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Sample records for continuous porcine alveolar

  1. Transcription analysis of the porcine alveolar macrophage response to porcine circovirus type 2

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) is the causal agent of postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PMWS), which has severely impacted the swine industry worldwide. PCV2 triggers a weak and atypical innate immune response, but the key genes and mechanisms by which the virus interferes with host innate immunity have not yet been elucidated. In this study, genes that control the response of primary porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs), the main target of PCV2, were profiled in vitro. Results PAMs were successfully infected by PCV2-WH strain, as evidenced quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and immunofluorescence assay (IFA) results. Infection-related differential gene expression was investigated using pig microarrays from the US Pig Genome Coordination Program and validated by real-time PCR and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Microarray analysis at 24 and 48 hours post-infection (HPI) revealed 266 and 175 unique genes, respectively, that were differentially expressed (false discovery rate <0.05; fold-change >2). Only six genes were differentially expressed between 24 and 48 HPI. The up-regulated genes were principally related to immune response, cytokine activity, locomotion, regulation of cell proliferation, apoptosis, cell growth arrest, and antigen procession and presentation. The down-regulated genes were mainly involved in terpenoid biosynthesis, carbohydrate metabolism, translation, proteasome degradation, signal transducer activity, and ribosomal proteins, which were representative of the reduced vital activity of PCV2-infected cells. Conclusions PCV2 infection of PAMs causes up-regulation of genes related to inflammation, indicating that PCV2 may induce systematic inflammation. PCV2 persistently induced cytokines, mainly through the Toll-like receptor (TLR) 1 and TLR9 pathways, which may promote high levels of cytokine secretion. PCV2 may prevent apoptosis in PAMs by up-regulating SERPINB9 expression, possibly to

  2. Transcription analysis of the porcine alveolar macrophage response to Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Bin, Li; Luping, Du; Bing, Sun; Zhengyu, Yu; Maojun, Liu; Zhixin, Feng; Yanna, Wei; Haiyan, Wang; Guoqing, Shao; Kongwang, He

    2014-01-01

    Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae is considered the major causative agent of porcine respiratory disease complex, occurs worldwide and causes major economic losses to the pig industry. To gain more insights into the pathogenesis of this organism, the high throughput cDNA microarray assays were employed to evaluate host responses of porcine alveolar macrophages to M. hyopneumoniae infection. A total of 1033 and 1235 differentially expressed genes were identified in porcine alveolar macrophages in responses to exposure to M. hyopneumoniae at 6 and 15 hours post infection, respectively. The differentially expressed genes were involved in many vital functional classes, including inflammatory response, immune response, apoptosis, cell adhesion, defense response, signal transduction, protein folding, protein ubiquitination and so on. The pathway analysis demonstrated that the most significant pathways were the chemokine signaling pathway, Toll-like receptor signaling pathway, RIG-I-like receptor signaling pathway, nucleotide-binding oligomerization domains (Nod)-like receptor signaling pathway and apoptosis signaling pathway. The reliability of the data obtained from the microarray was verified by performing quantitative real-time PCR. The expression kinetics of chemokines was further analyzed. The present study is the first to document the response of porcine alveolar macrophages to M. hyopneumoniae infection. The data further developed our understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of M. hyopneumoniae.

  3. In depth global analysis of transcript abundance levels in porcine alveolar macrophages following infection with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is a major pathogen of swine worldwide and causes considerable economic loss. Infection of the primary target cells, porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs), by PRRSV causes significant changes in their function by mechanisms that are not under...

  4. In depth global analysis of gene expression levels in porcine alveolar macrophages following infection with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is a major pathogen of swine worldwide. Infection of the preferential target cells, porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs), by PRRSV causes significant changes in their function by mechanisms that are not understood. Serial Analysis of Gene Ex...

  5. Reactomes of porcine alveolar macrophages infected with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) has devastated pig industries worldwide for many years. It is caused by a small RNA virus (PRRSV), which targets almost exclusively pig monocytes or macrophages. In the present study, five SAGE (serial analysis of gene expression) libraries derive...

  6. Porcine circovirus type 2 decreases the infection and replication of attenuated classical swine fever virus in porcine alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu-Liang; Pang, Victor Fei; Deng, Ming-Chung; Chang, Chia-Yi; Jeng, Chian-Ren

    2014-02-01

    Recently, it has been noted that porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) infection adversely affects the protective efficacy of Lapinized Philippines Coronel (LPC) vaccine, an attenuated strain of classical swine fever virus (CSFV), in pigs. In order to investigate the possible mechanisms of the PCV2-derived interference, an in vitro model was established to study the interaction of LPC virus (LPCV) and PCV2 in porcine alveolar macrophages (AMs). The results showed that PCV2 reduced the LPCV infection in AMs and the levels of PCV2-derived interference were dose-dependent. The PCV2-derived interference also reduced the replication level of LPCV in AMs. The full-length PCV2 DNA and its fragment DNA C9 CpG-ODN were involved in the reduction of LPCV infection in AMs, whereas UV-inactivated PCV2 was not. In addition, a moderate negative correlation between the LPCV antigen-containing rate and IFN-γ production was observed, and had a dose-dependent trend with the level of PCV2-inoculation. The results of the present study may partially explain how PCV2 infection interferes with the efficacy of LPC vaccine.

  7. Lipopolysaccharide modulation of a CD14-like molecule on porcine alveolar macrophages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kielian, T. L.; Ross, C. R.; McVey, D. S.; Chapes, S. K.; Blecha, F.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    Cluster of differentiation antigen 14 (CD14) functions as a receptor for lipopolysaccharide (LPS) LPS-binding protein (LBP) complexes. Because LPS has varying effects on CD14 expression in vitro, we evaluated CD14 expression in response to LPS with a fully differentiated macrophage phenotype, the alveolar macrophage. By using flow microfluorometric analysis and a radioimmunoassay with an anti-human CD14 monoclonal antibody (My4) that cross-reacts with porcine CD14, we found that macrophages stimulated with LPS for 24 h exhibited a two- to fivefold increase in CD14-like antigen compared with unstimulated cells. At low concentrations of LPS, up-regulation of the CD14-like antigen was dependent on serum; at higher concentrations of LPS, serum was not required. In the absence of serum a 10-fold higher dose of LPS (10 ng/ml) was required to increase CD14-like expression. In addition, LPS-induced CD14-like up-regulation correlated with secretion of tumor necrosis factor-alpha, regardless of serum concentration. Blockade with My4 antibody significantly inhibited LPS-induced tumor necrosis factor-alpha secretion at 1 ng/ml of LPS. However, inhibition decreased as we increased the LPS concentration, suggesting the existence of CD14-independent pathways of macrophage activation in response to LPS. Alternatively, My4 may have a lower affinity for the porcine CD14 antigen than LPS, which may have only partially blocked the LPS-LBP binding site at high concentrations of LPS. Therefore, these data suggest that LPS activation of porcine alveolar macrophages for 24 h increased CD14-like receptor expression. The degree of CD14-like up-regulation was related to LPS concentration, however, activation did not require the presence of serum at high concentrations of LPS.

  8. Matrine displayed antiviral activity in porcine alveolar macrophages co-infected by porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus and porcine circovirus type 2

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Na; Sun, Panpan; Lv, Haipeng; Sun, Yaogui; Guo, Jianhua; Wang, Zhirui; Luo, Tiantian; Wang, Shaoyu; Li, Hongquan

    2016-01-01

    The co-infection of porcine reproductive respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) and porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) is quite common in clinical settings and no effective treatment to the co-infection is available. In this study, we established the porcine alveolar macrophages (PAM) cells model co-infected with PRRSV/PCV2 with modification in vitro, and investigated the antiviral activity of Matrine on this cell model and further evaluated the effect of Matrine on virus-induced TLR3,4/NF-κB/TNF-α pathway. The results demonstrated PAM cells inoculated with PRRSV followed by PCV2 2 h later enhanced PRRSV and PCV2 replications. Matrine treatment suppressed both PRRSV and PCV2 infection at 12 h post infection. Furthermore, PRRSV/PCV2 co- infection induced IκBα degradation and phosphorylation as well as the translocation of NF-κB from the cytoplasm to the nucleus indicating that PRRSV/PCV2 co-infection induced NF-κB activation. Matrine treatment significantly down-regulated the expression of TLR3, TLR4 and TNF-α although it, to some extent, suppressed p-IκBα expression, suggesting that TLR3,4/NF-κB/TNF-α pathway play an important role of Matrine in combating PRRSV/PCV2 co-infection. It is concluded that Matrine possesses activity against PRRSV/PCV2 co-infection in vitro and suppression of the TLR3,4/NF-κB/TNF-α pathway as an important underlying molecular mechanism. These findings warrant Matrine to be further explored for its antiviral activity in clinical settings. PMID:27080155

  9. Suppression of NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity against PRRSV-infected porcine alveolar macrophages in vitro.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jun; Grauwet, Korneel; Vermeulen, Ben; Devriendt, Bert; Jiang, Ping; Favoreel, Herman; Nauwynck, Hans

    2013-06-28

    The adaptive immunity against PRRSV has already been studied in depth, but only limited data are available on the innate immune responses against this pathogen. In the present study, we analyzed the interaction between porcine natural killer (NK) cells and PRRSV-infected primary porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs), since NK cells are one of the most important components of innate immunity and PAMs are primary target cells of PRRSV infection. NK cytotoxicity assays were performed using enriched NK cells as effector cells and virus-infected or mock-inoculated PAMs as target cells. The NK cytotoxicity against PRRSV-infected PAMs was decreased starting from 6h post inoculation (hpi) till the end of the experiment (12 hpi) and was significantly lower than that against pseudorabies virus (PrV)-infected PAMs. UV-inactivated PRRSV also suppressed NK activity, but much less than infectious PRRSV. Furthermore, co-incubation with PRRSV-infected PAMs inhibited degranulation of NK cells. Finally, using the supernatant of PRRSV-infected PAMs collected at 12 hpi showed that the suppressive effect of PRRSV on NK cytotoxicity was not mediated by soluble factors. In conclusion, PRRSV-infected PAMs showed a reduced susceptibility toward NK cytotoxicity, which may represent one of the multiple evasion strategies of PRRSV.

  10. Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 10 derived ApxI induces apoptosis in porcine alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Chien, Maw-Sheng; Chan, You-Yu; Chen, Zeng-Weng; Wu, Chi-Ming; Liao, Jiunn-Wang; Chen, Ter-Hsin; Lee, Wei-Cheng; Yeh, Kuang-Sheng; Hsuan, Shih-Ling

    2009-03-30

    Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae (AP) is the causative agent of swine pleuropneumonia, a fibrinous, exudative, hemorrhagic, necrotizing pleuropneumonia affecting all ages of pigs. Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae exotoxins (Apx) are one of the major virulence factors of AP. Due to the complex nature of Apx toxins produced by AP, little is known regarding the interactions of individual species of Apx toxin with target cells. The objective of this study was to examine whether AP serotype 10-derived exotoxin, ApxI, caused apoptosis in porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs) and to delineate the underlying signaling pathways. Isolated PAMs were stimulated with different concentrations of native ApxI and monitored for apoptosis using Hoechst staining, TUNEL, and DNA laddering assays. The ApxI-stimulated PAMs exhibited typical morphological features of apoptosis, including condensation of chromatin, formation of apoptotic bodies and DNA laddering. ApxI-induced apoptosis in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Furthermore, to delineate the signaling events involved in ApxI-induced apoptosis, it was observed that caspase 3 was activated in ApxI-stimulated PAMs. Ablation of caspase 3 activity via specific inhibitors protected PAMs from apoptosis by ApxI. This study is the first to demonstrate that native ApxI causes apoptosis in PAMs at low concentrations and that these apoptotic events are mediated via a caspase 3-dependent pathway. These findings suggest a role of ApxI in AP infection as it might impair the host defense system through the induction of apoptosis in PAMs.

  11. In-Depth Global Analysis of Transcript Abundance Levels in Porcine Alveolar Macrophages Following Infection with Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Laura C.; Neill, John D.; Harhay, Gregory P.; Lager, Kelly M.; Laegreid, William W.; Kehrli, Marcus E.

    2010-01-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is a major pathogen of swine worldwide and causes considerable economic loss. Identifying specific cell signaling or activation pathways that associate with variation in PRRSV replication and macrophage function may lead to identification of novel gene targets for the control of PRRSV infection. Serial Analysis of Gene Expression (SAGE) was used to create and survey the transcriptome of in vitro mock-infected and PRRSV strain VR-2332-infected porcine alveolar macrophages (PAM) at 0, 6, 12, 16, and 24 hours after infection. The transcriptome data indicated changes in transcript abundance occurring in PRRSV-infected PAMs over time after infection with more than 590 unique tags with significantly altered transcript abundance levels identified (P < .01). Strikingly, innate immune genes (whose transcript abundances are typically altered in response to other pathogens or insults including IL-8, CCL4, and IL-1β) showed no or very little change at any time point following infection. PMID:22331987

  12. Molecular characterization of transcriptome-wide interactions between highly pathogenic porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus and porcine alveolar macrophages in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ping; Zhai, Shanli; Zhou, Xiang; Lin, Ping; Jiang, Tengfei; Hu, Xueying; Jiang, Yunbo; Wu, Bin; Zhang, Qingde; Xu, Xuewen; Li, Jin-Ping; Liu, Bang

    2011-01-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) infects mainly the porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs) and causes porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS). Previous studies have analyzed the global gene expression profiles of lung tissue in vivo and PAMs in vitro following infection with PRRSV, however, transcriptome-wide understanding of the interaction between highly pathogenic PRRSV (HP-PRRSV) and PAMs in vivo has not yet been established. In this study, we employed Affymetrix microarrays to investigate the gene expression patterns of PAMs isolated from Tongcheng piglets (a Chinese indigenous breed) after infection with HP-PRRSV. During the infection, Tongcheng piglets exhibited typical clinical signs, e.g. fever, asthma, coughing, anorexia, lethargy and convulsion, but displayed mild regional lung damage at 5 and 7 dpi. Microarray analysis revealed that HP-PRRSV infection has affected PAMs in expression of the important genes involved in cytoskeleton and exocytosis organization, protein degradation and folding, intracellular calcium and zinc homeostasis. Several potential antiviral strategies might be employed in PAMs, including upregulating IFN-induced genes and increasing intracellular zinc ion concentration. And inhibition of the complement system likely attenuated the lung damage during HP-PRRSV infection. Transcriptomic analysis of PAMs in vivo could lead to a better understanding of the HP-PRRSV-host interaction, and to the identification of novel antiviral therapies and genetic components of swine tolerance/susceptibility to HP-PRRS.

  13. Immune response of porcine alveolar macrophages to a concurrent infection with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus and Haemophilus parasuis in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kavanová, Lenka; Prodělalová, Jana; Nedbalcová, Kateřina; Matiašovic, Ján; Volf, Jiří; Faldyna, Martin; Salát, Jiří

    2015-10-22

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) can predispose pigs to secondary respiratory infection with bacteria such as Haemophilus parasuis. Animals infected with both pathogens develop more severe clinical disease. The immune response of porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs) to simultaneous infection with PRRSV and H. parasuis was analysed in vitro, describing cytokine production, expression of cell surface molecules, and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Concurrent infection with PRRSV and H. parasuis increased gene expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-8) in PAMs in comparison with PAMs infected with PRRSV or H. parasuis alone. An additive effect of dual infection on IL-1β production was confirmed at the protein level. PAMs infected with PRRSV showed increased production of ROS compared to controls. Conversely, simultaneous infection of PAMs with PRRSV and H. parasuis decreased production of ROS, indicating the presence of an H. parasuis defence mechanism against respiratory burst. Concurrent infection of PAMs with PRRSV and H. parasuis was shown to elicit a pro-inflammatory immune response represented by significant IL-1β production. Severe multifactorial respiratory disease in natural conditions caused by both pathogens could be the consequence of pro-inflammatory mediated immunopathology.

  14. Transcription analysis on response of porcine alveolar macrophages to co-infection of the highly pathogenic porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus and Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Du, Luping; Xu, Xiangwei; Sun, Bing; Yu, Zhengyu; Feng, Zhixin; Liu, Maojun; Wei, Yanna; Wang, Haiyan; Shao, Guoqing; He, Kongwang

    2015-01-22

    Porcine respiratory disease complex (PRDC) is of great concern economically, for swine producers worldwide. Co-infections with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) and Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (Mhp) are considered the major causative agents of PRDC, and responsible for mass mortality in pigs. Nevertheless, the molecular mechanisms underlying the host factors involved in pathogenesis and persistent infection have not been clearly established because of a lack of information regarding host responses following co-infection. In the current study, high throughput cDNA microarray assays were employed to evaluate host responses of porcine alveolar macrophages (PAM) to co-infection with highly pathogenic PRRSV (HP-PRRSV) and Mhp. A total of 2152 and 1760 genes were identified as being differentially expressed between the control group and PRRSV+Mhp co-infected group at 6 and 15 h post infection, respectively. The DE genes were involved in many vital functional classes, including inflammatory response, immune response, apoptosis, defense response, signal transduction. The pathway analysis demonstrated that the most significant pathways were associated with chemokine signaling pathway, cytokine, TLR, RLR and NLR signaling pathways and Jak-STAT signaling pathway. STRING analysis demonstrated that IL-1β is an integral gene in co-infections with PRRSV and Mhp. The present study is the first to document the response of PAMs to co-infection with HP-PRRSV and Mhp. The observed gene expression profile could help with the screening of potential host agents for reducing the prevalence of co-infections, and to further develop our understanding of the molecular pathogenesis associated with PRRSV and Mhp co-infection in pigs.

  15. Towards a global analysis of porcine alveolar macrophages proteins through two-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Reinado, Eva; Ramírez-Boo, María; Garrido, Juan J; Jorrín, Jesús V; Moreno, Angela

    2007-01-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AM) are the primary phagocytes of the innate immune systems, constituting a link between innate and adaptive immunity. With the aim of studying the porcine AM biology and the dynamics of pig-pathogen cell interactions, we have obtained a reference 2-DE map of the porcine AM proteins. The proteins were separated by 2-DE using a 5-8 range pH gradient in isoelectric focusing and over 800 spots were detected. A set of proteins, covering the pI 5.2-7.4 and M(W) 19 to 106kDa ranges, was subjected to MS analysis and 106 proteins were assigned identification by PMF, this identification being confirmed by MS/MS. An important number of proteins is involved in immunological functions, signalling process, transport or apoptosis, confirming that macrophages are involved in a wide range of biological functions. This reference map provides a useful tool for identifying protein pattern changes as a result of inflammation, exposure to infectious agents or genetic diseases.

  16. Innate immune responses to replication of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus in isolated Swine alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Ait-Ali, Tahar; Wilson, Alison D; Westcott, David G; Clapperton, Mary; Waterfall, Martin; Mellencamp, Martha A; Drew, Trevor W; Bishop, Stephen C; Archibald, Alan L

    2007-01-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) is an infectious disease caused by a positive RNA strand arterivirus. PRRS virus (PRRSV) interacts primarily with lung macrophages. Identifying the genetic components involved in host resistance/susceptibility would represent an important step forward in the design of disease control programs. In this study, alveolar macrophages derived from five commercial pig lines were used to study the innate immune response to PRRSV infection in vitro. Analysis by flow cytometry has demonstrated that bronchial alveolar lavage fluid (BALF) preparations were almost exclusively composed of alveolar macrophages and that the pigs tested were free from infection. Macrophages from the Landrace line showed significantly reduced virus replication and poor growth of PRRSV during 30 h of infection. By 72 h, PRRSV viral load was down to 2.5 log(10) TCID(50) compared with an average of 5 log(10) TCID(50) for the other breeds tested. These observations suggest that factors intrinsic to the Landrace breed may be responsible for this reduced or delayed response to PRRSV. Preliminary investigation suggests that the PRRSV coreceptor, sialoadhesin, may not be responsible for the Landrace macrophage phenotype as its abundance and localisation were comparable in all the breeds. Strikingly, we found that the reduced or delayed growth of PRRSV was temporally associated with high levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin (IL)-8 mRNA accumulation and substantial reduction of secretion of IL-8, suggesting a key contributory role for cytokine synthesis and secretion during the innate immune response to PRRSV infection.

  17. Effects of pseudorabies virus infection upon cytotoxicity and antiviral activities of porcine alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Iglesias, G; Pijoan, C; Molitor, T

    1992-10-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AM) infected with Pseudorabies virus (PRV) were compared to noninfected AM for cytotoxicity against foreign or transformed cells and production of interferon (IFN). Five PRV strains were used to infect AM including strains that are known to be highly virulent for pigs, i.e. strain 4892 and strain S-62 as well as strains that are regarded as mild or nonvirulent, i.e. BUK and Bartha. The multiplicity of infection ranged from 0.005 to 0.05 TCID50/cell. The target cells in the cytotoxicity assays were either chicken red blood cells, PRV-infected vero cells, or human myeloblastoma cells (K562 cell line). For the production of IFN, AM cultures were treated with polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (Poly I:C) diluted in tissue culture media at a concentration of 5 micrograms/10(6) cells. Culture supernatants were collected at various times poststimulation and tested for antiviral activity using the Vesicular Stomatitis Virus replication inhibition test. Swine AM were able to lyse chicken red blood cells in an antibody-independent way but not in an antibody-dependent way, whereas lysis of PRV-infected vero cells was accomplished both ways. The cytotoxicity against chicken red blood cells was reduced in the PRV-infected AM as compared to noninfected cells, particularly in AM infected with virulent PRV strains. Specific 51Cr release values for AM infected with S-62 and 4892 strains were 14 and 19, while the noninfected AM had values of 36. Similarly, in the antibody-dependent cytotoxicity assay against PRV-infected vero cells there was no activity of AM against K562 cells. The production of IFN was readily stimulated with Poly I:C. The optimal time for supernatant collection was between 12 and 16 h poststimulation. The antiviral activity was abrogated by treatment of the supernatant with antiserum against human leukocyte IFN; it was therefore considered to be due to interferon-alpha (IFN alpha) released from the macrophages. The antiviral activity present in

  18. Porcine circovirus type 2 increases IL-1β and IL-10 production via the MyD88-NF-κB signaling pathway in porcine alveolar macrophages in vitro.

    PubMed

    Han, Junyuan; Zhang, Shuxia; Zhang, Yaqun; Chen, Mengmeng; Lv, Yingjun

    2016-07-25

    Porcine alveolar macrophages represent the first line of defense in the porcine lung after infection with porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) via the respiratory tract. However, PCV2 infection impairs the microbicidal capability of PAMs and alters cytokine production and/or secretion. Currently, the reason for the imbalance of cytokines has not been fully elucidated and the regulatory mechanisms involved are not clear. Here, we investigated the expression levels and regulation of IL-1β and IL-10 in PAMs following incubation with PCV2 in vitro. Both levels of IL-1β and IL-10 increased in PAM supernatants, and the distribution of NF-κB p65 staining in the nucleus, the expression of MyD88 and p-IκB in the cytoplasm and the DNA-binding activity of NF-κB increased after incubation with PCV2, while the expression of p65 in the cytoplasm of PAMs decreased. However, when PAMs were co-incubated with PCV2 and small interfering RNA targeting MyD88, these effects were reversed. Additionally, mRNA expression levels of Toll-like receptor (TLR)-2, -3, -4, -7, -8 and -9 were increased when PAMs were incubated with PCV2. These findings showed that PCV2 induced increased IL-1β and IL-10 production in PAMs, and these changes in expression were relative to the TLR-MyD88-NF-κB signaling pathway.

  19. RNA-sequence analysis of primary alveolar macrophages after in vitro infection with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus strains of differing virulence.

    PubMed

    Badaoui, Bouabid; Rutigliano, Teresa; Anselmo, Anna; Vanhee, Merijn; Nauwynck, Hans; Giuffra, Elisabetta; Botti, Sara

    2014-01-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) mainly infects porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs), resulting in porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) in pigs. Most of the transcriptomic studies on PAMs infected with PRRSV conducted thus far have made use of microarray technology. Here, we investigated the transcriptome of PAMs in vitro at 12 h post-infection with two European PRRSV strains characterized by low (Lelystad, LV) and high (Lena) virulence through RNA-Seq. The expression levels of genes, isoforms, alternative transcription start sites (TSS) and differential promoter usage revealed a complex pattern of transcriptional and post-transcriptional gene regulation upon infection with the two strains. Gene ontology analysis confirmed that infection of PAMs with both the Lena and LV strains affected signaling pathways directly linked to the innate immune response, including interferon regulatory factors (IRF), RIG1-like receptors, TLRs and PKR pathways. The results confirmed that interferon signaling is crucial for transcriptional regulation during PAM infection. IFN-β1 and IFN-αω, but not IFN-α, were up-regulated following infection with either the LV or Lena strain. The down-regulation of canonical pathways, such as the interplay between the innate and adaptive immune responses, cell death and TLR3/TLR7 signaling, was observed for both strains, but Lena triggered a stronger down-regulation than LV. This analysis contributes to a better understanding of the interactions between PRRSV and PAMs and outlines the differences in the responses of PAMs to strains with different levels of virulence, which may lead to the development of new PRRSV control strategies.

  20. Continuous infusion of porcine factor VIII: stability, microbiological safety and clinical experience.

    PubMed

    DiMichele, D M; Gorman, P O; Kasper, C K; Mannucci, P M; Santagostino, E; Hay, C R M

    2002-01-01

    Porcine factor VIII (pFVIII) is an effective haemostatic treatment for bleeding in selected patients with FVIII inhibitors. Its use is sometimes associated with a transient fall in platelet count and transfusion reactions, the risk of which may be related to the rate of administration. Theoretical considerations suggest that the administration of pFVIII by continuous infusion should be effective, and could have pharmacokinetic advantages that lead to an improvement in the side-effect profile. The results of a retrospective survey of continuous infusion of pFVIII with respect to clinical safety and efficacy are reported. Porcine FVIII stability and microbiological studies are included. It is concluded that pFVIII given by continuous infusion is safe and effective. The risk of transfusion reactions and fall in platelet count appears to be reduced, compared with bolus administration. Stability studies showed that pFVIII activity declined at room temperature, most rapidly in the dilute solution (5-10 U mL(-1)). More concentrated mixtures showed acceptable stability for up to 24 h using a variety of infusion devices. Various concentrations of pFVIII did not support the growth of Escherichia coli or Staphylococcus aureus. These observations suggest that the porcine factor is suitable for continuous infusion (CI).

  1. Recombinant swine beta interferon protects swine alveolar macrophages and MARC-145 cells from infection with Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus.

    PubMed

    Overend, C; Mitchell, R; He, D; Rompato, G; Grubman, M J; Garmendia, A E

    2007-03-01

    Swine beta interferon (swIFN-beta) produced in HEK 293 cells infected with a recombinant, replication-defective human adenovirus 5 (Ad5) encoding the swIFN-beta gene was tested for antiviral activity against Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV). MARC-145 cells were incubated overnight with dilutions of supernatant fluids from HEK 293 cells infected with Ad5-swIFN-beta or with an Ad5 control virus (Ad5-Blue). Treated cells were infected with PRRSV; MARC-145 cells incubated with Ad5-Blue supernatants developed cytopathic effects (CPE), whereas those incubated with swIFN-beta showed no CPE. To confirm the antiviral activity of swIFN-beta, culture fluids from Ad5-swIFN-beta-infected cells were affinity-purified on a Sepharose-anti-swIFN-beta matrix, and the resulting fractions exhibited antiviral activity upon infection with PRRSV. The antiviral effects were specific, as they were blocked by mAbs against swIFN-beta. Additional cultures of MARC-145 cells treated with swIFN-beta-containing supernatants or affinity-purified swIFN-beta were infected with PRRSV and tested by real-time RT-PCR for viral RNA in culture supernatants at various times post-inoculation. These experiments confirmed the protective effects of swIFN-beta. swIFN-beta was also tested for antiviral activity on porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs) obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage from PRRSV-negative swine. PAMs were treated with dilutions of swIFN-beta or Ad5-Blue culture fluids, infected with PRRSV and tested for viral RNA by real-time RT-PCR. The viral load data showed a dose-dependent protection in swIFN-beta-treated PAMs, whereas no protection was evident from Ad5-Blue culture fluids. The data demonstrate that swIFN-beta protects both MARC-145 cells and PAMs from PRRSV infection.

  2. Mitogen-activated protein kinases p38 and JNK mediate Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae exotoxin ApxI-induced apoptosis in porcine alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chi-Ming; Chen, Zeng-Weng; Chen, Ter-Hsin; Liao, Jiunn-Wang; Lin, Cheng-Chung; Chien, Maw-Sheng; Lee, Wei-Cheng; Hsuan, Shih-Ling

    2011-08-05

    Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae exotoxins (Apx) are major virulence factors that play important roles in the pathogenesis of pleuropneumonia in swine. A previous study has demonstrated that native ApxI at low concentrations induces apoptosis in primary porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs) via a caspase-3-dependent pathway. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying ApxI-induced apoptosis remain largely unknown. In this study, it was shown that ApxI treatment in PAMs rapidly induced phosphorylation of both p38 and JNK, members of the mitogen-activated protein kinase family. Application of a selective p38 or JNK inhibitor significantly reduced ApxI-induced apoptosis, indicating the involvement of p38 and JNK pathways in this event. Furthermore, activation of both caspase-8 and -9 were observed in ApxI-stimulated PAMs. Inhibition of caspase-8 and caspase-9 activity significantly protected PAMs from ApxI-induced apoptosis. In addition, Bid activation was also noted in ApxI-treated PAMs, and inhibition of caspase-8 suppressed the activation of Bid and caspase-9, suggesting that ApxI was able to activate the caspases-8-Bid-caspase-9 pathway. Notably, inhibition of p38 or JNK pathway greatly attenuated the activation of caspases-3, -8, and -9. This study is the first to demonstrate that ApxI-induced apoptosis of PAMs involves the activation of p38 and JNK, and engages the extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways.

  3. Effect of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) (isolate ATCC VR-2385) infection on bactericidal activity of porcine pulmonary intravascular macrophages (PIMs): in vitro comparisons with pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAMs).

    PubMed

    Thanawongnuwech, R; Thacker, E L; Halbur, P G

    1997-11-01

    Porcine pulmonary intravascular macrophages (PIMs) were recovered by in situ pulmonary vascular perfusion with 0.025% collagenase in saline from six 8-week old, crossbred pigs. Pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAMs) were recovered by bronchoalveolar lavage from the same pigs for comparisons in each assay. The macrophages were exposed to PRRSV (ATCC VR-2385) in vitro for 24 h and infection was confirmed by an indirect immunofluorescence test or transmission electron microscopy. Viral particles tended to accumulate in the vesicles of the Golgi apparatus or endoplasmic reticulum. Bactericidal function assays were performed on the recovered macrophages to determine the effects of the virus on macrophage functions. In vitro PRRSV infection reduced the bactericidal ability of PIMs from 68.3% to 56.4% (P < 0.09), and PAMs from 69.3% to 61.0% (P > 0.1) at 24 h post-infection. The mean percentage of bacteria killed by macrophages after PRRSV infection was not significantly different among the treatment groups or between the treatment groups and non-infected controls based on colorimetric MTT bactericidal (Staphylococcus aureus) assay. PRRSV did not affect the ability of PIMs or PAMs to internalize opsonized 125I-iododeoxyuridine-labeled S. aureus (P > 0.05). PRRSV infection significantly decreased the production of superoxide anion (P < 0.01) by 67.0% in PIMs and by 69.4% in PAMs. PRRSV reduced the myeloperoxidase-H2O2-halide product (P < 0.01) by 36.5% for PIMs and by 48.1% for PAMs. The results suggest: (1) PIMs should be considered as an important replication site of PRRSV; (2) PRRSV may have a detrimental effect on both PIMs and PAMs; (3) loss of bactericidal function in PIMs may facilitate hematogenous bacterial infections.

  4. Continuous Quadrupole Magnetic Separation of Islets during Digestion Improves Purified Porcine Islet Viability

    PubMed Central

    Kumar Sajja, Venkata Sunil; Rizzari, Michael D.; Scott III, William E.; Kitzmann, Jennifer P.; Kennedy, David J.; Todd, Paul W.; Balamurugan, Appakalai N.; Hering, Bernhard J.

    2016-01-01

    Islet transplantation (ITx) is an emerging and promising therapy for patients with uncontrolled type 1 diabetes. The islet isolation and purification processes require exposure to extended cold ischemia, warm-enzymatic digestion, mechanical agitation, and use of damaging chemicals for density gradient separation (DG), all of which reduce viable islet yield. In this paper, we describe initial proof-of-concept studies exploring quadrupole magnetic separation (QMS) of islets as an alternative to DG to reduce exposure to these harsh conditions. Three porcine pancreata were split into two parts, the splenic lobe (SPL) and the combined connecting/duodenal lobes (CDL), for paired digestions and purifications. Islets in the SPL were preferentially labeled using magnetic microparticles (MMPs) that lodge within the islet microvasculature when infused into the pancreas and were continuously separated from the exocrine tissue by QMS during the collection phase of the digestion process. Unlabeled islets from the CDL were purified by conventional DG. Islets purified by QMS exhibited significantly improved viability (measured by oxygen consumption rate per DNA, p < 0.03) and better morphology relative to control islets. Islet purification by QMS can reduce the detrimental effects of prolonged exposure to toxic enzymes and density gradient solutions and substantially improve islet viability after isolation. PMID:27843954

  5. Continuous Quadrupole Magnetic Separation of Islets during Digestion Improves Purified Porcine Islet Viability.

    PubMed

    Weegman, Bradley P; Kumar Sajja, Venkata Sunil; Suszynski, Thomas M; Rizzari, Michael D; Scott Iii, William E; Kitzmann, Jennifer P; Mueller, Kate R; Hanley, Thomas R; Kennedy, David J; Todd, Paul W; Balamurugan, Appakalai N; Hering, Bernhard J; Papas, Klearchos K

    2016-01-01

    Islet transplantation (ITx) is an emerging and promising therapy for patients with uncontrolled type 1 diabetes. The islet isolation and purification processes require exposure to extended cold ischemia, warm-enzymatic digestion, mechanical agitation, and use of damaging chemicals for density gradient separation (DG), all of which reduce viable islet yield. In this paper, we describe initial proof-of-concept studies exploring quadrupole magnetic separation (QMS) of islets as an alternative to DG to reduce exposure to these harsh conditions. Three porcine pancreata were split into two parts, the splenic lobe (SPL) and the combined connecting/duodenal lobes (CDL), for paired digestions and purifications. Islets in the SPL were preferentially labeled using magnetic microparticles (MMPs) that lodge within the islet microvasculature when infused into the pancreas and were continuously separated from the exocrine tissue by QMS during the collection phase of the digestion process. Unlabeled islets from the CDL were purified by conventional DG. Islets purified by QMS exhibited significantly improved viability (measured by oxygen consumption rate per DNA, p < 0.03) and better morphology relative to control islets. Islet purification by QMS can reduce the detrimental effects of prolonged exposure to toxic enzymes and density gradient solutions and substantially improve islet viability after isolation.

  6. Suppression and recovery of the alveolar macrophage phagocytic system during continuous exposure to 0. 5 ppm ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmour, M.I.; Hmieleski, R.R.; Stafford, E.A.; Jakab, G.J. )

    1991-05-01

    Short-term exposures to ozone (O3) are known to impair pulmonary antibacterial defenses and alveolar macrophage (AM) phagocytosis in a dose-related manner. To determine the effect of prolonged O3 exposure, Swiss mice were exposed continuously to 0.5 ppm O3. At 1, 3, 7, and 14 days, intrapulmonary killing was assessed by inhalation challenge with Staphylococcus aureus or Proteus mirabilis and by comparing the number of viable bacteria remaining in the lungs at 4 h between O3-exposed and control animals. To evaluate the effects of O3 on the functional capacity of the AMs, Fc-receptor mediated phagocytosis was assessed. Ozone exposure impaired the intrapulmonary killing of S. aureus at 1 and 3 days; however, with prolonged exposure, the bactericidal capacity of the lungs returned to normal. This trend of an initial suppression followed by recovery was reflected in the phagocytic capacity of the AMs. In contrast to S. aureus, when P. mirabilis was used as the challenge organism, O3 exposure had no suppressive effect on pulmonary bactericidal activity, which correlated with an increase in the phagocytic cell population in the lungs. Morphologic examination of the lavaged macrophages showed that after 1 day of O3 exposure, the AMs were more foamy, and contained significantly more vacuoles. There was also a significant increase in binucleated cells at 3 days. These studies demonstrate that continuous exposure to O3 modulates AM-dependent lung defenses and points to the importance of the challenge organism and exposure protocol in establishing the adverse effect of O3.

  7. Alveolar abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001093.htm Alveolar abnormalities To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Alveolar abnormalities are changes in the tiny air sacs in ...

  8. Effect of continuous compression and 30:2 cardiopulmonary resuscitation on cerebral microcirculation in a porcine model of cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The effect of rescue breathing on neurologic prognosis after cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is controversial. Therefore, we investigated the cerebral microcirculatory and oxygen metabolism during continuous compression (CC) and 30:2 CPR (VC) in a porcine model of cardiac arrest to determine which is better for neurologic prognosis after CPR. Methods After 4 min of ventricular fibrillation, 20 pigs were randomised into two groups (n=10/group) receiving CC-CPR or VC-CPR. Cerebral oxygen metabolism and blood flow were measured continuously using laser Doppler flowmetry. Haemodynamic data were recorded at baseline and 5 min, 30 min, 2 h and 4 h after restoration of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). Results Compared with the VC group, the mean cortical cerebral blood flow was significantly higher at 5 min ROSC in the CC group (P<0.05), but the difference disappeared after that time point. Brain percutaneous oxygen partial pressures were higher, and brain percutaneous carbon dioxide partial pressures were lower, in the VC group from 30 min to 4 h after ROSC; significant differences were found between the two groups (P<0.05). However, no significant difference of the cerebral oxygen extraction fraction existed between the two groups. Conclusions Inconsistency of systemic circulation and cerebral microcirculation with regard to blood perfusion and oxygen metabolism is common after CPR. No significant differences in cortical blood flow and oxygen metabolism were found between the CC-CPR and VC-CPR groups after ROSC. PMID:23849600

  9. Porcine circovirus type 2 induces type I interferon production via MyD88-IKKα-IRFs signaling rather than NF-κB in porcine alveolar macrophages in vitro.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mengmeng; Han, Junyuan; Zhang, Yaqun; Duan, Dianning; Zhang, Shuxia

    2016-02-01

    Type I interferon (IFN-I) plays important roles in host antiviral responses. The interferon regulatory factor (IRF) and NF-κB transcription factors are thought to be important in the processes of viral secretion and triggering of interferon production. Recently, studies have shown that porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) can induce IFN-I production in vivo and in vitro, but the mechanisms underlying the production of PAMs infected with PCV2 remains unknown. Treatment of these cells with BAY11-7082, an inhibitor of NF-κB activation, allowed us to study the secretion of IFN-α and IFN-β in PAMs infected with PCV2. We found that IFN-α expression was induced following virus infection of PAMs. Notably, even after inhibitor treatment of PAMs infected with PCV2, secretion of IFN-α was significantly higher (P<0.05) compared with the PCV2 infection alone group. Our findings suggest that NF-κB plays a minor role in PCV2-induced type I interferon responses. To further characterize the signaling pathway that drives IFN-I expression in PAMs in response to PCV2, we used siRNA to silence the expression of Myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88) and study the role of MyD88-IKKα-IRF signaling in IFN-I production in PAMs induced by PCV2. Our findings show that PCV2 induced IFN-α mRNA transcription, which is associated with the activities of MyD88, IRF7, and IRF3. Thus, PCV2 can induce IFN-I transcription via the MyD88-IKKα-IRF signaling axis.

  10. Continuous infusion of porcine factor VIII in patients with haemophilia A and high-responding inhibitors: stability and clinical experience.

    PubMed

    O'Gorman, P; Dimichele, D M; Kasper, C K; Mannucci, P M; Santagostini, E; Hay, C R

    2001-11-01

    A multicentre retrospective survey was conducted to assess the efficacy and side-effect profile of porcine factor VIII (pFVIII:C) given by continuous infusion (CI) to patients with congenital haemophilia A and inhibitors. Twenty-nine episodes in 18 patients were treated by CI of pFVIII:C. Efficacy was graded as good in 79% of infusions and fair in 17%. There was a failed response in only one episode. Fourteen percent of patients experienced transfusion reactions with bolus doses, but no reactions were observed in patients given CI. There were no severe reactions. All the reactions resolved following interruption of the infusion and administration of steroids. Premedication did not prevent reactions. In this series the median decrease in platelet count after bolus injection of pFVIII:C was -67 X 10(9) L(-1) compared with a median decrease of -2 x 109 L(-1) during the course of CI, thus, continuous infusion of pFVIII:C appears to have less effect on platelet count than bolus injection. An anamnestic response was associated with 77% of infusions. This high rate of anamnesis reflects patient selection, in that they were all known to have high-level high-responding FVIII inhibitors with cross-reactivity to pFVIII. After reconstitution, the pFVIII:C showed little loss in factor VIII activity in solution over a 24-h period. We conclude that pFVIII:C may be effectively administered by CI to patients with haemophilia A and high-responding FVIII inhibitors. CI is the probably the mode of administration of choice for intensive replacement therapy with pFVIII.

  11. [Alveolar hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Parrot, A; Fartoukh, M; Cadranel, J

    2015-04-01

    Alveolar hemorrhage occurs relatively rarely and is a therapeutic emergency because it can quickly lead to acute respiratory failure, which can be fatal. Hemoptysis associated with anemia and pulmonary infiltrates suggest the diagnosis of alveolar hemorrhage, but may be absent in one third of cases including patients in respiratory distress. The diagnosis of alveolar hemorrhage is based on the findings of a bronchoalveolar lavage. The causes are numerous. It is important to identify alveolar hemorrhage due to sepsis, then separate an autoimmune cause (vasculitis associated with antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody, connective tissue disease and Goodpasture's syndrome) with the search for autoantibodies and biopsies from readily accessible organs, from a non-immune cause, performing echocardiography. Lung biopsy should be necessary only in exceptional cases. If the hemorrhage has an immune cause, treatment with steroids and cyclophosphamide may be started. The indications for treatment with rituximab are beginning to be established (forms that are not severe and refractory forms). The benefit of plasma exchange is unquestionable in Goodpasture's syndrome. In patients with an immune disease that can lead to an alveolar hemorrhage, removing any source of infection is the first priority.

  12. [The long-term course of 60 patients with alveolar echinococcosis in continuous therapy with mebendazole (1976-85)].

    PubMed

    Ammann, R; Tschudi, K; von Ziegler, M; Meister, F; Cotting, J; Eckert, J; Witassek, F; Freiburghaus, A

    1988-11-01

    Since 1976 60 patients with inoperable alveolar echinococcosis caused by Echinococcus multilocularis were treated with high doses of mebendazole and examined at regular intervals prospectively according to our protocol regarding clinical course, liver function, morphology, immunologically and plasma mebendazole levels. The average duration of disease was 8(1-19) years, the average duration of chemotherapy was 4.25 (0.75-9) years. The long term results showed a correlation of the clinical course with the mean plasma mebendazole levels and the duration of chemotherapy, respectively. Death (n = 5) or transient progression of the disease process (n = 14) was observed primarily in patients with low plasma mebendazole levels in the early course and within the first two years of chemotherapy. Only 9 patients showed a decrease of the parasite mass. Immundiagnosis (total serum IgE and serum antibodies against Echinococcus antigen) gave some information with regard to therapy results, but only in the long-term course. The cumulative survival of the patients under study was 96% at 5 years and 84% at 10 years, respectively which is markedly higher compared to historical control series with a letality of greater than 90% within 10 years.

  13. Porcine gonadogenesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Five images submitted for teaching purposes related to porcine gonadogenesis (2), porcine fetal testicular development (2), and porcine fetal ovarian development. Key words include: Egg cell nests, Embryo, GATA4, Genital ridge, Gonad, Leydig cell, Mesonephros, MIS, Ovary, P450c17, Porcine, Sertoli ...

  14. Automated continuous quantitative measurement of proximal airways on dynamic ventilation CT: initial experience using an ex vivo porcine lung phantom

    PubMed Central

    Yamashiro, Tsuneo; Tsubakimoto, Maho; Nagatani, Yukihiro; Moriya, Hiroshi; Sakuma, Kotaro; Tsukagoshi, Shinsuke; Inokawa, Hiroyasu; Kimoto, Tatsuya; Teramoto, Ryuichi; Murayama, Sadayuki

    2015-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of continuous quantitative measurement of the proximal airways, using dynamic ventilation computed tomography (CT) and our research software. Methods A porcine lung that was removed during meat processing was ventilated inside a chest phantom by a negative pressure cylinder (eight times per minute). This chest phantom with imitated respiratory movement was scanned by a 320-row area-detector CT scanner for approximately 9 seconds as dynamic ventilatory scanning. Obtained volume data were reconstructed every 0.35 seconds (total 8.4 seconds with 24 frames) as three-dimensional images and stored in our research software. The software automatically traced a designated airway point in all frames and measured the cross-sectional luminal area and wall area percent (WA%). The cross-sectional luminal area and WA% of the trachea and right main bronchus (RMB) were measured for this study. Two radiologists evaluated the traceability of all measurable airway points of the trachea and RMB using a three-point scale. Results It was judged that the software satisfactorily traced airway points throughout the dynamic ventilation CT (mean score, 2.64 at the trachea and 2.84 at the RMB). From the maximum inspiratory frame to the maximum expiratory frame, the cross-sectional luminal area of the trachea decreased 17.7% and that of the RMB 29.0%, whereas the WA% of the trachea increased 6.6% and that of the RMB 11.1%. Conclusion It is feasible to measure airway dimensions automatically at designated points on dynamic ventilation CT using research software. This technique can be applied to various airway and obstructive diseases. PMID:26445535

  15. Comparison of the Effects of Different Negative Pressure Wound Therapy Modes—Continuous, Noncontinuous, and With Instillation—on Porcine Excisional Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Lessing, M. Christian; James, Roberta B.; Ingram, Shannon C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) can be delivered in continuous or noncontinuous modes, while NPWT with instillation (NPWTi) couples NPWT with automated delivery and removal of topical wound treatment solutions and suspensions. This porcine study compared granulation response of NPWTi (instillation foam dressing with saline) to NPWT (standard foam dressing) in continuous and noncontinuous modes. Methods: Full-thickness dorsal excisional wounds in pigs were treated with continuous NPWT, intermittent NPWT, dynamic (controlled variable) NPWT, and NPWTi with saline (n = 10 per group). Wound dimensions were determined from 3D images collected on days 0, 2, 5, and 7. On day 7, animals were euthanized and specimens were harvested for histopathological review. Results: Average granulation thickness was not statistically different among continuous (3.29 ± 0.33 mm), intermittent (3.03 ± 0.47 mm), and dynamic (3.40 ± 0.34 mm) NPWT wounds at day 7. Average granulation thickness of NPWTi wounds (4.75 ± 0.54 mm), however, was statistically greater (P < .05) by 44%, 57%, and 40%, respectively, than that of wounds treated with continuous, intermittent, and dynamic NPWT. Analysis of 3D images revealed a greater reduction in wound area and perimeter in NPWTi wounds compared to all NPWT wounds (P < .05). In addition, the average wound fill rate for NPWTi wounds was faster than that for continuous (40%; P < .05), intermittent (25%; P > .05), and dynamic (65%; P < .05) NPWT wounds. Conclusions: Although not confirmed in humans, these porcine data suggest that NPWTi with saline may stimulate a faster rate of wound granulation than NPWT in continuous and noncontinuous modes. PMID:24106564

  16. Genomic and Proteomic Evaluation of Tissue Quality of Porcine Wounds Treated With Negative Pressure Wound Therapy in Continuous, Noncontinuous, and Instillation Modes

    PubMed Central

    Lessing, M. Christian

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Negative pressure wound therapy with instillation (NPWTi-d) combines NPWT with automated delivery and removal of topical wound treatment solutions. This porcine study compared genomic and proteomic responses of wounds treated with NPWTi-d with saline to wounds treated with NPWT in continuous and noncontinuous modes. Methods: Full-thickness porcine dorsal excisional wounds were treated with continuous NPWT, intermittent NPWT, dynamic NPWT, or NPWTi-d with saline (n = 10 wounds per group). On day 7, animals were euthanized and tissues collected. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction arrays profiled expression of 84 genes including extracellular matrix remodeling factors, inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, and growth factors and major signaling molecules. Concentrations of proteins associated with angiogenesis, extracellular matrix components, and cellular energetics were analyzed via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Results: Gene expression profiles for NPWTi-d with saline and continuous NPWT were similar. There were 5 upregulated and 18 downregulated genes overexpressed in NPWTi-d compared to NPWT wounds. Protein content was comparable in all treatment groups and similar to unwounded tissue. Conclusions: Previous preclinical studies have reported an increased rate of granulation tissue formation with NPWTi-d with saline compared to NPWT in continuous and noncontinuous modes. This evaluation of gene and protein expression suggests that the granulation tissue in these wounds has a similar quality. This first look at the differences in gene expression, particularly in genes related to remodeling, cell adhesion, inflammation, and growth factors, could help to clarify the observed differences in granulation rates. PMID:25525482

  17. Effects of continuous renal replacement therapy on intestinal mucosal barrier function during extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in a porcine model

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Backgrounds Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) has been recommended for treatment of acute, potentially reversible, life-threatening respiratory failure unresponsive to conventional therapy. Intestinal mucosal barrier dysfunction is one of the most critical pathophysiological disorders during ECMO. This study aimed to determine whether combination with CRRT could alleviate damage of intestinal mucosal barrier function during VV ECMO in a porcine model. Methods Twenty-four piglets were randomly divided into control(C), sham(S), ECMO(E) and ECMO + CRRT(EC) group. The animals were treated with ECMO or ECMO + CRRT for 24 hours. After the experiments, piglets were sacrificed. Jejunum, ileum and colon were harvested for morphologic examination of mucosal injury and ultrastructural distortion. Histological scoring was assessed according to Chiu’s scoring standard. Blood samples were taken from the animals at -1, 2, 6, 12 and 24 h during experiment. Blood, liver, spleen, kidney and mesenteric lymphnode were collected for bacterial culture. Serum concentrations of diamine oxidase (DAO) and intestinal fatty acid binding protein (I-FABP) were tested as markers to assess intestinal epithelial function and permeability. DAO levels were determined by spectrophotometry and I-FABP levels by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. Results Microscopy findings showed that ECMO-induced intestinal microvillus shedding and edema, morphological distortion of tight junction between intestinal mucous epithelium and loose cell-cell junctions were significantly improved with combination of CRRT. No significance was detected on positive rate of serum bacterial culture. The elevated colonies of bacterial culture in liver and mesenteric lymphnode in E group reduced significantly in EC group (p < 0.05). Compared with E group, EC group showed significantly decreased level of serum DAO and I-FABP (p < 0.05). Conclusions CRRT can alleviate the intestinal mucosal dysfunction

  18. The effect of continuous release of recombinant human epidermal growth factor (rh-EGF) in chitosan film on full thickness excisional porcine wounds.

    PubMed

    Hong, Joon Pio; Kim, Yeun Wha; Lee, Sang Kil; Kim, Sun Hee; Min, Kyung Hyun

    2008-10-01

    The purpose of this article is to evaluate the effect of continuously released recombinant human epidermal growth factor (rh-EGF) in chitosan film in full thickness porcine wounds. A total of 10 domestic pigs (Yorkshire species) weighing 18 to 22 kg between the ages of 50 to 60 days were used. The wounds were divided into 3 groups and treated selectively with rh-EGF in chitosan film (EGF 20 ug/wound/d), chitosan film without rh-EGF, or remained as the control group. One hundred percent healing time was observed, and hematoxylin and eosin and Anti Ki-67 antibody immunohistochemical staining were performed. The 100% healing time and Anti Ki-67 antibody immunohistochemical staining showed statistical significance of the rh-EGF chitosan film-treated group against the control group (P < 0.05). But it did not reveal any statistical significance over the chitosan film-treated group. In this preliminary study, although continuous release of rh-EGF in chitosan film accelerates epithelialization, the benefit of the combination of rh-EGF in chitosan cannot be determined over the use of chitosan alone. Further analysis using complex wound models such as diabetes or infection, which may have different pathology in healing, will be needed to evaluate the potential benefit/synergistic effectiveness.

  19. Transfer of tylosin resistance between Enterococcus spp. during continuous-flow culture of feral or domestic porcine gut microbes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mixed populations of domesticated and feral pig gut microbes (RPCF and FC, respectively) were grown in continuous culture to investigate the effects of tylosin on antimicrobial resistance. Cultures established in steady state were inoculated with 9.7 log10 colony forming units (CFU) of a tylosin-re...

  20. 7 CFR 1230.18 - Porcine animal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Porcine animal. 1230.18 Section 1230.18 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS... animal. Porcine animal means a swine, that is raised as (a) a feeder pig, that is, a young pig sold...

  1. 7 CFR 1230.18 - Porcine animal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Porcine animal. 1230.18 Section 1230.18 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS... animal. Porcine animal means a swine, that is raised as (a) a feeder pig, that is, a young pig sold...

  2. 7 CFR 1230.18 - Porcine animal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Porcine animal. 1230.18 Section 1230.18 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS... animal. Porcine animal means a swine, that is raised as (a) a feeder pig, that is, a young pig sold...

  3. 7 CFR 1230.18 - Porcine animal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Porcine animal. 1230.18 Section 1230.18 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS... animal. Porcine animal means a swine, that is raised as (a) a feeder pig, that is, a young pig sold...

  4. 7 CFR 1230.18 - Porcine animal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Porcine animal. 1230.18 Section 1230.18 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS... animal. Porcine animal means a swine, that is raised as (a) a feeder pig, that is, a young pig sold...

  5. In Depth Global Analysis of Transcript Abundance Levels Following Infection with Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is a major pathogen of swine worldwide and causes considerable economic loss. Infection of the primary target cells, porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs), by PRRSV causes significant changes in their function by mechanisms that are not under...

  6. Marked differences between MARC-145 cells and swine alveolar macrophages in IFN beta-induced activation of antiviral state against PRRSV

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The replication kinetics of field isolates and a vaccine virus of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) were evaluated in MARC-145 cells and porcine alveolar macrophages (PAM). In MARC-145 cells, the eclipse period of the vaccine virus was about 10 hours and was shorter than t...

  7. Lung epithelial branching program antagonizes alveolar differentiation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Daniel R; Martinez Alanis, Denise; Miller, Rachel K; Ji, Hong; Akiyama, Haruhiko; McCrea, Pierre D; Chen, Jichao

    2013-11-05

    Mammalian organs, including the lung and kidney, often adopt a branched structure to achieve high efficiency and capacity of their physiological functions. Formation of a functional lung requires two developmental processes: branching morphogenesis, which builds a tree-like tubular network, and alveolar differentiation, which generates specialized epithelial cells for gas exchange. Much progress has been made to understand each of the two processes individually; however, it is not clear whether the two processes are coordinated and how they are deployed at the correct time and location. Here we show that an epithelial branching morphogenesis program antagonizes alveolar differentiation in the mouse lung. We find a negative correlation between branching morphogenesis and alveolar differentiation temporally, spatially, and evolutionarily. Gain-of-function experiments show that hyperactive small GTPase Kras expands the branching program and also suppresses molecular and cellular differentiation of alveolar cells. Loss-of-function experiments show that SRY-box containing gene 9 (Sox9) functions downstream of Fibroblast growth factor (Fgf)/Kras to promote branching and also suppresses premature initiation of alveolar differentiation. We thus propose that lung epithelial progenitors continuously balance between branching morphogenesis and alveolar differentiation, and such a balance is mediated by dual-function regulators, including Kras and Sox9. The resulting temporal delay of differentiation by the branching program may provide new insights to lung immaturity in preterm neonates and the increase in organ complexity during evolution.

  8. Review of secondary alveolar cleft repair

    PubMed Central

    Cho-Lee, Gui-Youn; García-Díez, Eloy-Miguel; Nunes, Richard-Agostinho; Martí-Pagès, Carles; Sieira-Gil, Ramón; Rivera-Baró, Alejandro

    2013-01-01

    achieves all these several objectives: (1) to obtain maxillary arch continuity, (2) to maximize bone support for the dentition, (3) to stabilize the maxillary segments after orthodontic treatment, (4) to eliminate oronasal fistulae, (5) to provide nasal alar cartilage support, (6) to establish ideal alveolar morphology, and (7) to provide available bone with attached soft tissue for future endosteal implant placement in cases where there is a residual dental space. We advocate for the use of a minimal incision to obtain the iliac crest bone graft and for the use of a corticocancellous block of bone in combination with bone chips. PMID:23662259

  9. Complete genome sequence of a novel porcine parainfluenza virus 5 isolate in Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yu Na; Lee, Changhee

    2013-08-01

    A novel cytopathogenic paramyxovirus was isolated from a lung sample from a piglet, using continuous porcine alveolar macrophage cells. Morphologic and genetic studies indicated that this porcine virus (pPIV5) belongs to the species Parainfluenza 5 in the family Paramyxoviridae. We attempted to determine the complete nucleotide sequence of the first Korean pPIV5 isolate, designated KNU-11. The full-length genome of KNU-11 was found to be 15,246 nucleotides in length and consist of seven nonoverlapping genes (3'-N-V/P-M-F-SH-HN-L-5') predicted to encode eight proteins. The overall degree of nucleotide sequence identity was 98.7 % between KNU-11 and PIV5 (formerly simian virus 5, SV5), a prototype paramyxovirus, and the putative proteins had 74.4 to 99.2 % amino acid identity to those of PIV5. Phylogenetic analysis further demonstrated that the novel pPIV5 isolate is a member of the genus Rubulavirus of the subfamily Paramyxovirinae. The present study describes the identification and genomic characterization of a pPIV5 isolate in South Korea.

  10. Porcine TLR3 characterization and expression in response to influenza virus and Bordetella bronchiseptica

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have provided a detailed structural analysis of porcine alveolar macrophage TLR3 extracellular domain (ECD). The pTLR3-ECD contains 18 leucine-rich repeat (LRRs) consisting of blocks of consensus motifs and non-consensus motifs containing insertions. Excluding the N-terminal and C-terminal LRRs, ...

  11. Overexpression of Histone Deacetylase 6 Enhances Resistance to Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiuyan; Li, Zhiguo; Wang, Meng; Liu, Lin; Tian, Kegong; Li, Ning

    2017-01-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is one of the most economically relevant viral pathogens in pigs and causes substantial losses in the pig industry worldwide each year. At present, PRRSV vaccines do not effectively prevent and control this disease. Consequently, it is necessary to develop new antiviral strategies to compensate for the inefficacy of the available vaccines. Histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) is an important member of the histone deacetylase family that is responsible for regulating many important biological processes. Studies have shown that HDAC6 has anti-viral activities during the viral life cycle. However, whether HDAC6 overexpression enhances resistance to PRRSV in pigs remains unknown. In this study, we used a somatic cell cloning method to produce transgenic (TG) pigs that constitutively overexpress porcine HDAC6. These TG pigs showed germ line transmission with continued overexpression of HDAC6. In vitro, virus-challenged porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs) overexpressed HDAC6, which suppressed viral gene expression and PRRSV production. In vivo, resistance to PRRSV in TG pigs was evaluated by direct or cohabitation mediated infection with a highly pathogenic PRRSV (HP-PRRSV) strain. Compared with non-TG (NTG) siblings, TG pigs showed a significantly lower viral load in the lungs and an extended survival time after infection with HP-PRRSV via intramuscular injection. In the cohabitation study, NTG pigs housed with challenged NTG pigs exhibited significantly worse clinical symptoms than the other three in-contact groups. These results collectively suggest that HDAC6 overexpression enhances resistance to PRRSV infection both in vitro and in vivo. Our findings suggest the potential involvement of HDAC6 in the response to PRRSV, which will facilitate the development of novel therapies for PRRSV. PMID:28052127

  12. Pulmonary Alveolar Microlithiasis

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Kevan; Dell, Sharon; Birken, Catherine; Al-Saleh, Suhail

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis (PAM) is a rare autosomal recessive condition that is often asymptomatic despite significant changes in chest imaging. Diagnosis is often made when patients become symptomatic in adulthood. There are still no proven treatments, but earlier diagnosis may allow for evaluation of preventative strategies that could improve outcome. It is an important diagnosis to consider in children who have marked radiographic findings with no or very mild symptoms or physical findings. Diagnosis can be made with imaging alone but may necessitate lung biopsy for definitive diagnosis. PMID:27445543

  13. Alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma of maxilla

    PubMed Central

    Ananthaneni, Anuradha; Kuberappa, Puneeth Horatti; Srinivas, G Vijay; Kiresur, Mohammad Asif

    2016-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS), a malignant neoplasm of skeletal muscle origin, is the most common soft tissue sarcoma seen in childhood and adolescence. The most frequent site is the head and neck accounting for 40% of all cases and other involved sites are genitourinary tract, retroperitoneum, and to a lesser extent, the extremities. RMS is relatively uncommon in the oral cavity and the involvement of the jaws is extremely rare. Here, we report a case of 50-year-old female with oral RMS involving maxillary alveolar region with clinical, radiological, histopathological and immunohistochemical findings. PMID:27194887

  14. Antibody repertoire development in fetal and neonatal piglets. XV. Porcine circovirus type 2 infection differentially affects serum IgG levels and antibodies to ORF2 in piglets free from other environmental factors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) is an important pathogen in the porcine respiratory disease complex (PRDC) and its persistence may be due to dysregulation of systemic immunity. We examined this contention using isolator piglets. We present data on Ig levels in serum and bronchio-alveolar lavage (BA...

  15. A comparative study on the effect of subtherapeutic tylosin administration on select feral or domestic porcine gut microflora grown in continuous-flow culture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Continuous flow cultures of feral (culture FC) and domesticated (culture RPCF) pig gut microflora were established in steady state. Cultures, in duplicate, were continuously infused subtherapeutic (25 ug/ml) levels of tylosin and sampled at intervals to assess effects on total culturable anaerobes,...

  16. Replication of porcine circoviruses.

    PubMed

    Faurez, Florence; Dory, Daniel; Grasland, Béatrice; Jestin, André

    2009-05-18

    Porcine circoviruses are circular single-stranded DNA viruses that infect swine and wild boars. Two species of porcine circoviruses exist. Porcine circovirus type 1 is non pathogenic contrary to porcine circovirus type 2 which is associated with the disease known as Post-weaning Multisystemic Wasting Syndrome. Porcine circovirus DNA has been shown to replicate by a rolling circle mechanism. Other studies have revealed similar mechanisms of rolling-circle replication in plasmids and single-stranded viruses such as Geminivirus. Three elements are important in rolling-circle replication: i) a gene encoding initiator protein, ii) a double strand origin, and iii) a single strand origin. However, differences exist between viruses and plasmids and between viruses. Porcine circovirus replication probably involves a "melting pot" rather than "cruciform" rolling-circle mechanism.This review provides a summary of current knowledge of replication in porcine circoviruses as models of the Circovirus genus. Based on various studies, the factors affecting replication are defined and the mechanisms involved in the different phases of replication are described or proposed.

  17. Rosiglitazone dampens pulmonary inflammation in a porcine model of acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Mirakaj, Valbona; Mutz, Christian; Vagts, Dierk; Henes, Janek; Haeberle, Helene A; Husung, Susanne; König, Tony; Nöldge-Schomburg, Gabriele; Rosenberger, Peter

    2014-08-01

    The hallmarks of acute lung injury (ALI) are the compromised alveolar-capillary barrier and the extravasation of leukocytes into the alveolar space. Given the fact that the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ agonist rosiglitazone holds significant anti-inflammatory properties, we aimed to evaluate whether rosiglitazone could dampen these hallmarks of local pulmonary inflammation in a porcine model of lung injury. For this purpose, we used a model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 50 μg/kg)-induced ALI. One hundred twenty minutes following the infusion of LPS, we started the exposure to rosiglitazone through inhalation or infusion. We found that intravenous rosiglitazone significantly controlled local pulmonary inflammation as determined through the expression of cytokines within the alveolar compartment. Furthermore, we found a significant reduction of the protein concentration and neutrophil activity within the alveolar space. In summary, we therefore conclude that the treatment with rosiglitazone might dampen local pulmonary inflammation during the initial stages of ALI.

  18. Emergency management of alveolar osteitis.

    PubMed

    Summers, Anthony

    2011-12-01

    Patients with urgent dental problems who present to emergency departments (EDs) during weekday office hours are usually referred to their dentists, often after being provided with analgesia. Outside these hours, however, ED professionals may have to provide treatment before referral. One dental emergency with which patients may present but of which ED staff are unlikely to have experience is alveolar osteitis, a painful condition that occurs usually after tooth extraction. This article defines alveolar osteitis and describes management in an ED.

  19. Porcine skin damage thresholds for 0.6 to 9.5 cm beam diameters from 1070-nm continuous-wave infrared laser radiation.

    PubMed

    Vincelette, Rebecca; Noojin, Gary D; Harbert, Corey A; Schuster, Kurt J; Shingledecker, Aurora D; Stolarski, Dave; Kumru, Semih S; Oliver, Jeffrey W

    2014-03-01

    There is an increasing use of high-power fiber lasers in manufacturing and telecommunications industries operating in the infrared spectrum between 1000 and 2000 nm, which are advertised to provide as much as 10 kW continuous output power at 1070 nm. Safety standards have traditionally been based on experimental and modeling investigations with scant data available for these wavelengths. A series of studies using 1070-nm infrared lasers to determine the minimum visible lesion damage thresholds in skin using the Yucatan miniature pig (Sus scrofa domestica) for a range of beam diameters (0.6, 1.1, 1.9, 2.4, 4.7, and 9.5 cm) and a range of exposure durations (10 ms to 10 s) is presented. Experimental peak temperatures associated with each damage threshold were measured using thermal imaging. Peak temperatures at damage threshold for the 10-s exposures were ∼10°C lower than those at shorter exposures. The lowest and highest experimental minimum visible lesion damage thresholds were found to have peak radiant exposures of 19 and 432  J/cm2 for the beam diameter-exposure duration pairs of 2.4 cm, 25 ms and 0.6 cm, 10 s, respectively. Thresholds for beam diameters >2.5  cm had a weak to no effect on threshold radiant exposure levels for exposure times ≤0.25  s, but may have a larger effect on thresholds for exposures ≥10  s.

  20. Sessile alveolar macrophages communicate with alveolar epithelium to modulate immunity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westphalen, Kristin; Gusarova, Galina A.; Islam, Mohammad N.; Subramanian, Manikandan; Cohen, Taylor S.; Prince, Alice S.; Bhattacharya, Jahar

    2014-02-01

    The tissue-resident macrophages of barrier organs constitute the first line of defence against pathogens at the systemic interface with the ambient environment. In the lung, resident alveolar macrophages (AMs) provide a sentinel function against inhaled pathogens. Bacterial constituents ligate Toll-like receptors (TLRs) on AMs, causing AMs to secrete proinflammatory cytokines that activate alveolar epithelial receptors, leading to recruitment of neutrophils that engulf pathogens. Because the AM-induced response could itself cause tissue injury, it is unclear how AMs modulate the response to prevent injury. Here, using real-time alveolar imaging in situ, we show that a subset of AMs attached to the alveolar wall form connexin 43 (Cx43)-containing gap junction channels with the epithelium. During lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation, the AMs remained sessile and attached to the alveoli, and they established intercommunication through synchronized Ca2+ waves, using the epithelium as the conducting pathway. The intercommunication was immunosuppressive, involving Ca2+-dependent activation of Akt, because AM-specific knockout of Cx43 enhanced alveolar neutrophil recruitment and secretion of proinflammatory cytokines in the bronchoalveolar lavage. A picture emerges of a novel immunomodulatory process in which a subset of alveolus-attached AMs intercommunicates immunosuppressive signals to reduce endotoxin-induced lung inflammation.

  1. Blood gas and hematological changes in experimental peracute porcine pleuropneumonia.

    PubMed Central

    Kiorpes, A L; MacWilliams, P S; Schenkman, D I; Bäckström, L R

    1990-01-01

    The effect of experimental, peracute, porcine pleuropneumonia on arterial blood gases, acid base status, the leukogram, and gross and microscopic lung structure was studied in nine growing pigs (mean weight +/- SD 10.6 +/- 2.0 kg). Pigs were inoculated intranasally with a virulent serotype 5 isolate of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, and all showed signs typical of the disease within four hours. Death occurred in all pigs from 4.5 to 32 hours postinoculation (mean 14 hours). Gross and microscopic changes were typical of porcine pleuropneumonia in all pigs. Changes in the leukogram included a rapid decline in total white cells, segmented neutrophils, lymphocytes, monocytes, and eosinophils. Pigs maintained alveolar ventilation throughout the study as arterial CO2 tension was unchanged; however, arterial O2 tension and pH decreased from (mean +/- SD) 95.2 +/- 5.7 torr and 7.463 +/- 0.018 at baseline to 62.1 +/- 12.3 torr and 7.388 +/- 0.045, respectively, within 90 minutes prior to death. The data showed that in this model of peracute porcine pleuropneumonia, progressive ventilatory failure was not a feature of the disease, and the blood gas values and acid base status were maintained within physiological ranges. The histopathological hematological and physiological findings were consistent with the hypothesis that peracute porcine pleuropneumonia resembles septic shock. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:2106382

  2. Is alveolar cleft reconstruction still controversial? (Review of literature)

    PubMed Central

    Seifeldin, Sameh A.

    2015-01-01

    Cleft lip and palate (CL/P) is a frequent congenital malformation that manifests in several varieties including unilateral or bilateral and complete or incomplete. Alveolar cleft reconstruction remains controversial with regard to timing, graft materials, surgical techniques, and methods of evaluation. Many studies have been conducted addressing these points to develop an acceptable universal protocol for managing CL/P. The primary goal of alveolar cleft reconstruction in CL/P patients is to provide a bony bridge at the cleft site that allows maxillary arch continuity, oronasal fistula repair, eruption of the permanent dentition into the newly formed bone, enhances nasal symmetry through providing alar base support, orthodontic movement and placement of osseointegrated implants when indicated. Other goals include improving speech, improvement of periodontal conditions, establishing better oral hygiene, and limiting growth disturbances. In order to rehabilitate oral function in CL/P patients alveolar bone grafting is necessary. Secondary bone grafting is the most widely accepted method for treating alveolar clefts. Autogenous bone graft is the primary source for reconstructing alveolar cleft defects and is currently the preferred grafting material. PMID:26792963

  3. Genetic engineering alveolar macrophages for host resistance to PRRSV.

    PubMed

    Prather, Randall S; Whitworth, Kristin M; Schommer, Susan K; Wells, Kevin D

    2017-02-10

    Standard strategies for control of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) have not been effective, as vaccines have not reduced the prevalence of disease and many producers depopulate after an outbreak. Another method of control would be to prevent the virus from infecting the pig. The virus was thought to infect alveolar macrophages by interaction with a variety of cell surface molecules. One popular model had PRRSV first interacting with heparin sulfate followed by binding to sialoadhesin and then being internalized into an endosome. Within the endosome, PRRSV was thought to interact with CD163 to uncoat the virus so the viral genome could be released into the cytosol and infect the cell. Other candidate receptors have included vimentin, CD151 and CD209. By using genetic engineering, it is possible to test the importance of individual entry mediators by knocking them out. Pigs engineered by knockout of sialoadhesin were still susceptible to infection, while CD163 knockout resulted in pigs that were resistant to infection. Genetic engineering is not only a valuable tool to determine the role of specific proteins in infection by PRRSV (in this case), but also provides a means to create animals resistant to disease. Genetic engineering of alveolar macrophages can also illuminate the role of other proteins in response to infection. We suggest that strategies to prevent infection be pursued to reduce the reservoir of virus.

  4. Primary diffuse alveolar septal amyloidosis.

    PubMed Central

    Poh, S C; Tjia, T S; Seah, H C

    1975-01-01

    The case is reported of a 61-year-old man with primary diffuse alveolar septal pulmonary amyloidosis. Amyloid infiltration of the heart and other organs was also observed. The clinical findings and laboratory investigations reveal features characteristic of defective gas transfer with pulmonary oedema due to left ventricular failure from myocardial involvement. Images PMID:1179316

  5. Enhanced proliferation, attachment and osteopontin expression by porcine periodontal cells exposed to Emdogain.

    PubMed

    Rincon, J C; Xiao, Y; Young, W G; Bartold, P M

    2005-12-01

    Emdogain (EMD) is an enamel matrix derivative extracted from developing porcine teeth with demonstrated periodontal regenerative potential. EMD has been shown to influence a number of properties of periodontal ligament cells including proliferation, cell attachment and matrix synthesis. To date, the effect of EMD on the epithelial cell rests of Malassez (ERM) is unknown. In this study, periodontal ligament fibroblasts, ERM, alveolar bone cells and gingival fibroblasts were obtained from porcine periodontal ligament, alveolar bone and gingiva. This study investigated, in vitro, the effect of EMD at three concentrations on proliferation, cell attachment and expression of mRNA for two mineralised tissue-related proteins (osteopontin and bone sialoprotein). As for other periodontal cells, the ERM proliferative response was enhanced by EMD. Attachment assays revealed a highly significant increase for ERM and gingival fibroblasts after EMD treatment at all concentrations. This study has also shown that EMD stimulated expression of osteopontin mRNA by ERM and alveolar bone cells. The results from this study provide evidence that EMD enhanced cellular events related with proliferation, attachment and osteopontin mRNA expression by porcine periodontal cells, in a manner consistent with its role in periodontal regenerative therapy.

  6. Xenotransplantation and porcine cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed

    Denner, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Porcine microorganisms may be transmitted to the human recipient when xenotransplantation with pig cells, tissues, and organs will be performed. Most of such microorganisms can be eliminated from the donor pig by specified or designated pathogen-free production of the animals. As human cytomegalovirus causes severe transplant rejection in allotransplantation, considerable concern is warranted on the potential pathogenicity of porcine cytomegalovirus (PCMV) in the setting of xenotransplantation. On the other hand, despite having a similar name, PCMV is different from HCMV. The impact of PCMV infection on pigs is known; however, the influence of PCMV on the human transplant recipient is unclear. However, first transplantations of pig organs infected with PCMV into non-human primates were associated with a significant reduction of the survival time of the transplants. Sensitive detection methods and strategies for elimination of PCMV from donor herds are required.

  7. [Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis. Study of pulmonary circulation].

    PubMed

    Orea Tejeda, A; Atencio, C; Sandoval, J; Lupi Herrera, E

    1982-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis is a rare disease of unknown etiology which consists of alveolar deposit of calcium microspheres. We report the procedures for the diagnosis of this disease, as well as the hemodynamic features of the pulmonary circulation. Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), and cor pulmonale were documented. The active and passive factors involved in PAH are analyzed. We conclude that alveolar hypoxia and estructural vascular changes play a major role in the genesis of PAH.

  8. [Persistent dento-alveolar pain disorder (PDAP)].

    PubMed

    Warnsinck, C J; Koutris, M; Shemesh, H; Lobbezoo, F

    2015-02-01

    Dento-alveolar pain is common in the orofacial area. Persistent dento-alveolar pain could be experienced without an identifiable etiology with poor response to existing treatments. Confusion about the diagnosis and classification of persistent dento-alveolar pain (PDAP) disorders could explain the difficulties in treatment and unfavorable prognosis. Recently, initial steps were made to improve the taxonomy and diagnostic criteria for PDAP in order to improve clinical research and care.

  9. The Systemic Inflammation of Alveolar Hypoxia Is Initiated by Alveolar Macrophage–Borne Mediator(s)

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Jie; Wood, John G.; Blanco, Victor Gustavo; Gonzalez, Norberto C.

    2009-01-01

    Alveolar hypoxia produces widespread systemic inflammation in rats. The inflammation appears to be triggered by activation of mast cells by a mediator released from alveolar macrophages, not by the reduced systemic partial pressure of oxygen (PO2). If this is correct, the following should apply: (1) neither mast cells nor tissue macrophages should be directly activated by hypoxia; and (2) mast cells should be activated when in contact with hypoxic alveolar macrophages, but not with hypoxic tissue macrophages. We sought here to determine whether hypoxia activates isolated alveolar macrophages, peritoneal macrophages, and peritoneal mast cells, and to study the response of the microcirculation to supernatants of these cultures. Rat mesenteric microcirculation intravital microscopy was combined with primary cultures of alveolar macrophages, peritoneal macrophages, and peritoneal mast cells. Supernatant of hypoxic alveolar macrophages, but not of hypoxic peritoneal macrophages, produced inflammation in mesentery. Hypoxia induced a respiratory burst in alveolar, but not peritoneal macrophages. Cultured peritoneal mast cells did not degranulate with hypoxia. Immersion of mast cells in supernatant of hypoxic alveolar macrophages, but not in supernatant of hypoxic peritoneal macrophages, induced mast cell degranulation. Hypoxia induced release of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, a mast cell secretagogue, from alveolar, but not peritoneal macrophages or mast cells. We conclude that a mediator released by hypoxic alveolar macrophages activates mast cells and triggers systemic inflammation. Reduced systemic PO2 and activation of tissue macrophages do not play a role in this phenomenon. The inflammation could contribute to systemic effects of diseases featuring alveolar hypoxia. PMID:19244200

  10. Porcine circovirus diseases.

    PubMed

    Segalés, Joaquim; Allan, Gordon M; Domingo, Mariano

    2005-12-01

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) is a member of the family Circoviridae, a recently established virus family composed of small, non-enveloped viruses, with a circular, single-stranded DNA genome. PCV2, which is found all over the world in the domestic pig and probably the wild boar, has been recently associated with a number of disease syndromes, which have been collectively named porcine circovirus diseases (PCVD). Postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PMWS), porcine dermatitis and nephropathy syndrome (PDNS) and reproductive disorders are the most relevant ones. Among them, only PMWS is considered to have a severe impact on domestic swine production. PMWS mainly affects nursery and/or fattening pigs; wasting is considered the most representative clinical sign in this disease. Diagnosis of this disease is confirmed by histopathological examination of lymphoid tissues and detection of a moderate to high amount of PCV2 in damaged tissues. Since PMWS is considered a multifactorial disease in which other factors in addition to PCV2 are needed in most cases to trigger the clinical disease, effective control measures have focused on the understanding of the co-factors involved in individual farms and the control or elimination of these triggers. PDNS, an immuno-complex disease characterized by fibrino-necrotizing glomerulonephritis and systemic necrotizing vasculitis, has been linked to PCV2, but a definitive proof of this association is still lacking. PCV2-associated reproductive disease seems to occur very sporadically under field conditions, but it has been characterized by late-term abortions and stillbirths, extensive fibrosing and/or necrotizing myocarditis in fetuses and the presence of moderate to high amounts of PCV2 in these lesions. Taking into account that scientific information on PCV2 and its associated diseases has been markedly expanded in the last 8 years, the objective of this review is to summarize the current state of knowledge of the most

  11. Porcine prion protein amyloid.

    PubMed

    Hammarström, Per; Nyström, Sofie

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian prions are composed of misfolded aggregated prion protein (PrP) with amyloid-like features. Prions are zoonotic disease agents that infect a wide variety of mammalian species including humans. Mammals and by-products thereof which are frequently encountered in daily life are most important for human health. It is established that bovine prions (BSE) can infect humans while there is no such evidence for any other prion susceptible species in the human food chain (sheep, goat, elk, deer) and largely prion resistant species (pig) or susceptible and resistant pets (cat and dogs, respectively). PrPs from these species have been characterized using biochemistry, biophysics and neurobiology. Recently we studied PrPs from several mammals in vitro and found evidence for generic amyloidogenicity as well as cross-seeding fibril formation activity of all PrPs on the human PrP sequence regardless if the original species was resistant or susceptible to prion disease. Porcine PrP amyloidogenicity was among the studied. Experimentally inoculated pigs as well as transgenic mouse lines overexpressing porcine PrP have, in the past, been used to investigate the possibility of prion transmission in pigs. The pig is a species with extraordinarily wide use within human daily life with over a billion pigs harvested for human consumption each year. Here we discuss the possibility that the largely prion disease resistant pig can be a clinically silent carrier of replicating prions.

  12. Porcine prion protein amyloid

    PubMed Central

    Hammarström, Per; Nyström, Sofie

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mammalian prions are composed of misfolded aggregated prion protein (PrP) with amyloid-like features. Prions are zoonotic disease agents that infect a wide variety of mammalian species including humans. Mammals and by-products thereof which are frequently encountered in daily life are most important for human health. It is established that bovine prions (BSE) can infect humans while there is no such evidence for any other prion susceptible species in the human food chain (sheep, goat, elk, deer) and largely prion resistant species (pig) or susceptible and resistant pets (cat and dogs, respectively). PrPs from these species have been characterized using biochemistry, biophysics and neurobiology. Recently we studied PrPs from several mammals in vitro and found evidence for generic amyloidogenicity as well as cross-seeding fibril formation activity of all PrPs on the human PrP sequence regardless if the original species was resistant or susceptible to prion disease. Porcine PrP amyloidogenicity was among the studied. Experimentally inoculated pigs as well as transgenic mouse lines overexpressing porcine PrP have, in the past, been used to investigate the possibility of prion transmission in pigs. The pig is a species with extraordinarily wide use within human daily life with over a billion pigs harvested for human consumption each year. Here we discuss the possibility that the largely prion disease resistant pig can be a clinically silent carrier of replicating prions. PMID:26218890

  13. Predictors of alveolar air leaks.

    PubMed

    Loran, David B; Woodside, Kenneth J; Cerfolio, Robert J; Zwischenberger, Joseph B

    2002-08-01

    Persistent air leaks are caused by the failure of the postoperative lung to achieve a configuration that is physiologically amenable to healing. The raw pulmonary surface caused by the dissection of the fissure often is separated from the pleura, and the air leak fails to close. Additionally, higher air flow thorough an alveolar-pleural fistula seems to keep the fistula open. Other factors that interfere with wound healing, such as steroid use, diabetes, or malnutrition, can result in persistence of the leak. A thoracic surgeon can minimize the incidence of air leak through meticulous surgical technique and can identify patients in whom the balance of risks (Table 1) and benefits warrant operative intervention based on an understanding of the underlying pathophysiology.

  14. Vertical Alveolar Ridge Augmentation by Distraction Osteogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, N. Nanda; Ravindran, C.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Compromised alveolar ridge in vertical and horizontal dimension is a common finding in patients visiting practitioners for dental prosthesis. Various treatment modalities are available for correction of deficient ridges among which alveolar distraction osteogenesis is one. Aim To study the efficacy of alveolar distraction osteogenesis in augmentation of alveolar ridges deficient in vertical dimension. Materials and Methods Ten patients aged 16 to 46 years with deficient alveolar ridge underwent ridge augmentation in 11 alveolar segments using the distraction osteogenesis method. For each patient a custom made distraction device was fabricated. The device was indigenously manufactured with SS-316 (ISO 3506). Results The vertical bone gain reached more than 10mm without the use of bone transplantation. Certain complications like incorrect vector of distraction, paresthesia, pain and loss of transport segment were encountered during the course of the study. Conclusion Alveolar vertical distraction osteogenesis is a reliable and predictable technique for both hard and soft tissue genesis. Implant placement is feasible with primary stability in neogenerated bone at the level of the distracted areas. PMID:26816991

  15. Inferior alveolar nerve block: Alternative technique

    PubMed Central

    Thangavelu, K.; Kannan, R.; Kumar, N. Senthil

    2012-01-01

    Background: Inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB) is a technique of dental anesthesia, used to produce anesthesia of the mandibular teeth, gingivae of the mandible and lower lip. The conventional IANB is the most commonly used the nerve block technique for achieving local anesthesia for mandibular surgical procedures. In certain cases, however, this nerve block fails, even when performed by the most experienced clinician. Therefore, it would be advantageous to find an alternative simple technique. Aim and Objective: The objective of this study is to find an alternative inferior alveolar nerve block that has a higher success rate than other routine techniques. To this purpose, a simple painless inferior alveolar nerve block was designed to anesthetize the inferior alveolar nerve. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted in Oral surgery department of Vinayaka Mission's dental college Salem from May 2009 to May 2011. Five hundred patients between the age of 20 years and 65 years who required extraction of teeth in mandible were included in the study. Out of 500 patients 270 were males and 230 were females. The effectiveness of the IANB was evaluated by using a sharp dental explorer in the regions innervated by the inferior alveolar, lingual, and buccal nerves after 3, 5, and 7 min, respectively. Conclusion: This study concludes that inferior alveolar nerve block is an appropriate alternative nerve block to anesthetize inferior alveolar nerve due to its several advantages. PMID:25885503

  16. AB038. Isolated pauci-immune pulmonary capillaritis: rare case of diffuse alveolar hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Athanasopoulou, Athanasia; Kavvada, Aikaterini; Labrakis, Charilaos; Karageorgas, Theofanis; Tzimopoulos, Konstantinos; Sougles, Filippos; Rapti, Aggeliki

    2016-01-01

    As diffuse alveolar hemorrhage is defined the clinical pathological syndrome characterized by hemoptysis, diffuse alveolar infiltrates, acute respiratory failure and anemia. It is a life-threatening condition and a medical emergency. Causes are multiple and variable. A 75-year-old male, ex-smoker, with known coronary artery disease and paroxysmal atrial fibrillation treated with aspirin, presents due to low grade fever and bloody sputum. Hemodynamically stable, without respiratory failure, but with multiple alveolar infiltrates on chest imaging and anemia. Initially treated as lower respiratory tract infection with intravenous antibiotics while anticoagulant treatment was interrupted. Full laboratory testing for anemia, collagen vascular diseases and specific and nonspecific infections was performed. Anemia was normochromic, normocytic, without findings of hemolysis. Diffuse bilateral alveolar infiltrates were revealed on thorax computer tomography. Diagnostic bronchoscopy was performed with negative results for either infection or malignancy, while bronchoalveolar lavage analysis revealed siderophages 81% of alveolar macrophages. The patient underwent full pulmonary function testing, which revealed obstructive respiratory disease with a low diffusion capacity. Due to continuing life threatening anemia, despite blood transfusions, in combination with the results of the laboratory tests, the patient was started on high dose intravenous corticosteroids, followed by intravenous cyclophosphamide every 28 days for five cycles. Rapid improvement was achieved with elimination of chest CT infiltrates and normalization of blood tests and pulmonary function tests. At present peros treatment with azathioprine and low dose corticosteroids is given. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage is a clinical pathological syndrome caused by different pathophysiological mechanisms, including capillary failure stress, diffuse alveolar damage and capillaritis. The most common cause is capillaritis

  17. Toward therapeutic pulmonary alveolar regeneration in humans.

    PubMed

    Massaro, Donald; Massaro, Gloria Decarlo

    2006-11-01

    In humans, age results in loss of pulmonary alveoli; menopause accelerates loss of diffusing capacity, an index of alveolar surface area; and disease (e.g., chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) results in loss of alveoli. Thus, an important goal for investigators is to generate knowledge that allows induction of pulmonary alveolar regeneration in humans. Our enthusiasm for this goal and our assessment of its feasibility are based on work in several laboratories over the last decade that has disproved the notion that pulmonary alveoli are incapable of regeneration, and on the growing evidence that signals that regulate programs of alveolar turnover (loss and regeneration) are conserved from rodents to humans. We review animal models of alveolar loss and regeneration and their conservation during evolution, and hence their relevance to humans.

  18. Lung alveolar epithelium and interstitial lung disease.

    PubMed

    Corvol, Harriet; Flamein, Florence; Epaud, Ralph; Clement, Annick; Guillot, Loic

    2009-01-01

    Interstitial lung diseases (ILDs) comprise a group of lung disorders characterized by various levels of inflammation and fibrosis. The current understanding of the mechanisms underlying the development and progression of ILD strongly suggests a central role of the alveolar epithelium. Following injury, alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) may actively participate in the restoration of a normal alveolar architecture through a coordinated process of re-epithelialization, or in the development of fibrosis through a process known as epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Complex networks orchestrate EMT leading to changes in cell architecture and behaviour, loss of epithelial characteristics and gain of mesenchymal properties. In the lung, AECs themselves may serve as a source of fibroblasts and myofibroblasts by acquiring a mesenchymal phenotype. This review covers recent knowledge on the role of alveolar epithelium in the pathogenesis of ILD. The mechanisms underlying disease progression are discussed, with a main focus on the apoptotic pathway, the endoplasmic reticulum stress response and the developmental pathway.

  19. Urokinase plasminogen activator released by alveolar epithelial cells modulates alveolar epithelial repair in vitro.

    PubMed

    Van Leer, Coretta; Stutz, Monika; Haeberli, André; Geiser, Thomas

    2005-12-01

    Intra-alveolar fibrin is formed following lung injury and inflammation and may contribute to the development of pulmonary fibrosis. Fibrin turnover is altered in patients with pulmonary fibrosis, resulting in intra-alveolar fibrin accumulation, mainly due to decreased fibrinolysis. Alveolar type II epithelial cells (AEC) repair the injured alveolar epithelium by migrating over the provisional fibrin matrix. We hypothesized that repairing alveolar epithelial cells modulate the underlying fibrin matrix by release of fibrinolytic activity, and that the degree of fibrinolysis modulates alveolar epithelial repair on fibrin. To test this hypothesis we studied alveolar epithelial wound repair in vitro using a modified epithelial wound repair model with human A549 alveolar epithelial cells cultured on a fibrin matrix. In presence of the inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1beta, wounds increase by 800% in 24 hours mainly due to detachment of the cells, whereas in serum-free medium wound areas decreases by 22.4 +/- 5.2% (p < 0.01). Increased levels of D-dimer, FDP and uPA in the cell supernatant of IL-1beta-stimulated A549 epithelial cells indicate activation of fibrinolysis by activation of the plasmin system. In presence of low concentrations of fibrinolysis inhibitors, including specific blocking anti-uPA antibodies, alveolar epithelial repair in vitro was improved, whereas in presence of high concentrations of fibrinolysis inhibitors, a decrease was observed mainly due to decreased spreading and migration of cells. These findings suggest the existence of a fibrinolytic optimum at which alveolar epithelial repair in vitro is most efficient. In conclusion, uPA released by AEC alters alveolar epithelial repair in vitro by modulating the underlying fibrin matrix.

  20. Infection of porcine bone marrow-derived macrophages by porcine respiratory and reproductive syndrome virus impairs phagosomal maturation.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, Sibapriya; McKenna, Neil; Balce, Dale R; Yates, Robin M

    2016-03-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), a positive-sense, ssRNA virus of the genus Arterivirus, is a devastating disease of swine worldwide. Key early targets of PRRSV infection in pigs include professional phagocytes in the lung, such as alveolar and interstitial macrophages and dendritic cells, the dysfunction of which is believed to be responsible for much of the associated mortality. In order to study the effect of virus infection on phagocyte function, the development of a robust, reproducible model would be advantageous. Given the limitations of current models, we set out to develop a porcine bone marrow-derived macrophage (PBMMΦ) cell model to study phagosomal maturation and function during PRRSV infection. Derivation of PBMMΦs from marrow using cultured L929 fibroblast supernatant produced a homogeneous population of cells that exhibited macrophage-like morphology and proficiency in Fc-receptor-mediated phagocytosis and phagosomal maturation. PBMMΦs were permissive to PRRSV infection, resulting in a productive infection that peaked at 24 h. Assessment of the effect of PRRSV infection on the properties of phagosomal maturation in PBMMΦs revealed a significant decrease in phagosomal proteolysis and lowered production of reactive oxygen species, but no change in PBMMΦ viability, phagocytosis or the ability of phagosomes to acidify. In this study, we present a new model to investigate PRRSV infection of phagocytes, which demonstrates a significant effect on phagosomal maturation with the associated implications on proper macrophage function. This model can also be used to study the effect on the phagosomal microenvironment of infection by other viruses targeting porcine macrophages.

  1. 7 CFR 1230.611 - Porcine animal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Porcine animal. 1230.611 Section 1230.611 Agriculture... CONSUMER INFORMATION Procedures for the Conduct of Referendum Definitions § 1230.611 Porcine animal. The term Porcine animal means a swine, that is raised: (a) As a feeder pig, that is, a young pig sold...

  2. 7 CFR 1230.611 - Porcine animal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Porcine animal. 1230.611 Section 1230.611 Agriculture... CONSUMER INFORMATION Procedures for the Conduct of Referendum Definitions § 1230.611 Porcine animal. The term Porcine animal means a swine, that is raised: (a) As a feeder pig, that is, a young pig sold...

  3. 7 CFR 1230.611 - Porcine animal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Porcine animal. 1230.611 Section 1230.611 Agriculture... CONSUMER INFORMATION Procedures for the Conduct of Referendum Definitions § 1230.611 Porcine animal. The term Porcine animal means a swine, that is raised: (a) As a feeder pig, that is, a young pig sold...

  4. 7 CFR 1230.611 - Porcine animal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Porcine animal. 1230.611 Section 1230.611 Agriculture... CONSUMER INFORMATION Procedures for the Conduct of Referendum Definitions § 1230.611 Porcine animal. The term Porcine animal means a swine, that is raised: (a) As a feeder pig, that is, a young pig sold...

  5. 7 CFR 1230.611 - Porcine animal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Porcine animal. 1230.611 Section 1230.611 Agriculture... CONSUMER INFORMATION Procedures for the Conduct of Referendum Definitions § 1230.611 Porcine animal. The term Porcine animal means a swine, that is raised: (a) As a feeder pig, that is, a young pig sold...

  6. Candidate chemosensory cells in the porcine stomach.

    PubMed

    Widmayer, Patricia; Breer, Heinz; Hass, Nicole

    2011-07-01

    A continuous chemosensory monitoring of the ingested food is of vital importance for adjusting digestive processes according to diet composition. Although any dysfunction of this surveillance system may be the cause of severe gastrointestinal disorders, information about the cellular and molecular basis of chemosensation in the gastrointestinal tract is limited. The porcine alimentary canal is considered as an appropriate model for the human gastrointestinal tract. Therefore, in this study we have investigated the gastric mucosa of swine for cells which express gustatory transduction elements such as TRPM5 or PLCβ2, and thus may represent candidate "chemosensors". It was found that the porcine stomach indeed contains cells expressing gustatory marker molecules; however, the morphology and topographic distribution of putative chemosensory cells varied significantly from that in mice. Whereas in the murine stomach these cells were clustered at a distinct region near the gastric entrance, no such compact cell cluster was found in the pig stomach. These results indicate substantial differences regarding the phenotype of candidate chemosensory cells of mice and swine and underline the importance of choosing the most suitable model organisms.

  7. A New Device for Alveolar Bone Transportation

    PubMed Central

    Vega, Omar; Pérez, Daniel; Páramo, Viviana; Falcón, Jocelyn

    2011-01-01

    We present a retrospective review of a new technique for the transportation of alveolar bone using a Hyrax device modified by the principal author (O.A.V.). There were seven patients (five males and two females), including five patients with cleft palate and lip diagnosis, one patient with a high-speed gunshot wound, and one patient with facial trauma sequel due to mandibular fracture. They were all treated with an alveolar bone transportation technique (ABT) through the use of the modified Hyrax device (VEGAX). Before surgery, distraction osteogenesis of the bifocal type was performed on four patients, and the trifocal type was performed on the other three patients. However, in one case, direct dental anchorage was not used, only orthodontic appliances. In all the cases, new bone formation and gingival tissue around the defect were obtained, posterior to the alveolar distraction process; no complications were observed in any patient. In one case, two teeth involved in the disk of the ABT were extracted, due to a previous condition of periodontal disease. The alveolar bone transport with the VEGAX device is an accessible technique for almost every patient with alveolar defects due to diverse causes. In all the presented cases, predictability and success were demonstrated. PMID:22655120

  8. The amino acid residues at 102 and 104 in GP5 of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus regulate viral neutralization susceptibility to the porcine serum neutralizing antibody.

    PubMed

    Fan, Baochao; Liu, Xing; Bai, Juan; Zhang, Tingjie; Zhang, Qiaoya; Jiang, Ping

    2015-06-02

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is mainly responsible for the heavy economic losses in pig industry in the world. A number of neutralizing epitopes have been identified in the viral structural proteins GP3, GP4, GP5 and M. In this study, the important amino acid (aa) residues of HP-PRRSV strain BB affecting neutralization susceptibility of antibody were examined using resistant strains generated under neutralizing antibody (NAb) pressure in MARC-145 cells, reverse genetic technique and virus neutralization assay. HP-PRRSV strain BB was passaged under the pressure of porcine NAb serum in vitro. A resistant strain BB34s with 102 and 104 aa substitutions in GP5, which have been predicted to be the positive sites for pressure selection (Delisle et al., 2012), was cloned and identified. To determine the effect of the two aa residues on neutralization, eight recombinant PRRSV strains were generated, and neutralization assay results confirmed that the aa residues 102 and 104 in GP5 played an important role in NAbs against HP-PRRSV in MARC-145 cells and porcine alveolar macrophages. Alignment of GP5 sequences revealed that the variant aa residues at 102 and 104 were frequent among type 2 PRRSV strains. It may be helpful for understanding the mechanism regulating the neutralization susceptibility of PRRSV to the NAbs and monitoring the antigen variant strains in the field.

  9. Is Radiologic Assessment of Alveolar Crest Height Useful to Monitor Periodontal Disease Activity?

    PubMed Central

    Zaki, Hattan; Hoffmann, Kenneth R.; Hausmann, Ernest; Scannapieco, Frank A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary While the mainstay of periodontal assessment is clinical probing, radiographic assessment is also commonly employed and has the potential to provide facile quantitative information on the status of tooth-supporting bone. This article provides a brief review of standard methods to assess periodontal structures, including basic tenants of radiograph acquisition, assessment of alveolar crest levels, and typical patterns of bone loss seen in periodontal patients. Studies of the use of computer technology to objectively assess loss of alveolar crest from standardized and non-standardized radiographs are reviewed. Several recent developments in computer-assisted quantitation of alveolar crest height are described. Although probing measurements continue to be viewed as more practical than radiographic measurements, radiographic assessment can be made quantitative and likely easier and more precise than probing for routine assessment of periodontal disease activity. PMID:26427571

  10. Lateralization Technique and Inferior Alveolar Nerve Transposition

    PubMed Central

    Sanches, Marco Antonio; Ramalho, Gabriel Cardoso; Manzi, Marcello Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Bone resorption of the posterior mandible can result in diminished bone edge and, therefore, the installation of implants in these regions becomes a challenge, especially in the presence of the mandibular canal and its contents, the inferior alveolar nerve. Several treatment alternatives are suggested: the use of short implants, guided bone regeneration, appositional bone grafting, distraction osteogenesis, inclined implants tangential to the mandibular canal, and the lateralization of the inferior alveolar nerve. The aim was to elucidate the success rate of implants in the lateralization technique and in inferior alveolar nerve transposition and to determine the most effective sensory test. We conclude that the success rate is linked to the possibility of installing implants with long bicortical anchor which favors primary stability and biomechanics. PMID:27433360

  11. Remodeling of alveolar septa after murine pneumonectomy

    PubMed Central

    Ysasi, Alexandra B.; Wagner, Willi L.; Bennett, Robert D.; Ackermann, Maximilian; Valenzuela, Cristian D.; Belle, Janeil; Tsuda, Akira; Konerding, Moritz A.

    2015-01-01

    In most mammals, removing one lung (pneumonectomy) results in the compensatory growth of the remaining lung. In mice, stereological observations have demonstrated an increase in the number of mature alveoli; however, anatomic evidence of the early phases of alveolar growth has remained elusive. To identify changes in the lung microstructure associated with neoalveolarization, we used tissue histology, electron microscopy, and synchrotron imaging to examine the configuration of the alveolar duct after murine pneumonectomy. Systematic histological examination of the cardiac lobe demonstrated no change in the relative frequency of dihedral angle components (Ends, Bends, and Junctions) (P > 0.05), but a significant decrease in the length of a subset of septal ends (“E”). Septal retraction, observed in 20–30% of the alveolar ducts, was maximal on day 3 after pneumonectomy (P < 0.01) and returned to baseline levels within 3 wk. Consistent with septal retraction, the postpneumonectomy alveolar duct diameter ratio (Dout:Din) was significantly lower 3 days after pneumonectomy compared to all controls except for the detergent-treated lung (P < 0.001). To identify clumped capillaries predicted by septal retraction, vascular casting, analyzed by both scanning electron microscopy and synchrotron imaging, demonstrated matted capillaries that were most prominent 3 days after pneumonectomy. Numerical simulations suggested that septal retraction could reflect increased surface tension within the alveolar duct, resulting in a new equilibrium at a higher total energy and lower surface area. The spatial and temporal association of these microstructural changes with postpneumonectomy lung growth suggests that these changes represent an early phase of alveolar duct remodeling. PMID:26078396

  12. ALVEOLAR BREATH SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS IN HUMAN EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Alveolar breath sampling and analysis can be extremely useful in exposure assessment studies involving volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Over recent years scientists from the EPA's National Exposure Research Laboratory have developed and refined an alveolar breath collection ...

  13. Lung Transplant Recipient with Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, M. Frances; Abdelrazek, Hesham; Patel, Vipul J.; Walia, Rajat

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a progressive lung disease characterized by accumulated surfactant-like lipoproteinaceous material in the alveoli and distal bronchioles. This accumulation is the result of impaired clearance by alveolar macrophages. PAP has been described in 11 solid organ transplant recipients, 9 of whom were treated with mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors. We report a case of a lung transplant recipient treated with prednisone, mycophenolate mofetil (MMF), and tacrolimus who ultimately developed PAP, which worsened when MMF was replaced with everolimus. PMID:27213073

  14. Idiopathic inflammatory myopathy with diffuse alveolar damage.

    PubMed

    Lee, C-S; Chen, T-L; Tzen, C-Y; Lin, F-J; Peng, M-J; Wu, C-L; Chen, P-J

    2002-09-01

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) in patients with myositis is defined by the presence of interstitial changes on radiographic examination. The reported prevalence of ILD varies from 0% to nearly 50%. However, only rarely has the pathological pattern of diffuse alveolar damage (DAD) associated with idiopathic inflammatory myopathy (IIM) been reported. We report five patients with IIM (one with dermatomyositis, one with polymyositis, and three with amyopathic dermatomyositis) and respiratory failure. Four underwent open lung biopsy with pathological proof of diffuse alveolar damage (DAD). Despite intensive immunosuppressive therapy, all of them died. In addition to the case reports, we discuss DAD in patients with IIM.

  15. Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) is the number one disease affecting US swine. It is caused by the PRRS virus (PRRSV) and is recognized as reproductive failure of sows and respiratory problems of piglets and growing pigs. This book chapter is part of the Office of International E...

  16. Interleukin-5 is the predominant cytokine produced by peripheral blood mononuclear cells in alveolar echinococcosis.

    PubMed Central

    Sturm, D; Menzel, J; Gottstein, B; Kern, P

    1995-01-01

    An involvement of cellular immunity in alveolar echinococcosis is strongly suggested by the intense granulomatous infiltrations observed around the hepatic parasite lesions. However, the basis of cellular immunoregulation in patient with alveolar echinococcosis is poorly understood. The present report shows a comparative analysis of lymphoid cell function in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of 16 patients with alveolar echinococcosis and of healthy individuals. Our in vitro restimulation studies with crude Echinococcus multilocularis antigen demonstrated that PBMC from patients with alveolar echinococcosis were responsive to challenge with parasitic antigen as measured by lymphoid cell proliferation. In this system, we also evaluated cytokine expression at the gene and protein levels after stimulation with E. multilocularis antigen. Analysis of cytokine mRNA expression revealed distinct patterns of cytokine expression in patients and normal donors. By using reverse transcriptase PCR, we could demonstrate that the TH1 cytokine transcripts interleukin-2 (IL-2) and gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) are present in PBMC from patients with alveolar echinococcosis. Moreover, it was found that stimulation with E. multilocularis antigen induced or enhanced the expression of the TH2 cytokine IL-3, IL-4, IL-10, and especially IL-5 mRNAs in PBMC from 13 of 16 patients with alveolar echinococcosis. Two patients who were examined after radical surgery, as well as another patient with a stable course of the disease under continuous chemotherapy, were not able to generate the same pattern of cytokine response and had no evidence of IL-5 mRNA synthesis. In contrast to the frequent expression of TH2 cytokine mRNAs observed in patients with alveolar echinococcosis, PBMC cultures from normal donors showed prominent IL-2 and IFN-gamma mRNA expression but weak IL-3, IL-4, and IL-10 mRNA expression. Most interestingly, IL-5 mRNA was substantially absent in PBMC from healthy

  17. [Construction and specificity of porcine bmp15 gene reporter vector].

    PubMed

    Qin, Mingming; Wei, Jianghua; Yu, Xiaoli; Zhang, Jinglong; Liu, Xiaopeng; Ma, Xiaoling; Wang, Huayan

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study is to identify the express specificity of bone morphogenetic protein 15 (Bmp15) in porcine. The pBMP15-EGFP reporter vector was constructed from the 2.2 kb fragment of porcine bmp15 promoter to trace the differentiation process of stem cells into oocyte-like cells. We used porcine ovary and Chinese Hamster Ovary cell line (CHO), mouse myoblast cell line (C2C12) and porcine amniotic fluid stem cell (pAFSC) to investigate the expression and regulation of this gene via RT-PCR, immunofluorescence, cell transfection, and microinjection methods. We also used single layer cell differentiation to detect the application potential of bmp15. The results show that bmp15 gene was specifically expressed in the porcine ovary and CHO rather than in C2C12 and pAFSC. In addition, the characteristic of tissue-specific of Bmp15 was detected on CHO instead of other cell lines by transient transfection. We also detected the expression of Bmp15 in oocyte at different development stages by immunofluorescence of fixed paraffin-embedded ovary sections. Furthermore, microinjection results show that bmp15 expressed in oocytes at 18 h of maturation in vitro, and continued up to 4-cell stage embryos. Most importantly, we found that the expression of Bmp15 started at day 12 after inducing pAFSC into oocyte-like cells by transfection; green fluorescent was visible in round cell masses. It indicated that bmp15 has the expression specificity and the pBMP15-EGFP reporter vector can be used to trace Bmp15 action in the differentiation of stem cells into germ cells.

  18. Oxidative inactivation of alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor by alveolar epithelial type II cells.

    PubMed

    Wallaert, B; Aerts, C; Gressier, B; Gosset, P; Voisin, C

    1993-12-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the ability of guinea pig alveolar epithelial type II cells to generate significant amounts of reactive oxygen species to inactivate alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor (alpha 1-PI). Inactivation of alpha 1-PI was evaluated by its inhibitory activity against porcine pancreatic elastase and was expressed as a percentage. The same experiments were performed in parallel with alveolar macrophages (AM) obtained from the same animals and with MRC-5 fibroblasts. Both type II cells and AM released significant amounts of hydrogen peroxide and superoxide, whereas the fibroblasts did not. Unstimulated type II cells (0.5 +/- 2%), AM (1.2 +/- 1.5%), and fibroblasts (0.5 +/- 0.5%) were unable to inactivate alpha 1-PI. Addition of phorbol myristate acetate did not increase their ability to inactivate alpha 1-PI. In contrast, type II cells (79.7 +/- 7%) and AM (80.1 +/- 8%) dramatically inactivated alpha 1-PI in the presence of myeloperoxidase (25 mU/ml), whereas fibroblasts did not. Addition of catalase to the reaction significantly prevented the inactivation of alpha 1-PI. Western blot analysis of alpha 1-PI did not reveal a significant proteolysis of alpha 1-PI, which supports the hypothesis that, in the presence of neutrophil-derived myeloperoxidase, type II cells may oxidatively inactivate alpha 1-PI.

  19. Teaching Alveolar Ventilation with Simple, Inexpensive Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiCarlo, Stephen E.

    2008-01-01

    When teaching and learning about alveolar ventilation with our class of 300 first-year medical students, we use four simple, inexpensive "models." The models, which encourage research-oriented learning and help our students to understand complex ideas, are distributed to the students before class. The students anticipate something new every day,…

  20. Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus infection triggers HMGB1 release to promote inflammatory cytokine production

    SciTech Connect

    Duan, Erzhen; Wang, Dang; Luo, Rui; Luo, Jingyi; Gao, Li; Chen, Huanchun; Fang, Liurong Xiao, Shaobo

    2014-11-15

    The high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein is an endogenous damage-associated molecular pattern (DAMP) molecule involved in the pathogenesis of various infectious agents. Based on meta-analysis of all publicly available microarray datasets, HMGB1 has recently been proposed as the most significant immune modulator during the porcine response to porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) infection. However, the function of HMGB1 in PRRSV pathogenesis is unclear. In this study, we found that PRRSV infection triggers the translocation of HMGB1 from the nucleus to the extracellular milieu in MARC-145 cells and porcine alveolar macrophages. Although HMGB1 has no effect on PRRSV replication, HMGB1 promotes PRRSV-induced NF-κB activation and subsequent expression of inflammatory cytokines through receptors RAGE, TLR2 and TLR4. Our findings show that HMGB1 release, triggered by PRRSV infection, enhances the efficiency of virus-induced inflammatory responses, thereby providing new insights into the pathogenesis of PRRSV infection. - Highlights: • PRRSV infection triggers HMGB1 release from MARC-145 cells and PAMs. • HMGB1 does not significantly affect PRRSV proliferation. • HMGB1 is involved in PRRSV-induced NF-κB activation and inflammatory responses. • HMGB1 promotes PRRSV-induced inflammatory responses through TLR2/4 and RAGE.

  1. Characterization in vitro and in vivo of a novel porcine parainfluenza virus 5 isolate in Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yu Na; Park, Choi-Kyu; Kim, Seong-Hee; Lee, Du Sik; Shin, Jae-Ho; Lee, Changhee

    2013-12-26

    A novel porcine parainfluenza 5 (pPIV5), KNU-11, in the genus Rubulavirus of the subfamily Paramyxovirinae, was isolated from the lung of a piglet in Korea in 2011. To understand the importance of this virus as an infectious agent, in vitro and in vivo characteristics of KNU-11 virus was investigated. KNU-11 was remarkably cytopathogenic, showing distinct cell rounding and clumping evident in porcine alveolar macrophage (PAM), porcine kidney (PK-15), and swine testicle (ST) cells within 12h postinfection and capable of hemagglutinating guinea pig red blood cells. Interestingly, this cytopathology was found to be absent in cell lines from other mammalian species. To evaluate the in vitro immunity of the pPIV5 isolate, we sought to explore alteration of inflammatory cytokine and chemokine expression in PAM cells infected with KNU-11 by using quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Most cytokine and chemokine genes including type 1 interferons (IFN-α/β) and IFN-related antiviral genes were found to be significantly elevated in KNU-11 virus-infected PAM cells. A serum neutralization test-based serosurvey demonstrated that neutralizing antibodies against KNU-11 are readily detected in domestic swine populations, suggesting high prevalence of pPIV5 in Korean pig farms. Animal studies showed that KNU-11 fails to establish an acute respiratory illness, indicating that pPIV5 is non- or very mildly pathogenic to pigs.

  2. Alveolar Bone Fracture: Pathognomonic Sign for Clinical Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Gutmacher, Zvi; Peled, Eli; Norman, Doron; Lin, Shaul

    2017-01-01

    Aim: Dental injuries, especially luxation and avulsion, are common. Dental trauma can cause alveolar bone fracture that can lead to tooth loss and malocclusion. Single tooth alveolar bone fractures are difficult to identify unless it protrudes through the overlying mucosa and can be visualized. Pain, malocclusion, and tooth mobility provide signs of suspected alveolar bone fractures. Integrity of the proximate alveolar bone should be examined for fractures where avulsion, luxation, or other tooth trauma is detected. Any suggestion of alveolar fractures should be further investigated with an appropriate radiograph. Summary: This case report shows a pathognomonic sign that detects and diagnosis single tooth alveolar bone fractures, i.e., a localized hematoma crossing the attached gingiva from the free gingival margin to the vestibular mucosa. This should serve as a warning for localized alveolar bone fracture. A visualized hematoma and gentle, careful palpation may help detect covered fractures when the overlying mucosa is not perforated.

  3. Alveolar distraction osteogenesis for implant site development.

    PubMed

    Batal, Hussam S; Cottrell, David A

    2004-02-01

    Alveolar distraction osteogenesis can be a valuable tool for implant site development. Simultaneous regeneration of hard and soft tissue and an overall decrease in treatment time compared with other methods of site preparation can be an advantage. The authors advocate the concept of "prosthetically driven alveolar distraction." Surgical planning should begin with visualization of the final restoration to determine the volume and position of the soft and hard tissue deficiency. Surgical guides will help the surgeon determine the vector of distraction. Adherence to surgical principles to avoid damage to adjacent vital structures and maintain vascular supply to the transport segment is necessary for success. Bone grafting may be necessary before or after distraction to increase the surgical success of the procedure. Close follow-up is needed to verify the appropriate distraction vector and volume. Patient management and acceptance should be considered in distractor design and placement.

  4. Dephasing and diffusion on the alveolar surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buschle, L. R.; Kurz, F. T.; Kampf, T.; Wagner, W. L.; Duerr, J.; Stiller, W.; Konietzke, P.; Wünnemann, F.; Mall, M. A.; Wielpütz, M. O.; Schlemmer, H. P.; Ziener, C. H.

    2017-02-01

    We propose a surface model of spin dephasing in lung tissue that includes both susceptibility and diffusion effects to provide a closed-form solution of the Bloch-Torrey equation on the alveolar surface. The nonlocal susceptibility effects of the model are validated against numerical simulations of spin dephasing in a realistic lung tissue geometry acquired from synchotron-based μ CT data sets of mouse lung tissue, and against simulations in the well-known Wigner-Seitz model geometry. The free induction decay is obtained in dependence on microscopic tissue parameters and agrees very well with in vivo lung measurements at 1.5 Tesla to allow a quantification of the local mean alveolar radius. Our results are therefore potentially relevant for the clinical diagnosis and therapy of pulmonary diseases.

  5. Rare lung diseases II: Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis

    PubMed Central

    Juvet, Stephen C; Hwang, David; Waddell, Thomas K; Downey, Gregory P

    2008-01-01

    The present article is the second in a series on rare lung diseases. It focuses on pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP), a disorder in which lipoproteinaceous material accumulates in the alveolar space. PAP was first described in 1958, and for many years the nature of the material accumulating in the lungs was unknown. Major insights into PAP have been made in the past decade, and these have led to the notion that PAP is an autoimmume disorder in which autoantibodies interfere with signalling through the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor, leading to macrophage and neutrophil dysfunction. This has spurred new therapeutic approaches to this disorder. The discussion of PAP will begin with a case report, then will highlight the classification of PAP and review recent insights into the pathogenesis of PAP. The approach to therapy and the prognosis of PAP will also be discussed. PMID:18551202

  6. Treatment of Adult Primary Alveolar Proteinosis.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez Portal, José Antonio

    2015-07-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a rare disease characterized by the accumulation of surfactant-like lipoproteinaceous material in the distal air spaces and terminal bronchi, which may lead to impaired gas exchange. This accumulation of surfactant is due to decreased clearance by the alveolar macrophages. Its primary, most common form, is currently considered an autoimmune disease. Better knowledge of the causes of PAP have led to the emergence of alternatives to whole lung lavage, although this is still considered the treatment of choice. Most studies are case series, often with limited patient numbers, so the level of evidence is low. Since the severity of presentation and clinical course are variable, not all patients will require treatment. Due to the low level of evidence, some objective criteria based on expert opinion have been arbitrarily proposed in an attempt to define in which patients it is best to initiate treatment.

  7. Endoscopic sensing of alveolar pH

    PubMed Central

    Choudhury, D.; Tanner, M. G.; McAughtrie, S.; Yu, F.; Mills, B.; Choudhary, T. R.; Seth, S.; Craven, T. H.; Stone, J. M.; Mati, I. K.; Campbell, C. J.; Bradley, M.; Williams, C. K. I.; Dhaliwal, K.; Birks, T. A.; Thomson, R. R.

    2016-01-01

    Previously unobtainable measurements of alveolar pH were obtained using an endoscope-deployable optrode. The pH sensing was achieved using functionalized gold nanoshell sensors and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). The optrode consisted of an asymmetric dual-core optical fiber designed for spatially separating the optical pump delivery and signal collection, in order to circumvent the unwanted Raman signal generated within the fiber. Using this approach, we demonstrate a ~100-fold increase in SERS signal-to-fiber background ratio, and demonstrate multiple site pH sensing with a measurement accuracy of ± 0.07 pH units in the respiratory acini of an ex vivo ovine lung model. We also demonstrate that alveolar pH changes in response to ventilation. PMID:28101415

  8. [Alveolar haemorrhage following a cannabis water pipe].

    PubMed

    Moatemri, Z; Zaibi, H; Dabboussi, S; Mhamedi, S; Aichaouia, C; Khadhraoui, M; Cheikh, R

    2016-10-01

    Respiratory toxicity of cannabis is well-known today particularly with the new consumption patterns. We report the case of a 25-year-old man admitted for haemoptysis, with unfavourable outcome and acute respiratory failure. Various explorations concluded to acute respiratory distress syndrome secondary to diffuse alveolar haemorrhage. Etiological assessment was initially negative. Outcome was favourable during hospitalization, authorizing the discharge of our patient. Two days later, alveolar haemorrhage recur, with positive toxicological tests for cannabis and the patient admits smoking cannabis by plastic "bang". We illustrate, through this case, the severity of respiratory complications caused by new methods of using cannabis, particularly with plastic 'bang', hence the need to insist of the importance of supported withdrawal and to inform young people how these techniques are serious.ssss.

  9. Effects of Pharmacologic Intervention on Oxygenation, Lung Water and Protein Leak in the Pseudomonas ARDS Porcine Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-07-01

    swine U6 i!D 19, ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse if necessary and identify by block number) A porcine model of Pseudorronas induced acute lung injury...and the clinical picture seen in ARDS unfolds. Pseudomonas- induced ARDS in the porcine model has been used as an effective and reproducible model of...sepsis- induced ARDS in this laboratory. Because ARDS is mediated by numerous inflammatory mediators, it is likely that treatment will require several

  10. Depletion of Alveolar Macrophages Does Not Prevent Hantavirus Disease Pathogenesis in Golden Syrian Hamsters

    PubMed Central

    Hammerbeck, Christopher D.; Brocato, Rebecca L.; Bell, Todd M.; Schellhase, Christopher W.; Mraz, Steven R.; Queen, Laurie A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Andes virus (ANDV) is associated with a lethal vascular leak syndrome in humans termed hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS). The mechanism for the massive vascular leakage associated with HPS is poorly understood; however, dysregulation of components of the immune response is often suggested as a possible cause. Alveolar macrophages are found in the alveoli of the lung and represent the first line of defense to many airborne pathogens. To determine whether alveolar macrophages play a role in HPS pathogenesis, alveolar macrophages were depleted in an adult rodent model of HPS that closely resembles human HPS. Syrian hamsters were treated, intratracheally, with clodronate-encapsulated liposomes or control liposomes and were then challenged with ANDV. Treatment with clodronate-encapsulated liposomes resulted in significant reduction in alveolar macrophages, but depletion did not prevent pathogenesis or prolong disease. Depletion also did not significantly reduce the amount of virus in the lung of ANDV-infected hamsters but altered neutrophil recruitment, MIP-1α and MIP-2 chemokine expression, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels in hamster bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid early after intranasal challenge. These data demonstrate that alveolar macrophages may play a limited protective role early after exposure to aerosolized ANDV but do not directly contribute to hantavirus disease pathogenesis in the hamster model of HPS. IMPORTANCE Hantaviruses continue to cause disease worldwide for which there are no FDA-licensed vaccines, effective postexposure prophylactics, or therapeutics. Much of this can be attributed to a poor understanding of the mechanism of hantavirus disease pathogenesis. Hantavirus disease has long been considered an immune-mediated disease; however, by directly manipulating the Syrian hamster model, we continue to eliminate individual immune cell types. As the most numerous immune cells present in the respiratory tract

  11. Alveolar flows of the developing lungs:from embryonic to early childhood airways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenenbaum-Katan, Janna; Hofemeier, Philipp; Fishler, Rami; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara; Sznitman, Josue

    2014-11-01

    At the onset of life in utero the respiratory system is simply a liquid-filled duct. With our first breath, alveoli are filled with air and become a significant port of entry for airborne particles. As such, alveolar lining is nearly fully functional at birth, though lung development continues during childhood as structural changes increase alveolar surface area to optimize ventilation. We hypothesize that such fluid dynamical changes potentially affect two phenomena occurring within alveoli: (i) flow patterns in airspaces at distinct stages of both in- and ex-utero life and (ii) fate of inhaled particles ex-utero. To investigate these phenomena, we combine experimental and numerical approaches where (i) microfluidic in vitro devices mimic liquid flows across the epithelium of fetal airspaces, and (ii) computational simulations are employed to examine particle transport and deposition in the deep alveolated regions of infants' lungs. Our approaches capture anatomically-inspired geometries based on morphometrical data, as well as physiological flows, including the convective-diffusive nature of submicron particle transport in alveolar regions.Overall, we investigate respiratory flows in alveolar regions of developing lungs, from early embryonic stages to late childhood

  12. Technical note: Isolation and characterization of porcine mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Dahanayaka, S; Rezaei, R; Porter, W W; Johnson, G A; Burghardt, R C; Bazer, F W; Hou, Y Q; Wu, Z L; Wu, G

    2015-11-01

    Within the mammary gland, functional synthesis of milk is performed by its epithelial (alveolar) cells. The availability of a stable mammary epithelial cell line is essential for biochemical studies to elucidate cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for nutritional regulation of lactation. Therefore, porcine mammary epithelial cells (PMEC) were isolated from mammary glands of a 9-mo-old nonpregnant and nonlactating gilt and cultured to establish a nonimmortalized cell line. These cells were characterized by expression of cytokeratin-18 (an intermediate filament specific for epithelial cells), β-casein (a specific marker for mammary epithelial cells), and α-lactalbumin. In culture, the PMEC doubled in number every 24 h and maintained a cobblestone morphology, typical for cultured epithelial cells, for at least 15 passages. Addition of 0.2 to 2 μg/mL prolactin to culture medium for 3 d induced the production of β-casein and α-lactalbumin by PMEC in a dose-dependent manner. Thus, we have successfully developed a useful PMEC line for future studies of cellular and molecular regulation of milk synthesis by mammary epithelial cells of the sow.

  13. [Alveolar hemorrhage associated with intestinal inflammatory disease and Hashimoto thyroiditis].

    PubMed

    Rabec, C; Barcat, J; Rey, D

    2003-06-01

    Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) is characterized by diffuse bleeding into alveolar spaces. Three histopathological patterns may be seen: 1) pulmonary capillaritis due to immunological aggression to the membrane, 2) diffuse alveolar damage within the context of acute respiratory distress syndrome, and 3) and "bland" DAH without alveolar or capillary damage. In the first two groups, pulmonary damage usually occurs within the context of a systemic disease. In the last, injury is usually found only in the lung, an entity called pulmonary hemosiderosis. We present a case of DAH with neither capillaritis nor diffuse alveolar damage in association with inflammatory bowel disease and Hashimoto thyroiditis. The case is interesting both because the association has not yet been described in the literature and because the presence of alveolar bleeding without evident tissue damage within the context of known autoimmune diseases may extend the field to include a new pathophysiological mechanism of pulmonary hemorrhage.

  14. Mast cells in the human alveolar wall: an electronmicroscopic study.

    PubMed Central

    Fox, B; Bull, T B; Guz, A

    1981-01-01

    Mast cells were identified by electronmicroscopy in the alveolar wall of the lung in 20 subjects (10 normal, 10 abnormal). A quantitative and qualitative study was made of the mast cells. In the normal lung there was an average concentration of 350 mast cells/mm2 of alveolar wall and in the abnormal 523/mm2. Mast cells occupied approximately 1.6-2.1% of the area of the alveolar wall. There was marked variation in the structure of the mast cell granules but no differences between those in the normal and abnormal lungs. There was evidence that constant degranulation of mast cells may be occurring in the lung. The role that alveolar mast cells may play in the vasoconstrictor response to alveolar hypoxia is discussed. It is suggested that the tachypnoea present in asthma may partly be due to release of mediators from sensitised mast cells within the alveolar wall. Images PMID:7328180

  15. Silver nanowire interactions with primary human alveolar type-II epithelial cell secretions: contrasting bioreactivity with human alveolar type-I and type-II epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Sweeney, Sinbad; Theodorou, Ioannis G.; Zambianchi, Martina; Chen, Shu; Gow, Andrew; Schwander, Stephan; Zhang, Junfeng (Jim); Chung, Kian Fan; Shaffer, Milo S.; Ryan, Mary P.; Porter, Alexandra E.; Tetley, Teresa D.

    2015-01-01

    Inhaled nanoparticles have a high deposition rate in the alveolar units of the deep lung. The alveolar epithelium is composed of type-I and type-II epithelial cells (ATI and ATII respectively) and is bathed in pulmonary surfactant. The effect of native human ATII cell secretions on nanoparticle toxicity is not known. We investigated the cellular uptake and toxicity of silver nanowires (AgNWs; 70 nm diameter, 1.5 μm length) with human ATI-like cells (TT1), in the absence or presence of Curosurf® (a natural porcine pulmonary surfactant with a low amount of protein) or harvested primary human ATII cell secretions (HAS; containing both the complete lipid as well as the full protein complement of human pulmonary surfactant i.e. SP-A, SP-B, SP-C and SP-D). We hypothesised that Curosurf® or HAS would confer improved protection for TT1 cells, limiting the toxicity of AgNWs. In agreement with our hypothesis, HAS reduced the inflammatory and reactive oxygen species (ROS)-generating potential of AgNWs with exposed TT1 cells. For example, IL-8 release and ROS generation was reduced by 38% and 29%, respectively, resulting in similar levels to that of the non-treated controls. However in contrast to our hypothesis, Curosurf® had no effect. We found a significant reduction in AgNW uptake by TT1 cells in the presence of HAS but not Curosurf. Furthermore, we show that the SP-A and SP-D are likely to be involved in this process as they were found to be specifically bound to the AgNWs. While ATI cells appear to be protected by HAS, evidence suggested that ATII cells, despite no uptake, were vulnerable to AgNW exposure (indicated by increased IL-8 release and ROS generation and decreased intracellular SP-A levels one day post-exposure). This study provides unique findings that may be important for the study of lung epithelial-endothelial translocation of nanoparticles in general and associated toxicity within the alveolar unit. PMID:25996248

  16. Blocking porcine sialoadhesin improves extracorporeal porcine liver xenoperfusion with human blood

    PubMed Central

    Waldman, Joshua P.; Vogel, Thomas; Burlak, Christopher; Coussios, Constantin; Dominguez, Javier; Friend, Peter; Rees, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Patients in fulminant hepatic failure currently do not have a temporary means of support while awaiting liver transplantation. A potential therapeutic approach for such patients is the use of extracorporeal perfusion with porcine livers as a form of “liver dialysis”. During a 72-hour extracorporeal perfusion of porcine livers with human blood, porcine Kupffer cells bind to and phagocytose human red blood cells (hRBC) causing the hematocrit to decrease to 2.5% of the original value. Our laboratory has identified porcine sialoadhesin expressed on Kupffer cells as the lectin responsible for binding N-acetylneuraminic acid on the surface of the hRBC. We evaluated whether blocking porcine sialoadhesin prevents the recognition and subsequent destruction of hRBCs seen during extracorporeal porcine liver xenoperfusion. Ex vivo studies were performed using wild type pig livers perfused with isolated hRBCs for 72-hours in the presence of an anti-porcine sialoadhesin antibody or isotype control. The addition of an anti-porcine sialoadhesin antibody to an extracorporeal porcine liver xenoperfusion model reduces the loss of hRBC over a 72 hour period. Sustained liver function was demonstrated throughout the perfusion. This study illustrates the role of sialoadhesin in mediating the destruction of hRBCs in an extracorporeal porcine liver xenoperfusion model. PMID:23822217

  17. [Research advances in porcine bocavirus].

    PubMed

    Zhai, Shao-Lun; Chen, Sheng-Nan; Wei, Wen-Kang

    2012-03-01

    Porcine bocavirus (PBoV) was considered as a new member of the genus Bocavirus of the subfamily Parvovirinae of the family Parvoviridae, which was discovered in Swedish swine herds with postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PMWS) in 2009. At present, as an emerging pathogen, it was paid great attention by researchers at home and abroad. This paper referred to some published literatures and reviewed several aspects of PBoV including its finding, classification, genome structure and replication, epidemiology, associativity with diseases, cultural and diagnostic methods.

  18. Silencing porcine CMAH and GGTA1 genes significantly reduces xenogeneic consumption of human platelets by porcine livers

    PubMed Central

    Butler, James R.; Paris, Leela L.; Blankenship, Ross L.; Sidner, Richard A.; Martens, Gregory R.; Ladowski, Joeseph M.; Li, Ping; Estrada, Jose L; Tector, Matthew; Tector, A. Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Background A profound thrombocytopenia limits hepatic xenotransplantation in the pig-to-primate model. Porcine livers also have shown the ability to phagocytose human platelets in the absence of immune-mediate injury. Recently, inactivation of the porcine ASGR1 gene has been shown to decrease this phenomenon. Inactivating GGTA1 and CMAH genes has reduced the antibody-mediated barrier to xenotransplantation; herein we describe the effect that these modifications have on xenogeneic consumption of human platelets in the absence of immune-mediated graft injury. Methods WT, ASGR1−/−, GGTA1−/−, and GGTA1−/−CMAH−/− knockout pigs were compared for their xenogeneic hepatic consumption of human platelets. An in vitro assay was established to measure the association of human platelets with liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) by immunohistochemistry. Perfusion models were used to measure human platelet uptake in livers from WT, ASGR1−/−, GGTA1−/−, and GGTA1−/− CMAH−/− pigs. Results GGTA1−/−, CMAH−/− LSECs exhibited reduced levels of human platelet binding in vitro, when compared to GGTA1−/− and WT LSECs. In a continuous perfusion model, GGTA1−/− CMAH−/− livers consumed fewer human platelets than GGTA1−/− and WT livers. GGTA1−/− CMAH−/− livers also consumed fewer human platelets than ASGR1−/− livers in a single pass model. Conclusions Silencing the porcine carbohydrate genes necessary to avoid antibody-mediated rejection in a pig-to-human model also reduces the xenogeneic consumption of human platelets by the porcine liver. The combination of these genetic modifications may be an effective strategy to limit the thrombocytopenia associated with pig-to-human hepatic xenotransplantation. PMID:26906939

  19. Stochastic simulation of alveolar particle deposition in lungs affected by different types of emphysema.

    PubMed

    Sturm, R; Hofmann, W

    2004-01-01

    In the present study, disease-specific stochastic models were developed for the computation of particle deposition in lungs affected by COPD, emphysema, or both, distinguishing between four types of pulmonary emphysema-centriacinar, paraseptal, panacinar, and bullous. To simulate COPD, airway calibers of the tracheobronchial tree were randomly reduced between 20% and 50% in each airway. For the study of pure COPD ("blue bloaters"), alveolated airway dimensions of the healthy lung were used, while for the simulation of emphysema without COPD ("pink puffers"), normal conductive airway diameters were assumed. Deposition calculations in diseased lungs were carried out by assuming (a) identical inspiration and expiration times (no breath-hold time) and (b) a continuous increase of the functional residual capacity (from 3,300 to 5,000 mL), accompanied by a simultaneous drop of the tidal volume (from 1,000 to 500 mL). Independent of particle size, total alveolar deposition in emphysematous lungs was significantly decreased relative to normal lungs. In particular, the deposition maximum at large particle sizes, which is a characteristic for healthy subjects, completely disappeared. Among the various emphysema models, deposition was smallest in lungs with bullous emphysema due to strongly enhanced settling and diffusion distances within the alveolar structures. A change of the lung volume caused a further decrease in particle deposition. Alveolar deposition in "blue bloaters" and "pink puffers" was very similar to the deposition in patients suffering from COPD and emphysema. Alveolar deposition per acinar airway generation was also strongly reduced in diseased lungs compared to normal lungs. Besides this reduction, deposition patterns became more uniform throughout the alveolar region.

  20. Genome Sequences and Phylogenetic Analysis of K88- and F18-Positive Porcine Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Shepard, Sara M.; Danzeisen, Jessica L.; Isaacson, Richard E.; Seemann, Torsten; Achtman, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Porcine enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) continues to result in major morbidity and mortality in the swine industry via postweaning diarrhea. The key virulence factors of ETEC strains, their serotypes, and their fimbrial components have been well studied. However, most studies to date have focused on plasmid-encoded traits related to colonization and toxin production, and the chromosomal backgrounds of these strains have been largely understudied. Here, we generated the genomic sequences of K88-positive and F18-positive porcine ETEC strains and examined the phylogenetic distribution of clinical porcine ETEC strains and their plasmid-associated genetic content. The genomes of porcine ETEC strains UMNK88 and UMNF18 were both found to contain remarkable plasmid complements containing known virulence factors, potential novel virulence factors, and antimicrobial resistance-associated elements. The chromosomes of these strains also possessed several unique genomic islands containing hypothetical genes with similarity to classical virulence factors, although phage-associated genomic islands dominated the accessory genomes of these strains. Phylogenetic analysis of 78 clinical isolates associated with neonatal and porcine diarrhea revealed that a limited subset of porcine ETEC lineages exist that generally contain common toxin and fimbrial profiles, with many of the isolates belonging to the ST10, ST23, and ST169 multilocus sequencing types. These lineages were generally distinct from existing human ETEC database isolates. Overall, most porcine ETEC strains appear to have emerged from a limited subset of E. coli lineages that either have an increased propensity to carry plasmid-encoded virulence factors or have the appropriate ETEC core genome required for virulence. PMID:22081385

  1. Ribavirin efficiently suppresses porcine nidovirus replication.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngnam; Lee, Changhee

    2013-01-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) and porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) are porcine nidoviruses that represent emerging viral pathogens causing heavy economic impacts on the swine industry. Although ribavirin is a well-known antiviral drug against a broad range of both DNA and RNA viruses in vitro, its inhibitory effect and mechanism of action on porcine nidovirus replication remains to be elucidated. Therefore, the present study was conducted to determine whether ribavirin suppresses porcine nidovirus infection. Our results demonstrated that ribavirin treatment dose-dependently inhibited the replication of both nidoviruses. The antiviral activity of ribavirin on porcine nidovirus replication was found to be primarily exerted at early times post-infection. Treatment with ribavirin resulted in marked reduction of viral genomic and subgenomic RNA synthesis, viral protein expression, and progeny virus production in a dose-dependent manner. Investigations into the mechanism of action of ribavirin against PRRSV and PEDV revealed that the addition of guanosine to the ribavirin treatment significantly reversed the antiviral effects, suggesting that depletion of the intracellular GTP pool by inhibiting IMP dehydrogenase may be essential for ribavirin activity. Further sequencing analysis showed that the mutation frequency in ribavirin-treated cells was similar to that in untreated cells, indicating that ribavirin did not induce error-prone replication. Taken together, our data indicate that ribavirin might not only be a good therapeutic agent against porcine nidovirus, but also a potential candidate to be evaluated against other human and animal coronaviruses.

  2. A porcine model of osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Saalfrank, A; Janssen, K-P; Ravon, M; Flisikowski, K; Eser, S; Steiger, K; Flisikowska, T; Müller-Fliedner, P; Schulze, É; Brönner, C; Gnann, A; Kappe, E; Böhm, B; Schade, B; Certa, U; Saur, D; Esposito, I; Kind, A; Schnieke, A

    2016-01-01

    We previously produced pigs with a latent oncogenic TP53 mutation. Humans with TP53 germline mutations are predisposed to a wide spectrum of early-onset cancers, predominantly breast, brain, adrenal gland cancer, soft tissue sarcomas and osteosarcomas. Loss of p53 function has been observed in >50% of human cancers. Here we demonstrate that porcine mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) convert to a transformed phenotype after activation of latent oncogenic TP53R167H and KRASG12D, and overexpression of MYC promotes tumorigenesis. The process mimics key molecular aspects of human sarcomagenesis. Transformed porcine MSCs exhibit genomic instability, with complex karyotypes, and develop into sarcomas on transplantation into immune-deficient mice. In pigs, heterozygous knockout of TP53 was sufficient for spontaneous osteosarcoma development in older animals, whereas homozygous TP53 knockout resulted in multiple large osteosarcomas in 7–8-month-old animals. This is the first report that engineered mutation of an endogenous tumour-suppressor gene leads to invasive cancer in pigs. Unlike in Trp53 mutant mice, osteosarcoma developed in the long bones and skull, closely recapitulating the human disease. These animals thus promise a model for juvenile osteosarcoma, a relatively uncommon but devastating disease. PMID:26974205

  3. An estimation of mechanical stress on alveolar walls during repetitive alveolar reopening and closure.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zheng-Long; Song, Yuan-Lin; Hu, Zhao-Yan; Zhang, Su; Chen, Ya-Zhu

    2015-08-01

    Alveolar overdistension and mechanical stresses generated by repetitive opening and closing of small airways and alveoli have been widely recognized as two primary mechanistic factors that may contribute to the development of ventilator-induced lung injury. A long-duration exposure of alveolar epithelial cells to even small, shear stresses could lead to the changes in cytoskeleton and the production of inflammatory mediators. In this paper, we have made an attempt to estimate in situ the magnitudes of mechanical stresses exerted on the alveolar walls during repetitive alveolar reopening by using a tape-peeling model of McEwan and Taylor (35). To this end, we first speculate the possible ranges of capillary number (Ca) ≡ μU/γ (a dimensionless combination of surface tension γ, fluid viscosity μ, and alveolar opening velocity U) during in vivo alveolar opening. Subsequent calculations show that increasing respiratory rate or inflation rate serves to increase the values of mechanical stresses. For a normal lung, the predicted maximum shear stresses are <15 dyn/cm(2) at all respiratory rates, whereas for a lung with elevated surface tension or viscosity, the maximum shear stress will notably increase, even at a slow respiratory rate. Similarly, the increased pressure gradients in the case of elevated surface or viscosity may lead to a pressure drop >300 dyn/cm(2) across a cell, possibly inducing epithelial hydraulic cracks. In addition, we have conceived of a geometrical model of alveolar opening to make a prediction of the positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) required to splint open a collapsed alveolus, which as shown by our results, covers a wide range of pressures, from several centimeters to dozens of centimeters of water, strongly depending on the underlying pulmonary conditions. The establishment of adequate regional ventilation-to-perfusion ratios may prevent recruited alveoli from reabsorption atelectasis and accordingly, reduce the required levels of

  4. Decompression of inferior alveolar nerve: case report.

    PubMed

    Marques, Tiago Miguel Santos; Gomes, Joana Marques

    2011-01-01

    Paresthesia as a result of mechanical trauma is one of the most frequent sensory disturbances of the inferior alveolar nerve. This case report describes surgical treatment for paresthesia caused by a compressive phenomenon within the mandibular canal. The cause of the compression, a broken instrument left in the patient's mouth during previous endodontic therapy, was identified during routine radiography and computed tomography. Once the foreign object was removed by surgery, the paresthesia resolved quickly. This case highlights the potential for an iatrogenic mechanical cause of paresthesia.

  5. Proteomic Analysis of Gingival Tissue and Alveolar Bone during Alveolar Bone Healing*

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hee-Young; Kwon, Joseph; Kook, Min-Suk; Kang, Seong Soo; Kim, Se Eun; Sohn, Sungoh; Jung, Seunggon; Kwon, Sang-Oh; Kim, Hyung-Seok; Lee, Jae Hyuk; Lee, Tae-Hoon

    2013-01-01

    Bone tissue regeneration is orchestrated by the surrounding supporting tissues and involves the build-up of osteogenic cells, which orchestrate remodeling/healing through the expression of numerous mediators and signaling molecules. Periodontal regeneration models have proven useful for studying the interaction and communication between alveolar bone and supporting soft tissue. We applied a quantitative proteomic approach to analyze and compare proteins with altered expression in gingival soft tissue and alveolar bone following tooth extraction. For target identification and validation, hard and soft tissue were extracted from mini-pigs at the indicated times after tooth extraction. From triplicate experiments, 56 proteins in soft tissue and 27 proteins in alveolar bone were found to be differentially expressed before and after tooth extraction. The expression of 21 of those proteins was altered in both soft tissue and bone. Comparison of the activated networks in soft tissue and alveolar bone highlighted their distinct responsibilities in bone and tissue healing. Moreover, we found that there is crosstalk between identified proteins in soft tissue and alveolar bone with respect to cellular assembly, organization, and communication. Among these proteins, we examined in detail the expression patterns and associated networks of ATP5B and fibronectin 1. ATP5B is involved in nucleic acid metabolism, small molecule biochemistry, and neurological disease, and fibronectin 1 is involved in cellular assembly, organization, and maintenance. Collectively, our findings indicate that bone regeneration is accompanied by a profound interaction among networks regulating cellular resources, and they provide novel insight into the molecular mechanisms involved in the healing of periodontal tissue after tooth extraction. PMID:23824910

  6. Distance of the alveolar antral artery from the alveolar crest. Related factors and surgical considerations in sinus floor elevation

    PubMed Central

    Varela-Centelles, Pablo; Loira-Gago, María; Gonzalez-Mosquera, Antonio; Seoane-Romero, Juan M.; Garcia-Martin, José M.

    2016-01-01

    Background In a variable proportion of maxillary sinuses alveolar antral artery is located close to the residual ridge, increasing the chances for haemorrhagic complications during sinus floor elevation procedures. Material and Methods Retrospective observational study of CBCT explorations performed for implant-treatment planning. The upper first molar area was selected for this study. The relative uncertainty (standard deviation of the measurement divided by its mean and expressed as a percentage from 0% to 100%) was chosen for determining the observational errors. For modeling the chances of AAA detection, the generalized additive models (GAM) approach was chosen. Results A total of 240 maxillary sinuses were studied (46.25% males) whose median median age was 58 years old (IQR: 52-66). Univariate models showed that the chances for an AAA-alvelar crest distance ≤15mm increase in wider sinuses with lower, subsinusally edentulous crests. When distance is considered as a continuous variable, the best mutivariate model showed an explained deviance of 67% and included AAA diameter, distance AAA-sinus floor, sinus width, and shape, height and width of the residual ridge. Thinner AAAs are found closer to the crest (within the ≤15mm safe distance). Conclusions Bearing in mind the inclusion criteria and the limitations of this investigation, it is concluded that there is a high proportion of maxillary sinuses where AAA describes a course close to the alveolar crest (≤15mm), which was classically considered a safe distance for SFE. This position is related to the presence of atrophic crests (depressed ridge form) and wide maxillary sinuses where the distance of the vessel to the floor of the sinus is small. This information may permit a better surgical planning of SFE procedures. Key words:Cone-beam computed tomography, blood vessels, sinus floor augmentation, intraoperative complications. PMID:27694790

  7. Oxidative inactivation of alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor by alveolar macrophages from healthy smokers requires the presence of myeloperoxidase.

    PubMed

    Wallaert, B; Gressier, B; Aerts, C; Mizon, C; Voisin, C; Mizon, J

    1991-11-01

    The aim of this work was to study the ability of human alveolar macrophages (AM) of 10 healthy smokers to inactivate alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor (alpha 1PI). Purified alpha 1PI was incubated for 45 min, with human alveolar macrophages before and after stimulation by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) or opsonized zymosan. As a positive control, the same experiments were performed in parallel with blood human neutrophils (PMN). Results are expressed as percentage of inactivation of alpha 1PI as evaluated from its inhibitory activity against porcine pancreatic elastase. A strong correlation (r = 0.99) was shown when inhibitory activity of alpha 1PI was evaluated against porcine pancreatic elastase or human neutrophil elastase. Unstimulated AM (1.57 +/- 0.9%) as well as stimulated AM (PMA: 1 +/- 0.4%; zymosan: 3 +/- 0.6%) were unable to inactivate alpha 1PI. Gel electrophoresis of alpha 1PI demonstrated that AM before or after stimulation induced a slight proteolysis of alpha 1PI, whereas both cleaved and complexed alpha 1PI were found when alpha 1PI was incubated with activated PMN. Both unstimulated (22 +/- 2.6%) and activated PMN (PMA: 91.7 +/- 4.7%; zymosan: 90 +/- 5.5%) were responsible for a significant inactivation of alpha 1PI. Catalase, in contrast to superoxide dismutase, was responsible for a near complete protection of alpha 1PI inactivation by PMN. To better determine the role of PMN secretory products, especially myeloperoxidase (MPO), we also investigated the effect of zymosan-activated PMN supernatants or of purified MPO on the alpha 1PI-AM reaction. MPO assay in PMN supernatants demonstrated that activated neutrophils released significant amounts of MPO (16.8 +/- 4.1 U/ml), whereas MPO was undetectable in activated AM supernatants.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Analysis of regional compliance in a porcine model of acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Czaplik, Michael; Biener, Ingeborg; Dembinski, Rolf; Pelosi, Paolo; Soodt, Thomas; Schroeder, Wolfgang; Leonhardt, Steffen; Marx, Gernot; Rossaint, Rolf; Bickenbach, Johannes

    2012-10-15

    Lung protective ventilation in acute lung injury (ALI) focuses on using low tidal volumes and adequate levels of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP). Identifying optimal pressure is difficult because pressure-volume (PV) relations differ regionally. Precise analysis demands local measurements of pressures and related alveolar morphologies. In a porcine model of surfactant depletion (n=24), we combined measuring static pressures with endoscopic microscopy and electrical impedance tomography (EIT) to examine regional PV loops and morphologic heterogeneities between healthy (control group; CON) and ALI lungs ventilated with low (LVT) or high tidal volumes (HVT). Quantification included indices for microscopy (Volume Air Index (VAI), Heterogeneity and Circularity Index), EIT analysis and calculation of regional compliances due to generated PV loops. We found that: (1) VAI decreased in lower lobe after ALI, (2) electrical impedance decreased in dorsal regions and (3) PV loops differed regionally. Further studies should prove the potentials of these techniques on individual respiratory settings and clinical outcome.

  9. Autophagy sustains the replication of porcine reproductive and respiratory virus in host cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Qinghao; Qin, Yixian; Zhou, Lei; Kou, Qiuwen; Guo, Xin; Ge, Xinna; Yang, Hanchun; Hu, Hongbo

    2012-08-01

    In this study, we confirmed the autophagy induced by porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) in permissive cells and investigated the role of autophagy in the replication of PRRSV. We first demonstrated that PRRSV infection significantly results in the increased double-membrane vesicles, the accumulation of LC3 fluorescence puncta, and the raised ratio of LC3-II/{beta}-actin, in MARC-145 cells. Then we discovered that induction of autophagy by rapamycin significantly enhances the viral titers of PRRSV, while inhibition of autophagy by 3-MA and silencing of LC3 gene by siRNA reduces the yield of PRRSV. The results showed functional autolysosomes can be formed after PRRSV infection and the autophagosome-lysosome-fusion inhibitor decreases the virus titers. We also examined the induction of autophagy by PRRSV infection in pulmonary alveolar macrophages. These findings indicate that autophagy induced by PRRSV infection plays a role in sustaining the replication of PRRSV in host cells.

  10. The hidden X suture: a technical note on a novel suture technique for alveolar ridge preservation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The present study investigated the impact of 2 different suture techniques, the conventional crossed mattress suture (X suture) and the novel hidden X suture, for alveolar ridge preservation (ARP) with an open healing approach. Methods This study was a prospective randomized controlled clinical trial. Fourteen patients requiring extraction of the maxillary or mandibular posterior teeth were enrolled and allocated into 2 groups. After extraction, demineralized bovine bone matrix mixed with 10% collagen (DBBM-C) was grafted and the socket was covered by porcine collagen membrane in a double-layer fashion. No attempt to obtain primary closure was made. The hidden X suture and conventional X suture techniques were performed in the test and control groups, respectively. Cone-beam computed tomographic (CBCT) images were taken immediately after the graft procedure and before implant surgery 4 months later. Additionally, the change in the mucogingival junction (MGJ) position was measured and was compared after extraction, after suturing, and 4 months after the operation. Results All sites healed without any complications. Clinical evaluations showed that the MGJ line shifted to the lingual side immediately after the application of the X suture by 1.56±0.90 mm in the control group, while the application of the hidden X suture rather pushed the MGJ line slightly to the buccal side by 0.25±0.66 mm. It was demonstrated that the amount of keratinized tissue (KT) preserved on the buccal side was significantly greater in the hidden X suture group 4 months after the procedure (P<0.05). Radiographic analysis showed that the hidden X suture had a significant effect in preserving horizontal width and minimizing vertical reduction in comparison to X suture (P<0.05). Conclusions Our study provided clinical and radiographic verification of the efficacy of the hidden X suture in preserving the width of KT and the dimensions of the alveolar ridge after ARP. PMID:28050319

  11. A comparison of different compressive forces on graft materials during alveolar ridge preservation

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Following tooth extraction, alveolar ridge preservation (ARP) can maintain the dimensions of ridge height and width. Although previous studies have demonstrated the effects of ARP, few if any studies have investigated the compressive force applied during grafting. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of different compressive forces on the graft materials during ARP. Methods After tooth extraction, sockets were filled with deproteinized bovine bone mineral with 10% porcine collagen and covered by a resorbable collagen membrane in a double-layered fashion. The graft materials were compressed using a force of 5 N in the test group (n=12) and a force of 30 N in the control group (n=12). A hidden X suture was performed to secure the graft without primary closure. Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) was performed immediately after grafting and 4 months later, just before implant surgery. Tissue samples were retrieved using a trephine bur from the grafted sites during implant surgery for histologic and histomorphometric evaluations. Periotest values (PTVs) were measured to assess the initial stability of the dental implants. Results Four patients dropped out from the control group and 20 patients finished the study. Both groups healed without any complications. The CBCT measurements showed that the ridge volume was comparably preserved vertically and horizontally in both groups (P>0.05). Histomorphometric analysis demonstrated that the ratio of new bone formation was significantly greater in the test group (P<0.05). The PTVs showed no significant differences between the 2 groups (P>0.05). Conclusions The application of a greater compressive force on biomaterials during ARP significantly enhanced new bone formation while preserving the horizontal and vertical dimensions of the alveolar ridge. Further studies are required to identity the optimal compressive force for ARP. PMID:28261524

  12. Estrogen regulates pulmonary alveolar formation, loss, and regeneration in mice.

    PubMed

    Massaro, Donald; Massaro, Gloria Decarlo

    2004-12-01

    Lung tissue elastic recoil and the dimension and number of pulmonary gas-exchange units (alveoli) are major determinants of gas-exchange function. Loss of gas-exchange function accelerates after menopause in the healthy aged and is progressively lost in individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The latter, a disease of midlife and later, though more common in men than in women, is a disease to which women smokers and never smokers may be more susceptible than men; it is characterized by diminished lung tissue elastic recoil and presently irremediable alveolar loss. Ovariectomy in sexually immature rats diminishes the formation of alveoli, and estrogen prevents the diminution. In the present work, we found that estrogen receptor-alpha and estrogen receptor-beta, the only recognized mammalian estrogen receptors, are required for the formation of a full complement of alveoli in female mice. However, only the absence of estrogen receptor-beta diminishes lung elastic tissue recoil. Furthermore, ovariectomy in adult mice results, within 3 wk, in loss of alveoli and of alveolar surface area without a change of lung volume. Estrogen replacement, after alveolar loss, induces alveolar regeneration, reversing the architectural effects of ovariectomy. These studies 1) reveal estrogen receptors regulate alveolar size and number in a nonredundant manner, 2) show estrogen is required for maintenance of already formed alveoli and induces alveolar regeneration after their loss in adult ovariectomized mice, and 3) offer the possibility estrogen can slow alveolar loss and induce alveolar regeneration in women with COPD.

  13. Tongue-Palate Contact of Perceptually Acceptable Alveolar Stops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Alice; Gibbon, Fiona E.; O'Donovan, Cliona

    2013-01-01

    Increased tongue-palate contact for perceptually acceptable alveolar stops has been observed in children with speech sound disorders (SSD). This is a retrospective study that further investigated this issue by using quantitative measures to compare the target alveolar stops /t/, /d/ and /n/ produced in words by nine children with SSD (20 tokens of…

  14. [The in vivo penetration of erythromycin into alveolar macrophages].

    PubMed

    Carré, P; Piva, F; Aerts, C; Voisin, C; Wallaert, B

    1990-01-01

    In order to appreciate the in vivo penetration of erythromycin the alveolar spaces a broncho-alveolar lavage was carried out in 24 guinea pigs, 30 minutes, 1 hour 30 minutes and three hours after a single intraperitoneal injection of 50 mgms. of erythromycin. The erythromycin dose was assessed by a microbiological method in the alveolar macrophages and the supernatant of the broncho-alveolar lavage liquid. The intramacrophage concentrations of erythromycin were 3.9, 11.5 and 12 times higher than the serum concentrations at 30 minutes, 1 hour 30 and three hours respectively. The concentrations in the broncho-alveolar lavage liquid was always higher than the serum concentrations tacking account of the different dilutions estimated with relation to the glucose concentrations. At 30 minutes, 1 hour 30 minutes and three hours the alveolar macrophages contained 1.9; 7.6 and 6 times more erythromycin respectively than the lavage supernatant. From the first half hour of its administration the erythromycin was concentrated in the alveolar spaces, in particular within the macrophages. Already noted in vitro, this rapidity of erythromycin concentration in vivo in alveolar macrophages appears to be one of the reasons to explain its activity against micro-organisms developing within macrophages.

  15. Silver nanowire interactions with primary human alveolar type-II epithelial cell secretions: contrasting bioreactivity with human alveolar type-I and type-II epithelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweeney, Sinbad; Theodorou, Ioannis G.; Zambianchi, Marta; Chen, Shu; Gow, Andrew; Schwander, Stephan; Zhang, Junfeng (Jim); Chung, Kian Fan; Shaffer, Milo S. P.; Ryan, Mary P.; Porter, Alexandra E.; Tetley, Teresa D.

    2015-06-01

    Inhaled nanoparticles have a high deposition rate in the alveolar units of the deep lung. The alveolar epithelium is composed of type-I and type-II epithelial cells (ATI and ATII respectively) and is bathed in pulmonary surfactant. The effect of native human ATII cell secretions on nanoparticle toxicity is not known. We investigated the cellular uptake and toxicity of silver nanowires (AgNWs; 70 nm diameter, 1.5 μm length) with human ATI-like cells (TT1), in the absence or presence of Curosurf® (a natural porcine pulmonary surfactant with a low amount of protein) or harvested primary human ATII cell secretions (HAS; containing both the complete lipid as well as the full protein complement of human pulmonary surfactant i.e. SP-A, SP-B, SP-C and SP-D). We hypothesised that Curosurf® or HAS would confer improved protection for TT1 cells, limiting the toxicity of AgNWs. In agreement with our hypothesis, HAS reduced the inflammatory and reactive oxygen species (ROS)-generating potential of AgNWs with exposed TT1 cells. For example, IL-8 release and ROS generation was reduced by 38% and 29%, respectively, resulting in similar levels to that of the non-treated controls. However in contrast to our hypothesis, Curosurf® had no effect. We found a significant reduction in AgNW uptake by TT1 cells in the presence of HAS but not Curosurf. Furthermore, we show that the SP-A and SP-D are likely to be involved in this process as they were found to be specifically bound to the AgNWs. While ATI cells appear to be protected by HAS, evidence suggested that ATII cells, despite no uptake, were vulnerable to AgNW exposure (indicated by increased IL-8 release and ROS generation and decreased intracellular SP-A levels one day post-exposure). This study provides unique findings that may be important for the study of lung epithelial-endothelial translocation of nanoparticles in general and associated toxicity within the alveolar unit.Inhaled nanoparticles have a high deposition rate in

  16. [Mandibular and maxillary alveolar atrophy. Comparative analysis by sex, topography and seriousness of problem].

    PubMed

    Carbajal Bello, L

    1990-01-01

    Maxillary and/or mandibular osseous alveolar reabsorption that occurs after teeth loss is a continuous and irreversible process that, in authors opinion, seems to affect more women than men and more the mandible than the maxillary. In our country the epidemiologist profile of the problem is unknown and previous published studies at this respect was not found by this author in domestic literature. In this paper maxillary mandibular Alveolar Atrophy Syndrome characteristics are studied in a group of patients of the Departamento de Cirugía de la Escuela de Odontología de la Universidad del Bajío on the perspective of its prevalence in relation of sex, problem seriousness and its topography.

  17. Relative effects of asbestos and wollastonite on alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Pailes, W H; Judy, D J; Resnick, H; Castranova, V

    1984-01-01

    Rabbit alveolar macrophages were exposed in culture to chrysotile asbestos, wollastonite, or latex, and the effects on various biochemical and physiological parameters related to cellular viability and fibrogenicity were determined. Exposure of alveolar macrophages to asbestos, wollastonite, or latex for 3 d has no effect on oxygen consumption or cellular volume. However, treatment of alveolar macrophages with as little as 25 micrograms asbestos/ml for 1 d increases lysosomal enzyme release and decreases membrane integrity, i.e., decreases trypan blue exclusion and increases leakage of cytosolic enzymes. In contrast, exposure of alveolar macrophages to wollastonite or latex at 250 micrograms/ml does not induce lysosomal enzyme release or alter membrane integrity even after 3 d of exposure in culture. These data suggest that chrysotile asbestos damages rabbit alveolar macrophages, while wollastonite, a potential substitute for asbestos, is far less cytotoxic.

  18. (PCG) Protein Crystal Growth Porcine Elastase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    (PCG) Protein Crystal Growth Porcine Elastase. This enzyme is associated with the degradation of lung tissue in people suffering from emphysema. It is useful in studying causes of this disease. Principal Investigator on STS-26 was Charles Bugg.

  19. Effects of implant drilling parameters for pilot and twist drills on temperature rise in bone analog and alveolar bones.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yung-Chuan; Hsiao, Chih-Kun; Ciou, Ji-Sih; Tsai, Yi-Jung; Tu, Yuan-Kun

    2016-11-01

    This study concerns the effects of different drilling parameters of pilot drills and twist drills on the temperature rise of alveolar bones during dental implant procedures. The drilling parameters studied here include the feed rate and rotation speed of the drill. The bone temperature distribution was analyzed through experiments and numerical simulations of the drilling process. In this study, a three dimensional (3D) elasto-plastic dynamic finite element model (DFEM) was proposed to investigate the effects of drilling parameters on the bone temperature rise. In addition, the FE model is validated with drilling experiments on artificial human bones and porcine alveolar bones. The results indicate that 3D DFEM can effectively simulate the bone temperature rise during the drilling process. During the drilling process with pilot drills or twist drills, the maximum bone temperature occurred in the region of the cancellous bones close to the cortical bones. The feed rate was one of the important factors affecting the time when the maximum bone temperature occurred. Our results also demonstrate that the elevation of bone temperature was reduced as the feed rate increased and the drill speed decreased, which also effectively reduced the risk region of osteonecrosis. These findings can serve as a reference for dentists in choosing drilling parameters for dental implant surgeries.

  20. Porcine models of muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Selsby, Joshua T; Ross, Jason W; Nonneman, Dan; Hollinger, Katrin

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a progressive, fatal, X-linked disease caused by a failure to accumulate the cytoskeletal protein dystrophin. This disease has been studied using a variety of animal models including fish, mice, rats, and dogs. While these models have contributed substantially to our mechanistic understanding of the disease and disease progression, limitations inherent to each model have slowed the clinical advancement of therapies, which necessitates the development of novel large-animal models. Several porcine dystrophin-deficient models have been identified, although disease severity may be so severe as to limit their potential contributions to the field. We have recently identified and completed the initial characterization of a natural porcine model of dystrophin insufficiency. Muscles from these animals display characteristic focal necrosis concomitant with decreased abundance and localization of dystrophin-glycoprotein complex components. These pigs recapitulate many of the cardinal features of muscular dystrophy, have elevated serum creatine kinase activity, and preliminarily appear to display altered locomotion. They also suffer from sudden death preceded by EKG abnormalities. Pig dystrophinopathy models could allow refinement of dosing strategies in human-sized animals in preparation for clinical trials. From an animal handling perspective, these pigs can generally be treated normally, with the understanding that acute stress can lead to sudden death. In summary, the ability to create genetically modified pig models and the serendipitous discovery of genetic disease in the swine industry has resulted in the emergence of new animal tools to facilitate the critical objective of improving the quality and length of life for boys afflicted with such a devastating disease.

  1. Inhibition of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus replication by flavaspidic acid AB.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qian; Gao, Li; Si, Jianyong; Sun, Yipeng; Liu, Jinhua; Cao, Li; Feng, Wen-Hai

    2013-01-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) represents a significant challenge to the swine industry worldwide. Current control strategies against PRRSV are still inadequate and there is an urgent need for new antiviral therapies. Flavaspidic acid AB (FA-AB) is a compound derived from Dryopteris crassirhizoma, a traditional antiviral Chinese medicine. Here, we first identified its anti-PRRSV activity through targeting multiple stages in PRRSV infection in vitro. Our studies demonstrated that FA-AB could inhibit the internalization and cell-to-cell spreading of PRRSV, but not block PRRSV binding to cells. By monitoring the kinetics of PRRSV replication, we showed that FA-AB significantly suppressed PRRSV replication when treatment was initiated 24h after virus infection. Furthermore, we confirmed that FA-AB was able to significantly induce IFN-α, IFN-β, and IL1-β expression in porcine alveolar macrophages, suggesting that induction of antiviral cytokines by FA-AB could contribute to FA-AB induced inhibition of PRRSV replication. In conclusion, we provide a foundation for the possibility to develop a new therapeutic agent to control PRRSV infection.

  2. Percutaneous Irreversible Electroporation Lung Ablation: Preliminary Results in a Porcine Model

    SciTech Connect

    Deodhar, Ajita; Monette, Sebastien; Single, Gordon W.; Hamilton, William C.; Thornton, Raymond H.; Sofocleous, Constantinos T.; Maybody, Majid; Solomon, Stephen B.

    2011-12-15

    Objective: Irreversible electroporation (IRE) uses direct electrical pulses to create permanent 'pores' in cell membranes to cause cell death. In contrast to conventional modalities, IRE has a nonthermal mechanism of action. Our objective was to study the histopathological and imaging features of IRE in normal swine lung. Materials and Methods: Eleven female swine were studied for hyperacute (8 h), acute (24 h), subacute (96 h), and chronic (3 week) effects of IRE ablation in lung. Paired unipolar IRE applicators were placed under computed tomography (CT) guidance. Some applicators were deliberately positioned near bronchovascular structures. IRE pulse delivery was synchronized with the cardiac rhythm only when ablation was performed within 2 cm of the heart. Contrast-enhanced CT scan was performed immediately before and after IRE and at 1 and 3 weeks after IRE ablation. Representative tissue was stained with hematoxylin and eosin for histopathology. Results: Twenty-five ablations were created: ten hyperacute, four acute, and three subacute ablations showed alveolar edema and necrosis with necrosis of bronchial, bronchiolar, and vascular epithelium. Bronchovascular architecture was maintained. Chronic ablations showed bronchiolitis obliterans and alveolar interstitial fibrosis. Immediate post-procedure CT images showed linear or patchy density along the applicator tract. At 1 week, there was consolidation that resolved partially or completely by 3 weeks. Pneumothorax requiring chest tube developed in two animals; no significant cardiac arrhythmias were noted. Conclusion: Our preliminary porcine study demonstrates the nonthermal and extracellular matrix sparing mechanism of action of IRE. IRE is a potential alternative to thermal ablative modalities.

  3. Splenic CD163(+) macrophages as targets of porcine reproductive and respiratory virus: Role of Siglecs.

    PubMed

    Yuste, María; Fernández-Caballero, Teresa; Prieto, Cinta; Álvarez, Belén; Martínez-Lobo, Javier; Simarro, Isabel; Castro, José María; Alonso, Fernando; Ezquerra, Ángel; Domínguez, Javier; Revilla, Concepción

    2017-01-01

    CD169 and CD163 have been involved in the process of PRRS virus attachment and infection in macrophages, although recent studies have challenged the requirement for CD169. In addition to CD169, macrophages express other siglecs, whose role in PRRS virus infection is so far unknown. Splenic CD163(+) macrophages express Siglec-3 and Siglec-5 but almost undetectable levels of CD169. Hence, we considered this cell population appropriate for analysing the role of these siglecs in the attachment and internalization of PRRS virus into macrophages. PRRS virus replicated efficiently in these macrophages, yielding even higher titres than in alveolar macrophages. Besides, a recombinant protein consisting in the ectodomain of porcine Siglec-3 fused to the Fc fragment of human IgG1 (Siglec3-Fc) was able to bind PRRS virus, while binding to Siglec-5-Fc was inconsistent. Antibodies to CD169 but not to Siglec-3 or Siglec-5 blocked the binding and infection of PRRS virus on alveolar macrophages. Unexpectedly, our antibody to CD169 also blocked the binding of PRRS virus to splenic CD163(+) macrophages, whereas antibodies to Siglec-3 or Siglec-5 had no effect. These results show that very low levels of CD169 expression are enough to support the attachment and internalization of PRRS virus into macrophages, whereas Siglec-3 and Siglec-5 do not seem to contribute to the virus entry in these cells.

  4. Characteristics and EGFP expression of porcine mammary gland epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yue-Mao; He, Xiao-Ying

    2010-12-01

    The aims of this study were to establish a porcine mammary gland epithelial (PMGE) cell line, and to determine if these PMGE cells could be maintained long-term in culture by continuous subculturing following transfection with a reporter gene, enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP). Primary culture of PMGE cells was achieved by outgrowth of migrating cells from the fragments of the mammary gland tissue of a lactating pig. The passage sixteen PMGE cells were transfected with EGFP gene using lipofection. The expression of Cell keratins of epithelial cells in PMGE cells was tested by immunofluorescence. Βeta-Casein gene mRNA was tested for PMGE cells by RT-PCR. The results showed that PMGE cells could form dome-like structure which looked like nipple, and the cells contained different cell types. The expression of Cell keratins demonstrated the property of epithelial cells, and the PMGE cells could express transcript encoding a Βeta-Casein protein. EGFP gene was successfully transferred into the PMGE cells, and the transfected cells could be maintained long-term in culture by continuous subculturing. In conclusion, we have established a EGFP gene transfected porcine mammary gland epithelial (ET-PMGE) cell line.

  5. Comparison of alveolar ridge preservation methods using three-dimensional micro-computed tomographic analysis and two-dimensional histometric evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Park, Young-Seok; Kim, Sungtae; Oh, Seung-Hee; Park, Hee-Jung; Lee, Sophia; Lee, Young-Kyu; Heo, Min-Suk

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This study evaluated the efficacy of alveolar ridge preservation methods with and without primary wound closure and the relationship between histometric and micro-computed tomographic (CT) data. Materials and Methods Porcine hydroxyapatite with polytetrafluoroethylene membrane was implanted into a canine extraction socket. The density of the total mineralized tissue, remaining hydroxyapatite, and new bone was analyzed by histometry and micro-CT. The statistical association between these methods was evaluated. Results Histometry and micro-CT showed that the group which underwent alveolar preservation without primary wound closure had significantly higher new bone density than the group with primary wound closure (P<0.05). However, there was no significant association between the data from histometry and micro-CT analysis. Conclusion These results suggest that alveolar ridge preservation without primary wound closure enhanced new bone formation more effectively than that with primary wound closure. Further investigation is needed with respect to the comparison of histometry and micro-CT analysis. PMID:24944964

  6. A feasibility study of applying cone-beam computed tomography to observe dimensional changes in human alveolar bone*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bei; Wang, Yao; Li, Jun

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of applying cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) to observe dimensional changes in human alveolar bone continuously after tooth extraction. Sixty patients were selected from a CBCT database. Each patient had two CBCT scans (CBCT I and CBCT II), one taken before and one taken after implant surgery. A fixed anatomic reference point was used to orient the horizontal slice of the two scans. The alveolar ridge width was measured on the horizontal slice. In each series of CBCT I sagittal slices, the number of slices from the start point to the pulp center of the test tooth was recorded. The tooth length was measured on the sagittal slice. In each series of CBCT II slices, tooth length was measured on a sagittal slice selected based on the number of slices from the start point to the pulp center recorded in CBCT I. Intraobserver reliability, assessed by the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), was high. Paired sample t-tests of repeated measurements of both tooth length and alveolar bone width showed no statistically significant differences (P<0.05). This study has proved that projection differences among CBCT scans taken at different time points from one patient can be neglected without affecting the accuracy of millimeter scale measurements. CBCT is a reliable imaging tool for continuously observing dimensional changes in human alveolar bone. PMID:24711360

  7. Alveolar Ridge Contouring with Free Connective Tissue Graft at Implant Placement: A 5-Year Consecutive Clinical Study.

    PubMed

    Hanser, Thomas; Khoury, Fouad

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated volume stability after alveolar ridge contouring with free connective tissue grafts at implant placement in single-tooth gaps. A total of 52 single-tooth gaps with labial volume deficiencies in the maxilla (incisors, canines, and premolars) were consecutively treated with implants and concomitant free palatal connective tissue grafts in 46 patients between 2006 and 2009. Implants had to be covered with at least 2 mm peri-implant local bone after insertion. At implant placement, a free connective tissue graft from the palate was fixed inside a labial split-thickness flap to form an existing concave buccal alveolar ridge contour due to tissue volume deficiency into a convex shape. Standardized volumetric measurements of the labial alveolar contour using a template were evaluated before connective tissue grafting and at 2 weeks, 1 year, and 5 years after implantprosthetic incorporation. Tissue volume had increased significantly (P < .05) in all six reference points representing the outer alveolar soft tissue contour of the implant before connective tissue grafting to baseline (2 weeks after implant-prosthetic incorporation). Statistically, 50% of the reference points (P > .05) kept their volume from baseline to 1 year after prosthetic incorporation and from baseline to 5 years after prosthetic incorporation, respectively, whereas reference points located within the area of the implant sulcus showed a significant (P < .05) decrease in volume. Clinically, 5 years after prosthetic incorporation the originally concave buccal alveolar contour was still convex in all implants, leading to a continuous favorable anatomical shape and improved esthetic situation. Intraoral radiographs confirmed osseointegration and stable peri-implant parameters with a survival rate of 100% after a follow-up of approximately 5 years. Implant placement with concomitant free connective tissue grafting appears to be an appropriate long-term means to contour preexisting buccal

  8. Arterial hypertension perpetuates alveolar bone loss.

    PubMed

    de Medeiros Vanderlei, Janine Montenegro Toscano Moura; Messora, Michel Reis; Fernandes, Patrícia Garani; Novaes, Arthur B; Palioto, Daniela Bazan; de Moraes Grisi, Marcio Fernando; Scombatti de Souza, Sergio Luis; Gerlach, Raquel Fernanda; Antoniali, Cristina; Taba, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Few studies have focused on the impact of hypertension on the progression of periodontitis (PD). The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether hypertension affects PD by enhancing bone loss even after the stimulus for PD induction is removed. Ligature-induced PD was created on the first mandibular molars of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and normotensive rats (Wistar Kyoto-WKY). The animals were assigned to non-ligated controls (C) and PD groups: WKY-C, WKY-PD, SHR-C, and SHR-PD. After 10 days, five animals of each group were killed and the ligatures of the other animals were removed. On the 21st day (11 days without PD induced), the remaining animals were killed. The jaws were defleshed and the amount of bone loss was measured. After 10 days, the PD groups showed more bone loss than its controls (P < .05); SHR-PD = 0.72 ± 0.05 mm, SHR-C = 0.39 ± 0.04 mm, WKY-PD = 0.75 ± 0.04 mm, and WKY-C = 0.56 ± 0.04 mm. The cumulative bone loss on day 21 (0.94 ± 0.13 mm) was significantly worse than on day 10 only in SHR-PD group (P < .05). The final bone loss differences between PD and C groups accounted for 102% (SHR) and 26% (WKY) increase in comparison with the initial control levels. Hypertension is associated with progressive alveolar bone loss even when the stimulus for PD induction is removed and it may be speculated that host condition perpetuates alveolar bone loss.

  9. Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin reduces human alveolar epithelial barrier function.

    PubMed

    Langer, Marybeth; Duggan, Elizabeth Stewart; Booth, John Leland; Patel, Vineet Indrajit; Zander, Ryan A; Silasi-Mansat, Robert; Ramani, Vijay; Veres, Tibor Zoltan; Prenzler, Frauke; Sewald, Katherina; Williams, Daniel M; Coggeshall, Kenneth Mark; Awasthi, Shanjana; Lupu, Florea; Burian, Dennis; Ballard, Jimmy Dale; Braun, Armin; Metcalf, Jordan Patrick

    2012-12-01

    The lung is the site of entry for Bacillus anthracis in inhalation anthrax, the deadliest form of the disease. Bacillus anthracis produces virulence toxins required for disease. Alveolar macrophages were considered the primary target of the Bacillus anthracis virulence factor lethal toxin because lethal toxin inhibits mouse macrophages through cleavage of MEK signaling pathway components, but we have reported that human alveolar macrophages are not a target of lethal toxin. Our current results suggest that, unlike human alveolar macrophages, the cells lining the respiratory units of the lung, alveolar epithelial cells, are a target of lethal toxin in humans. Alveolar epithelial cells expressed lethal toxin receptor protein, bound the protective antigen component of lethal toxin, and were subject to lethal-toxin-induced cleavage of multiple MEKs. These findings suggest that human alveolar epithelial cells are a target of Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin. Further, no reduction in alveolar epithelial cell viability was observed, but lethal toxin caused actin rearrangement and impaired desmosome formation, consistent with impaired barrier function as well as reduced surfactant production. Therefore, by compromising epithelial barrier function, lethal toxin may play a role in the pathogenesis of inhalation anthrax by facilitating the dissemination of Bacillus anthracis from the lung in early disease and promoting edema in late stages of the illness.

  10. Bacillus anthracis Lethal Toxin Reduces Human Alveolar Epithelial Barrier Function

    PubMed Central

    Langer, Marybeth; Duggan, Elizabeth Stewart; Booth, John Leland; Patel, Vineet Indrajit; Zander, Ryan A.; Silasi-Mansat, Robert; Ramani, Vijay; Veres, Tibor Zoltan; Prenzler, Frauke; Sewald, Katherina; Williams, Daniel M.; Coggeshall, Kenneth Mark; Awasthi, Shanjana; Lupu, Florea; Burian, Dennis; Ballard, Jimmy Dale; Braun, Armin

    2012-01-01

    The lung is the site of entry for Bacillus anthracis in inhalation anthrax, the deadliest form of the disease. Bacillus anthracis produces virulence toxins required for disease. Alveolar macrophages were considered the primary target of the Bacillus anthracis virulence factor lethal toxin because lethal toxin inhibits mouse macrophages through cleavage of MEK signaling pathway components, but we have reported that human alveolar macrophages are not a target of lethal toxin. Our current results suggest that, unlike human alveolar macrophages, the cells lining the respiratory units of the lung, alveolar epithelial cells, are a target of lethal toxin in humans. Alveolar epithelial cells expressed lethal toxin receptor protein, bound the protective antigen component of lethal toxin, and were subject to lethal-toxin-induced cleavage of multiple MEKs. These findings suggest that human alveolar epithelial cells are a target of Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin. Further, no reduction in alveolar epithelial cell viability was observed, but lethal toxin caused actin rearrangement and impaired desmosome formation, consistent with impaired barrier function as well as reduced surfactant production. Therefore, by compromising epithelial barrier function, lethal toxin may play a role in the pathogenesis of inhalation anthrax by facilitating the dissemination of Bacillus anthracis from the lung in early disease and promoting edema in late stages of the illness. PMID:23027535

  11. Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae Possesses an Antiviral Activity against Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus

    PubMed Central

    Labrie, Josée; Hernandez Reyes, Yenney; Burciaga Nava, Jorge A.; Gagnon, Carl A.; Jacques, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Pigs are often colonized by more than one bacterial and/or viral species during respiratory tract infections. This phenomenon is known as the porcine respiratory disease complex (PRDC). Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae (App) and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) are pathogens that are frequently involved in PRDC. The main objective of this project was to study the in vitro interactions between these two pathogens and the host cells in the context of mixed infections. To fulfill this objective, PRRSV permissive cell lines such as MARC-145, SJPL, and porcine alveolar macrophages (PAM) were used. A pre-infection with PRRSV was performed at 0.5 multiplicity of infection (MOI) followed by an infection with App at 10 MOI. Bacterial adherence and cell death were compared. Results showed that PRRSV pre-infection did not affect bacterial adherence to the cells. PRRSV and App co-infection produced an additive cytotoxicity effect. Interestingly, a pre-infection of SJPL and PAM cells with App blocked completely PRRSV infection. Incubation of SJPL and PAM cells with an App cell-free culture supernatant is also sufficient to significantly block PRRSV infection. This antiviral activity is not due to LPS but rather by small molecular weight, heat-resistant App metabolites (<1 kDa). The antiviral activity was also observed in SJPL cells infected with swine influenza virus but to a much lower extent compared to PRRSV. More importantly, the PRRSV antiviral activity of App was also seen with PAM, the cells targeted by the virus in vivo during infection in pigs. The antiviral activity might be due, at least in part, to the production of interferon γ. The use of in vitro experimental models to study viral and bacterial co-infections will lead to a better understanding of the interactions between pathogens and their host cells, and could allow the development of novel prophylactic and therapeutic tools. PMID:24878741

  12. Impairment of phagocytic functions of alveolar macrophages by hydrogen peroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Oosting, R.S.; van Bree, L.; van Iwaarden, J.F.; van Golde, L.M.; Verhoef, J. )

    1990-08-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) inhibited phagocytosis and superoxide anion production by rat alveolar macrophages. The inhibition was irreversible and concentration and exposure time dependent. The potential relationship between H2O2-induced biochemical perturbations and impaired alveolar macrophage phagocytic functions was investigated. Alveolar macrophage viability and Fc receptor binding capacity were not affected by H2O2. There was probably no correlation between a H2O2-induced rise in cytosolic (Ca2+) ((Ca2+)i) and the impairment of phagocytosis by alveolar macrophages, as was suggested by the following findings. First, the H2O2-induced rise in (Ca2+)i could be inhibited by chelation of extracellular Ca2+, whereas the H2O2-induced impairment of phagocytosis could not. Second, the H2O2-induced rise in (Ca2+)i was reversible, whereas the impairment of phagocytosis was not. And finally, a rise in (Ca2+)i by incubation of alveolar macrophages with the calcium ionophore A23187 did not affect phagocytosis. Various experiments suggested that ATP depletion may play an important role in the H2O2 toxicity for alveolar macrophages. Comparable concentrations of H2O2 caused an irreversible decrease both in cellular ATP and in phagocytosis and superoxide production by alveolar macrophages. In addition, time course of ATP depletion and induction of impaired alveolar macrophage function were similar. In view of the fact that the strong oxidant H2O2 may react with a large variety of biological substances, possible other toxic lesions may not be excluded as underlying mechanism for H2O2-induced inhibition of phagocytic functions of alveolar macrophages.

  13. Swine alveolar macrophage cell model allows optimal replication of influenza A viruses regardless of their origin.

    PubMed

    Kasloff, Samantha B; Weingartl, Hana M

    2016-03-01

    The importance of pigs in interspecies transmission of influenza A viruses has been repeatedly demonstrated over the last century. Eleven influenza A viruses from avian, human and swine hosts were evaluated for replication phenotypes at three physiologically relevant temperatures (41°C, 37°C, 33°C) in an immortalized swine pulmonary alveolar macrophage cell line (IPAM 3D4/31) to determine whether this system would allow for their efficient replication. All isolates replicated well in IPAMs at 37°C while clear distinctions were observed at 41°C and 33°C, correlating to species of origin of the PB2, reflected in distinct amino acid residue profiles rather than in one particular PB2 residue. A strong TNF-α response was induced by some mammalian but not avian IAVs, while other selected cytokines remained below detection levels. Porcine IPAMs represent a natural host cell model for influenza virus replication where the only condition requiring modification for optimal IAV replication, regardless of virus origin.

  14. A Suspected Case of an Alveolar Haemorrhage Caused by Dasatinib

    PubMed Central

    Sakoda, Yoritake; Arimori, Yojiro; Ueno, Masakatsu; Matsumoto, Takafumi

    2017-01-01

    A 39-year-old man treated with dasatinib for chronic myelogenous leukaemia presented to our hospital with haemoptysis, coughing, and dyspnoea. Chest radiography and computed tomography revealed ground-glass opacities and a crazy-paving pattern. Bronchoalveolar lavage was not performed due to serious hypoxemia and bleeding. Significant bleeding from the peripheral bronchi led to a diagnosis of an alveolar haemorrhage. Dasatinib-induced alveolar haemorrhaging was suspected based on the clinical findings. His condition improved immediately after dasatinib withdrawal and initiation of steroid therapy. Reports of alveolar haemorrhaging induced by dasatinib are rare. As such, this is considered an important case. PMID:28090053

  15. In vitro study of gas effects on alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Wallaert, B; Voisin, C

    1992-01-01

    To evaluate the biological effects of gas pollutants on alveolar macrophages several in vitro systems have been developed. We described here an original method of cell culture in aerobiosis, which permitted direct contact between the atmosphere and the target cells. We studied the long term (24 h) and short term (30 min) effects of NO2 on alveolar macrophages. Our results demonstrated that exposure of alveolar macrophages to gas pollutants may be responsible for either cell injury or cell activation associated with the release of various bioactive mediators (superoxide anion, neutrophil chemotactic activity). Cell culture in aerobiosis opens new ways for the research on the biological effects of gas pollutants.

  16. Secondary alveolar bone grafting in cleft of the lip and palate patients

    PubMed Central

    Walia, Abhilashaa

    2011-01-01

    Aim: The aim was to restore the function and form of both arches with a proper occlusal relationship and eruption of tooth in the cleft area. Materials and Methods: Eleven patients were selected irrespective of sex and socio-economic status and whose age was within the mixed dentition period. Iliac crest is grafted in cleft area and subsequently evaluated for graft success using study models, and periapical and occlusal radiographs. Results: At the time of evaluation teeth were erupted in the area and good alveolar bone levels were present. Premaxilla becomes immobile with a good arch form and arch continuity. There are no major complications in terms of pain, infection, paraesthesia, hematoma formation at donor site without difficulty in walking. There is no complication in terms of pain, infection, exposure of graft, rejection of graft, and wound dehiscence at the recipient site. Discussion: It is evident that secondary alveolar grafting during the mixed dentition period is more beneficial for patients at the donor site as well as the recipient site. Conclusion: Long-term follow-up is required to achieve maximum advantage of secondary alveolar grafting; the age of the patient should be within the mixed dentition period, irrespective of sex, socio-economic status. It may be unilateral or bilateral. PMID:22090755

  17. Subantimicrobial Dose Doxycycline Effects on Alveolar Bone Loss in Postmenopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Jeffrey B.; Stoner, Julie A.; Nummikoski, Pirkka V.; Reinhardt, Richard A.; Goren, Arthur D.; Wolff, Mark S.; Lee, Hsi-ming; Lynch, James C.; Valente, Robert; Golub, Lorne M.

    2007-01-01

    Aim: Determine efficacy of two-year continuous subantimicrobial dose doxycycline (SDD; 20 mg bid) on alveolar bone in postmenopausal osteopenic, estrogen-deficient women undergoing periodontal maintenance in a two-year double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trial. Materials and Methods: 128 subjects randomized to SDD or placebo (n=64 each). Posterior vertical bite-wings taken at baseline, one and two years for alveolar bone density (ABD), using radiographic absorptiometry (RA) and computer-assisted densitometric image analysis (CADIA), and alveolar bone height (ABH). Statistical analyses utilized Generalized Estimating Equations; primary analyses were intent-to-treat (ITT). Results presented as SDD versus placebo. Results: Under ITT, there was no statistically-significant effect of SDD on ABD loss (RA: p=0.8; CADIA: p=0.2) or ABH loss (p=0.2). Most sites (81−95%) were inactive. For subgroup analyses, mean CADIA was higher with SDD for non-smokers (p=0.05) and baseline probing depths ≥ 5 mm (p =0.003). SDD was associated with 29% lower odds of more progressive ABH loss in women > 5 years postmenopausal (p=0.05) and 36% lower among protocol-adherent subjects (p =0.03). Conclusion: In postmenopausal osteopenic women with periodontitis, SDD did not differ overall from placebo. Based on exploratory subgroup analyses, additional research is needed to determine the usefulness of SDD in non-smokers, subjects > 5 years postmenopausal and in deeper pockets. PMID:17716313

  18. Development of a Consistent and Reproducible Porcine Scald Burn Model

    PubMed Central

    Kempf, Margit; Kimble, Roy; Cuttle, Leila

    2016-01-01

    There are very few porcine burn models that replicate scald injuries similar to those encountered by children. We have developed a robust porcine burn model capable of creating reproducible scald burns for a wide range of burn conditions. The study was conducted with juvenile Large White pigs, creating replicates of burn combinations; 50°C for 1, 2, 5 and 10 minutes and 60°C, 70°C, 80°C and 90°C for 5 seconds. Visual wound examination, biopsies and Laser Doppler Imaging were performed at 1, 24 hours and at 3 and 7 days post-burn. A consistent water temperature was maintained within the scald device for long durations (49.8 ± 0.1°C when set at 50°C). The macroscopic and histologic appearance was consistent between replicates of burn conditions. For 50°C water, 10 minute duration burns showed significantly deeper tissue injury than all shorter durations at 24 hours post-burn (p ≤ 0.0001), with damage seen to increase until day 3 post-burn. For 5 second duration burns, by day 7 post-burn the 80°C and 90°C scalds had damage detected significantly deeper in the tissue than the 70°C scalds (p ≤ 0.001). A reliable and safe model of porcine scald burn injury has been successfully developed. The novel apparatus with continually refreshed water improves consistency of scald creation for long exposure times. This model allows the pathophysiology of scald burn wound creation and progression to be examined. PMID:27612153

  19. Locally Produced BDNF Promotes Sclerotic Change in Alveolar Bone after Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ida-Yonemochi, Hiroko; Yamada, Yurie; Yoshikawa, Hiroyuki

    2017-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which is released due to nerve injury, is known to promote the natural healing of injured nerves. It is often observed that damage of mandibular canal induces local sclerotic changes in alveolar bone. We reported that peripheral nerve injury promotes the local production of BDNF; therefore, it was possible to hypothesize that peripheral nerve injury affects sclerotic changes in the alveolar bone. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of BDNF on osteogenesis using in vitro osteoblast-lineage cell culture and an in vivo rat osteotomy model. MC3T3-E1 cells were cultured with BDNF and were examined for cell proliferative activity, chemotaxis and mRNA expression levels of osteoblast differentiation markers. For in vivo study, inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) injury experiments and mandibular cortical osteotomy were performed using a rat model. In the osteotomy model, exogenous BDNF was applied to bone surfaces after corticotomy of the mandible, and we morphologically analyzed the new bone formation. As a result, mRNA expression of osteoblast differentiation marker, osteocalcin, was significantly increased by BDNF, although cell proliferation and migration were not affected. In the in vivo study, osteopontin-positive new bone formation was significantly accelerated in the BDNF-grafted groups, and active bone remodeling, involving trkB-positive osteoblasts and osteocytes, continued after 28 days. In conclusion, BDNF stimulated the differentiation of MC3T3-E1 cells and it promoted new bone formation and maturation. These results suggested that local BDNF produced by peripheral nerve injury contributes to accelerating sclerotic changes in the alveolar bone. PMID:28072837

  20. Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis in Afghan pika (Ochotona rufescens rufescens).

    PubMed

    Madarame, H; Kumagai, M; Suzuki, J; Watanabe, A; Konno, S

    1989-07-01

    Lung lesions of 60 Afghan pikas (Ochotona rufescens rufescens) were examined histologically; 38 cases of pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis were found. Neither sex was predominantly affected, and there was no predilection for age.

  1. Interrelationships between the Human Alveolar Macrophage and Alpha-1-Antitrypsin

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Allen B.

    1973-01-01

    Alveolar macrophages lavaged from human lungs contain protease activity at an optimum pH of 3.0 and possibly a lesser peak of activity at pH 5.5. Protease activity measured at pH 4.1 is inhibited by purified alpha-1-antitrypsin. Fluorescent antibody studies of human alveolar macrophages showed that alpha-1-antitrypsin is present in normal alveolar macrophages. In addition, macrophages from a patient with a homozygous deficiency of alpha-1-antitrypsin exhibited less fluorescence when incubated in autologous serum than the same macrophages incubated in normal serum. Macrophages from normal subjects showed maximal fluorescence when removed from the lung and additional incubation with serum did not increase fluorescence. These results implicate the human alveolar macrophage as a possible source of an enzyme that may cause emphysema in patients deficient in alpha-1-antitrypsin. They also show that alpha-1-antitrypsin has access to the alveolus in normal subjects. Images PMID:4201266

  2. *Ambient Particluate Matter Supresses Alveolar Macrophage Cytokine Response to Lipopolysaccharide

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reports link ambient particulate matter (PM) exposure with cardiopulmonary mortality and morbidity, including the exacerbation of inflammatory disease and increased hospitalization for lung infections. Alveolar macrophages (AM) play an important defense role against infections v...

  3. AMBIENT PARTICULATE MATTER DECREASED IN HUMAN ALVEOLAR MACHROPHAGE CYTOKINE RELEASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human exposure to ambient airborne particulate matter (PM) is associated with cardiopulmonary mortality and morbidity, including increased hospitalizations for lung infection. Normal lung immune responses to bacterial infection include alveolar macrophage cytokine production and...

  4. Restriction of Porcine Endogenous Retrovirus by Porcine APOBEC3 Cytidine Deaminases ▿

    PubMed Central

    Dörrschuck, Eva; Fischer, Nicole; Bravo, Ignacio G.; Hanschmann, Kay-Martin; Kuiper, Heidi; Spötter, Andreas; Möller, Ronny; Cichutek, Klaus; Münk, Carsten; Tönjes, Ralf R.

    2011-01-01

    Xenotransplantation of porcine cells, tissues, and organs shows promise to surmount the shortage of human donor materials. Among the barriers to pig-to-human xenotransplantation are porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERV) since functional representatives of the two polytropic classes, PERV-A and PERV-B, are able to infect human embryonic kidney cells in vitro, suggesting that a xenozoonosis in vivo could occur. To assess the capacity of human and porcine cells to counteract PERV infections, we analyzed human and porcine APOBEC3 (A3) proteins. This multigene family of cytidine deaminases contributes to the cellular intrinsic immunity and act as potent inhibitors of retroviruses and retrotransposons. Our data show that the porcine A3 gene locus on chromosome 5 consists of the two single-domain genes A3Z2 and A3Z3. The evolutionary relationships of the A3Z3 genes reflect the evolutionary history of mammals. The two A3 genes encode at least four different mRNAs: A3Z2, A3Z3, A3Z2-Z3, and A3Z2-Z3 splice variant A (SVA). Porcine and human A3s have been tested toward their antiretroviral activity against PERV and murine leukemia virus (MuLV) using novel single-round reporter viruses. The porcine A3Z2, A3Z3 and A3Z2-Z3 were packaged into PERV particles and inhibited PERV replication in a dose-dependent manner. The antiretroviral effect correlated with editing by the porcine A3s with a trinucleotide preference for 5′ TGC for A3Z2 and A3Z2-Z3 and 5′ CAC for A3Z3. These results strongly imply that human and porcine A3s could inhibit PERV replication in vivo, thereby reducing the risk of infection of human cells by PERV in the context of pig-to-human xenotransplantation. PMID:21307203

  5. Porcine model of hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Kashiwakura, Yuji; Mimuro, Jun; Onishi, Akira; Iwamoto, Masaki; Madoiwa, Seiji; Fuchimoto, Daiichiro; Suzuki, Shunichi; Suzuki, Misae; Sembon, Shoichiro; Ishiwata, Akira; Yasumoto, Atsushi; Sakata, Asuka; Ohmori, Tsukasa; Hashimoto, Michiko; Yazaki, Satoko; Sakata, Yoichi

    2012-01-01

    Hemophilia A is a common X chromosome-linked genetic bleeding disorder caused by abnormalities in the coagulation factor VIII gene (F8). Hemophilia A patients suffer from a bleeding diathesis, such as life-threatening bleeding in the brain and harmful bleeding in joints and muscles. Because it could potentially be cured by gene therapy, subhuman animal models have been sought. Current mouse hemophilia A models generated by gene targeting of the F8 have difficulties to extrapolate human disease due to differences in the coagulation and immune systems between mice and humans. Here, we generated a porcine model of hemophilia A by nuclear transfer cloning from F8-targeted fibroblasts. The hemophilia A pigs showed a severe bleeding tendency upon birth, similar to human severe hemophiliacs, but in contrast to hemophilia A mice which rarely bleed under standard breed conditions. Infusion of human factor VIII was effective in stopping bleeding and reducing the bleeding frequency of a hemophilia A piglet but was blocked by the inhibitor against human factor VIII. These data suggest that the hemophilia A pig is a severe hemophilia A animal model for studying not only hemophilia A gene therapy but also the next generation recombinant coagulation factors, such as recombinant factor VIII variants with a slower clearance rate.

  6. Complications in the treatment with alveolar extraosseous distractors. Literature review

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Grandjean, Alfredo; Reininger, David

    2015-01-01

    Background To review the literature that analyses the types and frequency of complications associated with the use of extraosseous alveolar distraction from 2007 to 2013. Material and Methods Review of the literature in PubMed, using these keywords; alveolar ridge, alveolar distraction osteogenesis, complication, literature review. Inclusion criteria were: articles published between 2007 and 2013 that included the distraction protocol, the complications encountered and the time when they occurred. Results According to the above criteria, 12 articles were included in this review, where 334 extraosseous distractors were placed and 395 complications were encountered, of which 19 (4.81%) were intraoperative, 261 (66.07%) postoperative and 115 (29.11 %) were postdistraction. The most common complication was the incorrect distraction vector found in 105 cases (26.58%), in 23 cases (5.82%) there were severe complications, of which 14 (3.54%) were mandibular fracture and 9 (2.27%) were fractures of the distractor elements. Conclusions According to this review, although alveolar distraction is a safe and predictable technique, it can cause complications; however, they are usually minor and easily resolved without affecting the treatment outcome. Key words: Alveolar ridge, alveolar distraction osteogenesis, complication, literature review. PMID:25858083

  7. [Fatal alveolar haemorrhage following a "bang" of cannabis].

    PubMed

    Grassin, F; André, M; Rallec, B; Combes, E; Vinsonneau, U; Paleiron, N

    2011-09-01

    The new methods of cannabis consumption (home made water pipe or "bang") may be responsible for fatal respiratory complications. We present a case, with fatal outcome, of a man of 19 years with no previous history other than an addiction to cannabis using "bang". He was admitted to intensive care with acute dyspnoea. A CT scan showed bilateral, diffuse alveolar shadowing. He was anaemic with an Hb of 9.3g/l. Bronchoalveolar lavage revealed massive alveolar haemorrhage. Investigations for infection and immunological disorder were negative and toxicology was negative except for cannabis. Antibiotic treatment was given and favourable progress allowed early discharge. Death occurred 15 days later due to alveolar haemorrhage following a further "bang" of cannabis. Autopsy showed toxic alveolar haemorrhage. The probable mechanism is pulmonary damage due to acid anhydrides released by the incomplete combustion of cannabis in contact with plastic. These acids have a double effect on the lungs: a direct toxicity with severe inflammation of the mucosa leading to alveolar haemorrhage and subsequently the acid anhydrides may lead to the syndrome of intra-alveolar haemorrhage and anaemia described in occupational lung diseases by Herbert in Oxford in 1979. It manifests itself by haemoptysis and intravascular haemolysis. We draw attention to the extremely serious potential consequences of new methods of using cannabis, particularly the use of "bang" in homemade plastic materials.

  8. Alveolar Macrophages Prevent Lethal Influenza Pneumonia By Inhibiting Infection Of Type-1 Alveolar Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cardani, Amber; Boulton, Adam; Kim, Taeg S.; Braciale, Thomas J.

    2017-01-01

    The Influenza A virus (IAV) is a major human pathogen that produces significant morbidity and mortality. To explore the contribution of alveolar macrophages (AlvMΦs) in regulating the severity of IAV infection we employed a murine model in which the Core Binding Factor Beta gene is conditionally disrupted in myeloid cells. These mice exhibit a selective deficiency in AlvMΦs. Following IAV infection these AlvMΦ deficient mice developed severe diffuse alveolar damage, lethal respiratory compromise, and consequent lethality. Lethal injury in these mice resulted from increased infection of their Type-1 Alveolar Epithelial Cells (T1AECs) and the subsequent elimination of the infected T1AECs by the adaptive immune T cell response. Further analysis indicated AlvMΦ-mediated suppression of the cysteinyl leukotriene (cysLT) pathway genes in T1AECs in vivo and in vitro. Inhibition of the cysLT pathway enzymes in a T1AECs cell line reduced the susceptibility of T1AECs to IAV infection, suggesting that AlvMΦ-mediated suppression of this pathway contributes to the resistance of T1AECs to IAV infection. Furthermore, inhibition of the cysLT pathway enzymes, as well as blockade of the cysteinyl leukotriene receptors in the AlvMΦ deficient mice reduced the susceptibility of their T1AECs to IAV infection and protected these mice from lethal infection. These results suggest that AlvMΦs may utilize a previously unappreciated mechanism to protect T1AECs against IAV infection, and thereby reduce the severity of infection. The findings further suggest that the cysLT pathway and the receptors for cysLT metabolites represent potential therapeutic targets in severe IAV infection. PMID:28085958

  9. Bayesian inference of the lung alveolar spatial model for the identification of alveolar mechanics associated with acute respiratory distress syndrome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christley, Scott; Emr, Bryanna; Ghosh, Auyon; Satalin, Josh; Gatto, Louis; Vodovotz, Yoram; Nieman, Gary F.; An, Gary

    2013-06-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is acute lung failure secondary to severe systemic inflammation, resulting in a derangement of alveolar mechanics (i.e. the dynamic change in alveolar size and shape during tidal ventilation), leading to alveolar instability that can cause further damage to the pulmonary parenchyma. Mechanical ventilation is a mainstay in the treatment of ARDS, but may induce mechano-physical stresses on unstable alveoli, which can paradoxically propagate the cellular and molecular processes exacerbating ARDS pathology. This phenomenon is called ventilator induced lung injury (VILI), and plays a significant role in morbidity and mortality associated with ARDS. In order to identify optimal ventilation strategies to limit VILI and treat ARDS, it is necessary to understand the complex interplay between biological and physical mechanisms of VILI, first at the alveolar level, and then in aggregate at the whole-lung level. Since there is no current consensus about the underlying dynamics of alveolar mechanics, as an initial step we investigate the ventilatory dynamics of an alveolar sac (AS) with the lung alveolar spatial model (LASM), a 3D spatial biomechanical representation of the AS and its interaction with airflow pressure and the surface tension effects of pulmonary surfactant. We use the LASM to identify the mechanical ramifications of alveolar dynamics associated with ARDS. Using graphical processing unit parallel algorithms, we perform Bayesian inference on the model parameters using experimental data from rat lung under control and Tween-induced ARDS conditions. Our results provide two plausible models that recapitulate two fundamental hypotheses about volume change at the alveolar level: (1) increase in alveolar size through isotropic volume change, or (2) minimal change in AS radius with primary expansion of the mouth of the AS, with the implication that the majority of change in lung volume during the respiratory cycle occurs in the

  10. Bayesian inference of the lung alveolar spatial model for the identification of alveolar mechanics associated with acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Christley, Scott; Emr, Bryanna; Ghosh, Auyon; Satalin, Josh; Gatto, Louis; Vodovotz, Yoram; Nieman, Gary F; An, Gary

    2013-06-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is acute lung failure secondary to severe systemic inflammation, resulting in a derangement of alveolar mechanics (i.e. the dynamic change in alveolar size and shape during tidal ventilation), leading to alveolar instability that can cause further damage to the pulmonary parenchyma. Mechanical ventilation is a mainstay in the treatment of ARDS, but may induce mechano-physical stresses on unstable alveoli, which can paradoxically propagate the cellular and molecular processes exacerbating ARDS pathology. This phenomenon is called ventilator induced lung injury (VILI), and plays a significant role in morbidity and mortality associated with ARDS. In order to identify optimal ventilation strategies to limit VILI and treat ARDS, it is necessary to understand the complex interplay between biological and physical mechanisms of VILI, first at the alveolar level, and then in aggregate at the whole-lung level. Since there is no current consensus about the underlying dynamics of alveolar mechanics, as an initial step we investigate the ventilatory dynamics of an alveolar sac (AS) with the lung alveolar spatial model (LASM), a 3D spatial biomechanical representation of the AS and its interaction with airflow pressure and the surface tension effects of pulmonary surfactant. We use the LASM to identify the mechanical ramifications of alveolar dynamics associated with ARDS. Using graphical processing unit parallel algorithms, we perform Bayesian inference on the model parameters using experimental data from rat lung under control and Tween-induced ARDS conditions. Our results provide two plausible models that recapitulate two fundamental hypotheses about volume change at the alveolar level: (1) increase in alveolar size through isotropic volume change, or (2) minimal change in AS radius with primary expansion of the mouth of the AS, with the implication that the majority of change in lung volume during the respiratory cycle occurs in the

  11. Diffuse Alveolar Hemorrhage Associated with Edoxaban Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Imamura, Hiroshi; Yashio, Akihiro; Kashima, Satoko; Mochizuki, Katsunori

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. The main adverse effect of anticoagulant therapy is bleeding, and major bleeding, including intracranial, gastrointestinal, and retroperitoneal bleeding, has been reported as an adverse effect of edoxaban, a direct oral anticoagulant (DOAC). Bleeding during systemic anticoagulation with edoxaban presents a therapeutic conundrum, because there is currently no safe or efficacious reversal agent to stop major bleeding. Case Report. A 51-year-old woman had multiple traumatic injuries, including lower limb fractures. On day 8, she developed deep venous thrombosis, and edoxaban was administered orally. On day 38, she developed fungemia, which was treated with an antifungal drug. On day 43, she presented with dyspnea. Chest computed tomography scan showed bilateral diffuse ground-glass opacities in the whole lung fields. The results of the subsequent workup (i.e., serum levels of the antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody, antinuclear antibody, and antiglomerular basement membrane antibody) and microbiological study were unremarkable. Based on these findings, her condition was diagnosed as diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) associated with edoxaban therapy. The lung opacities disappeared spontaneously after edoxaban therapy was discontinued. Conclusion. DAH is a dangerous complication associated with edoxaban therapy. DOACs, including edoxaban, should be prescribed with caution, especially for patients in a critical condition. PMID:27872767

  12. Tooth rotation and alveolar bone loss.

    PubMed

    Peretz, B; Machtei, E E

    1996-07-01

    Tooth rotation and periodontal breakdown has not been thoroughly studied due to lack of quantitative tools. The purpose of the present study was to examine this correlation, with respect to alveolar bone loss, from direct observation of 17 skulls. A photograph of the mandibular occlusal plane was taken from a fixed reference point, and the midcentral fossa and the extreme mesial and distal points of each tooth were marked on the photograph. A computer program established the arch form of each mandibular from the midtooth landmarks. The angle between individual teeth and the arch (at any given point) was calculated. Bone loss, indicated by the distance of the bone crest from the cementoenamel junction, was measured at six reference points around each tooth with a caliper. A positive correlation, through weak, was found between increased tooth rotation and greater bone loss. Mean bone loss of teeth with rotation of 20 degrees and greater was 4.03 mm, while that of teeth with less than 20 degrees of rotation was 3.49 mm.

  13. Lung vasculitis and alveolar hemorrhage: pathology.

    PubMed

    Fishbein, Gregory A; Fishbein, Michael C

    2011-06-01

    Pulmonary vasculitides are a diverse group of limited and systemic disorders associated with inflammation of pulmonary vessels and parenchyma. These diseases often have distinctive clinical, serological, and histopathological features-extrapulmonary sites of involvement, circulating autoantibodies, predispositions for small or large vessels, and others. Some have characteristic inflammatory lesions; others are characterized by the absence of such lesions. Frequently pathological findings overlap, rendering classification, and diagnosis a challenge. The anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated small-vessel diseases constitute the major pulmonary vasculitides. These include Wegener granulomatosis (WG), Churg Strauss syndrome (CSS), and microscopic polyangiitis (MPA). Less frequently, diseases such as polyarteritis nodosa, Takayasu arteritis, Behçet syndrome, and connective tissue diseases may involve pulmonary vessels, but these entities are better associated with extrapulmonary disease. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) is a severe manifestation of pulmonary vasculitis. DAH is most commonly seen in small-vessel vasculitides, specifically MPA and WG. Other syndromes associated with DAH include Goodpasture syndrome, Henoch-Schönlein purpura, and systemic lupus erythematosus. Less commonly, DAH may be secondary to infection or drugs/toxins. Furthermore, in the absence of discernable systemic disease, DAH may be idiopathic-referred to as isolated pulmonary capillaritis (IPC) or idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis (IPH), depending on the presence of capillaritis.

  14. CHARACTERIZATION OF PORCINE PARVOVIRUS TYPE 3 AND PORCINE CIRCOVIRUS TYPE 2 IN WILD BOARS (SUS SCROFA) IN SLOVAKIA.

    PubMed

    Sliz, Ivan; Vlasakova, Michaela; Jackova, Anna; Vilcek, Stefan

    2015-07-01

    As the number of free-living wild boars (Sus scrofa L.) continues to rise in Slovakia, the probability of pathogen transmission between susceptible species increases. We investigated the distribution and genetic characterization of porcine parvovirus type 3 (PPV3), porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2), and their coinfection in wild boars. Among 194 animals tested, 19.1% were positive for PPV3 and 43.8% for PCV2. Similar rates of coinfection with both viruses reaching 11.0% and 11.8% were observed in juvenile and mature wild boars, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis of PPV3 sequences from VP1 and NS1 genomic regions revealed a close genetic relationship among isolates from Slovakia and those sampled worldwide. Prevalence of PCV2 in wild boars was lower than that reported in domestic pigs in Slovakia. The PCV2 variants originating from sylvatic and domestic hosts in Slovakia were grouped in the same clusters, namely PCV2b-1A/1B and PCV2a-2D.

  15. Modeling Alveolar Epithelial Cell Behavior In Spatially Designed Hydrogel Microenvironments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Katherine Jean Reeder

    The alveolar epithelium consists of two cell phenotypes, elongated alveolar type I cells (AT1) and rounded alveolar type II cells (ATII), and exists in a complex three-dimensional environment as a polarized cell layer attached to a thin basement membrane and enclosing a roughly spherical lumen. Closely surrounding the alveolar cysts are capillary endothelial cells as well as interstitial pulmonary fibroblasts. Many factors are thought to influence alveolar epithelial cell differentiation during lung development and wound repair, including physical and biochemical signals from the extracellular matrix (ECM), and paracrine signals from the surrounding mesenchyme. In particular, disrupted signaling between the alveolar epithelium and local fibroblasts has been implicated in the progression of several pulmonary diseases. However, given the complexity of alveolar tissue architecture and the multitude of signaling pathways involved, designing appropriate experimental platforms for this biological system has been difficult. In order to isolate key factors regulating cellular behavior, the researcher ideally should have control over biophysical properties of the ECM, as well as the ability to organize multiple cell types within the scaffold. This thesis aimed to develop a 3D synthetic hydrogel platform to control alveolar epithelial cyst formation, which could then be used to explore how extracellular cues influence cell behavior in a tissue-relevant cellular arrangement. To accomplish this, a poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogel network containing enzymatically-degradable crosslinks and bioadhesive pendant peptides was employed as a base material for encapsulating primary alveolar epithelial cells. First, an array of microwells of various cross-sectional shapes was photopatterned into a PEG gel containing photo-labile crosslinks, and primary ATII cells were seeded into the wells to examine the role of geometric confinement on differentiation and multicellular arrangement

  16. Topographic Findings of the Porcine Cornea

    PubMed Central

    HEICHEL, Jens; WILHELM, Frank; KUNERT, Kathleen S.; HAMMER, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The porcine eye is often used as an ex vivo animal model in ophthalmological research. It is well suited for investigations concerning refractive surgery; however, corneal topography data are scarce. This study investigated the corneal topography and pachymetry of the porcine eye to provide further reproducible data. We evaluated freshly enucleated porcine eyes (n = 16) by performing computerized corneal topographies (Orbscan® IIz, Bausch and Lomb, Rochester, NY, USA). We assessed the steepest and flattest keratometric powers (K1 and K2, units in diopters (D)), astigmatism (D), white-to-white (WTW) diameter (mm), thinnest point pachymetry (µm), anterior and posterior best-fit sphere (BFS) (D), refractive power of the anterior and posterior curvatures, and total refractive power of the cornea (D). The mean keratometric powers were 39.6 ± 0.89 D (K1) and 38.5 ± 0.92 D (K2), and the mean astigmatism was 1.1 ± 0.78 D. The mean WTW diameter was 13.81 ± 0.83 mm, and the mean corneal thickness was 832.6 ± 40.18 µm. The BFSs were 38.14 ± 0.73 D (anterior) and 42.56 ± 1.15 D (posterior), and the mean refractive powers were 43.27 ± 1.08 D (anterior) and -5.15 ± 0.20 D (posterior); therefore, the mean of the total refractive power was 38.16 ± 1.00 D. The topography and pachymetry of the porcine cornea showed a specific configuration differing from the human cornea. When using animal ex vivo models such as porcine corneas for experimental corneal surgery, findings such as these should be considered. PMID:28293660

  17. Retinoic acid in alveolar development, maintenance and regeneration.

    PubMed Central

    Maden, Malcolm; Hind, Matthew

    2004-01-01

    Recent data suggest that exogenous retinoic acid (RA), the biologically active derivative of vitamin A, can induce alveolar regeneration in a rat model of experimental emphysema. Here, we describe a mouse model of disrupted alveolar development using dexamethasone administered postnatally. We show that the effects of dexamethasone are concentration dependent, dose dependent, long lasting and result in a severe loss of alveolar surface area. When RA is administered to these animals as adults, lung architecture and the surface area per unit of body weight are completely restored to normal. This remarkable effect may be because RA is required during normal alveolar development and administering RA re-awakens gene cascades used during development. We provide evidence that RA is required during alveologenesis in the mouse by showing that the levels of the retinoid binding proteins, the RA receptors and two RA synthesizing enzymes peak postnatally. Furthermore, an inhibitor of RA synthesis, disulphiram, disrupts alveologenesis. We also show that RA is required throughout life for the maintenance of lung alveoli because when rats are deprived of dietary retinol they lose alveoli and show the features of emphysema. Alveolar regeneration with RA may therefore be an important novel therapeutic approach to the treatment of respiratory diseases characterized by a reduced gas-exchanging surface area such as bronchopulmonary dysplasia and emphysema for which there are currently no treatments. PMID:15293808

  18. Alveolar targeting of aerosol pentamidine. Toward a rational delivery system

    SciTech Connect

    Simonds, A.K.; Newman, S.P.; Johnson, M.A.; Talaee, N.; Lee, C.A.; Clarke, S.W. )

    1990-04-01

    Nebulizer systems that deposit a high proportion of aerosolized pentamidine on large airways are likely to be associated with marked adverse side effects, which may lead to premature cessation of treatment. We have measured alveolar deposition and large airway-related side effects (e.g., cough, breathlessness, and effect on pulmonary function) after aerosolization of 150 mg pentamidine isethionate labeled with {sup 99m}Tc-Sn-colloid. Nine patients with AIDS were studied using three nebulizer systems producing different droplet size profiles: the Acorn System 22, Respirgard II, and Respirgard II with the inspiratory baffle removed. Alveolar deposition was greatest and side effects least with the nebulizer producing the smallest droplet size profile (Respirgard II), whereas large airway-related side effects were prominent and alveolar deposition lowest with the nebulizer producing the largest droplet size (Acorn System 22). Values for alveolar deposition and adverse airway effects were intermediate using the Respirgard with inspiratory baffle removed, thus indicating the importance of the baffle valve in determining droplet size. Addition of a similar baffle valve to the Acorn System 22 produced a marked improvement in droplet size profile. Selection of a nebulizer that produces an optimal droplet size range offers the advantage of enhancing alveolar targeting of aerosolized pentamidine while reducing large airway-related side effects.

  19. Alveolar edema fluid clearance and acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Berthiaume, Yves; Matthay, Michael A

    2007-12-15

    Although lung-protective ventilation strategies have substantially reduced mortality of acute lung injury patients there is still a need for new therapies that can further decrease mortality in patients with acute lung injury. Studies of epithelial ion and fluid transport across the distal pulmonary epithelia have provided important new concepts regarding potential new therapies for acute lung injury. Overall, there is convincing evidence that the alveolar epithelium is not only a tight epithelial barrier that resists the movement of edema fluid into the alveoli, but it is also actively involved in the transport of ions and solutes, a process that is essential for edema fluid clearance and the resolution of acute lung injury. The objective of this article is to consider some areas of recent progress in the field of alveolar fluid transport under normal and pathologic conditions. Vectorial ion transport across the alveolar and distal airway epithelia is the primary determinant of alveolar fluid clearance. The general paradigm is that active Na(+) and Cl(-) transport drives net alveolar fluid clearance, as demonstrated in several different species, including the human lung. Although these transport processes can be impaired in severe lung injury, multiple experimental studies suggest that upregulation of Na(+) and Cl(-) transport might be an effective therapy in acute lung injury. We will review mechanisms involved in pharmacological modulation of ion transport in lung injury with a special focus on the use of beta-adrenergic agonists which has generated considerable interest and is a promising therapy for clinical acute lung injury.

  20. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage caused by exposure to organic dust.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yuzo; Imokawa, Shiro; Nihashi, Fumiya; Uto, Tomohiro; Sato, Jun; Suda, Takafumi

    2015-01-01

    Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage, a life-threatening disease, can complicate various conditions. We herein describe, for the first time, a patient with diffuse alveolar hemorrhage caused by exposure to organic dust. A 49-year-old woman who worked as a cantaloupe farmer in a greenhouse was referred to our hospital for sudden onset of dyspnea 3 h after exposure to organic dust. A chest X-ray and computed tomography scan performed on admission showed diffuse ground-glass opacities in both lung fields. Suspecting hypersensitivity pneumonitis, fiberoptic bronchoscopy was performed. Mucopurulent sputum was present in the trachea and both bronchi, and bronchoalveolar lavage revealed a progressively bloody return, typical of diffuse alveolar hemorrhage. Based on the history and bronchoscopy findings, she was diagnosed with diffuse alveolar hemorrhage following exposure to organic dust and was treated with antibiotics and corticosteroids. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage should be considered in the differential diagnosis of diffuse ground-glass opacities observed on radiographs in farmers following exposure to organic dust.

  1. Differentiation of Club Cells to Alveolar Epithelial Cells In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Dahai; Soh, Boon-Seng; Yin, Lu; Hu, Guangan; Chen, Qingfeng; Choi, Hyungwon; Han, Jongyoon; Chow, Vincent T. K.; Chen, Jianzhu

    2017-01-01

    Club cells are known to function as regional progenitor cells to repair the bronchiolar epithelium in response to lung damage. By lineage tracing in mice, we have shown recently that club cells also give rise to alveolar type 2 cells (AT2s) and alveolar type 1 cells (AT1s) during the repair of the damaged alveolar epithelium. Here, we show that when highly purified, anatomically and phenotypically confirmed club cells are seeded in 3-dimensional culture either in bulk or individually, they proliferate and differentiate into both AT2- and AT1-like cells and form alveolar-like structures. This differentiation was further confirmed by transcriptomic analysis of freshly isolated club cells and their cultured progeny. Freshly isolated club cells express Sca-1 and integrin α6, markers commonly used to characterize lung stem/progenitor cells. Together, current study for the first time isolated highly purified club cells for in vitro study and demonstrated club cells’ capacity to differentiate into alveolar epithelial cells at the single-cell level. PMID:28128362

  2. Neutrophil-induced injury of rat pulmonary alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Simon, R H; DeHart, P D; Todd, R F

    1986-01-01

    The damage to pulmonary alveolar epithelial cells that occurs in many inflammatory conditions is thought to be caused in part by phagocytic neutrophils. To investigate this process, we exposed monolayers of purified rat alveolar epithelial cells to stimulated human neutrophils and measured cytotoxicity using a 51Cr-release assay. We found that stimulated neutrophils killed epithelial cells by a process that did not require neutrophil-generated reactive oxygen metabolites. Pretreatment of neutrophils with an antibody (anti-Mo1) that reduced neutrophil adherence to epithelial cells limited killing. Although a variety of serine protease inhibitors partially inhibited cytotoxicity, we found that neutrophil cytoplasts, neutrophil lysates, neutrophil-conditioned medium, purified azurophilic or specific granule contents, and purified human neutrophil elastase did not duplicate the injury. We conclude that stimulated neutrophils can kill alveolar epithelial cells in an oxygen metabolite-independent manner. Tight adherence of stimulated neutrophils to epithelial cell monolayers appears to promote epithelial cell killing. Images PMID:3771800

  3. Alveolar Osteitis: A Comprehensive Review of Concepts and Controversies

    PubMed Central

    Kolokythas, Antonia; Olech, Eliza; Miloro, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Alveolar osteitis, “dry socket”, remains amongst the most commonly encountered complications following extraction of teeth by general dentists and specialists. A great body of literature is devoted to alveolar osteitis addressing the etiology and pathophysiology of this condition. In addition numerous studies are available discussing methods and techniques to prevent this condition. To this date though great controversy still exists regarding the appropriate terminology used for this condition as well as the actual etiology, pathophysiology, and best methods of prevention and treatment. This article is a comprehensive critical review of the available literature addressing the concepts and controversies surrounding alveolar osteitis. We aim to assist the dental health care professional with patient preparation and management of this commonly encountered postoperative condition should be encountered. PMID:20652078

  4. Traumatic neuroma of the inferior alveolar nerve: a case report.

    PubMed

    Arribas-García, Ignacio; Alcalá-Galiano, Andrea; Gutiérrez, Ramón; Montalvo-Moreno, Juan José

    2008-03-01

    Traumatic neuromas are rare entities which characteristically arise subsequently to surgery and are usually accompanied by pain, typically neuralgic. We present an unusual case of an intraosseous traumatic neuroma of the inferior alveolar nerve following tooth extraction. A 56-year-old man consulted for paresthesias and hyperesthesia in the left mandibular region following extraction of the left mandibular third molar (#38). The panoramic radiograph revealed a radiolucent lesion in the inferior alveolar nerve canal, and CT demonstrated the existence of a mass within the canal, producing widening of the same. Nerve-sparing excisional biopsy was performed. Histopathology and immunohistochemistry were consistent with traumatic neuroma of the left inferior alveolar nerve. After 3 years of follow-up, the patient is asymptomatic and there are no signs of recurrence.

  5. Variant Inferior Alveolar Nerves and Implications for Local Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Kevin T.; Brokaw, Everett J.; Bell, Andrea; Joy, Anita

    2016-01-01

    A sound knowledge of anatomical variations that could be encountered during surgical procedures is helpful in avoiding surgical complications. The current article details anomalous morphology of inferior alveolar nerves encountered during routine dissection of the craniofacial region in the Gross Anatomy laboratory. We also report variations of the lingual nerves, associated with the inferior alveolar nerves. The variations were documented and a thorough review of literature was carried out. We focus on the variations themselves, and the clinical implications that these variations present. Thorough understanding of variant anatomy of the lingual and inferior alveolar nerves may determine the success of procedural anesthesia, the etiology of pathologic processes, and the avoidance of surgical misadventure. PMID:27269666

  6. Mechanisms underlying the redistribution of particles among the lung's alveolar macrophages during alveolar phase clearance

    SciTech Connect

    Lehnert, B.E.; Oritz, J.B.; Steinkamp, J.A.; Tietjen, G.L.; Sebring, R.J. ); Oberdorster, G. )

    1991-01-01

    In order to obtain information about the particle redistribution phenomenon following the deposition of inhaled particles, as well as to obtain information about some of the mechanisms that may be operable in the redistribution of particles, lavaged lung free cell analyses and transmission electron microscopic (TEM) analyses of lung tissue and were performed using lungs from rats after they were subchronically exposed to aerosolized dioxide (TiO{sub 2}). TEM analyses indicated that the in situ autolysis of particle-containing Alveolar Macropages (AM) is one important mechanism involved in the redistribution of particles. Evidence was also obtained that indicated that the engulfment of one particle-containing phagocyte by another phagocyte also occurs. Another prominent mechanism of the particle redistribution phenomenon may be the in situ proliferation of particle-laden AM. We used the macrophage cell line J774A.1 as a surrogate for AM to investigate how different particulate loads in macrophages may affect their abilities to proliferate. These in vitro investigations indicated that the normal rate of proliferation of macrophages is essentially unaffected by the containment of relatively high particulate burdens. Overall, the results of our investigations suggest that in situ autolysis of particle-containing AM and the rephagocytosis of freed particles by other phagocytes, the phagocytosis of effete and disintegrating particle-containing phagocytes by other AM, and the in situ division of particle-containing AM are likely mechanisms that underlie the post-depositional redistribution of particles among the lung's AM during alveolar phase clearance. 19 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Secretion of alpha 1-antitrypsin by alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Venembre, P; Boutten, A; Seta, N; Dehoux, M S; Crestani, B; Aubier, M; Durand, G

    1994-06-13

    We have investigated the ability of alveolar epithelial cells (human A549 cell line and rat type-II pneumocytes) to produce alpha 1-antitrypsin (AAT). Northern blot analysis demonstrated the presence of an AAT-specific mRNA transcript in A549 cells. Unstimulated A549 cells secreted immunoreactive AAT at a rate of 0.51 +/- 0.04 ng/10(6) cells/h, with a modified glycosylation compared to serum AAT. AAT formed a complex with neutrophil elastase. Rat type-II pneumocytes secreted immunoreactive AAT. Our results suggest that alveolar epithelial cells could participate in antiprotease defense within the lung through local AAT production.

  8. Alveolar hemorrhage as the initial presentation of systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    de Holanda, Bruna A.; Barreto, Isabela G. Menna; de Araujo, Isadora S. Gomes

    2016-01-01

    Alveolar hemorrhage (AH) is a rare syndrome that can often occur in autoimmune diseases, blood clotting disorders, infection or by acute inhalation injury, presenting rapid evolution and high mortality, especially with late diagnosis and treatment. Among the autoimmune diseases, there are reported cases in patients with primary antiphospholipid syndrome (PAPS), vasculitis and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). An early diagnosis is an essential tool in the successful management of this complication, requiring aggressive treatment based on vigorous immunosuppression and broad-spectrum antibiotic. We describe here a case of alveolar hemorrhage associated with glomerulonephritis as the open presentation in a patient with SLE. PMID:27994272

  9. Alveolar hemorrhage as the initial presentation of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    de Holanda, Bruna A; Barreto, Isabela G Menna; de Araujo, Isadora S Gomes; de Araujo, Daniel B

    2016-01-01

    Alveolar hemorrhage (AH) is a rare syndrome that can often occur in autoimmune diseases, blood clotting disorders, infection or by acute inhalation injury, presenting rapid evolution and high mortality, especially with late diagnosis and treatment. Among the autoimmune diseases, there are reported cases in patients with primary antiphospholipid syndrome (PAPS), vasculitis and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). An early diagnosis is an essential tool in the successful management of this complication, requiring aggressive treatment based on vigorous immunosuppression and broad-spectrum antibiotic. We describe here a case of alveolar hemorrhage associated with glomerulonephritis as the open presentation in a patient with SLE.

  10. Case Report: Multifocal biphasic squamoid alveolar renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Jose Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    A multifocal biphasic squamoid alveolar renal cell carcinoma in a 68-year-old man is reported. Four different peripheral tumor nodules were identified on gross examination. A fifth central tumor corresponded to a conventional clear cell renal cell carcinoma. Biphasic squamoid alveolar renal cell carcinoma is a rare tumor that has been very recently characterized as a distinct histotype within the spectrum of papillary renal cell carcinoma. Immunostaining with cyclin D1 seems to be specific of this tumor subtype. This is the first reported case with multifocal presentation. PMID:27158455

  11. From alveolar diffuse atrophy to aggressive periodontitis: a brief history.

    PubMed

    Guzeldemir, Esra; Toygar, Hilal Uslu

    2006-01-01

    Technologic advances in mechanics, electronics, physics, chemistry, and computer science have contributed to advances in dental medicine. Periodontology is not only a clinical science but is also directly related to the basic sciences. Research is conducted in laboratories rather than in clinics now. During the last century, aggressive periodontitis has received attention from numerous researchers because of its multifactorial features. This paper explores the long scientific journey of aggressive periodontitis, beginning with its first definition as alveolar diffuse atrophy. Perhaps in the future, "alveolar diffuse atrophy" will be referred to by another name or term. However, this journey will never end.

  12. Effects of spray-dried porcine plasma on growth performance, immune response, total antioxidant capacity, and gut morphology of nursery pigs.

    PubMed

    Tran, H; Bundy, J W; Li, Y S; Carney-Hinkle, E E; Miller, P S; Burkey, T E

    2014-10-01

    Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the effects of spray-dried porcine plasma (SDPP) on growth performance, immunity, antioxidant capacity, and gut morphology of nursery pigs. In Exp. 1, 96 weaned pigs (Nebraska female × Danbred sire; 20 ± 1 d of age; initial BW = 6.06 ± 0.02 kg) were assigned to 16 pens and randomly allotted to the control (CTL; no SDPP) or the CTL + SDPP treatment in 2 phases (phase 1: d 0 to 14, 5% SDPP; phase 2: d 14 to 28, 2.5% SDPP). Blood samples were collected on d 0 and weekly thereafter to quantify IgG, IgA, and total antioxidant capacity. On d 14, pigs (n = 16; 8 pigs/treatment) were selected and euthanized for small intestine tissue and alveolar macrophage collection. On d 7, pigs fed SDPP had greater ADG, ADFI (P = 0.001), and G:F (P = 0.019) compared with CTL pigs. On d 28, pigs fed SDPP had greater BW (P = 0.024) and tended to have greater ADG (P = 0.074) and ADFI (P = 0.062) compared with CTL pigs. There were no differences between treatments for serum IgG, IgA, and total antioxidant capacity. On d 14, greater villus height (P = 0.011) and villus:crypt (P = 0.008) were observed in duodenal tissue sections obtained from SDPP-fed pigs compared with CTL pigs. To evaluate effects of SDPP on immune biomarkers, alveolar macrophages collected from 3 pigs/treatment on d 14 were cultured in vitro and challenged with lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 10 ng/mL). Therefore, 4 treatments included 1) CTL diet with no LPS, 2) CTL diet with LPS (CTL+), 3) SDPP diet with no LPS, and 4) SDPP diet with LPS. There were no diet effects on tumor necrosis factor-α gene expression or secretion by alveolar macrophages. For IL-10 gene expression, a diet × LPS interaction (P = 0.009) was observed where CTL+ had greater (P < 0.05) IL-10 mRNA abundance compared with other treatments. A second experiment was conducted to evaluate the in vitro effects of porcine plasma using model porcine jejunal epithelial cells (IPEC-J2). The treatments applied to the IPEC

  13. Molecular mobility in the monolayers of foam films stabilized by porcine lung surfactant.

    PubMed Central

    Lalchev, Z I; Todorov, R K; Christova, Y T; Wilde, P J; Mackie, A R; Clark, D C

    1996-01-01

    Certain physical properties of a range of foam film types that are believed to exist in vivo in the lung have been investigated. The contribution of different lung surfactant components found in porcine lung surfactant to molecular surface diffusion in the plane of foam films has been investigated for the first time. The influence of the type and thickness of black foam films, temperature, electrolyte concentration, and extract composition on surface diffusion has been studied using the fluorescence recovery after photobleaching technique. Fluorescent phospholipid probe molecules in foam films stabilized by porcine lung surfactant samples or their hydrophobic extracts consisting of surfactant lipids and hydrophobic lung surfactant proteins, SP-B and SP-C, exhibited more rapid diffusion than observed in films of its principal lipid component alone, L-alpha-phosphatidylcholine dipalmitoyl. This effect appears to be due to contributions from minor lipid components present in the total surfactant lipid extracts. The minor lipid components influence the surface diffusion in foam films both by their negative charge and by lowering the phase transition temperature of lung surfactant samples. In contrast, the presence of high concentrations of the hydrophillic surfactant protein A (SP-A) and non-lung-surfactant proteins in the sample reduced the diffusion coefficient (D) of the lipid analog in the adsorbed layer of the films. Hysteresis behavior of D was observed during temperature cycling, with the cooling curve lying above the heating curve. However, in cases where some surface molecular aggregation and surface heterogeneity were observed during cooling, the films became more rigid and molecules at the interfaces became immobilized. The thickness, size, capillary pressure, configuration, and composition of foam films of lung surfactant prepared in vitro support their investigation as realistic structural analogs of the surface films that exist in vivo in the lung

  14. Broadly neutralizing antibodies against the rapidly evolving porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Sally R; Li, Juan; Nelson, Eric A; Murtaugh, Michael P

    2015-05-04

    Neutralizing antibodies are a critical part of the immune armory for defense against viruses, and the mechanism by which many effective vaccines work to protect against viral infections. However, infections by rapidly evolving and genetically diverse viruses are often characterized by ineffective neutralizing antibody responses. Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is a highly genetically diverse RNA virus that causes PRRS, the most significant disease of pigs worldwide. The prevailing view of immunity to PRRSV is characterized by delayed and ineffectual production of neutralizing antibodies lacking cross-reactivity that is necessary for vaccine efficacy. Using an ELISA-based neutralizing assay developed to analyze PRRSV growth in porcine alveolar macrophages, the naturally permissive cell of PRRSV, we showed that sera from previously infected commercial sows had high levels of neutralizing activity against diverse PRRSV strains, including across distinct genotypes of PRRSV. Fifty percent cross-neutralization titers in excess of 1/1024 were observed. Neutralizing activity was dose-dependent and was maintained in the immunoglobulin fraction. Presence of high-titer, anti-PRRSV antibody activity that cross-neutralizes diverse strains of virus has prompted reevaluation of the role of neutralizing antibodies for cross-protection against PRRSV under field conditions. Understanding conditions that favor development of cross-neutralizing activity will be crucial for improved strategies to enhance cross-protection against PRRSV. More detailed studies are expected to elucidate mechanisms of neutralizing antibody production and maturation and to investigate conserved epitope targets of cross-neutralization in this rapidly evolving virus.

  15. MicroRNA let-7f-5p Inhibits Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus by Targeting MYH9

    PubMed Central

    Li, Na; Du, Taofeng; Yan, Yunhuan; Zhang, Angke; Gao, Jiming; Hou, Gaopeng; Xiao, Shuqi; Zhou, En-Min

    2016-01-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is one of the most important viral pathogens in the swine industry. Current antiviral strategies do not effectively prevent and control PRRSV. Recent reports show that microRNAs (miRNAs) play vital roles in viral infections by post transcriptionally regulating the expression of viral or host genes. Our previous research showed that non-muscle myosin heavy chain 9 (MYH9) is an essential factor for PRRSV infection. Using bioinformatic prediction and experimental verification, we demonstrate that MYH9 expression is regulated by the miRNA let-7f-5p, which binds to the MYH9 mRNA 3′UTR and may play an important role during PRRSV infection. To understand how let-7f-5p regulates PRRSV infection, we analyzed the expression pattern of both let-7f-5p and MYH9 in porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs) after infection with either highly pathogenic PRRSV (HP-PRRSV) or classical type PRRSV (N-PRRSV) using a deep sequencing approach with quantitative real-time PCR validation. Our results showed that both HP-PRRSV and N-PRRSV infection reduced let-7f-5p expression while also inducing MYH9 expression. Furthermore, let-7f-5p significantly inhibited PRRSV replication through suppression of MYH9 expression. These findings not only provide new insights into the pathogenesis of PRRSV, but also suggest potential new antiviral strategies against PRRSV infection. PMID:27686528

  16. Localization of porcine CD29 transcripts and protein in pig cells and tissues by RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Marín, Angeles; Moreno, Angela; de la Mulas, Juana Martín; Millán, Yolanda; Morera, Luis; Barbancho, Manuel; Llanes, Diego; Garrido, Juan J

    2005-04-08

    Integrins are heterodimeric cell adhesion proteins with major roles in a variety of biological processes ranging from cell migration to tissue organization, immune and non-immune defense mechanisms and oncogenic transformation. Members of the beta(1) integrin subfamily are composed of a beta(1) subunit (CD29) non-covalently associated with different alpha subunits to constitute a group of transmembrane glycoproteins that participate in many physiologically important events. Here, we have studied the CD29 expression in porcine tissues and cells at two different levels: expression of the CD29 mRNA by RT-PCR and localization of the protein by immunohistochemistry. CD29 transcripts were detected in a variety of tissues and cells: platelets, PBMC, granulocytes, alveolar macrophages, smooth muscle, intestine, lung, liver, spleen, lymph node, skin, testis, heart, kidney and bone marrow. Our results suggest that CD29 gene transcription occurs in all organs examined, although with different intensities. The precise localization of CD29 protein in paraffin-embedded tissues was detected by using a specific polyclonal antibody indicating that its expression is limited to smooth muscle, epithelium cells, endothelium of blood vessels and myeloid cells and is no detectable in cells of the lymphoid lineage. The distribution of the CD29 in normal tissues provide insight into the physiological function of the porcine beta(1) integrins and should be of importance in understanding the role of this integrin family in pathological processes.

  17. Distraction osteogenesis of the porcine mandible: histomorphometric evaluation of bone.

    PubMed

    Glowacki, Julie; Shusterman, E Mark; Troulis, Maria; Holmes, Ralph; Perrott, David; Kaban, Leonard B

    2004-02-01

    Distraction osteogenesis is a technique for skeletal lengthening that exploits the body's innate capacity for bone formation in response to tension forces on the repair callus. The authors developed a distraction osteogenesis model with a semiburied device in the Yucatan minipig mandible because of similarities between human and porcine mandibular anatomy, temporomandibular function, chewing patterns, and bone turnover rates. The purpose of this study was to measure histomorphometric bone fill after different latency periods, rates of distraction, and duration of neutral fixation in the minipig mandible. In addition, the relationship between histomorphometric bone fill and clinical stability was investigated. Mandibular osteotomies in 20 female Yucatan minipigs weighing 25 to 30 kg were distracted with modified semiburied distraction devices. Variables included 0-day or 4-day latency; 1-mm, 2-mm, or 4-mm daily distraction rates; gap size of 7 or 12 mm; and evaluation after neutral fixation for various lengths of time. Specimens were fixed in 2% paraformaldehyde, pH 7.4, before being embedded in methylmethacrylate. Sections were prepared from the region just below the inferior alveolar canal. The area of new bone formation within the gap was measured and expressed as a percentage of the total area of the distraction gap. Bone fill ranged from 0 to 100 percent. A pilot study with 7-mm advancements showed similar bone fill with 0-day or 4-day latency, but with poor reproducibility. Mandibles that were distracted to 12 mm at 1 mm per day exhibited nearly complete bone fill, either with 0-day latency (average, 93 percent) or 4-day latency (average, 100 percent). Mandibles that had been distracted for 3 days at 4 mm per day showed moderate osteogenesis and clinical stability with increasing time of neutral fixation. Bone fill was significantly correlated with clinical stability (Spearman r = 0.801, p = 0.001). Histological examination showed exuberant periosteal

  18. Breast metastasis in an adult woman with alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma of the ethmoid sinus

    PubMed Central

    Raj, Sean D.; Raj, Karuna M.; Krishnamurthy, Savitri; Brahmaroutu, Ashrita; Whitman, Gary J.

    2015-01-01

    A new breast mass was identified in an adult woman undergoing treatment for a known ethmoid sinus alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma. Histopathological evaluation revealed alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma metastatic to the breast. Alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma, primarily described in adolescents and especially rare in adults, can uncommonly metastasize to the breast. PMID:27186248

  19. Involvement of mouse and porcine PLCζ-induced calcium oscillations in preimplantation development of mouse embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Yoneda, Akihiro; Watanabe, Tomomasa

    2015-05-01

    In mammals, phospholipase Cζ (PLCζ) has the ability to trigger calcium (Ca{sup 2+}) oscillations in oocytes, leading to oocyte activation. Although there is a species-specific difference in the PLCζ-induced Ca{sup 2+} oscillatory pattern, whether PLCζ-induced Ca{sup 2+} oscillations affect preimplantation embryonic development remains unclear. Here, we show that Ca{sup 2+} oscillations in mouse PLCζ cRNA-injected oocytes stopped just before pronuclear formation, while that in porcine PLCζ cRNA-injected oocytes continued for several hours after pronuclei had been formed. This difference of Ca{sup 2+} oscillations in oocytes after pronuclear formation was dependent on the difference in the nuclear localization signal (NLS) sequence of PLCζ between the mouse and pig. However, mouse and porcine PLCζ cRNA-injected oocytes parthenogenetically developed to blastocysts regardless of the absence or presence of Ca{sup 2+} oscillations after pronuclear formation. Furthermore, the developmental rate of mouse or porcine PLCζ-activated oocytes injected with round spermatids to the blastocyst stage was not significantly different from that of strontium-activated oocytes injected with round spermatids. These results suggest that the PLCζ-induced Ca{sup 2+} oscillatory pattern in mouse oocytes is dependent on the NLS sequence of PLCζ and injection of PLCζ may be a useful method for activation of round spermatid-injected and somatic nuclear transferred oocytes. - Highlights: • Porcine PLCζ-induced Ca{sup 2+} oscillations continued after pronuclear formation. • The Ca{sup 2+} oscillatory pattern was dependent on the difference in the NLS sequence of PLCζ. • PLCζ-activated oocytes parthenogenetically developed to blastocysts. • PLCζ-activated oocytes injected with round spermatids developed to blastocysts.

  20. Tissue Sampling Guides for Porcine Biomedical Models.

    PubMed

    Albl, Barbara; Haesner, Serena; Braun-Reichhart, Christina; Streckel, Elisabeth; Renner, Simone; Seeliger, Frank; Wolf, Eckhard; Wanke, Rüdiger; Blutke, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    This article provides guidelines for organ and tissue sampling adapted to porcine animal models in translational medical research. Detailed protocols for the determination of sampling locations and numbers as well as recommendations on the orientation, size, and trimming direction of samples from ∼50 different porcine organs and tissues are provided in the Supplementary Material. The proposed sampling protocols include the generation of samples suitable for subsequent qualitative and quantitative analyses, including cryohistology, paraffin, and plastic histology; immunohistochemistry;in situhybridization; electron microscopy; and quantitative stereology as well as molecular analyses of DNA, RNA, proteins, metabolites, and electrolytes. With regard to the planned extent of sampling efforts, time, and personnel expenses, and dependent upon the scheduled analyses, different protocols are provided. These protocols are adjusted for (I) routine screenings, as used in general toxicity studies or in analyses of gene expression patterns or histopathological organ alterations, (II) advanced analyses of single organs/tissues, and (III) large-scale sampling procedures to be applied in biobank projects. Providing a robust reference for studies of porcine models, the described protocols will ensure the efficiency of sampling, the systematic recovery of high-quality samples representing the entire organ or tissue as well as the intra-/interstudy comparability and reproducibility of results.

  1. Porcine sperm vitrification I: cryoloops method.

    PubMed

    Arraztoa, C C; Miragaya, M H; Chaves, M G; Trasorras, V L; Gambarotta, M C; Péndola, C H; Neild, D M

    2016-09-29

    The aims of this study were to evaluate porcine sperm vitrification in cryoloops, with and without two different cryoprotectants and assess two warming procedures. Extended (n = 3; r = 4) and raw (n = 5; r = 2) semen was diluted in media without and with cryoprotectants (4% dimethylformamide and 4% glycerol) to a final concentration of 20 × 10(6) spermatozoa ml(-1) and vitrified using the cryoloops method. Two warming procedures were evaluated: rapid method (30 s at 37°C) and an ultra-rapid method (7 s at 75°C, followed by 30 s at 37°C). Total motility (phase contrast), sperm viability (6-carboxifluorescein diacetate and propidium iodide stain), membrane function (hypo-osmotic swelling test), acrosome integrity (phase contrast), chromatin condensation (toluidine blue stain) and chromatin susceptibility to acid denaturation (acridine orange stain) were evaluated before and after vitrification and analysed using Friedman's test. In all media, the only seminal parameters that were maintained after vitrification were chromatin condensation and integrity. Vitrification of porcine spermatozoon using cryoloops, both in the presence or absence of cryoprotectants and independent of the warming procedure used, permits conservation of sperm chromatin condensation and integrity. It would be interesting to further verify this by producing porcine embryos using vitrified spermatozoon with intracytoplasmic sperm injection.

  2. Porcine sperm vitrification II: Spheres method.

    PubMed

    Arraztoa, C C; Miragaya, M H; Chaves, M G; Trasorras, V L; Gambarotta, M C; Neild, D M

    2016-11-10

    Owing to current problems in boar sperm cryopreservation, this study proposes to evaluate vitrification in spheres as an alternative cryopreservation procedure, comparing the use or not of permeable cryoprotectants and two warming methods. Extended (n = 3; r = 4) and raw (n = 5; r = 2) porcine spermatozoa were diluted in media, in the absence or presence of either 4% dimethylformamide or 4% glycerol, to a final concentration of 5 × 10(6)  spermatozoa/ml and vitrified using the spheres method. Two warming procedures were evaluated: a rapid method (30 s at 37°C) and an ultrarapid method (7 s at 75°C, followed by 30 s at 37°C). Percentages of total motility (phase contrast), membrane function (hypo-osmotic swelling test), acrosome integrity (phase contrast), sperm viability (6-carboxyfluorescein diacetate and propidium iodide stain), chromatin condensation (toluidine blue stain) and chromatin susceptibility to acid denaturation (acridine orange stain) were evaluated in the samples before and after vitrification. Results, analysed using Friedman's test, suggest that rapid warming of raw porcine spermatozoa vitrified without permeable cryoprotectants may preserve DNA condensation and integrity better than the other processing methods studied in this work. Hence, porcine sperm vitrification using spheres could be used to produce embryos with ICSI to further validate this method.

  3. Cloning of Porcine Pituitary Tumor Transforming Gene 1 and Its Expression in Porcine Oocytes and Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shuai; Nong, Suqun; Ma, Qingyan; Chen, Baojian; Liu, Mingjun; Pan, Tianbiao; Liao, D. Joshua

    2016-01-01

    The maternal-to-embryonic transition (MET) is a complex process that occurs during early mammalian embryogenesis and is characterized by activation of the zygotic genome, initiation of embryonic transcription, and replacement of maternal mRNA with embryonic mRNA. The objective of this study was to reveal the temporal expression and localization patterns of PTTG1 during early porcine embryonic development and to establish a relationship between PTTG1 and the MET. To achieve this goal, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was performed to clone porcine PTTG1. Subsequently, germinal vesicle (GV)- and metaphase II (MII)-stage oocytes, zygotes, 2-, 4-, and 8-cell-stage embryos, morulas, and blastocysts were produced in vitro and their gene expression was analyzed. The results revealed that the coding sequence of porcine PTTG1 is 609-bp in length and that it encodes a 202-aa polypeptide. Using qRT-PCR, PTTG1 mRNA expression was observed to be maintained at high levels in GV- and MII-stage oocytes. The transcript levels in oocytes were also significantly higher than those in embryos from the zygote to blastocyst stages. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed that porcine PTTG1 was primarily localized to the cytoplasm and partially localized to the nucleus. Furthermore, the PTTG1 protein levels in MII-stage oocytes and zygotes were significantly higher than those in embryos from the 2-cell to blastocyst stage. After fertilization, the level of this protein began to decrease gradually until the blastocyst stage. The results of our study suggest that porcine PTTG1 is a new candidate maternal effect gene (MEG) that may participate in the processes of oocyte maturation and zygotic genome activation during porcine embryogenesis. PMID:27058238

  4. A Novel Murine Model for Chronic Inflammatory Alveolar Bone loss

    PubMed Central

    Oz, Helieh S; Ebersole, Jeffrey L

    2009-01-01

    Objective Chronic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) demonstrates some similarities of dysregulated chronic immunoinflammatory lesion of periodontitis. Trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) and dextran sodium sulphate (DSS) administered to rodents have been shown to elicit inflammatory responses that undermine the integrity of the gut epithelium similar to IBD in humans. The objective of this study was to evaluate the ability of these chemicals to elicit periodontal inflammation as a novel model for alveolar bone loss. Methods Mice were treated by oral application of TNBS 2 times/week, or with DSS in the diet over a period of 18 weeks. Alveolar bone loss was assessed on defleshed skull using morphometric measures for area of bone resorption. Results TNBS-treated animals tolerated oral administration with no clinical symptoms and gained weight similar to normal controls. In contrast, DSS exerted a systemic response including shortening of colonic tissue and liver enzyme changes. Both TNBS and DSS caused a localized action on periodontal tissues with alveolar bone loss observed in both maxilla and mandibles with progression in a time dependent manner. Bone loss was detected as early as week 7, with more severe periodontitis increasing over the 18 weeks (p<0.001). Young (7 month) and old (12 month) SCID mice were treated with TNBS for a period of 7 weeks and did not develop significant bone loss. Conclusions These data show that oral administration of TNBS and DSS provoke alveolar bone loss in concert with the autochthonous oral microbiota. PMID:19602109

  5. Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor therapy for pulmonary alveolar proteinosis.

    PubMed

    Shende, Ruchira P; Sampat, Bhavin K; Prabhudesai, Pralhad; Kulkarni, Satish

    2013-03-01

    We report a case of 58 year old female diagnosed with Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis (PAP) with recurrence of PAP after 5 repeated whole lung lavage, responding to subcutaneous injections of Granulocyte Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor therapy (GM-CSF). Thus indicating that GM-CSF therapy is a promising alternative in those requiring repeated whole lung lavage

  6. Alveolar Ridge Split Technique Using Piezosurgery with Specially Designed Tips

    PubMed Central

    Moro, Alessandro; Foresta, Enrico; Falchi, Marco; De Angelis, Paolo; D'Amato, Giuseppe; Pelo, Sandro

    2017-01-01

    The treatment of patients with atrophic ridge who need prosthetic rehabilitation is a common problem in oral and maxillofacial surgery. Among the various techniques introduced for the expansion of alveolar ridges with a horizontal bone deficit is the alveolar ridge split technique. The aim of this article is to give a description of some new tips that have been specifically designed for the treatment of atrophic ridges with transversal bone deficit. A two-step piezosurgical split technique is also described, based on specific osteotomies of the vestibular cortex and the use of a mandibular ramus graft as interpositional graft. A total of 15 patients were treated with the proposed new tips by our department. All the expanded areas were successful in providing an adequate width and height to insert implants according to the prosthetic plan and the proposed tips allowed obtaining the most from the alveolar ridge split technique and piezosurgery. These tips have made alveolar ridge split technique simple, safe, and effective for the treatment of horizontal and vertical bone defects. Furthermore the proposed piezosurgical split technique allows obtaining horizontal and vertical bone augmentation. PMID:28246596

  7. Diffuse alveolar haemorrhage secondary to propylthiouracil-induced vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Catarina; Costa, Teresa; Marques, Ana Vieira

    2015-01-01

    Propylthiouracil is a drug used to treat hyperthyroidism. It can cause several side effects including pulmonary disorders that, although rare, can be severe. The authors describe the case of a woman treated with propylthiouracil who developed diffuse alveolar haemorrhage with severe respiratory failure and anaemia, which improved with discontinuation of the antithyroid drug and on starting systemic corticosteroid therapy. PMID:25661751

  8. Shock lung and diffuse alveolar damage pathological and pathogenetic considerations.

    PubMed

    Blennerhassett, J B

    1985-04-01

    Diffuse alveolar damage may be caused by any one or more of a large number of injurious agents. While the etiology may be diverse, the pathology is relatively uniform ranging from an acute exudative phase characterized by protein-rich interstitial and alveolar edema, through to a reactive subacute proliferative phase characterized by interstitial fibroplasia and collagenization together with granular pneumocyte hyperplasia. Interstitial inflammation is a variable feature and of course mixed exudative and proliferative features are common. In the clinically overt adult respiratory distress syndrome, the mortality is formidable. The pathogenesis is damage to endothelial cells and membranous pneumocytes. This may be caused by direct chemical action or indirectly through the mediation of oxidizing free radicles or leukotrienes. In diffuse alveolar damage associated with shock, recent work suggests mediation of the cellular injury via complement activation following tissue injury, with the major pathology being due to lysosomal enzyme damage from phagocytes chemotactically attracted to the lung. Etiological factors in diffuse alveolar damage are numerous and details of appropriate primary therapy are therefore diverse. The pathogenesis and pathology are however relatively uniform, calling for uniform supportive therapeutic measures of the clinical adult respiratory distress syndrome.

  9. Endodontic-related inferior alveolar nerve and mental foramen paresthesia.

    PubMed

    Morse, D R

    1997-10-01

    Paresthesia is a condition that involves perverted sensations of pain, touch, or temperature. It has a variety of possible causes. This article presents a literature review and case reports of endodontically related inferior alveolar nerve and mental foramen paresthesia. Nondrug prevention methods and the dental uses of dexamethasone are also discussed.

  10. The development and plasticity of alveolar type 1 cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jun; Hernandez, Belinda J.; Martinez Alanis, Denise; Narvaez del Pilar, Odemaris; Vila-Ellis, Lisandra; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Evans, Scott E.; Ostrin, Edwin J.; Chen, Jichao

    2016-01-01

    Alveolar type 1 (AT1) cells cover >95% of the gas exchange surface and are extremely thin to facilitate passive gas diffusion. The development of these highly specialized cells and its coordination with the formation of the honeycomb-like alveolar structure are poorly understood. Using new marker-based stereology and single-cell imaging methods, we show that AT1 cells in the mouse lung form expansive thin cellular extensions via a non-proliferative two-step process while retaining cellular plasticity. In the flattening step, AT1 cells undergo molecular specification and remodel cell junctions while remaining connected to their epithelial neighbors. In the folding step, AT1 cells increase in size by more than 10-fold and undergo cellular morphogenesis that matches capillary and secondary septa formation, resulting in a single AT1 cell spanning multiple alveoli. Furthermore, AT1 cells are an unexpected source of VEGFA and their normal development is required for alveolar angiogenesis. Notably, a majority of AT1 cells proliferate upon ectopic SOX2 expression and undergo stage-dependent cell fate reprogramming. These results provide evidence that AT1 cells have both structural and signaling roles in alveolar maturation and can exit their terminally differentiated non-proliferative state. Our findings suggest that AT1 cells might be a new target in the pathogenesis and treatment of lung diseases associated with premature birth. PMID:26586225

  11. Particle-macrophage relationships during the clearance of particles from the alveolar macrophage compartment

    SciTech Connect

    Lehnert, B.E.; Toevs, K.E.; Valdez, Y.E.; Sebring, R.J.

    1988-11-01

    In this study, we quantitatively characterized the distributions of particles among lavageable AM over a 30 day period after the acute intratracheal instillation of /approximately/3 mg of 1.9 ..mu..m dia. polystyrene microspheres into the lungs of rats. Information obtained for particles retained in the lavageable AM compartment and particle-AM distribution data were collectively examined using a simple, first order kinetic model for AM removal from the lung. The results of our analyses suggest that a volume load of particles in a macrophage up to at least /approximately/450 ..mu..m/sup 3/ does not inhibit the mobilization of macrophages from the alveolar compartment. Additionally, the kinetic analyses of the particle-macrophage distributions suggest that macrophages that replenish those AM that are translocated from the lung on a continual basis during alveolar clearance are not and/or do not remain particle-free in the alveoli. This latter observation can be explained by: (1) the influx of particle-bearing macrophages into the alveoli, or (2) the in situ proliferation of particle bearing AM, or (3) the release of particles by AM and the subsequent phagocytosis of the particles by newly arrived cells, or (4) a combination of these possibilities. 32 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Alveolar echinococcosis of the liver: percutaneous stent therapy in Budd-Chiari syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, J; Görich, J; Kramme, E; Merkle, E; Sokiranski, R; Kern, P; Brambs, H J

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Infiltration of the hepatic veins in the alveolar echinococcosis can lead to the development of the Budd-Chiari syndrome. The medical and surgical treatment of this condition is generally unsatisfactory. The results of successful interventional treatment with percutaneous stent implantation in the hepatic veins are reported. METHODS: Using a transjugular approach, metal mesh stents (Boston Scientific, Medi-Tech Accuflex 8/60 mm) were placed in the median and left hepatic veins of a 53 year old woman. After the intervention, oral chemotherapy with albendazole (2 x 400 mg/day) was continued, but no anticoagulants were given. RESULTS: Stent placement was performed without complications. The clinical picture improved rapidly: normalisation of portal blood flow was confirmed by Doppler ultrasound and there was improvement of liver function, reduction of oesophageal varices, and disappearance of ascites. A follow-up examination at 15 months showed no evidence of stent occlusion. CONCLUSIONS: Treatment of portal hypertension in alveolar echinococcosis of the liver is problematic. In selected patients with portal hypertension secondary to hepatic vein stenoses but no cirrhosis, percutaneous stent placement in the hepatic veins represents a promising treatment alternative. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:9026484

  13. Remodeling dynamics in the alveolar process in skeletally mature dogs.

    PubMed

    Huja, Sarandeep S; Fernandez, Soledad A; Hill, Kara J; Li, Yan

    2006-12-01

    Bone turnover rates can be altered by metabolic and mechanical demands. Due to the difference in the pattern of loading, we hypothesized that there are differences in bone remodeling rates between the maxillary and mandibular alveolar processes. Furthermore, in a canine model, the alveolar process of teeth that lack contact (e.g., second premolars) would have a different turnover rate than bone supporting teeth with functional contact (e.g., first molars). Six skeletally mature male dogs were given a pair of calcein labels. After sacrifice, specimens representing the anterior and posterior locations of both jaws were prepared for examination by histomorphometric methods to evaluate the bone volume/total volume (BV/TV; %), bone volume (mm2), mineral apposition rate (MAR; microm/day), and bone formation rate (BFR; %/year) in the alveolar process. There were no significant differences (P>0.05) in the BV/TV within the jaws. The bone volume within the alveolar process of the mandible was 2.8-fold greater than in the maxilla. The MAR was not significantly different between the jaws and anteroposterior locations. However, the BFR was significantly (P<0.0001) greater in the mandible than in the maxilla. The anterior location had higher (P=0.002) remodeling than the posterior location in the maxilla but not in the mandible. While there was a greater bone mass and increased remodeling in the mandible, no remodeling gradient in the coronal-apical direction was apparent in the alveolar process. Bone adaptation probably involves a complex interplay of bone turnover, mass, and architecture.

  14. Morphofunctional and clinical study on mandibular alveolar distraction osteogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zaffe, Davide; Bertoldi, Carlo; Palumbo, Carla; Consolo, Ugo

    2002-10-01

    Alveolar Distraction Osteogenesis (ADO) is a process which forms new alveolar bone to correct alveolar deformities in ridge height and width. This work aims (a). to verify the predictability of the augmentation of height of atrophic alveolar ridges using an extra-alveolar distraction device and (b). to study the bone processes in order to optimize implanto-prosthetic rehabilitation. ADO was performed on 10 patients with ridge deformities to obtain the required ridge augmentation. Clinical and radiological (OPT and CT with densitometric assay) evaluations were carried out during the following 12 weeks, before implant insertion. Biopsies at 40, 60 and 88 days were studied after general, specific and histochemical staining of slides; microradiographs were analyzed to evaluate the Trabecular Bone Volume. Forty days after the end of distraction, soft callus indicated the start of ossification. Sixty days after the end of distraction, the soft callus was largely converted into a network of trabecular woven bone; osteogenic activity was high and TBV was about 50%. Eighty-eight days after the end of distraction, the amount of bone appeared reduced, with a more ordered structure; bone formation activity and TBV also diminished, whereas osteoclast erosion was active. The densitometric assay shows values increasing from the end of distraction, particularly after implant insertion. Histological results show a regression in bone deposition processes 88 days after the end of distraction culminating in a virtual steady-state after a certain time. The results suggest that early implant insertion may be desirable to avoid bone loss due to mechanical unloading.

  15. DA-Raf-dependent inhibition of the Ras-ERK signaling pathway in type 2 alveolar epithelial cells controls alveolar formation.

    PubMed

    Watanabe-Takano, Haruko; Takano, Kazunori; Sakamoto, Akemi; Matsumoto, Kenji; Tokuhisa, Takeshi; Endo, Takeshi; Hatano, Masahiko

    2014-06-03

    Alveolar formation is coupled to the spatiotemporally regulated differentiation of alveolar myofibroblasts (AMYFs), which contribute to the morphological changes of interalveolar walls. Although the Ras-ERK signaling pathway is one of the key regulators for alveolar formation in developing lungs, the intrinsic molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying its role remain largely unknown. By analyzing the Ras-ERK signaling pathway during postnatal development of lungs, we have identified a critical role of DA-Raf1 (DA-Raf)-a dominant-negative antagonist for the Ras-ERK signaling pathway-in alveolar formation. DA-Raf-deficient mice displayed alveolar dysgenesis as a result of the blockade of AMYF differentiation. DA-Raf is predominantly expressed in type 2 alveolar epithelial cells (AEC2s) in developing lungs, and DA-Raf-dependent MEK1/2 inhibition in AEC2s suppresses expression of tissue inhibitor of matalloprotienase 4 (TIMP4), which prevents a subsequent proteolytic cascade matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)14-MMP2. Furthermore, MMP14-MMP2 proteolytic cascade regulates AMYF differentiation and alveolar formation. Therefore, DA-Raf-dependent inhibition of the Ras-ERK signaling pathway in AEC2s is required for alveolar formation via triggering MMP2 activation followed by AMYF differentiation. These findings reveal a pivotal role of the Ras-ERK signaling pathway in the dynamic regulation of alveolar development.

  16. The Rho pathway mediates transition to an alveolar type I cell phenotype during static stretch of alveolar type II cells

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Cherie D; Varghese, Linda S; Gonzales, Linda W.; Margulies, Susan S.; Guttentag, Susan H.

    2011-01-01

    Stretch is an essential mechanism for lung growth and development. Animal models in which fetal lungs have been chronically over- or under-distended demonstrate a disrupted mix of type II and type I cells, with static overdistention typically promoting a type I cell phenotype. The Rho GTPase family, key regulators of cytoskeletal signaling, are known to mediate cellular differentiation in response to stretch in other organs. Using a well-described model of alveolar epithelial cell differentiation and a validated stretch device, we investigated the effects of supraphysiologic stretch on human fetal lung (HFL) alveolar epithelial cell phenotype. Static stretch applied to epithelial cells suppressed type II cell markers (SP-B and Pepsinogen C, PGC), and induced type I cell markers (Caveolin-1, Claudin 7 and Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1, PAI-1) as predicted. Static stretch was also associated with Rho A activation. Furthermore, the Rho kinase (ROCK) inhibitor Y27632 decreased Rho A activation, and blunted the stretch-induced changes in alveolar epithelial cell marker expression. Together these data provide further evidence that mechanical stimulation of the cytoskeleton and Rho activation are key upstream events in mechanotransduction-associated alveolar epithelial cell differentiation. PMID:20220547

  17. Three-dimensional analysis of alveolar wall destruction in the early stage of pulmonary emphysema.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yukihiro; Uehara, Takeshi; Kawasaki, Kenji; Sugano, Mitsutoshi; Matsumoto, Takehisa; Matsumoto, Gou; Honda, Takayuki

    2015-03-01

    The morphological mechanism of alveolar wall destruction during pulmonary emphysema has not been clarified. The aim of this study was to elucidate this process three-dimensionally. Lung specimens from five patients with pulmonary emphysema were used, and five controls with normal alveolar structure were also examined. Sections 150 μm thick were stained with hematoxylin and eosin, elastica, and silver impregnation, and immunostained with selected antibodies. We examined these sections three-dimensionally using a laser confocal microscope and a light microscope. There were only a few Kohn's pores and no fenestrae in the normal alveoli from the controls. In the lungs of the emphysema patients a small rupture appeared in the extremely thin alveolar wall among the alveolar capillaries. This rupture enlarged to form a circle surrounded by the capillaries, which was called an alveolar fenestra. Two neighboring fenestrae fused by breakdown of the collapsed or cord-like capillary between them to form a large fenestra. The large fenestrae fused repeatedly to become larger, and these were bordered by thick elastic fibers constructing an alveolar framework. Alveolar wall destruction during emphysema could start from small ruptures of the alveolar wall that become fenestrae surrounded by capillaries, which fuse repeatedly to become larger fenestrae rimmed with elastic fibers. The alveolar capillary network could initially prevent enlargement of the fenestrae, and the thick elastic fibers constituting the alveolar framework could secondarily prevent destruction of the alveolar wall structure.

  18. Outbreak investigation of porcine epidemic diarrhea in swine in Ontario.

    PubMed

    Pasma, Tim; Furness, Mary Catherine; Alves, David; Aubry, Pascale

    2016-01-01

    Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus was first diagnosed in Ontario in January of 2014. An outbreak investigation was conducted and it was hypothesized that feed containing spray-dried porcine plasma contaminated with the virus was a risk factor in the introduction and spread of the disease in Ontario.

  19. A nine-base nucleotide sequence in the porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) nucleocapsid gene determines viral replication and virulence.

    PubMed

    Krakowka, Steven; Allan, Gordon; Ellis, John; Hamberg, Alexander; Charreyre, Catherine; Kaufmann, Eva; Brooks, Charles; Meehan, Brian

    2012-03-01

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) was retrospectively identified by serology in swine populations as an asymptomatic infection at least 25 years prior to the first reported case of PCV2-associated postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PMWS). To investigate the sudden emergence of PMWS, viral sequences were amplified from frozen archived (1970-1971) porcine tissues and the complete genome of archival PCV2 was determined. The ORF1 gene product (viral DNA replicase) was homologous to contemporary PCV2 ORF1. In ORF2 (viral nucleocapsid gene) archival PCV2, a consistent linear nine-base sequence difference at base positions 1331 through 1339 was observed. The deduced amino acid sequence from these base changes alters the nucleocapsid conformation within the second immunogenic epitope from a hydrophobic (contemporary PCV2) to a hydrophilic (archival PCV2) configuration. To test the hypothesis that archival PCV2 was avirulent, cloned engineered archival and contemporary PCV2 genomes were constructed wherein the ORF1 gene was identical in each clone and the ORF2 gene (nucleocapsid protein) was sequence-identical in both clones except for the nine-base difference (bases 1331-1339), corresponding to archival and contemporary PCV2 viruses respectively. Clones were transfected into porcine kidney (PK) 15 cells and, after sequence confirmation, further passed in PK15 and 3D4/2 porcine alveolar macrophage cell cultures. Virulence trials in gnotobiotic piglets were conducted with cloned PCV2s. The data show that archival PCV2 is avirulent when compared to contemporary PCV2 and supports the hypothesis that the emergence of virulent contemporary PCV2 was a result of mutational events within this critical epitope after 1971.

  20. Endovascular embolization for the management of inferior alveolar artery bleeding after a third molar extraction: A case report.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Bernardo; Varazzani, Anea; Ferri, Anea; Menozzi, Roberto; Sesenna, Enrico

    2016-03-01

    Removal of third molars is a common surgical procedure with low complication rates. Localized alveolar osteitis, infection, bleeding, and paresthesia are the four most common postoperative complications of third molar extraction reported in the literature. Postoperative severe hemorrhages are rare and are usually related to inferior alveolar artery damage. Although most bleeding is usually managed effectively by local compression or packing of the socket, even life-threatening complications may occur. Endovascular embolization has been rarely reported as treatment for such a complication and represents an ideal solution, with a low complication rate and excellent control of bleeding. The authors report a case of potentially life-threatening hemorrhage continuing 4 days after extraction of the mandibular right third molar, resulting in significant anemia (Hb 6.6 g/dL) and treated successfully with endovascular embolization of the inferior alveolar artery. The authors consider it important for general practitioners to know this treatment and how to manage this rare complication in the correct way, saving time if satisfactory hemostasis cannot be reached with common procedures.

  1. Accidental injury of the inferior alveolar nerve due to the extrusion of calcium hydroxide in endodontic treatment: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    During clinical endodontic treatment, we often find radiopaque filling material beyond the root apex. Accidental extrusion of calcium hydroxide could cause the injury of inferior alveolar nerve, such as paresthesia or continuous inflammatory response. This case report presents the extrusion of calcium hydroxide and treatment procedures including surgical intervention. A 48 yr old female patient experienced Calcipex II extrusion in to the inferior alveolar canal on left mandibular area during endodontic treatment. After completion of endodontic treatment on left mandibular first molar, surgical intervention was planned under general anesthesia. After cortical bone osteotomy and debridement, neuroma resection and neurorrhaphy was performed, and prognosis was observed. But no improvement in sensory nerve was seen following surgical intervention after 20 mon. A clinician should be aware of extrusion of intracanal medicaments and the possibility of damage on inferior alveolar canal. Injectable type of calcium hydroxide should be applied with care for preventing nerve injury. The alternative delivery method such as lentulo spiral was suggested on the posterior mandibular molar. PMID:26877992

  2. Accidental injury of the inferior alveolar nerve due to the extrusion of calcium hydroxide in endodontic treatment: a case report.

    PubMed

    Shin, Yooseok; Roh, Byoung-Duck; Kim, Yemi; Kim, Taehyeon; Kim, Hyungjun

    2016-02-01

    During clinical endodontic treatment, we often find radiopaque filling material beyond the root apex. Accidental extrusion of calcium hydroxide could cause the injury of inferior alveolar nerve, such as paresthesia or continuous inflammatory response. This case report presents the extrusion of calcium hydroxide and treatment procedures including surgical intervention. A 48 yr old female patient experienced Calcipex II extrusion in to the inferior alveolar canal on left mandibular area during endodontic treatment. After completion of endodontic treatment on left mandibular first molar, surgical intervention was planned under general anesthesia. After cortical bone osteotomy and debridement, neuroma resection and neurorrhaphy was performed, and prognosis was observed. But no improvement in sensory nerve was seen following surgical intervention after 20 mon. A clinician should be aware of extrusion of intracanal medicaments and the possibility of damage on inferior alveolar canal. Injectable type of calcium hydroxide should be applied with care for preventing nerve injury. The alternative delivery method such as lentulo spiral was suggested on the posterior mandibular molar.

  3. Isolation, Culture and Identification of Porcine Skeletal Muscle Satellite Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Bo-Jiang; Li, Ping-Hua; Huang, Rui-Hua; Sun, Wen-Xing; Wang, Han; Li, Qi-Fa; Chen, Jie; Wu, Wang-Jun; Liu, Hong-Lin

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this study was to establish the optimum protocol for the isolation and culture of porcine muscle satellite cells. Mononuclear muscle satellite cells are a kind of adult stem cell, which is located between the basal lamina and sarcolemma of muscle fibers and is the primary source of myogenic precursor cells in postnatal muscle. Muscle satellite cells are a useful model to investigate the mechanisms of muscle growth and development. Although the isolation and culture protocols of muscle satellite cells in some species (e.g. mouse) have been established successfully, the culture system for porcine muscle satellite cells is very limited. In this study, we optimized the isolation procedure of porcine muscle satellite cells and elaborated the isolation and culture process in detail. Furthermore, we characterized the porcine muscle satellite cells using the immunofluorecence. Our study provides a reference for the isolation of porcine muscle satellite cells and will be useful for studying the molecular mechanisms in these cells.

  4. Extrahepatic islet transplantation with microporous polymer scaffolds in syngeneic mouse and allogeneic porcine models.

    PubMed

    Gibly, Romie F; Zhang, Xiaomin; Graham, Melanie L; Hering, Bernhard J; Kaufman, Dixon B; Lowe, William L; Shea, Lonnie D

    2011-12-01

    Intraportal transplantation of islets has successfully treated select patients with type 1 diabetes. However, intravascular infusion and the intrahepatic site contribute to significant early and late islet loss, yet a clinical alternative has remained elusive. We investigated non-encapsulating, porous, biodegradable polymer scaffolds as a vehicle for islet transplantation into extrahepatic sites, using syngeneic mouse and allogeneic porcine models. Scaffold architecture was modified to enhance cell infiltration leading to revascularization of the islets with minimal inflammatory response. In the diabetic mouse model, 125 islets seeded on scaffolds implanted into the epididymal fat pad restored normoglycemia within an average of 1.95 days and transplantation of only 75 islets required 12.1 days. Increasing the pore size to increase islet-islet interactions did not significantly impact islet function. The porcine model was used to investigate early islet engraftment. Increasing the islet seeding density led to a greater mass of engrafted islets, though the efficiency of islet survival decreased. Transplantation into the porcine omentum provided greater islet engraftment than the gastric submucosa. These results demonstrate scaffolds support murine islet transplantation with high efficiency, and feasibility studies in large animals support continued pre-clinical studies with scaffolds as a platform to control the transplant microenvironment.

  5. Inferior Alveolar Nerve Lateralization and Transposition for Dental Implant Placement. Part II: a Systematic Review of Neurosensory Complications

    PubMed Central

    Juodzbalys, Gintaras

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives This article, the second in a two-part series, continues the discussion of inferior alveolar nerve lateralization/transposition for dental implant placement. The aim of this article is to review the scientific literature and clinical reports in order to analyse the neurosensory complications, risks and disadvantages of lateralization/transposition of the inferior alveolar nerve followed by implant placement in an edentulous atrophic posterior mandible. Material and Methods A comprehensive review of the current literature was conducted according to the PRISMA guidelines by accessing the NCBI PubMed and PMC databases, as well as academic sites and books. The articles were searched from January 1997 to July 2014. Articles in English language, which included adult patients between 18 - 80 years of age who had minimal residual bone above the mandibular canal and had undergone inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) repositioning, with minimum 6 months of follow-up, were included. Results A total of 21 studies were included in this review. Ten were related to IAN transposition, 7 to IAN lateralization and 4 to both transposition and lateralization. The IAN neurosensory disturbance function was present in most patients (99.47% [376/378]) for 1 to 6 months. In total, 0.53% (2/378) of procedures the disturbances were permanent. Conclusions Inferior alveolar nerve repositioning is related to initial transient change in sensation in the majority of cases. The most popular causes of nerve damage are spatula-caused traction in the mucoperiosteal flap, pressure due to severe inflammation or retention of fluid around the nerve and subsequent development of transient ischemia, and mandibular body fracture. PMID:25937874

  6. In vivo microscopy in a porcine model of acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Bickenbach, Johannes; Czaplik, Michael; Dembinski, Rolf; Pelosi, Paolo; Schroeder, Wolfgang; Marx, Gernot; Rossaint, Rolf

    2010-07-31

    Regional inhomogeneity and alveolar mechanics in a porcine model of acute lung injury (ALI) was evaluated using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). CLSM was performed through thoracic windows of the upper and lower lobes. Image quantification was conducted by use of a volume air index (VAI). Twelve anesthetized, mechanically ventilated pigs were randomized to non-injury (control group, n = 6) or ALI induced by surfactant depletion (ALI group, n = 6). CLSM was performed at baseline, after 1 h at 5 mbar and after 2 h at 15 mbar positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP). Haemodynamics, respiratory mechanics and calculation of pulmonary ventilation-perfusion distribution by MIGET were determined. At baseline, VAI was not different. In the upper lobes, VAI significantly decreased in ALI compared to control group, with no changes after PEEP application. In the lower lobes, VAI significantly decreased in ALI compared to control group. Incremental PEEP significantly increased VAI in ALI, but not in control group. Haemodynamics were significantly compromised in the ALI group. A significant deterioration in oxygenation and ventilation-perfusion distribution could be seen being restored after PEEP adjustment. The VAI may help to assess regional inhomogeneity of the acutely injured lung.

  7. Gene editing as applied to prevention of reproductive porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome.

    PubMed

    Whitworth, Kristin M; Prather, Randall S

    2017-04-08

    Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome (PRRS) causes severe reproductive failure in sows, as well as transplacental transfer of PRRS virus (PRRSV) to late-gestation fetuses, resulting in abortions, early farrowing, increased number of stillborn piglets, and weak neonatal piglets. PRRSV-infected boars present with anorexia and lethargy, and have decreased sperm quality. The gene for the cellular receptor that the PRRSV uses, Cluster of differentiation 163 (CD163), was edited using Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9 gene-editing technology to create biallelic DNA edits to the CD163 gene in 100% of the offspring. CD163-null pigs challenged with virus were completely resistant to both Type 1 and Type 2 PRRSV isolates, as measured by clinical signs, viremia, antibody response, and lung histopathology. In vitro studies showed that CD163-null alveolar macrophages were also not permissive to infection by a panel of six Type 1 and nine Type 2 viral isolates. Thus, DNA editing of the CD163 gene prevented PRRSV infection and reproductive losses associated with infection. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  8. Sustaining Interferon Induction by a High-Passage Atypical Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus Strain

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Zexu; Yu, Ying; Xiao, Yueqiang; Opriessnig, Tanja; Wang, Rong; Yang, Liping; Nan, Yuchen; Samal, Siba K.; Halbur, Patrick G.; Zhang, Yan-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) strain A2MC2 induces type I interferons in cultured cells. The objective of this study was to attenuate this strain by serial passaging in MARC-145 cells and assess its virulence and immunogenicity in pigs. The A2MC2 serially passaged 90 times (A2MC2-P90) retains the feature of interferon induction. The A2MC2-P90 replicates faster with a higher virus yield than wild type A2MC2 virus. Infection of primary pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAMs) also induces interferons. Sequence analysis showed that the A2MC2-P90 has genomic nucleic acid identity of 99.8% to the wild type but has a deletion of 543 nucleotides in nsp2. The deletion occurred in passage 60. The A2MC2-P90 genome has a total of 35 nucleotide variations from the wild type, leading to 26 amino acid differences. Inoculation of three-week-old piglets showed that A2MC2-P90 is avirulent and elicits immune response. Compared with Ingelvac PRRS® MLV strain, A2MC2-P90 elicits higher virus neutralizing antibodies. The attenuated IFN-inducing A2MC2-P90 should be useful for development of an improved PRRSV vaccine. PMID:27805024

  9. Pathological Characterization of an Outbreak of Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome in Northern Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Huong Giang, N T; Lan, N T; Nam, N H; Hirai, T; Yamaguchi, R

    2016-01-01

    In 2007, a highly pathogenic porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (HP-PRRSV) emerged in Vietnam and spread to nearly all regions of the country by 2010. Ten representative pigs of different age groups, infected naturally with HP-PRRSV in northern Vietnam in 2010, were used to characterize the pathological features of the infection. Infection was confirmed using reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and viral isolation. The clinical signs and gross findings in these pigs included high fever (>40.2°C), red skin, blue ears, anorexia, respiratory distress, diarrhoea, haemorrhagic pleurisy and lymphadenopathy. Reproductive failure was the main clinical feature in sows. PRRSV infection-associated microscopical lung and lymph node lesions were observed frequently, regardless of age of the animals. Lung lesions were characterized by interstitial pneumonia and were occasionally associated with haemorrhage and fluid exudation following alveolar collapse. Lymph nodes exhibited characteristic haemorrhage and apoptosis, lymphocytic depletion and disorganization secondary to fibrosis and capillary formation. Haematoxylin and eosin staining or caspase-3 immunohistochemistry revealed apoptosis induction in various tissues and organs, particularly the lymph nodes and lungs. Primarily haemorrhagic microscopical lesions were observed commonly in other organs including the spleen, liver, heart and kidney. Immunohistochemical examination revealed HP-PRRS antigen in the lung, lymph node, liver and kidney macrophages, and lung and kidney epithelial cells. Pigs infected naturally with HP-PRRS in the field have multisystemic disease characterized by marked apoptotic cell death.

  10. Actions of melatonin mixed with collagenized porcine bone versus porcine bone only on osteointegration of dental implants.

    PubMed

    Calvo-Guirado, José Luis; Gómez-Moreno, Gerardo; López-Marí, Laura; Guardia, Javier; Marínez-González, José María; Barone, Antonio; Tresguerres, Isabel F; Paredes, Sergio D; Fuentes-Breto, Lorena

    2010-04-01

    This study evaluated the effect of the topical application of melatonin mixed with collagenized porcine bone on the osteointegration on the rough discrete calcium deposit (DCD) surface implants in Beagle dogs 3 months after their insertion. In preparation for subsequent insertion of dental implants, lower molars were extracted from 12 Beagle dogs. Each mandible received two parallel wall expanded platform implants with a DCD surface of 4 mm in diameter and 10 mm in length. The implants were randomly assigned to the distal sites on each mandible in the molar area and the gaps were filled with 5 mg lyophilized powdered melatonin and porcine bone and collagenized porcine bone alone. Ten histological sections per implant were obtained for histomorphometric studies. After a 4-wk treatment period, melatonin plus porcine bone significantly increased the perimeter of bone that was in direct contact with the treated implants (P < 0.0001), bone density (P < 0.0001), and new bone formation (P < 0.0001) in comparison with porcine bone alone around the implants. Melatonin plus collagenized porcine bone on DCD surface may act as a biomimetic agent in the placement of endo-osseous dental implants and enhance the osteointegration. Melatonin combined with porcine bone on DCD implants reveals more bone in implant contact at 12 wk (84.5 +/- 1.5%) compared with porcine bone alone treated area (67.17 +/- 1.2%).

  11. Phenotypic map of porcine retinal ganglion cells

    PubMed Central

    Veiga-Crespo, Patricia; del Río, Patricia; Blindert, Marcel; Ueffing, Marius; Hauck, Stefanie M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Porcine retina is an excellent model for studying diverse retinal processes and diseases. The morphologies of porcine retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) have, however, not yet been described comprehensively. The aim of the present study was to créate a classification of the RGCs using the 1, 1′-dioctadecyl-3,3,3′,3′-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (DiI) tracing method. Methods About 170 RGCs were retrogradely labeled by injecting DiI into the optic nerve of postmortem eyes and statistically analyzed by two different clustering methods: Ward’s algorithm and the K-means clustering. Major axis length of the soma, soma area size, and dendritic field area size were selected as main parameters for cluster classification. Results RGC distribution in clusters was achieved according to their morphological parameters. It was feasible to combine both statistical methods, thereby obtaining a robust clustering distribution. Morphological analysis resulted in a classification of RGCs in three groups according to the soma size and dendritic field: A (large somas and large dendritic fields), B (medium to large somas and medium to large dendritic fields), C (medium to small somas and medium to small dendritic fields). Within groups, fine clustering defined several subgroups according to dendritic arborization and level of stratification. Additionally, cells stratifying in two different levels of the inner plexiform layer were observed within the clusters. Conclusions This comprehensive study of RGC morphologies in the porcine retina provides fundamental knowledge about RGC cell types and provides a basis for functional studies toward selective RGC cell degeneration in retinal disorders. PMID:23687427

  12. Alveolar bone loss in osteoporosis: a loaded and cellular affair?

    PubMed Central

    Jonasson, Grethe; Rythén, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    Maxillary and mandibular bone mirror skeletal bone conditions. Bone remodeling happens at endosteal surfaces where the osteoclasts and osteoblasts are situated. More surfaces means more cells and remodeling. The bone turnover rate in the mandibular alveolar process is probably the fastest in the body; thus, the first signs of osteoporosis may be revealed here. Hormones, osteoporosis, and aging influence the alveolar process and the skeletal bones similarly, but differences in loading between loaded, half-loaded, and unloaded bones are important to consider. Bone mass is redistributed from one location to another where strength is needed. A sparse trabeculation in the mandibular premolar region (large intertrabecular spaces and thin trabeculae) is a reliable sign of osteopenia and a high skeletal fracture risk. Having dense trabeculation (small intertrabecular spaces and well-mineralized trabeculae) is generally advantageous to the individual because of the low fracture risk, but may imply some problems for the clinician. PMID:27471408

  13. Retinoid induction of alveolar regeneration: from mice to man?

    PubMed

    Hind, M; Gilthorpe, A; Stinchcombe, S; Maden, M

    2009-05-01

    The use of retinoids to induce human lung regeneration is under investigation in a number of studies in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Retinoic acid (RA) has complex pleiotropic functions during vertebrate patterning and development and can induce regeneration in a number of different organ systems. Studies of retinoid signalling during lung development might provide a molecular basis to explain pharmacological induction of alveolar regeneration in adult models of lung disease. In this review the role of endogenous RA signalling during alveologenesis is explored and data suggesting that a number of exogenous retinoids can induce regeneration in the adult lung are discussed. Current controversies in this area are highlighted and a hypothesis of lung regeneration is put forward. Understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms of induction of regeneration will be central for effective translation into patients with lung disease and may reveal novel insights into the pathogenesis of alveolar disease and senescence.

  14. Rudolf Virchow and the recognition of alveolar echinococcosis, 1850s.

    PubMed

    Tappe, Dennis; Frosch, Matthias

    2007-05-01

    Alveolar echinococcosis, which is caused by the larval stage of the fox tapeworm Echinococcus multilocularis, is one of the most dangerous parasitic diseases. It is endemic in many parts of the Northern Hemisphere and an emerging health problem in the People's Republic of China. In Europe and North America, human cases are rare, but concomitant with an increase in the population of the final host, the red fox, an increase of human infections is expected. Rudolf Virchow, the father of the concept of cellular pathology, determined in the 1850s that an Echinococcus sp. was the causative agent of this enigmatic emerging disease. In his famous publication in 1855, he described the clinical course of the disease, its macroscopic aspects, and histopathologic findings in detail. He also identified the disease formerly known as alveolar colloid of the liver to be an infection with the larval stage of an Echinococcus sp.

  15. An automatic early stage alveolar-bone-resorption evaluation method on digital dental panoramic radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Min; Katsumata, Akitoshi; Muramatsu, Chisako; Hara, Takeshi; Suzuki, Hiroki; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2014-03-01

    Periodontal disease is a kind of typical dental diseases, which affects many adults. The presence of alveolar bone resorption, which can be observed from dental panoramic radiographs, is one of the most important signs of the progression of periodontal disease. Automatically evaluating alveolar-bone resorption is of important clinic meaning in dental radiology. The purpose of this study was to propose a novel system for automated alveolar-bone-resorption evaluation from digital dental panoramic radiographs for the first time. The proposed system enables visualization and quantitative evaluation of alveolar bone resorption degree surrounding the teeth. It has the following procedures: (1) pre-processing for a test image; (2) detection of tooth root apices with Gabor filter and curve fitting for the root apex line; (3) detection of features related with alveolar bone by using image phase congruency map and template matching and curving fitting for the alveolar line; (4) detection of occlusion line with selected Gabor filter; (5) finally, evaluation of the quantitative alveolar-bone-resorption degree in the area surrounding teeth by simply computing the average ratio of the height of the alveolar bone and the height of the teeth. The proposed scheme was applied to 30 patient cases of digital panoramic radiographs, with alveolar bone resorption of different stages. Our initial trial on these test cases indicates that the quantitative evaluation results are correlated with the alveolar-boneresorption degree, although the performance still needs further improvement. Therefore it has potential clinical practicability.

  16. Injury of the Inferior Alveolar Nerve during Implant Placement: a Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hom-Lay; Sabalys, Gintautas

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives The purpose of present article was to review aetiological factors, mechanism, clinical symptoms, and diagnostic methods as well as to create treatment guidelines for the management of inferior alveolar nerve injury during dental implant placement. Material and Methods Literature was selected through a search of PubMed, Embase and Cochrane electronic databases. The keywords used for search were inferior alveolar nerve injury, inferior alveolar nerve injuries, inferior alveolar nerve injury implant, inferior alveolar nerve damage, inferior alveolar nerve paresthesia and inferior alveolar nerve repair. The search was restricted to English language articles, published from 1972 to November 2010. Additionally, a manual search in the major anatomy, dental implant, periodontal and oral surgery journals and books were performed. The publications there selected by including clinical, human anatomy and physiology studies. Results In total 136 literature sources were obtained and reviewed. Aetiological factors of inferior alveolar nerve injury, risk factors, mechanism, clinical sensory nerve examination methods, clinical symptoms and treatment were discussed. Guidelines were created to illustrate the methods used to prevent and manage inferior alveolar nerve injury before or after dental implant placement. Conclusions The damage of inferior alveolar nerve during the dental implant placement can be a serious complication. Clinician should recognise and exclude aetiological factors leading to nerve injury. Proper presurgery planning, timely diagnosis and treatment are the key to avoid nerve sensory disturbances management. PMID:24421983

  17. Relationship of Anterior Alveolar Dimensions with Mandibular Divergence in Class I Malocclusion – A Cephalometric Study

    PubMed Central

    Korath, Vinoth Abraham; Nagachandran; Vijayalakshmi, Devaki; Parameswaran, Ratna; Raman, Priya; Sunitha, Catherine; Khan, Nayeemullah

    2016-01-01

    Introduction One of the major limiting factors in retraction of proclined teeth is the width of the alveolus both in maxilla and mandible. Aim The objective of this study was to assess the maxillary and mandibular anterior alveolar dimensions and to correlate with mandibular divergence in Class I bi-dento-alveolar protrusion patients. Materials and Methods Pretreatment lateral cephalograms (n=88) were analysed using a composite analysis with cephalometric software. Both maxillary and mandibular anterior alveolar widths and heights were measured and correlated with mandibular divergence. One-way analysis (ANOVA) and Pearson correlation test were used to compare and establish the significance between groups. Results Segregation of the data based on variation in the bi-cortical widths and heights showed that lesser alveolar widths and greater alveolar heights were associated with the high angled subjects and greater alveolar widths and lesser heights were associated with low angled subjects. Conclusion Patients with hyperdivergent mandible exhibited thin anterior alveolar width and greater alveolar height whereas low angled subjects had wider alveolar width and lesser alveolar height. Orthodontic treatment plan for retraction of anterior teeth must be based on these differences caused by variations in mandibular divergence. PMID:27437356

  18. Bruxism elicited by inferior alveolar nerve injury: a case report.

    PubMed

    Melis, Marcello; Coiana, Carlo; Secci, Simona

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this case report is to describe the history of a patient who received an injury to the right inferior alveolar nerve after placement of a dental implant, with bruxism noted afterward. The symptoms were managed by the use of an occlusal appliance worn at night and occasionally during the day, associated with increased awareness of parafunction during the day to reduce muscle pain and fatigue. Paresthesia of the teeth, gingiva, and lower lip persisted but were reduced during appliance use.

  19. Alveolar bone loss: mechanisms, potential therapeutic targets, and interventions.

    PubMed

    Intini, G; Katsuragi, Y; Kirkwood, K L; Yang, S

    2014-05-01

    This article reviews recent research into mechanisms underlying bone resorption and highlights avenues of investigation that may generate new therapies to combat alveolar bone loss in periodontitis. Several proteins, signaling pathways, stem cells, and dietary supplements are discussed as they relate to periodontal bone loss and regeneration. RGS12 is a crucial protein that mediates osteoclastogenesis and bone destruction, and a potential therapeutic target. RGS12 likely regulates osteoclast differentiation through regulating calcium influx to control the calcium oscillation-NFATc1 pathway. A working model for RGS10 and RGS12 in the regulation of Ca(2+) oscillations during osteoclast differentiation is proposed. Initiation of inflammation depends on host cell-microbe interactions, including the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway. Oral p38 inhibitors reduced lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced bone destruction in a rat periodontitis model but showed unsatisfactory safety profiles. The p38 substrate MK2 is a more specific therapeutic target with potentially superior tolerability. Furthermore, MKP-1 shows anti-inflammatory activity, reducing inflammatory cytokine biosynthesis and bone resorption. Multipotent skeletal stem cell (SSC) populations exist within the bone marrow and periosteum of long bones. These bone-marrow-derived SSCs and periosteum-derived SSCs have shown therapeutic potential in several applications, including bone and periodontal regeneration. The existence of craniofacial bone-specific SSCs is suggested based on existing studies. The effects of calcium, vitamin D, and soy isoflavone supplementation on alveolar and skeletal bone loss in post-menopausal women were investigated. Supplementation resulted in stabilization of forearm bone mass density and a reduced rate of alveolar bone loss over 1 yr, compared with placebo. Periodontal attachment levels were also well-maintained and alveolar bone loss suppressed during 24 wk of

  20. Chloride transport-driven alveolar fluid secretion is a major contributor to cardiogenic lung edema.

    PubMed

    Solymosi, Esther A; Kaestle-Gembardt, Stefanie M; Vadász, István; Wang, Liming; Neye, Nils; Chupin, Cécile Julie Adrienne; Rozowsky, Simon; Ruehl, Ramona; Tabuchi, Arata; Schulz, Holger; Kapus, Andras; Morty, Rory E; Kuebler, Wolfgang M

    2013-06-18

    Alveolar fluid clearance driven by active epithelial Na(+) and secondary Cl(-) absorption counteracts edema formation in the intact lung. Recently, we showed that impairment of alveolar fluid clearance because of inhibition of epithelial Na(+) channels (ENaCs) promotes cardiogenic lung edema. Concomitantly, we observed a reversal of alveolar fluid clearance, suggesting that reversed transepithelial ion transport may promote lung edema by driving active alveolar fluid secretion. We, therefore, hypothesized that alveolar ion and fluid secretion may constitute a pathomechanism in lung edema and aimed to identify underlying molecular pathways. In isolated perfused lungs, alveolar fluid clearance and secretion were determined by a double-indicator dilution technique. Transepithelial Cl(-) secretion and alveolar Cl(-) influx were quantified by radionuclide tracing and alveolar Cl(-) imaging, respectively. Elevated hydrostatic pressure induced ouabain-sensitive alveolar fluid secretion that coincided with transepithelial Cl(-) secretion and alveolar Cl(-) influx. Inhibition of either cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) or Na(+)-K(+)-Cl(-) cotransporters (NKCC) blocked alveolar fluid secretion, and lungs of CFTR(-/-) mice were protected from hydrostatic edema. Inhibition of ENaC by amiloride reproduced alveolar fluid and Cl(-) secretion that were again CFTR-, NKCC-, and Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase-dependent. Our findings show a reversal of transepithelial Cl(-) and fluid flux from absorptive to secretory mode at hydrostatic stress. Alveolar Cl(-) and fluid secretion are triggered by ENaC inhibition and mediated by NKCC and CFTR. Our results characterize an innovative mechanism of cardiogenic edema formation and identify NKCC1 as a unique therapeutic target in cardiogenic lung edema.

  1. Surface morphology and morphometry of rat alveolar macrophages after ozone exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Dormans, J.A.; Rombout, P.J.; van Loveren, H. )

    1990-09-01

    As the ultrastructural data on the effects of ozone on pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAM) are lacking, transmission (TEM) and scanning (SEM) electron microscopy were performed on rat PAM present in alveolar lavages following exposure to ozone. Rats were continuously exposed for 7 d to ozone concentrations ranging from 0.25 to 1.50 mg/m3 for 7 d followed by a 5-d recovery period. Additionally, morphometry on lung sections was performed to quantitate PAM. In a second experiment rats were continuously exposed to 1.50 mg O3/m3 for 1, 3, 5, or 7 d. To study the influence of concurrent ozone exposure and lung infection, due to Listeria monocytogenes, rats were exposed for 7 d to 1.50 mg O3/m3 after a Listeria infection. The surface area of lavaged control PAM was uniformly covered with ruffles as shown by SEM and TEM. Exposure to 0.5 mg ozone/m3 for 7 d resulted in cells partly covered with microvilli and blebs in addition to normal ruffles. The number of large size PAM increased with an increase in ozone concentration. After 1 d of exposure, normal-appearing as well as many small macrophages with ruffles and scattered lymphocytes were seen. Lavage samples taken after 5 or 7 d of exposure showed an identical cell composition to that taken after 3 d of exposure. After Listeria infection alone, lavage samples consisted of mainly lymphocytes and some macrophages. Small quantitative changes, such as an increase in the number of polymorphonuclear neutrophils and large-size PAM, occurred in lavages after ozone exposure and infection with L. monocytogenes. Morphometric examination of lung sections revealed a concentration-related increase in the number of PAM, even in animals exposed to 0.25 mg ozone/m3 for 7 d. Centriacinar regions were more severely affected than other regions of lung tissue.

  2. Transcriptomic analysis reveals the potential of highly pathogenic PRRS virus to modulate immune system activation related to host-pathogen and damage associated signaling in infected porcine monocytes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One of the largest risks to the continued stability of the swine industry is by pathogens like porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) that can decimate production as it spreads among individuals. These infections can be low or highly pathogenic, and because it infects monocytic ...

  3. Evaluation of optical reflectance techniques for imaging of alveolar structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unglert, Carolin I.; Namati, Eman; Warger, William C.; Liu, Linbo; Yoo, Hongki; Kang, DongKyun; Bouma, Brett E.; Tearney, Guillermo J.

    2012-07-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) visualization of the fine structures within the lung parenchyma could advance our understanding of alveolar physiology and pathophysiology. Current knowledge has been primarily based on histology, but it is a destructive two-dimensional (2-D) technique that is limited by tissue processing artifacts. Micro-CT provides high-resolution three-dimensional (3-D) imaging within a limited sample size, but is not applicable to intact lungs from larger animals or humans. Optical reflectance techniques offer the promise to visualize alveolar regions of the large animal or human lung with sub-cellular resolution in three dimensions. Here, we present the capabilities of three optical reflectance techniques, namely optical frequency domain imaging, spectrally encoded confocal microscopy, and full field optical coherence microscopy, to visualize both gross architecture as well as cellular detail in fixed, phosphate buffered saline-immersed rat lung tissue. Images from all techniques were correlated to each other and then to corresponding histology. Spatial and temporal resolution, imaging depth, and suitability for in vivo probe development were compared to highlight the merits and limitations of each technology for studying respiratory physiology at the alveolar level.

  4. Chronic alcohol ingestion changes the landscape of the alveolar epithelium.

    PubMed

    Downs, Charles A; Trac, David; Brewer, Elizabeth M; Brown, Lou Ann; Helms, My N

    2013-01-01

    Similar to effects of alcohol on the heart, liver, and brain, the effects of ethanol (EtOH) on lung injury are preventable. Unlike other vital organ systems, however, the lethal effects of alcohol on the lung are underappreciated, perhaps because there are no signs of overt pulmonary disorder until a secondary insult, such as a bacterial infection or injury, occurs in the lung. This paper provides overview of the complex changes in the alveolar environment known to occur following both chronic and acute alcohol exposures. Contemporary animal and cell culture models for alcohol-induced lung dysfunction are discussed, with emphasis on the effect of alcohol on transepithelial transport processes, namely, epithelial sodium channel activity (ENaC). The cascading effect of tissue and phagocytic Nadph oxidase (Nox) may be triggered by ethanol exposure, and as such, alcohol ingestion and exposure lead to a prooxidative environment; thus impacting alveolar macrophage (AM) function and oxidative stress. A better understanding of how alcohol changes the landscape of the alveolar epithelium can lead to improvements in treating acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) for which hospitalized alcoholics are at an increased risk.

  5. Dento-alveolar characteristics in adolescents born extremely preterm.

    PubMed

    Rythén, Marianne; Thilander, Birgit; Robertson, Agneta

    2013-08-01

    It has been shown that children born extremely preterm (EPT) often suffer from medical complications and growth restrictions in early childhood. Catchup growth diminishes these effects but the children are known to have lower weight, height, and head circumference as school children. Effects on enamel development have been shown. How this affects the dento-alveolar outcome during adolescence is not known. Forty EPT children with a gestational age (GA) of less than 29 weeks, at 12-16 years of age, and matched healthy controls born at term, with a GA of 37-43 weeks, were examined. Data from the clinical examination, dental casts, and bitewing radiographs were collected and compared. Malocclusion was noted, and dento-alveolar length, width, palatal height, and mesio-distal tooth width were measured. Medical diagnoses, neurological, and neuropsychiatric disturbances were noted at the time of the survey. The two groups were compared with an epidemiological normal reference material. The results showed no differences between the controls and reference material. Angle Class II was the most frequent malocclusion associated with morbidity, neurological, and neuropsychiatric disturbances, followed by deep bite and overjet. Three or more malocclusions were almost twice as common among the EPT children compared with the controls. Significantly smaller incisors, canines, and first molars were found. In summary, the EPT children, during adolescence, had medical aberrations as well as dento-alveolar effects opposed to the healthy children born at term. Dentists should be aware of this and treatment plans should be made in due time.

  6. Intraosseous schwannoma originating in inferior alveolar nerve: a case report.

    PubMed

    Suga, Kenichiro; Ogane, Satoru; Muramatsu, Kyotaro; Ohata, Hitoshi; Uchiyama, Takeshi; Takano, Nobuo; Shibahara, Takahiko; Eguchi, Jun; Murakami, Satoshi; Matsuzaka, Kenichi

    2013-01-01

    Schwannomas (neurilemmomas) are benign neoplasms derived from Schwann cells of the neurilemma and appear most frequently on the auditory nerve or peripheral nerves of the skin. They arise in the oral and maxillofacial region infrequently, and very rarely in the center of the jaw. We herein present a case of a rare mandibular intraosseous schwannoma derived from the main trunk of the inferior alveolar nerve in a 33-year-old man. Fusiform expansion in the mandibular canal was observed and a mass showing the target sign in the mandibular canal was confirmed on T2-weighted and Gd contrastenhanced T1-weighted MRI. Based on these findings, an inferior alveolar nerve-derived schwannoma or other benign nervous system neoplasm was diagnosed. A buccal side cortical bone flap in the mandibular molar region was removed to expose the mass, which was then peeled away from the nerve fibers and completely removed. Some inferior alveolar nerve fibers that were connected to the mass were removed at the same time, but the remaining nerve fiber bundle was preserved. Histopathology confirmed the diagnosis of a schwannoma with Antoni type A and Antoni type B regions. Although the patient experienced extremely mild paresthesia in the skin over the mental region and mental foramen at immediately after surgery, this had almost entirely disappeared at 7 years and 4 months later, and there has been no tumor recurrence.

  7. Three Dimensional Alveolar Flow Phenomena Using a CFD Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sznitman, Josue

    2005-11-01

    Respiratory flows in the lung periphery are characterized by low Reynolds numbers (typically Re<1) in sub-millimeter airways marked by the presence of alveoli (gas exchange units). We present for realistic breathing conditions using CFD simulations (CFX-5.7.1), 3D velocity fields and flow patterns induced by the expansion/contraction of alveoli and acinar ducts during oscillatory flow. Based on anatomical data, the alveolus and airway are modeled as a spherical cap connected to a cylindrical duct, both subject to moving wall boundary conditions simulating respiration. The resulting 3D flow patterns are complex and governed by the ratio of the alveolar to ductal flow rates. This ratio describes the interplay between alveolar recirculation, induced by the ductal shear flow over the alveolus opening, and alveolar radial flow, induced by the expansion/contraction motion. Our 3D results are in good agreement with 2D simulations reported in the literature. Although convection mechanisms may transport gas along acinar ducts and deeper into the acinus, velocity fields within alveoli predict that upon gas entering them, transport is then solely dominated by diffusion mechanisms.

  8. Molecular characterization and expression of porcine Siglec-5.

    PubMed

    Escalona, Z; Álvarez, B; Uenishi, H; Toki, D; Yuste, M; Revilla, C; Gómez del Moral, M; Alonso, F; Ezquerra, A; Domínguez, J

    2014-05-01

    In this study we describe the characterization of the porcine orthologue of Siglec-5. A cDNa clone was obtained from a porcine cDNa library derived from swine small intestine which encodes a 555 a-a type 1 transmembrane protein with sequence homology to human Siglec-5. This protein consists of four Ig-like domains, a transmembrane region, and a cytoplasmic tail with two tyrosine-based signalling motifs. When expressed as a recombinant protein fused to the Fc region of human IgG1, porcine Siglec-5 was able to bind porcine red blood cells in a sialic acid-dependent manner. Monoclonal antibodies (mAb) were developed against porcine Siglec-5 and used to analyse its expression in bone marrow and blood cells, and lymphoid tissues. Porcine Siglec-5 expression was mainly restricted to myelomonocytic cells and their precursors, being detected also, although at low levels, on plasmacytoid dendritic cells and B lymphocytes. In lymphoid tissues, ellipsoids of the spleen and subcapsular and medullar sinuses of lymph nodes were positive for Siglec-5. These mAbs were able to precipitate, from granulocyte lysates, a protein of approximately 85 kDa under non-reducing conditions, indicating that porcine Siglec-5 is expressed as a monomer in the plasma membrane.

  9. Justifying clinical trials for porcine islet xenotransplantation.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Cara E; Korbutt, Gregory S

    2015-01-01

    The development of the Edmonton Protocol encouraged a great deal of optimism that a cell-based cure for type I diabetes could be achieved. However, donor organ shortages prevent islet transplantation from being a widespread solution as the supply cannot possibly equal the demand. Porcine islet xenotransplantation has the potential to address these shortages, and recent preclinical and clinical trials show promising scientific support. Consequently, it is important to consider whether the current science meets the ethical requirements for moving toward clinical trials. Despite the potential risks and the scientific unknowns that remain to be investigated, there is optimism regarding the xenotransplantation of some types of tissue, and enough evidence has been gathered to ethically justify clinical trials for the most safe and advanced area of research, porcine islet transplantation. Researchers must make a concerted effort to maintain a positive image for xenotransplantation, as a few well-publicized failed trials could irrevocably damage public perception of xenotransplantation. Because all of society carries the burden of risk, it is important that the public be involved in the decision to proceed. As new information from preclinical and clinical trials develops, policy decisions should be frequently updated. If at any point evidence shows that islet xenotransplantation is unsafe, then clinical trials will no longer be justified and they should be halted. However, as of now, the expected benefit of an unlimited supply of islets, combined with adequate informed consent, justifies clinical trials for islet xenotransplantation.

  10. Phenol esterase activity of porcine skin.

    PubMed

    Laszlo, Joseph A; Smith, Leslie J; Evans, Kervin O; Compton, David L

    2015-01-01

    The alkyl esters of plant-derived phenols may serve as slow-release sources for cutaneous delivery of antioxidants. The ability of skin esterases to hydrolyze phenolic esters was examined. Esters of tyrosol and hydroxytyrosol were prepared from decanoic and lipoic acids. Ferulic acid was esterified with octadecanol, glycerol, and dioleoylglycerol. These phenolic derivatives were treated in taurodeoxycholate microemulsion and unilamellar liposomes with ex vivo porcine skin and an aqueous extract of the skin. Extracted esterases hydrolyzed the microemulsions at rates in the order: tyrosyl lipoate > tyrosyl decanoate > hydroxytyrosyl lipoate > hydroxytyrosyl decanoate. The tyrosyl decanoate was subject to comparatively little hydrolysis (10-30% after 24h) when incorporated into liposomes, while hydroxytyrosyl decanoate in liposomes was not hydrolyzed at all by the skin extract. Ferulate esters were not hydrolyzed by the extract in aqueous buffer, microemulsion, nor liposomes. Tyrosyl decanoate applied topically to skin explants in microemulsion were readily hydrolyzed within 4h, while hydrolysis was minimal when applied in liposomes. These findings indicate that porcine skin displays a general esterase activity toward medium-chain esters of tyrosol and hydroxytyrosol, which can be moderated by the physiochemical properties of the lipid vehicle, but no feruloyl esterase activity.

  11. Progesterone improves porcine in vitro fertilisation system.

    PubMed

    Malo, Clara; Gil, Lydia; Cano, Rafael; Martinez, Felisa; Gonzalez, Noelia

    2014-03-01

    In an effort to improve the quality of in vitro produced porcine embryos, the effect of progestagens - progesterone analogues - on the in vitro developmental competence of porcine oocytes was studied. A total of 1421 in vitro matured oocytes, from 4 replicates, were inseminated with frozen-thawed spermatozoa. Progestagens were added to late maturation and embryo cultures (10 IU/ml). Fertilisation success (pre-maturation, penetration, monospermy and efficiency) and nuclear maturation were evaluated. There were no differences among prematuration rates between groups (P = 0.221). Penetration rates were higher (P < 0.001) in the presence of progestagens (75.0%) as compared to the control (51.7%). However, no differences were observed in monospermy percentages (P = 0.246). The results indicated that supplementation with progestagens increased the efficiency of the in vitro fertilisation system (P < 0.001). An additional beneficial effect was observed in nuclear maturation with progestagens (P = 0.035). In summary, progestagen supplementation is an important factor to improve the in vitro fertilisation procedure.

  12. Influence of the Alveolar Cleft Type on Preoperative Estimation Using 3D CT Assessment for Alveolar Cleft

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hang Suk; Choi, Hyun Gon; Kim, Soon Heum; Park, Hyung Jun; Shin, Dong Hyeok; Jo, Dong In; Kim, Cheol Keun

    2012-01-01

    Background The bone graft for the alveolar cleft has been accepted as one of the essential treatments for cleft lip patients. Precise preoperative measurement of the architecture and size of the bone defect in alveolar cleft has been considered helpful for increasing the success rate of bone grafting because those features may vary with the cleft type. Recently, some studies have reported on the usefulness of three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT) assessment of alveolar bone defect; however, no study on the possible implication of the cleft type on the difference between the presumed and actual value has been conducted yet. We aimed to evaluate the clinical predictability of such measurement using 3D CT assessment according to the cleft type. Methods The study consisted of 47 pediatric patients. The subjects were divided according to the cleft type. CT was performed before the graft operation and assessed using image analysis software. The statistical significance of the difference between the preoperative estimation and intraoperative measurement was analyzed. Results The difference between the preoperative and intraoperative values were -0.1±0.3 cm3 (P=0.084). There was no significant intergroup difference, but the groups with a cleft palate showed a significant difference of -0.2±0.3 cm3 (P<0.05). Conclusions Assessment of the alveolar cleft volume using 3D CT scan data and image analysis software can help in selecting the optimal graft procedure and extracting the correct volume of cancellous bone for grafting. Considering the cleft type, it would be helpful to extract an additional volume of 0.2 cm3 in the presence of a cleft palate. PMID:23094242

  13. Cell-free extract from porcine induced pluripotent stem cells can affect porcine somatic cell nuclear reprogramming.

    PubMed

    No, Jin-Gu; Choi, Mi-Kyung; Kwon, Dae-Jin; Yoo, Jae Gyu; Yang, Byoung-Chul; Park, Jin-Ki; Kim, Dong-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Pretreatment of somatic cells with undifferentiated cell extracts, such as embryonic stem cells and mammalian oocytes, is an attractive alternative method for reprogramming control. The properties of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are similar to those of embryonic stem cells; however, no studies have reported somatic cell nuclear reprogramming using iPSC extracts. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the effects of porcine iPSC extracts treatment on porcine ear fibroblasts and early development of porcine cloned embryos produced from porcine ear skin fibroblasts pretreated with the porcine iPSC extracts. The Chariot(TM) reagent system was used to deliver the iPSC extracts into cultured porcine ear skin fibroblasts. The iPSC extracts-treated cells (iPSC-treated cells) were cultured for 3 days and used for analyzing histone modification and somatic cell nuclear transfer. Compared to the results for nontreated cells, the trimethylation status of histone H3 lysine residue 9 (H3K9) in the iPSC-treated cells significantly decreased. The expression of Jmjd2b, the H3K9 trimethylation-specific demethylase gene, significantly increased in the iPSC-treated cells; conversely, the expression of the proapoptotic genes, Bax and p53, significantly decreased. When the iPSC-treated cells were transferred into enucleated porcine oocytes, no differences were observed in blastocyst development and total cell number in blastocysts compared with the results for control cells. However, H3K9 trimethylation of pronuclear-stage-cloned embryos significantly decreased in the iPSC-treated cells. Additionally, Bax and p53 gene expression in the blastocysts was significantly lower in iPSC-treated cells than in control cells. To our knowledge, this study is the first to show that an extracts of porcine iPSCs can affect histone modification and gene expression in porcine ear skin fibroblasts and cloned embryos.

  14. Genetic Characterization of Porcine Circovirus Type 2 from Pigs with Porcine Circovirus Associated Diseases in Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Pereda, Ariel; Piñeyro, Pablo; Bratanich, Ana; Quiroga, María Alejandra; Bucafusco, Danilo; Craig, María Isabel; Cappuccio, Javier; Machuca, Mariana; Rimondi, Agustina; Dibárbora, Marina; Sanguinetti, Hector Ramón; Perfumo, Carlos Juan

    2011-01-01

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV-2) has been associated with syndromes grouped by the term porcine circovirus associated diseases (PCVAD). The PCV-2 isolates have been grouped into two major groups or genotypes according to their nucleotide sequence of whole genomes and/or ORF-2: PCV-2b, which have, in turn, been subdivided into three clusters (1A–1C), and PCV-2a, which has been subdivided into five clusters (2A–2E). In the present study, we obtained 16 sequences of PCV-2 from different farms from 2003 to 2008, from animals with confirmatory diagnosis of PCVAD. Since results showed an identity of 99.8% among them, they were grouped within a common cluster 1A-B. This preliminary study suggests a stable circulation of PCV-2b among the Argentinean pig population. PMID:23738099

  15. Activation of porcine cytomegalovirus, but not porcine lymphotropic herpesvirus, in pig-to-baboon xenotransplantation.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Nicolas J; Livingston, Christine; Knosalla, Christoph; Barth, Rolf N; Yamamoto, Shin; Gollackner, Bernd; Dor, Frank J M F; Buhler, Leo; Sachs, David H; Yamada, Kazuhiko; Cooper, David K C; Fishman, Jay A

    2004-05-01

    Tissue-invasive disease due to porcine cytomegalovirus (PCMV) has been demonstrated after pig-to-baboon solid-organ xenotransplantation. Porcine lymphotropic herpesvirus (PLHV)-1 is associated with B cell proliferation and posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation in swine but has not been observed in pig-to-primate xenotransplantation. Activation of PCMV and PLHV-1 was investigated in 22 pig-to-baboon xenotransplants by use of quantitative polymerase chain reaction. PCMV was found in all xenografts; increased viral replication occurred in 68% of xenografts during immunosuppression. PLHV-1 was found in 12 xenografts (55%); no increases in viral replication occurred during immunosuppression. Control immunosuppressed swine coinfected with PCMV and PLHV-1 had activation of PCMV but not PLHV-1. PCMV, but not PLHV-1, is activated in solid-organ xenotransplantation.

  16. Direct trabecular meshwork imaging in porcine eyes through multiphoton gonioscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masihzadeh, Omid; Ammar, David A.; Kahook, Malik Y.; Gibson, Emily A.; Lei, Tim C.

    2013-03-01

    The development of technologies to characterize the ocular aqueous outflow system (AOS) is important for the understanding of the pathophysiology of glaucoma. Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) offers the advantage of high-resolution, label-free imaging with intrinsic image contrast because the emitted signals result from the specific biomolecular content of the tissue. Previous attempts to use MPM to image the murine irido-corneal region directly through the sclera have suffered from degradation in image resolution due to scattering of the focused laser light. As a result, transscleral MPM has limited ability to observe fine structures in the AOS. In this work, the porcine irido-corneal angle was successfully imaged through the transparent cornea using a gonioscopic lens to circumvent the highly scattering scleral tissue. The resulting high-resolution images allowed the detailed structures in the trabecular meshwork (TM) to be observed. Multimodal imaging by two-photon autofluorescence and second harmonic generation allowed visualization of different features in the TM without labels and without disruption of the TM or surrounding tissues. MPM gonioscopy is a promising noninvasive imaging tool for high-resolution studies of the AOS, and research continues to explore the potential for future clinical applications in humans.

  17. Differential gene expression profiling of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae during induction of primary alveolar macrophage apoptosis in piglets.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Qin, Wanhai; Ruidong, Zhai; Liu, Shiting; Zhang, Hu; Sun, Changjiang; Feng, Xin; Gu, Jingmin; Du, Chongtao; Han, Wenyu; Langford, P R; Lei, Liancheng

    2015-01-01

    Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae (A. pleuropneumoniae) is the causative agent of porcine pleuropneumonia, a disease that causes serious problems for the swine industry. Successful infection by this bacterium requires breaking the first line of defence in the lungs, the primary alveolar macrophages (PAMs). Therefore, exploring A. pleuropneumoniae-PAM interactions will provide vital groundwork for the scientific control of this infectious disease, which has been little studied up to now. In this work, PAMs were isolated from piglets and co-incubated with A. pleuropneumoniae serovar 5b strain L20 in vitro, and their interaction, PAM cell death, and differential gene expression of A. pleuropneumoniae in response to PAM cell death were observed and analysed using confocal microscopy, electron microscopy, RT-PCR, Western blot, flow cytometry and the use of a gene expression profile chip. A. pleuropneumoniae quickly adhered to and invaded PAMs, inducing apoptosis, which was confirmed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The highest percentage of apoptosis in cells was confirmed using flow cytometry when the cells were infected at a multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 10 and incubated for 5 h, with higher expression of activated caspase-3 as measured by Western blot. Using microarray gene chips with 2868 probes containing nearly all of the genomic sequence of A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 5b strain L20, a total of 185 bacterial genes were found to be differentially expressed (including 92 up-regulated and 93 down-regulated genes) and involved in the process of apoptosis, as compared with the expression of control bacteria cultured without PAMs in BHI medium (mean expression ratios >1.5-fold, p < 0.05). The up-regulated genes are involved in energy metabolism, gene transcription and translation, virulence related gene such as LPS, Trimeric Autotransporter Adhesin, RTX and similar genes. The down-regulated genes are

  18. Continuous Problem of Function Continuity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jayakody, Gaya; Zazkis, Rina

    2015-01-01

    We examine different definitions presented in textbooks and other mathematical sources for "continuity of a function at a point" and "continuous function" in the context of introductory level Calculus. We then identify problematic issues related to definitions of continuity and discontinuity: inconsistency and absence of…

  19. Porcine aminopeptidase N mediated polarized infection by porcine epidemic diarrhea virus in target cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cong, Yingying; Li, Xiaoxue; Bai, Yunyun; Lv, Xiaonan; Herrler, Georg; Enjuanes, Luis; Zhou, Xingdong; Qu, Bo; Meng, Fandan; Cong, Chengcheng; Ren, Xiaofeng; Li, Guangxing

    2015-04-15

    Infection of polarized intestinal epithelial cells by porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) was characterized. Indirect immunofluorescence assay, real-time PCR, and transmission electron microscopy confirmed PEDV can be successfully propagated in immortalized swine small intestine epithelial cells (IECs). Infection involved porcine aminpeptidase N (pAPN), a reported cellular receptor for PEDV, transient expression of pAPN and siRNA targeted pAPN increased and decreased the infectivity of PEDV in IECs, respectively. Subsequently, polarized entry into and release from both Vero E6 and IECs was analyzed. PEDV entry into polarized cells and pAPN grown on membrane inserts occurs via apical membrane. The progeny virus released into the medium was also quantified which demonstrated that PEDV is preferentially released from the apical membrane. Collectively, our data demonstrate that pAPN, the cellular receptor for PEDV, mediates polarized PEDV infection. These results imply the possibility that PEDV infection may proceed by lateral spread of virus in intestinal epithelial cells. - Highlights: • PEDV infection of polarized intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) was characterized. • Porcine aminpeptidase N (pAPN) facilitated PEDV infection in IECs. • PEDV entry into and release from polarized cell via its apical membrane. • PEDV infection may proceed by lateral spread of virus in IECs.

  20. Porcine circovirus type 2 detection in in vitro produced porcine blastocysts after virus sperm exposure.

    PubMed

    Galeati, Giovanna; Zannoni, Augusta; Spinaci, Marcella; Bucci, Diego; Ostanello, Fabio; Panarese, Serena; Tamanini, Carlo; Sarli, Giuseppe

    2016-04-01

    This study was aimed at assessing the capability of semen experimentally infected with porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) to produce porcine blastocysts PCR positive for PCV2. Embryos were obtained from in vitro maturation (IVM) and in vitro fertilization (IVF) of porcine oocytes or by parthenogenesis. Sperm suspension was exposed to PCV2b and utilized for IVF. PCV2 spiked semen did not reveal any reduction in sperm viability or motility but its ability to produce infected blastocysts was irrelevant as only one out of 15 blastocysts obtained by IVF were PCV2b; however two blastocysts were PCV2a positive. Furthermore, the presence of PCV2 was demonstrated also in embryos obtained by parthenogenesis (one out of 17 was PCV2b and one PCV2a positive). Even if PCV2 firmly attaches to the surface of spermatozoa, experimentally spiked sperm were not effective in infecting oocytes during IVF and in producing PCR positive embryos. The infected blastocysts we obtained derived most probably from infected oocytes recovered at the abattoir.

  1. Functional analysis of the porcine USP18 and its role during porcine arterivirus replication.

    PubMed

    Ait-Ali, Tahar; Wilson, Alison W; Finlayson, Heather; Carré, Wilfrid; Ramaiahgari, Sreenivasa Chakravarthy; Westcott, David G; Waterfall, Martin; Frossard, Jean-Pierre; Baek, Kwang-Hyun; Drew, Trevor W; Bishop, Stephen C; Archibald, Alan L

    2009-06-15

    Emerging evidence places deubiquitylation at the core of a multitude of regulatory processes, ranging from cell growth to innate immune response and health, such as cancer, degenerative and infectious diseases. Little is known about deubiquitylation in pig and arterivirus infection. This report provides information on the biochemical and functional role of the porcine USP18 during innate immune response to the porcine respiratory and reproductive syndrome virus (PRRSV). We have shown that UBP gene is the ortholog of the murine USP18 (Ubp43) gene and the human ubiquitin specific protease 18 (USP18) gene and encodes a biochemically functional de-ubiquitin enzyme which inhibits signalling pathways that lead to IFN-stimulating response element (ISRE) promotor regulation. Furthermore we have demonstrated that overexpression of the porcine USP18 leads to reduced replication and/or growth of PRRSV. Our data contrast with the conclusion of numerous reports demonstrating that USP18-deficient mice are highly resistant to viral and bacterial infections and to oncogenic transformation by BCR-ABL, and highlight USP18 as a potential target gene that promotes reduced replication of PRRSV.

  2. Biological and binding activities of ovine and porcine prolactins in porcine mammary tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Jerry, D.J.

    1987-01-01

    The concentration of prolactin receptors may play a critical role in regulating growth and development of the mammary gland during gestation and tumor development; however, the discrepancy between specific binding of ovine prolactin (oPRL) and porcine prolactin (pPRL) in porcine mammary tissue was disturbing. It was possible that /sup 125/I-oPRL may be an unsuitable ligand for the procine prolactin receptor. The validate the use of oPRL in binding assays, the biological and binding activities of oPRL and pPRL were compared. A lactogenic bioassay of pPRL was developed using porcine mammary explants cultured in Medium 199 containing insulin, cortisol, and pPRL. The potencies of oPRL and pPRL were compared using this bioassay. Oxidation of glucose and incorporation of glucose into lipids were similarly enhanced by physiological concentrations of both oPRL and pPRL. However, specific binding of /sup 125/I-oPRL was 20%, while less than 1% of /sup 125/I-pPRL was bound. /sup 125/I-oPRL bound to high affinity sites.

  3. Multiplex PCR for Detection and Typing of Porcine Circoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Ouardani, M.; Wilson, L.; Jetté, R.; Montpetit, C.; Dea, S.

    1999-01-01

    Sets of oligonucleotide primers were designed according to the sequences of the open reading frames (ORFs) ORF1 and ORF2 of the prototype nonpathogenic PK-15 strain of porcine circovirus (PCV) type 1 (PCV-1). By the PCR performed with the various primer sets, genomic DNA or RNA from other bacterial or viral pathogens of the respiratory tracts of pigs could not be amplified. A positive amplification reaction could be visualized with DNA extracted from a viral suspension containing as few as 10 viral particles per ml. No DNA fragment could be amplified from lysates of continuous porcine cell lines (PT, ST, and PFT cells) known to be negative for PCV. When tested with clinical samples from pigs, the results of the single PCR method showed nearly 93% (13 of 14 samples) correlation with histopathological and immunohistochemical findings. Interestingly, subclinical PCV infections could be detected by single PCR with clinical samples that have been submitted from animals with irrelevant cases of respiratory and/or enteric problems. On the basis of the nucleotide sequences of PCV strains (PCV-2) recently associated with outbreaks of postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PWMS) in Quebec, Canada, pig farms, other primers were designed from the PCV-1 genome, and these primers failed to amplify genomic fragments specific to the ORF1 or ORF2 genes of clinical isolates associated with PWMS but amplified DNA from the PCV-1 strain. Two rapid multiplex PCR (mPCR) methods have been developed to distinguish between both genotypes of PCV. By those two mPCR methods, (i) species-specific primer pairs were used to amplify a DNA fragment of 488 bp specific for the ORF2 genes of both genotypes, whereas a 375-bp fragment was amplified from the ORF1 gene of the PCV-1 strain only, or (ii) species-specific primer pairs were used to amplify a DNA fragment of 646 bp specific for the ORF1 genes of both genotypes, whereas a 425-bp fragment was amplified from the ORF2 gene of the PCV-1 strain

  4. Porcine radial artery decellularization by high hydrostatic pressure.

    PubMed

    Negishi, Jun; Funamoto, Seiichi; Kimura, Tsuyoshi; Nam, Kwangoo; Higami, Tetsuya; Kishida, Akio

    2015-11-01

    Many types of decellularized tissues have been studied and some have been commercially used in clinics. In this study, small-diameter vascular grafts were made using HHP to decellularize porcine radial arteries. One decellularization method, high hydrostatic pressure (HHP), has been used to prepare the decellularized porcine tissues. Low-temperature treatment was effective in preserving collagen and collagen structures in decellularized porcine carotid arteries. The collagen and elastin structures and mechanical properties of HHP-decellularized radial arteries were similar to those of untreated radial arteries. Xenogeneic transplantation (into rats) was performed using HHP-decellularized radial arteries and an untreated porcine radial artery. Two weeks after transplantation into rat carotid arteries, the HHP-decellularized radial arteries were patent and without thrombosis. In addition, the luminal surface of each decellularized artery was covered by recipient endothelial cells and the arterial medium was fully infiltrated with recipient cells.

  5. Acute neurologic disease in Porcine rubulavirus experimentally infected piglets.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Jenifer; Gómez-Núñez, Luis; Lara-Romero, Rocío; Diosdado, Fernando; Martínez-Lara, Atalo; Jasso, Miguel; Ramírez-Mendoza, Humberto; Pérez-Torres, Armando; Rivera-Benítez, José Francisco

    2017-02-15

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the clinical disease, humoral response and viral distribution of recent Porcine rubulavirus (PorPV) isolates in experimentally infected pigs. Four, 6-piglet (5-days old) groups were employed (G1-84, G2-93, G3-147, and G4-T). Three viral strains were used for the experimental infection: the reference strain LPMV-1984 (Michoacán 1984) and two other strains isolated in 2013, one in Queretaro (Qro/93/2013) and the other in Michoacán (Mich/147/2013). Each strain was genetically characterized by amplification and sequencing of the gene encoding hemagglutinin-neuroamidase (HN). The inoculation was performed through the oronasal and ocular routes, at a dose of 1×10(6)TCID50/ml. Subsequently, the signs were evaluated daily and necropsies were performed on 3 different days post infection (dpi). We recorded all micro- and macroscopic lesions. Organs from the nervous, lymphatic, and respiratory system were analyzed by quantifying the viral RNA load and the presence of the infectious virus. The presence of the viral antigen in organs was evidenced through immunohistochemistry. Seroconversion was evaluated through the use of a hemagglutination inhibition test. In the characterization of gene HN, only three substitutions were identified in strain Mich/147/2013, two in strain LPMV/1984 (fourth passage) and one in strain Qro/93/2013, with respect to reference strain LPMV-84, these changes had not been identified as virulence factors in previously reported strains. Neurological alterations associated with the infection were found in all three experimental groups starting from 3dpi. Groups G1-84 and G3-147 presented the most exacerbated nervous signs. Group G2-93 only presented milder signs including slight motor incoordination, and an increased rectal temperature starting from day 5 post infection (PI). The main histopathological findings were the presence of a mononuclear inflammatory infiltrate (lymphocytic/monocytic) surrounding the

  6. Porcine skin flow-through diffusion cell system.

    PubMed

    Baynes, R E

    2001-11-01

    Porcine Skin Flow-Through Diffusion Cell System (Ronald E. Baynes, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina). Porcine skin can be used in a diffusion cell apparatus to study the rate and extent of absorption of topically applied chemicals through the skin. Although the skin of a number of animals can be used in this system, that of the pig most closely approximates human skin anatomically and physiologically.

  7. Genetic and antigenic changes in porcine rubulavirus.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Betancourt, José I; Trujillo, María E; Mendoza, Susana E; Reyes-Leyva, Julio; Alonso, Rogelio A

    2012-01-01

    Blue eye disease, caused by a porcine rubulavirus (PoRV), is an emergent viral swine disease that has been endemic in Mexico since 1980. Atypical outbreaks were detected in 1990 and 2003. Growing and adult pigs presented neurological signs, mild neurological signs were observed in piglets, and severe reproductive problems were observed in adults. Amino acid sequence comparisons and phylogenetic analysis of the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) protein revealed genetically different lineages. We used cross-neutralization assays, with homologous and heterologous antisera, to determine the antigenic relatedness values for the PoRV isolates. We found antigenic changes among several strains and identified a highly divergent one, making up a new serogroup. It seems that genetically and antigenically different PoRV strains are circulating simultaneously in the swine population in the geographical region studied. The cross neutralization studies suggest that the HN is not the only antigenic determinant participating in the antigenic changes among the different PoRV strains.

  8. Tiamulin resistance in porcine Brachyspira pilosicoli isolates.

    PubMed

    Pringle, M; Landén, A; Franklin, A

    2006-02-01

    There are few studies on antimicrobial susceptibility of Brachyspira pilosicoli, therefore this study was performed to investigate the situation among isolates from pigs. The tiamulin and tylosin susceptibility was determined by broth dilution for 93 and 86 porcine B. pilosicoli isolates, respectively. The isolates came from clinical samples taken in Swedish pig herds during the years 2002 and 2003. The tylosin minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) was >16 microg/ml for 50% (n=43) of the isolates tested. A tiamulin MIC >2 microg/ml was obtained for 14% (n=13) of the isolates and these were also tested against doxycycline, salinomycin, valnemulin, lincomycin and aivlosin. For these isolates the susceptibility to salinomycin and doxycycline was high but the MICs for aivlosin varied. The relationship between the 13 tiamulin resistant isolates was analyzed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Among the 13 isolates 10 different PFGE patterns were identified.

  9. Persistence of porcine rubulavirus in experimentally infected boars.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Benitez, José Francisco; Martínez-Bautista, Rebeca; Pérez-Torres, Armando; García-Contreras, Adelfa Del Carmen; Reyes-Leyva, Julio; Hernández, Jesús; Ramírez-Mendoza, Humberto

    2013-03-23

    Porcine rubulavirus is the etiological agent of blue eye disease in pigs. In boars, this virus causes orchitis and epididymitis and reduces seminal quality. The objective of this study was to determine the persistence of porcine rubulavirus in experimentally infected boars. Nine 12-month-old boars were infected with 5 ml of the PAC-3 strain of porcine rubulavirus at 1 × 10(5) TCID(50)/ml and held for 142 days post infection (DPI) to evaluate humoral immune response. The virus was isolated in cell cultures and detected by RT-PCR. Infection with porcine rubulavirus produced clinical signs beginning at 5 DPI. Necropsy results showed that 3 boars had lesions in the testicles and epididymes. Histological analysis showed the characteristic lesions in all infected boars. Porcine rubulavirus antibodies were detected in the second week post infection and increased significantly (P<0.05) over time. Isolation of the virus from semen was achieved between 5 DPI and 48 DPI and from the testicles and epididymes between 64 DPI and 142 DPI. Viral RNA was detected in the serum between 2 DPI and 64 DPI and in the semen until 142 DPI. These results confirm that the RNA of the porcine rubulavirus persists in the semen and that this virus remains in the reproductive tract for prolonged periods of infection. Semen of persistently infected boars, therefore, represents an important source of the virus and a risk factor for the spread of blue eye disease in swine populations.

  10. Expression of bioactive porcine interferon-alpha in Lactobacillus casei.

    PubMed

    Ma, Shi-jie; Li, Kun; Li, Xin-Sheng; Guo, Xiao-Qing; Fu, Peng-Fei; Yang, Ming-Fan; Chen, Hong-Ying

    2014-09-01

    In this study, we constructed an expression cassette containing the inducible lac promoter and the secretion signal from an S-layer protein of Lactobacillus brevis for the expression of porcine interferon-alpha (IFN-α) in Lactobacillus casei (Lb. casei). Reverse-transcriptase PCR verified the presence of porcine IFN-α mRNA in the recombinant Lb. casei. The porcine IFN-α protein expressed in the recombinant Lb. casei was identified by both Western blot analysis and ELISA. We used various pH values and induction times to optimize the yield of IFN-α, and found that induction with 0.8% lactose for 16 h under anaerobic conditions produced the highest concentrations of IFN-α. Furthermore, the activity of porcine IFN-α in the cultural supernatant was evaluated on ST cells infected with pseudorabies virus. The results revealed that porcine IFN-α inhibited virus replication in vitro. The findings of our study indicate that recombinant Lb. casei producing porcine IFN-α has great potential for use as a novel oral antiviral agent in animal healthcare.

  11. Alveolar hemorrhage and kidney disease: characteristics and therapy.

    PubMed

    Fatma, Lilia Ben; El Ati, Zohra; Lamia, Rais; Aich, Dorra Ben; Madiha, Krid; Wided, Smaoui; Maiz, Hedi Ben; Beji, Somaya; Karim, Zouaghi; Moussa, Fatma Ben

    2013-07-01

    Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis and Goodpasture's glomerular basement membrane disease are the most common causes of diffuse alveolar hemorrhage, a life-threatening disease. Systemic lupus erythematosus and the antiphospholipid syndrome are also causes of alveolar hemorrhage. We retrospectively reviewed 15 cases of diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) associated with renal diseases. Diagnosis of DAH was based on the presence of bloody bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. There were three men and 12 women, with a mean age of 50.5 years (extremes: 24-74 years). Proteinuria and hematuria were observed, respectively, in 15 and 14 cases. Six patients revealed arterial hypertension. Crescentic glomerulonephritis was diagnosed with kidney biopsies in ten cases. The etiology of renal disease was microscopic polyangiitis (MPA) in seven cases, Wegener disease in four cases, systemic lupus erythematous in one case, cryoglobulinemia in one case, myeloma in one case and propyl-thiouracil-induced MPA in one case. Hemoptysis occurred in 14 cases. The mean serum level of hemoglobin was 7.1 g/dL (5.1-10 g/dL). The mean serum creatinine concentration was 7.07 mg/dL (2.4-13.7 mg/dL). Gas exchange was severely compromised, with an oxygenation index <80 mmHg in 14 patients and <60 mmHg in seven patients. Bronchoalveolar lavage was performed in 11 cases, and had positive findings for hemorrhage in all. Methylprednisolone pulses and cyclophosphamide were used in 14 patients. Plasmapheresis was performed in three cases. One patient received cycles of Dexamethasome-Melphalan. Three patients died as a result of DAH. The mortality rate in our study was 20%.

  12. Effects of alveolar ridge preservation on delayed implant osseointegration

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Shan; Li, Bin; Xue, Hui-Min; Huang, Hai-Yun; Liu, Gang-Li

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of alveolar ridge preservation with Bio-Oss bone substitute (Geistlich Pharma) on delayed implant osseointegration. The 3rd and 4th left and right mandibular premolars were extracted from four adult healthy male and female dogs. For the experimental group, we randomly selected two extraction sockets in each dog to be filled with Bio-Oss bone substitute (Geistlich Pharma). The two remaining extraction sockets remained untreated and served as the control group. Three months after Bio-Oss placement, dental implants were inserted into the alveolar bone of the experimental group and the control group. The osteogenic activity of the bone around the implants was assessed by evaluating the histological morphology and by estimating histomorphometric parameters at 3 and 6 months after delayed implantation. At 3 months, Goldner’s trichrome staining analysis showed that the bone-implant contact rate and mineralised bone area around the implant were significantly higher in the experimental group (75.98% ± 8.97% and 69.52% ± 9.63%, respectively) than in the control group (56.13% ± 8.18% and 52.82% ± 7.25%, respectively; P < 0.05). However, at 6 months, the two groups showed no significant difference. Fluorescence microscopy analysis revealed that the average mineralisation apposition rate of the bone tissue around the dental implant in the experimental group at 3 and 6 months was 6.80 ± 0.43 μm and 8.38 ± 0.84 μm, respectively, which was significantly higher than the rate in the control group (P < 0.05). These data indicated that alveolar ridge preservation by using Bio-Oss placement can promote osseointegration of delayed implantation. This may be a promising option for clinical use. PMID:26379871

  13. Albuterol Improves Alveolar-Capillary Membrane Conductance in Healthy Humans

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Natalie E.; Baker, Sarah E.; Olson, Thomas P.; Lalande, Sophie; Johnson, Bruce D.; Snyder, Eric M.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Beta-2 adrenergic receptors (β2ARs) are located throughout the body including airway and alveolar cells. The β2ARs regulate lung fluid clearance through a variety of mechanisms including ion transport on alveolar cells and relaxation of the pulmonary lymphatics. We examined the effect of an inhaled β2-agonist (albuterol) on alveolar-capillary membrane conductance (DM) and pulmonary capillary blood volume (VC) in healthy humans. METHODS We assessed the diffusing capacity of the lungs for carbon monoxide (DLCO) and nitric oxide (DLNO) at baseline, 30 minutes, and 60 minutes following nebulized albuterol (2.5 mg, diluted in 3 mL normal saline) in 45 healthy subjects. Seventeen subjects repeated these measures following nebulized normal saline (age = 27 ± 9 years, height = 165 ± 21 cm, weight = 68 ± 12 kg, BMI = 26 ± 9 kg/m2). Cardiac output (Q), heart rate, systemic vascular resistance (SVR), blood pressure, oxygen saturation, forced expiratory volume at one-second (FEV1), and forced expiratory flow at 50% of forced vital capacity (FEF50) were assessed at baseline, 30 minutes, and 60 minutes following the administration of albuterol or saline. RESULTS Albuterol resulted in a decrease in SVR, and an increase in Q, FEV1, and FEF50 compared to saline controls. Albuterol also resulted in a decrease in VC at 60 minutes post albuterol. Both albuterol and normal saline resulted in no change in DLCO or DM when assessed alone, but a significant increase was observed in DM when accounting for changes in VC. CONCLUSION These data suggest that nebulized albuterol improves pulmonary function in healthy humans, while nebulization of both albuterol and saline results in an increase in DM/VC. PMID:27773996

  14. Anesthetic technique for inferior alveolar nerve block: a new approach

    PubMed Central

    PALTI, Dafna Geller; de ALMEIDA, Cristiane Machado; RODRIGUES, Antonio de Castro; ANDREO, Jesus Carlos; LIMA, José Eduardo Oliveira

    2011-01-01

    Background Effective pain control in Dentistry may be achieved by local anesthetic techniques. The success of the anesthetic technique in mandibular structures depends on the proximity of the needle tip to the mandibular foramen at the moment of anesthetic injection into the pterygomandibular region. Two techniques are available to reach the inferior alveolar nerve where it enters the mandibular canal, namely indirect and direct; these techniques differ in the number of movements required. Data demonstrate that the indirect technique is considered ineffective in 15% of cases and the direct technique in 1329% of cases. Objective Objective: The aim of this study was to describe an alternative technique for inferior alveolar nerve block using several anatomical points for reference, simplifying the procedure and enabling greater success and a more rapid learning curve. Materials and Methods A total of 193 mandibles (146 with permanent dentition and 47 with primary dentition) from dry skulls were used to establish a relationship between the teeth and the mandibular foramen. By using two wires, the first passing through the mesiobuccal groove and middle point of the mesial slope of the distolingual cusp of the primary second molar or permanent first molar (right side), and the second following the oclusal plane (left side), a line can be achieved whose projection coincides with the left mandibular foramen. Results The obtained data showed correlation in 82.88% of cases using the permanent first molar, and in 93.62% of cases using the primary second molar. Conclusion This method is potentially effective for inferior alveolar nerve block, especially in Pediatric Dentistry. PMID:21437463

  15. Alveolar Epithelial Cell Injury Due to Zinc Oxide Nanoparticle Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yong Ho; Fazlollahi, Farnoosh; Kennedy, Ian M.; Yacobi, Nazanin R.; Hamm-Alvarez, Sarah F.; Borok, Zea; Kim, Kwang-Jin; Crandall, Edward D.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale: Although inhalation of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles (NPs) is known to cause systemic disease (i.e., metal fume fever), little is known about mechanisms underlying injury to alveolar epithelium. Objectives: Investigate ZnO NP–induced injury to alveolar epithelium by exposing primary cultured rat alveolar epithelial cell monolayers (RAECMs) to ZnO NPs. Methods: RAECMs were exposed apically to ZnO NPs or, in some experiments, to culture fluid containing ZnCl2 or free Zn released from ZnO NPs. Transepithelial electrical resistance (RT) and equivalent short-circuit current (IEQ) were assessed as functions of concentration and time. Morphologic changes, lactate dehydrogenase release, cell membrane integrity, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), and mitochondrial activity were measured. Measurements and Main Results: Apical exposure to 176 μg/ml ZnO NPs decreased RT and IEQ of RAECMs by 100% over 24 hours, whereas exposure to 11 μg/ml ZnO NPs had little effect. Changes in RT and IEQ caused by 176 μg/ml ZnO NPs were irreversible. ZnO NP effects on RT yielded half-maximal concentrations of approximately 20 μg/ml. Apical exposure for 24 hours to 176 μg/ml ZnO NPs induced decreases in mitochondrial activity and increases in lactate dehydrogenase release, permeability to fluorescein sulfonic acid, increased intracellular ROS, and translocation of ZnO NPs from apical to basolateral fluid (most likely across injured cells and/or damaged paracellular pathways). Conclusions: ZnO NPs cause severe injury to RAECMs in a dose- and time-dependent manner, mediated, at least in part, by free Zn released from ZnO NPs, mitochondrial dysfunction, and increased intracellular ROS. PMID:20639441

  16. Enhanced rifampicin delivery to alveolar macrophages by solid lipid nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuan, Junlan; Li, Yanzhen; Yang, Likai; Sun, Xun; Zhang, Qiang; Gong, Tao; Zhang, Zhirong

    2013-05-01

    The present study aimed at developing a drug delivery system targeting the densest site of tuberculosis infection, the alveolar macrophages (AMs). Rifampicin (RFP)-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles (RFP-SLNs) with an average size of 829.6 ± 16.1 nm were prepared by a modified lipid film hydration method. The cytotoxicity of RFP-SLNs to AMs and alveolar epithelial type II cells (AECs) was examined using MTT assays. The viability of AMs and AECs was above 80 % after treatment with RFP-SLNs, which showed low toxicity to both AMs and AECs. Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy was employed to observe the interaction between RFP-SLNs and both AMs and AECs. After incubating the cells with RFP-SLNs for 2 h, the fluorescent intensity in AMs was more and remained longer (from 0.5 to 12 h) when compared with that in AECs (from 0.5 to 8 h). In vitro uptake characteristics of RFP-SLNs in AMs and AECs were also investigated by detection of intracellular RFP by High performance liquid chromatography. Results showed that RFP-SLNs delivered markedly higher RFP into AMs (691.7 ng/mg in cultured AMs, 662.6 ng/mg in primary AMs) than that into AECs (319.2 ng/mg in cultured AECs, 287.2 ng/mg in primary AECs). Subsequently, in vivo delivery efficiency and the selectivity of RFP-SLNs were further verified in Sprague-Dawley rats. Under pulmonary administration of RFP-SLNs, the amount of RFP in AMs was significantly higher than that in AECs at each time point. Our results demonstrated that solid lipid nanoparticles are a promising strategy for the delivery of rifampicin to alveolar macrophages selectively.

  17. How Active Are Porcine Endogenous Retroviruses (PERVs)?

    PubMed Central

    Denner, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERVs) represent a risk factor if porcine cells, tissues, or organs were to be transplanted into human recipients to alleviate the shortage of human transplants; a procedure called xenotransplantation. In contrast to human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs), which are mostly defective and not replication-competent, PERVs are released from normal pig cells and are infectious. PERV-A and PERV-B are polytropic viruses infecting cells of several species, among them humans; whereas PERV-C is an ecotropic virus infecting only pig cells. Virus infection was shown in co-culture experiments, but also in vivo, in the pig, leading to de novo integration of proviruses in certain organs. This was shown by measurement of the copy number per cell, finding different numbers in different organs. In addition, recombinations between PERV-A and PERV-C were observed and the recombinant PERV-A/C were found to be integrated in cells of different organs, but not in the germ line of the animals. Here, the evidence for such in vivo activities of PERVs, including expression as mRNA, protein and virus particles, de novo infection and recombination, will be summarised. These activities make screening of pigs for provirus number and PERV expression level difficult, especially when only blood or ear biopsies are available for analysis. Highly sensitive methods to measure the copy number and the expression level will be required when selecting pigs with low copy number and low expression of PERV as well as when inactivating PERVs using the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated nuclease (CRISPR/Cas) technology. PMID:27527207

  18. Electromechanical Reshaping of Ex Vivo Porcine Trachea

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Syed; Manuel, Cyrus T.; Protsenko, Dmitriy E.; Wong, Brian J. F.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The trachea is a composite cartilaginous structure particularly prone to various forms of convexities. Electromechanical reshaping (EMR) is an emerging technique used to reshape cartilaginous tissues by applying electric current in tandem with imposed mechanical deformation to achieve shape change. In this study, EMR was used to reshape tracheal cartilage rings to demonstrate the feasibility of this technology as a potentially minimally invasive procedure to alter tracheal structure. Study Design Controlled laboratory study using ex vivo porcine tracheae. Methods The natural concavity of each porcine tracheal ring was reversed around a cork mandrel. Two pairs of electrodes were inserted along the long axis of the tracheal ring and placed 1.5 millimeters from the midline. Current was applied over a range of voltages (3 volts [V], 4V, and 5V) for either 2 or 3 minutes. The degree of EMR-induced reshaping was quantified from photographs using digital techniques. Confocal imaging with fluorescent live and dead assays was conducted to determine viability of the tissue after EMR. Results Specimens that underwent EMR for 2 or 3 minutes at 4V or 5V were observed to have undergone significant (P <.05) reshaping relative to the control. Viability results demonstrated that EMR reshaping occurs at the expense of tissue injury, although the extent of injury is modest relative to conventional techniques. Conclusion EMR reshapes tracheal cartilage rings as a function of voltage and application time. It has potential as a minimally invasive and cost-efficient endoscopic technology to treat pathologic tracheal convexities. Given our findings, consideration of EMR for use in larger ex vivo tracheal segments and animal studies is now plausible. Level of Evidence N/A. PMID:25692713

  19. Nursing supports neonatal porcine testicular development.

    PubMed

    Rahman, K M; Lovich, J E; Lam, C; Camp, M E; Wiley, A A; Bartol, F F; Bagnell, C A

    2014-07-01

    The lactocrine hypothesis suggests a mechanism whereby milk-borne bioactive factors delivered to nursing offspring affect development of neonatal tissues. The objective of this study was to assess whether nursing affects testicular development in neonatal boars as reflected by: (1) Sertoli cell number and proliferation measured by GATA-4 expression and proliferating cell nuclear antigen immunostaining patterns; (2) Leydig cell development and steroidogenic activity as reflected by insulin-like factor 3 (INSL3), and P450 side chain cleavage (scc) enzyme expression; and (3) expression of estrogen receptor-alpha (ESR1), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) A, and relaxin family peptide receptor (RXFP) 1. At birth, boars were randomly assigned (n = 6-7/group) to nurse ad libitum or to be pan fed porcine milk replacer for 48 h. Testes were collected from boars at birth, before nursing and from nursed and replacer-fed boars at 50 h on postnatal day (PND) 2. Sertoli cell proliferating cell nuclear antigen labeling index increased (P < 0.01) from birth to PND 2 in nursed, but not in replacer-fed boars. Sertoli cell number and testicular GATA-4 protein levels increased (P < 0.01) from PND 0 to PND 2 only in nursed boars. Neither age nor nursing affected testicular INSL3, P450scc, ESR1, or VEGFA levels. However, testicular relaxin family peptide receptor 1 (RXFP1) levels increased (P < 0.01) with age and were greater in replacer-fed boars on PND 2. Results suggest that nursing supports neonatal porcine testicular development and provide additional evidence for the importance of lactocrine signaling in pigs.

  20. Glycosaminoglycans of the porcine central nervous system†

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhenling; Masuko, Sayaka; Solakyildirim, Kemal; Pu, Dennis; Linhardt, Robert J.; Zhang, Fuming

    2010-01-01

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAG) are known to participate in central nervous system processes such as development, cell migration, and neurite outgrowth. In this paper, we report an initial glycomics study on GAGs from porcine central nervous system. GAGs of the porcine central nervous system, brain and spinal cord, were isolated and purified by defating, proteolysis, anion-exchange chromatography and methanol precipitation. The isolated GAG content in brain was 5-times higher than in spinal cord (0.35 mg/g, compared to 0.07 mg/g dry sample). In both tissues, chondroitin sulfate (CS) and heparan sulfate (HS) were the major and the minor GAG. The average molecular weight of CS from brain and spinal cord was 35.5 and 47.1 kDa, respectively, and HS from brain and spinal cord was 56.9 and 34 kDa, respectively. The disaccharide analysis showed that the composition of CS from brain and spinal cords are similar with uronic acid (1→3) 4-O-sulfo-N-acetylgalactosamine residue corresponding to the major disaccharide unit (CS type-A) along with five minor disaccharide units. The major disaccharides of both brain and spinal cord HS were uronic acid (1→4) N-acetylglucosamine and uronic acid (1→4) 6-O-sulfo-N-sulfoglucosamine but their composition of minor disaccharides differed. Analysis by 1H- and two-dimensional-NMR spectroscopy confirmed these disaccharide analyses and provided the glucuronic/iduronic acid ratio. Finally, both purified CS and HS were biotinylated and immobilized on BIAcore SA biochips. Interactions between these GAGs and fibroblast growth factors (FGF1 and FGF2) and sonic hedgehog (Shh) were investigated by surface plasmon resonance. PMID:20954748

  1. Continuation Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fremont Unified School District, CA.

    The Fremont, California Unified School District organized a continuing education program through a workshop held in the summer of 1968. This paper presents the results of that workshop. Following a statement of philosophy, an outline of the characteristics of the continuation student, and an outline of the functions of the program, an overview of…

  2. Transient transmission of porcine endogenous retrovirus to fetal lambs after pig islet tissue xenotransplantation.

    PubMed

    Popp, Sarah K; Mann, David A; Milburn, Peter J; Gibbs, Adrian J; McCullagh, Peter J; Wilson, James Dennis; Tönjes, Ralf R; Simeonovic, Charmaine J

    2007-01-01

    term (> or =day 96) in NODscid mice but no PERV transmission was found. Both nested and real-time PCR assays revealed that 2/3 mice had become microchimeric. Long-term expression of PERV A, B and C as well as porcine 12S or COII RNAs was found at the graft site (day 96) only, indicating that PERV transcription and possibly replication, continued in the donor pig islet tissue after transplantation. Overall, detection of PERV transmission and microchimerism was limited by the sensitivity of the PCR assay and the primers chosen. The absence of stable PERV transmission and microchimerism in fetal lambs and the rejection of pig proislet xenografts correlated in time with the establishment of host immunocompetence. We therefore suggest that the frequent failure to identify PERV transmission late after transplantation could be due to the immunological destruction of PERV-infected host cells. Recipient NODscid mice demonstrated long-term microchimerism and intragraft PERV expression, which was consistent with their stable immunoincompetence.

  3. Alveolar hemorrhage after scuba diving: a case report.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Ming-Ju; Tsai, Mee-Sun; Tsai, Ying-Ming; Lien, Chi-Tun; Hwang, Jhi-Jhu; Huang, Ming-Shyan

    2010-07-01

    Self-contained underwater breathing apparatus (scuba) diving is increasingly popular in Taiwan. There are few references in the literature regarding pulmonary hemorrhage as the sole manifestation of pulmonary barotrauma in scuba divers, and no study from Taiwan was found in the literature. We present the case of a 25-year-old man who suffered alveolar hemorrhage related to pulmonary barotrauma as a complication of scuba diving. To our knowledge, this is the first case report describing a Taiwanese subject suffering from non-fatal pulmonary hemorrhage after scuba diving.

  4. Alveolar osteitis (dry socket) in a dog: a case report.

    PubMed

    Van Cauwelaert de Wyels, S

    1998-06-01

    Following extraction of a maxillary left first molar tooth in an eight year-old retriever, the dog re-presented five days later because of oral pain, which did not respond to analgesic therapy. The extraction site contained a foul-smelling fluid, but did not contain a clot or granulation tissue. Alveolar osteitis (dry socket) was diagnosed. The alveolus was curetted and flushed, and the dog was given cefalexine and prednisolone. The alveolus was filling with healthy granulation tissue one week later and the dog was no longer in pain.

  5. Diffuse alveolar damage syndrome associated with amiodarone therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Jirik, F. R.; Henning, H.; Huckell, V. F.; Ostrow, D. V.

    1983-01-01

    Amiodarone is an effective antiarrhythmic that has been used in Europe for over a decade and has been available for investigational use in North America for a shorter time. It has several well recognized side effects. Recent reports have related pulmonary disorders to the use of this drug; fibrosing alveolitis has been found by lung biopsy. Amiodarone's toxicity to the lung does not appear to be dose-related. Besides cessation of amiodarone administration, management of this complication includes steroid therapy. A case is described of nonspecific diffuse alveolar damage syndrome in a patient who had received amiodarone. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 FIG. 3 FIG. 4 PMID:6839242

  6. Does Orthodontic Treatment Affect the Alveolar Bone Density?

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jian-Hong; Huang, Heng-Li; Liu, Chien-Feng; Wu, Jay; Li, Yu-Fen; Tsai, Ming-Tzu; Hsu, Jui-Ting

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Few studies involving human participants have been conducted to investigate the effect of orthodontic treatment on alveolar bone density around the teeth. Our previous study revealed that patients who received 6 months of active orthodontic treatment exhibited an ∼24% decrease in alveolar bone density around the teeth. However, after an extensive retention period following orthodontic treatment, whether the bone density around the teeth can recover to its original state from before the treatment remains unclear, thus warranting further investigation. The purpose of this study was to assess the bone density changes around the teeth before, during, and after orthodontic treatment. Dental cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) was used to measure the changes in bone density around 6 teeth in the anterior maxilla (maxilla central incisors, lateral incisors, and canines) of 8 patients before and after orthodontic treatment. Each patient underwent 3 dental CBCT scans: before treatment (T0); at the end of 7 months of active orthodontic treatment (T1); after several months (20–22 months) of retention (T2). The Friedman test was applied to evaluate the changes in the alveolar bone density around the teeth according to the 3 dental CBCT scans. From T0 to T1, a significant reduction in bone density was observed around the teeth (23.36 ± 10.33%); by contrast, a significant increase was observed from T1 to T2 (31.81 ± 23.80%). From the perspective of the overall orthodontic treatment, comparing the T0 and T2 scans revealed that the bone density around the teeth was relatively constant (a reduction of only 0.75 ± 19.85%). The results of the statistical test also confirmed that the difference in bone density between T0 and T2 was nonsignificant. During orthodontic tooth movement, the alveolar bone density around the teeth was reduced. However, after a period of bone recovery, the reduced bone density recovered to its previous state from before the

  7. [Modern approaches to dental implants placement in deficient alveolar bone].

    PubMed

    Kulakov, A A; Gvetadze, R Sh; Brailovskaya, T V; Khar'kova, A A; Dzikovitskaya, L S

    2017-01-01

    The paper presents statistical data on implant placement procedures in Central Research Institute of Dentistry and Maxillofacial Surgery (Moscow, Russia) in 2010-2015. In 64% of cases inadequate bone volume was attributed to alveolar bone atrophy. Bone deficiency was equally often in upper and lower jaws (in 49.3 and 50.7%, correspondently) but varied in forms with complex configurations to be more specific for maxilla. The study also includes a series of clinical cases illustrating implant placement procedures in anatomically unfavorable settings.

  8. Does Orthodontic Treatment Affect the Alveolar Bone Density?

    PubMed

    Yu, Jian-Hong; Huang, Heng-Li; Liu, Chien-Feng; Wu, Jay; Li, Yu-Fen; Tsai, Ming-Tzu; Hsu, Jui-Ting

    2016-03-01

    Few studies involving human participants have been conducted to investigate the effect of orthodontic treatment on alveolar bone density around the teeth. Our previous study revealed that patients who received 6 months of active orthodontic treatment exhibited an ∼24% decrease in alveolar bone density around the teeth. However, after an extensive retention period following orthodontic treatment, whether the bone density around the teeth can recover to its original state from before the treatment remains unclear, thus warranting further investigation.The purpose of this study was to assess the bone density changes around the teeth before, during, and after orthodontic treatment.Dental cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) was used to measure the changes in bone density around 6 teeth in the anterior maxilla (maxilla central incisors, lateral incisors, and canines) of 8 patients before and after orthodontic treatment. Each patient underwent 3 dental CBCT scans: before treatment (T0); at the end of 7 months of active orthodontic treatment (T1); after several months (20-22 months) of retention (T2). The Friedman test was applied to evaluate the changes in the alveolar bone density around the teeth according to the 3 dental CBCT scans.From T0 to T1, a significant reduction in bone density was observed around the teeth (23.36 ± 10.33%); by contrast, a significant increase was observed from T1 to T2 (31.81 ± 23.80%). From the perspective of the overall orthodontic treatment, comparing the T0 and T2 scans revealed that the bone density around the teeth was relatively constant (a reduction of only 0.75 ± 19.85%). The results of the statistical test also confirmed that the difference in bone density between T0 and T2 was nonsignificant.During orthodontic tooth movement, the alveolar bone density around the teeth was reduced. However, after a period of bone recovery, the reduced bone density recovered to its previous state from before the orthodontic treatment

  9. Inferior alveolar nerve paresthesia relieved by microscopic endodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Yatsuhashi, Takaaki; Nakagawa, Kan-Ichi; Matsumoto, Miho; Kasahara, Masataka; Igarashi, Tomoko; Ichinohe, Tatsuya; Kaneko, Yuzuru

    2003-11-01

    We experienced two cases of inferior alveolar nerve paresthesia caused by root canal medicaments, which were successfully relieved by microscopic endodontic treatment. In the first case, the paresthesia might have been attributable to infiltration of calcium hydroxide into the mandibular canal through the root canals of the mandibular left second molar tooth. In the second case, the paresthesia might have been attributable to infiltration of paraformaldehyde through the root canals of the mandibular right second molar tooth. The paresthesia was relieved in both cases by repetitive microscopic endodontic irrigation using physiological saline solution in combination with oral vitamin B12 and adenosine triphosphate.

  10. Magnetic thermal ablation using ferrofluids: influence of administration mode on biological effect in different porcine tissues.

    PubMed

    Bruners, Philipp; Hodenius, Michael; Baumann, Martin; Oversohl, Jessica; Günther, Rolf W; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Mahnken, Andreas H

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of magnetic thermal ablation in different porcine tissues using either a singular injection or a continuous infusion of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. In the first setting samples of three ferrofluids containing different amounts of iron (1:171, 2:192, and 3:214 mg/ml) were singularly interstitially injected into specimens of porcine liver, kidney, and muscle (n = 5). Then the specimens were exposed to an alternating magnetic field (2.86 kA/m, 190 kHz) generated by a circular coil for 5 min. In the second experimental setup ferrofluid samples were continuously interstitially infused into the tissue specimens during the exposure to the magnetic field. To measure the temperature increase two fiber-optic temperature probes with a fixed distance of 0.5 cm were inserted into the specimens along the puncture tract of the injection needle and the temperature was measured every 15 s. Finally, the specimens were dissected, the diameters of the created thermal lesions were measured, and the volumes were calculated and compared. Compared to continuous infusion, a single injection of ferrofluids resulted in smaller coagulation volumes in all tissues. Significant differences regarding coagulation volume were found in kidney and muscle specimens. The continuous infusion technique led to more elliptically shaped coagulation volumes due to larger diameters along the puncture tract. Our data show the feasibility of magnetic thermal ablation using either a single interstitial injection or continuous infusion for therapy of lesions in muscle, kidney, and liver. Continuous infusion of ferrofluids results in larger zones of necrosis compared to a single injection technique.

  11. Magnetic Thermal Ablation Using Ferrofluids: Influence of Administration Mode on Biological Effect in Different Porcine Tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Bruners, Philipp Hodenius, Michael Baumann, Martin Oversohl, Jessica; Guenther, Rolf W.; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas Mahnken, Andreas H.

    2008-11-15

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of magnetic thermal ablation in different porcine tissues using either a singular injection or a continuous infusion of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. In the first setting samples of three ferrofluids containing different amounts of iron (1:171, 2:192, and 3:214 mg/ml) were singularly interstitially injected into specimens of porcine liver, kidney, and muscle (n = 5). Then the specimens were exposed to an alternating magnetic field (2.86 kA/m, 190 kHz) generated by a circular coil for 5 min. In the second experimental setup ferrofluid samples were continuously interstitially infused into the tissue specimens during the exposure to the magnetic field. To measure the temperature increase two fiber-optic temperature probes with a fixed distance of 0.5 cm were inserted into the specimens along the puncture tract of the injection needle and the temperature was measured every 15 s. Finally, the specimens were dissected, the diameters of the created thermal lesions were measured, and the volumes were calculated and compared. Compared to continuous infusion, a single injection of ferrofluids resulted in smaller coagulation volumes in all tissues. Significant differences regarding coagulation volume were found in kidney and muscle specimens. The continuous infusion technique led to more elliptically shaped coagulation volumes due to larger diameters along the puncture tract. Our data show the feasibility of magnetic thermal ablation using either a single interstitial injection or continuous infusion for therapy of lesions in muscle, kidney, and liver. Continuous infusion of ferrofluids results in larger zones of necrosis compared to a single injection technique.

  12. Involvement of CD16 in antibody-dependent enhancement of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus infection.

    PubMed

    Gu, Weihong; Guo, Longjun; Yu, Haidong; Niu, Junwei; Huang, Mingming; Luo, Xiaolei; Li, Ren; Tian, Zhijun; Feng, Li; Wang, Yue

    2015-07-01

    The immunological effect of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome disease virus (PRRSV) vaccines is thought to be influenced by a variety of host factors, in which antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) of infection is one crucial factor. Here, we assessed the mechanism of ADE of PRRSV infection. First, we found that subneutralizing serum could induce ADE of PRRSV infection in porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs). Quantitative PCR, Western blotting and flow cytometry revealed that CD16 is the most abundant Fcγ receptor (FcγR) expressed on the surface of PAMs; thus, the role of CD16 in ADE of PRRSV infection was examined in PAMs. By using functional blocking antibodies, we demonstrated that CD16 is involved in enhanced virus production in PRRSV-antibody immune complex-infected PAMs. Because PAMs co-express different FcγR isoforms, we evaluated the effects of CD16 in FcγR-non-bearing cells by transfection. Using these engineered cells, we found that CD16 could specifically bind to the PRRSV-antibody immune complex and subsequently mediate internalization of the virus, resulting in the generation of progeny virus. We also showed that efficient expression of CD16 required association of the FcR γ-chain. Together, our findings provide significant new insights into PRRSV infection, which can be enhanced by CD16-mediated PRRSV-antibody immune complexes. This CD16-mediated ADE may induce a shift in PRRSV tropism towards CD16-expressing cells, distributing virus to more organs during virus infection.

  13. Inhibition of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus replication with exosome-transferred artificial microRNA targeting the 3' untranslated region.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Li; Bao, Liping; Zhang, Xinyu; Xia, Xiaoli; Sun, Huaichang

    2015-10-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) is an economically important swine disease. As part of the development of RNA interference (RNAi) strategy against the disease, in this study a recombinant adenovirus (rAd) expressing the artificial microRNA (amiRNA) targeting the 3' untranslated region (UTR) was used to investigate the exosome-mediated amiRNA transfer from different pig cell types to porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs). Quantitative RT-PCR showed that the sequence-specific amiRNA was expressed in and secreted via exosomes from the rAd-transduced pig kidney cell line PK-15, PAM cell line 3D4/163, kidney fibroblast cells (PFCs) and endometrial endothelial cells (PEECs) with different secretion efficiencies. Fluorescent microscopy revealed that the dye-labeled amiRNA-containing exosomes of different cell origins were efficiently taken up by all of the five types of pig cells tested, including primary PAMs. Quantitative RT-PCR showed that the amiRNA-containing exosomes of different cell origins were taken up by primary PAMs in both time- and dose-dependent manners. Both quantitative RT-PCR and viral titration assays showed that the exosome-delivered amiRNA had potent anti-viral effects against three different PRRSV strains. These data suggest that the exosomes derived from pig cells could serve as an efficient miRNA transfer vehicle, and that the exosome-delivered amiRNA had potent anti-viral effects against different PRRSV strains.

  14. The non-structural protein Nsp2TF of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus down-regulates the expression of Swine Leukocyte Antigen class I.

    PubMed

    Cao, Qian M; Subramaniam, Sakthivel; Ni, Yan-Yan; Cao, Dianjun; Meng, Xiang-Jin

    2016-04-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is arguably the most economically-important global swine pathogen. Here we demonstrated that PRRSV down-regulates Swine Leukocyte Antigen class I (SLA-I) expression in porcine alveolar macrophages, PK15-CD163 cells and monocyte-derived dendritic cells. To identify the viral protein(s) involved in SLA-I down-regulation, we tested all 22 PRRSV structural and non-structural proteins and identified that Nsp1α and Nsp2TF, and GP3 significantly down-regulated SLA-I expression with Nsp2TF showing the greatest effect. We further generated a panel of mutant viruses in which the Nsp2TF protein synthesis was abolished, and found that the two mutants with disrupted -2 ribosomal frameshifting elements and additional stop codons in the TF domain were unable to down-regulate SLA-I expression. Additionally we demonstrated that the last 68 amino acids of TF domain in Nsp2TF are critical for this function. Collectively, the results indicate a novel function of Nsp2TF in negative modulation of SLA-I expression.

  15. Is there a relation between local bone quality as assessed on panoramic radiographs and alveolar bone level?

    PubMed

    Nackaerts, Olivia; Gijbels, Frieda; Sanna, Anna-Maria; Jacobs, Reinhilde

    2008-03-01

    The aim was to explore the relation between radiographic bone quality on panoramic radiographs and relative alveolar bone level. Digital panoramic radiographs of 94 female patients were analysed (mean age, 44.5; range, 35-74). Radiographic density of the alveolar bone in the premolar region was determined using Agfa Musica software. Alveolar bone level and bone quality index (BQI) were also assessed. Relationships between bone density and BQI on one hand and the relative loss of alveolar bone level on the other were assessed. Mandibular bone density and loss of alveolar bone level were weakly but significantly negatively correlated for the lower premolar area (r = -.27). The BQI did not show a statistically significant relation to alveolar bone level. Radiographic mandibular bone density on panoramic radiographs shows a weak but significant relation to alveolar bone level, with more periodontal breakdown for less dense alveolar bone.

  16. A novel SLC34A2 mutation in a patient with pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis

    PubMed Central

    Izumi, Hiroki; Kurai, Jun; Kodani, Masahiro; Watanabe, Masanari; Yamamoto, Akihiro; Nanba, Eiji; Adachi, Kaori; Igishi, Tadashi; Shimizu, Eiji

    2017-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis (PAM) is a rare autosomal recessive disease caused by mutations in SLC34A2 and characterized by intra-alveolar accumulation of microliths. We diagnosed a case of PAM in a 27-year-old Japanese female and identified a novel mutation in SLC34A2 (c.1390 G>C [G464R] in exon 12). PMID:28144448

  17. Changes in alveolar bone support induced by the Herbst appliance: a tomographic evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, João Paulo; Raveli, Taisa Boamorte; Schwartz-Filho, Humberto Osvaldo; Raveli, Dirceu Barnabé

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: This study evaluated alveolar bone loss around mandibular incisors, induced by the Herbst appliance. Methods: The sample consisted of 23 patients (11 men, 12 women; mean age of 15.76 ± 1.75 years), Class II, Division 1 malocclusion, treated with the Herbst appliance. CBCT scans were obtained before treatment (T0) and after Herbst treatment (T1). Vertical alveolar bone level and alveolar bone thickness of mandibular incisors were assessed. Buccal (B), lingual (L) and total (T) bone thicknesses were assessed at crestal (1), midroot (2) and apical (3) levels of mandibular incisors. Student's t-test and Wilcoxon t-test were used to compare dependent samples in parametric and nonparametric cases, respectively. Pearson's and Spearman's rank correlation analyses were performed to determine the relationship of changes in alveolar bone thickness. Results were considered at a significance level of 5%. Results: Mandibular incisors showed no statistical significance for vertical alveolar bone level. Alveolar bone thickness of mandibular incisors significantly reduced after treatment at B1, B2, B3, T1 and significantly increased at L2. The magnitude of the statistically significant changes was less than 0.2 mm. The changes in alveolar bone thickness showed no statistical significance with incisor inclination degree. Conclusions: CBCT scans showed an association between the Herbst appliance and alveolar bone loss on the buccal surface of mandibular incisors; however, without clinical significance. PMID:27275621

  18. Fas ligand-expressing lymphocytes enhance alveolar macrophage apoptosis in the resolution of acute pulmonary inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Barthel, Lea; Bednarek, Joseph M.; Yunt, Zulma X.; Henson, Peter M.; Janssen, William J.

    2014-01-01

    Apoptosis of alveolar macrophages and their subsequent clearance by neighboring phagocytes are necessary steps in the resolution of acute pulmonary inflammation. We have recently identified that activation of the Fas death receptor on the cell surface of macrophages drives macrophage apoptosis. However, the source of the cognate ligand for Fas (FasL) responsible for induction of alveolar macrophage apoptosis is not defined. Given their known role in the resolution of inflammation and ability to induce macrophage apoptosis ex vivo, we hypothesized that T lymphocytes represented a critical source of FasL. To address this hypothesis, C57BL/6J and lymphocyte-deficient (Rag-1−/−) mice were exposed to intratracheal lipopolysaccharide to induce pulmonary inflammation. Furthermore, utilizing mice expressing nonfunctional FasL, we adoptively transferred donor lymphocytes into inflamed lymphocyte-deficient mice to characterize the effect of lymphocyte-derived FasL on alveolar macrophage apoptosis in the resolution of inflammation. Herein, evidence is presented that lymphocytes expressing FasL enhance alveolar macrophage apoptosis during the resolution of LPS-induced inflammation. Moreover, lymphocyte induction of alveolar macrophage apoptosis results in contraction of the alveolar macrophage pool, which occurs in a FasL-dependent manner. Specifically, FasL-expressing CD8+ T lymphocytes potently induce alveolar macrophage apoptosis and contraction of the alveolar macrophage pool. Together, these studies identify a novel role for CD8+ T lymphocytes in the resolution of acute pulmonary inflammation. PMID:24838751

  19. A Therapeutic Technique for the Improvement of Lingua-Alveolar Valving Abilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dworkin, James Paul

    1978-01-01

    The study was designed to determine if a remedial program using a bite-block device could inhibit hypermandibular activity and thereby improve the lingua-alveolar valving abilities of four boys (mean age 7.2 years-old) who demonstrated multiple lingua-alveolar phonemic errors. (Author/PHR)

  20. Regional differences in alveolar density in the human lung are related to lung height.

    PubMed

    McDonough, John E; Knudsen, Lars; Wright, Alexander C; Elliott, W Mark; Ochs, Matthias; Hogg, James C

    2015-06-01

    The gravity-dependent pleural pressure gradient within the thorax produces regional differences in lung inflation that have a profound effect on the distribution of ventilation within the lung. This study examines the hypothesis that gravitationally induced differences in stress within the thorax also influence alveolar density in terms of the number of alveoli contained per unit volume of lung. To test this hypothesis, we measured the number of alveoli within known volumes of lung located at regular intervals between the apex and base of four normal adult human lungs that were rapidly frozen at a constant transpulmonary pressure, and used microcomputed tomographic imaging to measure alveolar density (number alveoli/mm3) at regular intervals between the lung apex and base. These results show that at total lung capacity, alveolar density in the lung apex is 31.6 ± 3.4 alveoli/mm3, with 15 ± 6% of parenchymal tissue consisting of alveolar duct. The base of the lung had an alveolar density of 21.2 ± 1.6 alveoli/mm3 and alveolar duct volume fraction of 29 ± 6%. The difference in alveolar density can be negated by factoring in the effects of alveolar compression due to the pleural pressure gradient at the base of the lung in vivo and at functional residual capacity.

  1. Simultaneous paresthesia of the lingual nerve and inferior alveolar nerve caused by a radicular cyst.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Yoshiki; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Hamada, Akiko; Kondoh, Toshirou; Suzuki, Mami; Noguchi, Kazuhide; Ito, Ko; Seto, Kanichi

    2005-10-01

    The inferior alveolar nerve is sometimes affected by periapical pathoses and mandibular cysts. However, mandibular intraosseous lesions have not been reported to disturb the lingual nerve. A case of simultaneous paresthesia of the right lingual nerve and the right inferior alveolar nerve is presented. The possible mechanisms of this extremely uncommon condition are discussed.

  2. Popliteal pterygium syndrome (PPS) with intra-alveolar syngnathia: a discussion of anesthetic and surgical considerations.

    PubMed

    Gahm, Caroline; Kuylenstierna, Richard; Papatziamos, Georgios

    2007-10-01

    Popliteal pterygium syndrome (PPS) is a rare genetic disorder that involves the association of a popliteal web with a combination of craniofacial, genitourinary and extremity malformations. In this article, we describe a patient with PPS complicated with multiple intra-alveolar syngnathia. We discuss the anesthetic and the surgical management of this case and review the literature regarding PPS and intra-alveolar syngnathia.

  3. Reaction of alveolar macrophages to inhaled metal aerosols.

    PubMed Central

    Camner, P; Johansson, A

    1992-01-01

    For more than a decade we have exposed rabbits to different metals, usually in soluble form, and investigated the effects on the lungs. The metal concentrations have been around 1 mg/m3,i.e., not more than a factor of 10 above occupational threshold limit values. The exposure periods have been 1-8 months (6 hr/day, 5 days/week). We have studied especially the morphology and function of alveolar macrophages (AM), the morphology of alveolar type I and type II epithelial cells, and analyzed lung phospholipids. Several metals produce specific, complex effects. For example, metallic and soluble nickel (NiCl2) increase both number and size of the type II cells, increase the production of surfactant, and affect morphology and function of AM. Cobalt (CoCl2) induces a different effect on type II cells from nickel, causing the formation of nodules in these cells. Trivalent chromium [Cr(NO3)3] does not affect either type II cells or the amount of surfactant significantly, but markedly affects AM. The administered metals affect AM both directly and indirectly. For example, nickel induces an increased production of surfactant, resulting in overfed AM with an increased metabolic activity. However, nickel also induces a direct decrease in the release of lysozyme activity by AM. Our results emphasize the complexity of the effects on the lungs of inhaled agents, which can act both directly and indirectly on AM. PMID:1396456

  4. Hepatic alveolar echinococcosis: clinical report from an endemic region

    PubMed Central

    Polat, Kamil Y.; Balik, Ahmet A.; Celebi, Fehmi

    2002-01-01

    Objective To review the clinical management of alveolar echinococcosis. Design A retrospective analysis. Setting A university-affiliated hospital in Turkey. Patients Forty patients treated for alveolar echinococcosis between 1987 and 2000. Interventions Curative resection followed by chemotherapy, or medical palliation with chemotherapy only. Palliative procedures such as bilioenteric or external drainage were done for cholestatic jaundice and liver abscess. Outcome measures Results of medical and surgical treatment. Results Seventeen patients had a resectable tumour and all underwent curative resection. Of the other 23 patients with nonresectable tumour, 11 underwent palliative surgical procedures such as bilioenteric or external drainage for cholestatic jaundice or liver abscess. All patients received long-term albendazole therapy. Four patients with nonresectable tumour died because of chronic liver failure. In a 6.5-year follow-up, there was no recurrence in patients who underwent curative resection. The efficacy of chemotherapy is limited in nonresectable disease. Conclusions To increase the rate of early detection and curative resection, screening programs are essential. Research on new chemotherapeutic approaches should be made to improve survival in patients with nonresectable disease. PMID:12500915

  5. Microtomography of the human tooth-alveolar bone complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalstra, Michel; Cattaneo, Paolo M.; Beckmann, Felix; Sakima, Maurício T.; Lemor, Carsten; Laursen, Morten G.; Melsen, Birte

    2006-08-01

    In this study the structure of the adult human dentoalveolar process is examined using conventional and synchrotron radiation-based microtomography (SRμCT). Mandibular and maxillary segments containing two to five adjacent teeth were harvested at autopsy from 49 adult donors. These segments were embedded in blocks of methylmetacrylate and scanned using a conventional table-top μCT-scanner at a pixel size and slice thickness of 35 μm. A few segments were also scanned at a synchrotron facility at an initial pixel size of 16.4 μm, which was binned by a factor 2 to result in an effective voxel size of almost 32.8 μm. The three-dimensional reconstructions revealed how intricately the teeth are supported by the alveolar bone. Furthermore, this support is highly inhomogeneous with respect to the buccal, mesial, lingual and distal quadrants. Reflecting their various degrees of mineralization, tissues like bone, dentine, enamel and cementum, could well be identified, especially in the scans made with SRμCT. Despite comparable voxel sizes, the reconstructed data-sets obtained with conventional μCT were less detailed and somewhat fuzzy in appearance compared to the data-sets of SRμCT. However, for quantification of macroscopical features like the thickness of the alveolar wall or the presence of dehiscences/fenestrations this seemed sufficient.

  6. Alveolar hemorrhage in systemic lupus erythematosus: a cohort review.

    PubMed

    Andrade, C; Mendonça, T; Farinha, F; Correia, J; Marinho, A; Almeida, I; Vasconcelos, C

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) is a rare but potentially catastrophic manifestation with a high mortality. Among rheumatologic diseases, it occurs most frequently in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and systemic vasculitis. Despite new diagnostic tools and therapies, it remains a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. The aim of this work was to characterize the SLE patients with an episode of alveolar hemorrhage followed in our Clinical Immunology Unit (CIU). A retrospective chart review was carried out for all patients with SLE followed in CIU between 1984 and the end of 2013. We reviewed the following data: demographic characteristics, clinical and laboratory data, radiologic investigations, histologic studies, treatment, and outcome. We identified 10 episodes of DAH, corresponding to seven patients, all female. These represent 1.6% of SLE patients followed in our Unit. The age at DAH attack was 42.75 ± 18.9 years. The average time between diagnosis of SLE and the onset of DAH was 7.1 years. Three patients had the diagnosis of SLE and the DAH attack at the same time. Disease activity according to SLEDAI was high, ranging from 15 to 41. All patients were treated with methylprednisolone, 37.5% cyclophosphamide and 28.6% plasmapheresis. The overall mortality rate was 28.6%.

  7. Transport Mechanism of Nicotine in Primary Cultured Alveolar Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Takano, Mikihisa; Nagahiro, Machi; Yumoto, Ryoko

    2016-02-01

    Nicotine is absorbed from the lungs into the systemic circulation during cigarette smoking. However, there is little information concerning the transport mechanism of nicotine in alveolar epithelial cells. In this study, we characterized the uptake of nicotine in rat primary cultured type II (TII) and transdifferentiated type I-like (TIL) epithelial cells. In both TIL and TII cells, [(3)H]nicotine uptake was time and temperature-dependent, and showed saturation kinetics. [(3)H]Nicotine uptake in these cells was not affected by Na(+), but was sensitive to extracellular and intracellular pH, suggesting the involvement of a nicotine/proton antiport system. The uptake of [(3)H]nicotine in these cells was potently inhibited by organic cations such as clonidine, diphenhydramine, and pyrilamine, but was not affected by substrates and/or inhibitors of known organic cation transporters such as carnitine, 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium, and tetraethylammonium. In addition, the uptake of [(3)H]nicotine in TIL cells was stimulated by preloading the cells with unlabeled nicotine, pyrilamine, and diphenhydramine, but not with tetraethylammonium. These results suggest that a novel proton-coupled antiporter is involved in the uptake of nicotine in alveolar epithelial cells and its absorption from the lungs into the systemic circulation.

  8. Peptide secreted by human alveolar macrophages releases neutrophil granule contents

    SciTech Connect

    MacArthur, C.K.; Miller, E.J.; Cohen, A.B.

    1987-11-15

    A monoclonal antibody was developed against an 8000-kDa enzyme-releasing peptide (ERP) released from human alveolar macrophages. ERP was isolated on an immunoaffinity column containing the antibody bound to staphylococcal protein A-Sepharose, and by autoradiography. Release of ERP from the macrophages is not changed by plastic adherence, phagocytosis, calcium ionophore, or phorbol esters. The peptide was not antigenically similar to interferon-..gamma.., tumor necrosis factor, or interleukin l..cap alpha.. or 1..beta... The release of constituents from azurophilic and specific granules was the main identified biologic function of ERP. ERP was a more effective secretagogue in the untreated neutrophils and f-met-leu-phe was more effective in the cytochalasin B-treated neutrophils. Absorption of ERP from macrophage-conditioned medium removed a small amount of the chemotactic activity; however, the immunopurified peptide was not chemotactic or chemokinetic for neutrophils, and at high concentrations, it suppressed base line chemokinesis. Treatment of washed macrophages with trypsin released active ERP of approximately the same m.w. of spontaneously secreted ERP. These studies showed that human alveolar macrophages release a peptide which is a secretagogue for human neutrophils under conditions which may be encountered in the lungs during certain disease states. Proteolytic enzymes which are free in the lungs may release the peptide and lead to the secretion of neutrophil enzymes.

  9. Proteomic analysis of human dental cementum and alveolar bone

    PubMed Central

    Salmon, Cristiane R.; Tomazela, Daniela M.; Ruiz, Karina Gonzales Silvério; Foster, Brian L.; Leme, Adriana Franco Paes; Sallum, Enilson Antonio; Somerman, Martha J.; Nociti, Francisco H.

    2013-01-01

    Dental cementum (DC) is a bone-like tissue covering the tooth root and responsible for attaching the tooth to the alveolar bone (AB) via the periodontal ligament (PDL). Studies have unsuccessfully tried to identify factors specific to DC versus AB, in an effort to better understand DC development and regeneration. The present study aimed to use matched human DC and AB samples (n=7) to generate their proteomes for comparative analysis. Bone samples were harvested from tooth extraction sites, whereas DC samples were obtained from the apical root portion of extracted third molars. Samples were denatured, followed by protein extraction reduction, alkylation and digestion for analysis by nanoAcquity HPLC system and LTQ-FT Ultra. Data analysis demonstrated that a total of 318 proteins were identified in AB and DC. In addition to shared proteins between these tissues, 105 and 83 proteins exclusive to AB or DC were identified, respectively. This is the first report analyzing the proteomic composition of human DC matrix and identifying putative unique and enriched proteins in comparison to alveolar bone. These findings may provide novel insights into developmental differences between DC and AB, and identify candidate biomarkers that may lead to more efficient and predictable therapies for periodontal regeneration. PMID:24007660

  10. Myogenic potential of human alveolar mucosa derived cells.

    PubMed

    Zorin, Vadim L; Pulin, Andrey A; Eremin, Ilya I; Korsakov, Ivan N; Zorina, Alla I; Khromova, Natalia V; Sokova, Olga I; Kotenko, Konstantin V; Kopnin, Pavel B

    2017-03-19

    Difficulties related to the obtainment of stem/progenitor cells from skeletal muscle tissue make the search for new sources of myogenic cells highly relevant. Alveolar mucosa might be considered as a perspective candidate due to availability and high proliferative capacity of its cells. Human alveolar mucosa cells (AMC) were obtained from gingival biopsy samples collected from 10 healthy donors and cultured up to 10 passages. AMC matched the generally accepted multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells criteria and possess population doubling time, caryotype and immunophenotype stability during long-term cultivation. The single myogenic induction of primary cell cultures resulted in differentiation of AMC into multinucleated myotubes. The myogenic differentiation was associated with expression of skeletal muscle markers: skeletal myosin, skeletal actin, myogenin and MyoD1. Efficiency of myogenic differentiation in AMC cultures was similar to that in skeletal muscle cells. Furthermore, some of differentiated myotubes exhibited contractions in vitro. Our data confirms the sufficiently high myogenic potential and proliferative capacity of AMC and their ability to maintain in vitro proliferation-competent myogenic precursor cells regardless of the passage number.

  11. Type II alveolar epithelial cell in vitro culture in aerobiosis.

    PubMed

    Aerts, C; Voisin, C; Wallaert, B

    1988-08-01

    A method of Type II alveolar epithelial cell culture in aerobiosis has been developed. Isolation of Type II cells was performed by digesting guinea-pig lung tissue with crude trypsin and elastase and using discontinuous Percoll density gradients. The Type II cells, as identified by light and electron microscopy, were cultured in aerobiosis for up to six days, in direct contact with the atmosphere in conditions mimicking those present in the lower respiratory tract. Significant activities of cellular superoxide dismutase (SOD), manganese dependent superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD), catalase and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) were found at the time of isolation. In contrast, cell glutathione content varied widely from one experiment to another. Changes of antioxidant enzymes were evaluated during cell culture in aerobiosis. SOD, Mn-SOD and catalase were significantly decreased after three days but were not significantly different between a three day and six day culture. Antioxidant changes did not influence the cell culture. In marked contrast, decrease in cell glutathione was associated with rapid cell death, whereas good cell survival was obtained at high levels of cell glutathione. Cell culture in aerobiosis will permit a precise evaluation of the effects of gases, particularly oxidant gases, on a primary culture of Type II alveolar epithelial cells.

  12. Are Panoramic Radiographs Reliable to Diagnose Mild Alveolar Bone Resorption?

    PubMed Central

    Semenoff, Larissa; Semenoff, Tereza Aparecida Delle; Pedro, Fabio Luiz Miranda; Volpato, Evaristo Ricci; Machado, Maria Aparecida de Andrade Moreira; Borges, Álvaro Henrique; Semenoff-Segundo, Alex

    2011-01-01

    It is extremely important to assess variations between the most used radiographs in dental practice, since minimum distortion on obtained images may change diagnosis, treatment plan, and prognosis for the patient. For this, the distance between the enamel-cementum junction and the alveolar bone crest was measured on conventional and digitized periapical, bitewing, and panoramic radiographs and compared among them. From a total of 1484 records, 39 sets of radiographs that fulfilled the inclusion criteria of the study sample were selected. The measurements were grouped according to the intensity of bone loss. Statistically significant difference was found in the averages of the measurements assessed in radiographs with absence of bone loss between conventional panoramic and periapical radiographs, between digitized panoramic and periapical radiographs and between digitized bitewing and panoramic radiographs. By analyzing the results of this work and considering the research protocol used, one can conclude that small losses in height of alveolar bone crest observed in panoramic radiographs should be cautiously evaluated, as they may be overestimated. PMID:21991470

  13. Are panoramic radiographs reliable to diagnose mild alveolar bone resorption?

    PubMed

    Semenoff, Larissa; Semenoff, Tereza Aparecida Delle; Pedro, Fabio Luiz Miranda; Volpato, Evaristo Ricci; Machado, Maria Aparecida de Andrade Moreira; Borges, Alvaro Henrique; Semenoff-Segundo, Alex

    2011-01-01

    It is extremely important to assess variations between the most used radiographs in dental practice, since minimum distortion on obtained images may change diagnosis, treatment plan, and prognosis for the patient. For this, the distance between the enamel-cementum junction and the alveolar bone crest was measured on conventional and digitized periapical, bitewing, and panoramic radiographs and compared among them. From a total of 1484 records, 39 sets of radiographs that fulfilled the inclusion criteria of the study sample were selected. The measurements were grouped according to the intensity of bone loss. Statistically significant difference was found in the averages of the measurements assessed in radiographs with absence of bone loss between conventional panoramic and periapical radiographs, between digitized panoramic and periapical radiographs and between digitized bitewing and panoramic radiographs. By analyzing the results of this work and considering the research protocol used, one can conclude that small losses in height of alveolar bone crest observed in panoramic radiographs should be cautiously evaluated, as they may be overestimated.

  14. Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor of the alveolar mucosa of the mandible.

    PubMed

    Johann, A C B R; Caldeira, P C; Abdo, E N; Sousa, S O M; Aguiar, M C F; Mesquita, R A

    2008-01-01

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor is a rare lesion composed of myofibroblastic spindle cells accompanied by inflammatory infiltrate. The objective of this paper is to report an uncommon case of inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor located in the alveolar mucosa of the mandible. A 33-year-old male presented an asymptomatic tumoral lesion, firm, pedunculated, pink-colored, covered by smooth mucosa, with focal ulceration, measuring 30x20x20 mm, located in the left posterior alveolar mucosa. Clinical diagnosis was soft tissue tumor. An excisional biopsy was made. Microscopic examination showed compact fascicular spindle cells proliferation with a diffuse inflammatory infiltrate of plasma cells, lymphocytes, and eosinophils. Large ganglion-like cells were observed. The lesional cells were immunopos-itive to vimentin, a-smooth muscle actin, muscle specific actin, and CD68. Negative immunostain was observed to S-100, Bcl-2, Ki-67, desmin, CD34, and cytokeratin. A diagnosis of inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor was performed. After 28 months of follow-up there was no recurrence. Although no evidence of oral inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor recurrence or malignant transformation has been reported, it has been observed that in inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor of other regions a prolonged follow-up is necessary after surgical excision.

  15. Sonicated Protein Fractions of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae Induce Inflammatory Responses and Differential Gene Expression in a Murine Alveolar Macrophage Cell Line.

    PubMed

    Damte, Dereje; Lee, Seung-Jin; Birhanu, Biruk Tesfaye; Suh, Joo-Won; Park, Seung-Chun

    2015-12-28

    Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae is known to cause porcine enzootic pneumonia (EP), an important disease in swine production. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of sonicated protein fractions of M. hyopneumoniae on inflammatory response and gene expression in the murine alveolar macrophage MH-S cell line. The effects of sonicated protein fractions and intact M. hyopneumoniae on the gene expression of cytokines and iNOS were assessed using RT-PCR. The Annealing Control Primer (ACP)-based PCR method was used to screen differentially expressed genes. Increased transcription of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, COX-2, and iNOS mRNA was observed after exposure to the supernatant (SPT), precipitant (PPT), and intact M. hyopneumoniae protein. A time-dependent analysis of the mRNA expression revealed an upregulation after 4 h for IL-6 and iNOS and after 12 h for IL-1β and TNF-α, for both SPT and PPT; the fold change in COX-2 expression was less. A dose- and time-dependent correlation was observed in nitrite (NO) production for both protein fractions; however, there was no significant difference between the effects of the two protein fractions. In a differential gene analysis, PCR revealed differential expression for nine gene bands after 3 h of stimulation - only one gene was downregulated, while the remaining eight were upregulated. The results of this study provide insights that help improve our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of and macrophage defenses against M. hyopneumoniae assault, and suggest targets for future studies on therapeutic interventions for M. hyopneumoniae infections.

  16. Alveolar type II cell-fibroblast interactions, synthesis and secretion of surfactant and type I collagen.

    PubMed

    Griffin, M; Bhandari, R; Hamilton, G; Chan, Y C; Powell, J T

    1993-06-01

    During alveolar development and alveolar repair close contacts are established between fibroblasts and lung epithelial cells through gaps in the basement membrane. Using co-culture systems we have investigated whether these close contacts influence synthesis and secretion of the principal surfactant apoprotein (SP-A) by cultured rat lung alveolar type II cells and the synthesis and secretion of type I collagen by fibroblasts. The alveolar type II cells remained cuboidal and grew in colonies on fibroblast feeder layers and on Matrigel-coated cell culture inserts but were progressively more flattened on fixed fibroblast monolayers and plastic. Alveolar type II cells cultured on plastic released almost all their SP-A into the medium by 4 days. Alveolar type II cells cultured on viable fibroblasts or Matrigel-coated inserts above fibroblasts accumulated SP-A in the medium at a constant rate for the first 4 days, and probably recycle SP-A by endocytosis. The amount of mRNA for SP-A was very low after 4 days of culture of alveolar type II cells on plastic, Matrigel-coated inserts or fixed fibroblast monolayers: relatively, the amount of mRNA for SP-A was increased 4-fold after culture of alveolar type II cells on viable fibroblasts. Co-culture of alveolar type II cells with confluent human dermal fibroblasts stimulated by 2- to 3-fold the secretion of collagen type I into the culture medium, even after the fibroblasts' growth had been arrested with mitomycin C. Collagen secretion, by fibroblasts, also was stimulated 2-fold by conditioned medium from alveolar type II cells cultured on Matrigel. The amount of mRNA for type I collagen increased only modestly when fibroblasts were cultured in this conditioned medium. This stimulation of type I collagen secretion diminished as the conditioned medium was diluted out, but at high dilutions further stimulation occurred, indicating that a factor that inhibited collagen secretion also was being diluted out. The conditioned medium

  17. [Alveolar arterial O2 gradient in patients with cardiopulmonary pathology. Its study at rest with respiration of environmental air].

    PubMed

    Martínez Guerra, M L; Fernández Bonett, P; Lupi Herrera, E

    1979-01-01

    The arterial oxygen pressure (PAO2) and the arterial carbon dioxide pressure (PACO2) are the mirror of the whole stage in alveolar ventilation, because there is a numerical correlation between them, in the alveolar air equation. In our material no difference was found when the respiratory cocient is used to calculate the equation modifying the PACO2 value. On the other hand, the PaO depends on a great amount of variables, i.e., the rationship V/Q. Qs/Qt and the arteriovenous oxygen difference in volume percentage, which reflect the functional stage of the gaseous interchange; other variables depend essentially of technical factors as the methodology used in the obtention and management of the samples and the measurement of the PAO2 at the laboratory. Thus, the alveolo-arterial oxigen Difference delta (A-a)O2 is considered as a mirror of the fluctuations in gaseous interchange, only if the alveolar ventilation the cardiac output, the systemic arterial-vein oxygen difference and in minor importance the respiratory cocient (RP remain constant. The delta (A-a)O2 is not always correlated with other parameters far from the gaseous interchange at lung level in the critically ill patient, for this, it has not a pronostic mecaning by itself. Nevertheless, we believe that delta (A-a)O2 continues being a useful measurement to evaluate the gaseous interchange if at the same time all the factors which may have influence in it are analysed. We consider, for trying to be simple in the management of the acute respiratory failure at the bedside that the (A-a)O2 must not be linked to only one parameter of the respiratory function, i.e. the intrapulmonar veno-arterial shunt, without considering the cardiac output and the systemic arterial-vein oxygen difference.

  18. Alveolar Subphase pH in the Lungs of Anesthetized Rabbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielson, D. W.; Goerke, J.; Clements, J. A.

    1981-11-01

    We measured the pH of the alveolar subphase fluid by puncturing the most superficial alveoli of the exposed lungs of anesthetized rabbits with H+-selective and nonselective KCl microelectrodes. In these experiments, we bathed the lung surface with paraffin oil or buffered Ringer's solutions that had a CO2 tension of 40 Torr (1 Torr = 133.3 Pa) and found an alveolar pH of 6.92± 0.01 (mean ± SEM). When the pH of the surface buffer was below 6.7 or above 7.5, alveolar pH varied with surface buffer pH. With the nonselective electrode, we did not find a significant electrical potential difference between the alveolar fluid and the pleural surface. These results are consistent with active transport of H+ (or HCO3-) across alveolar epithelium.

  19. A contemporary perspective on techniques for the clinical assessment of alveolar bone

    SciTech Connect

    Hausmann, E. )

    1990-03-01

    Radiographic techniques, traditional ones as well as newer ones under development, for clinically assessing alveolar bone are critically assessed. Traditional intraoral radiography is reexamined, in particular with regard to the accuracy with which the alveolar crest is seen. Evidence is presented for a more accurate representation of the alveolar crest on bitewings rather than periapical films. Application in periodontics of newer radiographic techniques, subtraction radiography, and single and dual photon aborptiometry presently under clinical development are discussed in regard to their potential and limitations. Similarly, radiopharmaceuticals to evaluate the metabolic status of alveolar bone are discussed as well as the potential for using analyses of gingival crevice fluid as a window for assessment of alveolar crest metabolism. 46 references.

  20. Avoiding injury to the inferior alveolar nerve by routine use of intraoperative radiographs during implant placement.

    PubMed

    Burstein, Jeffrey; Mastin, Chris; Le, Bach

    2008-01-01

    Injury to the inferior alveolar nerve during implant placement in the posterior atrophic mandible is a rare but serious complication. Although a preoperative computerized tomography scan can help determine the distance from the alveolar ridge to the nerve canal, variables such as magnification errors, ridge anatomy, and operator technique can increase the chance for complications. The routine use of intraoperative periapical radiographs during the drilling sequence is an inexpensive and reliable tool, allowing the operator to confidently adjust the direction and depth of the implant during placement. Most important, it helps avoid the risk of injury to the inferior alveolar nerve in cases in which there is limited vertical alveolar bone. Using this technique for 21 implants placed in the posterior atrophic mandible, with less than 10 mm of vertical bone to the inferior alveolar nerve canal, the authors observed no incidents of postoperative paresthesia.

  1. MCP-1 antibody treatment enhances damage and impedes repair of the alveolar epithelium in influenza pneumonitis.

    PubMed

    Narasaraju, T; Ng, H H; Phoon, M C; Chow, Vincent T K

    2010-06-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated an essential role of alveolar macrophages during influenza virus infection. Enhanced mortalities were observed in macrophage-depleted mice and pigs after influenza virus infection, but the basis for the enhanced pathogenesis is unclear. This study revealed that blocking macrophage recruitment into the lungs in a mouse model of influenza pneumonitis resulted in enhanced alveolar epithelial damage and apoptosis, as evaluated by histopathology, immunohistochemistry, Western blot, RT-PCR, and TUNEL assays. Abrogation of macrophage recruitment was achieved by treatment with monoclonal antibody against monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) after sub-lethal challenge with mouse-adapted human influenza A/Aichi/2/68 virus. Interestingly, elevated levels of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), a mitogen for alveolar epithelium, were detected in bronchoalveolar lavage samples and in lung homogenates of control untreated and nonimmune immunoglobulin (Ig)G-treated mice after infection compared with anti-MCP-1-treated infected mice. The lungs of control animals also displayed strongly positive HGF staining in alveolar macrophages as well as alveolar epithelial cell hyperplasia. Co-culture of influenza virus-infected alveolar epithelial cells with freshly isolated alveolar macrophages induced HGF production and phagocytic activity of macrophages. Recombinant HGF added to mouse lung explants after influenza virus infection resulted in enhanced BrdU labeling of alveolar type II epithelial cells, indicating their proliferation, in contrast with anti-HGF treatment showing significantly reduced epithelial regeneration. Our data indicate that inhibition of macrophage recruitment augmented alveolar epithelial damage and apoptosis during influenza pneumonitis, and that HGF produced by macrophages in response to influenza participates in the resolution of alveolar epithelium.

  2. The use of digital periapical radiographs to study the prevalence of alveolar domes

    PubMed Central

    Xambre, Pedro Augusto Oliveira Santos; Valerio, Claudia Scigliano; e Alves Cardoso, Claudia Assunção; Custódio, Antônio Luís Neto

    2016-01-01

    Purpose In the present study, we coined the term 'alveolar dome' and aimed to demonstrate the prevalence of alveolar domes through digital periapical radiographs. Materials and Methods This study examined 800 digital periapical radiographs in regard to the presence of alveolar domes. The periapical radiographs were acquired by a digital system using a photostimulable phosphor (PSP) plate. The χ2 test, with a significance level of 5%, was used to compare the prevalence of alveolar domes in the maxillary posterior teeth and, considering the same teeth, to verify the difference in the prevalence of dome-shaped phenomena between the roots. Results The prevalence of alveolar domes present in the first pre-molars was statistically lower as compared to the other maxillary posterior teeth (p<0.05). No statistically significant difference was observed in the prevalence of alveolar domes between the maxillary first and second molars. Considering the maxillary first and second molars, it was observed that the palatal root presented a lower prevalence of alveolar domes when compared to the distobuccal and mesiobuccal roots (p<0.05). Conclusion The present study coined the term 'alveolar dome', referring to the anatomical projection of the root into the floor of the maxillary sinus. The maxillary first and second molars presented a greater prevalence of alveolar domes, especially in the buccal roots, followed by the third molars and second pre-molars. Although the periapical radiograph is a two-dimensional method, it can provide dentists with the auxiliary information necessary to identify alveolar domes, thus improving diagnosis, planning, and treatment. PMID:27672614

  3. Presurgical orthodontic decompensation alters alveolar bone condition around mandibular incisors in adults with skeletal Class III malocclusion

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Boyang; Tang, Jun; Xiao, Ping; Ding, Ying

    2015-01-01

    This study is to use cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) to acquire accurate radiographic images for alveolar bone in lower incisors and the change after presurgical orthodontic treatment. Seventeen patients with skeletal Class III malocclusion, ten normal occlusion subjects, and fifteen patients treated with orthodontic treatment and orthognathic surgery were included. CBCT images were obtained. The labial and lingual inclinations of mandibular incisors, the thickness of alveolar bone, the vertical alveolar height and root length were measured. Alveolar bone thickness at the apex in patients with skeletal Class III malocclusion was thinner than normal subjects. The vertical alveolar bone heights at labial and lingual sides in patients with skeletal Class III malocclusion were both reduced compared with normal subjects, especially at the labial side. There were statistically significant correlations between lower incisor inclination and alveolar bone morphology. After orthodontics, the incisors root apex was closer to the lingual side of alveolar bone. The alveolar bone thickness at apex was not statistically changed. The vertical alveolar bone heights at the labial and lingual sides were both significantly reduced especially the lingual side after presurgical orthodontic treatment. The root length was not significantly changed. In conclusion, the alveolar bone thickness at apex is thinner and the vertical alveolar height is reduced at the labial side. Forward movement of lower incisors during presurgical orthodontic treatment can render the lower incisors root apex closer to the lingual side and the vertical alveolar height is reduced. PMID:26550202

  4. Presurgical orthodontic decompensation alters alveolar bone condition around mandibular incisors in adults with skeletal Class III malocclusion.

    PubMed

    Sun, Boyang; Tang, Jun; Xiao, Ping; Ding, Ying

    2015-01-01

    This study is to use cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) to acquire accurate radiographic images for alveolar bone in lower incisors and the change after presurgical orthodontic treatment. Seventeen patients with skeletal Class III malocclusion, ten normal occlusion subjects, and fifteen patients treated with orthodontic treatment and orthognathic surgery were included. CBCT images were obtained. The labial and lingual inclinations of mandibular incisors, the thickness of alveolar bone, the vertical alveolar height and root length were measured. Alveolar bone thickness at the apex in patients with skeletal Class III malocclusion was thinner than normal subjects. The vertical alveolar bone heights at labial and lingual sides in patients with skeletal Class III malocclusion were both reduced compared with normal subjects, especially at the labial side. There were statistically significant correlations between lower incisor inclination and alveolar bone morphology. After orthodontics, the incisors root apex was closer to the lingual side of alveolar bone. The alveolar bone thickness at apex was not statistically changed. The vertical alveolar bone heights at the labial and lingual sides were both significantly reduced especially the lingual side after presurgical orthodontic treatment. The root length was not significantly changed. In conclusion, the alveolar bone thickness at apex is thinner and the vertical alveolar height is reduced at the labial side. Forward movement of lower incisors during presurgical orthodontic treatment can render the lower incisors root apex closer to the lingual side and the vertical alveolar height is reduced.

  5. Porcine arterivirus activates the NF-{kappa}B pathway through I{kappa}B degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sang-Myeong; Kleiboeker, Steven B. . E-mail: KleiboekerS@Missouri.edu

    2005-11-10

    Nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-{kappa}B) is a critical regulator of innate and adaptive immune function as well as cell proliferation and survival. The present study demonstrated for the first time that a virus belonging to the Arteriviridae family activates NF-{kappa}B in MARC-145 cells and alveolar macrophages. In porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV)-infected cells, NF-{kappa}B activation was characterized by translocation of NF-{kappa}B from the cytoplasm to the nucleus, increased DNA binding activity, and NF-{kappa}B-regulated gene expression. NF-{kappa}B activation was increased as PRRSV infection progressed and in a viral dose-dependent manner. UV-inactivation of PRRSV significantly reduced the level of NF-{kappa}B activation. Degradation of I{kappa}B protein was detected late in PRRSV infection, and overexpression of the dominant negative form of I{kappa}B{alpha} (I{kappa}B{alpha}DN) significantly suppressed NF-{kappa}B activation induced by PRRSV. However, I{kappa}B{alpha}DN did not affect viral replication and viral cytopathic effect. PRRSV infection induced oxidative stress in cells by generating reactive oxygen species (ROS), and antioxidants inhibited NF-{kappa}B DNA binding activity in PRRSV-infected cells, suggesting ROS as a mechanism by which NF-{kappa}B was activated by PRRSV infection. Moreover, NF-{kappa}B-dependent expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 was observed in PRRSV-infected cells, an observation which implies that NF-{kappa}B activation is a biologically significant aspect of PRRSV pathogenesis. The results presented here provide a basis for understanding molecular pathways of pathology and immune evasion associated with disease caused by PRRSV.

  6. Lung alveolar proteomics of bronchoalveolar lavage from a pulmonary alveolar proteinosis patient using high-resolution FTICR mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yu; Galetskiy, Dmitry; Damoc, Eugen; Ripper, Jan; Woischnik, Markus; Griese, Matthias; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Shuying; Przybylski, Michael

    2007-10-01

    High-resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometry was developed and applied to the proteome analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) from a patient with pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. With use of 1-D and 2-D gel electrophoresis, surfactant protein A (SP-A) and other surfactant-related lung alveolar proteins were efficiently separated and identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization FTICR mass spectrometry . Low molecular mass BALF proteins were separated using a gradient 2-D gel. An efficient extraction/precipitation system was developed and used for the enrichment of surfactant proteins. The result of the BALF proteome analysis show the presence of several isoforms of SP-A, in which an N-non-glycosylierte form and several proline hydroxylations were identified. Furthermore, a number of protein spots were found to contain a mixture of proteins unresolved by 2-D gel electrophoresis, illustrating the feasibility of high-resolution mass spectrometry to provide identifications of proteins that remain unseparated in 2-D gels even upon extended pH gradients.

  7. Enhanced alveolar clearance with chest percussion therapy and positional changes during whole-lung lavage for alveolar proteinosis.

    PubMed

    Perez, Andrew; Rogers, Robert M

    2004-06-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis has traditionally been treated with whole-lung lavage (WLL). The literature describes a variety of techniques used in performing the WLL, including mechanical vs manual chest percussion, use of prone positioning, and variances in lavage volume. We have quantified and compared the effective alveolar clearance for each component of the lavage by measuring the dry weight of material in the lavage effluent. We measured this in five patients who underwent six consecutive WLLs at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. We performed the lavage in the following three stages: stage I, passive drainage; stage II, assisted clearance; and stage III, positional clearance. Aliquots of lavage effluent were centrifuged to determine the dry weight of material present in sequentially recorded bottles within each stage. At the initiation of each augmentation, there was a statistically significant improvement in the clearance of material (stage II, p = 0.009; stage III, p = 0.012). Furthermore, we show that lipoproteinaceous material is present in the lavage effluent in all stages of latter portions of the lavage. The effective removal of material would be expected to have an impact on the physiologic and clinical response to WLL. This finding emphasizes the importance of performing an adequate and standardized lavage.

  8. Tissue lesion created by HIFU in continuous scanning mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Tingbo; Liu, Zhenbo; Zhang, Dong

    2012-09-01

    The lesion formation was numerically and experimentally investigated by the continuous scanning mode. Simulations were presented based on the combination of Khokhlov-Zabolotskaya-Kuznetov (KZK) equation and bio-heat equation. Measurements were performed on porcine liver tissues using a 1.01 MHz single-element focused transducer at various acoustic powers, confirmed the predicted results. Controlling of the peak temperature and lesion by the scanning speed may be exploited for improvement of efficiency in HIFU therapy.

  9. Porcine respiratory disease complex: Interaction of vaccination and porcine circovirus type 2, porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus, and Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Chae, Chanhee

    2016-06-01

    Porcine respiratory disease is a multifactorial and complex disease caused by a combination of infectious pathogens, environmental stressors, differences in production systems, and various management practices; hence the name porcine respiratory disease complex (PRDC) is used. Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2), porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), and Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae are considered to be the most important pathogens that cause PRDC. Although interactions among the three major respiratory pathogens are well documented, it is also necessary to understand the interaction between vaccines and the three major respiratory pathogens. PRRSV and M. hyopneumoniae are well known to potentiate PCV2-associated lesions; however, PRRSV and mycoplasmal vaccines can both enhance PCV2 viraemia regardless of the effects of the actual PRRSV or M. hyopneumoniae infection. On the other hand, M. hyopneumoniae potentiates the severity of pneumonia induced by PRRSV, and vaccination against M. hyopneumoniae alone is also able to decrease PRRSV viraemia and PRRSV-induced lung lesions in dually infected pigs. This review focuses on (1) interactions between PCV2, PRRSV, and M. hyopneumoniae; and (2) interactions between vaccines and the three major respiratory pathogens.

  10. Porcine Rotaviruses: Epidemiology, Immune Responses and Control Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Vlasova, Anastasia N.; Amimo, Joshua O.; Saif, Linda J.

    2017-01-01

    Rotaviruses (RVs) are a major cause of acute viral gastroenteritis in young animals and children worldwide. Immunocompetent adults of different species become resistant to clinical disease due to post-infection immunity, immune system maturation and gut physiological changes. Of the 9 RV genogroups (A–I), RV A, B, and C (RVA, RVB, and RVC, respectively) are associated with diarrhea in piglets. Although discovered decades ago, porcine genogroup E RVs (RVE) are uncommon and their pathogenesis is not studied well. The presence of porcine RV H (RVH), a newly defined distinct genogroup, was recently confirmed in diarrheic pigs in Japan, Brazil, and the US. The complex epidemiology, pathogenicity and high genetic diversity of porcine RVAs are widely recognized and well-studied. More recent data show a significant genetic diversity based on the VP7 gene analysis of RVB and C strains in pigs. In this review, we will summarize previous and recent research to provide insights on historic and current prevalence and genetic diversity of porcine RVs in different geographic regions and production systems. We will also provide a brief overview of immune responses to porcine RVs, available control strategies and zoonotic potential of different RV genotypes. An improved understanding of the above parameters may lead to the development of more optimal strategies to manage RV diarrheal disease in swine and humans. PMID:28335454

  11. Expression of interleukin-18 by porcine airway and intestinal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Muneta, Yoshihiro; Goji, Noriko; Tsuji, Noriko M; Mikami, Osamu; Shimoji, Yoshihiro; Nakajima, Yasuyuki; Yokomizo, Yuichi; Mori, Yasuyuki

    2002-08-01

    In this study, we investigated the expression of interleukin-18 (IL-18) in porcine airway and intestinal epithelium. We found constitutive protein expression of precursor IL-18 in primary culture of porcine airway epithelium. Immunohistochemical staining revealed that porcine IL-18 was localized in the porcine airway epithelium and that it was significantly upregulated with experimental endotoxemia induced by Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) inoculation. We also confirmed by immunohistochemical staining that IL-18 was expressed in porcine intestinal epithelial cells. Moreover, the concentration of IL-18 in intestinal cell lysates of 1-day-old piglets was about 3-fold and 6-fold less than that in those of 1-month-old and 6-month-old piglets, respectively. Exogenous IL-18 was able to induce interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) in the peripheral blood of 1-day-old piglets, whereas concanavalin A (ConA) was not able to induce IFN-gamma in the same condition. These results suggest that mucosal epithelial cells are among the major sources of IL-18 in pig and that IL-18 may be useful as a therapeutic agent for the enhancement of immune responses and as a vaccine adjuvant, especially in neonatal piglets.

  12. An Optimised Human Cell Culture Model for Alveolar Epithelial Transport

    PubMed Central

    Birch, Nigel P.; Suresh, Vinod

    2016-01-01

    Robust and reproducible in vitro models are required for investigating the pathways involved in fluid homeostasis in the human alveolar epithelium. We performed functional and phenotypic characterisation of ion transport in the human pulmonary epithelial cell lines NCI-H441 and A549 to determine their similarity to primary human alveolar type II cells. NCI-H441 cells exhibited high expression of junctional proteins ZO-1, and E-cadherin, seal-forming claudin-3, -4, -5 and Na+-K+-ATPase while A549 cells exhibited high expression of pore-forming claudin-2. Consistent with this phenotype NCI-H441, but not A549, cells formed a functional barrier with active ion transport characterised by higher electrical resistance (529 ± 178 Ω cm2 vs 28 ± 4 Ω cm2), lower paracellular permeability ((176 ± 42) ×10−8 cm/s vs (738 ± 190) ×10−8 cm/s) and higher transepithelial potential difference (11.9 ± 4 mV vs 0 mV). Phenotypic and functional properties of NCI-H441 cells were tuned by varying cell seeding density and supplement concentrations. The cells formed a polarised monolayer typical of in vivo epithelium at seeding densities of 100,000 cells per 12-well insert while higher densities resulted in multiple cell layers. Dexamethasone and insulin-transferrin-selenium supplements were required for the development of high levels of electrical resistance, potential difference and expression of claudin-3 and Na+-K+-ATPase. Treatment of NCI-H441 cells with inhibitors and agonists of sodium and chloride channels indicated sodium absorption through ENaC under baseline and forskolin-stimulated conditions. Chloride transport was not sensitive to inhibitors of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) under either condition. Channels inhibited by 5-nitro-1-(3-phenylpropylamino) benzoic acid (NPPB) contributed to chloride secretion following forskolin stimulation, but not at baseline. These data precisely define experimental conditions for the application of NCI

  13. Establishment and characterisation of a porcine rubulavirus (LPMV) persistent infection in porcine kidney cells.

    PubMed

    Hjertner, B; Linné, T; Moreno-López, J

    1997-01-01

    Porcine rubulavirus (LPMV) can establish persistent infections in porcine kidney cells. Cell cultures characterised at passages 25 and 65 demonstrated haemadsorption, formation of syncytia, and a slower growth rate. The nucleoprotein (NP) and haemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) protein were present in all cells, although not to the same extent as in wild type infected cells. Incubation of the cell cultures with virus neutralising antibodies could not cure them from the infection. The cells were resistant to LPMV high multiplicity superinfection, but lysed rapidly upon infection with VSV. These cells thus fulfilled the criteria of a true persistent infection. Viral particles were released into the medium from the persistently infected cells as measured by HA and infection of PK-15 cells with medium from the persistently infected cells. The infectious titer of the virus released from the persistently infected cells was 3 logs lower compared to wild type virus, the HN titer still being comparable. Virus released from the persistently infected cells was unable to cause a lytic infection in PK-15 cells, and showed a reduced ability to spread when compared to a LPMV lytic infection.

  14. Porcine relaxin, a 500 million-year-old hormone? the tunicate Ciona intestinalis has porcine relaxin.

    PubMed

    Georges, D; Schwabe, C

    1999-07-01

    The fossil record of tunicates reaches back to the upper Cambrian period. Ascidians have mobile, tadpole-like juvenile forms with a notochord, which inspired the classification of tunicates as Urochordata, i.e., predecessors of vertebrates. The genome of the tunicate Ciona intestinalis contains a relaxin coding region that is organized like a mammalian gene, i.e., signal peptide, B-chain domain, connecting peptide domain, followed by the A-chain domain with a stop codon after cysteine A-22. RNA-derived cDNA encodes a relaxin that is identical to the circulating form of the porcine hormone. In contrast to the porcine gene, the ascidian gene has no intron in the C-peptide domain, and in that respect is similar to the bombyxin gene of the silkworm. During the spawning period, only enough relaxin could be extracted and isolated from gonads of C. intestinalis for a partial sequence analysis. Remarkable as it may be, these findings suggest that relaxin is identical in pigs, whales, and the tunicate C. intestinalis.

  15. Porcine allergy and IgE.

    PubMed

    Rupa, Prithy; Schmied, Julie; Wilkie, Bruce N

    2009-11-15

    Anaphylaxis was reported in 1963 in pigs experimentally sensitized with ovalbumin and was subsequently associated indirectly with IgE-related antibodies by functional assays to confirm heat-labile passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA), reverse passive anaphylaxis (RPA) and Prausnitz-Küstner (PK) reactions to this and other allergens. The immunoglobulin mediating immediate hypersensitivity could be cross-adsorbed with anti-human IgE. Porcine IgE epsilon chain has been cloned and sequenced. Rabbit anti-pig IgE has been described by two groups, as has cross reactivity with pig IgE of various heterologous polyclonal and monoclonal anti-IgEs. Pigs develop transient post-weaning food allergy to soy allergens which can be prevented by pre-weaning feeding of soy proteins in sufficient quantity. Natural hypersensitivity also occurs to nematodes. Recently, experimental allergy has been induced in outbred pigs to peanut and to egg allergens which manifest as respiratory, cutaneous and enteric signs similar to those of human food allergy. These models are platforms for comparative allergy research as realistic alternatives to use of inbred mice or humans for investigation of pathogenesis, prophylaxis and therapy.

  16. Genetic and antigenic changes in porcine rubulavirus

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Betancourt, José I.; Trujillo, María E.; Mendoza, Susana E.; Reyes-Leyva, Julio; Alonso, Rogelio A.

    2012-01-01

    Blue eye disease, caused by a porcine rubulavirus (PoRV), is an emergent viral swine disease that has been endemic in Mexico since 1980. Atypical outbreaks were detected in 1990 and 2003. Growing and adult pigs presented neurological signs, mild neurological signs were observed in piglets, and severe reproductive problems were observed in adults. Amino acid sequence comparisons and phylogenetic analysis of the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) protein revealed genetically different lineages. We used cross-neutralization assays, with homologous and heterologous antisera, to determine the antigenic relatedness values for the PoRV isolates. We found antigenic changes among several strains and identified a highly divergent one, making up a new serogroup. It seems that genetically and antigenically different PoRV strains are circulating simultaneously in the swine population in the geographical region studied. The cross neutralization studies suggest that the HN is not the only antigenic determinant participating in the antigenic changes among the different PoRV strains. PMID:22754092

  17. Ultrafast laser machining of porcine sclera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Góra, W. S.; Carter, R. M.; Dhillon, B.; Hand, D. P.; Shephard, J. D.

    2015-07-01

    The use of ultrafast lasers (pulsed lasers with pulse lengths of a few picoseconds or less) offers the possibility for minimally invasive removal of soft ophthalmic tissue. The potential for using pico- and femtosecond pulses for modification of scleral tissue has been reported elsewhere [1-6] and has resulted in the introduction of new, minimally invasive, procedures into clinical practice [3, 5-10]. Our research is focused on finding optimal parameters for picosecond laser machining of scleral tissue without introducing any unwanted collateral damage to the tissue. Experiments were carried out on hydrated porcine sclera in vitro, which has similar collagen organization, histology and water content (~70%) to human tissue. In this paper we present a 2D finite element ablation model which employs a one-step heating process. It is assumed that the incident laser radiation that is not reflected is absorbed in the tissue according to the Beer-Lambert law and transformed into heat energy. The experimental setup uses an industrial picosecond laser (TRUMPF TruMicro 5x50) with 5.9 ps pulses at 1030 nm, with pulse energies up to 125 μJ and a focused spot diameter of 35 μm. The use of a scan head allows flexibility in designing various scanning patterns. We show that picosecond pulses are capable of modifying scleral tissue without introducing collateral damage. This offers a possible route for minimally invasive sclerostomy. Many scanning patterns including single line ablation, square and circular cavity removal were tested.

  18. Steroid binding domain of porcine estrogen receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Koike, S.; Nii, A.; Sakai, M.; Muramatsu, M.

    1987-05-05

    For the purpose of characterizing the estrogen binding domain of porcine estrogen receptor (ER), the authors have made use of affinity labeling of partially purified ER with (/sup 3/H)tamoxifen aziridine. The labeling is very efficient and selective particularly after partial purification of ER. A 65,000-dalton (65-kDa) band was detected on the fluorogram of a sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel, together with a 50-kDa band and a few more smaller bands. The 50-kDa protein appears to be a degradation product of the 65-kDa protein in view of the similar peptide map. ER was affinity labeled before or after controlled limited proteolysis with either trypsin, papain, or ..cap alpha..-chymotrypsin. The labeling patterns of limited digests indicate that a fragment of about 30 kDa is relatively resistant to proteases and has a full and specific binding activity to estrogen, whereas smaller fragments have lost much of the binding activity. This fragment is very hydrophobic and probably corresponds to the carboxy half of ER.

  19. KBSH parvovirus: comparison with porcine parvovirus.

    PubMed Central

    Molitor, T W; Joo, H S; Collett, M S

    1985-01-01

    We compared the molecular, antigenic, and pathogenic properties of KBSH parvovirus to those of porcine parvovirus (PPV) isolate NADL-8. KBSH, propagated in swine testes cells in culture, possessed two major capsid polypeptides of 83 and 64 kilodaltons that were similar in size to those of PPV. KBSH-infected cells also contained an 86-kilodalton nonstructural polypeptide that was identical in size to the PPV nonstructural polypeptide (NS-1). The KBSH polypeptides were structurally similar but not identical to the corresponding PPV polypeptides, as revealed by partial proteolysis mapping. Viral replicative-form DNA from KBSH-infected cells was similar in size to PPV replicative-form DNA and exhibited similar but not identical restriction endonuclease cleavage patterns to that of PPV replicative-form DNA. Antigenically, the two viruses were also very closely related. By using heterologous and homologous antisera, the two viruses were indistinguishable in hemagglutination inhibition and immunoprecipitation assays. However, pathogenically these viruses were dramatically different. NADL-8 caused fetal death when injected into swine fetuses in utero and viremia and high persisting antibody titers when administered orally to weaning-age swine. KBSH-inoculated fetuses were normal in appearance, and pigs orally exposed to KBSH failed to establish viremia and demonstrated only transient antibody titers. Thus, KBSH appears to be a PPV that is very closely related to a highly pathogenic PPV isolate, yet is itself nonpathogenic in swine. This reduced pathogenic potential of KBSH may be attributable to its poor ability to replicate in swine. Images PMID:2991553

  20. A Genetic Porcine Model of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Schook, Lawrence B.; Collares, Tiago V.; Hu, Wenping; Liang, Ying; Rodrigues, Fernanda M.; Rund, Laurie A.; Schachtschneider, Kyle M.; Seixas, Fabiana K.; Singh, Kuldeep; Wells, Kevin D.; Walters, Eric M.; Prather, Randall S.; Counter, Christopher M.

    2015-01-01

    The large size of the pig and its similarity in anatomy, physiology, metabolism, and genetics to humans make it an ideal platform to develop a genetically defined, large animal model of cancer. To this end, we created a transgenic “oncopig” line encoding Cre recombinase inducible porcine transgenes encoding KRASG12D and TP53R167H, which represent a commonly mutated oncogene and tumor suppressor in human cancers, respectively. Treatment of cells derived from these oncopigs with the adenovirus encoding Cre (AdCre) led to KRASG12D and TP53R167H expression, which rendered the cells transformed in culture and tumorigenic when engrafted into immunocompromised mice. Finally, injection of AdCre directly into these oncopigs led to the rapid and reproducible tumor development of mesenchymal origin. Transgenic animals receiving AdGFP (green fluorescent protein) did not have any tumor mass formation or altered histopathology. This oncopig line could thus serve as a genetically malleable model for potentially a wide spectrum of cancers, while controlling for temporal or spatial genesis, which should prove invaluable to studies previously hampered by the lack of a large animal model of cancer. PMID:26132737

  1. Nuclear protein extraction from frozen porcine myocardium.

    PubMed

    Kuster, Diederik W D; Merkus, Daphne; Jorna, Huub J J; Dekkers, Dick H W; Duncker, Dirk J; Verhoeven, Adrie J M

    2011-06-01

    Protocols for the extraction of nuclear proteins have been developed for cultured cells and fresh tissue, but sometimes only frozen tissue is available. We have optimized the homogenization procedure and subsequent fractionation protocol for the preparation of nuclear protein extracts from frozen porcine left ventricular (LV) tissue. This method gave a highly reproducible protein yield (6.5±0.7% of total protein; mean±SE, n=9) and a 6-fold enrichment of the nuclear marker protein B23. The nuclear protein extracts were essentially devoid of cytosolic, myofilament, and histone proteins. Compared to nuclear extracts from fresh LV tissue, some loss of nuclear proteins to the cytosolic fraction was observed. Using this method, we studied the distribution of tyrosine phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (PY-STAT3) in LV tissue of animals treated with the β-agonist dobutamine. Upon treatment, PY-STAT3 increased 30.2±8.5-fold in total homogenates, but only 6.9±2.1-fold (n=4, P=0.03) in nuclear protein extracts. Of all PY-STAT3 formed, only a minor fraction appeared in the nuclear fraction. This simple and reproducible protocol yielded nuclear protein extracts that were highly enriched in nuclear proteins with almost complete removal of cytosolic and myofilament proteins. This nuclear protein extraction protocol is therefore well-suited for nuclear proteome analysis of frozen heart tissue collected in biobanks.

  2. Cryopreservation of porcine spermatogonial stem cells by slow-freezing testis tissue in trehalose.

    PubMed

    Lee, Y-A; Kim, Y-H; Ha, S-J; Kim, K-J; Kim, B-J; Kim, B-G; Choi, S-H; Kim, I-C; Schmidt, J A; Ryu, B-Y

    2014-03-01

    Spermatogonial stem cells provide the foundation for continued adult spermatogenesis and their manipulation can facilitate assisted reproductive technologies or the development of transgenic animals. Because the pig is an important agricultural and biomedical research animal, the development of practical application techniques to manipulate the pig Spermatogonial stem cell is needed. The ability to preserve porcine Spermatogonial stem cell or testis tissue long term is one of these fundamental techniques. The objective of this study was to optimize methods to cryopreserve porcine Spermatogonial stem cell when freezing testis cells or testis tissue. To identify the most efficient cryopreservation technique, porcine testis cells (cell freezing) or testis tissue (tissue freezing) were frozen in medium containing dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and fetal bovine serum (FBS) or DMSO, FBS, and various concentrations of trehalose (50, 100, or 200 mM). After thawing, undifferentiated germ cells were enriched and treatments were evaluated for cryopreservation efficiency. The tissue freezing method resulted in significantly greater germ cell recovery (P = 0.041) and proliferation capacity (P < 0.001) compared to the cell freezing treatment. Regardless of freezing method (cell vs. tissue), addition of 200 mM trehalose to freezing medium increased germ cell recovery and proliferation capacity compared to cells frozen using the same freezing method without trehalose. Interestingly, addition of trehalose to the tissue freezing medium significantly increased germ cell recovery (P = 0.012) and proliferation capacity (P = 0.004) compared to the cell freezing treatment supplemented with trehalose. To confirm that cryopreservation in trehalose improves the survival of Spermatogonial stem cell, testis cells enriched for undifferentiated germ cells were xenotransplanted into recipient mouse testes. Germ cells recovered from tissue frozen with 200 mM trehalose generated significantly more (P

  3. Half-life of porcine antibodies absorbed from a colostrum supplement containing porcine immunoglobulins.

    PubMed

    Polo, J; Campbell, J M; Crenshaw, J; Rodríguez, C; Pujol, N; Navarro, N; Pujols, J

    2012-12-01

    Absorption of immunoglobulins (Ig) at birth from colostrum is essential for piglet survival. The objective was to evaluate the half-life of antibodies absorbed in the bloodstream of newborn piglets orally fed a colostrum supplement (CS) containing energy (fat and carbohydrates) and IgG from porcine plasma. Viable piglets (n = 23; 900 to 1,800 g BW) from 6 sows were colostrum deprived and blood sampled and within the next 2 h of life randomly allocated to either control group (n = 9) providing 30 mL of Ig-free milk replacer or a group (n = 14) receiving 30 mL of CS by oral gavage. Piglets were transported to a Biosafety Level 3 facility (Centre de Recerca en Sanitat Animal, Spain) and fed Ig-free milk replacer every 3 to 4 h for 15 d. Survival, weight, plasma IgG content by radial immunodiffusion (RID), and antibodies against porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2), porcine parvovirus (PPV), porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS), Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (Mhy), and swine influenza virus (SIV) were determined by specific ELISA before treatment administration, at 24 h, and weekly for 56 d. Clinical symptoms were not observed for either group. Mortality index was lower (17 vs. 38%; P < 0.02) and BW higher (17.7 vs. 15.3 kg; P = 0.035) for pigs supplemented with CS than piglets in the control group. At 24 h postadministration, the CS group had a plasma IgG mean of 7.6 ± 0.06 vs. 0.14 ± 0.03 mg/mL for the control group. The IgG levels in the CS group decayed until day 21 when de novo synthesis of IgG was detected in 25% of piglets. Half-life of antibody concentration (HLAC) by RID was 6.2 d. In the CS group, efficiency of PCV2 and PPV antibody transfer was high. For PCV2, all animals remained positive by day 56 and the calculated HLAC was 17.7 d. For PPV, 72.7% of piglets were ELISA positive by day 35 and HLAC was 12.0 d. For PRRS, all piglets remained positive by day 14 and the calculated HLAC was 11.9 d. For Mhy and SIV the calculated HLAC were 8.4 and 3.0 d

  4. [Intraoperative monitoring in artificial respiration of premature and newborn infants. I. Monitoring of respiratory parameters and alveolar ventilation].

    PubMed

    Lenz, G; Heipertz, W; Leidig, E; Madee, S

    1986-06-01

    Monitoring of ventilation serves to ensure adequate alveolar ventilation and arterial oxygenation, and to avoid pulmonary damage due to mechanical ventilation. Basic clinical monitoring, i.e., inspection, auscultation (including precordial or oesophageal stethoscope) and monitoring of heart rate and blood pressure, is mandatory. Mechanical ventilation is monitored by ventilation pressures (peak pressure, plateau pressure and endexpiratory pressure), ventilation volumes (measured at the in/expiratory valve of the respirator and by hot-wire anemometry at the tube connector), ventilation rate, and inspiratory oxygen concentration (FiO2). Alveolar ventilation should be continuously and indirectly recorded by capnometry (pECO2) and by measurement of transcutaneous pCO2 (tcpCO2), whereas oxygenation is determined via measurement of transcutaneous pO2 (tcpO2). Invasive monitoring of gas exchange is essential in prolonged or intrathoracic interventions as well as in neonates with cardiopulmonary problems. paCO2 may be estimated by capillary or venous blood gas analysis; arterial blood gas analysis is required for exact determination of paCO2 as well as arteriocutaneous pCO2 (atcDCO2) and arterio-end-expiratory (aEDCO2) gradients.

  5. [Alveolar soft part sarcoma of the larynx: a case report].

    PubMed

    Xiao, Hao; Yang, Hui; Wang, Huan

    2015-07-01

    Alveolar soft part sarcoma (ASPS) is a rare soft tissue sarcomas, this sarcoma occurs rarely in the larynx. Herein, we describe an unusual case of ASPS occurring in the larynx. The patient was a 46-year-old woman who presented with a more than 2-year history of right pyriform fossa mass and progressive hoarseness for three months. The endoscopic examination of the larynx revealed a mass in the right pyriform fossa with smooth surface and well-defined margin. Computed tomography demonstrated a heterogeneous tumor in the right pyriform fossa, and involving the paralaryngeal space, measuring approximately 2.1 cm x 1.7 cm x 2.6 cm, which was resected via lateral neck approach. Histopathology and immunohistochemistry revealed an ASPS. To ours knowledge, this is the first reported case of ASPS arising in pyriform fossa.

  6. Diffuse Alveolar Hemorrhage Associated with Makyo-kanseki-to Administration

    PubMed Central

    Iida, Yuko; Takano, Yuki; Ishiwatari, Yusaku; Yoshida, Akiko; Shimizu, Tetsuo; Ito, Reiko; Hattori, Tomohiro; Takahashi, Noriaki; Hashimoto, Shu

    2016-01-01

    We herein describe the first known case of diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) associated with the administration of Makyo-kanseki-to, a Chinese herbal drug. A 64-year-old man with bronchial asthma presented with persistent cough. Makyo-kanseki-to was prescribed as an adjunctive treatment for bronchial asthma. Immediately after drug ingestion, the patient expectorated bloody sputum. DAH was diagnosed based on the presence of bilateral ground-glass opacity which was identified on chest computed tomography and bloody bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. We diagnosed that the administration of Makyo-kanseki-to was the responsible medication because the hemorrhage developed immediately after drug ingestion and resolved after the cessation of such medication with no subsequent recurrence. PMID:27853076

  7. The mechanical behavior of a mammalian lung alveolar duct model.

    PubMed

    Denny, E; Schroter, R C

    1995-08-01

    A model for the mechanical properties of an alveolar duct is analyzed using the finite element method. Its geometry comprises an assemblage of truncated octahedral alveoli surrounding a longitudinal air duct. The amounts and distributions of elastin and collagen fiber bundles, modeled by separate stress-strain laws, are based upon published data for dogs. The surface tension of the air-liquid interface is modeled using an area-dependent relationship. Pressure-volume curves are computed that compare well with experimental data for both saline-filled and air-filled lungs. Pressure-volume curves of the separate elastin and collagen fiber contributions are similar in form to the behavior of saline-filled lungs treated with either elastase or collagenase. A comparison with our earlier model, based upon a single alveolus, shows the duct to have a behavior closer to reported experimental data.

  8. Altered sialylation of alveolar macrophages in HIV-1-infected individuals

    PubMed Central

    PERRIN, C; GIORDANENGO, V; BANNWARTH, S; BLAIVE, B; LEFEBVRE, J-C

    1997-01-01

    In previous studies, we have demonstrated that O-glycans at the surface of HIV-1-infected cell lines were hyposialylated. Moreover, we and others have shown that HIV+ individuals produced autoantibodies that react with hyposialylated CD43, on T cell lines. Since the autoantigen responsible for this abnormal immune response was not easily found in the peripheral blood cells of corresponding patients, we searched for its possible presence in other sites. Using fluorescence staining of alveolar macrophages with various lectins, we show that the binding of the PNA lectin specific for asialo O-glycans is much more efficient on cells from HIV-1-infected individuals. Moreover, the degree of reactivity of PNA is correlated with the clinical stage of the illness. PMID:9353144

  9. Altered sialylation of alveolar macrophages in HIV-1-infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Perrin, C; Giordanengo, V; Bannwarth, S; Blaive, B; Lefebvre, J C

    1997-10-01

    In previous studies, we have demonstrated that O-glycans at the surface of HIV-1-infected cell lines were hyposialylated. Moreover, we and others have shown that HIV+ individuals produced autoantibodies that react with hyposialylated CD43, on T cell lines. Since the autoantigen responsible for this abnormal immune response was not easily found in the peripheral blood cells of corresponding patients, we searched for its possible presence in other sites. Using fluorescence staining of alveolar macrophages with various lectins, we show that the binding of the PNA lectin specific for asialo O-glycans is much more efficient on cells from HIV-1-infected individuals. Moreover, the degree of reactivity of PNA is correlated with the clinical stage of the illness.

  10. Anesthetic Efficacy of Bupivacaine Solutions in Inferior Alveolar Nerve Block

    PubMed Central

    Volpato, Maria Cristina; Ranali, José; Ramacciato, Juliana Cama; de Oliveira, Patrícia Cristine; Ambrosano, Glaúcia Maria Bovi; Groppo, Francisco Carlos

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the anesthetic efficacy of 2 bupivacaine solutions. Twenty-two volunteers randomly received in a crossover, double-blinded manner 2 inferior alveolar nerve blocks with 1.8 mL of racemic bupivacaine and a mixture of 75% levobupivacaine and 25% dextrobupivacaine, both 0.5% and with 1 : 200,000 epinephrine. Before and after the injection, the first mandibular pre-molar was evaluated every 2 minutes until no response to the maximal output (80 reading) of the pulp tester and then again every 20 minutes. Data were analyzed using the Wilcoxon paired test and the paired t test. No differences were found between the solutions for onset and duration of pulpal anesthesia and duration of soft tissue anesthesia (P > .05). It was concluded that the solutions have similar anesthetic efficacy. PMID:16596912

  11. Comparative damage to alveolar macrophages after phagocytosis of respirable particles

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, J.O.; Gray, R.H.; DeNee, P.B.; Newton, G.J.

    1982-02-01

    Backscatter electron and secondary electron imaging were used in a scanning electron microscope study of the in vitro toxic effects of particles ingested by alveolar macrophages. Relatively nontoxic aluminosilicate fly ash particles from the Mount St. Helens eruption and from a coal-fired power plant as well as toxic quartz particles from the Westphalia (Germany) mine deposits were readily taken up by macrophages. The presence of fly ash particles inside the cells was not associated with any changes in surface morphology. The presence of intracellular quartz particles, on the other hand, was correlated with damage to the cell membrane as determined by alterations in surface morphology, uptake of trypan blue, and release of the cytoplasmic enzyme, lactate dehydrogenase. The use of backscatter electron imaging is useful in scanning electron microscope studies which attempt to establish cause and effect relationships between exposure to respirable particles and the morphological and cytotoxic response.

  12. Repeated Diffuse Alveolar Hemorrhage in a Patient with Hemophilia B

    PubMed Central

    Kasai, Hajime; Terada, Jiro; Hoshi, Hiromasa; Urushibara, Takashi; Kato, Fumiaki; Nishimura, Rintaro; Tatsumi, Koichiro

    2017-01-01

    Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) is a life-threatening complication that occurs in association with various diseases including coagulation disorders. In rare cases, it is caused by hemophilia. A 48-year-old man was admitted to our hospital for a third time due to DAH. Although the cause of DAH could not be identified by bronchoscopy or laboratory tests, a good response to corticosteroids suggested idiopathic DAH with pulmonary capillaritis. The patient was diagnosed with hemophilia B based on the results of a detailed inquiry, a mildly prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time, and low factor IX activity. Hemophilia may be an underlying factor that exacerbates the bleeding of patients with DAH, even when they show a good response to corticosteroids. PMID:28202865

  13. A case of pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis with Cor Pulmonale.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen; Gu, Tao

    2012-03-01

    Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis (PAM) is a rare disease characterized by the formation and deposition of microliths within the alveoli and a paucity of symptoms in contrast to the imaging findings. It has familial tendency and is thought to be an autosomal recessive disorder with the mutation in the SLC34A2 gene. We describe a case of PAM with Cor Pulmonale. Ultrasonic cardiogram showed pulmonary hypertension (82 mmHg). Chest radiography revealed diffuse, bilateral sandstorm-like micronodules with greater density in the lower lung fields. HRCT scans demonstrated diffuse ground-grass opacities, thickening and calcification of interlobular septa and confluent calcified nodules. A diagnosis of PAM was suggested and confirmed by transbronchial lung biopsy (TBLB).

  14. Determination of minimum alveolar concentration of sevoflurane in juvenile swine.

    PubMed

    Moeser, Adam J; Blikslager, Anthony T; Swanson, Cliff

    2008-04-01

    Pigs are important animal models in veterinary and medical research and have been widely used in experiments requiring surgical anesthesia. Sevoflurane is an inhalant anesthetic with unique properties that make it an ideal anesthetic for mask induction and anesthesia maintenance. However, there are relatively few studies reporting the anesthetic requirements for sevoflurane in juvenile swine, an age group that is commonly used in research experiments. Therefore the objective of this study was to determine the Minimum Alveolar Concentration (MAC) for sevoflurane in juvenile swine. Sevoflurane anesthesia was induced in six Yorkshire-cross pigs of approximately 9 weeks-of-age and MAC for sevoflurane was determined. The sevoflurane MAC value was determined to be 3.5+/-0.1% which is notably higher than values reported in the literature for pigs. This discrepancy in MAC values may represent changes in anesthetic requirements between different age groups of pigs and differences in the type of stimulus used to determine MAC.

  15. Molecular and functional characterization of porcine Siglec-3/CD33 and analysis of its expression in blood and tissues.

    PubMed

    Álvarez, B; Escalona, Z; Uenishi, H; Toki, D; Revilla, C; Yuste, M; Del Moral, M Gómez; Alonso, F; Ezquerra, A; Domínguez, J

    2015-08-01

    A cDNA clone encoding a 380 a-a type 1 transmembrane protein with homology to human Siglec-3/CD33 was obtained from a swine small intestine library. An analysis of protein sequence identified two immunoglobulin-like domains, a transmembrane region, and a carboxi-terminal tail with two tyrosine-based signalling motifs. Binding assays of Siglec-3 transfected CHO cells to polyacrylamide glycoconjugates showed a preference for α2-6-linked sialic acids. Using mAbs raised against a fragment containing the two Ig-like domains, porcine Siglec-3 was found to be expressed on monocytes and granulocytes, and their bone marrow precursors. It was also detected in lymph node, splenic and alveolar macrophages. MAbs immunoprecipitated, from granulocyte lysates, a protein of 51-60 kDa under both non-reducing and reducing conditions. MAbs were also used to analyse functional activity of Siglec-3 on bone marrow and blood cells. Engagement of Siglec-3 by mAb had no apparent effect on cell proliferation or cytokine production.

  16. Proteomic alteration of Marc-145 cells and PAMs after infection by porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus.

    PubMed

    Ding, Zhuang; Li, Zhi-jie; Zhang, Xiao-dong; Li, Ya-gang; Liu, Chang-jun; Zhang, Yan-Ping; Li, Yang

    2012-01-15

    Viral infections usually result in alterations in the host cell proteome, which determine the fate of infected cells and the progress of pathogenesis. To uncover cellular protein responses in porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), infected pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAMs) and Marc-145 cells were subjected to proteomic analysis involving two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) followed by MALDI-TOF-MS/MS identification. Altered expression of 44 protein spots in infected cells was identified in 2D gels, of which the 29 characterised by MALDI-TOF-MS/MS included 17 up-regulated and 12 down-regulated proteins. Some of these proteins were further confirmed at the mRNA level using real-time RT-PCR. Moreover, Western blot analysis confirmed the up-regulation of HSP27, vimentin and the down-regulation of galectin-1. Our study is the first attempt to analyze the cellular protein profile of PRRSV-infected Marc-145 cells using proteomics to provide valuable information about the effects of PRRSV-induced alterations on Marc-145 cell function. Further study of the affected proteins may facilitate our understanding of the mechanisms of PRRSV infection and pathogenesis.

  17. Alveolar macrophage cytokine response to air pollution particles: Oxidant mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Imrich, Amy; Ning Yaoyu; Lawrence, Joy; Coull, Brent; Gitin, Elena; Knutson, Mitchell; Kobzik, Lester . E-mail: lkobzik@hsph.harvard.edu

    2007-02-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AMs) primed with LPS and treated with concentrated ambient air particles (CAPs) showed enhanced release of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and provide an in vitro model for the amplified effects of air pollution particles seen in people with preexisting lung disease. To investigate the mechanism(s) by which CAPs mediate TNF release in primed rat AMs, we first tested the effect of a panel of antioxidants. N-Acetyl-L-cysteine (20 mM), dimethyl thiourea (20 mM) and catalase (5 {mu}M) significantly inhibited TNF release by primed AMs incubated with CAPs. Conversely, when LPS-primed AMs were treated with CAPs in the presence of exogenous oxidants (H{sub 2}O{sub 2} generated by glucose oxidase, 10 {mu}M/h), TNF release and cell toxicity was significantly increased. The soluble fraction of CAPs suspensions caused most of the increased bioactivity in the presence of exogenous H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. The metal chelator deferoxamine (DFO) strongly inhibited the interaction of the soluble fraction with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} but had no effect on the bioactivity of the insoluble CAPs fraction. We conclude that CAPs can mediate their effects in primed AMs by acting on oxidant-sensitive cytokine release in at least two distinct ways. In the primed cell, insoluble components of PM mediate enhanced TNF production that is H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-dependent (catalase-sensitive) yet independent of iron (DFO-insensitive). In the presence of exogenous H{sub 2}O{sub 2} released by AMs, PMNs, or other lung cells within an inflamed alveolar milieu, soluble iron released from air particles can also mediate cytokine release and cell toxicity.

  18. In vitro dissolution of uranium oxide by baboon alveolar macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Poncy, J.L.; Dhilly, M.; Verry, M. ); Metivier, H. ); Masse, R. )

    1992-07-01

    In vitro cellular dissolution tests for insoluble forms of uranium oxide are technically difficult with conventional methodology using adherent alveolar macrophages. The limited number of cells per flask and the slow dissolution rate in a large volume of nutritive medium are obvious restricting factors. macrophages in suspension cannot be substituted because they represent different and poorly reproducible functional subtypes with regard to activation and enzyme secretion. Preliminary results on the dissolution of uranium oxide using immobilized alveolar macrophages are promising because large numbers of highly function macrophages can be cultured in a limited volume. Cells were obtained by bronchoalveolar lavages performed on baboons (Papio papio) and then immobilized after the phagocytosis of uranium octoxide (U[sub 3]O[sub 8]) particles in alginate beads linked with Ca[sup 2+]. The dissolution rate expressed as percentage of initial uranium content in cells was 0.039 [+-] 0.016%/day for particles with a count median geometric diameter of 3.84 [mu]m([sigma][sub g] = 1.84). A 2-fold increase in the dissolution rate was observed when the same number of particles was immobilized without macrophages. These results, obtained in vitro, suggest that the U[sub 3]O[sub g] preparation investigated should be assigned to inhalation class Y as recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection. Future experiments are intended to clarify this preliminary work and to examine the dissolution characteristics of other particles such as uranium dioxide. It is recommended that the dissolution rate should be measured over an interval of 3 weeks, which is compatible with the survival time of immobilized cells in culture and may reveal transformation states occurring with aging of the particles. 23 refs., 3 figs.

  19. Liver transplantation for alveolar echinococcosis in an endemic region.

    PubMed

    Aydinli, Bulent; Ozturk, Gurkan; Arslan, Sukru; Kantarci, Mecit; Tan, Onder; Ahıskalioglu, Ali; Özden, Kemalettin; Colak, Abdurrahim

    2015-08-01

    Alveolar echinococcosis (AE) is a chronic disease caused by ingestion of the eggs of the parasitic cestode Echinococcosis multilocularis (EM). In severe cases, liver transplantation (LT) may represent the only possibility of survival and cure. Patients undergoing LT associated with hepatic AE at our institution between April 2011 and October 2014 were investigated retrospectively. The clinical findings of the 27 patients who participated in the study were noted. Kaplan-Meier and chi-square tests were used to investigate the effect of these characteristics on survival and mortality. Living donor LT was performed on 20 patients (74.1%), and deceased donor LT was performed on 7 patients (25.9%). Hilar invasion was the most common indication (14 patients, 51.9%) for transplantation. The patient follow-up was 16.1 ± 11.4 months, and the overall survival rate was 77.8%. Primary nonfunction developed only in 2 patients in the posttransplantation period. Six patients died during monitoring, the most common cause of death being sepsis (3 patients). The relationship between the mortality rate of the patients and the invasion of the bile duct and/or portal vein by alveolar lesions was found to be statistically significant (P = 0.024 and P = 0.043, respectively). According to PNM staging, when the AE disease exceeds the resectability limits, the only alternative for the treatment of the disease is LT. However, different from LT due to cirrhosis, it is extremely difficult to perform a transplantation for AE disease because of the invasive characteristics of it. In order to decrease the difficulty of the operation and the postoperative mortality, the intracystic abscess and cholangitis which occur because of AE must be treated via medical and percutaneous methods before transplantation.

  20. Three-dimensional convective alveolar flow induced by rhythmic breathing motion of the pulmonary acinus.

    PubMed

    Sznitman, Josué; Heimsch, Fabian; Heimsch, Thomas; Rusch, Daniel; Rösgen, Thomas

    2007-10-01

    Low Reynolds number flows (Re<1) in the human pulmonary acinus are often difficult to assess due to the submillimeter dimensions and accessibility of the region. In the present computational study, we simulated three-dimensional alveolar flows in an alveolated duct at each generation of the pulmonary acinar tree using recent morphometric data. Rhythmic lung expansion and contraction motion was modeled using moving wall boundary conditions to simulate realistic sedentary tidal breathing. The resulting alveolar flow patterns are largely time independent and governed by the ratio of the alveolar to ductal flow rates, Qa/Qd. This ratio depends uniquely on geometrical configuration such that alveolar flow patterns may be entirely determined by the location of the alveoli along the acinar tree. Although flows within alveoli travel very slowly relative to those in acinar ducts, 0.021%alveolar opening and radial flows induced by wall displacement. Furthermore, alveolar flow patterns under rhythmic wall motion contrast sharply with results obtained in a rigid alveolus, further confirming the importance of including inherent wall motion to understand realistic acinar flow phenomena. The present findings may give further insight into the role of convective alveolar flows in determining aerosol kinematics and deposition in the pulmonary acinus.

  1. The clinical application of rhBMP-7 for the reconstruction of alveolar cleft.

    PubMed

    Ayoub, Ashraf; Roshan, Cherian P; Gillgrass, Toby; Naudi, Kurt; Ray, Arup

    2016-01-01

    In this study, radiographic assessment was performed to find out the effectiveness of bone regeneration following the application of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein 7 (rhBMP-7) for the reconstruction of alveolar cleft defects in 11 cases: nine unilateral and two bilateral alveolar clefs. Reconstruction of the alveolar cleft was performed by using 3.5 mg of rhBMP-7 (Osigraft OP1) on a type I collagen carrier. Radiographs were taken 6 months post operation using a Gendex Intraoral Unit with Agfa Dentus M2 Comfort occlusal film. The amount of bony infill was graded on a Kindelan four-point scale. The patients were followed up for an average of 6.6 years. Based on the radiographic analysis, eight out of the nine unilateral alveolar cleft cases received a score of grade I and one patient had a grade II score, using the Kindelan scale. In the two bilateral alveolar clefts, only one side had bone formation. The radiographic appearance showed a normal trabecular pattern similar to the adjacent bone. Thus, rhBMP-7 was radiographically and clinically successful in regenerating the bone at the alveolar cleft which resulted in shortening of the operation time, absence of donor-site morbidity and a shorter hospital stay. The promising results of this preliminary study should encourage a phase II trial to compare bone grafts with BMP for the reconstruction of alveolar defects.

  2. Comparison of human and porcine skin for characterization of sunscreens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigmann, Hans-Jürgen; Schanzer, Sabine; Patzelt, Alexa; Bahaban, Virginie; Durat, Fabienne; Sterry, Wolfram; Lademann, Jürgen

    2009-03-01

    The universal sun protection factor (USPF) characterizing sunscreen efficacy based on spectroscopically determined data, which were obtained using the tape stripping procedure. The USPF takes into account the complete ultraviolet (UV) spectral range in contrast to the classical sun protection factor (SPF). Until now, the USPF determination has been evaluated only in human skin. However, investigating new filters not yet licensed excludes in vivo investigation on human skin but requires the utilization of a suitable skin model. The penetration behavior and the protection efficacy of 10 commercial sunscreens characterized by USPF were investigated, comparing human and porcine skin. The penetration behavior found for typical UV filter substances is nearly identical for both skin types. The comparison of the USPF obtained for human and porcine skin results in a linear relation between both USPF values with a correlation factor R2=0.98. The results demonstrate the possibility for the use of porcine skin to determine the protection efficacy of sunscreens.

  3. Spatial Clustering of Porcine Cysticercosis in Mbulu District, Northern Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Ngowi, Helena A.; Kassuku, Ayub A.; Carabin, Hélène; Mlangwa, James E. D.; Mlozi, Malongo R. S.; Mbilinyi, Boniface P.; Willingham, Arve L.

    2010-01-01

    Background Porcine cysticercosis is caused by a zoonotic tapeworm, Taenia solium, which causes serious disease syndromes in human. Effective control of the parasite requires knowledge on the burden and pattern of the infections in order to properly direct limited resources. The objective of this study was to establish the spatial distribution of porcine cysticercosis in Mbulu district, northern Tanzania, to guide control strategies. Methodology/Principal Findings This study is a secondary analysis of data collected during the baseline and follow-up periods of a randomized community trial aiming at reducing the incidence rate of porcine cysticercosis through an educational program. At baseline, 784 randomly selected pig-keeping households located in 42 villages in 14 wards were included. Lingual examination of indigenous pigs aged 2–12 (median 8) months, one randomly selected from each household, were conducted. Data from the control group of the randomized trial that included 21 of the 42 villages were used for the incidence study. A total of 295 pig-keeping households were provided with sentinel pigs (one each) and reassessed for cysticercosis incidence once or twice for 2–9 (median 4) months using lingual examination and antigen ELISA. Prevalence of porcine cysticercosis was computed in Epi Info 3.5. The prevalence and incidence of porcine cysticercosis were mapped at household level using ArcView 3.2. K functions were computed in R software to assess general clustering of porcine cysticercosis. Spatial scan statistics were computed in SatScan to identify local clusters of the infection. The overall prevalence of porcine cysticercosis was 7.3% (95% CI: 5.6, 9.4; n = 784). The K functions revealed a significant overall clustering of porcine cysticercosis incidence for all distances between 600 m and 5 km from a randomly chosen case household based on Ag-ELISA. Lingual examination revealed clustering from 650 m to 6 km and between 7.5 and 10 km. The

  4. [Recent advance on blood group antigen modification of porcine erythrocytes].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jie-Xi; Zhang, Yang-Pei

    2002-06-01

    Advances in the field of xenotransplantation raise the intriguing possibility of using porcine red blood cells (pRBCs) as an alternative source for blood transfusion. Serologically, pRBCs share a number of characteristics with human red blood cells (RBCs), so pRBCs are considered the most likely donor for xenotransfusion. However, xenoantigens on porcine erythrocytes play major roles in antibody-mediated RBC destruction. Although the alphaGal epitope (Galalpha1, 3Galbeta1, 4GalNAc-R) is the major xenoantigen on porcine erythrocytes and is responsible for the binding of the majority of human natural antibodies, other non-alphaGal xenoantigens have been identified. The importance of these non-alphaGal xenoantigens in binding human natural antibodies and subsequently triggering immunological responses cannot be underestimated.

  5. Similar matrix alterations in alveolar and small airway walls of COPD patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Remodelling in COPD has at least two dimensions: small airway wall thickening and destruction of alveolar walls. Recent studies indicate that there is some similarity between alveolar and small airway wall matrix remodelling. The aim of this study was to characterise and assess similarities in alveolar and small airway wall matrix remodelling, and TGF-β signalling in COPD patients of different GOLD stages. Methods Lung tissue sections of 14 smoking controls, 16 GOLD II and 19 GOLD IV patients were included and stained for elastin and collagens as well as hyaluronan, a glycosaminoglycan matrix component and pSMAD2. Results Elastin was significantly decreased in COPD patients not only in alveolar, but also in small airway walls. Interestingly, both collagen and hyaluronan were increased in alveolar as well as small airway walls. The matrix changes were highly comparable between GOLD stages, with collagen content in the alveolar wall increasing further in GOLD IV. A calculated remodelling index, defined as elastin divided over collagen and hyaluronan, was decreased significantly in GOLD II and further lowered in GOLD IV patients, suggesting that matrix component alterations are involved in progressive airflow limitation. Interestingly, there was a positive correlation present between the alveolar and small airway wall stainings of the matrix components, as well as for pSMAD2. No differences in pSMAD2 staining between controls and COPD patients were found. Conclusions In conclusion, remodelling in the alveolar and small airway wall in COPD is markedly similar and already present in moderate COPD. Notably, alveolar collagen and a remodelling index relate to lung function. PMID:24886452

  6. Temperature profiles of different cooling methods in porcine pancreas procurement.

    PubMed

    Weegman, Bradley P; Suszynski, Thomas M; Scott, William E; Ferrer Fábrega, Joana; Avgoustiniatos, Efstathios S; Anazawa, Takayuki; O'Brien, Timothy D; Rizzari, Michael D; Karatzas, Theodore; Jie, Tun; Sutherland, David E R; Hering, Bernhard J; Papas, Klearchos K

    2014-01-01

    Porcine islet xenotransplantation is a promising alternative to human islet allotransplantation. Porcine pancreas cooling needs to be optimized to reduce the warm ischemia time (WIT) following donation after cardiac death, which is associated with poorer islet isolation outcomes. This study examines the effect of four different cooling Methods on core porcine pancreas temperature (n = 24) and histopathology (n = 16). All Methods involved surface cooling with crushed ice and chilled irrigation. Method A, which is the standard for porcine pancreas procurement, used only surface cooling. Method B involved an intravascular flush with cold solution through the pancreas arterial system. Method C involved an intraductal infusion with cold solution through the major pancreatic duct, and Method D combined all three cooling Methods. Surface cooling alone (Method A) gradually decreased core pancreas temperature to <10 °C after 30 min. Using an intravascular flush (Method B) improved cooling during the entire duration of procurement, but incorporating an intraductal infusion (Method C) rapidly reduced core temperature 15-20 °C within the first 2 min of cooling. Combining all methods (Method D) was the most effective at rapidly reducing temperature and providing sustained cooling throughout the duration of procurement, although the recorded WIT was not different between Methods (P = 0.36). Histological scores were different between the cooling Methods (P = 0.02) and the worst with Method A. There were differences in histological scores between Methods A and C (P = 0.02) and Methods A and D (P = 0.02), but not between Methods C and D (P = 0.95), which may highlight the importance of early cooling using an intraductal infusion. In conclusion, surface cooling alone cannot rapidly cool large (porcine or human) pancreata. Additional cooling with an intravascular flush and intraductal infusion results in improved core porcine pancreas temperature profiles during procurement and

  7. Effects of ATP-sensitive potassium channel opener on potassium transport and alveolar fluid clearance in the resected human lung.

    PubMed

    Sakuma, T; Takahashi, K; Ohya, N; Nakada, T; Matthay, M A

    1998-07-01

    Since the effect of an ATP-sensitive potassium channel (KATP channel) opener on the function of alveolar epithelial cells is unknown, the effect of YM934, a newly synthesized KATP channel opener, on potassium influx into the alveolar spaces and alveolar fluid clearance was determined in the resected human lung. An isosmolar albumin solution with a low potassium concentration was instilled into the distal airspaces of resected human lungs. Alveolar fluid clearance was measured by the progressive increase in alveolar protein concentration. Net potassium transport was measured by the change in potassium concentration and alveolar fluid volume. YM934 (10(-4) M) increased net influx of potassium by 140% into the alveolar spaces and also increased alveolar fluid clearance by 60% in the experiments with a potassium concentration of 0.3 mEq/1. Glibenclamide (10(-4) M), a KATP channel blocker, inhibited the YM934-increased influx of potassium transport and the increase in alveolar fluid clearance. Also amiloride (10(-5) M), an inhibitors of apical sodium uptake, blocked the YM934 stimulated increase in net alveolar fluid clearance. These results indicate that a KATP channel opener can effect potassium transport and net vectorial fluid movement across the human alveolar epithelium.

  8. Biological Events in Periodontal Ligament and Alveolar Bone Associated with Application of Orthodontic Forces

    PubMed Central

    Feller, L.; Khammissa, R. A. G.; Schechter, I.; Thomadakis, G.; Fourie, J.; Lemmer, J.

    2015-01-01

    Orthodontic force-induced stresses cause dynamic alterations within the extracellular matrix and within the cytoskeleton of cells in the periodontal ligament and alveolar bone, mediating bone remodelling, ultimately enabling orthodontic tooth movement. In the periodontal ligament and alveolar bone, the mechanically induced tensile strains upregulate the expression of osteogenic genes resulting in bone formation, while mechanically induced compressive strains mediate predominantly catabolic tissue changes and bone resorption. In this review article we summarize some of the currently known biological events occurring in the periodontal ligament and in the alveolar bone in response to application of orthodontic forces and how these facilitate tooth movement. PMID:26421314

  9. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Clinical manifestations, treatment, and prognosis.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Martínez, Marco Ulises; Abud-Mendoza, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus is a rare but potentially fatal condition. Although the pathogenesis of this condition is unknown, high disease activity is the main characteristic; moreover, histopathology in some studies showed alveolar immune complex deposits and capillaritis. Clinical features of DAH include dyspnea, a drop in hemoglobin, and diffuse radiographic alveolar images, with or without hemoptysis. Factors associated with mortality include mechanical ventilation, renal failure, and infections. Bacterial infections have been reported frequently in patients with DAH, but also invasive fungal infections including aspergillosis. DAH treatment is based on high dose methylprednisolone; other accepted therapies include cyclophosphamide (controversial), plasmapheresis, immunoglobulin and rituximab.

  10. Alveolar macrophage count as an indicator of lung reaction to industrial air pollution.

    PubMed

    Mylius, E A; Gullvåg, B

    1986-01-01

    The major proportion of the cellular components found in most of the sputa from persons working in polluted atmospheres are alveolar macrophages, and counts of the alveolar macrophages present in smears made from sputa from exposed workers probably reflect the lung reaction to air pollution. An investigation of this phenomenon was undertaken using the sputa of workers in different types of industries: a coke plant, two different aluminum reduction plants, a ship-building yard and asphalt work on a road. The results showed that the alveolar macrophage count increases with a higher level of particulate pollution in the workplace. A synergistic effect of occupational air pollution and smoking habits was also recorded.

  11. Injurious mechanical ventilation in the normal lung causes a progressive pathologic change in dynamic alveolar mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Pavone, Lucio A; Albert, Scott; Carney, David; Gatto, Louis A; Halter, Jeffrey M; Nieman, Gary F

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Acute respiratory distress syndrome causes a heterogeneous lung injury, and without protective mechanical ventilation a secondary ventilator-induced lung injury can occur. To ventilate noncompliant lung regions, high inflation pressures are required to 'pop open' the injured alveoli. The temporal impact, however, of these elevated pressures on normal alveolar mechanics (that is, the dynamic change in alveolar size and shape during ventilation) is unknown. In the present study we found that ventilating the normal lung with high peak pressure (45 cmH20) and low positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP of 3 cmH2O) did not initially result in altered alveolar mechanics, but alveolar instability developed over time. Methods Anesthetized rats underwent tracheostomy, were placed on pressure control ventilation, and underwent sternotomy. Rats were then assigned to one of three ventilation strategies: control group (n = 3, Pcontrol = 14 cmH2O, PEEP = 3 cmH2O), high pressure/low PEEP group (n = 6, Pcontrol = 45 cmH2O, PEEP = 3 cmH2O), and high pressure/high PEEP group (n = 5, Pcontrol = 45 cmH2O, PEEP = 10 cmH2O). In vivo microscopic footage of subpleural alveolar stability (that is, recruitment/derecruitment) was taken at baseline and than every 15 minutes for 90 minutes following ventilator adjustments. Alveolar recruitment/derecruitment was determined by measuring the area of individual alveoli at peak inspiration (I) and end expiration (E) by computer image analysis. Alveolar recruitment/derecruitment was quantified by the percentage change in alveolar area during tidal ventilation (%I – EΔ). Results Alveoli were stable in the control group for the entire experiment (low %I – EΔ). Alveoli in the high pressure/low PEEP group were initially stable (low %I – EΔ), but with time alveolar recruitment/derecruitment developed. The development of alveolar instability in the high pressure/low PEEP group was associated with histologic lung injury. Conclusion A

  12. Lateralization of the inferior alveolar nerve with simultaneous implant placement: surgical techniques.

    PubMed

    Garg, A K; Morales, M J

    1998-01-01

    In the event of moderate to severe mandibular bone resorption posterior to the mental foramen, repositioning of the inferior alveolar nerve provides a greater amount of available bone for implant placement and reduces the risk of nerve injury. While neural paresthesia may initially occur, this altered sensation generally resolves spontaneously. Alveolar nerve repositioning may be possible in cases in which other procedures cannot be performed due to the extent of atrophy of the posterior mandibular alveolar crest. This article presents the surgical technique to achieve this objective.

  13. Alveolar recruitment maneuver in refractory hypoxemia and lobar atelectasis after cardiac surgery: A case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Objective This case report describes an unusual presentation of right upper lobe atelectasis associated with refractory hypoxemia to conventional alveolar recruitment maneuvers in a patient soon after coronary artery bypass grafting surgery. Method Case-report. Results The alveolar recruitment with PEEP = 40cmH2O improved the patient’s atelectasis and hypoxemia. Conclusion In the present report, the unusual alveolar recruitment maneuver with PEEP 40cmH2O showed to be safe and efficient to reverse refractory hypoxemia and uncommon atelectasis in a patient after cardiac surgery. PMID:22726992

  14. Tritiated porcine dynorphin (1-17): synthesis and characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Houghten, R.A.

    1982-10-18

    Tritiated porcine dynorphin (1-17) has been prepared from its corresponding iodinated analog. The iodinated analog (diiodotyrosine at position 1) was synthesized, along with its non-iodinated counterpart, by the solid-phase method. Catalytic exchange of this iodinated analog in the presence of tritium yielded tritiated porcine dynorphin having a specific activity of 42 Ci/mmole. Both the native, iodinated and tritiated dynorphin analogs were shown to be homogenous by chromatography on carboxymethylcellulose, paper chromatography, amino acid analysis, electrophoresis, high performance liquid chromatography and isoelectric focusing on polyacrylamide.

  15. Kinetics of uptake and distribution of arachidonic acid by rat alveolar macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Robison, T.W.; Duncan, D.P.; Forman, H.J.

    1988-10-01

    The time course of uptake and distribution of /sup 3/H-arachidonic acid (/sup 3/H-AA) into rat alveolar macrophage phospholipid pools was examined. Macrophages incubated with exogenous /sup 3/H-AA in RPMI-1640 containing 0.1% bovine serum albumin (BSA), incorporated this radiolabel into phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylinositol (PI) with plateaus reached within 2 to 4 hours, which remained relatively constant for up to 18 hours. Incorporation of /sup 3/H-AA into phosphatidylethanolamine was small, but continued to increase for 14 hours. Analysis of phosphate content in phospholipid pools revealed that treatment with exogenous 5 nM arachidonic acid had no effect upon pool sizes, but there was a selective incorporation of /sup 3/H-AA into PI. Cells were incubated with /sup 3/H-AA in RPMI alone or medium containing either 0.2% lactalbumin, fetal calf serum at variable concentrations, 10% Nu Serum, or 0.1% BSA. Incubation of macrophages with /sup 3/H-AA in RPMI alone or containing 0.2% lactalbumin, resulted in approximately 70% of the radiolabel taken up by the cells being incorporated into triglyceride. The addition of BSA to RPMI-1640 medium was found to facilitate selective uptake of /sup 3/H-AA into phospholipids. Approximately 70% of incorporated /sup 3/H-AA was releasable through the action of exogenous phospholipase A2.

  16. Cytogenetic effects of cigarette smoke on pulmonary alveolar macrophages of the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Rithidech, K.; Chen, B.T.; Mauderly, J.L.; Whorton, E.B. Jr.; Brooks, A.L. )

    1989-01-01

    To determine accurately the potential genetic damage induced by toxic inhaled agents, the cells that receive a high concentration of such agents should be analyzed. Pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAMs) represent such cells. The authors compared the cytogenetic effects of cigarette smoke on PAMs of rats exposed repeatedly by different methods. This study was part of a larger investigation of the health effects resulting from different methods of exposing rats to cigarette smoke. Fischer 344/N male rats were randomly selected from five different exposure groups. The rats were exposed 6 hr/day, 5 days/week for 22-24 days. All smoke-exposed rats received the same daily concentrations {times} time product of cigarette smoke. Rats were injected intraperitoneally with colchicine at the end of exposure. PAMs were obtained by lung lavage and chromosomal damage was measured. Highly significant smoke-induced differences in both structural and numerical aberrations were observed in continuously exposed rats vs. sham controls, regardless route of exposure. The structural aberrations observed were chromatid-type deletions. Both hypoploid and hyperploid cells were detected. The data suggest that cigarette smoke is clastogenic and may disrupt spindle-fiber formation. These activities may play a role in the induction of human carcinogenesis caused by cigarette smoke exposure.

  17. Alveolar metabolism of natural vs. synthetic surfactants in preterm newborn rabbits.

    PubMed

    Allen, V; Oulton, M; Stinson, D; MacDonald, J; Allen, A

    2001-01-01

    We compared the recoveries of four surfactant preparations: two natural [term fetal rabbit surfactant (FRS) and adult rabbit surfactant (ARS)] and two commercially available preparations [apoprotein-based Survanta (S) and synthetic Exosurf (E)] from 27-day gestation rabbit pups treated at birth and ventilated up to 120 min. At 5, 60, and 120 min, we measured the recovery of the heavy-aggregate, metabolically active form (H) and the light-aggregate, nonsurface active metabolic breakdown form (L) of alveolar surfactant and determined the phospholipid content and composition of the intracellularly stored lamellar body (LB) pool. Pups treated with FRS had <15% loss of H by 2 h. ARS-treated pups had a >50% loss of H by 1 h, and E- and S-treated pups had approximately 50% loss by 5 min, with a slower rate of continuing loss of up to 80% by 2 h. The major losses of H phospholipid were not explained by the L-form recovery. LB phospholipid significantly increased only in the E-treated pups and only at 2 h. FRS provides a biologically active form (H) of surfactant that appeared to remain in the airway for a significantly longer time than the other surfactant preparations. The unique properties of FRS merit further study.

  18. Inferior Alveolar Nerve Injuries Associated with Mandibular Fractures at Risk: A Two-Center Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Boffano, Paolo; Roccia, Fabio; Gallesio, Cesare; Karagozoglu, K.; Forouzanfar, Tymour

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the incidence of the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) injury in mandibular fractures. This study is based on two databases that have continuously recorded patients hospitalized with maxillofacial fractures in two departments—Department of Maxillofacial Surgery, Vrije Universiteit University Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands, and Division of Maxillofacial Surgery, San Giovanni Battista Hospital, Turin, Italy. Demographic, anatomic, and etiology variables were considered for each patient and statistically assessed in relation to the neurosensory IAN impairment. Statistically significant associations were found between IAN injury and fracture displacement (p = 0.03), isolated mandibular fractures (p = 0.01), and angle fractures (p = 0.004). A statistically significant association was also found between IAN injury and assaults (p = 0.03). Displaced isolated mandibular angle fractures could be considered at risk for increased incidence of IAN injury. Assaults seem to be the most important etiological factor that is responsible for IAN lesions. PMID:25383147

  19. Phospholipid-transfer activities in cytosols from lung, isolated alveolar type II cells and alveolar type II cell-derived adenomas.

    PubMed Central

    Pool, G L; Bubacz, D G; Lumb, R H; Mason, R J

    1983-01-01

    We have examined phospholipid-transfer activities in cytosols from rat and mouse whole lung, isolated rat alveolar type II cells and alveolar type II cell-derived mouse pulmonary adenomas. We report an enrichment in phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylglycerol (but not phosphatidylinositol) protein-catalysed transfer in the type II cell and adenoma cytosols compared with the whole-lung cytosols. The activities from these cytosols were resolved using column chromatofocusing, which clearly demonstrated the presence of a phosphatidylcholine-specific transfer protein in each of the four tissues. In addition, two proteins (rat) or three proteins (mouse) catalysing both phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylglycerol transfer were resolved from whole lung, whereas in both the rat isolated alveolar type II cells and the mouse type II cell-derived adenomas one of these less specific proteins is not present. PMID:6661189

  20. Iron homeostatis and oxidative stress in idiopathic pulmonary alveolar proteinosis: a case-control study

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Lung injury caused by both inhaled dusts and infectious agents depends on increased availability of iron and metal-catalyzed oxidative stress. Because inhaled particles, such as silica, and certain infections can cause secondary pulmonary alveolar proteinosi...

  1. Association of misoprostol, Moebius syndrome and congenital central alveolar hypoventilation. Case report.

    PubMed

    Nunes, M L; Friedrich, M A; Loch, L F

    1999-03-01

    We report a case showing the association of Moebius syndrome, the use of misoprostol during pregnancy and the development of central congenital alveolar hypoventilation. Pathophysiological aspects of these three diseases are discussed and also the unfavorable prognosis of this association.

  2. Reveromycin A Administration Prevents Alveolar Bone Loss in Osteoprotegerin Knockout Mice with Periodontal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, Manami; Miyazawa, Ken; Tabuchi, Masako; Tanaka, Miyuki; Yoshizako, Mamoru; Minamoto, Chisato; Torii, Yasuyoshi; Tamaoka, Yusuke; Kawatani, Makoto; Osada, Hiroyuki; Maeda, Hatsuhiko; Goto, Shigemi

    2015-01-01

    Chronic periodontal disease is characterized by alveolar bone loss and inflammatory changes. Reveromycin A (RMA) was recently developed and is a unique agent for inhibiting osteoclast activity. This study analysed the effects of RMA in an experimental mouse model of periodontitis involving osteoprotegerin (OPG)-knockout mice, specifically, whether it could control osteoclasts and reduce inflammation in periodontal tissue. We examined wild-type (WT) and OPG knockout mice (OPG KO) ligated with wire around contact points on the left first and second molars. RMA was administered twice a day to half of the mice. Using micro-computed tomography, we measured the volume of alveolar bone loss between the first and second molars, and also performed histological analysis. The OPG KO RMA+ group had significantly decreased osteoclast counts, alveolar bone loss, attachment loss, and inflammatory cytokine expression 8 weeks after ligation. Thus, RMA may reduce alveolar bone loss and inflamed periodontal tissues in patients with periodontitis. PMID:26561427

  3. Simultaneous Exposure to Multiple Air Pollutants Influences Alveolar Epithelial Cell Ion Transport

    EPA Science Inventory

    Purpose. Air pollution sources generally release multiple pollutants simultaneously and yet, research has historically focused on the source-to-health linkages of individual air pollutants. We recently showed that exposure of alveolar epithelial cells to a combination of particul...

  4. Periodontal Ligament and Alveolar Bone in Health and Adaptation: Tooth Movement.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Nan; Guo, Weihua; Chen, Mo; Zheng, Ying; Zhou, Jian; Kim, Sahng Gyoon; Embree, Mildred C; Songhee Song, Karen; Marao, Heloisa F; Mao, Jeremy J

    2016-01-01

    The periodontal ligament (PDL) and alveolar bone are two critical tissues for understanding orthodontic tooth movement. The current literature is replete with descriptive studies of multiple cell types and their matrices in the PDL and alveolar bone, but is deficient with how stem/progenitor cells differentiate into PDL and alveolar bone cells. Can one type of orthodontic force with a specific magnitude and frequency activate osteoblasts, whereas another force type activates osteoclasts? This chapter will discuss the biology of not only mature cells and their matrices in the periodontal ligament and alveolar bone, but also stem/progenitor cells that differentiate into fibroblasts, osteoblasts and osteoclasts. Key advances in tooth movement rely on further understanding of osteoblast and fibroblast differentiation from mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells, and osteoclastogenesis from the hematopoietic/monocyte lineage.

  5. Reveromycin A Administration Prevents Alveolar Bone Loss in Osteoprotegerin Knockout Mice with Periodontal Disease.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Manami; Miyazawa, Ken; Tabuchi, Masako; Tanaka, Miyuki; Yoshizako, Mamoru; Minamoto, Chisato; Torii, Yasuyoshi; Tamaoka, Yusuke; Kawatani, Makoto; Osada, Hiroyuki; Maeda, Hatsuhiko; Goto, Shigemi

    2015-11-12

    Chronic periodontal disease is characterized by alveolar bone loss and inflammatory changes. Reveromycin A (RMA) was recently developed and is a unique agent for inhibiting osteoclast activity. This study analysed the effects of RMA in an experimental mouse model of periodontitis involving osteoprotegerin (OPG)-knockout mice, specifically, whether it could control osteoclasts and reduce inflammation in periodontal tissue. We examined wild-type (WT) and OPG knockout mice (OPG KO) ligated with wire around contact points on the left first and second molars. RMA was administered twice a day to half of the mice. Using micro-computed tomography, we measured the volume of alveolar bone loss between the first and second molars, and also performed histological analysis. The OPG KO RMA+ group had significantly decreased osteoclast counts, alveolar bone loss, attachment loss, and inflammatory cytokine expression 8 weeks after ligation. Thus, RMA may reduce alveolar bone loss and inflamed periodontal tissues in patients with periodontitis.

  6. Dehydroepiandrosterone inhibits the spontaneous release of superoxide radical by alveolar macrophages in vitro in asbestosis

    SciTech Connect

    Rom, W.N.; Harkin, T. )

    1991-08-01

    Asbestosis is characterized by an alveolar macrophage alveolitis with injury and fibrosis of the lower respiratory tract. Alveolar macrophages recovered by bronchoalveolar lavage spontaneously release exaggerated amounts of oxidants including superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide that may mediate alveolar epithelial cell injury. Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) is a normally occurring adrenal androgen that inhibits glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, the initial enzyme in the pentose phosphate shunt necessary for NADPH generation and superoxide anion formation. In this regard, the authors hypothesized that DHEA may reduce asbestos-induced oxidant release. DHEA added in vitro to alveolar macrophages lavaged from 11 nonsmoking asbestos workers significantly reduced superoxide anion release. DHEA is an antioxidant and potential anticarcinogenic agent that may have a therapeutic role in reducing the increased oxidant burden in asbestos-induced alveolitis of the lower respiratory tract.

  7. [Study of the in vivo penetration of cotrimoxazole in alveolar macrophages].

    PubMed

    Lopez, I; Dubar, V; Aerts, C; Voisin, C; Wallaert, B

    1990-04-01

    Kinetic of cotrimoxazole was studied in serum, alveolar macrophages and BAL fluid from guinea pigs receiving sulfamethoxazole (SMX, 100 mg/kg) and trimethoprim (TMP, 20 mg/kg). Guinea pigs were killed by cervical dislocation 30 min, 1 h, 3 h, 6 h and 24 h after intraperitoneal injection. Lung lavage was performed to obtain alveolar macrophages and BAL fluid. TMP and SMX levels were assayed using high-performance-liquid chromatography. Highest SMX levels were obtained in serum at 30 min, in BAL fluid at 1 h and in alveolar macrophages at 3 h. Mean SMX/TMP ratios (30 min, 1 h, 3 h) was 26.5 +/- 0.8 in serum, 3.76 +/- 1.8 in BAL fluid and 1.15 +/- 0.02 in alveolar macrophages.

  8. Periodontal Ligament and Alveolar Bone in Health and Adaptation: Tooth Movement

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Nan; Guo, Weihua; Chen, Mo; Zheng, Ying; Zhou, Jian; Kim, Sahng Gyoon; Embree, Mildred C.; Song, Karen Songhee; Marao, Heloisa F.; Mao, Jeremy J.

    2015-01-01

    The periodontal ligament (PDL) and alveolar bone are two critical tissues for understanding orthodontic tooth movement. The current literature is replete with descriptive studies of multiple cell types and their matrices in the PDL and alveolar bone, but is deficient with how stem/progenitor cells differentiate into PDL and alveolar bone cells. Can one type of orthodontic force with a specific magnitude and frequency preferably activate osteoblasts, whereas another force type activates osteoclasts? This chapter will discuss the biology of not only mature cells and their matrices in the periodontal ligament and alveolar bone, but also stem/progenitor cells that differentiate into fibroblasts, osteoblasts and osteoclasts. Key advances in tooth movement rely on further understanding of osteoblast and fibroblast differentiation from mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells, and osteoclastogenesis from the hematopoietic/monocyte lineage. PMID:26599112

  9. Segmental maxillary distraction with a novel device for closure of a wide alveolar cleft

    PubMed Central

    Bousdras, Vasilios A.; Liyanage, Chandra; Mars, Michael; Ayliffe, Peter R

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of a wide alveolar cleft with initial application of segmental distraction osteogenesis is reported, in order to minimise cleft size prior to secondary alveolar bone grafting. The lesser maxillary segment was mobilised with osteotomy at Le Fort I level and, a novel distractor, facilitated horizontal movement of the dental/alveolar segment along the curvature of the maxillary dental arch. Following a latency period of 4 days distraction was applied for 7 days at a rate of 0.5 mm twice daily. Radiographic, ultrasonographic and clinical assessment revealed new bone and soft tissue formation 8 weeks after completion of the distraction phase. Overall the maxillary segment did move minimising the width of the cleft, which allowed successful closure with a secondary alveolar bone graft. PMID:24987601

  10. Deposition of Particles in the Alveolar Airways: Inhalation and Breath-Hold with Pharmaceutical Aerosols

    PubMed Central

    Khajeh-Hosseini-Dalasm, Navvab; Longest, P. Worth

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that factors such as airway wall motion, inhalation waveform, and geometric complexity influence the deposition of aerosols in the alveolar airways. However, deposition fraction correlations are not available that account for these factors in determining alveolar deposition. The objective of this study was to generate a new space-filling model of the pulmonary acinus region and implement this model to develop correlations of aerosol deposition that can be used to predict the alveolar dose of inhaled pharmaceutical products. A series of acinar models was constructed containing different numbers of alveolar duct generations based on space-filling 14-hedron elements. Selected ventilation waveforms were quick-and-deep and slow-and-deep inhalation consistent with the use of most pharmaceutical aerosol inhalers. Computational fluid dynamics simulations were used to predict aerosol transport and deposition in the series of acinar models across various orientations with gravity where ventilation was driven by wall motion. Primary findings indicated that increasing the number of alveolar duct generations beyond 3 had a negligible impact on total acinar deposition, and total acinar deposition was not affected by gravity orientation angle. A characteristic model containing three alveolar duct generations (D3) was then used to develop correlations of aerosol deposition in the alveolar airways as a function of particle size and particle residence time in the geometry. An alveolar deposition parameter was determined in which deposition correlated with d2t over the first half of inhalation followed by correlation with dt2, where d is the aerodynamic diameter of the particles and t is the potential particle residence time in the alveolar model. Optimal breath-hold times to allow 95% deposition of inhaled 1, 2, and 3 μm particles once inside the alveolar region were approximately >10, 2.7, and 1.2 s, respectively. Coupling of the deposition

  11. Contour changes in human alveolar bone following tooth extraction of the maxillary central incisor.

    PubMed

    Li, Bei; Wang, Yao

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to apply cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) to observe contour changes in human alveolar bone after tooth extraction of the maxillary central incisor and to provide original morphological evidence for aesthetic implant treatment in the maxillary anterior area. Forty patients were recruited into the study. Each patient had two CBCT scans (CBCT I and CBCT II), one taken before and one taken three months after tooth extraction of maxillary central incisor (test tooth T). A fixed anatomic reference point was used to orient the starting axial slice of the two scans. On three CBCT I axial slices, which represented the deep, middle, and shallow layers of the socket, labial and palatal alveolar bone widths of T were measured. The number of sagittal slices from the start point to the pulp centre of T was recorded. On three CBCT II axial slices, the pulp centres of extracted T were oriented according to the number of moved sagittal slices recorded in CBCT I. Labial and palatal alveolar bone widths at the oriented sites were measured. On the CBCT I axial slice which represented the middle layer of the socket, sagittal slices were reconstructed. Relevant distances of T on the sagittal slice were measured, as were the alveolar bone width and tooth length of the opposite central incisor. On the CBCT II axial slice, which represented the middle layer of the socket, relevant distances recorded in CBCT I were transferred on the sagittal slice. The height reduction of alveolar bone on labial and palatal sides was measured, as were the alveolar bone width and tooth length of the opposite central incisor at the oriented site. Intraobserver reliability assessed by intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) was high. Paired sample t-tests were performed. The alveolar bone width and tooth length of the opposite central incisor showed no statistical differences (P<0.05). The labial alveolar bone widths of T at the deep, middle, and shallow layers all showed

  12. Contour changes in human alveolar bone following tooth extraction of the maxillary central incisor

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bei; Wang, Yao

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to apply cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) to observe contour changes in human alveolar bone after tooth extraction of the maxillary central incisor and to provide original morphological evidence for aesthetic implant treatment in the maxillary anterior area. Forty patients were recruited into the study. Each patient had two CBCT scans (CBCT I and CBCT II), one taken before and one taken three months after tooth extraction of maxillary central incisor (test tooth T). A fixed anatomic reference point was used to orient the starting axial slice of the two scans. On three CBCT I axial slices, which represented the deep, middle, and shallow layers of the socket, labial and palatal alveolar bone widths of T were measured. The number of sagittal slices from the start point to the pulp centre of T was recorded. On three CBCT II axial slices, the pulp centres of extracted T were oriented according to the number of moved sagittal slices recorded in CBCT I. Labial and palatal alveolar bone widths at the oriented sites were measured. On the CBCT I axial slice which represented the middle layer of the socket, sagittal slices were reconstructed. Relevant distances of T on the sagittal slice were measured, as were the alveolar bone width and tooth length of the opposite central incisor. On the CBCT II axial slice, which represented the middle layer of the socket, relevant distances recorded in CBCT I were transferred on the sagittal slice. The height reduction of alveolar bone on labial and palatal sides was measured, as were the alveolar bone width and tooth length of the opposite central incisor at the oriented site. Intraobserver reliability assessed by intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) was high. Paired sample t-tests were performed. The alveolar bone width and tooth length of the opposite central incisor showed no statistical differences (P<0.05). The labial alveolar bone widths of T at the deep, middle, and shallow layers all showed

  13. Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virus among Farmed Pigs, Ukraine

    PubMed Central

    Carr, John; Ellis, Richard J.; Steinbach, Falko; Williamson, Susanna

    2015-01-01

    An outbreak of porcine epidemic diarrhea occurred in the summer of 2014 in Ukraine, severely affecting piglets <10 days of age; the mortality rate approached 100%. Full genome sequencing showed the virus to be closely related to strains reported from North America, showing a sequence identity of up to 99.8%. PMID:26584081

  14. Shotgun proteomic analysis of porcine colostrum and mature milk.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Shohei; Tsukahara, Takamitsu; Nishibayashi, Ryoichiro; Nakatani, Masako; Okutani, Mie; Nakanishi, Nobuo; Ushida, Kazunari; Inoue, Ryo

    2014-04-01

    The epitheliochorial nature of the porcine placenta prevents the transfer of maternal immunity. Therefore, ingestion of the colostrum immediately after birth is crucial for neonatal piglets to acquire passive immunity from the sow. We performed a shotgun proteomic analysis of porcine milk to reveal in detail the protein composition of porcine milk. On the basis of the Swiss-Prot database, 113 and 118 proteins were identified in the porcine colostrum and mature milk, respectively, and 50 of these proteins were common to both samples. Some immune-related proteins, including interleukin-18 (IL-18), were unique to the colostrum. The IL-18 concentration in the colostrum and mature milk of four sows was measured to validate the proteomic analysis, and IL-18 was only detected in the colostrum (191.0 ± 53.9 pg/mL) and not in mature milk. In addition, some proteins involved in primary defense, such as azurocidin, which has never been detected in any other mammal's milk, were also identified in the colostrum.

  15. Dystrophin deficiency-induced changes in porcine skeletal muscle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A novel porcine stress syndrome was detected in the U.S. Meat Animal Research Center’s swine research population when two sibling barrows died of apparent stress symptoms (open mouth breathing, vocalization, and refusal to move or stand) after transport at 12 weeks of age. At eight weeks of age, the...

  16. Adenosine modulates LPS-induced cytokine production in porcine monocytes.

    PubMed

    Ondrackova, Petra; Kovaru, Hana; Kovaru, Frantisek; Leva, Lenka; Faldyna, Martin

    2013-03-01

    Adenosine plays an important role during inflammation, particularly through modulation of monocyte function. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effect of synthetic adenosine analogs on cytokine production by porcine monocytes. The LPS-stimulated cytokine production was measured by flow cytometry and quantitative real-time PCR. Adenosine receptor expression was measured by quantitative real-time PCR. The present study demonstrates that adenosine analog N-ethylcarboxyamidoadenosine (NECA) down-regulates TNF-α production and up-regulates IL-8 production by LPS-stimulated porcine monocytes. The effect was more pronounced in CD163(-) subset of monocytes compared to the CD163(+) subset. Although both monocyte subsets express mRNA for A1, A2A, A2B and A3 adenosine receptors, the treatment of monocytes with various adenosine receptor agonists and antagonists proved that the effect of adenosine is mediated preferentially via A2A adenosine receptor. Moreover, the study suggests that the effect of NECA on porcine monocytes alters the levels of the cytokines which could play a role in the differentiation of naive T cells into Th17 cells. The results suggest that adenosine plays an important role in modulation of cytokine production by porcine monocytes.

  17. Age and nursing affect the neonatal porcine uterine transcriptome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The lactocrine hypothesis for maternal programming of neonatal development was proposed to describe a mechanism through which milk-borne bioactive factors, delivered from mother to nursing offspring, could affect development of tissues, including the uterus. Porcine uterine development, initiated be...

  18. Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS): an immune dysregulatory pandemic

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory disease syndrome (PRRS) is a viral pandemic that especially affects neonates within the "critical window" of immunological development. PRRS was recognized in 1987 and within a few years became pandemic causing an estimated yearly $600,000 economic loss in the US...

  19. Cryopreservation of primarily isolated porcine hepatocytes with UW solution.

    PubMed

    Kunieda, Takemi; Maruyama, Masanobu; Okitsu, Teru; Shibata, Norikuni; Takesue, Michihiko; Totsugawa, Toshinori; Kosaka, Yoshikazu; Arata, Takashi; Kobayashi, Kazuya; Ikeda, Hideaki; Oshita, Mizuko; Nakaji, Shuhei; Ohmoto, Kenji; Yamamoto, Shinichiro; Kurabayashi, Yuzuru; Kodama, Makoto; Tanaka, Noriaki; Kobayashi, Naoya

    2003-01-01

    Development of liver-targeted cell therapies, such as hepatocyte transplantation and bioartificial livers, requires a large amount of functional hepatocytes as needed. To achieve this development, establishing an excellent cryopreservation method of hepatocytes is an extremely important issue. Therefore, we performed a comparative review of cryoprotective effects of various cryopreservation solutions using primarily isolated porcine hepatocytes. Porcine hepatocytes were isolated with a four-step dispase and collagenase perfusion method. The obtained hepatocytes with the initial viabilities of 76%, 84%, and 96% were assigned to the following four groups for cryopreservation at -80 degrees C: Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM) + 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS) + 12% dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) (group A), University of Wisconsin (UW) solution + 12% DMSO (group B), Cell Banker 1 (group C), and Cell Banker 2 (group D). The hepatocytes in each group were thawed at 3 days, 10 days, and 5 months of cryopreservation and subjected to comparative analyses, including viability, plating efficiency, LDH release, ammonia removal test, and lentiviral gene transfer. These parameters were the most favorable in the hepatocytes cryopreserved with UW solution. Approximately 5% of thawed cryopreserved porcine hepatocytes expressed LacZ activity after lentiviral transduction. Intrasplenic transplantation of UW solution-cryopreserved hepatocytes improved the survival of rats treated with D-galactosamine. UW solution maintained the functions of cryopreserved porcine hepatocytes.

  20. Osteogenic and adipogenic potential of porcine adipose mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Qu, Chang-qing; Zhang, Guo-hua; Zhang, Li-jie; Yang, Gong-she

    2007-02-01

    Human, rat, and mouse studies have demonstrated the existence of a population of adipose mesenchymal stem cells (AMSCs) that can undergo multilineage differentiation in vitro. Understanding the clinical potential of AMSCs may require their use in preclinical large-animal models such as pigs. Thus, the objectives of this study were to establish a protocol for the isolation of porcine AMSCs from adipose tissue and to examine their ex vivo differentiation potential to adipocytes and osteoblast. The porcine AMSCs from passage 4 were selected for differentiation analysis. The adipocytes were identified morphologically by staining with Oil Red O, and the adipogenic marker genes were examined by RT-PCR technique. Osteogenic lineage was documented by deposition of calcium stained with Alzarin Red S, visualization of alkaline phosphatase activity, and expression of marker gene. Our result indicates that porcine AMSCs have been successfully isolated and induced differentiation into adipocytes and osteoblasts. This study suggested that porcine AMSCs are also a valuable model system for the study on the mesenchymal lineages for basic research and tissue engineering.

  1. Introduction to porcine red blood cells: implications for xenotransfusion.

    PubMed

    Zhu, A

    2000-04-01

    Advances in the field of xenotransplantation raise the intriguing possibility of using porcine red blood cells (pRBCs) as an alternative source for blood transfusion. The domestic pig is considered the most likely donor species for xenotransplantation. However, identification of xenoantigens on porcine erythrocytes and elucidation of their possible roles in antibody-mediated RBC destruction are necessary for developing clinical strategies to circumvent immunological incompatibility between humans and pigs. Although the alphaGal epitope (Galalpha1,3Galbeta1,4GIcNAc-R) is the major xenoantigen on porcine erythrocytes and is responsible for the binding of the majority of human natural antibodies, other non-alphaGal xenoantigens have been identified. The importance of these non-alphaGal xenoantigens in binding human natural antibodies and subsequently triggering immunological responses cannot be underestimated. Our data suggest that non-alphaGal xenoantigen(s) identified on the porcine erythrocyte membrane are not only recognized by xenoreactive human natural antibodies but are also involved in complement-mediated hemolysis.

  2. Porcine circovirus: transcription and rolling-circle DNA replication

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This review summarizes the molecular studies pertaining to porcine circovirus (PCV) transcription and DNA replication. The genome of PCV is circular, single-stranded DNA and contains 1759-1768 nucleotides. Both the genome-strand (packaged in the virus particle) and the complementary-strand (synthesi...

  3. Detection of a Novel Porcine Parvovirus in Chinese Swine Herds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To determine whether the recently reported novel porcine parvovirus type 4 (PPV4) is prevalent in China, a set of PPV4 specific primers were designed and used for the molecular survey of PPV4 among clinical samples. The results indicated a positive detection for PPV4 in Chinese swine herds of 1.84% ...

  4. Cigarette smoke exposure aggravates air space enlargement and alveolar cell apoptosis in Smad3 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Farkas, Laszlo; Farkas, Daniela; Warburton, David; Gauldie, Jack; Shi, Wei; Stampfli, Martin R; Voelkel, Norbert F; Kolb, Martin

    2011-10-01

    The concept of genetic susceptibility factors predisposing cigarette smokers to develop emphysema stems from the clinical observation that only a fraction of smokers develop clinically significant chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. We investigated whether Smad3 knockout mice, which develop spontaneous air space enlargement after birth because of a defect in transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling, develop enhanced alveolar cell apoptosis and air space enlargement following cigarette smoke exposure. We investigated Smad3(-/-) and Smad3(+/+) mice at different adult ages and determined air space enlargement, alveolar cell proliferation, and apoptosis. Furthermore, laser-capture microdissection and real-time PCR were used to measure compartment-specific gene expression. We then compared the effects of cigarette smoke exposure on Smad3(-/-) and littermate controls. Smad3 knockout resulted in the development of air space enlargement in the adult mouse and was associated with decreased alveolar VEGF levels and activity and increased alveolar cell apoptosis. Cigarette smoke exposure aggravated air space enlargement and alveolar cell apoptosis. We also found increased Smad2 protein expression and phosphorylation, which was enhanced following cigarette smoke exposure, in Smad3-knockout animals. Double immunofluorescence analysis revealed that endothelial apoptosis started before epithelial apoptosis. Our data indicate that balanced TGF-β signaling is not only important for regulation of extracellular matrix turnover, but also for alveolar cell homeostasis. Impaired signaling via the Smad3 pathway results in alveolar cell apoptosis and alveolar destruction, likely via increased Smad2 and reduced VEGF expression and might represent a predisposition for accelerated development of emphysema due to cigarette smoke exposure.

  5. Megalin mediates transepithelial albumin clearance from the alveolar space of intact rabbit lungs.

    PubMed

    Buchäckert, Yasmin; Rummel, Sebastian; Vohwinkel, Christine U; Gabrielli, Nieves M; Grzesik, Benno A; Mayer, Konstantin; Herold, Susanne; Morty, Rory E; Seeger, Werner; Vadász, István

    2012-10-15

    The alveolo-capillary barrier is effectively impermeable to large solutes such as proteins. A hallmark of acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome is the accumulation of protein-rich oedema fluid in the distal airspaces. Excess protein must be cleared from the alveolar space for recovery; however, the mechanisms of protein clearance remain incompletely understood. In intact rabbit lungs 29.8 ± 2.2% of the radio-labelled alveolar albumin was transported to the vascular compartment at 37°C within 120 min, as assessed by real-time measurement of 125I-albumin clearance from the alveolar space. At 4°C or 22°C significantly lower albumin clearance (3.7 ± 0.4 or 16.2 ± 1.1%, respectively) was observed. Deposition of a 1000-fold molar excess of unlabelled albumin into the alveolar space or inhibition of cytoskeletal rearrangement or clathrin-dependent endocytosis largely inhibited the transport of 125I-albumin to the vasculature, while administration of unlabelled albumin to the vascular space had no effect on albumin clearance. Furthermore, albumin uptake capacity was measured as about 0.37 mg ml−1 in cultured rat lung epithelial monolayers, further highlighting the (patho)physiological relevance of active alveolar epithelial protein transport. Moreover, gene silencing and pharmacological inhibition of the multi-ligand receptor megalin resulted in significantly decreased albumin binding and uptake in monolayers of primary alveolar type II and type I-like and cultured lung epithelial cells. Our data indicate that clearance of albumin from the distal air spaces is facilitated by an active, high-capacity, megalin-mediated transport process across the alveolar epithelium. Further understanding of this mechanism is of clinical importance, since an inability to clear excess protein from the alveolar space is associated with poor outcome in patients with acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome.

  6. Pathogenic role of B-cells in the development of diffuse alveolar hemorrhage induced by pristane

    PubMed Central

    Barker, Tolga; Lee, Pui Y.; Kelly-Scumpia, Kindra; Weinstein, Jason; Nacionales, Dina C.; Kumagai, Yutaro; Akira, Shizuo; Croker, Byron P.; Sobel, Eric S.; Reeves, Westley H.; Satoh, Minoru

    2011-01-01

    Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage is an uncommon yet often fatal complication of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Advances in the treatment of alveolar hemorrhage have been hampered due to the heterogeneity of clinical findings and the lack of suitable animal models. A single intraperitoneal injection of pristane induces a lupus-like syndrome characterized by lupus-related autoantibodies and glomerulonephritis in non-autoimmune prone strains of mice. In addition, C57BL/6 (B6) mice frequently develop alveolar hemorrhage within a few weeks of pristane injection. Immunopathogenesis of pristane-induced alveolar hemorrhage was investigated in the present study. Early (2-4 weeks after injection) mortality due to hemorrhage was unique to C57BL/6 and C57BL/10 strains of mice. Recruitment of the macrophages and neutrophils preceded the hemorrhage by several days and hemorrhage started 3-7 days after pristane injection in some mice, peaked at 2 weeks (84% in B6) and then resolved by 4 weeks in a majority of mice. Alveolar hemorrhage was independent of MyD88-, or TLR7 pathways, in contrast to autoantibody production and glomerulonephritis, and also was independent of FcγR or Fas. Rag1-/- mice had a reduced prevalence of alveolar hemorrhage compared to B6 (P = 0.01) congenics. However, T-cell receptor deficient mice developed alveolar hemorrhage at a rate comparable to wild type controls, while B6 Igμ-/- mice surprisingly had a strikingly reduced prevalence (7% vs 84% in B6, P < 0.0001). Reconstitution of B6 Igμ-/- mice with wild type B cells increased the prevalence to 50% (P = 0.028). Pristane-induced alveolar hemorrhage is a useful model to study the pathogenesis and develop new therapy for this underappreciated and often life-threatening complication of SLE. PMID:21808234

  7. Alveolar graft in the cleft lip and palate patient: Review of 104 cases

    PubMed Central

    Tobella-Camps, María L.; Rivera-Baró, Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Alveolar bone grafting is a vital part of the rehabilitation of cleft patients. The factors that have been most frequently associated with the success of the graft are the age at grafting and the pre-grafting orthodontic treatment. Objectives: 1) Describe the cases of alveolar bone grafts performed at the Maxilofacial Unit of Hospital Sant Joan de Déu, Barcelona (HSJD); and 2) Analyze the success/failure of alveolar grafts and related variables. Material and Methods: Descriptive retrospective study using a sample of 104 patients who underwent a secondary alveolar graft at the Craniofacial Unit of HSJD between 1998 and 2012. The graft was done by the same surgeon in all patients using bone from the iliac crest. Results: 70% of the patients underwent the procedure before the age of 15 (median 14.45 years); 70% of the graft patients underwent pre-graft maxillary expansion. A total of 100 cases were recorded as successful (median age of 14.58 years, 68 underwent pre-graft expansion) and only 4 were recorded as failures (median age of 17.62 years, 3 underwent pre-graft expansion). We did not find statistically significant differences in age at the time of grafting or pre-surgical expansion when comparing the success and failure groups. We found the success rate of the graft to be 96.2%. Conclusions: The number of failures was too small to establish a statistically significant conclusion in our sample regarding the age at grafting and pre-grafting expansion. The use of alveolar bone grafting from the iliac crest has a very high success rate with a very low incidence of complications. Existing controversies regarding secondary bone grafting and the wide range of success rates found in the literature suggest that it is necessary to establish a specific treatment protocol that ensures the success of this procedure. Key words:Alveolar graft, cleft lip and palate, alveolar cleft, alveolar defect. PMID:24880440

  8. Exposed inferior alveolar neurovascular bundle during surgical removal of a residual cyst.

    PubMed

    Boffano, Paolo; Gallesio, Cesare

    2010-01-01

    Iatrogenic neurodeficiency is one of the most distressing complications to any surgical procedure. The prediction of close proximity of the oral lesions to the inferior alveolar neurovascular bundle is extremely important. Furthermore, iatrogenic neurosensory dysfunctions of the facial region involve important medicolegal issues. In this report, we describe the case of a patient who did not show either paresthesia or anesthesia after the surgical removal of a mandibular residual cyst that exhibited adherence to the inferior alveolar nerve bundle.

  9. Permanent nerve damage from inferior alveolar nerve blocks: a current update.

    PubMed

    Pogrel, M Anthony

    2012-10-01

    Permanent nerve involvement has been reported following inferior alveolar nerve blocks. This study provides an update on cases reported to one unit in the preceding six years. Lidocaine was associated with 25 percent of cases, articaine with 33 percent of cases, and prilocaine with 34 percent of cases. It does appear that inferior alveolar nerve blocks can cause permanent nerve damage with any local anesthetic, but the incidences may vary.

  10. Alveolar soft part sarcoma following radiotherapy for a spinal hemangioma. A case report

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, S.; Mirra, J.; Bhuta, S.

    1984-06-15

    A case of alveolar soft part sarcoma arising some 20 years later in a site previously irradiated as a treatment for a spinal cord hemangioma is described. This is the first known case of radiation-associated alveolar soft part sarcoma, and it fulfills the criteria for a tumor to be radiation-induced. The coincidental finding of ''viral-like'' particles within some of the tumor cells was noted.

  11. [Domiciliary noninvasive positive pressure ventilation in chronic alveolar hypoventilation].

    PubMed

    Casas, J P; Robles, A M; Pereyra, M A; Abbona, H L; López, A M

    2000-01-01

    Effectiveness of treatment with domiciliary nocturnal noninvasive positive pressure ventilation is analyzed in a group of patients with chronic alveolar hypoventilation of different etiologies. It was applied with two levels of pressure (BiPAP) via nasal mask. Criteria for evaluation were symptomatology and improvement in gas exchange. Data were analyzed by Student t tests. A total of 13 patients were included, mean age 55.7 range 20 to 76 years (5 male 8 female). Main diagnosis was tuberculosis in 6, four of them having had surgical procedure (thoracoplasty 2, frenicectomy 1 and neumonectomy 1), myopathy 3 (myasthenia gravis 1, muscular dystrophy 1 and diaphragmatic paralysis 1), obesity-hypoventilation syndrome 1, escoliosis 1, bronchiectasis 1 and cystic fibrosis 1. These last two patients were on waiting list for lung transplantation. At the moment of consultation, the symptoms were: dysnea 13/13 (100%), astenia 13/13 (100%), hypersomnolency 10/13 (77%), cephalea 9/13 (69%), leg edema 6/13 (46%), loss of memory 6/13 (46%). Regarding gas exchange, they showed hypoxemia and hypercapnia. Mean follow up was of 2.2 years (range 6 months to 4 years). Within the year, all 13 patients became less dyspneic. Astenia, hypersomnolency, cephalea, leg edema and memory loss disappeared. Improvement in gas exchange was: PaO2/FiO2 from 269 +/- 65.4 (basal) to 336.7 +/- 75.3 post-treatment (p = 0.0018). PaCO2 from 70.77 +/- 25.48 mmHg (basal) to 46.77 +/- 8.14 mmHg (p = 0.0013). Ventilatory support was discontinued en 5 patients: three because of pneumonia requiring intubation and conventional mechanical ventilation, two of them died and one is still with tracheostomy; One patient with bronchiectasis and one with cystic fibrosis were transplanted. The remaining eight patients are stable. In conclusion, chronic alveolar hypoventilation can be effectively treated with domiciliary nocturnal noninvasive ventilation. Long term improvement in symptomatology and arterial blood gases

  12. Structural and functional annotation of the porcine immunome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The domestic pig is known as an excellent model for human immunology and the two species share many pathogens. Susceptibility to infectious disease is one of the major constraints on swine performance, yet the structure and function of genes comprising the pig immunome are not well-characterized. The completion of the pig genome provides the opportunity to annotate the pig immunome, and compare and contrast pig and human immune systems. Results The Immune Response Annotation Group (IRAG) used computational curation and manual annotation of the swine genome assembly 10.2 (Sscrofa10.2) to refine the currently available automated annotation of 1,369 immunity-related genes through sequence-based comparison to genes in other species. Within these genes, we annotated 3,472 transcripts. Annotation provided evidence for gene expansions in several immune response families, and identified artiodactyl-specific expansions in the cathelicidin and type 1 Interferon families. We found gene duplications for 18 genes, including 13 immune response genes and five non-immune response genes discovered in the annotation process. Manual annotation provided evidence for many new alternative splice variants and 8 gene duplications. Over 1,100 transcripts without porcine sequence evidence were detected using cross-species annotation. We used a functional approach to discover and accurately annotate porcine immune response genes. A co-expression clustering analysis of transcriptomic data from selected experimental infections or immune stimulations of blood, macrophages or lymph nodes identified a large cluster of genes that exhibited a correlated positive response upon infection across multiple pathogens or immune stimuli. Interestingly, this gene cluster (cluster 4) is enriched for known general human immune response genes, yet contains many un-annotated porcine genes. A phylogenetic analysis of the encoded proteins of cluster 4 genes showed that 15% exhibited an accelerated

  13. Understanding the developmental pathways pulmonary fibroblasts may follow during alveolar regeneration.

    PubMed

    McGowan, Stephen

    2017-03-01

    Although pulmonary alveolar interstitial fibroblasts are less specialized than their epithelial and endothelial neighbors, they play essential roles during development and in response to lung injury. At birth, they must adapt to the sudden mechanical changes imposed by the onset of respiration and to a higher ambient oxygen concentration. In diseases such as bronchopulmonary dysplasia and interstitial fibrosis, their adaptive responses are overwhelmed leading to compromised gas-exchange function. Thus, although fibroblasts do not directly participate in gas-exchange, they are essential for creating and maintaining an optimal environment at the alveolar epithelial-endothelial interface. This review summarizes new information and concepts about the ontogeny differentiation, and function of alveolar fibroblasts. Alveolar development will be emphasized, because the development of strategies to evoke alveolar repair and regeneration hinges on thoroughly understanding the way that resident fibroblasts populate specific locations in which extracellular matrix must be produced and remodeled. Other recent reviews have described the disruption that diseases cause to the fibroblast niche and so my objective is to illustrate how the unique developmental origins and differentiation pathways could be harnessed favorably to augment certain fibroblast subpopulations and to optimize the conditions for alveolar regeneration.

  14. Physiology in Medicine: Understanding dynamic alveolar physiology to minimize ventilator induced lung injury (VILI).

    PubMed

    Nieman, Gary F; Satalin, Joshua; Kollisch-Singule, Michaela; Andrews, Penny L; Aiash, Hani; Habashi, Nader M; Gatto, Louis A

    2017-04-06

    The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) remains a serious clinical problem with the main treatment being supportive in the form of mechanical ventilation. However, mechanical ventilation can be a double edge sword, if set improperly can exacerbate the tissue damage caused by ARDS and is known as ventilator induced lung injury (VILI). In order to minimize VILI we must understand the pathophysiologic mechanisms of tissue damage at the alveolar level. In this Physiology in Medicine paper the dynamic physiology of alveolar inflation and deflation during mechanical ventilation will be reviewed. In addition, the pathophysiologic mechanisms of VILI will be reviewed and this knowledge used to suggest an optimal mechanical breath profile (MBP - all airway pressures, volumes, flows, rates and the duration that they are applied at both inspiration and expiration) necessary to minimize VILI. Our review suggests that the current protective ventilation strategy known as the 'Open Lung Strategy' would be the optimal lung protective approach. However, the viscoelastic behavior of dynamic alveolar inflation and deflation has not yet been incorporated into protective mechanical ventilation strategies. Using our knowledge of dynamic alveolar mechanics (i.e the dynamic change in alveolar and alveolar duct size and shape during tidal ventilation) to modify the MBP necessary to minimize VILI will reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with ARDS.

  15. Alveolar soft-part sarcoma of the mediastinum: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Kameda, Yohei; Nishii, Teppei; Tsuboi, Masahiro; Arai, Hiromasa; Inui, Kenji; Kaneko, Takeshi; Kimura, Noriko; Naruse, Mitsuhide; Masuda, Munetaka

    2017-01-01

    We report a 53-year-old man with metastases of alveolar soft-part sarcoma originated from the mediastinum. He was hospitalized due to lower extremities’ paralysis. Computed tomography scan findings revealed multiple nodules of bilateral lungs, swollen mediastinal lymph nodes, and osteolysis of thoracic vertebrae. We performed spinal decompression and biopsy from vertebra. And, we finally diagnosed this case as metastases of mediastinal alveolar soft-part sarcoma which was removed 10 years ago. Alveolar soft-part sarcoma is rare tumor accounted for 0.5%–1.0% of soft tissue sarcoma that often occurs primarily in the lower extremities and trunk. It is difficult to distinguish between alveolar soft-part sarcoma and paraganglioma, renal cell carcinoma and granular cell tumor morphologically. Periodic acid–Schiff stain and immunohistochemical staining of ASPL-TFE3 are useful in making a definitive diagnosis of alveolar soft-part sarcoma. This case is a rare case of alveolar soft-part sarcoma originated in the mediastinum with local recurrence and distant metastases 10 years after the initial surgery. PMID:28321306

  16. [Alveolar-arterial oxygen gradient in cardiopulmonary patients breathing ambient air at rest and during exercise].

    PubMed

    Martínez Guerra, M L; Gómez González, A; Fernández Bonetti, P; Lupi Herrera, E

    1983-01-01

    The alveolar to arterial difference of oxygen [(A-a)DO2] depends on variables such as ventilation, cardiac output, respiratory exchange ratio and arterial PO2. The arterial PO2 itself depends on the ventilation to perfusion ratio (V/Q) pulmonary shunt, (a-v) O2 difference, and the metabolic status of the patient. When the alveolar-ventilation is normal, the (A-a)DO2 reflects gas exchange abnormalities and when the alveolar-ventilation is increased, the (A-a)DO2 can increase because of a decrease in PaCO2. The factors capable of altering the alveolar to arterial oxygen difference were investigated in ninety patients with pulmonary disease: (pulmonary embolism, lung fibrosis and chronic obstructive lung disease), both at rest and during exercise. At rest when alveolar ventilation was increased, the (A-a)DO2 broadened due to the decrease in PaCO2. During exercise the (A-a)DO2 also increased and the PaCO2 was not significantly modified, therefore admixture it is the result of an increase in the proportion of venous. The difference between the mixed venous and arterial PO2 decreased due to alveolar hypoventilation reducing in consequence the (A-a)DO2. We conclude that in the group studied the increase in the (A-a)DO2 is mainly due to V/Q imbalance at rest and during exercise.

  17. Alveolar soft-part sarcoma of the mediastinum: A case report.

    PubMed

    Kameda, Yohei; Nishii, Teppei; Tsuboi, Masahiro; Arai, Hiromasa; Inui, Kenji; Kaneko, Takeshi; Kimura, Noriko; Naruse, Mitsuhide; Masuda, Munetaka

    2017-01-01

    We report a 53-year-old man with metastases of alveolar soft-part sarcoma originated from the mediastinum. He was hospitalized due to lower extremities' paralysis. Computed tomography scan findings revealed multiple nodules of bilateral lungs, swollen mediastinal lymph nodes, and osteolysis of thoracic vertebrae. We performed spinal decompression and biopsy from vertebra. And, we finally diagnosed this case as metastases of mediastinal alveolar soft-part sarcoma which was removed 10 years ago. Alveolar soft-part sarcoma is rare tumor accounted for 0.5%-1.0% of soft tissue sarcoma that often occurs primarily in the lower extremities and trunk. It is difficult to distinguish between alveolar soft-part sarcoma and paraganglioma, renal cell carcinoma and granular cell tumor morphologically. Periodic acid-Schiff stain and immunohistochemical staining of ASPL-TFE3 are useful in making a definitive diagnosis of alveolar soft-part sarcoma. This case is a rare case of alveolar soft-part sarcoma originated in the mediastinum with local recurrence and distant metastases 10 years after the initial surgery.

  18. Simultaneous determination of the protein conversion process in porcine stratum corneum after pretreatment with skin enhancers by a combined microscopic FT-IR/DSC system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Shan-Yang; Duan, Kwo-Jen; Lin, Tsung-Chien

    1996-11-01

    A newly developed microscopic Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrometry combined with differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) has been used to investigate simultaneously the thermal response and IR spectral changes in protein structure in porcine stratum corneum (SC) after pretreatment with skin penetration enhancers (propylene glycol (PG), azone/PG, oleic acid (OA)/PG, vitamin C, and vitamin C+ OA/PG). The amide I and II bands of the protein were used as probes to determine its structural transformation with temperature. A reheating process was also performed. The dual effects of enhancer and temperature on the protein conformational changes of porcine SC were studied. The results indicate that the newly developed FT-IR/DSC system can continuously determine the thermoresponsive conversion process from α-helix to β-sheet in the keratin structure of porcine SC pretreated with different enhancers. The temperature-induced keratin conversion in the protein structure of porcine SC was irreversible, with or without pretreatment with skin penetration enhancers. The conformational transition in the protein during heating was found to be partially from the α-helix to a random coil structure, and partially from the α-helix to the β-sheet structure. The kinetics of this conversion for the first and second heating processes were significantly different; the conversion process for all the first-heated SC samples during the second heating process was slower than that of the samples during the first heating process. Moreover, it was found that the skin penetration enhancers were able to alter synergistically and promote keratin conversion in the protein structure of porcine SC when accompanying the heating process. PG, OA/PG and azone/PG were found to be the most effective.

  19. Purification and characterization of the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase of Porcine rubulavirus LPMV.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Leyva, J; Espinosa, B; Santos, G; Zenteno, R; Hernández, J; Vallejo, V; Zenteno, E

    1999-09-01

    The Hemagglutinin-Neuraminidase (HN) from the LPMV strain of Porcine rubulavirus was purified from virions by ultracentrifugation in a continuous 20-60% sucrose gradient and by ion exchange chromatography. The HN is a glycoprotein of 66 kDa constituted by 50.5, 13.3 and 13.6% of non polar, uncharged polar, and charged polar amino acids, respectively. The HN contains 4% of carbohydrates, its glycannic portion is constituted by Man, Gal, GlcNAc, GalNAc, and Neu5Ac in 3:3:4:1:1 molar ratios. The HN possesses hemagglutinating activity in the presence of erythrocytes from several animal species, including human ABO, and treating the erythrocytes with neuraminidase or pronase abolishes this activity. The binding specificity of the purified HN was determined by hapten inhibition assays, indicating that the hemagglutinating activity of the HN is specific for sialic acid and Neu5Acalpha2,3Gal-containing structures.

  20. Kangaroo vs. porcine aortic valves: calcification potential after glutaraldehyde fixation.

    PubMed

    Narine, K; Chéry, Cyrille C; Goetghebeur, Els; Forsyth, R; Claeys, E; Cornelissen, Maria; Moens, L; Van Nooten, G

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the calcification potential of kangaroo and porcine aortic valves after glutaraldehyde fixation at both low (0.6%) and high (2.0%) concentrations of glutaraldehyde in the rat subcutaneous model. To our knowledge this is the first report comparing the time-related, progressive calcification of these two species in the rat subcutaneous model. Twenty-two Sprague-Dawley rats were each implanted with two aortic valve leaflets (porcine and kangaroo) after fixation in 0.6% glutaraldehyde and two aortic valve leaflets (porcine and kangaroo) after fixation in 2% glutaraldehyde respectively. Animals were sacrificed after 24 h and thereafter weekly for up to 10 weeks after implantation. Calcium content was determined using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry and confirmed histologically. Mean calcium content per milligram of tissue (dry weight) treated with 0.6 and 2% glutaraldehyde was 116.2 and 110.4 microg/mg tissue for kangaroo and 95.0 and 106.8 microg/mg tissue for porcine valves. Calcium content increased significantly over time (8.8 microg/mg tissue per week) and was not significantly different between groups. Regression analysis of calcification over time showed no significant difference in calcification of valves treated with 0.6 or 2% glutaraldehyde within and between the two species. Using the subcutaneous model, we did not detect a difference in calcification potential between kangaroo and porcine aortic valves treated with either high or low concentrations of glutaraldehyde.

  1. Optical absorption and scattering properties of bulk porcine muscle phantoms from interstitial radiance measurements in 650-900 nm range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabtchak, Serge; Montgomery, Logan G.; Whelan, William M.

    2014-05-01

    We demonstrated the application of relative radiance-based continuous wave (cw) measurements for recovering absorption and scattering properties (the effective attenuation coefficient, the diffusion coefficient, the absorption coefficient and the reduced scattering coefficient) of bulk porcine muscle phantoms in the 650-900 nm spectral range. Both the side-firing fiber (the detector) and the fiber with a spherical diffuser at the end (the source) were inserted interstitially at predetermined locations in the phantom. The porcine phantoms were prostate-shaped with ˜4 cm in diameter and ˜3 cm thickness and made from porcine loin or tenderloin muscles. The described method was previously validated using the diffusion approximation on simulated and experimental radiance data obtained for homogenous Intralipid-1% liquid phantom. The approach required performing measurements in two locations in the tissue with different distances to the source. Measurements were performed on 21 porcine phantoms. Spectral dependences of the effective attenuation and absorption coefficients for the loin phantom deviated from corresponding dependences for the tenderloin phantom for wavelengths <750 nm. The diffusion constant and the reduced scattering coefficient were very close for both phantom types. To quantify chromophore presence, the plot for the absorption coefficient was matched with a synthetic absorption spectrum constructed from deoxyhemoglobin, oxyhemoglobin and water. The closest match for the porcine loin spectrum was obtained with the following concentrations: 15.5 µM (±30% s.d.) Hb, 21 µM (±30% s.d.) HbO2 and 0.3 (±30% s.d.) fractional volume of water. The tenderloin absorption spectrum was best described by 30 µM Hb (±30% s.d), 19 µM (±30% s.d.) HbO2 and 0.3 (±30% s.d.) fractional volume of water. The higher concentration of Hb in tenderloin was consistent with a dark-red appearance of the tenderloin phantom. The method can be applied to a number of biological

  2. Cellular interaction of different forms of aluminum nanoparticles in rat alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Andrew J; Bleckmann, Charles A; Murdock, Richard C; Schrand, Amanda M; Schlager, John J; Hussain, Saber M

    2007-06-28

    Nanomaterials, with dimensions in the 1-100 nm range, possess numerous potential benefits to society. However, there is little characterization of their effects on biological systems, either within the environment or on human health. The present study examines cellular interaction of aluminum oxide and aluminum nanomaterials, including their effect on cell viability and cell phagocytosis, with reference to particle size and the particle's chemical composition. Experiments were performed to characterize initial in vitro cellular effects of rat alveolar macrophages (NR8383) after exposure to aluminum oxide nanoparticles (Al2O3-NP at 30 and 40 nm) and aluminum metal nanoparticles containing a 2-3 nm oxide coat (Al-NP at 50, 80, and 120 nm). Characterization of the nanomaterials, both as received and in situ, was performed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS), laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV), and/or CytoViva150 Ultra Resolution Imaging (URI)). Particles showed significant agglomeration in cell exposure media using DLS and the URI as compared to primary particle size in TEM. Cell viability assay results indicate a marginal effect on macrophage viability after exposure to Al2O3-NP at doses of 100 microg/mL for 24 h continuous exposure. Al-NP produced significantly reduced viability after 24 h of continuous exposure with doses from 100 to 250 microg/mL. Cell phagocytotic ability was significantly hindered by exposure to 50, 80, or 120 nm Al-NP at 25 microg/mL for 24 h, but the same concentration (25 microg/mL) had no significant effect on the cellular viability. However, no significant effect on phagocytosis was observed with Al2O3-NP. In summary, these results show that Al-NP exhibit greater toxicity and more significantly diminish the phagocytotic ability of macrophages after 24 h of exposure when compared to Al2O3-NP.

  3. Hsp90 inhibitor reduces porcine circovirus 2 replication in the porcine monocytic line 3D4/31.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Zhang, Xuliang; Ma, Chang; Jiang, Ping; Yun, Shifeng

    2017-02-01

    Porcine circovirus 2 (PCV2) is an important pathogen of swine, which causes porcine circovirus disease and porcine circovirus-associated diseases (PCVD/PCVAD). However, no effective countermeasures exist to combat this virus infection so far. Recently, heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) was found to be an important host factor for the replication of multiple viruses and the inhibition of Hsp90 showed significant antiviral effects. Inhibition of Hsp90 by treatment of porcine monocytic line 3D4/31 with geldanamycin (GA), a specific inhibitor of Hsp90, caused a 70 % decrease in viral Cap protein expression. Further, individual knockdown targeting Hsp90α or Hsp90β with siRNAs resulted in down to 20-25 % of decrease in viral replication, and inhibited the PCV2 titer by approximately 12- and 15-fold, respectively. In addition, we investigated alteration of several cytokine production in PCV2-infected cells following treatment with GA. Then, we found that GA could decrease IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-12p40 mRNA levels, respectively, by 30, 40, and 40 % in PCV2-infected cells. Our results shed light on the possibility of developing potential therapeutics targeting Hsp90 against PCV2 infection.

  4. An in-depth comparison of the porcine, murine and human inflammasomes; lessons from the porcine genome and transcriptome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Emerging evidence suggests that swine are a scientifically acceptable intermediate species between rodents and humans to model immune function relevant to humans. The swine genome has recently been sequenced and several preliminary structural and functional analysis of the porcine immunome have been...

  5. On the Evolution of the Pulmonary Alveolar Lipofibroblast

    PubMed Central

    Torday, John S.; Rehan, Virender K.

    2015-01-01

    The pulmonary alveolar lipofibroblast was first reported in 1970. Since then its development, structure, function and molecular characteristics have been determined. Its capacity to actively absorb, store and ‘traffic’ neutral lipid for protection of the alveolus against oxidant injury, and for the active supply of substrate for lung surfactant phospholipid production have offered the opportunity to identify a number of specialized functions of these strategically placed cells. Namely, Parathyroid Hormone-related Protein (PTHrP) signaling, expression of Adipocyte Differentiation Related Protein, leptin, peroxisome proliferator activator receptor gamma, and the prostaglandin E2 receptor EP2-which are all stretch-regulated, explaining how and why surfactant production is ‘on-demand’ in service to ventilation-perfusion matching. Because of the central role of the lipofibroblast in vertebrate lung physiologic evolution, it is a Rosetta Stone for understanding how and why the lung evolved in adaptation to terrestrial life, beginning with the duplication of the PTHrP Receptor some 300 mya. Moreover, such detailed knowledge of the workings of the lipofibroblast have provided insight to the etiology and effective treatment of Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia based on physiologic principles rather than on pharmacology. PMID:26706109

  6. Anesthetic efficacy of the anterior middle superior alveolar (AMSA) injection.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Shelly; Reader, Al; Nusstein, John; Beck, Mike; Weaver, Joel

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this prospective, randomized, blinded study was to determine the anesthetic efficacy of the anterior middle superior alveolar (AMSA) injection using the computer-assisted Wand Plus injection system versus a conventional syringe. The authors, using a crossover design, randomly administered in a blind manner 2 AMSA injections utilizing the computer-assisted injection system and a conventional syringe to 40 subjects during 2 separate appointments. A pulp tester was used to test for anesthesia, in 4-minute cycles for 60 minutes, of the central and lateral incisors, canine, and first and second premolars. Anesthesia was considered successful when 2 consecutive no responses (80 readings) with the pulp tester were obtained. For all teeth, except the central incisor, the use of the computer-assisted injection system was significantly (P < .05) more likely to result in pulpal anesthesia than the use of the conventional syringe technique. For the computer-assisted injection system, successful pulpal anesthesia ranged from 35 to 58%, and for the conventional syringe, successful pulpal anesthesia ranged from 20 to 42%. For both techniques, the onset of pulpal anesthesia was slow, and duration of pulpal anesthesia declined steadily over 60 minutes. We conclude that although the AMSA injection using the computer-assisted injection system was more successful than the conventional syringe technique, the rather modest to low success rates, slow onset, and declining duration of pulpal anesthesia over 60 minutes would not ensure predictable pulpal anesthesia from the second premolar to the central incisor. PMID:15497297

  7. On the evolution of the pulmonary alveolar lipofibroblast.

    PubMed

    Torday, John S; Rehan, Virender K

    2016-01-15

    The pulmonary alveolar lipofibroblast was first reported in 1970. Since then its development, structure, function and molecular characteristics have been determined. Its capacity to actively absorb, store and 'traffic' neutral lipid for protection of the alveolus against oxidant injury, and for the active supply of substrate for lung surfactant phospholipid production have offered the opportunity to identify a number of specialized functions of these strategically placed cells. Namely, Parathyroid Hormone-related Protein (PTHrP) signaling, expression of Adipocyte Differentiation Related Protein, leptin, peroxisome proliferator activator receptor gamma, and the prostaglandin E2 receptor EP2- which are all stretch-regulated, explaining how and why surfactant production is 'on-demand' in service to ventilation-perfusion matching. Because of the central role of the lipofibroblast in vertebrate lung physiologic evolution, it is a Rosetta Stone for understanding how and why the lung evolved in adaptation to terrestrial life, beginning with the duplication of the PTHrP Receptor some 300 mya. Moreover, such detailed knowledge of the workings of the lipofibroblast have provided insight to the etiology and effective treatment of Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia based on physiologic principles rather than on pharmacology.

  8. Functional and morphological differences between human alveolar and interstitial macrophages.

    PubMed

    Fathi, M; Johansson, A; Lundborg, M; Orre, L; Sköld, C M; Camner, P

    2001-04-01

    Macrophages play an essential role in pulmonary host defense. They are, however, a heterogeneous cell population located in different lung compartments. This study was designed to elucidate differences between two macrophage populations obtained from the human lung, i.e., alveolar macrophages (AM) and interstitial macrophages (IM). Macroscopically tumor-free lung segments from nine patients undergoing lobectomy or pulmectomy were studied. All patients had a diagnosis of primary lung cancer. AM were recovered by bronchoalveolar lavage and IM were isolated by mechanical fragmentation of the lavaged lung segments followed by enzymatic treatment. The cell fractions were analyzed with respect to morphology (transmission electron microscopy) and function (phagocytosis). The cells in the IM fraction were smaller (7.6 +/- 1.8 microm (mean +/- SD) compared with 16.0 +/- 4.1 microm) and morphologically more heterogeneous than those in the AM fraction. Interestingly, a considerable portion of the cells in the IM fraction had a typical AM-like appearance. Despite this, the AM fraction had a higher phagocytic activity compared to IM, with faster attachment and ingestion processes (P <0.001 for both). We conclude that the heterogeneity of human lung macrophages must be taken into consideration when their role in the inflammatory response is studied.

  9. Trace elements in human alveolar macrophages studied by PIXE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, G.; Roelandts, I.; Corhay, J. L.; Radermecker, M.; Delavignette, J. P.

    1990-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the metal content of alveolar macrophages by PIXE from 94 subjects divided into two groups as follows: group (1) — subjects with non-occupational exposure to industrial dust: 30 healthy volunteers (controls), 16 patients suffering from lung cancer; group (2) — 48 healthy steel workers from the Liège area (blast-furnace [ n=29] and coke oven [ n=19]). We hope to define more precisely the influence of carcinoma, smoking habit, pathology and occupational exposure in the steel industry on the macrophage metal content. This study has shown: (a) an Fe and Sr increase and a Br decrease in the macrophages of smokers (especially in heavy smokers): (b) a significant Fe, Ti, Br and Cu increase and a trend to Pb, Cr, As and Sr increase in macrophages of healthy steel workers (especially blast-furnace workers) in comparison with non-exposed controls; (c) a significant Fe, Br, Cu and Zn increase and a trend to Pb, As and Ni increase in macrophages of non-exposed patients with lung cancer by comparison with non-exposed controls. The mechanism of metal change could be explained by professional exposure and endogenous changes (protein synthesis, inflammation, bronchial bleeding, …)

  10. Mesodermal Pten inactivation leads to alveolar capillary dysplasia- like phenotype.

    PubMed

    Tiozzo, Caterina; Carraro, Gianni; Al Alam, Denise; Baptista, Sheryl; Danopoulos, Soula; Li, Aimin; Lavarreda-Pearce, Maria; Li, Changgong; De Langhe, Stijn; Chan, Belinda; Borok, Zea; Bellusci, Saverio; Minoo, Parviz

    2012-11-01

    Alveolar capillary dysplasia (ACD) is a congenital, lethal disorder of the pulmonary vasculature. Phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted from chromosome 10 (Pten) encodes a lipid phosphatase controlling key cellular functions, including stem/progenitor cell proliferation and differentiation; however, the role of PTEN in mesodermal lung cell lineage formation remains unexamined. To determine the role of mesodermal PTEN in the ontogeny of various mesenchymal cell lineages during lung development, we specifically deleted Pten in early embryonic lung mesenchyme in mice. Pups lacking Pten died at birth, with evidence of failure in blood oxygenation. Analysis at the cellular level showed defects in angioblast differentiation to endothelial cells and an accompanying accumulation of the angioblast cell population that was associated with disorganized capillary beds. We also found decreased expression of Forkhead box protein F1 (Foxf1), a gene associated with the ACD human phenotype. Analysis of human samples for ACD revealed a significant decrease in PTEN and increased activated protein kinase B (AKT). These studies demonstrate that mesodermal PTEN has a key role in controlling the amplification of angioblasts as well as their differentiation into endothelial cells, thereby directing the establishment of a functional gas exchange interface. Additionally, these mice could serve as a murine model of ACD.

  11. HES6 enhances the motility of alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wickramasinghe, Caroline M; Domaschenz, Renae; Amagase, Yoko; Williamson, Daniel; Missiaglia, Edoardo; Shipley, Janet; Murai, Kasumi; Jones, Philip H

    2013-01-01

    Absract: HES6, a member of the hairy-enhancer-of-split family of transcription factors, plays multiple roles in myogenesis. It is a direct target of the myogenic transcription factor MyoD and has been shown to regulate the formation of the myotome in development, myoblast cell cycle exit and the organization of the actin cytoskeleton during terminal differentiation. Here we investigate the expression and function of HES6 in rhabdomyosarcoma, a soft tissue tumor which expresses myogenic genes but fails to differentiate into muscle. We show that HES6 is expressed at high levels in the subset of alveolar rhabdomyosarcomas expressing PAX/FOXO1 fusion genes (ARMSp). Knockdown of HES6 mRNA in the ARMSp cell line RH30 reduces proliferation and cell motility. This phenotype is rescued by expression of mouse Hes6 which is insensitive to HES6 siRNA. Furthermore, expression microarray analysis indicates that the HES6 knockdown is associated with a decrease in the levels of Transgelin, (TAGLN), a regulator of the actin cytoskeleton. Knockdown of TAGLN decreases cell motility, whilst TAGLN overexpression rescues the motility defect resulting from HES6 knockdown. These findings indicate HES6 contributes to the pathogenesis of ARMSp by enhancing both proliferation and cell motility.

  12. Surgical treatment of painful lesions of the inferior alveolar nerve.

    PubMed

    Biglioli, Federico; Allevi, Fabiana; Lozza, Alessandro

    2015-10-01

    Nerve-related complications are being reported with increasing frequency following oral and dental surgery, and typically involve the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN). We assess herein the etiology of neuropathic pain related to IAN injuries, and describe the various surgical treatment techniques available. Between 2007 and 2013, 19 patients were referred to the Maxillofacial Surgery Department of San Paolo Hospital (Milan, Italy) with pain in the area supplied by the IAN, which developed following endodontic treatment, oral surgery and maxillofacial surgery. All patients underwent IAN surgery by several different microsurgical procedures. Most of the patients affected by pain before surgery experienced complete or partial amelioration of symptoms. All patients receiving sural nerve grafts were pain-free 12 months after surgery. In five patients the operation was unsuccessful. In 78.94% of cases, a significant increase in nerve function was observed. Pain following IAN surgical damage may be addressed by microsurgery; nerve substitution with a sural nerve interpositional graft appears to represent the most efficacious procedure. Scar releasing, nerve decompression and nerve substitution using vein grafts are less effective. Removal of endodontic material extravasated into the mandibular canal is mandatory and effective in patients experiencing severe pain. Surgery should be performed within 12 months postoperatively, ideally during the first few weeks after symptoms onset.

  13. Complications of orthognathic surgery: the inferior alveolar nerve.

    PubMed

    D'Agostino, Antonio; Trevisiol, Lorenzo; Gugole, Fabio; Bondí, Vincenzo; Nocini, Pier Francesco

    2010-07-01

    This study analyzes permanent paresthetic disorders regarding the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) after mandibular ramus sagittal osteotomy procedures. Fifty patients (ie, 100 nerves) who underwent mandibular bilateral sagittal split osteotomy between 2003 and 2007 were evaluated to detect sensorial disorders of the IAN. The evaluation was performed for each patient at least 1 year after surgical intervention. The sagittal osteotomy of the mandible ramus was performed according to Epker-Hunsuk technique. The method of fixing through titanium plates and monocortical screws and the displacement width of the osteotomized stumps were also considered. The evaluation of the IAN functionality was performed both subjectively, by means of a questionnaire, and clinically, by using 4 types of tests: light-touch sensation, pinprick sensation, Weber test, and Dellon test.The clinical test analysis revealed that no nervous lesion was detected in 52% of the tested sites, whereas 24% reported significant nervous lesions. In the subjective evaluations, 74% of the patients described the discomfort related to the neurologic alteration as "absent to mild" or "mild to moderate," 10% as "moderate to serious," and 4% as "serious."We observe that the percentage of significant nervous lesions is relatively low and that it matches the mean described in literature. The central nervous system capacity to hide or compensate for functional deficits due to peripheral nervous lesions was confirmed by the comparison between the results of the clinical tests and the patients' subjective evaluations.

  14. Defective nitric oxide production by alveolar macrophages during Pneumocystis pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Lasbury, Mark E; Liao, Chung-Ping; Hage, Chadi A; Durant, Pamela J; Tschang, Dennis; Wang, Shao-Hung; Zhang, Chen; Lee, Chao-Hung

    2011-04-01

    The effect of nitric oxide (NO) on Pneumocystis (Pc) organisms, the role of NO in the defense against infection with Pc, and the production of NO by alveolar macrophages (AMs) during Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) were investigated. The results indicate that NO was toxic to Pc organisms and inhibited their proliferation in culture. When the production of NO was inhibited by intraperitoneal injection of rats with the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor L-N(5)-(1-iminoethyl) ornithine, progression of Pc infection in immunocompetent rats was enhanced. Concentrations of NO in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids from immunosuppressed, Pc-infected rats and mice were greatly reduced, compared with those from uninfected animals, and AMs from these animals were defective in NO production. However, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) mRNA and protein concentrations were high in AMs from Pc-infected rats and mice. Immunoblot analysis showed that iNOS in AMs from Pc-infected rats existed primarily as a monomer, but the homo-dimerization of iNOS monomers was required for the production of NO. When iNOS dimerization cofactors, including calmodulin, were added to macrophage lysates, iNOS dimerization increased, whereas incubation of the same lysates with all cofactors except calmodulin did not rescue iNOS dimer formation. These data suggest that NO is important in the defense against Pc infection, but that the production of NO in AMs during PCP is defective because of the reduced dimerization of iNOS.

  15. PAX3-FOXO1 and FGFR4 in alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Amy D; van der Ent, Martijn A; Grosveld, Gerard C

    2012-10-01

    We and others have identified FGFR4 as a direct transcriptional target of the alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma (ARMS) specific fusion protein, PAX3-FOXO1. We hypothesized fibroblast growth factor receptor 4 (FGFR4) may act as an effector of PAX3-FOXO1, contributing to PAX3-FOXO1 tumorigenic phenotypes. However, we demonstrate that enhanced expression of FGFR4 does not contribute to inhibited differentiation, enhanced proliferation, or transformation downstream of PAX3-FOXO1 in primary mouse myoblasts. Therefore we were unable to identify any contribution of up regulation of wild type FGFR4 to PAX3-FOXO1 driven tumorigenesis. Conversely, a constitutively active mutant of FGFR4 can enhance primary myoblast proliferation and transformation, indicating activating mutations of FGFR4 could contribute to the development and progression of ARMS. We sequenced the FGFR4 mRNA from five ARMS cell lines and identified no somatic mutations, nor any association with any human single nucleotide polymorphism within the FGFR4 coding region.

  16. Characterization of alveolar macrophage receptors involved in opsonin independent phagocytosis

    SciTech Connect

    Godleski, J.J.; Parod, R.J.; Katler, M.; Brain, J.D.

    1986-03-05

    Hamster alveolar macrophages (AM) avidly ingest particles in the absence of serum. This process is calcium dependent and can be blocked by HAMM, a mouse monoclonal antibody specific for hamster AM's. The purpose of this study was to identify the membrane receptors involved. AM membranes were labeled with /sup 125/I, lysed with RIPA-PMSF, and then reacted with uncoated latex beads or with beads coated with BSA, gelatin, or poly-L-lysine. Lysed membranes were also reacted with zymosan particles. All of these reactions were done in the presence and absence of calcium and magnesium ions. After reaction, the particles were boiled in SDS to remove attached membrane constituents which were then separated by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Only one AM membrane protein (37 kilodaltons (kd)) bound to BSA and gelatin coated latex, uncoated latex, and zymosan particles in the presence of Ca/sup + +/ and Mg/sup + +/. Proteins of 45 and 19 kd attached to all particles even in the absence of divalent cations. In contrast, HAMM reacted with a membrane constituent of 102 kd. The authors conclude that the Ca/sup + +/ dependent receptor for opsonin independent phagocytosis has a molecular weight of 37 kd and is different from the antigen identified by HAMM.

  17. Dissolution of beryllium in artificial lung alveolar macrophage phagolysosomal fluid.

    PubMed

    Stefaniak, Aleksandr B; Virji, M Abbas; Day, Gregory A

    2011-05-01

    Dissolution of a lung burden of poorly soluble beryllium particles is hypothesized to be necessary for development of chronic beryllium lung disease (CBD) in humans. As such, particle dissolution rate must be sufficient to activate the lung immune response and dissolution lifetime sufficient to maintain chronic inflammation for months to years to support development of disease. The purpose of this research was to investigate the hypothesis that poorly soluble beryllium compounds release ions via dissolution in lung fluid. Dissolution kinetics of 17 poorly soluble particulate beryllium materials that span extraction through ceramics machining (ores, hydroxide, metal, copper-beryllium [CuBe] fume, oxides) and three CuBe alloy reference materials (chips, solid block) were measured over 31 d using artificial lung alveolar macrophage phagolysosomal fluid (pH 4.5). Differences in beryllium-containing particle physicochemical properties translated into differences in dissolution rates and lifetimes in artificial phagolysosomal fluid. Among all materials, dissolution rate constant values ranged from 10(-5) to 10(-10)gcm(-2)d(-1) and half-times ranged from tens to thousands of days. The presence of magnesium trisilicate in some beryllium oxide materials may have slowed dissolution rates. Materials associated with elevated prevalence of CBD had faster beryllium dissolution rates [10(-7)-10(-8)gcm(-2)d(-1)] than materials not associated with elevated prevalence (p<0.05).

  18. Agonist-stimulated alveolar macrophages: apoptosis and phospholipid signaling.

    PubMed

    Lütjohann, J; Spiess, A N; Gercken, G

    1998-08-01

    Bovine alveolar macrophages (BAM) were labeled with [3H]-choline or [3H]-ethanolamine and exposed to quartz dust, metal oxide-coated silica particles, Escherichia coli-derived lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or tumor promotor 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol 13-acetate (PMA). The activation of phospholipases A2, C and D (PLA2, PLC and PLD) acting on phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine was determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) separation and liquid scintillation counting of water- and lipid-soluble phospholipid metabolites. Exposure of BAM to quartz dust, metal oxide-coated silica particles, and LPS led to a transient PLD activation while treatment with PMA caused a prolonged rise in PLD activity. LPS and quartz dust induced a short-term increase of PLC cleavage products. All agonists caused a transient activation of PLA2. To induce apoptosis, BAM were stimulated with C8-ceramide, calcium-ionophore 23187, or gliotoxin. Apoptosis was investigated by qualitative and quantitative methods like flow cytometry, propidium iodide/Hoechst 33258 double staining, Cell Death Detection ELISA, and electrophoretical detection of DNA fragmentation. All three agonists led to apoptosis of BAM in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. After stimulation with gliotoxin an increase in ceramide and a drastic decrease in sphingosine-1-phosphate levels were observed, suggesting an involvement of these sphingolipids in gliotoxin-mediated apoptosis.

  19. Interaction of Mycoplasma dispar with bovine alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, R A; Wannemuehler, M J; Rosenbusch, R F

    1992-01-01

    The capacity to avoid phagocytosis and the activation of bovine alveolar macrophages (BAM) by encapsulated Mycoplasma dispar or purified M. dispar capsule was investigated. Encapsulated and unencapsulated M. dispar were cocultured with BAM in the presence or absence of antisera prepared against unencapsulated M. dispar or purified capsule antiserum. Unopsonized mycoplasmas resisted phagocytosis, while only anti-capsule antibodies enhanced the phagocytosis of encapsulated mycoplasmas. BAM were cultured in the presence of purified M. dispar capsule or either live or heat-killed encapsulated or unencapsulated M. dispar. These BAM were then activated with Escherichia coli endotoxin or left without further activation. The supernatants of these cultures were assayed for tumor necrosis factor, interleukin 1, and glucose consumption as indicators of macrophage activation. Tumor necrosis factor and interleukin 1 were produced by BAM stimulated with unencapsulated M. dispar but not when encapsulated M. dispar or its purified capsule was used. Similarly, glucose consumption was increased in the presence of unencapsulated M. dispar, but not when BAM were cocultured with encapsulated M. dispar or purified capsule. When BAM were treated with purified capsule or encapsulated mycoplasmas, they could not be subsequently activated by endotoxin. These results indicate that encapsulated M. dispar or purified capsule exerts an inhibitory effect on the activity of BAM and prevents the activation of these cells. PMID:1612758

  20. Mechanisms of particle-induced activation of alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Gercken, G; Berg, I; Dörger, M; Schlüter, T

    1996-11-01

    Bovine alveolar macrophages were exposed in vitro to quartz dusts, metal-containing dusts or silica particles coated with a single metal oxide. The release of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI) was measured in short-term incubations (90 min). The secretion of both ROI was markedly enhanced by silica particles coated with vanadium oxide and lowered by copper oxide-coated particles. The particle-induced ROI release was significantly decreased by the inhibition of protein kinase C (PKC) as well as phospholipase A2, suggesting the involvement of both enzymes in the NADPH oxidase activation. Quartz dusts induced a transient increase of free cytosolic calcium ion concentration, slight intracellular acidification, and depolarization of the plasma membrane. In the presence of EGTA or verapamil the rise of [Ca2+]i was diminished, suggesting an influx of extracellular calcium ions. The PKC inhibitor GF 109203X did not inhibit the quartz-induced calcium rise, while both the cytosolic acidification and depolarization were prevented. BSA-coating of the quartz particles abolished the calcium influx as well as the decrease of pHi, and possibly hyperpolarized the plasma membrane.

  1. Carbocisteine promotes phagocytosis of apoptotic cells by alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Masako; Ishibashi, Yuji; Nogawa, Hisashi; Yasue, Tokutaro

    2012-02-29

    Clearance of apoptotic cells, so-called efferocytosis, by alveolar macrophages (AMs) is important for lung homeostasis and is impaired in pulmonary inflammatory diseases, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma. Carbocisteine, a mucoregulatory drug, corrects the contents of fucose in airway mucus and has anti-inflammatory properties in airway inflammation. Thus, we conducted the present study to better understand the anti-inflammatory properties of carbocisteine. First, we induced airway inflammation in mice with lipopolysaccharide intratracheally. Carbocisteine significantly decreased neutrophil numbers in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid at the resolution phase of inflammation, implying the promotion of neutrophil clearance. Then, we investigated whether carbocisteine would enhance the efferocytosis by AMs isolated from mice and found that this drug promoted not only the phagocytosis but also the binding of apoptotic cells to AMs in vitro. Furthermore, carbocisteine decreased the fucose residues stained with fluorescent fucose-binding lectin, Lens culinaris agglutinin, on the cell surface of AMs. We found here that removing fucose residues from cell surfaces of AMs by fucosidase markedly enhanced both the binding and phagocytosis of apoptotic cells. Finally, AMs from mice orally given carbocisteine also promoted both the binding and phagocytosis ex vivo similarly to in vitro. These results suggest that carbocisteine could promote the clearance of apoptotic cells by AMs in airway. In addition, the present findings suggest that the binding and phagocytosis of apoptotic cells may be modulated by fucose residues on the cell surface of AMs.

  2. Quantitative Real-Time Gene Profiling of Human Alveolar Osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Coates, Dawn E; Zafar, Sobia; Milne, Trudy J

    2017-01-01

    The use of quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase PCR (qRT(2)-PCR) for the identification of differentially regulated genes is a powerful technology. The protocol presented here uses qRT(2)-PCR gene arrays to investigate the regulation of 84 angiogenic related genes in human primary alveolar osteoblasts following treatment with the bisphosphonate, zoledronic acid (ZA), and geranylgeraniol (GGOH). GGOH has potential as a therapeutic agent for Bisphosphate-Related Osteonecrosis of the Jaw (BRONJ), a serious side-effect resulting from the treatment for metastatic cancer (Zafar et al., J Oral Pathol Med 43:711-721, 2014; Ruggiero, Ann NY Acad Sci 1218:38-46, 2011). The isolation of the primary osteoblast cells follows the methods previously described (Dillon et al., Methods Mol Biol 816:3-18, 2012) with a new RNA extraction technique described fully. The method highlights the importance of obtaining high-quality RNA which is DNA-free. Relative levels of gene expression are normalized against selected housekeeping genes (HKG) and a number of examples of how fold regulation (2(-∆∆Cq)) and gene expression level (2(-∆Cq)) data can be presented are given.

  3. Toxicity of metallic ions and oxides to rabbit alveolar macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Labedzka, M.; Gulyas, H.; Schmidt, N.; Gercken, G. )

    1989-04-01

    The effects of soluble compounds and oxides of As, Cd, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb, Sb, Sn, V, and Zn on oxidative metabolism and membrane integrity of rabbit alveolar macrophages were studied by 24-hr in vitro exposure. Oxidative metabolism induced by phagocytosis of opsonized zymosan was measured by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} release and by chemiluminescence in the presence of luminol. Membrane integrity was estimated by extracellular LDH activity. Metallic ions and oxides inhibited the release of active oxygen species. Cd(II), As(III), and V(V) were the most toxic elements as measured by all investigated parameters. Cu(II) decreased O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} release and chemiluminescence effectively but H{sub 2}O{sub 2} release and membrane integrity less. Chemiluminescence was decreased strongly by Hg(II) while O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} release were depressed moderately. Zn(II) and Sb(III) compounds caused medium toxicity and the tested Sn, Ni, and Pb compounds showed only faint toxic effects.

  4. Quantitative assessment of rabbit alveolar macrophage function by chemiluminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan, P.C.; Kirchner, F.R.

    1985-08-01

    Rabbit alveolar macrophages (RAM) were cultured for 24 hr with concentrations ranging from 3 to 12 ..mu..g/ml of vanadium oxide (V/sub 2/O/sub 5/), a known cytotoxic agent, or with high-molecular-weight organic by-products from coal gasification processes. After culture the cells were harvested and tested for functional capacity using three types of indicators: (1) luminol-amplified chemiluminescence (CL), which quantitatively detects photon emission due to respiratory burst activity measured in a newly designed instrument with standardized reagents; (2) the reduction of nitro blue tetrazolium-saturated polyacrylamide beads, a semiquantitative measure of respiratory burst activity; and (3) phagocytic efficiency, defined as percentage of cells incorporating immunoglobulin-coated polyacrylamide beads. Chemiluminescence declined linearly with increasing concentrations of V/sub 2/O/sub 5/ over the dose range tested. Dye reduction and phagocytic efficiency similarly decreased with increasing V/sub 2/O/sub 5/ concentration, but were less sensitive indicators of functional impairment than CL as measured by the amount required to reduce the response to 50% of untreated cells. The effect of coal gasification condensates on RAM function varied, but in general these test also indicated that the CL response was the most sensitive indicator.

  5. Alveolar Ridge Preservation Using Xenogeneic Collagen Matrix and Bone Allograft

    PubMed Central

    Parashis, Andreas O.; Kalaitzakis, Charalampos J.; Tatakis, Dimitris N.; Tosios, Konstantinos

    2014-01-01

    Alveolar ridge preservation (ARP) has been shown to prevent postextraction bone loss. The aim of this report is to highlight the clinical, radiographic, and histological outcomes following use of a bilayer xenogeneic collagen matrix (XCM) in combination with freeze-dried bone allograft (FDBA) for ARP. Nine patients were treated after extraction of 18 teeth. Following minimal flap elevation and atraumatic extraction, sockets were filled with FDBA. The XCM was adapted to cover the defect and 2-3 mm of adjacent bone and flaps were repositioned. Healing was uneventful in all cases, the XCM remained in place, and any matrix exposure was devoid of further complications. Exposed matrix portions were slowly vascularized and replaced by mature keratinized tissue within 2-3 months. Radiographic and clinical assessment indicated adequate volume of bone for implant placement, with all planned implants placed in acceptable positions. When fixed partial dentures were placed, restorations fulfilled aesthetic demands without requiring further augmentation procedures. Histological and immunohistochemical analysis from 9 sites (4 patients) indicated normal mucosa with complete incorporation of the matrix and absence of inflammatory response. The XCM + FDBA combination resulted in minimal complications and desirable soft and hard tissue therapeutic outcomes, suggesting the feasibility of this approach for ARP. PMID:25328523

  6. Evidence for particle transport between alveolar macrophages in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, J.M.; Nikula, K.J.; Guilmette, R.A.

    1995-12-01

    Recent studies at this Institute have focused on determining the role of alveolar macrophages (AMs) in the transport of particles within and form the lung. For those studies, AMs previously labeled using the nuclear stain Hoechst 33342 and polychromatic Fluoresbrite microspheres (1 {mu}m diameter, Polysciences, Inc., Warrington, PA) were instilled into lungs of recipient F344 rats. The fate of the donor particles and the doubly labeled AMs within recipient lungs was followed for 32 d. Within 2-4 d after instillation, the polychromatic microspheres were found in both donor and resident AMs, suggesting that particle transfer occurred between the donor and resident AMs. However, this may also have been an artifact resulting from phagocytosis of the microspheres form dead donor cells or from the fading or degradation of Hoechst 33342 within the donor cells leading to their misidentification as resident AMs. The results support the earlier findings that microspheres in donor AMs can be transferred to resident AMs within 2 d after instillation.

  7. A plasmapheresis protocol for refractory pulmonary alveolar proteinosis.

    PubMed

    Garber, Bryan; Albores, Jeffrey; Wang, Tisha; Neville, Thanh H

    2015-04-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a rare lung disease characterized by the accumulation of proteinaceous material within the lungs. While typically managed with whole lung lavage (WLL), more recent PAP therapies aimed at reducing granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor autoantibodies (anti-GM-CSF) have reduced symptoms and improved lung function. We present a patient with PAP refractory to WLL, exogenous GM-CSF and rituximab who underwent a novel plasmapheresis protocol as a therapeutic trial. While previously reported regimens have utilized plasmapheresis sessions distributed over months, our patient underwent five consecutive days of plasmapheresis, followed by rituximab. Anti-GM-CSF levels decreased from 24.8 to 2.7 mcg/mL post-plasmapheresis. This reduction of autoantibody correlated with reduction in WLL frequency, increase in diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide, and subjective improvement in dyspnea. Our case suggests that five consecutive days of plasmapharesis results in increased clearance of anti-GM-CSF and may be potentially efficacious in cases of refractory PAP.

  8. The Anesthetic Effect of Anterior Middle Superior Alveolar Technique (AMSA)

    PubMed Central

    de Souza Tolentino, Lívia; Barbisan Souza, André; Girardi, Ana Alice; Romito, Giuseppe Alexandre; Araújo, Maurício Guimarães

    2015-01-01

    Anesthesia of the soft and hard tissues of the maxilla may require up to 5 injections. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the anesthetic efficacy of the anterior middle superior alveolar (AMSA) and supraperiosteal injection techniques during subgingival scaling and root planing (SRP). Thirty individuals with periodontitis were scheduled for SRP on the buccal aspect of teeth in the anterior maxilla. Before SRP, on a randomly chosen side of the maxilla, the supraperiosteal injection was performed in 1 session, while the AMSA injection was conducted in the contralateral side of the same patient in another session. Immediately after each SRP session, patients rated their pain perception during the procedure with a visual analog scale. No statistically significant differences in mean pain ratings during SRP were found after both anesthetic techniques (P > .05). This preliminary study demonstrated that the AMSA and supraperiosteal injection techniques provided similar anesthetic comfort during SRP. The AMSA injection could be an alternative to anesthetize the buccal aspect of maxilla, without the undesirable effects on facial structures such as the upper lip, nostrils, and lower eyelids. However, further randomized clinical trials with larger samples are necessary to confirm such results. PMID:26650493

  9. Alveolocapillary model system to study alveolar re-epithelialization.

    PubMed

    Willems, Coen H M P; Zimmermann, Luc J I; Sanders, Patricia J L T; Wagendorp, Margot; Kloosterboer, Nico; Cohen Tervaert, Jan Willem; Duimel, Hans J Q; Verheyen, Fons K C P; van Iwaarden, J Freek

    2013-01-01

    In the present study an in vitro bilayer model system of the pulmonary alveolocapillary barrier was established to investigate the role of the microvascular endothelium on re-epithelialization. The model system, confluent monolayer cultures on opposing sides of a porous membrane, consisted of a human microvascular endothelial cell line (HPMEC-ST1.6R) and an alveolar type II like cell line (A549), stably expressing EGFP and mCherry, respectively. These fluorescent proteins allowed the real time assessment of the integrity of the monolayers and the automated analysis of the wound healing process after a scratch injury. The HPMECs significantly attenuated the speed of re-epithelialization, which was associated with the proximity to the A549 layer. Examination of cross-sectional transmission electron micrographs of the model system revealed protrusions through the membrane pores and close contact between the A549 cells and the HPMECs. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that these close contacts consisted of heterocellular gap-, tight- and adherens-junctions. Additional analysis, using a fluorescent probe to assess gap-junctional communication, revealed that the HPMECs and A549 cells were able to exchange the fluorophore, which could be abrogated by disrupting the gap junctions using connexin mimetic peptides. These data suggest that the pulmonary microvascular endothelium may impact the re-epithelialization process.

  10. [Atelectasis in general anesthesia and alveolar recruitment strategies].

    PubMed

    Martínez, G; Cruz, P

    2008-10-01

    Atelectasis occurs in most patients during general anesthesia and is the main cause of hypoxemia. The objective of this review is to examine the causes and diagnosis of atelectasis and the different strategies for reducing or preventing this complication and improving oxygenation. Pulmonary atelectasis is mainly caused by 3 factors: compression, gas absorption, and lack of surfactant. Compression and gas absorption are, however, the 2 most commonly implicated factors. Lung collapse is accentuated if pure oxygen is inhaled during induction or if the patient is morbidly obese. Laparoscopic, thoracic, and upper abdominal interventions also carry risk of lung collapse. Various techniques may be used to prevent atelectasis or to reopen collapsed lung tissue. These include using positive end-expiratory pressure or a high tidal volume-thus providing a higher airway pressure (vital capacity maneuver)-or both in combination. Alveolar recruitment strategies have been tried in bariatric surgery, single-lung ventilation, laparoscopy, and adult respiratory distress syndrome. Their application has reduced or prevented atelectasis, thereby reducing postoperative pulmonary complications.

  11. Serial lobar lung lavage in pulmonary alveolar proteinosis.

    PubMed

    Baldi, Milind M; Nair, Jairaj; Athavale, Amita; Gavali, Varun; Sarkar, Manjula; Divate, Smita; Shah, Unmil

    2013-10-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a rare disease with worldwide distribution and an estimated incidence of 0.36 cases per million. We report a case of a PAP coexisting with Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia and Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. The patient was treated with serial lobar lung lavages, GM-CSF, cotrimoxazole, and antituberculosis drugs. His PaO2 on room air improved from 45.7 to 63.8 torr and pulmonary functions normalized (FVC 81.2%, FEV1 95.3%, FEV1/FVC 91.8). A high-resolution computed tomography scan of the thorax showed clearing of both lower lobes. Whole-lung lavage is used in the treatment of PAP, but it may worsen the hypoxemia and lead to hemodynamic instability during the procedure. To the best of our knowledge, there are no reports of bronchoscopic serial lobar lung lavages in cases of PAP performed in India. This method can be performed in bronchoscopic suites having general anesthesia facilities without the requirement of special gadgets.

  12. Substrate stiffness regulates extracellular matrix deposition by alveolar epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Eisenberg, Jessica L; Safi, Asmahan; Wei, Xiaoding; Espinosa, Horacio D; Budinger, GR Scott; Takawira, Desire; Hopkinson, Susan B; Jones, Jonathan CR

    2012-01-01

    Aim The aim of the study was to address whether a stiff substrate, a model for pulmonary fibrosis, is responsible for inducing changes in the phenotype of alveolar epithelial cells (AEC) in the lung, including their deposition and organization of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. Methods Freshly isolated lung AEC from male Sprague Dawley rats were seeded onto polyacrylamide gel substrates of varying stiffness and analyzed for expression and organization of adhesion, cytoskeletal, differentiation, and ECM components by Western immunoblotting and confocal immunofluorescence microscopy. Results We observed that substrate stiffness influences cell morphology and the organization of focal adhesions and the actin cytoskeleton. Surprisingly, however, we found that substrate stiffness has no influence on the differentiation of type II into type I AEC, nor does increased substrate stiffness lead to an epithelial–mesenchymal transition. In contrast, our data indicate that substrate stiffness regulates the expression of the α3 laminin subunit by AEC and the organization of both fibronectin and laminin in their ECM. Conclusions An increase in substrate stiffness leads to enhanced laminin and fibronectin assembly into fibrils, which likely contributes to the disease phenotype in the fibrotic lung. PMID:23204878

  13. Alveolar echinococcosis: spectrum of findings at cross-sectional imaging.

    PubMed

    Kantarci, Mecit; Bayraktutan, Ummugulsum; Karabulut, Nevzat; Aydinli, Bulent; Ogul, Hayri; Yuce, Ihsan; Calik, Muhammet; Eren, Suat; Atamanalp, Sabri Selcuk; Oto, Aytekin

    2012-01-01

    Alveolar echinococcosis is a rare parasitic disease caused by the fox tapeworm Echinococcus multilocularis, which is endemic in many parts of the world. Without timely diagnosis and therapy, the prognosis is dismal, with death the eventual outcome in most cases. Diagnosis is usually based on findings at radiologic imaging and in serologic analyses. Because echinococcal lesions can occur almost anywhere in the body, familiarity with the spectrum of cross-sectional imaging appearances is advantageous. Echinococcal lesions may produce widely varied imaging appearances depending on the parasite's growth stage, the tissues or organs affected, and the presence of associated complications. Although the liver is the initial site of mass infestation by E multilocularis, the parasite may disseminate from there to other organs and tissues, such as the lung, heart, brain, bones, and ligaments. In severe infestations, the walls of the bile ducts and blood vessels may be invaded. Disseminated parasitic lesions in unusual locations with atypical imaging appearances may make it difficult to narrow the differential diagnosis. Ultrasonography, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with standard and diffusion-weighted sequences, and MR cholangiopancreatography all provide useful information and play complementary roles in detecting and characterizing echinococcal lesions. Cross-sectional imaging is crucial for differentiating echinococcosis from malignant processes: CT is most useful for depicting the peripheral calcifications surrounding established echinococcal cysts, and MR imaging is most helpful for identifying echinococcosis of the central nervous system.

  14. Alveolar regions of the mandible for the installation of immediate-implant fixtures and bone screws of alveolar distractors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Da-Hye; Park, Man-Soo; Won, Sung-Yoon; Hu, Kyung-Seok; Han, Dong-Hoo; Kim, Hee-Jin

    2011-05-01

    The purposes of this study were to elucidate the anatomic relationship between the dental roots and surrounding tissues and to identify the optimal sites at which to install dental surgical devices including immediate-implant fixtures and alveolar distractors. We made 5 types of measurements on horizontal cross sections obtained at 1-mm intervals from 20 Korean mandibles. The following results were obtained: (1) the mandibular facial plate was thinnest at the canine (0.5-0.7 mm) and became thicker toward the molar region; (2) the thicknesses of the facial and lingual cortical bone in the interdental region increased from anterior to posterior and from coronal to apical aspects; (3) in each section, the buccolingual root was narrower than 4 mm at depths greater than 8 and 9 mm in the central and lateral incisors, respectively, and the maximum mesiodistal root widths were 3.0 and 3.3 mm; (4) the interroot distance increased from anterior to posterior and from coronal to apical aspects; and (5) on the sections of the first and second molars, the diameter of the septal bone ranged from 4.2 to 7.9 mm buccolingually and from 1.3 to 3.3 mm mesiodistally. Achieving successful placements of implant fixtures and bone screws requires an accurate understanding of the anatomic structure at the installation site. The reported anatomic data might facilitate successful treatments and provide crucial information for use when planning and performing placements of dental surgical devices.

  15. A survey of porcine picornaviruses and adenoviruses in fecal samples in Spain.

    PubMed

    Buitrago, Dolores; Cano-Gómez, Cristina; Agüero, Montserrat; Fernandez-Pacheco, Paloma; Gómez-Tejedor, Concepción; Jiménez-Clavero, Miguel Angel

    2010-09-01

    In the course of an epidemiologic surveillance program for swine diseases carried out in Spain, 206 cytopathic viruses were isolated from 600 porcine fecal samples between 2004 and 2005. The virus isolates were examined using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) methods specific for different types of porcine picornaviruses, including members of the Teschovirus, Enterovirus, and Sapelovirus genera, and PCR for porcine adenoviruses. Of the 206 isolates, 97 (47%) were identified as teschoviruses, 18 (9%) as sapeloviruses, and 7 (3%) as porcine adenoviruses. Neither Porcine enterovirus B nor Swine vesicular disease virus was found among the isolates. The present study confirms that teschoviruses are highly prevalent in porcine fecal samples, at least in Spain. It also reveals that these viruses commonly circulate among apparently healthy pigs.

  16. Effects of oestrogen deficiency on the alveolar bone of rats with experimental periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    XU, XIN-CHEN; CHEN, HUI; ZHANG, XI; ZHAI, ZAN-JING; LIU, XU-QIANG; ZHENG, XIN-YI; ZHANG, JUN; QIN, AN; LU, ER-YI

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis is an inflammatory disease characterized by loss of connective tissue and alveolar bone, and osteoporosis is a common disease characterized by a systemic impairment of bone mass and microarchitecture. To date, the association between periodontitis and osteoporosis has remained to be fully elucidated. In the present study, an experimental rat model of periodontitis was used to explore the effects of oestrogen deficiency-induced osteoporosis on the maxillary alveolar bone. Forty-four female, six-month-old Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into four groups: Control, ligature, ovariectomized (OVX), and OVX + ligature. One month after ovariectomy, rats in the ligature and OVX + ligature groups received ligatures on their first and second maxillary molars for 1 month. Fluorescent labelling was performed prior to sacrificing the animals. At the end of the experiment, the maxillae and serum were collected and subjected to micro-computed tomography analysis, confocal laser-scanning microscopic observation, Van Gieson's fuchsin staining, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining and ELISA. Ligatures slightly reduced the alveolar bone mineral density (BMD) and bone formation rate, but significantly reduced alveolar crest height (ACH). Ovariectomy reduced the alveolar BMD, impaired the trabecular structure, reduced the bone formation rate and increased the serum levels of bone resorption markers. Animals in the OVX + ligature group exhibited a lower alveolar BMD, a poorer trabecular structure, a reduced ACH, a lower bone formation rate and higher serum levels of bone resorption markers compared with those in the control group. The results of the present study showed that ovariectomy enhanced alveolar bone loss and reduced the ACH of rats with experimental periodontitis. Thus, post-menopausal osteoporosis may influence the progression of periodontitis. PMID:26035209

  17. Evaluation of the Posterior Superior Alveolar Artery Using Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Pandharbale, Atul A.; Gadgil, Rajeev M.; Bhoosreddy, Ajay R.; Kunte, Varun R.; Ahire, Bhushan S.; Shinde, Manila R.; Joshi, Sidharth S.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Maxillary posterior tooth region is an important area with respect to periapical surgery, implant placement, and sinus lifts. Posterior superior alveolar artery (PSAA) is located on the lateral wall of maxillary sinus and may become injured during such surgical procedures. Therefore, knowledge of the subject is essential to a clinician. The goal was to determine the anatomical relationship of posterior superior alveolar artery to the floor of maxillary sinus and alveolar crest. In our study we attempted to present the locations and course of posterior superior alveolar artery (PSAA) using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging. Material/Methods CBCT scans of 50 patients (30 males, 20 females) who had undergone computed tomography imaging were analyzed. We assessed the visibility and location of vascular canal/notch of posterior superior alveolar artery on cross sectional images and measured the distances from lower margin to the floor of maxillary sinus and alveolar crest in the 1st molar and 2nd molar regions. Unpaired t-test was carried out in the analysis to determine the level of significance. Results Maxillary PSAA was visualized in 36 patients (70%). Mean diameter of the vessel was 0.63 mm. Mean distance between PSAA and alveolar crest was the shortest in the 2nd molar region. The mean distance between PSAA and floor of maxillary sinus was 9.96 mm. Conclusions Periapical surgeries, implants and maxillary sinus lift are performed on routine basis. PSAA is an important structure in the posterior maxillary region; the clinician should be aware of its location and course. CBCT is an excellent tool to localize the PSAA because of it provides finer details at low exposure and less radiation. It should be recommended in clinical practices. PMID:28058075

  18. Effects of oestrogen deficiency on the alveolar bone of rats with experimental periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xin-Chen; Chen, Hui; Zhang, Xi; Zhai, Zan-Jing; Liu, Xu-Qiang; Zheng, Xin-Yi; Zhang, Jun; Qin, An; Lu, Er-Yi

    2015-09-01

    Periodontitis is an inflammatory disease characterized by loss of connective tissue and alveolar bone, and osteoporosis is a common disease characterized by a systemic impairment of bone mass and microarchitecture. To date, the association between periodontitis and osteoporosis has remained to be fully elucidated. In the present study, an experimental rat model of periodontitis was used to explore the effects of oestrogen deficiency‑induced osteoporosis on the maxillary alveolar bone. Forty‑four female, six‑month‑old Sprague‑Dawley rats were randomly divided into four groups: Control, ligature, ovariectomized (OVX), and OVX + ligature. One month after ovariectomy, rats in the ligature and OVX + ligature groups received ligatures on their first and second maxillary molars for 1 month. Fluorescent labelling was performed prior to sacrificing the animals. At the end of the experiment, the maxillae and serum were collected and subjected to micro‑computed tomography analysis, confocal laser‑scanning microscopic observation, Van Gieson's fuchsin staining, tartrate‑resistant acid phosphatase staining and ELISA. Ligatures slightly reduced the alveolar bone mineral density (BMD) and bone formation rate, but significantly reduced alveolar crest height (ACH). Ovariectomy reduced the alveolar BMD, impaired the trabecular structure, reduced the bone formation rate and increased the serum levels of bone resorption markers. Animals in the OVX + ligature group exhibited a lower alveolar BMD, a poorer trabecular structure, a reduced ACH, a lower bone formation rate and higher serum levels of bone resorption markers compared with those in the control group. The results of the present study showed that ovariectomy enhanced alveolar bone loss and reduced the ACH of rats with experimental periodontitis. Thus, post‑menopausal osteoporosis may influence the progression of periodontitis.

  19. Lysophosphatidic Acid Signaling through the Lysophosphatidic Acid-1 Receptor Is Required for Alveolarization.

    PubMed

    Funke, Manuela; Knudsen, Lars; Lagares, David; Ebener, Simone; Probst, Clemens K; Fontaine, Benjamin A; Franklin, Alicia; Kellner, Manuela; Kühnel, Mark; Matthieu, Stephanie; Grothausmann, Roman; Chun, Jerold; Roberts, Jesse D; Ochs, Matthias; Tager, Andrew M

    2016-07-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) signaling through one of its receptors, LPA1, contributes to both the development and the pathological remodeling after injury of many organs. Because we found previously that LPA-LPA1 signaling contributes to pulmonary fibrosis, here we investigated whether this pathway is also involved in lung development. Quantitative assessment of lung architecture of LPA1-deficient knock-out (KO) and wild-type (WT) mice at 3, 12, and 24 weeks of age using design-based stereology suggested the presence of an alveolarization defect in LPA1 KO mice at 3 weeks, which persisted as alveolar numbers increased in WT mice into adulthood. Across the ages examined, the lungs of LPA1 KO mice exhibited decreased alveolar numbers, septal tissue volumes, and surface areas, and increased volumes of the distal airspaces. Elastic fibers, critical to the development of alveolar septa, appeared less organized and condensed and more discontinuous in KO alveoli starting at P4. Tropoelastin messenger RNA expression was decreased in KO lungs, whereas expression of matrix metalloproteinases degrading elastic fibers was either decreased or unchanged. These results are consistent with the abnormal lung phenotype of LPA1 KO mice, being attributable to reduced alveolar septal formation during development, rather than to increased septal destruction as occurs in the emphysema of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Peripheral septal fibroblasts and myofibroblasts, which direct septation in late alveolarization, demonstrated reduced production of tropoelastin and matrix metalloproteinases, and diminished LPA-induced migration, when isolated from LPA1 KO mice. Taken together, our data suggest that LPA-LPA1 signaling is critically required for septation during alveolarization.

  20. Patient-specific factors in the proximity of the inferior alveolar nerve to the tooth apex

    PubMed Central

    Adigüzel, Özkan; Kaya, Sadullah; Akkuş, Zeki

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate whether age and gender differences are predictive factors for inferior alveolar nerve position with respect to mandibular first molar roots. Study Design: Cone-beam computed tomography scans [0.2-mm3 voxel size; n = 200 (100 males, 100 females)] of patients aged 15–65 years showing mandibular first and second molars were included in this study. Patients with pathoses that might affect inferior alveolar nerve position, including second molar and/or first premolar extraction, were excluded. Fourteen measurements (mm) were taken from the inferior alveolar nerve to the mesial and distal root apices. Subjects were grouped by age and gender. Data were analysed using two-way analyses of variance with post hoc Bonferroni corrections. Results: The distance from the inferior alveolar nerve to the root apices was smaller in females than males, regardless of age (p < 0.01). Distal roots were closer to the nerve than mesial roots in both genders (p < 0.05). Total buccolingual mandibular length (at 3-mm apical level) was shorter in females than males (p < 0.01) but mean buccolingual mandibular width at the level of the inferior alveolar canal did not differ. Nerve–root apex distances were significantly shorter in males and females aged 16–25 and 56–65 years than in other age groups (p < 0.01). Conclusions: The distance between inferior alveolar nerve and mandibular first molar roots depends upon the age and gender: it is shorter in females than in males and in subjects aged 16–25 years and >55 years than in other age groups. Key words:Age, cone-beam computed tomography, inferior alveolar nerve, root apex, gender. PMID:22926478

  1. Species differences in impairment and recovery of alveolar macrophage functions following single and repeated ozone exposures

    SciTech Connect

    Oosting, R.S.; van Golde, L.M.; Verhoef, J.; Van Bree, L. )

    1991-08-01

    Effects of single (0.4 ppm for 3, 6, or 12 hr) and repeated (0.4 ppm, 12 hr/day for 3 or 7 days) in vivo ozone exposures on rat and mouse alveolar macrophage functions and cell number were investigated. Single ozone exposure of rats resulted in a small (approximately 15%) decrease in Fc-receptor-mediated phagocytosis and phorbol ester-induced superoxide production by the alveolar macrophages and was followed by recovery above control levels within 12 hr of exposure. Repeated exposures of rats for up to 7 days did not alter alveolar macrophage functions, with the exception of the effects of 3 days of exposure on superoxide production (71 {plus minus} 9% as compared with the controls). In mice, significant changes in alveolar macrophage functions were not observed until 12 hr of exposure (at that timepoint phagocytosis was 74 {plus minus} 2%). Repeated ozone exposures of mice did not cause a further decrease in phagocytosis (at Day 7, 74 {plus minus} 14%). Both after 3 and 7 days of repeated ozone exposure of mice, superoxide production by the alveolar macrophages was inhibited approximately 50%. In rats and mice, repeated ozone exposures led to an increase in the number of alveolar macrophages. In mice, this increase appeared at a later time point (at Day 7 vs Day 3) and was less pronounced (at Day 7, 139 {plus minus} 9% vs 179 {plus minus} 17%) as compared with rats. In summary, our data show that rat and mouse alveolar macrophages have different susceptibilities to both single and repeated in vivo ozone exposures.

  2. Modulation of Mitogen-Induced Proliferation of Autologous Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes by Human Alveolar Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Yeager, Henry; Sweeney, Jan A.; Herscowitz, Herbert B.; Barsoum, Ibrahim S.; Kagan, Elliott

    1982-01-01

    Experiments were carried out to determine the effect of cocultivation of T-cell-enriched human peripheral blood lymphocytes with autologous alveolar macrophages on mitogen-induced proliferation as determined by [3H]thymidine uptake. Cells obtained by fiberoptic bronchoscopy and saline bronchial lavage from 14 normal volunteers were enriched for macrophages by adherence in plastic dishes for 1 h in RPMI 1640 medium supplemented with 10% fetal calf serum. Nonadherent mononuclear cells were prepared from heparinized venous blood after Ficoll-Hypaque sedimentation by passage over nylon wool columns. T-cell-enriched populations were incubated with and without alveolar macrophages, either in the presence or absence of phytohemagglutinin. In these experiments, the number of lymphocytes was held constant (105 per well), while the number of alveolar macrophages was varied (0.1 × 105 to 4.0 × 105 per well). Alveolar macrophages generally tended to stimulate phytohemagglutinin-induced lymphoproliferation at lymphocyte/macrophage ratios of 10:1 but consistently and significantly suppressed proliferation at ratios which approach those usually observed in recovered human bronchial lavage fluid, namely, 1:4. The suppressive effect of alveolar macrophages was observed as early as 48 h after culture initiation, while the magnitude of suppression increased with time. Suppression did not appear to be due to alteration in lymphocyte viability, nor was it sensitive to indomethacin. These results indicate that human alveolar macrophages can modulate the in vitro proliferative response of autologous peripheral blood lymphocytes. This observation may have relevance to interactions between alveolar macrophages and bronchial lymphocytes in the human lung in vivo. PMID:6982862

  3. Stress preconditioning attenuates oxidative injury to the alveolar epithelium of the lung following haemorrhage in rats

    PubMed Central

    Pittet, J F; Lu, L N; Geiser, T; Lee, H; Matthay, M A; Welch, W J

    2002-01-01

    Inhibition of cAMP-dependent stimulation of vectorial fluid transport across the alveolar epithelium following haemorrhagic shock is mediated by reactive nitrogen species released within the airspaces of the lung. We tested here the hypothesis that the prior activation of the cellular heat shock or stress response, via exposure to either heat or geldanamycin, would attenuate the release of airspace nitric oxide (NO) responsible for the shock-mediated failure of the alveolar epithelium to respond to catecholamines in rats. Rats were haemorrhaged to a mean arterial pressure of 30–35 mmHg for 60 min, and then resuscitated with a 4 % albumin solution. Alveolar fluid clearance was measured by change in concentration of a protein solution instilled into the airspaces 5 h after the onset of haemorrhage. Stress preconditioning restored the cAMP-mediated upregulation of alveolar liquid clearance after haemorrhage. The protective effect of stress preconditioning was mediated in part by a decrease in the expression of iNOS in the lung. Specifically, stress preconditioning decreased the production of nitrite by endotoxin-stimulated alveolar macrophages removed from haemorrhaged rats or by A549 and rat alveolar epithelial type II cell monolayers stimulated with cytomix (a mixture of TNF-α, IL-1β and IFN-γ) for 24 h. In summary, these results provide the first in vivo evidence that stress preconditioning restores a normal fluid transport capacity of the alveolar epithelium in the early phase following haemorrhagic shock by attenuating NO-mediated oxidative stress to the lung epithelium. PMID:11790821

  4. Temperature effect on endocytosis and exocytosis by rabbit alveolar macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Tomoda, H.; Kishimoto, Y.; Lee, Y.C. )

    1989-09-15

    Endocytosis of 125I-mannose-bovine serum albumin (BSA) and exocytosis of {sup 125}I-mannose-poly-D-lysine by rabbit alveolar macrophages were examined as a function of temperature. A plot for total ligand uptake (cell-associated ligand plus degraded ligand) versus time shows a single inflection point at 20{degrees}C. Ligand degradation does not occur below 20{degrees}C. Internalization of surface-bound {sup 125}I-mannose-BSA is negligible below 10{degrees}C. The rate constant for internalization increases dramatically above 20{degrees}C: 0.02 min-1 at 20{degrees}C, 0.05 min-1 at 25 degrees C, 0.13 min-1 at 30{degrees}C, and 0.29 min-1 at 35{degrees}C. {sup 125}I-Mannose-N-acetyl-poly-D-lysine preloaded in lysosomes is exocytosed in a temperature and time-dependent fashion. Even at lower temperatures (2-10{degrees}C), secretion of {sup 125}I-mannose-N-acetyl-poly-D-lysine was detected, indicating that movement of lysosomal content to plasma membrane and beyond cannot be suppressed at these temperatures. Thus, the temperature dependence of exocytosis of an {sup 125}I-labeled ligand is quite different from that of endocytosis, suggesting that the two processes are controlled by different mechanisms. Stimulation of secretion of preloaded {sup 125}I-mannose-N-acetyl-poly-D-lysine by mannose-BSA was more pronounced at lower temperatures with a sharp inflection point at 10{degrees}C. These findings suggest that endosomes containing newly internalized mannose-BSA interact with the exocytosis pathway and enhance secretion of {sup 125}I-mannose-N-acetyl-poly-D-lysine from lysosomes.

  5. Fusion transcriptome profiling provides insights into alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zhongqiu; Babiceanu, Mihaela; Kumar, Shailesh; Jia, Yuemeng; Qin, Fujun; Barr, Frederic G; Li, Hui

    2016-11-15

    Gene fusions and fusion products were thought to be unique features of neoplasia. However, more and more studies have identified fusion RNAs in normal physiology. Through RNA sequencing of 27 human noncancer tissues, a large number of fusion RNAs were found. By analyzing fusion transcriptome, we observed close clusterings between samples of same or similar tissues, supporting the feasibility of using fusion RNA profiling to reveal connections between biological samples. To put the concept into use, we selected alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma (ARMS), a myogenic pediatric cancer whose exact cell of origin is not clear. PAX3-FOXO1 (paired box gene 3 fused with forkhead box O1) fusion RNA, which is considered a hallmark of ARMS, was recently found during normal muscle cell differentiation. We performed and analyzed RNA sequencing from various time points during myogenesis and uncovered many chimeric fusion RNAs. Interestingly, we found that the fusion RNA profile of RH30, an ARMS cell line, is most similar to the myogenesis time point when PAX3-FOXO1 is expressed. In contrast, full transcriptome clustering analysis failed to uncover this connection. Strikingly, all of the 18 chimeric RNAs in RH30 cells could be detected at the same myogenic time point(s). In addition, the seven chimeric RNAs that follow the exact transient expression pattern as PAX3-FOXO1 are specific to rhabdomyosarcoma cells. Further testing with clinical samples also confirmed their specificity to rhabdomyosarcoma. These results provide further support for the link between at least some ARMSs and the PAX3-FOXO1-expressing myogenic cells and demonstrate that fusion RNA profiling can be used to investigate the etiology of fusion-gene-associated cancers.

  6. Biological reaction of alveolar bone to orthodontic tooth movement.

    PubMed

    Melsen, B

    1999-04-01

    Direct and indirect resorption are perceived as reactions to an applied force. This is in contrast to the view of orthopedic surgeons, who describe apposition as a reaction to loading of bone. A histomorphometric study of the circumalveolar bone reaction to a force system generating translation of premolars and molars of five maccaca fascicularis monkeys is described. Three force levels (100 cN, 200 cN, and 300 cN) were applied for a period of 11 weeks. Undecalcified serial sections were cut parallel to the occlusal plane, and a grid consisting of three concentric outlines of the root intersected by six radii was placed on each section. Areas anticipated to be submitted to different stress/strain distributions were isolated. A-posteriori tests were used in order to separate areas that differed with regard to parameters reflecting bone turnover. Based on these results, a new hypothesis regarding tissue reaction to orthodontic forces is suggested. Direct resorption could be perceived as a result of the lowering of the normal strain from the functioning PDL and as such, as a start of remodeling, in the bone biological sense of the word. Indirect remodeling could be perceived as a sterile inflammation attempting to remove ischemic bone under the hyalinized tissue. At a distance from the alveolus, dense woven bone was observed as a sign of a RAP (regional acceleratory phenomena). The apposition could, according to the new hypothesis, be perceived as a result of the bending of the alveolar wall produced by the pull from the Sharpey fibers. The above suggested interpretation of tissue reaction would be shared with bone biologists.

  7. Pathogenetics of alveolar capillary dysplasia with misalignment of pulmonary veins.

    PubMed

    Szafranski, Przemyslaw; Gambin, Tomasz; Dharmadhikari, Avinash V; Akdemir, Kadir Caner; Jhangiani, Shalini N; Schuette, Jennifer; Godiwala, Nihal; Yatsenko, Svetlana A; Sebastian, Jessica; Madan-Khetarpal, Suneeta; Surti, Urvashi; Abellar, Rosanna G; Bateman, David A; Wilson, Ashley L; Markham, Melinda H; Slamon, Jill; Santos-Simarro, Fernando; Palomares, María; Nevado, Julián; Lapunzina, Pablo; Chung, Brian Hon-Yin; Wong, Wai-Lap; Chu, Yoyo Wing Yiu; Mok, Gary Tsz Kin; Kerem, Eitan; Reiter, Joel; Ambalavanan, Namasivayam; Anderson, Scott A; Kelly, David R; Shieh, Joseph; Rosenthal, Taryn C; Scheible, Kristin; Steiner, Laurie; Iqbal, M Anwar; McKinnon, Margaret L; Hamilton, Sara Jane; Schlade-Bartusiak, Kamilla; English, Dawn; Hendson, Glenda; Roeder, Elizabeth R; DeNapoli, Thomas S; Littlejohn, Rebecca Okashah; Wolff, Daynna J; Wagner, Carol L; Yeung, Alison; Francis, David; Fiorino, Elizabeth K; Edelman, Morris; Fox, Joyce; Hayes, Denise A; Janssens, Sandra; De Baere, Elfride; Menten, Björn; Loccufier, Anne; Vanwalleghem, Lieve; Moerman, Philippe; Sznajer, Yves; Lay, Amy S; Kussmann, Jennifer L; Chawla, Jasneek; Payton, Diane J; Phillips, Gael E; Brosens, Erwin; Tibboel, Dick; de Klein, Annelies; Maystadt, Isabelle; Fisher, Richard; Sebire, Neil; Male, Alison; Chopra, Maya; Pinner, Jason; Malcolm, Girvan; Peters, Gregory; Arbuckle, Susan; Lees, Melissa; Mead, Zoe; Quarrell, Oliver; Sayers, Richard; Owens, Martina; Shaw-Smith, Charles; Lioy, Janet; McKay, Eileen; de Leeuw, Nicole; Feenstra, Ilse; Spruijt, Liesbeth; Elmslie, Frances; Thiruchelvam, Timothy; Bacino, Carlos A; Langston, Claire; Lupski, James R; Sen, Partha; Popek, Edwina; Stankiewicz, Paweł

    2016-05-01

    Alveolar capillary dysplasia with misalignment of pulmonary veins (ACDMPV) is a lethal lung developmental disorder caused by heterozygous point mutations or genomic deletion copy-number variants (CNVs) of FOXF1 or its upstream enhancer involving fetal lung-expressed long noncoding RNA genes LINC01081 and LINC01082. Using custom-designed array comparative genomic hybridization, Sanger sequencing, whole exome sequencing (WES), and bioinformatic analyses, we studied 22 new unrelated families (20 postnatal and two prenatal) with clinically diagnosed ACDMPV. We describe novel deletion CNVs at the FOXF1 locus in 13 unrelated ACDMPV patients. Together with the previously reported cases, all 31 genomic deletions in 16q24.1, pathogenic for ACDMPV, for which parental origin was determined, arose de novo with 30 of them occurring on the maternally inherited chromosome 16, strongly implicating genomic imprinting of the FOXF1 locus in human lungs. Surprisingly, we have also identified four ACDMPV families with the pathogenic variants in the FOXF1 locus that arose on paternal chromosome 16. Interestingly, a combination of the severe cardiac defects, including hypoplastic left heart, and single umbilical artery were observed only in children with deletion CNVs involving FOXF1 and its upstream enhancer. Our data demonstrate that genomic imprinting at 16q24.1 plays an important role in variable ACDMPV manifestation likely through long-range regulation of FOXF1 expression, and may be also responsible for key phenotypic features of maternal uniparental disomy 16. Moreover, in one family, WES revealed a de novo missense variant in ESRP1, potentially implicating FGF signaling in the etiology of ACDMPV.

  8. Alveolocapillary model system to study alveolar re-epithelialization

    SciTech Connect

    Willems, Coen H.M.P.; Zimmermann, Luc J.I.; Sanders, Patricia J.L.T.; Wagendorp, Margot; Kloosterboer, Nico; Cohen Tervaert, Jan Willem; Duimel, Hans J.Q.; Verheyen, Fons K.C.P.; Iwaarden, J. Freek van

    2013-01-01

    In the present study an in vitro bilayer model system of the pulmonary alveolocapillary barrier was established to investigate the role of the microvascular endothelium on re-epithelialization. The model system, confluent monolayer cultures on opposing sides of a porous membrane, consisted of a human microvascular endothelial cell line (HPMEC-ST1.6R) and an alveolar type II like cell line (A549), stably expressing EGFP and mCherry, respectively. These fluorescent proteins allowed the real time assessment of the integrity of the monolayers and the automated analysis of the wound healing process after a scratch injury. The HPMECs significantly attenuated the speed of re-epithelialization, which was associated with the proximity to the A549 layer. Examination of cross-sectional transmission electron micrographs of the model system revealed protrusions through the membrane pores and close contact between the A549 cells and the HPMECs. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that these close contacts consisted of heterocellular gap-, tight- and adherens-junctions. Additional analysis, using a fluorescent probe to assess gap-junctional communication, revealed that the HPMECs and A549 cells were able to exchange the fluorophore, which could be abrogated by disrupting the gap junctions using connexin mimetic peptides. These data suggest that the pulmonary microvascular endothelium may impact the re-epithelialization process. -- Highlights: ► Model system for vital imaging and high throughput screening. ► Microvascular endothelium influences re-epithelialization. ► A549 cells form protrusions through membrane to contact HPMEC. ► A549 cells and HPMECs form heterocellular tight-, gap- and adherens-junctions.

  9. [In vivo kinetics of cotrimoxazole in alveolar macrophages].

    PubMed

    Lopez, I; Dubar, V; Aerts, C; Lhermitte, M; Voisin, C; Wallaert, B

    1991-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study the kinetic of intramacrophage penetration of cotrimoxazole in guinea pigs which had received 100 mg/kg of sulfamethoxazole and 20 mg/kg of trimethoprim after a single intraperitoneal injection. 30 minutes, 1, 3, 6 and 24 hours after this injection an intra-cardiac blood sample was taken and pulmonary lavage was performed immediately after sacrificing the animal by cervical cord dislocation. The level of trimethoprim and sulfamethoxazole was measured in each sample by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). An estimation of the dilution of the supernatant was obtained by comparing the supernatant glucose with the serum glucose. The serum kinetics of trimethoprim and sulfamethoxazole progressed in a parallel fasion with time with a maximal concentration at 30 minutes (for trimethoprim: 6.7 +/- 0.9 micrograms/ml and for sulfamethoxazole 176.1 +/- 16.2 micrograms/ml). On the other hand their penetration capacity was different in the supernatant and in the alveolar macrophages: the maximal concentrations were obtained after one hour in the supernatant and after 3 hours in the cellular extract and were respectively for trimethoprim 0.43 +/- 0.07 microgram/ml and 20.9 +/- 8.06 micrograms/ml of intramacrophage water and for sulfamethoxazole 1.86 +/- 0.24 micrograms/ml and 23.8 +/- 12.7 micrograms/ml of intramacrophage water. A concentration around six times greater was noted for the trimethoprim inside the cells compared with serum and was only 0.25 time for sulfamethoxazole. On the other hand the supernatant/serum ratio showed a greater concentration for trimethoprim (4 to 10) than for sulfamethoxazole (0.6 to 1).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Killing of Klebsiella pneumoniae by human alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Hickman-Davis, Judy M; O'Reilly, Philip; Davis, Ian C; Peti-Peterdi, Janos; Davis, Glenda; Young, K Randall; Devlin, Robert B; Matalon, Sadis

    2002-05-01

    We investigated putative mechanisms by which human surfactant protein A (SP-A) effects killing of Klebsiella pneumoniae by human alveolar macrophages (AMs) isolated from bronchoalveolar lavagates of patients with transplanted lungs. Coincubation of AMs with human SP-A (25 microg/ml) and Klebsiella resulted in a 68% decrease in total colony forming units by 120 min compared with AMs infected with Klebsiella in the absence of SP-A, and this SP-A-mediated effect was abolished by preincubation with N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine. Incubation of transplant AMs with SP-A increased intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) by 70% and nitrite and nitrate (NO(x)) production by 45% (from 0.24 +/- 0.02 to 1.3 +/- 0.21 nmol small middle dot 10(6) AMs(-1).h(-1)). Preincubation with 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid-acetoxymethyl ester inhibited the increase in [Ca(2+)](i) and abrogated the SP-A-mediated Klebsiella phagocytosis and killing. In contrast, incubation of AMs from normal volunteers with SP-A decreased both [Ca(2+)](i) and NO(x) production and did not result in killing of Klebsiella. Significant killing of Klebsiella was also seen in a cell-free system by sustained production of peroxynitrite (>1 microM/min) at pH 5 but not at pH 7.4. These findings indicate that SP-A mediates pathogen killing by AMs from transplant lungs by stimulating phagocytosis and production of reactive oxygen-nitrogen intermediates.

  11. Effect of plasma rich in growth factors on alveolar osteitis

    PubMed Central

    Haraji, Afshin; Lassemi, Eshagh; Motamedi, Mohammad Hosein Kalantar; Alavi, Maryam; Adibnejad, Saman

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The high prevalence of dry socket or alveolar osteitis (AO) is of concern in surgical removal of third molars. The aim of the present study was to assess the preventive effect of plasma rich in growth factors (PRGF) on AO and also its effect on pain management and healing acceleration in third molar extraction sockets of high-risk patients. Materials and Methods: This split-mouth, double-blind clinical trial included 40 bilateral third molar extractions (80 sockets) with at least one identified risk factor for AO. PRGF was obtained from patient's own blood, based on manufacturer's instruction, and blindly placed in one of the two bilateral sockets (PRGF group; n = 20) of each patient. The contralateral socket was treated with a placebo (control group; n = 20). Samples were evaluated for AO and pain incidence on days 2, 3 and 4 and healing and infection on days 3 and 7. Data were analyzed in SPSS v16 using Wilcoxon test. Results: There was a significant difference in dry socket and pain incidence and healing rate between the two groups. Intensity of pain and occurrence of dry socket in the study group was lower than the controls. Also the healing rate was higher (P < 0.05) for the PRGF group. No sign of infection was seen in either group. Conclusion: The application of PRGF may significantly reduce the incidence of AO or its associated pain and may accelerate healing. The prophylactic use of PRGF following third molar extraction may be suggested especially in the patients at risk of AO. PMID:23251056

  12. Interactions between alveolar macrophage subpopulations modulate their migratory function.

    PubMed Central

    Laplante, C.; Lemaire, I.

    1990-01-01

    To better understand the mechanisms by which alveolar macrophages (AM) are attracted to local sites in the lung, the locomotion of AM in response to N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP) was investigated. Total bronchoalveolar cells (99% AM) obtained by a nondiscriminating bronchoalveolar lavage procedure migrated toward FMLP over a range of concentrations of 10(-12) M to 10(-6) M. Dose-response experiments showed a biphasic response with two peaks of migration obtained respectively at 5 x 10(-10) M and 10(-8) M. Analysis in the presence and absence of a positive gradient of FMLP revealed that the first peak of migration (5 x 10(-10) M FMLP) corresponded predominantly to chemotactic activity whereas the second peak of migration (10(-8) M FMLP) was associated with chemokinetic activity. To further evaluate these activities of oriented (chemotaxis) vs. random (chemokinesis) migration, AM were separated into two fractions by a two-step bronchoalveolar lavage procedure. Whereas fraction 1 displayed exclusively chemokinesis in response to higher concentrations of FMLP (10(-8) M), fraction 2 was totally unresponsive to FMLP over a wide range of concentrations (5 x 10(-11) M - 10(-7) M). When both fractions were combined, however, the chemotactic response to low concentrations of FMLP (5 x 10(-10) M) was restored. Additional analysis of these two AM fractions indicated that fraction 1 AM had a significantly lower degree of adherence and aggregation than fraction 2 AM. These data suggest that cell-cell cooperation is important for AM chemotactic response to FMLP and that such interaction may involve changes in adherence and aggregation. Images Figure 5 PMID:2297048

  13. Confocal laser scanning microscopy of porcine skin: implications for human wound healing studies

    PubMed Central

    VARDAXIS, N. J.; BRANS, T. A.; BOON, M. E.; KREIS, R. W.; MARRES, L. M.

    1997-01-01

    The structure of porcine skin as examined by light microscopy is reviewed and its similarities to and differences from human skin are highlighted. Special imaging techniques and staining procedures are described and their use in gathering morphological information in porcine skin is discussed. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) was employed to examine the structure of porcine skin and the findings are presented as an adjunct to the information already available in the literature. It is concluded that CLSM provides valuable additional morphological information to material examined by conventional microscopy and is useful for wound healing studies in the porcine model. PMID:9183682

  14. Effects of porcine oocytes on the expression levels of transcripts encoding glycolytic enzymes in granulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Matsuno, Yuta; Onuma, Asuka; Fujioka, Yoshie A; Emori, Chihiro; Fujii, Wataru; Naito, Kunihiko; Sugiura, Koji

    2016-09-01

    Oocytes play critical roles in regulating the expression of transcripts encoding the glycolytic enzymes phosphofructokinase, platelet (PFKP) and lactate dehydrogenase A (LDHA) in granulosa cells in mice, but whether this is the case in pigs or other mammals has not been adequately investigated. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine whether porcine oocytes regulate the expression levels of these transcripts in granulosa cells in vitro. Porcine cumulus cells expressed higher levels of PFKP and LDHA transcripts than mural granulosa cells (MGCs). However, co-culturing with oocytes had no significant effect on the isolated cumulus cells. While murine oocytes promoted the expression of both Pfkp and Ldha transcripts by murine MGCs, porcine oocytes promoted the expression of only Pfkp, but not Ldha transcripts by murine MGCs. Neither murine nor porcine oocytes affected PFKP and LDHA expression by porcine MGCs. Moreover, in the presence of porcine follicular fluid, porcine oocytes maintained the expression of PFKP, but not LDHA by porcine cumulus cells. Therefore, porcine oocytes are capable of regulating the expression of PFKP but not LDHA in granulosa cells in coordination with unknown factor(s) present in the follicular fluid.

  15. Cytotoxicity, oxidative stress and genotoxicity induced by glass fibers on human alveolar epithelial cell line A549.

    PubMed

    Rapisarda, Venerando; Loreto, Carla; Ledda, Caterina; Musumeci, Giuseppe; Bracci, Massimo; Santarelli, Lory; Renis, Marcella; Ferrante, Margherita; Cardile, Venera

    2015-04-01

    Man-made vitreous fibers have been widely used as insulation material as asbestos substitutes; however their morphology and composition raises concerns. In 1988 the International Agency for Research on Cancer classified fiberglass, rock wool, slag wool, and ceramic fibers as Group 2B, i.e. possibly carcinogenic to humans. In 2002 it reassigned fiberglass, rock and slag wool, and continuous glass filaments to Group 3, not classifiable as carcinogenic to humans. The aim of this study was to verify the cytotoxic and genotoxic effects and oxidative stress production induced by in vitro exposure of human alveolar epithelial cells A549 to glass fibers with a predominant diameter <3 μm (97%) and length >5 μm (93%). A549 cells were incubated with 5, 50, or 100 μg/ml (2.1, 21, and 42 μg/cm(2), respectively) of glass fibers for 72 h. Cytotoxicity and DNA damage were tested by the MTT and the Comet assay, respectively. Oxidative stress was determined by measuring inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression by Western blotting, production of nitric oxide (NO) with Griess reagent, and concentration of reactive oxygen species by fluorescent quantitative analysis with 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein-diacetate (DCFH-DA). The results showed that glass fiber exposure significantly reduced cell viability and increased DNA damage and oxidative stress production in a concentration-dependent manner, demonstrating that glass fibers exert cytotoxic and genotoxic effects related to increased oxidative stress on the human alveolar cell line A549.

  16. Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virus Induces Autophagy to Benefit Its Replication.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaozhen; Zhang, Mengjia; Zhang, Xiaoqian; Tan, Xin; Guo, Hengke; Zeng, Wei; Yan, Guokai; Memon, Atta Muhammad; Li, Zhonghua; Zhu, Yinxing; Zhang, Bingzhou; Ku, Xugang; Wu, Meizhou; Fan, Shengxian; He, Qigai

    2017-03-19

    The new porcine epidemic diarrhea (PED) has caused devastating economic losses to the swine industry worldwide. Despite extensive research on the relationship between autophagy and virus infection, the concrete role of autophagy in porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) infection has not been reported. In this study, autophagy was demonstrated to be triggered by the effective replication of PEDV through transmission electron microscopy, confocal microscopy, and Western blot analysis. Moreover, autophagy was confirmed to benefit PEDV replication by using autophagy regulators and RNA interference. Furthermore, autophagy might be associated with the expression of inflammatory cytokines and have a positive feedback loop with the NF-κB signaling pathway during PEDV infection. This work is the first attempt to explore the complex interplay between autophagy and PEDV infection. Our findings might accelerate our understanding of the pathogenesis of PEDV infection and provide new insights into the development of effective therapeutic strategies.

  17. Thermal stability of porcine circovirus type 2 in cell culture.

    PubMed

    O'Dea, Mark A; Hughes, Andrew P; Davies, Linda J; Muhling, Jillian; Buddle, Ross; Wilcox, G E

    2008-01-01

    International trade in pig meat has resulted in some countries placing restrictions on the importation of pig meat, with requirements for cooking of imported meat to destroy viral agents. This study investigated the in vitro resistance of an Australian strain of porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2), the causative agent of post-weaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PMWS), to heat treatment. The viability of the virus in cell cultures was determined by a combination of reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to detect viral transcripts, and immunohistochemistry (IHC) to visualize viral capsid antigen. PCV2 retained infectivity when heated at 75 degrees C for 15 min but was inactivated by heating at 80 degrees C and above for 15 min. The results provide important information on the thermal tolerance of PCV2, which can be taken into account in risk assessments for trade in pig meat and porcine-derived biological products.

  18. Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus: Origin Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    2003-01-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome is a serious swine disease that appeared suddenly in the midwestern United States and central Europe approximately 14 years ago; the disease has now spread worldwide. In North America and Europe, the syndrome is caused by two genotypes of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), an arterivirus whose genomes diverge by approximately 40%. My hypothesis, which explains the origin and evolution of the two distinct PRRSV genotypes, is that a mutant of a closely related arterivirus of mice (lactate dehydrogenase-elevating virus) infected wild boars in central Europe. These wild boars functioned as intermediate hosts and spread the virus to North Carolina in imported, infected European wild boars in 1912; the virus then evolved independently on the two continents in the prevalent wild hog populations for approximately 70 years until independently entering the domestic pig population. PMID:12967485

  19. Perforation forces of the intact porcine anterior lens capsule.

    PubMed

    Ullrich, Franziska; Lussi, Jonas; Felekis, Dimitrios; Michels, Stephan; Petruska, Andrew J; Nelson, Bradley J

    2016-09-01

    During the first step of cataract surgery, the lens capsule is perforated and a circular hole is created with a sharp instrument, a procedure called capsulorhexis. To develop automated systems that can assist ophthalmologists during capsulorhexis, the forces required must be quantified. This study investigates perforation forces of the central anterior lens capsule in porcine eyes, which are used as a conservative model for the human eye. A micro-mechanical characterisation method is presented that measures capsular bag perforation forces with a high precision positioning and high-resolution force sensing system. The force during perforation of the anterior lens capsule was measured with various sized needles and indentation speeds and is found to be 15-35mN. A bio-mechanical model is identified that describes an exponential correlation between indentation force and depth, indicating strain hardening behaviour of the porcine anterior lens capsule.

  20. Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virus Induces Autophagy to Benefit Its Replication

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xiaozhen; Zhang, Mengjia; Zhang, Xiaoqian; Tan, Xin; Guo, Hengke; Zeng, Wei; Yan, Guokai; Memon, Atta Muhammad; Li, Zhonghua; Zhu, Yinxing; Zhang, Bingzhou; Ku, Xugang; Wu, Meizhou; Fan, Shengxian; He, Qigai

    2017-01-01

    The new porcine epidemic diarrhea (PED) has caused devastating economic losses to the swine industry worldwide. Despite extensive research on the relationship between autophagy and virus infection, the concrete role of autophagy in porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) infection has not been reported. In this study, autophagy was demonstrated to be triggered by the effective replication of PEDV through transmission electron microscopy, confocal microscopy, and Western blot analysis. Moreover, autophagy was confirmed to benefit PEDV replication by using autophagy regulators and RNA interference. Furthermore, autophagy might be associated with the expression of inflammatory cytokines and have a positive feedback loop with the NF-κB signaling pathway during PEDV infection. This work is the first attempt to explore the complex interplay between autophagy and PEDV infection. Our findings might accelerate our understanding of the pathogenesis of PEDV infection and provide new insights into the development of effective therapeutic strategies. PMID:28335505

  1. Preparation of Cardiac Extracellular Matrix from an Intact Porcine Heart

    PubMed Central

    Wainwright, John M.; Czajka, Caitlin A.; Patel, Urvi B.; Freytes, Donald O.; Tobita, Kimimasa; Gilbert, Thomas W.

    2010-01-01

    Whole organ engineering would benefit from a three-dimensional scaffold produced from intact organ-specific extracellular matrix (ECM). The microenvironment and architecture provided by such a scaffold would likely support site-appropriate cell differentiation and spatial organization. The methods to produce such scaffolds from intact organs require customized decellularization protocols. In the present study, intact adult porcine hearts were successfully decellularized in less than 10 h using pulsatile retrograde aortic perfusion. Serial perfusion of an enzymatic, nonionic detergent, ionic detergent, and acid solution with hypotonic and hypertonic rinses was used to systematically remove cellular content. The resultant cardiac ECM retained collagen, elastin, and glycosaminoglycans, and mechanical integrity. Cardiac ECM supported the formation of organized chicken cardiomyocyte sarcomere structure in vitro. The intact decellularized porcine heart provides a tissue engineering template that may be beneficial for future preclinical studies and eventual clinical applications. PMID:19702513

  2. Preparation of cardiac extracellular matrix from an intact porcine heart.

    PubMed

    Wainwright, John M; Czajka, Caitlin A; Patel, Urvi B; Freytes, Donald O; Tobita, Kimimasa; Gilbert, Thomas W; Badylak, Stephen F

    2010-06-01

    Whole organ engineering would benefit from a three-dimensional scaffold produced from intact organ-specific extracellular matrix (ECM). The microenvironment and architecture provided by such a scaffold would likely support site-appropriate cell differentiation and spatial organization. The methods to produce such scaffolds from intact organs require customized decellularization protocols. In the present study, intact adult porcine hearts were successfully decellularized in less than 10 h using pulsatile retrograde aortic perfusion. Serial perfusion of an enzymatic, nonionic detergent, ionic detergent, and acid solution with hypotonic and hypertonic rinses was used to systematically remove cellular content. The resultant cardiac ECM retained collagen, elastin, and glycosaminoglycans, and mechanical integrity. Cardiac ECM supported the formation of organized chicken cardiomyocyte sarcomere structure in vitro. The intact decellularized porcine heart provides a tissue engineering template that may be beneficial for future preclinical studies and eventual clinical applications.

  3. Cloning and prokaryotic expression of the porcine lipasin gene.

    PubMed

    Li, M M; Geng, J; Guo, Y J; Jiao, X Q; Lu, W F; Zhu, H S; Wang, Y Y; Yang, G Y

    2015-11-23

    Lipasin has recently been demonstrated to be involved in lipid metabolism. In this study, two specific primers were used to amplify the lipasin open reading frame from porcine liver tissue. The polymerase chain reaction product was cloned to a pGEM®-T Easy Vector, digested by SalI and NotI, and sequenced. The lipasin fragment was then cloned to a pET21(b) vector and digested by the same restriction enzyme. The recombinant plasmid was transferred to Escherichia coli (BL21), and the lipasin protein was induced with isopropyl-β-D-thiogalactopyranoside. The protein obtained was identified by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and western blotting. A pET-lipasin prokaryotic recombinant expression vector was successfully constructed, and a 25.2-kDa protein was obtained. This study provides a basis for further research on the biological function of porcine lipasin.

  4. Histologic, Clinical, and Radiologic Findings of Alveolar Bone Expansion and Osteomyelitis of the Jaws in Cats.

    PubMed

    Bell, C M; Soukup, J W

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize clinical, radiologic, and histologic patterns of alveolar bone expansion and osteomyelitis in cats. Based on case materials submitted as surgical biopsy specimens, alveolar bone pathology was diagnosed in 28 cats. These cats had a total of 37 oral lesions with clinical and radiologic changes that involved bone and/or teeth, including periodontitis, bone expansion, tooth resorption, and/or chronic osteomyelitis; 32 lesions were evaluated by histopathology. Canine teeth were affected in 19 cats (27 affected teeth), with bilateral lesions in 5 (26.3%) cats. The caudal premolar and/or molar regions were affected in 10 cats (10 affected sites). All biopsy sites evaluated by a review of clinical images and/or radiographs had evidence of periodontitis. Clinical photographs showed expansion of alveolar bone in 13 of 16 (81%) biopsy sites evaluated. Radiologically, rarifying osseous proliferation of alveolar bone was seen at 26 of 27 (96%) biopsy sites, and tooth resorption occurred at 15 of 18 (83%) sites. Histologically, the tissue samples from canine sites had compressed trabeculae of mature remodeled bone, loose fibrous stroma with paucicellular inflammation, and mild proliferation of woven bone. Tissue samples from the premolar/molar biopsy sites were often highly cellular with mixed lymphoplasmacytic and chronic suppurative inflammation, ulceration with granulation tissue, and robust proliferation of woven bone. Alveolar bone expansion and osteomyelitis in cats occurs in conjunction with periodontal inflammation and frequently with tooth resorption.

  5. Anesthetic efficacy of a combination of hyaluronidase and lidocaine with epinephrine in inferior alveolar nerve blocks.

    PubMed Central

    Ridenour, S.; Reader, A.; Beck, M.; Weaver, J.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this prospective, randomized, double-blind study was to determine the anesthetic efficacy of a buffered lidocaine with epinephrine solution compared to a combination buffered lidocaine with epinephrine plus hyaluronidase solution in inferior alveolar nerve blocks. Thirty subjects randomly received an inferior alveolar nerve block using 1 of the 2 solutions at 2 separate appointments using a repeated-measures design. Mandibular anterior and posterior teeth were blindly pulp tested at 4-minute cycles for 60 minutes postinjection. No response from the subject to the maximum output (80 reading) of the pulp tester was used as the criterion for pulpal anesthesia. Anesthesia was considered successful when 2 consecutive readings of 80 were obtained. A postoperative survey was used to measure pain and trismus. The results demonstrated 100% of the subjects had profound lip numbness with both solutions for inferior alveolar nerve blocks. The anesthetic success rates for individual teeth ranged from 20 to 80%. There were no significant differences (P > .05) between the 2 solutions. However, the combination lidocaine/hyaluronidase solution resulted in a significant increase in postoperative pain and trismus. It was concluded that adding hyaluronidase to a buffered lidocaine solution with epinephrine did not statistically increase the incidence of pulpal anesthesia in inferior alveolar nerve blocks and, because of its potential tissue damaging effect, it should not be added to local anesthetic solutions for inferior alveolar nerve blocks. PMID:11495405

  6. Detection of Alveolar Fibrocytes in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis and Systemic Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Phin, Sophie; Debray, Marie-Pierre; Marchal-Somme, Joelle; Tiev, Kiet; Bonay, Marcel; Fabre, Aurélie; Soler, Paul; Dehoux, Monique; Crestani, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    Background Fibrocytes are circulating precursors for fibroblasts. Blood fibrocytes are increased in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). The aim of this study was to determine whether alveolar fibrocytes are detected in broncho-alveolar lavage (BAL), to identify their prognostic value, and their potential association with culture of fibroblasts from BAL. Methods We quantified fibrocytes in BAL from 26 patients with IPF, 9 patients with Systemic Sclerosis(SSc)-interstitial lung disease (ILD), and 11 controls. BAL cells were cultured to isolate alveolar fibroblasts. Results Fibrocytes were detected in BAL in 14/26 IPF (54%) and 5/9 SSc patients (55%), and never in controls. Fibrocytes were in median 2.5% [0.4–19.7] and 3.0% [2.7–3.7] of BAL cells in IPF and SSc-ILD patients respectively. In IPF patients, the number of alveolar fibrocytes was correlated with the number of alveolar macrophages and was associated with a less severe disease but not with a better outcome. Fibroblasts were cultured from BAL in 12/26 IPF (46%), 5/9 SSc-ILD (65%) and never in controls. The detection of BAL fibrocytes did not predict a positive culture of fibroblasts. Conclusion Fibrocytes were detected in BAL fluid in about half of the patients with IPF and SSc-ILD. Their number was associated with less severe disease in IPF patients and did not associate with the capacity to grow fibroblasts from BAL fluid. PMID:23341987

  7. Sonographic Lobe Localization of Alveolar-Interstitial Syndrome in the Critically Ill

    PubMed Central

    Stefanidis, Konstantinos; Dimopoulos, Stavros; Kolofousi, Chrysafoula; Cokkinos, Demosthenes D.; Chatzimichail, Katerina; Eisen, Lewis A.; Wachtel, Mitchell; Karakitsos, Dimitrios; Nanas, Serafim

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Fast and accurate diagnosis of alveolar-interstitial syndrome is of major importance in the critically ill. We evaluated the utility of lung ultrasound (US) in detecting and localizing alveolar-interstitial syndrome in respective pulmonary lobes as compared to computed tomography scans (CT). Methods. One hundred and seven critically ill patients participated in the study. The presence of diffuse comet-tail artifacts was considered a sign of alveolar-interstitial syndrome. We designated lobar reflections along intercostal spaces and surface lines by means of sonoanatomy in an effort to accurately localize lung pathology. Each sonographic finding was thereafter grouped into the respective lobe. Results. From 107 patients, 77 were finally included in the analysis (42 males with mean age = 61 ± 17 years, APACHE II score = 17.6 ± 6.4, and lung injury score = 1.0 ± 0.7). US exhibited high sensitivity and specificity values (ranging from over 80% for the lower lung fields up to over 90% for the upper lung fields) and considerable consistency in the diagnosis and localization of alveolar-interstitial syndrome. Conclusions. US is a reliable, bedside method for accurate detection and localization of alveolar-interstitial syndrome in the critically ill. PMID:22645669

  8. Epithelial Notch signaling regulates lung alveolar morphogenesis and airway epithelial integrity

    PubMed Central

    Tsao, Po-Nien; Matsuoka, Chisa; Wei, Shu-Chen; Sato, Atsuyasu; Sato, Susumu; Hasegawa, Koichi; Chen, Hung-kuan; Ling, Thai-Yen; Mori, Munemasa; Cardoso, Wellington V.; Morimoto, Mitsuru

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal enlargement of the alveolar spaces is a hallmark of conditions such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Notch signaling is crucial for differentiation and regeneration and repair of the airway epithelium. However, how Notch influences the alveolar compartment and integrates this process with airway development remains little understood. Here we report a prominent role of Notch signaling in the epithelial–mesenchymal interactions that lead to alveolar formation in the developing lung. We found that alveolar type II cells are major sites of Notch2 activation and show by Notch2-specific epithelial deletion (Notch2cNull) a unique contribution of this receptor to alveologenesis. Epithelial Notch2 was required for type II cell induction of the PDGF-A ligand and subsequent paracrine activation of PDGF receptor-α signaling in alveolar myofibroblast progenitors. Moreover, Notch2 was crucial in maintaining the integrity of the epithelial and smooth muscle layers of the distal conducting airways. Our data suggest that epithelial Notch signaling regulates multiple aspects of postnatal development in the distal lung and may represent a potential target for intervention in pulmonary diseases. PMID:27364009