Site-wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Supplemental Stockpile Stewardship and Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement

    SciTech Connect

    N /A

    2004-02-27

    This ''Site-wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Supplemental Stockpile Stewardship and Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement'' (LLNL SW/SPEIS) describes the purpose and need for agency action for the continued operation of LLNL and analyzes the environmental impacts of these operations. The primary purpose of continuing operation of LLNL is to provide support for the National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA's) nuclear weapons stockpile stewardship missions. LLNL, located about 40 miles east of San Francisco, California, is also needed to support other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) programs and Federal agencies such as the U.S. Department of Defense, Nuclear Regulatory Commission, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the newly established U.S. Department of Homeland Security. This LLNL SW/SPEIS analyzes the environmental impacts of reasonable alternatives for ongoing and foreseeable future operations, facilities, and activities at LLNL. The reasonable alternatives include the No Action Alternative, Proposed Action, and the Reduced Operation Alternative. The major decision to be made by DOE/NNSA is to select one of the alternatives for the continued operation of the LLNL. As part of the Proposed Action, DOE/NNSA is considering: using additional materials including plutonium on the National Ignition Facility (NIF); increasing the administrative limit for plutonium in the Superblock, which includes the Plutonium Facility, the Tritium Facility, and the Hardened Engineering Test Building; conducting the Integrated Technology Project, using laser isotope separation to provide material for Stockpile Stewardship experiments, in the Plutonium Facility; increasing the material-at-risk limit for the Plutonium Facility; and increasing the Tritium Facility material-at-risk. A discussion of these issues is presented in Section S.5.2, Proposed Action. The ''National

  8. Retrograde air escape via the nasolacrimal system: a previously unrecognized complication of continuous positive airway pressure in the management of obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Singh, Narinder Pal; Walker, Robbie James Eades; Cowan, Fiona; Davidson, Arthur Craig; Roberts, David Newton

    2014-05-01

    Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is the gold standard treatment for moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). Eye-related side effects of CPAP are commonly attributed to a poorly sealed mask, allowing leaked air to blow over the eye. We present 3 cases where attended polysomnography (A-PSG) demonstrated CPAP-associated retrograde air escape via the nasolacrimal system (CRANS) in the absence of any mask leaks. Symptoms included dry eye, epiphora, air escape from the medial canthus, and eyelid flutter. Symptoms were controlled with a variety of surgical and nonsurgical techniques. CRANS represents a previously undescribed clinical entity. CRANS may be responsible for some CPAP-related eye side effects and possibly for rarer secondary eye complications, including conjunctivitis and corneal ulceration. CRANS should be suspected in any patient on CPAP complaining of eye symptoms. CRANS may be diagnosed through careful observation during A-PSG and confirmed by performing a "saline bubble test." Management options include nonsurgical (mask alternatives, humidification, nasopharyngeal airway) and surgical techniques (nasal airway surgery, inferior turbinate out-fracture and adhesion, injection of bulking agent around Hasner's valve).

  9. Comparison of continuous epidural infusion of fentanyl and bupivacaine with intermittent epidural administration of morphine for postoperative pain management in children.

    PubMed

    Kart, T; Walther-Larsen, S; Svejborg, T F; Feilberg, V; Eriksen, K; Rasmussen, M

    1997-04-01

    The aim of this study was to compare epidural infusion of bupivacaine and fentanyl and intermittent epidural morphine with regard to analgesic effect, and incidence and severity of side effects in children undergoing major abdominal or genito-urological surgery in order to improve the postoperative pain management of children. A double-blind, block-randomised study design was used. Thirty-one children aged 3 months to 6 years undergoing major abdominal or genito-urological surgery were studied. After induction of anaesthesia a lumbar epidural catheter was placed at L3-4 or L4-5. Postoperatively, the children received either 30 micrograms/kg of morphine every 8 h or a continuous infusion of fentanyl 2 micrograms/ml and bupivacaine 1.0 mg/ml at a rate of 0.25 ml.kg-1.h-1. All children additionally received rectal paracetamol in doses of 50-100 mg.kg-1.d-1 on a regular basis, and amol in doses of 50-100 mg.kg-1.d-1 on a regular basis, and if necessary supplementary intravenous morphine in doses of 50 micrograms/kg. Postoperatively, pain, administration of supplemental morphine and side effects were recorded 5 times by one observer during the day of surgery and the first postoperative day. All children had an epidural catheter throughout the study period. Both regimens provided effective analgesia, but significantly better pain relief was obtained in children receiving the fentanyl/bupivacaine regimen. Sedation, pruritus, vomiting, and administration of antiemetics were seen in both treatment groups, and even though both the incidence and severity of side effects tended to be higher in children receiving morphine, no statistically significant difference was found. No episodes of respiratory depression or motor blockade were noticed. Continuous epidural infusion of fentanyl and bupivacaine was found to be superior to intermittent epidural morphine. The initial regimen should be fentanyl 2 micrograms/ml and bupivacaine 1.0 mg/ml infused at a rate of 0.25 ml.kg-1.h-1.

  10. Should I stay or should I go? Understanding families' decisions regarding initiating, continuing, and terminating health services for managing pediatric obesity: the protocol for a multi-center, qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Ball, Geoff D C; Perez Garcia, Arnaldo; Chanoine, Jean-Pierre; Morrison, Katherine M; Legault, Laurent; Sharma, Arya M; Gokiert, Rebecca; Holt, Nicholas L

    2012-12-31

    At least two million Canadian children meet established criteria for weight management. Due to the adverse health consequences of obesity, most pediatric weight management research has examined the efficacy and effectiveness of interventions to improve lifestyle behaviors, reduce co-morbidities, and enable weight management. However, little information is available on families' decisions to initiate, continue, and terminate weight management care. This is an important knowledge gap since a substantial number of families fail to initiate care after being referred for weight management while many families who initiate care discontinue it after a brief period of time. This research aims to understand the interplay between individual, family, environmental, and systemic factors that influence families' decisions regarding the management of pediatric obesity. Individual interviews will be conducted with children and youth with obesity (n = 100) and their parents (n = 100) for a total number of 200 interviews with 100 families. Families will be recruited from four Canadian multi-disciplinary pediatric weight management centers in Vancouver, Edmonton, Hamilton, and Montreal. Participants will be purposefully-sampled into the following groups: (i) Non-Initiators (5 families/site): referred for weight management within the past 6 months and did not follow-up the referral; (ii) Initiators (10 families/site): referred for weight management within the past 6 months and did follow-up the referral with at least one clinic appointment; and (iii) Continuers (10 families/site): participated in a formal weight management intervention within the past 12 months and did continue with follow-up care for at least 6 months. Interviews will be digitally recorded and analyzed using an ecological framework, which will enable a multi-level evaluation of proximal and distal factors that underlie families' decisions regarding initiation, continuation, and termination of care. Demographic and

  11. Claim and Continuous Improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulová, Iveta; Meravá, Miroslava

    2010-01-01

    The claim will always represent the kind of information that is annoying to recipients. Systematic work with claims has a positive value for the company. Addressing the complaint has a positive effect on continuous improvement. This paper was worked out with the support of VEGA No.1/0229/08 Perspectives of quality management development in coherence with requirements of Slovak republic market.

  12. Using FORSEE and continuous forest inventory information to evaluate implementation of uneven-aged management in Santa Cruz County coast redwood forests

    Treesearch

    Douglas D. Piirto; Scott Sink; Dominic Ali; Steve Auten; Christopher Hipkin; Reid. Cody

    2012-01-01

    Swanton Pacific Ranch in northern Santa Cruz County has been owned and managed by California Polytechnic State University (Cal Poly) Foundation since 1987. The California Forest Practice Rules specific to Santa Cruz County limit harvest rate and opening size. Cal Poly forest managers are implementing uneven-aged forest management on 1,182 acres of 80 to 110...

  13. 5 CFR 9701.105 - Continuing collaboration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Section 9701.105 Administrative Personnel DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY-OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT) DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM General Provisions § 9701.105 Continuing collaboration. (a)...

  14. 5 CFR 9701.105 - Continuing collaboration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Section 9701.105 Administrative Personnel DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY-OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT) DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM General Provisions § 9701.105 Continuing collaboration. (a)...

  15. 5 CFR 9701.105 - Continuing collaboration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Section 9701.105 Administrative Personnel DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY-OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT) DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM General Provisions § 9701.105 Continuing collaboration. (a)...

  16. Distribution of organic carbon in physical fractions of soils as affected by agricultural management

    SciTech Connect

    Sindhu, Jagadamma; Lal, Dr. Rattan

    2010-08-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) is distributed heterogeneously among different-sized primary particles and aggregates. Further, the SOC associated with different physical fractions respond differently to managements. Therefore, this study was conducted with the objective to quantify the SOC associated with all the three structural levels of SOC (particulate organic matter, soil separates and aggregate-size fractions) as influenced by long-term change in management. The study also aims at reevaluating the concept that the SOC sink capacity of individual size-fractions is limited. Long-term tillage and crop rotation effects on distribution of SOC among fractions were compared with soil from adjacent undisturbed area under native vegetation for the mixed, mesic, Typic Fragiudalf of Wooster, OH. Forty five years of no-till (NT) management resulted in more SOC accumulation in soil surface (0 7.5 cm) than in chisel tillage and plow tillage (PT) treatments. However, PT at this site resulted in a redistribution of SOC from surface to deeper soil layers. The soils under continuous corn accumulated significantly more SOC than those under corn soybean rotation at 7.5 45 cm depth. Although soil texture was dominated by the silt-sized particles, most of the SOC pool was associated with the clay fraction. Compared to PT, the NT treatment resulted in (i) significantly higher proportion of large macroaggregates (>2,000 m) and (ii) 1.5 2.8 times higher SOC concentrations in all aggregate-size classes. A comparative evaluation using radar graphs indicated that among the physical fractions, the SOC associated with sand and silt fractions quickly changed with a land use conversion from native vegetation to agricultural crops. A key finding of this study is the assessment of SOC sink capacity of individual fractions, which revealed that the clay fraction of agricultural soils continues to accumulate more SOC, albeit at a slower rate, with progressive increase in total SOC concentration

  17. Continual improvement plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    NASA's approach to continual improvement (CI) is a systems-oriented, agency-wide approach that builds on the past accomplishments of NASA Headquarters and its field installations and helps achieve NASA's vision, mission, and values. The NASA of the future will fully use the principles of continual improvement in every aspect of its operations. This NASA CI plan defines a systematic approach and a model for continual improvement throughout NASA, stressing systems integration and optimization. It demonstrates NASA's constancy of purpose for improvement - a consistent vision of NASA as a worldwide leader in top-quality science, technology, and management practices. The CI plan provides the rationale, structures, methods, and steps, and it defines NASA's short term (1-year) objectives for improvement. The CI plan presents the deployment strategies necessary for cascading the goals and objectives throughout the agency. It also provides guidance on implementing continual improvement with participation from top leadership and all levels of employees.

  18. Satellite and ground-based analysis of the effects on vegetation of continuous SO2 degassing at Turrialba volcano (Costa Rica) and its application to hazard management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tortini, R.; van Manen, S. M.; Burson, B.; Carn, S. A.

    2014-12-01

    Turrialba is an active stratovolcano located 35 km northeast of San Jose, Costa Rica's capital city and socioeconomic hub. After over 100 years of quiescence Turrialba resumed activity in 1996 progressively increasing its degassing and seismic activity, showing continuous gas emissions since 2007. Intermittent phreatic explosions with ash emissions that have reached the capital have occurred since 2010. This activity has resulted in the temporary evacuation of two villages, closure of the National Park that comprises the summit region of the volcano and devastation of the local ecosystem. We combined a variety of satellite-based time series with ground-based measurements of ambient gas concentrations, element deposition and surveys of species richness to enable a comprehensive assessment of SO2 emissions and changes in vegetation. Satellite-based time-series were obtained from Landsat ETM+, Terra ASTER, Terra/Aqua MODIS and Aura OMI, with some of the data dating back to 2000. From 2007-2010 we observed emissions of SO2 and loss of vegetation healthiness (i.e. decrease of EVI2) downwind of the vents. From 2010 onwards these stabilized, but we observe an apparent decrease in agriculture. Other multi-temporal products, such as the ALOS PALSAR FNF data, confirm our observations. The exposure to the volcanic plume resulted in high soil acidity and significant uptake of certain heavy metals by vegetation; in contrast other elements are leached from the soil as a result of the acid deposition. These factors are likely to be responsible for decreased species richness and physiological damage observed at Turrialba. Our study shows ecological impacts, in terms of soil characteristics, vegetation composition and diversity and physiological damage of vegetation, which all correlate to fumigation by Turrialba's plume. Analyzing and relating the remote observations to conditions and impacts on the ground provides a better understanding of volcanic degassing, its impacts on

  19. A multidisciplinary and multi-sensor assessment of continuous degassing at Turrialba volcano, Costa Rica; insights and their application to hazard management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Manen, S. M.; Tortini, R.; Burson, B.; Carn, S. A.

    2013-12-01

    Turrialba is an active stratovolcano located in the Central Cordillera of Costa Rica with an elevation of 3,340 m. Located just 35 km northeast of Costa Rica's capital city San Jose it looms over Costa Rica's Central Valley, the social and economic hub of the country. After more than 100 years of quiescence Turrialba resumed activity in 1996, marked by progressive increases in degassing and seismic activity with gas emissions becoming continuous in 2007. Intermittent phreatic explosions accompanied by ash emissions that have reached the capital have been occurring since 2010. The activity has resulted in the evacuation of two villages, closure of the National Park that comprises the summit region of the volcano and devastation of the local ecosystem. In this work we present a multi-disciplinary and multi-sensor assessment of the persistent degassing and its impacts on the local ecosystem. Combining a variety of high temporal and high spatial resolution satellite-based time series with ground-based measurements of ambient gas concentrations, element deposition and surveys of species richness, enables a comprehensive assessment of SO2 emissions and changes in vegetation. Satellite-based time-series were obtained from Landsat TM and ETM+, Terra ASTER and MODIS, Aqua MODIS, EO-1 and Aura OMI, with some of the data dating back to 2000. Preliminary results show exposure to the volcanic plume results in high soil acidity and significant uptake of certain heavy metals (e.g. Cd, Co, Cu, Hg and Pb) by vegetation, in contrast other elements such as Ba, Ca and Sr are leached from the soil as a result of the acid deposition. These factors are likely to be responsible for decreased species richness and physiological damage observed downwind of Turrialba. Ambient SO2 concentrations that exceed WHO guideline values have been recorded, which has potentially important consequences for human health in the area. Analyzing and relating the remote observations to conditions and impacts

  20. Improvement in rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease management and prevention using a health centre-based continuous quality improvement approach.

    PubMed

    Ralph, Anna P; Fittock, Marea; Schultz, Rosalie; Thompson, Dale; Dowden, Michelle; Clemens, Tom; Parnaby, Matthew G; Clark, Michele; McDonald, Malcolm I; Edwards, Keith N; Carapetis, Jonathan R; Bailie, Ross S

    2013-12-18

    Rheumatic heart disease (RHD) remains a major health concern for Aboriginal Australians. A key component of RHD control is prevention of recurrent acute rheumatic fever (ARF) using long-term secondary prophylaxis with intramuscular benzathine penicillin (BPG). This is the most important and cost-effective step in RHD control. However, there are significant challenges to effective implementation of secondary prophylaxis programs. This project aimed to increase understanding and improve quality of RHD care through development and implementation of a continuous quality improvement (CQI) strategy. We used a CQI strategy to promote implementation of national best-practice ARF/RHD management guidelines at primary health care level in Indigenous communities of the Northern Territory (NT), Australia, 2008-2010. Participatory action research methods were employed to identify system barriers to delivery of high quality care. This entailed facilitated discussion with primary care staff aided by a system assessment tool (SAT). Participants were encouraged to develop and implement strategies to overcome identified barriers, including better record-keeping, triage systems and strategies for patient follow-up. To assess performance, clinical records were audited at baseline, then annually for two years. Key performance indicators included proportion of people receiving adequate secondary prophylaxis (≥80% of scheduled 4-weekly penicillin injections) and quality of documentation. Six health centres participated, servicing approximately 154 people with ARF/RHD. Improvements occurred in indicators of service delivery including proportion of people receiving ≥40% of their scheduled BPG (increasing from 81/116 [70%] at baseline to 84/103 [82%] in year three, p = 0.04), proportion of people reviewed by a doctor within the past two years (112/154 [73%] and 134/156 [86%], p = 0.003), and proportion of people who received influenza vaccination (57/154 [37%] to 86/156 [55%], p

  1. Can Novel Management Practice Improve Soil and Environmental Quality and Sustain Crop Yield Simultaneously?

    PubMed Central

    Sainju, Upendra M.

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about management practices that can simultaneously improve soil and environmental quality and sustain crop yields. The effects of novel and traditional management practices that included a combination of tillage, crop rotation, and N fertilization on soil C and N, global warming potential (GWP), greenhouse gas intensity (GHGI), and malt barley (Hordeum vulgarie L.) yield and quality were examined under non-irrigated and irrigated cropping systems from 2008 to 2011 in eastern Montana and western North Dakota, USA. In loamy soil under non-irrigated condition in eastern Montana, novel and traditional management practices were no-till malt barley-pea (Pisum sativum L.) with 80 kg N ha-1 and conventional till malt barley-fallow with 80 kg N ha-1, respectively. In sandy loam soil under irrigated and non-irrigated conditions in western North Dakota, novel and traditional management practices included no-till malt barley-pea with 67 (non-irrigated) to 134 kg N ha-1 (irrigated) and conventional till malt barley with 67 (non-irrigated) to 134 kg N ha-1 (irrigated), respectively. Compared with the traditional management practice, soil organic C (SOC) and total N (STN) at 0–120 cm were 5% greater with the novel management practice under non-irrigated condition in eastern Montana and under irrigated condition in western North Dakota, but were not different under non-irrigated condition in western North Dakota. In both places under irrigated and non-irrigated conditions, total applied N rate, residual soil NO3-N content at 0–120 cm, global warming potential (GWP), and greenhouse gas intensity (GHGI) were 15 to 70% lower with the novel than the traditional management practice. Malt barley yield and quality were not different between the two practices in both places. Novel management practices, such as no-till malt barley-pea with reduced N rate, can simultaneously enhance soil and environmental quality, reduce N input, and sustain crop yield compared with

  2. Can Novel Management Practice Improve Soil and Environmental Quality and Sustain Crop Yield Simultaneously?

    PubMed

    Sainju, Upendra M

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about management practices that can simultaneously improve soil and environmental quality and sustain crop yields. The effects of novel and traditional management practices that included a combination of tillage, crop rotation, and N fertilization on soil C and N, global warming potential (GWP), greenhouse gas intensity (GHGI), and malt barley (Hordeum vulgarie L.) yield and quality were examined under non-irrigated and irrigated cropping systems from 2008 to 2011 in eastern Montana and western North Dakota, USA. In loamy soil under non-irrigated condition in eastern Montana, novel and traditional management practices were no-till malt barley-pea (Pisum sativum L.) with 80 kg N ha(-1) and conventional till malt barley-fallow with 80 kg N ha(-1), respectively. In sandy loam soil under irrigated and non-irrigated conditions in western North Dakota, novel and traditional management practices included no-till malt barley-pea with 67 (non-irrigated) to 134 kg N ha(-1) (irrigated) and conventional till malt barley with 67 (non-irrigated) to 134 kg N ha(-1) (irrigated), respectively. Compared with the traditional management practice, soil organic C (SOC) and total N (STN) at 0-120 cm were 5% greater with the novel management practice under non-irrigated condition in eastern Montana and under irrigated condition in western North Dakota, but were not different under non-irrigated condition in western North Dakota. In both places under irrigated and non-irrigated conditions, total applied N rate, residual soil NO3-N content at 0-120 cm, global warming potential (GWP), and greenhouse gas intensity (GHGI) were 15 to 70% lower with the novel than the traditional management practice. Malt barley yield and quality were not different between the two practices in both places. Novel management practices, such as no-till malt barley-pea with reduced N rate, can simultaneously enhance soil and environmental quality, reduce N input, and sustain crop yield compared with

  3. Effects of Zero Tillage (No-Till) Conservation Agriculture on soil physical and biological properties and their contributions to sustainability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landers, John N.; Rass, Gerard; de Freitas, Pedro L.; Basch, Gottlieb; González Sanchez, Emilio J.; Tabaglio, Vincenzo; Kassan, Amir; Derpsch, Rolf; Friedrich, Theodor; Giupponi, Luca

    2013-04-01

    Not cultivating soil, rotating crops over the years, and leaving crop residues on the surface in the practice of zero tillage/conservation agriculture (ZT/CA) reverses the historically accelerating degradation of soil organic matter (SOM) and soil structure, while increasing soil biological activity by a factor of 2 to 4. The results of this are many: (a) not cultivating reduces soil compaction, leaving old root holes to facilitate internal drainage, averts the pulverization of soil aggregates and formation of pans, reduces draft power for planting and gives shelter, winter food and nesting sites for fauna, (b) crop residues on the surface practically eliminate wind and water erosion, reduce soil moisture loss through the mulch effect, slow spring warm-up (possibly offset by a lower specific heat demand with less water retention in surface soil) and act as a reserve of organically-compounded nutrients (as they decompose to humus), (c) more SOM means higher available water and nutrient retention, higher biological activity year round (enhancing biological controls), higher levels of water-stable aggregates and a positive carbon sink in incremental SOM. The positive impacts for society are: (i) more and cheaper food, (ii) reduced flood and drought-induced famine risks, (iii) a positive carbon sink in SOM and possible reductions in NO2 emissions, (iv) cleaner water and greater aquifer recharge due to reduced runoff, (v) cleaner air through effective elimination of dust as a product of cultivation (vi) less water pollution and greater aquifer recharge from reduced rainfall runoff, (vii) farm diesel consumption halved, (viii) reduced demand for (tropical) de-forestation, by permitting crop expansion on steeper lands, (ix) increased wildlife populations (skylarks, plovers, partridge and peccaries) and (x) an improved conservation mindset in farmers. It is notable that, in spite of successful practitioners in all European countries, mainstream adoption is still to come: Europés ZT/CA area is 1.35 million hectares, while the world area is now some 125 million and growing at a rate of 7 million hectares per year. More scientific measurements of the benefits of this system are required, both to assist adoption and to trigger policy measures. In the EEC, CAP reform (greening) needs to consider making environmental services payments for these social benefits since a reduction in single farm payments is ineluctable and carbon footprint reduction is of the essence, in the face of constantly-rising fuel prices and the need to cut GHG emissions. Therefore, as the principal farm tool which offers an effective and immediate solution towards positive changes in soil quality, productivity and sustainability, ZT/CA adoption needs financial incentives, which have high economic and environmental returns to society.

  4. Irrigation and cultivar effects in no-till, cover crop, and conventional tillage systems in Arkansas Cotton.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This field experiment was conducted in association with a long term tillage study established in fall 2007 at the Judd Hill Foundation Research Farm in Northeast Arkansas to assess agronomic and environmental impacts of conservation tillage systems. In component studies in 2016 we evaluated performa...

  5. Fecal bacterial losses in runoff from conventional and no-till pearl millet fertilized with broiler litter

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Georgia farmers are increasing preemergence applications of soil residual herbicides to control glyphosate resistant weeds. To be effective these herbicides must be activated by post-application irrigation. Broiler litter is often applied to fields before these herbicides. This wetting-in practice ...

  6. Curve numbers from conventional and no-till cropping: A 39-yr dataset from a small Georgia Piedmont watershed

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Since its inception in the 1950s, acceptance, use and adaptation of the curve number (CN) method for estimating direct runoff from a rainfall event has increased worldwide receiving critical reviews. There have been calls for development of locally defined CNs to address concerns with regional and s...

  7. Biomass production of 12 winter cereal cover crop cultivars and their effect on subsequent no-till corn yield

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cover crops can improve the sustainability and resilience of corn and soybean production systems. However, there have been isolated reports of corn yield reductions following winter rye cover crops. Although there are many possible causes of corn yield reductions following winter cereal cover crops,...

  8. Research achievements and adoption of no-till, dryland cropping in the semi-arid US Great Plains

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The Great Plains region of the United States and Canada is an area of widespread dryland crop production, with wheat being the dominant crop. Precipitation in the region ranges from 300 to 500 mm annually, with the majority of precipitatioCPRLn falling during hot summer months. The prevailing croppi...

  9. Effects of terminating cover crops with rolling/crimping and herbicides in a cotton no-till system

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In fall of 2008, a field experiment was initiated in central Alabama to study the effects of rolling/crimping and different herbicides with different application rates on cover crops termination rates, cotton population and yield. Results from 2009 and 2010 growing seasons are presented. A roller/cr...

  10. In situ validation of fungal N translocation to cereal rye mulches under no-till soybean production

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Grass cover crop shoots can be used as a mulch to suppress weeds. Physical control (light and temperature) of weeds appear to be the primary mechanism with chemical control (allelopathy) playing a smaller role. However, limitations of nitrogen availability to weeds in a soybean crop have been identi...

  11. Comparison of mineral element cycling under till and no-till practices: an experimental approach to agroecosystems analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Stinner, B R; Crossley, Jr, D A

    1980-08-01

    In this paper we give an overview of a research project which is attempting to integrate the approaches of agronomy and ecosystem ecology. We are attempting to apply methodologies and approaches of ecosystem study, in particular nutrient cycling, as a means of evaluating performance of agronomic systems. Specifically, we are comparing structure, function, and nutrient dynamics in a set of no-tillage and conventional plots.

  12. Carbon Balance of No-Till Soybean with Winter Wheat Cover Crop in the Southeastern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebremedhin, M. T.; Loescher, H.; Tsegaye, T.

    2012-12-01

    The southeast is an important agricultural region in the U.S. and key component of the continental carbon budget. Croplands in the region store a substantial amount of soil organic carbon (C). However, their C sink status may be altered under the projected changes in precipitation pattern for the region. The study was conducted at Winfred Thomas Agricultural Research Station, Hazel Green, Alabama (2007-2009). We investigated the seasonal and interannual variation in net ecosystem exchange of CO2 (NEE) of winter wheat (Tricticum aestivum) and soybean (Glycine max) using the eddy covariance method. Annual C balance ranged from the highest source in 2007 (NEE = 100 g C m-2 y-1) to sink (-20 g C m-2 y-1) in 2009. Annual ecosystem respiration (Re) ranged between 750 and 1013 g C m-2 y-1, while gross ecosystem productivity (GEP) was 650-1034 g C m-2 y-1. Seasonal NEE for soybean ranged between 42 and -66 g C m-2. Stronger winter wheat NEE (-80.0, -80.4, -40.0 g C m-2 for 2007, 2008 and 2009) than soybean suggested the importance of winter C uptakes offsetting summer C losses. Re was controlled by air temperature, and it varied between 286 and 542 g C m-2 for soybean, and between 160 and 313 g C m-2 for winter wheat. Precipitation was key determinant of C balance implying larger C release during drought periods. During fallow months, the site was C source. If we include removal of grain off site, this system could become a C source under all conditions.

  13. Rye cover crop effects on soil quality in no-till corn silage-soybean cropping systems

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Corn and soybean farmers in the upper Midwest are showing increasing interest in winter cover crops. Known benefits of winter cover crops include reductions in nutrient leaching, erosion prevention, and weed suppression; however, the effects of winter cover crops on soil quality in this region have ...

  14. Can cover crop and manure maintain or improve soil properties after stover removal from irrigated no-till corn?

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Addition of cover crops and animal manure following corn (Zea mays L.) stover removal for expanded uses may mitigate negative soil property effects of stover removal. We studied the short-term (3 yr) cumulative impacts of stover removal with and without winter rye (Secale cereale L.) cover crop or a...

  15. Vegetative cover effects of infiltration and other soil physical parameters in a no-till loess soil

    SciTech Connect

    Bandaranayake, W.M.; Tyler, D.D.; Houston, A.E.

    1996-12-31

    Large-scale conversion of crop-land from annual row crops to tree crops to tree crops could cause significant changes in soil hydraulic properties, including infiltration rates, an important component in environmental impact evaluations. Infiltration rates were measured with double ring infiltrometers, under 50 yr natural forest (F), 12 yr sycamore and pine (OS and P), 1 yr sycamore (YS), soybean (SB), and corn (C), in a Memphis-Loring silt loam intergrade (fine-silty mixed thermic Typic Hapludalf; - fine-silty mixed thermic Typic Fragiudalf). Total organic carbon (TOC), and bulk density (BD) were measured with Walkley-Black method and soil core samples respectively, at two shallow depths. The infiltration and the associated variability were relatively high under F. The steady state infiltration (SSI) rates under F, OS, P, C, SB and YS ranged from 27.3 to 0.61 (CV=91%), 6.1 to 0.83 (CV=66%), 3.3 to 0.16 (CV=62%), 1.68 to 0.3 (CV=63%), 0.82 to 0.30 (CV=44%), and 0.73 to 1.15 (CV=50%), cm hr{sup -1} respectively. Bulk density and TOC were significantly different between different vegetative covers and between depths under each cover; with a negative relationship of SSI to BD (RI{sup 2}=0.86) and a positive relationship to TOC (R{sup 2}=0.75). High SSI under F, and very low under YS and field crops, with medium values under OS and P, indicate and increasing trend of SSI with age of the tree crop.

  16. Health-care district management information system plan: Review of operations analysis activities during calendar year 1975 and plan for continued research and analysis activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielson, G. J.; Stevenson, W. G.

    1976-01-01

    Operations research activities developed to identify the information required to manage both the efficiency and effectiveness of the Veterans Administration (VA) health services as these services relate to individual patient care are reported. The clinical concerns and management functions that determine this information requirement are discussed conceptually. Investigations of existing VA data for useful management information are recorded, and a diagnostic index is provided. The age-specific characteristics of diseases and lengths of stay are explored, and recommendations for future analysis activities are articulated. The effect of the introduction of new technology to health care is also discussed.

  17. Comparison of Insulin Pump Therapy (Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion) to Alternative Methods for Perioperative Glycemic Management in Patients with Planned Postoperative Admissions

    PubMed Central

    Corney, Sarah M.; Dukatz, Tamra; Rosenblatt, Solomon; Harrison, Barbara; Murray, Robert; Sakharova, Alla; Balasubramaniam, Mamtha

    2012-01-01

    Background Patients with diabetes who use insulin pumps [continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII)] undergo surgeries that require postoperative hospital admission. There are no defined guidelines for CSII perioperative use. Methods This retrospective single-institution study identified type 1 and type 2 diabetes subjects by electronically searching 2005–2010 anesthesia preoperative assessments for “pump.” Surgical cases (n = 92) were grouped according to intraoperative insulin delivery method: (a) CSII continuation of basal rate with/without correctional insulin bolus(es) (n = 53); (b) conversion to intravenous insulin infusion (n = 20); and (c) CSII suspension with/without correctional insulin bolus(es) (n = 19). These groups were compared on mean intraoperative blood glucose (BG) and category of most extreme intraoperative BG. Results Differences were found on baseline characteristics of diabetes duration (p = .010), anesthesia time (p = .011), proportions receiving general anesthesia (p = .013), and preoperative BG (p = .033). The conversion group had the longest diabetes duration and anesthesia time; it had a higher proportion of general anesthesia recipients and a higher mean preoperative BG than the continuation group. There was no significant difference in mean BG/surgical case between continuation (163.5 ± 58.5 mg/dl), conversion (152.3 ± 28.9 mg/dl), and suspension groups (188.3 ± 44.9 mg/dl; p = .128). The suspension group experienced a greater percentage of cases (84.2%) with one or more intraoperative BG > 179 mg/dl than continuation (45.3%) and conversion (40%) groups Figure 1 groupings (p = .034). Conclusions In this limited sample, preliminary findings are consistent with similar intraoperative glycemic control between CSII continuation and CSII conversion to intravenous insulin infusions. Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion suspension had a greater rate of hyperglycemia. Preoperative differences between insulin delivery groups

  18. Effects of Soil Management on N Mineralization and Nitrification Rates in Soybean Fields of the Amazon, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueira, M.; Mitsuya, M.; Moura, J. M. S.

    2014-12-01

    The biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) promoted by the cultivation of soybean [Glycine max. (L.) Merrill], consists in a significant input of reactive nitrogen (N) in the system. The availability of this nutrient to plants occurs through the mineralization of organic-N of the soil, conducted by soil organic matter and / or crop residues. Thus, understanding the fate of this increased supply, as well as changes in the dynamics of N in the system is essential in the context of the recent expansion of soybean in the Amazon. This work aims to understand the dynamics of N in the soil cultivated with soybean, through the determination of ammonium and nitrate concentrations, as well as, mineralization and nitrification rates in soybean fields under till and no-till systems in the municipality of Santarém, Brazil. We collected 12 soil samples (0-10cm depth) in each crop and the extractions were done in 2M KCl solution using 10 g of soil. The samples were incubated for 7 days when new extractions were done to determine the rates of mineralization and nitrification. The till system showed higher concentrations of nitrate (0.82 ± 0.13 mg kg-1) and ammonium (8.15 ± 0.54 mg kg-1) compared to the results found in no-till system (0.59 ± 0.09 mg kg-1 and 5.25 ± 0.28 mg kg-1 for nitrate and ammonium respectively). The mineralization rates were negative in the till system, indicating possible immobilization of N in the soil during that period. In contrast, no-till system showed higher rates of mineralization in the soil. Although there is a great removal of N by grain harvest, it is possible to infer that no-till system has higher nitrogen availability to soybean and that this management could contribute to an increased productivity mainly due to deposition of crop residues enriched in N on the soil.

  19. Containment of the western corn rootworm Diabrotica v.virgifera: continued successful management 2008 in southern Switzerland by monitoring and crop rotation.

    PubMed

    Hummel, Hans E; Bertossa, M

    2009-01-01

    Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte (Col.: Chrysomelidae), known as western corn rootworm (WCR) and endemic in North America, invaded Europe about two decades ago. Various unsuccessful attempts have been made to eradicate it from the Old World. Management with a variety of strategies is the option now remaining. WCR management in Southern Switzerland by a unique containment approach has been practiced successfully since 2003 using biotechnical means. Without any chemical pesticides or GMO input, the Swiss government mandated adherence to strict crop rotation. In addition to the economic benefits of this relatively simple approach, the environment was saved a considerable burden of pesticide applications. Other countries are invited to follow this example of sustainable pest management.

  20. Class, Culture, and Curriculum: A Study of Continuity and Change in a Catholic School. EED433 Management of Resources in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angus, Lawrence

    This monograph presents a fictionalized case study of a real Catholic school in Australian society, Christian Brothers College (C.B.C.), which illustrates the manner in which "forces" for both continuity and change are negotiated at C.B.C. After a brief introduction, the volume opens with four thematic papers by separate authors,…