Science.gov

Sample records for continuous position sensitive

  1. Continuous lateral gradients in film morphology for position sensitive detection and organic solar cell optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campoy-Quiles, M.; Randon, V.; Mróz, M. M.; Jarzaguet, M.; Garriga, M.; Cabanillas-González, J.

    2013-07-01

    We present a method to fabricate binary organic donor and acceptor blends exhibiting a controlled lateral gradient in morphology. Upon combining photometry, ellipsometry and Xray maps together with photoinduced absorption measurements, we show how the gradual exposure to solvent vapor results in a varying degree of polymer crystallinity for the polythiophene/soluble fullerene system along one direction. These morphologically graded samples are characterized by a spectral photoresponse that depends on the specific location in the area of the device where the light beam impinges, a property that stands as proof-of-concept for position sensitive detection. Moreover, we demonstrate that the development of graded morphologies is an effective one-step method which allows for fast performance optimization of organic solar cells. Finally, the appropriateness of eight different solvents for morphology control via vapor annealing is evaluated in a time-effective way using the advanced method, which helps to identify boiling point and solubility as the key processing parameters.

  2. Position Sensitive Microcalorimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadleir, J. E.; Hammock, C.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Stahle, C. K.; Bandler, S.; Saab, T.; Lindeman, M.; Porter, F. S.; Chervenak, J.; Brown, G.

    2004-01-01

    A Position Sensitive Transition-Edge Sensor (PoST) is a microcalorimeter device capable of one-dimensional imaging spectroscopy. The device consists of two Transition-Edge Sensors (TESs) connected to the ends of a long X-ray absorbing strip. The energy of a photon hitting the absorber and the position of the absorption event along the strip is measured from the response in the two sensors by analyzing the relative signal sizes, pulse rise times, and the sum of the pulses measured at each sensor, We report on the recent PoST effort at Goddard for applications to large field of view, high-energy- resolution, X-ray astrophysics.

  3. Effect of Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Therapy on Glycemic Excursions and Insulin Sensitivity in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea-hypopnea Syndrome and Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Li-Xin; Zhao, Xin; Pan, Qi; Sun, Xue; Li, Hui; Wang, Xiao-Xia; Zhang, Li-Na; Wang, Yao

    2015-01-01

    Background: For patients with obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), the night sleep interruption and intermittent hypoxia due to apnea or hypopnea may induce glycemic excursions and reduce insulin sensitivity. This study aimed to investigate the effect of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy in patients with OSAHS and T2DM. Methods: Continuous glucose monitoring system (CGMS) was used in 40 patients with T2DM and newly diagnosed OSAHS. The measurements were repeated after 30 days of CPAP treatment. Subsequently, insulin sensitivity and glycohemoglobin (HbA1c) were measured and compared to the pretreatment data. Results: After CPAP therapy, the CGMS indicators showed that the 24-h mean blood glucose (MBG) and the night time MBG were significantly reduced (P < 0.05 and P = 0.03, respectively). The mean ambulatory glucose excursions (MAGEs) and the mean of daily differences were also significantly reduced (P < 0.05 and P = 0.002, respectively) compared to pretreatment levels. During the night, MAGE also significantly decreased (P = 0.049). The differences between the highest and lowest levels of blood glucose over 24 h and during the night were significantly lower than prior to CPAP treatment (P < 0.05 and P = 0.024, respectively). The 24 h and night time durations of high blood glucose (>7.8 mmol/L and > 11.1 mmol/L) decreased (P < 0.05 and P < 0.05, respectively) after the treatment. In addition, HbA1c levels were also lower than those before treatment (P < 0.05), and the homeostasis model assessment index of insulin resistance was also significantly lower than before CPAP treatment (P = 0.034). Conclusions: CPAP therapy may have a beneficial effect on improving not only blood glucose but also upon insulin sensitivity in T2DM patients with OSAHS. This suggests that CPAP may be an effective treatment for T2DM in addition to intensive diabetes management. PMID:26315076

  4. 32 CFR 154.13 - Sensitive positions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... be categorized, with respect to security sensitivity, as either nonsensitive, noncritical-sensitive... shall designate each position within their jurisdiction as to its security sensitivity and maintain...

  5. 32 CFR 154.13 - Sensitive positions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... be categorized, with respect to security sensitivity, as either nonsensitive, noncritical-sensitive... shall designate each position within their jurisdiction as to its security sensitivity and maintain...

  6. Position-sensitive superconductor detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurakado, M.; Taniguchi, K.

    2016-12-01

    Superconducting tunnel junction (STJ) detectors and superconducting transition- edge sensors (TESs) are representative superconductor detectors having energy resolutions much higher than those of semiconductor detectors. STJ detectors are thin, thereby making it suitable for detecting low-energy X rays. The signals of STJ detectors are more than 100 times faster than those of TESs. By contrast, TESs are microcalorimeters that measure the radiation energy from the change in the temperature. Therefore, signals are slow and their time constants are typically several hundreds of μs. However, TESs possess excellent energy resolutions. For example, TESs have a resolution of 1.6 eV for 5.9-keV X rays. An array of STJs or TESs can be used as a pixel detector. Superconducting series-junction detectors (SSJDs) comprise multiple STJs and a single-crystal substrate that acts as a radiation absorber. SSJDs are also position sensitive, and their energy resolutions are higher than those of semiconductor detectors. In this paper, we give an overview of position-sensitive superconductor detectors.

  7. Positive Behavior Support: Sustainability and Continuous Regeneration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntosh, Kent; Turri, Mary G.

    2014-01-01

    Because of its widespread adoption and implementation (in over 13,000 schools in the US; Center on Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports, 2010), there has been increasing attention to how School-wide Positive Behavior Support (SWPBS) systems can be sustained. Sustained implementation can be defined as "continued use of an…

  8. Increasing Sensitivity In Continuous-Flow Electrophoresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharnez, Rizwan; Sammons, David W.

    1994-01-01

    Sensitivity of continuous-flow electrophoresis (CFE) chamber increased by introducing lateral gradients in concentration of buffer solution and thickness of chamber. Such gradients, with resulting enhanced separation, achieved in CFE chamber with wedge-shaped cross section and collateral flow. Enables improved separations of homogeneous components of mixtures of variety of biologically important substances.

  9. Increasing Sensitivity In Continuous-Flow Electrophoresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharnez, Rizwan; Sammons, David W.

    1994-01-01

    Sensitivity of continuous-flow electrophoresis (CFE) chamber increased by introducing lateral gradients in concentration of buffer solution and thickness of chamber. Such gradients, with resulting enhanced separation, achieved in CFE chamber with wedge-shaped cross section and collateral flow. Enables improved separations of homogeneous components of mixtures of variety of biologically important substances.

  10. Continuing professional development in sensitive cultures.

    PubMed

    Huntington, Mark K

    2008-01-01

    Many cultures of the world face threats to their existence due to the homogenizing effects of the global commercial pop culture. These same influences present challenges to vulnerable cultures that seek the benefits of modern medicine, while attempting to preserve their unique identities. This paper briefly reviews some of these challenges and presents one novel approach to providing continuing medical education that minimizes the potential for adverse influences on the sensitive culture.

  11. When continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) fails

    PubMed Central

    Virk, Jagdeep S.

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is increasingly prevalent, particularly in the context of the obesity epidemic, and is associated with a significant social, health and economic impact. The gold standard of treatment for moderate to severe OSA is continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). However compliance rates can be low. Methodology to improve patient tolerance to CPAP alongside with alternative, non-surgical and surgical, management strategies are discussed. All patients that fail CPAP therapy would benefit from formal upper airway evaluation by the otolaryngologist to identify any obvious causes and consider site-specific surgical therapies. Patient selection is integral to ensuring successful outcomes. A multidisciplinary team is needed to manage these patients. PMID:27867577

  12. Effects of Continuous Positive Airway Pressure on Lipidaemia and High-sensitivity C-reactive Protein Levels in Non-obese Patients with Coronary Artery Disease and Obstructive Sleep Apnoea.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhiwei; Liu, Zhihong; Zhao, Zhihui; Zhao, Qing; Luo, Qin; Tang, Yi

    2016-06-01

    The effect of obesity and medication on the relationship between obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) and lipidaemia and systemic inflammation is not fully understood for various reasons. The aim of the present study is to determine the effects of 12 months of therapy with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) on lipid profiles and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) in non-obese patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) and OSA. We consecutively recruited 78 non-obese subjects with newly diagnosed CAD and moderate-to-severe OSA who were taking lipid-lowering medication. Patients were randomised to CPAP treatment or the control group. The patients' lipids and the hs-CRP level were measured at baseline and at follow-up. Seventy patients completed the study. The CPAP and control groups had similar characteristics at baseline. The mean duration of CPAP treatment was 4.2±1.1h/night. There was no significant difference in the lipids or hs-CRP levels at 12 months (both, P>0.05). The apnoea-hypopnoea index and Epworth Sleepiness Scale were significantly lower in the CPAP treatment group than in the control group (both, P<0.05). Continuous positive airway pressure treatment in non-obese patients with CAD and OSA who are taking standardised lipid-lowering treatment does not significantly decrease the lipid or hs-CRP levels. In addition, there are no relationships found between the severity of OSA and the lipid profiles. However, the status of OSA and daytime sleepiness improved significantly in the CPAP group. URL: http://clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT02127177. Copyright © 2015 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Position Sensitive Detection System for Charged Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Coello, E. A.; Favela, F.; Curiel, Q.; Chavez, E; Huerta, A.; Varela, A.; Shapira, Dan

    2012-01-01

    The position sensitive detection system presented in this work employs the Anger logic algorithm to determine the position of the light spark produced by the passage of charged particles on a 170 x 170 x 10 mm3 scintillator material (PILOT-U). The detection system consists of a matrix of nine photomultipliers, covering a fraction of the back area of the scintillators. Tests made with a non-collimated alpha particle source together with a Monte Carlo simulation that reproduces the data, suggest an intrinsic position resolution of up to 6 mm is achieved.

  14. A New Positioning Algorithm for Position-Sensitive Avalanche Photodiodes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jin; Olcott, Peter D.; Levin, Craig S.

    2013-01-01

    We are using a novel position sensitive avalanche photodiode (PSAPD) for the construction of a high resolution positron emission tomography (PET) camera. Up to now most researchers working with PSAPDs have been using an Anger-like positioning algorithm involving the four corner readout signals of the PSAPD. This algorithm yields a significant non-linear spatial “pin-cushion” distortion in raw crystal positioning histograms. In this paper, we report an improved positioning algorithm, which combines two diagonal corner signals of the PSAPD followed by a 45° rotation to determine the X or Y position of the interaction. We present flood positioning histogram data generated with the old and new positioning algorithms using a 3 × 4 array of 2 × 2 × 3 mm3 and a 3 × 8 array of 1 × 1 × 3 mm3 of LSO crystals coupled to 8 × 8 mm2 PSAPDs. This new algorithm significantly reduces the pin-cushion distortion in raw flood histogram image. PMID:24307743

  15. A New Positioning Algorithm for Position-Sensitive Avalanche Photodiodes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin; Olcott, Peter D; Levin, Craig S

    2007-06-01

    We are using a novel position sensitive avalanche photodiode (PSAPD) for the construction of a high resolution positron emission tomography (PET) camera. Up to now most researchers working with PSAPDs have been using an Anger-like positioning algorithm involving the four corner readout signals of the PSAPD. This algorithm yields a significant non-linear spatial "pin-cushion" distortion in raw crystal positioning histograms. In this paper, we report an improved positioning algorithm, which combines two diagonal corner signals of the PSAPD followed by a 45° rotation to determine the X or Y position of the interaction. We present flood positioning histogram data generated with the old and new positioning algorithms using a 3 × 4 array of 2 × 2 × 3 mm(3) and a 3 × 8 array of 1 × 1 × 3 mm(3) of LSO crystals coupled to 8 × 8 mm(2) PSAPDs. This new algorithm significantly reduces the pin-cushion distortion in raw flood histogram image.

  16. [Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value].

    PubMed

    Faller, H

    2005-02-01

    What does it mean that a screening test has a sensitivity of 80 % and a specificity of 80 %? What conclusion can be drawn as to the probability of a patient tested positive having the target disorder? Is this probability dependent on the prevalence of the target disorder? These are the questions addressed in the present paper. The classical concepts of sensitivity and specificity are presented as well as the more modern and clinically relevant concepts of the predictive values of a positive and a negative test. The author employs different didactic methods such as 2 x 2 tables, graphical illustrations and natural frequencies for elaborating on these often intermixed concepts in a clear and easily understandable way.

  17. Continuous psychophysics: Target-tracking to measure visual sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Bonnen, Kathryn; Burge, Johannes; Yates, Jacob; Pillow, Jonathan; Cormack, Lawrence K.

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a novel framework for estimating visual sensitivity using a continuous target-tracking task in concert with a dynamic internal model of human visual performance. Observers used a mouse cursor to track the center of a two-dimensional Gaussian luminance blob as it moved in a random walk in a field of dynamic additive Gaussian luminance noise. To estimate visual sensitivity, we fit a Kalman filter model to the human tracking data under the assumption that humans behave as Bayesian ideal observers. Such observers optimally combine prior information with noisy observations to produce an estimate of target position at each time step. We found that estimates of human sensory noise obtained from the Kalman filter fit were highly correlated with traditional psychophysical measures of human sensitivity (R2 > 97%). Because each frame of the tracking task is effectively a “minitrial,” this technique reduces the amount of time required to assess sensitivity compared with traditional psychophysics. Furthermore, because the task is fast, easy, and fun, it could be used to assess children, certain clinical patients, and other populations that may get impatient with traditional psychophysics. Importantly, the modeling framework provides estimates of decision variable variance that are directly comparable with those obtained from traditional psychophysics. Further, we show that easily computed summary statistics of the tracking data can also accurately predict relative sensitivity (i.e., traditional sensitivity to within a scale factor). PMID:25795437

  18. False-Positive Stress Echocardiograms: A Continuing Challenge.

    PubMed

    Qamruddin, Salima

    2016-01-01

    Stress echocardiography is an integral test in the cardiac diagnostic laboratory and has high sensitivity and specificity. Despite the excellent specificity of stress echocardiography, we continue to see a subset of patients with false-positive tests (defined as <50% diameter stenosis on subsequent coronary angiography). These false-positive findings present a management challenge because it remains unclear if and how to treat these patients. This article reviews relevant clinical studies and their outcomes. Studies suggest that a group of patients develops a hypertensive response to exercise and therefore may have false-positive stress echocardiography. Hence, superior blood pressure control prior to stress echocardiography may prevent some false-positive tests. In addition, a subset of patients has microvascular abnormalities, vasomotor changes, endothelial dysfunction, and/or small vessel coronary disease that can lead to false-positive stress echocardiography. The evidence is insufficient to state that a false-positive stress echocardiography in the absence of obstructive coronary artery disease portends a poor outcome, but considerable evidence shows that some of these patients have microvascular abnormalities and endothelial dysfunction and consequently may benefit from aggressive medical management and further testing.

  19. Position-sensitive scanning fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Joseph P; Chen, Yan; Müller, Joachim D

    2005-08-01

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) uses a stationary laser beam to illuminate a small sample volume and analyze the temporal behavior of the fluorescence fluctuations within the stationary observation volume. In contrast, scanning FCS (SFCS) collects the fluorescence signal from a moving observation volume by scanning the laser beam. The fluctuations now contain both temporal and spatial information about the sample. To access the spatial information we synchronize scanning and data acquisition. Synchronization allows us to evaluate correlations for every position along the scanned trajectory. We use a circular scan trajectory in this study. Because the scan radius is constant, the phase angle is sufficient to characterize the position of the beam. We introduce position-sensitive SFCS (PSFCS), where correlations are calculated as a function of lag time and phase. We present the theory of PSFCS and derive expressions for diffusion, diffusion in the presence of flow, and for immobilization. To test PSFCS we compare experimental data with theory. We determine the direction and speed of a flowing dye solution and the position of an immobilized particle. To demonstrate the feasibility of the technique for applications in living cells we present data of enhanced green fluorescent protein measured in the nucleus of COS cells.

  20. High speed curved position sensitive detector

    DOEpatents

    Hendricks, Robert W.; Wilson, Jack W.

    1989-01-01

    A high speed curved position sensitive porportional counter detector for use in x-ray diffraction, the detection of 5-20 keV photons and the like. The detector employs a planar anode assembly of a plurality of parallel metallic wires. This anode assembly is supported between two cathode planes, with at least one of these cathode planes having a serpentine resistive path in the form of a meander having legs generally perpendicular to the anode wires. This meander is produced by special microelectronic fabrication techniques whereby the meander "wire" fans outwardly at the cathode ends to produce the curved aspect of the detector, and the legs of the meander are small in cross-section and very closely spaced whereby a spatial resolution of about 50 .mu.m can be achieved. All of the other performance characteristics are about as good or better than conventional position sensitive proportional counter type detectors. Count rates of up to 40,000 counts per second with 0.5 .mu.s shaping time constants are achieved.

  1. Two-dimensional position sensitive radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Mihalczo, J.T.

    1994-02-22

    Nuclear reaction detectors capable of position sensitivity with submillimeter resolution in two dimensions are each provided by placing arrays of scintillation or wavelength shifting optical fibers formed of a plurality of such optical fibers in a side-by-side relationship in X and Y directions with a layer of nuclear reactive material operatively associated with surface regions of the optical fiber arrays. Each nuclear reaction occurring in the layer of nuclear reactive material produces energetic particles for simultaneously providing a light pulse in a single optical fiber in the X oriented array and in a single optical fiber in the Y oriented array. These pulses of light are transmitted to a signal producing circuit for providing signals indicative of the X-Y coordinates of each nuclear event. 6 figures.

  2. Two-dimensional position sensitive radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Mihalczo, John T.

    1994-01-01

    Nuclear reaction detectors capable of position sensitivity with submillimeter resolution in two dimensions are each provided by placing arrays of scintillation or wave length shifting optical fibers formed of a plurality of such optical fibers in a side-by-side relationship in X and Y directions with a layer of nuclear reactive material operatively associated with surface regions of the optical fiber arrays. Each nuclear reaction occurring in the layer of nuclear reactive material produces energetic particles for simultaneously providing a light pulse in a single optical fiber in the X oriented array and in a single optical fiber in the Y oriented array. These pulses of light are transmitted to a signal producing circuit for providing signals indicative of the X-Y coordinates of each nuclear event.

  3. Sensitivity Optimization in Continuous-Flow FTNMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudmeier, James L.; Günther, Ulrich L.; Albert, Klaus; Bachovchin, William W.

    Equations simulating the steady-state magnetization of liquids in continuous-flow FTNMR are derived using a classical vector model, assuming plug flow. These equations are applied to calculation of ( S/ N) t, the relative signal/noise per unit time of any nucleus undergoing any degree of Overhauser enhancement either in the detection cell or upstream, or both, and to optimization of experimental conditions, including pulse repetition time Trep, pulse angle β, and flow rate. Ideal parameters include a pulse angle of 90° and a Trepvalue equal to sample residence time in the NMR detection cell. Optimal flow rates are directly proportional to the premagnetization volume (the portion of sample equilibrated with the magnetic field prior to detection) and inversely proportional to spin-lattice relaxation times T1. Optimal premagnetization times are smaller than previously assumed, varying from about 1.1 to 1.9 T1values. ( S/ N) tfor static FTNMR is discussed in some detail, and a new graphical method is presented for its optimization. Flow advantage, the ( S/ N) tof optimized flow FTNMR experiments compared to that of static FTNMR in a given detection cell, is proportional to the square root of the ratio of premagnetization to detection cell volumes, and virtually independent of[formula]where[formula]is the apparent transverse-relaxation time. The theory is applied to examples from recent literature, including dynamic electron-nuclear polarization, and the literature is critically reviewed. The analysis shows that claims by previous authors of recycled flow FTNMR by itself leading to increased ( S/ N) tfor slowly relaxing resonances are misleading, owing to underdetermination of ( S/ N) tin static measurements and failure to account for greater sample sizes required in flow experiments. For monitoring and control of chemical processes, the theory presented here enables the first rational basis for the design of a flow FTNMR apparatus and for the selection of acquisition

  4. Particle tracking with scintillating fibers and position sensitive photomultipliers

    SciTech Connect

    C.F. Perdrisat; R. Pourang; D. Koechner; D. Raine, III; B. Kross; S. Majewski; A. Weisenberger; R. Wojcik; K. Zorn; V. Punjabi; A. Day

    1991-11-01

    The use of position-sensitive phototubes in conjunction with scintillating plastic fibers for a particle tracking application in a future focal plane polarimeter (FPP) in the hadron arm of the hall A HRS 2 facility at the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF). Current results indicate that the design parameters of the FPP in the hadron arm of the double spectrometer facility HRS2 can be met with a design which couples round or square fibers 3 mm in size to Hamamatsu R4135 phototubes. Position resolutions {sigma}x or {sigma}y on the order of 0.6 mm are obtained in the phototubes. Detector structures with staggered double fiber layers lead to overall resolution of {sigma}=1 mm, and detection efficiencies close to 1. The characteristic speed of these detectors makes them particularly appropriate for the high rates which are expected with the 200-{micro}A continuous wave beam at CEBAF.

  5. Practical Considerations for Optimizing Position Sensitivity in Arrays of Position-sensitive TES's

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Stephen J.; Bandler, Simon R.; Figueroa-Feliciano, Encetali; Iyomoto, Naoko; Kelley, Richard L.; Kilbourne, Caroline A.; Porder, Frederick S.; Sadleir, John E.

    2007-01-01

    We are developing Position-Sensitive Transitions-Edge Sensors (PoST's) for future X-ray astronomy missions such as NASA's Constellation-X. The PoST consists of one or more Transitions Edge Sensors (TES's) thermally connected to a large X-ray absorber, which through heat diffusion, gives rise to position dependence. The development of PoST's is motivated by the desire to achieve the largest the focal-plan coverage with the fewest number of readout channels. In order to develop a practical array, consisting of an inner pixellated core with an outer array of large absorber PoST's, we must be able to simultaneously read out all (-1800) channels in the array. This is achievable using time division multiplexing (TDM), but does set stringent slew rate requirements on the array. Typically, we must damp the pulses to reduce the slew rate of the input signal to the TDM. This is achieved by applying a low-pass analog filter with large inductance to the signal. This attenuates the high frequency components of the signal, essential for position discrimination in PoST's, relative to the white noise of the readout chain and degrades the position sensitivity. Using numerically simulated data, we investigate the position sensing ability of typical PoST designs under such high inductance conditions. We investigate signal-processing techniques for optimal determination of the event position and discuss the practical considerations for real-time implementation.

  6. Practical Considerations for Optimizing Position Sensitivity in Arrays of Position-sensitive TES's

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Stephen J.; Bandler, Simon R.; Figueroa-Feliciano, Encetali; Iyomoto, Naoko; Kelley, Richard L.; Kilbourne, Caroline A.; Porder, Frederick S.; Sadleir, John E.

    2007-01-01

    We are developing Position-Sensitive Transitions-Edge Sensors (PoST's) for future X-ray astronomy missions such as NASA's Constellation-X. The PoST consists of one or more Transitions Edge Sensors (TES's) thermally connected to a large X-ray absorber, which through heat diffusion, gives rise to position dependence. The development of PoST's is motivated by the desire to achieve the largest the focal-plan coverage with the fewest number of readout channels. In order to develop a practical array, consisting of an inner pixellated core with an outer array of large absorber PoST's, we must be able to simultaneously read out all (-1800) channels in the array. This is achievable using time division multiplexing (TDM), but does set stringent slew rate requirements on the array. Typically, we must damp the pulses to reduce the slew rate of the input signal to the TDM. This is achieved by applying a low-pass analog filter with large inductance to the signal. This attenuates the high frequency components of the signal, essential for position discrimination in PoST's, relative to the white noise of the readout chain and degrades the position sensitivity. Using numerically simulated data, we investigate the position sensing ability of typical PoST designs under such high inductance conditions. We investigate signal-processing techniques for optimal determination of the event position and discuss the practical considerations for real-time implementation.

  7. Nasal deformities resulting from flow driver continuous positive airway pressure.

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, N J; McCarthy, L S; Hamilton, P A; Moss, A L

    1996-01-01

    Over a period of six months, seven cases were documented of trauma to the nose as a result of flow driver continuous positive airway pressure in babies of very low birthweight (VLBW). There was a complication rate of 20% in the babies who required it. Deformities consisted of columella nasi necrosis which can occur within three days, flaring of nostrils which worsens with duration of continuous positive airway pressure, and snubbing of the nose which persists after prolonged continuous positive airway pressure. These complications should be preventable by modifications to the mechanism and method of use. Images PMID:8976689

  8. SCALE Continuous-Energy Eigenvalue Sensitivity Coefficient Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Perfetti, Christopher M.; Rearden, Bradley T.; Martin, William R.

    2016-02-25

    Sensitivity coefficients describe the fractional change in a system response that is induced by changes to system parameters and nuclear data. The Tools for Sensitivity and UNcertainty Analysis Methodology Implementation (TSUNAMI) code within the SCALE code system makes use of eigenvalue sensitivity coefficients for an extensive number of criticality safety applications, including quantifying the data-induced uncertainty in the eigenvalue of critical systems, assessing the neutronic similarity between different critical systems, and guiding nuclear data adjustment studies. The need to model geometrically complex systems with improved fidelity and the desire to extend TSUNAMI analysis to advanced applications has motivated the development of a methodology for calculating sensitivity coefficients in continuous-energy (CE) Monte Carlo applications. The Contributon-Linked eigenvalue sensitivity/Uncertainty estimation via Tracklength importance CHaracterization (CLUTCH) and Iterated Fission Probability (IFP) eigenvalue sensitivity methods were recently implemented in the CE-KENO framework of the SCALE code system to enable TSUNAMI-3D to perform eigenvalue sensitivity calculations using continuous-energy Monte Carlo methods. This work provides a detailed description of the theory behind the CLUTCH method and describes in detail its implementation. This work explores the improvements in eigenvalue sensitivity coefficient accuracy that can be gained through the use of continuous-energy sensitivity methods and also compares several sensitivity methods in terms of computational efficiency and memory requirements.

  9. SCALE Continuous-Energy Eigenvalue Sensitivity Coefficient Calculations

    DOE PAGES

    Perfetti, Christopher M.; Rearden, Bradley T.; Martin, William R.

    2016-02-25

    Sensitivity coefficients describe the fractional change in a system response that is induced by changes to system parameters and nuclear data. The Tools for Sensitivity and UNcertainty Analysis Methodology Implementation (TSUNAMI) code within the SCALE code system makes use of eigenvalue sensitivity coefficients for an extensive number of criticality safety applications, including quantifying the data-induced uncertainty in the eigenvalue of critical systems, assessing the neutronic similarity between different critical systems, and guiding nuclear data adjustment studies. The need to model geometrically complex systems with improved fidelity and the desire to extend TSUNAMI analysis to advanced applications has motivated the developmentmore » of a methodology for calculating sensitivity coefficients in continuous-energy (CE) Monte Carlo applications. The Contributon-Linked eigenvalue sensitivity/Uncertainty estimation via Tracklength importance CHaracterization (CLUTCH) and Iterated Fission Probability (IFP) eigenvalue sensitivity methods were recently implemented in the CE-KENO framework of the SCALE code system to enable TSUNAMI-3D to perform eigenvalue sensitivity calculations using continuous-energy Monte Carlo methods. This work provides a detailed description of the theory behind the CLUTCH method and describes in detail its implementation. This work explores the improvements in eigenvalue sensitivity coefficient accuracy that can be gained through the use of continuous-energy sensitivity methods and also compares several sensitivity methods in terms of computational efficiency and memory requirements.« less

  10. 32 CFR 154.13 - Sensitive positions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) Noncritical-sensitive. (A) Access to Secret or Confidential information. (B) Security police/provost marshal...) Critical-sensitive. (A) Access to Top Secret information. (B) Development or approval of plans, policies... report required in subpart K. (e) Billet control system for Top Secret. (1) To standardize and control...

  11. 32 CFR 154.13 - Sensitive positions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) Noncritical-sensitive. (A) Access to Secret or Confidential information. (B) Security police/provost marshal...) Critical-sensitive. (A) Access to Top Secret information. (B) Development or approval of plans, policies... report required in subpart K. (e) Billet control system for Top Secret. (1) To standardize and control...

  12. The continuity of the output entropy of positive maps

    SciTech Connect

    Shirokov, Maxim E

    2011-10-31

    Global and local continuity conditions for the output von Neumann entropy for positive maps between Banach spaces of trace-class operators in separable Hilbert spaces are obtained. Special attention is paid to completely positive maps: infinite dimensional quantum channels and operations. It is shown that as a result of some specific properties of the von Neumann entropy (as a function on the set of density operators) several results on the output entropy of positive maps can be obtained, which cannot be derived from the general properties of entropy type functions. In particular, it is proved that global continuity of the output entropy of a positive map follows from its finiteness. A characterization of positive linear maps preserving continuity of the entropy (in the following sense: continuity of the entropy on an arbitrary subset of input operators implies continuity of the output entropy on this subset) is obtained. A connection between the local continuity properties of two completely positive complementary maps is considered. Bibliography: 21 titles.

  13. Sensitivity of GRETINA position resolution to hole mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasher, V. S.; Cromaz, M.; Chowdhury, P.; Merchan, E.; Lister, C. J.; Crawford, H. L.; Campbell, C. M.; Macchiavelli, A. O.; Radford, D. C.; Lee, I. Y.; Wiens, A.

    2016-09-01

    The GRETINA array has been commissioned and has begun generating physics results. As the community moves towards the proposed full 4- π national gamma-ray energy tracking array GRETA, optimizing algorithms that reconstruct gamma-ray interaction points continues to be an important task. To this end, the sensitivity of the position resolution of the GRETINA array to the hole mobility parameter has been investigated. The chi-square deviations from a ``superpulse'' exhibit a shallow minimum for hole mobilities 15 % lower than currently used values. Calibration data on position resolution is analyzed, together with simulations that isolate the signal decomposition dependence from electronics cross-talk. The results of this exercise will be presented and the effect of varying hole mobility on the inferred interaction points will be discussed. Supported by the U.S. Department of Energy under Award DE-FG02-94ER40848 and Contract DE-AC02-05CHI1231.

  14. Intergenerational continuity in economic hardship, parental positivity, and positive parenting: The association with child behavior.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Shinyoung; Neppl, Tricia K

    2016-02-01

    The current study examined intergenerational continuity in economic hardship, parental positivity, and positive parenting across generations based on both the family stress model (FSM) and the family resilience framework. The study included 220 generation 1 (G1) parents, their target youth (generation 2: G2) who participated from adolescence through adulthood, and the target's child (generation 3: G3). Assessments included observational and self-report measures. Results indicated that G1 economic hardship negatively influenced both G1 positivity and G1 positive parenting. Similarly, G2 economic hardship was negatively related to both G2 positivity and G2 positive parenting, which in turn was associated with G3 positive behavior to G2. For both G1 and G2, parental positivity mediated the association between economic hardship and positive parenting. G2 economic hardship was indirectly related to G3 positive behavior through G2 parental positivity and positive parenting. An important finding is that the intergenerational continuity of economic hardship, positivity, and positive parenting were transmitted from G1 to G2. Results suggest that even in times of economic adversity, parental positivity and positive parenting were transmitted from G1 parents to their G2 youth during adulthood. Such continuity seems to influence the positive behavior of the G3 children.

  15. Intergenerational continuity in economic hardship, parental positivity, and positive parenting: The association with child behavior

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Shinyoung; Neppl, Tricia K.

    2015-01-01

    The current study examined intergenerational continuity in economic hardship, parental positivity, and positive parenting across generations based on both the Family Stress Model and the Family Resilience Framework. The study included 220 generation one (G1) parents, their target youth (generation two: G2) who participated from adolescence through adulthood, and the target’s child (generation three: G3). Assessments included observational and self-report measures. Results indicated that G1 economic hardship negatively influenced both G1 positivity and G1 positive parenting. Similarly, G2 economic hardship was negatively related to both G2 positivity and G2 positive parenting which, in turn, was associated with G3 positive behavior to G2. For both G1 and G2, parental positivity mediated the association between economic hardship and positive parenting. G2 economic hardship was indirectly related to G3 positive behavior through G2 parental positivity and positive parenting. An important finding is that the intergenerational continuity of economic hardship, positivity, and positive parenting were transmitted from G1 to G2. Results suggest that even in times of economic adversity, parental positivity and positive parenting were transmitted from G1 parents to their G2 youth during adulthood. Such continuity seems to influence the positive behavior of the G3 children. PMID:26371448

  16. Continuously-Variable Positive-Mesh Power Transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, J. L.

    1982-01-01

    Proposed transmission with continuously-variable speed ratio couples two mechanical trigonometric-function generators. Transmission is expected to handle higher loads than conventional variable-pulley drives; and, unlike variable pulley, positive traction through entire drive train with no reliance on friction to transmit power. Able to vary speed continuously through zero and into reverse. Possible applications in instrumentation where drive-train slippage cannot be tolerated.

  17. Position sensitive detector for fluorescence lifetime imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokazov, Y.; Turbin, E.; Weber, A.; Hartig, R.; Zuschratter, W.

    2014-12-01

    We present a detector system with a microchannel plate based photomultiplier tube (MCP-PMT) and its application for fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) in visible light. A capacity coupled imaging technique (charge image) combined with a charge division anode is employed for the positional readout. Using an artificial neural network's (ANN) computation model we are able to reconstruct the position of the incident photon as precise as 20 microns over the detector active area of 25 mm diameter. Thus, the resulting image quality corresponds roughly to a megapixel conventional CCD camera. Importantly, it is feasible to reach such resolution using only 9 charge acquisition channels supporting the anode structure of 14 interconnected readout electrodes. Additionally, the system features better than 50 ps temporal resolution allowing single photon counting FLIM acquisition with a regular fluorescence wide-field microscope.

  18. Neutron position-sensitive scintillation detector

    DOEpatents

    Strauss, Michael G.; Brenner, Raul

    1984-01-01

    A device is provided for mapping one- and two-dimensional distributions of neutron-positions in a scintillation detector. The device consists of a lithium glass scintillator coupled by an air gap and a light coupler to an array of photomultipliers. The air gap concentrates light flashes from the scintillator, whereas the light coupler disperses this concentrated light to a predetermined fraction of the photomultiplier tube array.

  19. Position-sensitive CZT detector module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matteson, James L.; Duttweiler, Fred; Huszar, George L.; Leblanc, Philippe C.; Skelton, Robert E.; Stephan, Edwin A.; Hink, Paul L.; Dowkontt, Paul F.; Slavis, Kimberly R.; Tumer, Tumay O.; Kravis, Scott D.

    1998-07-01

    Coded mask imagers for future high energy x-ray astronomy missions will require detector planes with areas of hundreds to thousands of cm(superscript 2) and position resolutions < 1 mm. Such detectors will enable coded mask imagers to discover and study thousands of high energy x-ray sources. The UCSD/WU/UCR/NOVA collaboration has been developing CZT detector systems with crossed-strip readout to meet these requirements. We report progress on a compact detector module with 41 cm(superscript 2) area and 0.5 mm spatial resolution. The design includes the bias network and ASIC readout electronics, and allows modules to be combined in large area arrays with very high live-area factors. Results from laboratory and balloon flight tests are presented.

  20. Continuous Morse-Smale flows with three equilibrium positions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuzhoma, E. V.; Medvedev, V. S.

    2016-05-01

    Continuous Morse-Smale flows on closed manifolds whose nonwandering set consists of three equilibrium positions are considered. Necessary and sufficient conditions for topological equivalence of such flows are obtained and the topological structure of the underlying manifolds is described. Bibliography: 36 titles.

  1. 43 CFR 422.11 - Position sensitivity and investigations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Position sensitivity and investigations. 422.11 Section 422.11 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF... Requirements § 422.11 Position sensitivity and investigations. Each law enforcement contract or cooperative...

  2. 43 CFR 422.11 - Position sensitivity and investigations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Position sensitivity and investigations. 422.11 Section 422.11 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF... Requirements § 422.11 Position sensitivity and investigations. Each law enforcement contract or cooperative...

  3. 43 CFR 422.11 - Position sensitivity and investigations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Position sensitivity and investigations. 422.11 Section 422.11 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF... Requirements § 422.11 Position sensitivity and investigations. Each law enforcement contract or cooperative...

  4. 43 CFR 422.11 - Position sensitivity and investigations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Position sensitivity and investigations. 422.11 Section 422.11 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF... Requirements § 422.11 Position sensitivity and investigations. Each law enforcement contract or cooperative...

  5. 43 CFR 422.11 - Position sensitivity and investigations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Position sensitivity and investigations. 422.11 Section 422.11 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF... Requirements § 422.11 Position sensitivity and investigations. Each law enforcement contract or cooperative...

  6. Continuous position measurements and the quantum Zeno effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagen, M. J.; Wiseman, H. M.; Milburn, G. J.

    1993-07-01

    We present a model of continuous (in time) position measurements on a quantum system using a single pseudoclassical meter. The nonselective evolution of the system is described by a master equation which is identical to that obtained from previous models. The selective evolution is described by a stochastic nonlinear Schrödinger equation. The significance of this equation is that the stochastic term has a physical interpretaion. By carefully choosing the parameters which define the meter and the system-meter coupling, we obtain a meter pointer with well-defined position which undergoes fluctuations. This ``jitter'' in the pointer position gives rise to the stochastic dynamical collapse of the system wave function. By the inclusion of feedback on the meter, the pointer is made to relax towards an appropriate readout. We apply this model to the selective measurement of the position of a particle in a double-well potential. In contrast to a recent claim [H. Fearn and W. E. Lamb, Jr., Phys. Rev. A 46, 1199 (1992)] we show that truly continuous position measurements lead to a quantum Zeno effect in certain parameter regimes. This is manifest by the changing of the particle dynamics from coherent tunneling between the well minima to incoherent flipping, as in a random telegraph. As the measurement strength increases, the average length of time the particle remains stuck in one well increases proportionally.

  7. Continuous positive airway pressure improves sleep apnea associated fatty liver.

    PubMed

    Shpirer, Isaac; Copel, Laurian; Broide, Efrat; Elizur, Arnon

    2010-08-01

    Treatment of sleep apnea can improve liver enzyme abnormalities in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. However, the effect of continuous positive airway pressure therapy for sleep apnea on liver fat accumulation was not assessed. Liver biopsy is the "gold standard" for determining and quantifying liver fat accumulation; however, obtaining two separate liver biopsies is challenging. We examined, using a newly described computerized tomography method to quantify liver fat accumulation, whether treatment of sleep apnea improves liver steatosis. In a prospective cohort study, patients diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnea, at Assaf Harofeh Medical Center's sleep laboratory, were identified. Patients completed a questionnaire and underwent blood tests for liver enzymes and lipid profile, and computed tomography scans to determine the liver attenuation index. Patients with liver attenuation index or=30%) were treated with continuous positive airway pressure for 2-3 years. Subsequently, patients underwent repeat blood tests and tomography scans. Of 47 patients who were analyzed, 16 had a low liver attenuation index (continuous positive airway pressure treatment demonstrated significant improvement in the mean liver attenuation index, whereas noncompliant patients did not. Patients with nonalcoholic fatty-liver disease may benefit from identification and treatment for obstructive sleep apnea because treatment may improve liver steatosis.

  8. Continuous adjoint sensitivity analysis for aerodynamic and acoustic optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghayour, Kaveh

    1999-11-01

    A gradient-based shape optimization methodology based on continuous adjoint sensitivities has been developed for two-dimensional steady Euler equations on unstructured meshes and the unsteady transonic small disturbance equation. The continuous adjoint sensitivities of the Helmholtz equation for acoustic applications have also been derived and discussed. The highlights of the developments for the steady two-dimensional Euler equations are the generalization of the airfoil surface boundary condition of the adjoint system to allow a proper closure of the Lagrangian functional associated with a general cost functional and the results for an inverse problem with density as the prescribed target. Furthermore, it has been demonstrated that a transformation to the natural coordinate system, in conjunction with the reduction of the governing state equations to the control surface, results in sensitivity integrals that are only a function of the tangential derivatives of the state variables. This approach alleviates the need for directional derivative computations with components along the normal to the control surface, which can render erroneous results. With regard to the unsteady transonic small disturbance equation (UTSD), the continuous adjoint methodology has been successfully extended to unsteady flows. It has been demonstrated that for periodic airfoil oscillations leading to limit-cycle behavior, the Lagrangian functional can be only closed if the time interval of interest spans one or more periods of the flow oscillations after the limit-cycle has been attained. The steady state and limit-cycle sensitivities are then validated by comparing with the brute-force derivatives. The importance of accounting for the flow circulation sensitivity, appearing in the form of a Dirac delta in the wall boundary condition at the trailing edge, has been stressed and demonstrated. Remarkably, the cost of an unsteady adjoint solution is about 0.2 times that of a UTSD solution

  9. GPS and odometer data fusion for outdoor robots continuous positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozo-Ruz, Ana; Garcia-Perez, Lia; Garcia-Alegre, Maria C.; Guinea, Domingo; Ribeiro, Angela; Sandoval, Francisco

    2002-02-01

    Present work describes an approximation to obtain the best estimation of the position of the outdoor robot ROJO, a low cost lawnmower to perform unmanned precision agriculture task such are the spraying of pesticides in horticulture. For continuous location of ROJO, two redundant sensors have been installed onboard: a DGPS submetric precision model and an odometric system. DGPS system will allow an absolute positioning of the vehicle in the field, but GPS failures in the reception of the signals due to obstacles and electrical and meteorological disturbance, lead us to the integration of the odometric system. Thus, a robust odometer based upon magnetic strip sensors has been designed and integrated in the vehicle. These sensors continuosly deliver the position of the vehicle relative to its initial position, complementing the DGPS blindness periods. They give an approximated location of the vehicle in the field that can be in turn conveniently updated and corrected by the DGPS. Thus, to provided the best estimation, a fusion algorithm has been proposed and proved, wherein the best estimation is calculated as the maximum value of the join probability function obtained from both position estimation of the onboard sensors. Some results are presented to show the performance of the proposed sensor fusion technique.

  10. Position sensitivity of MAMA detectors. [Multi-Anode Microchannel Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, J. S.; Slater, D. S.; Timothy, J. G.; Jenkins, E. B.

    1988-01-01

    The results of laboratory and telescopic measurements of the position sensitivity of a visible MAMA detector utilizing a 'coarse-fine' array are presented. The photometric accuracy of this detector was determined under point source illumination. It was found that computed centroid positions are accurate across the entire array to within 0.04 pixels.

  11. Position sensitivity of MAMA detectors. [Multi-Anode Microchannel Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, J. S.; Slater, D. S.; Timothy, J. G.; Jenkins, E. B.

    1988-01-01

    The results of laboratory and telescopic measurements of the position sensitivity of a visible MAMA detector utilizing a 'coarse-fine' array are presented. The photometric accuracy of this detector was determined under point source illumination. It was found that computed centroid positions are accurate across the entire array to within 0.04 pixels.

  12. Comparison of Efficacy and Tolerance of Automatic Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Devices With the Optimum Continuous Positive Airway Pressure.

    PubMed

    Tommi, George; Aronow, Wilbert S; Sheehan, John C; McCleay, Matthew T; Meyers, Patrick G

    Patients diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome were randomly placed on automatic continuous positive airway pressure (ACPAP) for 2 hours followed by manual titration for the rest of the night. One hundred sixty-one patients entered the study, with at least 50 patients titrated with each of 3 ACPAP devices. The optimum continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) was defined as the lowest pressure with an apnea-hypoxia index of ≤5/hr, which ranged from 4 cm to 18 cm. Success with ACPAP was approximately 60%-80% when the optimum CPAP was 4-6 cm but fell to below 30% if the optimum CPAP was ≥8 cm (P = 0.001). Average ACPAP ranged from 2 to 10 cm below the optimum level if the optimum CPAP was ≥8 cm. Patients who responded to a low CPAP but deteriorated on higher pressures failed to respond to any of the automatic devices. We recommend that CPAP titration be performed manually before initiation of ACPAP in patients with obstructive sleep apnea. The basal pressure for ACPAP should be the optimum pressure obtained by manual titration. Limits on the upper level of ACPAP may be necessary for patients who deteriorate on higher positive pressures.

  13. Vantage sensitivity: individual differences in response to positive experiences.

    PubMed

    Pluess, Michael; Belsky, Jay

    2013-07-01

    The notion that some people are more vulnerable to adversity as a function of inherent risk characteristics is widely embraced in most fields of psychology. This is reflected in the popularity of the diathesis-stress framework, which has received a vast amount of empirical support over the years. Much less effort has been directed toward the investigation of endogenous factors associated with variability in response to positive influences. One reason for the failure to investigate individual differences in response to positive experiences as a function of endogenous factors may be the absence of adequate theoretical frameworks. According to the differential-susceptibility hypothesis, individuals generally vary in their developmental plasticity regardless of whether they are exposed to negative or positive influences--a notion derived from evolutionary reasoning. On the basis of this now well-supported proposition, we advance herein the new concept of vantage sensitivity, reflecting variation in response to exclusively positive experiences as a function of individual endogenous characteristics. After distinguishing vantage sensitivity from theoretically related concepts of differential-susceptibility and resilience, we review some recent empirical evidence for vantage sensitivity featuring behavioral, physiological, and genetic factors as moderators of a wide range of positive experiences ranging from family environment and psychotherapy to educational intervention. Thereafter, we discuss genetic and environmental factors contributing to individual differences in vantage sensitivity, potential mechanisms underlying vantage sensitivity, and practical implications. 2013 APA, all rights reserved

  14. [Continuous positive airways pressure treatment for obstructive sleep apnoea].

    PubMed

    Antone, E; Gilbert, M; Bironneau, V; Meurice, J C

    2015-04-01

    Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) still remains the most frequently used and the most efficient treatment for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. However, its efficiency is conditioned by healthcare quality depending on many factors such as medical specificities of the patients as well as the severity of sleep-related breathing disorders. In order to optimize CPAP efficiency, it is necessary to be aware of the functional abilities of the different devices, and to perform a close monitoring of the patients, particularly during the first weeks of treatment, by maximally using the data provided by the CPAP apparatus. Some questions remain unsolved, such as the impact of nasal CPAP on glucose metabolism or cardiovascular prognosis. Furthermore, the strategy of CPAP use should be improved according to future results of studies dedicated to the interest of home telemonitoring and taking into account the validated mode of CPAP initiation. Copyright © 2015 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Continuing Education Workshops in Bioinformatics Positively Impact Research and Careers.

    PubMed

    Brazas, Michelle D; Ouellette, B F Francis

    2016-06-01

    Bioinformatics.ca has been hosting continuing education programs in introductory and advanced bioinformatics topics in Canada since 1999 and has trained more than 2,000 participants to date. These workshops have been adapted over the years to keep pace with advances in both science and technology as well as the changing landscape in available learning modalities and the bioinformatics training needs of our audience. Post-workshop surveys have been a mandatory component of each workshop and are used to ensure appropriate adjustments are made to workshops to maximize learning. However, neither bioinformatics.ca nor others offering similar training programs have explored the long-term impact of bioinformatics continuing education training. Bioinformatics.ca recently initiated a look back on the impact its workshops have had on the career trajectories, research outcomes, publications, and collaborations of its participants. Using an anonymous online survey, bioinformatics.ca analyzed responses from those surveyed and discovered its workshops have had a positive impact on collaborations, research, publications, and career progression.

  16. Self-Balancing Position-Sensitive Detector (SBPSD).

    PubMed

    Porrazzo, Ryan; Lydecker, Leigh; Gattu, Suhasini; Bakhru, Hassaram; Tokranova, Natalya; Castracane, James

    2015-07-20

    Optical position-sensitive detectors (PSDs) are a non-contact method of tracking the location of a light spot. Silicon-based versions of such sensors are fabricated with standard CMOS technology, are inexpensive and provide a real-time, analog signal output corresponding to the position of the light spot. An innovative type of optical position sensor was developed using two back-to-back connected photodiodes. These so called self-balancing position-sensitive detectors (SBPSDs) eliminate the need for external readout circuitry entirely. Fabricated prototype devices demonstrate linear, symmetric coordinate characteristics and a spatial resolution of 200 μm for a 74 mm device. PSDs are commercially available only up to a length of 37 mm. Prototype devices were fabricated with various lengths up to 100 mm and can be scaled down to any size below that.

  17. Dual Position Sensitive MWPC for tracking reaction products at VAMOS++

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandebrouck, M.; Lemasson, A.; Rejmund, M.; Fremont, G.; Pancin, J.; Navin, A.; Michelagnoli, C.; Goupil, J.; Spitaels, C.; Jacquot, B.

    2016-03-01

    The characteristics and performance of a Dual Position Sensitive Multi-Wire Proportional Counter (DPS-MWPC) used to measure the scattering angle, the interaction position on the target and the velocity of reaction products detected in the VAMOS++ magnetic spectrometer, are reported. The detector consists of a pair of position sensitive low pressure MWPCs and provides both fast timing signals, along with the two-dimensional position coordinates required to define the trajectory of the reaction products. A time-of-flight resolution of 305(11) ps (FWHM) was measured. The measured resolutions (FWHM) were 2.5(3) mrad and 560(70) μm for the scattering angle and the interaction point at the target respectively. The subsequent improvement of the Doppler correction of the energy of the γ-rays, detected in the γ-ray tracking array AGATA in coincidence with isotopically identified ions in VAMOS++, is also discussed.

  18. Comparison of conventional continuous positive airway pressure to continuous positive airway pressure titration performed with sleep endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Civelek, Senol; Emre, Ismet Emrah; Dizdar, Denizhan; Cuhadaroglu, Caglar; Eksioglu, Birsen Karaci; Eraslan, Algın Kayar; Turgut, Suat

    2012-03-01

    To evaluate the effect and obtain a pressure value of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) under direct visualization using drug-induced sleep endoscopy (DISE) and compare the pressure values with values obtained using conventional CPAP. Prospective, double-blinded, cohort study. Sixteen patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) were included in the study. Each patient underwent polysomnographic evaluation. After diagnosis of OSAS, patients underwent conventional CPAP titration. Patients were then taken to the operating theatre and put under sedation, where CPAP titration with nasendoscopy was performed (DISE CPAP). There were no statistically significant differences between the two techniques regarding pressure levels that decreased apneas in conventional CPAP and provided sufficient opening during DISE CPAP. Results with conventional CPAP titration and endoscopy-assisted CPAP titration showed no statistically significant difference. Endoscopy-assisted CPAP is a cheaper and less time consuming alternative to conventional CPAP and has similar results. Copyright © 2012 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  19. Position sensitive radioactivity detection for gas and liquid chromatography

    DOEpatents

    Cochran, Joseph L.; McCarthy, John F.; Palumbo, Anthony V.; Phelps, Tommy J.

    2001-01-01

    A method and apparatus are provided for the position sensitive detection of radioactivity in a fluid stream, particularly in the effluent fluid stream from a gas or liquid chromatographic instrument. The invention represents a significant advance in efficiency and cost reduction compared with current efforts.

  20. Sensitivity of GRETINA position resolution to hole mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasher, V. S.; Cromaz, M.; Merchan, E.; Chowdhury, P.; Crawford, H. L.; Lister, C. J.; Campbell, C. M.; Lee, I. Y.; Macchiavelli, A. O.; Radford, D. C.; Wiens, A.

    2017-02-01

    The sensitivity of the position resolution of the gamma-ray tracking array GRETINA to the hole charge-carrier mobility parameter is investigated. The χ2 results from a fit of averaged signal ("superpulse") data exhibit a shallow minimum for hole mobilities 15% lower than the currently adopted values. Calibration data on position resolution is analyzed, together with simulations that isolate the hole mobility dependence of signal decomposition from other effects such as electronics cross-talk. The results effectively exclude hole mobility as a dominant parameter for improving the position resolution for reconstruction of gamma-ray interaction points in GRETINA.

  1. Sensitivity of GRETINA position resolution to hole mobility

    DOE PAGES

    Prasher, V. S.; Cromaz, M.; Merchan, E.; ...

    2017-02-01

    The sensitivity of the position resolution of the gamma-ray tracking array GRETINA to the hole charge-carrier mobility parameter is investigated. The χ 2 results from a fit of averaged signal (“superpulse”) data exhibit a shallow minimum for hole mobilities 15% lower than the currently adopted values. Calibration data on position resolution is analyzed, together with simulations that isolate the hole mobility dependence of signal decomposition from other effects such as electronics cross-talk. Our results effectively exclude hole mobility as a dominant parameter for improving the position resolution for reconstruction of gamma-ray interaction points in GRETINA.

  2. Personality correlates of adherence with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP).

    PubMed

    Moran, Alicia M; Everhart, Daniel Erik; Davis, Claude Ervin; Wuensch, Karl L; Lee, Daniel O; Demaree, Heath A

    2011-12-01

    Adherence with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has been problematic. Understanding the factors associated with nonadherence may assist with psychosocial interventions. The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between adherence and three measures of personality and coping strategies. Ratings on the behavioral inhibition system/behavioral activation system (BIS/BAS) scales, the ways of coping inventory, and a broad personality measure (mini-IPIP) were analyzed with a binary logistic regression among 63 subjects, adult men (31) and women (32), diagnosed with OSA. Data from the CPAP device was obtained following initial 30 days at minimum, with adherence defined as >4 h/night on 70% of nights. Elevated BIS was the strongest predictor of nonadherence (r = -.452, p < .01), followed by neuroticism. The regression correctly classified 73% of participants as adherent or nonadherent. Nonadherence is associated with elevated BIS scores and neuroticism, which indicates that personality factors play a role in determining adherence to CPAP. Although more research is needed to draw firm conclusions, the differences noted in BIS may also point toward differences in neurophysiological function. The BIS scale may be a useful tool for predicting nonadherence and assist with the development of intervention strategies that will increase adherence.

  3. Traumatic keratoplasty rupture resulting from continuous positive airway pressure mask.

    PubMed

    Fiorentzis, Miltiadis; Seitz, Berthold; Viestenz, Arne

    2015-06-01

    To report a rare case of traumatic wound dehiscence caused by the use of a continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) mask in a patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) after penetrating keratoplasty (PKP). Observational case report. A 55-year-old man who was treated with uncomplicated PKP due to pellucid marginal corneal degeneration in the right eye 9 months earlier presented to the emergency department after a globe rupture caused by dislocation of his CPAP mask during sleep. The best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) was light perception in the right eye. The corneal graft was dehisced from 12 over 3 to 6 o'clock (180 degrees) with interruption of the double running corneal sutures and nasal iris as well as vitreous incarceration. The graft was resutured in place with 33 interrupted 10-0 monofilament nylon sutures. The BCVA improved to 20/100 three months after globe reconstruction. This case underlines the necessity of education for patients undergoing keratoplasty regarding the use of protective eyewear, to avoid predictable or accidental ocular injuries and graft dehiscence or its subsequent consequences. CPAP masks should be fitted (eyeball sparing) to the margins of the orbit after PKP.

  4. Impact of group education on continuous positive airway pressure adherence.

    PubMed

    Lettieri, Christopher J; Walter, Robert J

    2013-06-15

    To compare the impact of a group educational program versus individual education on continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) adherence. Post hoc assessment of a performance improvement initiative designed to improve clinic efficiency, access to care, and time to initiate therapy. Consecutive patients newly diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) initiating CPAP therapy participated in either an individual or group educational program. The content and information was similar in both strategies. Of 2,116 included patients, 1,032 received education regarding OSA and CPAP through a group clinic, and 1,084 received individual education. Among the cohort, 76.6% were men, mean age 48.3 ± 9.2 years, mean body mass index 29.6 ± 4.6 kg/m(2), and mean apnea-hypopnea index was 33.3 ± 24.4 events/hour. Baseline characteristics were similar between groups. CPAP adherence was significantly greater in those participating in a group program than those receiving individual education. Specifically, CPAP was used for more nights (67.2% vs. 62.1%, p = 0.02) and more hours per night during nights used (4.3 ± 2.1 vs. 3.7 ± 2.8, p = 0.03). Further, fewer individuals discontinued therapy (10.6% vs. 14.5%, p < 0.001), more achieved regular use of CPAP (45.2%. vs. 40.6%, p = 0.08), and time to initiate therapy was shorter (13.2 ± 3.1 versus 24.6 ± 7.4 days, p < 0.001). Group education resulted in a 3- to 4-fold increase in the number of patients seen per unit time. A group educational program facilitated improved CPAP adherence. If confirmed by prospective randomized studies, group CPAP education may be an appropriate alternative to individual counseling, may improve acceptance of and adherence to therapy, and decrease time to treatment.

  5. Myofunctional therapy improves adherence to continuous positive airway pressure treatment.

    PubMed

    Diaféria, Giovana; Santos-Silva, Rogerio; Truksinas, Eveli; Haddad, Fernanda L M; Santos, Renata; Bommarito, Silvana; Gregório, Luiz C; Tufik, Sergio; Bittencourt, Lia

    2017-05-01

    Few studies have investigated myofunctional therapy in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of myofunctional therapy on continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) adherence. The study was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01289405). Male patients with OSAS were randomly divided into four treatment groups: placebo, patients undergoing placebo myofunctional therapy (N = 24); myofunctional therapy, undergoing myofunctional therapy (N = 27); CPAP, undergoing treatment with CPAP (N = 27); and combined, undergoing CPAP therapy and myofunctional therapy (N = 22). All patients underwent evaluations before and after 3 months of treatment evaluation and after 3 weeks of washout. Evaluations included Epworth sleepiness scale (ESS), polysomnography, and myofunctional evaluation. The 100 men had a mean age of 48.1 ± 11.2 years, body mass index of 27.4 ± 4.9 kg/m(2), ESS score of 12.7 ± 3.0, and apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) of 30.9 ± 20.6. All treated groups (myofunctional therapy, CPAP, and combined myofunctional therapy with CPAP) showed decreased ESS and snoring, and the myofunctional therapy group maintained this improvement after the "washout" period. AHI reduction occurred in all treated groups and was more significant in CPAP group. The myofunctional therapy and combined groups showed improvement in tongue and soft palate muscle strength when compared with the placebo group. The association of myofunctional therapy to CPAP (combined group) showed an increased adherence to CPAP compared with the CPAP group. Our results suggest that in patients with OSAS, myofunctional therapy may be considered as an adjuvant treatment and an intervention strategy to support adherence to CPAP.

  6. A position sensitive microchannel photomultiplier for ultraviolet space astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lampton, M.; Siegmund, O. H. W.; Bixler, J.; Bowyer, S.

    1986-01-01

    The 25-mm microchannel-plate, position-sensitive UV astronomy photomultiplier tube presented is intended for the EOM-1 Spacelab Mission's FAUST payload and conducts wide-field imaging surveys in the VUV over the 1400-1800-A range. The sealed detector encompasses a CsI photocathode deposited on the inner surface of a MgF2 window, a stack of microchannel plates, and a wedge-and-strip two-dimensional position-sensing anode. Since the wedge-and-strip principle requires only three anode signals, flight electronics can be reduced to three charge amplifiers and three analog-to-digital converters.

  7. A position sensitive microchannel photomultiplier for ultraviolet space astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lampton, M.; Siegmund, O. H. W.; Bixler, J.; Bowyer, S.

    1986-01-01

    The 25-mm microchannel-plate, position-sensitive UV astronomy photomultiplier tube presented is intended for the EOM-1 Spacelab Mission's FAUST payload and conducts wide-field imaging surveys in the VUV over the 1400-1800-A range. The sealed detector encompasses a CsI photocathode deposited on the inner surface of a MgF2 window, a stack of microchannel plates, and a wedge-and-strip two-dimensional position-sensing anode. Since the wedge-and-strip principle requires only three anode signals, flight electronics can be reduced to three charge amplifiers and three analog-to-digital converters.

  8. A position sensitive phoswich hard X-ray detector system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, A. J.; Hanson, C. G.; Hopkins, C. J.; Lewis, R. A.; Fraser-Mitchell, J.

    1985-01-01

    A prototype position sensitive phoswich hard X-ray detector, designed for eventual astronomical usage, was tested in the laboratory. The scintillation crystal geometry was designed on the basis of a Monte Carlo simulation of the internal optics and includes a 3mm thick NaI(T1) primary X-ray detector which is actively shielded by a 20 mm thick CsI(T1) scintillation crystal. This phoswich arrangement is viewed by a number two inch photomultipliers. Measured values of the positional and spectral resolution of incident X-ray photons are compared with calculation.

  9. Development of a fast position-sensitive laser beam detector

    SciTech Connect

    Chavez, Isaac; Huang Rongxin; Henderson, Kevin; Florin, Ernst-Ludwig; Raizen, Mark G.

    2008-10-15

    We report the development of a fast position-sensitive laser beam detector. The detector uses a fiber-optic bundle that spatially splits the incident beam, followed by a fast balanced photodetector. The detector is applied to the study of Brownian motion of particles on fast time scales with 1 A spatial resolution. Future applications include the study of molecule motors, protein folding, as well as cellular processes.

  10. Spectroscopy of Actinide Nuclei - Perspectives with Position Sensitive HPGe Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiter, P.; Birkenbach, B.; Kotthaus, T.

    Recent advances in in-beam gamma-ray spectroscopy of actinide nuclei are based on highly efficient arrays of escape-suppressed spectrometers. The sensitivity of these detector arrays is greatly enhanced by the combination with powerful mass separators or particle detector systems. This technique is demonstrated by an experiment to investigate excited states in 234U after the one-neutron-transfer reaction 235U(d,t). In coincidence with the outgoing tritons, γ-rays were detected with the highly efficient MINIBALL spectrometer. In the near future an even enhanced sensitivity will be achieved by utilizing position sensitive HPGe detectors which will exploit the novel detection method of gamma-ray energy tracking in electrically segmented germanium detectors. An example for this novel approach is the investigation neutron-rich actinide Th and U nuclei after multi nucleon transfer reactions employing the AGATA demonstrator and PRISMA setup at LNL, Italy. A primary 136Xe beam hitting a 238U target was used to produce the nuclei of interest. Beam-like reaction products after neutron transfer were selected by the PRISMA spectrometer. Coincident γ-rays from excited states in beam and target like particles were measured with the position sensitive AGATA HPGe detectors. Improved Doppler correction and quality of the γ-spectra is based on the novel γ-ray tracking technique, which was successfully exploited in this region.

  11. Positioning Continuing Education Computer Programs for the Corporate Market.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tilney, Ceil

    1993-01-01

    Summarizes the findings of the market assessment phase of Bellevue Community College's evaluation of its continuing education computer training program. Indicates that marketing efforts must stress program quality and software training to help overcome strong antiacademic client sentiment. (MGB)

  12. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) for acute bronchiolitis in children.

    PubMed

    Jat, Kana R; Mathew, Joseph L

    2015-01-07

    Acute bronchiolitis is one of the most frequent causes of emergency department visits and hospitalisation in infants. There is no specific treatment for bronchiolitis except for supportive therapy. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is supposed to widen the peripheral airways of the lung, allowing deflation of over-distended lungs in bronchiolitis. The increase in airway pressure also prevents the collapse of poorly supported peripheral small airways during expiration. In observational studies, CPAP is found to be beneficial in acute bronchiolitis. To assess the efficacy and safety of CPAP compared to no CPAP or sham CPAP in infants and children up to three years of age with acute bronchiolitis. We searched CENTRAL (2014, Issue 3), MEDLINE (1946 to April week 2, 2014), EMBASE (1974 to April 2014), CINAHL (1981 to April 2014) and LILACS (1982 to April 2014). We considered randomised controlled trials (RCTs), quasi-RCTS, cross-over RCTs and cluster-RCTs evaluating the effect of CPAP in children with acute bronchiolitis. Two review authors independently assessed study eligibility, extracted data using a structured proforma, analysed the data and performed meta-analyses. We included two studies with a total of 50 participants under 12 months of age. In one study there was a high risk of bias for incomplete outcome data and selective reporting, and both studies had an unclear risk of bias for several domains including random sequence generation. The effect of CPAP on the need for mechanical ventilation in children with acute bronchiolitis was uncertain due to imprecision around the effect estimate (two RCTs, 50 participants; risk ratio (RR) 0.19, 95% CI 0.01 to 3.63; low quality evidence). Neither trial measured our other primary outcome of time to recovery. One trial found that CPAP significantly improved respiratory rate compared with no CPAP (one RCT, 19 participants; mean difference (MD) -5.70 breaths per minute, 95% CI -9.30 to -2.10), although the other

  13. When pressure is positive: a literature review of the prehospital use of continuous positive airway pressure.

    PubMed

    Williams, Brett; Boyle, Malcolm; Robertson, Nicole; Giddings, Coco

    2013-02-01

    Heart failure poses a significant burden of disease, resulting in 2,658 Australian deaths in 2008, and listed as an associated cause of death in a further 14,466 cases. Common in the hospital setting, continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy is a non-invasive ventilation technique used to prevent airway collapse and manage acute pulmonary edema (APO). In the hospital setting, CPAP has been known to decrease the need for endotracheal intubation in patients with APO. Therefore the objective of this literature review was to identify the effectiveness of CPAP therapy in the prehospital environment. A review of selected electronic medical databases (Cochrane, Medline, EMBASE, and CINAHL) was conducted from their commencement date through the end of May 2012. Inclusion criterion was any study type reporting the use of CPAP therapy in the prehospital environment, specifically in the treatment of heart failure and acute pulmonary edema. References of relevant articles were also reviewed. The literature search located 1,253 articles, 12 of which met the inclusion criteria. The majority of studies found that the use of CPAP therapy in the prehospital environment is associated with reduced short-term mortality as well as reduced rates of endotracheal intubation. Continuous positive airway pressure therapy was also shown to improve patient vital signs during prehospital transport and reduce myocardial damage. The studies conducted of prehospital use of CPAP to manage APO have all demonstrated improvement in patient outcomes in the short term. Available evidence suggests that the use of CPAP therapy in the prehospital environment may be beneficial to patients with acute pulmonary edema as it can potentially decrease the need for endotracheal intubation, improve vital signs during transport to hospital, and improve short-term mortality.

  14. Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Strategies with Bubble Nasal Continuous Positive Airway Pressure: Not All Bubbling Is the Same: The Seattle Positive Airway Pressure System.

    PubMed

    Welty, Stephen E

    2016-12-01

    Premature neonates are predisposed to complications, including bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). BPD is associated with long-term pulmonary and neurodevelopmental consequences. Noninvasive respiratory support with nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) has been recommended strongly by the American Academy of Pediatrics. However, CPAP implementation has shown at least a 50% failure rate. Enhancing nasal CPAP effectiveness may decrease the need for mechanical ventilation and reduce the incidence of BPD. Bubble nasal CPAP is better than nasal CPAP using mechanical devices and the bubbling provides air exchange in distal respiratory units. The Seattle PAP system reduces parameters that assess work of breathing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Implementation of Complex Signal Processing Algorithms for Position-Sensitive Microcalorimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Stephen J.

    2008-01-01

    We have recently reported on a theoretical digital signal-processing algorithm for improved energy and position resolution in position-sensitive, transition-edge sensor (POST) X-ray detectors [Smith et al., Nucl, lnstr and Meth. A 556 (2006) 2371. PoST's consists of one or more transition-edge sensors (TES's) on a large continuous or pixellated X-ray absorber and are under development as an alternative to arrays of single pixel TES's. PoST's provide a means to increase the field-of-view for the fewest number of read-out channels. In this contribution we extend the theoretical correlated energy position optimal filter (CEPOF) algorithm (originally developed for 2-TES continuous absorber PoST's) to investigate the practical implementation on multi-pixel single TES PoST's or Hydras. We use numerically simulated data for a nine absorber device, which includes realistic detector noise, to demonstrate an iterative scheme that enables convergence on the correct photon absorption position and energy without any a priori assumptions. The position sensitivity of the CEPOF implemented on simulated data agrees very well with the theoretically predicted resolution. We discuss practical issues such as the impact of random arrival phase of the measured data on the performance of the CEPOF. The CEPOF algorithm demonstrates that full-width-at- half-maximum energy resolution of < 8 eV coupled with position-sensitivity down to a few 100 eV should be achievable for a fully optimized device.

  16. Improvement of the position linearity in a comb-type one-dimensional position sensitive detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jiuyao; Huang, Meizhen; Kim, Hoseob

    2002-09-01

    In a conventional, strip-type one-dimensional (1-D) position sensitive detector (PSD) the sensitive area and the position resistance area are combined together, the contact structure of the device is handicapped, so its accuracy and linearity is affected adversely. The sensitive area and the position resistance area in a new, comb-type 1-D PSD are separated to become the comb teeth and the comb ridge area respectively, moreover the position resistance area is made very narrow, thus the doping uniformity of that area is greatly improved. On the other hand, its position resistance can be largely increased owing to its narrower shape, if doping level is kept the same, so the restriction that is imposed on the contact structure previously can be lifted. Our measurements made on a strip-type 1-D PSD and a comb type 1-D PSD confirmed this difference, and showed that the accuracy and linearity of the comb type 1-D PSD has been increased markedly, especially the RMS nonlinearity of the comb type 1-D PSD is reduced to 0.090% from that of the strip-type 1-D PSD, 0.94%.

  17. Michrochannel plate for position sensitive alpha particle detection

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Hurley and James Tinsley

    2007-08-31

    This paper will describe the use of a microchannel plate (MCP) as the associated particle detector on a sealed tube neutron generator. The generator produces neutrons and associated alpha particles for use as a probe to locate and identify hidden explosives in associated particle imaging (API). The MCP measures the position in two dimensions and precise timing of the incident alpha particle, information which is then used to calculate the emission time and direction of the corresponding neutron. The MCP replaces the position-sensitive photomultipler tube (PSPMT) which, until recently, had been the only detector available for measuring position and timing for alpha particles in neutron generator applications. Where the PSPMT uses charge division for generating position information, a process that requires a first order correction to each pulse, the MCP uses delay-line timing, which requires no correction. The result is a device with an order of magnitude improvement in both position resolution and timing compared to the PSPMT. Hardware and software development and the measurements made to characterize the MCP for API applications are described.

  18. Canadian Penning Trap Mass Measurements using a Position Sensitive MCP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuta, Trenton; Aprahamian, Ani; Marley, Scott; Nystrom, Andrew; Clark, Jason; Perez Galvan, Adrian; Hirsh, Tsviki; Savard, Guy; Orford, Rodney; Morgan, Graeme

    2015-10-01

    The primary focus of the Canadian Penning Trap (CPT) located at Argonne National Lab is to determine the masses of various isotopes produced in the spontaneous fission of Californium. Currently, the CPT is operating in conjunction with CARIBU at the ATLAS facility in an attempt to measure neutron-rich nuclei produced by a 1.5 Curie source of Californium 252. The masses of nuclei produced in fission is accomplished by measuring the cyclotron frequency of the isotopes circling within the trap. This frequency is determined by a position sensitive MCP, which records the relative position of the isotope in the trap at different times. Using these position changes over time in connection with a center spot, angles between these positions are calculated and used to determine the frequency. Most of the work currently being conducted on the CPT is focused on the precision of these frequency measurements. The use of traps has revolutionized the measurements of nuclear masses to very high precision. The optimization methods employed here include focusing the beam in order to reduce the spread on the position of the isotope as well as the tuning of the MR-ToF, a mass separator that is intended on removing contaminants in the beam. This work was supported by the nuclear Grant PHY-1419765 for the University of Notre Dame.

  19. Position-Sensitive Nuclear Spectroscopy with Pixel Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Granja, Carlos; Vykydal, Zdenek; Jakubek, Jan; Pospisil, Stanislav

    2007-10-26

    State-of-the-art hybrid semiconductor pixel detectors such as Medipix2 are suitable for energy- and position-sensitive nuclear spectroscopy. In addition to excellent energy- and spatial-resolution, these devices can operate in spectroscopic, single-quantum counting and/or on-line tracking mode. A devoted compact USB-readout interface provides functionality and ease of operation. The compact and versatile Medipix2/USB radiation camera provides visualization, vacuum and room-temperature operation as a real-time portable active nuclear emulsion.

  20. Functionalised hexagonal-domain graphene for position-sensitive photodetectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Sanctis, Adolfo; Barnes, Matthew D.; Amit, Iddo; Craciun, Monica F.; Russo, Saverio

    2017-03-01

    Graphene’s unique photoresponse has been largely used in a multitude of optoelectronics applications ranging from broadband photodetectors to wave-guide modulators. In this work we extend the range of applications to position-sensitive photodetectors (PSDs) using FeCl3-intercalated hexagonal domains of graphene grown by atmospheric pressure chemical vapour deposition (APCVD). The FeCl3-based chemical functionalisation of APCVD graphene crystals is affected by the presence of wrinkles and results in a non-uniform doping of the graphene layers. This doping profile creates multiple p-p+ photoactive junctions which show a linear and bipolar photoresponse with respect to the position of a focused light spot, which is ideal for the realization of a PSD. Our study paves the way towards the fabrication of flexible and transparent PSDs that could be embedded in smart textile and wearable electronics.

  1. Functionalised hexagonal-domain graphene for position-sensitive photodetectors.

    PubMed

    De Sanctis, Adolfo; Barnes, Matthew D; Amit, Iddo; Craciun, Monica F; Russo, Saverio

    2017-03-24

    Graphene's unique photoresponse has been largely used in a multitude of optoelectronics applications ranging from broadband photodetectors to wave-guide modulators. In this work we extend the range of applications to position-sensitive photodetectors (PSDs) using FeCl3-intercalated hexagonal domains of graphene grown by atmospheric pressure chemical vapour deposition (APCVD). The FeCl3-based chemical functionalisation of APCVD graphene crystals is affected by the presence of wrinkles and results in a non-uniform doping of the graphene layers. This doping profile creates multiple p-p(+) photoactive junctions which show a linear and bipolar photoresponse with respect to the position of a focused light spot, which is ideal for the realization of a PSD. Our study paves the way towards the fabrication of flexible and transparent PSDs that could be embedded in smart textile and wearable electronics.

  2. Emulation workbench for position sensitive gaseous scintillation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, L.; Margato, L. M. S.; Morozov, A.; Solovov, V.; Fraga, F. A. F.

    2015-12-01

    Position sensitive detectors based on gaseous scintillation proportional counters with Anger-type readout are being used in several research areas such as neutron detection, search for dark matter and neutrinoless double beta decay. Design and optimization of such detectors are complex and time consuming tasks. Simulations, while being a powerful tool, strongly depend on the light transfer models and demand accurate knowledge of many parameters, which are often not available. Here we describe an alternative approach based on the experimental evaluation of a detector using an isotropic point-like light source with precisely controllable light emission properties, installed on a 3D positioning system. The results obtained with the developed setup at validation conditions, when the scattered light is strongly suppressed show good agreement with simulations.

  3. Silicon position sensitive detectors for the HELIOS (NA34) experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Beuttenmuller, R.; Bisi, V.; Chesi, E.; Di Nardo, R.P.; Esten, M.J.; Giubellino, P.; Kraner, H.W.; Ludlam, T.W.; Meddi, F.; Piuz, F.

    1986-03-01

    Silicon detectors having both ''pad'' and strip position sensitive configurations have been fabricated for the HELIOS experiment which requires an elaborate pulse height-dependent trigger as well as one dimensional silicon strip position sensing. The trigger detector is a 400 element, 30 mm diameter detector with readout connections from a ceramic overlay board. Tests with full prototype detectors have shown essentially 100% detection efficiency and excellent pulse height resolution well capable of delineating 0, 1 or 2 hits per pad. Strip detectors with 25 ..mu..m pitch and a varying readout pitch have been tested, which utilize both capacitive and resistive charge division. Techniques for realization of required interstrip resistors will be discussed and results which may compare these readout methods will be reported. 11 refs., 13 figs.

  4. Positioning a University Outreach Center: Strategies for Support and Continuation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skivington, Kristen D.

    1998-01-01

    Argues that a strong case can be made for supporting outreach as a value-added function in a university. Specific strategies for positioning outreach within the university by developing a power base are outlined. The case of the University of Michigan-Flint is offered as an example of this approach. Seven lessons learned in the process are noted.…

  5. Positioning a University Outreach Center: Strategies for Support and Continuation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skivington, Kristen D.

    1998-01-01

    Argues that a strong case can be made for supporting outreach as a value-added function in a university. Specific strategies for positioning outreach within the university by developing a power base are outlined. The case of the University of Michigan-Flint is offered as an example of this approach. Seven lessons learned in the process are noted.…

  6. Position Sensitive Proximity Charge Sensing Readout of HPGe Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priest, Anders Peterson

    Electrode segmentation is a necessity to achieve position sensitivity in semicon- ductor radiation detectors. Traditional segmentation requires decreasing electrode sizes while increasing channel numbers to achieve very fine position resolution. These electrodes can be complicated to fabricate, and many electrodes with individual electronic channels are required to instrument large detector areas. To simplify the fabrication process, we have moved the readout electrodes onto a printed circuit board that is positioned above the ionization type detection material. In this scheme, charge from radiation interactions will be shared amongst several electrodes, allowing for position interpolation. Because events can be reconstructed in between electrodes, fewer electrodes are needed to instrument large detector areas. The proximity charge sensing method of readout promises to simplify detector fabrication while maintaining the position resolution that is required by fields such as homeland security, astrophysics, environmental remediation, nuclear physics, and medical imaging. We performed scanning measurements on a proof of principle detector that we fabricated at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). These measurements showed that position resolution much finer than the strip pitch was achievable using the proximity charge readout method. We performed analytic calculations and Monte Carlo modeling to optimize the readout electrode geometry for a larger detector to test the limits of this technology. We achieved an average position resolution of 288 microm with eight proximity electrodes at a 5 mm pitch and 1 mm strip width, set 100 microm away from the detector surface by a Kapton spacer. To achieve this resolution using standard technologies, 300 microm pitch strips are necessary, and would require 100 channels to instrument the same area. Through our optimization calculations, we found that there is a trade-off between position resolution and energy resolution

  7. Continuous-energy eigenvalue sensitivity coefficient calculations in TSUNAMI-3D

    SciTech Connect

    Perfetti, C. M.; Rearden, B. T.

    2013-07-01

    Two methods for calculating eigenvalue sensitivity coefficients in continuous-energy Monte Carlo applications were implemented in the KENO code within the SCALE code package. The methods were used to calculate sensitivity coefficients for several test problems and produced sensitivity coefficients that agreed well with both reference sensitivities and multigroup TSUNAMI-3D sensitivity coefficients. The newly developed CLUTCH method was observed to produce sensitivity coefficients with high figures of merit and a low memory footprint, and both continuous-energy sensitivity methods met or exceeded the accuracy of the multigroup TSUNAMI-3D calculations. (authors)

  8. Development of a SCALE Tool for Continuous-Energy Eigenvalue Sensitivity Coefficient Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Perfetti, Christopher M; Rearden, Bradley T

    2013-01-01

    Two methods for calculating eigenvalue sensitivity coefficients in continuous-energy Monte Carlo applications were implemented in the KENO code within the SCALE code package. The methods were used to calculate sensitivity coefficients for several criticality safety problems and produced sensitivity coefficients that agreed well with both reference sensitivities and multigroup TSUNAMI-3D sensitivity coefficients. The newly developed CLUTCH method was observed to produce sensitivity coefficients with high figures of merit and low memory requirements, and both continuous-energy sensitivity methods met or exceeded the accuracy of the multigroup TSUNAMI-3D calculations.

  9. Development of a SCALE Tool for Continuous-Energy Eigenvalue Sensitivity Coefficient Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perfetti, Christopher M.; Rearden, Bradley T.

    2014-06-01

    Two methods for calculating eigenvalue sensitivity coefficients in continuous-energy Monte Carlo applications were implemented in the KENO code within the SCALE code package. The methods were used to calculate sensitivity coefficients for several criticality safety problems and produced sensitivity coefficients that agreed well with both reference sensitivities and multigroup TSUNAMI-3D sensitivity coefficients. The newly developed CLUTCH method was observed to produce sensitivity coefficients with high figures of merit and low memory requirements, and both continuous-energy sensitivity methods met or exceeded the accuracy of the multigroup TSUNAMI-3D calculations.

  10. Delay-Line Three-Dimensional Position Sensitive Radiation Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Manhee

    High-resistivity silicon(Si) in large volumes and with good charge carrier transport properties has been produced and achieved success as a radiation detector material over the past few years due to its relatively low cost as well as the availability of well-established processing technologies. One application of that technology is in the fabrication of various position-sensing topologies from which the incident radiation's direction can be determined. We have succeeded in developing the modeling tools for investigating different position-sensing schemes and used those tools to examine both amplitude-based and time-based methods, an assessment that indicates that fine position-sensing can be achieved with simpler readout designs than are conventionally deployed. This realization can make ubiquitous and inexpensive deployment of special nuclear materials (SNM) detecting technology becomes more feasible because if one can deploy position-sensitive semiconductor detectors with only one or two contacts per side. For this purpose, we have described the delay-line radiation detector and its optimized fabrication. The semiconductor physics were simulated, the results from which guided the fabrication of the guard ring structure and the detector electrode, both of which included metal-field-plates. The measured improvement in the leakage current was confirmed with the fabricated devices, and the structures successfully suppressed soft-breakdown. We also demonstrated that fabricating an asymmetric strip-line structure successfully minimizing the pulse shaping and increases the distance through which one can propagate the information of the deposited charge distribution. With fabricated delay-line detectors we can acquire alpha spectra (Am-241) and gamma spectra (Ba-133, Co-57 and Cd-109). The delay-line detectors can therefore be used to extract the charge information from both ion and gamma-ray interactions. Furthermore, standard charge-sensitive circuits yield high SNR

  11. Parametric positioning of a continuous crystal PET detector with depth of interaction decoding

    PubMed Central

    Ling, T; Burnett, T H; Lewellen, T K; Miyaoka, R S

    2009-01-01

    Here we demonstrate a parametric positioning method on a continuous crystal detector. Three different models for the light distribution were tested. Diagnosis of the residues showed that the parametric model fits the experimental data better than Gaussian and Cauchy models in our particular experimental setup. Based on the correlation between the spread and the peak value of the light distribution model with the depth of interaction (DOI), we were able to estimate the three-dimensional position of a scintillation event. On our continuous miniature crystal element (cMiCE) detector module with 8 mm thick LYSO crystal, the intrinsic spatial resolution is 1.06 mm at the center and 1.27 mm at the corner using a maximum-likelihood estimation (MLE) method and the parametric model. The DOI resolution (full width at half maximum) is estimated to be ∼3.24 mm. The positioning method using the parametric model outperformed the Gaussian and Cauchy models, in both MLE and weighted least-squares (WLS) fitting methods. The key feature of this technique is that it requires very little calibration of the detector, but still retains high resolution and high sensitivity. PMID:18364542

  12. Parametric positioning of a continuous crystal PET detector with depth of interaction decoding.

    PubMed

    Ling, T; Burnett, T H; Lewellen, T K; Miyaoka, R S

    2008-04-07

    Here we demonstrate a parametric positioning method on a continuous crystal detector. Three different models for the light distribution were tested. Diagnosis of the residues showed that the parametric model fits the experimental data better than Gaussian and Cauchy models in our particular experimental setup. Based on the correlation between the spread and the peak value of the light distribution model with the depth of interaction (DOI), we were able to estimate the three-dimensional position of a scintillation event. On our continuous miniature crystal element (cMiCE) detector module with 8 mm thick LYSO crystal, the intrinsic spatial resolution is 1.06 mm at the center and 1.27 mm at the corner using a maximum-likelihood estimation (MLE) method and the parametric model. The DOI resolution (full width at half maximum) is estimated to be approximately 3.24 mm. The positioning method using the parametric model outperformed the Gaussian and Cauchy models, in both MLE and weighted least-squares (WLS) fitting methods. The key feature of this technique is that it requires very little calibration of the detector, but still retains high resolution and high sensitivity.

  13. ASIC for High Rate 3D Position Sensitive Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Vernon, E.; De Geronimo, G.; Ackley, K.; Fried, J.; He, Z.; Herman, C.; Zhang, F.

    2010-06-16

    We report on the development of an application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) for 3D position sensitive detectors (3D PSD). The ASIC is designed to operate with pixelated wide bandgap sensors like Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride (CZT), Mercuric Iodide (Hgl2) and Thallium Bromide (TIBr). It measures the amplitudes and timings associated with an ionizing event on 128 anodes, the anode grid, and the cathode. Each channel provides low-noise charge amplification, high-order shaping with peaking time adjustable from 250 ns to 12 {micro}s, gain adjustable to 20 mV/fC or 120 mV/fC (for a dynamic range of 3.2 MeV and 530 keV in CZT), amplitude discrimination with 5-bit trimming, and positive and negative peak and timing detections. The readout can be full or sparse, based on a flag and single- or multi-cycle token passing. All channels, triggered channels only, or triggered with neighbors can be read out thus increasing the rate capability of the system to more than 10 kcps. The ASIC dissipates 330 mW which corresponds to about 2.5 mW per channel.

  14. Should we continue or stop insulin sensitizing drugs during pregnancy?

    PubMed

    Norman, Robert J; Wang, Jim X; Hague, William

    2004-06-01

    The use of insulin sensitizing drugs such as metformin in polycystic ovary syndrome has been increasingly popular and validated by systematic reviews. There has also been an interest in the use of metformin for gestational diabetes. However, administration of metformin to prevent miscarriage is controversial and widespread use of this drug in early pregnancy requires investigation. There are claims that miscarriage and gestational diabetes are more common in polycystic ovary syndrome and that use of insulin sensitizers improves outcomes dramatically. This review suggests there is no evidence for increased risk of miscarriage solely due to polycystic ovary syndrome and that there are insufficient data for promoting therapy with metformin. There is some reason for use of metformin in mid-pregnancy for gestational diabetes but better evidence from randomized controlled trials is urgently needed. The use of metformin in early pregnancy for reducing the risk of miscarriage should be avoided outside of the context of properly designed prospective randomized trials. Safety in early pregnancy appears to be reassuring but not completely proven. The use of metformin in mid-pregnancy for gestational diabetes appears more logical but also needs adequate trials before general use is advocated.

  15. High-sensitivity, high-speed continuous imaging system

    DOEpatents

    Watson, Scott A; Bender, III, Howard A

    2014-11-18

    A continuous imaging system for recording low levels of light typically extending over small distances with high-frame rates and with a large number of frames is described. Photodiode pixels disposed in an array having a chosen geometry, each pixel having a dedicated amplifier, analog-to-digital convertor, and memory, provide parallel operation of the system. When combined with a plurality of scintillators responsive to a selected source of radiation, in a scintillator array, the light from each scintillator being directed to a single corresponding photodiode in close proximity or lens-coupled thereto, embodiments of the present imaging system may provide images of x-ray, gamma ray, proton, and neutron sources with high efficiency.

  16. 75 FR 17124 - Pressure Sensitive Plastic Tape from Italy: Notice of Continuation of Antidumping Duty Finding

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-05

    ... International Trade Administration Pressure Sensitive Plastic Tape from Italy: Notice of Continuation of... plastic tape (PSP Tape) from Italy would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of dumping and of... to be revoked. See Pressure Sensitive Plastic Tape from Italy: Final Results of Expedited...

  17. Theory and development of position-sensitive quantum calorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueroa Feliciano, Enectali

    Quantum calorimeters are being developed as imaging spectrometers for future X-ray astrophysics observatories. Much of the science to be done by these instruments could benefit greatly from larger focal-plane coverage of the detector (without increasing pixel size). An order of magnitude more area will greatly increase the science throughput of these future instruments. One of the main deterrents to achieving this goal is the complexity of the readout schemes involved. We devised a way to increase the number of pixels from the current baseline designs by an order of magnitude without increasing the number of channels required for readout. The instrument is a high energy resolution, distributed-readout imaging spectrometer called a Position-Sensitive Transition-Edge Sensor (PoST). A PoST is a quantum calorimeter consisting of two Transition-Edge Sensors (TESs) on the ends of a long absorber to do one-dimensional imaging spectroscopy. Comparing rise time and energy information, the position of the event in the PoST is determined. Energy is inferred from the sum of the two pulses. We develop a generalized theoretical formalism for distributed-readout calorimeters and apply it to our devices. We derive the noise theory and calculate the theoretical energy resolution of a PoST. Our calculations show that a 7-pixel PoST with 6˜keV saturation energy can achieve 2.3˜eV resolution, making this a competitive design for future quantum calorimeter instruments. For this thesis we fabricated 7- and 15-pixel PoSTs using Mo/Au TESs and gold absorbers, and moved from concept drawings on scraps of napkins to a 32 eV at 1.5 keV energy resolution 7-pixel PoST calorimeter.

  18. Positive and negative polarity contrast sensitivity measuring app.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Alex D; Peli, Eli

    2016-01-01

    Contrast sensitivity (CS) quantifies an observer's ability to detect the smallest (threshold) luminance difference between a target and its surrounding. In clinical settings, printed letter contrast charts are commonly used, and the contrast of the letter stimuli is specified by the Weber contrast definition. Those paper-printed charts use negative polarity contrast (NP, dark letters on bright background) and are not available with positive polarity contrast (PP, bright letters on dark background), as needed in a number of applications. We implemented a mobile CS measuring app supporting both NP and PP contrast stimuli that mimic the paper charts for NP. A novel modified Weber definition was developed to specify the contrast of PP letters. The validity of the app is established in comparison with the paper chart. We found that our app generates more accurate and a wider range of contrast stimuli than the paper chart (especially at the critical high CS, low contrast range), and found a clear difference between NP and PP CS measures (CSNP>CSPP) despite the symmetry afforded by the modified Weber contrast definition. Our app provides a convenient way to measure CS in both lighted and dark environments.

  19. Positive and negative polarity contrast sensitivity measuring app

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Alex D.; Peli, Eli

    2017-01-01

    Contrast sensitivity (CS) quantifies an observer’s ability to detect the smallest (threshold) luminance difference between a target and its surrounding. In clinical settings, printed letter contrast charts are commonly used, and the contrast of the letter stimuli is specified by the Weber contrast definition. Those paper-printed charts use negative polarity contrast (NP, dark letters on bright background) and are not available with positive polarity contrast (PP, bright letters on dark background), as needed in a number of applications. We implemented a mobile CS measuring app supporting both NP and PP contrast stimuli that mimic the paper charts for NP. A novel modified Weber definition was developed to specify the contrast of PP letters. The validity of the app is established in comparison with the paper chart. We found that our app generates more accurate and a wider range of contrast stimuli than the paper chart (especially at the critical high CS, low contrast range), and found a clear difference between NP and PP CS measures (CSNP>CSPP) despite the symmetry afforded by the modified Weber contrast definition. Our app provides a convenient way to measure CS in both lighted and dark environments. PMID:28649669

  20. READOUT ASIC FOR 3D POSITION-SENSITIVE DETECTORS.

    SciTech Connect

    DE GERONIMO,G.; VERNON, E.; ACKLEY, K.; DRAGONE, A.; FRIED, J.; OCONNOR, P.; HE, Z.; HERMAN, C.; ZHANG, F.

    2007-10-27

    We describe an application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) for 3D position-sensitive detectors. It was optimized for pixelated CZT sensors, and it measures, corresponding to an ionizing event, the energy and timing of signals from 121 anodes and one cathode. Each channel provides low-noise charge amplification, high-order shaping, along with peak- and timing-detection. The cathode's timing can be measured in three different ways: the first is based on multiple thresholds on the charge amplifier's voltage output; the second uses the threshold crossing of a fast-shaped signal; and the third measures the peak amplitude and timing from a bipolar shaper. With its power of 2 mW per channel the ASIC measures, on a CZT sensor Connected and biased, charges up to 100 fC with an electronic resolution better than 200 e{sup -} rms. Our preliminary spectral measurements applying a simple cathode/mode ratio correction demonstrated a single-pixel resolution of 4.8 keV (0.72 %) at 662 keV, with the electronics and leakage current contributing in total with 2.1 keV.

  1. Position sensitivity in 3"×3" Spectroscopic LaBr3:Ce Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blasi, N.; Giaz, A.; Boiano, C.; Brambilla, S.; Camera, F.; Million, B.; Riboldi, S.

    2015-06-01

    The position sensitivity of a thick, cylindrical and continuous 3" × 3" (7.62 cm × 7.62 cm) LaBr3:Ce crystal with diffusive surfaces was investigated. Nuclear physics basic research uses thick LaBr3:Ce crystals (> 3cm) to measure medium or high energy gamma rays (0.5 MeV < Eγ< 20 MeV). In the first measurement the PMT photocathode entrance window was covered by black absorber except for a small window 1 cm × 1cm wide. A complete scan of the detector over a 0.5 cm step grid was performed. The data show that even in a 3" thick LaBr3:Ce crystal with diffusive surfaces the position of the full energy peak centroid depends on the source position. The position of the full energy peak centroids are sufficient to identify the collimated gamma source position. The crystal was then coupled to four Position Sensitive Photomultipliers (PSPMT). We acquired the signals from the 256 segments of the four PSPMTs grouping them into 16 elements. An event by event analysis shows a positon resolution of the order of 2 cm.

  2. Signal and noise properties of position-sensitive avalanche photodiodes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yongfeng; Wu, Yibao; Farrell, Richard; Dokhale, Purushottam A; Shah, Kanai S; Cherry, Simon R

    2011-10-07

    After many years of development, position-sensitive avalanche photodiodes (PSAPDs) are now being incorporated into a range of scintillation detector systems, including those used in high-resolution small-animal PET and PET/MR scanners. In this work, the signal, noise, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), flood histogram and timing resolution were measured for lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO) scintillator arrays coupled to PSAPDs ranging in size from 10 to 20 mm, and the optimum bias voltage and working temperature were determined. Variations in the SNR performance of PSAPDs with the same dimensions were small, but the SNR decreased significantly with increasing PSAPD size and increasing temperature. Smaller PSAPDs (10 mm and 15 mm in width) produced acceptable flood histograms at 24 °C, and cooling lower than 16 °C produced little improvement. The optimum bias voltage was about 25 V below the break down voltage. The larger 20 mm PSAPDs have lower SNR and require cooling to 0-7 °C for acceptable performance. The optimum bias voltage is also lower (35 V or more below the break down voltage depending on the temperature). Significant changes in the timing resolution were observed as the bias voltage and temperature varied. Higher bias voltages provided better timing resolution. The best timing resolution obtained for individual crystals was 2.8 ns and 3.3 ns for the 10 mm and 15 mm PSAPDs, respectively. The results of this work provide useful guidance for selecting the bias voltage and working temperature for scintillation detectors that incorporate PSAPDs as the photodetector.

  3. Signal and Noise Properties of Position-Sensitive Avalanche Photodiodes

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yongfeng; Wu, Yibao; Farrell, Richard; Dokhale, Purushottam A.; Shah, Kanai S.; Cherry, Simon R.

    2011-01-01

    After many years of development, position-sensitive avalanche photodiodes (PSAPDs) are now being incorporated into a range of scintillation detector systems, including those used in high-resolution small-animal PET and PET/MR scanners. In this work, the signal, noise, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), flood histogram and timing resolution were measured for lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO) scintillator arrays coupled to PSAPDs ranging in size from 10–20 mm, and the optimum bias voltage and working temperature determined. Variations in the SNR performance of PSAPDs with the same dimensions were small, but the SNR decreased significantly with increasing PSAPD size and increasing temperature. Smaller PSAPDs (10 mm and 15 mm in width) produced acceptable flood histograms at 24 °C, and cooling lower than 16 °C produced little improvement. The optimum bias voltage was about 25 V below the break down voltage. The larger 20 mm PSAPDs have lower SNR and require cooling to 0–7 °C for acceptable performance. The optimum bias voltage also is lower (35 V or more below the break down voltage depending on the temperature). Significant changes in the timing resolution were observed as the bias voltage and temperature were varied. Higher bias voltages provided better timing resolution. The best timing resolution obtained for individual crystals was 2.8 ns and 3.3 ns for the 10 mm and 15 mm PSAPDs, respectively. The results of this work provide useful guidance for selecting the bias voltage and working temperature for scintillation detectors that incorporate PSAPDs as the photodetector. PMID:21896961

  4. Use of Opioid Medications for Employees in Critical Safety or Security Positions and Positions with Safety Sensitive Duties

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-01-30

    Employees in Critical Safety or Security Positions and Positions with Safety Sensitive Duties . 1. REFERENCES. A. Army Regulation 40-5, Preventive... duties . C. The employee is considered unfit for safety sensitive duties until such a time when he or she is no longer taking opioid pain...Aeromedical Policy Letters, Medication Waivers, January 2002 Revision. 2. BACKGROUND. Employees who work in safety-sensitive occupations or handle

  5. Modeling and Implementation of Multi-Position Non-Continuous Rotation Gyroscope North Finder

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jun; Wang, Zhiqian; Shen, Chengwu; Kuijper, Arjan; Wen, Zhuoman; Liu, Shaojin

    2016-01-01

    Even when the Global Positioning System (GPS) signal is blocked, a rate gyroscope (gyro) north finder is capable of providing the required azimuth reference information to a certain extent. In order to measure the azimuth between the observer and the north direction very accurately, we propose a multi-position non-continuous rotation gyro north finding scheme. Our new generalized mathematical model analyzes the elements that affect the azimuth measurement precision and can thus provide high precision azimuth reference information. Based on the gyro’s principle of detecting a projection of the earth rotation rate on its sensitive axis and the proposed north finding scheme, we are able to deduct an accurate mathematical model of the gyro outputs against azimuth with the gyro and shaft misalignments. Combining the gyro outputs model and the theory of propagation of uncertainty, some approaches to optimize north finding are provided, including reducing the gyro bias error, constraining the gyro random error, increasing the number of rotation points, improving rotation angle measurement precision, decreasing the gyro and the shaft misalignment angles. According them, a north finder setup is built and the azimuth uncertainty of 18” is obtained. This paper provides systematic theory for analyzing the details of the gyro north finder scheme from simulation to implementation. The proposed theory can guide both applied researchers in academia and advanced practitioners in industry for designing high precision robust north finder based on different types of rate gyroscopes. PMID:27657067

  6. Modeling and Implementation of Multi-Position Non-Continuous Rotation Gyroscope North Finder.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jun; Wang, Zhiqian; Shen, Chengwu; Kuijper, Arjan; Wen, Zhuoman; Liu, Shaojin

    2016-09-20

    Even when the Global Positioning System (GPS) signal is blocked, a rate gyroscope (gyro) north finder is capable of providing the required azimuth reference information to a certain extent. In order to measure the azimuth between the observer and the north direction very accurately, we propose a multi-position non-continuous rotation gyro north finding scheme. Our new generalized mathematical model analyzes the elements that affect the azimuth measurement precision and can thus provide high precision azimuth reference information. Based on the gyro's principle of detecting a projection of the earth rotation rate on its sensitive axis and the proposed north finding scheme, we are able to deduct an accurate mathematical model of the gyro outputs against azimuth with the gyro and shaft misalignments. Combining the gyro outputs model and the theory of propagation of uncertainty, some approaches to optimize north finding are provided, including reducing the gyro bias error, constraining the gyro random error, increasing the number of rotation points, improving rotation angle measurement precision, decreasing the gyro and the shaft misalignment angles. According them, a north finder setup is built and the azimuth uncertainty of 18" is obtained. This paper provides systematic theory for analyzing the details of the gyro north finder scheme from simulation to implementation. The proposed theory can guide both applied researchers in academia and advanced practitioners in industry for designing high precision robust north finder based on different types of rate gyroscopes.

  7. Development of Continuous-Energy Eigenvalue Sensitivity Coefficient Calculation Methods in the Shift Monte Carlo Code

    SciTech Connect

    Perfetti, Christopher M; Martin, William R; Rearden, Bradley T; Williams, Mark L

    2012-01-01

    Three methods for calculating continuous-energy eigenvalue sensitivity coefficients were developed and implemented into the SHIFT Monte Carlo code within the Scale code package. The methods were used for several simple test problems and were evaluated in terms of speed, accuracy, efficiency, and memory requirements. A promising new method for calculating eigenvalue sensitivity coefficients, known as the CLUTCH method, was developed and produced accurate sensitivity coefficients with figures of merit that were several orders of magnitude larger than those from existing methods.

  8. A systematic technical review of the systems for the continuous positive airway pressure.

    PubMed

    Chiumello, D; Esquinas, A M; Moerer, O; Terzi, N

    2012-12-01

    Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is the application in the airways of continuous positive pressure, close to the positive end expiratory pressure. The two common available systems are by a continuous (high/low) flow system and by a mechanical ventilator. Aim of this study was to compare the mechanical performance of the CPAP systems in intubated and not intubated patients. Medical literature databases (MEDLINE and EMBASE) were searched for articles on "clinical trials" and "randomized controlled trials". The key words "continuous positive airway pressure" and "CPAP", were combined with any of these key words: adult, work of breathing, continuous flow, mechanical valve, water valve, balloon reservoir, mechanical ventilator, pressure triggering, flow triggering, lung model, demand valve, equipment. Thirty-two articles (18 human and 14 bench studies) met the inclusion criteria. The continuous flow systems are able to maintain acceptable airway pressure variations during normal breathing. The most recent mechanical ventilators equipped with flow by systems compared to the first one, presented a similar or better work of breathing compared to the continuous flow systems due to the application of a little amount of pressure support. Although the use of a continuous flow is cheaper compared to mechanical ventilators, it does not allow a continuous respiratory monitoring.

  9. A two-dimensional position sensitive gas chamber with scanned charge transfer readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, F.; Iglesias, A.; Lobato, R.; Mosquera, J.; Pardo, J.; Pena, J.; Pazos, A.; Pombar, M.; Rodríguez, A.

    2003-10-01

    We have constructed and tested a two-dimensional position sensitive parallel-plate gas ionization chamber with scanned charge transfer readout. The scan readout method described here is based on the development of a new position-dependent charge transfer technique. It has been implemented by using gate strips perpendicularly oriented to the collector strips. This solution reduces considerably the number of electronic readout channels needed to cover large detector areas. The use of a 25 μm thick kapton etched circuit allows high charge transfer efficiency with a low gating voltage, consequently needing a very simple commutating circuit. The present prototype covers 8×8 cm2 with a pixel size of 1.27×1.27 mm2. Depending on the intended use and beam characteristics a smaller effective pixel is feasible and larger active areas are possible. This detector can be used for X-ray or other continuous beam intensity profile monitoring.

  10. CONTINUOUS-ENERGY MONTE CARLO METHODS FOR CALCULATING GENERALIZED RESPONSE SENSITIVITIES USING TSUNAMI-3D

    SciTech Connect

    Perfetti, Christopher M; Rearden, Bradley T

    2014-01-01

    This work introduces a new approach for calculating sensitivity coefficients for generalized neutronic responses to nuclear data uncertainties using continuous-energy Monte Carlo methods. The approach presented in this paper, known as the GEAR-MC method, allows for the calculation of generalized sensitivity coefficients for multiple responses in a single Monte Carlo calculation with no nuclear data perturbations or knowledge of nuclear covariance data. The theory behind the GEAR-MC method is presented here, and proof of principle is demonstrated by using the GEAR-MC method to calculate sensitivity coefficients for responses in several 3D, continuous-energy Monte Carlo applications.

  11. Residual sleepiness in sleep apnea patients treated by continuous positive airway pressure.

    PubMed

    Gasa, Merce; Tamisier, Renaud; Launois, Sandrine H; Sapene, Marc; Martin, Francis; Stach, Bruno; Grillet, Yves; Levy, Patrick; Pepin, Jean-Louis

    2013-08-01

    Hypoxic brain damage might explain persistent sleepiness in some continuous positive airway pressure-compliant obstructive sleep apnea called residual excessive sleepiness. Although continuous positive airway pressure may not be fully efficient in treating this symptom, wake-promoting drug prescription in residual excessive sleepiness is no longer allowed by the European Medicines Agency. The aim of this study is to describe residual excessive sleepiness phenotypes in a large prospective sample of patients with obstructive sleep apnea. Residual excessive sleepiness was defined by an Epworth Sleepiness Scale score ≥ 11. Eligible patients from the French National Sleep Registry attending follow-up continuous positive airway pressure visits numbered 1047. Patients using continuous positive airway pressure < 3 h (n = 275), with residual apnea-hypopnea index > 15 h⁻¹ (n = 31) or with major depression were excluded (n = 150). Residual excessive sleepiness prevalence in continuous positive airway pressure-treated obstructive sleep apnea was 13% (18% for those with an initial Epworth Sleepiness Scale score > 11), and significantly decreased with continuous positive airway pressure use (9% in ≥ 6 h night⁻¹ continuous positive airway pressure users, P < 0.005). At the time of diagnosis, patients with residual excessive sleepiness had worse subjective appreciation of their disease (general health scale, Epworth Sleepiness Scale and fatigue score), and complained more frequently of continuous positive airway pressure side-effects. Residual excessive sleepiness prevalence was lower in severe obstructive sleep apnea than in moderate obstructive sleep apnea (11% when AHI > 30 h⁻¹ versus 18% when AHI 15-30, P < 0.005). There was no relationship between residual excessive sleepiness and body mass index, cardiovascular co-morbidities or diabetes. Continuous positive airway pressure improved symptoms in the whole population, but to a lower extent in patients with

  12. Continuous-flow ATP amplification system for increasing the sensitivity of quantitative bioluminescence assay.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Tetsuya; Shinoda, Yasuharu; Alexandrov, Maxym; Kuroda, Akio; Murakami, Yuji

    2008-08-01

    We constructed a novel ATP amplification reactor using a continuous-flow system, and this allowed us to increase the sensitivity of a quantitative bioluminescence assay by controlling the number of ATP amplification cycles. We previously developed a bioluminescence assay coupled with ATP amplification using a batch system. However, it was difficult to control the number of amplification cycles. In this study, ATP amplification was performed using a continuous-flow system, and significant linear correlations between amplified luminescence and initial ATP concentration were observed. When performing four cycles of continuous-flow ATP amplification, the gradient of amplification was 1.87(N). Whereas the lower quantifiable level was 500 pM without amplification, values as low as 50 pM ATP could be measured after amplification. The sensitivity thus increased 10-fold, with further improvements expected with additional amplification cycles. The continuous-flow system thus effectively increased the sensitivity of the quantitative bioluminescence assay.

  13. Analytical expression for position sensitivity of linear response beam position monitor having inter-electrode cross talk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Mukesh; Ojha, A.; Garg, A. D.; Puntambekar, T. A.; Senecha, V. K.

    2017-02-01

    According to the quasi electrostatic model of linear response capacitive beam position monitor (BPM), the position sensitivity of the device depends only on the aperture of the device and it is independent of processing frequency and load impedance. In practice, however, due to the inter-electrode capacitive coupling (cross talk), the actual position sensitivity of the device decreases with increasing frequency and load impedance. We have taken into account the inter-electrode capacitance to derive and propose a new analytical expression for the position sensitivity as a function of frequency and load impedance. The sensitivity of a linear response shoe-box type BPM has been obtained through simulation using CST Studio Suite to verify and confirm the validity of the new analytical equation. Good agreement between the simulation results and the new analytical expression suggest that this method can be exploited for proper designing of BPM.

  14. Adherence to Continuous Positive Airway Pressure in Existing Users: Self-Efficacy Enhances the Association between Continuous Positive Airway Pressure and Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Dzierzewski, Joseph M.; Wallace, Douglas M.; Wohlgemuth, William K.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) is a common sleep disorder associated with a myriad of sequelae. OSAHS is effectively treated with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy. However, fewer than 50% of patients are compliant with their CPAP therapy prescriptions. The current study sought to explore an integrated, biopsychological approach to CPAP adherence among experienced CPAP users. Methods: We performed a retrospective, cross-sectional analysis of a cohort of veterans with a diagnosis of OSAHS (n = 191) who were prescribed CPAP therapy and returned for adherence download at the Miami VA Sleep Clinic. The relationships between biomedical characteristics (e.g., CPAP pressure, self-reported sleepiness, and change in sleep efficiency) and psychological factors (e.g., self-efficacy beliefs and psychological diagnoses) and objectively measured CPAP use were examined to determine whether psychological factors moderated the relationships between biomedical characteristics and CPAP adherence. Results: Hierarchical regression analyses predicting CPAP adherence (adjusting for time since CPAP prescription, age, education, prescribed CPAP pressure, daytime sleepiness, changes in sleep efficiency with CPAP, and psychiatric conditions) revealed the following: (1) CPAP self-efficacy and CPAP pressure were positively related to adherence, and (2) CPAP self-efficacy moderates the relationship between CPAP pressure and CPAP adherence. Conclusions: There was no relationship between CPAP pressure and adherence in individuals with low self-efficacy beliefs. However, for individuals with high self-efficacy beliefs, there was a significant positive relationship between CPAP pressure and adherence. Self-efficacy beliefs appear to be a prime target for focused interventions aimed at improving CPAP adherence among those individuals with higher pressure prescriptions. Citation: Dzierzewski JM, Wallace DM, Wohlgemuth WK. Adherence to continuous

  15. Influence of body position on the displacement of nasal prongs in preterm newborns receiving continuous positive airway pressure

    PubMed Central

    Brunherotti, Marisa Afonso Andrade; Martinez, Francisco Eulógio

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To evaluate the influence of body position on the displacement of nasal prongs in preterm infants. Methods: This prospective, randomized, crossover study enrolled infants born at a mean gestational age of 29.7±2 weeks, birth weight of 1353±280g and 2.9±2.2 days of life, submitted to continuous positive airway pressure by nasal prongs. The main outcome was the number of times that the nasal prongs were displaced following infant positioning in the following body positions: prone, right lateral, left lateral, and supine, according to a pre-established random order. Moreover, cardiorespiratory variables (respiratory rate, heart rate, and oxygen saturation) were evaluated for each body position. Data for each position were collected every 10 min, over a period of 60 min. An occurrence was defined when the nasal prongs were displaced from the nostrils after 3 min in the desired position, requiring intervention of the examiner. Results: Among the 16 studied infants, the occurrence of nasal prong displacement was only observed in the prone position (9 infants - 56.2%) and in the left lateral position (2 infants - 12.5%). The number of times that the prongs were displaced was 11 in the prone position (7 within the first 10min) and 2 in the left lateral position (1 within the first 10min). No clinically significant changes were observed in the cardiorespiratory variables. Conclusions: Maintenance of the nasal prongs to provide adequate noninvasive respiratory support was harder in the prone position. PMID:26116326

  16. [Influence of body position on the displacement of nasal prongs in preterm newborns receiving continuous positive airway pressure].

    PubMed

    Brunherotti, Marisa Afonso Andrade; Martinez, Francisco Eulógio

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the influence of body position on the displacement of nasal prongs in preterm infants. This prospective, randomized, crossover study enrolled infants born at a mean gestational age of 29.7±2 weeks, birth weight of 1.353±280g and 2.9±2.2 days of life, submitted to continuous positive airway pressure by nasal prongs. The main outcome was the number of times that the nasal prongs were displaced following infant positioning in the following body positions: prone, right lateral, left lateral, and supine, according to a pre-established random order. Moreover, cardiorespiratory variables (respiratory rate, heart rate, and oxygen saturation) were evaluated for each body position. Data for each position were collected every 10 minutes, over a period of 60minutes. An occurrence was defined when the nasal prongs were displaced from the nostrils after 3 minutes in the desired position, requiring intervention of the examiner. Among the 16 studied infants, the occurrence of nasal prong displacement was only observed in the prone position (9 infants-56.2%) and in the left lateral position (2 infants-12.5%). The number of times that the prongs were displaced was 11 in the prone position (seven within the first 10minutes) and two in the left lateral position (one within the first 10minutes). No clinically significant changes were observed in the cardiorespiratory variables. Maintenance of the nasal prongs to provide adequate noninvasive respiratory support was harder in the prone position. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade de Pediatria de São Paulo. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  17. The effect of continuous positive airway pressure on metabolic variables in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea.

    PubMed

    Schlatzer, Christian; Schwarz, Esther I; Kohler, Malcolm

    2014-02-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is increasingly considered as a risk factor for metabolic disturbances, such as diabetes mellitus or dyslipidaemia. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy, the standard treatment for patients with OSA, may improve various metabolic variables, such as insulin sensitivity, glucose metabolism, lipids, fat distribution and adipokines. Several observational and uncontrolled clinical studies claim an improvement of these metabolic variables through the use of CPAP. However, there is only a limited number of clinical randomised controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating the effect of CPAP on metabolic variables. In this review, we summarise and discuss non-randomised studies and RCTs evaluating the effect of CPAP on metabolic variables in patients with OSA. In summary, the currently available body of evidence does not support a clinically important effect of CPAP treatment on any of the investigated metabolic variables. However, some investigators found small, but statistically significant changes in some metabolic variables, thus beneficial effects of CPAP treatment in selected patient cohorts cannot be excluded. To answer this question, more data from RCTs with well-defined study populations are warranted.

  18. Use of SCALE Continuous-Energy Monte Carlo Tools for Eigenvalue Sensitivity Coefficient Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Perfetti, Christopher M; Rearden, Bradley T

    2013-01-01

    The TSUNAMI code within the SCALE code system makes use of eigenvalue sensitivity coefficients for an extensive number of criticality safety applications, such as quantifying the data-induced uncertainty in the eigenvalue of critical systems, assessing the neutronic similarity between different critical systems, and guiding nuclear data adjustment studies. The need to model geometrically complex systems with improved fidelity and the desire to extend TSUNAMI analysis to advanced applications has motivated the development of a methodology for calculating sensitivity coefficients in continuous-energy (CE) Monte Carlo applications. The CLUTCH and Iterated Fission Probability (IFP) eigenvalue sensitivity methods were recently implemented in the CE KENO framework to generate the capability for TSUNAMI-3D to perform eigenvalue sensitivity calculations in continuous-energy applications. This work explores the improvements in accuracy that can be gained in eigenvalue and eigenvalue sensitivity calculations through the use of the SCALE CE KENO and CE TSUNAMI continuous-energy Monte Carlo tools as compared to multigroup tools. The CE KENO and CE TSUNAMI tools were used to analyze two difficult models of critical benchmarks, and produced eigenvalue and eigenvalue sensitivity coefficient results that showed a marked improvement in accuracy. The CLUTCH sensitivity method in particular excelled in terms of efficiency and computational memory requirements.

  19. Effect of prior deformation on sensitization development in stainless steel during continuous cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, J.W.; Atteridge, D.G.; Bruemmer, S.M. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1991-09-01

    Continuous cooling sensitization (CCS) occurs in austenitic stainless steel (SS) weldment HAZs where the material is subjected to weld-induced plastic deformation, and non-linear heating and cooling cycles. The primary purpose of this investigation was to quantitatively determine the effects of prior deformation on CCS. In addition, these results were used to develop a CCS data base for comparison to a recently published sensitization prediction model (SSDOS). Continuous cooling thermal cycling of specimens from high-carbon Type 316 SSs was performed in a computer-controlled Gleeble thermal simulator. The degree of sensitization (DOS) of thermally treated specimens was quantitatively measured using the electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation (EPR) test. Prior deformation significantly enhanced the rate of CCS development in the Type 316 SS material. The DOS increased with increasing amounts of prior strain and decreasing cooling rates. Sensitization response was also sensitive to peak cycle temperatures. Continuous cooling sensitization development occurred primarily in the critical temperature range between about 900 and 750{degree}C. Peak cycle temperatures of 1000 and 1050{degree}C retarded sensitization development during subsequent continuous cooling. Strain recovery at elevated temperatures played an important role in reducing the effectiveness of prior deformation in accelerating sensitization kinetics. Due to the effects of recovery, in certain cases, prior strain values of 20% were only as effective as 10% in increasing the rate of sensitization development. Limited transgranular carbide precipitation was observed in 20% prior strain samples depending on specific thermal cycle parameters but was not a significant factor in the present work. The SSDOS model consistently overpredicted the CCS development in both heats of 316 SS studied, regardless of material condition (i.e. mill-annealed, solution-annealed, and pre-strained materials).

  20. Methodology, verification, and performance of the continuous-energy nuclear data sensitivity capability in MCNP6

    SciTech Connect

    Kiedrowski, B. C.; Brown, F. B.

    2013-07-01

    A continuous-energy sensitivity coefficient capability has been introduced into MCNP6. The methods for generating energy-resolved and energy-integrated sensitivity profiles are discussed. Results from the verification exercises that were performed are given, and these show that MCNP6 compares favorably with analytic solutions, direct density perturbations, and comparisons to TSUNAMI-3D and MONK. Run-time and memory requirements are assessed for typical applications, and these are shown to be reasonable with modern computing resources. (authors)

  1. Position-sensitive radiation monitoring (surface contamination monitor). Innovative technology summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1999-06-01

    The Shonka Research Associates, Inc. Position-Sensitive Radiation Monitor both detects surface radiation and prepares electronic survey map/survey report of surveyed area automatically. The electronically recorded map can be downloaded to a personal computer for review and a map/report can be generated for inclusion in work packages. Switching from beta-gamma detection to alpha detection is relatively simple and entails moving a switch position to alpha and adjusting the voltage level to an alpha detection level. No field calibration is required when switching from beta-gamma to alpha detection. The system can be used for free-release surveys because it meets the federal detection level sensitivity limits requires for surface survey instrumentation. This technology is superior to traditionally-used floor contamination monitor (FCM) and hand-held survey instrumentation because it can precisely register locations of radioactivity and accurately correlate contamination levels to specific locations. Additionally, it can collect and store continuous radiological data in database format, which can be used to produce real-time imagery as well as automated graphics of survey data. Its flexible design can accommodate a variety of detectors. The cost of the innovative technology is 13% to 57% lower than traditional methods. This technology is suited for radiological surveys of flat surfaces at US Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facility decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) sites or similar public or commercial sites.

  2. Three-dimensional, position-sensitive radiation detection

    DOEpatents

    He, Zhong; Zhang, Feng

    2010-04-06

    Disclosed herein is a method of determining a characteristic of radiation detected by a radiation detector via a multiple-pixel event having a plurality of radiation interactions. The method includes determining a cathode-to-anode signal ratio for a selected interaction of the plurality of radiation interactions based on electron drift time data for the selected interaction, and determining the radiation characteristic for the multiple-pixel event based on both the cathode-to-anode signal ratio and the electron drift time data. In some embodiments, the method further includes determining a correction factor for the radiation characteristic based on an interaction depth of the plurality of radiation interactions, a lateral distance between the selected interaction and a further interaction of the plurality of radiation interactions, and the lateral positioning of the plurality of radiation interactions.

  3. Development of continuous-energy eigenvalue sensitivity coefficient calculation methods in the shift Monte Carlo Code

    SciTech Connect

    Perfetti, C.; Martin, W.; Rearden, B.; Williams, M.

    2012-07-01

    Three methods for calculating continuous-energy eigenvalue sensitivity coefficients were developed and implemented into the Shift Monte Carlo code within the SCALE code package. The methods were used for two small-scale test problems and were evaluated in terms of speed, accuracy, efficiency, and memory requirements. A promising new method for calculating eigenvalue sensitivity coefficients, known as the CLUTCH method, was developed and produced accurate sensitivity coefficients with figures of merit that were several orders of magnitude larger than those from existing methods. (authors)

  4. Continuous non-invasive monitoring improves blood pressure stability in upright position: randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Benes, Jan; Simanova, Alena; Tovarnicka, Tereza; Sevcikova, Silvie; Kletecka, Jakub; Zatloukal, Jan; Pradl, Richard; Chytra, Ivan; Kasal, Eduard

    2015-02-01

    Intermittent blood pressure (BP) monitoring is the standard-of-care during low and intermediate risk anaesthesia, yet it could lead to delayed recognition of BP fluctuations. Perioperative hypotension is known to be associated with postoperative complications. Continuous, non-invasive methods for BP monitoring have been developed recently. We have tested a novel non-invasive, continuous monitor (using the volume clamp method) to assist with maintaining BP in safe ranges for patients undergoing surgery in a beach chair position. Forty adult patients undergoing thyroid gland surgery in an upright position were included in this prospective randomised controlled trial. Patients were equally allocated to the group with continuous monitoring of BP using the CNAP® Monitor and to the control group managed using an intermittent oscillometric BP cuff. The absolute and proportional time spent outside the range of ±20% of the target BP along with other hemodynamic and clinical parameters were evaluated. The continuous monitoring decreased the anaesthesia time spent below -20% pressure range [absolute: 12 min (4-20) vs. 27 min (16-34); p=0.001; relative to procedure length: 14% (7-20) vs. 33.5% (17.5-53); p=0.003]. No significant differences were observed in postoperative morbidity or in hospital length of stay. Continuous non-invasive BP monitoring via the CNAP® Monitor allows for better BP management in patients undergoing surgery in a beach chair position. In our randomised trial the time spent in hypotension was significantly shorter using continuous monitoring.

  5. Use of Biphasic Continuous Positive Airway Pressure in Premature Infant with Cleft Lip–Cleft Palate

    PubMed Central

    George, Lovya; Jain, Sunil K.

    2015-01-01

    Preterm infants (PIs) often require respiratory support due to surfactant deficiency. Early weaning from mechanical ventilation to noninvasive respiratory support decreases ventilation-associated irreversible lung damage. This wean is particularly challenging in PIs with cleft lip and cleft palate due to anatomical difficulties encountered in maintaining an adequate seal for positive pressure ventilation. PI with a cleft lip and palate often fail noninvasive respiratory support and require continued intubation and mechanical ventilation. We are presenting the first case report of a PI with cleft lip and palate who was managed by biphasic nasal continuous positive airway pressure. PMID:26495158

  6. Maternal sensitivity and latency to positive emotion following challenge: pathways through effortful control.

    PubMed

    Conway, Anne; McDonough, Susan C; Mackenzie, Michael; Miller, Alison; Dayton, Carolyn; Rosenblum, Katherine; Muzik, Maria; Sameroff, Arnold

    2014-01-01

    The ability to self-generate positive emotions is an important component of emotion regulation. In this study, we focus on children's latency to express positive emotions following challenging situations and assess whether this ability operates through early maternal sensitivity and children's effortful control. Longitudinal relations between maternal sensitivity, infant negative affect, effortful control, and latency to positive emotion following challenge were examined in 156 children who were 33 months of age. Structural equation models supported the hypothesis that maternal sensitivity during infancy predicted better effortful control and, in turn, shorter latencies to positive emotions following challenge at 33 months. Directions for future research are discussed.

  7. Continuous antagonism of the ghrelin receptor results in early induction of salt-sensitive hypertension.

    PubMed

    Sato, Takahiro; Nakashima, Yoshiki; Nakamura, Yuki; Ida, Takanori; Kojima, Masayasu

    2011-02-01

    Ghrelin is a hormone that mediates a variety of physiological roles, such as stimulating appetite, initiating food intake, and modulating energy metabolism. Although it has been reported that a bolus injection of ghrelin decreases blood pressure, the effect of continuous ghrelin administration on vasoregulation has yet to be determined. We examined the longitudinal effect of ghrelin on vasoregulation using Dahl-Iwai salt-sensitive rats. In this model, a high-salt diet induced high blood pressure and increased ghrelin levels but reduced food intake. In salt-sensitive hypertension, cumulative food intake decreased, while both ghrelin messenger RNA levels and plasma ghrelin content increased. Continuous administration of a ghrelin receptor agonist, growth hormone releasing peptide-6 (GHRP-6), for 2 weeks by mini-osmotic pump did not change blood pressure values although the cumulative food intake recovered. In contrast, continuous administration of a ghrelin receptor antagonist, [D-Lys³]-GHRP-6, induced early elevations in blood pressure without changes in heart rate. Quantitative RT-PCR revealed high expression levels of genes involved in the catecholamine biosynthetic pathway, tyrosine hydroxylase and dopamine-β-hydroxylase, after continuous [D-Lys³]-GHRP-6 administration. These results indicate that continuous antagonism of the ghrelin receptor results in early induction of salt-sensitive hypertension in this animal model and suggests that increases in autonomic nervous activity induced by ghrelin receptor antagonism are responsible, as indicated by the high expression levels of genes in the catecholamine biosynthetic pathway.

  8. Absolute continuity for operator valued completely positive maps on C∗-algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gheondea, Aurelian; Kavruk, Ali Şamil

    2009-02-01

    Motivated by applicability to quantum operations, quantum information, and quantum probability, we investigate the notion of absolute continuity for operator valued completely positive maps on C∗-algebras, previously introduced by Parthasarathy [in Athens Conference on Applied Probability and Time Series Analysis I (Springer-Verlag, Berlin, 1996), pp. 34-54]. We obtain an intrinsic definition of absolute continuity, we show that the Lebesgue decomposition defined by Parthasarathy is the maximal one among all other Lebesgue-type decompositions and that this maximal Lebesgue decomposition does not depend on the jointly dominating completely positive map, we obtain more flexible formulas for calculating the maximal Lebesgue decomposition, and we point out the nonuniqueness of the Lebesgue decomposition as well as a sufficient condition for uniqueness. In addition, we consider Radon-Nikodym derivatives for absolutely continuous completely positive maps that, in general, are unbounded positive self-adjoint operators affiliated to a certain von Neumann algebra, and we obtain a spectral approximation by bounded Radon-Nikodym derivatives. An application to the existence of the infimum of two completely positive maps is indicated, and formulas in terms of Choi's matrices for the Lebesgue decomposition of completely positive maps in matrix algebras are obtained.

  9. Mandibular Advancement Device as a Comparable Treatment to Nasal Continuous Positive Airway Pressure for Positional Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Takaesu, Yoshikazu; Tsuiki, Satoru; Kobayashi, Mina; Komada, Yoko; Nakayama, Hideaki; Inoue, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Positional obstructive sleep apnea (P-OSA) is a clinically common phenotype of OSA, which can be treated effectively with mandibular advancement devices (MADs). We hypothesized that the efficacy of an MAD is comparable to that of nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) in P-OSA patients. Methods: Among patients diagnosed with OSA at a single sleep center from January 2008 to May 2014, male subjects with moderate OSA were recruited and stringently categorized as having P-OSA when the ratio of their lateral apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) to supine AHI was ≤ 0.5, their lateral sleep time was > 60 minutes, and their lateral REM sleep time was longer than 10 minutes. Treatment efficacy was compared between P-OSA subjects with an MAD (n = 34) and those with nCPAP (n = 34) after matching for age, body-mass index, and baseline AHI. Results: There were no significant differences in baseline AHI (MAD: nCPAP = 20.6 ± 3.9/h: 21.3 ± 1.7/h, p = 0.35) or in follow-up AHI (MAD: nCPAP = 4.7 ± 3.5/h: 3.4 ± 3.7/h, p = 0.12) between the 2 treatment groups, and hence MADs lowered the AHI to the same extent as nCPAP. Conclusions: These findings suggest that an MAD is as efficacious as nCPAP for P-OSA patients. MAD treatment for this specific phenotype may be a promising patient-tailored and first-line approach to OSA. Commentary: A commentary on this article appears in this issue on page 1079. Citation: Takaesu Y, Tsuiki S, Kobayashi M, Komada Y, Nakayama H, Inoue Y. Mandibular advancement device as a comparable treatment to nasal continuous positive airway pressure for positional obstructive sleep apnea. J Clin Sleep Med 2016;12(8):1113–1119. PMID:27250814

  10. [Initiation of therapy in the sleep apnea syndrome using continuous positive pressure respiration].

    PubMed

    Sonka, K; Kucerová, O; Hoskovec, P; Nevsímalová, S

    1994-09-26

    Continuous positive airway pressure is the most important therapeutic method of sleep apnea syndrome (SAS). The prerequisite for its initiation is assessment of the optimal positive pressure and adaptation of the patient to this treatment. The basic criterium for assessment of positive pressure is elimination of apnoic intervals. The objective of the present work was to evaluate the optimal positive pressure CPAP according to the continuity of sleep and the appearance of an abnormally long (longer than 30 mins.) episode of REM sleep ("REM rebound"). CPAP was indicated in 13 patients with SAS (12 men, 1 woman), mean age 52.1 +/- 8.8 (SD) years, mean body mass index (BMI) 37.4 +/- 10.5. Severe cases of SAS were involved and/or SAS associated with other diseases (acromegaly-2, hypertension-8, IHD-4, chronic bronchopulmonary obstruction-3, and stroke-1). During one-night polysomnographic monitoring gradually the CPAP pressure was increased. Optimal positive pressure was signalized in addition to indicators of ventilation by uninterrupted sleep and "REM rebound". For treatment equipment of SEFAM Co. was used: 2x Pression+, 7x REM+, 4x REM+Control. Two patients refused CPAP treatment during the adaptation night. Eleven patients accepted CPAP treatment. The mean positive pressure value was 10.4 +/- 3.0 mbar. Assessment based on "REM rebound" was possible in six patients and based on continuity in 5 patients. Later pressure changes were called for in one patient (during adaptation he did not have "REM rebound"). Assessment of the optimal CPAP pressure as the lowest positive pressure compatible with regular breathing, as well as stabilized normal oxygen saturation of peripheral blood, continuous sleep and possibly "rebound" REM sleep proved useful.

  11. Continuous positive airway pressure-associated cutaneous amoebiasis in an immunosuppressed patient.

    PubMed

    Sells, R E; Chen, C A; Wong, M T; Zimarowski, M J; Kirby, J E; Joyce, R M; Wu, P A

    2016-03-01

    Organisms of the genus Acanthamoeba are environmentally ubiquitous and colonizers of the oral mucosa in humans. While largely asymptomatic in healthy persons, Acanthamoeba infection can cause disseminated disease with poor prognosis in immunosuppressed populations. Here we report a unique case of cutaneous amoebiasis associated with continuous positive airway pressure use in an immunosuppressed patient. © 2015 British Association of Dermatologists.

  12. Use of continuous positive airway pressure in the acute management of laryngeal paralysis in a cat.

    PubMed

    Ticehurst, K; Zaki, S; Hunt, G B; Macpherson, C; Nicholson, H

    2008-10-01

    Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) has been is used widely in humans to manage obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome, but it has not been widely used in animals. A brachycephalic cat, with previously undiagnosed laryngeal paralysis, that developed acute upper respiratory tract obstruction on recovery from anaesthesia, is presented. The condition was managed by CPAP, delivered via a facial mask.

  13. Motivational Interviewing (MINT) Improves Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) Acceptance and Adherence: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olsen, Sara; Smith, Simon S.; Oei, Tian P. S.; Douglas, James

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Adherence to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy for obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is poor. We assessed the effectiveness of a motivational interviewing intervention (motivational interview nurse therapy [MINT]) in addition to best practice standard care to improve acceptance and adherence to CPAP therapy in people with…

  14. Motivational Interviewing (MINT) Improves Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) Acceptance and Adherence: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olsen, Sara; Smith, Simon S.; Oei, Tian P. S.; Douglas, James

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Adherence to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy for obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is poor. We assessed the effectiveness of a motivational interviewing intervention (motivational interview nurse therapy [MINT]) in addition to best practice standard care to improve acceptance and adherence to CPAP therapy in people with…

  15. A Study of Position-Sensitive Solid-State Photomultiplier Signal Properties.

    PubMed

    Schmall, Jeffrey P; Du, Junwei; Judenhofer, Martin S; Dokhale, Purushottam; Christian, James; McClish, Mickel; Shah, Kanai S; Cherry, Simon R

    2014-06-12

    We present an analysis of the signal properties of a position-sensitive solid-state photomultiplier (PS-SSPM) that has an integrated resistive network for position sensing. Attractive features of PS-SSPMs are their large area and ability to resolve small scintillator crystals. However, the large area leads to a high detector capacitance, and in order to achieve high spatial resolution a large network resistor value is required. These inevitably create a low-pass filter that drastically slows what would be a fast micro-cell discharge pulse. Significant changes in the signal shape of the PS-SSPM cathode output as a function of position are observed, which result in a position-dependent time delay when using traditional time pick-off methods such as leading edge discrimination and constant fraction discrimination. The timing resolution and time delay, as a function of position, were characterized for two different PS-SSPM designs, a continuous 10 mm × 10 mm PS-SSPM and a tiled 2 × 2 array of 5 mm × 5 mm PS-SSPMs. After time delay correction, the block timing resolution, measured with a 6 × 6 array of 1.3 × 1.3 × 20 mm(3) LSO crystals, was 8.6 ns and 8.5 ns, with the 10 mm PS-SSPM and 5 mm PS-SSPM respectively. The effect of crystal size on timing resolution was also studied, and contrary to expectation, a small improvement was measured when reducing the crystal size from 1.3 mm to 0.5 mm. Digital timing methods were studied and showed great promise for allowing accurate timing by implementation of a leading edge time pick-off. Position-dependent changes in signal shape on the anode side also are present, which complicates peak height data acquisition methods used for positioning. We studied the effect of trigger position on signal amplitude, flood histogram quality, and depth-of-interaction resolution in a dual-ended readout detector configuration. We conclude that detector timing and positioning can be significantly improved by implementation of digital timing

  16. Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Treatment of Sleepy Patients with Milder Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Mancini, Cristina; Maislin, Greg; Cater, Jacqueline; Staley, Bethany; Landis, J. Richard; Ferguson, Kathleen A.; George, Charles F. P.; Schulman, David A.; Greenberg, Harly; Rapoport, David M.; Walsleben, Joyce A.; Lee-Chiong, Teofilo; Gurubhagavatula, Indira; Kuna, Samuel T.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale: Twenty-eight percent of people with mild to moderate obstructive sleep apnea experience daytime sleepiness, which interferes with daily functioning. It remains unclear whether treatment with continuous positive airway pressure improves daytime function in these patients. Objectives: To evaluate the efficacy of continuous positive airway pressure treatment to improve functional status in sleepy patients with mild and moderate obstructive sleep apnea. Methods: Patients with self-reported daytime sleepiness (Epworth Sleepiness Scale score >10) and an apnea-hypopnea index with 3% desaturation and from 5 to 30 events per hour were randomized to 8 weeks of active or sham continuous positive airway pressure treatment. After the 8-week intervention, participants in the sham arm received 8 weeks of active continuous positive airway pressure treatment. Measurements and Main Results: The Total score on the Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire was the primary outcome measure. The adjusted mean change in the Total score after the first 8-week intervention was 0.89 for the active group (n = 113) and −0.06 for the placebo group (n = 110) (P = 0.006). The group difference in mean change corresponded to an effect size of 0.41 (95% confidence interval, 0.14–0.67). The mean (SD) improvement in Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire Total score from the beginning to the end of the crossover phase (n = 91) was 1.73 ± 2.50 (t[90] = 6.59; P < 0.00001) with an effect size of 0.69. Conclusions: Continuous positive airway pressure treatment improves the functional outcome of sleepy patients with mild and moderate obstructive sleep apnea. Clinical trial registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT 00127348). PMID:22837377

  17. The use of nasal dilator strips as a placebo for trials evaluating continuous positive airway pressure

    PubMed Central

    Amaro, Aline C.S.; Duarte, Felipe H.G.; Jallad, Raquel S.; Bronstein, Marcello D.; Redline, Susan; Lorenzi-Filho, Geraldo

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of the current study was to compare the objective and subjective effects of continuous positive airway pressure to the use of nasal dilator strips in patients with acromegaly and moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea. METHODS: We studied 12 patients with acromegaly and moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea (male/females = 8/4, age = 52±8 ys, body mass index = 33.5±4.6 Kg/m2, apnea–hypopnea index = 38±14 events/h) who had been included in a randomized, crossover study to receive three months of treatment with continuous positive airway pressure and nasal dilator strips. All patients were evaluated at study entry and at the end of each treatment by polysomnography, and Epworth Sleepiness Scale, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index and treatment satisfaction questionnaires. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01265121 RESULTS: The apnea–hypopnea index values decreased significantly with continuous positive airway pressure treatment but did not change with the use of nasal dilator strips. All of the subjective symptoms improved with both treatments, but these improvements were significantly greater with continuous positive airway pressure than with the nasal dilator strips. CONCLUSION: The use of nasal dilator strips had a much smaller effect on the severity of obstructive sleep apnea in patients with acromegaly and moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea in comparison to the use of continuous positive airway pressure. Moreover, the improvement in several subjective parameters without any significant objective improvement in obstructive sleep apnea resulting from the use of nasal dilator strips is compatible with a placebo effect. PMID:22666791

  18. Distributed Position-Based Consensus of Second-Order Multiagent Systems With Continuous/Intermittent Communication.

    PubMed

    Song, Qiang; Liu, Fang; Wen, Guanghui; Cao, Jinde; Yang, Xinsong

    2017-04-24

    This paper considers the position-based consensus in a network of agents with double-integrator dynamics and directed topology. Two types of distributed observer algorithms are proposed to solve the consensus problem by utilizing continuous and intermittent position measurements, respectively, where each observer does not interact with any other observers. For the case of continuous communication between network agents, some convergence conditions are derived for reaching consensus in the network with a single constant delay or multiple time-varying delays on the basis of the eigenvalue analysis and the descriptor method. When the network agents can only obtain intermittent position data from local neighbors at discrete time instants, the consensus in the network without time delay or with nonuniform delays is investigated by using the Wirtinger's inequality and the delayed-input approach. Numerical examples are given to illustrate the theoretical analysis.

  19. Continuous Indoor Positioning Fusing WiFi, Smartphone Sensors and Landmarks

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Zhi-An; Wang, Guofeng; Qin, Danyang; Na, Zhenyu; Cui, Yang; Chen, Juan

    2016-01-01

    To exploit the complementary strengths of WiFi positioning, pedestrian dead reckoning (PDR), and landmarks, we propose a novel fusion approach based on an extended Kalman filter (EKF). For WiFi positioning, unlike previous fusion approaches setting measurement noise parameters empirically, we deploy a kernel density estimation-based model to adaptively measure the related measurement noise statistics. Furthermore, a trusted area of WiFi positioning defined by fusion results of previous step and WiFi signal outlier detection are exploited to reduce computational cost and improve WiFi positioning accuracy. For PDR, we integrate a gyroscope, an accelerometer, and a magnetometer to determine the user heading based on another EKF model. To reduce accumulation error of PDR and enable continuous indoor positioning, not only the positioning results but also the heading estimations are recalibrated by indoor landmarks. Experimental results in a realistic indoor environment show that the proposed fusion approach achieves substantial positioning accuracy improvement than individual positioning approaches including PDR and WiFi positioning. PMID:27608019

  20. Continuous Indoor Positioning Fusing WiFi, Smartphone Sensors and Landmarks.

    PubMed

    Deng, Zhi-An; Wang, Guofeng; Qin, Danyang; Na, Zhenyu; Cui, Yang; Chen, Juan

    2016-09-05

    To exploit the complementary strengths of WiFi positioning, pedestrian dead reckoning (PDR), and landmarks, we propose a novel fusion approach based on an extended Kalman filter (EKF). For WiFi positioning, unlike previous fusion approaches setting measurement noise parameters empirically, we deploy a kernel density estimation-based model to adaptively measure the related measurement noise statistics. Furthermore, a trusted area of WiFi positioning defined by fusion results of previous step and WiFi signal outlier detection are exploited to reduce computational cost and improve WiFi positioning accuracy. For PDR, we integrate a gyroscope, an accelerometer, and a magnetometer to determine the user heading based on another EKF model. To reduce accumulation error of PDR and enable continuous indoor positioning, not only the positioning results but also the heading estimations are recalibrated by indoor landmarks. Experimental results in a realistic indoor environment show that the proposed fusion approach achieves substantial positioning accuracy improvement than individual positioning approaches including PDR and WiFi positioning.

  1. K-Eigenvalue sensitivities of secondary distributions of continuous-energy data

    SciTech Connect

    Kiedrowski, B. C.; Brown, F. B.

    2013-07-01

    MCNP6 has the capability to produce energy-resolved sensitivity profiles for secondary distributions (fission {Chi} and scattering laws). Computing both unconstrained and constrained profiles are possible. Verification is performed with analytic test problems and a comparison to TSUNAMI-3D, and the comparisons show MCNP6 calculates correct or consistent results. Continuous-energy calculations are performed for three fast critical experiments: Jezebel, Flattop, and copper-reflected Zeus. The sensitivities to the secondary distributions (integrated over chosen energy ranges) are of similar magnitude to those of many of the cross sections, demonstrating the possibility that integral experiments are useful for assessing the fidelity of these data as well. (authors)

  2. The Effects of Sleep Continuity Disruption on Positive Mood and Sleep Architecture in Healthy Adults.

    PubMed

    Finan, Patrick H; Quartana, Phillip J; Smith, Michael T

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to test an experimental model of the effects of sleep continuity disturbance on sleep architecture and positive mood in order to better understand the mechanisms linking insomnia and depression. Participants were randomized to receive 3 consecutive nights of sleep continuity disruption via forced nocturnal awakenings (FA, n = 21), or one of two control conditions: restricted sleep opportunity (RSO, n = 17) or uninterrupted sleep (US, n = 24). The study was set in an inpatient clinical research suite. Healthy, good-sleeping men and women were included. Polysomnography was used to measure sleep architecture, and mood was assessed via self-report each day. Compared to restricted sleep opportunity controls, forced awakenings subjects had significantly less slow wave sleep (P < 0.05) after the first night of sleep deprivation, and significantly lower positive mood (P < 0.05) after the second night of sleep deprivation. The differential change in slow wave sleep statistically mediated the observed group differences in positive mood (P = 0.002). To our knowledge, this is the first human experimental study to demonstrate that, despite comparable reductions in total sleep time, partial sleep loss from sleep continuity disruption is more detrimental to positive mood than partial sleep loss from delaying bedtime, even when controlling for concomitant increases in negative mood. With these findings, we provide temporal evidence in support of a putative biologic mechanism (slow wave sleep deficit) that could help explain the strong comorbidity between insomnia and depression. © 2015 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  3. The Effects of Sleep Continuity Disruption on Positive Mood and Sleep Architecture in Healthy Adults

    PubMed Central

    Finan, Patrick H.; Quartana, Phillip J.; Smith, Michael T.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to test an experimental model of the effects of sleep continuity disturbance on sleep architecture and positive mood in order to better understand the mechanisms linking insomnia and depression. Design: Participants were randomized to receive 3 consecutive nights of sleep continuity disruption via forced nocturnal awakenings (FA, n = 21), or one of two control conditions: restricted sleep opportunity (RSO, n = 17) or uninterrupted sleep (US, n = 24). Setting: The study was set in an inpatient clinical research suite. Participants: Healthy, good-sleeping men and women were included. Measurement and Results: Polysomnography was used to measure sleep architecture, and mood was assessed via self-report each day. Compared to restricted sleep opportunity controls, forced awakenings subjects had significantly less slow wave sleep (P < 0.05) after the first night of sleep deprivation, and significantly lower positive mood (P < 0.05) after the second night of sleep deprivation. The differential change in slow wave sleep statistically mediated the observed group differences in positive mood (P = 0.002). Conclusions: To our knowledge, this is the first human experimental study to demonstrate that, despite comparable reductions in total sleep time, partial sleep loss from sleep continuity disruption is more detrimental to positive mood than partial sleep loss from delaying bedtime, even when controlling for concomitant increases in negative mood. With these findings, we provide temporal evidence in support of a putative biologic mechanism (slow wave sleep deficit) that could help explain the strong comorbidity between insomnia and depression. Citation: Finan PH, Quartana PJ, Smith MT. The effects of sleep continuity disruption on positive mood and sleep architecture in healthy adults. SLEEP 2015;38(11):1735–1742. PMID:26085289

  4. Sleep continuity is positively correlated with sleep duration in laboratory nighttime sleep recordings.

    PubMed

    Kishi, Akifumi; Van Dongen, Hans P A; Natelson, Benjamin H; Bender, Amy M; Palombini, Luciana O; Bittencourt, Lia; Tufik, Sergio; Ayappa, Indu; Rapoport, David M

    2017-01-01

    Sleep duration varies widely across individuals and appears to be trait-like. Differences in the stability of underlying sleep processes may underlie this phenomenon. To investigate underlying mechanisms, we examined the relationship between sleep duration and sleep continuity in baseline polysomnography (PSG) recordings from three independently collected datasets: 1) 134 healthy controls (ages 37 ± 13 years) from the São Paulo Epidemiologic Sleep Study, who spent one night in a sleep laboratory, 2) 21 obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients who were treated with continuous positive airway pressure for at least 2 months (45 ± 12 years, respiratory disturbance index <15), who spent one night in a sleep laboratory with previous experience of multiple PSG studies, and 3) 62 healthy controls (28 ± 6 years) who, as part of larger experiments, spent 2 consecutive nights in a sleep laboratory. For each dataset, we used total sleep time (TST) to separate subjects into those with shorter sleep (S-TST) and those with longer sleep (L-TST). In all three datasets, survival curves of continuous sleep segments showed greater sleep continuity in L-TST than in S-TST. Correlation analyses with TST as a continuous variable corroborated the results; and the results also held true after controlling for age. There were no significant differences in baseline waking performance and sleepiness between S-TST and L-TST. In conclusion, in both healthy controls and treated OSA patients, sleep continuity was positively correlated with sleep duration. These findings suggest that S-TST may differ from L-TST in processes underlying sleep continuity, shedding new light on mechanisms underlying individual differences in sleep duration.

  5. Sleep continuity is positively correlated with sleep duration in laboratory nighttime sleep recordings

    PubMed Central

    Van Dongen, Hans P. A.; Natelson, Benjamin H.; Bender, Amy M.; Palombini, Luciana O.; Bittencourt, Lia; Tufik, Sergio; Ayappa, Indu; Rapoport, David M.

    2017-01-01

    Sleep duration varies widely across individuals and appears to be trait-like. Differences in the stability of underlying sleep processes may underlie this phenomenon. To investigate underlying mechanisms, we examined the relationship between sleep duration and sleep continuity in baseline polysomnography (PSG) recordings from three independently collected datasets: 1) 134 healthy controls (ages 37 ± 13 years) from the São Paulo Epidemiologic Sleep Study, who spent one night in a sleep laboratory, 2) 21 obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients who were treated with continuous positive airway pressure for at least 2 months (45 ± 12 years, respiratory disturbance index <15), who spent one night in a sleep laboratory with previous experience of multiple PSG studies, and 3) 62 healthy controls (28 ± 6 years) who, as part of larger experiments, spent 2 consecutive nights in a sleep laboratory. For each dataset, we used total sleep time (TST) to separate subjects into those with shorter sleep (S-TST) and those with longer sleep (L-TST). In all three datasets, survival curves of continuous sleep segments showed greater sleep continuity in L-TST than in S-TST. Correlation analyses with TST as a continuous variable corroborated the results; and the results also held true after controlling for age. There were no significant differences in baseline waking performance and sleepiness between S-TST and L-TST. In conclusion, in both healthy controls and treated OSA patients, sleep continuity was positively correlated with sleep duration. These findings suggest that S-TST may differ from L-TST in processes underlying sleep continuity, shedding new light on mechanisms underlying individual differences in sleep duration. PMID:28394943

  6. Ant Colony Optimization Algorithm for Continuous Domains Based on Position Distribution Model of Ant Colony Foraging

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Liqiang; Dai, Yuntao

    2014-01-01

    Ant colony optimization algorithm for continuous domains is a major research direction for ant colony optimization algorithm. In this paper, we propose a distribution model of ant colony foraging, through analysis of the relationship between the position distribution and food source in the process of ant colony foraging. We design a continuous domain optimization algorithm based on the model and give the form of solution for the algorithm, the distribution model of pheromone, the update rules of ant colony position, and the processing method of constraint condition. Algorithm performance against a set of test trials was unconstrained optimization test functions and a set of optimization test functions, and test results of other algorithms are compared and analyzed to verify the correctness and effectiveness of the proposed algorithm. PMID:24955402

  7. Apical Lung Herniation Associated with Continuous Positive Airway Pressure in a 4-Year-Old Girl

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, Christopher J.; Daftary, Ameet S.; Machogu, Evans M.

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of apical lung herniation through the superior thoracic aperture of an obese child using nocturnal CPAP. Lung herniation has been described in association with congenital thoracic abnormalities and elevated intra-thoracic pressure, such as trauma. This patient was hospitalized with community acquired pneumonia and required nocturnal CPAP for treatment of concurrent obstructive sleep apnea. Her lung hernia was discovered incidentally on routine follow-up chest radiography and resolved with cessation of CPAP treatment. Lung herniation in association with the use of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) has not been previously described. Citation: Lehmann CJ, Daftary AS, Machogu EM. Apical lung herniation associated with continuous positive airway pressure in a 4-year-old girl. J Clin Sleep Med 2016;12(11):1565–1566. PMID:27397657

  8. Ant colony optimization algorithm for continuous domains based on position distribution model of ant colony foraging.

    PubMed

    Liu, Liqiang; Dai, Yuntao; Gao, Jinyu

    2014-01-01

    Ant colony optimization algorithm for continuous domains is a major research direction for ant colony optimization algorithm. In this paper, we propose a distribution model of ant colony foraging, through analysis of the relationship between the position distribution and food source in the process of ant colony foraging. We design a continuous domain optimization algorithm based on the model and give the form of solution for the algorithm, the distribution model of pheromone, the update rules of ant colony position, and the processing method of constraint condition. Algorithm performance against a set of test trials was unconstrained optimization test functions and a set of optimization test functions, and test results of other algorithms are compared and analyzed to verify the correctness and effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  9. Continued Sensitivity of Plasmodium falciparum to Artemisinin in Guyana, With Absence of Kelch Propeller Domain Mutant Alleles

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Reyaud; Martin, Maria Jesus Sanchez; Persaud, Shamdeo; Ceron, Nicolas; Kellman, Dwayne; Musset, Lise; Carter, Keith H.; Ringwald, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Because of concerns about possible emergence of artemisinin resistance strains of Plasmodium falciparum in mining areas of the interior of Guyana, a 7-day artesunate trial was conducted from March to December 2014. The day-3 parasite clearance rate, the efficacy of artesunate at day 28, and polymorphism of Kelch 13 (PfK13)—the marker of artemisinin resistance—were assessed. The study confirmed the continued sensitivity of P falciparum to artemisinin. A 7-day course of artesunate was 100% efficacious with only 2% (95% confidence interval, .1%–10.9%) of enrolled subjects positive at day 3. All day-0 parasite samples were wild type. Continued resistance monitoring is nevertheless recommended, given the widespread availability and uncontrolled use of artemisinin drugs in mining areas of Guyana. PMID:27704030

  10. Supraglottic Atomization of Surfactant in Spontaneously Breathing Lambs Receiving Continuous Positive Airway Pressure.

    PubMed

    Milesi, Ilaria; Tingay, David G; Lavizzari, Anna; Bianco, Federico; Zannin, Emanuela; Tagliabue, Paolo; Mosca, Fabio; Ventura, Maria Luisa; Rajapaksa, Anushi; Perkins, Elizabeth J; Black, Don; Di Castri, Marco; Sourial, Magdy; Pohlmann, Gerhard; Dellaca', Raffaele L

    2017-09-01

    To determine the short-term tolerance, efficacy, and lung deposition of supraglottic atomized surfactant in spontaneously breathing lambs receiving continuous positive airway pressure. Prospective, randomized animal study. Animal research laboratory. Twenty-two preterm lambs on continuous positive airway pressure (132 ± 1 d gestational age). Animals receiving continuous positive airway pressure via binasal prongs at 8 cm H2O were randomized to receive atomized surfactant at approximately 60-minute of life (atom; n = 15) or not (control; n = 7). The atom group received 200 mg/kg of poractant alfa (Curosurf; Chiesi Farmaceutici SpA, Parma, Italy) over 45 minutes via a novel atomizer located in the upper pharynx that synchronized surfactant delivery with the inspiratory phase. Arterial blood gas, regional distribution of tidal ventilation (electrical impedance tomography), and carotid blood flow were recorded every 15 minutes until 90 minutes after stabilizing on continuous positive airway pressure. Gas exchange, respiratory rate, and hemodynamic variables, including carotid blood flow, remained stable during surfactant treatment. There was a significant improvement in arterial alveolar ratio after surfactant delivery in the atom group (p < 0.05; Sidak posttests), while there was no difference in PaCO2. Electrical impedance tomography data showed a more uniform pattern of ventilation in the atom group. In the atom group, the median (interquartile range) deposition of surfactant in the lung was 32% (22-43%) of the delivered dose, with an even distribution between the right and the left lungs. In our model of spontaneously breathing lambs receiving CPAP, supraglottic atomization of Curosurf via a novel device was safe, improved oxygenation and ventilation homogeneity compared with CPAP only, and provided a relatively large lung deposition suggesting clinical utility.

  11. Definability of semifields of continuous positive functions by the lattices of their subalgebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidorov, V. V.

    2016-09-01

    We consider the lattice {A}(U(X)) of subalgebras of a semifield U(X) of continuous positive functions on an arbitrary topological space X and its sublattice {A}_1(U(X)) of subalgebras with unity. The main result of the paper is the proof of the definability of any semifield U(X) both by the lattice {A}(U(X)) and by its sublattice {A}_1(U(X)). Bibliography: 12 titles.

  12. Comparison of nasal intermittent positive pressure ventilation and nasal continuous positive airway pressure treatments using parametric survival models.

    PubMed

    Baneshi, Mohammad-Reza; Bahmanbijari, Bahareh; Mahdian, Reza; Haji-Maghsoodi, Saeide; Nikbakht, Roya

    2014-04-01

    The Cox model is the dominant tool in clinical trials to compare treatment options. This model does not specify any specific form to the hazard function. On the other hand, parametric models allow the researcher to consider an appropriate shape of hazard function for the event of interest. The aim of this article is to compare performance of Cox and parametric models. We used data collected in a prospective clinical trial that aimed to compare performance of nasal intermittent positive pressure ventilation (NIPPV) and nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP) treatments in terms of survival of newborn infants who had respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). Performance of Cox, exponential, Weibull, and log-logistic models were compared in terms of goodness of fit. Fitting the Cox model, we have seen that infants who received NCPAP were 4.23 (Hazard Ratio= 4.23, 95% Confidence Interval: 1.87-9.59) times more likely to fail than those received NIPPV (P=0.001). Adequacy of the exponential model was rejected. We have seen a decreasing hazard rate over time, in both treatment groups. This decrease was sharper in NCPAP group. Akiake information criterion corresponded to the log-logistic model and was lower than all other models followed by Weibull model. Our results demonstrate the benefit of parametric survival models over traditional Cox regression model in terms of modeling of shape of hazard function. We saw a decreasing hazard that confirms the flexibility of parametric models in terms of the modeling of hazard rate.

  13. Theoretical Noise Analysis on a Position-sensitive Metallic Magnetic Calorimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Stephen J.

    2007-01-01

    We report on the theoretical noise analysis for a position-sensitive Metallic Magnetic Calorimeter (MMC), consisting of MMC read-out at both ends of a large X-ray absorber. Such devices are under consideration as alternatives to other cryogenic technologies for future X-ray astronomy missions. We use a finite-element model (FEM) to numerically calculate the signal and noise response at the detector outputs and investigate the correlations between the noise measured at each MMC coupled by the absorber. We then calculate, using the optimal filter concept, the theoretical energy and position resolution across the detector and discuss the trade-offs involved in optimizing the detector design for energy resolution, position resolution and count rate. The results show, theoretically, the position-sensitive MMC concept offers impressive spectral and spatial resolving capabilities compared to pixel arrays and similar position-sensitive cryogenic technologies using Transition Edge Sensor (TES) read-out.

  14. Auditory cortical neurons are sensitive to static and continuously changing interaural phase cues.

    PubMed

    Reale, R A; Brugge, J F

    1990-10-01

    1. The interaural-phase-difference (IPD) sensitivity of single neurons in the primary auditory (AI) cortex of the anesthetized cat was studied at stimulus frequencies ranging from 120 to 2,500 Hz. Best frequencies of the 43 AI cells sensitive to IPD ranged from 190 to 2,400 Hz. 2. A static IPD was produced when a pair of low-frequency tone bursts, differing from one another only in starting phase, were presented dichotically. The resulting IPD-sensitivity curves, which plot the number of discharges evoked by the binaural signal as a function of IPD, were deeply modulated circular functions. IPD functions were analyzed for their mean vector length (r) and mean interaural phase (phi). Phase sensitivity was relatively independent of best frequency (BF) but highly dependent on stimulus frequency. Regardless of BF or stimulus frequency within the excitatory response area the majority of cells fired maximally when the ipsilateral tone lagged the contralateral signal and fired least when this interaural-phase relationship was reversed. 3. Sensitivity to continuously changing IPD was studied by delivering to the two ears 3-s tones that differed slightly in frequency, resulting in a binaural beat. Approximately 26% of the cells that showed a sensitivity to static changes in IPD also showed a sensitivity to dynamically changing IPD created by this binaural tonal combination. The discharges were highly periodic and tightly synchronized to a particular phase of the binaural beat cycle. High synchrony can be attributed to the fact that cortical neurons typically respond to an excitatory stimulus with but a single spike that is often precisely timed to stimulus onset. A period histogram, binned on the binaural beat frequency (fb), produced an equivalent IPD-sensitivity function for dynamically changing interaural phase. For neurons sensitive to both static and continuously changing interaural phase there was good correspondence between their static (phi s) and dynamic (phi d

  15. Development of Position-Sensitive Magnetic Calorimeters for X-Ray Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bandler, SImon; Stevenson, Thomas; Hsieh, Wen-Ting

    2011-01-01

    Metallic magnetic calorimeters (MMC) are one of the most promising devices to provide very high energy resolution needed for future astronomical x-ray spectroscopy. MMC detectors can be built to large detector arrays having thousands of pixels. Position-sensitive magnetic (PoSM) microcalorimeters consist of multiple absorbers thermally coupled to one magnetic micro calorimeter. Each absorber element has a different thermal coupling to the MMC, resulting in a distribution of different pulse shapes and enabling position discrimination between the absorber elements. PoSMs therefore achieve the large focal plane area with fewer number of readout channels without compromising spatial sampling. Excellent performance of PoSMs was achieved by optimizing the designs of key parameters such as the thermal conductance among the absorbers, magnetic sensor, and heat sink, as well as the absorber heat capacities. Micro fab ri - cation techniques were developed to construct four-absorber PoSMs, in which each absorber consists of a two-layer composite of bismuth and gold. The energy resolution (FWHM full width at half maximum) was measured to be better than 5 eV at 6 keV x-rays for all four absorbers. Position determination was demonstrated with pulse-shape discrimination, as well as with pulse rise time. X-ray microcalorimeters are usually designed to thermalize as quickly as possible to avoid degradation in energy resolution from position dependence to the pulse shapes. Each pixel consists of an absorber and a temperature sensor, both decoupled from the cold bath through a weak thermal link. Each pixel requires a separate readout channel; for instance, with a SQUID (superconducting quantum interference device). For future astronomy missions where thousands to millions of resolution elements are required, having an individual SQUID readout channel for each pixel becomes difficult. One route to attaining these goals is a position-sensitive detector in which a large continuous or

  16. Effect of a heated humidifier during continuous positive airway pressure delivered by a helmet

    PubMed Central

    Chiumello, Davide; Chierichetti, Monica; Tallarini, Federica; Cozzi, Paola; Cressoni, Massimo; Polli, Federico; Colombo, Riccardo; Castelli, Antonio; Gattinoni, Luciano

    2008-01-01

    Introduction The helmet may be an effective interface for the delivery of noninvasive positive pressure ventilation. The high internal gas volume of the helmet can act as a 'mixing chamber', in which the humidity of the patient's expired alveolar gases increases the humidity of the dry medical gases, thus avoiding the need for active humidification. We evaluated the temperature and humidity of respiratory gases inside the helmet, with and without a heated humidifier, during continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) delivered with a helmet. Methods Nine patients with acute respiratory failure (arterial oxygen tension/fractional inspired oxygen ratio 209 ± 52 mmHg) and 10 healthy individuals were subjected to CPAP. The CPAP was delivered either through a mechanical ventilator or by continuous low (40 l/min) or high flow (80 l/min). Humidity was measured inside the helmet using a capacitive hygrometer. The level of patient comfort was evaluated using a continuous scale. Results In patients with acute respiratory failure, the heated humidifier significantly increased the absolute humidity from 18.4 ± 5.5 mgH2O/l to 34.1 ± 2.8 mgH2O/l during ventilator CPAP, from 11.4 ± 4.8 mgH2O/l to 33.9 ± 1.9 mgH2O/l during continuous low-flow CPAP, and from 6.4 ± 1.8 mgH2O/l to 24.2 ± 5.4 mgH2O/l during continuous high-flow CPAP. Without the heated humidifier, the absolute humidity was significantly higher with ventilator CPAP than with continuous low-flow and high-flow CPAP. The level of comfort was similar for all the three modes of ventilation and with or without the heated humidifier. The findings in healthy individuals were similar to those in the patients with acute respiratory failure. Conclusion The fresh gas flowing through the helmet with continuous flow CPAP systems limited the possibility to increase the humidity. We suggest that a heated humidifier should be employed with continuous flow CPAP systems. PMID:18426561

  17. Event-related potential correlates of the extraverts' sensitivity to valence changes in positive stimuli.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jiajin; He, Yuanyuan; Lei, Yi; Yang, Jiemin; Li, Hong

    2009-08-05

    This study investigated whether the human sensitivity to valence intensity changes in positive stimuli varies with extraversion. Event-related potentials were recorded for highly positive, moderately positive, and neutral stimuli while participants (extraverts and nonextraverts) performed a standard/deviant categorization task, irrespective of the emotionality of deviants. The results of extraverts showed larger P2 and P3 amplitudes during highly positive condition than during moderately positive condition which, in turn, elicited larger P2 than neutral condition. Conversely, nonextraverts showed no differences at both P2 and P3 components. Thus, extraverts, unlike less extraverted individuals, are sensitive to valence changes in positive stimuli, which may be underlain by certain biogenetic mechanism.

  18. Prone positioning does not affect cannula function during extracorporeal membrane oxygenation or continuous renal replacement therapy

    PubMed Central

    Goettler, Claudia E; Pryor, John P; Hoey, Brian A; Phillips, JoAnne K; Balas, Michelle C; Shapiro, Michael B

    2002-01-01

    Introduction Prone positioning in respiratory failure has been shown to be a useful adjunct in the treatment of severe hypoxia. However, the prone position can result in dislodgment or malfunction of tubes and cannulae. Certain patients receiving extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) or continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) may also benefit from positional therapy. The impact of cannula-related complications in these patients is potentially disastrous. The safety and efficacy of prone positioning of these patients has not been previously reported. Materials and methods A retrospective chart review evaluated ECMO or CRRT cannula location, and displacement or malfunction during positional change or while prone. The study was set in a General Surgery and Trauma Intensive Care Unit. The subjects were all patients at our institution who simultaneously underwent ECMO or CRRT and prone positioning from July 1996 to July 2001. There were no interventions. Results Ten patients underwent ECMO and 42 patients underwent CRRT during the study period. Seven patients underwent simultaneous prone positioning and either ECMO (4/10) or CRRT (4/42). A total of 68 turning events (prone to supine or supine to prone) were recorded, with each patient averaging 9.7 (range, 4–16) turning episodes. Turning was performed with sheets and extra nursing personnel; no special mechanical assist devices were used. No patients experienced inadvertent cannula removal during turning. Two patients had poor flow through their cannulae. In one patient, this occurred in the supine position and required repositioning of the cannula. In the second patient, cannulae were changed twice and flow was poor in both the supine and the prone positions. All ECMO and CRRT patients received venous cannulae. Cannula location (seven internal jugular and 11 femoral) did not the affect risk of malfunction. Discussion and conclusions Patients with venous cannulae for ECMO or CRRT can be safely placed in the

  19. DETECTORS AND EXPERIMENTAL METHODS: New test and analysis of position-sensitive-silicon-detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Lang; Ge, Yu-Cheng; Wang, He; Fan, Feng-Ying; Qiao, Rui; Lu, Fei; Song, Yu-Shou; Zheng, Tao; Ye, Yan-Lin

    2009-01-01

    We have tested and analyzed the properties of two-dimensional Position-Sensitive-silicon-Detector (PSD) with new integrated preamplifiers. The test demonstrates that the best position resolution for 5.5 MeV α particles is 1.7 mm (FWHM), and the best energy resolution is 2.1%, which are notably better than the previously reported results. A scaling formula is introduced to make the absolute position calibration.

  20. Effects of rider position on continuous wave Doppler responses to maximal cycle ergometry.

    PubMed Central

    Franke, W D; Betz, C B; Humphrey, R H

    1994-01-01

    Using 10 well-trained (VO2peak = 60.6 ml kg-1min-1) college age cyclists and continuous wave Doppler echocardiography, peak acceleration (PkA) and velocity (PkV) of blood flow in the ascending aorta, and the stroke velocity integral (SVI) were assessed to determine if rider position influenced the central haemodynamic responses to graded maximal cycle ergometry. Cyclist position was determined by hand placement on the uprights (UPRI) or drops (DROP) of conventional handlebars or using aerodynamic handlebars (AHB). All subjects consistently achieved a peak workload of 300 W. The Doppler variables did not differ significantly between rider positions at each stage of the maximal exercise tests but did change in response to increasing workloads. PkA was significantly (P < 0.05) greater at workloads > or = 240 W versus < or = 120 W. PkV increased significantly (P < 0.05) up to 180 W and then reached a plateau. SVI increased to a workload of 120 W and then progressively declined, becoming significantly (P < 0.05) less at 300 W. For each stage, neither submaximal VO2, VI nor heart rate (HR) differed significantly between each trial. These results suggest that rider position does not affect the physiological response to maximal bicycle ergometry as responses to each position are similar. PMID:8044492

  1. Linear motor drive system for continuous-path closed-loop position control of an object

    DOEpatents

    Barkman, William E.

    1980-01-01

    A precision numerical controlled servo-positioning system is provided for continuous closed-loop position control of a machine slide or platform driven by a linear-induction motor. The system utilizes filtered velocity feedback to provide system stability required to operate with a system gain of 100 inches/minute/0.001 inch of following error. The filtered velocity feedback signal is derived from the position output signals of a laser interferometer utilized to monitor the movement of the slide. Air-bearing slides mounted to a stable support are utilized to minimize friction and small irregularities in the slideway which would tend to introduce positioning errors. A microprocessor is programmed to read command and feedback information and converts this information into the system following error signal. This error signal is summed with the negative filtered velocity feedback signal at the input of a servo amplifier whose output serves as the drive power signal to the linear motor position control coil.

  2. Discrete and continuous fractional persistence problems - the positivity property and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cresson, Jacky; Szafrańska, Anna

    2017-03-01

    In this article, we study the continuous and discrete fractional persistence problem which looks for the persistence of properties of a given classical (α = 1) differential equation in the fractional case (here using fractional Caputo's derivatives) and the numerical scheme which are associated (here with discrete Grünwald-Letnikov derivatives). Our main concerns are positivity, order preserving ,equilibrium points and stability of these points. We formulate explicit conditions under which a fractional system preserves positivity. We deduce also sufficient conditions to ensure order preserving. We deduce from these results a fractional persistence theorem which ensures that positivity, order preserving, equilibrium points and stability is preserved under a Caputo fractional embedding of a given differential equation. At the discrete level, the problem is more complicated. Following a strategy initiated by R. Mickens dealing with non local approximations, we define a non standard finite difference scheme for fractional differential equations based on discrete Grünwald-Letnikov derivatives, which preserves positivity unconditionally on the discretization increment. We deduce a discrete version of the fractional persistence theorem for what concerns positivity and equilibrium points. We then apply our results to study a fractional prey-predator model introduced by Javidi et al.

  3. Sensitivities of five alpha continuous air monitors for detection of airborne sup 239 Pu

    SciTech Connect

    McIsaac, C.V.; Amaro, C.R.

    1992-07-01

    Results of measurements of the sensitivities of five alpha continuous air monitors (CAMs) for detection of airborne {sup 239}Pu are presented. Four commercially available alpha CAMs (Kurz model 8311, Merlin Gerin Edgar, RADeCO model 452, and Victoreen model 758) and a prototype alpha CAM currently in use at Argonne National Laboratory- West (ANL-W) were tested sampling natural ambient air and laboratory-generated atmospheres laden with either blank dust or dust containing nCi/g concentrations of {sup 239}Pu. Cumulative alpha spectra were stored at 30 or 60 minute intervals during each sampling and were subsequently analyzed using three different commonly used alpha spectrum analysis algorithms. The effect of airborne dust concentration and sample filter porosity on detector resolution and sensitivity for airborne {sup 239}Pu are described.

  4. Sensitivities of five alpha continuous air monitors for detection of airborne {sup 239}Pu

    SciTech Connect

    McIsaac, C.V.; Amaro, C.R.

    1992-07-01

    Results of measurements of the sensitivities of five alpha continuous air monitors (CAMs) for detection of airborne {sup 239}Pu are presented. Four commercially available alpha CAMs (Kurz model 8311, Merlin Gerin Edgar, RADeCO model 452, and Victoreen model 758) and a prototype alpha CAM currently in use at Argonne National Laboratory- West (ANL-W) were tested sampling natural ambient air and laboratory-generated atmospheres laden with either blank dust or dust containing nCi/g concentrations of {sup 239}Pu. Cumulative alpha spectra were stored at 30 or 60 minute intervals during each sampling and were subsequently analyzed using three different commonly used alpha spectrum analysis algorithms. The effect of airborne dust concentration and sample filter porosity on detector resolution and sensitivity for airborne {sup 239}Pu are described.

  5. Continuous and sensitive acid phosphatase assay based on a conjugated polyelectrolyte.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yonghua; Tan, Ying; Liu, Renxuan; Zhao, Rui; Tan, Chunyan; Jiang, Yuyang

    2012-08-01

    We report a novel continuous and sensitive fluorescence turn-on assay for ACPs, which consists of a cationic conjugated polyelectrolyte (PPE4+) and a commonly used phosphatase substrate p-nitrophenyl phosphate (pNPP). The kinetics of the ACP catalyzed hydrolysis of the substrate pNPP was monitored by the fluorescence change of PPE4+ and corresponding kinetic parameters were derived to be consistent with the literature reports. The applications of PPE4+/pNPP-based ACP assay in high-throughput screening of ACP inhibitors and detection of prostatic acid phosphotase (PAP) in vitro were demonstrated.

  6. Management of severe obstructive sleep apnea using mandibular advancement devices with auto continuous positive airway pressures

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyay, Rashmi; Dubey, Abhishek; Kant, Surya; Singh, Balendra Pratap

    2015-01-01

    The use of continuous positive airway pressures (CPAP) is considered standard treatment of moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Treatment of the disease poses a great challenge not only for its diagnostic purpose but also for its treatment part. In about 29-83% of the patients, treatment is difficult because of non-compliance resulting due to high pressures, air leaks and other related issues. In such situations, alternative methods of treatment need to be looked for so as to ascertain better management. Mandibular advancement devices along with CPAP may show better treatment outcome in specific situations. PMID:25814802

  7. Bubble continuous positive airway pressure in a human immunodeficiency virus-infected infant

    PubMed Central

    McCollum, E. D.; Smith, A.; Golitko, C. L.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY World Health Organization-classified very severe pneumonia due to Pneumocystis jirovecii infection is recognized as a life-threatening condition in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected infants. We recount the use of nasal bubble continuous positive airway pressure (BCPAP) in an HIV-infected African infant with very severe pneumonia and treatment failure due to suspected infection with P. jirovecii. We also examine the potential implications of BCPAP use in resource-poor settings with a high case index of acute respiratory failure due to HIV-related pneumonia, but limited access to mechanical ventilation. PMID:21396221

  8. Continuous rainfall generation for a warmer climate using observed temperature sensitivities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasko, Conrad; Sharma, Ashish

    2017-01-01

    Continuous rainfall sequences are often used as inputs in hydrologic modeling, particularly where a probabilistic assessment is required. Continuous rainfall sequences provide a means for accounting of all aspects of rainfall that produce flooding, for example, not just the design rainfall event but also the rainfall prior to the extreme rainfall event. With the advent of climate change, higher temperatures have been associated with changes in rainfall, in particular intensifying rainfall extremes with less uniform temporal patterns. Given these demonstrated changes to extreme rainfall with temperature rise, there is a need to modify continuous rainfall generators to account for current and likely future changes in temperature. In this work we propose a novel method for simulating continuous rainfall sequences for a future warmer climate by conditioning parameters on their historical sensitivity with temperature. To demonstrate the proposed technique we use a one-dimensional Neyman-Scott Rectangular Pulses model at two locations across Australia. The statistics used in the parameter estimation are conditioned on their historical sensitivity to average monthly temperature to simulate rainfall for a change in temperature. The results are validated by comparing the simulated rainfall against observations originating from differing temperatures and it is shown that the model captures the relative difference in the mean monthly rainfall and monthly maxima. Encouraged by these results we simulate rainfall for higher temperatures and capture expected changes to annual maxima and design temporal patterns for a warmer climate. While we demonstrate our methodology in the simulation of sub-daily rainfall using a specific model, the approach presented here can be applied to all weather generation schemes for projection in a warmer climate.

  9. Single-point position and transition defects in continuous time quantum walks

    PubMed Central

    Li, Z. J.; Wang, J. B.

    2015-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of continuous time quantum walks (CTQW) with both position and transition defects defined at a single point in the line. Analytical solutions of both traveling waves and bound states are obtained, which provide valuable insight into the dynamics of CTQW. The number of bound states is found to be critically dependent on the defect parameters, and the localized probability peaks can be readily obtained by projecting the state vector of CTQW on to these bound states. The interference between two bound states are also observed in the case of a transition defect. The spreading of CTQW probability over the line can be finely tuned by varying the position and transition defect parameters, offering the possibility of precision quantum control of the system. PMID:26323855

  10. Continuous and Discrete Space Particle Filters for Predictions in Acoustic Positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Will; Kim, Surrey; Kouritzin, Michael A.

    2002-12-01

    Predicting the future state of a random dynamic signal based on corrupted, distorted, and partial observations is vital for proper real-time control of a system that includes time delay. Motivated by problems from Acoustic Positioning Research Inc., we consider the continual automated illumination of an object moving within a bounded domain, which requires object location prediction due to inherent mechanical and physical time lags associated with robotic lighting. Quality computational predictions demand high fidelity models for the coupled moving object signal and observation equipment pair. In our current problem, the signal represents the vector position, orientation, and velocity of a stage performer. Acoustic observations are formed by timing ultrasonic waves traveling from four perimeter speakers to a microphone attached to the performer. The goal is to schedule lighting movements that are coordinated with the performer by anticipating his/her future position based upon these observations using filtering theory. Particle system based methods have experienced rapid development and have become an essential technique of contemporary filtering strategies. Hitherto, researchers have largely focused on continuous state particle filters, ranging from traditional weighted particle filters to adaptive refining particle filters, readily able to perform path-space estimation and prediction. Herein, we compare the performance of a state-of-the-art refining particle filter to that of a novel discrete-space particle filter on the acoustic positioning problem. By discrete space particle filter we mean a Markov chain that counts particles in discretized cells of the signal state space in order to form an approximated unnormalized distribution of the signal state. For both filters mentioned above, we will examine issues like the mean time to localize a signal, the fidelity of filter estimates at various signal to noise ratios, computational costs, and the effect of signal

  11. [Acceptability and compliance to long-term continuous positive pressure treatment].

    PubMed

    Berkani, K; Dimet, J

    2015-03-01

    Compliance with continuous positive pressure treatment (CPAP) is a determining factor in the management of the obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). Long-term compliance has been poorly studied. The probability of long-term continuation of CPAP was evaluated retrospectively by an analysis of survival in 252 patients treated by CPAP after a screening of 472 patients during the years 2002 and 2003. Twenty-eight patients fulfilling the criteria for CPAP immediately refused the treatment. The mean follow-up for the 252 treated patients was 76.9±46.4 months, with 38 patients having died and 75 having discontinued treatment during the period. The 136 patients who continued treatment used CPAP for a mean of 7.4±1.6hours daily. The probability of continuing treatment was 71% at 5 years and 68% at 10 years. The severity of OSAS was a predictive factor for long-term CPAP compliance, with a 10-year compliance of 82% in patients having an apnoea/hypopnoea index >60, versus 68% with an index between 30-60 and 44% with an index <30. Long-term CPAP treatment is globally well accepted, with a 68% probability of continuing treatment for 10 years, particularly in the most severely affected patients. Long-term daily compliance is very satisfactory. Copyright © 2014 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Differential Sensitivity to Learning from Positive and Negative Outcomes in Cocaine Users

    PubMed Central

    Strickland, Justin C.; Bolin, B. Levi; Lile, Joshua A.; Rush, Craig R.; Stoops, William W.

    2016-01-01

    Background Altered sensitivity to positive and negative outcomes may be linked to the maladaptive choices characteristic of substance use disorders. Few studies have determined the distinct roles that positive and negative outcomes play in stimulus-response learning in cocaine users. The purpose of the present study was to investigate sensitivity to learning from positive and negative outcomes on a probabilistic learning task in cocaine users employing human laboratory and crowdsourcing techniques. Methods Individuals who reported cocaine use were recruited for a laboratory study (Experiment 1) or an online study on Amazon.com’s Mechanical Turk (mTurk) (Experiment 2). All participants completed a feedback-based probabilistic learning task in which images were classified into categories (A versus B). Positive and negative outcomes were provided in a probabilistic manner on separate trials. Proportion of optimal responses and response times were recorded. Results Active cocaine users were less sensitive to learning from positive relative to negative outcomes. These effects were consistent across image type and session in the laboratory sample. Similarly, reduced sensitivity to learning from positive outcomes was observed in cocaine users on mTurk. Control participants did not show suboptimal performance following positive or negative outcomes. Conclusions This study extends the limited research on feedback-based learning in drug users by demonstrating reduced sensitivity to positive outcomes in cocaine users recruited in the human laboratory and online. Future studies on the clinical significance and mechanisms underlying this bias are needed to understand its relevance as a target for intervention development. PMID:27373186

  13. A novel position-sensitive mega-size dosimeter for photoneutrons in high-energy X-ray medical accelerators.

    PubMed

    Sohrabi, Mehdi; Hakimi, Amir; Mahdavi, Seyed Rabi

    2016-06-01

    A novel position-sensitive mega-size polycarbonate (MSPC) dosimeter is introduced. It provides photoneutron (PN) dose equivalent matrix of positions in and out of a beam of a high energy X-ray medical accelerator under a single exposure. A novel position-sensitive MSPC dosimeter was developed and applied. It has an effective etched area of 50×50cm(2), as used in this study, processed in a mega-size electrochemical etching chamber to amplify PN-induced-recoil tracks to a point viewed by the unaided eyes. Using such dosimeters, PN dose equivalents, dose equivalent profiles and isodose equivalent distribution of positions in and out of beams for different X-ray doses and field sizes were determined in a Siemens ONCOR Linac. The PN dose equivalent at each position versus X-ray dose was linear up to 20Gy studied. As the field size increased, the PN dose equivalent in the beam was also increased but it remained constant at positions out of the beam up to 20cm away from the beam edge. The jaws and MLCs due to material differences and locations relative to the target produce different PN contributions. The MSPC dosimeter introduced in this study is a perfect candidate for PN dosimetry with unique characteristics such as simplicity, efficiency, dose equivalent response, large size, flexibility to be bent, resembling the patient's skin, highly position-sensitive with high spatial resolution, highly insensitive to X-rays, continuity in measurements and need to a single dosimeter to obtain PN dose equivalent matrix data under a single X-ray exposure. Copyright © 2016 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. [Bilateral parotitis in a patient under continuous positive airway pressure treatment].

    PubMed

    Abdullayev, Ruslan; Saral, Filiz Cosku; Kucukebe, Omer Burak; Sayiner, Hakan Sezgin; Bayraktar, Cem; Akgun, Sadik

    Many conditions such as bacterial and viral infectious diseases, mechanical obstruction due to air and calculi and drugs can cause parotitis. We present a case of unusual bilateral parotitis in a patient under non-invasive continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbation in intensive care unit. A 36-year-old patient was admitted to intensive care unit with the diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbation. Antibiotherapy, bronchodilator therapy and non-invasive positive pressure ventilation were applied as treatment regimen. Painless swellings developed on the 3rd day of admission on the right and a day after this on the left parotid glands. Amylase levels were increased and ultrasonographic evaluation revealed bilateral parotitis. No intervention was made and the therapy was continued. The patient was discharged on the 6th day with clinical improvement and regression of parotid swellings without any complications. Parotitis may have occurred after retrograde air flow in the Stensen duct during CPAP application. After the exclusion of possible viral and bacteriological etiologies and possible drug reactions we can focus on this diagnosis. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  15. Spontaneous breathing patterns of very preterm infants treated with continuous positive airway pressure at birth.

    PubMed

    te Pas, Arjan B; Davis, Peter G; Kamlin, C Omar F; Dawson, Jennifer; O'Donnell, Colm P F; Morley, Colin J

    2008-09-01

    There are no data describing how very preterm infants breathe spontaneously immediately after birth. We studied a convenience sample of spontaneously breathing infants continuous positive airway pressure at birth. Airway pressure and flow were measured and each breath analyzed. Twelve infants had 792 breaths suitable for analysis. Results are given as mean (SD). Gestational age and birth weight were 29 (1.9) wk and 1220 (412) g. Recordings were started 159 (77) s after birth. The inspiratory pattern and duration was similar in all breaths at 0.36 (0.11) s. There were five expiratory patterns; most infants had more than one. In 79% of breaths expiratory duration (1.6 (1.1) s) was slowed or held by interruption or braking of expiratory flow. It was braked in 47% to a complete expiratory hold, in 22% by grunting or crying, and in 10% by slow or interrupted expiration. In 21% of the breaths, expiration was not interrupted and lasted 0.53 (0.13) s. Half of these breaths represented a panting pattern (rate >60 /min). Immediately after birth, most very preterm infants, treated with continuous positive airway pressure, frequently prolong their expiration by braking the expiratory flow. :

  16. Uptake and continuous use of copper intrauterine device in a cohort of HIV-positive women.

    PubMed

    Landolt, Nadia Kancheva; Phanuphak, Nittaya; Teeratakulpisarn, Nipat; Kriengsinyot, Rosalin; Ahluwalia, Jennisa; Pinyakorn, Suteeraporn; Chaithongwongwatthana, Surasith; Ananworanich, Jintanat

    2013-01-01

    Copper intrauterine device (IUD) is not commonly used in many countries, though it provides effective reversible contraception with no or minimal primary systemic side effects. We assessed its uptake and continuation of use among HIV-positive Thai women. Sixty-six of 322 women of reproductive age, whom we approached for the study, met the eligibility criteria. Sterilization (62%) was the main reason for failure to enroll. Twenty-nine of them (44%) underwent IUD insertion. Considering condom use sufficient for pregnancy prevention (12%) was the main reason among eligible women for the refusal to participate in the study. At six months, 54% of enrolled participants reported one or more side effects such as increased menstrual flow (43%), spotting (21%) and dysmenorrhea (11%). The continuation rate of IUD use was high (93%), in spite of the persistent non-systemic side effects. The study showed that copper IUD could be an acceptable contraceptive choice for Thai HIV-positive women. Easy access to the method in a setting linked with the HIV service, and education on IUD risks and benefits is needed to promote the use of IUD in addition to condoms as an effective contraceptive option in HIV-infected women.

  17. Bilateral parotitis in a patient under continuous positive airway pressure treatment.

    PubMed

    Abdullayev, Ruslan; Saral, Filiz Cosku; Kucukebe, Omer Burak; Sayiner, Hakan Sezgin; Bayraktar, Cem; Akgun, Sadik

    Many conditions such as bacterial and viral infectious diseases, mechanical obstruction due to air and calculi and drugs can cause parotitis. We present a case of unusual bilateral parotitis in a patient under non-invasive continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbation in intensive care unit. A 36-year-old patient was admitted to intensive care unit with the diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbation. Antibiotherapy, bronchodilator therapy and non-invasive positive pressure ventilation were applied as treatment regimen. Painless swellings developed on the 3rd day of admission on the right and a day after this on the left parotid glands. Amylase levels were increased and ultrasonographic evaluation revealed bilateral parotitis. No intervention was made and the therapy was continued. The patient was discharged on the 6th day with clinical improvement and regression of parotid swellings without any complications. Parotitis may have occurred after retrograde air flow in the Stensen duct during CPAP application. After the exclusion of possible viral and bacteriological etiologies and possible drug reactions we can focus on this diagnosis. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  18. Atomic force microscopy: Loading position dependence of cantilever spring constants and detector sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vakarelski, Ivan U.; Edwards, Scott A.; Dagastine, Raymond R.; Chan, Derek Y. C.; Stevens, Geoffrey W.; Grieser, Franz

    2007-11-01

    A simple and accurate experimental method is described for determining the effective cantilever spring constant and the detector sensitivity of atomic force microscopy cantilevers on which a colloidal particle is attached. By attaching large (approximately 85μm diameter) latex particles at various positions along the V-shaped cantilevers, we demonstrate how the normal and lateral spring constants as well as the sensitivity vary with loading position. Comparison with an explicit point-load theoretical model has also been used to verify the accuracy of the method.

  19. Atomic force microscopy: loading position dependence of cantilever spring constants and detector sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Vakarelski, Ivan U; Edwards, Scott A; Dagastine, Raymond R; Chan, Derek Y C; Stevens, Geoffrey W; Grieser, Franz

    2007-11-01

    A simple and accurate experimental method is described for determining the effective cantilever spring constant and the detector sensitivity of atomic force microscopy cantilevers on which a colloidal particle is attached. By attaching large (approximately 85 microm diameter) latex particles at various positions along the V-shaped cantilevers, we demonstrate how the normal and lateral spring constants as well as the sensitivity vary with loading position. Comparison with an explicit point-load theoretical model has also been used to verify the accuracy of the method.

  20. Continuous monitoring of prostate position using stereoscopic and monoscopic kV image guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, M. Tynan R.; Parsons, Dave D.; Robar, James L.

    2016-05-15

    Purpose: To demonstrate continuous kV x-ray monitoring of prostate motion using both stereoscopic and monoscopic localizations, assess the spatial accuracy of these techniques, and evaluate the dose delivered from the added image guidance. Methods: The authors implemented both stereoscopic and monoscopic fiducial localizations using a room-mounted dual oblique x-ray system. Recently developed monoscopic 3D position estimation techniques potentially overcome the issue of treatment head interference with stereoscopic imaging at certain gantry angles. To demonstrate continuous position monitoring, a gold fiducial marker was placed in an anthropomorphic phantom and placed on the Linac couch. The couch was used as a programmable translation stage. The couch was programmed with a series of patient prostate motion trajectories exemplifying five distinct categories: stable prostate, slow drift, persistent excursion, transient excursion, and high frequency excursions. The phantom and fiducial were imaged using 140 kVp, 0.63 mAs per image at 1 Hz for a 60 s monitoring period. Both stereoscopic and monoscopic 3D localization accuracies were assessed by comparison to the ground-truth obtained from the Linac log file. Imaging dose was also assessed, using optically stimulated luminescence dosimeter inserts in the phantom. Results: Stereoscopic localization accuracy varied between 0.13 ± 0.05 and 0.33 ± 0.30 mm, depending on the motion trajectory. Monoscopic localization accuracy varied from 0.2 ± 0.1 to 1.1 ± 0.7 mm. The largest localization errors were typically observed in the left–right direction. There were significant differences in accuracy between the two monoscopic views, but which view was better varied from trajectory to trajectory. The imaging dose was measured to be between 2 and 15 μGy/mAs, depending on location in the phantom. Conclusions: The authors have demonstrated the first use of monoscopic localization for a room-mounted dual x-ray system. Three

  1. Continuous positive airway pressure treatment for acute mountain sickness at 4240 m in the Nepal Himalaya.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Pamela L; Johnson, Claire C; Poudyal, Prasanta; Regmi, Nirajan; Walmsley, Megan A; Basnyat, Buddha

    2013-09-01

    Acute mountain sickness (AMS) is very common at altitudes above 2500 m. There are few treatment options in the field where electricity availability is limited, and medical assistance or oxygen is unavailable or difficult to access. Positive airway pressure has been used to treat AMS at 3800 m. We hypothesized that continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) could be used under field conditions powered by small rechargeable batteries. Methods Part 1. 5 subjects trekked to 3500 m from 2800 m in one day and slept there for one night, ascending in the late afternoon to 3840 m, where they slept using CPAP 6-7 cm via mask. The next morning they descended to 3500 m, spent the day there, ascended in late afternoon to 3840 m, and slept the night without CPAP. Continuous overnight oximetry was recorded and the Lake Louise questionnaire for AMS administered both mornings. Methods Part 2. 14 trekkers with symptoms of AMS were recruited at 4240 m. All took acetazolamide. The Lake Louise questionnaire was administered, oximetry recorded, and CPAP 6-7 cm was applied for 10-15 min. CPAP was used overnight and oximetry recorded continuously. In the morning the Lake Louise questionnaire was administered, and oximetry recorded for 10-15 min. The equipment used in both parts was heated, humidified Respironics RemStar® machines powered by Novuscell™ rechargeable lithium ion batteries. Oximetry was recorded using Embletta™ PDS. Results Part 1. CPAP improved overnight Sao2 and eliminated AMS symptoms in the one subject who developed AMS. CPAP was used for 7-9 h and the machines operated for >8 h using the battery. Results Part 2. CPAP use improved Sao2 when used for 10-15 min at the time of recruitment and overnight CPAP use resulted in significantly reduced AMS symptoms. Conclusion. CPAP with rechargeable battery may be a useful treatment option for trekkers and climbers who develop AMS.

  2. Study of positive and negative feedback sensitivity in psychosis using the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test.

    PubMed

    Farreny, Aida; Del Rey-Mejías, Ángel; Escartin, Gemma; Usall, Judith; Tous, Núria; Haro, Josep Maria; Ochoa, Susana

    2016-07-01

    Schizophrenia involves marked motivational and learning deficits that may reflect abnormalities in reward processing. The purpose of this study was to examine positive and negative feedback sensitivity in schizophrenia using computational modeling derived from the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST). We also aimed to explore feedback sensitivity in a sample with bipolar disorder. Eighty-three individuals with schizophrenia and 27 with bipolar disorder were included. Demographic, clinical and cognitive outcomes, together with the WCST, were considered in both samples. Computational modeling was performed using the R syntax to calculate 3 parameters based on trial-by-trial execution on the WCST: reward sensitivity (R), punishment sensitivity (P), and choice consistency (D). The associations between outcome variables and the parameters were investigated. Positive and negative sensitivity showed deficits, but P parameter was clearly diminished in schizophrenia. Cognitive variables, age, and symptoms were associated with R, P, and D parameters in schizophrenia. The sample with bipolar disorder would show cognitive deficits and feedback abnormalities to a lesser extent than individuals with schizophrenia. Negative feedback sensitivity demonstrated greater deficit in both samples. Idiosyncratic cognitive requirements in the WCST might introduce confusion when supposing model-free reinforcement learning. Negative symptoms of schizophrenia were related to lower feedback sensitivity and less goal-directed patterns of choice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Vibration measurements using continuous scanning laser Doppler vibrometry: theoretical velocity sensitivity analysis with applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halkon, B. J.; Rothberg, S. J.

    2003-03-01

    It is readily accepted that a laser vibrometer measures target velocity in the direction of the incident laser beam, but this measured velocity must be considered in terms of the various components of the target velocity. This paper begins with a review of the theoretical description of the velocity sensed by a single laser beam incident in an arbitrary direction on a rotating target undergoing arbitrary vibration. The measured velocity is presented as the sum of six terms, each the product of a combination of geometric parameters, relating to the laser beam orientation, and a combination of motion parameters - the 'vibration sets'. This totally general velocity sensitivity model can be applied to any measurement configuration on any target. The model is also sufficiently versatile to incorporate time-dependent beam orientation and this is described in this paper, with reference to continuous scanning laser Doppler vibrometry. For continuous scanning applications, the velocity sensitivity model is shown formulated in two useful ways. The first is in terms of the laser beam orientation angles, developing the original model to include time dependency in the angles, whilst the second is an entirely new development in which the model is written in terms of the mirror scan angles, since it is these which the operator would seek to control in practice. In the original derivation, the illuminated section of the rotating target was assumed to be of rigid cross section but, since continuous scanning measurements are employed on targets with flexible cross sections, such as beams, panels and thin or bladed discs, the theory is developed in this paper for the first time to include provision for such flexibility.

  4. Impact of treatment with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) on weight in obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Quan, Stuart F; Budhiraja, Rohit; Clarke, Denise P; Goodwin, James L; Gottlieb, Daniel J; Nichols, Deborah A; Simon, Richard D; Smith, Terry W; Walsh, James K; Kushida, Clete A

    2013-10-15

    To determine the impact of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) on weight change in persons with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). The Apnea Positive Pressure Long-term Efficacy Study (APPLES) was a 6-month, randomized, double-blinded sham-controlled multicenter clinical trial conducted at 5 sites in the United States. Of 1,105 participants with an apnea hypopnea index ≥ 10 events/ hour initially randomized, 812 had body weight measured at baseline and after 6 months of study. CPAP or Sham CPAP. Body weight, height, hours of CPAP or Sham CPAP use, Epworth Sleepiness Scale score. Participants randomized to CPAP gained 0.35 ± 5.01 kg, whereas those on Sham CPAP lost 0.70 ± 4.03 kg (mean ± SD, p = 0.001). Amount of weight gain with CPAP was related to hours of device adherence, with each hour per night of use predicting a 0.42 kg increase in weight. This association was not noted in the Sham CPAP group. CPAP participants who used their device ≥ 4 h per night on ≥ 70% of nights gained the most weight over 6 months in comparison to non-adherent CPAP participants (1.0 ± 5.3 vs. -0.3 ± 5.0 kg, p = 0.014). OSA patients using CPAP may gain a modest amount of weight with the greatest weight gain found in those most compliant with CPAP. A commentary on this article appears in this issue on page 995. Quan SF; Budhiraja R; Clarke DP; Goodwin JL; Gottlieb DJ; Nichols DA; Simon RD; Smith TW; Walsh JK; Kushida CA. Impact of treatment with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) on weight in obstructive sleep apnea.

  5. Impact of Treatment with Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) on Weight in Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Stuart F.; Budhiraja, Rohit; Clarke, Denise P.; Goodwin, James L.; Gottlieb, Daniel J.; Nichols, Deborah A.; Simon, Richard D.; Smith, Terry W.; Walsh, James K.; Kushida, Clete A.

    2013-01-01

    Study Objective: To determine the impact of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) on weight change in persons with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Design, Setting, and Participants: The Apnea Positive Pressure Long-term Efficacy Study (APPLES) was a 6-month, randomized, double-blinded sham-controlled multicenter clinical trial conducted at 5 sites in the United States. Of 1,105 participants with an apnea hypopnea index ≥ 10 events/ hour initially randomized, 812 had body weight measured at baseline and after 6 months of study. Intervention: CPAP or Sham CPAP. Measurements: Body weight, height, hours of CPAP or Sham CPAP use, Epworth Sleepiness Scale score. Results: Participants randomized to CPAP gained 0.35 ± 5.01 kg, whereas those on Sham CPAP lost 0.70 ± 4.03 kg (mean ± SD, p = 0.001). Amount of weight gain with CPAP was related to hours of device adherence, with each hour per night of use predicting a 0.42 kg increase in weight. This association was not noted in the Sham CPAP group. CPAP participants who used their device ≥ 4 h per night on ≥ 70% of nights gained the most weight over 6 months in comparison to non-adherent CPAP participants (1.0 ± 5.3 vs. -0.3 ± 5.0 kg, p = 0.014). Conclusions: OSA patients using CPAP may gain a modest amount of weight with the greatest weight gain found in those most compliant with CPAP. Commentary: A commentary on this article appears in this issue on page 995. Citation: Quan SF; Budhiraja R; Clarke DP; Goodwin JL; Gottlieb DJ; Nichols DA; Simon RD; Smith TW; Walsh JK; Kushida CA. Impact of treatment with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) on weight in obstructive sleep apnea. J Clin Sleep Med 2013;9(10):989-993. PMID:24127141

  6. Position-sensitive detection of slow neutrons: Survey of fundamental principles

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, R.K.

    1992-01-01

    This paper sets forth the fundamental principles governing the development of position-sensitive detection systems for slow neutrons. Since neutrons are only weakly interacting with most materials, it is not generally practical to detect slow neutrons directly. Therefore all practical slow neutron detection mechanisms depend on the use of nuclear reactions to convert'' the neutron to one or more charged particles, followed by the subsequent detection of the charged particles. The different conversion reactions which can be used are discussed, along with the relative merits of each. This is followed with a discussion of the various methods of charged particle detection, how these lend themselves to position-sensitive encoding, and the means of position encoding which can be applied to each case. Detector performance characteristics which may be of importance to the end user are discussed and related to these various detection and position-encoding mechanisms.

  7. Position-sensitive detection of slow neutrons: Survey of fundamental principles

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, R.K.

    1992-07-01

    This paper sets forth the fundamental principles governing the development of position-sensitive detection systems for slow neutrons. Since neutrons are only weakly interacting with most materials, it is not generally practical to detect slow neutrons directly. Therefore all practical slow neutron detection mechanisms depend on the use of nuclear reactions to ``convert`` the neutron to one or more charged particles, followed by the subsequent detection of the charged particles. The different conversion reactions which can be used are discussed, along with the relative merits of each. This is followed with a discussion of the various methods of charged particle detection, how these lend themselves to position-sensitive encoding, and the means of position encoding which can be applied to each case. Detector performance characteristics which may be of importance to the end user are discussed and related to these various detection and position-encoding mechanisms.

  8. Increased dead space in face mask continuous positive airway pressure in neonates.

    PubMed

    Hishikawa, Kenji; Fujinaga, Hideshi; Ito, Yushi

    2017-01-01

    Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) by face mask is commonly performed in newborn resuscitation. We evaluated the effect of face mask CPAP on system dead space. Face mask CPAP increases dead space. A CPAP model study. We estimated the volume of the inner space of the mask. We devised a face mask CPAP model, in which the outlet of the mask was covered with plastic; and three modified face mask CPAP models, in which holes were drilled near to the cushion of the covered face mask to alter the air exit. We passed a continuous flow of 21% oxygen through each model and we controlled the inner pressure to 5 cmH2 O by adjusting the flow-relief valve. To evaluate the ventilation in the inner space of each model, we measured the oxygen concentration rise time, that is, the time needed for the oxygen concentration of each model to reach 35% after the oxygen concentration of the continuous flow was raised from 21% to 40%. The volume of inner space of the face mask was 38.3 ml. Oxygen concentration rise time in the face mask CPAP model was significantly longer at various continuous flow rates and points of the inner space of the face mask compared with that of the modified face mask CPAP model. Our study indicates that face mask CPAP leads to an increase in dead space and a decrease in ventilation efficiency under certain circumstances. Pediatr Pulmonol. 2017;52:107-111. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. A New Animal Model of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Responding to Continuous Positive Airway Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Neuzeret, Pierre-Charles; Gormand, Frédéric; Reix, Philippe; Parrot, Sandrine; Sastre, Jean-Pierre; Buda, Colette; Guidon, Gérard; Sakai, Kazuya; Lin, Jian-Sheng

    2011-01-01

    Study Objectives: An improved animal model of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is needed for the development of effective pharmacotherapies. In humans, flexion of the neck and a supine position, two main pathogenic factors during human sleep, are associated with substantially greater OSA severity. We postulated that these two factors might generate OSA in animals. Design: We developed a restraining device for conditioning to investigate the effect of the combination of 2 body positions—prone (P) or supine (S)—and 2 head positions—with the neck flexed at right angles to the body (90°) or in extension in line with the body (180°)—during sleep in 6 cats. Polysomnography was performed twice on each cat in each of the 4 sleeping positions—P180, S180, P90, or S90. The effect of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment was then investigated in 2 cats under the most pathogenic condition. Setting: NA. Patients or Participants: NA. Interventions: NA. Measurements and Results: Positions P180 and, S90 resulted, respectively, in the lowest and highest apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) (3 ± 1 vs 25 ± 2, P < 0.001), while P90 (18 ± 3, P < 0.001) and S180 (13 ± 5, P < 0.01) gave intermediate values. In position S90, an increase in slow wave sleep stage 1 (28% ± 3% vs 22% ± 3%, P < 0.05) and a decrease in REM sleep (10% ± 2% vs 18% ± 2%, P < 0.001) were also observed. CPAP resulted in a reduction in the AHI (8 ± 1 vs 27 ± 3, P < 0.01), with the added benefit of sleep consolidation. Conclusion: By mimicking human pathogenic sleep conditions, we have developed a new reversible animal model of OSA. Citation: Neuzeret PC; Gormand F; Reix P; Parrot S; Sastre JP; Buda C; Guidon G; Sakai K; Lin JS. A new animal model of obstructive sleep apnea responding to continuous positive airway pressure. SLEEP 2011;34(4):541-548. PMID:21461333

  10. Effects of Continuous Positive Airway Pressure on Neurocognitive Function in Obstructive Sleep Apnea Patients: The Apnea Positive Pressure Long-term Efficacy Study (APPLES)

    PubMed Central

    Kushida, Clete A.; Nichols, Deborah A.; Holmes, Tyson H.; Quan, Stuart F.; Walsh, James K.; Gottlieb, Daniel J.; Simon, Richard D.; Guilleminault, Christian; White, David P.; Goodwin, James L.; Schweitzer, Paula K.; Leary, Eileen B.; Hyde, Pamela R.; Hirshkowitz, Max; Green, Sylvan; McEvoy, Linda K.; Chan, Cynthia; Gevins, Alan; Kay, Gary G.; Bloch, Daniel A.; Crabtree, Tami; Dement, William C.

    2012-01-01

    Study Objective: To determine the neurocognitive effects of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy on patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Design, Setting, and Participants: The Apnea Positive Pressure Long-term Efficacy Study (APPLES) was a 6-month, randomized, double-blind, 2-arm, sham-controlled, multicenter trial conducted at 5 U.S. university, hospital, or private practices. Of 1,516 participants enrolled, 1,105 were randomized, and 1,098 participants diagnosed with OSA contributed to the analysis of the primary outcome measures. Intervention: Active or sham CPAP Measurements: Three neurocognitive variables, each representing a neurocognitive domain: Pathfinder Number Test-Total Time (attention and psychomotor function [A/P]), Buschke Selective Reminding Test-Sum Recall (learning and memory [L/M]), and Sustained Working Memory Test-Overall Mid-Day Score (executive and frontal-lobe function [E/F]) Results: The primary neurocognitive analyses showed a difference between groups for only the E/F variable at the 2 month CPAP visit, but no difference at the 6 month CPAP visit or for the A/P or L/M variables at either the 2 or 6 month visits. When stratified by measures of OSA severity (AHI or oxygen saturation parameters), the primary E/F variable and one secondary E/F neurocognitive variable revealed transient differences between study arms for those with the most severe OSA. Participants in the active CPAP group had a significantly greater ability to remain awake whether measured subjectively by the Epworth Sleepiness Scale or objectively by the maintenance of wakefulness test. Conclusions: CPAP treatment improved both subjectively and objectively measured sleepiness, especially in individuals with severe OSA (AHI > 30). CPAP use resulted in mild, transient improvement in the most sensitive measures of executive and frontal-lobe function for those with severe disease, which suggests the existence of a complex OSA-neurocognitive relationship

  11. Automatic detection of position and depth of potential UXO using continuous wavelet transforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billings, Stephen D.; Herrmann, Felix J.

    2003-09-01

    Inversion algorithms for UXO discrimination using magnetometery have recently been used to achieve very low False Alarm Rates, with 100% recovery of detected ordnance. When there are many UXO and/or when the UXO are at significantly different depths, manual estimation of the initial position and scale for each item, is a laborious and time-consuming process. In this paper, we utilize the multi-resolution properties of wavelets to automatically estimate both the position and scale of dipole peaks. The Automated Wavelet Detection (AWD) algorithm that we develop consists of four-stages: (i) maxima and minima in the data are followed across multiple scales as we zoom with a continuous wavelet transform; (ii) the decay of the amplitude of each peak with scale is used to estimate the depth to source; (iii) adjacent maxima and minima of comparable depth are joined together to form dipole anomalies; and (iv) the relative positions and amplitudes of the extrema, along with their depths, are used to estimate a dipole model. We demonstrate the application of the AWD algorithm to three datasets with different characteristics. In each case, the method rapidly located the majority of dipole anomalies and produced accurate estimates of dipole parameters.

  12. Positioning Continuing Education: Boundaries and Intersections between the Domains Continuing Education, Knowledge Translation, Patient Safety and Quality Improvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kitto, Simon; Bell, Mary; Peller, Jennifer; Sargeant, Joan; Etchells, Edward; Reeves, Scott; Silver, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    Public and professional concern about health care quality, safety and efficiency is growing. Continuing education, knowledge translation, patient safety and quality improvement have made concerted efforts to address these issues. However, a coordinated and integrated effort across these domains is lacking. This article explores and discusses the…

  13. Positioning Continuing Education: Boundaries and Intersections between the Domains Continuing Education, Knowledge Translation, Patient Safety and Quality Improvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kitto, Simon; Bell, Mary; Peller, Jennifer; Sargeant, Joan; Etchells, Edward; Reeves, Scott; Silver, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    Public and professional concern about health care quality, safety and efficiency is growing. Continuing education, knowledge translation, patient safety and quality improvement have made concerted efforts to address these issues. However, a coordinated and integrated effort across these domains is lacking. This article explores and discusses the…

  14. Estimates of cost-effectiveness of prehospital continuous positive airway pressure in the management of acute pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Hubble, Michael W; Richards, Michael E; Wilfong, Denise A

    2008-01-01

    To estimate the cost-effectiveness of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) in managing prehospital acute pulmonary edema in an urban EMS system. Using estimates from published reports on prehospital and emergency department CPAP, a cost-effectiveness model of implementing CPAP in a typical urban EMS system was derived from the societal perspective as well as the perspective of the implementing EMS system. To assess the robustness of the model, a series of univariate and multivariate sensitivity analyses was performed on the input variables. The cost of consumables, equipment, and training yielded a total cost of $89 per CPAP application. The theoretical system would be expected to use CPAP 4 times per 1000 EMS patients and is expected to save 0.75 additional lives per 1000 EMS patients at a cost of $490 per life saved. CPAP is also expected to result in approximately one less intubation per 6 CPAP applications and reduce hospitalization costs by $4075 per year for each CPAP application. Through sensitivity analyses the model was verified to be robust across a wide range of input variable assumptions. Previous studies have demonstrated the clinical effectiveness of CPAP in the management of acute pulmonary edema. Through a theoretical analysis which modeled the costs and clinical benefits of implementing CPAP in an urban EMS system, prehospital CPAP appears to be a cost-effective treatment.

  15. Sensitivity to Social Contingency and Positive Emotion in 2-Month-Olds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soussignan, Robert; Nadel, Jacqueline; Canet, Pierre; Gerardin, Priscille

    2006-01-01

    This study was aimed at sorting out conflicting results in the literature concerning 2-month-olds' sensitivity to interpersonal contingency, and investigated the potential role of infants' positive emotion in contingency detection. Infants were randomly assigned to an experimental group (EG) that was presented an uninterrupted live-replay-live…

  16. Complex microcalorimeter models and their application to position-sensitive detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Figueroa-Feliciano, Enectali

    2006-06-01

    We present a general formalism for calculating the linear response, noise spectrum, and energy resolution of complex calorimeters. Using this formalism calorimeters with arbitrary numbers of distinct linked heat capacity systems and/or coupled thermometers can be analyzed. We use this formalism to derive the theoretical resolution of an imaging microcalorimeter called a position- sensitive transition-edge sensor.

  17. Sensitization to petrolatum: an unusual cause of false-positive drug patch-tests.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, G; Schmutz, J L; Trechot, Ph; Commun, N; Barbaud, A

    2004-09-01

    We report on an unexpected sensitization to petrolatum diagnosed with the occurrence of multiple nonrelevant and false-positive drug patch-tests performed while investigating a patient suffering from many cutaneous adverse drug reactions. All the positive drug patch-tests were prepared with GILBERT vaseline. This petrolatum reaction is positive as it was tested with five other brands of petrolatums a few months later. As the same petrolatums, but from different batches were tested, patch-tests with GILBERT petrolatum were doubtful, while other petrolatums were positive. White petrolatum is a mixture of semisolid hydrocarbons of the methane series. The sensitizing impurities of petrolatum are polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, e.g. phenanthrene derivatives. The purity of petrolatum depends on both the petroleum stock and on the production and packaging methods. Even if rare, contact sensitization to petrolatum can disturb the interpretation of drug patch-tests. It is necessary in the interpretation of drug patch-tests to test both in petrolatum and other vehicles and with all the different petrolatums used in preparing the material for drug patch-tests. So, it is essential to advise the patients sensitized to petrolatum to remove all the topical drugs, such as all the cosmetics, which contain petrolatum in their formulation.

  18. Face Inversion Disproportionately Disrupts Sensitivity to Vertical over Horizontal Changes in Eye Position

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crookes, Kate; Hayward, William G.

    2012-01-01

    Presenting a face inverted (upside down) disrupts perceptual sensitivity to the spacing between the features. Recently, it has been shown that this disruption is greater for vertical than horizontal changes in eye position. One explanation for this effect proposed that inversion disrupts the processing of long-range (e.g., eye-to-mouth distance)…

  19. Face Inversion Disproportionately Disrupts Sensitivity to Vertical over Horizontal Changes in Eye Position

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crookes, Kate; Hayward, William G.

    2012-01-01

    Presenting a face inverted (upside down) disrupts perceptual sensitivity to the spacing between the features. Recently, it has been shown that this disruption is greater for vertical than horizontal changes in eye position. One explanation for this effect proposed that inversion disrupts the processing of long-range (e.g., eye-to-mouth distance)…

  20. Centroid position measurements and subpixel sensitivity variations with the MAMA detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Jeffrey S.; Slater, D. C.; Timothy, John G.; Jenkins, E. B.

    1989-01-01

    Initial measurements of the position sensitivity of a visible-light multianode microchannel array detector show that centroid calculations for image spots are accurate to better than 0.04 pixels even with sources that are essentially delta functions at the photocathode.Subpixel sensitivity variations of 10-15 percent are typically found for pixels in the array. Variations as large as 30 percent are possible in the worst conditions. These variations limit the photometric accuracy of the detector when very small scale features are observed. The photometric accuracy and the position sensitivity of the detector appear to be limited by cross-coupling effects within the anode array. Initial measurements with more recent designs of the detector show that most or all of this cross-coupling has been eliminated.

  1. Effect of continuous and interval aerobic exercise training on baroreflex sensitivity in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Masson, Gustavo Santos; Borges, Juliana Pereira; da Silva, Pedro Paulo Soares; da Nóbrega, Antônio Cláudio Lucas; Tibiriçá, Eduardo; Lessa, Marcos Adriano

    2016-05-01

    The ability of continuous aerobic exercise training (AET) to increase baroreflex control and cardiac function in heart failure (HF) has been well described, but the comparison between continuous and interval AET on these functions is inconclusive. To compare the effects of continuous and interval AET on cardiac function and baroreflex sensitivity (BrS) in an experimental model of HF. Rats were divided into the following groups: continuous training (HF-CT), intense interval training (HF-IIT), moderate interval training (HF-MIT), sedentary group (HF-SED), and sham sedentary (SHAM-SED). Animals underwent surgery to induce HF by ligation of the interventricular coronary artery. Six weeks after surgery, AET was started (8weeks, 3sessions/week). Echocardiography studies to assess cardiac function were performed before and after AET. At the end of the training protocols, the BrS index was assessed by stepwise intravenous infusions of sodium nitroprusside and phenylephrine. All methods of exercise prevented the HF-induced increase in left ventricular diameter in diastole observed in the HF-SED rats (0.88±0.09 vs. 1.03±0.09cm; P<0.05), but only the HF-CT (28.5±6.3 vs. 39.2±12.7%; P<0.05) and HF-MIT (31.0±8.5 vs. 42.0±10.3%; P<0.05) groups exhibited an increase in ejection fraction. Nevertheless, the HF-CT group was the only group that showed a tachycardia reflex higher than that of the HF-SED group (0.87±0.34 vs. 0.20±0.05bpm/mmHg; P<0.05) and similar to that of the SHAM-SED group (1.04±0.11bpm/mmHg). These results suggest that continuous and moderate interval training induced similar improvements in cardiac function but that only continuous training induced higher BrS in HF rats. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. [Phrenic nerve paralysis of obstetrical origin: favorable course using continuous positive airway pressure].

    PubMed

    Escande, B; Cerveau, C; Kuhn, P; Astruc, D; Daemgen, F; Messer, J

    2000-09-01

    Isolated diaphragmatic paralysis due to obstetrical factors is rare and therapeutic management modalities are not quite clear. A neonate born by breech delivery presented with respiratory distress due to isolated paralysis of the right hemidiaphragm. The clinical course was progressive, his condition worsening with oxygen supplementation. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) delivered via a nasal cannula was started in the one-month-old child, inducing gradual improvement towards recovery at the age of two months and a half. Non-invasive nasal CPAP should be proposed for the treatment of phrenic nerve obstetrical palsy before introducing more invasive ventilation techniques. Surgical plication should be delayed until the child reaches the age of at least three months.

  3. Nonexistence of entangled continuous-variable Werner states with positive partial transpose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNulty, Daniel; Tatham, Richard; Mišta, Ladislav

    2014-03-01

    We address an open question about the existence of entangled continuous-variable (CV) Werner states with positive partial transpose (PPT). We prove that no such state exists by showing that all PPT CV Werner states are separable. The separability follows by observing that these CV Werner states can be approximated by truncating the states into a finite-dimensional convex mixture of product states. In addition, the constituents of the product states comprise a generalized non-Gaussian measurement which gives, rather surprisingly, a strictly tighter upper bound on quantum discord than photon counting. These results uncover the presence of only negative partial transpose entanglement and illustrate the complexity of more general nonclassical correlations in this paradigmatic class of genuine non-Gaussian quantum states.

  4. Graded exposure therapy for addressing claustrophobic reactions to continuous positive airway pressure: a case series report.

    PubMed

    Means, Melanie K; Edinger, Jack D

    2007-01-01

    Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is a safe, effective treatment for obstructive sleep apnea, and yet many patients develop claustrophobic reactions to the CPAP nasal mask and cannot tolerate this treatment. We examined the efficacy of a graded in-vivo exposure therapy for enhancing CPAP adherence using a retrospective, case series design. Objective CPAP adherence data were obtained on clinical patients who attended 1 or more sessions of exposure therapy with a behavioral sleep psychologist. Compared to pre-treatment, patients used CPAP significantly longer after exposure therapy. No predictors of treatment response were identified. CPAP exposure therapy may be beneficial in some cases; however, further research is needed to determine types of patients most likely to benefit from this therapy.

  5. [Two cases of chronic atelectasis that improved through use of nasal continuous positive pressure].

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Michiko; Katsuki, Yuko; Enokibori, Toru; Ninomiya, Kiyoshi; Fujimura, Naoki

    2007-06-01

    We observed improvements in two cases of chronic atelectasis through use of nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP). Case 1 suffered from middle lobe syndrome accompanied by chronic atelectasis resistant to medical treatment. Case 2 suffered from respiratory failure caused by chronic atelectasis and airway infection complications thereof following a total pneumonectomy and post-pneumonectomy syndrome. The patient was placed on artificial ventilation, and atelectasis was improved by maintaining PEEP and airflow to the atelectatic region. Following extubation we obtained good pneumatization using nCPAP. nCPAP has been reported as effective not only in cases of sleep apnea, but also for cardiogenic pulmonary edema and post-operative atelectasis; we believe it holds great promise for chronic atelectasis as well.

  6. Efficiency of cold passover and heated humidification under continuous positive airway pressure.

    PubMed

    Randerath, W J; Meier, J; Genger, H; Domanski, U; Rühle, K H

    2002-07-01

    Cold passover and heated humidifiers are employed for the prevention of side-effects associated with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment. However, to date, it has not been possible to separately measure the humidity of inspired and expired air. The aim of this study was to compare the relative humidity of the inspired air and the water loss during respiration between cold passover and heated humidifiers under CPAP. Humidity and temperature were determined separately for the respiratory phases, without humidification, with cold passover and heated humidifiers in 10 healthy subjects. Humidity was measured with a capacitive hygrometer, temperature with a "Type K" thermosensor, and impedance of the total respiratory system with impulse oscillometry. The relative humidity (rH) of the inspired air (mean+/-SD) increased significantly from 24.0+/-9.1%, rH (34.8+/-1.0 degrees C, no humidifier) to 34.5+/-10.1%, rH (34.6+/-1.0 degrees C) under cold humidification, and to 53.9+/-13.2% rH (35.0+/-1.1 degrees C) under heated humidification. With heated humidification, water loss was reduced by 38% compared to cold humidification. The impedance increased from 5.7+/-1.8 cmH2O x L x s(-1) (no humidifier) to 6.7+/-1.8 cmH2O x L x s(-1) (heated humidifier). The authors conclude that the use of a heated humidifier during continuous positive airway pressure appreciably increases the relative humidity of the inspired air and reduces the water loss during respiration.

  7. Aerophagia and Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease in Patients using Continuous Positive Airway Pressure: A Preliminary Observation

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Nathaniel F.; Mystkowski, Sue K.

    2008-01-01

    Study Objectives: Aerophagia is a complication of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy for sleep disordered breathing (SDB), whereupon air is forced into the stomach and bowel. Associated discomfort can result in CPAP discontinuation. We hypothesize that aerophagia is associated with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) via mechanisms involving GERD related lower esophageal sphincter (LES) compromise. Methods: Twenty-two subjects with aerophagia and 22 controls, matched for age, gender, and body mass index, who were being treated with CPAP for SDB were compared in regard to clinical aspects of GERD, GERD associated habits, SDB severity as measured by polysomnography, and mean CPAP pressure. Results: More subjects with aerophagia had symptoms of GERD (77.3% vs. 36.4%; p < 0.01) and were on GERD related medications (45.5% vs. 18.2%, p < 0.05) than controls. Regarding polysomnography, mean oxygen saturation percentages were lower in the aerophagia group than controls (95.0% vs. 96.5%, p < 0.05). No other differences were observed, including mean CPAP pressures. No one in the aerophagia group (vs. 27.3% of the control group) was a current tobacco user (p < 0.01). There was no difference in caffeine or alcohol use between the 2 groups. Conclusions: These results imply aerophagia is associated with GERD symptoms and GERD related medication use. This finding suggests a relationship between GERD related LES pathophysiology and the development of aerophagia in patients with SDB treated with CPAP. Citation: Watson NF; Mystkowski SK. Aerophagia and gastroesophageal reflux disease in patients using continuous positive airway pressure: a preliminary observation. J Clin Sleep Med 2008;4(5):434–438. PMID:18853700

  8. Hydrocolloid dressing in preventing nasal trauma secondary to nasal continuous positive airway pressure in preterm infants

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Li- hua

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) with nasal devices (nCPAP) is widely used in the respiratory management of newborns. The present study aimed to compare the incidence of nasal trauma secondary to nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) protected with or without hydrocolloid dressing in preterm infants. METHODS: This prospective controlled study was performed in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) of the Children’s Hospital of Hunan Province from March 1, 2010 to June 31, 2010. A total of 65 infants, 46 males and 19 females, were recruited in this study. Their average gestational age was 32.6 weeks (range 28–37 weeks). The infants were randomly divided into clinical trial group (group A, n=33) and control group (group B, n=32). Paraffin oil was smeared around the nostrils before inserting prongs in group B; the infants in group A were covered on the infant’s nostrils surface with hydrocolloid dressing (hydrocolloid dressing, 1.8 mm thick, 90029T, 3M Company, Minnesota, USA) with a size of 2–3 cm cutting two holes adapted to the nose and nostrils. The nostrils of those infants were inspected daily during nCPAP support until they were weaned off nCPAP. RESULTS: Nine infants (2 in group A and 7 in group B) developed nasal injury during nCPAP support. The Chi-square test revealed that there was a statistically significant difference (P=0.01) in the incidence of nasal injury between groups A and B. CONCLUSION: The study demonstrated that hydrocolloid dressing significantly decreased the incidence and the severity of nasal injury. PMID:25225588

  9. Hydrocolloid dressing in preventing nasal trauma secondary to nasal continuous positive airway pressure in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Xie, Li-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) with nasal devices (nCPAP) is widely used in the respiratory management of newborns. The present study aimed to compare the incidence of nasal trauma secondary to nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) protected with or without hydrocolloid dressing in preterm infants. This prospective controlled study was performed in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) of the Children's Hospital of Hunan Province from March 1, 2010 to June 31, 2010. A total of 65 infants, 46 males and 19 females, were recruited in this study. Their average gestational age was 32.6 weeks (range 28-37 weeks). The infants were randomly divided into clinical trial group (group A, n=33) and control group (group B, n=32). Paraffin oil was smeared around the nostrils before inserting prongs in group B; the infants in group A were covered on the infant's nostrils surface with hydrocolloid dressing (hydrocolloid dressing, 1.8 mm thick, 90029T, 3M Company, Minnesota, USA) with a size of 2-3 cm cutting two holes adapted to the nose and nostrils. The nostrils of those infants were inspected daily during nCPAP support until they were weaned off nCPAP. Nine infants (2 in group A and 7 in group B) developed nasal injury during nCPAP support. The Chi-square test revealed that there was a statistically significant difference (P=0.01) in the incidence of nasal injury between groups A and B. The study demonstrated that hydrocolloid dressing significantly decreased the incidence and the severity of nasal injury.

  10. High sensitivity sensor for continuous direct measurement of bipolar charged aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxter, Karen; Jones, Chris; Fletcher-Wood, Guy

    2008-12-01

    The disruptive generation of aerosols is known to cause particles to carry electrostatic charges. Anthropogenic aerosol may have a standard deviation of charges when generated that is different to other sources or equilibrated aerosols. A simple, low cost 'Bipolar Charged Aerosol Sensor' (BCAS) has been developed to continuously measure charged aerosol in the ambient environment in real-time. Direct measurement of the current released from the charged aerosol particles when they deposit onto an electrode in a DC field is achieved using custom designed, sensitive electrometers. The mobility range of particles collected is defined by the DC field strength, air flow rate through the instrument and the electrode geometry. The mobility range of interest has been selected based on measurements made previously with a complex Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) based instrument. The BCAS has been assessed in laboratory. The sensor design and initial measurement data will be discussed.

  11. Polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography using continuous polarization modulation with arbitrary phase modulation amplitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zenghai; Kasaragod, Deepa K.; Matcher, Stephen J.

    2012-03-01

    We demonstrate theoretically and experimentally that the phase retardance and relative optic-axis orientation of a sample can be calculated without prior knowledge of the actual value of the phase modulation amplitude when using a polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography system based on continuous polarization modulation (CPM-PS-OCT). We also demonstrate that the sample Jones matrix can be calculated at any values of the phase modulation amplitude in a reasonable range depending on the system effective signal-to-noise ratio. This has fundamental importance for the development of clinical systems by simplifying the polarization modulator drive instrumentation and eliminating its calibration procedure. This was validated on measurements of a three-quarter waveplate and an equine tendon sample by a fiber-based swept-source CPM-PS-OCT system.

  12. High-sensitivity attenuated total internal reflection continuous-wave terahertz imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongxiang; Wang, Yuye; Xu, Degang; Wu, Limin; Yan, Chao; Yan, Dexian; Tang, Longhuang; He, Yixin; Feng, Hua; Yao, Jianquan

    2017-09-01

    We demonstrate an attenuated total internal reflection imaging system. The surface information of the sample on top of a prism can be acquired by two-dimensionally scanning this prism moving in the vertical plane with horizontally incident continuous terahertz waves at a fixed height. The principles and feasibility of this method are investigated. The effective imaging area on the prism, image resolution and polarization dependence of contrast enhancement and stability improvement are analyzed. Examples including solid agar, distilled water and porcine tissue are presented, demonstrating the method’s advantages of high sensitivity and simple sample preparation. The experimental and theoretical results consistently show that p-polarization contributes to enhanced image contrast and more stable intensity of the attenuated total internal reflected signal.

  13. Continuous positive airway pressure therapy in obstuctive sleep apnea: benefits and alternatives.

    PubMed

    Cao, Michelle T; Sternbach, Joshua M; Guilleminault, C

    2017-04-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a highly prevalent condition affecting persons of all age with an increasing public health burden. It is implicated in cardiovascular disease, metabolic syndrome, neurocognitive impairment, reductions in quality of life, and increased motor vehicle accidents. The goals of OSA treatment are to improve sleep and daytime symptoms, and minimize cardiovascular risks.Areas covered: Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is considered the gold standard therapy that delivers pressurized air into the upper airway to relieve obstruction during sleep. Although CPAP is an effective modality of treatment for OSA, adherence to therapy is highly variable. This article highlights the benefits of CPAP therapy, along with alternative treatment options including oral appliance, implantable and wearable devices, and surgery. Expert commentary: CPAP therapy is the gold standard treatment option and should continue to be offered to those who suffer from OSA. Alternative options are available for those who are unable to adhere to CPAP or choose an alternative treatment modality. The most interesting advances have been incorporating orthodontic procedures in conjunction with myofunctional therapy in prepubertal children, raising the possibility of OSA prevention by initiating treatment early in life.

  14. Time of flight elastic recoil detection analysis with a position sensitive detector

    SciTech Connect

    Siketic, Zdravko; Radovic, Iva Bogdanovic; Jaksic, Milko; Skukan, Natko

    2010-03-15

    A position sensitive detection system based on the microchannel plate detector has been constructed and installed at the existing time of flight (TOF) spectrometer in order to perform a kinematic correction and improve the surface time/depth resolution of elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA) system. The position resolution of the detector has been tested for different types of ions and anode voltages. TOF spectra of recoiled O ions from SiO{sub 2} and F from CaF{sub 2} were collected in coincidence with position sensitive detector signal. Kinematic correction of TOF spectra improved surface time/depth resolution by {approx}20% for our system; however even higher improvements could be obtained in larger solid angle TOF-ERDA systems.

  15. A direct, continuous, sensitive assay for protein disulphide-isomerase based on fluorescence self-quenching.

    PubMed

    Raturi, Arun; Vacratsis, Panayiotis O; Seslija, Dana; Lee, Lana; Mutus, Bulent

    2005-10-15

    PDI (protein disulphide-isomerase) activity is generally monitored by insulin turbidity assay or scrambled RNase assay, both of which are performed by UV-visible spectroscopy. In this paper, we present a sensitive fluorimetric assay for continuous determination of disulphide reduction activity of PDI. This assay utilizes the pseudo-substrate diabz-GSSG [where diabz stands for di-(o-aminobenzoyl)], which is formed by the reaction of isatoic anhydride with the two free N-terminal amino groups of GSSG. The proximity of two benzoyl groups leads to quenching of the diabz-GSSG fluorescence by approx. 50% in comparison with its non-disulphide-linked form, abz-GSH (where abz stands for o-aminobenzoyl). Therefore the PDI-dependent disulphide reduction can be monitored by the increase in fluorescence accompanying the loss of proximity-quenching upon conversion of diabz-GSSG into abz-GSH. The apparent K(m) of PDI for diabz-GSSG was estimated to be approx. 15 muM. Unlike the insulin turbidity assay and scrambled RNase assay, the diabz-GSSG-based assay was shown to be effective in determining a single turnover of enzyme in the absence of reducing agents with no appreciable blank rates. The assay is simple to perform and very sensitive, with an estimated detection limit of approx. 2.5 nM PDI, enabling its use for the determination of platelet surface PDI activity in crude sample preparations.

  16. Changes in gene expression and sensitivity of cocaine reward produced by a continuous fat diet.

    PubMed

    Blanco-Gandía, M Carmen; Aracil-Fernández, Auxiliadora; Montagud-Romero, Sandra; Aguilar, Maria A; Manzanares, Jorge; Miñarro, José; Rodríguez-Arias, Marta

    2017-08-01

    Preclinical studies report that free access to a high-fat diet (HFD) alters the response to psychostimulants. The aim of the present study was to examine how HFD exposure during adolescence modifies cocaine effects. Gene expression of CB1 and mu-opioid receptors (MOr) in the nucleus accumbens (N Acc) and prefrontal cortex (PFC) and ghrelin receptor (GHSR) in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) were assessed. Mice were allowed continuous access to fat from PND 29, and the locomotor (10 mg/kg) and reinforcing effects of cocaine (1 and 6 mg/kg) on conditioned place preference (CPP) were evaluated on PND 69. Another group of mice was exposed to a standard diet until the day of post-conditioning, on which free access to the HFD began. HFD induced an increase of MOr gene expression in the N Acc, but decreased CB1 receptor in the N Acc and PFC. After fat withdrawal, the reduction of CB1 receptor in the N Acc was maintained. Gene expression of GHSR in the VTA decreased during the HFD and increased after withdrawal. Following fat discontinuation, mice exhibited increased anxiety, augmented locomotor response to cocaine, and developed CPP for 1 mg/kg cocaine. HFD reduced the number of sessions required to extinguish the preference and decreased sensitivity to drug priming-induced reinstatement. Our results suggest that consumption of a HFD during adolescence induces neurobiochemical changes that increased sensitivity to cocaine when fat is withdrawn, acting as an alternative reward.

  17. Positional stability of electromagnetic transponders used for prostate localization and continuous, real-time tracking.

    PubMed

    Litzenberg, Dale W; Willoughby, Twyla R; Balter, James M; Sandler, Howard M; Wei, John; Kupelian, Patrick A; Cunningham, Alexis A; Bock, Andrea; Aubin, Michele; Roach, Mack; Shinohara, Katsuto; Pouliot, Jean

    2007-07-15

    To determine the relative positional stability of implanted glass-encapsulated circuits (transponders) used in continuous electromagnetic localization and tracking of target volumes during radiation therapy. Ideally, the distances between transponders remains constant over the course of treatment. In this work, we evaluate the accuracy of these conditions. Three transponders were implanted in each of 20 patients. Images (CT scan or X-ray pair) were acquired at 13 time points. These images occurred from the day of implant (2 weeks before simulation) to 4 weeks posttreatment. The distance between transponders was determined from each dataset. The average and standard deviation of each distance were determined, and changes were evaluated over several time periods, including pretreatment and during therapy. Of 60 transponders implanted, 58 showed no significant migration from their intended positions. Of the two transponders that did migrate, one appears to have been implanted in the venous plexus, and the other in the urethra, with no clinical consequences to the patients. An analysis that included the planning CT scan and all subsequent distance measurements showed that the standard deviation of intertransponder distances was < or =1.2 mm for up to 1 month after the completion of therapy. Implanted transponders demonstrate the same long-term stability characteristics as implanted gold markers, within statistical uncertainties. As with gold markers, and using the same implant procedure, basic guidelines for the placement of transponders within the prostate help ensure minimal migration.

  18. Continuous separation of multiple particles by negative and positive dielectrophoresis in a modified H-filter.

    PubMed

    Lewpiriyawong, Nuttawut; Yang, Chun

    2014-03-01

    The article presents a new application of the modified H-filter with insulating rectangular blocks using negative and positive DEP for separation of multiple particles in a continuous pressure-driven flow. The multiple insulating blocks fabricated along the main channel induce spatially nonuniform electric fields which exert differential repulsive (negative) or attractive (positive) DEP forces on particles, depending on the size and the polarizability of particles relative to their suspending medium. As a result, particles of different sizes and polarizability can be separated into different outlets of the H-filter. Numerical simulations are also performed to analyze the effects of block gap and width on electric field distribution and DEP force characteristics near the insulating blocks so as to provide design guidelines for optimal structural dimensions of the microfluidic device. The device performance is demonstrated by separating a three-sized particles mixture, including 2 μm fluorescent particles with an attractive DEP force and both 5 and 10 μm nonfluorescent particles with differential repulsive DEP forces. High separation rate of 99% is successfully achieved. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. The Supraglottic Effect of a Reduction in Expiratory Mask Pressure During Continuous Positive Airway Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Masdeu, Maria J.; Patel, Amit V.; Seelall, Vijay; Rapoport, David M.; Ayappa, Indu

    2012-01-01

    Study Objectives: Patients with obstructive sleep apnea may have difficulty exhaling against positive pressure, hence limiting their acceptance of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). C-Flex is designed to improve comfort by reducing pressure in the mask during expiration proportionally to expiratory airflow (3 settings correspond to increasing pressure changes). When patients use CPAP, nasal resistance determines how much higher supraglottic pressure is than mask pressure. We hypothesized that increased nasal resistance results in increased expiratory supraglottic pressure swings that could be mitigated by the effects of C-Flex on mask pressure. Design: Cohort study. Setting: Sleep center. Participants: Seventeen patients with obstructive sleep apnea/hypopnea syndrome and a mechanical model of the upper airway. Interventions: In patients on fixed CPAP, CPAP with different C-Flex levels was applied multiple times during the night. In the model, 2 different respiratory patterns and resistances were tested. Measurements and Results: Airflow, expiratory mask, and supraglottic pressures were measured on CPAP and on C-Flex. Swings in pressure during expiration were determined. On CPAP, higher nasal resistance produced greater expiratory pressure swings in the supraglottis in the patients and in the model, as expected. C-Flex 3 produced expiratory drops in mask pressure (range −0.03 to −2.49 cm H2O) but mitigated the expira-tory pressure rise in the supraglottis only during a sinusoidal respiratory pattern in the model. Conclusions: Expiratory changes in mask pressure induced by C-Flex did not uniformly transmit to the supraglottis in either patients with obstructive sleep apnea on CPAP or in a mechanical model of the upper airway with fixed resistance. Data suggest that the observed lack of expiratory drop in supraglottic pressure swings is related to dynamics of the C-Flex algorithm. Citation: Masdeu MJ; Patel AV; Seelall V; Rapoport DM; Ayappa I. The

  20. Continuous positive airway pressure therapy for infants with respiratory distress in non tertiary care centers: a randomized, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Buckmaster, Adam G; Arnolda, Gaston; Wright, Ian M R; Foster, Jann P; Henderson-Smart, David J

    2007-09-01

    Our objective was to determine whether continuous positive airway pressure therapy would safely reduce the need for up-transfer of infants with respiratory distress from nontertiary centers. We randomly assigned 300 infants at >30 weeks of gestation with respiratory distress to receive either Hudson prong bubble continuous positive airway pressure therapy or headbox oxygen treatment (standard care). The primary end point was "up-transfer or treatment failure." Secondary end points included death, length of nursery stay, time receiving oxygen therapy, cost of care, and other measures of morbidity. Of 151 infants who received continuous positive airway pressure therapy, 35 either were up-transferred or experienced treatment failure, as did 60 of the 149 infants given headbox oxygen treatment. There was no difference in the length of stay or the duration of oxygen treatment. For every 6 infants treated with continuous positive airway pressure therapy, there was an estimated cost saving of $10,000. Pneumothorax was identified for 14 infants in the continuous positive airway pressure group and 5 in the headbox group. There was no difference in any other measure of morbidity or death. Hudson prong bubble continuous positive airway pressure therapy reduces the need for up-transfer of infants with respiratory distress in nontertiary centers. There is a clinically relevant but not statistically significant increase in the risk of pneumothorax. There are significant benefits associated with continuous positive airway pressure use in larger nontertiary centers.

  1. Combination of constant-flow and continuous positive-pressure ventilation in canine pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Sznajder, J I; Becker, C J; Crawford, G P; Wood, L D

    1989-08-01

    Constant-flow ventilation (CFV) maintains alveolar ventilation without tidal excursion in dogs with normal lungs, but this ventilatory mode requires high CFV and bronchoscopic guidance for effective subcarinal placement of two inflow catheters. We designed a circuit that combines CFV with continuous positive-pressure ventilation (CPPV; CFV-CPPV), which negates the need for bronchoscopic positioning of CFV cannula, and tested this system in seven dogs having oleic acid-induced pulmonary edema. Addition of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP, 10 cmH2O) reduced venous admixture from 44 +/- 17 to 10.4 +/- 5.4% and kept arterial CO2 tension (PaCO2) normal. With the innovative CFV-CPPV circuit at the same PEEP and respiratory rate (RR), we were able to reduce tidal volume (VT) from 437 +/- 28 to 184 +/- 18 ml (P less than 0.001) and elastic end-inspiratory pressures (PEI) from 25.6 +/- 4.6 to 17.7 +/- 2.8 cmH2O (P less than 0.001) without adverse effects on cardiac output or pulmonary exchange of O2 or CO2; indeed, PaCO2 remained at 35 +/- 4 Torr even though CFV was delivered above the carina and at lower (1.6 l.kg-1.min-1) flows than usually required to maintain eucapnia during CFV alone. At the same PEEP and RR, reduction of VT in the CPPV mode without CFV resulted in CO2 retention (PaCO2 59 +/- 8 Torr). We conclude that CFV-CPPV allows CFV to effectively mix alveolar and dead spaces by a small bulk flow bypassing the zone of increased resistance to gas mixing, thereby allowing reduction of the CFV rate, VT, and PEI for adequate gas exchange.

  2. Changes in Energy Metabolism after Continuous Positive Airway Pressure for Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

    PubMed

    Tachikawa, Ryo; Ikeda, Kaori; Minami, Takuma; Matsumoto, Takeshi; Hamada, Satoshi; Murase, Kimihiko; Tanizawa, Kiminobu; Inouchi, Morito; Oga, Toru; Akamizu, Takashi; Mishima, Michiaki; Chin, Kazuo

    2016-09-15

    Disrupted energy homeostasis in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) may lead to weight gain. Paradoxically, treating OSA with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) may also promote weight gain, although the underlying mechanism remains unclear. To explore the underlying mechanism by which patients with OSA gain weight after CPAP. A comprehensive assessment of energy metabolism was performed in 63 newly diagnosed OSA study participants (51 men; 60.8 ± 10.1 yr; apnea-hypopnea index >20 h(-1)) at baseline, CPAP initiation, and at a 3-month follow-up. Measurements included polysomnography, body weight, body composition, basal metabolic rate (BMR), hormones (norepinephrine, cortisol, leptin, ghrelin, insulin-like growth factor-1), dietary intake, eating behavior, and physical activity. BMR significantly decreased after CPAP (1,584 kcal/d at baseline, 1,561 kcal/d at CPAP initiation, and 1,508 kcal/d at follow-up; P < 0.001), whereas physical activity and total caloric intake did not significantly change. In multivariate regression, baseline apnea-hypopnea index, Δurine norepinephrine, and CPAP adherence were significant predictors of ΔBMR. The weight gainers had higher leptin levels, lower ghrelin levels, and higher eating behavior scores than the non-weight gainers, indicating a positive energy balance and disordered eating behavior among the weight gainers. Among the parameters related to energy metabolism, increased caloric intake was a particularly significant predictor of weight gain. Although a reduction in BMR after CPAP predisposes to a positive energy balance, dietary intake and eating behavior had greater impacts on weight change. These findings highlight the importance of lifestyle modifications combined with CPAP. Clinical trial registered with http://www.umin.ac.jp/english/ (UMIN000012639).

  3. Front-end circuit for position sensitive silicon and vacuum tube photomultipliers with gain control and depth of interaction measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrero, Vicente; Colom, Ricardo; Gadea, Rafael; Lerche, Christoph W.; Cerdá, Joaquín; Sebastiá, Ángel; Benlloch, José M.

    2007-06-01

    Silicon Photomultipliers, though still under development for mass production, may be an alternative to traditional Vacuum Photomultipliers Tubes (VPMT). As a consequence, electronic front-ends initially designed for VPMT will need to be modified. In this simulation, an improved architecture is presented which is able to obtain impact position and depth of interaction of a gamma ray within a continuous scintillation crystal, using either kind of PM. A current sensitive preamplifier stage with individual gain adjustment interfaces the multi-anode PM outputs with a current division resistor network. The preamplifier stage allows to improve front-end processing delay and temporal resolution behavior as well as to increase impact position calculation resolution. Depth of interaction (DOI) is calculated from the width of the scintillation light distribution, which is related to the sum of voltages in resistor network input nodes. This operation is done by means of a high-speed current mode scheme.

  4. Position sensitive x-ray spectrophotometer using microwave kinetic inductance detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Mazin, Benjamin A.; Bumble, Bruce; Day, Peter K.; Eckart, Megan E.; Golwala, Sunil; Zmuidzinas, Jonas; Harrison, Fiona A.

    2006-11-27

    The surface impedance of a superconductor changes when energy is absorbed and Cooper pairs are broken to produce single electron (quasiparticle) excitations. This change may be sensitively measured using a thin-film resonant circuit called a microwave kinetic inductance detector (MKID). The practical application of MKIDs for photon detection requires a method of efficiently coupling the photon energy to the MKID. The authors present results on position sensitive x-ray detectors made by using two aluminum MKIDs on either side of a tantalum photon absorber strip. Diffusion constants, recombination times, and energy resolution are reported. MKIDs can easily be scaled into large arrays.

  5. Use of a pulsed magnetic field to increase the position sensitivity of a photomultiplier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yong-Geng, Qian; Thompson, C. J.

    1987-05-01

    It is well known that photomultipliers (PMTs) are sensitive to external magnetic fields. We have used this property to vary the gain of the PMT depending on the position of the light source. Various coil configurations have been evaluated to produce local magnetic fields in the region between the photocathode and first dynode to maximize the amplitude variation in the anode signal with respect to change in the coil current. The aim was to improve the position sensitivity of a PMT used in positron emission tomography (PET). The position sensitivity was tested with an array of collimated light emitting diodes directed towards the photocathodes of a Hamamatsu R1548 PMT. The best coil position was above the photocathodes. A 60% reduction in output for light pulses from two LEDs near the coil was obtained with a current of 43 Ampere-turns while signals from two LEDs far from the coil remained the same. The rise time of the magnetic field was 2 μs.

  6. Continuous and Delayed Photohemolysis Sensitized With Methylene Blue and Iron Oxide Nanoparticles (Fe3O4)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AL-Akhras, M.-Ali; Aljarrah, Khaled; Albiss, Borhan; Alhaji Bala, Abba

    2015-10-01

    This research present the sensitization of methylene blue (MB), as a potential photodynamic therapy photo sensitizer which showed phototoxicity for many tumor cells in vitro incorporated with iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe3O4, IO-NP), which offer magnificent interaction both inside and outside the surface of biomolecules together with red blood cells (RBC's) with significant change in hemolysis process. The study investigated the sensitization of continuous photohemolysis (CPH) for MB and MB with IO-NP, delayed photohemolysis (DPH) at different irradiation temperature (Tirr). The photohemolysis rate for CPH at room temperature has a power dependence of 0.39 ± 0.05 with relative of steepness of 1.25 ± 0.02 and for different concentration of MB and power dependent of 0.15 ± 0.03 with relative steepness of 1.34 ± 0.01 for different MB and IO-NP. Logistic and Gompertz functions were applied as appropriate mathematical models to fit the collected experimental data for CPH and DPH respectively, and to calculate fractional photohemolysis rate with minimum errors. The Logistic function parameter; α, the hemolysis rate, increases with increasing concentrations of MB and decreases with increasing IO-NP concentrations in the presence of 6 μg/ml of MB. The parameter β the time required to reduce the maximum number of RBCs to one half of its value, decreases with increasing MB concentration and increases with increasing IO-NP concentrations in the presence of 6 pg/ml of MB. In DPH at different Tirr, the Gompertz parameter; a, fractional hemolysis ratio, is independent of temperature in both case MB and MB plus IO-NP, while the parameter; b, rate of fractional hemolysis change, increases with increasing Tirr, in both case MB and MB plus IO-NP. The apparent activation energy of colloid-osmotic hemolysis is 9.47±0.01 Kcal/mol with relative steepness of 1.31 ± 0.05 for different MB and 6.06±0.03 Kcal/mol with relative steepness of 1.41 ± 0.09 for MB with iron oxide. Our

  7. Continuous Positive Airway Pressure and Breathlessness in Obese Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Sichang; Bastianpillai, Johan; Ratneswaran, Culadeeban; Pengo, Martino F.; Luo, Yuanming; Jolley, Caroline J.; Moxham, John; Steier, Joerg

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is an effective treatment for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). However, long-term compliance with CPAP is limited. We tested the hypothesis that CPAP levels routinely used during sleep increase neural respiratory drive (NRD) and breathlessness, which may discourage compliance. Methods: This was an observational physiological cohort study in a respiratory physiology and sleep unit, University Hospital. Patients with a body mass index (BMI) > 25 kg/m2 and confirmed OSA were studied supine and awake on CPAP (4–20 cm H2O, increments of 2 cm H2O/3 min). We measured NRD during awake CPAP titration in obese subjects to quantify the response to the load of the respiratory system and compared it to the CPAP used for nocturnal treatment, with the modified Borg Scale (mBorg) for dyspnea recorded (from 0 to 10 points, with higher numbers indicating more breathlessness). Results: Fifteen patients (age 48 ± 10 years, 12 male, BMI 38.9 ± 5.8 kg/m2) with OSA (AHI 32.2 ± 21.1/h, 95th percentile of CPAP 14.1 ± 3.8 cm H2O) were studied and NRD (electromyogram of the parasternal intercostals, EMGpara; EMG of the external oblique, EMGabdomen) was recorded (awake, supine). Awake, EMGpara declined from baseline to 70.2% ± 17.1% when CPAP of 10.7 ± 3.4 cm H2O (P = 0.026) was applied. Further increase in CPAP led to a rise in EMGpara and increased breathlessness (P = 0.02). CPAP compliance (nights used) correlated negatively with mBorg scores (r = −0.738, P = 0.006). Conclusions: Awake, the respiratory system is maximally offloaded with lower than therapeutic CPAP levels in obese patients with OSA. Levels of NRD observed at effective CPAP levels while asleep are associated with breathlessness which may limit long-term CPAP compliance. Citation: Xiao S, Bastianpillai J, Ratneswaran C, Pengo MF, Luo Y, Jolley CJ, Moxham J, Steier J. Continuous positive airway pressure and breathlessness in obese patients with obstructive

  8. Effect of Continuous Positive Airway Pressure on Stroke Rehabilitation: A Pilot Randomized Sham-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Khot, Sandeep P.; Davis, Arielle P.; Crane, Deborah A.; Tanzi, Patricia M.; Li Lue, Denise; Claflin, Edward S.; Becker, Kyra J.; Longstreth, W.T.; Watson, Nathaniel F.; Billings, Martha E.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) predicts poor functional outcome after stroke and increases the risk for recurrent stroke. Less is known about continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment on stroke recovery. Methods: In a pilot randomized, double-blind, sham-controlled trial, adult stroke rehabilitation patients were assigned to auto-titrating or sham CPAP without diagnostic testing for OSA. Change in Functional Independence Measure (FIM), a measure of disability, was assessed between rehabilitation admission and discharge. Results: Over 18 months, 40 patients were enrolled and 10 withdrew from the study: 7 from active and 3 from sham CPAP (p > 0.10). For the remaining 30 patients, median duration of CPAP use was 14 days. Average CPAP use was 3.7 h/night, with at least 4 h nightly use among 15 patients. Adherence was not influenced by treatment assignment or stroke severity. In intention-to-treat analyses (n = 40), the median change in FIM favored active CPAP over sham but did not reach statistical significance (34 versus 26, p = 0.25), except for the cognitive component (6 versus 2.5, p = 0.04). The on-treatment analyses (n = 30) yielded similar results (total FIM: 32 versus 26, p = 0.11; cognitive FIM: 6 versus 2, p = 0.06). Conclusions: A sham-controlled CPAP trial among stroke rehabilitation patients was feasible in terms of recruitment, treatment without diagnostic testing and adequate blinding—though was limited by study retention and CPAP adherence. Despite these limitations, a trend towards a benefit of CPAP on recovery was evident. Tolerance and adherence must be improved before the full benefits of CPAP on recovery can be assessed in larger trials. Citation: Khot SP, Davis AP, Crane DA, Tanzi PM, Li Lue D, Claflin ES, Becker KJ, Longstreth WT, Watson NF, Billings ME. Effect of continuous positive airway pressure on stroke rehabilitation: a pilot randomized sham-controlled trial. J Clin Sleep Med 2016;12(7):1019–1026. PMID

  9. Does personality play a role in continuous positive airway pressure compliance?

    PubMed Central

    Maschauer, Emily L.; Fairley, Donna M.

    2017-01-01

    Key points Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) adherence is low among individuals with obstructive sleep apnoea. Type D personality and high scores on the depression and hypochondriasis scales on the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) have been identified as factors contributing to non-compliance with CPAP. Further research into personality type may assist in understanding why some people adhere to CPAP, while others fail. Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is a condition characterised by repetitive, intermittent partial or complete collapse/obstruction of the upper airway during sleep. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is highly efficacious in treating OSA but its effectiveness is limited due to suboptimal acceptance and adherence rates, with as many as 50% of OSA patients discontinuing CPAP treatment within the first year. Until recently, research has focused on examining mechanistic and demographic factors that could explain nonadherence (e.g. age, sex, race and education level) with limited applicability in a prospective or clinical manner. More recent research has focused on personality factors or types of patients with OSA who comply and do not comply with CPAP adherence in an attempt to enhance the accuracy of predicting treatment compliance. Type D personality has been found to be prevalent in one third of patients with OSA. The presence of Type D personality increases noncompliance and poor treatment outcomes due to negative affectivity, social inhibition, unhealthy lifestyle, and a reluctance to consult and/or follow medical advice. Conversely, individuals who are more likely to adhere to CPAP treatment tend to have a high internal locus of control and high self-efficacy, self-refer for treatment, and have active coping skills. By assessing personality and coping skills, the clinician may gain insight into the likelihood of a patient’s adherence to treatment. If the patient displays potential risk factors for CPAP

  10. Overnight Motor Skill Learning Outcomes in Obstructive Sleep Apnea: Effect of Continuous Positive Airway Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Landry, Shane; O'Driscoll, Denise M.; Hamilton, Garun S.; Conduit, Russell

    2016-01-01

    Study Objective: To determine the effectiveness of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy in alleviating known impairments in the overnight consolidation of motor skill learning in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Methods: Twenty-five patients with untreated moderate-severe OSA, 13 first-night CPAP users, 17 compliant CPAP users, and 14 healthy control patients were trained on a motor sequence learning task (Sequential Finger Tapping Task, SFTT) and were subsequently tested prior to and after polysomnographic recorded sleep. Measures of subjective sleepiness (Karolinska Sleepiness Scale) and sustained attention (Psychomotor Vigilance Task) were also completed before and after sleep. Results: Typical analyses of overnight improvement on the SFTT show significantly greater overnight gains in motor task speed in controls (+11.6 ± 4.7%, p = 0.007) and compliant CPAP users (+8.9 ± 4.3%, p = 0.008) compared to patients with OSA (−4.86 ± 4.5%). Additional analyses suggest that these improvements in motor performance occurred prior to the sleep episode, as all groups significantly improved (15% to 22%) over a 10-min presleep rest period. Thereafter, performance in all groups significantly deteriorated over sleep (6% to 16%) with trends toward patients with OSA showing greater losses in performance compared to control patients and compliant CPAP users. No between-group differences in subjective sleepiness and sustained attention were found presleep and postsleep. Conclusions: The current data suggest impairments in overnight motor learning in patients with OSA may be a combination of deficient stabilization of memory over a sleep episode as well as increased vulnerability to time on task fatigue effects. Compliant CPAP usage possibly offsets both of these impediments to learning outcomes by improving both sleep quality and subsequent daytime function. Citation: Landry S, O'Driscoll DM, Hamilton GS, Conduit R. Overnight motor skill learning

  11. Is the Relationship between Race and Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Adherence Mediated by Sleep Duration?

    PubMed Central

    Billings, Martha E.; Rosen, Carol L.; Wang, Rui; Auckley, Dennis; Benca, Ruth; Foldvary-Schaefer, Nancy; Iber, Conrad; Zee, Phyllis; Redline, Susan; Kapur, Vishesh K.

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: Black race has been associated with decreased continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) adherence. Short sleep duration, long sleep latency, and insomnia complaints may affect CPAP adherence as they affect sleep and opportunity to use CPAP. We assessed whether self-reported sleep measures were associated with CPAP adherence and if racial variations in these sleep characteristics may explain racial differences in CPAP adherence. Design: Analysis of data from a randomized controlled trial (HomePAP), which investigated home versus laboratory-based diagnosis and treatment of obstructive sleep apnea. Setting: Seven American Academy of Sleep Medicine-accredited sleep centers in five cities in the United States. Patients or Participants: Enrolled subjects (n = 191) with apnea-hypopnea index ≥ 15 and sleepiness (Epworth Sleepiness Scale > 12). Interventions: N/A. Measurements and Results: Multivariable regression was used to assess if subjective sleep measures and symptoms predicted 3-mo CPAP use. Mediation analysis was used to assess if sleep measures mediated the association of race with CPAP adherence. Black participants reported shorter sleep duration and longer sleep latency at baseline than white and Hispanic participants. Shorter sleep duration and longer sleep latency predicted worse CPAP adherence. Sleep duration mediated the association of black race with lower CPAP adherence. However, insomnia symptoms were not associated with race or CPAP adherence. Conclusions: Among subjects with similar severity of obstructive sleep apnea and sleepiness, baseline self-reported sleep duration and latency, but not perceived insomnia, predicted CPAP adherence over 3 mo. Sleep duration explains some of the observed differences in CPAP use by race. Sleep duration and latency should be considered when evaluating poor CPAP adherence. Clinical Trial Information: Portable Monitoring for Diagnosis and Management of Sleep Apnea (HomePAP) URL: http

  12. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) decreases pulmonary shunt in anaesthetized horses.

    PubMed

    Mosing, Martina; MacFarlane, Paul; Bardell, David; Lüthi, Laura; Cripps, Peter J; Bettschart-Wolfensberger, Regula

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate the effects of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) on intrapulmonary shunt, cardiac output and oxygen delivery in horses subjected to a 6 hour period of general anaesthesia. Randomized, experimental, crossover study. Ten healthy adult horses. Following medetomidine, diazepam and ketamine administration, orotracheal intubation was performed and horses positioned in dorsal recumbency. Anaesthesia was maintained with isoflurane carried in an oxygen and air mix (FiO2 0.5) combined with a medetomidine infusion. Horses were anaesthetized twice and either CPAP (8 cmH2 O) or physiologic airway pressure (NO CPAP) was applied to the lungs for 6 hours; the order of treatments was randomly assigned. Following induction of anaesthesia, cardiovascular and respiratory variables (including arterial blood gas analysis) were recorded every 30 minutes, cardiac output was measured every 60 minutes using the lithium dilution technique and oxygen delivery calculated. If PaCO2 exceeded 100 mmHg (13.3 kPa), controlled ventilation was initiated and horses excluded from further data collection. Groups were compared using a general linear model. Data from eight horses were analysed. PaO2 was 15-56 mmHg (2.00-7.45 kPa) higher (p < 0.001) and shunt fraction 6-14% lower (p < 0.001) in the CPAP group. No differences were seen for cardiac output and oxygen delivery. The lack of difference in oxygen delivery was attributed to lower haemoglobin levels in the CPAP group than in the NO CPAP group. CPAP of 8 cmH2 O can be used in dorsally recumbent horses to decrease pulmonary shunt fraction without causing a decrease in cardiac output during longterm anaesthesia. © 2016 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and the American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia.

  13. Adapting the Bird Mark 7 to deliver noninvasive continuous positive airway pressure: a bench study.

    PubMed

    Kikuti, Beatriz Mayumi; Utsunomia, Karen; Colaneri, Renata Potonyacz; Carvalho, Carlos Roberto Ribeiro de; Caruso, Pedro

    2008-03-01

    To test the efficiency of the Bird Mark 7 ventilator adapted to deliver continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) in noninvasive positive pressure ventilation. This was an experimental study using a mechanical model of the respiratory system. A Bird Mark 7 ventilator was supplied with 400 and 500 kPa and tested at CPAP of 5, 10 and 15 cmH2O. The following variables were analyzed: difference between the preset CPAP and the CPAP actually attained CPAP (trueCPAP); area of airway pressure at the CPAP level employed (AREA CPAP); and tidal volume generated. Adapting the Bird Mark 7 to offer CPAP achieved the expected tidal volume in all situations of inspiratory effort (normal or high), ventilator pressure supply (400 or 500 kPa) and CPAP value (5, 10 or 15 cmH2O). At a CPAP of 5 or 10 cmH2O, the trueCPAP was near the preset level, and the AREA CPAP was near zero. However, at a CPAP of 15 cmH2O, the value remained below the preset, and the AREA CPAP was high. The efficiency of Bird Mark 7 adaptation in offering CPAP was satisfactory at 5 and 10 cmH2O but insufficient at 15 cmH2O. If adapted as described in our study, the Bird Mark 7 might be an option for offering CPAP up to 10 cmH2O in areas where little or no equipment is available.

  14. Lung Volume and Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Requirements in Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Heinzer, Raphael C.; Stanchina, Michael L.; Malhotra, Atul; Fogel, Robert B.; Patel, Sanjay R.; Jordan, Amy S.; Schory, Karen; White, David P.

    2005-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that lung volume during wakefulness influences upper airway size and resistance, particularly in patients with sleep apnea. We sought to determine the influence of lung volume on the level of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) required to prevent flow limitation during non-REM sleep in subjects with sleep apnea. Seventeen subjects (apnea–hypopnea index, 42.6 ± 6.2 [SEM]) were studied during stable non-REM sleep in a rigid head-out shell equipped with a positive/negative pressure attachment for manipulation of extrathoracic pressure. An epiglottic pressure catheter plus a mask/pneumotachometer were used to assess flow limitation. When lung volume was increased by 1,035 ± 22 ml, the CPAP level could be decreased from 11.9 ± 0.7 to 4.8 ± 0.7 cm H2O (p < 0.001) without flow limitation. The decreased CPAP at the same negative extrathoracic pressure yielded a final lung volume increase of 421 ± 36 ml above the initial value. Conversely, when lung volume was reduced by 732 ± 74 ml (n = 8), the CPAP level had to be increased from 11.9 ± 0.7 to 17.1 ± 1.0 cm H2O (p < 0.001) to prevent flow limitation, with a final lung volume decrease of 567 ± 78 ml. These results demonstrate that relatively small changes in lung volume have an important effect on the upper airway in subjects with sleep apnea during non-REM sleep. PMID:15817803

  15. An Indoor Continuous Positioning Algorithm on the Move by Fusing Sensors and Wi-Fi on Smartphones.

    PubMed

    Li, Huaiyu; Chen, Xiuwan; Jing, Guifei; Wang, Yuan; Cao, Yanfeng; Li, Fei; Zhang, Xinlong; Xiao, Han

    2015-12-11

    Wi-Fi indoor positioning algorithms experience large positioning error and low stability when continuously positioning terminals that are on the move. This paper proposes a novel indoor continuous positioning algorithm that is on the move, fusing sensors and Wi-Fi on smartphones. The main innovative points include an improved Wi-Fi positioning algorithm and a novel positioning fusion algorithm named the Trust Chain Positioning Fusion (TCPF) algorithm. The improved Wi-Fi positioning algorithm was designed based on the properties of Wi-Fi signals on the move, which are found in a novel "quasi-dynamic" Wi-Fi signal experiment. The TCPF algorithm is proposed to realize the "process-level" fusion of Wi-Fi and Pedestrians Dead Reckoning (PDR) positioning, including three parts: trusted point determination, trust state and positioning fusion algorithm. An experiment is carried out for verification in a typical indoor environment, and the average positioning error on the move is 1.36 m, a decrease of 28.8% compared to an existing algorithm. The results show that the proposed algorithm can effectively reduce the influence caused by the unstable Wi-Fi signals, and improve the accuracy and stability of indoor continuous positioning on the move.

  16. An Indoor Continuous Positioning Algorithm on the Move by Fusing Sensors and Wi-Fi on Smartphones

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huaiyu; Chen, Xiuwan; Jing, Guifei; Wang, Yuan; Cao, Yanfeng; Li, Fei; Zhang, Xinlong; Xiao, Han

    2015-01-01

    Wi-Fi indoor positioning algorithms experience large positioning error and low stability when continuously positioning terminals that are on the move. This paper proposes a novel indoor continuous positioning algorithm that is on the move, fusing sensors and Wi-Fi on smartphones. The main innovative points include an improved Wi-Fi positioning algorithm and a novel positioning fusion algorithm named the Trust Chain Positioning Fusion (TCPF) algorithm. The improved Wi-Fi positioning algorithm was designed based on the properties of Wi-Fi signals on the move, which are found in a novel “quasi-dynamic” Wi-Fi signal experiment. The TCPF algorithm is proposed to realize the “process-level” fusion of Wi-Fi and Pedestrians Dead Reckoning (PDR) positioning, including three parts: trusted point determination, trust state and positioning fusion algorithm. An experiment is carried out for verification in a typical indoor environment, and the average positioning error on the move is 1.36 m, a decrease of 28.8% compared to an existing algorithm. The results show that the proposed algorithm can effectively reduce the influence caused by the unstable Wi-Fi signals, and improve the accuracy and stability of indoor continuous positioning on the move. PMID:26690447

  17. Similar cisplatin sensitivity of HPV-positive and -negative HNSCC cell lines.

    PubMed

    Busch, Chia-Jung; Becker, Benjamin; Kriegs, Malte; Gatzemeier, Fruzsina; Krüger, Katharina; Möckelmann, Nikolaus; Fritz, Gerhard; Petersen, Cordula; Knecht, Rainald; Rothkamm, Kai; Rieckmann, Thorsten

    2016-06-14

    Patients with HPV-positive head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) show better survival rates than those with HPV-negative HNSCC. While an enhanced radiosensitivity of HPV-positive tumors is clearly evident from single modality treatment, cisplatin is never administered as monotherapy and therefore its contribution to the enhanced cure rates of HPV-positive HNSCC is not known. Both cisplatin and radiotherapy can cause severe irreversible side effects and therefore various clinical studies are currently testing deintensified regimes for patients with HPV-positive HNSCC. One strategy is to omit cisplatin-based chemotherapy or replace it by less toxic treatments but the risk assessment of these approaches remains difficult. In this study we have compared the cytotoxic effects of cisplatin in a panel of HPV-positive and -negative HNSCC cell lines alone and when combined with radiation.While cisplatin-treated HPV-positive strains showed a slightly stronger inhibition of proliferation, there was no difference regarding colony formation. Cellular responses to the drug, namely cell cycle distribution, apoptosis and γH2AX-induction did not differ between the two entities but assessment of cisplatin-DNA-adducts suggests differences regarding the mechanisms that determine cisplatin sensitivity. Combining cisplatin with radiation, we generally observed an additive but only in a minority of strains from both entities a clear synergistic effect on colony formation. In summary, HPV-positive and -negative HNSCC cells were equally sensitive to cisplatin. Therefore replacing cisplatin may be feasible but the substituting agent should be of similar efficacy in order not to jeopardize the high cure rates for HPV-positive HNSCC.

  18. Similar cisplatin sensitivity of HPV-positive and -negative HNSCC cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Kriegs, Malte; Gatzemeier, Fruzsina; Krüger, Katharina; Möckelmann, Nikolaus; Fritz, Gerhard; Petersen, Cordula; Knecht, Rainald; Rothkamm, Kai; Rieckmann, Thorsten

    2016-01-01

    Patients with HPV-positive head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) show better survival rates than those with HPV-negative HNSCC. While an enhanced radiosensitivity of HPV-positive tumors is clearly evident from single modality treatment, cisplatin is never administered as monotherapy and therefore its contribution to the enhanced cure rates of HPV-positive HNSCC is not known. Both cisplatin and radiotherapy can cause severe irreversible side effects and therefore various clinical studies are currently testing deintensified regimes for patients with HPV-positive HNSCC. One strategy is to omit cisplatin-based chemotherapy or replace it by less toxic treatments but the risk assessment of these approaches remains difficult. In this study we have compared the cytotoxic effects of cisplatin in a panel of HPV-positive and -negative HNSCC cell lines alone and when combined with radiation. While cisplatin-treated HPV-positive strains showed a slightly stronger inhibition of proliferation, there was no difference regarding colony formation. Cellular responses to the drug, namely cell cycle distribution, apoptosis and γH2AX-induction did not differ between the two entities but assessment of cisplatin-DNA-adducts suggests differences regarding the mechanisms that determine cisplatin sensitivity. Combining cisplatin with radiation, we generally observed an additive but only in a minority of strains from both entities a clear synergistic effect on colony formation. In summary, HPV-positive and -negative HNSCC cells were equally sensitive to cisplatin. Therefore replacing cisplatin may be feasible but the substituting agent should be of similar efficacy in order not to jeopardize the high cure rates for HPV-positive HNSCC. PMID:27127883

  19. Initial characterization of a position-sensitive photodiode/BGO detector for PET (positron emission tomography)

    SciTech Connect

    Derenzo, S.E.; Moses, W.W.; Jackson, H.G.; Turko, B.T.; Cahoon, J.L.; Geyer, A.B.; Vuletich, T.

    1988-11-01

    We present initial results of a position-sensitive photodiode/BGO detector for high resolution, multi-layer positron emission tomography (PET). Position sensitivity is achieved by dividing the 3 mm /times/ 20 mm rectangular photosensitive area along the diagonal to form two triangular segments. Each segment was individually connected to a low-noise amplifier. The photodiodes and crystals were cooled to /minus/100/degree/C to reduce dark current and increase the BGO signal. With an amplifier peaking time of 17 ..mu..sec, the sum of the signals (511 keV photopeak) was 3200 electrons with a full width at half maximum (fwhm) of 750 electrons. The ratio of one signal to the sum determined the depth of interaction with a resolution of 11 mm fwhm. 27 refs., 7 figs.

  20. Position sensitivity in large spectroscopic LaBr3:Ce crystals for Doppler broadening correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blasi, N.; Giaz, A.; Boiano, C.; Brambilla, S.; Camera, F.; Million, B.; Riboldi, S.

    2016-12-01

    The position sensitivity of a large LaBr3:Ce crystal was investigated with the aim of correcting for the Doppler broadening in nuclear physics experiments. The crystal was cylindrical, 3 in×3 in (7.62 cm x 7.62 cm) and with diffusive surfaces as typically used in nuclear physics basic research to measure medium or high energy gamma rays (0.5 MeVPosition Sensitive Photomultipliers (PSPMT). The signals from the 256 segments of the four PSPMTs were acquired grouping them into 16 elements. An event by event analysis was performed and a positon resolution of the order of 2 cm was found. It was verified that this allows an important reduction of the Doppler broadening induced by relativistic beams in Nuclear Physics experiments.

  1. Powder diffraction by fixed incident angle reflection using a curved position-sensitive detector

    SciTech Connect

    Haggerty, Ryan P.; Sarin, Pankaj; Bérar, Jean-Francois; Apostolov, Zlatomir D.; Kriven, Waltraud M.

    2010-05-25

    As curved position-sensitive detectors improve in angular resolution, the effects that fixed incident angle reflection have on X-ray diffraction peaks become more apparent. In this study the effects of sample transparency, incident beam height, detector resolution and sample displacement on the intensity, location, width and shape of powder diffraction peaks were examined. The functions describing each of these phenomena are presented and were successfully used to quantitatively model the diffraction peaks collected in this geometry. Three distinct regimes of diffraction peak resolution were identified from the phenomena that limit the peak variance. Pertinent criteria based on experimental parameters have been outlined to classify fixed incident angle reflection experiments into each regime. Guidelines for improvement of experimental resolution and for conducting analysis of data acquired using fixed incident angle reflection geometry and curved position-sensitive detectors are also provided.

  2. A position-sensitive X-ray detector for the HEAO-A satellite.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Held, D.; Weisskopf, M. C.

    1973-01-01

    A position-sensitive, low-energy proportional counter system is described which will be used on the High-Energy Astronomical Observatory, Mission A, spacecraft. The associated system incorporates the capability to employ pulse-shape discrimination for background rejection and interpolation circuitry to locate the centroid of an X-ray event with an accuracy of approximately one eighth the cathode-wire spacing.

  3. Assessment of baroreflex sensitivity by continuous noninvasive monitoring of peripheral and central aortic pressure.

    PubMed

    Kouchaki, Zahra; Butlin, Mark; Qasem, Ahmed; Avolio, Alberto P

    2014-01-01

    Noninvasive assessment of baroreceptor sensitivity (BRS) facilitates clinical investigation of autonomic function. The spontaneous sequence method estimates BRS using the continuous measurement of arterial pressure in the finger. Since the baroreceptors are centrally located (aortic arch, carotid arteries), this study assessed the use of a continuous aortic pressure signal derived from the peripheral pressure pulse to compute the BRS from changes in systolic pressure (SBP) and pulse interval (PI). BRS computed from central aortic (cBRS) and peripheral pressure (pBRS) was calculated in 12 healthy subjects (25-62 years, 7 females). The difference between pBRS and cBRS was calculated for four levels of pulse lags between changes in SBP and PI. For each lag and for the pooled data for all lags, cBRS was significantly correlated with pBRS (r(2)=0.82). The within subject difference ranged from -41.2% to 59.2%. This difference was not related to age, gender of hemodynamic parameters (systolic or diastolic pressure, heart rate, aortic pulse wave velocity). However 18.2% of the variance was due to the difference in the number of spontaneous pulse sequences used to determine values of cBRS and pBRS. The differences between pBRS and cBRS are in the range of values of BRS as those found, in other studies, to discriminate between patient groups with different levels of autonomic function. Findings of this study suggest that, given the heart rate dependent amplification of the arterial pressure pulse between the central aorta and the peripheral limbs, BRS determined from central aortic pressure derived from the peripheral pulse may provide an improved method for noninvasive assessment of baroreceptor function.

  4. Wnt activity and basal niche position sensitize intestinal stem and progenitor cells to DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Tao, Si; Tang, Duozhuang; Morita, Yohei; Sperka, Tobias; Omrani, Omid; Lechel, André; Sakk, Vadim; Kraus, Johann; Kestler, Hans A; Kühl, Michael; Rudolph, Karl Lenhard

    2015-03-04

    Aging and carcinogenesis coincide with the accumulation of DNA damage and mutations in stem and progenitor cells. Molecular mechanisms that influence responses of stem and progenitor cells to DNA damage remain to be delineated. Here, we show that niche positioning and Wnt signaling activity modulate the sensitivity of intestinal stem and progenitor cells (ISPCs) to DNA damage. ISPCs at the crypt bottom with high Wnt/β-catenin activity are more sensitive to DNA damage compared to ISPCs in position 4 with low Wnt activity. These differences are not induced by differences in cell cycle activity but relate to DNA damage-dependent activation of Wnt signaling, which in turn amplifies DNA damage checkpoint activation. The study shows that instructed enhancement of Wnt signaling increases radio-sensitivity of ISPCs, while inhibition of Wnt signaling decreases it. These results provide a proof of concept that cell intrinsic levels of Wnt signaling modulate the sensitivity of ISPCs to DNA damage and heterogeneity in Wnt activation in the stem cell niche contributes to the selection of ISPCs in the context of DNA damage.

  5. Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Device Time to Procurement in a Disadvantaged Population.

    PubMed

    DelRosso, Lourdes M; Hoque, Romy; Chesson, Andrew L

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. The management of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in patients who cannot afford a continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) device is challenging. In this study we compare time to CPAP procurement in three groups of patients diagnosed with OSA: uninsured subsidized by a humanitarian grant (Group 1), uninsured unsubsidized (Group 2), and those with Medicare or Medicaid (Group 3). We evaluate follow-up and adherence in Group 1. We hypothesize that additional factors, rather than just the ability to obtain CPAP, may uniquely affect follow-up and adherence in uninsured patients. Methods. 30 patients were in Groups 1 and 2, respectively. 12 patients were in Group 3. Time of CPAP procurement from OSA diagnosis to CPAP initiation was assessed in all groups. CPAP adherence data was collected for Group 1 patients at 1, 3, 6, and 9 months. Results. There were no significant differences between groups in gender, age, body mass index, or apnea hypopnea index. The mean time to procurement in Group 1 was shorter compared to Group 2 but not significant. Compared to both Group 1 and Group 2, Group 3 patients had significantly shorter times to device procurement. Conclusion. Time to procurement of CPAP was significantly shorter in those with Medicaid/Medicare insurance compared to the uninsured.

  6. Tobacco industry litigation position on addiction: continued dependence on past views

    PubMed Central

    Henningfield, Jack E; Rose, Christine A; Zeller, Mitch

    2006-01-01

    This paper reviews the tobacco industry's litigation strategy for addressing the addiction issue through trial testimony by its experts, and opening and closing statements by its lawyers. Despite the fact that several companies now claim to accept, in varying degrees, the conclusions of the Surgeon General concerning tobacco addiction, the tobacco industry litigation strategy pertaining to addiction is essentially unchanged since that of the early 1980s when the issue emerged as crucial. The industry uses its experts and the process of cross‐examination of plaintiff's experts to imply that the addictiveness of tobacco and nicotine are more comparable to substances such as caffeine, chocolate, and even milk, than to heroin, cocaine and alcohol. Furthermore, the tobacco industry contends that the definition of addiction has now become so broadened as to include carrots and caffeine and hence that any concurrence that smoking is addictive, does not imply that cigarettes are addictive to the standards that drugs such as heroin and cocaine are addictive. Finally, the industry has continuously asserted that tobacco users assumed the risks of tobacco since they understood that quitting could be difficult when they began to use, and moreover, that the main barrier to cessation is lack of desire or motivation to quit and not physical addiction. These positions have been maintained through the 2004–2005 US Government litigation that was ongoing as the time of this writing. PMID:17130621

  7. Effects of continuous positive airway pressure on energy balance regulation: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Shechter, Ari

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is both a cause and a possible consequence of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA), as OSA seems to affect parameters involved in energy balance regulation, including food intake, hormonal regulation of hunger/satiety, energy metabolism and physical activity. It is known that weight loss improves OSA, yet it remains unclear why continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) often results in weight gain. The goal of this systematic review is to explore if and how CPAP affects the behaviour and/or metabolism involved in regulating energy balance. CPAP appears to correct for a hormonal profile characterised by abnormally high leptin and ghrelin levels in OSA, by reducing the circulating levels of each. This is expected to reduce excess food intake. However, reliable measures of food intake are lacking, and not yet sufficient to make conclusions. Although studies are limited and inconsistent, CPAP may alter energy metabolism, with reports of reductions in resting metabolic rate or sleeping metabolic rate. CPAP appears to not have an appreciable effect on altering physical activity levels. More work is needed to characterise how CPAP affects energy balance regulation. It is clear that promoting CPAP in conjunction with other weight loss approaches should be used to encourage optimal outcomes in OSA patients. PMID:27824596

  8. Controlled trial of continuous positive airway pressure given by face mask for hyaline membrane disease.

    PubMed Central

    Allen, L P; Reynolds, E R; Rivers, R P; Le Souëf, P M; Wimberley, P D

    1977-01-01

    A controlled trial of elective intervention with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) was performed on 24 infants with hyaline membrane disease whose arterial oxygen tension (Pao2) fell below 8kPa (60 mmHg) while they were breathing a fractional inspired oxygen concentration (F1O2) greater than 0.60. A face mask was used to apply the CPAP. The progress of the 12 infants who were treated on entry to the trial was compared with that of 12 infants who were treated later. All 12 infants in the early-intervention group and 8 infants in the late-intervention group survived. When CPAP was started, Pao2 increased and the early-treated infants breathed high concentrations of oxygen for a shorter period than the late-treated infants. The 4 infants in the early-intervention group who required mechanical ventilation needed lower mean airway pressures to achieve satisfactory gas exchange than the 7 ventilated infants in the late-intervention group. We conclude that a Pao2 less than 8 kPa while breathing an F1o2 greater than 0.60 is an adequate indication for giving CPAP in hyaline membrane disease, and that early intervention with CPAP allows infants who go on to require mechanical ventilation to be ventilated at lower pressures. PMID:326199

  9. Randomized trial of continuous positive airways pressure to prevent reventilation in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Peake, M; Dillon, P; Shaw, N J

    2005-03-01

    A prospective randomized controlled trial was performed comparing the use of a short period (24 hr) of postextubation nasal continuous positive airways pressure (CPAP) with direct extubation into headbox oxygen on the outcome of the need for reintubation within 7 days of initial extubation. Infants at less than 32 weeks of gestation who had received mechanical ventilation in the first 28 postnatal days and were being extubated for the first time were recruited. Ninety-seven babies were entered into the study (48 CPAP and 49 headbox oxygen). Twenty-four (49%) babies in the headbox group were reventilated within a week, compared to 16 (33%) in the CPAP group (P=0.17). By 14 days after initial extubation, 25 babies (51%) in the headbox group and 23 (48%) in the CPAP group required reventilation (P=0.9). There was a trend toward babies in the CPAP group requiring fewer reintubations (median, 2; range, 1-6) compared to those in the headbox group (median, 3; range, 1-7) (P=0.063). There was no significant difference between groups with respect to total number of days of ventilation (headbox median, 4; range, 1-24; CPAP median, 2; range, 1-20). In conclusion, this study showed that a short period of nasal CPAP is not associated with a reduction in reventilation.

  10. High Altitude, Continuous Positive Airway Pressure, and Obstructive Sleep Apnea: Subjective Observations and Objective Data

    PubMed Central

    Malhotra, Atul; Schwartz, Eli

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Ginosar, Yehuda, Atul Malhotra, and Eli Schwartz. High altitude, continuous positive airway pressure, and obstructive sleep apnea: Subjective observations and objective data. High Alt Med Biol 14:186–189, 2013.—We report observations made by one of the authors who ascended to the Thorang La pass (5416 m) in the Nepal Himalaya in October 2010, despite moderate-severe obstructive sleep apnea. We report the first recorded use of nasal CPAP to treat high altitude pulmonary edema (progressively severe dyspnea at rest and severe orthopnea, with tachycardia and tachypnea) that occurred at 4400 meters, when snow and darkness made safe evacuation difficult. We also present objective longitudinal data of the effects of altitude on auto-adjusting CPAP delivered via a portable nasal CPAP device, and on the apnea hypopnea index measured during sleep while using the device. OSA may be a risk factor for the development of high altitude pulmonary edema and we suggest that a nasal CPAP device located in high altitude trekking stations may provide an additional or alternative treatment option for managing high altitude pulmonary edema until evacuation is possible. PMID:23795742

  11. Adherence to Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Treatment for Obstructive Sleep Apnea: Implications for Future Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Terri E.; Sawyer, Amy M.

    2010-01-01

    Adherence to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a critical problem with adherence rates ranging from 30–60%. Poor adherence to CPAP is widely recognized as a significant limiting factor in treating OSA, reducing the overall effectiveness of the treatment and leaving many OSA patients at heightened risk for comorbid conditions, impaired function and quality of life. The extant literature examining adherence to CPAP provides critical insight to measuring adherence outcomes, defining optimal adherence levels, and predicting CPAP adherence. This research has revealed salient factors that are associated with or predict CPAP adherence and may guide the development of interventions to promote CPAP adherence. Over the past 10 years, intervention studies to promote CPAP adherence have incorporated a multitude of strategies including education, support, cognitive behavioral approaches, and mixed strategies. This review of the current state of science of CPAP adherence will (1) synthesize the extant literature with regard to measuring, defining, and predicting CPAP adherence, (2) review published intervention studies aimed at promoting CPAP adherence, and (3) suggest directions for future empiric study of adherence to CPAP that will have implications for translational science. Our current understanding of CPAP adherence suggests that adherence is a multi-factorial, complex clinical problem that requires similarly designed approaches to effectively address poor CPAP adherence in the OSA population. PMID:20308750

  12. Upper Airway Variation and Frequent Alcohol Consumption Can Affect Compliance With Continuous Positive Airway Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Jong In; Kim, Hyo Yeol; Hong, Sang Duk; Ryu, Gwanghui; Kim, Su Jin; Lee, Kyung Eun; Dhong, Hun-Jong; Chung, Seung-Kyu

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Compliance with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment remains a primary concern for improving treatment outcomes of obstructive sleep apnea. There are few studies that have considered the role of upper airway anatomy on the compliance with CPAP. We hypothesized that upper airway anatomy would influence the compliance with CPAP. Methods One hundred out of 161 consecutive patients were enrolled in this study. The following possible determinants were tested against CPAP use: demographic and anthropometric data, minimal cross-sectional area on acoustic rhinometry, cephalometric and polysomnographic data, questionnaires of Epworth sleepiness scale and Beck depression index, and histories of previous upper airway surgery, degree of nasal obstruction, daily cigarette consumption, and weekly frequency of alcohol intake. Results Univariate analysis showed that histories of previous upper airway surgery and less frequent alcohol consumption, and longer mandibular plane-hyoid length (MP-H) on cephalometry were associated with longer average daily CPAP use. After adjustment for the confounding factors with multiple linear regression analysis, alcohol consumption and MP-H were still associated with the compliance with CPAP significantly. Conclusion To improve compliance with CPAP, careful evaluations of upper airway problems and life style are important before initiating CPAP. PMID:27334512

  13. Increased airway reactivity in a neonatal mouse model of Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP)

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Catherine A.; Martin, Richard J.; MacFarlane, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is a primary form of respiratory support used in the intensive care of preterm infants, but its long-term effects on airway (AW) function are unknown. Methods We developed a neonatal mouse model of CPAP treatment to determine whether it modifies later AW reactivity. Un-anesthetized spontaneously breathing mice were fitted with a mask to deliver CPAP (6cmH2O, 3hrs/day) for 7 consecutive days starting at postnatal day 1. Airway reactivity to methacholine was assessed using the in vitro living lung slice preparation. Results One week of CPAP increased AW responsiveness to methacholine in male, but not female mice, compared to untreated control animals. The AW hyper-reactivity of male mice persisted for 2 weeks (at P21) after CPAP treatment ended. 4 days of CPAP, however, did not significantly increase AW reactivity. Females also exhibited AW hyper-reactivity at P21, suggesting a delayed response to early (7 days) CPAP treatment. The effects of 7 days of CPAP on hyper-reactivity to methacholine were unique to smaller AWs whereas larger ones were relatively unaffected. Conclusion These data may be important to our understanding of the potential long-term consequences of neonatal CPAP therapy used in the intensive care of preterm infants. PMID:25950451

  14. Continuous positive pressure ventilation during epidural blockade--effects on cardiac output distribution.

    PubMed

    Elowsson, P; Norlén, K; Jakobson, S

    2001-01-01

    It has been shown that when cardiac output (CO) decreases during continuous positive pressure ventilation (CPPV), its regional distribution adapts with a favouring of vital organs. Does epidural blockade modify this adaptation? Regional blood flows were assessed by the microsphere technique (15 microm) in 17 anaesthetised pigs during spontaneous breathing and CPPV with 8 cm H2O end-expiratory pressure (CPPV8) before and after epidural blockade. The block was induced at either the Th6-7 (Thep) or the L6-S1 (Lep) level with 1 ml of lidocaine 40 mg x ml(-1). When Lep was combined with CPPV8, mean arterial pressure and CO decreased significantly, and they decreased even more when combined with Thep. In contrast, the relative perfusion of the central nervous system, heart and kidneys remained stable during the four conditions studied. The adrenal perfusion during CPPV8 was obviated by epidural blockade. The absolute and relative perfusion of the skeletal muscle decreased during epidural blockade. The administered doses of epidural lidocaine did not affect blood flow in the spinal cord. The locally mediated nutritive vasoregulation of vital organs outweighed the sympathetic blockade induced by epidural blockade. During Thep blockade the animals were less capable of responding to the haemodynamic changes induced by CPPV8, probably due to the blockade of the cardiac part of the sympathetic nervous system.

  15. Tobacco industry litigation position on addiction: continued dependence on past views.

    PubMed

    Henningfield, Jack E; Rose, Christine A; Zeller, Mitch

    2006-12-01

    This paper reviews the tobacco industry's litigation strategy for addressing the addiction issue through trial testimony by its experts, and opening and closing statements by its lawyers. Despite the fact that several companies now claim to accept, in varying degrees, the conclusions of the Surgeon General concerning tobacco addiction, the tobacco industry litigation strategy pertaining to addiction is essentially unchanged since that of the early 1980s when the issue emerged as crucial. The industry uses its experts and the process of cross-examination of plaintiff's experts to imply that the addictiveness of tobacco and nicotine are more comparable to substances such as caffeine, chocolate, and even milk, than to heroin, cocaine and alcohol. Furthermore, the tobacco industry contends that the definition of addiction has now become so broadened as to include carrots and caffeine and hence that any concurrence that smoking is addictive, does not imply that cigarettes are addictive to the standards that drugs such as heroin and cocaine are addictive. Finally, the industry has continuously asserted that tobacco users assumed the risks of tobacco since they understood that quitting could be difficult when they began to use, and moreover, that the main barrier to cessation is lack of desire or motivation to quit and not physical addiction. These positions have been maintained through the 2004-2005 US Government litigation that was ongoing as the time of this writing.

  16. Obstructive sleep apnea: a comparison of continuous positive airway pressure and surgical treatment.

    PubMed

    Anand, V K; Ferguson, P W; Schoen, L S

    1991-09-01

    Since earlier descriptions of the syndrome of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), various treatment alternatives have included a variety of medical regimens, continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), tracheostomy, and other surgical options. A lack of acceptable criteria for surgical intervention remains an important concern for the surgeon. in an attempt to resolve some of the controversies pertaining to various therapeutic modalities, we performed a retrospective analysis--from 1983 to the present--of posttreatment results in patients who underwent surgical therapy and those who were treated primarily with CPAP at this institution. Of 400 patients diagnosed with OSA, only 66 underwent surgical treatment, including uvulopalatopharyngoplasty. CPAP was the mainstay of treatment in the majority of our patients. Post-treatment data were available for 50 patients treated with CPAP and for 45 patients treated surgically. A comparative analysis of polysomnographic studies revealed superior cures with CPAP, although long-term compliance remains a significant problem. We advocate CPAP as initial therapy in patients with no clinically apparent causes for obstruction (e.g., nasal polyps, deviated nasal septum, or obstructive tonsillar hypertrophy) because of the predictability of success, and lower costs and complication rates. Long-term followup of OSA patients is indicated, regardless of treatment modality.

  17. Critical care patients' experience of the helmet continuous positive airway pressure.

    PubMed

    Dimech, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is a common treatment modality for acute respiratory failure (ARF) in critical care. Historically, a tight-fitting mask is used to provide respiratory support. This however is not without risks to the patient. The helmet CPAP is a new product that provides the same treatment with a different method of delivery. There is minimal evidence to date explaining the patient's experience of the new helmet modality. The aim of this research study is to explore critical care patient's experience of helmet CPAP. A qualitative approach was taken utilizing descriptive phenomenological methodology. In order to obtain rich data, six interviews with cues provided the platform for data generation and collection. A thematic framework was utilized with emergent themes manually analysed using a constant comparative technique to express the experiences or phenomena of a particular event or experiences. The overall experience was unique to each patient. The patients entrusted the health care team which made the experience more tolerable. Paradoxical themes were experienced during treatment. The themes included entrapment, confusion, helping me breathe, liberation, challenges, apprehension, relief, trust and endurance. The desire to survive the acute illness proved to be a driving factor. The study has provided an insight into the patient's experience of helmet CPAP in the critical care setting. The findings have provided a basis for policy and guideline development. It will also assist in developing future patient focused care. © 2012 The Author. Nursing in Critical Care © 2012 British Association of Critical Care Nurses.

  18. Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Device Time to Procurement in a Disadvantaged Population

    PubMed Central

    DelRosso, Lourdes M.; Chesson, Andrew L.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. The management of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in patients who cannot afford a continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) device is challenging. In this study we compare time to CPAP procurement in three groups of patients diagnosed with OSA: uninsured subsidized by a humanitarian grant (Group 1), uninsured unsubsidized (Group 2), and those with Medicare or Medicaid (Group 3). We evaluate follow-up and adherence in Group 1. We hypothesize that additional factors, rather than just the ability to obtain CPAP, may uniquely affect follow-up and adherence in uninsured patients. Methods. 30 patients were in Groups 1 and 2, respectively. 12 patients were in Group 3. Time of CPAP procurement from OSA diagnosis to CPAP initiation was assessed in all groups. CPAP adherence data was collected for Group 1 patients at 1, 3, 6, and 9 months. Results. There were no significant differences between groups in gender, age, body mass index, or apnea hypopnea index. The mean time to procurement in Group 1 was shorter compared to Group 2 but not significant. Compared to both Group 1 and Group 2, Group 3 patients had significantly shorter times to device procurement. Conclusion. Time to procurement of CPAP was significantly shorter in those with Medicaid/Medicare insurance compared to the uninsured. PMID:26137322

  19. Relationships between Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome, Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Treatment, and Inflammatory Cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Ünüvar Doğan, Filiz; Yosunkaya, Şebnem; Kuzu Okur, Hacer; Can, Ümmügülsüm

    2014-01-01

    The cardiovascular complications that frequently accompany obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) are thought to develop as a result of inflammatory stress associated with cytokines such as IL-6 and TNF-α. We conducted the current study to compare levels of these cytokines in OSAS patients (n = 33) and nonapneic controls (n = 24). Furthermore, we investigated the impact of a three-month regime of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) on serum levels of IL-6 and TNF-α only in the OSAS patients. There were no significant differences in serum levels of either IL-6 (P = 0.782) or TNF- α (P = 0.722) or TNF-α (P = 0.722) between OSAS patients and nonapneic controls. Serum IL-6 levels correlated significantly with neck circumference in OSAS patients (P = 0.006). In OSAS patients, reduced levels of TNF-α and IL-6 correlated with increases in mean SaO2 after CPAP treatment (P = 0.020 and P = 0.051, resp.). However, neither of cytokine levels was significantly impacted by CPAP therapy (both P > 0.137). We have demonstrated that plasma cytokine levels are similar in both otherwise healthy subjects with OSAS and in nonapneic control, and we conclude that OSAS-related parameters and CPAP treatment do not play a significant role in altering cytokine levels. PMID:24895539

  20. Nasal airway responses to nasal continuous positive airway pressure breathing: An in-vivo pilot study.

    PubMed

    White, David E; Bartley, Jim; Shakeel, Muhammad; Nates, Roy J; Hankin, Robin K S

    2016-06-14

    The nasal cycle, through variation in nasal airflow partitioning, allows the upper airway to accommodate the contrasting demands of air conditioning and removal of entrapped air contaminants. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) breathing has on both nasal airflow partitioning and nasal geometry. Using a custom-made nasal mask, twenty healthy participants had the airflow in each naris measured during normal nasal breathing followed by nCPAP breathing. Eight participants also underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the nasal region during spontaneous nasal breathing, and then nCPAP breathing over a range of air pressures. During nCPAP breathing, a simultaneous reduction in airflow through the patent airway together with a corresponding increase in airway flow within the congested nasal airway were observed in sixteen of the twenty participants. Nasal airflow resistance is inversely proportional to airway cross-sectional area. MRI data analysis during nCPAP breathing confirmed airway cross-sectional area reduced along the patent airway while the congested airway experienced an increase in this parameter. During awake breathing, nCPAP disturbs the normal inter-nasal airflow partitioning. This could partially explain the adverse nasal drying symptoms frequently reported by many users of this therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Alternative methods of titrating continuous positive airway pressure: a large multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Masa, Juan F; Jiménez, Antonio; Durán, Joaquín; Capote, Francisco; Monasterio, Carmen; Mayos, Mercedes; Terán, Joaquín; Hernández, Lourdes; Barbé, Ferrán; Maimó, Andrés; Rubio, Manuela; Montserrat, José M

    2004-12-01

    Standard practice for continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment in sleep apnea and hypopnea syndrome (SAHS) requires pressure titration during attended laboratory polysomnography. However, polysomnographic titration is expensive and time-consuming. The aim of this study was to ascertain, in a large sample of CPAP-naive patients, whether CPAP titration performed by an unattended domiciliary autoadjusted CPAP device or with a predicted formula was as effective as CPAP titration performed by full polysomnography. The main outcomes were the apnea-hypopnea index and the subjective daytime sleepiness. We included 360 patients with SAHS requiring CPAP treatment. Patients were randomly allocated into three groups: standard, autoadjusted, and predicted formula titration with domiciliary adjustment. The follow-up period was 12 weeks. With CPAP treatment, the improvement in subjective sleepiness and apnea-hypopnea index was very similar in the three groups. There were no differences in the objective compliance of CPAP treatment and in the dropout rate of the three groups at the end of the follow-up. Autoadjusted titration at home and predicted formula titration with domiciliary adjustment can replace standard titration. These procedures could lead to considerable savings in cost and to significant reductions in the waiting list.

  2. Fractionating negative and positive affectivity in handedness: Insights from the Reinforcement Sensitivity Theory of personality.

    PubMed

    Beaton, Alan A; Mutinelli, Sofia; Corr, Philip J

    2016-07-28

    The Annett Hand Preference Questionnaire (AHPQ), as modified by Briggs and Nebes [(1975). Patterns of hand preference in a student population. Cortex, 11(3), 230-238. doi: 10.1016/s0010-9452(75)80005-0 ], was administered to a sample of 177 participants alongside the Reinforcement Sensitivity Theory of Personality Questionnaire [RST-PQ; Corr, P. J., & Cooper, A. (2016). The Reinforcement Sensitivity Theory of Personality Questionnaire (RST-PQ): Development and validation. Psychological Assessment. doi: 10.1037/pas000 ], which measures two factors of defensive negative emotion, motivation and affectivity-the Behavioural Inhibition System (BIS) and the Fight-Flight-Freeze System (FFFS)-and one positive-approach dimension related to reward sensitivity, persistence and reactivity-the Behavioural Approach System. We sought to clarify the nature of negative, and positive, affectivity in relation to handedness. ANOVAs and multiple regression analyses converged on the following conclusions: left-handers were higher on the BIS, not the FFFS, than right-handers; in right-handers only, strength of hand preference was positively correlated with the FFFS, not the BIS. The original assessment method proposed by Annett was also used to assess handedness, but associations with RST-PQ factors were not found. These findings help us to clarify existing issues in the literature and raise new ones for future research.

  3. Development of Position-sensitive Transition-edge Sensor X-ray Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, S. J.; Bandler, S. R.; Brekosky, R. P.; Brown, A.-D.; Chervenak, J. A.; Eckard, M. E.; Finkbeiner, F. M.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Porter, F. s.; hide

    2008-01-01

    We report on the development of position-sensitive transition-edge sensors (PoST's) for future x-ray astronomy missions such as the International X-ray Observatory (IXO), currently under study by NASA and ESA. PoST's consist of multiple absorbers each with a different thermal coupling to one or more transition-edge sensor (TES). This differential thermal coupling between absorbers and TES's results in different characteristic pulse shapes and allows position discrimination between the different pixels. The development of PoST's is motivated by a desire to achieve maximum focal-plane area with the least number of readout channels and as such. PoST's are ideally suited to provide a focal-plane extension to the Constellation-X microcalorimeter array. We report the first experimental results of our latest one and two channel PoST's, which utilize fast thermalizing electroplated Au/Bi absorbers coupled to low noise Mo/Au TES's - a technology already successfully implemented in our arrays of single pixel TES's. We demonstrate 6 eV energy resolution coupled with spatial sensitivity in the keV energy range. We also report on the development of signal processing algorithms to optimize energy and position sensitivity of our detectors.

  4. Development of Position-sensitive Transition-edge Sensor X-ray Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, S. J.; Bandler, S. R.; Brekosky, R. P.; Brown, A.-D.; Chervenak, J. A.; Eckard, M. E.; Finkbeiner, F. M.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Porter, F. s.; Sad (eor. K/ E/); Figueroa-Feliciano, E.

    2008-01-01

    We report on the development of position-sensitive transition-edge sensors (PoST's) for future x-ray astronomy missions such as the International X-ray Observatory (IXO), currently under study by NASA and ESA. PoST's consist of multiple absorbers each with a different thermal coupling to one or more transition-edge sensor (TES). This differential thermal coupling between absorbers and TES's results in different characteristic pulse shapes and allows position discrimination between the different pixels. The development of PoST's is motivated by a desire to achieve maximum focal-plane area with the least number of readout channels and as such. PoST's are ideally suited to provide a focal-plane extension to the Constellation-X microcalorimeter array. We report the first experimental results of our latest one and two channel PoST's, which utilize fast thermalizing electroplated Au/Bi absorbers coupled to low noise Mo/Au TES's - a technology already successfully implemented in our arrays of single pixel TES's. We demonstrate 6 eV energy resolution coupled with spatial sensitivity in the keV energy range. We also report on the development of signal processing algorithms to optimize energy and position sensitivity of our detectors.

  5. Influence of stimulation position on the sensitivity for bone conduction hearing aids without skin penetration.

    PubMed

    Dobrev, Ivo; Stenfelt, Stefan; Röösli, Christof; Bolt, Lucy; Pfiffner, Flurin; Gerig, Rahel; Huber, Alexander; Sim, Jae Hoon

    2016-08-01

    This study explores the influence of stimulation position on bone conduction (BC) hearing sensitivity with a BC transducer attached using a headband. (1) The cochlear promontory motion was measured in cadaver heads using laser Doppler vibrometry while seven different positions around the pinna were stimulated using a bone anchored hearing aid transducer attached using a headband. (2) The BC hearing thresholds were measured in human subjects, with the bone vibrator Radioear B71 attached to the same seven stimulation positions. Three cadaver heads and twenty participants. Stimulation on a position superior-anterior to the pinna generated the largest promontory motion and the lowest BC thresholds. Stimulations on the positions superior to the pinna, the mastoid, and posterior-inferior to the pinna showed similar magnitudes of promontory motion and similar levels of BC thresholds. Stimulations on the regions superior to the pinna, the mastoid, and posterior-inferior to the pinna provide stable BC transmission, and are insensitive to small changes of the stimulation position. Therefore it is reliable to use the mastoid to determine BC thresholds in clinical audiometry. However, stimulation on a position superior-anterior to the pinna provides more efficient BC transmission than stimulation on the mastoid.

  6. Range position and climate sensitivity: The structure of among-population demographic responses to climatic variation.

    PubMed

    Amburgey, Staci M; Miller, David A W; Campbell Grant, Evan H; Rittenhouse, Tracy A G; Benard, Michael F; Richardson, Jonathan L; Urban, Mark C; Hughson, Ward; Brand, Adrianne B; Davis, Christopher J; Hardin, Carmen R; Paton, Peter W C; Raithel, Christopher J; Relyea, Rick A; Scott, A Floyd; Skelly, David K; Skidds, Dennis E; Smith, Charles K; Werner, Earl E

    2017-08-19

    Species' distributions will respond to climate change based on the relationship between local demographic processes and climate and how this relationship varies based on range position. A rarely tested demographic prediction is that populations at the extremes of a species' climate envelope (e.g., populations in areas with the highest mean annual temperature) will be most sensitive to local shifts in climate (i.e., warming). We tested this prediction using a dynamic species distribution model linking demographic rates to variation in temperature and precipitation for wood frogs (Lithobates sylvaticus) in North America. Using long-term monitoring data from 746 populations in 27 study areas, we determined how climatic variation affected population growth rates and how these relationships varied with respect to long-term climate. Some models supported the predicted pattern, with negative effects of extreme summer temperatures in hotter areas and positive effects on recruitment for summer water availability in drier areas. We also found evidence of interacting temperature and precipitation influencing population size, such as extreme heat having less of a negative effect in wetter areas. Other results were contrary to predictions, such as positive effects of summer water availability in wetter parts of the range and positive responses to winter warming especially in milder areas. In general, we found wood frogs were more sensitive to changes in temperature or temperature interacting with precipitation than to changes in precipitation alone. Our results suggest that sensitivity to changes in climate cannot be predicted simply by knowing locations within the species' climate envelope. Many climate processes did not affect population growth rates in the predicted direction based on range position. Processes such as species-interactions, local adaptation, and interactions with the physical landscape likely affect the responses we observed. Our work highlights the need to

  7. Bridging particle and wave sensitivity in a configurable detector of positive operator-valued measures.

    PubMed

    Puentes, Graciana; Lundeen, Jeff S; Branderhorst, Matthijs P A; Coldenstrodt-Ronge, Hendrik B; Smith, Brian J; Walmsley, Ian A

    2009-02-27

    We report an optical detector with tunable positive operator-valued measures. The device is based on a combination of weak-field homodyne techniques and photon-number-resolving detection. The resulting positive operator-valued measures can be continuously tuned from Fock-state projectors to a variety of phase-dependent quantum-state measurements by adjusting different system parameters such as local oscillator coupling, amplitude, and phase, allowing thus not only detection but also preparation of exotic quantum states. Experimental tomographic reconstructions of classical benchmark states are presented as a demonstration of the detector capabilities.

  8. A fast neuronal signal-sensitive continuous-wave near-infrared imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhongxing; Sun, Bailei; Gong, Hui; Zhang, Lei; Sun, Jinyan; Wang, Bangde; Luo, Qingming

    2012-09-01

    We have developed a continuous-wave near-infrared imaging system to measure fast neuronal signals. We used a simultaneous sampling method with a separate high-speed analog-to-digital converter for each input channel, which provides a much larger point sample in a digital lock-in algorithm, higher temporal resolution, and lower crosstalk among detected channels. Without any analog filter, digital lock-in detection with a large point sample suppresses noise excellently, making the system less complex and offering better flexibility. In addition, using a custom-made collimator, more photons can reach the brain tissue due to the smaller divergence angle. Performance analysis shows high detection sensitivity (on the order of 0.1 pW) and high temporal resolution (˜50 Hz, 48 channels). Simulation experiments show that intensity changes on the order of 0.01% can be resolved by our instrument when averaging over approximately 500 stimuli. In vivo experiments over the motor cortex show that our instrument can detect fast neuronal signals in the human brain.

  9. A fast neuronal signal-sensitive continuous-wave near-infrared imaging system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhongxing; Sun, Bailei; Gong, Hui; Zhang, Lei; Sun, Jinyan; Wang, Bangde; Luo, Qingming

    2012-09-01

    We have developed a continuous-wave near-infrared imaging system to measure fast neuronal signals. We used a simultaneous sampling method with a separate high-speed analog-to-digital converter for each input channel, which provides a much larger point sample in a digital lock-in algorithm, higher temporal resolution, and lower crosstalk among detected channels. Without any analog filter, digital lock-in detection with a large point sample suppresses noise excellently, making the system less complex and offering better flexibility. In addition, using a custom-made collimator, more photons can reach the brain tissue due to the smaller divergence angle. Performance analysis shows high detection sensitivity (on the order of 0.1 pW) and high temporal resolution (~50 Hz, 48 channels). Simulation experiments show that intensity changes on the order of 0.01% can be resolved by our instrument when averaging over approximately 500 stimuli. In vivo experiments over the motor cortex show that our instrument can detect fast neuronal signals in the human brain.

  10. Line-robust statistics for continuous gravitational waves: safety in the case of unequal detector sensitivities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keitel, David; Prix, Reinhard

    2015-02-01

    The multi-detector F-statistic is close to optimal for detecting continuous gravitational waves (CWs) in Gaussian noise. However, it is susceptible to false alarms from instrumental artefacts, for example quasi-monochromatic disturbances (‘lines’), which resemble a CW signal more than Gaussian noise. In a recent paper (Keitel et al 2014 Phys. Rev. D 89 064023), a Bayesian model selection approach was used to derive line-robust detection statistics for CW signals, generalizing both the F-statistic and the F-statistic consistency veto technique and yielding improved performance in line-affected data. Here we investigate a generalization of the assumptions made in that paper: if a CW analysis uses data from two or more detectors with very different sensitivities, the line-robust statistics could be less effective. We investigate the boundaries within which they are still safe to use, in comparison with the F-statistic. Tests using synthetic draws show that the optimally-tuned version of the original line-robust statistic remains safe in most cases of practical interest. We also explore a simple idea on further improving the detection power and safety of these statistics, which we, however, find to be of limited practical use.

  11. Sensitivity of protein array deposition using continuous flow printing for fluorescent microarray applications - biomed 2013.

    PubMed

    Romanov, Valentin; Miles, Adam; Gale, Bruce; Eckman, Josh; Brooks, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    The promise of antibody and protein microarrays to revolutionize disease diagnostics has failed to live up to the hype primarily due to the problems associated with the printing of the antibodies and/or proteins onto the detection surface. The current standard in printing proteins is pin printing. An alternative to the pin printer is the continuous-flow microspotter (CFM), a protein printer that uses microfluidic flow to print down the proteins. The advantages of the CFM include consistent spot morphology, spot-to-spot uniformity and enhanced surface concentration. Further, the CFM is effective at capturing proteins and antibodies from either dilute or complex (e.g. blood or tissue) samples. In this study, the sensitivity of CFM printing Cy3 and Cy5 fluorescently labeled proteins was determined. Values were obtained at low concentrations tens of ng/mL with low coefficients of variation. Thus, the CFM can effectively print and quantify proteins and antibodies from low concentration and complex buffered samples.

  12. Continuous positive airway pressure for bronchiolitis in a general paediatric ward; a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Oymar, Knut; Bårdsen, Kjersti

    2014-05-12

    Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is commonly used to relieve respiratory distress in infants with bronchiolitis, but has mostly been studied in an intensive care setting. Our prime aim was to evaluate the feasibility of CPAP for infants with bronchiolitis in a general paediatric ward, and secondary to assess capillary PCO2 (cPCO2) levels before and during treatment. From May 1(st) 2008 to April 30(th) 2012, infants with bronchiolitis at Stavanger University Hospital were treated with CPAP in a general paediatric ward, but could be referred to an intensive care unit (ICU) when needed, according to in-house guidelines. Levels of cPCO2 were prospectively registered before the start of CPAP and at approximately 4, 12, 24 and 48 hours of treatment as long as CPAP was given. We had a continuous updating program for the nurses and physicians caring for the infants with CPAP. The study was population based. 672 infants (3.4%) were hospitalized with bronchiolitis. CPAP was initiated in 53 infants (0.3%; 7.9% of infants with bronchiolitis), and was well tolerated in all but three infants. 46 infants were included in the study, the majority of these (n = 33) were treated in the general ward only. These infants had lower cPCO2 before treatment (8.0; 7.7, 8.6)(median; quartiles) than those treated at the ICU (n = 13) (9.3;8.5, 9.9) (p < 0.001). The level of cPCO2 was significantly reduced after 4 h in both groups; 1.1 kPa (paediatric ward) (p < 0.001) and 1.3 kPa (ICU) (p = 0.002). Two infants on the ICU did not respond to CPAP (increasing cPCO2 and severe apnoe) and were given mechanical ventilation, otherwise no side effects were observed in either group treated with CPAP. Treatment with CPAP for infants with bronchiolitis may be feasible in a general paediatric ward, providing sufficient staffing and training, and the possibility of referral to an ICU when needed.

  13. Continuous positive airway pressure for bronchiolitis in a general paediatric ward; a feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is commonly used to relieve respiratory distress in infants with bronchiolitis, but has mostly been studied in an intensive care setting. Our prime aim was to evaluate the feasibility of CPAP for infants with bronchiolitis in a general paediatric ward, and secondary to assess capillary PCO2 (cPCO2) levels before and during treatment. Methods From May 1st 2008 to April 30th 2012, infants with bronchiolitis at Stavanger University Hospital were treated with CPAP in a general paediatric ward, but could be referred to an intensive care unit (ICU) when needed, according to in-house guidelines. Levels of cPCO2 were prospectively registered before the start of CPAP and at approximately 4, 12, 24 and 48 hours of treatment as long as CPAP was given. We had a continuous updating program for the nurses and physicians caring for the infants with CPAP. The study was population based. Results 672 infants (3.4%) were hospitalized with bronchiolitis. CPAP was initiated in 53 infants (0.3%; 7.9% of infants with bronchiolitis), and was well tolerated in all but three infants. 46 infants were included in the study, the majority of these (n = 33) were treated in the general ward only. These infants had lower cPCO2 before treatment (8.0; 7.7, 8.6)(median; quartiles) than those treated at the ICU (n = 13) (9.3;8.5, 9.9) (p < 0.001). The level of cPCO2 was significantly reduced after 4 h in both groups; 1.1 kPa (paediatric ward) (p < 0.001) and 1.3 kPa (ICU) (p = 0.002). Two infants on the ICU did not respond to CPAP (increasing cPCO2 and severe apnoe) and were given mechanical ventilation, otherwise no side effects were observed in either group treated with CPAP. Conclusion Treatment with CPAP for infants with bronchiolitis may be feasible in a general paediatric ward, providing sufficient staffing and training, and the possibility of referral to an ICU when needed. PMID:24886569

  14. Conformable large-area position-sensitive photodetectors based on luminescence-collecting silicone waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartu, Petr; Koeppe, Robert; Arnold, Nikita; Neulinger, Anton; Fallon, Lisa; Bauer, Siegfried

    2010-06-01

    Position sensitive detection schemes based on the lateral photoeffect rely on inorganic semiconductors. Such position sensitive devices (PSDs) are reliable and robust, but preparation with large active areas is expensive and use on curved substrates is impossible. Here we present a novel route for the fabrication of conformable PSDs which allows easy preparation on large areas, and use on curved surfaces. Our device is based on stretchable silicone waveguides with embedded fluorescent dyes, used in conjunction with small silicon photodiodes. Impinging laser light (e.g., from a laser pointer) is absorbed by the dye in the PSD and re-emitted as fluorescence light at a larger wavelength. Due to the isotropic emission from the fluorescent dye molecules, most of the re-emitted light is coupled into the planar silicone waveguide and directed to the edges of the device. Here the light signals are detected via embedded small silicon photodiodes arranged in a regular pattern. Using a mathematical algorithm derived by extensive using of models from global positioning system (GPS) systems and human activity monitoring, the position of light spots is easily calculated. Additionally, the device shows high durability against mechanical stress, when clamped in an uniaxial stretcher and mechanically loaded up to 15% strain. The ease of fabrication, conformability, and durability of the device suggests its use as interface devices and as sensor skin for future robots.

  15. Development of Three-Dimensional Position-Sensitive Room Temperature Semiconductor Gamma-Ray Spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong He; Wen Li; Glenn F. Knoll; D. K. Wehe

    2000-06-04

    Semiconductor detectors can provide better spectroscopic performance than scintillation or gas-filled detectors because of the small ionization energy required to generate each electron-hole pair. Indeed, cryogenically cooled high-purity germanium detectors have played the dominant role whenever the best gamma-ray spectroscopy is required. A decades-long search for other semiconductor detectors that could provide higher stopping power and could operate at room temperature has been ongoing. Wide-bandgap semiconductors, such as CdTe, CdZnTe, and HgI{sub 2}, have captured the most attention. However, the use of these semiconductors in detectors has been hindered primarily by problems of charge trapping and material nonuniformity. Introduced in 1994, single-polarity charge sensing on semiconductor detectors has shown great promise in avoiding the hole-trapping problem, and the newly demonstrated three-dimensional position-sensing technique can significantly mitigate the degradation of energy resolution due to nonuniformity of detector material. In addition, three-dimensional position sensitivity will provide unique imaging capabilities of these gamma-ray spectrometers. These devices are of interest for nuclear nonproliferation, medical imaging, gamma-ray astronomy, and high-energy physics applications. This paper describes the three-dimensional position-sensing method and reports our latest results using second-generation three-dimensional position-sensitive semiconductor spectrometers.

  16. Sensitivity of reactor multiplication factor to positions of cross-section resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalakrishnan, V.; Vijayaraghavan, K. R.

    2017-09-01

    Neutron-nuclear interaction cross-section is sensitive to neutron kinetic energy and most nuclei exhibit resonance behaviour at specific energies within the resonance energy range, spanning from a fraction of an electron volt to several tens or hundreds of kilo electron volts. The energy positions of these resonances correspond to the excitation energy levels of the compound nucleus that are formed as intermediate states during the interaction. Though these positions, thanks to sophistication in science and technology, are known reasonably precisely for the materials of reactor interest, deviations or spread in this data among different evaluations cannot be ruled out. In this work, the effect of such a spread in the resonance positions of the reactor materials on the multiplication factor of an infinite reactor, is obtained. The study shows that the effect on a thermal reactor is more pronounced than on a fast reactor.

  17. [Comparison of different continuous positive airway pressure titration methods for obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome].

    PubMed

    Li, Jingjing; Ye, Jingying; Zhang, Peng; Kang, Dan; Cao, Xin; Zhang, Yuhuan; Ding, Xiu; Zheng, Li; Li, Hongguang; Bian, Qiuli

    2014-10-01

    To explore whether there were differences between the results of automatic titration and the results of manual titration for positive airway pressure treatment in patients with obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) and its influencing factors, the results might provide a theoretical basis for the rational use of two pressure titration methods. Sixty one patients with OSAHS were included in this study. All patients underwent a manual titration and an automatic titration within one week. The clinical informations, polysomnography data, and the results of both two titration of all patients were obtained for analysis. The overall apnea/hypopnea index was (63.1 ± 17.7)/h, with a range of 14.9/h to 110.4/h. The treatment pressure of manual titration was (8.4 ± 2.1) cmH(2)O, which was significantly lower than the treatment pressure of automatic titration, (11.5 ± 2.7) cmH(2)O (t = -9.797, P < 0.001). After using a ΔP of 3 cmH(2)O for the cutoff value (ΔP was defined as the difference of automatic titration and manual titration), it was found that the pressure of automatic titration was significantly higher in patients with a ΔP > 3 cmH(2)O than in patients with a ΔP ≤ 3 cmH(2)O, which was (13.3 ± 2.3) cmH(2)O vs (10.0 ± 2.0) cmH(2)O (t = -6.159, P < 0.001). However, there were no differences for the pressure of manual titration between these two groups, which was (8.6 ± 2.4) cmH(2)O vs (8.3 ± 2.0)cmH(2)O (P > 0.05). There was no significant difference in age, body mass index, neck circumference, abdomen circumference, apnea hypopnea index, and arterial oxygen saturation between these two groups. The treatment pressure of automatic titration is usually higher than that of manual titration. For patients with a high treatment pressure which is derived from automatic titration, a suggestion about manual titration could be given to decrease the potential treatment pressure of continuous positive airway pressure, which may be helpful in improving the

  18. Prophylactic nasal continuous positive airways pressure for preventing morbidity and mortality in very preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, P; Henderson-Smart, D J; Davis, P G

    2005-07-20

    Cohort studies (Avery 1987; Jonsson 1997) have suggested that early post-natal nasal continuous positive airways pressure (CPAP) may be beneficial in reducing the need for intubation and intermittent positive pressure ventilation, and in preventing chronic lung disease in preterm or low birth weight infants. To determine if prophylactic nasal CPAP commenced soon after birth regardless of respiratory status in the very preterm or very low birth weight infant reduces the use of IPPV and the incidence of chronic lung disease (CLD) without adverse effects. The search was updated in April 2005. The standard search strategy of the Neonatal Review Group was used. This included searches of the Oxford Database of Perinatal Trials, Cochrane Library Issue 1 2005, MEDLINE 1966-April 2005, previous reviews including cross references, abstracts, conferences, symposia, proceedings, expert informants, journal hand searching mainly in the English language. All trials using random or quasi-random patient allocation of very preterm infants < 32 weeks gestation and / or < 1500 gms at birth were eligible. Comparison had to be between prophylactic nasal CPAP commencing soon after birth regardless of the respiratory status of the infant compared with "standard" methods of treatment where CPAP or IPPV is used for a defined respiratory condition. Standard methods of the Cochrane Collaboration and its Neonatal Review Group, including independent assessment of trial quality and extraction of data by each author, were used. Data were analysed using relative risk (RR). Meta-analysis was performed using a fixed effects model. There are no statistically significant differences in any of the outcomes studied in either of the eligible trials (Han 1987; Sandri 2004) reporting on 82 and 230 infants respectively. In Han 1987 there are trends towards increases in the incidence of BPD at 28 days [RR 2.27 (0.77, 6.65)], death [RR 3.63 (0.42, 31.08)] and any IVH [RR 2.18 (0.84, 5.62)] in the CPAP group

  19. [Position dependent influence that sensitivity correction processing gives the signal-to-noise ratio measurement in parallel imaging].

    PubMed

    Murakami, Koichi; Yoshida, Koji; Yanagimoto, Shinichi

    2012-01-01

    We studied the position dependent influence that sensitivity correction processing gave the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) measurement of parallel imaging (PI). Sensitivity correction processing that referred to the sensitivity distribution of the body coil improved regional uniformity more than the sensitivity uniformity correction filter with a fixed correction factor. In addition, the position dependent influence to give the SNR measurement in PI was different from the sensitivity correction processing. Therefore, if we divide SNR of the sensitivity correction processing image by SNR of the original image in each pixel and calculate SNR ratio, we can show the position dependent influence that sensitivity correction processing gives the SNR measurement in PI. It is with an index of the sensitivity correction processing precision.

  20. Application of continuous positive airway pressure in the delivery room: a multicenter randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves-Ferri, W.A.; Martinez, F.E.; Caldas, J.P.S.; Marba, S.T.M.; Fekete, S.; Rugolo, L.; Tanuri, C.; Leone, C.; Sancho, G.A.; Almeida, M.F.B.; Guinsburg, R.

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated whether the use of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) in the delivery room alters the need for mechanical ventilation and surfactant during the first 5 days of life and modifies the incidence of respiratory morbidity and mortality during the hospital stay. The study was a multicenter randomized clinical trial conducted in five public university hospitals in Brazil, from June 2008 to December 2009. Participants were 197 infants with birth weight of 1000-1500 g and without major birth defects. They were treated according to the guidelines of the American Academy of Pediatrics (APP). Infants not intubated or extubated less than 15 min after birth were randomized for two treatments, routine or CPAP, and were followed until hospital discharge. The routine (n=99) and CPAP (n=98) infants studied presented no statistically significant differences regarding birth characteristics, complications during the prenatal period, the need for mechanical ventilation during the first 5 days of life (19.2 vs 23.4%, P=0.50), use of surfactant (18.2 vs 17.3% P=0.92), or respiratory morbidity and mortality until discharge. The CPAP group required a greater number of doses of surfactant (1.5 vs 1.0, P=0.02). When CPAP was applied to the routine group, it was installed within a median time of 30 min. We found that CPAP applied less than 15 min after birth was not able to reduce the need for ventilator support and was associated with a higher number of doses of surfactant when compared to CPAP applied as clinically indicated within a median time of 30 min. PMID:24554040

  1. Application of continuous positive airway pressure in the delivery room: a multicenter randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves-Ferri, W A; Martinez, F E; Caldas, J P S; Marba, S T M; Fekete, S; Rugolo, L; Tanuri, C; Leone, C; Sancho, G A; Almeida, M F B; Guinsburg, R

    2014-02-01

    This study evaluated whether the use of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) in the delivery room alters the need for mechanical ventilation and surfactant during the first 5 days of life and modifies the incidence of respiratory morbidity and mortality during the hospital stay. The study was a multicenter randomized clinical trial conducted in five public university hospitals in Brazil, from June 2008 to December 2009. Participants were 197 infants with birth weight of 1000-1500 g and without major birth defects. They were treated according to the guidelines of the American Academy of Pediatrics (APP). Infants not intubated or extubated less than 15 min after birth were randomized for two treatments, routine or CPAP, and were followed until hospital discharge. The routine (n=99) and CPAP (n=98) infants studied presented no statistically significant differences regarding birth characteristics, complications during the prenatal period, the need for mechanical ventilation during the first 5 days of life (19.2 vs 23.4%, P=0.50), use of surfactant (18.2 vs 17.3% P=0.92), or respiratory morbidity and mortality until discharge. The CPAP group required a greater number of doses of surfactant (1.5 vs 1.0, P=0.02). When CPAP was applied to the routine group, it was installed within a median time of 30 min. We found that CPAP applied less than 15 min after birth was not able to reduce the need for ventilator support and was associated with a higher number of doses of surfactant when compared to CPAP applied as clinically indicated within a median time of 30 min.

  2. Randomized trial of early bubble continuous positive airway pressure for very low birth weight infants.

    PubMed

    Tapia, Jose L; Urzua, Soledad; Bancalari, Aldo; Meritano, Javier; Torres, Gabriela; Fabres, Jorge; Toro, Claudia A; Rivera, Fabiola; Cespedes, Elizabeth; Burgos, Jaime F; Mariani, Gonzalo; Roldan, Liliana; Silvera, Fernando; Gonzalez, Agustina; Dominguez, Angelica

    2012-07-01

    To determine whether very low birth weight infants (VLBWIs), initially supported with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) and then selectively treated with the INSURE (intubation, surfactant, and extubation to CPAP; CPAP/INSURE) protocol, need less mechanical ventilation than those supported with supplemental oxygen, surfactant, and mechanical ventilation if required (Oxygen/mechanical ventilation [MV]). In a multicenter randomized controlled trial, spontaneously breathing VLBWIs weighing 800-1500 g were allocated to receive either therapy. In the CPAP/INSURE group, if respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) did not occur, CPAP was discontinued after 3-6 hours. If RDS developed and the fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO(2)) was >0.35, the INSURE protocol was indicated. Failure criteria included FiO(2) >0.60, severe apnea or respiratory acidosis, and receipt of more than 2 doses of surfactant. In the Oxygen/MV group, in the presence of RDS, supplemental oxygen without CPAP was given, and if FiO(2) was >0.35, surfactant and mechanical ventilation were provided. A total of 256 patients were randomized to either the CPAP/INSURE group (n = 131) or the Oxygen/MV group (n = 125). The need for mechanical ventilation was lower in the CPAP/INSURE group (29.8% vs 50.4%; P = .001), as was the use of surfactant (27.5% vs 46.4%; P = .002). There were no differences in death, pneumothorax, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, and other complications of prematurity between the 2 groups. CPAP and early selective INSURE reduced the need for mechanical ventilation and surfactant in VLBWIs without increasing morbidity and death. These results may be particularly relevant for resource-limited regions. Copyright © 2012 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Type of Mask May Impact on Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Adherence in Apneic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Borel, Jean Christian; Tamisier, Renaud; Dias-Domingos, Sonia; Sapene, Marc; Martin, Francis; Stach, Bruno; Grillet, Yves; Muir, Jean François; Levy, Patrick; Series, Frederic; Pepin, Jean-Louis

    2013-01-01

    Rationale In obstructive sleep apnea patients (OSA), continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) adherence is crucial to improve symptoms and cardiometabolic outcomes. The choice of mask may influence CPAP adherence but this issue has never been addressed properly. Objective To evaluate the impact of nasal pillows, nasal and oronasal masks on CPAP adherence in a cohort of OSA. Methods Newly CPAP treated OSA participating in “Observatoire Sommeil de la Fédération de Pneumologie”, a French national prospective cohort, were included between March 2009 and December 2011. Anthropometric data, medical history, OSA severity, sleepiness, depressive status, treatment modalities (auto-CPAP versus fixed pressure, pressure level, interface type, use of humidifiers) and CPAP-related side effects were included in multivariate analysis to determine independent variables associated with CPAP adherence. Results 2311 OSA (age = 57(12) years, apnea+hypopnea index = 41(21)/h, 29% female) were included. Nasal masks, oronasal masks and nasal pillows were used by 62.4, 26.2 and 11.4% of the patients, respectively. In univariate analysis, oronasal masks and nasal pillows were associated with higher risk of CPAP non-adherence. CPAP non-adherence was also associated with younger age, female gender, mild OSA, gastroesophageal reflux, depression status, low effective pressure and CPAP-related side effects. In multivariate analysis, CPAP non-adherence was associated with the use of oronasal masks (OR = 2.0; 95%CI = 1.6; 2.5), depression, low effective pressure, and side effects. Conclusion As oronasal masks negatively impact on CPAP adherence, a nasal mask should be preferred as the first option. Patients on oronasal masks should be carefully followed. PMID:23691209

  4. Effects of nasal continuous positive airway pressure therapy on partners' sexual lives.

    PubMed

    Acar, Mustafa; Kaya, Coskun; Catli, Tolgahan; Hancı, Deniz; Bolluk, Ozge; Aydin, Yunus

    2016-01-01

    To assess sexual functioning in male and female partners before and after nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy in men with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Twenty-one male patients with moderate to severe OSA and erectile dysfunction, and their female partner, were recruited into this prospective study. Males diagnosed with OSA were treated with nasal CPAP therapy for 12 weeks. Women were assessed for sexual functioning using the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI), and for mood status using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), before and after their male partner underwent nasal CPAP therapy. Sexual functioning was assessed in men using the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF), before and after nasal CPAP therapy. After nasal CPAP therapy for OSA in men, IIEF scores were significantly higher than pre-treatment scores. Total pre- and post-treatment IIEF scores (mean ± standard deviation) were 50.28 ± 15.88 and 65.42 ± 7.47, respectively, P < 0.01. Pre- and post-treatment FSFI scores in women were 21.54 ± 6.62 and 29.94 ± 3.76, respectively, P < 0.01. Pre- and post-treatment BDI scores in women were 14.61 ± 9.69 and 12.42 ± 8.92, respectively, P < 0.01. Following treatment of men with OSA, our data indicate benefits for nasal CPAP therapy on sexual functioning in both the male and female partners. Moreover, our findings indicate that improved sexual function in women after their male partner underwent nasal CPAP also had psychological benefits.

  5. Effectiveness of prehospital continuous positive airway pressure in the management of acute pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Hubble, Michael W; Richards, Michael E; Jarvis, Roger; Millikan, Tori; Young, Dwayne

    2006-01-01

    To compare the effectiveness of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) with standard pharmacologic treatment in the management of prehospital acute pulmonary edema. Using a nonrandomized control group design, all consecutive patients presenting to two participating emergency medical services (EMS) systems with a field impression of acute pulmonary edema between July 1, 2004, and June 30, 2005, were included in the study. The control EMS system patients received standard treatment with oxygen, nitrates, furosemide, morphine, and, if indicated, endotracheal intubation. The intervention EMS system patients received CPAP via face mask at 10 cm H2O in addition to standard therapy. Ninety-five patients received standard therapy, and 120 patients received CPAP and standard therapy. Intubation was required in 8.9% of CPAP-treated patients compared with 25.3% in the control group (p = 0.003), and mortality was lower in the CPAP group than in the control group (5.4% vs. 23.2%; p = 0.000). When compared with the control group, the CPAP group had more improvement in respiratory rate (-4.55 vs. -1.81; p = 0.001), pulse rate (-4.77 vs. 0.82; p = 0.013), and dyspnea score (-2.11 vs. -1.36; p = 0.008). Using logistic regression to control for potential confounders, patients receiving standard treatment were more likely to be intubated (odds ratio, 4.04; 95% confidence interval, 1.64 to 9.95) and more likely to die (odds ratio, 7.48; 95% confidence interval, 1.96 to 28.54) than those receiving standard therapy and CPAP. The prehospital use of CPAP is feasible, may avert the need for endotracheal intubation, and may reduce short-term mortality.

  6. Is the relationship between race and continuous positive airway pressure adherence mediated by sleep duration?

    PubMed

    Billings, Martha E; Rosen, Carol L; Wang, Rui; Auckley, Dennis; Benca, Ruth; Foldvary-Schaefer, Nancy; Iber, Conrad; Zee, Phyllis; Redline, Susan; Kapur, Vishesh K

    2013-02-01

    Black race has been associated with decreased continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) adherence. Short sleep duration, long sleep latency, and insomnia complaints may affect CPAP adherence as they affect sleep and opportunity to use CPAP. We assessed whether self-reported sleep measures were associated with CPAP adherence and if racial variations in these sleep characteristics may explain racial differences in CPAP adherence. Analysis of data from a randomized controlled trial (HomePAP), which investigated home versus laboratory-based diagnosis and treatment of obstructive sleep apnea. Seven American Academy of Sleep Medicine-accredited sleep centers in five cities in the United States. Enrolled subjects (n = 191) with apnea-hypopnea index ≥ 15 and sleepiness (Epworth Sleepiness Scale > 12). N/A. Multivariable regression was used to assess if subjective sleep measures and symptoms predicted 3-mo CPAP use. Mediation analysis was used to assess if sleep measures mediated the association of race with CPAP adherence. Black participants reported shorter sleep duration and longer sleep latency at baseline than white and Hispanic participants. Shorter sleep duration and longer sleep latency predicted worse CPAP adherence. Sleep duration mediated the association of black race with lower CPAP adherence. However, insomnia symptoms were not associated with race or CPAP adherence. Among subjects with similar severity of obstructive sleep apnea and sleepiness, baseline self-reported sleep duration and latency, but not perceived insomnia, predicted CPAP adherence over 3 mo. Sleep duration explains some of the observed differences in CPAP use by race. Sleep duration and latency should be considered when evaluating poor CPAP adherence. PORTABLE MONITORING FOR DIAGNOSIS AND MANAGEMENT OF SLEEP APNEA (HOMEPAP) URL: http://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT00642486. NIH clinical trials registry number: NCT00642486.

  7. Obstructive sleep apnoea in the elderly: role of continuous positive airway pressure treatment.

    PubMed

    Martínez-García, Miguel Ángel; Chiner, Eusebi; Hernández, Luis; Cortes, Jose Pascual; Catalán, Pablo; Ponce, Silvia; Diaz, Jose Ramón; Pastor, Ester; Vigil, Laura; Carmona, Carmen; Montserrat, Josep Maria; Aizpuru, Felipe; Lloberes, Patricia; Mayos, Mercedes; Selma, Maria José; Cifuentes, Jose Fernando; Muñoz, Alvaro

    2015-07-01

    Almost all the information about the effect of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) comes from clinical trials involving only middle-aged patients. The objective of this study was to assess the effect of CPAP treatment in elderly patients with severe OSA on clinical, quality-of-life and neurocognitive spheres. We performed an open-label, randomised, multicentre clinical trial in a consecutive clinical cohort of 224 elderly (≥70 years old) patients with confirmed severe OSA (apnoea-hypopnea index ≥30) randomised to receive CPAP (n=115) or no CPAP (n=109) for 3 months. A sleep study was performed by either full polysomnography or respiratory polygraphy. CPAP titration was performed by an autoCPAP device. The primary endpoint was quality of life (Quebec Sleep Questionnaire) and secondary endpoints included sleep-related symptoms, presence of anxiety/depression, office-based blood pressure and some neurocognitive tests. The mean±sd age was 75.5±3.9 years. The CPAP group achieved a greater improvement in all quality-of-life domains (p<0.001; effect size: 0.41-0.98), sleep-related symptoms (p<0.001; effect size 0.31-0.91) as well as anxiety (p=0.016; effect size 0.51) and depression (p<0.001; effect size: 0.28) indexes and some neurocognitive tests (digit symbol test (p=0.047; effect size: 0.20) and Trail Making Test A (p=0.029; effect size: 0.44)) in an intention-to-treat analysis. In conclusion, CPAP treatment resulted in an improvement in quality of life, sleep-related symptoms, anxiety and depression indexes and some neurocognitive aspects in elderly people with severe OSA. Copyright ©ERS 2015.

  8. Effects of Continuous Positive Airway Pressure on Middle Ear Pressure and Acoustic Stapedial Reflex.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinrang; Li, Keliang

    2016-08-01

    This study investigated the effects of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) on middle ear pressure and acoustic stapedial reflex and the correlation between CPAP and middle ear pressure. Prospective cohort study. Tertiary hospitals. Fifty patients with obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome were assigned to the study group, and 50 healthy volunteers were assigned to the control group. The subjects underwent standard tympanometry while wearing a CPAP device (ie, simulated CPAP treatment), which was set to 0, 5, 10, and 15 cm H2O, respectively. Tympanometry was performed before and after swallowing at each pressure of CPAP treatment. The mean middle ear pressures were 21.2, 22.6, 22.7, and 23.4 daPa (before swallowing) and 21.6, 42.6, 81.4, and 118.6 daPa (after swallowing) in the study group and 17.6, 18.7, 19.5, and 20.8 daPa (before swallowing) and 17.7, 44.2, 85.6, and 120.5 daPa (after swallowing) in the control group at the CPAPs of 0, 5, 10, and 15 cm H2O, respectively. While the CPAPs were at 0 and 15 cm H2O, the stapedial muscle reflex at 1.0 kHz did not have a significant difference between the 2 groups (χ(2) = 0.521, P = .470). The Pearson correlation coefficient of the CPAP pressure and the middle ear pressure after swallowing was 0.812 (P < .001). CPAP affected middle ear pressure and was directly proportional to the pressure of the CPAP. However, CPAP treatment had no significant effect on stapedial muscle reflex. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2016.

  9. Gel pillow designed specifically for obstructive sleep apnea treatment with continuous positive airway pressure

    PubMed Central

    Salvaggio, Adriana; Lo Bue, Anna; Isidoro, Serena Iacono; Romano, Salvatore; Marrone, Oreste; Insalaco, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To determine whether the use of a gel pillow with side cutouts designed to accommodate a continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) mask and reduce head temperature improves the efficacy of and adherence to auto-CPAP therapy. Methods: Twenty-three consecutive CPAP-naïve patients with obstructive sleep apnea were enrolled in the study. Patients were given an auto-CPAP machine with an appropriate CPAP mask and were instructed to use CPAP for 15 nights. They were instructed to sleep with their own pillow (the control pillow) from nights 1 to 5 and with either a foam pillow or a gel pillow, both of which had side cutouts, for 5 consecutive nights each, in random order. After night 15, auto-CPAP machine data were downloaded and patients rated their satisfaction with each pillow on a visual analog scale. Results: Twenty-two patients completed the protocol. The pressures administered, residual apnea-hypopnea index, air leaks, and mean duration of CPAP use did not differ among the periods during which each pillow was used. Patients were significantly more satisfied with the gel pillow than with the control pillow and the foam pillow (p = 0.022 and p = 0.004, respectively), their level of satisfaction with the gel pillow correlating significantly with excessive daytime sleepiness (r2 = 0.19; p = 0.0443). Conclusions: Among obstructive sleep apnea patients treated with nasal CPAP, the use of a gel pillow with side cutouts appears to have no impact on treatment effectiveness. Nevertheless, such patients seem to prefer a gel pillow over other types of pillows. PMID:27812636

  10. Mouth leak with nasal continuous positive airway pressure increases nasal airway resistance.

    PubMed

    Richards, G N; Cistulli, P A; Ungar, R G; Berthon-Jones, M; Sullivan, C E

    1996-07-01

    Nasal congestion, dry nose and throat, and sore throat affect approximately 40% of patients using nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). The mechanisms causing nasal symptoms are unclear, but mouth leaks causing high unidirectional nasal airflow may be important. We conducted a study to investigate the effects of mouth leak and the influence of humidification on nasal resistance in normal subjects. Nasal resistance was measured with posterior rhinomanometry in six normal subjects who deliberately produced a mouth leak for 10 min while using nasal CPAP. Nasal resistance was measured regularly for 20 min after the challenge. A series of tests were performed using air at differing temperatures and humidities. There was no change in nasal resistance when subjects breathed through their noses while on CPAP, but a mouth leak caused a large increase in resistance (at a flow of 0.5 L/s) from a baseline mean of 2.21 cm H2O/L/s to a maximum mean of 7.52 cm H2O/L/s at 1 min after the challenge. Use of a cold passover humidifier caused little change in the response (maximum mean: 8.27 cm H2O/L/s), but a hot water bath humidifier greatly attenuated the magnitude (maximum mean: 4.02 cm H2O/L/s) and duration of the response. Mouth leak with nasal CPAP leads to high unidirectional nasal airflow, which causes a large increase in nasal resistance. This response can be largely prevented by fully humidifying the inspired air.

  11. Biomarkers of oxidative stress following continuous positive airway pressure withdrawal: data from two randomised trials.

    PubMed

    Stradling, John R; Schwarz, Esther I; Schlatzer, Christian; Manuel, Ari R; Lee, Regent; Antoniades, Charalambos; Kohler, Malcolm

    2015-10-01

    There is conflicting evidence whether intermittent hypoxia in obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) influences oxidative stress. We hypothesised that withdrawal of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) from patients with OSA would raise markers of oxidative stress.59 patients with CPAP-treated moderate-to-severe OSA (oxygen desaturation index (ODI) >20 events·h(-1)) were randomised 1:1 to either stay on CPAP (n=30) or change to sham CPAP (n=29) for 2 weeks. Using samples from two similar studies at two sites, we measured early morning blood malondialdehyde (MDA, a primary outcome in one study and a secondary outcome in the other), lipid hydroperoxides, total antioxidant capacity, superoxide generation from mononuclear cells and urinary F2-isoprostane. We also measured superoxide dismutase as a marker of hypoxic preconditioning. "Treatment" effects (sham CPAP versus CPAP) were calculated via linear regression.Sham CPAP provoked moderate-to-severe OSA (mean ODI 46 events·h(-1)), but blood markers of oxidative stress did not change significantly (MDA "treatment" effect (95% CI) -0.02 (-0.23 to +0.19) μmol·L(-1)). Urinary F2-isoprostane fell significantly by ~30% (-0.26 (-0.42 to -0.10) ng·mL(-1)) and superoxide dismutase increased similarly (+0.17 (+0.02 to +0.30) ng·mL(-1)).We found no direct evidence of increased oxidative stress in patients experiencing a return of their moderate-to-severe OSA. The fall in urinary F2-isoprostane and rise in superoxide dismutase implies that hypoxic preconditioning may have reduced oxidative stress. Copyright ©ERS 2015.

  12. Randomised controlled crossover trial of humidified continuous positive airway pressure in mild obstructive sleep apnoea

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, N; Neill, A; Campbell, A; Sheppard, D

    2005-01-01

    Background: It is unclear whether continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), the treatment of choice for severe obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA), is effective at improving outcomes in mild OSA. Methods: To help define the role of humidified CPAP in mild OSA, a randomised crossover study was undertaken of patients with an apnoea hypopnoea index (AHI) of 5–30/hour. Subjective sleepiness, objective wakefulness, mood, reaction time, and quality of life were measured at baseline, after 3 weeks treatment with humidified CPAP and 3 weeks sham CPAP (2 week washout). Results: Twenty nine of 31 enrolled patients (age 25–67 years, seven women, mean (SD) body mass index 31.5 (6) kg/m2) completed the protocol. Humidified CPAP improved polysomnographic indices of OSA and Epworth Sleepiness Scale (2.4 points (95% CI 0.6 to 4.2)). Objective wakefulness (modified maintenance of wakefulness test) showed a trend towards improvement (5.2 minutes (95% CI –0.6 to 11)). Mood (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale), quality of life (SF 36, Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire), and reaction times (Psychomotor Vigilance Task) were not improved more than sham CPAP. Compliance with humidified and sham CPAP both averaged 4.9 hours/night. Placebo effects were evident in many outcomes and there was no clear treatment preference. Conclusions: Humidified CPAP improves subjective sleepiness and possibly objective wakefulness but not reaction times, quality of life, or mood. These results do not support the routine use of CPAP in all patients with mild OSA, but offers some support for the trialling of CPAP in those with severe sleepiness. PMID:15860720

  13. Noninvasive continuous positive airway pressure in acute respiratory failure: helmet versus facial mask.

    PubMed

    Chidini, Giovanna; Calderini, Edoardo; Cesana, Bruno Mario; Gandini, Cristiano; Prandi, Edi; Pelosi, Paolo

    2010-08-01

    Noninvasive continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) is applied through different interfaces to treat mild acute respiratory failure (ARF) in infants. Recently a new pediatric helmet was introduced in clinical practice to deliver nCPAP. The objective of this study was to compare the feasibility of the delivery of nCPAP by the pediatric helmet with delivery by a conventional facial mask in infants with ARF. We conducted a single-center physiologic, randomized, controlled study with a crossover design on 20 consecutive infants with ARF. All patients received nCPAP by helmet and facial mask in random order for 90 minutes. In infants in both trials, nCPAP treatment was preceded by periods of unassisted spontaneous breathing through a Venturi mask. The primary end point was the feasibility of nCPAP administered with the 2 interfaces (helmet and facial mask). Feasibility was evaluated by the number of trial failures defined as the occurrence of 1 of the following: intolerance to the interface; persistent air leak; gas-exchange derangement; or major adverse events. nCPAP application time, number of patients who required sedation, and the type of complications with each interface were also recorded. The secondary end point was gas-exchange improvement. Feasibility of nCPAP delivery was enhanced by the helmet compared with the mask, as indicated by a lower number of trial failures (P < .001), less patient intolerance (P < .001), longer application time (P < .001), and reduced need for patient sedation (P < .001). For both delivery methods, no major patient complications occurred. The results of this current study revealed that the helmet is a feasible alternative to the facial mask for delivery of nCPAP to infants with mild ARF.

  14. Association between continuous positive airway pressure and circulating omentin levels in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea.

    PubMed

    Uygur, Firat; Tanrıverdi, Hakan; Can, Murat; Erboy, Fatma; Altınsoy, Bulent; Atalay, Figen; Ornek, Tacettin; Damar, Murat; Kokturk, Furuzan; Tor, Meltem

    2016-09-01

    Inflammation and oxidative stress play important roles in the pathogenesis of obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS). Omentin is expressed in visceral adipose tissue and is associated with the inflammatory response. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between OSAS and omentin based on a comparison of its serum levels at baseline and after 3 months of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy. Ninety-six newly diagnosed OSAS patients and 31 non-apnoeic controls were enrolled in this study. Blood samples were obtained in the morning after polysomnography. Within the OSAS group, 30 patients were started on CPAP therapy and then reassessed clinically, including a blood test for serum omentin and other biochemical analysis, at 3 months. Serum omentin levels were significantly lower in the OSAS group than in the control group (27.7 ± 7.6 and 42.5 ± 5.2 ng/mL, P < 0.001). In the subgroup analysis, omentin concentrations were significantly lower in patients with severe OSAS than in those with mild/moderate OSAS (P < 0.001). Circulating omentin levels were significantly correlated with the apnoea-hypopnoea index (AHI), mean SaO2, oxygen desaturation index, and serum C-reactive protein levels. Treatment with CPAP resulted in a significant increase in circulating omentin levels after 3 months, from 22.7 ± 1.4 to 41.2 ± 3.3 ng/mL (P < 0.001). OSAS is associated with low serum omentin levels, and these levels can be reversed by effective CPAP treatment.

  15. Acceptance, effectiveness and safety of continuous positive airway pressure in acute stroke: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Scala, Raffaele; Turkington, Peter M; Wanklyn, Peter; Bamford, John; Elliott, Mark W

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the acceptance, effectiveness in preventing upper airways obstruction, and haemodynamic effects of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) in acute stroke. Twelve patients (4 M, and 8 F; mean (SD), 75.2 (5.5) years) within 48 h of acute stroke onset underwent: (1) sleep studies (1st night: auto-CPAP mode; 2nd night: diagnostic); (2) nocturnal non-invasive blood pressure studies (1st night during CPAP; 2nd night during spontaneous breathing (SB)); and (3) daytime cerebral blood flow velocity measurement in middle cerebral artery (FV) with transcranial Doppler during SB and with CPAP (5, 10, 15 cm H(2)O). Ninety percent, 60% and 50% of stroke patients had a respiratory disturbance index (RDI) of >or=5, >or=10 and >or=15 events per hour, respectively (18.2 (11.3)). CPAP acceptance was 84%; 42% used CPAP more than 6h and 42% between 1-3h with a mean use of CPAP of 5.2h (4.0). Compared to SB, CPAP reduced, though not significantly, RDI, time with SaO(2)<90%, mean blood pressure and mean blood pressure dips (10 mm Hg)/h. Compared with SB, any level of CPAP progressively and significantly reduced systolic and mean FV; drop in diastolic FV was significant at CPAP10 and CPAP15. The partial pressure of end-tidal CO(2) was significantly lowered by all levels of CPAP. According to this pilot study, CPAP is reasonably well tolerated by patients with acute stroke for at least one night. Despite its possible beneficial effect on obstructive sleep-disordered breathing and blood pressure variability, CPAP use in acute stroke should be still considered with caution due to possible harmful haemodynamic effects at higher pressures.

  16. Effect of Continuous Positive Airway Pressure on Stroke Rehabilitation: A Pilot Randomized Sham-Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Khot, Sandeep P; Davis, Arielle P; Crane, Deborah A; Tanzi, Patricia M; Lue, Denise Li; Claflin, Edward S; Becker, Kyra J; Longstreth, W T; Watson, Nathaniel F; Billings, Martha E

    2016-07-15

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) predicts poor functional outcome after stroke and increases the risk for recurrent stroke. Less is known about continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment on stroke recovery. In a pilot randomized, double-blind, sham-controlled trial, adult stroke rehabilitation patients were assigned to auto-titrating or sham CPAP without diagnostic testing for OSA. Change in Functional Independence Measure (FIM), a measure of disability, was assessed between rehabilitation admission and discharge. Over 18 months, 40 patients were enrolled and 10 withdrew from the study: 7 from active and 3 from sham CPAP (p > 0.10). For the remaining 30 patients, median duration of CPAP use was 14 days. Average CPAP use was 3.7 h/night, with at least 4 h nightly use among 15 patients. Adherence was not influenced by treatment assignment or stroke severity. In intention-to-treat analyses (n = 40), the median change in FIM favored active CPAP over sham but did not reach statistical significance (34 versus 26, p = 0.25), except for the cognitive component (6 versus 2.5, p = 0.04). The on-treatment analyses (n = 30) yielded similar results (total FIM: 32 versus 26, p = 0.11; cognitive FIM: 6 versus 2, p = 0.06). A sham-controlled CPAP trial among stroke rehabilitation patients was feasible in terms of recruitment, treatment without diagnostic testing and adequate blinding-though was limited by study retention and CPAP adherence. Despite these limitations, a trend towards a benefit of CPAP on recovery was evident. Tolerance and adherence must be improved before the full benefits of CPAP on recovery can be assessed in larger trials. © 2016 American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

  17. Nocturnal continuous positive airway pressure in severe non-apneic asthma. A pilot study.

    PubMed

    D'Amato, Maria; Stanziola, Anna A; de Laurentiis, Guglielmo; Diana, Radicella; Russo, Cristian; Maniscalco, Mauro; D'Amato, Gennaro; Sofia, Matteo

    2014-10-01

    It has been demonstrated that brief periods of nocturnal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) reduce airway reactivity in animal models and in patients with asthma. The effects of nCPAP in severe uncontrolled non-apneic asthmatic patients are not well known. In this open pilot study, we aimed to assess the effect nCPAP on peak flow (PEF) variability and asthma control in this type of patients. CPAP was applied to 10 patients with severe long-standing asthma without obstructive sleep apnea for seven consecutive nights. CPAP was titrated in auto setting and applied to the patients. Daily PEF, was measured from 2 weeks before the intervention to 2 weeks after the end of nCPAP treatment. PEF amplitude and PEF morning dip (MD) over 24-h periods averaged over 1 week were calculated as indexes of PEF variability. Asthma control test (ACT) and European quality of life (EuroQol) questionnaire were measured at baseline and after 1 month, and at baseline and at the end of CPAP period, respectively. The PEF amplitude significantly decreased both during CPAP period and in the first week after nCPAP discontinuation as compared with the baseline (19.8 ± 7.5%, 23.9 ± 9.1% and 28.9 ± 11.5%, respectively, always P < 0.05). PEF MD significantly decreased during nCPAP in comparison with the baseline (P < 0.001). The ACT and EuroQol significantly improved after nCPAP in comparison with the basal value. In this preliminary report, brief period of nCPAP reduces PEF variability and improves control in severe non-apneic asthma at a short-term evaluation. Further studies with longer-term evaluation and larger number of patients are warranted. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Position-gram - A Visual Method for Detecting Transient Events in Continuous GPS Time Series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Y.; Wdowinski, S.

    2008-12-01

    Continuous Global Positioning System (CGPS) time series provide excellent observations for detecting crustal deformation at various length and time-scales. With the increasing precision and length of the time series, new modes of deformation, such as slow slip events and sub-continental scale changes in crustal velocities, can be detected. However, non-tectonic surface movements and measurement noise limit our ability to detect and quantify tectonic-induced transient deformation. Two common methods for reducing noise level in CGPS time series, spatial filtering and periodic seasonal fitting, significantly improve the secular tectonic signal, but fail when transient deformation events are embedded in the time series. We developed a new visually-based method for detecting transient events in CGPS time series. The development was inspired by wavelet analysis presentations that use color to present quantitative information about relationships between time and frequency domains. Here we explore the relationship between time and space domains. The displacement information is color coded according to spline fitting of each time series. This 3-D information (time, space, and displacement in color) allows easy detection of spatio-temporal patterns, which can serve as indicators for transient deformation events. We tested the new method with CGPS time series from three regions with different spatial scales: the Pacific Northwest, Southern California, and the entire continental US. The Pacific Northwest study confirmed that our proposed methodology is capable of detecting transient events and mapping their lateral distribution. The Southern California study detected a new transient event near the intersection of the San Andreas and San Jacinto faults, far from any known creeping fault segments. Finally the continental scale analysis revealed regionally correlated crustal movements in the Basin and Range and California, but uncorrelated with sites in eastern US. Such signal

  19. Improved growth and development in premature infants managed with nasal continuous positive airway pressure.

    PubMed

    Flesher, Susan Lee; Domanico, Renee S

    2014-01-01

    Our goal was to assess the association between the use of nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP) vs. conventional ventilation (CV) in premature infants and its effects on: 1) growth in the NICU and at follow up visits 2) neurodevelopmental outcomes measured by Bayley Infant Neurodevelopmental Screener (BINS) 3) the incidence of retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) and chronic lung disease (CLD). A retrospective chart review of two groups of NICU patients was conducted. The first group was from 1/1999-12/2000 (n = 140) and was managed by CV. The second group (n = 168) was from 1/2003-12/2004 and was managed primarily by NCPAP. Categorical variables were analyzed using Pearson Chi Square. Mean numerical values were analyzed with the student t-test. There was no statistical difference between the groups in regard to 15 demographic and interventional variables. There were significant differences between the two groups in CLD (p < 0.05) and ROP (p < 0.01), mean weight at one month (p < 0.05), 9-12 months (p < 0.01) and 15-18 months (p < 0.01), length at 4-6 months (p < 0.05), 9-12 months (p < 0.05), 15-18 months (p < 0.01), and 2 years (p = .05), and in BINS scores at 9-12 months (p < 0.01) and 15-18 months (p < 0.01). Managing babies with NCPAP therapy when compared with CV, significantly increased the weight at one month which was sustained at the 9-12 month and 15-18 month visits, increased length at all follow up visits, increased BINS scores at the 9-12 month and 15-18 month visits, and decreased the incidence of ROP and CLD.

  20. Noninvasive continuous positive airway pressure delivered using a pediatric helmet in dogs recovering from general anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Staffieri, Francesco; Crovace, Antonio; De Monte, Valentina; Centonze, Paola; Gigante, Giulio; Grasso, Salvatore

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of noninvasive continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) administered with a pediatric helmet in healthy dogs recovering from general anesthesia. Randomized, cross-over, clinical study. University teaching hospital. Fifteen healthy female, client-owned dogs recovering from general anesthesia following elective ovariohysterectomy. All dogs received the same standardized anesthetic protocol (acepromazine, morphine, propofol, and isoflurane in oxygen). After extubation, a pediatric helmet was placed on all dogs and connected to a venturi valve supplied with medical air. In all patients, the gas flow was set to 50 L/minute and the FiO2 to 0.21. Dogs received the following sequence of treatments, each lasting 20 minutes: 0 CPAP (pre-CPAP), CPAP of 5 cm H2 O (CPAP), and again 0 CPAP (post-CPAP). During the entire study, the following data were collected: pressure and FiO2 inside the helmet, mean arterial pressure, respiratory rate, heart rate, sedation score (0 = awake, 10 = deep sedation), and tolerance to the helmet (0 = excellent, 4 = poor). At the end of each phase, an arterial blood sample was sampled. As compared with the pre-CPAP and the post-CPAP periods, during the CPAP period, the PaCO2 , alveolar-arterial oxygen gradient (P[A-a]O2 ), and respiratory rate significantly decreased. The PaO2 was higher at CPAP (105.6 ± 4.0 mm Hg) compared with pre-CPAP (80.6 ± 6.9 mm Hg) and post-CPAP (86.7 ± 5.8 mm Hg). Tolerance and sedation scores during the CPAP period were not different from those in the pre-CPAP and post-CPAP periods. Noninvasive CPAP applied through a helmet is a feasible and effective supportive technique in dogs recovering from general anesthesia. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2014.

  1. Continuous positive airway pressure administered via face mask in tranquilized dogs.

    PubMed

    Briganti, Angela; Melanie, Pierre; Portela, Diego; Breghi, Gloria; Mama, Khursheed

    2010-10-01

    To evaluate the tolerance of a continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) mask in tranquilized dogs and compare PaO₂ in arterial blood in dogs receiving oxygen with a regular face mask or CPAP mask set to maintain a pressure of 2.5 or 5 cm H₂O. Prospective, randomized clinical study. University teaching hospital. Sixteen client-owned dogs without evidence of cardiopulmonary disease were studied. Eight animals were randomly assigned to each of 2 treatment groups: group A received 2.5 cm H₂O CPAP and group B received 5 cm H₂O CPAP after first receiving oxygen (5 L/min) by a regular face mask. Animals were tranquilized with acepromazine 0.05 mg/kg, i.v. and morphine 0.2 mg/kg, i.m.. An arterial catheter was then placed to facilitate blood sampling for pHa, PaO₂, and PaCO₂ determinations before and after treatments. Direct mean arterial pressure, heart rate, respiratory rate, and temperature were also recorded after each treatment. CPAP administration was well tolerated by all animals. The mean arterial pressure, heart rate, respiratory rate, temperature, PaCO₂, and pHa, did not differ at any time point between groups. Differences were seen in oxygenation; in group A, PaO₂ significantly increased from a mean of 288.3 ± 47.5 mm Hg with a standard mask to a mean of 390.3 ± 65.5 mm Hg with the CPAP mask and in group B, PaO₂ increased similarly from 325.0 ± 70.5 to 425.2 ± 63.4 mm Hg (P<0.05); no differences were detected between the 2 CPAP treatments. In healthy tranquilized dogs noninvasive CPAP is well tolerated and increases PaO₂ above values obtained when using a regular face mask. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2010.

  2. Effects of Use of a Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Device on Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Ulusoy, Seckin; Erden, Meltem; Dinc, Mehmet Emre; Yavuz, Nurdogan; Caglar, Erdem; Dalgic, Abdullah; Erdogan, Coskun

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of glaucoma in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) and to determine the efficacy of the equipment used in the treatment of this disease. Material/Methods In this cross-sectional study, 38 patients with OSAS used the continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) device (Group 1) and 32 patients with OSAS refused CPAP device (Group 2). Thirty-six patients did not have OSAS (Group 3). Results Patient age, gender, height, weight, and neck circumference did not differ among groups (p>0.05); and the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) and respiratory disturbance index (RDI) values did not differ between Groups 1 and 2 (p>0.05). Vision and pachymetric values did not differ among groups (p>0.05). The IOP was significantly higher in Group 2 than in Group 1 (p<0.05) but did not differ between Groups 1 and 3 (p>0.05). The fundus C/D ratio was significantly higher (p<0.05) in Group 2 than in the other groups but did not differ between Groups 1 and 3 (p>0.05). In Group 1, 2, and 3, 5.2%, 12.5%, and 0%, respectively, of patients had glaucoma. Conclusions OSAS should be considered a significant risk factor for glaucoma. Eye tests may help to identify individuals with undiagnosed OSAS, and such testing of patients with diagnosed OSAS may allow early detection of glaucoma and referral of such patients for CPAP therapy to prevent development of complications. PMID:26547930

  3. Compton imaging with a highly-segmented, position-sensitive HPGe detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinbach, T.; Hirsch, R.; Reiter, P.; Birkenbach, B.; Bruyneel, B.; Eberth, J.; Gernhäuser, R.; Hess, H.; Lewandowski, L.; Maier, L.; Schlarb, M.; Weiler, B.; Winkel, M.

    2017-02-01

    A Compton camera based on a highly-segmented high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector and a double-sided silicon-strip detector (DSSD) was developed, tested, and put into operation; the origin of γ radiation was determined successfully. The Compton camera is operated in two different modes. Coincidences from Compton-scattered γ-ray events between DSSD and HPGe detector allow for best angular resolution; while the high-efficiency mode takes advantage of the position sensitivity of the highly-segmented HPGe detector. In this mode the setup is sensitive to the whole 4π solid angle. The interaction-point positions in the 36-fold segmented large-volume HPGe detector are determined by pulse-shape analysis (PSA) of all HPGe detector signals. Imaging algorithms were developed for each mode and successfully implemented. The angular resolution sensitively depends on parameters such as geometry, selected multiplicity and interaction-point distances. Best results were obtained taking into account the crosstalk properties, the time alignment of the signals and the distance metric for the PSA for both operation modes. An angular resolution between 13.8° and 19.1°, depending on the minimal interaction-point distance for the high-efficiency mode at an energy of 1275 keV, was achieved. In the coincidence mode, an increased angular resolution of 4.6° was determined for the same γ-ray energy.

  4. The position effect of electron-deficient quinoxaline moiety in porphyrin based sensitizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Suhua; Lv, Kai; Sun, Hong; Zhou, Gang; Wang, Zhong-Sheng

    2015-04-01

    An electron-deficient group, 2,3-diphenylquinoxaline (DPQ), is incorporated as an auxiliary acceptor into the different positions of the porphyrin (Por) based donor-π bridge-acceptor (D-π-A) dye (FNE57) to construct D-A‧-Por-π-A (FNE58) and D-Por-A‧-π-A (FNE59) configurations. The incorporation of DPQ unit between the donor and porphyrin unit has negligible influence on the absorption property, whereas the DPQ unit located between the porphyrin unit and acceptor significantly increases the absorbance for the Soret band and the valley between the Soret and Q bands. Theoretical calculation reveals that incorporating the DPQ unit adjacent to the acceptor is more advantageous to delocalize the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital and enhance the electronic asymmetry, which facilitates the intramolecular charge transfer. The effect of DPQ unit and its linkage position on the performance of related quasi-solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) is systematically investigated. The quasi-solid-state DSSC with sensitizer FNE59 displays a power conversion efficiency of 6.02%, which is 23% and 51% higher than those for FNE57 and FNE58 based DSSCs. Our studies facilitate the understanding of the crucial importance of molecular engineering and pave a new path to design novel porphyrin based sensitizers for highly efficient DSSCs.

  5. Imaging and Timing Performance of 1cm × 1cm Position-sensitive Solid-state Photomultiplier

    PubMed Central

    Schmall, J.; Stapels, C.; Christian, J.; Cherry, S.; Squillante, M. R.; Shah, K.

    2014-01-01

    We have designed and built a large-area 1cm × 1cm position-sensitive solid-state photomultiplier (PS-SSPM) for use in detector design for medical imaging applications. Our new large-area PS-SSPM concept implements resistive network between the micro-pixels, which are photodiodes operated in Geiger mode, called Geiger Photodiodes (GPDs), to provide continuous position sensitivity. Here we present imaging and timing performance of the large-area PS-SSPM for different temperatures and operating biases to find the optimum operating parameters for the device in imaging applications. A detector module was built by coupling a polished 8×8 LYSO array, with 1×1×20 mm3 elements, to a 1×1 cm2 PS-SSPM. Flood images recorded at room temperature show good crystal separation as all 64 elements were separated from each other. Cooling the device at 10 °C showed significant improvement. The device optimum bias voltage was ~4.5V over breakdown voltage. The coincidence timing resolution was improved significantly by increasing the operating bias, as well as by lowering the temperature to 0 °C. Results show excellent imaging performance and good timing response with a large-area PS-SSPM device. PMID:25540669

  6. Long-term continuous positive airway pressure therapy improves cardiac autonomic tone during sleep in patients with obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Palma, Jose-Alberto; Iriarte, Jorge; Fernandez, Secundino; Alegre, Manuel; Valencia, Miguel; Artieda, Julio; Urrestarazu, Elena

    2015-08-01

    Cardiac autonomic tone after long-term continuous positive airway pressure therapy in patients with obstructive sleep apnea remains unexplored. Thirty patients with obstructive sleep apnea (14 with moderate and 16 with severe obstructive sleep apnea) were studied during a baseline polysomnographic study, after a full night of acute continuous positive airway pressure treatment, and after long-term (~2 years) chronic continuous positive airway pressure therapy. Twenty age- and gender-matched controls with baseline sleep study were selected for comparison purposes. Cross-spectral analysis and the low-frequency (LF) and high-frequency (HF) components of the heart rate variability were computed separately over 10-min ECG epochs during rapid eye movement sleep, non-rapid eye movement sleep, and wakefulness. During the baseline study, obstructive sleep apnea patients exhibited increased LF, decreased HF, and increased LF/HF ratio during sleep when compared to controls. In a multiple regression model, the mean oxygen saturation explained the increased LF during rapid and non-rapid eye movement sleep in obstructive sleep apnea patients. Acute continuous positive airway pressure therapy decreased the LF modulations and the LF/HF ratio and increased the HF modulations during sleep in patients with severe obstructive sleep apnea. Long-term continuous positive airway pressure therapy decreased LF modulations and LF/HF ratio with increased HF modulations during sleep in patients with moderate and severe obstructive sleep apnea. Long-term continuous positive airway pressure reduces the sympathovagal imbalance in patients with moderate and severe obstructive sleep apnea, both during rapid and non-rapid eye movement sleep. Continuous positive airway pressure seems to exert its changes in cardiac autonomic modulation by decreasing the burden of nocturnal hypoxia.

  7. Diastolic function and functional capacity after a single session of continuous positive airway pressure in patients with compensated heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Bussoni, Marjory Fernanda; Guirado, Gabriel Negretti; Matsubara, Luiz Shiguero; Roscani, Meliza Goi; Polegato, Bertha Furlan; Minamoto, Suzana Tanni; Bazan, Silméia Garcia Zanati; Matsubara, Beatriz Bojikian

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The effects of acute continuous positive airway pressure therapy on left ventricular diastolic function and functional capacity in patients with compensated systolic heart failure remain unclear. METHODS: This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial included 43 patients with heart failure and a left ventricular ejection fraction <0.50 who were in functional classes I-III according to the New York Heart Association criteria. Twenty-three patients were assigned to continuous positive airway pressure therapy (10 cmH2O), while 20 patients received placebo with null pressure for 30 minutes. All patients underwent a 6-minute walk test (6MWT) and Doppler echocardiography before and immediately after intervention. Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01088854. RESULTS: The groups had similar clinical and echocardiographic baseline variables. Variation in the diastolic function index (e′) after intervention was associated with differences in the distance walked in both groups. However, in the continuous positive airway pressure group, this difference was greater (continuous positive airway pressure group: Δ6MWT = 9.44+16.05×Δe′, p = 0.002; sham group: Δ6MWT = 7.49+5.38×Δe′; p = 0.015). There was a statistically significant interaction between e′ index variation and continuous positive airway pressure for the improvement of functional capacity (p = 0.020). CONCLUSIONS: Continuous positive airway pressure does not acurately change the echocardiographic indexes of left ventricle systolic or diastolic function in patients with compensated systolic heart failure. However, 30-minute continuous positive airway pressure therapy appears to have an effect on left ventricular diastolic function by increasing functional capacity. PMID:24838902

  8. Dorsal striatal D2-like receptor availability covaries with sensitivity to positive reinforcement during discrimination learning.

    PubMed

    Groman, Stephanie M; Lee, Buyean; London, Edythe D; Mandelkern, Mark A; James, Alex S; Feiler, Karen; Rivera, Ronald; Dahlbom, Magnus; Sossi, Vesna; Vandervoort, Eric; Jentsch, J David

    2011-05-18

    Deviations in reward sensitivity and behavioral flexibility, particularly in the ability to change or stop behaviors in response to changing environmental contingencies, are important phenotypic dimensions of several neuropsychiatric disorders. Neuroimaging evidence suggests that variation in dopamine signaling through dopamine D(2)-like receptors may influence these phenotypes, as well as associated psychiatric conditions, but the specific neurocognitive mechanisms through which this influence is exerted are unknown. To address this question, we examined the relationship between behavioral sensitivity to reinforcement during discrimination learning and D(2)-like receptor availability in vervet monkeys. Monkeys were assessed for their ability to acquire, retain, and reverse three-choice, visual-discrimination problems, and once behavioral performance had stabilized, they received positron emission tomography (PET) scans. D(2)-like receptor availability in dorsal aspects of the striatum was not related to individual differences in the ability to acquire or retain visual discriminations but did relate to the number of trials required to reach criterion in the reversal phase of the task. D(2)-like receptor availability was also strongly correlated with behavioral sensitivity to positive, but not negative, feedback during learning. These results go beyond electrophysiological findings by demonstrating the involvement of a striatal dopaminergic marker in individual differences in feedback sensitivity and behavioral flexibility, providing insight into the neural mechanisms that are affected in neuropsychiatric disorders that feature these deficits.

  9. The formation of continuous opinion dynamics based on a gambling mechanism and its sensitivity analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yueying; Alexandre Wang, Qiuping; Li, Wei; Cai, Xu

    2017-09-01

    The formation of continuous opinion dynamics is investigated based on a virtual gambling mechanism where agents fight for a limited resource. We propose a model with agents holding opinions between -1 and 1. Agents are segregated into two cliques according to the sign of their opinions. Local communication happens only when the opinion distance between corresponding agents is no larger than a pre-defined confidence threshold. Theoretical analysis regarding special cases provides a deep understanding of the roles of both the resource allocation parameter and confidence threshold in the formation of opinion dynamics. For a sparse network, the evolution of opinion dynamics is negligible in the region of low confidence threshold when the mindless agents are absent. Numerical results also imply that, in the presence of economic agents, high confidence threshold is required for apparent clustering of agents in opinion. Moreover, a consensus state is generated only when the following three conditions are satisfied simultaneously: mindless agents are absent, the resource is concentrated in one clique, and confidence threshold tends to a critical value(=1.25+2/ka ; k_a>8/3 , the average number of friends of individual agents). For fixed a confidence threshold and resource allocation parameter, the most chaotic steady state of the dynamics happens when the fraction of mindless agents is about 0.7. It is also demonstrated that economic agents are more likely to win at gambling, compared to mindless ones. Finally, the importance of three involved parameters in establishing the uncertainty of model response is quantified in terms of Latin hypercube sampling-based sensitivity analysis.

  10. A network of visual motion-sensitive neurons for computing object position in an arthropod.

    PubMed

    Medan, Violeta; Berón De Astrada, Martín; Scarano, Florencia; Tomsic, Daniel

    2015-04-29

    Highly active insects and crabs depend on visual motion information for detecting and tracking mates, prey, or predators, for which they require directional control systems containing internal maps of visual space. A neural map formed by large, motion-sensitive neurons implicated in processing panoramic flow is known to exist in an optic ganglion of the fly. However, an equivalent map for processing spatial positions of single objects has not been hitherto identified in any arthropod. Crabs can escape directly away from a visual threat wherever the stimulus is located in the 360° field of view. When tested in a walking simulator, the crab Neohelice granulata immediately adjusts its running direction after changes in the position of the visual danger stimulus smaller than 1°. Combining mass and single-cell staining with in vivo intracellular recording, we show that a particular class of motion-sensitive neurons of the crab's lobula that project to the midbrain, the monostratified lobula giants type 1 (MLG1), form a system of 16 retinotopically organized elements that map the 360° azimuthal space. The preference of these neurons for horizontally moving objects conforms the visual ecology of the crab's mudflat world. With a mean receptive field of 118°, MLG1s have a large superposition among neighboring elements. Our results suggest that the MLG1 system conveys information on object position as a population vector. Such computational code can enable the accurate directional control observed in the visually guided behaviors of crabs.

  11. Exploring the spatial resolution of position-sensitive microchannel plate detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiggins, Blake; Siwal, Davinder; Desouza, Romualdo

    2016-03-01

    High amplification and excellent timing make microchannel plate (MCP) detectors excellent devices for detection of photons, electrons, and ions. In addition to providing sub-nanosecond time resolution MCP detectors can also provide spatial resolution, thus making them useful in imaging applications. Use of a resistive anode (RA) is a routinely used approach to make an MCP position-sensitive. The spatial resolution of the RA associated with detection of a single incident electron was determined. Factors impacting the spatial resolution obtained with the RA will be discussed and the achieved spatial resolution of 64 μm (FWHM) will be presented. Recently, a novel approach has been developed to provide position-sensitivity for an MCP detector. In this approach, namely the induced signal approach, the position of the incident particle is determined by sensing the electron cloud emanating from a MCP stack. By utilizing the zero-crossing point of the inherently bipolar signals, a spatial resolution of 466 μm (FWHM) has been achieved. Work to improve the spatial resolution of the induced signal approach further will be presented. Supported by the US DOE NNSA under Award No. DE-NA0002012.

  12. Role of induced negative and positive emotions in sensitivity to itch and pain in women.

    PubMed

    van Laarhoven, A I M; Walker, A L; Wilder-Smith, O H; Kroeze, S; van Riel, P L C M; van de Kerkhof, P C M; Kraaimaat, F W; Evers, A W M

    2012-08-01

    Itch and pain are common symptoms in skin disease. It has been suggested that negative emotions may play a role in itch and pain. To date, however, the role of emotions has only been studied for pain in experimental studies, not yet for itch. To investigate the effects of negative and positive emotions on the sensitivity to itch and pain. Film fragments were used to induce a negative or positive emotional state in healthy women. Itch and pain were induced using the following somatosensory stimuli: electrical stimulation, histamine iontophoresis and the cold pressor test. Results showed that the scores for itch and pain evoked by histamine and the cold pressor test, respectively, were significantly higher in the negative than in the positive emotion condition, whereas tolerance thresholds to electrical stimulation and the cold pressor test, and stimulus unpleasantness scores did not differ between the two conditions. These findings for the first time indicate in an experimental design that emotions play a role in sensitivity to somatosensory sensations of both itch and pain. © 2012 The Authors. BJD © 2012 British Association of Dermatologists.

  13. An improved method of energy calibration for position-sensitive silicon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ming-Dao; Huang, Tian-Heng; Liu, Zhong; Ding, Bing; Yang, Hua-Bin; Zhang, Zhi-Yuan; Wang, Jian-Guo; Ma, Long; Yu, Lin; Wang, Yong-Sheng; Gan, Zai-Guo; Xiao-Hong, Zhou

    2016-04-01

    Energy calibration of resistive charge division-based position-sensitive silicon detectors is achieved by parabolic fitting in the traditional method, where the systematic variations of vertex and curvature of the parabola with energy must be considered. In this paper we extend the traditional method in order to correct the fitting function, simplify the procedure of calibration and improve the experimental data quality. Instead of a parabolic function as used in the traditional method, a new function describing the relation of position and energy is introduced. The energy resolution of the 8.088 MeV α decay of 213Rn is determined to be about 87 keV (FWHM), which is better than the result of the traditional method, 104 keV (FWHM). The improved method can be applied to the energy calibration of resistive charge division-based position-sensitive silicon detectors with various performances. Supported by ‘100 Person Project’ of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (11405224 and 11435014)

  14. A Novel Positive Selection for Identifying Cold-Sensitive Myosin II Mutants in Dictyostelium

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, B.; Spudich, J. A.

    1995-01-01

    We developed a positive selection for myosin heavy chain mutants in Dictyostelium. This selection is based on the fact that brief exposure to azide causes wild-type cells to release from the substrate, whereas myosin null cells remain adherent. This procedure assays myosin function on a time scale of minutes and has therefore allowed us to select rapid-onset cold-sensitive mutants after random chemical mutagenesis of Dictyostelium cells. We developed a rapid technique for determining which mutations lie in sequences of the myosin gene that encode the head (motor) domain and localized 27 of 34 mutants to this domain. We recovered the appropriate sequences from five of the mutants and demonstrated that they retain their cold-sensitive properties when expressed from extrachromosomal plasmids. PMID:7498732

  15. Adhesion Force Measurements Using an Atomic Force Microscope Upgraded with a Linear Position Sensitive Detector

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, M.; Stuart, J.; Pungor, A.; Dryden, P.

    2012-01-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM), in addition to providing images on an atomic scale, can be used to measure the forces between surfaces and the AFM probe. The potential uses of mapping the adhesive forces on the surface include a spatial determination of surface energy and a direct identification of surface proteins through specific protein–ligand binding interactions. The capabilities of the AFM to measure adhesive forces can be extended by replacing the four-quadrant photodiode detection sensor with an external linear position sensitive detector and by utilizing a dedicated user-programmable signal generator and acquisiton system. Such an upgrade enables the microscope to measure in the larger dynamic range of adhesion forces, improves the sensitivity and linearity of the measurement, and eliminates the problems inherent to the multiple repetitious contacts between the AFM probe and the specimen surface. PMID:25125792

  16. Biological Basis for Increased Sensitivity to Radiation Therapy in HPV-Positive Head and Neck Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Bol, V.; Grégoire, V.

    2014-01-01

    Although development of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs) is commonly linked to the consumption of tobacco and alcohol, a link between human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and a subgroup of head and neck cancers has been established. These HPV-positive tumors represent a distinct biological entity with overexpression of viral oncoproteins E6 and E7. It has been shown in several clinical studies that HPV-positive HNSCCs have a more favorable outcome and greater response to radiotherapy. The reason for improved prognosis of HPV-related HNSCC remains speculative, but it could be owned to multiple factors. One hypothesis is that HPV-positive cells are intrinsically more sensitive to standard therapies and thus respond better to treatment. Another possibility is that HPV-positive tumors uniquely express viral proteins that induce an immune response during therapy that helps clear tumors and prevents recurrence. Here, we will review current evidence for the biological basis of increased radiosensitivity in HPV-positive HNSCC. PMID:24804233

  17. Lung Ultrasonography Score to Evaluate Oxygenation and Surfactant Need in Neonates Treated With Continuous Positive Airway Pressure.

    PubMed

    Brat, Roselyne; Yousef, Nadya; Klifa, Roman; Reynaud, Stephanie; Shankar Aguilera, Shivani; De Luca, Daniele

    2015-08-01

    (area under the curve = 0.71; 95% CI, 0.54-0.90; P = .02); the areas under the curve for these 2 GA subgroups are significantly different (P = .02). In babies with a GA less than 34 weeks, a LUS score cutoff of 4 predicted surfactant administration with 100% sensitivity and 61% specificity, yielding a posttest probability of 72%. The LUS score is well correlated with oxygenation status in both term and preterm neonates, and it shows good reliability to predict surfactant administration in preterm babies with a GA less than 34 weeks under continuous positive airway pressure.

  18. Learning from Public Television and the Web: Positioning Continuing Education as a Knowledge Portal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vedro, Steven R.

    1999-01-01

    Digital convergence--the merging of television and computing--challenges localized monopolies of public television and continuing education. Continuing educators can reposition themselves in the electronic marketplace by serving as an educational portal, bringing their strengths of "brand recognition," local customer base, and access to…

  19. Learning from Public Television and the Web: Positioning Continuing Education as a Knowledge Portal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vedro, Steven R.

    1999-01-01

    Digital convergence--the merging of television and computing--challenges localized monopolies of public television and continuing education. Continuing educators can reposition themselves in the electronic marketplace by serving as an educational portal, bringing their strengths of "brand recognition," local customer base, and access to…

  20. Effect of Nasal Obstruction on Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Treatment: Computational Fluid Dynamics Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Wakayama, Tadashi; Suzuki, Masaaki; Tanuma, Tadashi

    2016-01-01

    Objective Nasal obstruction is a common problem in continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy for obstructive sleep apnea and limits treatment compliance. The purpose of this study is to model the effects of nasal obstruction on airflow parameters under CPAP using computational fluid dynamics (CFD), and to clarify quantitatively the relation between airflow velocity and pressure loss coefficient in subjects with and without nasal obstruction. Methods We conducted an observational cross-sectional study of 16 Japanese adult subjects, of whom 9 had nasal obstruction and 7 did not (control group). Three-dimensional reconstructed models of the nasal cavity and nasopharynx with a CPAP mask fitted to the nostrils were created from each subject’s CT scans. The digital models were meshed with tetrahedral cells and stereolithography formats were created. CPAP airflow simulations were conducted using CFD software. Airflow streamlines and velocity contours in the nasal cavities and nasopharynx were compared between groups. Simulation models were confirmed to agree with actual measurements of nasal flow rate and with pressure and flow rate in the CPAP machine. Results Under 10 cmH2O CPAP, average maximum airflow velocity during inspiration was 17.6 ± 5.6 m/s in the nasal obstruction group but only 11.8 ± 1.4 m/s in the control group. The average pressure drop in the nasopharynx relative to inlet static pressure was 2.44 ± 1.41 cmH2O in the nasal obstruction group but only 1.17 ± 0.29 cmH2O in the control group. The nasal obstruction and control groups were clearly separated by a velocity threshold of 13.5 m/s, and pressure loss coefficient threshold of approximately 10.0. In contrast, there was no significant difference in expiratory pressure in the nasopharynx between the groups. Conclusion This is the first CFD analysis of the effect of nasal obstruction on CPAP treatment. A strong correlation between the inspiratory pressure loss coefficient and maximum airflow

  1. Effect of Nasal Obstruction on Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Treatment: Computational Fluid Dynamics Analyses.

    PubMed

    Wakayama, Tadashi; Suzuki, Masaaki; Tanuma, Tadashi

    2016-01-01

    Nasal obstruction is a common problem in continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy for obstructive sleep apnea and limits treatment compliance. The purpose of this study is to model the effects of nasal obstruction on airflow parameters under CPAP using computational fluid dynamics (CFD), and to clarify quantitatively the relation between airflow velocity and pressure loss coefficient in subjects with and without nasal obstruction. We conducted an observational cross-sectional study of 16 Japanese adult subjects, of whom 9 had nasal obstruction and 7 did not (control group). Three-dimensional reconstructed models of the nasal cavity and nasopharynx with a CPAP mask fitted to the nostrils were created from each subject's CT scans. The digital models were meshed with tetrahedral cells and stereolithography formats were created. CPAP airflow simulations were conducted using CFD software. Airflow streamlines and velocity contours in the nasal cavities and nasopharynx were compared between groups. Simulation models were confirmed to agree with actual measurements of nasal flow rate and with pressure and flow rate in the CPAP machine. Under 10 cmH2O CPAP, average maximum airflow velocity during inspiration was 17.6 ± 5.6 m/s in the nasal obstruction group but only 11.8 ± 1.4 m/s in the control group. The average pressure drop in the nasopharynx relative to inlet static pressure was 2.44 ± 1.41 cmH2O in the nasal obstruction group but only 1.17 ± 0.29 cmH2O in the control group. The nasal obstruction and control groups were clearly separated by a velocity threshold of 13.5 m/s, and pressure loss coefficient threshold of approximately 10.0. In contrast, there was no significant difference in expiratory pressure in the nasopharynx between the groups. This is the first CFD analysis of the effect of nasal obstruction on CPAP treatment. A strong correlation between the inspiratory pressure loss coefficient and maximum airflow velocity was found.

  2. Mouth breathing in obstructive sleep apnea prior to and during nasal continuous positive airway pressure.

    PubMed

    Ruhle, Karl Heinz; Nilius, Georg

    2008-01-01

    Patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) often complain of dryness of mouth and throat prior to and during nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP). It is believed that this is due to mouth breathing (MB). However, the association between mouth breathing and apneas/hypopneas and the effect of CPAP on MB has not been studied. The purpose of the present study was, therefore, to assess the frequency and duration of episodes of MB prior to and during treatment with nCPAP. MB was recorded prior to and during nCPAP with a closely fitting mouth mask connected to a pneumotachograph and nasal flow was measured via nasal prongs. MB episodes were expressed as the number of events divided by total sleep time x 60, to give the MB event index per hour of sleep. MB time divided by total sleep time x 60 was calculated in minutes to get the MB time index per hour of sleep. Eleven male patients with OSAS (mean age 57.9 +/- 8.3 years, body mass index 30.2 +/- 3.8) were recruited to the study. Prior to nCPAP, the apnea/hypopnea index was 55.8 +/- 26 and decreased during nCPAP to 8.0 +/- 3.4. The lowest SaO2 measured was 82.9 +/- 4.7%, and increased to 87.5 +/- 2.7% under nCPAP. The mean nCPAP was 7.8 +/- 1.6 cm H2O. MB event index per hour of sleep decreased from 35.2 +/- 19.7 prior to treatment to 5.0 +/- 5.2 under nCPAP (p < 0.01). In 52.2 +/- 27.4% of obstructive respiratory events, MB started at the end of an apnea/hypopnea episode, decreasing to 8.5 +/- 12.5% with nCPAP treatment. MB time index per hour of sleep was reduced from 13.5 +/- 10.2 min prior to treatment to 4.6 +/- 5.5 min under nCPAP (p < 0.05). In OSAS patients, MB episodes often appear at the termination of an apnea/hypopnea episode. In many cases, MB episodes can be markedly reduced by nCPAP treatment. When patients on nCPAP complain of dry mouth, appropriate measurements should be performed to verify MB. 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Cost-effectiveness of Out-of-Hospital Continuous Positive Airway Pressure for Acute Respiratory Failure

    PubMed Central

    Thokala, Praveen; Goodacre, Steve; Ward, Matt; Penn-Ashman, Jerry; Perkins, Gavin D.

    2015-01-01

    Study objective We determine the cost-effectiveness of out-of-hospital continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) compared with standard care for adults presenting to emergency medical services with acute respiratory failure. Methods We developed an economic model using a United Kingdom health care system perspective to compare the costs and health outcomes of out-of-hospital CPAP to standard care (inhospital noninvasive ventilation) when applied to a hypothetical cohort of patients with acute respiratory failure. The model assigned each patient a probability of intubation or death, depending on the patient’s characteristics and whether he or she had out-of-hospital CPAP or standard care. The patients who survived accrued lifetime quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) and health care costs according to their age and sex. Costs were accrued through intervention and hospital treatment costs, which depended on patient outcomes. All results were converted into US dollars, using the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development purchasing power parities rates. Results Out-of-hospital CPAP was more effective than standard care but was also more expensive, with an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of £20,514 per QALY ($29,720/QALY) and a 49.5% probability of being cost-effective at the £20,000 per QALY ($29,000/QALY) threshold. The probability of out-of-hospital CPAP’s being cost-effective at the £20,000 per QALY ($29,000/QALY) threshold depended on the incidence of eligible patients and varied from 35.4% when a low estimate of incidence was used to 93.8% with a high estimate. Variation in the incidence of eligible patients also had a marked influence on the expected value of sample information for a future randomized trial. Conclusion The cost-effectiveness of out-of-hospital CPAP is uncertain. The incidence of patients eligible for out-of-hospital CPAP appears to be the key determinant of cost-effectiveness. PMID:25737210

  4. Fast neutron spectrometry and dosimetry using a spherical moderator with position-sensitive detectors.

    PubMed

    Li, Taosheng; Yang, Lianzhen; Ma, Jizeng; Fang, Dong

    2007-01-01

    A neutron spectrometry and dosimetry measurement system has been developed based on a different design of the divided regions for a sphere, with three position-sensitive counters. The characteristics of the measurement system have been investigated in the reference radiation fields of Am-Be and (252)Cf sources. When realistic input spectra are used for the unfolding, the overall deviations of the calculated results for four dosimetric quantities are less than +/-10%. The results of other input spectra are also discussed in this report.

  5. Two-dimensional spectrally resolved position-sensitive proportional counter for plasma imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Thorn, D.; Beiersdorfer, P.

    2004-10-01

    We describe a 160x100 mm two-dimensional position-sensitive proportional counter for use in high-temperature plasma spectroscopy. The detector employs a novel design based on a printed circuit board for the cathode plane and a single-wire switchback design for the anode plane. The spacial resolution for one dimension is 200 {mu}m and for the other dimension is 2-5 mm. The integral nonlinearity is 0.08% for the first and 1% for the second dimension. We demonstrate the utility of the new detector with a spacially resolved measurement of the Lyman-{alpha} transitions in hydrogenic Ar{sup 17+}.

  6. CdZnTe position-sensitive drift detectors with thicknesses up to 5 cm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolotnikov, A. E.; Camarda, G. S.; Chen, E.; Cheng, S.; Cui, Y.; Gul, R.; Gallagher, R.; Dedic, V.; De Geronimo, G.; Ocampo Giraldo, L.; Fried, J.; Hossain, A.; MacKenzie, J. M.; Sellin, P.; Taherion, S.; Vernon, E.; Yang, G.; El-hanany, U.; James, R. B.

    2016-02-01

    We investigated the feasibility of long-drift-time CdZnTe (CZT) gamma-ray detectors, fabricated from CZT material produced by Redlen Technologies. CZT crystals with cross-section areas of 5 × 5 mm2 and 6 × 6 mm2 and thicknesses of 20-, 30-, 40-, and 50-mm were configured as 3D position-sensitive drift detectors and were read out using a front-end ASIC. By correcting the electron charge losses caused by defects in the crystals, we demonstrated high performance for relatively thick detectors fabricated from unselected CZT material.

  7. Comparison of the effects of continuous positive airway pressure, oral appliance and exercise training in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Schütz, Teresa Cristina Barros; Cunha, Thays Crosara Abrahão; Moura-Guimaraes, Thais; Luz, Gabriela Pontes; Ackel-D'Elia, Carolina; Alves, Eduardo da Silva; Pantiga, Gilberto; Mello, Marco Tulio de; Tufik, Sergio; Bittencourt, Lia

    2013-01-01

    There are several treatments for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, such as weight loss, use of an oral appliance and continuous positive airway pressure, that can be used to reduce the signs and symptoms of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. Few studies have evaluated the effectiveness of a physical training program compared with other treatments. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of physical exercise on subjective and objective sleep parameters, quality of life and mood in obstructive sleep apnea patients and to compare these effects with the effects of continuous positive airway pressure and oral appliance treatments. Male patients with moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea and body mass indices less than 30 kg/m2 were randomly assigned to three groups: continuous positive airway pressure (n = 9), oral appliance (n = 9) and physical exercise (n = 7). Polysomnographic recordings, blood samples and daytime sleepiness measurements were obtained prior to and after two months of physical exercise or treatment with continuous positive airway pressure or an oral appliance. Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01289392 RESULTS: After treatment with continuous positive airway pressure or an oral appliance, the patients presented with a significant reduction in the apnea-hypopnea index. We did not observe changes in the sleep parameters studied in the physical exercise group. However, this group presented reductions in the following parameters: T leukocytes, very-low-density lipoprotein and triglycerides. Two months of exercise training also had a positive impact on subjective daytime sleepiness. Our results suggest that isolated physical exercise training was able to modify only subjective daytime sleepiness and some blood measures. Continuous positive airway pressure and oral appliances modified the apnea-hypopnea index.

  8. Identifying Moderators of the Link between Parent and Child Anxiety Sensitivity: The Roles of Gender, Positive Parenting, and Corporal Punishment

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Rebecca A.; Weems, Carl F.

    2014-01-01

    A substantial body of literature suggests that anxiety sensitivity is a risk factor for the development of anxiety problems and research has now begun to examine the links between parenting, parent anxiety sensitivity and their child’s anxiety sensitivity. However, the extant literature has provided mixed findings as to whether parent anxiety sensitivity is associated with child anxiety sensitivity, with some evidence suggesting that others factors may influence the association. Theoretically, specific parenting behaviors may be important to the development of child anxiety sensitivity and also in understanding the association between parent and child anxiety sensitivity. In this study, 191 families (n = 255 children and adolescents aged 6–17 and their parents) completed measures of child anxiety sensitivity (CASI) and parenting (APQ-C), and parents completed measures of their own anxiety sensitivity (ASI) and their parenting (APQ-P). Corporal punishment was associated with child anxiety sensitivity and the child’s report of their parent’s positive parenting behaviors moderated the association between parent and child anxiety sensitivity. The child’s gender was also found to moderate the association between parent and child anxiety sensitivity, such that there was a positive association between girls and parent anxiety sensitivity and a negative association in boys. The findings advance the understanding of child anxiety sensitivity by establishing a link with corporal punishment and by showing that the association between parent and child anxiety sensitivity may depend upon the parenting context and child’s gender. PMID:25301177

  9. Identifying Moderators of the Link Between Parent and Child Anxiety Sensitivity: The Roles of Gender, Positive Parenting, and Corporal Punishment.

    PubMed

    Graham, Rebecca A; Weems, Carl F

    2015-07-01

    A substantial body of literature suggests that anxiety sensitivity is a risk factor for the development of anxiety problems and research has now begun to examine the links between parenting, parent anxiety sensitivity and their child's anxiety sensitivity. However, the extant literature has provided mixed findings as to whether parent anxiety sensitivity is associated with child anxiety sensitivity, with some evidence suggesting that other factors may influence the association. Theoretically, specific parenting behaviors may be important to the development of child anxiety sensitivity and also in understanding the association between parent and child anxiety sensitivity. In this study, 191 families (n = 255 children and adolescents aged 6-17 and their parents) completed measures of child anxiety sensitivity (CASI) and parenting (APQ-C), and parents completed measures of their own anxiety sensitivity (ASI) and their parenting (APQ-P). Corporal punishment was associated with child anxiety sensitivity and the child's report of their parent's positive parenting behaviors moderated the association between parent and child anxiety sensitivity. The child's gender was also found to moderate the association between parent and child anxiety sensitivity, such that there was a positive association between girls' and their parents anxiety sensitivity and a negative association in boys. The findings advance the understanding of child anxiety sensitivity by establishing a link with corporal punishment and by showing that the association between parent and child anxiety sensitivity may depend upon the parenting context and child's gender.

  10. Demonstration of a high sensitivity GNSS software receiver for indoor positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Tao; Ma, Martin; Broumandan, Ali; Lachapelle, Gérard

    2013-03-01

    Advances in signal processing techniques contributed to the significant improvements of GNSS receiver performance in dense multipath environments and created the opportunities for a new category of high-sensitivity GNSS (HS-GNSS) receivers that can provide GNSS location services in indoor environments. The difficulties in improving the availability, reliability, and accuracy of these indoor capable GNSS receivers exceed those of the receivers designed for the most hostile urban canyon environments. The authors of this paper identified the vector tracking schemes, signal propagation statistics, and parallel processing techniques that are critical to a robust HS-GNSS receiver for indoor environments and successfully incorporated them into a fully functional high-sensitivity software receiver. A flexible vector-based receiver architecture is introduced to combine these key indoor signal processing technologies into GSNRx-hs™ - the high sensitivity software navigation receiver developed at the University of Calgary. The resulting receiver can perform multi-mode vector tracking in indoor environment at various levels of location and timing uncertainties. In addition to the obvious improvements in time-to-first-fix (TTFF) and signal sensitivity, the field test results in indoor environments surrounded by wood, glass, and concrete showed that the new techniques effectively improved the performance of indoor GNSS positioning. With fine GNSS timing, the proposed receiver can consistently deliver indoor navigation solution with the horizontal accuracy of 2-15 m depending on the satellite geometry and the indoor environments. If only the coarse GNSS timing is available, the horizontal accuracy of the indoor navigation solution from the proposed receiver is around 30 m depending on the coarse timing accuracy, the satellite geometry, and the indoor environments. From the preliminary field test results, it has been observed that the signal processing sensitivity is the

  11. Binaural sensitivity as a function of interaural electrode position with a bilateral cochlear implant user

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Christopher J.; Eddington, Donald K.; Colburn, H. Steven; Rabinowitz, William M.

    2003-09-01

    Experiments were conducted with a single, bilateral cochlear implant user to examine interaural level and time-delay cues that putatively underlie the design and efficacy of bilateral implant systems. The subject's two implants were of different types but custom equipment allowed presentation of controlled bilateral stimuli, particularly those with specified interaural time difference (ITD) and interaural level difference (ILD) cues. A lateralization task was used to measure the effect of these cues on the perceived location of the sensations elicited. For trains of fixed-amplitude, biphasic current pulses at 100 pps, the subject demonstrated sensitivity to an ITD of 300 μs, providing evidence of access to binaural information. The choice of bilateral electrode pair greatly influenced ITD sensitivity, suggesting that electrode pairings are likely to be an important consideration in the effort to provide binaural advantages. The selection of bilateral electrode pairs showing sensitivity to ITD was partially aided by comparisons of the pitch elicited by individual electrodes in each ear (when stimulated alone with fixed-amplitude current pulses at 813 pps): specifically, interaural electrodes with similar pitches were more likely (but not certain) to show ITD sensitivity. Significant changes in lateral position occurred with specific electrode pairs. With five bilateral electrode pairs of 14 tested, ITDs of 300 and 600 μs moved an auditory image significantly from right to left. With these same pairs, ILD changes of ~11% of the dynamic range (in μApp) moved an auditory image from the far left to the far right-significantly farther than the nine pairs not showing significant ITD sensitivity. However, even these nine pairs did show response changes as a function of the interaural (or confounding monaural) level cue. Overall, insofar as the access to bilateral cues demonstrated herein generalizes to other subjects, it provides hope that the normal binaural advantages

  12. Gel pillow designed specifically for obstructive sleep apnea treatment with continuous positive airway pressure.

    PubMed

    Salvaggio, Adriana; Lo Bue, Anna; Isidoro, Serena Iacono; Romano, Salvatore; Marrone, Oreste; Insalaco, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    To determine whether the use of a gel pillow with side cutouts designed to accommodate a continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) mask and reduce head temperature improves the efficacy of and adherence to auto-CPAP therapy. Twenty-three consecutive CPAP-naïve patients with obstructive sleep apnea were enrolled in the study. Patients were given an auto-CPAP machine with an appropriate CPAP mask and were instructed to use CPAP for 15 nights. They were instructed to sleep with their own pillow (the control pillow) from nights 1 to 5 and with either a foam pillow or a gel pillow, both of which had side cutouts, for 5 consecutive nights each, in random order. After night 15, auto-CPAP machine data were downloaded and patients rated their satisfaction with each pillow on a visual analog scale. Twenty-two patients completed the protocol. The pressures administered, residual apnea-hypopnea index, air leaks, and mean duration of CPAP use did not differ among the periods during which each pillow was used. Patients were significantly more satisfied with the gel pillow than with the control pillow and the foam pillow (p = 0.022 and p = 0.004, respectively), their level of satisfaction with the gel pillow correlating significantly with excessive daytime sleepiness (r2 = 0.19; p = 0.0443). Among obstructive sleep apnea patients treated with nasal CPAP, the use of a gel pillow with side cutouts appears to have no impact on treatment effectiveness. Nevertheless, such patients seem to prefer a gel pillow over other types of pillows. Determinar se o uso de um travesseiro de gel com recortes laterais para acomodar a máscara de continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP, pressão positiva contínua nas vias aéreas) e diminuir a temperatura em torno da cabeça melhora a eficácia do tratamento com auto-CPAP e a adesão dos pacientes ao tratamento. Foram incluídos no estudo 23 pacientes consecutivos com apneia obstrutiva do sono que nunca haviam recebido tratamento com CPAP. Os

  13. A multiplexed TOF and DOI capable PET detector using a binary position sensitive network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bieniosek, M. F.; Cates, J. W.; Levin, C. S.

    2016-11-01

    Time of flight (TOF) and depth of interaction (DOI) capabilities can significantly enhance the quality and uniformity of positron emission tomography (PET) images. Many proposed TOF/DOI PET detectors require complex readout systems using additional photosensors, active cooling, or waveform sampling. This work describes a high performance, low complexity, room temperature TOF/DOI PET module. The module uses multiplexed timing channels to significantly reduce the electronic readout complexity of the PET detector while maintaining excellent timing, energy, and position resolution. DOI was determined using a two layer light sharing scintillation crystal array with a novel binary position sensitive network. A 20 mm effective thickness LYSO crystal array with four 3 mm  ×  3 mm silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) read out by a single timing channel, one energy channel and two position channels achieved a full width half maximum (FWHM) coincidence time resolution of 180  ±  2 ps with 10 mm of DOI resolution and 11% energy resolution. With sixteen 3 mm  ×  3 mm SiPMs read out by a single timing channel, one energy channel and four position channels a coincidence time resolution 204  ±  1 ps was achieved with 10 mm of DOI resolution and 15% energy resolution. The methods presented here could significantly simplify the construction of high performance TOF/DOI PET detectors.

  14. A multiplexed TOF and DOI capable PET detector using a binary position sensitive network.

    PubMed

    Bieniosek, M F; Cates, J W; Levin, C S

    2016-11-07

    Time of flight (TOF) and depth of interaction (DOI) capabilities can significantly enhance the quality and uniformity of positron emission tomography (PET) images. Many proposed TOF/DOI PET detectors require complex readout systems using additional photosensors, active cooling, or waveform sampling. This work describes a high performance, low complexity, room temperature TOF/DOI PET module. The module uses multiplexed timing channels to significantly reduce the electronic readout complexity of the PET detector while maintaining excellent timing, energy, and position resolution. DOI was determined using a two layer light sharing scintillation crystal array with a novel binary position sensitive network. A 20 mm effective thickness LYSO crystal array with four 3 mm  ×  3 mm silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) read out by a single timing channel, one energy channel and two position channels achieved a full width half maximum (FWHM) coincidence time resolution of 180  ±  2 ps with 10 mm of DOI resolution and 11% energy resolution. With sixteen 3 mm  ×  3 mm SiPMs read out by a single timing channel, one energy channel and four position channels a coincidence time resolution 204  ±  1 ps was achieved with 10 mm of DOI resolution and 15% energy resolution. The methods presented here could significantly simplify the construction of high performance TOF/DOI PET detectors.

  15. Global sensitivity analysis of the dispersion maximum position of the PCFs with circular holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guryev, Igor; Sukhoivanov, Igor; Andrade Lucio, Jose A.; Vargas Rodrigues, Everardo; Shulika, Oleksiy; Mata Chavez, Ruth I.; Baca Montero, Eric R.

    2015-08-01

    Microstructured fibers have recently become popular due to their numerous applications for fiber lasers,1 super-continuum generationi2 and pulse reshaping.3 One of the most important properties of such fibers that is taken into account is its dispersion. Fine tuning of the dispersion (i.e. dispersion management) is one of the crucial peculiarities of the photonic crystal fibers (PCFs)4 that are particular case of the microstructured fibers. During last years, there have been presented various designs of the PCFs possessing specially-designed dispersion shapes. 5-7 However, no universal technique exists which would allow tuning the PCF dispersion without using optimization methods. In our work, we investigate the sensitivity of the PCF dispersion as respect to variation of its basic parameters. This knowledge allows fine-tuning the position of local maximum of the PCF dispersion while maintaining other properties unchanged. The work is organized as follows. In the first section we discuss the dispersion computation method that is suitable for the global sensitivity analysis. The second section presents the global sensitivity analysis for this specific case. We also discuss there possible selection of the variable parameters.

  16. High spatial resolution two-dimensional position sensitive detector for the performance of coincidence experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ceolin, D.; Chaplier, G.; Lemonnier, M.; Garcia, G.A.; Miron, C.; Nahon, L.; Simon, M.; Leclercq, N.; Morin, P.

    2005-04-01

    A position sensitive detector (PSD) adapted to the technical and mechanical specifications of our angle and energy resolved electron-ion(s) coincidence experiments is described in this article. The device, whose principle is very similar to the one detailed by J. H. D. Eland [Meas. Sci. Technol. 5, 1501 (1994)], is composed by a set of microchannel plates and a delay line anode. The originality comes from the addition in front of the encoding surface of a ceramic disk covered by a resistive surface. The capacitive coupling between the anode and the resistive plane has the double advantage of eliminating the spatial modulations due to the lattice of the anode and also of sensitizing a greater number of electrodes, increasing thus considerably the accuracy of the position measurements. The tests carried out with a time to digital conversion module of 250 ps resolution showed that a spatial resolution better than 50 {mu}m and a dead time of 160 ns can be achieved. Typical images obtained with the help of the EPICEA and DELICIOUS coincidence setups are also shown.

  17. A position-sensitive twin ionization chamber for fission fragment and prompt neutron correlation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Göök, A.; Geerts, W.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Oberstedt, S.; Vidali, M.; Zeynalov, Sh.

    2016-09-01

    A twin position-sensitive Frisch grid ionization chamber, intended as a fission fragment detector in experiments to study prompt fission neutron correlations with fission fragment properties, is presented. Fission fragment mass and energies are determined by means of the double kinetic energy technique, based on conservation of mass and linear momentum. The position sensitivity is achieved by replacing each anode plate in the standard twin ionization chamber by a wire plane and a strip anode, both readout by means of resistive charge division. This provides information about the fission axis orientation, which is necessary to reconstruct the neutron emission process in the fully accelerated fragment rest-frame. The energy resolution compared to the standard twin ionization chamber is found not to be affected by the modification. The angular resolution of the detector relative to an arbitrarily oriented axis is better than 7° FWHM. Results on prompt fission neutron angular distributions in 235U(n,f) obtained with the detector in combination with an array of neutron scintillation detectors is presented as a proof of principle.

  18. Shear sensitivity of hybridoma cells in batch, fed-batch, and continuous cultures.

    PubMed

    Petersen, J F; McIntire, L V; Papoutsakis, E T

    1990-01-01

    Previously, we observed that CRL-8018 hybridoma cells were more sensitive to well-defined viscometric shear during the lag and stationary phases than during the exponential phase of batch cultures. Some potential hypotheses for explaining the increase in shear sensitivity are (1) nutrient limitations that result in a decrease in production of specific cellular components responsible for the mechanical strength of the cell, (2) nutrient limitations that lead to synchronization of the culture in a cell cycle phase that is more sensitive to shear, or (3) a link between cell growth and shear sensitivity, such that slowly growing cells are more sensitive to shear. Here, the duration of the exponential phase was increased with use of fed-batch, and the effect on shear sensitivity of the cultures was measured with a viscometric technique. Extension of exponential growth resulted in an increased period during which the cells were insensitive to shear. Additionally, the shear sensitivity of the cells was constant over a wide range of growth rates and metabolic yields in chemostat cultures. These observations suggest that as long as the cells are actively (exponentially) growing, their shear sensitivity does not depend on the growth rate or metabolic state of the cell as expressed by metabolic yields. Thus, hypothesis 3 above can be dismissed.

  19. Imprinted Numbers: Newborn Chicks' Sensitivity to Number vs. Continuous Extent of Objects They Have Been Reared with

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rugani, Rosa; Regolin, Lucia; Vallortigara, Giorgio

    2010-01-01

    Newborn chicks were tested for their sensitivity to number vs. continuous physical extent of artificial objects they had been reared with soon after hatching. Because of the imprinting process, such objects were treated by chicks as social companions. We found that when the objects were similar, chicks faced with choices between 1 vs. 2 or 2 vs. 3…

  20. A Noninvasive Surfactant Adsorption Test Predicting the Need for Surfactant Therapy in Preterm Infants Treated with Continuous Positive Airway Pressure.

    PubMed

    Autilio, Chiara; Echaide, Mercedes; Benachi, Alexandra; Marfaing-Koka, Anne; Capoluongo, Ettore D; Pérez-Gil, Jesús; De Luca, Daniele

    2017-03-01

    To determine the diagnostic accuracy of the surfactant adsorption test (SAT) as a predictor for the need for surfactant replacement therapy in neonates with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). Amniotic fluid samples were collected from 41 preterm neonates with RDS treated with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) and 15 healthy control term neonates. Purified porcine surfactant served as a further control. Lamellar bodies and lung ultrasound score were also measured in a subset of the neonates treated with CPAP. Surfactant was administered according to the European guidelines, and clinical data were collected prospectively. Surfactant activity was measured as adsorption at the air/liquid interface and given in relative fluorescent units (RFU). Surfactant activity differed among native porcine surfactant (median, 4863 RFU; IQR, 4405-5081 RFU), healthy term neonates (median, 2680 RFU; IQR, 2069-3050 RFU), and preterm neonates with RDS (median, 442 RFU; IQR, 92-920 RFU; P <.0001). The neonates who failed CPAP had lower surfactant activity compared with those who did not fail CPAP (median, 92 RFU; IQR, 0-315 RFU vs 749 RFU; IQR, 360-974 RFU; P = .0002). Differences between groups were more evident beyond 20-30 minutes of fluorescence; the 30-minute time point showed the highest area under the curve (0.84; P <.001) and the best cutoff level (170 RFU; specificity, 72%; sensitivity, 96%) for the prediction of CPAP failure. Surfactant activity at 30 minutes was significantly correlated with lamellar bodies (r = 0.51, P = .006) and lung ultrasound score (r = -0.39, P = .013). This technique has the potential to be developed into a fast, simple-to-interpret clinical test. The SAT can reliably identify preterm infants with subsequent CPAP failure and shows promise as a screening test for surfactant replacement in preterm neonates. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Development of three-dimensional position-sensitive room temperature semiconductor gamma-ray spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    He, Z.; Li, W.; Knoll, G.F.; Wehe, D.K.

    2000-07-01

    Semiconductor detectors can provide better spectroscopic performance than scintillation or gas-filled detectors because of the small ionization energy required to generate each electron-hole pair. Indeed, cryogenically cooled high-purity germanium detectors have played the dominant role whenever the best gamma-ray spectroscopy is required. A decades-long search for other semiconductor detectors that could provide higher stopping power and could operate at room temperature has been ongoing. Wide-band-gap semiconductors, such as CdTe, CdZnTe, and HgI{sub 2}, have captured the most attention. However, the use of these semiconductors in detectors has been hindered primarily by problems of charge trapping and material nonuniformity. Introduced in 1994, single-polarity charge sensing on semiconductor detectors has shown great promise in avoiding the hole-trapping problem, and the newly demonstrated three-dimensional position-sensing technique can significantly mitigate the degradation of energy resolution due to the nonuniformity of detector material. In addition, three-dimensional position sensitivity will provide unique imaging capabilities of these gamma-ray spectrometers. These devices are of interest for nuclear nonproliferation, medical imaging, gamma-ray astronomy, and high-energy physics applications. This paper reports the latest results using second-generation three-dimensional position-sensitive semiconductor spectrometers. The improvements over the first generation devices include: (1) Larger volume; (2) Improved anode design; (3) More reliable connections; (4) Enhanced electronic capability; and (5) Measurement of electron drift times. The new detectors and readout electronics (from IDE AS) are being assembled and tested.

  2. EML1 (CNG-modulin) controls light sensitivity in darkness and under continuous illumination in zebrafish retinal cone photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Korenbrot, Juan I; Mehta, Milap; Tserentsoodol, Nomingerel; Postlethwait, John H; Rebrik, Tatiana I

    2013-11-06

    The ligand sensitivity of cGMP-gated (CNG) ion channels in cone photoreceptors is modulated by CNG-modulin, a Ca(2+)-binding protein. We investigated the functional role of CNG-modulin in phototransduction in vivo in morpholino-mediated gene knockdown zebrafish. Through comparative genomic analysis, we identified the orthologue gene of CNG-modulin in zebrafish, eml1, an ancient gene present in the genome of all vertebrates sequenced to date. We compare the photoresponses of wild-type cones with those of cones that do not express the EML1 protein. In the absence of EML1, dark-adapted cones are ∼5.3-fold more light sensitive than wild-type cones. Previous qualitative studies in several nonmammalian species have shown that immediately after the onset of continuous illumination, cones are less light sensitive than in darkness, but sensitivity then recovers over the following 15-20 s. We characterize light sensitivity recovery in continuously illuminated wild-type zebrafish cones and demonstrate that sensitivity recovery does not occur in the absence of EML1.

  3. EML1 (CNG-Modulin) Controls Light Sensitivity in Darkness and under Continuous Illumination in Zebrafish Retinal Cone Photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Milap; Tserentsoodol, Nomingerel; Postlethwait, John H.; Rebrik, Tatiana I.

    2013-01-01

    The ligand sensitivity of cGMP-gated (CNG) ion channels in cone photoreceptors is modulated by CNG-modulin, a Ca2+-binding protein. We investigated the functional role of CNG-modulin in phototransduction in vivo in morpholino-mediated gene knockdown zebrafish. Through comparative genomic analysis, we identified the orthologue gene of CNG-modulin in zebrafish, eml1, an ancient gene present in the genome of all vertebrates sequenced to date. We compare the photoresponses of wild-type cones with those of cones that do not express the EML1 protein. In the absence of EML1, dark-adapted cones are ∼5.3-fold more light sensitive than wild-type cones. Previous qualitative studies in several nonmammalian species have shown that immediately after the onset of continuous illumination, cones are less light sensitive than in darkness, but sensitivity then recovers over the following 15–20 s. We characterize light sensitivity recovery in continuously illuminated wild-type zebrafish cones and demonstrate that sensitivity recovery does not occur in the absence of EML1. PMID:24198367

  4. Estimation of spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity using transfer function analysis: effects of positive pressure ventilation.

    PubMed

    Glos, Martin; Romberg, Dietrich; Endres, Susanne; Fietze, Ingo

    2007-02-01

    To determine the short-term effects of non-invasive positive pressure ventilation (PPV) on spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity, we acquired time series of RR interval and beat-to-beat blood pressure in 55 healthy volunteers (mean age 46.5+/-10.5 years), who performed breathing tests on four occasions at frequencies of 12 and 15/min, with application of PPV of 5 mbar, and without positive pressure (control). Using spectral and transfer function analysis, we estimated RR interval variability (HRV) and systolic blood pressure variability (SBPV), as well as the gain (alpha-index) and phase shift (Phi) of the baroreceptor reflex for low- (LF) and high-frequency (HF) bands. Compared to control breathing, PPV at 12 and 15/min led to an increase in mean RR (p<0.001) and blood pressure (p<0.05). The alpha-index in the HF band increased significantly due to PPV for both respiratory frequencies (p<0.05). Phase shifts did not show significant changes in response to pressure ventilation. These results indicate that short-term administration of PPV in normal subjects elicits significant enhancement in the HF index of baroreflex gain. These findings may contribute to understanding the mechanisms, indications, and effectiveness of positive pressure breathing strategies in treating cardiorespiratory and other disease conditions.

  5. Positive Affect Relevant to Epistemic Curiosity to Reflect Continuance Intention to Join a Hands-On Making Contest

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hong, Jon-Chao; Hwang, Ming-Yueh; Szeto, Elson; Tai, Kai-Hsin; Tsai, Chi-Ruei

    2016-01-01

    Hands-on making (e.g., "Maker") has become prevalent in current educational settings. To understand the role that students' epistemic curiosity plays in hands-on making contests, this study explored its correlation to students' positive affect and continuance intention to participate in a hands-on making contest called…

  6. Positive Affect Relevant to Epistemic Curiosity to Reflect Continuance Intention to Join a Hands-On Making Contest

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hong, Jon-Chao; Hwang, Ming-Yueh; Szeto, Elson; Tai, Kai-Hsin; Tsai, Chi-Ruei

    2016-01-01

    Hands-on making (e.g., "Maker") has become prevalent in current educational settings. To understand the role that students' epistemic curiosity plays in hands-on making contests, this study explored its correlation to students' positive affect and continuance intention to participate in a hands-on making contest called…

  7. A quasi-positive family of continuous Darcy-flux finite-volume schemes with full pressure support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Michael G.; Zheng, Hongwen

    2008-11-01

    A new family of flux-continuous, locally conservative, finite-volume schemes is presented for solving the general tensor pressure equation of subsurface flow in porous media. The new schemes have full pressure continuity imposed across control-volume faces. Previous families of flux-continuous schemes are point-wise continuous in pressure and flux. When applying the earlier point-wise flux-continuous schemes to strongly anisotropic full-tensor fields their failure to satisfy a maximum principle (as with other FEM and finite-volume methods) can result in loss of local stability for high anisotropy ratios which can cause strong spurious oscillations in the numerical pressure solution. An M-matrix analysis reveals the upper limits for guaranteeing a maximum principle for general 9-point schemes and aids in the design of schemes that minimize the occurrence of spurious oscillations in the discrete pressure field. The full pressure continuity schemes are shown to possess a larger range of flux-continuous schemes, than the previous point-wise counter parts. For strongly anisotropic full-tensor cases it is shown that the full quadrature range possessed by the new schemes permits these schemes to exploit quadrature points (previously out of range) that are shown to minimize spurious oscillations in discrete pressure solutions. The new formulation leads to a more robust quasi-positive family of flux-continuous schemes applicable to general discontinuous full-tensor fields.

  8. 231 Pattern of Positive Sensitization in Patient with Asthma and Rhinitis to 3600 MSNM (La Paz, Bolivia)

    PubMed Central

    Moncada Alcon, Abel Marcelo; Rios Mora, Roxana Ivon

    2012-01-01

    Background In the high altitude exists very few studies about allergies, we seek to give to know our sensitization in population with breathing problems (asthma and Allergic Rhinitis). Methods They were carried out allergy tests to 94 patients between 6 and 13 years with breathing symptoms predominantly allergic rhinitis and asthma. They were carried out allergy tests to foods like peanut, wheat, almond, tomato, milk, fish, soya, nuts, corn egg, chocolate, dog epithelia, cat, rabbit, feathers, horse, dermatophagoides spp, blatella, periplaneta pollens: lolium, poa, cynodon, festuca, ambrosia, artemisa, plantago, chenopodium, rumex, zea mays, populus, cupressus, platanus, fraxinus, schinus, dactylis, and mushrooms like it would alternate, aspergillus and cladosporium. They took positive all hives bigger than 3 mm of diameter. Results Of the 94 patients 9 gave negative to the tests, 88 positive%. In the foods, milk prevails (lactoglobuline 39%; casein 21%), tomato 33%, fish, almond and wheat; 23% peanut and nuts less than 10%. In the epithelia: cat 20%. Dermatophagoides 46%, pollens grasses lolium 13% and poa 14%, other pollens important festuca, chenopodium and dactylis with 21 to 23%, trees less than 15% and mushrooms with less than 15%. You begin handling predominantly according to these tests to dematophagoides, poa, lolium, festuca, dactylis, mushrooms and cat epithelium since their reactions were similar to the positive challenge of histamine. It is necessary to mention that the diagnoses were alone allergic Rinitis on the whole in 60%, asthma allergic single 10% and asthma and rinitis 30%. Conclusions Although this is a closed population, it guides us that to 3600 m.s.n.m. the allergen more frequent is dermatophagoides, and many articles refers that to high altitude we are liberated of the mites but it is not this way. Another important discovery is the positive to milk, tomato and very little to other foods that it is part of our population's diet. They are

  9. Position-sensitive detection of ultracold neutrons with an imaging camera and its implications to spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Wanchun; Broussard, L. J.; Hoffbauer, M. A.; Makela, M.; Morris, C. L.; Tang, Z.; Adamek, E. R.; Callahan, N. B.; Clayton, S. M.; Cude-Woods, C.; Currie, S.; Dees, E. B.; Ding, X.; Geltenbort, P.; Hickerson, K. P.; Holley, A. T.; Ito, T. M.; Leung, K. K.; Liu, C.-Y.; Morley, D. J.; Ortiz, Jose D.; Pattie, R. W.; Ramsey, J. C.; Saunders, A.; Seestrom, S. J.; Sharapov, E. I.; Sjue, S. K.; Wexler, J.; Womack, T. L.; Young, A. R.; Zeck, B. A.; Wang, Zhehui

    2016-09-01

    Position-sensitive detection of ultracold neutrons (UCNs) is demonstrated using an imaging charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. A spatial resolution less than 15 μm has been achieved, which is equivalent to a UCN energy resolution below 2 pico-electron-volts through the relation δE =m0 gδx. Here, the symbols δE, δx, m0 and g are the energy resolution, the spatial resolution, the neutron rest mass and the gravitational acceleration, respectively. A multilayer surface convertor described previously is used to capture UCNs and then emits visible light for CCD imaging. Particle identification and noise rejection are discussed through the use of light intensity profile analysis. This method allows different types of UCN spectroscopy and other applications.

  10. Position-sensitive detection of ultracold neutrons with an imaging camera and its implications to spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Wei, Wanchun; Broussard, Leah J.; Hoffbauer, Mark Arles; ...

    2016-05-16

    Position-sensitive detection of ultracold neutrons (UCNs) is demonstrated using an imaging charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. A spatial resolution less than 15μm has been achieved, which is equivalent to a UCN energy resolution below 2 pico-electron-volts through the relation δE=m0gδx. Here, the symbols δE, δx, m0 and g are the energy resolution, the spatial resolution, the neutron rest mass and the gravitational acceleration, respectively. A multilayer surface convertor described previously is used to capture UCNs and then emits visible light for CCD imaging. Particle identification and noise rejection are discussed through the use of light intensity profile analysis. As a result,more » this method allows different types of UCN spectroscopy and other applications.« less

  11. 3D scanning characteristics of an amorphous silicon position sensitive detector array system.

    PubMed

    Contreras, Javier; Gomes, Luis; Filonovich, Sergej; Correia, Nuno; Fortunato, Elvira; Martins, Rodrigo; Ferreira, Isabel

    2012-02-13

    The 3D scanning electro-optical characteristics of a data acquisition prototype system integrating a 32 linear array of 1D amorphous silicon position sensitive detectors (PSD) were analyzed. The system was mounted on a platform for imaging 3D objects using the triangulation principle with a sheet-of-light laser. New obtained results reveal a minimum possible gap or simulated defect detection of approximately 350 μm. Furthermore, a first study of the angle for 3D scanning was also performed, allowing for a broad range of angles to be used in the process. The relationship between the scanning angle of the incident light onto the object and the image displacement distance on the sensor was determined for the first time in this system setup. Rendering of 3D object profiles was performed at a significantly higher number of frames than in the past and was possible for an incident light angle range of 15 ° to 85 °.

  12. Position-sensitive detection of ultracold neutrons with an imaging camera and its implications to spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Wanchun; Broussard, Leah J.; Hoffbauer, Mark Arles; Makela, Mark F.; Morris, Christopher L.; Tang, Zhaowen; Adamek, Evan Robert; Callahan, Nathen Brannan; Clayton, Steven M.; Cude-Woods, Chris B.; Currie, Scott Allister; Dees, E. B.; Ding, Xinjian; Geltenbort, Peter W.; Hickerson, Kevin Peter; Holley, Adam Tarte; Ito, Takeyasu M.; Leung, Kent Kwan Ho; Liu, Chen -Yu; Morley, Deborah Jean; Ortiz, Jose D.; Pattie, Jr., Robert Wayne; Ramsey, John Clinton; Saunders, Alexander; Seestrom, Susan Joyce; Sharapov, E. I.; Sjue, Sky K.; Wexler, Jonathan William; Womack, Todd Lane; Young, Albert Raymond; Zeck, Bryan Alexander; Wang, Zhehui

    2016-05-16

    Position-sensitive detection of ultracold neutrons (UCNs) is demonstrated using an imaging charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. A spatial resolution less than 15μm has been achieved, which is equivalent to a UCN energy resolution below 2 pico-electron-volts through the relation δE=m0gδx. Here, the symbols δE, δx, m0 and g are the energy resolution, the spatial resolution, the neutron rest mass and the gravitational acceleration, respectively. A multilayer surface convertor described previously is used to capture UCNs and then emits visible light for CCD imaging. Particle identification and noise rejection are discussed through the use of light intensity profile analysis. As a result, this method allows different types of UCN spectroscopy and other applications.

  13. Position-sensitive CdTe detector using improved crystal growth method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The feasibility of developing a position-sensitive CdTe detector array for astronomical observations in the hard X-ray, soft gamma ray region is demonstrated. In principle, it was possible to improve the resolution capability for imaging measurements in this region by orders of magnitude over what is now possible through the use of CdTe detector arrays. The objective was to show that CdTe crystals of the quality, size and uniformity required for this application can be obtained with a new high pressure growth technique. The approach was to fabricate, characterize and analyze a 100 element square array and several single-element detectors using crystals from the new growth process. Results show that detectors fabricated from transversely sliced, 7 cm diameter wafers of CdTe exhibit efficient counting capability and a high degree of uniformity over their entire areas. A 100 element square array of 1 sq mm detectors was fabricated and operated.

  14. Position-sensitive detection of ultracold neutrons with an imaging camera and its implications to spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Wanchun; Broussard, Leah J.; Hoffbauer, Mark Arles; Makela, Mark F.; Morris, Christopher L.; Tang, Zhaowen; Adamek, Evan Robert; Callahan, Nathen Brannan; Clayton, Steven M.; Cude-Woods, Chris B.; Currie, Scott Allister; Dees, E. B.; Ding, Xinjian; Geltenbort, Peter W.; Hickerson, Kevin Peter; Holley, Adam Tarte; Ito, Takeyasu M.; Leung, Kent Kwan Ho; Liu, Chen -Yu; Morley, Deborah Jean; Ortiz, Jose D.; Pattie, Jr., Robert Wayne; Ramsey, John Clinton; Saunders, Alexander; Seestrom, Susan Joyce; Sharapov, E. I.; Sjue, Sky K.; Wexler, Jonathan William; Womack, Todd Lane; Young, Albert Raymond; Zeck, Bryan Alexander; Wang, Zhehui

    2016-05-16

    Position-sensitive detection of ultracold neutrons (UCNs) is demonstrated using an imaging charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. A spatial resolution less than 15μm has been achieved, which is equivalent to a UCN energy resolution below 2 pico-electron-volts through the relation δE=m0gδx. Here, the symbols δE, δx, m0 and g are the energy resolution, the spatial resolution, the neutron rest mass and the gravitational acceleration, respectively. A multilayer surface convertor described previously is used to capture UCNs and then emits visible light for CCD imaging. Particle identification and noise rejection are discussed through the use of light intensity profile analysis. As a result, this method allows different types of UCN spectroscopy and other applications.

  15. Development of an optical lens based alpha-particle imaging system using position sensitive photomultiplier tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Koki; Oka, Miki; Yamamoto, Seiichi

    2017-02-01

    We developed an optical lens based alpha-particle imaging system using position sensitive photomultiplier tube (PSPMT). The alpha-particle imaging system consists of an optical lens, an extension tube and a 1 in. square high quantum efficiency (HQE) type PSPMT. After a ZnS(Ag) is attached to subject, the scintillation image of ZnS(Ag) is focused on the photocathode of the PSPMT by the use of the optical lens. With this configuration we could image the alpha particle distribution with energy information without contacting to the subject. The spatial resolution and energy resolution were 0.8 mm FWHM and 50% FWHM at 5 mm from the optical lens, respectively. We could successfully image the alpha particle distribution in uranium ore. The developed alpha-particle imaging system will be a new tool for imaging alpha emitters with energy information without contacting the subject.

  16. Geoscience Australia Continuous Global Positioning System (CGPS) Station Field Campaign Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ruddick, R.; Twilley, B.

    2016-03-01

    This station formed part of the Australian Regional GPS Network (ARGN) and South Pacific Regional GPS Network (SPRGN), which is a network of continuous GPS stations operating within Australia and its Territories (including Antarctica) and the Pacific. These networks support a number of different science applications including maintenance of the Geospatial Reference Frame, both national and international, continental and tectonic plate motions, sea level rise, and global warming.

  17. Time-resolved luminescence biosensor for continuous activity detection of protein acetylation-related enzymes based on DNA-sensitized terbium(III) probes.

    PubMed

    Han, Yitao; Li, Hao; Hu, Yufang; Li, Pei; Wang, Huixia; Nie, Zhou; Yao, Shouzhuo

    2015-09-15

    Protein acetylation of histone is an essential post-translational modification (PTM) mechanism in epigenetic gene regulation, and its status is reversibly controlled by histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and histone deacetylases (HDACs). Herein, we have developed a sensitive and label-free time-resolved luminescence (TRL) biosensor for continuous detection of enzymatic activity of HATs and HDACs, respectively, based on acetylation-mediated peptide/DNA interaction and Tb(3+)/DNA luminescent probes. Using guanine (G)-rich DNA-sensitized Tb(3+) luminescence as the output signal, the polycationic substrate peptides interact with DNA with high affinity and subsequently replace Tb(3+), eliminating the luminescent signal. HAT-catalyzed acetylation remarkably reduces the positive charge of the peptides and diminishes the peptide/DNA interaction, resulting in the signal on detection via recovery of DNA-sensitized Tb(3+) luminescence. With this TRL sensor, HAT (p300) can be sensitively detected with a wide linear range from 0.2 to 100 nM and a low detection limit of 0.05 nM. The proposed sensor was further used to continuously monitor the HAT activity in real time. Additionally, the TRL biosensor was successfully applied to evaluating HAT inhibition by two specific inhibitors, anacardic acid and C464, and satisfactory Z'-factors above 0.73 were obtained. Moreover, this sensor is feasible to continuously monitor the HDAC (Sirt1)-catalyzed deacetylation with a linear range from 0.5 to 500 nM and a detection limit of 0.5 nM. The proposed sensor is a convenient, sensitive, and mix-and-read assay, presenting a promising platform for protein acetylation-targeted epigenetic research and drug discovery.

  18. Control system to reduce the effects of friction in drive trains of continuous-path-positioning systems. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Green, W.L.

    1980-12-01

    An improved continuous-path-positioning servo-control system is provided for reducing the effects of friction arising at very low cutting speeds in the drive trains of numerically controlled cutting machines, and the like. The improvement comprises a feed forward network for altering the gain of the servo-control loop at low positioning velocities to prevent stick-slip movement of the cutting tool holder being positioned by the control system. The feed forward network shunts conventional lag-compensators in the control loop, or loops, so that the error signal used for positioning varies linearly when the value is small, but being limited for larger values. Thus, at higher positioning speeds there is little effect of the added component upon the control being achieved.

  19. Experience with position-sensitive neutron detectors at the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, R. K.; Haumann, J. R.; Epperson, J. E.; Thiyagarajan, P.; Schultz, A. J.; Felcher, G. P.; Montague, D. G.; Dejus, R. J.

    1990-12-01

    At the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) at Argonne National Laboratory, pulses of protons accelerated in a synchrotron produce pulses of fast neutrons via the spallation process in an enriched uranium target. After moderation, the resulting pulses of slow neutrons are directed into beams which serve a variety of neutron-scattering instruments. Currently there are thirteen neutron-scattering instruments in operation or under development at IPNS, and six of these use position-sensitive neutron detectors (PSDs). These PSDs are: a 30 cm × 30 cm, ˜3 mm resolution, neutron Anger camera area PSD with 6Li-glass scintillator; a 2.5 cm diameter, ˜0.7 mm resolution, microchannel-plate area PSD with 6Li-glass scintillator; a 20 cm × 20 cm, ˜5 mm resolution, 3He proportional-counter area PSD; a 40 cm × 40 cm, ˜4 mm resolution, 3He proportional-counter area PSD; a flat 20 cm long, ˜1.6 mm resolution, 3He proportional-counter linear PSD; and 160 cylindrical 3He proportional-counter linear PSDs, each of which is 1.27 cm in diameter and 60 cm long and has ˜14 mm resolution. These detectors, in addition to being position-sensitive, resolve the time of the neutron capture with ˜1 μs precision for neutron time-of-flight measurements. This paper will discuss these various PSDs with emphasis on the instrumental specifications and the reasons for the selection of the different types of PSDs, and will also discuss the observed performances of these PSDs.

  20. Experience with position sensitive neutron detectors at the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, R.K.; Haumann, J.R.; Schultz, A.J.; Felcher, G.P.; Epperson, J.E.; Thiyagarajan, P.; Montague, D.G.; Dejus, R.J.

    1990-05-07

    At the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) pulses of protons accelerated in a synchrotron produce pulses of fast neutrons via the spallation process in an enriched uranium target. After moderation, the resulting pulses of slow neutrons are directed into beams which serve a variety of neutron scattering instruments. Currently there are thirteen neutron scattering instruments in operation or under development at IPNS, and six of these use position-sensitive neutron detectors (PSDs). These PSDs are: a 30 cm {times} 30 cm, {approximately}3 mm resolution, neutron Anger camera area PSD with {sup 6}Li-glass scintillator; a 2.5 cm dia, {approximately}0.7 mm resolution, microchannel-plate area PSD with {sup 6}Li-glass scintillator; a 20 cm {times} 20 cm, {approximately}5 mm resolution, {sup 3}He proportional counter area PSD; a 40 cm {times} 40 cm, {approximately}4 mm resolution, {sup 3}He proportional counter area PSD; a flat 20 cm long, {approximately}1.6 mm resolution, {sup 3}He proportional counter linear PSD; and 160 cylindrical {sup 3}He proportional counter linear PSDs, each of which is 1.27 cm in dia 60 cm long and has {approximately}14 mm resolution. These detectors, in addition to being position-sensitive, resolve the time of the neutron capture with {approximately}1 {mu}s precision for neutron time-of-flight measurements. This paper will discuss these various PSDs with emphasis on the instrumental specifications and the reasons for the selection of the different types of PSDs, and will also discuss the observed performances of these PSDs. 14 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Development of a generalized perturbation theory method for sensitivity analysis using continuous-energy Monte Carlo methods

    SciTech Connect

    Perfetti, Christopher M.; Rearden, Bradley T.

    2016-03-01

    The sensitivity and uncertainty analysis tools of the ORNL SCALE nuclear modeling and simulation code system that have been developed over the last decade have proven indispensable for numerous application and design studies for nuclear criticality safety and reactor physics. SCALE contains tools for analyzing the uncertainty in the eigenvalue of critical systems, but cannot quantify uncertainty in important neutronic parameters such as multigroup cross sections, fuel fission rates, activation rates, and neutron fluence rates with realistic three-dimensional Monte Carlo simulations. A more complete understanding of the sources of uncertainty in these design-limiting parameters could lead to improvements in process optimization, reactor safety, and help inform regulators when setting operational safety margins. A novel approach for calculating eigenvalue sensitivity coefficients, known as the CLUTCH method, was recently explored as academic research and has been found to accurately and rapidly calculate sensitivity coefficients in criticality safety applications. The work presented here describes a new method, known as the GEAR-MC method, which extends the CLUTCH theory for calculating eigenvalue sensitivity coefficients to enable sensitivity coefficient calculations and uncertainty analysis for a generalized set of neutronic responses using high-fidelity continuous-energy Monte Carlo calculations. Here, several criticality safety systems were examined to demonstrate proof of principle for the GEAR-MC method, and GEAR-MC was seen to produce response sensitivity coefficients that agreed well with reference direct perturbation sensitivity coefficients.

  2. Development of a generalized perturbation theory method for sensitivity analysis using continuous-energy Monte Carlo methods

    DOE PAGES

    Perfetti, Christopher M.; Rearden, Bradley T.

    2016-03-01

    The sensitivity and uncertainty analysis tools of the ORNL SCALE nuclear modeling and simulation code system that have been developed over the last decade have proven indispensable for numerous application and design studies for nuclear criticality safety and reactor physics. SCALE contains tools for analyzing the uncertainty in the eigenvalue of critical systems, but cannot quantify uncertainty in important neutronic parameters such as multigroup cross sections, fuel fission rates, activation rates, and neutron fluence rates with realistic three-dimensional Monte Carlo simulations. A more complete understanding of the sources of uncertainty in these design-limiting parameters could lead to improvements in processmore » optimization, reactor safety, and help inform regulators when setting operational safety margins. A novel approach for calculating eigenvalue sensitivity coefficients, known as the CLUTCH method, was recently explored as academic research and has been found to accurately and rapidly calculate sensitivity coefficients in criticality safety applications. The work presented here describes a new method, known as the GEAR-MC method, which extends the CLUTCH theory for calculating eigenvalue sensitivity coefficients to enable sensitivity coefficient calculations and uncertainty analysis for a generalized set of neutronic responses using high-fidelity continuous-energy Monte Carlo calculations. Here, several criticality safety systems were examined to demonstrate proof of principle for the GEAR-MC method, and GEAR-MC was seen to produce response sensitivity coefficients that agreed well with reference direct perturbation sensitivity coefficients.« less

  3. Localized Surface Plasmon Induced Position-Sensitive Photodetection in Silicon-Nanowire-Modified Ag/Si.

    PubMed

    Mei, Chunlian; Liu, Shuai; Huang, Xu; Gan, Zhikai; Zhou, Peiqi; Wang, Hui

    2017-09-22

    Surface plasmon-based approaches are widely applied to improve the efficiency of photoelectric devices such as photosensors and photocells. In order to promote the light absorption and electron-hole pair generation in devices, metallodielectric nanostructures are used to boost the growth of surface plasmons. Here, silicon nanowires (SiNWs) are used to modify a metal-semiconductor structure; thus, Ag/SiNWs/Si is manufactured. In this system, a large increased lateral photovoltaic effect (LPE) is detected with a maximum positional sensitivity of 65.35 mV mm(-1) , which is ≈53-fold and 1000-fold compared to the conventional Ag/Si (1.24 mV mm(-1) ) and SiNWs/Si (0.06 mV mm(-1) ), respectively. It is demonstrated that localized surface plasmons (LSPs) contribute a lot to the increment of LPE. Furthermore, through the surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectra of rhodamine-6G and finite-difference time-domain simulation, it is illustrated that silver-coated SiNWs support strong LSPs. The results propose an enhancement mechanism based on LSPs to facilitate the photoelectric conversion in LPE and offer an effective way to improve the sensitivity of photodetectors. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Fourier synthesis image reconstruction by use of one-dimensional position-sensitive detectors.

    PubMed

    Kotoku, Jun'ichi; Makishima, Kazuo; Okada, Yuu; Negoro, Hitoshi; Terada, Yukikatsu; Kaneda, Hidehiro; Oda, Minoru

    2003-07-10

    An improvement of Fourier synthesis optics for hard x-ray imaging is described, and the basic performance of the new optics is confirmed through numerical simulations. The original concept of the Fourier synthesis imager utilizes nonposition-sensitive hard x-ray detectors coupled to individual bigrid modulation collimators. The improved concept employs a one-dimensional position-sensitive detector (such as a CdTe strip detector) instead of the second grid layer of each bigrid modulation collimator. This improves the imaging performance in several respects over the original design. One performance improvement is a two-fold increase in the average transmission, from 1/4 to 1/2. The second merit is that both the sine and cosine components can be derived from a single grid-detector module, and hence the number of imaging modules can be halved. Furthermore, it provides information along the depth direction simultaneously. This in turn enables a three-dimensional imaging hard x-ray microscope for medical diagnostics, incorporating radioactive tracers. A conceptual design of such a microscope is presented, designed to provide a field of view of 4 mm and a spatial resolution of 400 microm.

  5. Position sensitivity of graphene field effect transistors to X-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Cazalas, Edward Moore, Michael E.; Jovanovic, Igor; Sarker, Biddut K.; Childres, Isaac; Chen, Yong P.

    2015-06-01

    Device architectures that incorporate graphene to realize detection of electromagnetic radiation typically utilize the direct absorbance of radiation by graphene. This limits their effective area to the size of the graphene and their applicability to lower-energy, less penetrating forms of radiation. In contrast, graphene-based transistor architectures that utilize the field effect as the detection mechanism can be sensitive to interactions of radiation not only with graphene but also with the surrounding substrate. Here, we report the study of the position sensitivity and response of a graphene-based field effect transistor (GFET) to penetrating, well-collimated radiation (micro-beam X-rays), producing ionization in the substrate primarily away from graphene. It is found that responsivity and response speed are strongly dependent on the X-ray beam distance from graphene and the gate voltage applied to the GFET. To develop an understanding of the spatially dependent response, a model is developed that incorporates the volumetric charge generation, transport, and recombination. The model is in good agreement with the observed spatial response characteristics of the GFET and predicts a greater response potential of the GFET to radiation interacting near its surface. The study undertaken provides the necessary insight into the volumetric nature of the GFET response, essential for development of GFET-based detectors for more penetrating forms of ionizing radiation.

  6. Recodifications of Academic Positions and Reiterations of Desire: Change but Continuity in Gendered Subjectivities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lapping, Claudia

    2006-01-01

    This article argues that the analysis of changes in the social position of women needs to distinguish between levels of social practice and psychic subjectification. The argument draws on Lacan's conception of the relationship between subjectivity, desire and sexual difference to describe gendered aspects of subjectivity embedded within the…

  7. Rural Special Education Teachers' Plans to Continue or Leave Their Teaching Positions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westling, David L.; Whitten, Thomas M.

    1996-01-01

    A survey of 158 rural special education teachers found that 57% expected to be in the same position in 5 years. A predictive model developed through logistic regression analysis suggested that administrative support and job requirements played important roles in teachers' five-year plans. (Author/DB)

  8. COUPP - a search for dark matter with a continuously sensitive bubble chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Collar, Juan,; Crum, Keith; Mishra, Smriti; Nakazawa, Dante; Odom, Brian; Rasmussen, Julia; Riley, Nathan; Szydagis, Matthew; Behnke, Ed; Levine, Ilan; Vander Werf, Nate; Cooper, Peter; Crisler, Mike; Hu, Martin; Ramberg, Erik; Sonnenschein, Andrew; Tschirhart, Robert; /Fermilab

    2007-01-01

    We propose to construct and operate a 60-kg room temperature CF{sub 3}I bubble chamber as a prototype dark matter (WIMP) detector. Operating in weakly-superheated mode, the chamber will be sensitive to WIMP induced nuclear recoils above 10 keV, while rejecting background electron recoils at a level approaching 10{sup 10}. We would first commission and operate this chamber in the MINOS near detector hall with the goal to demonstrate stable operation and measure internal contamination and any other backgrounds. This chamber, or an improved version, would then be relocated to an appropriate deep underground site such as the Soudan Mine. This detector will have unique sensitivity to spin-dependent WIMP-nucleon couplings, and even in this early stage of development will attain competitive sensitivity to spin-independent couplings.

  9. Communication between patients with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome and healthcare personnel during the initial visit to a continuous positive airway pressure clinic.

    PubMed

    Broström, Anders; Fridlund, Bengt; Hedberg, Berith; Nilsen, Per; Ulander, Martin

    2017-02-01

    To describe facilitators and barriers from a patient perspective in communications between patients with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome and healthcare personnel during the first meeting when continuous positive airway pressure is initiated. Adherence to continuous positive airway pressure treatment tends to be poor, especially at the initial phase of treatment. Communication between the patient and healthcare personnel has not been studied from the patient perspective, as either a barrier or facilitator for adherence. A descriptive design using qualitative content analysis was used. Interviews with 25 patients with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome took place after their initial visit at four continuous positive airway pressure clinics. A deductive analysis based on The 4 Habits Model (i.e. emphasise the importance of investing in the beginning of the consultation, elicit the patient's perspective, demonstrate empathy and invest in the end of the consultation) was conducted. Building confidence (i.e. structure building, information transfer, commitment) or hindering confidence (i.e. organisational insufficiency, stress behaviour, interaction deficit) was associated with investing in the beginning. Motivating (i.e. situational insight, knowledge transfer, practical training) or demotivating (i.e. expectations, dominance and power asymmetry, barriers) was associated with eliciting the patient's perspective. Building hope (i.e. awareness, sensitivity, demonstration of understanding) or hindering hope (i.e. unprepared, uncommitted, incomprehension) was associated with showing empathy. Agreement (i.e. confirmation, responsibilities, comprehensive information) or disagreement (i.e. structural obscurity, irresponsibility, absent-mindedness) was associated with investing in the end. Understanding of facilitators and barriers, as described by patients, can be used to improve contextual conditions and communication skills among healthcare personnel. A patient

  10. A collision history-based approach to Sensitivity/Perturbation calculations in the continuous energy Monte Carlo code SERPENT

    SciTech Connect

    Giuseppe Palmiotti

    2015-05-01

    In this work, the implementation of a collision history-based approach to sensitivity/perturbation calculations in the Monte Carlo code SERPENT is discussed. The proposed methods allow the calculation of the eects of nuclear data perturbation on several response functions: the eective multiplication factor, reaction rate ratios and bilinear ratios (e.g., eective kinetics parameters). SERPENT results are compared to ERANOS and TSUNAMI Generalized Perturbation Theory calculations for two fast metallic systems and for a PWR pin-cell benchmark. New methods for the calculation of sensitivities to angular scattering distributions are also presented, which adopts fully continuous (in energy and angle) Monte Carlo estimators.

  11. Is a Bioprosthetic Valve in the Aortic Position Desirable with a Continuous Flow LVAD?

    PubMed

    Doi, Atsuo; Marasco, Silvana F; McGiffin, David C

    2015-05-01

    Commissural fusion of the native aortic valve in a patient with a continuous flow left ventricular assist device (LVAD) is a known phenomenon. This may result in aortic insufficiency (AI) leading to symptomatic heart failure. In patients with AI at the time of LVAD implantation, repairing, or replacing the aortic valve is advisable. We describe a patient who had a severe dilated cardiomyopathy and moderate AI who underwent implantation of an LVAD and aortic valve replacement with a bioprosthesis that subsequently developed commissural fusion which was found at the time of heart transplantation. This case highlights the conundrum of the management of AI in patients requiring LVAD support.

  12. Position-sensitive change in the transition metal L-edge fine structures

    SciTech Connect

    Gulec, Ahmet; Phillips, Patrick J.; Klie, Robert F.

    2015-10-05

    Studying the structure and composition of solid-state materials on the atomic scale has become nearly routine in transmission electron microscopy with the development of novel electron optics and electron sources. In particular, with spatial resolutions better than 0.1 nm and energy resolution smaller than 100 meV, the stoichiometry, bonding, and coordination can now be examined on similar scales. Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) have played a crucial role in identifying charge ordering, valence, and as spin state transitions in transition metal perovskite oxides. In this letter, we investigate the effects of ever-decreasing electron-probe sizes on the measured near-edge fine-structure of the transition metal core-loss edge using EELS. We find that for certain transition metal perovskites, the position of the electron probe with respect to the atomic column is crucial in determining the correct valence state. Several reasons for the observed position-sensitive EELS fine-structure are discussed.

  13. Free recall of pleasant words from recency positions is especially sensitive to acute administration of cortisol.

    PubMed

    Tops, M; van der Pompe, G; Wijers, A A; Den Boer, J A; Meijman, T F; Korf, J

    2004-04-01

    In a recent study we investigated the acute effects of cortisol administration in healthy male volunteers on free recall of pleasant, unpleasant, and neutral nouns using a between-subjects double-blind placebo-controlled design. The volunteers were administered 10 mg of hydrocortisone or placebo between 9:00 and 10:30. Two hours after administration of cortisol a decline in recall of neutral and pleasant words was found, while recall of unpleasant words did not change. These results are consistent with a possible inhibitory influence of cortisol on a prefrontal dopaminergic mechanism involved in approach and positivity bias. In this paper we first explain why this interpretation would predict recall of pleasant words from recency positions to be especially sensitive to cortisol administration. Comparing primacy and recency recall of pleasant and unpleasant words, there proved to be a selective decline in recall of pleasant recency words. These results did not appear to stem from differences in recall strategies between our groups of volunteers.

  14. Position-sensitive proportional counter with low-resistance metal-wire anode

    DOEpatents

    Kopp, Manfred K.

    1980-01-01

    A position-sensitive proportional counter circuit is provided which allows the use of a conventional (low-resistance, metal-wire anode) proportional counter for spatial resolution of an ionizing event along the anode of the counter. A pair of specially designed active-capacitance preamplifiers are used to terminate the anode ends wherein the anode is treated as an RC line. The preamplifiers act as stabilized active capacitance loads and each is composed of a series-feedback, low-noise amplifier, a unity-gain, shunt-feedback amplifier whose output is connected through a feedback capacitor to the series-feedback amplifier input. The stabilized capacitance loading of the anode allows distributed RC-line position encoding and subsequent time difference decoding by sensing the difference in rise times of pulses at the anode ends where the difference is primarily in response to the distributed capacitance along the anode. This allows the use of lower resistance wire anodes for spatial radiation detection which simplifies the counter construction and handling of the anodes, and stabilizes the anode resistivity at high count rates (>10.sup.6 counts/sec).

  15. Higher Sensitivity of Human Auditory Nerve Fibers to Positive Electrical Currents

    PubMed Central

    Carlyon, Robert P.; van Wieringen, Astrid; Deeks, John M.; Wouters, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Most contemporary cochlear implants (CIs) stimulate the auditory nerve with trains of amplitude-modulated, symmetric biphasic pulses. Although both polarities of a pulse can depolarize the nerve fibers and generate action potentials, it remains unknown which of the two (positive or negative) phases has the stronger effect. Understanding the effects of pulse polarity will help to optimize the stimulation protocols and to deliver the most relevant information to the implant listeners. Animal experiments have shown that cathodic (negative) current flows are more effective than anodic (positive) ones in eliciting neural responses, and this finding has motivated the development of novel speech-processing algorithms. In this study, we show electrophysiologically and psychophysically that the human auditory system exhibits the opposite pattern, being more sensitive to anodic stimulation. We measured electrically evoked compound action potentials in CI listeners for phase-separated pulses, allowing us to tease out the responses to each of the two opposite-polarity phases. At an equal stimulus level, the anodic phase yielded the larger response. Furthermore, a measure of psychophysical masking patterns revealed that this polarity difference was still present at higher levels of the auditory system and was therefore not solely due to antidromic propagation of the neural response. This finding may relate to a particular orientation of the nerve fibers relative to the electrode or to a substantial degeneration and demyelination of the peripheral processes. Potential applications to improve CI speech-processing strategies are discussed. PMID:18288537

  16. Estimation of Compton imager using single 3D position-sensitive LYSO scintillator: Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Taewoong; Lee, Hyounggun; Kim, Younghak; Lee, Wonho

    2017-07-01

    The performance of a Compton imager using a single three-dimensional position-sensitive LYSO scintillator detector was estimated using a Monte Carlo simulation. The Compton imager consisted of a single LYSO scintillator with a pixelized structure. The size of the scintillator and each pixel were 1.3 × 1.3 × 1.3 cm3 and 0.3 × 0.3 × 0.3 cm3, respectively. The order of γ-ray interactions was determined based on the deposited energies in each detector. After the determination of the interaction sequence, various types of reconstruction algorithms such as simple back-projection, filtered back-projection, and list-mode maximum-likelihood expectation maximization (LM-MLEM) were applied and compared with each other in terms of their angular resolution and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for several γ-ray energies. The LM-MLEM reconstruction algorithm exhibited the best performance for Compton imaging in maintaining high angular resolution and SNR. The two sources of 137Cs (662 keV) could be distinguishable if they were more than 17° apart. The reconstructed Compton images showed the precise position and distribution of various radiation isotopes, which demonstrated the feasibility of the monitoring of nuclear materials in homeland security and radioactive waste management applications.

  17. Continuous Associative Responding to Threatening and Nonthreatening Stimuli by Repressors and Sensitizers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haney, Jack N.

    1974-01-01

    The focus of this study is on the approach-avoidance reactions durning mediational activity of repressors and sensitizers. It was hypothesized that repressors would exhibit (a) disruption and early termination of chained free association, (b) a redundancy in their association repertoires, and (c) a lesser degree of sexual content in their…

  18. Continuous Attractor Network Model for Conjunctive Position-by-Velocity Tuning of Grid Cells

    PubMed Central

    Si, Bailu; Romani, Sandro; Tsodyks, Misha

    2014-01-01

    The spatial responses of many of the cells recorded in layer II of rodent medial entorhinal cortex (MEC) show a triangular grid pattern, which appears to provide an accurate population code for animal spatial position. In layer III, V and VI of the rat MEC, grid cells are also selective to head-direction and are modulated by the speed of the animal. Several putative mechanisms of grid-like maps were proposed, including attractor network dynamics, interactions with theta oscillations or single-unit mechanisms such as firing rate adaptation. In this paper, we present a new attractor network model that accounts for the conjunctive position-by-velocity selectivity of grid cells. Our network model is able to perform robust path integration even when the recurrent connections are subject to random perturbations. PMID:24743341

  19. Effect of continuing repeated passive and active exercises on knee's position senses in patients with hemiplegia.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Oh Sung; Lee, Seung Won

    2013-01-01

    To determine the repeated passive movement (RPM) and repeated active movement (RAM) exercise on position sense of the knee joint in patients with hemiplegia. 45 hemiplegia patients were randomly allocated to either the control group(no exercise), RPM group, or RAM group, with 15 subjects in each group. The exercise was repeated 60 times on the angle 10 to 100 degrees of the knee joint with an angle speed of 120°/s, with three sets for 15 minutes. Evaluation was performed using Passive Angle Repositioning (PAR) and Active Angle Repositioning (AAR). Error of positioning sense showed a decrease in PAR and AAR in the RPM group (p < 0.01) and an increase in AAR was observed in the RAM group (p < 0.05). In comparison of knee joint position sense error value and rate of change among the three groups, the RPM group is decreased mostly in PAR and AAR (p < 0.01), and Error value (p < 0.05) and rate of change (p < 0.01) of the RAM group showed a greater increase in AAR than the control group. RAM exercise can support an increase in proprioception on the knee joint of hemiplegia; however, RAM exercise that causes fatigue can decrease proprioception.

  20. Continuous wavelength tunable laser source with optimum positioning of pivot axis for grating

    DOEpatents

    Pushkarsky, Michael; Amone, David F.

    2010-06-08

    A laser source (10) for generating a continuously wavelength tunable light (12) includes a gain media (16), an optical output coupler (36F), a cavity collimator (38A), a diffraction grating (30), a grating beam (54), and a beam attacher (56). The diffraction grating (30) is spaced apart from the cavity collimator (38A) and the grating (30) cooperates with the optical output coupler (36F) to define an external cavity (32). The grating (30) includes a grating face surface (42A) that is in a grating plane (42B). The beam attacher (56) retains the grating beam (54) and allows the grating beam (54) and the grating (30) to effectively pivot about a pivot axis (33) that is located approximately at an intersection of a pivot plane (50) and the grating plane (42B). As provided herein, the diffraction grating (30) can be pivoted about the unique pivot axis (33) to move the diffraction grating (30) relative to the gain media (16) to continuously tune the lasing frequency of the external cavity (32) and the wavelength of the output light (12) so that the output light (12) is mode hop free.

  1. A study of the timing properties of position-sensitive avalanche photodiodes

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yibao; Ng, Thomas SC; Yang, Yongfeng; Shah, Kanai; Farrell, Richard; Cherry, Simon R

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we study position-dependent timing shifts and timing resolution in position sensitive avalanche photodiodes (PSAPDs) and their effect on the coincidence window used in positron emission tomography (PET) systems using these devices. There is a delay in PSAPD signals that increases as the excitation position moves from the corner to the center of the device and the timing resolution concurrently worsens. The difference in timing between the center and corner can be up to 30.7 ns for a 14×14 mm2 area PSAPD. This means that a PSAPD-based PET system could require a very wide coincidence timing window (>60 ns) if this effect is not corrected, although the individual crystal pairs still have full-width half-maximum (FWHM) timing resolutions better than 7.4 ns. In addition to characterizing the timing properties of PSAPDs, two correction methods were developed and applied to data from a pair of PSAPD detectors. These two timing offset corrections reduced the timing shift of a crystal pair from 52.4 ns to 9.7 ns or 1.3 ns, improved FWHM timing resolution of the detector pair from 24.6 ns to 9.5 ns or 6.0 ns and reduced the timing window (sufficient to cover at least twice the FWHM for all crystal pairs) from 65.1 ns to 22.0 ns or 15.2 ns respectively. A two-step timing alignment method is proposed for a PET system consisting of multiple PSAPDs. Lastly, the effect of PSAPD size on the timing performance was also evaluated. PMID:19671971

  2. A study of the timing properties of position-sensitive avalanche photodiodes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yibao; Ng, Thomas S C; Yang, Yongfeng; Shah, Kanai; Farrell, Richard; Cherry, Simon R

    2009-09-07

    In this paper, we study position-dependent timing shifts and timing resolution in position sensitive avalanche photodiodes (PSAPDs) and their effects on the coincidence window used in positron emission tomography (PET) systems using these devices. There is a delay in PSAPD signals that increases as the excitation position moves from the corner to the center of the device and the timing resolution concurrently worsens. The difference in timing between the center and the corner can be up to 30.7 ns for a 14 x 14 mm(2) area PSAPD. This means that a PSAPD-based PET system could require a very wide coincidence timing window (>60 ns) if this effect is not corrected, although the individual crystal pairs still have full-width half-maximum (FWHM) timing resolutions better than 7.4 ns. In addition to characterizing the timing properties of PSAPDs, two correction methods were developed and applied to data from a pair of PSAPD detectors. These two timing offset corrections reduced the timing shift of a crystal pair from 52.4 ns to 9.7 ns or 1.3 ns, improved the FWHM timing resolution of the detector pair from 24.6 ns to 9.5 ns or 6.0 ns and reduced the timing window (sufficient to cover at least twice the FWHM for all crystal pairs) from 65.1 ns to 22.0 ns or 15.2 ns, respectively. A two-step timing alignment method is proposed for a PET system consisting of multiple PSAPDs. Lastly, the effect of PSAPD size on the timing performance was also evaluated.

  3. Position sensitive photon detectors using epitaxial InGaAs/InAlAs quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganbold, T.; Antonelli, M.; Biasiol, G.; Cautero, G.; Jark, H.; Eichert, D. M.; Cucini, R.; Menk, R. H.

    2014-12-01

    This work deals with the investigation of novel position-sensitive devices based on InGaAs/InAlAs quantum wells, which could be applied to several applications of either synchrotron or conventional light sources. Such devices may be used as fast and efficient detectors due to the direct, low-energy band gap and high electron mobility at room temperature. Metamorphic In0.75Ga0.25As/In0.75Al0.25As quantum wells containing a two-dimensional electron gas were grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Two devices with size of 5 × 5 mm2 were prepared by using optical lithography. In the first, the active layers were segmented into four electrically insulated quadrants. Indium ohmic contacts were realized on the corner of each quadrant (for readout) and on the back surface (for bias). In the second, the quantum well was left unsegmented and covered by 400 nm of Al providing a single bias electrode, while four readout electrodes were fabricated on the back side by depositing and segmenting a Ni/Ge/Au layer. Photo-generated carriers can be collected at the readout electrodes by biasing from either the QW side or the back side of the devices during beam exposure. Individual currents obtained from each electrode allow monitoring of both the position and the intensity of the impinging beam for photon energies ranging from visible to hard X-ray. Such detector prototypes were tested with synchrotron radiation. Moreover, the position of the beam can be estimated with a precision of 800 nm in the segmented QW. A lower precision of 10 μm was recorded in the unsegmented QW due to the charge diffusion through the 500-μm-thick wafer, with however a lower electronic noise due to the better uniformity of the contacts.

  4. Behavioral and self-reported sensitivity to reward are linked to stress-related differences in positive affect.

    PubMed

    Corral-Frías, Nadia S; Nadel, Lynn; Fellous, Jean-Marc; Jacobs, W Jake

    2016-04-01

    Despite the high prevalence of stress exposure healthy adaptation or resilience is a common response. Theoretical work and recent empirical evidence suggest that a robust reward system, in part, supports healthy adaptation by preserving positive emotions even under exceptionally stressful circumstances. We tested this prediction by examining empirical relations among behavioral and self-reported measures of sensitivity to reward, trait resilience, and measures of affect in the context of experimentally induced stress. Using a quasi-experimental design we obtained measures of sensitivity to reward (self-report and behavioral), as well as affective and physiological responses to experimental psychosocial stress in a sample of 140 healthy college-age participants. We used regression-based moderation and mediational models to assess associations among sensitivity to reward, affect in the context of stress, and trait resilience and found that an interaction between exposure to experimental stress and self-reported sensitivity to reward predicted positive affect following experimental procedure. Participants with high sensitivity to reward reported higher positive affect following stress. Moreover, positive affect during or after stress mediated the relation between sensitivity to reward and trait resilience. Consistent with the prediction that a robust reward system serves as a protective factor against stress-related negative outcomes, our results found predictive associations among sensitivity to reward, positive affect, and resilience. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. A Simple Capacitive Charge-Division Readout for Position-Sensitive Solid-State Photomultiplier Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Du, Junwei; Schmall, Jeffrey P.; Yang, Yongfeng; Di, Kun; Dokhale, Purushottam A.; Shah, Kanai S.; Cherry, Simon R.

    2014-01-01

    A capacitive charge-division readout method for reading out a 2 × 2 array of 5 mm × 5 mm position-sensitive solid-state photomultipliers (PS-SSPM) was designed and evaluated. Using this analog multiplexing method, the 20 signals (16 position, 4 timing) from the PS-SSPM array are reduced to 5 signals (4 position, 1 timing), allowing the PS-SSPM array to be treated as an individual large-area PS-SSPM module. A global positioning approach can now be used, instead of individual positioning for each PS-SSPM in the array, ensuring that the entire light signal is utilized. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and flood histogram quality at different bias voltages (27.5 V to 32.0 V at 0.5 V intervals) and a fixed temperature of 0 °C were evaluated by coupling a 6 × 6 array of 1.3 mm × 1.3 mm × 20 mm polished LSO crystals to the center of the PS-SSPM array. The timing resolution was measured at a fixed bias voltage of 31.0 V and a fixed temperature of 0 °C. All the measurements were evaluated and compared using capacitors with different values and tolerances. Capacitor values ranged from 0.051 nf to 10 nf, and the capacitance tolerance ranged from 1% to 20%. The results show that better performance was achieved using capacitors with smaller values and better capacitance tolerance. Using 0.2 nf capacitors, the SNR, energy resolution and timing resolution were 24.3, 18.2% and 8.8 ns at a bias voltage 31.0 V, respectively. The flood histogram quality was also evaluated by using a 10 × 10 array of 1 mm × 1 mm × 10 mm polished LSO crystals and a 10 × 10 array of 0.7 mm × 0.7 mm × 20 mm unpolished LSO crystals to determine the smallest crystal size resolvable. These studies showed that the high spatial resolution of the PS-SSPM was preserved allowing for 0.7 mm crystals to be identified. These results show that the capacitive charge-division analog signal processing method can significantly reduce the number of electronic channels, from 20 to 5, while retaining the

  6. Positive appraisal of in-home family caregivers of dementia patients as an influence on the continuation of caregiving.

    PubMed

    Kajiwara, Kohei; Nakatani, Hisae; Ono, Mitsu; Miyakoshi, Yukiko

    2015-03-01

    We attempted to determine the factors that influence the continuation of in-home caregiving for patients with dementia. The participants were family caregivers of dementia patients who received home care services. Data were collected via a questionnaire completed by caregivers and then returned in the mail. Of the 705 caregivers who received the questionnaire, 405 completed and returned it (response rate: 57.4%). The average age of the caregivers was 63.9 ± 11.5 years, and they had been providing care for an average of 5.1 ± 4.1 years. The average age of the patients was 84.7 ± 7.4 years. We analyzed the path model. Caregivers' current feelings about continuing caregiving were directly affected by a positive appraisal of caregiving (β = 0.20, P < 0.001) and by the burden they experienced (β = -0.39, P < 0.001). The continuation of caregiving of patients with worsening symptoms was directly affected by a positive appraisal of caregiving (β = 0.15, P < 0.01) and by the burden experienced by the caregivers (β = -0.46, P < 0.001). The continuation of caregiving was indirectly affected by the patients' cognitive impairment and by the behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia score. The continuation of in-home caregiving among caregivers of patients with dementia was affected by both positive appraisal and caregiver burden. In addition, the present study revealed that behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia score indirectly affects the continuation of caregiving by directly affecting caregiver burden. © 2014 The Authors. Psychogeriatrics © 2014 Japanese Psychogeriatric Society.

  7. High sensitivity detection of NO2 employing cavity ringdown spectroscopy and an external cavity continuously tunable quantum cascade laser.

    PubMed

    Rao, Gottipaty N; Karpf, Andreas

    2010-09-10

    A trace gas sensor for the detection of nitrogen dioxide based on cavity ringdown spectroscopy (CRDS) and a continuous wave external cavity tunable quantum cascade laser operating at room temperature has been designed, and its features and performance characteristics are reported. By measuring the ringdown times of the cavity at different concentrations of NO(2), we report a sensitivity of 1.2 ppb for the detection of NO(2) in Zero Air.

  8. Continuous vs. intermittent vancomycin therapy for Gram-positive infections not caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Duszynska, Wieslawa; Taccone, Fabio S; Hurkacz, Magdalena; Wiela-Hojenska, Anna; Kübler, Andrzej

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of vancomycin pharmacokinetics (PKs) on effectiveness and safety in the treatment of Gram-positive infections due to pathogens other than methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Prospective study including septic patients received either continuous (N.=21) or intermittent (N.=21) infusions of vancomycin; the target drug concentration was 15-20 mg/L and target area under the curve of vancomycin concentrations over the minimum inhibitory concentration of the pathogen on day 1 (AUC24/MIC) >400. Clinical and microbiological responses, the development of acute kidney injury (AKI) and therapy costs were recorded. The median AUC24/MIC was 195(133-343) vs. 189(136-328) mg/L*h in the continuous and intermittent infusion groups. Target drug concentrations were achieved in 15/21 vs. 9/21 (P=0.12) patients and AUC24/MIC>400 in only 5/21 vs. 3/21 (P=0.35) patients of continuous and intermittent groups, respectively. High clinical cure (17/21 for continuous vs. 17/21 for intermittent, P=1.00) and microbiological eradication (17/21 vs. 15/21, P=0.47) were observed in both groups and not associated with drug concentrations or with AUC24/MIC. AKI was diagnosed during therapy in 5/21 patients in the continuous group and 8/21 in the intermittent group (P=0.32). The median total therapy costs were lower in the continuous than in the intermittent group (377 [304-485] vs. 552 [371-644] €, P=0.04). Vancomycin resulted in high clinical response during non-MRSA Gram-positive infections treatment even at drug concentrations lower than those for MRSA. A continuous infusion of vancomycin was associated with a significant reduction in therapy costs compared to intermittent infusions.

  9. Multiple Chemical Sensitivity and the Workplace: Current Position and Need for an Occupational Health Surveillance Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Martini, A.; Iavicoli, S.; Corso, L.

    2013-01-01

    Multiple chemical sensitivity, commonly known as environmental illness, is a chronic disease in which exposure to low levels of chemicals causes correlated symptoms of varying intensity. With the continuous introduction of new substances, people with MCS suffer significant limitations to their living environment and frequently to their workplace. This paper describes the current situation as regards MCS and the critical points in its case definition, which is still not generally agreed upon; this makes it difficult to recognize with certainty, especially, its precise relationship with work. Other problems arise in relation to the occupational physician's role in diagnosing and managing the worker with the disorder, the question of low levels of exposure to chemicals, and the best measures possible to prevent it. A diagnostic “route” is proposed, useful as a reference for the occupational physician who is often called in first to identify cases suspected of having this disease and to manage MCS workers. Work-related problems for people with MCS depend not only on occupational exposure but also on the incompatibility between their illness and their work. More occupational physicians need to be “sensitive” to MCS, so that these workers are recognized promptly, the work is adapted as necessary, and preventive measures are promoted in the workplace. PMID:23844274

  10. Sensitivity of MJO propagation to a robust positive Indian Ocean dipole event in the superparameterized CAM

    DOE PAGES

    Benedict, James J.; Pritchard, Michael S.; Collins, William D.

    2015-11-23

    The superparameterized Community Atmosphere Model (SPCAM) is used to investigate the impact and geographic sensitivity of positive Indian Ocean Dipole (+IOD) sea-surface temperatures (SSTs) on Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO) propagation. The goal is to clarify potentially appreciable +IOD effects on MJO dynamics detected in prior studies by using a global model with explicit convection representation. Prescribed climatological October SSTs and variants of the SST distribution from October 2006, a +IOD event, force the model. Modest MJO convection weakening over the Maritime Continent occurs when either climatological SSTs, or +IOD SST anomalies restricted to the Indian Ocean, are applied. However, severe MJOmore » weakening occurs when either +IOD SST anomalies are applied globally or restricted to the equatorial Pacific. MJO disruption is associated with time-mean changes in the zonal wind profile and lower moist static energy (MSE) in subsiding air masses imported from the Subtropics by Rossby-like gyres. On intraseasonal scales, MJO disruption arises from significantly smaller MSE accumulation, weaker meridional advective moistening, and overactive submonthly eddies that mix drier subtropical air into the path of MJO convection. These results (1) demonstrate that SPCAM reproduces observed time-mean and intraseasonal changes during +IOD episodes, (2) reaffirm the role that submonthly eddies play in MJO propagation and show that such multiscale interactions are sensitive to interannual SST states, and (3) suggest that boreal fall +IOD SSTs local to the Indian Ocean have a significantly smaller impact on Maritime Continent MJO propagation compared to contemporaneous Pacific SST anomalies which, for October 2006, resemble El Ninõ-like conditions.« less

  11. Sensitivity of MJO propagation to a robust positive Indian Ocean dipole event in the superparameterized CAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedict, James J.; Pritchard, Michael S.; Collins, William D.

    2015-12-01

    The superparameterized Community Atmosphere Model (SPCAM) is used to investigate the impact and geographic sensitivity of positive Indian Ocean Dipole (+IOD) sea-surface temperatures (SSTs) on Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO) propagation. The goal is to clarify potentially appreciable +IOD effects on MJO dynamics detected in prior studies by using a global model with explicit convection representation. Prescribed climatological October SSTs and variants of the SST distribution from October 2006, a +IOD event, force the model. Modest MJO convection weakening over the Maritime Continent occurs when either climatological SSTs, or +IOD SST anomalies restricted to the Indian Ocean, are applied. However, severe MJO weakening occurs when either +IOD SST anomalies are applied globally or restricted to the equatorial Pacific. MJO disruption is associated with time-mean changes in the zonal wind profile and lower moist static energy (MSE) in subsiding air masses imported from the Subtropics by Rossby-like gyres. On intraseasonal scales, MJO disruption arises from significantly smaller MSE accumulation, weaker meridional advective moistening, and overactive submonthly eddies that mix drier subtropical air into the path of MJO convection. These results (1) demonstrate that SPCAM reproduces observed time-mean and intraseasonal changes during +IOD episodes, (2) reaffirm the role that submonthly eddies play in MJO propagation and show that such multiscale interactions are sensitive to interannual SST states, and (3) suggest that boreal fall +IOD SSTs local to the Indian Ocean have a significantly smaller impact on Maritime Continent MJO propagation compared to contemporaneous Pacific SST anomalies which, for October 2006, resemble El Niño-like conditions.

  12. Improvement of sensitivity in continuous wave near infra-red spectroscopy systems by using silicon photomultipliers.

    PubMed

    Pagano, Roberto; Libertino, Sebania; Sanfilippo, Delfo; Fallica, Giorgio; Lombardo, Salvatore

    2016-04-01

    We experimentally analyze the signal-to-noise ratio of continuous wave (CW) near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) reflectance systems based on light emitting diodes and silicon photomultipliers for high performance low cost NIRS biomedical systems. We show that under suitable experimental conditions such systems exhibit a high SNR, which allows an SDS of 7 cm, to our knowledge the largest ever demonstrated in a CW-NIRs system.

  13. Improvement of sensitivity in continuous wave near infra-red spectroscopy systems by using silicon photomultipliers

    PubMed Central

    Pagano, Roberto; Libertino, Sebania; Sanfilippo, Delfo; Fallica, Giorgio; Lombardo, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    We experimentally analyze the signal-to-noise ratio of continuous wave (CW) near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) reflectance systems based on light emitting diodes and silicon photomultipliers for high performance low cost NIRS biomedical systems. We show that under suitable experimental conditions such systems exhibit a high SNR, which allows an SDS of 7 cm, to our knowledge the largest ever demonstrated in a CW-NIRs system. PMID:27486551

  14. Betabox: a beta particle imaging system based on a position sensitive avalanche photodiode

    PubMed Central

    Dooraghi, AA; Vu, NT; Silverman, RW; Farrell, R; Shah, KS; Wang, J; Heath, JR; Chatziioannou, AF

    2013-01-01

    A beta camera has been developed that allows planar imaging of the spatial and temporal distribution of beta particles using a 14 × 14 mm2 position sensitive avalanche photodiode (PSAPD). This camera system, which we call Betabox, can be directly coupled to microfluidic chips designed for cell incubation or other biological applications. Betabox allows for imaging the cellular uptake of molecular imaging probes labeled with charged particle emitters such as 18F inside these chips. In this work, we investigate the quantitative imaging capabilities of Betabox for 18F beta particles, in terms of background rate, efficiency, spatial resolution, and count rate. Measurements of background and spatial resolution are considered both at room temperature (21 °C ± 1 °C) and at an elevated operating temperature (37 °C ± 1 °C), as is often required for biological assays. The background rate measured with a 4 keV energy cutoff is below 2 cph mm−2 at both 21 and 37 °C. The absolute efficiency of Betabox for the detection of 18F positron sources in contact with a PSAPD with the surface passivated from ambient light and damage is 46% ± 1%. The lower detection limit is estimated using the Rose Criterion to be 0.2 cps mm−2 for 1 min acquisitions and a 62 × 62 µm2 pixel size. The upper detection limit is approximately 21 000 cps. The spatial resolution at both 21 and 37 °C ranges from 0.4 mm FWHM at the center of the field of view (FOV), and degrades to 1 mm at a distance of 5 mm away from center yielding a useful FOV of approximately 10 × 10 mm2. We also investigate the effects on spatial resolution and sensitivity that result from the use of a polymer based microfluidic chip. For these studies we place varying layers of low-density polyethylene (LDPE) between the detector and the source and find that the spatial resolution degrades by ~180 µm for every 100 µm of LDPE film. Sensitivity is reduced by half with the inclusion of ~200 µm of additional LDPE film

  15. Betabox: a beta particle imaging system based on a position sensitive avalanche photodiode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dooraghi, A. A.; Vu, N. T.; Silverman, R. W.; Farrell, R.; Shah, K. S.; Wang, J.; Heath, J. R.; Chatziioannou, A. F.

    2013-06-01

    A beta camera has been developed that allows planar imaging of the spatial and temporal distribution of beta particles using a 14 × 14 mm2 position sensitive avalanche photodiode (PSAPD). This camera system, which we call Betabox, can be directly coupled to microfluidic chips designed for cell incubation or other biological applications. Betabox allows for imaging the cellular uptake of molecular imaging probes labeled with charged particle emitters such as 18F inside these chips. In this work, we investigate the quantitative imaging capabilities of Betabox for 18F beta particles, in terms of background rate, efficiency, spatial resolution, and count rate. Measurements of background and spatial resolution are considered both at room temperature (21 °C ± 1 °C) and at an elevated operating temperature (37 °C ± 1 °C), as is often required for biological assays. The background rate measured with a 4 keV energy cutoff is below 2 cph mm-2 at both 21 and 37 °C. The absolute efficiency of Betabox for the detection of 18F positron sources in contact with a PSAPD with the surface passivated from ambient light and damage is 46% ± 1%. The lower detection limit is estimated using the Rose Criterion to be 0.2 cps mm-2 for 1 min acquisitions and a 62 × 62 µm2 pixel size. The upper detection limit is approximately 21 000 cps. The spatial resolution at both 21 and 37 °C ranges from 0.4 mm FWHM at the center of the field of view (FOV), and degrades to 1 mm at a distance of 5 mm away from center yielding a useful FOV of approximately 10 × 10 mm2. We also investigate the effects on spatial resolution and sensitivity that result from the use of a polymer based microfluidic chip. For these studies we place varying layers of low-density polyethylene (LDPE) between the detector and the source and find that the spatial resolution degrades by ˜180 µm for every 100 µm of LDPE film. Sensitivity is reduced by half with the inclusion of ˜200 µm of additional LDPE film. Lastly

  16. [Compliance with nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment in sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome].

    PubMed

    Alarcón, A; León, C; Maimó, A; Barbé, F; Agustí, A G; Rodríguez-Roisin, R; Granados, A; Montserrat, J M

    1995-02-01

    Ever since Sullivan introduced nighttime nasal continuous pressure on the upper airway (CPAP) in 1981 it has been the standard treatment for sleep-hypopnea syndrome (SAHS). However, CPAP is carried out at great expense and is not tolerated by all patients. Moreover, its efficacy is dependent on the degree of compliance. In this study we set out to analyze the degree of compliance with CPAP over the first 3 months of treatment in a group of 142 consecutive patients with moderate to severe SAHS (apnea-hypopnea index: 48.9 +/- 20). Diagnosis and measurement of the level of CPAP needed (9.6 +/- 2.5 cm H2O) were based on polysomnography. Eighteen (13%) patients did not return for follow-up evaluation. In the remaining 124 patients (age 54 +/- 11 years) compliance with treatment was evaluated by way of a sleep diary in which the patient recorded the hours CPAP was used at night; this record was compared with readings from the CPAP generator's counter. All subjects were asked about their degree of sleepiness before treatment by way of a standard questionnaire. Although most patients reported regular use of CPAP in diaries, only about 60% actually used it for longer than a mean 4.5 hours daily. The most compliant patients could not be differentiated from the least compliant with respect to degree of initial sleepiness, apnea-hypopnea-per-hour index or level of CPAP required.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Position Statement on the management of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII): The Italian Lazio experience.

    PubMed

    Maurizi, Anna R; Suraci, Concetta; Pitocco, Dario; Schiaffini, Riccardo; Tubili, Claudio; Morviducci, Lelio; Giordano, Renato; Manfrini, Silvia; Lauro, Davide; Frontoni, Simona; Pozzilli, Paolo; Buzzetti, Raffaella

    2016-01-01

    This document has been developed by a group of Italian diabetologists with extensive experience in continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) therapy to provide indications for the clinical management of CSII in diabetic patients (both type 1 and type 2) based on delivery mode operating in Italy. Although the potential benefits of pump therapy in achieving glycemic goals is now accepted, such results cannot be obtained without specific knowledge and skills being conveyed to patients during ad hoc educational training. To ensure that these new technologies reach their full effectiveness, as demonstrated theoretically and clinically, a careful assessment of the overall therapeutic and educational process is required, in both qualitative and quantitative terms. Therefore, to ensure the cost-effectiveness of insulin pump therapy and to justify reimbursement of therapy costs by the National Health System in Italy, in this article we present a model for diabetes and healthcare centers to follow that provides for different levels of expertise in the field of CSII therapy. This model will guarantee the provision of excellent care during insulin pump therapies, thus representing the basis for a successful outcome and expansion of this form of insulin treatment in patients with diabetes while also keeping costs under control. © 2015 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  18. Positioning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conone, Ruth M.

    The key to positioning is the creation of a clear benefit image in the consumer's mind. One positioning strategy is creating in the prospect's mind a position that takes into consideration the company's or agency's strengths and weaknesses as well as those of its competitors. Another strategy is to gain entry into a position ladder owned by…

  19. New mechanism that accounts for position sensitivity of saccades evoked in response to stimulation of superior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Moschovakis, A K; Dalezios, Y; Petit, J; Grantyn, A A

    1998-12-01

    New mechanism that accounts for position sensitivity of saccades evoked in response to stimulation of superior colliculus. J. Neurophysiol. 80: 3373-3379, 1998. Electrical stimulation of the feline superior colliculus (SC) is known to evoke saccades whose size depends on the site stimulated (the "characteristic vector" of evoked saccades) and the initial position of the eyes. Similar stimuli were recently shown to produce slow drifts that are presumably caused by relatively direct projections of the SC onto extraocular motoneurons. Both slow and fast evoked eye movements are similarly affected by the initial position of the eyes, despite their dissimilar metrics, kinematics, and anatomic substrates. We tested the hypothesis that the position sensitivity of evoked saccades is due to the superposition of largely position-invariant saccades and position-dependent slow drifts. We show that such a mechanism can account for the fact that the position sensitivity of evoked saccades increases together with the size of their characteristic vector. Consistent with it, the position sensitivity of saccades drops considerably when the contribution of slow drifts is minimal as, for example, when there is no overlap between evoked saccades and short-duration trains of high-frequency stimuli.

  20. Coexistence of positive and negative refractive index sensitivity in the liquid-core photonic crystal fiber based plasmonic sensor.

    PubMed

    Shuai, Binbin; Xia, Li; Liu, Deming

    2012-11-05

    We present and numerically characterize a liquid-core photonic crystal fiber based plasmonic sensor. The coupling properties and sensing performance are investigated by the finite element method. It is found that not only the plasmonic mode dispersion relation but also the fundamental mode dispersion relation is rather sensitive to the analyte refractive index (RI). The positive and negative RI sensitivity coexist in the proposed design. It features a positive RI sensitivity when the increment of the SPP mode effective index is larger than that of the fundamental mode, but the sensor shows a negative RI sensitivity once the increment of the fundamental mode gets larger. A maximum negative RI sensitivity of -5500nm/RIU (Refractive Index Unit) is achieved in the sensing range of 1.50-1.53. The effects of the structural parameters on the plasmonic excitations are also studied, with a view of tuning and optimizing the resonant spectrum.

  1. Theory and Development of Position-Sensitive Quantum Calorimeters. Degree awarded by Stanford Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Figueroa-Feliciano, Enectali; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Quantum calorimeters are being developed as imaging spectrometers for future X-ray astrophysics observatories. Much of the science to be done by these instruments could benefit greatly from larger focal-plane coverage of the detector (without increasing pixel size). An order of magnitude more area will greatly increase the science throughput of these future instruments. One of the main deterrents to achieving this goal is the complexity of the readout schemes involved. We have devised a way to increase the number of pixels from the current baseline designs by an order of magnitude without increasing the number of channels required for readout. The instrument is a high energy resolution, distributed-readout imaging spectrometer called a Position-Sensitive Transition-Edge Sensor (POST). A POST is a quantum calorimeter consisting of two Transition-Edge Sensors (TESS) on the ends of a long absorber capable of one-dimensional imaging spectroscopy. Comparing rise time and energy information from the two TESS, the position of the event in the POST is determined. The energy of the event is inferred from the sum of the two pulses. We have developed a generalized theoretical formalism for distributed-readout calorimeters and apply it to our devices. We derive the noise theory and calculate the theoretical energy resolution of a POST. Our calculations show that a 7-pixel POST with 6 keV saturation energy can achieve 2.3 eV resolution, making this a competitive design for future quantum calorimeter instruments. For this thesis we fabricated 7- and 15-pixel POSTS using Mo/Au TESs and gold absorbers, and moved from concept drawings on scraps of napkins to a 32 eV energy resolution at 1.5 keV, 7-pixel POST calorimeter.

  2. Application of segmented dental panoramic tomography among children: positive effect of continuing education in radiation protection.

    PubMed

    Pakbaznejad Esmaeili, Elmira; Waltimo-Sirén, Janna; Laatikainen, Tuula; Haukka, Jari; Ekholm, Marja

    2016-05-23

    Dental panoramic tomography is the most frequent examination among 7-12-year olds, according to the Radiation Safety and Nuclear Authority of Finland. At those ages, dental panoramic tomographs (DPTs) are mostly obtained for orthodontic reasons. Children's dose reduction by trimming the field size to the area of interest is important because of their high radiosensitivity. Yet, the majority of DPTs in this age group are still taken by using an adult programme and never by using a segmented programme. The purpose of the present study was to raise the awareness of dental staff with respect to children's radiation safety, to increase the application of segmented and child DPT programmes by further educating the whole dental team and to evaluate the outcome of the educational intervention. A five-step intervention programme, focusing on DPT field limitation possibilities, was carried out in community-based dental care as a part of mandatory continuing education in radiation protection. Application of segmented and child DPT programmes was thereafter prospectively followed up during a 1-year period and compared with our similar data from 2010 using a logistic regression analysis. Application of the child programme increased by 9% and the segmented programme by 2%, reaching statistical significance (odds ratios 1.68; 95% confidence interval 1.23-2.30; p-value < 0.001). The number of repeated exposures remained at an acceptable level. The segmented DPTs were most frequently taken from the maxillary lateral incisor-canine area. The educational intervention resulted in improvement of radiological practice in respect to radiation safety of children during dental panoramic tomography. Segmented and child DPT programmes can be applied successfully in dental practice for children.

  3. Application of segmented dental panoramic tomography among children: positive effect of continuing education in radiation protection

    PubMed Central

    Waltimo-Sirén, Janna; Laatikainen, Tuula; Haukka, Jari; Ekholm, Marja

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Dental panoramic tomography is the most frequent examination among 7–12-year olds, according to the Radiation Safety and Nuclear Authority of Finland. At those ages, dental panoramic tomographs (DPTs) are mostly obtained for orthodontic reasons. Children's dose reduction by trimming the field size to the area of interest is important because of their high radiosensitivity. Yet, the majority of DPTs in this age group are still taken by using an adult programme and never by using a segmented programme. The purpose of the present study was to raise the awareness of dental staff with respect to children's radiation safety, to increase the application of segmented and child DPT programmes by further educating the whole dental team and to evaluate the outcome of the educational intervention. Methods: A five-step intervention programme, focusing on DPT field limitation possibilities, was carried out in community-based dental care as a part of mandatory continuing education in radiation protection. Application of segmented and child DPT programmes was thereafter prospectively followed up during a 1-year period and compared with our similar data from 2010 using a logistic regression analysis. Results: Application of the child programme increased by 9% and the segmented programme by 2%, reaching statistical significance (odds ratios 1.68; 95% confidence interval 1.23–2.30; p-value < 0.001). The number of repeated exposures remained at an acceptable level. The segmented DPTs were most frequently taken from the maxillary lateral incisor–canine area. Conclusions: The educational intervention resulted in improvement of radiological practice in respect to radiation safety of children during dental panoramic tomography. Segmented and child DPT programmes can be applied successfully in dental practice for children. PMID:27142159

  4. Blood pressure improvement with continuous positive airway pressure is independent of obstructive sleep apnea severity.

    PubMed

    Bakker, Jessie P; Edwards, Bradley A; Gautam, Shiva P; Montesi, Sydney B; Durán-Cantolla, Joaquín; Aizpuru, Felipe; Barandiarán, Felipe Aizpuru; Barbé, Ferran; Sánchez-de-la-Torre, Manuel; Malhotra, Atul

    2014-04-15

    We sought to perform a patient-level meta-analysis using the individual patient data of the trials identified in our previous study-level meta-analysis investigating the effect of positive airway pressure (PAP) treatment for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) on blood pressure (BP). Patient-level meta-analysis. N/A. 968 adult OSA subjects without major comorbidities drawn from eight randomized controlled trials. Therapeutic PAP versus non-therapeutic control conditions (sham-PAP, pill placebo or standard care) over at least one week. The mean reductions in BP between PAP and non-therapeutic control arms were -2.27 mm Hg (95% CI -4.01 to -0.54) for systolic BP and -1.78 mm Hg (95% CI -2.99 to -0.58) for diastolic BP. The presence of uncontrolled hypertension at baseline was significantly associated with a reduction in systolic BP of 7.1 mm Hg and diastolic BP of 4.3 mm Hg after controlling for OSA severity (apnea-hypopnea index, Epworth Sleepiness Scale score, PAP level), patient demographics (age, gender, body mass index, use of antihypertensive medication/s), and measures of PAP efficacy (PAP adherence and treatment duration). OSA patients with uncontrolled hypertension are likely to gain the largest benefit from PAP in terms of a substantial reduction in BP, even after controlling for disease severity.

  5. Toward increased concentration sensitivity for continuous wave EPR investigations of spin-labeled biological macromolecules at high fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Likai; Liu, Zhanglong; Kaur, Pavanjeet; Esquiaqui, Jackie M.; Hunter, Robert I.; Hill, Stephen; Smith, Graham M.; Fanucci, Gail E.

    2016-04-01

    High-field, high-frequency electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy at W-(∼94 GHz) and D-band (∼140 GHz) is important for investigating the conformational dynamics of flexible biological macromolecules because this frequency range has increased spectral sensitivity to nitroxide motion over the 100 ps to 2 ns regime. However, low concentration sensitivity remains a roadblock for studying aqueous samples at high magnetic fields. Here, we examine the sensitivity of a non-resonant thin-layer cylindrical sample holder, coupled to a quasi-optical induction-mode W-band EPR spectrometer (HiPER), for continuous wave (CW) EPR analyses of: (i) the aqueous nitroxide standard, TEMPO; (ii) the unstructured to α-helical transition of a model IDP protein; and (iii) the base-stacking transition in a kink-turn motif of a large 232 nt RNA. For sample volumes of ∼50 μL, concentration sensitivities of 2-20 μM were achieved, representing a ∼10-fold enhancement compared to a cylindrical TE011 resonator on a commercial Bruker W-band spectrometer. These results therefore highlight the sensitivity of the thin-layer sample holders employed in HiPER for spin-labeling studies of biological macromolecules at high fields, where applications can extend to other systems that are facilitated by the modest sample volumes and ease of sample loading and geometry.

  6. Effect of skin and fat layers on the spatial sensitivity profile of continuous wave diffuse reflectance near-infrared spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ye; Shear, Michael A.; Soyemi, Olusola O.; Soller, Babs R.

    2005-11-01

    In order to measure muscle physiological parameters such as pH and oxygen partial pressure (PO2) by continuous wave (CW) diffuse reflectance near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), light must penetrate through skin and subcutaneous fat layers overlying muscle. In this study, the effect of skin and subcutaneous fat layer and on the spatial sensitivity profile of CW diffuse reflectance near-infrared spectra is investigated through Monte Carlo simulations. The simulation model uses a semi-infinite medium consisting of skin, fat and muscle. The optical properties of each layer are taken from the reported optical data at 750 nm. The skin color is either Caucasian or Negroid and the fat thickness is varied from 0 ~ 20 mm. The spatial sensitivity profile, penetration depth, and sensitivity ratio as functions of optical fiber source-detector separation (SD, 2.5 mm, 5.0 mm, 10.0 mm, 20.0 mm, 30.0 mm and 40.0 mm), skin color and fat thicknesses are predicted by the simulations. It is shown that skin color only slightly influenced the spatial sensitivity profile, while the presence of the fat layer greatly decreased the detector sensitivity. It is also shown that probes with longer SD separations can detect light from deeper inside the medium. The simulation results are used to design a fiber optic probe which ensures that enough light is propagated inside the muscle in NIRS measurement on a leg with a fat layer of normal thickness.

  7. Development of position-sensitive time-of-flight spectrometer for fission fragment research

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, C. W.; Tovesson, F.; Meierbachtol, K.; Bredeweg, T.; Jandel, M.; Jorgenson, H. J.; Laptev, A.; Rusev, G.; Shields, D. W.; White, M.; Blakeley, R. E.; Mader, D. M.; Hecht, A. A.

    2014-07-09

    A position-sensitive, high-resolution time-of-flight detector for fission fragments has been developed. The SPectrometer for Ion DEtermination in fission Research (SPIDER) is a 2E–2v spectrometer designed to measure the mass of light fission fragments to a single mass unit. The time pick-off detector pairs to be used in SPIDER have been tested with α-particles from 229Th and its decay chain and α-particles and spontaneous fission fragments from 252Cf. Each detector module is comprised of thin electron conversion foil, electrostatic mirror, microchannel plates, and delay-line anodes. Particle trajectories on the order of 700 mm are determined accurately to within 0.7 mm. Flight times were measured with 250 ps resolution FWHM. Computed particle velocities are accurate to within 0.06 mm/ns corresponding to a precision of 0.5%. As a result, an ionization chamber capable of 400 keV energy resolution coupled with the velocity measurements described here will pave the way for modestly efficient measurements of light fission fragments with unit mass resolution.

  8. Phenothiazine-sensitized organic solar cells: effect of dye anchor group positioning on the cell performance.

    PubMed

    Hart, Aaron S; K C, Chandra Bikram; Subbaiyan, Navaneetha K; Karr, Paul A; D'Souza, Francis

    2012-11-01

    Effect of positioning of the cyanoacrylic acid anchoring group on ring periphery of phenothiazine dye on the performance of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) is reported. Two types of dyes, one having substitution on the C-3 aromatic ring (Type 1) and another through the N-terminal (Type 2), have been synthesized for this purpose. Absorption and fluorescence studies have been performed to visualize the effect of substitution pattern on the spectral coverage and electrochemical studies to monitor the tuning of redox levels. B3LYP/6-31G* studies are performed to visualize the frontier orbital location and their significance in charge injection when surface modified on semiconducting TiO₂. New DSSCs have been built on nanocrystalline TiO₂ according to traditional two-electrode Grätzel solar cell setup with a reference cell based on N719 dye for comparison. The lifetime of the adsorbed phenothiazine dye is found to be quenched significantly upon immobilizing on TiO₂ suggesting charge injection from excited dye to semiconducting TiO₂. The performances of the cells are found to be prominent for solar cells made out of Type 1 dyes compared to Type 2 dyes. This trend has been rationalized on the basis of spectral, electrochemical, computational, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy results.

  9. Development of position-sensitive time-of-flight spectrometer for fission fragment research

    DOE PAGES

    Arnold, C. W.; Tovesson, F.; Meierbachtol, K.; ...

    2014-07-09

    A position-sensitive, high-resolution time-of-flight detector for fission fragments has been developed. The SPectrometer for Ion DEtermination in fission Research (SPIDER) is a 2E–2v spectrometer designed to measure the mass of light fission fragments to a single mass unit. The time pick-off detector pairs to be used in SPIDER have been tested with α-particles from 229Th and its decay chain and α-particles and spontaneous fission fragments from 252Cf. Each detector module is comprised of thin electron conversion foil, electrostatic mirror, microchannel plates, and delay-line anodes. Particle trajectories on the order of 700 mm are determined accurately to within 0.7 mm. Flightmore » times were measured with 250 ps resolution FWHM. Computed particle velocities are accurate to within 0.06 mm/ns corresponding to a precision of 0.5%. As a result, an ionization chamber capable of 400 keV energy resolution coupled with the velocity measurements described here will pave the way for modestly efficient measurements of light fission fragments with unit mass resolution.« less

  10. The particle background of the Rosat PSPC. [Position Sensitive Proportional Counter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snowden, S. L.; Plucinsky, P. P.; Briel, U.; Hasinger, G.; Pfeffermann, E.

    1992-01-01

    In order to permit quantitative studies of the diffuse cosmic X-ray background and of extended X-ray sources, the particle induced background of the Roentgen Satellite, Rosat, Position Sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC) is parameterized. Data collected during 210,000 s of PSPC operation have been analyzed and the temporal, spectral, and spatial distributions investigated. About 77 percent of the residual events originate within the detector while the remainder enter through the counter window. During typical conditions, the count rate of the residual events is well correlated with the Master Veto (MV) count rate. The spectrum of these events is well described by a flat component plus a soft power law and an Al K-alpha line at 1.5 keV. Also during typical conditions, the ratio between the power law and flat components remains constant to +/- 4 while the relative Al K-alpha contribution increases with increasing MV count rate. The distribution of the counts over the field of view is uniform except for a slight radial dependence and shadowing caused by blockage of the externally produced component by the window support structure.

  11. Position-sensitive ``movie'' in situ neutron detector for the UCN τ experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, Hannah; UCNTau Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    Precision measurements of neutron β-decay parameters provide tests of fundamental theories in elementary particle physics and cosmology such as the Standard Model and Big Bang nucleosynthesis. In particular, the UCN τ experiment aims to measure the mean lifetime of ultracold neutrons confined in an asymmetric magneto-gravitational trap using an in situ neutron detector. This detector consists of a 20 nm film of 10B on top of a ZnS:Ag scintillating screen. The screen is readout using two photomultipliers which view an array of wavelength shifting fibers optically coupled to the scintillator. When the detector is lowered into the loaded trap, light is emitted due to the charged particles recoiling into the ZnS:Ag when neutrons absorb on the 10B. Phase space evolution in the stored neutron population can lead to apparent shifts in the measured neutron lifetime with the detector height. In order to quantify this systematic uncertainty, we are implementing a supplemental 64-channel position-sensitive PMT module with high quantum efficiency and fast time response to image the entire detector in situ during measurements. We have characterized a prototype using a ZnS screen and an α-particle source along with a prototype lens system and will report the results and future plans.

  12. ROSAT Position Sensitive Proportional Counter spectra of six Seyfert 1 galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, T. J.; George, I. M.; Mushotzky, R. F.

    1993-01-01

    We present the results from ROSAT Position Sensitive Proportional Counter observations of six Seyfert 1 galaxies in the soft (0.1-2.0 keV) X-ray band. The sources (Mrk 335, ESO 198-G24, ESO 141-G55, Mrk 509, NGC 7469, and MCG-2-58-22) were chosen to have low absorbing column densities along the line of sight. As expected, it is found that all the sources possess significantly steeper spectra below about 1 keV than observed at higher X-ray energies. Assuming a simple absorbed power-law spectral model, the mean (photon) spectral index for the sample is Gamma = 2.38 +/- 0.25, compared to the canonical 1.7 typically observed in the 2-10 keV band. Furthermore, we find strong evidence for soft X-ray spectral features in half the sources. In NGC 7469 and ESO 198-G24, we find that the addition of a narrow emission line or an absorption edge to the underlying continuum is a significant improvement to the parameterization of the spectra. Mrk 335 also shows evidence for spectral complexity, but from these data it is not possible to unambiguously distinguish between an absorption edge and a steepening of the spectrum at low energies. We examine these results in the light of the accuracy of the PSPC spectral calibration.

  13. Force Control by Flexible Manipulator Based on Resonance Ratio Control using Position Sensitive Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsura, Seiichiro; Ohnishi, Kouhei

    This paper presents a novel force controller to suppress torsional vibration of two-mass resonant system. The resonance ratio control is one of the effective control methods of two-mass resonant system. In this method, the ratio between the resonant frequency of motor and arm is determined arbitrary according to the feedback of estimated reaction torque. The reaction torque is estimated by using position sensitive detector (PSD). Since the estimation method does not need the parameter identification, the torsion information is obtained with accuracy. To attain the affinity and adaptability to environment, motion systems should control the reaction force from the environment. In the force control system, the force response is regarded as a disturbance of the arm portion. The arm disturbance is observed by the arm disturbance observer. The proposed force control system is based on both the conventional PD control and the resonance ratio control and the determination method of pole placement is discussed. The proposed force control system can realize both the suppression of the inner torsional reaction torque and the adaptation to outer force inputs. The numerical and experimental results show viability of the proposed method.

  14. A position-sensitive neutron spectrometer/dosimeter based on pressurized superheated drop (bubble) detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    d'Errico, F.; Nath, R.; Holland, S. K.; Lamba, M.; Patz, S.; Rivard, M. J.

    2002-01-01

    A position-sensitive, superheated emulsion chamber (SEC) is introduced for three-dimensional (3D) spectrometry and dosimetry of fast neutrons. The detector is based on a fine suspension of octafluorocyclobutane droplets emulsified in a tissue-equivalent gel. This gel is highly viscous and immobilizes the bubbles at the location of their formation. At an operating temperature of 35°C, the droplets are moderately superheated and their evaporation is nucleated by the densely ionizing products of fast neutron interactions, with no response to sparsely ionizing radiations. Thus, when a neutron emitter such as a 252Cf brachytherapy source is inserted in the SEC, a bubble distribution forms around the source and makes the neutron field visible. The SEC is operated at different externally applied pressures that correspond to different response thresholds. These responses form a virtually orthogonal matrix which is suitable for spectrometry and allows the use of effective few channel unfolding procedures, yielding the spatial dependence of absorbed dose and neutron energy spectra in-tissue. Bubble spatial distributions in the chamber can be determined through optical tomography or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A 3D, steady-state MRI method has proven particularly effective for this purpose. After the imaging, the SEC can be pressurized above the halocarbon vapor tension in order to recondense the bubbles to the liquid phase. Within a few minutes, the device is annealed and ready to be used again for repeated measurements improving the bubble counting statistics.

  15. Reciprocal space mapping of epitaxial materials using position-sensitive x-ray detection

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.R.; Doyle, B.L.; Drummond, T.J.; Medernach, J.W.; Schneider, R.P. Jr.

    1994-10-01

    Reciprocal space mapping can be efficiently carried out using a position-sensitive x-ray detector (PSD) coupled to a traditional double-axis diffractometer. The PSD offers parallel measurement of the total scattering angle of all diffracted x-rays during a single rocking-curve scan. As a result, a two-dimensional reciprocal space map can be made in a very short time similar to that of a one-dimensional rocking-curve scan. Fast, efficient reciprocal space mapping offers numerous routine advantages to the x-ray diffraction analyst. Some of these advantages are the explicit differentiation of lattice strain from crystal orientation effects in strain-relaxed heteroepitaxial layers; the nondestructive characterization of the size, shape and orientation of nanocrystalline domains in ordered-alloy epilayers; and the ability to measure the average size and shape of voids in porous epilayers. Here, the PSD-based diffractometer is described, and specific examples clearly illustrating the advantages of complete reciprocal space analysis are presented.

  16. Single-Photon Computed Tomography With Large Position-Sensitive Phototubes*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldmann, John; Ranck, Amoreena; Saunders, Robert S.; Welsh, Robert E.; Bradley, Eric L.; Saha, Margaret S.; Kross, Brian; Majewski, Stan; Popov, Vladimir; Weisenberger, Andrew G.; Wojcik, Randolph

    2000-10-01

    Position-sensitive photomultiplier tubes (PSPMTs) coupled to pixelated CsI(Tl) scintillators have been used with parallel-hole collimators to view the metabolism in small animals of radiopharmaceuticals tagged with ^125I. We report here our preliminary results analyzed using a tomography program^1 written in IDL programming language. The PSPMTs are mounted on a rotating gantry so as to view the subject animal from any azimuth. Preliminary results to test the tomography algorithm have been obtained by placing a variety of plastic mouse-brain phantoms (loaded with Na^125I) in front of one of the detectors and rotating the phantom in steps through 360 degrees. Results of this simulation taken with a variety of collimator hole sizes will be compared and discussed. Extentions of this technique to the use of very small PSPMTs (Hamamatsu M-64) which are capable of a very close approach to those parts of the animal of greatest interest will be described. *Supported in part by The Department of Energy, The National Science Foundation, The American Diabetes Association, The Howard Hughes Foundation and The Jeffress Trust. 1. Tomography algorithm kindly provided by Dr. S. Meikle of The Royal Prince Albert Hospital, Sydney, Australia

  17. Position sensitive and energy dispersive x-ray detector based on silicon strip detector technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiącek, P.; Dąbrowski, W.; Fink, J.; Fiutowski, T.; Krane, H.-G.; Loyer, F.; Schwamberger, A.; Świentek, K.; Venanzi, C.

    2015-04-01

    A new position sensitive detector with a global energy resolution for the entire detector of about 380 eV FWHM for 8.04 keV line at ambient temperature is presented. The measured global energy resolution is defined by the energy spectra summed over all strips of the detector, and thus it includes electronic noise of the front-end electronics, charge sharing effects, matching of parameters across the channels and other system noise sources. The target energy resolution has been achieved by segmentation of the strips to reduce their capacitance and by careful optimization of the front-end electronics. The key design aspects and parameters of the detector are discussed briefly in the paper. Excellent noise and matching performance of the readout ASIC and negligible system noise allow us to operate the detector with a discrimination threshold as low as 1 keV and to measure fluorescence radiation lines of light elements, down to Al Kα of 1.49 keV, simultaneously with measurements of the diffraction patterns. The measurement results that demonstrate the spectrometric and count rate performance of the developed detector are presented and discussed in the paper.

  18. Spectral comb mitigation to improve continuous-wave search sensitivity in Advanced LIGO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neunzert, Ansel; LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Searches for continuous gravitational waves, such as those emitted by rapidly spinning non-axisymmetric neutron stars, are degraded by the presence of narrow noise ``lines'' in detector data. These lines either reduce the spectral band available for analysis (if identified as noise and removed) or cause spurious outliers (if unidentified). Many belong to larger structures known as combs: series of evenly-spaced lines which appear across wide frequency ranges. This talk will focus on the challenges of comb identification and mitigation. I will discuss tools and methods for comb analysis, and case studies of comb mitigation at the LIGO Hanford detector site.

  19. Acute Effects of Continuous Positive Air way Pressure on Pulse Pressure in Chronic Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Quintão, Mônica; Chermont, Sérgio; Marchese, Luana; Brandão, Lúcia; Bernardez, Sabrina Pereira; Mesquita, Evandro Tinoco; Rocha, Nazareth de Novaes; Nóbrega, Antônio Claudio L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients with heart failure (HF) have left ventricular dysfunction and reduced mean arterial pressure (MAP). Increased adrenergic drive causes vasoconstriction and vessel resistance maintaining MAP, while increasing peripheral vascular resistance and conduit vessel stiffness. Increased pulse pressure (PP) reflects a complex interaction of the heart with the arterial and venous systems. Increased PP is an important risk marker in patients with chronic HF (CHF). Non-invasive ventilation (NIV) has been used for acute decompensated HF, to improve congestion and ventilation through both respiratory and hemodynamic effects. However, none of these studies have reported the effect of NIV on PP. Objective The objective of this study was to determine the acute effects of NIV with CPAP on PP in outpatients with CHF. Methods Following a double-blind, randomized, cross-over, and placebo-controlled protocol, twenty three patients with CHF (17 males; 60 ± 11 years; BMI 29 ± 5 kg/cm2, NYHA class II, III) underwent CPAP via nasal mask for 30 min in a recumbent position. Mask pressure was 6 cmH2O, whereas placebo was fixed at 0-1 cmH2O. PP and other non invasive hemodynamics variables were assessed before, during and after placebo and CPAP mode. Results CPAP decreased resting heart rate (Pre: 72 ± 9; vs. Post 5 min: 67 ± 10 bpm; p < 0.01) and MAP (CPAP: 87 ± 11; vs. control 96 ± 11 mmHg; p < 0.05 post 5 min). CPAP decreased PP (CPAP: 47 ± 20 pre to 38 ± 19 mmHg post; vs. control: 42 ± 12 mmHg, pre to 41 ± 18 post p < 0.05 post 5 min). Conclusion NIV with CPAP decreased pulse pressure in patients with stable CHF. Future clinical trials should investigate whether this effect is associated with improved clinical outcome. PMID:24676373

  20. Acute effects of continuous positive air way pressure on pulse pressure in chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Quintão, Mônica; Chermont, Sérgio; Marchese, Luana; Brandão, Lúcia; Bernardez, Sabrina Pereira; Mesquita, Evandro Tinoco; Novaes Rocha, Nazareth de; Nóbrega, Antônio Claudio L

    2014-02-01

    Patients with heart failure (HF) have left ventricular dysfunction and reduced mean arterial pressure (MAP). Increased adrenergic drive causes vasoconstriction and vessel resistance maintaining MAP, while increasing peripheral vascular resistance and conduit vessel stiffness. Increased pulse pressure (PP) reflects a complex interaction of the heart with the arterial and venous systems. Increased PP is an important risk marker in patients with chronic HF (CHF). Non-invasive ventilation (NIV) has been used for acute decompensated HF, to improve congestion and ventilation through both respiratory and hemodynamic effects. However, none of these studies have reported the effect of NIV on PP. The objective of this study was to determine the acute effects of NIV with CPAP on PP in outpatients with CHF. Following a double-blind, randomized, cross-over, and placebo-controlled protocol, twenty three patients with CHF (17 males; 60±11 years; BMI 29±5 kg/cm2, NYHA class II, III) underwent CPAP via nasal mask for 30 min in a recumbent position. Mask pressure was 6 cmH2O, whereas placebo was fixed at 0-1 cmH2O. PP and other non invasive hemodynamics variables were assessed before, during and after placebo and CPAP mode. CPAP decreased resting heart rate (Pre: 72±9; vs. Post 5 min: 67±10 bpm; p<0.01) and MAP (CPAP: 87±11; vs. control 96±11 mmHg; p<0.05 post 5 min). CPAP decreased PP (CPAP: 47±20 pre to 38±19 mmHg post; vs. control: 42±12 mmHg, pre to 41±18 post p<0.05 post 5 min). NIV with CPAP decreased pulse pressure in patients with stable CHF. Future clinical trials should investigate whether this effect is associated with improved clinical outcome.

  1. Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Improves Sleep and Daytime Sleepiness in Patients with Parkinson Disease and Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Neikrug, Ariel B.; Liu, Lianqi; Avanzino, Julie A.; Maglione, Jeanne E.; Natarajan, Loki; Bradley, Lenette; Maugeri, Alex; Corey-Bloom, Jody; Palmer, Barton W.; Loredo, Jose S.; Ancoli-Israel, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), common in Parkinson disease (PD), contributes to sleep disturbances and daytime sleepiness. We assessed the effect of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) on OSA, sleep, and daytime sleepiness in patients with PD. Design: This was a randomized placebo-controlled, crossover design. Patients with PD and OSA were randomized into 6 w of therapeutic treatment or 3 w of placebo followed by 3 w of therapeutic treatment. Patients were evaluated by polysomnography (PSG) and multiple sleep latency test (MSLT) pretreatment (baseline), after 3 w, and after 6 w of CPAP treatment. Analyses included mixed models, paired analysis, and within-group analyses comparing 3 w to 6 w of treatment. Setting: Sleep laboratory. Participants: Thirty-eight patients with PD (mean age = 67.2 ± 9.2 y; 12 females). Intervention: Continuous positive airway pressure. Measurements: PSG outcome measures: sleep efficiency, %sleep stages (N1, N2, N3, R), arousal index, apnea-hypopnea index (AHI), and % time oxygen saturation < 90% (%time SaO2 < 90%). MSLT outcome measures: mean sleep-onset latency (MSL). Results: There were significant group-by-time interactions for AHI (P < 0.001), % time SaO2 < 90% (P = 0.02), %N2 (P = 0.015) and %N3 (P = 0.014). Subjects receiving therapeutic CPAP showed significant decrease in AHI, %time SaO2 < 90%, %N2, and significant increase in %N3 indicating effectiveness of CPAP in the treatment of OSA, improvement in nighttime oxygenation, and in deepening sleep. The paired sample analyses revealed that 3 w of therapeutic treatment resulted in significant decreases in arousal index (t = 3.4, P = 0.002). All improvements after 3 w were maintained at 6 w. Finally, 3 w of therapeutic CPAP also resulted in overall decreases in daytime sleepiness (P = 0.011). Conclusions: Therapeutic continuous positive airway pressure versus placebo was effective in reducing apnea events, improving oxygen saturation, and deepening sleep in

  2. Differential Effects of Intermittent versus Continuous Haloperidol Treatment throughout Adolescence on Haloperidol Sensitization and Social Behavior in Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jun; Li, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Animal work on the behavioral effects of antipsychotic treatment suggests that different dosing regimens could affect drug sensitivity differently, with an intermittent treatment regimen tending to cause a sensitization effect, while a continuous treatment causing a tolerance. In this study, we explored how haloperidol (HAL) sensitization induced throughout adolescence and tested in adulthood was differentially impacted by these two dosing regimens in the conditioned avoidance response (CAR) test. We also examined how these two dosing regiments affected social interaction and social memory in adulthood. Male adolescent Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with HAL via either osmotic minipump (HAL-0.25 CONT; 0.25 mg/kg/day, n = 14) or daily injection (HAL-0.05 INT; 0.05 mg/kg/injection/day, sc, n = 14), or sterile water (n = 14) from postnatal days (PND) 44 to 71. HAL sensitization was assessed in a challenge test in which all rats were injected with HAL (0.025 and 0.05 mg/kg, sc) on PND 80 and PND 82. Two days later, half of the rats from each group (n = 7/group) were assayed in two 4-trial social interaction tests in which a subject rat was given four 5-min social encounters with a familiar or novel juvenile rat (PND 35–40) at 10 min intervals. Another half were tested in a quinpirole-induced hyperlocomotion assay to assess the potential HAL-induced change in D2-mediated function. Results show that only the intermittent dosing group under the HAL 0.05 mg/kg challenge showed a robust sensitization effect as rats in this group made significantly fewer avoidance responses than those in the vehicle and HAL-0.25 CONT groups. Adolescent HAL treatment did not affect social behavior and social memory, as rats from all 3 groups exhibited a similar level of social interaction and showed a similar level of sensitivity to the change of social stimuli. Similarly, adolescent HAL treatment also did not produce a long-lasting change in D2 function, as all 3 groups exhibited a

  3. Sex and sensitivity: the continued need for sex-based biomedical research and implementation.

    PubMed

    Tingen, Candace M; Kim, Alison M; Wu, Pei-Hsuan; Woodruff, Teresa K

    2010-07-01

    The phrase 'women's health research' embraces women as part of the biomedical research engine while categorizing women as separate. Before personalized medicine can become a reality, we must first ensure that basic physiological differences between the sexes are clearly delineated. In this article we argue that research into sex differences should be encouraged at the most fundamental levels of the biomedical sciences. Moreover, appropriate representation of both sexes as participants in clinical studies is still critically needed. Academic and governmental organizations must continue to articulate strong policy in order to ensure inclusion and analysis of sex as a critical variable. Focused attention on sex as a contributing factor to health, disease and therapeutic activity will increase our fund of knowledge regarding our everyday health, increase the pace of clinical research and ensure a healthier population.

  4. Imaging study of a phase-sensitive breast-CT system in continuous acquisition mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delogu, P.; Golosio, B.; Fedon, C.; Arfelli, F.; Bellazzini, R.; Brez, A.; Brun, F.; Di Lillo, F.; Dreossi, D.; Mettivier, G.; Minuti, M.; Oliva, P.; Pichera, M.; Rigon, L.; Russo, P.; Sarno, A.; Spandre, G.; Tromba, G.; Longo, R.

    2017-01-01

    The SYRMA-CT project aims to set-up the first clinical trial of phase-contrast breast Computed Tomography with synchrotron radiation at the SYRMEP beamline of Elettra, the Italian synchrotron light source. The challenge in a dedicated breast CT is to match a high spatial resolution with a low dose level. In order to fulfil these requirements, the SYRMA-CT project uses a large area CdTe single photon counting detector (Pixirad-8), simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (SART) and phase retrieval pre-processing. This work investigates the imaging performances of the system in a continuous acquisition mode and with a low dose level towards the clinical application. A custom test object and a large surgical sample have been studied.

  5. Maladaptive emotion regulation strategies and stress sensitivity mediate the relation between adverse life events and attenuated positive psychotic symptoms.

    PubMed

    Laloyaux, Julien; Dessart, Grégory; Van der Linden, Martial; Lemaire, Morgan; Larøi, Frank

    2016-01-01

    There is now solid evidence for a relation between adverse life events (ALE) and psychotic symptoms in patients with psychosis and in the general population. A recent study has shown that this relation may be partially mediated by stress sensitivity, suggesting the influence of other factors. The aim of this study was to assess the mediation effect of emotion regulation strategies and stress sensitivity in the relation between ALE and attenuated positive psychotic symptoms (APPS) in the general population. Hundred and twelve healthy volunteers were evaluated with measures of APPS, emotion regulation strategies, ALE and stress sensitivity. Results demonstrated that the relation between ALE, hallucination and delusion proneness was completely mediated by maladaptive emotion regulation strategies, but not by stress sensitivity. However, in addition to maladaptive emotion regulation strategies, stress sensitivity demonstrated a mediation effect between ALE and attenuated positive psychotic positive symptoms when positive psychotic symptoms were grouped together. There are probably several possible trajectories leading to the formation of positive psychotic symptoms and the results of the present study reveal that one such trajectory may involve the maladaptive regulation of negative emotions alongside a certain general vulnerability after experiencing ALE.

  6. Fast two-dimensional position-sensitive detection of neutrons in a time-of-flight reflectometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Kruijs, R. W. E.; de Blois, J.

    2002-04-01

    A two-dimensional position-sensitive neutron detector with a maximum count rate of 500 kHz is described. The high counting rate is obtained by making use of dedicated electronics for data handling. The electronics convert the wire charges of a position-sensitive photomultiplier into a position using internal look-up tables. Timing modules are presented for neutron time-of-flight (TOF) determination and for dynamic measurements with an independent time-base. The position and TOF information are stored by a fast Data Handling Module. The detector is calibrated with a grid of 256×256 channels, using channel widths of 0.25 mm.The maximum error in position determination is 0.25 mm.This error is reduced to less than 0.05 mm when the electronics are used one dimensionally instead of two dimensionally. The total detector resolution was determined to be 0.6 mm.

  7. Depth of interaction resolution measurements for a high resolution PET detector using position sensitive avalanche photodiodes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yongfeng; Dokhale, Purushottam A; Silverman, Robert W; Shah, Kanai S; McClish, Mickel A; Farrell, Richard; Entine, Gerald; Cherry, Simon R

    2006-05-07

    We explore dual-ended read out of LSO arrays with two position sensitive avalanche photodiodes (PSAPDs) as a high resolution, high efficiency depth-encoding detector for PET applications. Flood histograms, energy resolution and depth of interaction (DOI) resolution were measured for unpolished LSO arrays with individual crystal sizes of 1.0, 1.3 and 1.5 mm, and for a polished LSO array with 1.3 mm pixels. The thickness of the crystal arrays was 20 mm. Good flood histograms were obtained for all four arrays, and crystals in all four arrays can be clearly resolved. Although the amplitude of each PSAPD signal decreases as the interaction depth moves further from the PSAPD, the sum of the two PSAPD signals is essentially constant with irradiation depth for all four arrays. The energy resolutions were similar for all four arrays, ranging from 14.7% to 15.4%. A DOI resolution of 3-4 mm (including the width of the irradiation band which is approximately 2 mm) was obtained for all the unpolished arrays. The best DOI resolution was achieved with the unpolished 1 mm array (average 3.5 mm). The DOI resolution for the 1.3 mm and 1.5 mm unpolished arrays was 3.7 and 4.0 mm respectively. For the polished array, the DOI resolution was only 16.5 mm. Summing the DOI profiles across all crystals for the 1 mm array only degraded the DOI resolution from 3.5 mm to 3.9 mm, indicating that it may not be necessary to calibrate the DOI response separately for each crystal within an array. The DOI response of individual crystals in the array confirms this finding. These results provide a detailed characterization of the DOI response of these PSAPD-based PET detectors which will be important in the design and calibration of a PET scanner making use of this detector approach.

  8. Single-mismatch position-sensitive detection of DNA based on a bifunctional ruthenium complex.

    PubMed

    García, T; Revenga-Parra, M; Abruña, H D; Pariente, F; Lorenzo, E

    2008-01-01

    A ruthenium complex, pentaamine ruthenium [3-(2-phenanthren-9-yl-vinyl)-pyridine] (which we refer to as RuL in the text) generated in situ has been used as a sensitive and selective electrochemical indicator in DNA sensing. The complex incorporates dual functionalities with the Ru center providing a redox probe and the ligand (L) providing a fluorescent tag. The presence of the aromatic groups in the ligand endows the complex with an intercalative character and makes it capable of binding to double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) more efficiently than to single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). Combining spectroscopic and electrochemical techniques, we have elucidated the nature of the interactions. From these data we conclude that the binding mode is fundamentally intercalative. The ligand-based fluorescence allows characterization of the complex formation as well as for melting experiments to be carried out. The metal-based redox center is employed as an electrochemical indicator to detect the hybridization event in a DNA biosensor. The biosensor has been developed by immobilization of a thiolated capture probe sequence from Helicobacter pylori onto gold electrodes. With the use of this approach, complementary target sequences of Helicobacter can be quantified over the range of 106 to 708 pmol with a detection limit of 92+/-0.4 pmol and a linear correlation coefficient of 0.995. In addition, this approach allows the detection, without the need for a hybridization suppressor in solution, such as formamide, of not only a single mismatch but also its position in a specific sequence of H. pylori, due to the selective interaction of this bifunctional ruthenium complex with dsDNA.

  9. Young children's developing sensitivity to discourse continuity as a cue for inferring reference.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, Alexandra C; Frank, Michael C

    2015-01-01

    Children encounter many opportunities for word learning where a novel word (e.g., "chinchilla") coincides in time with the presence of its referent (e.g., a parent pointing at a fuzzy rodent). These two ingredients are not always paired simultaneously, but they sometimes still occur in succession within a discourse. We investigated children's ability to apply their knowledge of discourse structure to infer the referent of a novel word in the absence of social cues such as pointing and eye gaze. In Experiment 1A, we introduced 2- to 6-year-old children and adults to two novel toys and described each using two sentences. We embedded the introduction of a novel label ("Have you seen a toma before?") between the two sentences about one of the toys, with no cues implying the label's referent other than its position in the discourse. Children older than 3 years and adults were more likely to attribute the label to the toy whose descriptions surrounded the naming event. In Experiment 1B, we tested whether participants made their selections based on temporal associations-choosing the toy that was described closest in time to the naming event-rather than inferences about discourse. Participants heard the novel label introduced after the two descriptions of a toy rather than embedded between them. Both children and adults responded close to chance in this experiment, indicating that temporal proximity alone did not guide their selections. Together, these results suggest that children can use discourse position to make inferences about reference in word learning situations.

  10. Comparison of glucose tolerance tests to detect the insulin sensitizing effects of a bout of continuous exercise.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Juan Fernando; Hamouti, Nassim; Fernández-Elías, Valentín Emilio; Mora-Rodriguez, Ricardo

    2014-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine which of the available glucose tolerance tests (oral (OGTT) vs. intravenous (IVGTT)) could more readily detect the insulin sensitizing effects of a bout of continuous exercise. Ten healthy moderately fit young men (V̇O2peak of 45.4 ± 1.8 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1); age 27.5 ± 2.7 yr) underwent 4 OGTT and 4 IVGTT on different days following a standardized dinner and overnight fast. One test was performed immediately after 55 min of cycle-ergometer exercise at 60% V̇O2peak. Insulin sensitivity index was determined during a 50 min IVGTT according to Tura (CISI) and from a 120 min OGTT using the Matsuda composite index (MISI). After exercise, MISI improved 29 ± 10% without reaching statistical significance (p = 0.182) due to its low reproducibility (coefficient of variation 16 ± 3%; intra-class reliability 0.846). However, CISI significantly improved (50 ± 4%; p < 0.001) after exercise showing better reproducibility (coefficient of variation 13 ± 4%; intra-class reliability 0.955). Power calculation revealed that 6 participants were required for detecting the effects of exercise on insulin sensitivity when using IVGTT, whereas 54 were needed when using OGTT. The superior response of CISI compared with MISI suggests the preferential use of IVGTT to assess the effects of exercise on insulin sensitivity when using a glucose tolerance test.

  11. Impact of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) on quality of life in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA).

    PubMed

    Batool-Anwar, Salma; Goodwin, James L; Kushida, Clete A; Walsh, James A; Simon, Richard D; Nichols, Deborah A; Quan, Stuart F

    2016-12-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea is a chronic illness with increasing prevalence. In addition to associated cardiovascular comorbidities, obstructive sleep apnea syndrome has been linked to poor quality of life, occupational accidents, and motor vehicle crashes secondary to excessive daytime sleepiness. Although continuous positive airway pressure is the gold standard for sleep apnea treatment, its effects on quality of life are not well defined. In the current study we investigated the effects of treatment on quality of life using the data from the Apnea Positive Pressure Long-term Efficacy Study (APPLES), a randomized controlled trial of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) versus sham CPAP. The Calgary Sleep Apnea Quality of Life Index (SAQLI) was used to assess quality of life. Overall we found no significant improvement in quality of life among sleep apnea patients after CPAP treatment. However, after stratifying by OSA severity, it was found that long-term improvement in quality of life might occur with the use of CPAP in people with severe and possibly moderate sleep apnea, and no demonstrable improvement in quality of life was noted among participants with mild obstructive sleep apnea. © 2016 European Sleep Research Society.

  12. A subsequent positive stroke developing in the channel of preceding negative stroke and containing bipolar continuing current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Y.; Rakov, V. A.; Tran, M. D.; Lu, W.

    2016-09-01

    A bipolar cloud-to-ground lightning flash was observed to exhibit two types of polarity reversal associated with the first two strokes separated by a not unduly long time interval of 70 ms. The first stroke was negative and had a peak current of -101 kA. The second stroke was positive, had a peak current of 16 kA and was followed by a 122 ms long bipolar continuing current. The first two strokes, including the bipolar continuing current, occurred in the same channel to ground, whose imaged 2-D length was 4.2 km. The occurrence of positive stroke in the negative-stroke channel is highly unusual. The 2-D speed versus height profiles for the negative stepped leader of the first stroke and, for the first time, for the positive leader in the previously conditioned, first-stroke channel were examined and the average speeds were found to be 4.7 × 105 m/s and 7.2 × 105 m/s, respectively.

  13. Effects of flow amplitudes on intraprong pressures during bubble versus ventilator-generated nasal continuous positive airway pressure in premature infants.

    PubMed

    Kahn, Doron J; Habib, Robert H; Courtney, Sherry E

    2008-11-01

    The goal were to characterize the flow dependence of bubble nasal continuous positive airway pressure delivery in a cohort of preterm infants and to compare the actual (delivered) intraprong continuous positive airway pressure with the intended (set) nasal continuous positive airway pressure for both ventilator-generated nasal continuous positive airway pressure and bubble nasal continuous positive airway pressure delivery. A range of set values and constant flow rates were studied in the same preterm infants. For 12 premature infants of <1500 g (birth weight: 1140 +/- 267 g; gestational age: 28.5 +/- 1.9 weeks; study age: 12.9 +/- 8 days; all mean +/- SD), intraprong pressures were measured at 3 increasing flow settings, repeated for set nasal continuous positive airway pressures (or desired immersion depths) of 4 and 6 cm H(2)O. Next, intraprong pressures were measured at bubble nasal continuous positive airway pressure expiratory tubing submersion depths and ventilator-generated nasal continuous positive airway pressure set expiratory pressures of 2, 3, 4, 5, and 7 cm H(2)O while the flow rate was held constant. Actual (delivered) intraprong pressure during bubble nasal continuous positive airway pressure delivery was highly flow dependent and increased as the flow rate increased. During ventilator-generated nasal continuous positive airway pressure delivery, actual pressure at the nasal prongs closely approximated the pressure set at the ventilator. During bubble nasal continuous positive airway pressure delivery at constant flow rate, the average delivered prong pressure was 1.3 cm H(2)O (range: 0.5-2.2 cm H(2)O) higher than that set through submersion of the expiratory tubing, and the relative difference between the set and actual pressures increased at lesser immersion depths. Prong pressure during bubble nasal continuous positive airway pressure delivery is highly variable and depends on the interaction of submersion depth and flow amplitudes.

  14. Modafinil Increases Awake EEG Activation and Improves Performance in Obstructive Sleep Apnea during Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Withdrawal

    PubMed Central

    Wang, David; Bai, Xiao Xue; Williams, Shaun C.; Hua, Shu Cheng; Kim, Jong-Won; Marshall, Nathaniel S.; D'Rozario, Angela; Grunstein, Ronald R.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: We examined the changes in waking electroencephalography (EEG) biomarkers with modafinil during continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) withdrawal in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) to investigate neurophysiological evidence for potential neurocognitive improvements. Design: Randomized double-blind placebo-controlled crossover study. CPAP was used for the first night and then withdrawn for 2 subsequent nights. Each morning after the 2 CPAP withdrawal nights, patients received either 200 mg modafinil or placebo. After a 5-w washout, the procedure repeated with the crossover drug. Setting: University teaching hospital. Participants: Stable CPAP users (n = 23 men with OSA) Measurement and Results: Karolinska Drowsiness Test (KDT) (awake EEG measurement with eyes open and closed), Psychomotor Vigilance Task (PVT), and driving simulator Performance were assessed bihourly during the 3 testing days following CPAP treatment and CPAP withdrawal nights. Compared to placebo, modafinil significantly increased awake EEG activation (faster EEG frequency) with increased alpha/delta (A/D) ratio (P < 0.0001) and fast ratio = (alpha+beta)/(delta+theta) (P < 0.0001) across the 2 days of CPAP withdrawal. The A/D ratio significantly correlated with the driving simulator response time (P = 0.015), steering variation (P = 0.002), and PVT reaction time (P = 0.006). In contrast, individual EEG band power of alpha, beta, theta, and delta did not correlate with any neurocognitive performance. Conclusions: Modafinil administration during continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) withdrawal increased awake EEG activation, which correlated to improved performance. This study provides supporting neurophysiological evidence that modafinil is a potential short-term treatment option during acute CPAP withdrawal. Citation: Wang D, Bai XX, Williams SC, Hua SC, Kim JW, Marshall NS, D'Rozario A, Grunstein RR. Modafinil increases awake EEG activation and improves performance

  15. Continuous positive airway pressure improves sleep and daytime sleepiness in patients with Parkinson disease and sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Neikrug, Ariel B; Liu, Lianqi; Avanzino, Julie A; Maglione, Jeanne E; Natarajan, Loki; Bradley, Lenette; Maugeri, Alex; Corey-Bloom, Jody; Palmer, Barton W; Loredo, Jose S; Ancoli-Israel, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), common in Parkinson disease (PD), contributes to sleep disturbances and daytime sleepiness. We assessed the effect of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) on OSA, sleep, and daytime sleepiness in patients with PD. This was a randomized placebo-controlled, crossover design. Patients with PD and OSA were randomized into 6 w of therapeutic treatment or 3 w of placebo followed by 3 w of therapeutic treatment. Patients were evaluated by polysomnography (PSG) and multiple sleep latency test (MSLT) pretreatment (baseline), after 3 w, and after 6 w of CPAP treatment. Analyses included mixed models, paired analysis, and within-group analyses comparing 3 w to 6 w of treatment. Sleep laboratory. Thirty-eight patients with PD (mean age = 67.2 ± 9.2 y; 12 females). Continuous positive airway pressure. PSG OUTCOME MEASURES: sleep efficiency, %sleep stages (N1, N2, N3, R), arousal index, apnea-hypopnea index (AHI), and % time oxygen saturation < 90% (%time SaO2 < 90%). MSLT outcome measures: mean sleep-onset latency (MSL). There were significant group-by-time interactions for AHI (P < 0.001), % time SaO2 < 90% (P = 0.02), %N2 (P = 0.015) and %N3 (P = 0.014). Subjects receiving therapeutic CPAP showed significant decrease in AHI, %time SaO2 < 90%, %N2, and significant increase in %N3 indicating effectiveness of CPAP in the treatment of OSA, improvement in nighttime oxygenation, and in deepening sleep. The paired sample analyses revealed that 3 w of therapeutic treatment resulted in significant decreases in arousal index (t = 3.4, P = 0.002). All improvements after 3 w were maintained at 6 w. Finally, 3 w of therapeutic CPAP also resulted in overall decreases in daytime sleepiness (P = 0.011). Therapeutic continuous positive airway pressure versus placebo was effective in reducing apnea events, improving oxygen saturation, and deepening sleep in patients with Parkinson disease and obstructive sleep apnea. Additionally, arousal index was reduced

  16. Established vascular effects of continuous positive airway pressure therapy in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea—an update

    PubMed Central

    Wons, Annette Marie

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this review was to summarize the current data from randomised controlled trials (RCTs) on vascular effects of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). There is good evidence from RCTs that CPAP lowers blood pressure (BP) to a clinically significant amount. The effect seems to be dependent on the hours of nightly CPAP usage. Data from RCTs have also proven a beneficial effect of CPAP on measures of vascular function such as endothelial function and arterial stiffness. However, there is still a lack of evidence from RCTs proving that CPAP reduces vascular events and mortality. PMID:26101649

  17. Symmetric flux continuous positive definite approximation of the elliptic full tensor pressure equation in local conservative form

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, M.G.

    1995-12-31

    A classical finite volume scheme well known in computational aerodynamics for solving the Transonic full potential equation is imported into reservoir simulation and applied to the full tensor pressure equation. Cell vertex discretization is shown to be a natural framework for approximation. With permeability placed at the cell centers and potential at the vertices (cell corner points), of the grid the scheme is flux continuous and locally conservative. Analysis is presented which proves that the resulting discrete matrix is symmetric positive definite provided the full permeability tensor is symmetric elliptic. The discrete matrix is also diagonally dominant subject to a sufficient elliptically condition. For a diagonal anisotropic tensor the discrete matrix is always symmetric positive definite and the scheme is up to 4th order accurate. A cell centered version of the scheme is indicated.

  18. Neutral vs positive oral contrast in diagnosing acute appendicitis with contrast-enhanced CT: sensitivity, specificity, reader confidence and interpretation time

    PubMed Central

    Naeger, D M; Chang, S D; Kolli, P; Shah, V; Huang, W; Thoeni, R F

    2011-01-01

    Objective The study compared the sensitivity, specificity, confidence and interpretation time of readers of differing experience in diagnosing acute appendicitis with contrast-enhanced CT using neutral vs positive oral contrast agents. Methods Contrast-enhanced CT for right lower quadrant or right flank pain was performed in 200 patients with neutral and 200 with positive oral contrast including 199 with proven acute appendicitis and 201 with other diagnoses. Test set disease prevalence was 50%. Two experienced gastrointestinal radiologists, one fellow and two first-year residents blindly assessed all studies for appendicitis (2000 readings) and assigned confidence scores (1=poor to 4=excellent). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were generated. Total interpretation time was recorded. Each reader's interpretation with the two agents was compared using standard statistical methods. Results Average reader sensitivity was found to be 96% (range 91–99%) with positive and 95% (89–98%) with neutral oral contrast; specificity was 96% (92–98%) and 94% (90–97%). For each reader, no statistically significant difference was found between the two agents (sensitivities p-values >0.6; specificities p-values>0.08), in the area under the ROC curve (range 0.95–0.99) or in average interpretation times. In cases without appendicitis, positive oral contrast demonstrated improved appendix identification (average 90% vs 78%) and higher confidence scores for three readers. Average interpretation times showed no statistically significant differences between the agents. Conclusion Neutral vs positive oral contrast does not affect the accuracy of contrast-enhanced CT for diagnosing acute appendicitis. Although positive oral contrast might help to identify normal appendices, we continue to use neutral oral contrast given its other potential benefits. PMID:20959365

  19. Comparison of two flow generators with a noninvasive ventilator to deliver continuous positive airway pressure: a test lung study.

    PubMed

    Fu, Carolina; Caruso, Pedro; Lucatto, Jeanette Janaina Jaber; de Paula Schettino, Guilherme Pinto; de Souza, Rogério; Carvalho, Carlos Roberto Ribeiro

    2005-11-01

    To compare the performance of two continuous flow generators with a ventilator designed for noninvasive positive pressure ventilation (NPPV) to deliver continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). The performance of flow generators using different oxygen pressure supplies was also compared. Experimental study using a mechanical lung model in a university research laboratory. Two flow generators supplied at 100, 200, and 300 kPa and an NPPV ventilator were compared at CPAP of 5, 10, and 15 cmH2O in: (a) area under the adjusted CPAP level during inspiration, (b) capacity to attain the preset CPAP, and (c) tidal volume. The NPPV ventilator attained the preset CPAP better than flow generators, but its area under adjusted CPAP was similar to or higher than that of flow generators when these were adjusted to their better pressure supply. Both flow generators had better performance with an output flow around 100 l/min, which was achieved at 100 kPa with one flow generator and 300 with the other. Flow generators and the NPPV ventilator generated similar tidal volumes. Flow generators performance showed large variations among different devices and oxygen pressure supplies. Adjusted to their better pressure supply, flow generators had a similar or better capacity to maintain the CPAP level, but the NPPV ventilator was more reliable to attain the preset CPAP. Flow generators could be an alternative to provide CPAP in low-income areas, usually with scarce medical equipment availability.

  20. P16-positive continuous minimal deviation adenocarcinoma and gastric type adenocarcinoma in a patient with Peutz-Jeghers syndrome.

    PubMed

    Peng, Wei-Xia; Kure, Shoko; Ishino, Kousuke; Kurose, Keisuke; Yoneyama, Koichi; Wada, Ryuichi; Naito, Zenya

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS) in a 33-year-old female patient with synchronous uterine cervical minimal deviation adenocarcinoma (MDA) and gastric type adenocarcinoma (GTA). The patient was diagnosed with PJS at the age of 10. At the time of consultation, she complained of watery discharge. Magnetic resonance imaging of the pelvis showed a poorly circumscribed mass in the uterine cervix. Histologically, both MDA and GTA components, as well as their transitional area, were observed. Both components were diffusely positive for MUC6, CK7 and, robustly, for p16. Moreover, the components were negative for ER, PgR and CEA, while HIK1083 and CK20 positive cells were found focally. Ki-67 labeling index in the MDA component was 5% while that in the GTA component was 50%. This case of GTA accompanied by MDA in a patient with PJS is distinct from the single previously-reported comparable case of which we are aware, with respect to the overexpression of p16 protein, an event considered rare in these tumors, and the continuity between the MDA and GTA components. This continuity favors the hypothesis that GTA arises from the dedifferentiation of MDA.

  1. Sci—Thur PM: Imaging — 01: Position-sensitive noise characteristics in multi-pinhole cardiac SPECT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Cuddy-Walsh, SG; Wells, RG

    2014-08-15

    Myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) with Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) is invaluable in the diagnosis and management of heart disease. It provides essential information on myocardial blood flow and ischemia. Multi-pinhole dedicated cardiac-SPECT cameras offer improved count sensitivity, and spatial and energy resolutions over parallel-hole camera designs however variable sensitivity across the field-of-view (FOV) can lead to position-dependent noise variations. Since MPI evaluates differences in the signal-to-noise ratio, noise variations in the camera could significantly impact the sensitivity of the test for ischemia. We evaluated the noise characteristics of GE Healthcare's Discovery NM530c camera with a goal of optimizing the accuracy of our patient assessment and thereby improving outcomes. Theoretical sensitivity maps of the camera FOV, including attenuation effects, were estimated analytically based on the distance and angle between the spatial position of a given voxel and each pinhole. The standard deviation in counts, σ was inferred for each voxel position from the square root of the sensitivity mapped at that position. Noise was measured experimentally from repeated (N=16) acquisitions of a uniform spherical Tc-99m-water phantom. The mean (μ) and standard deviation (σ) were calculated for each voxel position in the reconstructed FOV. Noise increased ∼2.1× across a 12 cm sphere. A correlation of 0.53 is seen when experimental noise is compared with theory suggesting that ∼53% of the noise is attributed to the combined effects of attenuation and the multi-pinhole geometry. Further investigations are warranted to determine the clinical impact of the position-dependent noise variation.

  2. Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Treatment for Acute Mountain Sickness at 4240 m in the Nepal Himalaya

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Claire C.; Poudyal, Prasanta; Regmi, Nirajan; Walmsley, Megan A.; Basnyat, Buddha

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Johnson, Pamela L., Claire C. Johnson, Prasanta Poudyal, Nirajan N. Regmi, Megan A. Walmsley, and Buddha Basnyat. Continuous positive airway pressure treatment for acute mountain sickness at 4240 m in the Nepal Himalaya. High Alt Med Biol 14:230–233, 2013.—Acute mountain sickness (AMS) is very common at altitudes above 2500 m. There are few treatment options in the field where electricity availability is limited, and medical assistance or oxygen is unavailable or difficult to access. Positive airway pressure has been used to treat AMS at 3800 m. We hypothesized that continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) could be used under field conditions powered by small rechargeable batteries. Methods Part 1. 5 subjects trekked to 3500 m from 2800 m in one day and slept there for one night, ascending in the late afternoon to 3840 m, where they slept using CPAP 6–7 cm via mask. The next morning they descended to 3500 m, spent the day there, ascended in late afternoon to 3840 m, and slept the night without CPAP. Continuous overnight oximetry was recorded and the Lake Louise questionnaire for AMS administered both mornings. Methods Part 2. 14 trekkers with symptoms of AMS were recruited at 4240 m. All took acetazolamide. The Lake Louise questionnaire was administered, oximetry recorded, and CPAP 6–7 cm was applied for 10–15 min. CPAP was used overnight and oximetry recorded continuously. In the morning the Lake Louise questionnaire was administered, and oximetry recorded for 10–15 min. The equipment used in both parts was heated, humidified Respironics RemStar® machines powered by Novuscell™ rechargeable lithium ion batteries. Oximetry was recorded using Embletta™ PDS. Results Part 1. CPAP improved overnight Sao2 and eliminated AMS symptoms in the one subject who developed AMS. CPAP was used for 7–9 h and the machines operated for >8 h using the battery. Results Part 2. CPAP use improved Sao2 when used for 10–15

  3. The sensitivity of soil O2 and redox biogeochemistry to landscape position and climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silver, W. L.; Ruan, L.; O'Connell, C.; Gutiérrez del Arroyo, O.

    2015-12-01

    Soil oxygen (O2) availability and associated redox dynamics are key drivers of carbon and nitrogen cycling and greenhouse gas emissions in terrestrial ecosystems. However, few studies have measured soil O2 availability, and even fewer have related this to biogeochemical cycling over space and time. Redox dynamics are likely to play a particularly important role in humid tropical forests characterized by high rainfall, near constant warm temperatures, high biological activity, and finely textured soils, all of which contribute to periodic O2 depletion throughout the soil profile. These ecosystems exhibit rapid C turnover and are a globally important source of the major greenhouse gases. We report on an extensive network of galvanic O2 sensors and time-domain reflectometry along topographic gradients in a lower montane wet tropical forest in Puerto Rico (n = 105 sensors). Within the sensor field we also installed three automated surface flux chambers in each topographic zone (ridge, slope and valley). A Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) gas analyzer was used to measure pseudo-continuous fluxes of CO2, N2O, and CH4. Soil O2 concentrations decrease nonlinearly from ridges to valleys along topographic gradients. Soil moisture was the best single predictor of soil O2 concentrations explaining over 50% of the variability in the data, even in these well-drained soils. Drought conditions dramatically altered soil O2 dynamics in both time and space, and showed that redox drivers differed by topographic position. Both ridges and slopes produced higher CO2 fluxes than valleys. Daily CH4 emissions went up to ~2000 g CH4 ha-1d-1 for valleys (hot spots and hot moments). Soil O2 dynamics also helped explain patterns in reactive Fe species and C storage, as well as pH along the catena. Our results highlight the potential for soil O2 concentrations as an integrator of biogeochemical dynamics in variable redox environments. They also provide a mechanism for identifying and

  4. Choosing an Oronasal Mask to Deliver Continuous Positive Airway Pressure May Cause More Upper Airway Obstruction or Lead to Higher Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Requirements than a Nasal Mask in Some Patients: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Justin R.; Aiyappan, Vinod; Mercer, Jeremy; Catcheside, Peter G.; Chai-Coetzer, Ching Li; McEvoy, R. Doug; Antic, Nick

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: The choice of mask interface used with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy can affect the control of upper airway obstruction (UAO) in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). We describe a case series of four patients with paradoxical worsening of UAO with an oronasal mask and the effect of changing to a nasal mask. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the case histories of 4 patients and recorded patient demographics, in-laboratory and ambulatory CPAP titration data, CPAP therapy data, type of mask interface used and potential confounding factors. Results: The 4 cases (mean ± SD: age = 59 ± 16 y; BMI = 30.5 ± 4.5 kg/m2) had a high residual apnoea-hypopnea index (AHI) (43 ± 14.2 events/h) and high CPAP pressure requirements (14.9 ± 6.6 cmH2O) with an oronasal mask. Changing to a nasal mask allowed adequate control of UAO with a significant reduction in the average residual AHI (3.1 ± 1.5 events/h). In two of the four cases, it was demonstrated that control of UAO was obtained at a much lower CPAP pressure compared to the oronasal mask (Case one = 17.5 cmH2O vs 12cmH2O; Case two = 17.9 cmH2O vs 7.8 cmH2O). Other potential confounding factors were unchanged. There are various physiological observations that may explain these findings but it is uncertain which individuals are susceptible to these mechanisms. Conclusions: If patients have OSA incompletely controlled by CPAP with evidence of residual UAO and/or are requiring surprisingly high CPAP pressure to control OSA with an oronasal mask, the choice of mask should be reviewed and consideration be given to a trial of a nasal mask. Commentary: A commentary on this article appears in this issue on page 1209. Citation: Ng JR, Aiyappan V, Mercer J, Catcheside PG, Chai-Coetzer CL, McEvoy RD, Antic N. Choosing an oronasal mask to deliver continuous positive airway pressure may cause more upper airway obstruction or lead to higher continuous positive airway pressure requirements than a nasal

  5. Positional cloning of the human quantitative trait locus underlying taste sensitivity to phenylthiocarbamide.

    PubMed

    Kim, Un-kyung; Jorgenson, Eric; Coon, Hilary; Leppert, Mark; Risch, Neil; Drayna, Dennis

    2003-02-21

    The ability to taste the substance phenylthiocarbamide (PTC) has been widely used for genetic and anthropological studies, but genetic studies have produced conflicting results and demonstrated complex inheritance for this trait. We have identified a small region on chromosome 7q that shows strong linkage disequilibrium between single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers and PTC taste sensitivity in unrelated subjects. This region contains a single gene that encodes a member of the TAS2R bitter taste receptor family. We identified three coding SNPs giving rise to five haplotypes in this gene worldwide. These haplotypes completely explain the bimodal distribution of PTC taste sensitivity, thus accounting for the inheritance of the classically defined taste insensitivity and for 55 to 85% of the variance in PTC sensitivity. Distinct phenotypes were associated with specific haplotypes, which demonstrates that this gene has a direct influence on PTC taste sensitivity and that sequence variants at different sites interact with each other within the encoded gene product.

  6. Imprinted numbers: newborn chicks' sensitivity to number vs. continuous extent of objects they have been reared with.

    PubMed

    Rugani, Rosa; Regolin, Lucia; Vallortigara, Giorgio

    2010-09-01

    Newborn chicks were tested for their sensitivity to number vs. continuous physical extent of artificial objects they had been reared with soon after hatching. Because of the imprinting process, such objects were treated by chicks as social companions. We found that when the objects were similar, chicks faced with choices between 1 vs. 2 or 2 vs. 3 objects chose the set of objects of larger numerosity, irrespective of the number of objects they had been reared with. Moreover, when volume, surface or contour length were controlled for using sets of 1 vs. 4, 1 vs. 6 or 1 vs. 3 objects, chicks resorted to choosing the larger object, rather than the familiar numerosity. When, however, chicks were reared with objects differing in their aspect (colour, size, and shape) and then tested with completely novel objects (of different colour and shape but controlled for continuous extent), they chose to associate with the same number of objects they had been reared with. These results suggest that identification of objects as different and separate individuals is crucial for the computation of number rather than continuous extent in numerical representation of small numerosities and provide a striking parallel with results obtained in human infants. Early availability of small numerosity discrimination by chicks strongly suggests that these abilities are in place at birth.

  7. Continuous Monitoring and Intrafraction Target Position Correction During Treatment Improves Target Coverage for Patients Undergoing SBRT Prostate Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lovelock, D. Michael; Messineo, Alessandra P.; Cox, Brett W.; Kollmeier, Marisa A.; Zelefsky, Michael J.

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: To compare the potential benefits of continuous monitoring of prostate position and intervention (CMI) using 2-mm displacement thresholds during stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) treatment to those of a conventional image-guided procedure involving single localization prior to treatment. Methods and Materials: Eighty-nine patients accrued to a prostate SBRT dose escalation protocol were implanted with radiofrequency transponder beacons. The planning target volume (PTV) margin was 5 mm in all directions, except for 3 mm in the posterior direction. The prostate was kept within 2 mm of its planned position by the therapists halting dose delivery and, if necessary, correcting the couch position. We computed the number, type, and time required for interventions and where the prostate would have been during dose delivery had there been, instead, a single image-guided setup procedure prior to each treatment. Distributions of prostate displacements were computed as a function of time. Results: After the initial setup, 1.7 interventions per fraction were required, with a concomitant increase in time for dose delivery of approximately 65 seconds. Small systematic drifts in prostate position in the posterior and inferior directions were observed in the study patients. Without CMI, intrafractional motion would have resulted in approximately 10% of patients having a delivered dose that did not meet our clinical coverage requirement, that is, a PTV D95 of >90%. The posterior PTV margin required for 95% of the dose to be delivered with the target positioned within the PTV was computed as a function of time. The margin necessary was found to increase by 2 mm every 5 minutes, starting from the time of the imaging procedure. Conclusions: CMI using a tight 2-mm displacement threshold was not only feasible but was found to deliver superior PTV coverage compared with the conventional image-guided procedure in the SBRT setting.

  8. Long-Term Effects of Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Treatment on Sexuality in Female Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Marian; Kristensen, Ellids; Berg, Søren; Midgren, Bengt

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Results from a previous study showed that sexuality was negatively affected in females with untreated obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Data are sparse on the long-term effects of nocturnal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment on sexual difficulties and sexual distress in female patients with OSA. Aim The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects after 1 year of CPAP treatment on sexual difficulties, sexual distress, and manifest sexual dysfunction in female patients with OSA. The effect of CPAP on life satisfaction was also investigated. Methods Fifty-four therapy-compliant, female patients (age 22–71) received a survey before and after 1 year of nocturnal CPAP treatment. The questions on this survey were drawn from three self-administered questionnaires: two on sexuality and one on life satisfaction. The results were compared with a population sample. The Epworth Sleepiness Scale was used for assessment of daytime sleepiness. Main Outcome Measures The Female Sexual Function Index, Female Sexual Distress Scale, Manifest Female Sexual Dysfunction, four questions from Life Satisfaction 11, and the Epworth Sleepiness Scale were all used to measure outcome. Results In total, 44 patients responded to the survey (81% response rate). The results were a significant, positive change in manifest female sexual dysfunction, but no significant changes in isolated sexual difficulties or sexual distress. Daytime sleepiness significantly decreased after 1 year. The results from the Life Satisfaction 11 questionnaire remained unchanged after 1 year. Conclusions After 1 year of CPAP treatment, female patients with OSA reported reduced manifest sexual dysfunction. However, it cannot be concluded if this result is due to CPAP treatment alone. Furthermore, reduced daytime tiredness was found in the surveyed population. CPAP treatment, per se, does not seem to affect partner relationships. Petersen M, Kristensen E, Berg S, and Midgren B. Long

  9. Proportional counter for X-ray analysis of lunar and planetary surfaces. [a position sensitive scintillating imaging proportional counter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    A position sensitive proportional scintillation detector was developed and evaluated for use in applications involving X-ray imaging as well as spectroscopy. Topics covered include limitations of the proportional scintillation counter for use in space; purification of the xenon gas in the detector, and the operation of the detector system. Results show that the light signal in a proportional scintillation detector remains well localized. With modest electric fields in xenon, the primary electrons from a photoelectric absorption of an X-ray can be brought a distance of a few millimeters to a higher field region without spreading more than a millimeter or so. Therefore, it is possible to make a proportional scintillation detector with good position sensitivity that could be used to calibrate out the difference in light collection over its sensitive volume.

  10. Positioning system for single or multi-axis sensitive instrument calibration and calibration system for use therewith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finley, Tom D. (Inventor); Parker, Peter A. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A positioning and calibration system are provided for use in calibrating a single or multi axis sensitive instrument, such as an inclinometer. The positioning system includes a positioner that defines six planes of tangential contact. A mounting region within the six planes is adapted to have an inclinometer coupled thereto. The positioning system also includes means for defining first and second flat surfaces that are approximately perpendicular to one another with the first surface adapted to be oriented relative to a local or induced reference field of interest to the instrument being calibrated, such as a gravitational vector. The positioner is positioned such that one of its six planes tangentially rests on the first flat surface and another of its six planes tangentially contacts the second flat surface. A calibration system is formed when the positioning system is used with a data collector and processor.

  11. Investigation on gamma-ray position sensitivity at 662 keV in a spectroscopic 3' x 3' LaBr3:Ce scintillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giaz, A.; Camera, F.; Birocchi, F.; Blasi, N.; Boiano, C.; Brambilla, S.; Coelli, S.; Fiorini, C.; Marone, A.; Million, B.; Riboldi, S.; Wieland, O.

    2015-02-01

    The position sensitivity of a thick, cylindrical and continuous 3" x 3" (7.62 cm x 7.62 cm) LaBr3:Ce crystal was studied using a 1 mm collimated beam of 662 keV gamma rays from a 400 MBq intense 137Cs source and a spectroscopic photomultiplier (PMT) (HAMAMATSU R6233-100SEL). The PMT entrance window was covered by black absorber except for a small window 1 cm x 1 cm wide. A complete scan of the detector over a 0.5 cm step grid was performed for three positions of the 1 cm x 1 cm window. For each configuration the energy spectrum was measured and the peak centroid, the FWHM, the area and peak asymmetry of the 662 keV gamma transition were analyzed. The data show that, even in a 3" thick LaBr3:Ce crystal with diffusive surfaces the position of the full energy peak centroid depends on the source position. We verified that, on average, the position of the full energy peak centroids measured in the three 1 cm x 1 cm window configurations is sufficient for the correct identification of the collimated gamma source position.

  12. Impact of Randomization, Clinic Visits, and Medical and Psychiatric Cormorbidities on Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Adherence in Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Budhiraja, Rohit; Kushida, Clete A.; Nichols, Deborah A.; Walsh, James K.; Simon, Richard D.; Gottlieb, Daniel J.; Quan, Stuart F.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: To evaluate factors associated with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) adherence in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in the Apnea Positive Pressure Long-term Efficacy Study (APPLES) cohort. Methods: The data from a prospective 6-mo multicenter randomized controlled trial with 558 subjects randomized to active CPAP and 547 to sham CPAP were analyzed to assess adherence to CPAP during first 2 mo (early period) and during months 5-6 (late period). Results: Participants randomized to active CPAP had higher hours of nightly adherence compared to the sham CPAP group at both 2 (4.9 ± 2.0 h versus 4.07 ± 2.14 h, p < 0.001) and 6 mo (4.70 ± 2.08 h versus 3.41 ± 2.19 h, p < 0.001). Those assigned to sham CPAP were more likely to correctly identify their treatment group (70.0% versus 55.2%, p < 0.001). Irrespective of treatment group assignment, those who believed they were receiving active CPAP had higher hours of adherence than those who thought they were in the sham CPAP group at both 2 mo (4.91 ± 2.01 versus 4.17 ± 2.17, p < 0.001) and 6 mo (4.65 ± 2.10 versus 3.65 ± 2.22, p < 0.001). Among those randomized to active CPAP, older age was significantly related to CPAP use > 4 h per night. Presence of cardiovascular disorders was associated with higher hours of CPAP use, whereas presence of anxiety was associated with a trend toward lower hours of CPAP use. Presence of nasal congestion was associated with a decrease in mean daily CPAP use between the early and the late adherence period. The adherence during the week prior to a clinic visit was higher than the average adherence during the 2-mo period prior to the visit. Conclusions: Randomization to active therapy, belief that one is in the active treatment group, older age, and possibly presence of cardiovascular disorders are positively linked to CPAP adherence. Nasal congestion and anxiety are negatively associated with CPAP adherence. CPAP nightly usage increases as clinic

  13. High Sensitivity EMAT System using Chirp Pulse Compression and Its Application to Crater End Detection in Continuous Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iizuka, Y.; Awajiya, Y.

    2014-06-01

    A high sensitivity EMAT system using chirp pulse compression technique was developed. The system uses a high power gated amplifier having 2kVpp output to transmit chirp waves. Pulse compression of the received signals are performed digitally in a PC after amplification and analog-to-digital conversion. A 20dB improvement of the signal-to-noise ratio was achieved by chirp pulse compression and synchronous averaging. A new surface cooling technique was also developed to improve the signal amplitude of the bulk shear wave with hot steel, and its effectiveness was demonstrated. An actual plant test of crater end detection by the developed EMAT system was conducted at a continuous caster, and clear detection by non-contact EMATs was achieved.

  14. A better confidence interval for the sensitivity at a fixed level of specificity for diagnostic tests with continuous endpoints.

    PubMed

    Shan, Guogen

    2017-02-01

    For a diagnostic test with continuous measurement, it is often important to construct confidence intervals for the sensitivity at a fixed level of specificity. Bootstrap-based confidence intervals were shown to have good performance as compared to others, and the one by Zhou and Qin (2005) was recommended as the best existing confidence interval, named the BTII interval. We propose two new confidence intervals based on the profile variance method and conduct extensive simulation studies to compare the proposed intervals and the BTII intervals under a wide range of conditions. An example from a medical study on severe head trauma is used to illustrate application of the new intervals. The new proposed intervals generally have better performance than the BTII interval.

  15. Polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography measurements with different phase modulation amplitude when using continuous polarization modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zenghai; Kasaragod, Deepa K.; Matcher, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate theoretically and experimentally that the phase retardance and relative optic-axis orientation of a sample can be calculated without prior knowledge of the actual value of the phase modulation amplitude when using a polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography system based on continuous polarization modulation (CPM-PS-OCT). We also demonstrate that the sample Jones matrix can be calculated at any values of the phase modulation amplitude in a reasonable range depending on the system effective signal-to-noise ratio. This has fundamental importance for the development of clinical systems by simplifying the polarization modulator drive instrumentation and eliminating its calibration procedure. This was validated on measurements of a three-quarter waveplate and an equine tendon sample by a fiber-based swept-source CPM-PS-OCT system.

  16. A 4-week wait 'fast-track' sleep service is effective at establishing vocational drivers on continuous positive airway pressure.

    PubMed

    West, Sophie D; Downie, Beatrice; Olds, Gillian; Tomlinson, Mark; Wotton, Claire; Firth, Emma; McMillan, Alison

    2017-10-01

    We sought to establish whether an expedited or 'fast-track' NHS service to diagnose obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) and establish vocational drivers on continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) within 4 weeks of referral was possible. This model is recommended by the OSA Partnership Group. In total, 55 vocational drivers were referred to two sleep services. Assessment showed 73% had moderate or severe OSA on sleep study. Of those commenced on CPAP, review was a mean of 15 days after initiation (range 3-62 days). Median time from referral (or first clinic visit) to review on CPAP was 32 days, showing a 'fast-track' pathway is deliverable. © Royal College of Physicians 2017. All rights reserved.

  17. Surfactant and continuous positive airway pressure for the prevention of chronic lung disease: History, reality, and new challenges.

    PubMed

    Aly, Hany; Mohamed, Mohamed A; Wung, Jen-Tien

    2017-10-01

    The discovery of surfactant was one of the most significant research events to occur in the history of neonatology. Certainly, surfactant saved lives for premature infants who were otherwise considered non-viable. However, the prevention of chronic lung disease did not progress and it became clear that a significant portion of the help surfactant provides to the premature lung is counteracted by mechanical ventilation. A dilemma exists over the priorities in premature management to intubate and administer surfactant or not to intubate and support these infants non-invasively with the use of continuous positive airway pressure. A new hydrophilic surfactant preparation has been developed with the hope to enable the introduction of surfactant therapy without the need for tracheal intubation. Clinical trials on this product are currently in progress. This article provides the history and prospect of respiratory distress management in premature infants and evaluates the current evidence for non-invasive practices. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of sleep apnea and continuous positive airway pressure on cardiac structure and recurrence of atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Neilan, Tomas G; Farhad, Hoshang; Dodson, John A; Shah, Ravi V; Abbasi, Siddique A; Bakker, Jessie P; Michaud, Gregory F; van der Geest, Rob; Blankstein, Ron; Steigner, Michael; John, Roy M; Jerosch-Herold, Michael; Malhotra, Atul; Kwong, Raymond Y

    2013-11-25

    Sleep apnea (SA) is associated with an increased risk of atrial fibrillation (AF). We sought to determine the effect of SA on cardiac structure in patients with AF, whether therapy for SA was associated with beneficial cardiac structural remodelling, and whether beneficial cardiac structural remodelling translated into a reduced risk of recurrence of AF after pulmonary venous isolation (PVI). A consecutive group of 720 patients underwent a cardiac magnetic resonance study before PVI. Patients with SA (n=142, 20%) were more likely to be male, diabetic, and hypertensive and have an increased pulmonary artery pressure, right ventricular volume, atrial dimensions, and left ventricular mass. Treated SA was defined as duration of continuous positive airway pressure therapy of >4 hours per night. Treated SA patients (n=71, 50%) were more likely to have paroxysmal AF, a lower blood pressure, lower ventricular mass, and smaller left atrium. During a follow-up of 42 months, AF recurred in 245 patients. The cumulative incidence of AF recurrence was 51% in patients with SA, 30% in patients without SA, 68% in patients with untreated SA, and 35% in patients with treated SA. In a multivariable model, the presence of SA (hazard ratio 2.79, CI 1.97 to 3.94, P<0.0001) and untreated SA (hazard ratio 1.61, CI 1.35 to 1.92, P<0.0001) were highly associated with AF recurrence. Patients with SA have an increased blood pressure, pulmonary artery pressure, right ventricular volume, left atrial size, and left ventricular mass. Therapy with continuous positive airway pressure is associated with lower blood pressure, atrial size, and ventricular mass, and a lower risk of AF recurrence after PVI.

  19. Effects of continuous positive airway pressure treatment on cognitive functions in patients with severe obstructive sleep apnoea.

    PubMed

    Jurádo-Gámez, B; Guglielmi, O; Gude, F; Buela-Casal, G

    2016-06-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) has numerous implications for health and can affect neurocognitive functions in patients. To evaluate the neuropsychological functions most affected by OSAS, the factors associated with OSAS severity that are related to those functional limitations, and the effect of therapy with continuous positive airway pressure. The sample consisted of 60 participants: 30 patients diagnosed with OSAS (clinical group) and 30 people without the disorder (control group). Memory, intellectual processes, and attention were analysed with selected subtests from the Luria-Nebraska neuropsychological battery (immediate memory, logical memory, intellectual processes, and attentional control subtests). Patients obtained significantly lower scores than controls in most of the areas evaluated. Associations were identified between subjective sleep quality and conceptual activity (r=-0.279; P<.05) and attentional control (r=-0.392; P<.01); between oxygen saturation and both immediate memory (r=0.296; P<.05) and thematic drawings (r=0.318; P<.05); and between apnoea-hypopnoea index and immediate memory (r=-0.303; P<.05), logical memory (r=-0.359; P<.01), and thematic drawings (r=-0.302; P<.05). Continuous positive airway pressure was shown to be effective (P=.03) only for improving immediate memory in patients with OSAS. Patients with severe OSAS showed memory and attentional limitations, associated with poorer quality of sleep and with worst AHI and SaO2 mean. The CPAP use improved memory of the patients evaluated. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Therapy Reduces Right Ventricular Volume in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea: A Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Study

    PubMed Central

    Magalang, Ulysses J.; Richards, Kathryn; McCarthy, Beth; Fathala, Ahmed; Khan, Meena; Parinandi, Narasimham; Raman, Subha V.

    2009-01-01

    Study Objectives. There are few data on the effects of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy on the structural and functional characteristics of the right heart in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). We sought to leverage the advantages of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) and hypothesized that CPAP treatment would improve right ventricular (RV) function in a group of patients with OSA who were free of other comorbid conditions. Methods. Patients with severe (apnea-hypopnea index ≥ 30/h) untreated OSA were prospectively enrolled. CMR included 3-dimensional measurement of biventricular size and function, and rest/stress myocardial perfusion and was performed at baseline and after 3 months of CPAP therapy. Results. Fifteen patients with mild to moderate desaturation were enrolled; 2 could not undergo CMR due to claustrophobia and obesity. There were significant decreases in the Epworth Sleepiness Scale score (p < 0.0001) and RV end-systolic and RV end-diastolic volumes (p < 0.05) with CPAP. There was a trend toward improvement in RV ejection fraction, but the improvement did not reach statistical significance. Other measures such as left ventricular volumes, left ventricular ejection fraction, myocardial perfusion reserve index, and thickness of the interventricular septum and ventricular free wall did not change significantly. Conclusions: This preliminary study found that CPAP treatment decreases RV volumes in patients with severe OSA who are otherwise healthy. CMR offers a novel technique to determine the effects of CPAP on ventricular structure and function in patients with OSA. A randomized controlled study is needed to confirm the results of our study. Citation: Magalang UJ; Richards K; McCarthy B; Fathala A; Khan M; Parinandi N; Raman SV. Continuous positive airway pressure therapy reduces right ventricular volume in patients with obstructive sleep apnea: a cardiovascular magnetic resonance study. J Clin Sleep Med 2009

  1. Effect of Continuous Positive Airway Pressure on Sleep Structure in Heart Failure Patients with Central Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Ruttanaumpawan, Pimon; Logan, Alexander G.; Floras, John S.; Bradley, T. Douglas

    2009-01-01

    Study Objectives: At termination of obstructive apneas, arousal is a protective mechanism that facilitates restoration of upper airway patency and airflow. Treating obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) by continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) reduces arousal frequency indicating that such arousals are caused by OSA. In heart failure (HF) patients with central sleep apnea (CSA), however, arousals frequently occur several breaths after apnea termination, and there is uncertainty as to whether arousals from sleep are a consequence of CSA. If so, they should diminish in frequency when CSA is attenuated. We therefore sought to determine whether attenuation of CSA by CPAP reduces arousal frequency. Design: Randomized controlled clinical trial. Patients and Setting: We examined data from 205 HF patients with CSA (apnea-hypopnea index [AHI] ≥ 15, > 50% were central) randomized to CPAP or control who had polysomnograms performed at baseline and 3 months later. Measurements and Results: In the control group, there was no change in AHI or frequency of arousals. In the CPAP-treated group, the AHI decreased significantly (from [mean ± SD] 38.9 ± 15.0 to 17.6 ± 16.3, P < 0.001) but neither the frequency of arousals nor sleep structure changed significantly. Conclusion: These data suggest that attenuation of CSA by CPAP does not reduce arousal frequency in HF patients. We conclude that arousals were not mainly a consequence of CSA, and may not have been acting as a defense mechanism to terminate apneas in the same way they do in OSA. Citation: Ruttanaumpawan P; Logan AG; Floras JS; Bradley TD. Effect of Continuous Positive Airway Pressure on Sleep Structure in Heart Failure Patients with Central Sleep Apnea. SLEEP 2009;32(1):91-98. PMID:19189783

  2. [Ultrasound-guided continuous infraclavicular block for hand surgery: technical report arm position for perineural catheter placement].

    PubMed

    Zaragoza-Lemus, Guadalupe; Hernández-Gasca, Verónica; Espinosa-Gutiérrez, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    Continuous perineural infusion of local anesthetic provides better postoperative analgesia than intravenous administration of opioids or NSAIDs in upper limb surgery. The infraclavicular approach is a good option due to the muscular stability to catheter; the abduction of the arm apparently makes more superficial the brachial plexus and which elevates clavicle cephalad. The aim of this study was to identify whether the abduction of the arm for to decreases the skin-plexus distance, facilitating it catheter insertion in a perineural way for a better analgesia. This relation between the arm and the colocation of catheter has not yet been established. We included 58 adult patients, undergoing forearm and hand surgery, initially divided into two groups, adduction and abduction. It was placed continuous infraclavicular block guided by ultrasound, it allow the catheter tip was adjacent to the posterior cord. In the group patients with high technical difficulties were allowed to reposition the arm abduction, recording number of punctures, redirects, ease of insertion of the catheter and skin-plexus distance. The abduction of the arm moved the clavicle toward cephalad and separated it from the linear transducer, this allowed to maneuver the needle right angle and redirect it, the distance skin-plexus did not decrease significantly with arm position. Arm abduction allows better scanning facilitates the infraclavicular puncture and catheter introduction. Copyright © 2015. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A.

  3. Effects of 12 Months Continuous Positive Airway Pressure on Sympathetic Activity Related Brainstem Function and Structure in Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Luke A.; Fatouleh, Rania H.; Lundblad, Linda C.; McKenzie, David K.; Macefield, Vaughan G.

    2016-01-01

    Muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) is greatly elevated in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) during normoxic daytime wakefulness. Increased MSNA is a precursor to hypertension and elevated cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. However, the mechanisms underlying the high MSNA in OSA are not well understood. In this study we used concurrent microneurography and magnetic resonance imaging to explore MSNA-related brainstem activity changes and anatomical changes in 15 control and 15 OSA subjects before and after 6 and 12 months of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment. We found that following 6 and 12 months of CPAP treatment, resting MSNA levels were significantly reduced in individuals with OSA. Furthermore, this MSNA reduction was associated with restoration of MSNA-related brainstem activity and structural changes in the medullary raphe, rostral ventrolateral medulla, dorsolateral pons, and ventral midbrain. This restoration occurred after 6 months of CPAP treatment and was maintained following 12 months CPAP. These findings show that continual CPAP treatment is an effective long-term treatment for elevated MSNA likely due to its effects on restoring brainstem structure and function. PMID:27013952

  4. Development of Gamma-Ray Compton Imager Using Room-Temperature 3-D Position Sensitive Semiconductor Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong He; David Whe; Glenn Knoll

    2003-05-14

    During the three years of this project, two 3-dimensional position sensitive CdZnTe spectrometers were upgraded in collaboration with Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory. A prototype Compton-scattering gamma-ray imager was assembled using the two upgraded CdZnTe detectors. The performance of both gamma-ray spectrometers were individually tested. The angular resolution and detection sensitivity of the imaging system were measured using both a point and a line-shaped 137 Cs radiation source. The measurement results are consistent with that obtained from Monte-Carlo simulations performed during the early phase of the project.

  5. An FPGA-Based Real-Time Maximum Likelihood 3D Position Estimation for a Continuous Crystal PET Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yonggang; Xiao, Yong; Cheng, Xinyi; Li, Deng; Wang, Liwei

    2016-02-01

    For the continuous crystal-based positron emission tomography (PET) detector built in our lab, a maximum likelihood algorithm adapted for implementation on a field programmable gate array (FPGA) is proposed to estimate the three-dimensional (3D) coordinate of interaction position with the single-end detected scintillation light response. The row-sum and column-sum readout scheme organizes the 64 channels of photomultiplier (PMT) into eight row signals and eight column signals to be readout for X- and Y-coordinates estimation independently. By the reference events irradiated in a known oblique angle, the probability density function (PDF) for each depth-of-interaction (DOI) segment is generated, by which the reference events in perpendicular irradiation are assigned to DOI segments for generating the PDFs for X and Y estimation in each DOI layer. Evaluated by the experimental data, the algorithm achieves an average X resolution of 1.69 mm along the central X-axis, and DOI resolution of 3.70 mm over the whole thickness (0-10 mm) of crystal. The performance improvements from 2D estimation to the 3D algorithm are also presented. Benefiting from abundant resources of FPGA and a hierarchical storage arrangement, the whole algorithm can be implemented into a middle-scale FPGA. By a parallel structure in pipelines, the 3D position estimator on the FPGA can achieve a processing throughput of 15 M events/s, which is sufficient for the requirement of real-time PET imaging.

  6. Model-based correction of the influence of body position on continuous segmental and hand-to-foot bioimpedance measurements.

    PubMed

    Medrano, Guillermo; Eitner, Frank; Walter, Marian; Leonhardt, Steffen

    2010-06-01

    Bioimpedance spectroscopy (BIS) is suitable for continuous monitoring of body water content. The combination of body posture and time is a well-known source of error, which limits the accuracy and therapeutic validity of BIS measurements. This study evaluates a model-based correction as a possible solution. For this purpose, an 11-cylinder model representing body impedance distribution is used. Each cylinder contains a nonlinear two-pool model to describe fluid redistribution due to changing body position and its influence on segmental and hand-to-foot (HF) bioimpedance measurements. A model-based correction of segmental (thigh) and HF measurements (Xitron Hydra 4200) in nine healthy human subjects (following a sequence of 7 min supine, 20 min standing, 40 min supine) has been evaluated. The model-based compensation algorithm represents a compromise between accuracy and simplicity, and reduces the influence of changes in body position on the measured extracellular resistance and extracellular fluid by up to 75 and 70%, respectively.

  7. Polysomnographic predictors of persistent continuous positive airway pressure adherence in patients with moderate and severe obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yung-Fu; Hang, Liang-Wen; Huang, Chun-Sen; Liang, Shinn-Jye; Chung, Wei-Sheng

    2015-02-01

    Extensive use of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) has positive clinical benefits for most patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). However, patient adherence is a major limiting factor to the effectiveness of CPAP treatment. This study determined the potential and quantifiable factors affecting the willingness of patients with OSA to undertake CPAP treatment by comparing the polysomnographic parameters recorded during diagnosis and titration. Patients with moderate and severe OSA who attended diagnostic polysomnography (PSG) and CPAP titration at the sleep center of China Medical University Hospital (CMUH) were included in the study. A total of 312 patients were divided into persistent users and nonusers of CPAP according to their use of in-home CPAP following titration and a 7-day CPAP trial. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to define the potential polysomnographic predictors of persistent CPAP adherence, and odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. Most patients were men older than 50 years who were overweight or obese. Among the patients, 146 (46.8%) became persistent CPAP users. A 10% improvement of oxygen desaturation index (ODI) and a 10% increment in deep sleep percentage increased the chance of persistent CPAP use 1.18-fold and 1.07-fold, respectively. In addition, the improved ODI and deep sleep during CPAP titration increased the chance of persistent CPAP user. The polysomnographic parameters obtained from diagnosis and during titration can facilitate the prediction of persistent CPAP use. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  8. Study of position reconstruction of a LaBr3:Ce continuous scintillation crystal for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabbri, A.; Sacco, D.; Bennati, P.; Baroncelli, A.; Galasso, M.; Cinti, M. N.; Pellegrini, R.; Pani, R.; Cencelli, V. O.

    2013-12-01

    Many modern molecular imaging techniques, based on radiopharmaceuticals, can take advantage of sophisticated devices but are still based on the scintillation detector mechanism proposed by Anger. These devices can perform with millimeter spatial resolution and high detection efficiency, but the final performance is strongly affected by the algorithm used for the scintillation position detection. In this work, a detailed comparison of the effect on the imaging performances of three new position detection algorithms, in terms of spatial resolution, detection linearity and useful Field of View is performed on a prototype gamma detector. The detector, built by the authors, is based on a continuous LaBr3:Ce scintillation crystal coupled to an Hamamatsu MA-PMT H8500 and a single anode readout electronics. The experimental data are obtained scanning the detector surface with a Tc99m collimated source (0.4 mm phi) at 1.5 mm step. The overall imaging performances of the device are also tested by mean of a bar phantom. We conclude that the Anger-like algorithms give a 50% uFoV with a 1.30 mm ±0.05 mm spatial resolution while the proposed algorithms give a 80% uFoV and 1.10 mm ±0.06 mm spatial resolution.

  9. Effect of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy on IL-23 in patients with obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Can, Murat; Uygur, Fırat; Tanrıverdi, Hakan; Acıkgoz, Bilgehan; Alper, Barıs; Guven, Berrak

    2016-12-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is a common sleep disorder characterized by repeated episodes of apnea and hypopnea during sleep. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is the most effective method for treating OSAS and alleviating the patients' symptoms. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of 3-month CPAP therapy on serum levels of IL-23 in patients with OSAS. Twenty-three patients with newly diagnosed moderate-to-severe OSAS who had not yet started nasal CPAP treatment were prospectively enrolled. All of the subjects underwent simple spirometry and an overnight sleep study. Twenty-seven healthy individuals without OSAS were also recruited as the control group. Serum IL-23 and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were measured before and after 3 months of CPAP therapy. There was no significant difference between moderate and severe OSAS patients in IL-23 and CRP, but both parameters were significantly higher than control group. The CPAP treatment produced a significant decrease in the levels of the inflammatory mediators CRP and IL-23 in patients. Changes in IL-23 were positively correlated with changes in AHI and in CRP. In conclusion, based on these results, serum IL-23 levels reflect OSAS-related systemic inflammation and are a useful marker for improvement in OSAS following CPAP therapy.

  10. The impact of continuously-variable dose rate VMAT on beam stability, MLC positioning, and overall plan dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Boylan, Christopher; McWilliam, Alan; Johnstone, Emily; Rowbottom, Carl

    2012-11-06

    A recent control system update for Elekta linear accelerators includes the ability to deliver volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) with continuously variable dose rate (CVDR), rather than a number of fixed binned dose rates (BDR). The capacity to select from a larger range of dose rates allows the linac to maintain higher gantry speeds, resulting in faster, smoother deliveries. The purpose of this study is to investigate two components of CVDR delivery - the increase in average dose rate and gantry speed, and a determination of their effects on beam stability, MLC positioning, and overall plan dosimetry. Initially, ten VMAT plans (5 prostate, 5head and neck) were delivered to a Delta4 dosimetric phantom using both the BDR and CVDR systems. The plans were found to be dosimetrically robust using both delivery methods, although CVDR was observed to give higher gamma pass rates at the 2%/2 mm gamma level for prostates (p < 0.01). For the dual arc head-and-neck plans, CVDR delivery resulted in improved pass rates at all gamma levels (2%/2 mm to 4%/4 mm) for individual arc verifications (p < 0.01), but gave similar results to BDR when both arcs were combined. To investigate the impact of increased gantry speed on MLC positioning, a dynamic leaf-tracking tool was developed using the electronic portal imaging device (EPID). Comparing the detected MLC positions to those expected from the plan, CVDR was observed to result in a larger mean error compared to BDR (0.13 cm and 0.06 cm, respectively, p < 0.01). The EPID images were also used to monitor beam stability during delivery. It was found that the CVDR deliveries had a lower standard deviation of the gun-target (GT) and transverse (AB) profiles (p < 0.01). This study has determined that CVDR may offer a dosimetric advantage for VMAT plans. While the higher gantry speed of CVDR appears to increase deviations in MLC positioning, the relative effect on dosimetry is lower than the positive impact of a flatter and more

  11. Music training and empathy positively impact adults’ sensitivity to infant distress

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, Christine E.; Young, Katherine S.; Jegindø, Else-Marie E.; Vuust, Peter; Stein, Alan; Kringelbach, Morten L.

    2014-01-01

    Crying is the most powerful auditory signal of infant need. Adults’ ability to perceive and respond to crying is important for infant survival and in the provision of care. This study investigated a number of listener variables that might impact on adults’ perception of infant cry distress, namely parental status, musical training, and empathy. Sensitivity to infant distress was tested using a previously validated task, which experimentally manipulated distress by varying the pitch of infant cries. This task required that participants discriminate between pitch differences and interpret these as differences in infant distress. Parents with musical training showed a significant advantage on this task when compared with parents without. The extent of the advantage was correlated with the amount of self-reported musical training. For non-parents, individual differences in empathy were associated with task performance, with higher empathy scores corresponding to greater sensitivity to infant distress. We suggest that sensitivity to infant distress can be impacted by a number of listener variables, and may be amenable to training. PMID:25566122

  12. Comparisons of the five analytic reference lines of the horizontal lip position: their consistency and sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Hsu, B S

    1993-10-01

    One-hundred ten lateral facial profiles were judged to be attractive and were selected from 1000 Taiwanese pupils by a panel of four men and three women from different educational backgrounds. The 110 in the attractive group were analyzed by using five analytic reference lines: Ricketts E line, Holdaway's H line, Steiner's S1 line, Burstone's B line, and Sushner's S2 line. Comparisons of the "consistency" (the smaller coefficient of variation the better the consistency) and the "sensitivity" (the power to differentiate the attractive lateral facial profiles from the unattractive ones) of the five analytic lines were performed. The B line was found to be best in terms of both consistency and sensitivity. From the point of view of convenience, the E line is of great value because its anterior location makes it convenient for the clinician to use. However, the B line appears best from the perspective of the value of reference. This study found that those analytic reference lines that do not transverse an anatomic landmark of the nose most likely have poor consistency and sensitivity. This finding is consistent with the idea that the nose should be taken into consideration when a line is to be used as a reference for beauty on the lateral facial profile.

  13. Stress-sensitive nutrient consumption via steady and non-reversing dynamic shear in continuous-flow rotational bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Belfiore, Laurence A; Bonani, Walter; Leoni, Matteo; Belfiore, Carol J

    2009-05-01

    Stress-sensitive biological response is simulated in a modified parallel-disk viscometer that implements steady and unidirectional dynamic shear under physiological conditions. Anchorage-dependent mammalian cells adhere to a protein coating on the surface of the rotating plate, receiving nutrients and oxygen from an aqueous medium that flows radially and tangentially, accompanied by transverse diffusion in the z-direction toward the active surface. This process is modeled as radial convection and axial diffusion with angular symmetry in cylindrical coordinates. The reaction/diffusion boundary condition on the surface of the rotating plate includes position-dependent stress-sensitive nutrient consumption via the zr- and zTheta-elements of the velocity gradient tensor at the cell/aqueous-medium interface. Linear transport laws in chemically reactive systems that obey Curie's theorem predict the existence of cross-phenomena between scalar reaction rates and the magnitude of the second-rank velocity gradient tensor, selecting only those elements of nabla v experienced by anchorage-dependent cells that are bound to protein-active sites. Stress sensitivity via the formalism of irreversible thermodynamics introduces a zeroth-order contribution to heterogeneous reaction rates that must be quenched when nutrients, oxygen, chemically anchored cells, or vacant active protein sites are not present on the surface of the rotating plate. Computer simulations of nutrient consumption profiles via simple nth-order kinetics (i.e., n=1,2) suggest that rotational bioreactor designs should consider stress-sensitivity when the shear-rate-based Damköhler number (i.e., ratio of the stress-dependent zeroth-order rate of nutrient consumption relative to the rate of nutrient diffusion toward active cells adhered to the rotating plate) is greater than approximately 25% of the stress-free Damköhler number. Rotational bioreactor simulations are presented for simple 1st-order, simple 2nd

  14. Sensitivity of the Quantiferon-Gold In-Tube Assay in Sputum Smear Positive TB Cases in Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Rutherford, Merrin; Alisjahbana, Bachti; Maharani, Winni; Sampurno, Hedy; van Crevel, Reinout; Hill, Philip C.

    2010-01-01

    Background As part of a formal evaluation of the Quantiferon-Gold in-tube assay (QFT-IT) for latent TB infection we compared its sensitivity to the tuberculin skin test (TST) in confirmed adult TB cases in Indonesia. Smear-positive TB disease was used as a proxy gold standard for latent TB infection. Methods and Findings We compared the sensitivity of QFT-IT and TST in 98 sputum smear and chest x-ray positive TB cases and investigated risk factors for negative and discordant results in both tests. Both tests showed high sensitivity; (QFT-IT; 88.7%: TST; 94.9%), not significantly different from each other (p value 0.11). Very high sensitivity was seen when tests were combined (98.9%). There were no variables significantly associated with discordant results or with a negative TST. For QFT-IT which particular staff member collected blood was significantly associated with test positivity (p value 0.01). Study limitations include small sample size and lack of culture confirmation or HIV test results. Conclusions The QFT-IT has similar sensitivity in Indonesian TB cases as in other locations. However, QFT-IT, like the TST cannot distinguish active TB disease from LTBI. In countries such as Indonesia, with high background rates of LTBI, test specificity for TB disease will likely be low. While our study was not designed to evaluate the QFT-IT in the diagnosis of active TB disease in TB suspects, the data suggest that a combination of TST and QFT-IT may prove useful for ruling out TB disease. Further research is required to explore the clinical role of QFT-IT in combination with other TB diagnostic tests. PMID:20711257

  15. Sensitivity of Human Choice to Manipulations of Parameters of Positive and Negative Sound Reinforcement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambert, Joseph M.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether altering parameters of positive and negative reinforcement in identical ways could influence behavior maintained by each in different ways. Three undergraduate students participated in a series of assessments designed to identify preferred and aversive sounds with similar reinforcing values.…

  16. Sensitivity of N170 and late positive components to social categorization and emotional valence.

    PubMed

    Montalan, B; Caharel, S; Personnaz, B; Le Dantec, C; Germain, R; Bernard, C; Lalonde, R; Rebaï, M

    2008-10-03

    Previous experiments have shown that categorization of people into two distinct fictive groups has an impact on cognitive processes. The main objective of the present study was to examine whether this mere categorization improves information processing speed and alters early and late onset ERPs during a social judgment task. In a group membership situation, in-group e