Science.gov

Sample records for continuous wave microwaves

  1. Longevity of microwave-treated (2. 45 GHz continuous wave) honey bees in observation hives

    SciTech Connect

    Gary, N.E.; Westerdahl, B.B.

    1981-12-15

    Adult honey bees were exposed for 30 min to 2.45 GHz of continuous wave microwave radiation at power densities ranging from 3 to 50 mW/cm/sup 2/. After exposure, bees were returned to glass-walled observation hives, and their longevity was compared with that of control bees. No significant differences were found between microwave- and sham-treated bees at any of the power densities tested.

  2. Chronic exposure of a honey bee colony to 2.45 GHz continuous wave microwaves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westerdahl, B. B.; Gary, N. E.

    1981-01-01

    A honey bee colony (Apis mellifera L.) was exposed 28 days to 2.45 GHz continuous wave microwaves at a power density (1 mW/sq cm) expected to be associated with rectennae in the solar power satellite power transmission system. Differences found between the control and microwave-treated colonies were not large, and were in the range of normal variation among similar colonies. Thus, there is an indication that microwave treatment had little, if any, effect on (1) flight and pollen foraging activity, (2) maintenance of internal colony temperature, (3) brood rearing activity, (4) food collection and storage, (5) colony weight, and (6) adult populations. Additional experiments are necessary before firm conclusions can be made.

  3. Chronic exposure of a honey bee colony to 2. 45 GHz continuous wave microwaves

    SciTech Connect

    Westerdahl, B.B.; Gary, N.E.

    1981-01-01

    A honey bee colony (Apis mellifera L.) was exposed 28 days to 2.45 GHz continuous wave microwaves at a power density (1 mW/sq cm) expected to be associated with rectennae in the solar power satellite power transmission system. Differences found between the control and microwave-treated colonies were not large, and were in the range of normal variation among similar colonies. Thus, there is an indication that microwave treatment had little, if any, effect on (1) flight and pollen foraging activity, (2) maintenance of internal colony temperature, (3) brood rearing activity, (4) food collection and storage, (5) colony weight, and (6) adult populations. Additional experiments are necessary before firm conclusions can be made.

  4. Stepped-frequency continuous-wave microwave-induced thermoacoustic imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Nan, Hao Arbabian, Amin

    2014-06-02

    Microwave-induced thermoacoustic (TA) imaging combines the dielectric contrast of microwave imaging with the resolution of ultrasound imaging. Prior studies have only focused on time-domain techniques with short but powerful microwave pulses that require a peak output power in excess of several kilowatts to achieve sufficient signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). This poses safety concerns as well as to render the imager expensive and bulky with requiring a large vacuum radio frequency source. Here, we propose and demonstrate a coherent stepped-frequency continuous-wave (SFCW) technique for TA imaging which enables substantial improvements in SNR and consequently a reduction in peak power requirements for the imager. Constructive and destructive interferences between TA signals are observed and explained. Full coherency across microwave and acoustic domains, in the thermo-elastic response, is experimentally verified and this enables demonstration of coherent SFCW microwave-induced TA imaging. Compared to the pulsed technique, an improvement of 17 dB in SNR is demonstrated.

  5. Effects of chronic continuous wave microwave radiation (2. 45 GHz) on the foraging behavior of the white-throated sparrow

    SciTech Connect

    Wasserman, F.E.; Patterson, D.A.; Kunz, T.H.; Battista, S.P.; Byman, D.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of chronic continuous wave microwave radiation on the foraging behavior of the White-throated Sparrow was examined using an optimal foraging laboratory technique. Birds were exposed to microwaves for seven days at a frequency of 2.45 GHz and power densities of 0.0, 0.1, 1.0, 10.0, and 25.0 mW/cm/sup 2/. Even though there were differences in foraging behaviors among power densities no trend was found for a dose response effect. Birds showed no significant differences in foraging behaviors among pre-exposure, exposure, and post-exposure periods.

  6. High power continuous wave microwave system at 3.7 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bora, D.; Dani, S.; Gangopadhyay, S.; Jadav, B.; Jha, M.; Kadia, B. R.; Khilar, P. L.; Kulkarni, S. V.; Kushwah, M.; Patel, A. P.; Parmar, K. G.; Parmar, K. M.; Parmar, P.; Rajnish, K.; Raghuraj, S.; Rao, S. L.; Samanta, K. K.; Sathyanarayana, K.; Shah, P.; Sharma, P. K.; Srinivas, Y. S. S.; Trivedi, R. G.; Verghese, G.

    2001-03-01

    The lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) system is an important system in superconducting steady state tokamak (SST-1). It is used to drive and maintain the plasma current for 1000 s with a duty cycle of 17%. The LHCD system is being designed to launch 1 MW of radio frequency (rf) power at 3.7 GHz. The rf source is comprised of two high power klystron amplifiers, each capable of delivering 500 kW rf power. In this article, the results obtained during installation and commissioning of these klystrons are presented. Two klystrons (model TH2103D) have been successfully installed and commissioned on dummy loads, delivering ˜200 kW power for more than 1000 s. The maximum output power that could be obtained is limited due to the available direct current (dc) power supply. The test system is comprised of a TH2103D klystron, a low power rf (3.7 GHz/25 W) source, two high power four port circulators, two high power dual directional couplers, two arc detector systems, and two dummy water loads. To avoid rf breakdown in the rf components of the transmission line, the system has been pressurized with dry air to 3 bar. To energize and operate the klystron, a high voltage dc power supply, a magnet power supply, an ion pump power supply, a -65 kV floating anode modulator power supply, and a filament power supply are used. An arc detector unit has been installed to detect and initiate action within a few microseconds to protect the klystron, waveguides, and other rf passive components during arcing. To protect the klystron in the event of an arc, a fast responding (<10 μs), rail gap based pressurized crowbar unit has been used. The entire system is water cooled to avoid excess temperature rise during high power continuous wave operation of the klystron and other rf components. The tube requires initial conditioning. Thereafter, the output rf power is studied as a function of beam parameters such as cathode voltage and beam current.

  7. A continuous microwave discharge maintained by two crossing millimeter-wave beams in hydrogen and argon: numerical simulation and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernov, V. V.; Gorbachev, A. M.; Vikharev, A. L.; Radishev, D. B.; Kozlov, A. V.

    2016-12-01

    The results of numerical simulation of a continuous microwave discharge in two crossing wave beams of 30 GHz radiation in a mixture of hydrogen and argon are presented. The model describes the steady state of the gas discharge in Ar-H2-H through the self-consistent solution of the following equations: Maxwell’s equations, the electron balance equation, the transport of hydrogen atoms in the ternary mixture, the heat conduction equation and the equation of state of ideal gas. In Maxwell’s equations the effect of the plasma is taken into account through the conduction current. It is assumed that the generation of electrons occurs due to ionization processes and their loss occurs due to processes of electron-ion recombination and ambipolar diffusion. In the model the heat transfer is considered to be due to gas thermal conductivity and transfer of dissociation energy through the flow of hydrogen atoms. The gas pressure is assumed to be constant, and convection effects are neglected. The other approximations and reductions used in the model are discussed. The adequacy of the obtained model is confirmed by comparing the calculation results to experimental data. For comparison the distributions of gas temperature along the substrate in the center of the discharge and the atomic hydrogen flow to the substrate are used. The temperature is experimentally obtained through the analysis of the optical emission of the C2 Swan line. The atomic hydrogen flow to the substrate is measured from the etching of graphite samples imbedded into the substrate. The possibility of obtaining large-area uniform plasma layers in hydrogen with a small addition of methane is predicted. The applications of such gas discharge are discussed.

  8. Automated Microwave Complex on the Basis of a Continuous-Wave Gyrotron with an Operating Frequency of 263 GHz and an Output Power of 1 kW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glyavin, M. Yu.; Morozkin, M. V.; Tsvetkov, A. I.; Lubyako, L. V.; Golubiatnikov, G. Yu.; Kuftin, A. N.; Zapevalov, V. E.; V. Kholoptsev, V.; Eremeev, A. G.; Sedov, A. S.; Malygin, V. I.; Chirkov, A. V.; Fokin, A. P.; Sokolov, E. V.; Denisov, G. G.

    2016-02-01

    We study experimentally the automated microwave complex for microwave spectroscopy and diagnostics of various media, which was developed at the Institute of Applied Physics of the Russian Academy of Sciences in cooperation with GYCOM Ltd. on the basis of a gyrotron with a frequency of 263 GHz and operated at the first gyrofrequency harmonic. In the process of the experiments, a controllable output power of 0 .1 -1 kW was achieved with an efficiency of up to 17 % in the continuous-wave generation regime. The measured radiation spectrum with a relative width of about 10 -6 and the frequency values measured at various parameters of the device are presented. The results of measuring the parameters of the wave beam, which was formed by a built-in quasioptical converter, as well as the data obtained by measuring the heat loss in the cavity and the vacuum output window are analyzed.

  9. Fully reconfigurable photonic microwave transversal filter based on digital micromirror device and continuous-wave, incoherent supercontinuum source.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ju Han; Chang, You Min; Han, Young-Geun; Lee, Sang Bae; Chung, Hae Yang

    2007-08-01

    The combined use of a programmable, digital micromirror device (DMD) and an ultrabroadband, cw, incoherent supercontinuum (SC) source is experimentally demonstrated to fully explore various aspects on the reconfiguration of a microwave filter transfer function by creating a range of multiwavelength optical filter shapes. Owing to both the unique characteristic of the DMD that an arbitrary optical filter shape can be readily produced and the ultrabroad bandwidth of the cw SC source that is 3 times larger than that of Er-amplified spontaneous emission, a multiwavelength optical beam pattern can be generated with a large number of wavelength filter taps apodized by an arbitrary amplitude window. Therefore various types of high-quality microwave filter can be readily achieved through the spectrum slicing-based photonic microwave transversal filter scheme. The experimental demonstration is performed in three aspects: the tuning of a filter resonance bandwidth at a fixed resonance frequency, filter resonance frequency tuning at a fixed resonance frequency, and flexible microwave filter shape reconstruction.

  10. Effects of 2450 MHz continuous wave microwave radiation and isothermal conduction on canine platelet aggregometry, survival and margination

    SciTech Connect

    Bushberg, J.T.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of 2450 MHz microwave radiation and isothermal conduction ex vivo exposures on canine platelets was analyzed in vitro by studying adenosine-5'-diphosphate activated aggregation and in vivo by studying the survival, distribution and physiological integrity of reinfused autologous Indium-111 labeled platelets. Platelet rich plasma (PRP) from eight healthy dogs was subjected to microwave irradiation at 10 MW/cm/sup 2/ and at 50 MW/cm/sup 2/ for 10, 100, 600, 900, 1800 seconds and at 100 MW/cm/sup 2/ for 10, 100, and 600 seconds. Aggregometry analysis was performed immediately after exposure and 10 minutes post-exposure. No significant perturbations were observed following microwave exposure of 10 MW/cm/sup 2/. At higher power densities six specific types of aggregation phenomena were demonstrated: (1) Hyperaggregation, (2) Decreased Velocity Reduced Hyperaggregation, (3) Recovery, (4) Decreased Velocity Delayed Hyperaggregation, (5) Reversible Afunctionality, and (6) Irreversible Afunctionality. The absence of equivalent aggregation responses with isothermal conduction heating (extraisothermal effects) was attributed to differences in heating rate and not to nonthermal microwave-specific effects. Scintigraphic and survival kinetic studies were performed following power density/exposure time combinations. PRP samples I and IV displayed normal survival half-times; however, exposure I resulted in a depressed 15-minute post-reinfusion circulating percentage (CP/sub 15/) of 29% compared to 61% for the control sample. Exposure of groups II and III resulted in a dramatic reduction in the CP/sub 15/ (i.e., 18% and 1.3% respectively) and survival half-times. Margination of the labeled platelets was divided between the spleen, liver and blood pool.

  11. Continuous microwave flow synthesis of mesoporous hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Akram, Muhammad; Alshemary, Ammar Z; Goh, Yi-Fan; Wan Ibrahim, Wan Aini; Lintang, Hendrik O; Hussain, Rafaqat

    2015-11-01

    We have successfully used continuous microwave flow synthesis (CMFS) technique for the template free synthesis of mesoporous hydroxyapatite. The continuous microwave flow reactor consisted of a modified 2.45GHz household microwave, peristaltic pumps and a Teflon coil. This cost effective and efficient system was exploited to produce semi-crystalline phase pure nano-sized hydroxyapatite. Effect of microwave power, retention time and the concentration of reactants on the phase purity, degree of crystallinity and surface area of the final product was studied in detail. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were used to study the phase purity and composition of the product, while transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to study the effect of process parameters on the morphology of hydroxyapatite. The TEM analysis confirmed the formation of spherical particles at low microwave power; however the morphology of the particles changed to mesoporous needle and rod-like structure upon exposing the reaction mixture to higher microwave power and longer retention time inside the microwave. The in-vitro ion dissolution behavior of the as synthesized hydroxyapatite was studied by determining the amount of Ca(2+) ion released in SBF solution.

  12. Continuous, real time microwave plasma element sensor

    DOEpatents

    Woskov, Paul P.; Smatlak, Donna L.; Cohn, Daniel R.; Wittle, J. Kenneth; Titus, Charles H.; Surma, Jeffrey E.

    1995-01-01

    Microwave-induced plasma for continuous, real time trace element monitoring under harsh and variable conditions. The sensor includes a source of high power microwave energy and a shorted waveguide made of a microwave conductive, refractory material communicating with the source of the microwave energy to generate a plasma. The high power waveguide is constructed to be robust in a hot, hostile environment. It includes an aperture for the passage of gases to be analyzed and a spectrometer is connected to receive light from the plasma. Provision is made for real time in situ calibration. The spectrometer disperses the light, which is then analyzed by a computer. The sensor is capable of making continuous, real time quantitative measurements of desired elements, such as the heavy metals lead and mercury.

  13. Continuous, real time microwave plasma element sensor

    DOEpatents

    Woskov, P.P.; Smatlak, D.L.; Cohn, D.R.; Wittle, J.K.; Titus, C.H.; Surma, J.E.

    1995-12-26

    Microwave-induced plasma is described for continuous, real time trace element monitoring under harsh and variable conditions. The sensor includes a source of high power microwave energy and a shorted waveguide made of a microwave conductive, refractory material communicating with the source of the microwave energy to generate a plasma. The high power waveguide is constructed to be robust in a hot, hostile environment. It includes an aperture for the passage of gases to be analyzed and a spectrometer is connected to receive light from the plasma. Provision is made for real time in situ calibration. The spectrometer disperses the light, which is then analyzed by a computer. The sensor is capable of making continuous, real time quantitative measurements of desired elements, such as the heavy metals lead and mercury. 3 figs.

  14. Continuous microwave regeneration apparatus for absorption media

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Douglas D.

    1999-01-01

    A method and apparatus for continuously drying and regenerating ceramic beads for use in process gas moisture drying operations such as glove boxes. A microwave energy source is coupled to a process chamber to internally heat the ceramic beads and vaporize moisture contained therein. In a preferred embodiment, the moisture laden ceramic beads are conveyed toward the microwave source by a screw mechanism. The regenerated beads flow down outside of the screw mechanism and are available to absorb additional moisture.

  15. Continuous microwave regeneration apparatus for absorption media

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.D.

    1999-09-07

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for continuously drying and regenerating ceramic beads for use in process gas moisture drying operations such as glove boxes. A microwave energy source is coupled to a process chamber to internally heat the ceramic beads and vaporize moisture contained therein. In a preferred embodiment, the moisture laden ceramic beads are conveyed toward the microwave source by a screw mechanism. The regenerated beads flow down outside of the screw mechanism and are available to absorb additional moisture.

  16. Coded continuous wave meteor radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vierinen, Juha; Chau, Jorge L.; Pfeffer, Nico; Clahsen, Matthias; Stober, Gunter

    2016-03-01

    The concept of a coded continuous wave specular meteor radar (SMR) is described. The radar uses a continuously transmitted pseudorandom phase-modulated waveform, which has several advantages compared to conventional pulsed SMRs. The coding avoids range and Doppler aliasing, which are in some cases problematic with pulsed radars. Continuous transmissions maximize pulse compression gain, allowing operation at lower peak power than a pulsed system. With continuous coding, the temporal and spectral resolution are not dependent on the transmit waveform and they can be fairly flexibly changed after performing a measurement. The low signal-to-noise ratio before pulse compression, combined with independent pseudorandom transmit waveforms, allows multiple geographically separated transmitters to be used in the same frequency band simultaneously without significantly interfering with each other. Because the same frequency band can be used by multiple transmitters, the same interferometric receiver antennas can be used to receive multiple transmitters at the same time. The principles of the signal processing are discussed, in addition to discussion of several practical ways to increase computation speed, and how to optimally detect meteor echoes. Measurements from a campaign performed with a coded continuous wave SMR are shown and compared with two standard pulsed SMR measurements. The type of meteor radar described in this paper would be suited for use in a large-scale multi-static network of meteor radar transmitters and receivers. Such a system would be useful for increasing the number of meteor detections to obtain improved meteor radar data products.

  17. Continuous-wave Submillimeter-wave Gyrotrons

    PubMed Central

    Han, Seong-Tae; Griffin, Robert G.; Hu, Kan-Nian; Joo, Chan-Gyu; Joye, Colin D.; Mastovsky, Ivan; Shapiro, Michael A.; Sirigiri, Jagadishwar R.; Temkin, Richard J.; Torrezan, Antonio C.; Woskov, Paul P.

    2007-01-01

    Recently, dynamic nuclear polarization enhanced nuclear magnetic resonance (DNP/NMR) has emerged as a powerful technique to obtain significant enhancements in spin spectra from biological samples. For DNP in modern NMR systems, a high power continuous-wave source in the submillimeter wavelength range is necessary. Gyrotrons can deliver tens of watts of CW power at submillimeter wavelengths and are well suited for use in DNP/NMR spectrometers. To date, 140 GHz and 250 GHz gyrotrons are being employed in DNP spectrometer experiments at 200 MHz and 380 MHz at MIT. A 460 GHz gyrotron, which has operated with 8 W of CW output power, will soon be installed in a 700 MHz NMR spectrometer. High power radiation with good spectral and spatial resolution from these gyrotrons should provide NMR spectrometers with high signal enhancement through DNP. Also, these tubes operating at submillimeter wavelengths should have important applications in research in physics, chemistry, biology, materials science and medicine. PMID:17404605

  18. Electric Field Tunable Microwave and MM-wave Ferrite Devices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-30

    Electric Field Tunable Microwave and MM-wave Ferrite Devices (N00014-06-01-0167) Period of Performance: May 1, 2006-April 30, 2010 Principal...modes as a function of E. The coupling was strong and ranged from 1 to 30 MHz/(kV/cm). Ferrite - ferroelectric composites were used in microwave and...2005, focused on ME effects at microwave and millimeter wave frequencies in ferrite -ferroelectric composites. Studies were performed on basic

  19. Industrial scale microwave processing of tomato juice using a novel continuous microwave system.

    PubMed

    Stratakos, Alexandros Ch; Delgado-Pando, Gonzalo; Linton, Mark; Patterson, Margaret F; Koidis, Anastasios

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of an industrial scale continuous flow microwave volumetric heating system in comparison to conventional commercial scale pasteurisation for the processing of tomato juice in terms of physicochemical properties, microbial characteristics and antioxidant capacity. The effect against oxidative stress in Caco-2 cells, after in vitro digestion was also investigated. Physicochemical and colour characteristics of juices were very similar between technologies and during storage. Both conventional and microwave pasteurisation inactivated microorganisms and kept them in low levels throughout storage. ABTS[Symbol: see text](+) values, but not ORAC, were higher for the microwave pasteurised juice at day 0 however no significant differences between juices were observed during storage. Juice processed with the microwave system showed an increased cytoprotective effect against H2O2 induced oxidation in Caco-2 cells. Organoleptic analysis revealed that the two tomato juices were very similar. The continuous microwave volumetric heating system appears to be a viable alternative to conventional pasteurisation.

  20. Three-dimensional standing waves in a microwave oven

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamol, S.; Limsuwan, P.; Onreabroy, W.

    2010-05-01

    A microwave oven operating at a frequency of 2.45 GHz was designed for demonstrating three-dimensional standing waves. The three-dimensional standing wave patterns formed on cobalt chloride paper placed at the center of the oven chamber were examined. The images on the cobalt chloride paper corresponding to antinodes of the standing waves were recorded by a digital camera after turning on the microwave oven. The results show that the numbers of antinodes of the standing waves in each plane agree with those of the theoretical calculation of the electric field distribution in the oven chamber.

  1. Quantum and wave dynamical chaos in superconducting microwave billiards

    SciTech Connect

    Dietz, B. Richter, A.

    2015-09-15

    Experiments with superconducting microwave cavities have been performed in our laboratory for more than two decades. The purpose of the present article is to recapitulate some of the highlights achieved. We briefly review (i) results obtained with flat, cylindrical microwave resonators, so-called microwave billiards, concerning the universal fluctuation properties of the eigenvalues of classically chaotic systems with no, a threefold and a broken symmetry; (ii) summarize our findings concerning the wave-dynamical chaos in three-dimensional microwave cavities; (iii) present a new approach for the understanding of the phenomenon of dynamical tunneling which was developed on the basis of experiments that were performed recently with unprecedented precision, and finally, (iv) give an insight into an ongoing project, where we investigate universal properties of (artificial) graphene with superconducting microwave photonic crystals that are enclosed in a microwave resonator, i.e., so-called Dirac billiards.

  2. Path Entanglement of Continuous-Variable Quantum Microwaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menzel, E. P.; Deppe, F.; Eder, P.; Zhong, L.; Haeberlein, M.; Baust, A.; Hoffmann, E.; Marx, A.; Gross, R.; di Candia, R.; Solano, E.; Ballester, D.; Ihmig, M.; Inomata, K.; Yamamoto, T.; Nakamura, Y.

    2013-03-01

    Entanglement is a quantum mechanical phenomenon playing a key role in quantum communication and information processing protocols. Here, we report on frequency-degenerate entanglement between continuous-variable quantum microwaves propagating along two separated paths. In our experiment, we combine a squeezed and a vacuum state via a beam splitter. Overcoming the challenges imposed by the low photon energies in the microwave regime, we reconstruct the squeezed state and, independently from this, detect and quantify the produced entanglement via correlation measurements (E. P. Menzel et al., arXiv:1210.4413). Our work paves the way towards quantum communication and teleportation with continuous variables in the microwave regime. This work is supported by SFB 631, German Excellence Initiative via NIM, EU projects SOLID, CCQED and PROMISCE, MEXT Kakenhi ``Quantum Cybernetics'', JSPS FIRST Program, the NICT Commissioned Research, EPSRC EP/H050434/1, Basque Government IT472-10, and Spanish MICINN FIS2009-12773-C02-01.

  3. PROCESS INTENSIFICATION: MICROWAVE INITIATED REACTIONS USING A CONTINUOUS FLOW REACTOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The concept of process intensification has been used to develop a continuous narrow channel reactor at Clarkson capable of carrying out reactions under isothermal conditions whilst being exposed to microwave (MW) irradiation thereby providing information on the true effect of mi...

  4. Pseudo continuous wave instrument. [ultrasonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, J. S. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    Acoustic properties and their changes in a sample of liquid, gas, plasma or solid are measured by applying a variable frequency source to the sample by means of a transducer to produce sound waves within the sample. The application of the variable frequency source to the sample is periodically interrupted for a short duration. Means are connected to the transducer for receiving the resulting acoustic signals during the interruptions for producing a control signal indicative of a difference in the frequency of the output of the variable frequency source and the frequency of a mechanical resonant peak in the sample. The control signal is applied to the variable frequency source to maintain its output frequency at the frequency of the mechanical resonant peak. The change in frequency of the variable frequency source indicates the shift in frequency of the mechanical resonant peak and the amplitude of the acoustic signals indicates the attenuation of the acoustic signals in the sample.

  5. Continuing Higher Education: The Coming Wave.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lerner, Allan W., Ed.; King, B. Kay, Ed.

    This book, containing seven chapters and an epilogue, describes how continuing education--as a structure and a function--can become a unique tool for reorienting major universities toward confronting new societal challenges. "The Coming Wave" (Lerner) discusses relevant organizational theory to explain the special role of continuing education in…

  6. Microwave excitation of spin wave beams in thin ferromagnetic films

    PubMed Central

    Gruszecki, P.; Kasprzak, M.; Serebryannikov, A. E.; Krawczyk, M.; Śmigaj, W.

    2016-01-01

    An inherent element of research and applications in photonics is a beam of light. In magnonics, which is the magnetic counterpart of photonics, where spin waves are used instead of electromagnetic waves to transmit and process information, the lack of a beam source limits exploration. Here, we present an approach enabling generation of narrow spin wave beams in thin homogeneous nanosized ferromagnetic films by microwave current. We show that the desired beam-type behavior can be achieved with the aid of a properly designed coplanar waveguide transducer generating a nonuniform microwave magnetic field. We test this idea using micromagnetic simulations, confirming numerically that the resulting spin wave beams propagate over distances of several micrometers. The proposed approach requires neither inhomogeneity of the ferromagnetic film nor nonuniformity of the biasing magnetic field. It can be generalized to different magnetization configurations and yield multiple spin wave beams of different width at the same frequency. PMID:26971711

  7. S-Band Shallow Bulk Acoustic Wave (SBAW) microwave source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Techniques necessary to fabricate a high performance S-band microwave single source using state-of-the-art shallow bulk acoustic wave (SBAW) were explored. The bulk wave structures of the AlN/Al 2O3 were investigated for both the R plane and basal plane of sapphire. A 1.072 GHz SBAW delay line and oscillators were developed. A method of selecting and setting oscillator output frequency by selecting substrate orientation angle was also established.

  8. Pulsed millimeter wave Fourier transform microwave spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolbe, W. F.; Leskovar, B.

    1986-09-01

    An improved pulsed microwave spectrometer for the detection of rotational transitions in gaseous molecules in the frequency range of 130-150 GHz is described. It incorporates a tunable Fabry-Perot cavity and a low noise superheterodyne receiver for the detection of the molecular emission signals. The molecules are excited by pi/2 pulses provided by a high efficiency frequency doubler which is pulse modulated at an IF frequency of 1.4 GHz.

  9. Full wave simulations of microwave interactions with turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Matthew; Vann, Roddy; Leddy, Jarrod; Koehn, Alf; University of York; IPP Garching Collaboration; University of York; Culham Microwave Group Team

    2016-10-01

    The interaction between electromagnetic radiation and plasma perturbations in the case that the radiation wavelength is comparable to the size of the perturbations is not a fully-understood problem. Yet the use of microwaves in magnetic confinement fusion plasmas is widespread for heating, current drive and both passive and active diagnostics, including in regimes for which there exist microwave length-scale plasma perturbations. We present simulation results using the full-wave cold plasma finite difference time domain codes EMIT-3D and IPF-FDMC developed independently at York and Stuttgart, respectively. First we present a novel systematic study of the scattering of microwaves through turbulence: we quantified the relationship between the normalised turbulent correlation length and the scattered power. Additionally we found a quadratic relationship between the scattered wave power and the turbulence amplitude. We go on to present results to model the Doppler back-scattering of a broad microwave beam from a moving turbulent slab. This second problem is particularly important for interpreting data from the Synthetic Aperture Microwave Imaging (SAMI) diagnostic currently installed on NSTX-U.

  10. Superstrong coupling of thin film magnetostatic waves with microwave cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xufeng; Tang, Hong X.; Zou, Changling; Jiang, Liang

    2016-01-14

    We experimentally demonstrated the strong coupling between a microwave cavity and standing magnetostatic magnon modes in a yttrium iron garnet film. Such strong coupling can be observed for various spin wave modes under different magnetic field bias configurations, with a coupling strength inversely proportional to the transverse mode number. A comb-like spectrum can be obtained from these high order modes. The collectively enhanced magnon-microwave photon coupling strength is comparable with the magnon free spectral range and therefore leads to the superstrong coupling regime. Our findings pave the road towards designing a new type of strongly hybridized magnon-photon system.

  11. Advanced Microwave/Millimeter-Wave Imaging Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Zuowei; Yang, Lu; Luhmann, N. C., Jr.; Domier, C. W.; Ito, N.; Kogi, Y.; Liang, Y.; Mase, A.; Park, H.; Sakata, E.; Tsai, W.; Xia, Z. G.; Zhang, P.

    Millimeter wave technology advances have made possible active and passive millimeter wave imaging for a variety of applications including advanced plasma diagnostics, radio astronomy, atmospheric radiometry, concealed weapon detection, all-weather aircraft landing, contraband goods detection, harbor navigation/surveillance in fog, highway traffic monitoring in fog, helicopter and automotive collision avoidance in fog, and environmental remote sensing data associated with weather, pollution, soil moisture, oil spill detection, and monitoring of forest fires, to name but a few. The primary focus of this paper is on technology advances which have made possible advanced imaging and visualization of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) fluctuations and microturbulence in fusion plasmas. Topics of particular emphasis include frequency selective surfaces, planar Schottky diode mixer arrays, electronically controlled beam shaping/steering arrays, and high power millimeter wave local oscillator and probe sources.

  12. Development, Test, and Evaluation of Microwave Radar Water Level (MWWL) Sensors' Wave Measurement Capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer, S. K.; Heitsenrether, R.

    2015-12-01

    Waves can have a significant impact on many coastal operations including navigational safety, recreation, and even the economy. Despite this, as of 2009, there were only 181 in situ real-time wave observation networks nationwide (IOOS 2009). There has recently been interest in adding real-time wave measurement systems to already existing NOAA Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services (CO-OPS) stations. Several steps have already been taken in order to achieve this, such as integrating information from existing wave measurement buoys and initial testing of multiple different wave measurement systems (Heitsenrether et al. 2012). Since wave observations can be derived from high frequency water level changes, we will investigate water level sensors' capability to measure waves. Recently, CO-OPS has been transitioning to new microwave radar water level (MWWL) sensors which have higher resolution and theoretically a greater potential wave measurement capability than the acoustic sensors in stilling wells. In this study, we analyze the wave measurement capability of MWWL sensors at two high energy wave environments, Duck, NC and La Jolla, CA, and compare results to two "reference" sensors (A Nortek acoustic waves and currents profiler (AWAC) at Duck and a single point pressure sensor at La Jolla). A summary of results from the two field test sites will be presented, including comparisons of wave energy spectra, significant wave height, and peak period measured by the test MWWL sensors and both reference AWAC and pressure sensors. In addition, relationships between MWWL versus reference wave sensor differences and specific wave conditions will be discussed. Initial results from spectral analysis and the calculation of bulk wave parameters indicate that MWWL sensors set to the "NoFilter" processing setting can produce wave measurements capability that compare well to the two reference sensors. These results support continued development to enable the

  13. Incoherently pumped continuous wave dye laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiel, E.; Zander, C.; Drexhage, K. H.

    1987-05-01

    Continuous wave operation of a dye laser, pumped by an incoherent light source, is reported. A jet of a water-based solution of Rhodamine 6G is used as the laser medium in a spherical cavity with high reflectivity mirrors. Two high pressure arcs generated by electrical discharge between tungsten electrodes serve as pump source. They produce a power density of 0.5-10 kW/cm 2 in the jet causing the dye to lase at 615 nm.

  14. Continuous wave laser for wind shear detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Loren

    1991-01-01

    Details of the design and development of a continuous-wave heterodyne carbon dioxide laser which has wind shear detection capabilities are given in viewgraph form. The goal of the development was to investigate the lower cost CW (rather than pulsed) lidar option for look-ahead wind shear detection from aircraft. The device has potential utility for ground based wind shear detection at secondary airports where the high cost of a Terminal Doppler Weather Radar system is not justifiable.

  15. Dirac leaky-wave antennas for continuous beam scanning from photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Memarian, Mohammad; Eleftheriades, George V

    2015-01-05

    Leaky-Wave Antennas (LWAs) enable directive and scannable radiation patterns, which are highly desirable attributes at terahertz, infrared and optical frequencies. However, a LWA is generally incapable of continuous beam scanning through broadside, due to an open stopband in its dispersion characteristic. This issue is yet to be addressed at frequencies beyond microwaves, mainly as existing microwave solutions (for example, transmission line metamaterials) are unavailable at these higher frequencies. Here we report leaky-wave radiation from the interface of a photonic crystal (PC) with a Dirac-type dispersion and air. The resulting Dirac LWA (DLWA) can radiate at broadside, chiefly owing to the closed Γ-point bandgap of the Dirac PC. Thus, the DLWA can continuously scan a directive beam over a wide range of angles by varying the frequency. These DLWAs can be designed at microwave as well as terahertz to optical frequencies, with feasible dimensions and low losses.

  16. Circulators for microwave and millimeter-wave integrated circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schloemann, Ernst F.

    1988-02-01

    The requirements for circulators for use in combination with microwave and millimeter-wave integrated circuits are reviewed, with special emphasis on modules for phased-array antennas. Recent advances in broadbanding and in miniaturization are summarized. Novel types of circulators that are fabricated by attaching a ferrite disc and a suitable coupling structure to the surface of a dielectric or semiconductor substrate ('quasi-monolithic' integration) are described. Methods for achieving complete monolithic integration are also discussed.

  17. Modification of a household microwave oven for continuous temperature and weight measurements during drying of foods.

    PubMed

    Okmen, Z; Bayindirli, A

    2000-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to modify a conventional household microwave oven for recording temperature and weight measurements continuously during microwave drying of foods. A household microwave oven with digital control was equipped with an electronic balance and a set of standard thermocouples that were connected to a PC for continuous data collection. The efficiency of the modified thermocouples was tested against the built-in probe of the oven. It was found that this microwave oven dryer set-up could be used for drying kinetics studies of foods since both the temperature and weight of the sample could be recorded continuously during the microwave drying operation.

  18. Sensitive Chiral Analysis via Microwave Three-Wave Mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, David; Doyle, John M.

    2013-07-01

    We demonstrate chirality-induced three-wave mixing in the microwave regime, using rotational transitions in cold gas-phase samples of 1,2-propanediol and 1,3-butanediol. We show that bulk three-wave mixing, which can only be realized in a chiral environment, provides a sensitive, species-selective probe of enantiomeric excess and is applicable to a broad class of molecules. The doubly resonant condition provides simultaneous identification of species and of handedness, which should allow sensitive chiral analysis even within a complex mixture.

  19. Spatiotemporal Wave Front Shaping in a Microwave Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Hougne, Philipp; Lemoult, Fabrice; Fink, Mathias; Lerosey, Geoffroy

    2016-09-01

    Controlling waves in complex media has become a major topic of interest, notably through the concepts of time reversal and wave front shaping. Recently, it was shown that spatial light modulators can counterintuitively focus waves both in space and time through multiple scattering media when illuminated with optical pulses. In this Letter, we transpose the concept to a microwave cavity using flat arrays of electronically tunable resonators. We prove that maximizing the Green's function between two antennas at a chosen time yields diffraction limited spatiotemporal focusing. Then, changing the photons' dwell time inside the cavity, we modify the relative distribution of the spatial and temporal degrees of freedom (DOF), and we demonstrate that it has no impact on the field enhancement: wave front shaping makes use of all available DOF, irrespective of their spatial or temporal nature. Our results prove that wave front shaping using simple electronically reconfigurable arrays of reflectors is a viable approach to the spatiotemporal control of microwaves, with potential applications in medical imaging, therapy, telecommunications, radar, or sensing. They also offer new fundamental insights regarding the coupling of spatial and temporal DOF in complex media.

  20. Continuous-wave NMR imaging of solids.

    PubMed

    Lurie, D J; McCallum, S J; Hutchison, J M; Alecci, M

    1996-03-01

    Current pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance methods of imaging samples such as solids with short spin-spin relaxation times are restricted to use with T2 values longer than approximately 10 microseconds. In the present study a method of imaging ultra-short T2 samples using continuous- wave, swept-field NMR is presented that, in principle, will be able to overcome this restriction. The technique is identical to that used in continuous-wave electron paramagnetic resonance imaging of paramagnetic species and involves irradiating the sample continuously with a radiofrequency excitation in the presence of a strong stationary magnetic field gradient. When the main magnetic field is swept over a suitable range, the variation of the NMR absorption signal with applied magnetic field yields a one-dimensional projection of the object under study along the gradient direction. Two- or three-dimensional image data sets may be reconstructed from projections that are obtained by applying the gradient in different directions. Signal-to-noise ratio can be improved by modulating the magnetic field and employing a lock-in amplifier to recover signal variations at the audio modulation frequency. Preliminary experiments were performed using a 7 Tesla magnet and a 300 MHz continuous-wave radiofrequency bridge with lock-in detection. The apparatus is described and the results of pilot experiments that employed vulcanized rubber samples are presented. The ability of the technique to detect short T2 samples was demonstrated by the presence of a background signal from the Perspex former of the birdcage resonator used for signal reception.

  1. Continuous waves probing in dynamic acoustoelastic testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalerandi, M.; Gliozzi, A. S.; Ait Ouarabi, M.; Boubenider, F.

    2016-05-01

    Consolidated granular media display a peculiar nonlinear elastic behavior, which is normally analysed with dynamic ultrasonic testing exploiting the dependence on amplitude of different measurable quantities, such as the resonance frequency shift, the amount of harmonics generation, or the break of the superposition principle. However, dynamic testing allows measuring effects which are averaged over one (or more) cycles of the exciting perturbation. Dynamic acoustoelastic testing has been proposed to overcome this limitation and allow the determination of the real amplitude dependence of the modulus of the material. Here, we propose an implementation of the approach, in which the pulse probing waves are substituted by continuous waves. As a result, instead of measuring a time-of-flight as a function of the pump strain, we study the dependence of the resonance frequency on the strain amplitude, allowing to derive the same conclusions but with an easier to implement procedure.

  2. High-power microwave attenuator employing slow wave structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Mitsuhiro; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Shintake, Tsumoru; Nishiyama, Koji; Miura, Sadao

    2012-11-01

    Using present pulsed microwave amplifier, we can obtain RF peak power beyond one hundred MW. However, it is not easy to test such a high-power RF. To overcome this difficulty we developed a high-power microwave attenuator employing a slow wave structure. For example, the output power of RF pulse compressor for present electron linear accelerator reaches a few hundreds MW RF power, but the existing dummy loads can absorb only a few tens MW of RF power. The attenuator we developed has a kind of periodic structure and is made of metal only. We operated this attenuator using a high-power RF source, and found that it could be operated fewer than 50 pps RF output at 40 MW, 2.5 μs or 100 MW, 0.5 μs.

  3. System to continuously produce carbon fiber via microwave assisted plasma processing

    SciTech Connect

    White, Terry L.; Paulauskas, Felix L.; Bigelow, Timothy S.

    2016-08-30

    A method for continuously processing carbon fiber including establishing a microwave plasma in a selected atmosphere contained in an elongated chamber having a microwave power gradient along its length defined by a lower microwave power at one end and a higher microwave power at the opposite end of the elongated chamber. The elongated chamber having an opening in each of the ends of the chamber that are adapted to allow the passage of the fiber tow while limiting incidental gas flow into or out of said chamber. A continuous fiber tow is introduced into the end of the chamber having the lower microwave power. The fiber tow is withdrawn from the opposite end of the chamber having the higher microwave power. The fiber to is subjected to progressively higher microwave energy as the fiber is being traversed through the elongated chamber.

  4. System to continuously produce carbon fiber via microwave assisted plasma processing

    SciTech Connect

    White, Terry L; Paulauskas, Felix L; Bigelow, Timothy S

    2014-03-25

    A method for continuously processing carbon fiber including establishing a microwave plasma in a selected atmosphere contained in an elongated chamber having a microwave power gradient along its length defined by a lower microwave power at one end and a higher microwave power at the opposite end of the elongated chamber. The elongated chamber having an opening in each of the ends of the chamber that are adapted to allow the passage of the fiber tow while limiting incidental gas flow into or out of said chamber. A continuous fiber tow is introduced into the end of the chamber having the lower microwave power. The fiber tow is withdrawn from the opposite end of the chamber having the higher microwave power. The fiber to is subjected to progressively higher microwave energy as the fiber is being traversed through the elongated chamber.

  5. Near Field Imaging at Microwave and Millemeter Wave Frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Sheen, David M.; McMakin, Douglas L.; Hall, Thomas E.

    2007-06-03

    Near field imaging at microwave and millimeter wave frequencies is useful for a wide variety of applications including concealed weapon detection, through-wall and inner-wall imaging, ground penetrating radar imaging, radar cross section analysis, and non-destructive evaluation of materials. A variety of novel imaging techniques have been developed for many of these applications at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) . These techniques make use of wideband holographic wavefront reconstruction methods, and have been developed to optimize the image quality and resolution. This paper will summarize several of these techniques and show imaging results for several interesting application areas.

  6. Propagating Structure Of A Microwave Driven Shock wave Inside A Tube

    SciTech Connect

    Shimada, Yutaka; Shibata, Teppei; Yamaguchi, Toshikazu; Komurasaki, Kimiya; Oda, Yasuhisa; Kajiwara, Ken; Takahashi, Koji; Kasugai, Atsushi; Sakamoto, Keishi; Arakawa, Yoshihiro

    2010-05-06

    The thrust generation process of a microwave rocket is similar to a pulse detonation engine, and understanding the interactions between microwave plasma and shock waves is important. Shadowgraph images of the microwave plasma generated in a tube under atmospheric air were taken. The observed plasma and shock wave were propagating one-dimensionally at constant velocity inside the tube. In order to understand the flow field inside the rocket, one-dimensional CFD analysis was conducted. With the change of microwave power density, the structure of the flow field was classified into two regimes: Microwave Supported Combustion (MSC), and Microwave Supported Detonation (MSD). The structure of the MSD was different from the structure of a chemical detonation, which implied the existence of a preheating in front of the shock wave. Furthermore, the flight performance was estimated by calculating the momentum coupling coefficient. It was confirmed that the efficiency was nearly constant in the MSD regime, with the increase of microwave power density.

  7. Fiber optic links for microwave/millimeter-wave systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pan, J. J.

    1989-01-01

    Recent advances in device technology for microwave/mm-wave (M/MMW) analog fiber-optic communication systems are surveyed, with discussion of system parameters, design optimization methods, and hardware selection and manufacturing considerations. Particular attention is given to 1-km-link systems operating at 21, 30, and 12 GHz for satellite-communication, electronic-warfare, and radar applications. The design and fabrication simplicity of direct modulation is weighed against the wide bandwidth, low distortion, and mm-wave and frequency operation advantages of external modulation. Homodyne or heterodyne coherent detection is shown to improve system S/N by 10-20 dB over conventional detection methods. Diagrams, drawings, photographs, and graphs of typical performance data are included.

  8. CONTINUOUS MICROWAVE REACTORS FOR ORGANIC SYNTHESIS: HYDRODECHLORINATION AND HYDROLYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microwave heating has been sought as a convenient way of enhancing chemical processes. The advantages of microwave heating, such as selective direct heating of materials of a catalytic site, minimized fouling on hot surfaces, process simplicity, rapid startup, as well as the poss...

  9. Theory of Microwave 5-WAVE Mixing of Chiral Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, Kevin

    2016-06-01

    Microwave three-wave mixing spectroscopy produces a Free Induction Decay Field that is proportional to the enantiomeric excess ( ee ) of a sample of chiral molecules. However, since there is an unavoidable loss of measured signal strength due to dephasing of the molecular emission, it is not possible to quantitate this ee unless one has an enantiomeric pure sample of the same molecule with which to compare the amplitude of the signal of a sample of unknown ee. In this talk, I will demonstrate that it is in principle possible to use a 5 wave mixing experiment, based upon AC Stark shifts produced by nearly resonant fields, to produce a differential splitting of a transition such that one has frequency resolved peaks for the two enantiomers. The peaks corresponding to the two enantiomers can be switched by phase cycling of the fields. This method is promising to allow the quantitative measurement of molecular ee's by microwave spectroscopy. There are experimental issues that make such an experiment difficult. It will likely be required to use of skimmed molecular beam (which will substantially reduce the number of molecular emitters and thus signal level) in order to reduce the field amplitude and phase inhomogeneity of the excited molecules.

  10. INSTRUMENTS AND METHODS OF INVESTIGATION: Transverse electron-beam waves for microwave electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanke, Vladimir A.

    2005-09-01

    A brief discussion is given of the state of the art, challenges, and prospects in the application of transverse (cyclotron and synchronous) electron-beam waves in microwave electronic devices, including protectors, parametric and electrostatic amplifiers, tunable filters, circularly polarized traveling wave tubes, microwave/DC converters, and combined interaction klystrons.

  11. Microwave photonic notch filter with complex coefficient based on four wave mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Dong; Cao, Ye; Tong, Zheng-rong; Yang, Jing-peng

    2016-11-01

    A microwave photonic notch filter with a complex coefficient is proposed and demonstrated based on four wave mixing (FWM). FWM effect of two single-frequency laser beams occurs in a highly nonlinear fiber (HNLF), and multi-wavelength optical signals are generated and used to generate the multi-tap of microwave photonic filter (MPF). The complex coefficient is generated by using a Fourier-domain optical processor (FD-OP) to control the amplitude and phase of the optical carrier and phase modulation sidebands. The results show that this filter can be changed from bandpass filter to notch filter by controlling the FD-OP. The center frequency of the notch filter can be continuously tuned from 5.853 GHz to 29.311 GHz with free spectral range ( FSR) of 11.729 GHz. The shape of the frequency response keeps unchanged when the phase is tuned.

  12. Continuous wave MRI of heterogeneous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fagan, Andrew J.; Davies, Gareth R.; Hutchison, James M. S.; Lurie, David J.

    2003-08-01

    A prototype continuous wave MRI system operating at 7 T has been used successfully to study a variety of heterogeneous materials exhibiting T 2 relaxation values ranging from 10 μs to 50 ms. Two-dimensional images of a poly(methly methacrylate) (PMMA) resolution phantom (T 2=38 μs) exhibited a spatial resolution of approximately 1 mm at a magnetic field gradient strength of 200 mT/m. The technique was used to study the hydration, drying, and subsequent water penetration properties of cement samples made from ordinary Portland cement, and revealed inhomogeneities arising from the cure conditions. Sandstone samples from an oil reservoir in the North Sea were also studied; structure within these materials, arising from the sedimentary bed layering in the reservoir, was found to have an effect on their water transport properties. A section from a confectionery bar (T 2* approximately 50-60 ms) was also imaged, and its internal structure could be clearly discerned.

  13. Continuous-wave circular polarization terahertz imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Jillian P.; Joseph, Cecil S.; Giles, Robert H.

    2016-07-01

    Biomedical applications of terahertz (THz) radiation are appealing because THz radiation is nonionizing and has the demonstrated ability to detect intrinsic contrasts between cancerous and normal tissue. A linear polarization-sensitive detection technique for tumor margin delineation has already been demonstrated; however, utilization of a circular polarization-sensitive detection technique has yet to be explored at THz frequencies. A reflective, continuous-wave THz imaging system capable of illuminating a target sample at 584 GHz with either linearly or circularly polarized radiation, and capable of collecting both cross- and copolarized signals remitted from the target, is implemented. To demonstrate the system's utility, a fresh ex vivo human skin tissue specimen containing nonmelanoma skin cancer was imaged. Both polarization-sensitive detection techniques showed contrast between tumor and normal skin tissue, although some differences in images were observed between the two techniques. Our results indicate that further investigation is required to explain the contrast mechanism, as well as to quantify the specificity and sensitivity of the circular polarization-sensitive detection technique.

  14. Continuous wave laser irradiation of explosives

    SciTech Connect

    McGrane, Shawn D.; Moore, David S.

    2010-12-01

    Quantitative measurements of the levels of continuous wave (CW) laser light that can be safely applied to bare explosives during contact operations were obtained at 532 nm, 785 nm, and 1550 nm wavelengths. A thermal camera was used to record the temperature of explosive pressed pellets and single crystals while they were irradiated using a measured laser power and laser spot size. A visible light image of the sample surface was obtained before and after the laser irradiation. Laser irradiation thresholds were obtained for the onset of any visible change to the explosive sample and for the onset of any visible chemical reaction. Deflagration to detonation transitions were not observed using any of these CW laser wavelengths on single crystals or pressed pellets in the unconfined geometry tested. Except for the photochemistry of DAAF, TATB and PBX 9502, all reactions appeared to be thermal using a 532 nm wavelength laser. For a 1550 nm wavelength laser, no photochemistry was evident, but the laser power thresholds for thermal damage in some of the materials were significantly lower than for the 532 nm laser wavelength. No reactions were observed in any of the studied explosives using the available 300 mW laser at 785 nm wavelength. Tables of laser irradiance damage and reaction thresholds are presented for pressed pellets of PBX9501, PBX9502, Composition B, HMX, TATB, RDX, DAAF, PETN, and TNT and single crystals of RDX, HMX, and PETN for each of the laser wavelengths.

  15. Continuous-Wave Single-Photon Transistor Based on a Superconducting Circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyriienko, Oleksandr; Sørensen, Anders S.

    2016-09-01

    We propose a microwave frequency single-photon transistor which can operate under continuous wave probing and represents an efficient single microwave photon detector. It can be realized using an impedance matched system of a three level artificial ladder-type atom coupled to two microwave cavities connected to input-output waveguides. Using a classical drive on the upper transition, we find parameter space where a single photon control pulse incident on one of the cavities can be fully absorbed into hybridized excited states. This subsequently leads to series of quantum jumps in the upper manifold and the appearance of a photon flux leaving the second cavity through a separate input-output port. The proposal does not require time variation of the probe signals, thus corresponding to a passive version of a single-photon transistor. The resulting device is robust to qubit dephasing processes, possesses low dark count rate for large anharmonicity, and can be readily implemented using current technology.

  16. Improvement of heating uniformity in packaged acidified vegetables pasteurized with a 915 MHz continuous microwave system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Continuous microwave processing to produce shelf-stable acidified vegetables with moderate to high salt contents poses challenges in pasteurization due to reduced microwave penetration depths and non-uniform heating. Cups of sweetpotato, red bell pepper, and broccoli acidified to pH 3.8 with citric...

  17. Microwave and millimeter-wave systems for wall penetration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferris, David D., Jr.; Currie, Nicholas C.

    1998-07-01

    The need for through-the-wall surveillance sensors has existed for many years. Recent advances in microwave and millimeter-wave (MMW) technologies provide new applications for law enforcement use. These applications include the potential to conduct surveillance through walls and the ability to detect the presence of living persons behind doors or other barriers. Covert surveillance and personnel detection are of high interest to both the Department of Defense in support of Small Unit Operations and the Justice Department for civilian law enforcement applications. Microwave sensors are under development that can detect the presence of persons (and even weapons) behind walls and track moving persons behind walls. MMW sensors are under development which can provide pseudo-images of persons behind the walls including radiometric sensors at 95 GHz, active 95 GHz real aperture radars, and heartbeat detection radars. Radiometric sensors include 2D FPA systems, 1D FPA, scanned systems, and single element scanned sensors. Active FPA radars include illuminated radiometric systems and coherent radar systems. Real aperture MMW radar systems include raster scanned and non-scanned (hand-held) sensors.

  18. The electromagnetic-trait imaging computation of traveling wave method in breast tumor microwave sensor system.

    PubMed

    Tao, Zhi-Fu; Han, Zhong-Ling; Yao, Meng

    2011-01-01

    Using the difference of dielectric constant between malignant tumor tissue and normal breast tissue, breast tumor microwave sensor system (BRATUMASS) determines the detected target of imaging electromagnetic trait by analyzing the properties of target tissue back wave obtained after near-field microwave radicalization (conelrad). The key of obtained target properties relationship and reconstructed detected space is to analyze the characteristics of the whole process from microwave transmission to back wave reception. Using traveling wave method, we derive spatial transmission properties and the relationship of the relation detected points distances, and valuate the properties of each unit by statistical valuation theory. This chapter gives the experimental data analysis results.

  19. X-band microwave backscattering from ocean waves

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, P.H.Y.; Barter, J.D.; Beach, K.L.

    1994-01-04

    Backscattering experiments at microwave frequencies were conducted off the west coast of Scotland in the summer of 1991. Using a dual-polarization, 8-frequency X-band coherent scatterometer mounted on the bow of a boat, we measured time-resolved backscattering from ocean waves at a range of grazing angles from 10{degrees} to 70{degrees}. From the grazing-angle-dependent signals and their Doppler spectra, we differentiate Bragg scattering from non-Bragg scattering and resolve ``peak separation`` between the vertical and horizontal polarizations. We observe instances of ``super`` events, i.e., instances when the horizontal polarization return power equals or exceeds the vertical polarization power. We find that ``super`` events occur not only at low grazing angles but at any grazing angle for against-wind viewing directions. Statistics for such occurrences as a function of grazing angle are obtained. We study the coherence properties of scatterers and find strong evidence that at low grazing angles, lifetime-dominated, non-Bragg scattering contributes noticeably to returns of both polarizations, but is dominant in providing returns for the horizontal polarization. We examine ``spiking`` events and find that they can be related to, but need not be limited to, breaking wave events. By comparing the data of against-wind runs with cross-wind and circle runs, we obtain wind-direction dependence of Doppler spectra which further assists in the identification of scattering mechanisms.

  20. Ex situ themo-catalytic upgrading of biomass pyrolysis vapors using a traveling wave microwave reactor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microwave heating offers a number of advantages over conventional heating methods, such as, rapid and volumetric heating, precise temperature control, energy efficiency and lower temperature gradient. In this article we demonstrate the use of 2450 MHz microwave traveling wave reactor to heat the cat...

  1. Peering inside microplasmas sustained by microwaves, millimeter waves and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopwood, Jeffrey

    2016-09-01

    Atmospheric microplasmas are experimentally investigated over a range of excitation frequency from 0.5 to 12 GHz. A validated fluid model correctly predicts the measured electron density in this band of operation. This model is then extended to predict plasma behavior up to 0.4 THz. At constant power (0.25 W), the central electron density increases to 5x1014 cm-3 as the microwave frequency increases toward the electron energy dissipation frequency of 5 GHz (in argon). Above 5 GHz, the argon plasma density remains approximately constant, but the electrode voltage decreases to less than 5 volts in amplitude. This is remarkable in that the microwave potential is less than the excitation potential of argon. In the millimeter wave band, we observe series resonance between the plasma inductance and sheath capacitance at 30 GHz. The parallel resonance results in strong electron oscillation within the microplasma at the position where the electron plasma frequency is equal to the excitation frequency ( 200 GHz). Crossing resonance boundaries changes the nature of the microplasma impedance between capacitive, resistive, and inductive. In addition to linear behavior, we also present models and measurements of microplasma nonlinearity. Nonlinearity generates harmonic plasma currents and is due primarily to dynamic sheath expansion and electron conduction currents. In total, the microplasma provides a rich variety of electromagnetic behaviors that can be incorporated into plasma-reconfigurable metamaterials and photonic crystals. This work was supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research under Award No. FA9550-14-10317 with Dr. Mitat Birkan as the program manager.

  2. Microwave/mm wave magnetics and MMIC compatibility (invited) (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, J. D.

    1987-04-01

    Ferrite devices can be loosely classified into three different categories, namely: control components using polycrystalline ferrites, tunable filters and oscillators using YIG spheres, and devices based on epitaxial YIG or ferrite films. Ferrite control components such as circulators, isolators, and switches are used in almost all microwave and millimeter wave systems. Tunable YIG sphere devices see more limited use in radar and EW systems, and microwave test equipment while epitaxial YIG devices have yet to make a significant systems impact. GaAs chips for phased array modules are under development by several companies for both radar and EW applications. The GaAs chips can contain small signal and power gain, phase shifters, filters, mixers, and switches. The modules are usually designed, however, with discrete circulators or isolators which are often significantly larger than the MMIC chips. Further reduction in module size and cost will require the design of the module without nonreciprocal components, or the development of ferrite devices which are more compatible with the size, bandwidth, and fabrication of the GaAs device. Integration of nonreciprocal ferrite components on the GaAs chip could have a large impact but presents a significant challenge both in terms of processing compatibility between the ferrite and the GaAs and in terms of cost. The impact in the areas of tunable YIG filters and oscillators and MSW devices are smaller but, fortunately, so are the difficulties. Here the YIG films or spheres, or hexagonal ferrite films can be laid on the GaAs substrate thus forming a hybrid device. Having integrated the ferrite with the GaAs it is necessary to consider the magnetic bias field requirement. Bias fields are not required in latching devices and can be minimized in other devices by use of hexagonal ferrite films with their large anisotropy fields. It may even be possible to integrate a permanent magnet film onto the GaAs chip.

  3. Microwave and millimeter-wave interaction with terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Yang

    To develop better understanding of the scattering mechanisms underlying microwave and millimeter wave (MMW) interaction with terrain, it is imperative to construct an extensive database of microwave and MMW measurements, and to develop analytical or empirical models to explain the observed features, with a fine balance between modeling rigorousness and flexibility as well as consistency. This thesis contributes to both aspects through several specific contributions. In the case of database construction and enhancement, the contribution entailed a first-of kind extensive experimental characterization of MMW snow backscatter at grazing incidence, as well as the characterization of the forward scattered signal off of terrain surface at MMW. The modeling contributions involved the development of analytical models for several important interactions of microwave and MMW with terrain. Specifically, first, the sensitivity to soil moisture for both active and passive sensors at, L band was evaluated, which showed that the radar and radiometric sensitivities exhibited comparable reductions due to vegetation cover, hence brought to a conclusion a long disputed issue. Second, this study showed that a simple first-order radiative transfer (RT) model, when coupled with high fidelity characterization of scattering parameters as functions of physical parameters, can capture the scattering mechanism for a complex setting such as a soybean-covered rough surface and provide very good prediction results. Third, we showed that mixed conventional RT (CRT) and dense media RT (DMRT) technique can be used to model the angular behavior of dry snow, provided that the disparity inherent in quasi-crystalline-approximation (QCA) for the extinction coefficient and in conventional determination of the phase matrix. To this purpose we proposed an albedo-matching technique and demonstrated its effectiveness. Forth, for MMW backscatter at wet snow, we showed that the underlying thermodynamic process

  4. Electrically controlling single-spin qubits in a continuous microwave field

    PubMed Central

    Laucht, Arne; Muhonen, Juha T.; Mohiyaddin, Fahd A.; Kalra, Rachpon; Dehollain, Juan P.; Freer, Solomon; Hudson, Fay E.; Veldhorst, Menno; Rahman, Rajib; Klimeck, Gerhard; Itoh, Kohei M.; Jamieson, David N.; McCallum, Jeffrey C.; Dzurak, Andrew S.; Morello, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale quantum computers must be built upon quantum bits that are both highly coherent and locally controllable. We demonstrate the quantum control of the electron and the nuclear spin of a single 31P atom in silicon, using a continuous microwave magnetic field together with nanoscale electrostatic gates. The qubits are tuned into resonance with the microwave field by a local change in electric field, which induces a Stark shift of the qubit energies. This method, known as A-gate control, preserves the excellent coherence times and gate fidelities of isolated spins, and can be extended to arbitrarily many qubits without requiring multiple microwave sources. PMID:26601166

  5. Microwave and millimeter-wave Doppler radar heart sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boric-Lubecke, Olga; Lin, Jenshan; Lubecke, Victor M.; Host-Madsen, Anders; Sizer, Tod

    2007-04-01

    Technology that can be used to unobtrusively detect and monitor the presence of human subjects from a distance and through barriers can be a powerful tool for meeting new security challenges, including asymmetric battlefield threats abroad and defense infrastructure needs back home. Our team is developing mobile remote sensing technology for battle-space awareness and warfighter protection, based on microwave and millimeter-wave Doppler radar motion sensing devices that detect human presence. This technology will help overcome a shortfall of current see-through-thewall (STTW) systems, which is, the poor detection of stationary personnel. By detecting the minute Doppler shifts induced by a subject's cardiopulmonary related chest motion, the technology will allow users to detect personnel that are completely stationary more effectively. This personnel detection technique can also have an extremely low probability of intercept since the signals used can be those from everyday communications. The software and hardware developments and challenges for personnel detection and count at a distance will be discussed, including a 2.4 GHz quadrature radar single-chip silicon CMOS implementation, a low-power double side-band Ka-band transmission radar, and phase demodulation and heart rate extraction algorithms. In addition, the application of MIMO techniques for determining the number of subjects will be discussed.

  6. Holographic frequency modulated continuous wave laser radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delaye, P.; Roosen, G.

    2007-10-01

    We present the operating principle and a first experimental characterization of a holographic rangefinder, that couples a two wave mixing phase demodulation set-up with a frequency modulated laser source. In its first implementation, the system allows millimetre sensitivity on tens of meters measurement range with the ability to work with scattering surfaces. This paper has been presented at “3e colloque interdisciplinaire en instrumentation (C2I 2004)”, École Normale Supérieure de Cachan, 29 30 janvier 2004.

  7. Continuous-wave terahertz imaging of nonmelanoma skin cancers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, Cecil Sudhir

    Continuous wave terahertz imaging has the potential to offer a safe, non-invasive medical imaging modality for detecting different types of human skin cancers. Terahertz pulse imaging (TPI) has already shown that there is contrast between basal cell carcinoma and normal skin. Continuous-wave imaging offers a simpler, lower cost alternative to terahertz pulse imaging. This project aims to isolate the optimal contrast frequency for a continuous wave terahertz imaging system and demonstrate transmission based, in-vitro , imaging of thin sections of non-melanoma skin cancers and correlate the images to sample histology. The aim of this project is to conduct a proof-of-principle experiment that establishes whether continuous-wave terahertz imaging can detect differences between cancerous and normal tissue while outlining the basic requirements for building a system capable of performing in vivo tests.

  8. Spin wave quantization in continuous film with stripe domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Seung-Seok; Yoon, Jungbum; Lee, Sukmock; You, Chun-Yeol; Jung, Myung-Hwa; Kim, Young Keun

    2009-04-01

    We investigated the spin wave dynamics of CoFeSiB film, which has a stripe domain structure at a low magnetic field region (<1 kOe). We measured the spin wave excitation spectra by employing Brillouin light scattering. Abnormal field dependence and dispersion relations were observed, and they are similar to spin wave quantization in laterally confined magnetic structures such as arrays of magnetic nanowires. The observed spin wave excitation spectra must be interpreted with spin wave quantization such as Damon-Eshbach mode separation. It was found that the spin wave quantization is related to the stripe magnetic domain structure in continuous film. The physical origin of the quantization is the partial reflection of the propagating spin wave at the periodic stripe domain boundaries.

  9. 1990 MTT-S International Microwave Symposium and Exhibition and Microwave and Millimeter-Wave Monolithic IC Symposium, Dallas, TX, May 7-10, 1990, Proceedings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McQuiddy, David N., Jr.; Sokolov, Vladimir

    1990-12-01

    The present conference discusses microwave filters, lightwave technology for microwave antennas, planar and quasi-planar guides, mixers and VCOs, cavity filters, discontinuity and coupling effects, control circuits, power dividers and phase shifters, microwave ICs, biological effects and medical applications, CAD and modeling for MMICs, directional couplers, MMIC design trends, microwave packaging and manufacturing, monolithic ICs, and solid-state devices and circuits. Also discussed are microwave and mm-wave superconducting technology, MICs for communication systems, the merging of optical and microwave technologies, microwave power transistors, ferrite devices, network measurements, advanced transmission-line structures, FET devices and circuits, field theory of IC discontinuities, active quasi-optical techniques, phased-array techniques and circuits, nonlinear CAD, sub-mm wave devices, and high power devices.

  10. Generation of magnetosonic waves over a continuous spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lunjin; Sun, Jicheng; Lu, Quanming; Gao, Xinliang; Xia, Zhiyang; Zhima, Zeren

    2016-02-01

    Magnetosonic waves, also known as equatorial noise emission, were found to have discrete frequency structures, which is consistent with instability caused by proton ring distribution. Nonetheless, nondiscrete structure, i.e., a broadband spectrum over a continuous frequency range, has been reported. We investigate the question whether proton ring distribution can generate nondiscrete spectra for perpendicularly propagating magnetosonic waves. We propose discrete and nondiscrete characteristics of the local instability for explaining the observation of discrete, continuous, and mixed spectra. The criterion for transition from discrete and continuous instability is given, γ >˜ Ωh/2, where γ is wave growth rate and Ωh is proton cyclotron frequency. The condition is verified by particle-in-cell simulation using more realistic electron-to-proton mass ratio and speed of light than in previous studies. Such criterion of generating a continuous spectrum can be tested against simultaneous in situ measurement of wave and particle. We also find that the modes at low Ωh harmonics, including the fundamental Ωh, can be still excited through nonlinear wave-wave coupling, even when they are neutral modes (γ = 0) according to the linear kinetic theory. Comparison with magnetosonic waves in cold plasma limit and electromagnetic ion Bernstein mode is also discussed.

  11. System to continuously produce carbon fiber via microwave assisted plasma processing

    DOEpatents

    White, Terry L [Knoxville, TN; Paulauskas, Felix L [Knoxville, TN; Bigelow, Timothy S [Knoxville, TN

    2010-11-02

    A system to continuously produce fully carbonized or graphitized carbon fibers using microwave-assisted plasma (MAP) processing comprises an elongated chamber in which a microwave plasma is excited in a selected gas atmosphere. Fiber is drawn continuously through the chamber, entering and exiting through openings designed to minimize in-leakage of air. There is a gradient of microwave power within the chamber with generally higher power near where the fiber exits and lower power near where the fiber enters. Polyacrylonitrile (PAN), pitch, or any other suitable organic/polymeric precursor fibers can be used as a feedstock for the inventive system. Oxidized or partially oxidized PAN or pitch or other polymeric fiber precursors are run continuously through a MAP reactor in an inert, non-oxidizing atmosphere to heat the fibers, drive off the unwanted elements such as oxygen, nitrogen, and hydrogen, and produce carbon or graphite fibers faster than conventionally produced carbon fibers.

  12. Directed search for continuous gravitational waves from the Galactic center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aasi, J.; Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T.; Abernathy, M. R.; Accadia, T.; Acernese, F.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Adhikari, R. X.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Amador Ceron, E.; Amariutei, D.; Anderson, R. A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C.; Areeda, J.; Ast, S.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Austin, L.; Aylott, B. E.; Babak, S.; Baker, P. T.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barker, D.; Barnum, S. H.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J.; Bauchrowitz, J.; Bauer, Th. S.; Bebronne, M.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Beker, M. G.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C.; Belopolski, I.; Bergmann, G.; Berliner, J. M.; Bertolini, A.; Bessis, D.; Betzwieser, J.; Beyersdorf, P. T.; Bhadbhade, T.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Bitossi, M.; Bizouard, M. A.; Black, E.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, D.; Blom, M.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Boer, M.; Bogan, C.; Bond, C.; Bondu, F.; Bonelli, L.; Bonnand, R.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Bose, S.; Bosi, L.; Bowers, J.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brannen, C. A.; Brau, J. E.; Breyer, J.; Briant, T.; Bridges, D. O.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Britzger, M.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brückner, F.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Campsie, P.; Cannon, K. C.; Canuel, B.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Carbognani, F.; Carbone, L.; Caride, S.; Castiglia, A.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C.; Cesarini, E.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Chow, J.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, S. S. Y.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, D. E.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colla, A.; Colombini, M.; Constancio, M., Jr.; Conte, A.; Conte, R.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cordier, M.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M.; Coyne, D. C.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Dahl, K.; Dal Canton, T.; Damjanic, M.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Dattilo, V.; Daudert, B.; Daveloza, H.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; Dayanga, T.; De Rosa, R.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; Del Pozzo, W.; Deleeuw, E.; Deléglise, S.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dereli, H.; Dergachev, V.; DeRosa, R.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Díaz, M.; Dietz, A.; Dmitry, K.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Dumas, J.-C.; Dwyer, S.; Eberle, T.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Endrőczi, G.; Essick, R.; Etzel, T.; Evans, K.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fairhurst, S.; Fang, Q.; Farr, B.; Farr, W.; Favata, M.; Fazi, D.; Fehrmann, H.; Feldbaum, D.; Ferrante, I.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Finn, L. S.; Fiori, I.; Fisher, R.; Flaminio, R.; Foley, E.; Foley, S.; Forsi, E.; Forte, L. A.; Fotopoulos, N.; Fournier, J.-D.; Franco, S.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frede, M.; Frei, M.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fujimoto, M.-K.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gair, J.; Gammaitoni, L.; Garcia, J.; Garufi, F.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; Gergely, L.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giampanis, S.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gil-Casanova, S.; Gill, C.; Gleason, J.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gordon, N.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S.; Goßler, S.; Gouaty, R.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Griffo, C.; Grote, H.; Grover, K.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guido, C.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hall, B.; Hall, E.; Hammer, D.; Hammond, G.; Hanke, M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, J.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Harstad, E. D.; Hartman, M. T.; Haughian, K.; Hayama, K.; Heefner, J.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Holt, K.; Holtrop, M.; Hong, T.; Hooper, S.; Horrom, T.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y.; Hua, Z.; Huang, V.; Huerta, E. A.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh, M.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Iafrate, J.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isogai, T.; Ivanov, A.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacobson, M.; James, E.; Jang, H.; Jang, Y. J.; Jaranowski, P.; Jiménez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; K, Haris; Kalmus, P.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Kasprzack, M.; Kasturi, R.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, H.; Kaufman, K.; Kawabe, K.; Kawamura, S.; Kawazoe, F.; Kéfélian, F.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kells, W.; Keppel, D. G.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kim, B. K.; Kim, C.; Kim, K.; Kim, N.; Kim, W.; Kim, Y.-M.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Klimenko, S.; Kline, J.; Koehlenbeck, S.; Kokeyama, K.; Kondrashov, V.; Koranda, S.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D.; Kremin, A.; Kringel, V.; Krishnan, B.; Królak, A.; Kucharczyk, C.; Kudla, S.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, A.; Kumar, P.; Kumar, R.; Kurdyumov, R.; Kwee, P.; Landry, M.; Lantz, B.; Larson, S.; Lasky, P. D.; Lawrie, C.; Lazzarini, A.; Le Roux, A.; Leaci, P.; Lebigot, E. O.; Lee, C.-H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Lee, J.; Lee, J.; Leonardi, M.; Leong, J. R.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levine, B.; Lewis, J. B.; Lhuillier, V.; Li, T. G. F.; Lin, A. C.; Littenberg, T. B.; Litvine, V.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Z.; Lloyd, D.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lockett, V.; Lodhia, D.; Loew, K.; Logue, J.; Lombardi, A. L.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J.; Luan, J.; Lubinski, M. J.; Lück, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Macarthur, J.; Macdonald, E.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magana-Sandoval, F.; Mageswaran, M.; Mailand, K.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Manca, G. M.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markosyan, A.; Maros, E.; Marque, J.; Martelli, F.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Martinelli, L.; Martynov, D.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Matzner, R. A.; Mavalvala, N.; May, G.; Mazumder, N.; Mazzolo, G.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Mehmet, M.; Meidam, J.; Meier, T.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Meyer, M. S.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, J.; Minenkov, Y.; Mingarelli, C. M. F.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moe, B.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Mokler, F.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morgado, N.; Mori, T.; Morriss, S. R.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, C. L.; Mueller, G.; Mukherjee, S.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D.; Murray, P. G.; Mytidis, A.; Nagy, M. F.; Nanda Kumar, D.; Nardecchia, I.; Nash, T.; Naticchioni, L.; Nayak, R.; Necula, V.; Neri, I.; Newton, G.; Nguyen, T.; Nishida, E.; Nishizawa, A.; Nitz, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E.; Nuttall, L. K.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Oppermann, P.; O'Reilly, B.; Ortega Larcher, W.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Osthelder, C.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Ou, J.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Padilla, C.; Pai, A.; Palomba, C.; Pan, Y.; Pankow, C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoletti, R.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Pedraza, M.; Peiris, P.; Penn, S.; Perreca, A.; Phelps, M.; Pichot, M.; Pickenpack, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pinard, L.; Pindor, B.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Pletsch, H. J.; Poeld, J.; Poggiani, R.; Poole, V.; Poux, C.; Predoi, V.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prix, R.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Rácz, I.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rajalakshmi, G.; Rakhmanov, M.; Ramet, C.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Re, V.; Reed, C. M.; Reed, T.; Regimbau, T.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Ricci, F.; Riesen, R.; Riles, K.; Robertson, N. A.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Roddy, S.; Rodriguez, C.; Rodruck, M.; Roever, C.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Romano, J. D.; Romano, R.; Romanov, G.; Romie, J. H.; Rosińska, D.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.; Salemi, F.; Sammut, L.; Sandberg, V.; Sanders, J.; Sannibale, V.; Santiago-Prieto, I.; Saracco, E.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Savage, R.; Schilling, R.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schreiber, E.; Schuette, D.; Schulz, B.; Schutz, B. F.; Schwinberg, P.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Seifert, F.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sentenac, D.; Sergeev, A.; Shaddock, D.; Shah, S.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaltev, M.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Sidery, T. L.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Simakov, D.; Singer, A.; Singer, L.; Sintes, A. M.; Skelton, G. R.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Slutsky, J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, M. R.; Smith, R. J. E.; Smith-Lefebvre, N. D.; Soden, K.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Souradeep, T.; Sperandio, L.; Staley, A.; Steinert, E.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steplewski, S.; Stevens, D.; Stochino, A.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Strigin, S.; Stroeer, A. S.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Susmithan, S.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B.; Szeifert, G.; Tacca, M.; Talukder, D.; Tang, L.; Tanner, D. B.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taylor, R.; ter Braack, A. P. M.; Thirugnanasambandam, M. P.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Tomlinson, C.; Toncelli, A.; Tonelli, M.; Torre, O.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Tse, M.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Vallisneri, M.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.; van der Putten, S.; van der Sluys, M. V.; van Heijningen, J.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vass, S.; Vasúth, M.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Verkindt, D.; Verma, S.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Vincent-Finley, R.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Vitale, S.; Vlcek, B.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Vousden, W. D.; Vrinceanu, D.; Vyachanin, S. P.; Wade, A.; Wade, L.; Wade, M.; Waldman, S. J.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Wan, Y.; Wang, J.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Wanner, A.; Ward, R. L.; Was, M.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L.-W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Welborn, T.; Wen, L.; Wessels, P.; West, M.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whitcomb, S. E.; White, D. J.; Whiting, B. F.; Wibowo, S.; Wiesner, K.; Wilkinson, C.; Williams, L.; Williams, R.; Williams, T.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M.; Winkelmann, L.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Worden, J.; Yablon, J.; Yakushin, I.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yang, H.; Yeaton-Massey, D.; Yoshida, S.; Yum, H.; Yvert, M.; Zadrożny, A.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J.-P.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, C.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, X. J.; Zotov, N.; Zucker, M. E.; Zweizig, J.

    2013-11-01

    We present the results of a directed search for continuous gravitational waves from unknown, isolated neutron stars in the Galactic center region, performed on two years of data from LIGO’s fifth science run from two LIGO detectors. The search uses a semicoherent approach, analyzing coherently 630 segments, each spanning 11.5 hours, and then incoherently combining the results of the single segments. It covers gravitational wave frequencies in a range from 78 to 496 Hz and a frequency-dependent range of first-order spindown values down to -7.86×10-8Hz/s at the highest frequency. No gravitational waves were detected. The 90% confidence upper limits on the gravitational wave amplitude of sources at the Galactic center are ˜3.35×10-25 for frequencies near 150 Hz. These upper limits are the most constraining to date for a large-parameter-space search for continuous gravitational wave signals.

  13. Theory of Microwave 3-WAVE Mixing of Chiral Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, Kevin

    2016-06-01

    The traditional spectroscopic methods to measure enantiomeric excess, based upon optical rotation or circular dichroism arise from an interference of electric and magnetic dipole contributions of an optical transitions. The later is relativisitic and gets smaller with decreasing frequency and thus these effects have not been previously observed in pure rotational spectroscopy. First introduced by the group at Harvard^1, it is possible to use a 3-wave mixing method (with one of the fields potentially a Stark Field) to distinguish enantiomers if the three wave are nonplaner. In the conceptually simplest form of this experiment, a molecule is polarized with X polarization on a a → b transition, and then the resulting ρab molecular coherence is transferred to a ρac coherence by application of a π pulse on the b → c transition. For a chiral molecule with nonzero dipole projections on the three inertial axes, this ρac coherence can radiate Z polarized emission at the frequency of the a → c transition. In this talk, I will present the full theory of such experiments, including accounting for dirrection cosine matrix elements and M degeneracy. The resulting expressions can be used to calculate the expected size of the signal as a function of the specific transitions used in the a → b → c → a cycle.^2 It will be demonstrated that the maximum size of the ρac coherence is nearly that generated by a ``π/2'' pulse on the a → c transition. However, it is not possible to phase match the emission generated by this polarization due to the requirement that the three fields be orthogonal. Given that in rotational spectroscopy the physical size of the sample produced in a pulsed supersonic jet is comparable to the wavelengths of the microwave fields, the lack of phase matching produces a substantial but not catastrophic loss in the amplitude of the emitted free induction decay field. I will present a proposal to realize an analogy of quasiphase matching to

  14. Influence of voltage rise time on microwave generation in relativistic backward wave oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Ping; Deng, Yuqun; Sun, Jun; Teng, Yan; Shi, Yanchao; Chen, Changhua

    2015-10-15

    In relativistic backward wave oscillators (RBWOs), although the slow wave structure (SWS) and electron beam determine the main characteristics of beam-wave interaction, many other factors can also significantly affect the microwave generation process. This paper investigates the influence of voltage rise time on beam-wave interaction in RBWOs. Preliminary analysis and PIC simulations demonstrate if the voltage rise time is moderately long, the microwave frequency will gradually increase during the startup process until the voltage reaches its amplitude, which can be explained by the dispersion relation. However, if the voltage rise time is long enough, the longitudinal resonance of the finitely-long SWS will force the RBWO to work with unwanted longitudinal modes for a while and then gradually hop to the wanted longitudinal mode, and this will lead to an impure microwave frequency spectrum. Besides, a longer voltage rise time will delay the startup process and thus lead to a longer microwave saturation time. And if unwanted longitudinal modes are excited due to long voltage rise time, the microwave saturation time will be further lengthened. Therefore, the voltage rise time of accelerators adopted in high power microwave technology should not be too long in case unwanted longitudinal modes are excited.

  15. Plasma filamentation and shock wave enhancement in microwave rockets by combining low-frequency microwaves with external magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Masayuki; Ohnishi, Naofumi

    2016-08-01

    A filamentary plasma is reproduced based on a fully kinetic model of electron and ion transports coupled with electromagnetic wave propagation. The discharge plasma transits from discrete to diffusive patterns at a 110-GHz breakdown, with decrease in the ambient pressure, because of the rapid electron diffusion that occurs during an increase in the propagation speed of the ionization front. A discrete plasma is obtained at low pressures when a low-frequency microwave is irradiated because the ionization process becomes more dominant than the electron diffusion, when the electrons are effectively heated by the low-frequency microwave. The propagation speed of the plasma increases with decrease in the incident microwave frequency because of the higher ionization frequency and faster plasma diffusion resulting from the increase in the energy-absorption rate. An external magnetic field is applied to the breakdown volume, which induces plasma filamentation at lower pressures because the electron diffusion is suppressed by the magnetic field. The thrust performance of a microwave rocket is improved by the magnetic fields corresponding to the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) and its higher-harmonic heating, because slower propagation of the ionization front and larger energy-absorption rates are obtained at lower pressures. It would be advantageous if the fundamental mode of ECR heating is coupled with a lower frequency microwave instead of combining the higher-harmonic ECR heating with the higher frequency microwave. This can improve the thrust performance with smaller magnetic fields even if the propagation speed increases because of the decrease in the incident microwave frequency.

  16. Continuous microwave pasteurization of a vegetable smoothie improves its physical quality and hinders detrimental enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Arjmandi, Mitra; Otón, Mariano; Artés, Francisco; Artés-Hernández, Francisco; Gómez, Perla A; Aguayo, Encarna

    2017-01-01

    The effect of a pasteurization treatment at 90 ± 2 ℃ for 35 s provided by continuous microwave under different doses (low power/long time and high power/short time) or conventional pasteurization on the quality of orange-colored smoothies and their changes throughout 45 days of storage at 5 ℃ was investigated. A better color retention of the microwave pasteurization- treated smoothie using high power/short time than in conventionally processed sample was evidenced by the stability of the hue angle. The continuous microwave heating increased the viscosity of the smoothie more than the conventional pasteurization in comparison with non-treated samples. Lower residual enzyme activities from peroxidase, pectin methylesterase and polygalacturonase were obtained under microwave heating, specifically due to the use of higher power/shorter time. For this kind of smoothie, polygalacturonase was the more thermo-resistant enzyme and could be used as an indicator of pasteurization efficiency. The use of a continuous semi-industrial microwave using higher power and shorter time, such as 1600 W/206 s and 3600 W/93 s, resulted in better quality smoothies and greater enzyme reduction than conventional thermal treatment.

  17. Optimization of continuous and intermittent microwave extraction of pectin from banana peels.

    PubMed

    Swamy, Gabriela John; Muthukumarappan, Kasiviswanathan

    2017-04-01

    Continuous and intermittent microwave-assisted extractions were used to extract pectin from banana peels. Extraction parameters which were employed in the continuous process were microwave power (300-900W), time (100-300s), pH (1-3) and in the intermittent process were microwave power (300-900W), pulse ratio (0.5-1), pH (1-3). The independent factors were optimized with the Box-Behnken response surface design (BBD) (three factor three level) with the desirability function methodology. Results indicate that the independent factors have substantial effect on the pectin yield. Optimized solutions for highest pectin yield (2.18%) from banana peels were obtained with microwave power of 900W, time 100s and pH 3.00 in the continuous method while the intermittent process yielded the highest pectin content (2.58%) at microwave power of 900W, pulse ratio of 0.5 and pH of 3.00. The optimized conditions were validated and close agreement was observed with the validation experiment and predicted value.

  18. Peregrine rogue waves induced by the interaction between a continuous wave and a soliton.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guangye; Li, Lu; Jia, Suotang

    2012-04-01

    Based on the soliton solution on a continuous wave background for an integrable Hirota equation, the reduction mechanism and the characteristics of the Peregrine rogue wave in the propagation of femtosecond pulses of optical fiber are discussed. The results show that there exist two processes of the formation of the Peregrine rogue wave: one is the localized process of the continuous wave background, and the other is the reduction process of the periodization of the bright soliton. The characteristics of the Peregrine rogue wave are exhibited by strong temporal and spatial localization. Also, various initial excitations of the Peregrine rogue wave are performed and the results show that the Peregrine rogue wave can be excited by a small localized (single peak) perturbation pulse of the continuous wave background, even for the nonintegrable case. The numerical simulations show that the Peregrine rogue wave is unstable. Finally, through a realistic example, the influence of the self-frequency shift to the dynamics of the Peregrine rogue wave is discussed. The results show that in the absence of the self-frequency shift, the Peregrine rogue wave can split into several subpulses; however, when the self-frequency shift is considered, the Peregrine rogue wave no longer splits and exhibits mainly a peak changing and an increasing evolution property of the field amplitude.

  19. Traveling-Wave Tube Cold-Test Circuit Optimization Using CST MICROWAVE STUDIO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chevalier, Christine T.; Kory, Carol L.; Wilson, Jeffrey D.; Wintucky, Edwin G.; Dayton, James A., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    The internal optimizer of CST MICROWAVE STUDIO (MWS) was used along with an application-specific Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) script to develop a method to optimize traveling-wave tube (TWT) cold-test circuit performance. The optimization procedure allows simultaneous optimization of circuit specifications including on-axis interaction impedance, bandwidth or geometric limitations. The application of Microwave Studio to TWT cold-test circuit optimization is described.

  20. Continued analysis of optical frequency-modulated continuous-wave interference.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jesse

    2005-02-10

    I continue to analyze systematically the theory of optical frequency-modulated continuous-wave (FMCW) interference. Two special cases, multiple-beam optical FMCW interference and multiple-wavelength optical FMCW interference, are discussed in detail. Multiple-beam optical FMCW interference generates a signal with multiple frequencies because of mutual interference among the waves. Multiple-wavelength optical FMCW interference produces a signal whose amplitude is modulated by a synthetic wave. The applications of both types of optical FMCW interference are also discussed.

  1. Continuous Dependence on the Density for Stratified Steady Water Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Robin Ming; Walsh, Samuel

    2016-02-01

    There are two distinct regimes commonly used to model traveling waves in stratified water: continuous stratification, where the density is smooth throughout the fluid, and layer-wise continuous stratification, where the fluid consists of multiple immiscible strata. The former is the more physically accurate description, but the latter is frequently more amenable to analysis and computation. By the conservation of mass, the density is constant along the streamlines of the flow; the stratification can therefore be specified by prescribing the value of the density on each streamline. We call this the streamline density function. Our main result states that, for every smoothly stratified periodic traveling wave in a certain small-amplitude regime, there is an L ∞ neighborhood of its streamline density function such that, for any piecewise smooth streamline density function in that neighborhood, there is a corresponding traveling wave solution. Moreover, the mapping from streamline density function to wave is Lipschitz continuous in a certain function space framework. As this neighborhood includes piecewise smooth densities with arbitrarily many jump discontinues, this theorem provides a rigorous justification for the ubiquitous practice of approximating a smoothly stratified wave by a layered one. We also discuss some applications of this result to the study of the qualitative features of such waves.

  2. Characteristics of surface-wave and volume-wave plasmas produced with internally mounted large-area planar microwave launcher

    SciTech Connect

    Nagatsu, Masaaki; Naito, Katsutoshi; Ogino, Akihisa; Ninomiya, Keigo; Nanko, Shohei

    2005-10-17

    We studied discharge characteristics of microwave plasmas excited with a large-area planar microwave launcher installed internally in a 600-mm-diam cylindrical vacuum chamber. With the microwave power less than roughly 400 W, we demonstrated the large volumetric volume-wave plasma (VWP) spread in the entire chamber at a pressure of 14-27 Pa in He. Above 400 W, the plasma discharge made a sudden transition to higher-density, uniform surface-wave plasma (SWP) having a spatial uniformity of {+-}3.5% over 300 mm in diameter. Electron energy probability functions in the downstream region were studied using Langmuir probe measurements with Druyvesteyn method in both the SWP and VWP discharges.

  3. Continuous-terahertz-wave molecular imaging system for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Liangliang; Wu, Tong; Wang, Ruixue; Zuo, Shasha; Wu, Dong; Zhang, Cunlin; Zhang, Jue; Fang, Jing

    2016-07-01

    Molecular imaging techniques are becoming increasingly important in biomedical research and potentially in clinical practice. We present a continuous-terahertz (THz)-wave molecular imaging system for biomedical applications, in which an infrared (IR) laser is integrated into a 0.2-THz reflection-mode continuous-THz-wave imaging system to induce surface plasmon polaritons on the nanoparticles and further improve the intensity of the reflected signal from the water around the nanoparticles. A strong and rapid increment of the reflected THz signal in the nanoparticle solution upon the IR laser irradiation is demonstrated, using either gold or silver nanoparticles. This low-cost, simple, and stable continuous-THz-wave molecular imaging system is suitable for miniaturization and practical imaging applications; in particular, it shows great promise for cancer diagnosis and nanoparticle drug-delivery monitoring.

  4. Continuity waves in fully resolved simulations of settling particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willen, Daniel; Sierakowski, Adam; Prosperetti, Andrea

    2016-11-01

    Fully resolved simulations of 500 to 2,000 particles settling in a fluid have been conducted with the Physalis method. A new approach to the reconstruction of pseudo-continuum fields is described and is used to examine the results with the purpose of identifying concentration waves. The velocity of concentration waves is successfully deduced from the simulations. A comparison of the results with continuity wave theory shows good agreement. Several new insights about the particle microstructure conditionally averaged on volume fraction and velocity are also described. This work is supported by NSF award CBET1335965.

  5. Quality evaluation of packaged acidified vegetables subjected to continuous microwave pasteurization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The study evaluated the use of 915 MHz continuous microwave processing with a rotation apparatus for pasteurization of acidified vegetable packages. Broccoli florets, and 1.2 cm cubes of broccoli stems, red bell pepper, and sweetpotato were pre-equilibrated to 1 g/100 g NaCl and 0.38 g/100 mL citric...

  6. Modular Low-Heater-Power Cathode/Electron Gun Assembly for Microwave and Millimeter Wave Traveling Wave Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wintucky, Edwin G.

    2000-01-01

    A low-cost, low-mass, electrically efficient, modular cathode/electron gun assembly has been developed by FDE Inc. of Beaverton, Oregon, under a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract with the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field. This new assembly offers significant improvements in the design and manufacture of microwave and millimeter wave traveling-wave tubes (TWT's) used for radar and communications. It incorporates a novel, low-heater-power, reduced size and mass, high-performance barium dispenser type thermionic cathode and provides for easy integration of the cathode into a large variety of conventional TWT circuits. Among the applications are TWT's for Earth-orbiting communication satellites and for deep space communications, where future missions will require smaller spacecraft, higher data transfer rates (higher frequencies and radiofrequency output power), and greater electrical efficiency. A particularly important TWT application is in the microwave power module (a hybrid microwave/millimeter wave amplifier consisting of a low-noise solid-state driver, a small TWT, and an electronic power conditioner integrated into a single compact package), where electrical efficiency and thermal loading are critical factors and lower cost is needed for successful commercialization. The design and fabrication are based on practices used in producing cathode ray tubes (CRT's), which is one of the most competitive and efficient manufacturing operations in the world today. The approach used in the design and manufacture of thermionic cathodes and electron guns for CRT's has been optimized for fully automated production, standardization of parts, and minimization of costs. It is applicable to the production of similar components for microwave tubes, with the additional benefits of low mass and significantly lower cathode heater power (less than half that of dispenser cathodes presently used in TWT s). Modular cathode/electron gun assembly. The modular

  7. Continuous-wave lasing between Landau levels in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yongrui; Tokman, Mikhail; Belyanin, Alexey

    2015-03-01

    We predict the general feasibility and demonstrate the design of the continuous-wave terahertz laser operating between Landau levels in graphene placed on a polar substrate in a magnetic field of order 1 T. Steady-state population inversion under a continuous-wave optical pumping becomes possible due to surface-phonon-mediated relaxation of carriers. The scheme is scalable to other materials with massless Dirac fermions, for example, surface states in three-dimensional topological insulators such as Bi2Se3 or Bi2Te3 .

  8. Fluorescence excitation by enhanced plasmon upconversion under continuous wave illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasgin, Mehmet Emre; Salakhutdinov, Ildar; Kendziora, Dania; Abak, Musa Kurtulus; Turkpence, Deniz; Piantanida, Luca; Fruk, Ljiljana; Lazzarino, Marco; Bek, Alpan

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate effective background-free continuous wave nonlinear optical excitation of molecules that are sandwiched between asymmetrically constructed plasmonic gold nanoparticle clusters. We observe that near infrared photons are converted to visible photons through efficient plasmonic second harmonic generation. Our theoretical model and simulations demonstrate that Fano resonances may be responsible for being able to observe nonlinear conversion using a continuous wave light source. We show that nonlinearity enhancement of plasmonic nanostructures via coupled quantum mechanical oscillators such as molecules can be several orders larger as compared to their classical counterparts.

  9. An adjustable RF tuning element for microwave, millimeter wave, and submillimeter wave integrated circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lubecke, Victor M.; Mcgrath, William R.; Rutledge, David B.

    1991-01-01

    Planar RF circuits are used in a wide range of applications from 1 GHz to 300 GHz, including radar, communications, commercial RF test instruments, and remote sensing radiometers. These circuits, however, provide only fixed tuning elements. This lack of adjustability puts severe demands on circuit design procedures and materials parameters. We have developed a novel tuning element which can be incorporated into the design of a planar circuit in order to allow active, post-fabrication tuning by varying the electrical length of a coplanar strip transmission line. It consists of a series of thin plates which can slide in unison along the transmission line, and the size and spacing of the plates are designed to provide a large reflection of RF power over a useful frequency bandwidth. Tests of this structure at 1 GHz to 3 Ghz showed that it produced a reflection coefficient greater than 0.90 over a 20 percent bandwidth. A 2 GHz circuit incorporating this tuning element was also tested to demonstrate practical tuning ranges. This structure can be fabricated for frequencies as high as 1000 GHz using existing micromachining techniques. Many commercial applications can benefit from this micromechanical RF tuning element, as it will aid in extending microwave integrated circuit technology into the high millimeter wave and submillimeter wave bands by easing constraints on circuit technology.

  10. Effects of continuous and pulsed chronic microwave exposure on rabbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Chung-Kwang; Guy, Arthur W.; McDougall, John A.; Han, Lock-Fong

    1982-01-01

    Eighteen young adult New Zealand rabbits (nine males, nine females) were equally divided into three groups. One group was exposed to CW 2450-MHz fields at an incident power density of 1.5 mW/cm2 for 2 hours daily for 3 months. Another group was exposed to pulsed fields with pulses of 10 μ s duration occurring 100 times per second. The third group was sham exposed. Each rabbit was placed in a Plexiglas cage and exposed in a miniature plane wave exposure chamber. An S band horn was mounted 1 m above the animal. Thermographic data showed a peak specific absorption rate of 1.64 W/kg in the head and 2.1 W/kg in the back. Body weights were measured every other day. Electroencephalogram and evoked potentials were recorded weekly via implanted carbon-loaded Teflon electrodes. Blood samples were taken monthly for hematological, chemical, and morphological studies. Eyes were examined for cataract formation. Before the animals were sacrificed, apomorphine-induced behavioral excitation and hyperthermia were studied. Finally, pathological examinations on many tissues and organs were performed. Statistically, there were no significant differences in measured parameters observed between the exposed and sham animals.

  11. Development of continuous microwave-assisted protein digestion with immobilized enzyme.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhengyi; Li, Yongle; Lin, Shuhai; Wei, Meiping; Du, Fuyou; Ruan, Guihua

    2014-03-07

    In this study, an easy and efficiency protein digestion method called continuous microwave-assisted protein digestion (cMAED) with immobilized enzyme was developed and applied for proteome analysis by LC-MS(n). Continuous microwave power outputting was specially designed and applied. Trypsin and bromelain were immobilized onto magnetic micropheres. To evaluate the method of cMAED, bovine serum albumin (BSA) and protein extracted from ginkgo nuts were used as model and real protein sample to verify the digestion efficiency of cMAED. Several conditions including continuous microwave power, the ratio of immobilized trypsin/BSA were optimized according to the analysis of peptide fragments by Tricine SDS-PAGE and LC-MS(n). Subsequently, the ginkgo protein was digested with the protocols of cMAED, MAED and conventional heating enzymatic digestion (HED) respectively and the LC-MS(n) profiles of the hydrolysate was compared. Results showed that cMAED combined with immobilized enzyme was a fast and efficient digestion method for protein digestion and microwave power tentatively affected the peptide producing. The cMAED method will be expanded for large-scale preparation of bioactive peptides and peptide analysis in biological and clinical research.

  12. Electron Density Measurements on LTX Using Microwave and Millimeter-Wave Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubota, S.; Nguyen, X. V.; Peebles, W. A.; Boyle, D. P.; Kaita, R.; Kozub, T.; Majeski, R.; Merino, E.; Schmitt, J. C.

    2015-11-01

    The dynamic evolution of the electron density profile is tracked using microwave and millimeter-wave diagnostics on LTX. The 296 GHz (λ =1 mm) interferometer provides a radial line density measurement at the midplane, while an FMCW (frequency-modulated continuous-wave) reflectometer (13.5 -33 GHz, or O-mode 0 . 2 - 1 . 3 ×1013 cm-3) provides density profile measurements for the low-field side. Data taken during FY2015 will be compared with measurements from Thomson scattering and estimates of the plasma position from LRDFIT. Measurements of density fluctuations due to low-frequency (<100 kHz) MHD instabilities will also be shown. Future plans include the installation of a correlation reflectomter (Ka-band, 27-40 GHz) with dual tuneable sources and a frequency bandwidth of up to 5 MHz. This system will utilize the same antennas as the profile reflectometer to provide radial and/or toroidal/poloidal correlations. Further diagnostic details will be presented at the meeting. Supported by U.S. DoE Grants DE-FG02-99ER54527 and DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  13. Microwave-assisted pyrolysis of methyl ricinoleate for continuous production of undecylenic acid methyl ester (UAME).

    PubMed

    Nie, Yong; Duan, Ying; Gong, Ruchao; Yu, Shangzhi; Lu, Meizhen; Yu, Fengwen; Ji, Jianbing

    2015-06-01

    Undecylenic acid methyl ester (UAME) was continuously produced from methyl ricinoleate using a microwave-assisted pyrolysis system with atomization feeding. The UAME yield of 77 wt.% was obtained at 500°C using SiC as the microwave absorbent and heating medium. The methyl ricinoleate conversion and UAME yield from microwave-assisted pyrolysis process were higher than those from conventional pyrolysis. The effect of temperature on the pyrolysis process was also investigated. The methyl ricinoleate conversion increased but the cracking liquid yield decreased when the temperature increased from 460°C to 560°C. The maximum UAME yield was obtained at the temperature of 500°C.

  14. Operational experience with room temperature continuous wave accelerator structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alimov, A. S.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Piskarev, I. M.; Shvedunov, V. I.; Tiunov, A. V.

    1993-05-01

    The paper reports the results of the computer simulation of parameters of the on-axis coupled accelerator structure for the continuous wave racetrack microtron. The operational experience with the accelerating sections on the basis of the on-axis coupled structure is described.

  15. Laser diode array pumped continuous wave Rubidium vapor laser.

    PubMed

    Zhdanov, B V; Stooke, A; Boyadjian, G; Voci, A; Knize, R J

    2008-01-21

    We have demonstrated continuous wave operation of a laser diode array pumped Rb laser with an output power of 8 Watts. A slope efficiency of 60% and a total optical efficiency of 45% were obtained with a pump power of 18 Watts. This laser can be scaled to higher powers by using multiple laser diode arrays or stacks of arrays.

  16. Microwave Three-Wave Mixing Experiments for Chirality Determination: Current Status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, Cristobal; Shubert, V. Alvin; Schmitz, David; Medcraft, Chris; Krin, Anna; Schnell, Melanie

    2015-06-01

    Microwave three-wave mixing experiments have been shown to provide a novel and sensitive way to generate and measure enantiomer-specific molecular signatures. The handedness of the sample can be obtained from the phase of the molecular free induction decay whereas the enantiomeric excess can be determined by the amplitude of the chiral signal. After the introduction of this technique by Patterson et al. remarkable improvements have been realized and experimental strategies for both absolute phase determination and enantiomeric excess have been presented. This technique has been also successfully implemented at higher microwave frequencies. Here we present the current status of this technique as well future directions and perspectives. This will be illustrated through our systematic study of chiral terpenes as well as preliminary results in molecular clusters. Patterson, D.; Schnell, M.; Doyle, J. M. Enantiomer-Specific Detection of Chiral Molecules via Microwave Spectroscopy. Nature 2013, 497, 475-477. Patterson, D.; Doyle, J. M. Sensitive Chiral Analysis via Microwave Three-Wave Mixing. Phys. Rev. Lett. 2013, 111, 023008. Shubert, V. A.; Schmitz, D.; Patterson, D.; Doyle, J. M.; Schnell, M. Identifying Enantiomers in Mixtures of Chiral Molecules with Broadband Microwave Spectroscopy. Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2014, 53, 1152-1155. Lobsiger, S.; Perez, C.; Evangelisti, L.; Lehmann, K. K.; Pate, B. H. Molecular Structure and Chirality Detection by Fourier Transform Microwave Spectroscopy. J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 2014, 6, 196-200.

  17. RF characterization of monolithic microwave and mm-wave ICs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romanofsky, R. R.; Ponchak, G. E.; Shalkhauser, K. A.; Bhasin, K. B.

    1986-01-01

    A number of fixturing techniques compatible with automatic network analysis are presented. The fixtures are capable of characterizing GaAs Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuits (MMICs) at K and Ka band. Several different transitions are used to couple the RF test port to microstrip. Fixtures which provide chip level de-embedding are included. In addition, two advanced characterization techniques are assessed.

  18. A microwave applicator for uniform irradiation by circularly polarized waves in an anechoic chamber.

    PubMed

    Chiang, W Y; Wu, M H; Wu, K L; Lin, M H; Teng, H H; Tsai, Y F; Ko, C C; Yang, E C; Jiang, J A; Barnett, L R; Chu, K R

    2014-08-01

    Microwave applicators are widely employed for materials heating in scientific research and industrial applications, such as food processing, wood drying, ceramic sintering, chemical synthesis, waste treatment, and insect control. For the majority of microwave applicators, materials are heated in the standing waves of a resonant cavity, which can be highly efficient in energy consumption, but often lacks the field uniformity and controllability required for a scientific study. Here, we report a microwave applicator for rapid heating of small samples by highly uniform irradiation. It features an anechoic chamber, a 24-GHz microwave source, and a linear-to-circular polarization converter. With a rather low energy efficiency, such an applicator functions mainly as a research tool. This paper discusses the significance of its special features and describes the structure, in situ diagnostic tools, calculated and measured field patterns, and a preliminary heating test of the overall system.

  19. A microwave applicator for uniform irradiation by circularly polarized waves in an anechoic chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, W. Y.; Wu, M. H.; Wu, K. L.; Lin, M. H.; Teng, H. H.; Tsai, Y. F.; Ko, C. C.; Yang, E. C.; Jiang, J. A.; Barnett, L. R.; Chu, K. R.

    2014-08-01

    Microwave applicators are widely employed for materials heating in scientific research and industrial applications, such as food processing, wood drying, ceramic sintering, chemical synthesis, waste treatment, and insect control. For the majority of microwave applicators, materials are heated in the standing waves of a resonant cavity, which can be highly efficient in energy consumption, but often lacks the field uniformity and controllability required for a scientific study. Here, we report a microwave applicator for rapid heating of small samples by highly uniform irradiation. It features an anechoic chamber, a 24-GHz microwave source, and a linear-to-circular polarization converter. With a rather low energy efficiency, such an applicator functions mainly as a research tool. This paper discusses the significance of its special features and describes the structure, in situ diagnostic tools, calculated and measured field patterns, and a preliminary heating test of the overall system.

  20. A microwave applicator for uniform irradiation by circularly polarized waves in an anechoic chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, W. Y.; Wu, M. H.; Wu, K. L.; Lin, M. H.; Teng, H. H.; Barnett, L. R.; Chu, K. R.; Tsai, Y. F.; Ko, C. C.; Yang, E. C.; Jiang, J. A.

    2014-08-15

    Microwave applicators are widely employed for materials heating in scientific research and industrial applications, such as food processing, wood drying, ceramic sintering, chemical synthesis, waste treatment, and insect control. For the majority of microwave applicators, materials are heated in the standing waves of a resonant cavity, which can be highly efficient in energy consumption, but often lacks the field uniformity and controllability required for a scientific study. Here, we report a microwave applicator for rapid heating of small samples by highly uniform irradiation. It features an anechoic chamber, a 24-GHz microwave source, and a linear-to-circular polarization converter. With a rather low energy efficiency, such an applicator functions mainly as a research tool. This paper discusses the significance of its special features and describes the structure, in situ diagnostic tools, calculated and measured field patterns, and a preliminary heating test of the overall system.

  1. Oil extraction from Scenedesmus obliquus using a continuous microwave system--design, optimization, and quality characterization.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, Sundar; Allen, James D; Kanitkar, Akanksha; Boldor, Dorin

    2011-02-01

    A 1.2 kW, 2450 MHz resonant continuous microwave processing system was designed and optimized for oil extraction from green algae (Scenedesmus obliquus). Algae-water suspension (1:1 w/w) was heated to 80 and 95°C, and subjected to extraction for up to 30 min. Maximum oil yield was achieved at 95°C and 30 min. The microwave system extracted 76-77% of total recoverable oil at 20-30 min and 95°C, compared to only 43-47% for water bath control. Extraction time and temperature had significant influence (p<0.0001) on extraction yield. Oil analysis indicated that microwaves extracted oil containing higher percentages of unsaturated and essential fatty acids (indicating higher quality). This study validates for the first time the efficiency of a continuous microwave system for extraction of lipids from algae. Higher oil yields, faster extraction rates and superior oil quality demonstrate this system's feasibility for oil extraction from a variety of feedstock.

  2. Aircraft and satellite measurement of ocean wave directional spectra using scanning-beam microwave radars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, F. C.; Walton, W. T.; Baker, P. L.

    1982-01-01

    A microwave radar technique for remotely measuring the vector wave number spectrum of the ocean surface is described. The technique, which employs short-pulse, noncoherent radars in a conical scan mode near vertical incidence, is shown to be suitable for both aircraft and satellite application, the technique was validated at 10 km aircraft altitude, where we have found excellent agreement between buoy and radar-inferred absolute wave height spectra.

  3. Printed circuit board impedance matching step for microwave (millimeter wave) devices

    DOEpatents

    Pao, Hsueh-Yuan; Aguirre, Jerardo; Sargis, Paul

    2013-10-01

    An impedance matching ground plane step, in conjunction with a quarter wave transformer section, in a printed circuit board provides a broadband microwave matching transition from board connectors or other elements that require thin substrates to thick substrate (>quarter wavelength) broadband microwave (millimeter wave) devices. A method of constructing microwave and other high frequency electrical circuits on a substrate of uniform thickness, where the circuit is formed of a plurality of interconnected elements of different impedances that individually require substrates of different thicknesses, by providing a substrate of uniform thickness that is a composite or multilayered substrate; and forming a pattern of intermediate ground planes or impedance matching steps interconnected by vias located under various parts of the circuit where components of different impedances are located so that each part of the circuit has a ground plane substrate thickness that is optimum while the entire circuit is formed on a substrate of uniform thickness.

  4. Cluster observations of non-time continuous magnetosonic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Simon N.; Demekhov, Andrei G.; Boardsen, Scott A.; Ganushkina, Natalia Y.; Sibeck, David G.; Balikhin, Michael A.

    2016-10-01

    Equatorial magnetosonic waves are normally observed as temporally continuous sets of emissions lasting from minutes to hours. Recent observations, however, have shown that this is not always the case. Using Cluster data, this study identifies two distinct forms of these non-temporally continuous emissions. The first, referred to as rising tone emissions, are characterized by the systematic onset of wave activity at increasing proton gyroharmonic frequencies. Sets of harmonic emissions (emission elements) are observed to occur periodically in the region ±10° off the geomagnetic equator. The sweep rate of these emissions maximizes at the geomagnetic equator. In addition, the ellipticity and propagation direction also change systematically as Cluster crosses the geomagnetic equator. It is shown that the observed frequency sweep rate is unlikely to result from the sideband instability related to nonlinear trapping of suprathermal protons in the wave field. The second form of emissions is characterized by the simultaneous onset of activity across a range of harmonic frequencies. These waves are observed at irregular intervals. Their occurrence correlates with changes in the spacecraft potential, a measurement that is used as a proxy for electron density. Thus, these waves appear to be trapped within regions of localized enhancement of the electron density.

  5. The 4-Day Wave as Obvserved from the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite Microwave Limb Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, D. R.; Stanford, J. L.

    1996-01-01

    The 4-day wave is an eastward moving quasi-nondispersive feature with period near 4 days occurring near the winter polar stratopause. This paper presents evidence of the 4-day feature in Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) temperature, geopotential height and ozone data from the late Southern winters of 1992 and 1993.

  6. Systematic effects from an ambient-temperature, continuously rotating half-wave plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essinger-Hileman, T.; Kusaka, A.; Appel, J. W.; Choi, S. K.; Crowley, K.; Ho, S. P.; Jarosik, N.; Page, L. A.; Parker, L. P.; Raghunathan, S.; Simon, S. M.; Staggs, S. T.; Visnjic, K.

    2016-09-01

    We present an evaluation of systematic effects associated with a continuously rotating, ambient-temperature half-wave plate (HWP) based on two seasons of data from the Atacama B-Mode Search (ABS) experiment located in the Atacama Desert of Chile. The ABS experiment is a microwave telescope sensitive at 145 GHz. Here we present our in-field evaluation of celestial (Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) plus galactic foreground) temperature-to-polarization leakage. We decompose the leakage into scalar, dipole, and quadrupole leakage terms. We report a scalar leakage of ˜0.01%, consistent with model expectations and an order of magnitude smaller than other CMB experiments have been reported. No significant dipole or quadrupole terms are detected; we constrain each to be <0.07% (95% confidence), limited by statistical uncertainty in our measurement. Dipole and quadrupole leakage at this level lead to systematic error on r ≲ 0.01 before any mitigation due to scan cross-linking or boresight rotation. The measured scalar leakage and the theoretical level of dipole and quadrupole leakage produce systematic error of r < 0.001 for the ABS survey and focal-plane layout before any data correction such as so-called deprojection. This demonstrates that ABS achieves significant beam systematic error mitigation from its HWP and shows the promise of continuously rotating HWPs for future experiments.

  7. Systematic effects from an ambient-temperature, continuously rotating half-wave plate.

    PubMed

    Essinger-Hileman, T; Kusaka, A; Appel, J W; Choi, S K; Crowley, K; Ho, S P; Jarosik, N; Page, L A; Parker, L P; Raghunathan, S; Simon, S M; Staggs, S T; Visnjic, K

    2016-09-01

    We present an evaluation of systematic effects associated with a continuously rotating, ambient-temperature half-wave plate (HWP) based on two seasons of data from the Atacama B-Mode Search (ABS) experiment located in the Atacama Desert of Chile. The ABS experiment is a microwave telescope sensitive at 145 GHz. Here we present our in-field evaluation of celestial (Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) plus galactic foreground) temperature-to-polarization leakage. We decompose the leakage into scalar, dipole, and quadrupole leakage terms. We report a scalar leakage of ∼0.01%, consistent with model expectations and an order of magnitude smaller than other CMB experiments have been reported. No significant dipole or quadrupole terms are detected; we constrain each to be <0.07% (95% confidence), limited by statistical uncertainty in our measurement. Dipole and quadrupole leakage at this level lead to systematic error on r ≲ 0.01 before any mitigation due to scan cross-linking or boresight rotation. The measured scalar leakage and the theoretical level of dipole and quadrupole leakage produce systematic error of r < 0.001 for the ABS survey and focal-plane layout before any data correction such as so-called deprojection. This demonstrates that ABS achieves significant beam systematic error mitigation from its HWP and shows the promise of continuously rotating HWPs for future experiments.

  8. System design development for microwave and millimeter-wave materials processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feher, Lambert; Thumm, Manfred

    2002-06-01

    The most notable effect in processing dielectrics with micro- and millimeter-waves is volumetric heating of these materials, offering the opportunity of very high heating rates for the samples. In comparison to conventional heating where the heat transfer is diffusive and depends on the thermal conductivity of the material, the microwave field penetrates the sample and acts as an instantaneous heat source at each point of the sample. By this unique property, microwave heating at 2.45 GHz and 915 MHz ISM (Industrial, Medical, Scientific) frequencies is established as an important industrial technology since more than 50 years ago. Successful application of microwaves in industries has been reported e.g. by food processing systems, domestic ovens, rubber industry, vacuum drying etc. The present paper shows some outlines of microwave system development at Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, IHM by transferring properties from the higher frequency regime (millimeter-waves) to lower frequency applications. Anyway, the need for using higher frequencies like 24 GHz (ISM frequency) for industrial applications has to be carefully verified with respect to special physical/engineering advantages or to limits the standard microwave technology meets for the specific problem.

  9. Sound waves and modulational instabilities on continuous-wave solutions in spinor Bose-Einstein condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasgal, Richard S.; Band, Y. B.

    2015-01-01

    We analyze sound waves (phonons, i.e. Bogoliubov excitations) propagating on continuous-wave (cw) solutions of repulsive F =1 spinor Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) such as 23Na (which is antiferromagnetic or polar) and 87Rb (which is ferromagnetic). Zeeman splitting by a uniform magnetic field is included. All cw solutions to ferromagnetic BECs with vanishing MF=0 particle density and nonzero components in both MF=±1 fields are subject to modulational instability (MI). Modulational instability increases with increasing particle density. Modulational instability also increases with differences in the components' wave numbers; this effect is larger at lower densities but becomes insignificant at higher particle densities. Continuous-wave solutions to antiferromagnetic (polar) BECs with vanishing MF=0 particle density and nonzero components in both MF=±1 fields do not suffer MI if the wave numbers of the components are the same. If there is a wave-number difference, MI initially increases with increasing particle density and then peaks before dropping to zero beyond a given particle density. The cw solutions with particles in both MF=±1 components and nonvanishing MF=0 components do not have MI if the wave numbers of the components are the same, but do exhibit MI when the wave numbers are different. Direct numerical simulations of a continuous wave with weak white noise confirm that weak noise grows fastest at wave numbers with the largest MI and show some of the results beyond small-amplitude perturbations. Phonon dispersion curves are computed numerically; we find analytic solutions for the phonon dispersion in a variety of limiting cases.

  10. A full-wave Helmholtz model for continuous-wave ultrasound transmission.

    PubMed

    Huttunen, Tomi; Malinen, Matti; Kaipio, Jari P; White, Phillip Jason; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2005-03-01

    A full-wave Helmholtz model of continuous-wave (CW) ultrasound fields may offer several attractive features over widely used partial-wave approximations. For example, many full-wave techniques can be easily adjusted for complex geometries, and multiple reflections of sound are automatically taken into account in the model. To date, however, the full-wave modeling of CW fields in general 3D geometries has been avoided due to the large computational cost associated with the numerical approximation of the Helmholtz equation. Recent developments in computing capacity together with improvements in finite element type modeling techniques are making possible wave simulations in 3D geometries which reach over tens of wavelengths. The aim of this study is to investigate the feasibility of a full-wave solution of the 3D Helmholtz equation for modeling of continuous-wave ultrasound fields in an inhomogeneous medium. The numerical approximation of the Helmholtz equation is computed using the ultraweak variational formulation (UWVF) method. In addition, an inverse problem technique is utilized to reconstruct the velocity distribution on the transducer which is used to model the sound source in the UWVF scheme. The modeling method is verified by comparing simulated and measured fields in the case of transmission of 531 kHz CW fields through layered plastic plates. The comparison shows a reasonable agreement between simulations and measurements at low angles of incidence but, due to mode conversion, the Helmholtz model becomes insufficient for simulating ultrasound fields in plates at large angles of incidence.

  11. Tuning the microwave absorption through engineered nanostructures in co-continuous polymer blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasanna Kar, Goutam; Biswas, Sourav; Bose, Suryasarathi

    2016-06-01

    Herein, we report tailor-made properties by dispersing nanostructured materials in a co-continuous polymer blend (PVDF/ABS) that is capable of shielding electromagnetic (EM) radiation. To accomplish this, lossy materials were employed like multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs), and barium titanate (BT), (which exhibit relaxation losses in the microwave frequency domain) and ferrites (like Fe3O4). To improve the state of dispersion, the MWNTs were non-covalently modified using 3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCD) via π-π stacking, and for effective shielding the MWNTs were conjugated with either BT or Fe3O4 nanoparticles through suitable modifications. The hybrid nanoparticles were selectively localized in the PVDF phase, governed by its polarity, and exhibited excellent microwave attenuation. In order to gain insight into the dielectric and magnetic attributes, the microwave parameters were assessed systematically. Taken together, our results uncover polymer blend as a promising candidate for designing lightweight, thermally stable microwave absorber materials.

  12. Polarization decoherence differential frequency-modulated continuous-wave gyroscope.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Chao; Zheng, Gang; Han, Liwei; Luo, Jianhua; Teng, Fei; Wang, Bing; Song, Ping; Gao, Kun; Hou, Zhiqing

    2014-12-01

    A polarization decoherence differential frequency-modulated continuous-wave (FMCW) gyroscope is presented. The impact of coherent polarization crosstalk noise on the differential FMCW gyro is analyzed. In order to suppress coherent polarization crosstalk noise, a novel method was proposed to produce two incoherent orthogonal polarization narrow band beams from laser diode. In this way, the random drift has been reduced about one order.

  13. Wave function of a microwave-driven Bose-Einstein magnon condensate

    SciTech Connect

    Rezende, Sergio M.

    2010-01-01

    It has been observed experimentally that a magnon gas in a film of yttrium-iron garnet at room temperature driven by a microwave field exhibits Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) when the driving power exceeds a critical value. In a previous paper we presented a model for the dynamics of the magnon system in wave-vector space that provides firm theoretical support for the formation of the BEC. Here we show that the wave function of the magnon condensate in configuration space satisfies a Gross-Pitaevskii equation similarly to other BEC systems. The theory is consistent with the previous model in wave-vector space, and its results are in qualitative agreement with recent measurements of the spatial distribution of the magnon condensate driven by a nonuniform microwave field.

  14. Photonic-integrated circuit for continuous-wave THz generation.

    PubMed

    Theurer, Michael; Göbel, Thorsten; Stanze, Dennis; Troppenz, Ute; Soares, Francisco; Grote, Norbert; Schell, Martin

    2013-10-01

    We demonstrate a photonic-integrated circuit for continuous-wave (cw) terahertz (THz) generation. By comprising two lasers and an optical phase modulator on a single chip, the full control of the THz signal is enabled via a unique bidirectional operation technique. Integrated heaters allow for continuous tuning of the THz frequency over 570 GHz. Applied to a coherent cw THz photomixing system operated at 1.5 μm optical wavelength, we reach a signal-to-noise ratio of 44 dB at 1.25 THz, which is identical to the performance of a standard system based on discrete components.

  15. Automation of an "Aculight" continuous-wave optical parametric oscillator.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Alexander M; Liang, Tao; Douberly, Gary E

    2013-01-01

    We report the automation of a continuous-wave, singly resonant, optical parametric oscillator (Lockheed-Martin Aculight ARGOS 2400-SF-15). This commercially available optical parametric oscillator (OPO) is capable of producing >1 W of continuously tunable idler output between 2.2 and 4.6 μm. An algorithm based on the feedback from a high accuracy wavemeter is implemented to synchronize three separate OPO tuning elements; the translation of a fan-out type periodically poled lithium niobate crystal, the rotation of an intracavity etalon, and the continuous tuning of the pump and idler wavelengths via piezoelectric strain of the tunable fiber pump laser. This allows for several hundred wavenumbers of efficient, automatic, continuous tuning of the idler wave. Continuous feedback from the wavemeter limits the absolute frequency accuracy to ±20 MHz. The broad, automatic tuning of the OPO is demonstrated via its implementation as a probe laser for the infrared action spectroscopy of methanol solvated in helium nanodroplets. LabVIEW virtual instruments for the automation of this OPO laser system are reported, along with detailed schematics of the associated hardware developed at the University of Georgia.

  16. Automation of an ``Aculight'' continuous-wave optical parametric oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, Alexander M.; Liang, Tao; Douberly, Gary E.

    2013-01-01

    We report the automation of a continuous-wave, singly resonant, optical parametric oscillator (Lockheed-Martin Aculight ARGOS 2400-SF-15). This commercially available optical parametric oscillator (OPO) is capable of producing >1 W of continuously tunable idler output between 2.2 and 4.6 μm. An algorithm based on the feedback from a high accuracy wavemeter is implemented to synchronize three separate OPO tuning elements; the translation of a fan-out type periodically poled lithium niobate crystal, the rotation of an intracavity etalon, and the continuous tuning of the pump and idler wavelengths via piezoelectric strain of the tunable fiber pump laser. This allows for several hundred wavenumbers of efficient, automatic, continuous tuning of the idler wave. Continuous feedback from the wavemeter limits the absolute frequency accuracy to ±20 MHz. The broad, automatic tuning of the OPO is demonstrated via its implementation as a probe laser for the infrared action spectroscopy of methanol solvated in helium nanodroplets. LabVIEW virtual instruments for the automation of this OPO laser system are reported, along with detailed schematics of the associated hardware developed at the University of Georgia.

  17. Physics of propagation in left-handed guided wave structures at microwave and millimeter-wave frequencies.

    PubMed

    Krowne, Clifford M

    2004-02-06

    A microstrip configuration is loaded with a left-handed medium substrate and studied regarding its dispersion diagrams over the microwave and millimeter-wave frequency bands for a number of different modal solutions. Ab initio calculations are accomplished self-consistently with a computer code using a full-wave integral equation numerical method based upon a Green's function employing appropriate boundary conditions. Bands of both propagating and evanescent behavior are discovered in some of the modes. Electromagnetic field plots in the cross-sectional dimension are made. New electric field line and magnetic circulation patterns are discovered.

  18. Microwave and millimetre-wave receivers with integral antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alder, C. J.; Brewitt-Taylor, C. R.; Dixon, M.; Hodges, R. D.; Irving, L. D.

    1991-06-01

    A family of microwave receivers is described which consists of antennas integrated with a balanced mixer and IF amplifier on a common substrate. Each receiver is small enough to enable two-dimensional arrays to be fabricated monolithically within a single semiconductor chip. The antenna pattern of each receiver is suitable for feeding via a dielectric immersion lens, thereby creating a high-gain array of beams in the farfield. Such receivers have been built to operate at 10 and 35 GHz, and show conversion loss similar to more conventional designs.

  19. Treatment of dairy manure using the microwave enhanced advanced oxidation process under a continuous mode operation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yang; Lo, Ing W; Liao, Ping H; Lo, Kwang V

    2010-11-01

    The microwave enhanced advanced oxidation process (MW/H(2)O(2)-AOP) was used to treat dairy manure for solubilization of nutrients and organic matters. This study investigated the effectiveness of the MW/H(2)O(2)-AOP under a continuous mode of operation, and compared the results to those of batch operations. The main factors affecting solubilization by the MW/H(2)O(2)-AOP were heating temperature and hydrogen peroxide dosage. Soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD) and volatile fatty acids (VFA) increased with an increase of microwave (MW) heating temperature; very high concentrations were obtained at 90°C. Insignificant amounts of ammonia and reducing sugars were released in all runs. An acidic pH condition was required for phosphorus solubilisation from dairy manure. The best yield was obtained at 90°C with an acid dosage of 1.0 %; about 92 % of total phosphorus and 90 % of total chemical oxygen demand were in the soluble forms. The MW/H(2)O(2)-AOP operated in a continuous operation mode showed pronounced synergistic effects between hydrogen peroxide and microwave irradiation when compared to a batch system under similar operating conditions, resulting in much better yields.

  20. Acousto-optic modulation of a photonic crystal nanocavity with Lamb waves in microwave K band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadesse, Semere A.; Li, Huan; Liu, Qiyu; Li, Mo

    2015-11-01

    Integrating nanoscale electromechanical transducers and nanophotonic devices potentially can enable acousto-optic devices to reach unprecedented high frequencies and modulation efficiency. Here, we demonstrate acousto-optic modulation of a photonic crystal nanocavity using Lamb waves with frequency up to 19 GHz, reaching the microwave K band. The devices are fabricated in suspended aluminum nitride membrane. Excitation of acoustic waves is achieved with interdigital transducers with period as small as 300 nm. Confining both acoustic wave and optical wave within the thickness of the membrane leads to improved acousto-optic modulation efficiency in these devices than that obtained in previous surface acoustic wave devices. Our system demonstrates a scalable optomechanical platform where strong acousto-optic coupling between cavity-confined photons and high frequency traveling phonons can be explored.

  1. Acousto-optic modulation of a photonic crystal nanocavity with Lamb waves in microwave K band

    SciTech Connect

    Tadesse, Semere A.; Li, Huan; Liu, Qiyu; Li, Mo

    2015-11-16

    Integrating nanoscale electromechanical transducers and nanophotonic devices potentially can enable acousto-optic devices to reach unprecedented high frequencies and modulation efficiency. Here, we demonstrate acousto-optic modulation of a photonic crystal nanocavity using Lamb waves with frequency up to 19 GHz, reaching the microwave K band. The devices are fabricated in suspended aluminum nitride membrane. Excitation of acoustic waves is achieved with interdigital transducers with period as small as 300 nm. Confining both acoustic wave and optical wave within the thickness of the membrane leads to improved acousto-optic modulation efficiency in these devices than that obtained in previous surface acoustic wave devices. Our system demonstrates a scalable optomechanical platform where strong acousto-optic coupling between cavity-confined photons and high frequency traveling phonons can be explored.

  2. Electromagnetic Wave Shieding Effectiveness of Carbon Fiber Sheet Coated Ferrite Film by Microwave-Hydrothermal Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Ri Ichi; Yamamoto, Hidetoshi; Kim, Chan Kong; Yim, Cheol Mun; Kim, Yun Hae

    The developments of electromagnetic wave shielding materials are strongly required because the malfunction of electronic equipment, mobile phone and wireless LAN avoids. In this study, it was investigated that the electromagnetic shielding effectiveness of carbon fiber sheets were enhanced by the ferrite which was coated by the microwave hydrothermal process. For coated carbon fiber sheet, the effects of ferrite and lamination of carbon fiber textile on the electromagnetic wave shielding effectiveness were discussed. In the range of frequency (100 1 GHz), the electromagnetic wave shielding effectiveness was measured by using TEM-Cell. The electromagnetic wave shielding effectiveness was greater for the coated carbon fiber sheets than for the uncoated carbon fiber sheets. When the insulation film was located between two carbon fiber sheets, the electromagnetic wave shielding effectiveness increased.

  3. Research of the applications of ITO in microwave-range surface plasmon waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Senfeng; Wu, Wen; Gu, Wenhua

    2016-09-01

    Because of the electromagnetic field enhancement effect in subwavelength scale, the surface plasmon wave (SPW) has been widely used in beam forming, bio-prospecting, and subwavelength structure design. But most research work is in the visible light or terahertz frequency band, and the surface plasmonic material (SPM) is usually limited to metals. In the microwave band, complex structures have to be used to achieve the desired subwavelength effects, making use of both metal and dielectric materials. In this paper, we propose the excitation of SPW in the microwave range using a simple structure and the material of indium tin oxide (ITO). By measuring the electric field profile during the propagation process, the excitation of SPW in ITO was verified. At the same time, frequency dependence was seen during the propagation process. Therefore, ITO can be a good SPM in the microwave band, just like metals in the visible light band. Considering the transparent characteristics of ITO, it can have many interesting applications.

  4. Searches for Continuous Gravitational Waves in LIGO and Virgo Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riles, Keith; LIGO Scientific Collaboration Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The LIGO Scientific Collaboration and Virgo Collaboration have carried out searches for periodic continuous gravitational waves. These analyses range from targeted searches for gravitational-wave signals from known pulsars, for which precise ephemerides from radio or X-ray observations are available, to all-sky searches for unknown neutron stars, including stars in unknown binary systems. Between these extremes lie directed searches for known stars of unknown spin frequency or for new unknown sources at specific locations. These different types of searches will be presented, including final results from the Initial LIGO and Virgo data runs and, where available, new results from searches of early Advanced LIGO data. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation grant PHY-1505932.

  5. Biological studies with continuous-wave radiofrequency (28 MHz) radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, N.A.; Borland, R.G.; Cookson, J.H.; Coward, R.F.; Davies, J.A.; Nicholson, A.N.; Christie, J.L.; Flanagan, N.G.; Goodridge, V.D.

    1984-03-01

    Effects of high-frequency (28 MHz) continous-wave radiation have been studied in the rat and monkey. No histopathological or hematological changes could be attributed to the radiation. In the monkey there was an increase in urinary calcium concentration which was most likely due to restricted movement. In the rat there was reduced uptake of iodine by the thyroid, lower levels of plasma thyroid-stimulating hormone, and reduced ratio of protein bound to nonprotein bound iodine. Food consumption was also decreased. The changes are likely to have arisen as a compensatory response to an induced heat load. A nonthermal effect of continuous-wave high-frequency radiation has not been shown in this study. The effects were likely to be associated with either physiological compensation for induced heating or restriction of movement.

  6. High power microwave source with a three dimensional printed metamaterial slow-wave structure.

    PubMed

    French, David M; Shiffler, Don

    2016-05-01

    For over the last decade, the concept of metamaterials has led to new approaches for considering the interaction of radiation with complex structures. However, practical manifestations of such a device operating at high power densities have proven difficult to achieve due to the resonant nature of metamaterials and the resultant high electric fields, which place severe constraints on manufacturing the slow wave structures. In this paper, we describe the first experimental manifestation of a high power microwave device utilizing a metallic slow wave structure (metamaterial-like) fabricated using additive manufacturing. The feasibility of utilizing additive manufacturing as a technique for building these relatively complicated structures has thus been demonstrated. The MW class microwave source operates in the C-band and shows frequency tunablility with electron beam voltage. The basic electromagnetic characteristics of this device, the construction using additive manufacturing, and the basic performance as a microwave oscillator are considered. Due to the tunable nature of the device, it shows promise not only as an oscillator but also as a microwave amplifier. Therefore, the dispersive characteristics and a discussion of the anticipated gain is included as it relates to an amplifier configuration.

  7. Continuous-wave optical parametric oscillators: recent developments and prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breunig, I.; Haertle, D.; Buse, K.

    2011-10-01

    We review the progress in the development of continuous-wave optical parametric oscillators over the last decade. A recently developed theoretical analysis shows that their stability strongly depends on the group velocity dispersion of the nonlinear material used. Now, these devices generate not only near- and mid-infrared radiation, but also visible and terahertz light. Active locking to external references like atom transitions, resonators, or frequency combs enables mode-hop-free operation up to days. Furthermore, whispering-gallery-resonator-based devices enable the realization of millimeter-sized monolithic resonators with microwatt oscillation thresholds.

  8. All-optoelectronic continuous wave THz imaging for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Siebert, Karsten J; Löffler, Torsten; Quast, Holger; Thomson, Mark; Bauer, Tobias; Leonhardt, Rainer; Czasch, Stephanie; Roskos, Hartmut G

    2002-11-07

    We present an all-optoelectronic THz imaging system for ex vivo biomedical applications based on photomixing of two continuous-wave laser beams using photoconductive antennas. The application of hyperboloidal lenses is discussed. They allow for f-numbers less than 1/2 permitting better focusing and higher spatial resolution compared to off-axis paraboloidal mirrors whose f-numbers for practical reasons must be larger than 1/2. For a specific histological sample, an analysis of image noise is discussed.

  9. All-optoelectronic continuous-wave terahertz systems.

    PubMed

    Löffler, Torsten; Siebert, Karsten J; Quast, Holger; Hasegawa, Noburu; Loata, Gabriel; Wipf, Robert; Hahn, Tobias; Thomson, Mark; Leonhardt, Rainer; Roskos, Hartmut G

    2004-02-15

    We discuss the optoelectronic generation and detection of continuous-wave terahertz (THz) radiation by the mixing of visible/near-infrared laser radiation in photoconductive antennas. We review attempts to reach higher THz output-power levels by reverting from mobility-lifetime-limited photomixers to transit-time-limited p-i-n photodiodes. We then describe our implementation of a THz spectroscopy and imaging-measurement system and demonstrate its imaging performance with several examples. Possible application areas of THz imaging in the biomedical field and in surface characterization for industrial purposes are explored.

  10. Experimental Investigation of Continuous-Wave Laser Ionization of Krypton

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, Bret D.; Shannon, Robert F.

    2001-10-30

    This report describes experimental investigations of a method that uses continuous-wave (CW) lasers to ionize selected isotopes of krypton with high isotopic selectivity. The experiments show that the ionization rate is at least a factor of 100 lower than calculated with our model that has been described in a previous report. This discrepancy may be due to a much smaller excitation cross section that expected based on previous work and/or the aberrations in the ultraviolet beam used for the first step in the excitation. Additional problems with damage to mirrors, alignment instabilities, and manufacturers halting production of key products make this approach not worth further development at this time

  11. A model for a continuous-wave iodine laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, In H.; Tabibi, Bagher M.

    1990-01-01

    A model for a continuous-wave (CW) iodine laser has been developed and compared with the experimental results obtained from a solar-simulator-pumped CW iodine laser. The agreement between the calculated laser power output and the experimental results is generally good for various laser parameters even when the model includes only prominent rate coefficients. The flow velocity dependence of the output power shows that the CW iodine laser cannot be achieved with a flow velocity below 1 m/s for the present solar-simulator-pumped CW iodine laser system.

  12. Continuous-wave terahertz reflective off-axis digital holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Min; Wang, Dayong; Rong, Lu; Wang, Yunxin; Huang, Haochong; Li, Bin

    2016-10-01

    Terahertz (THz) continuous-wave digital holography is an advanced interference imaging technique that can reconstruct quantitative distributions of amplitude and phase of the sample in real time with high resolution. In this paper, a reflective off-axis holographic system is presented. A Gaussian fitting method is applied to enhance the hologram contrast and Laplacian of Gaussian filter is used to obtain the reconstructed distance automatically. Furthermore, spectrum filtering method and angular spectrum algorithm are used to obtain the complex amplitude of the one-yuan chinese metal coin. The results confirm the prospective application of terahertz digital holography in the surface morphology for reflective samples.

  13. Temperature measurements with two different IR sensors in a continuous-flow microwave heated system

    PubMed Central

    Rydfjord, Jonas; Svensson, Fredrik; Fagrell, Magnus; Sävmarker, Jonas; Thulin, Måns

    2013-01-01

    Summary In a continuous-flow system equipped with a nonresonant microwave applicator we have investigated how to best assess the actual temperature of microwave heated organic solvents with different characteristics. This is non-trivial as the electromagnetic field will influence most traditional methods of temperature measurement. Thus, we used a microwave transparent fiber optic probe, capable of measuring the temperature inside the reactor, and investigated two different IR sensors as non-contact alternatives to the internal probe. IR sensor 1 measures the temperature on the outside of the reactor whilst IR sensor 2 is designed to measure the temperature of the fluid through the borosilicate glass that constitutes the reactor wall. We have also, in addition to the characterization of the before mentioned IR sensors, developed statistical models to correlate the IR sensor reading to a correct value of the inner temperature (as determined by the internal fiber optic probe), thereby providing a non-contact, indirect, temperature assessment of the heated solvent. The accuracy achieved with these models lie well within the range desired for most synthetic chemistry applications. PMID:24204419

  14. Impacts of microwave pretreatments on the semi-continuous anaerobic digestion of dairy waste activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Uma Rani, R; Adish Kumar, S; Kaliappan, S; Yeom, Icktae; Rajesh Banu, J

    2013-05-01

    Microwave (MW) irradiation is one of the new and possible methods used for pretreating the sludge. Following its use in different fields, this MW irradiation method has proved to be more appropriate in the field of environmental research. In this paper, we focused on the effects of MW irradiation at different intensities on solubilization, biodegradation and anaerobic digestion of sludge from the dairy sludge. The changes in the soluble fractions of the organic matter, the biogas yield, the methane content in the biogas were used as control parameters for evaluating the efficiency of the MW pretreatment. Additionally, the energetic efficiency was also examined. In terms of an energetic aspect, the most economical pretreatment of sludge was at 70% intensity for 12 min irradiation time. At this, COD solubilization, SS reduction and biogas production were found to be 18.6%, 14% and 35% higher than the control, respectively. Not only the increase in biogas production was investigated, excluding protein and carbohydrate hydrolysis was also performed successfully by this microwave pretreatment even at low irradiation energy input. Also, experiments were carried out in semi continuous anaerobic digesters, with 3.5L working volume. Combining microwave pretreatment with anaerobic digestion led to 67%, 64% and 57% of SS reduction, VS reduction and biogas production higher than the control, respectively.

  15. Continuous microwave saturation of EPR spectra of melanin complexes at different temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zdybel, Magdalena; Pilawa, Barbara; Buszman, Ewa; Wrzesniok, Dorota; Krzyminiewski, Ryszard; Kruczynski, Zdzislaw

    2011-01-01

    Paramagnetic centers in DOPA-melanin and complexes of DOPA-melanin with netilmicin and Cu(II) were studied by the use of an X-band (9.3 GHz) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. Measurements of continuous microwave saturation of EPR spectra at temperatures: 125 K, 175 K, 225 K, 275 K, were performed. Homogeneous broadening of all the examined EPR spectra was observed. EPR spectra of DOPA-melanin-Cu(II) complexes saturated at higher microwave powers than the others tested melanin samples. Fast spin-lattice relaxation exists in DOPA-melanin-Cu(II) complexes. Slow spin-lattice relaxation processes exist in melanin's paramagnetic centers of DOPA-melanin and its complexes with netilmicin, and its complexes with both netilimicin and Cu(II). EPR spectra of all the tested samples saturated at higher microwave powers with increasing of the measuring temperature. Faster spin-lattice relaxation processes occurs in DOPA-melanin and its complexes with netilmicin and Cu(II) at higher temperature.

  16. Multiphysics numerical modeling of the continuous flow microwave-assisted transesterification process.

    PubMed

    Muley, Pranjali D; Boldor, Dorin

    2012-01-01

    Use of advanced microwave technology for biodiesel production from vegetable oil is a relatively new technology. Microwave dielectric heating increases the process efficiency and reduces reaction time. Microwave heating depends on various factors such as material properties (dielectric and thermo-physical), frequency of operation and system design. Although lab scale results are promising, it is important to study these parameters and optimize the process before scaling up. Numerical modeling approach can be applied for predicting heating and temperature profiles including at larger scale. The process can be studied for optimization without actually performing the experiments, reducing the amount of experimental work required. A basic numerical model of continuous electromagnetic heating of biodiesel precursors was developed. A finite element model was built using COMSOL Multiphysics 4.2 software by coupling the electromagnetic problem with the fluid flow and heat transfer problem. Chemical reaction was not taken into account. Material dielectric properties were obtained experimentally, while the thermal properties were obtained from the literature (all the properties were temperature dependent). The model was tested for the two different power levels 4000 W and 4700 W at a constant flow rate of 840ml/min. The electric field, electromagnetic power density flow and temperature profiles were studied. Resulting temperature profiles were validated by comparing to the temperatures obtained at specific locations from the experiment. The results obtained were in good agreement with the experimental data.

  17. A Microwave Driven Ion Source for Continuous-Flow AMS (Abstract)

    SciTech Connect

    Wills, J.; Schneider, R.J.; Reden, K.F. von; Hayes, J.M.; Roberts, M.L.; Benthien, A.

    2005-03-15

    A microwave-driven, gas-fed ion source originally developed as a high-current positive ion injector for a Tandem accelerator at Chalk River has been the subject of a three-year development program at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution NOSAMS facility. Off-line tests have demonstrated positive carbon currents of 1 mA and negative carbon currents of 80 {mu}A from CO2 gas feed. This source and a magnesium charge-exchange canal were coupled to the recombinator of the NOSAMS Tandetron for on-line tests, with the source fed with reference gasses and a combustion device.The promising results obtained have prompted the redesign of the microwave source for use as an on-line, continuous-flow injector for a new AMS facility under construction at NOSAMS. The new design is optimized for best transmission of the extracted positive-ion beam through the charge-exchange canal and for reliable operation at 40 kV extraction voltage. Other goals of the re-design include improved lifetime of the microwave window and the elimination of dead volumes in the plasma generator that increase sample hold-up time.This talk will include a summary of results obtained to date at NOSAMS with the Chalk River source and a detailed description of the new design.

  18. Using lightning and microwave satellite rainfall retrievals to obtain continuous rainfall fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietrich, Stefano; Di Paola, Francesco; Panegrossi, Giulia; Casella, Daniele; Petracca, Marco; Sanò, Paolo; Mugnai, Alberto; Price, Colin

    2013-04-01

    A new methodology for combining microwave retrievals from (Low Earth Orbiting) LEO satellites with ground-based lightning observations to obtain rainfall estimates continuous in time was proposed during the EU FP6 FLASH project (www.flashproject.org). The first encouraging results (Dietrich et al., 2011) were achieved by exploiting lightning data from ZEUS network to propagate rain field estimates obtained from the multi-frequency brightness temperature measurements by the AMSU/MHS microwave radiometers onboard NOAA/EUMETSAT LEO operational satellites. Specifically, the method allows inferring the development (movement, morphology, and intensity) of convective rain cells from the spatial and temporal distribution of lightning strokes following any instantaneous observation by a satellite-borne microwave radiometer. This technique, particularly attractive for real-time operational purposes, is here further investigated through the analysis of a number of recent storms occurred in different parts of the world and hence observed with lightning networks having different detection efficiency and location estimate accuracy (LINET, WWLLN, WSI-GLN). Sensitivity studies, also using different MW retrieval techniques for the instantaneous rainfall estimates, will be discussed as well, in order to understand and evaluate the expected degradation performances for less instrumented areas around the world.

  19. Temperature measurements with two different IR sensors in a continuous-flow microwave heated system.

    PubMed

    Rydfjord, Jonas; Svensson, Fredrik; Fagrell, Magnus; Sävmarker, Jonas; Thulin, Måns; Larhed, Mats

    2013-01-01

    In a continuous-flow system equipped with a nonresonant microwave applicator we have investigated how to best assess the actual temperature of microwave heated organic solvents with different characteristics. This is non-trivial as the electromagnetic field will influence most traditional methods of temperature measurement. Thus, we used a microwave transparent fiber optic probe, capable of measuring the temperature inside the reactor, and investigated two different IR sensors as non-contact alternatives to the internal probe. IR sensor 1 measures the temperature on the outside of the reactor whilst IR sensor 2 is designed to measure the temperature of the fluid through the borosilicate glass that constitutes the reactor wall. We have also, in addition to the characterization of the before mentioned IR sensors, developed statistical models to correlate the IR sensor reading to a correct value of the inner temperature (as determined by the internal fiber optic probe), thereby providing a non-contact, indirect, temperature assessment of the heated solvent. The accuracy achieved with these models lie well within the range desired for most synthetic chemistry applications.

  20. Impacts of microwave pretreatments on the semi-continuous anaerobic digestion of dairy waste activated sludge

    SciTech Connect

    Uma Rani, R.; Adish Kumar, S.; Kaliappan, S.; Yeom, IckTae; Rajesh Banu, J.

    2013-05-15

    Highlights: ► Microwave pretreatment of dairy WAS was studied. ► MW pretreatment at 70% intensity for 12 min, COD solubilization was 18.6%. ► Biogas production and SS reduction was 35% and 14% higher than control. ► In digester at 15 days SRT with medium OLR, SS and VS reduction was 67% and 64%. ► Biogas and methane production was 57% and 49% higher than control, in digesters. - Abstract: Microwave (MW) irradiation is one of the new and possible methods used for pretreating the sludge. Following its use in different fields, this MW irradiation method has proved to be more appropriate in the field of environmental research. In this paper, we focused on the effects of MW irradiation at different intensities on solubilization, biodegradation and anaerobic digestion of sludge from the dairy sludge. The changes in the soluble fractions of the organic matter, the biogas yield, the methane content in the biogas were used as control parameters for evaluating the efficiency of the MW pretreatment. Additionally, the energetic efficiency was also examined. In terms of an energetic aspect, the most economical pretreatment of sludge was at 70% intensity for 12 min irradiation time. At this, COD solubilization, SS reduction and biogas production were found to be 18.6%, 14% and 35% higher than the control, respectively. Not only the increase in biogas production was investigated, excluding protein and carbohydrate hydrolysis was also performed successfully by this microwave pretreatment even at low irradiation energy input. Also, experiments were carried out in semi continuous anaerobic digesters, with 3.5 L working volume. Combining microwave pretreatment with anaerobic digestion led to 67%, 64% and 57% of SS reduction, VS reduction and biogas production higher than the control, respectively.

  1. Continuous-wave organic dye lasers and methods

    DOEpatents

    Shapira, Ofer; Chua, Song-Liang; Zhen, Bo; Lee, Jeongwon; Soljacic, Marin

    2014-09-16

    An organic dye laser produces a continuous-wave (cw) output without any moving parts (e.g., without using flowing dye streams or spinning discs of solid-state dye media to prevent photobleaching) and with a pump beam that is stationary with respect to the organic dye medium. The laser's resonant cavity, organic dye medium, and pump beam are configured to excite a lasing transition over a time scale longer than the associated decay lifetimes in the organic dye medium without photobleaching the organic dye medium. Because the organic dye medium does not photobleach when operating in this manner, it may be pumped continuously so as to emit a cw output beam. In some examples, operation in this manner lowers the lasing threshold (e.g., to only a few Watts per square centimeter), thereby facilitating electrical pumping for cw operation.

  2. Conversion loss and noise of microwave and millimeter-wave mixers. I - Theory. II - Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Held, D. N.; Kerr, A. R.

    1978-01-01

    The conversion loss and noise of microwave and millimeter-wave mixers are analyzed. Nonlinear capacitance, arbitrary embedding impedances, as well as shot, thermal and scattering noise arising in the diode, figure in the analysis. The anomalous mixer noise noted in millimeter-wave mixers by Kerr (1975) is shown to be explainable in terms of the correlation of down-converted components of the time-varying shot noise. A digital computer analysis of the conversion loss, noise, and output impedance of an 80-120-GHz mixer is also conducted.

  3. [Micro-wave local area network for radiological image transmission].

    PubMed

    Takizawa, M; Sone, S; Kasuga, T; Oguchi, K; Kondo, S; Fuwa, Y; Yamaura, I; Wako, T; Okazaki, Y; Maruyama, Y

    1994-10-25

    Shinshu University consists of five campuses in different locations, a situation that presents some problems in communication. To solve this problem, the Shinshu University Video and Data Network System (SUNS), which includes a high-speed audio-visual transfer function, has been developed and utilized for pre- and postgraduate education, administrative teleconferences, and local telephone (PBX) and Fax services. In 1988, a cooperative group for the study of radiographic image processing was organized, consisting of staff members of Shinshu University Hospital in Matsumoto, the Faculty of Engineering in Nagano (75 km from Matsumoto) and the Faculty of Textile Science and Technology in Ueda (45 km from Matsumoto). The system has been developed with a pair of personal computer (PC)-based interactive image workstations and high-speed digital telecommunication interfaces to the SUNS. A transmission time of 878 kbps has been attained, including the time needed for read/write onto the PC hard disk. Image data thus transferred from the hospital have been utilized for the study of image processing by researchers in the Faculty of Engineering, and the processed images have been sent back to the hospital for evaluation of clinical efficacy of the processing by diagnostic radiologists. This kind of microwave network is a promising alternative for high-speed data transmission for radiological images and their processing.

  4. Initial Stage of the Microwave Ionization Wave Within a 1D Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, V. E.; Rakova, E. I.; Glyavin, M. Yu.; Nusinovich, G. S.

    2016-05-01

    The dynamics of the microwave breakdown in a gas is simulated numerically within a simple 1D model which takes into account such processes as the impact ionization of gas molecules, the attachment of electrons to neutral molecules, and plasma diffusion. Calculations are carried out for different spatial distributions of seed electrons with account for reflection of the incident electromagnetic wave from the plasma. The results reveal considerable dependence of the ionization wave evolution on the relation between the field frequency and gas pressure, as well as on the existence of extended rarefied halo of seed electrons. At relatively low gas pressures (or high field frequencies), the breakdown process is accompanied by the stationary ionization wave moving towards the incident electromagnetic wave. In the case of a high gas pressure (or a relatively low field frequency), the peculiarities of the breakdown are associated with the formation of repetitive jumps of the ionization front.

  5. The space microwave interferometer and the search for cosmic background gravitational wave radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Allen Joel

    1989-01-01

    Present and planned investigations which use interplanetary spacecraft for gravitational wave searches are severely limited in their detection capability. This limitation has to do both with the Earth-based tracking procedures used and with the configuration of the experiments themselves. It is suggested that a much improved experiment can now be made using a multiarm interferometer designed with current operating elements. An important source of gravitational wave radiation, the cosmic background, may well be within reach of detection with these procedures. It is proposed to make a number of experimental steps that can now be carried out using TDRSS spacecraft and would conclude in the establishment of an operating multiarm microwave interferometer. This interferometer is projected to have a sensitivity to cosmic background gravitational wave radiation with an energy of less than 10(exp -4) cosmic closure density and to periodic waves generating spatial strain approaching 10(exp -19) in the range 0.1 to 0.001 Hz.

  6. Active Microwave Delay Line Based on Dipole-Exchange Spin Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slavin, Andrei; Kobljanskyj, Yuri; Melkov, Gennadiy; Tyberkevych, Vasil; Vasyuchka, Vitaliy

    2003-03-01

    An active microwave signal processor based on the interaction of relatively long (k 100 1/cm ) dipolar spin waves (or magnetostatic waves (MSW)) with localized electromagnetic pumping in an yttrium-iron garnet (YIG) film has been developed in [1]. The processor performs operations of controlled time delay, amplification, phase conjugation, compression, and convolution of pulsed microwave signals, but due to a relatively large group velocity of MSW pulses has a maximum delay time not exceeding 300 ns . In the current paper we develop theoretically and realize experimentally an active microwave delay line based on the excitation of relatively short-wavelength ( k 10000 1/cm ) dipole-exchange spin waves (DESW) that have considerably smaller dissipation parameter and much smaller group velocity than the MSW. The new DESW delay line has a single wire antenna (width of the order of several micrometers to allow the excitation of short-wavelength DESW) and a pumping dielectric resonator situated nearby. The input (signal) pulse excites in the YIG film both DESW and MSW. The pumping pulse, supplied to the resonator after a time interval t , performs a front reversal of all the excited waves and after a time interval T 2t a delayed output signal produced by both DESW and MSW is received at the antenna. With the increase of t due to the substantially smaller dissipation of DESW the larger and larger portion of the output signal is created by the DESW. As a result, a controlled time delay of an input microwave pulse of more than 1200 ns with insertion loss of 0.04 dB/ns was achieved . The developed microwave delay line is also capable of performing other signal processing operations like convolution and compression of delayed input pulses and might find applications in the modern radar technology [1]. G.A. Melkov, Yu.V. Kobljanskyj, A.A. Serga, V.S. Tiberkevich, and A.N. Slavin, Proceedings of the 8th International Symposium on Microwave and Optical Technology (ISMOT'01), p

  7. Spin wave resonance and relaxation in microwave magnetic multilayer structures and devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Cheng

    The continuous and increasing demand for higher frequency magnetic microwave structures triggered a tremendous development in the field of magnetization dynamics over the past decade. In order to develop smaller and faster devices, more efforts are required to achieve a better understanding of the complex magnetization precessional dynamics, the magnetization anisotropy, and the sources of spin scattering at the nanoscale. This thesis presents measurements of magnetic precession and relaxation dynamics in multilayer ferromagnetic films of CoFe/PtMn/CoFe in both frequency and time domain. First, we conducted the ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) measurements for samples with the ferromagnetic CoFe layer thicknesses varying from 10 A to 500 A. The magnetic anisotropic parameters were determined by rotating the field aligned axis with respect to the spectral field in the configurations of both in-plane and out-of-plane. Moreover, we identified a high-order standing spin wave in our spectra and found a "critical angle" in the multilayer samples. We included an effective surface anisotropy field to describe our results. This allows us to determine the exchange interaction stiffness in the CoFe layers. Next, we performed pump-probe Magneto-Optical Kerr Effect experiments in the multilayer films. Three precession modes were observed in the Voigt geometry. The modes are assigned to the exchange-dominated spin wave excitations and the non-homogeneous dipole mode. We developed a comprehensive model of the magnetic eigenmodes and their coupling to light to gain accurate values of the exchange, bulk and surface anisotropy constants. The results are consistent with those from the FMR measurements. Finally, the measured resonance linewidths of CoFe/PtMn/CoFe films were analyzed by the thickness dependence of the CoFe layers. We discussed the contribution of the Gilbert damping, two magnon scattering, as well as surface and interface to the FMR linewidth and concluded the two magnon

  8. Surface Acoustic Wave Microwave Oscillator and Frequency Synthesizer.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-06-01

    AD-A086 336 TRW DEFENSE AND SPACE SYSTEMS GROUP REDONDO BEACH CA F/ A /5 SURFACE ACOUSTIC WAVE MICROWA VE OSC ILLATOR AND FR EQUENCY SYNTME--ETC(U...DEVELOPMENT COMMAND FORT MONMOUTH, NEW JERSEY 07703 HISAŕ 78 UNCLASSIFIED 6 URTSfaceIO A si WHS ae Micowvef scilltr nermepteOt󈧫 BEFORE COEPETINFOR RE~~~ a ...D OKUI UBRj~ ~~n SpaReT ParkWCAIO OP T05HIS A .11eu.0t13..... IINCLASSTFTF[ gCUNTY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAOI(Whin DEla AIRIm Fminimum frequency step

  9. Communication with a chaotic traveling wave tube microwave generator.

    PubMed

    Dronov, Vasily; Hendrey, Matthew R; Antonsen, Thomas M; Ott, Edward

    2004-03-01

    Traveling wave tubes (TWTs) are vacuum electronic amplifiers (see Beck, Gittins, and Pierce) that are commonly used for communication in the centimeter wavelength range. Increasing demand for high data flow in wireless communication systems (satellite communication systems are a good example) raises needs for making TWT's more compact and efficient. Motivated by this we suggest a scheme in which a TWT with feedback is operated in a highly nonlinear regime where the device behaves chaotically. The chaos is controlled using small controls. Then, at the receiving end a receiving TWT synchronizes to the chaotic transmitter and amplifies the received signal with nearly no distortion. Results on numerical simulations of the proposed scheme are reported and used to evaluate its effectiveness.

  10. A continuously tunable microwave photonic notch filter with complex coefficient based on phase modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Dong; Cao, Ye; Tong, Zheng-rong; Yang, Jing-peng

    2017-01-01

    A continuously tunable microwave photonic notch filter with complex coefficient based on phase modulation is proposed and demonstrated. The complex coefficient is generated using a Fourier-domain optical processor (FD-OP) to control the amplitude and phase of the optical carrier and radio-frequency (RF) phase modulation sidebands. By controlling the FD-OP, the frequency response of the filter can be tuned in the full free spectral range ( FSR) without changing the shape and the FSR of the frequency response. The results show that the center frequency of the notch filter can be continuously tuned from 17.582 GHz to 29.311 GHz with FSR of 11.729 GHz. The shape of the frequency response keeps unchanged when the phase is tuned.

  11. Enhanced generation of a second-harmonic wave in a composite of metamaterial and microwave plasma with various permittivities.

    PubMed

    Iwai, Akinori; Nakamura, Yoshihiro; Sakai, Osamu

    2015-09-01

    The generation of a second-harmonic wave, which is one typical nonlinear feature, is enhanced in a composite of plasma and metamaterial. When we generate plasma by an injection of microwaves, whose frequencies are fundamental, we observe intensified second-harmonic waves in the cases of negative-refractive-index states in which both metamaterial permeability and plasma permittivity are negative for the fundamental waves. We performed the measurements at multiple levels of microwave input power up to 300 W to regulate permittivity in the negative polarity for the fundamental wave and in the transient region, including the positive-zero-negative values, for the second-harmonic wave. We clarified that the observed enhancement results from high electron density in negative-permittivity plasma, the propagating fundamental frequency wave not being attenuated in the negative-refractive-index state, and partial phase matching between the fundamental and second-harmonic waves.

  12. Correlation between opposite-helicity gravitons: Imprints on gravity-wave and microwave backgrounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubitosi, Giulia; Magueijo, João

    2017-01-01

    We examine some of the roots of parity violation for gravitons and uncover a closely related new effect: correlations between right- and left-handed gravitons. Such correlators have spin 4 if they involve gravitons moving along the same direction and spin zero for gravitons moving with opposite directions. In the first case, the most immediate implication would be a degree of linear polarization for the tensor vacuum fluctuations, which could be seen by gravity-wave detectors sensitive enough to probe the primordial background, its degree of polarization and anisotropies. Looking at the anisotropy of the gravity waves linear polarization, we identify the parity respecting and violating components of the effect. The imprint on the cosmic microwave background temperature and polarization would be more elusive, since it averages to zero in the two-point functions, appearing only in their cosmic variance or in fourth-order correlators. In contrast, spin-zero correlations would have an effect on the two-point function of the cosmic microwave background temperature and polarization, enhancing the B B component if they were anticorrelations. Such correlations represent an amplitude for the production of standing waves, as first envisaged by Grishchuk, and could also leave an interesting signature for gravity-wave detectors.

  13. Design, development and evaluation of an automatic fruit-juice pasteurization system using microwave - ultrasonic waves.

    PubMed

    Hosseinzadeh Samani, Bahram; Khoshtaghaza, Mohammad Hadi; Minaei, Saeid; Zareifourosh, Hemad; Eshtiaghi, Mohammad Naghi; Rostami, Sajad

    2016-01-01

    Conventional pasteurization treatments often lead to substantial decrease in fruits juice quality. Due to these issues, the objective of this research was to compare the combined effect of a novel thermal (microwave) and non-thermal (ultrasonic) treatments with conventional thermal pasteurization on some qualitative characteristics of sour cherry juice (vitamins, phenolics, anthocyanins, etc.). For this purpose, an automatic control system comprising of ultrasonic generator, ultrasonic transducer, horn, pump, circulator, microwave oven, container, pipe interface, temperature sensor, float, data acquisition card, microwave power control circuit, and reactor was designed and developed. Moreover, in order to optimize the effect of ultrasonic waves on the existing micro-organisms in the sour cherry juice, some preliminary experiments were carried out to optimize the ultrasonic probe and reactor design. The results of evaluations showed that using the combined automatic system, the qualitative properties of sour cherry (vitamin C content 14 %, total phenolics content 1 %, total anthocyanins content 6 %) can be better maintained compared with the conventional thermal method. Based on the results obtained in this study, the following processing conditions: microwave power of 541.7 W, temperature of 41 °C, ultrasonic power of 799.57 W and ultrasonic exposure time of 6 min were recommended for optimum processing of sour cherry juice.

  14. Influence of wall plasma on microwave frequency and power in relativistic backward wave oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jun; Wu, Ping; Cao, Yibing; Teng, Yan; Zhang, Yuchuan; Chen, Changhua

    2015-07-01

    The RF breakdown of the slow wave structure (SWS), which will lead to the generation of the wall plasma, is an important cause for pulse shortening in relativistic backward wave oscillators. Although many researchers have performed profitable studies about this issue, the influence mechanism of this factor on the microwave generation still remains not-so-clear. This paper simplifies the wall plasma with an "effective" permittivity and researches its influence on the microwave frequency and power. The dispersion relation of the SWS demonstrates that the introduction of the wall plasma will move the dispersion curves upward to some extent, which is confirmed by particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations and experiments. The plasma density and volume mainly affect the dispersion relation at the upper and lower frequency limits of each mode, respectively. Meanwhile, PIC simulations show that even though no direct power absorption exists since the wall plasma is assumed to be static, the introduction of the wall plasma may also lead to the decrease in microwave power by changing the electrodynamic property of the SWS.

  15. Influence of wall plasma on microwave frequency and power in relativistic backward wave oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Jun; Cao, Yibing; Teng, Yan; Zhang, Yuchuan; Chen, Changhua; Wu, Ping

    2015-07-15

    The RF breakdown of the slow wave structure (SWS), which will lead to the generation of the wall plasma, is an important cause for pulse shortening in relativistic backward wave oscillators. Although many researchers have performed profitable studies about this issue, the influence mechanism of this factor on the microwave generation still remains not-so-clear. This paper simplifies the wall plasma with an “effective” permittivity and researches its influence on the microwave frequency and power. The dispersion relation of the SWS demonstrates that the introduction of the wall plasma will move the dispersion curves upward to some extent, which is confirmed by particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations and experiments. The plasma density and volume mainly affect the dispersion relation at the upper and lower frequency limits of each mode, respectively. Meanwhile, PIC simulations show that even though no direct power absorption exists since the wall plasma is assumed to be static, the introduction of the wall plasma may also lead to the decrease in microwave power by changing the electrodynamic property of the SWS.

  16. Microwave and Millimeter Wave Imaging Using Synthetic Aperture Focusing and Holographical Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Case, Joseph Tobias

    2005-01-01

    Microwave and millimeter wave nondestructive testing and evaluation (NDT&E) methods have shown great potential for determining material composition in composite structures, determining material thickness or debond thickness between two layers, and determining the location and size of flaws, defects, and anomalies. The same testing methods have also shown great potential to produce relatively high-resolution images of voids inside Spray On Foam Insulation (SOFI) test panels using real focused methods employing lens antennas. An alternative to real focusing methods are synthetic focusing methods. The essence of synthetic focusing is to match the phase of the scattered signal to measured points spaced regularly on a plane. Many variations of synthetic focusing methods have already been developed for radars, ultrasonic testing applications, and microwave concealed weapon detection. Two synthetic focusing methods were investigated; namely, a) frequency-domain synthetic aperture focusing technique (FDSAFT), and b) wide-band microwave holography. These methods were applied towards materials whose defects were of low dielectric contrast like air void in SOFI. It is important to note that this investigation used relatively low frequencies from 8.2 GHz to 26.5 GHz that are not conducive for direct imaging of the SOFI. The ultimate goal of this work has been to demonstrate the capability of these methods before they are applied to much higher frequencies such as the millimeter wave frequency spectrum (e.g., 30-300 GHz).

  17. Survival of Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella spp. on catfish exposed to microwave heating in a continuous mode

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microwave (MW) heating using continuous output may provide better and consistent cooking for foods. Currently, household units with a build-in inverter device are available in which the output is continuous vs. the traditional on-off mode. With an inverter, these MW ovens may provide consistent he...

  18. Searches for Continuous Gravitational Waves from Nine Young Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aasi, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Alemic, A.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Amariutei, D.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C.; Areeda, J. S.; Ast, S.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Aylott, B. E.; Babak, S.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barbet, M.; Barclay, S.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Bartlett, J.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Bauer, Th. S.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Belczynski, C.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C.; Benacquista, M.; Bergman, J.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Biscans, S.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bojtos, P.; Bond, C.; Bondu, F.; Bonelli, L.; Bonnand, R.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Boschi, V.; Bose, Sukanta; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Bridges, D. O.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brown, N. M.; Buchman, S.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C.; Cesarini, E.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, Y.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, S.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C.; Colombini, M.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M., Jr.; Conte, A.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Cutler, C.; Dahl, K.; Dal Canton, T.; Damjanic, M.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Dartez, L.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Daveloza, H.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; DeBra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; De Laurentis, M.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dereli, H.; Dergachev, V.; De Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dojcinoski, G.; Dolique, V.; Dominguez, E.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S.; Eberle, T.; Edo, T.; Edwards, M.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Essick, R.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Feldbaum, D.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fournier, J.-D.; Franco, S.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fuentes-Tapia, S.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S.; Garufi, F.; Gatto, A.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Gendre, B.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; Gergely, L. Á.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gleason, J.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gordon, N.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S.; Gossler, S.; Gouaty, R.; Gräf, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guido, C. J.; Guo, X.; Gushwa, K.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.; Hanke, M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C.-J.; Haughian, K.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M.; Heinzel, G.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Hofman, D.; Hollitt, S. E.; Holt, K.; Hopkins, P.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Houston, E.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.; Huerta, E.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh, M.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Idrisy, A.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Islas, G.; Isler, J. C.; Isogai, T.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacobson, M.; Jang, H.; Jaranowski, P.; Jawahar, S.; Ji, Y.; Jiménez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; K, Haris; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Kasprzack, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, H.; Kaufer, S.; Kaur, T.; Kawabe, K.; Kawazoe, F.; Kéfélian, F.; Keiser, G. M.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kells, W.; Keppel, D. G.; Key, J. S.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kim, C.; Kim, K.; Kim, N. G.; Kim, N.; Kim, Y.-M.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Klimenko, S.; Kline, J.; Koehlenbeck, S.; Kokeyama, K.; Kondrashov, V.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D. B.; Kringel, V.; Krishnan, B.; Królak, A.; Krueger, C.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, A.; Kumar, P.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Landry, M.; Lantz, B.; Larson, S.; Lasky, P. D.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Lazzaro, C.; Le, J.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lebigot, E.; Lebigot, E. O.; Lee, C. H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Leonardi, M.; Leong, J. R.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Levine, B.; Lewis, J.; Li, T. G. F.; Libbrecht, K.; Libson, A.; Lin, A. C.; Littenberg, T. B.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lockett, V.; Logue, J.; Lombardi, A. L.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J.; Lubinski, M. J.; Lück, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; Macarthur, J.; MacDonald, T.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magaña na-Sandoval, F.; Magee, R.; Mageswaran, M.; Maglione, C.; Mailand, K.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markosyan, A.; Maros, E.; Martelli, F.; Martellini, L.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Martynov, D.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; Mazzolo, G.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McLin, K.; McWilliams, S.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Meidam, J.; Meinders, M.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Meyers, P. M.; Mezzani, F.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, A.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Minenkov, Y.; Ming, J.; Mirshekari, S.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moe, B.; Moggi, A.; Mohan, M.; Mohanty, S. D.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Moore, B.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morriss, S. R.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, C. L.; Mueller, G.; Mukherjee, S.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D.; Murray, P. G.; Mytidis, A.; Nagy, M. F.; Nardecchia, I.; Nash, T.; Naticchioni, L.; Nayak, R. K.; Necula, V.; Nedkova, K.; Nelemans, G.; Neri, I.; Neri, M.; Newton, G.; Nguyen, T.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A. H.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E. N.; Nuttall, L. K.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, R.; O'Reilly, B.; Ortega, W.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Osthelder, C.; Ott, C. D.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Padilla, C.; Pai, A.; Pai, S.; Palashov, O.; Palomba, C.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, H.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Paoletti, F.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patrick, Z.; Pedraza, M.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Perreca, A.; Phelps, M.; Pichot, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Poeld, J.; Poggiani, R.; Post, A.; Poteomkin, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Predoi, V.; Premachandra, S.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prix, R.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Pürrer, M.; Qin, J.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E.; Quiroga, G.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Rácz, I.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rajalakshmi, G.; Rakhmanov, M.; Ramirez, K.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Re, V.; Reed, C. M.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Reula, O.; Ricci, F.; Riles, K.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V.; Romano, R.; Romanov, G.; Romie, J. H.; Rosińska, D.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.; Sachdev, S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Sammut, L.; Sandberg, V.; Sanders, J. R.; Sannibale, V.; Santiago-Prieto, I.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Savage, R.; Sawadsky, A.; Scheuer, J.; Schilling, R.; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schreiber, E.; Schuette, D.; Schutz, B. F.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Serna, G.; Sevigny, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shah, S.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaltev, M.; Shao, Z.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Sidery, T. L.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Silva, A. D.; Simakov, D.; Singer, A.; Singer, L.; Singh, R.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, M. R.; Smith, R. J. E.; Smith-Lefebvre, N. D.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Souradeep, T.; Staley, A.; Stebbins, J.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B. C.; Steplewski, S.; Stevenson, S.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Straniero, N.; Strigin, S.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B.; Szczepanczyk, M.; Szeifert, G.; Tacca, M.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tápai, M.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, R.; Tellez, G.; Theeg, T.; Thirugnanasambandam, M. P.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, V.; Tomlinson, C.; Tonelli, M.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Tse, M.; Tshilumba, D.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; Vallisneri, M.; van Bakel, N.; van Beuzekom, M.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; van den Broeck, C.; van der Sluys, M. V.; van Heijningen, J.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vass, S.; Vasúth, M.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Vincent-Finley, R.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L.; Wade, M.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L.-W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Welborn, T.; Wen, L.; Wessels, P.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; White, D. J.; Whiting, B. F.; Wilkinson, C.; Williams, L.; Williams, R.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Worden, J.; Xie, S.; Yablon, J.; Yakushin, I.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yang, Q.; Yvert, M.; Zadrożny, A.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J.-P.; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zuraw, S.; Zweizig, J.

    2015-11-01

    We describe directed searches for continuous gravitational waves (GWs) in data from the sixth Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) science data run. The targets were nine young supernova remnants not associated with pulsars; eight of the remnants are associated with non-pulsing suspected neutron stars. One target's parameters are uncertain enough to warrant two searches, for a total of 10. Each search covered a broad band of frequencies and first and second frequency derivatives for a fixed sky direction. The searches coherently integrated data from the two LIGO interferometers over time spans from 5.3-25.3 days using the matched-filtering {F}-statistic. We found no evidence of GW signals. We set 95% confidence upper limits as strong (low) as 4 × 10-25 on intrinsic strain, 2 × 10-7 on fiducial ellipticity, and 4 × 10-5 on r-mode amplitude. These beat the indirect limits from energy conservation and are within the range of theoretical predictions for neutron-star ellipticities and r-mode amplitudes.

  19. Tracking driver's heart rate by continuous-wave Doppler radar.

    PubMed

    Kwang Jin Lee; Chanki Park; Boreom Lee

    2016-08-01

    Developing driving safety system with medical assistance devices for preventing accidents has become a major social issue in recent year. These devices have been developed using electrocardiogram (ECG) and photoplethysmogram (PPG) for measuring the heart rate (HR). However, driver should directly contact with the sensor for monitoring the HR. Recently, non-contact system based on continuous-wave Doppler radar has widely studied for monitoring HR. The periodogram by Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) was used for estimating HR. However, if motion artifacts by movement of driver and vehicle vibration contaminate the radar signal, we cannot find spectral peak of HR using FFT. In this paper, we propose a method using multiple signal classification (MUSIC) for estimating HR. We compared MUSIC algorithms with a commonly used FFT method using real experiment data while driving. The results indicate that our proposed method can estimate HR accurately from received radar Doppler signal with motion artifacts.

  20. Continuous-wave stimulated Raman scattering (cwSRS) microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Zhaokai; Petrov, Georgi I.; Yakovlev, Vladislav V.

    2013-08-01

    Stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy is a powerful tool for chemically sensitive non-invasive optical imaging. However, ultrafast laser sources, which are currently employed, are still expensive and require substantial maintenance to provide temporal overlap and spectral tuning. SRS imaging, which utilizes continuous-wave laser sources, has a major advantage, as it eliminates the cell damage due to exposure to the high-intensity light radiation, while substantially reducing the cost and complexity of the setup. As a proof-of-principle, we demonstrate microscopic imaging of dimethyl sulfoxide using two independent, commonly used lasers, a diode-pumped, intracavity doubled 532-nm laser and a He-Ne laser operating at 632.8-nm.

  1. Theory of continuous-wave excitation of the sodium beacon

    SciTech Connect

    Milonni, P.W.; Fearn, H.; Telle, J.M.; Fugate, R.Q.

    1999-10-01

    We extend our previous analysis of the sodium beacon [J. Opt. Soc. Am. A {bold 15}, 217 (1998)] to the case of continuous-wave excitation. Various effects that could be ignored in the case of pulsed excitation, such as the geomagnetic field, the recoil of the sodium atoms upon absorption and emission, and collisions of the sodium atoms with other mesospheric species, are included. Spin-relaxation collisions are among the most important of these effects for the cases considered. Analytical approximations to numerical results are presented, and using a semi-empirical estimate for Na-O{sub 2} spin relaxation, we compute photon returns in good agreement with recently reported measurements at the Steward Observatory. {copyright} 1999 Optical Society of America

  2. Continuous-wave laser generated jets for needle free applications

    PubMed Central

    Visser, Claas Willem; Schlautmann, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    We designed and built a microfluidic device for the generation of liquid jets produced by thermocavitation. A continuous wave (CW) laser was focused inside a micro-chamber filled with a light-absorbing solution to create a rapidly expanding vapor bubble. The chamber is connected to a micro-channel which focuses and ejects the liquid jet through the exit. The bubble growth and the jet velocity were measured as a function of the devices geometry (channel diameter D and chamber width A). The fastest jets were those for relatively large chamber size with respect to the channel diameter. Elongated and focused jets up to 29 m/s for a channel diameter of 250 μm and chamber size of 700 μm were obtained. The proposed CW laser-based device is potentially a compact option for a practical and commercially feasible needle-free injector. PMID:26858816

  3. Continuous-wave phase-matched molecular optical modulator.

    PubMed

    Zaitsu, Shin-ichi; Izaki, Hirotomo; Tsuchiya, Takao; Imasaka, Totaro

    2016-02-18

    In optical modulation, the highest available modulation rate is basically limited to the GHz frequency range at best. This is because optical modulation is often performed using electro-optic or acousto-optic effects that require application of an external signal to solid-state nonlinear optical materials. Here we describe optical modulation of continuous-wave radiation at frequencies exceeding 10 THz based on ultrafast variation of molecule polarizability arising from coherent molecular motion. The optical modulation efficiency is extensively enhanced by fulfilling phase-matching conditions with the help of dispersion control of the optical cavity, generating sidebands with a highest ratio of 7.3 × 10(-3). These results will pave the way for development of versatile optical modulation-based techniques in a wide range of research fields in optical sciences, such as mode-locked lasers operating in the THz range.

  4. High power continuous-wave Alexandrite laser with green pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanbari, Shirin; Major, Arkady

    2016-07-01

    We report on a continuous-wave (CW) Alexandrite (Cr:BeAl2O4) laser, pumped by a high power green source at 532 nm with a diffraction limited beam. An output power of 2.6 W at 755 nm, a slope efficiency of 26%, and wavelength tunability of 85 nm have been achieved using 11 W of green pump. To the best of our knowledge, this is the highest CW output power of a high brightness laser pumped Alexandrite laser reported to date. The results obtained in this experiment can lead to the development of a high power tunable CW and ultrafast sources of the near-infrared or ultraviolet radiation through frequency conversion.

  5. Basic gait analysis based on continuous wave radar.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun

    2012-09-01

    A gait analysis method based on continuous wave (CW) radar is proposed in this paper. Time-frequency analysis is used to analyze the radar micro-Doppler echo from walking humans, and the relationships between the time-frequency spectrogram and human biological gait are discussed. The methods for extracting the gait parameters from the spectrogram are studied in depth and experiments on more than twenty subjects have been performed to acquire the radar gait data. The gait parameters are calculated and compared. The gait difference between men and women are presented based on the experimental data and extracted features. Gait analysis based on CW radar will provide a new method for clinical diagnosis and therapy.

  6. Simulations of nonlinear continuous wave pressure fields in FOCUS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiaofeng; Hamilton, Mark F.; McGough, Robert J.

    2017-03-01

    The Khokhlov - Zabolotskaya - Kuznetsov (KZK) equation is a parabolic approximation to the Westervelt equation that models the effects of diffraction, attenuation, and nonlinearity. Although the KZK equation is only valid in the far field of the paraxial region for mildly focused or unfocused transducers, the KZK equation is widely applied in medical ultrasound simulations. For a continuous wave input, the KZK equation is effectively modeled by the Bergen Code [J. Berntsen, Numerical Calculations of Finite Amplitude Sound Beams, in M. F. Hamilton and D. T. Blackstock, editors, Frontiers of Nonlinear Acoustics: Proceedings of 12th ISNA, Elsevier, 1990], which is a finite difference model that utilizes operator splitting. Similar C++ routines have been developed for FOCUS, the `Fast Object-Oriented C++ Ultrasound Simulator' (http://www.egr.msu.edu/˜fultras-web) to calculate nonlinear pressure fields generated by axisymmetric flat circular and spherically focused ultrasound transducers. This new routine complements an existing FOCUS program that models nonlinear ultrasound propagation with the angular spectrum approach [P. T. Christopher and K. J. Parker, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 90, 488-499 (1991)]. Results obtained from these two nonlinear ultrasound simulation approaches are evaluated and compared for continuous wave linear simulations. The simulation results match closely in the farfield of the paraxial region, but the results differ in the nearfield. The nonlinear pressure field generated by a spherically focused transducer with a peak surface pressure of 0.2MPa radiating in a lossy medium with β = 3.5 is simulated, and the computation times are also evaluated. The nonlinear simulation results demonstrate acceptable agreement in the focal zone. These two related nonlinear simulation approaches are now included with FOCUS to enable convenient simulations of nonlinear pressure fields on desktop and laptop computers.

  7. Deciphering inflation with gravitational waves: Cosmic microwave background polarization vs direct detection with laser interferometers

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Tristan L.; Peiris, Hiranya V.; Cooray, Asantha

    2006-06-15

    A detection of the primordial gravitational wave background is considered to be the 'smoking-gun' evidence for inflation. While superhorizon waves are probed with cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization, the relic background will be studied with laser interferometers. The long lever arm spanned by the two techniques improves constraints on the inflationary potential and validation of consistency relations expected under inflation. If gravitational waves with a tensor-to-scalar amplitude ratio greater than 0.01 are detected by the CMB, then a direct-detection experiment with a sensitivity consistent with current concept studies should be pursued vigorously. If no primordial tensors are detected by the CMB, a direct-detection experiment to understand the simplest form of inflation must have a sensitivity improved by two to 3 orders of magnitude over current plans.

  8. High power water load for microwave and millimeter-wave radio frequency sources

    DOEpatents

    Ives, R. Lawrence; Mizuhara, Yosuke M.; Schumacher, Richard V.; Pendleton, Rand P.

    1999-01-01

    A high power water load for microwave and millimeter wave radio frequency sources has a front wall including an input port for the application of RF power, a cylindrical dissipation cavity lined with a dissipating material having a thickness which varies with depth, and a rear wall including a rotating reflector for the reflection of wave energy inside the cylindrical cavity. The dissipation cavity includes a water jacket for removal of heat generated by the absorptive material coating the dissipation cavity, and this absorptive material has a thickness which is greater near the front wall than near the rear wall. Waves entering the cavity reflect from the rotating reflector, impinging and reflecting multiple times on the absorptive coating of the dissipation cavity, dissipating equal amounts of power on each internal reflection.

  9. Two-frequency /Delta k/ microwave scatterometer measurements of ocean wave spectra from an aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, J. W.; Jones, W. L.; Weissman, D. E.

    1981-01-01

    A technique for remotely sensing the large-scale gravity wave spectrum on the ocean surface using a two frequency (Delta k) microwave scatterometer has been demonstrated from stationary platforms and proposed from moving platforms. This measurement takes advantage of Bragg type resonance matching between the electromagnetic wavelength at the difference frequency and the length of the large-scale surface waves. A prominent resonance appears in the cross product power spectral density (PSD) of the two backscattered signals. Ku-Band aircraft scatterometer measurements were conducted by NASA in the North Sea during the 1979 Maritime Remote Sensing (MARSEN) experiment. Typical examples of cross product PSD's computed from the MARSEN data are presented. They demonstrate strong resonances whose frequency and bandwidth agree with the surface characteristics and the theory. Directional modulation spectra of the surface reflectivity are compared to the gravity wave spectrum derived from surface truth measurements.

  10. Wave Correlation Effects in Active Microwave Remote Sensing of the Environment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khadr, Nagi Mahmoud

    This study examines the wave correlation effects that arise in active microwave remote sensing of the environment. These correlation effects, or coherent interference effects, are not accounted for by the regular phenomenological transport and radar equations, in which intensities, as a rule, are added incoherently. In particular, two types of correlation effects are examined: those associated with the medium and those associated with the source. The study method is the analytical wave approach to propagation and scattering from random media. This entails using Maxwell's equations to arrive at expressions for the first and second moments of the field. Unlike previous studies, however, in which plane wave incidence is assumed, here the radar is directly incorporated into the analytical wave formulation, and the antenna fields replaced via their plane wave representations. In this way, analysis of both the medium and source correlation effects on a per plane wave basis becomes a straightforward matter. The medium correlation effects are responsible for backscatter enhancement. Although the enhancement effect has been studied before on numerous occasions, careful characterization of the enhancement for microwave scattering from environmental scenes, such as vegetation canopies, has been lacking. The study at hand therefore fills this void and, in addition, quantifies the influence of this enhancement on phase difference statistics, a new and potentially important environmental remote sensing tool. The source correlation effects arise as a result of both the nature of the source and the geometry of the particular problem. By including these effects, a more general expression than the radar equation is obtained analytically. Quantitative examples show that, under certain circumstances, the results of this general expression deviate substantially from the results provided by the radar equation. This finding verifies the importance of considering source correlation

  11. Effect of the load size on the efficiency of microwave heating under stop flow and continuous flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Patil, Narendra G; Rebrov, Evgeny V; Eränen, Kari; Benaskar, Faysal; Meuldijk, Jan; Mikkola, Jyri-Pekka; Hessel, Volker; Hulshof, Lumbertus A; Murzin, Dmitry Yu; Schouten, Jaap C

    2012-01-01

    A novel heating efficiency analysis of the microwave heated stop-flow (i.e. stagnant liquid) and continuous-flow reactors has been presented. The thermal losses to the surrounding air by natural convection have been taken into account for heating efficiency calculation of the microwave heating process. The effect of the load diameter in the range of 4-29 mm on the heating efficiency of ethylene glycol was studied in a single mode microwave cavity under continuous flow and stop-flow conditions. The variation of the microwave absorbing properties of the load with temperature was estimated. Under stop-flow conditions, the heating efficiency depends on the load diameter. The highest heating efficiency has been observed at the load diameter close to the half wavelength of the electromagnetic field in the corresponding medium. Under continuous-flow conditions, the heating efficiency increased linearly. However, microwave leakage above the propagation diameter restricted further experimentation at higher load diameters. Contrary to the stop-flow conditions, the load temperature did not raise monotonously from the inlet to outlet under continuous-flow conditions. This was due to the combined effect of lagging convective heat fluxes in comparison to volumetric heating. This severely disturbs the uniformity of the electromagnetic field in the axial direction and creates areas of high and low field intensity along the load Length decreasing the heating efficiency as compared to stop-flow conditions.

  12. Low power consumption and continuously tunable all-optical microwave filter based on an opto-mechanical microring resonator.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li; Yang, Yue; Li, Zhihua; Jin, Xing; Mo, Wenqin; Liu, Xing

    2017-01-23

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a continuously tunable all-optical microwave filter using a silicon opto-mechanical microring resonator (MRR). By finely adjusting the pump light with submilliwatt power level, transmission spectrum of the MRR could be continuously shifted based on the nonlinear effects, including the opto-mechanical effect and thermo-optic effect. Therefore, in the case of optical single sideband (OSSB) modulation, the frequency intervals between the optical carrier (near one MRR resonance) and the corresponding resonance could be flexibly manipulated, which is the critical factor to achieve continuously tunable microwave photonic filter (MPF). In the experiment, the central frequency of the MPF could be continuously tuned from 6 GHz to 19 GHz with the pump power lower than -2.5 dBm. The proposed opto-mechanical device is competent to process microwave signals with dominant advantages, such as compact footprint, all-optical control and low power consumption. In the future, using light to control light, the opto-mechanical structure on silicon platforms might have many other potential applications in microwave systems, such as microwave switch.

  13. Magneto-acoustic imaging by continuous-wave excitation.

    PubMed

    Shunqi, Zhang; Zhou, Xiaoqing; Tao, Yin; Zhipeng, Liu

    2017-04-01

    The electrical characteristics of tissue yield valuable information for early diagnosis of pathological changes. Magneto-acoustic imaging is a functional approach for imaging of electrical conductivity. This study proposes a continuous-wave magneto-acoustic imaging method. A kHz-range continuous signal with an amplitude range of several volts is used to excite the magneto-acoustic signal and improve the signal-to-noise ratio. The magneto-acoustic signal amplitude and phase are measured to locate the acoustic source via lock-in technology. An optimisation algorithm incorporating nonlinear equations is used to reconstruct the magneto-acoustic source distribution based on the measured amplitude and phase at various frequencies. Validation simulations and experiments were performed in pork samples. The experimental and simulation results agreed well. While the excitation current was reduced to 10 mA, the acoustic signal magnitude increased up to 10(-7) Pa. Experimental reconstruction of the pork tissue showed that the image resolution reached mm levels when the excitation signal was in the kHz range. The signal-to-noise ratio of the detected magneto-acoustic signal was improved by more than 25 dB at 5 kHz when compared to classical 1 MHz pulse excitation. The results reported here will aid further research into magneto-acoustic generation mechanisms and internal tissue conductivity imaging.

  14. A continuous microwave system for prevention of invasive species during de-ballasting operation--death kinetics.

    PubMed

    Boldor, Dorin; Balasubramanian, Sundar; Purohit, Shreya; Salvi, Deepti; Gutierrez-Wing, Maria T; Rusch, Kelly A; Sabliov, Cristina M

    2008-01-01

    A continuous microwave heating system was tested for its effectiveness at removing potentially invasive organisms during deballasting operations. Four different organisms, namely Nannochloropsis oculata (microalgae), Artemia nauplii, Artemia adults and Crassosstrea virginica (oyster larvae) normally found in ballast water were investigated in a controlled study to quantify their survival after continuous microwave heating of synthetic ballast water. The experiments were performed in the microwave system using a 2 x 2 factorial design with power (2.5 and 4.5 kW) and flow rate (1.0 and 2.0 lpm) and the organisms subsequently subjected to different holding times. The control treatment was performed in a water bath using the same temperatures and holding times as in the case of the microwave treatment. Overall, the results obtained indicated that the microwave system was more effective in eliminating the organisms when compared with the control treatment. In most cases there were no survivors present after the microwave treatment at holding times above 100 s, and temperatures as low as 50 degrees C particularly for oyster larvae and Artemia adults. The results are promising, indicating that this technology has the potential to be an effective tool in controlling/preventing the introduction of invasive species into native environments.

  15. Detection and Characterization of Deep Water Wave Breaking Using Moderate Incidence Angle Microwave Backscatter from the Sea Surface

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-06-01

    with the detected events. (A discussion of the distribution of Fmax follows in the next section.) These plots confirm that very few non-breaking waves ...8217 and 0 Oceanographic Engineering 1930 DOCTORAL DISSERTATION Detection and Characterization of Deep Water Wave Breaking Using Moderate Incidence...Characterization of Deep Water Wave Breaking Using Moderate Incidence Angle Microwave Backscatter from the Sea Surface by -- Andrew Thomas Jessup ,. D, Woods

  16. Monitoring internal organ motion with continuous wave radar in CT

    SciTech Connect

    Pfanner, Florian; Maier, Joscha; Allmendinger, Thomas; Flohr, Thomas; Kachelrieß, Marc

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: To avoid motion artifacts in medical imaging or to minimize the exposure of healthy tissues in radiation therapy, medical devices are often synchronized with the patient's respiratory motion. Today's respiratory motion monitors require additional effort to prepare the patients, e.g., mounting a motion belt or placing an optical reflector on the patient's breast. Furthermore, they are not able to measure internal organ motion without implanting markers. An interesting alternative to assess the patient's organ motion is continuous wave radar. The aim of this work is to design, implement, and evaluate such a radar system focusing on application in CT.Methods: The authors designed a radar system operating in the 860 MHz band to monitor the patient motion. In the intended application of the radar system, the antennas are located close to the patient's body inside the table of a CT system. One receive and four transmitting antennas are used to avoid the requirement of exact patient positioning. The radar waves propagate into the patient's body and are reflected at tissue boundaries, for example at the borderline between muscle and adipose tissue, or at the boundaries of organs. At present, the authors focus on the detection of respiratory motion. The radar system consists of the hardware mentioned above as well as of dedicated signal processing software to extract the desired information from the radar signal. The system was evaluated using simulations and measurements. To simulate the radar system, a simulation model based on radar and wave field equations was designed and 4D respiratory-gated CT data sets were used as input. The simulated radar signals and the measured data were processed in the same way. The radar system hardware and the signal processing algorithms were tested with data from ten volunteers. As a reference, the respiratory motion signal was recorded using a breast belt simultaneously with the radar measurements.Results: Concerning the

  17. Numerical modeling of continuous flow microwave heating: a critical comparison of COMSOL and ANSYS.

    PubMed

    Salvi, D; Boldor, Dorin; Ortego, J; Aita, G M; Sabliov, C M

    2010-01-01

    Numerical models were developed to simulate temperature profiles in Newtonian fluids during continuous flow microwave heating by one way coupling electromagnetism, fluid flow, and heat transport in ANSYS 8.0 and COMSOL Multiphysics v3.4. Comparison of the results from the COMSOL model with the results from a pre-developed and validated ANSYS model ensured accuracy of the COMSOL model. Prediction of power Loss by both models was in close agreement (5-13% variation) and the predicted temperature profiles were similar. COMSOL provided a flexible model setup whereas ANSYS required coupling incompatible elements to transfer load between electromagnetic, fluid flow, and heat transport modules. Overall, both software packages provided the ability to solve multiphysics phenomena accurately.

  18. Continuous synthesis of monodispersed silver nanoparticles using a homogeneous heating microwave reactor system.

    PubMed

    Nishioka, Masateru; Miyakawa, Masato; Kataoka, Haruki; Koda, Hidekazu; Sato, Koichi; Suzuki, Toshishige M

    2011-06-01

    Continuous synthesis of silver nanoparticles based on a polyol process was conducted using a microwave-assisted flow reactor installed in a cylindrical resonance cavity. Silver nitrate (AgNO(3)) and poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP) dissolved in ethylene glycol were used respectively as a silver metal precursor and as a capping agent of nanoparticles. Ethylene glycol worked as the solvent and simultaneously as the reductant. Silver nanoparticles of narrow size distributions were synthesized steadily for 5 h, maintaining almost constant yield (>93%) and quality. The reaction was achieved within 2.8 s of residence time, although nanoparticles were not formed under this flow rate by conventional heating. A narrower particle size distribution was realized by the increased flow rate of the reaction solution. Nanoparticles of 9.8 nm average size with a standard deviation of 0.9 nm were synthesized at the rate of 100 ml h(-l).

  19. High-performance packaging for monolithic microwave and millimeter-wave integrated circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shalkhauser, K. A.; Li, K.; Shih, Y. C.

    1992-01-01

    Packaging schemes are developed that provide low-loss, hermetic enclosure for enhanced monolithic microwave and millimeter-wave integrated circuits. These package schemes are based on a fused quartz substrate material offering improved RF performance through 44 GHz. The small size and weight of the packages make them useful for a number of applications, including phased array antenna systems. As part of the packaging effort, a test fixture was developed to interface the single chip packages to conventional laboratory instrumentation for characterization of the packaged devices.

  20. Magnetic Sensor for Detection of Ground Vehicles Based on Microwave Spin Wave Generation in Ferrite Films

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-01

    kPMHHkHf 042, ππ γ += , 2 where γ/2π = 2.8 MHz/Oe is the gyromagnetic ratio, M0 is the saturation magnetization of the ferromagnetic material, and...measured by the frequency meter. Using typical values for high-quality magnetic films of yttrium-iron garnet ( YIG ) 4πM0 = 1750 Oe, H0 = 100 Oe... MAGNETIC SENSOR FOR DETECTION OF GROUND VEHICLES BASED ON MICROWAVE SPIN WAVE GENERATION IN FERRITE FILMS A. Slavin*, and V. Tiberkevich

  1. Tunable Microwave Transversal Filters and Dispersive Delay Lines Based on Oblique Incidence Reflection of Magnetostatic Wave Propagating in Epitaxial Garnets.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-09-30

    based on Epitaxial Ferrites . This final report summarizes the results of viable realizations of these goals. Transversal filters at microwave ...DISPLACEMENT IN DIELECTRIC IMAGE GUIDES At microwave or millimeter wave frequency range, ferrite materials play important roles in the design of...isolators utilizing epitaxial YIG on gadolinium Gallium Garnet at 90-100GHz. These experiments have shown that the concept is feasible but that ferrite

  2. Pump and probe spectroscopy with continuous wave quantum cascade lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkbride, James M. R.; Causier, Sarah K.; Dalton, Andrew R.; Ritchie, Grant A. D.; Weidmann, Damien

    2014-02-07

    This paper details infra-red pump and probe studies on nitric oxide conducted with two continuous wave quantum cascade lasers both operating around 5 μm. The pump laser prepares a velocity selected population in a chosen rotational quantum state of the v = 1 level which is subsequently probed using a second laser tuned to a rotational transition within the v = 2 ← v = 1 hot band. The rapid frequency scan of the probe (with respect to the molecular collision rate) in combination with the velocity selective pumping allows observation of marked rapid passage signatures in the transient absorption profiles from the polarized vibrationally excited sample. These coherent transient signals are influenced by the underlying hyperfine structure of the pump and probe transitions, the sample pressure, and the coherent properties of the lasers. Pulsed pump and probe studies show that the transient absorption signals decay within 1 μs at 50 mTorr total pressure, reflecting both the polarization and population dephasing times of the vibrationally excited sample. The experimental observations are supported by simulation based upon solving the optical Bloch equations for a two level system.

  3. The Feasibility of Monitoring Continuous Wave Sources with Seismic Arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Claassen, J.P.; Elbring, G.; Ladd, M.

    1999-03-15

    This paper identifies and explores the technical requirements and issues associated with remotely monitoring continuous wave (CW) sources with seismic arrays. Potential approaches to this monitoring problem will be suggested and partially evaluated to expose the monitoring challenges which arise when realistic local geologies and cultural noise sources are considered. The selective directionality and the adaptive noise cancellation properties of arrays are required to observe weak signals while suppressing a colored background punctuated with an unknown distribution of point and sometimes distributive sources. The array is also required to characterize the emitters and propagation environment so as to properly focus on the CW sources of interest while suppressing the remaining emitters. The proper application of arrays requires an appreciation of the complexity of propagation in a non-homogeneous earth. The heterogeneity often limits the available spatial coherence and therefore the size of the army. This adversely impacts the array gain and the array's ability to carefully resolve various emitters. Arrays must also contend with multipath induced by the source and the heterogeneous earth. If the array is to focus on an emitter and realize an enhancement in the signal to noise ratio, methods must be sought to coherently add the desired signal components while suppressing interference which may be correlated with the desired signal. The impact of these and other issues on army design and processing are described and discussed.

  4. Higher Order Mode Coupler Heating in Continuous Wave Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solyak, N.; Awida, M.; Hocker, A.; Khabibobulline, T.; Lunin, A.

    Electromagnetic heating due to higher order modes (HOM) propagation is particularly a concern for continuous wave (CW) particle accelerator machines. Power on the order of several watts could flow out of the cavity's HOM ports in CW operations. The upgrade of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS-II) at SLAC requires a major modification of the design of the higher order mode (HOM) antenna and feed through of the conventional ILC elliptical 9-cell cavity in order to utilize it for LCLS-II. The HOM antenna is required to bear higher RF losses, while relatively maintaining the coupling level of the higher order modes. In this paper, we present a detailed analysis of the heating expected in the HOM coupler with a thorough thermal quench study in comparison with the conventional ILC design. We discuss also how the heat will be removed from the cavity through RF cables with specially designed cooling straps. Finally, we report on the latest experimental results of cavity testing in vertical and horizontal cryostats.

  5. High power continuous-wave titanium:sapphire laser

    DOEpatents

    Erbert, G.V.; Bass, I.L.; Hackel, R.P.; Jenkins, S.L.; Kanz, V.K.; Paisner, J.A.

    1993-09-21

    A high-power continuous-wave laser resonator is provided, wherein first, second, third, fourth, fifth and sixth mirrors form a double-Z optical cavity. A first Ti:sapphire rod is disposed between the second and third mirrors and at the mid-point of the length of the optical cavity, and a second Ti:sapphire rod is disposed between the fourth and fifth mirrors at a quarter-length point in the optical cavity. Each Ti:sapphire rod is pumped by two counter-propagating pump beams from a pair of argon-ion lasers. For narrow band operation, a 3-plate birefringent filter and an etalon are disposed in the optical cavity so that the spectral output of the laser consists of 5 adjacent cavity modes. For increased power, seventy and eighth mirrors are disposed between the first and second mirrors to form a triple-Z optical cavity. A third Ti:sapphire rod is disposed between the seventh and eighth mirrors at the other quarter-length point in the optical cavity, and is pumped by two counter-propagating pump beams from a third pair of argon-ion lasers. 5 figures.

  6. High power continuous-wave titanium:sapphire laser

    DOEpatents

    Erbert, Gaylen V.; Bass, Isaac L.; Hackel, Richard P.; Jenkins, Sherman L.; Kanz, Vernon K.; Paisner, Jeffrey A.

    1993-01-01

    A high-power continuous-wave laser resonator (10) is provided, wherein first, second, third, fourth, fifth and sixth mirrors (11-16) form a double-Z optical cavity. A first Ti:Sapphire rod (17) is disposed between the second and third mirrors (12,13) and at the mid-point of the length of the optical cavity, and a second Ti:Sapphire rod (18) is disposed between the fourth and fifth mirrors (14,15) at a quarter-length point in the optical cavity. Each Ti:Sapphire rod (17,18) is pumped by two counter-propagating pump beams from a pair of argon-ion lasers (21-22, 23-24). For narrow band operation, a 3-plate birefringent filter (36) and an etalon (37) are disposed in the optical cavity so that the spectral output of the laser consists of 5 adjacent cavity modes. For increased power, seventy and eighth mirrors (101, 192) are disposed between the first and second mirrors (11, 12) to form a triple-Z optical cavity. A third Ti:Sapphire rod (103) is disposed between the seventh and eighth mirrors (101, 102) at the other quarter-length point in the optical cavity, and is pumped by two counter-propagating pump beams from a third pair of argon-ion lasers (104, 105).

  7. Environmental assessment of the proposed Continuous Wave Deuterium Demonstrator (CWDD)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    An assessment was made of the potential environmental impacts of construction and operation of the Continuous Wave Deuterium Demonstrator (CWDD) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), including an evaluation of alternative actions. Key elements considered were on- and off-site radiological effects and potential impacts to cultural resources. The radiological consequences of routine operations of the CWDD are readily reduced to insignificant levels by bulk shielding, confinement, and containment. The radiation dose to the maximally exposed off-site individual would be 0.52 mrem/yr from direct radiation and 1.2 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} mrem/yr from airborne radionuclides, based on maximum planned facility operation. The maximum credible postulated accident would result in a dose to the maximally exposed individual of less than 20 mrem. A cultural resource survey has determined that the location for the CWDD has, no cultural resource sites or materials and construction is permitted by the Illinois Historic Preservation Agency. Demands for utility services would require only about two percent of excess capacity already installed at Argonne. Other environmental impact categories were considered, including socioeconomic effects, aquatic and terrestrial flora and fauna, wetlands, and water and air quality.

  8. Low-current traveling wave tube for use in the microwave power module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, Raymond W.; Ramins, Peter; Force, Dale A.; Dayton, James A.; Ebihara, Ben T.; Gruber, Robert P.

    1993-01-01

    The results of a traveling-wave-tube/multistage depressed-collector (TWT-MDC) design study in support of the Advanced Research Projects Agency/Department of Defense (ARPA/DOD) Microwave Power Module (MPM) Program are described. The study stressed the possible application of dynamic and other tapers to the RF output circuit of the MPM traveling wave tube as a means of increasing the RF and overall efficiencies and reducing the required beam current (perveance). The results indicate that a highly efficient, modified dynamic velocity taper (DVT) circuit can be designed for the broadband MPM application. The combination of reduced cathode current (lower perveance) and increased RF efficiency leads to (1) a substantially higher overall efficiency and reduction in the prime power to the MPM, and (2) substantially reduced levels of MDC and MPM heat dissipation, which simplify the cooling problems. However, the selected TWT circuit parameters need to be validated by cold test measurements on actual circuits.

  9. Low-current traveling wave tube for use in the microwave power module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Raymond W.; Ramins, Peter; Force, Dale A.; Dayton, James A.; Ebihara, Ben T.; Gruber, Robert P.

    1993-07-01

    The results of a traveling-wave-tube/multistage depressed-collector (TWT-MDC) design study in support of the Advanced Research Projects Agency/Department of Defense (ARPA/DOD) Microwave Power Module (MPM) Program are described. The study stressed the possible application of dynamic and other tapers to the RF output circuit of the MPM traveling wave tube as a means of increasing the RF and overall efficiencies and reducing the required beam current (perveance). The results indicate that a highly efficient, modified dynamic velocity taper (DVT) circuit can be designed for the broadband MPM application. The combination of reduced cathode current (lower perveance) and increased RF efficiency leads to (1) a substantially higher overall efficiency and reduction in the prime power to the MPM, and (2) substantially reduced levels of MDC and MPM heat dissipation, which simplify the cooling problems. However, the selected TWT circuit parameters need to be validated by cold test measurements on actual circuits.

  10. Achromatic half-wave plate for submillimeter instruments in cosmic microwave background astronomy: experimental characterization.

    PubMed

    Pisano, Giampaolo; Savini, Giorgio; Ade, Peter A R; Haynes, Vic; Gear, Walter K

    2006-09-20

    An achromatic half-wave plate (HWP) to be used in millimeter cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization experiments has been designed, manufactured, and tested. The design is based on the 5-plates Pancharatnam recipe and it works in the frequency range 85-185 GHz. A model has been used to predict the transmission, reflection, absorption, and phase shift as a function of frequency. The HWP has been tested by using coherent radiation from a back-wave oscillator to investigate its modulation efficiency and with incoherent radiation from a polarizing Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) to explore its frequency behavior. The FTS measurements have been fitted with an optical performance model which is in excellent agreement with the data. A detailed analysis of the data also allows a precise determination of the HWP fast and slow axes in the frequency band of operation. A list of the HWP performance characteristics is reported including estimates of its cross polarization.

  11. Characterization and Applications of Micro- and Nano- Ferrites at Microwave and Millimeter Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Liu

    Ferrite materials are one of the most widely used magnetic materials in microwave and millimeter wave applications such as radar, wireless communication. They provide unique properties for microwave and millimeter wave devices especially non-reciprocal devices. Some ferrite materials with strong magnetocrystalline anisotropy fields can extend these applications to tens of GHz range while reducing the size, weight and cost. This thesis focuses on characterization of such ferrite materials as micro- and nano-powder and the fabrication of the devices. The ferrite materials with strong magnetocrystalline anisotropy field are metal/non-metal substituted iron oxides oriented in low crystal symmetry. The ferrite materials characterized in this thesis include M-type hexagonal ferrites such as barium ferrite (BaFe12O19), strontium ferrite (SrFe12O19), epsilon phase iron oxide (epsilon-Fe 2O3), substituted epsilon phase iron oxide (epsilon-Ga xFe2-xO3, epsilon-AlxFe2-xO 3). These ferrites exhibit great anisotropic magnetic fields. A transmission-reflection based in-waveguide technique that employs a vector network analyzer was used to determine the scattering parameters for each sample in the microwave bands (8.2--40 GHz). From the S-parameters, complex dielectric permittivity and complex magnetic permeability are evaluated by an improved algorithm. The millimeter wave measurement is based on a free space quasi-optical spectrometer. Initially precise transmittance spectra over a broad millimeter wave frequency range from 40 GHz to 120 GHz are acquired. Later the transmittance spectra are converted into complex permittivity and permeability spectra. These ferrite powder materials are further characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD) to understand the crystalline structure relating to the strength and the shift of the ferromagnetic resonance affected by the particle size. A Y-junction circulator working in the 60 GHz frequency band is designed based on characterized M

  12. Comparison of Obturation Quality in Modified Continuous Wave Compaction, Continuous Wave Compaction, Lateral Compaction and Warm Vertical Compaction Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Aminsobhani, Mohsen; Ghorbanzadeh, Abdollah; Sharifian, Mohammad Reza; Namjou, Sara; Kharazifard, Mohamad Javad

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to introduce modified continuous wave compaction (MCWC) technique and compare its obturation quality with that of lateral compaction (LC), warm vertical compaction (WVC) and continuous wave compaction techniques (CWC). The obturation time was also compared among the four techniques. Materials and Methods: Sixty-four single-rooted teeth with 0–5° root canal curve and 64 artificially created root canals with 15° curves in acrylic blocks were evaluated. The teeth and acrylic specimens were each divided into four subgroups of 16 for testing the obturation quality of four techniques namely LC, WVC, CWC and MCWC. Canals were prepared using the Mtwo rotary system and filled with respect to their group allocation. Obturation time was recorded. On digital radiographs, the ratio of area of voids to the total area of filled canals was calculated using the Image J software. Adaptation of the filling materials to the canal walls was assessed at three cross-sections under a stereomicroscope (X30). Data were statistically analyzed using ANOVA, Tukey’s post hoc HSD test, the Kruskal Wallis test and t-test. Results: No significant difference existed in adaptation of filling materials to canal walls among the four subgroups in teeth samples (P ≥ 0.139); but, in artificially created canals in acrylic blocks, the frequency of areas not adapted to the canal walls was significantly higher in LC technique compared to MCWC (P ≤ 0.02). The void areas were significantly more in the LC technique than in other techniques in teeth (P < 0.001). The longest obturation time belonged to WVC technique followed by LC, CW and MCWC techniques (P<0.05). The difference between the artificially created canals in blocks and teeth regarding the obturation time was not significant (P = 0.41). Conclusion: Within the limitations of this in vitro study, MCWC technique resulted in better adaptation of gutta-percha to canal walls than LC at all cross-sections with

  13. Analysis of upper mantle structure using wave field continuation of P waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walck, M. C.; Clayton, R. W.

    1984-01-01

    Wave field continuation theory, which allows transformation of the seismic record section data directly into velocity-depth space, is tested for upper mantle analysis using a large array-recorded data set obtained at the 200-station Caltech-USGS Southern California Seismic Network that is representative of the structure beneath the gulf of California. The method's resolution capability is illustrated by the comparison of the slant stacks and downward continuation of both synthetic and data record sections. It is stressed that when high-quality, densely sampled digital data are available, the technique is easy to implement, provides an inversion which contains all the data in the global format, and produces an objective estimate of depth resolution as a function of ray parameter.

  14. Ultrasonic, microwave, and millimeter wave inspection techniques for adhesively bonded stacked open honeycomb core composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, Clint D.; Cox, Ian; Ghasr, Mohammad Tayeb Ahmed; Ying, Kuang P.; Zoughi, Reza

    2015-03-01

    Honeycomb sandwich composites are used extensively in the aerospace industry to provide stiffness and thickness to lightweight structures. A common fabrication method for thick, curved sandwich structures is to stack and bond multiple honeycomb layers prior to machining core curvatures. Once bonded, each adhesive layer must be inspected for delaminations and the presence of unwanted foreign materials. From a manufacturing and cost standpoint, it can be advantageous to inspect the open core prior to face sheet closeout in order to reduce end-article scrap rates. However, by nature, these honeycomb sandwich composite structures are primarily manufactured from low permittivity and low loss materials making detection of delamination and some of the foreign materials (which also are low permittivity and low loss) quite challenging in the microwave and millimeter wave regime. Likewise, foreign materials such as release film in adhesive layers can be sufficiently thin as to not cause significant attenuation in through-transmission ultrasonic signals, making them difficult to detect. This paper presents a collaborative effort intended to explore the efficacy of different non-contact NDI techniques for detecting flaws in a stacked open fiberglass honeycomb core panel. These techniques primarily included air-coupled through-transmission ultrasonics, single-sided wideband synthetic aperture microwave and millimeter-wave imaging, and lens-focused technique. The goal of this investigation has been to not only evaluate the efficacy of these techniques, but also to determine their unique advantages and limitations for evaluating parameters such as flaw type, flaw size, and flaw depth.

  15. The POLARBEAR Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization Experiment and Anti-Reflection Coatings for Millimeter Wave Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quealy, Erin Elizabeth

    New technology has rapidly advanced the field of observational cosmology over the last 30 years. This trend will continue with the development of technologies to measure the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) polarization. The B-mode component of the polarization map will place limits on the energy scale of inflation and the sum of the neutrino masses. This thesis describes the pb instrument which will measure the CMB polarization anisotropy to unprecedented sensitivity. POLARBEAR-I is currently observing, and an upgraded version, POLARBEAR-II, is planned for the future. The first version of the experiment, POLARBEAR-I, is fielding several new technologies for the first time. POLARBEAR-I has high sensitivity due to its detector count. It employs a 1274 detector Transition-Edge Sensor (TES) bolometer array. The bolometers are coupled to a planar array of polarization sensitive antennas. These antennas are lithographed on the same substrate as the TES detectors, allowing on-chip band defining filters between the antenna and detector. The focal plane is composed of seven hexagonal detector modules. This modular scheme can be extended to create larger focal plane arrays in the future. POLARBEAR-I is observing at a single band near 150 GHz, the peak in the CMB blackbody curve. The lenslet antenna coupled detector technology, fielding for the first time in POLARBEAR-I, is naturally scalable to larger arrays with multi-chroic pixels. This broadband technology will have higher sensitivity and better capability for astronomical foreground contaminant removal. The antenna geometry can be changed to receive a wider frequency bandwidth. This bandwidth can be broken into multiple frequency bands with the on-chip band defining filters. Each band will be read out by one TES detector. A dual band instrument, pbtwo, is in development with bands at 90 and 150 GHz. One challenge for all CMB polarization measurements is minimization of systematic errors. One source of error is

  16. Model of attenuation of long waves under continuous ice layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochanov, M. B.; Petrov, B. A.

    2017-01-01

    In this work new mathematical model of long wave propagation on water surface with ice cover is proposed. The model of thin elastic plate is used to describe ice layer movement. Equation for ice cover contain additional term to takes into account dissipation effects in the ice cover to explain wave attenuation. Proposed model was reduced to one nonlinear evolution equation for water level perturbation. The expression for wave energy was obtained under assumption of long waves. Proposed model is numerically studied, energy of system is computed. Obtained results are compared with results of suggested before model that takes into account the flow law of Glen.

  17. Gravity Wave Emission by Spontaneous Imbalance of Baroclinic Waves in the Continuously Stratified Rotating Annulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borchert, S.; Achatz, U.; Rieper, F.; Fruman, M. D.

    2012-04-01

    We use a numerical model of the classic differentially heated rotating annulus experiment to study the spontaneous emission of gravity waves (GWs) from jet stream imbalances, which is a major source of these waves in the atmosphere for which no satisfactory parameterization exists. Atmospheric observations are the main tool for the testing and verification of theoretical concepts but have their limitations. Given their specific potential for yielding reproducible data and for studying process dependence on external system parameters, laboratory experiments are an invaluable complementary tool. Experiments with a rotating annulus exhibiting a jet modulated by large-scale waves due to baroclinic instability have already been used to study GWs: Williams et al (2008) observed spontaneously emitted interfacial GWs in a two-layer flow, and Jacoby et al (2011) detected GWs emitted from boundary-layer instabilities in a differentially heated rotating annulus. Employing a new finite-volume code for the numerical simulation of a continuously stratified liquid in a differentially heated rotating annulus, we here investigate whether such an experiment might be useful for studies of spontaneous imbalance. A major problem was the identification of experimental parameters yielding an atmosphere-like regime where the Brunt-Vaisala frequency is larger than the inertial frequency, so that energy transport by the lowest-frequency waves is predominantly horizontal while high-frequency GWs transport energy vertically. We show that this is indeed the case for a wide and shallow annulus with relatively large temperature difference between the inner and outer cylinder walls. We also show that this set-up yields a conspicuous signal in the horizontal divergence field close to the meandering jet. Various analyses support the notion that this signal is predominantly due to GWs superposed on a geostrophic flow. Jacoby, T. N. L., Read, P. L., Williams, P. D. and Young, R. M. B., 2011

  18. Gravity Wave Emission by Spontaneous Imbalance of Baroclinic Waves in the Continuously Stratified Rotating Annulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borchert, Sebastian; Achatz, Ulrich; Rieper, Felix; Fruman, Mark

    2013-04-01

    We use a numerical model of the classic differentially heated rotating annulus experiment to study the spontaneous emission of gravity waves (GWs) from jet stream imbalances, which is a major source of these waves in the atmosphere for which no satisfactory parameterization exists. Atmospheric observations are the main tool for the testing and verification of theoretical concepts but have their limitations. Given their specific potential for yielding reproducible data and for studying process dependence on external system parameters, laboratory experiments are an invaluable complementary tool. Experiments with a rotating annulus exhibiting a jet modulated by large-scale waves due to baroclinic instability have already been used to study GWs: Williams et al (2008) observed spontaneously emitted interfacial GWs in a two-layer flow, and Jacoby et al (2011) detected GWs emitted from boundary-layer instabilities in a differentially heated rotating annulus. Employing a finite-volume code for the numerical simulation of a continuously stratified liquid in a differentially heated rotating annulus, we here investigate the GWs in a wide and shallow annulus with relatively large temperature difference between inner and outer cylinder walls. In this atmosphere-like regime where the Brunt-Vaisala frequency is larger than the inertial frequency, various analyses suggest a distinct gravity wave activity. To identify regions of GW emission we decompose the flow into the geostrophic and ageostrophic part through the inversion of the quasi-geostrophic potential vorticity (e.g. Verkley, 2009). The analysis of the geostrophic sources of the ageostrophic flow indicates that, in addition to boundary layer instabilities, spontaneous imbalance in the jet region acts as an important source mechanism. Jacoby, T. N. L., Read, P. L., Williams, P. D. and Young, R. M. B., 2011: Generation of inertia-gravity waves in the rotating thermal annulus by a localised boundary layer instability. Geophys

  19. Advanced Sine Wave Modulation of Continuous Wave Laser System for Atmospheric CO2 Differential Absorption Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Joel F.; Lin, Bing; Nehrir, Amin R.

    2014-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center in collaboration with ITT Exelis have been experimenting with Continuous Wave (CW) laser absorption spectrometer (LAS) as a means of performing atmospheric CO2 column measurements from space to support the Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) mission.Because range resolving Intensity Modulated (IM) CW lidar techniques presented here rely on matched filter correlations, autocorrelation properties without side lobes or other artifacts are highly desirable since the autocorrelation function is critical for the measurements of lidar return powers, laser path lengths, and CO2 column amounts. In this paper modulation techniques are investigated that improve autocorrelation properties. The modulation techniques investigated in this paper include sine waves modulated by maximum length (ML) sequences in various hardware configurations. A CW lidar system using sine waves modulated by ML pseudo random noise codes is described, which uses a time shifting approach to separate channels and make multiple, simultaneous online/offline differential absorption measurements. Unlike the pure ML sequence, this technique is useful in hardware that is band pass filtered as the IM sine wave carrier shifts the main power band. Both amplitude and Phase Shift Keying (PSK) modulated IM carriers are investigated that exibit perfect autocorrelation properties down to one cycle per code bit. In addition, a method is presented to bandwidth limit the ML sequence based on a Gaussian filter implemented in terms of Jacobi theta functions that does not seriously degrade the resolution or introduce side lobes as a means of reducing aliasing and IM carrier bandwidth.

  20. Vascular spasm complicates continuous wave but not pulsed laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Gal, D.; Steg, P.G.; Rongione, A.J.; DeJesus, S.T.; Clarke, R.H.; Isner, J.M. )

    1989-11-01

    Preliminary clinical experience with laser angioplasty has suggested that arterial spasm may complicate attempts to employ laser light to accomplish vascular recanalization. The present study was designed to investigate the role of energy profile on the development of arterial spasm during laser angioplasty. Laser irradiation was delivered percutaneously in vivo to New Zealand white rabbits and to Yucatan microswine with or without atherosclerotic lesions induced by a combination of balloon endothelial denudation and atherogenic diet. Continuous wave (CW) laser irradiation from an argon ion gas laser (wavelength 488 to 514 nm) was applied to 23 arteries, while 16 arteries were irradiated using a pulsed xenon chloride (308 nm) or xenon fluoride (351 nm) excimer laser. Arterial spasm, defined as greater than 50% reduction in luminal diameter narrowing, complicated delivery of laser light to 17 (74%) of the 23 arteries irradiated with the CW argon laser. Spasm was consistently observed at powers greater than 2 W, at cumulative exposures greater than 200 seconds, and at total energy greater than 200 joules. Spasm was typically diffuse (including the length of the vessel) and protracted (lasting up to 120 minutes). Intra-arterial nitroglycerin (up to 300 micrograms) produced only temporary and incomplete resolution of laser-induced spasm. In contrast, spasm was never observed in any of the 16 arteries in which laser angioplasty was performed using a pulsed laser (0.95 to 6.37 joules/cm2, 10 to 50 Hz, 48 to 370 seconds). Thus CW but not pulsed laser angioplasty may be complicated by arterial spasm

  1. Continuous-wave laser particle conditioning: Thresholds and time scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Andrew; Ogloza, Albert; Olson, Kyle; Talghader, Joseph

    2017-03-01

    The optical absorption of contaminants on high reflectivity mirrors was measured using photo thermal common-path interferometry before and after exposure to high power continuous-wave laser light. The contaminants were micron-sized graphite flakes on hafnia-silica distributed Bragg reflectors illuminated by a ytterbium-doped fiber laser. After one-second periods of exposure, the mirrors demonstrated reduced absorption for irradiances as low as 11 kW cm-2 and had an obvious threshold near 20 kW cm-2. Final absorption values were reduced by up to 90% of their initial value for irradiances of 92 kW cm-2. For shorter pulses at 34 kW cm-2, a minimum exposure time required to begin absorption reduction was found between 100 μs and 200 μs, with particles reaching their final minimum absorption value within 300 ms. Microscope images of the surface showed agglomerated particles fragmenting with some being removed completely, probably by evaporation for exposures between 200 μs to 10 ms. Exposures of 100 ms and longer left behind a thin semi-transparent residue, covering much of the conditioned area. An order of magnitude estimate of the time necessary to begin altering the surface contaminants (also known as "conditioning") indicates about 200 μs seconds at 34 kW cm-2, based on heating an average carbon particle to its sublimation temperature including energy loss to thermal contact and radiation. This estimation is close to the observed exposure time required to begin absorption reduction.

  2. LDRD final report on continuous wave intersubband terahertz sources.

    SciTech Connect

    Samora, Sally; Mangan, Michael A.; Foltynowicz, Robert J.; Young, Erik W.; Fuller, Charles T.; Stephenson, Larry L.; Reno, John Louis; Wanke, Michael Clement; Hudgens, James J.

    2005-02-01

    There is a general lack of compact electromagnetic radiation sources between 1 and 10 terahertz (THz). This a challenging spectral region lying between optical devices at high frequencies and electronic devices at low frequencies. While technologically very underdeveloped the THz region has the promise to be of significant technological importance, yet demonstrating its relevance has proven difficult due to the immaturity of the area. While the last decade has seen much experimental work in ultra-short pulsed terahertz sources, many applications will require continuous wave (cw) sources, which are just beginning to demonstrate adequate performance for application use. In this project, we proposed examination of two potential THz sources based on intersubband semiconductor transitions, which were as yet unproven. In particular we wished to explore quantum cascade lasers based sources and electronic based harmonic generators. Shortly after the beginning of the project, we shifted our emphasis to the quantum cascade lasers due to two events; the publication of the first THz quantum cascade laser by another group thereby proving feasibility, and the temporary shut down of the UC Santa Barbara free-electron lasers which were to be used as the pump source for the harmonic generation. The development efforts focused on two separate cascade laser thrusts. The ultimate goal of the first thrust was for a quantum cascade laser to simultaneously emit two mid-infrared frequencies differing by a few THz and to use these to pump a non-linear optical material to generate THz radiation via parametric interactions in a specifically engineered intersubband transition. While the final goal was not realized by the end of the project, many of the completed steps leading to the goal will be described in the report. The second thrust was to develop direct THz QC lasers operating at terahertz frequencies. This is simpler than a mixing approach, and has now been demonstrated by a few groups

  3. Excitation of propagating spin waves in ferromagnetic nanowires by microwave voltage-controlled magnetic anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Verba, Roman; Carpentieri, Mario; Finocchio, Giovanni; Tiberkevich, Vasil; Slavin, Andrei

    2016-04-26

    The voltage-controlled magnetic anisotropy (VCMA) effect, which manifests itself as variation of anisotropy of a thin layer of a conductive ferromagnet on a dielectric substrate under the influence of an external electric voltage, can be used for the development of novel information storage and signal processing devices with low power consumption. Here it is demonstrated by micromagnetic simulations that the application of a microwave voltage to a nanosized VCMA gate in an ultrathin ferromagnetic nanowire results in the parametric excitation of a propagating spin wave, which could serve as a carrier of information. The frequency of the excited spin wave is twice smaller than the frequency of the applied voltage while its amplitude is limited by 2 mechanisms: (i) the so-called "phase mechanism" described by the Zakharov-L'vov-Starobinets "S-theory" and (ii) the saturation mechanism associated with the nonlinear frequency shift of the excited spin wave. The developed extension of the "S-theory", which takes into account the second limitation mechanism, allowed us to estimate theoretically the efficiency of the parametric excitation of spin waves by the VCMA effect.

  4. Excitation of propagating spin waves in ferromagnetic nanowires by microwave voltage-controlled magnetic anisotropy

    PubMed Central

    Verba, Roman; Carpentieri, Mario; Finocchio, Giovanni; Tiberkevich, Vasil; Slavin, Andrei

    2016-01-01

    The voltage-controlled magnetic anisotropy (VCMA) effect, which manifests itself as variation of anisotropy of a thin layer of a conductive ferromagnet on a dielectric substrate under the influence of an external electric voltage, can be used for the development of novel information storage and signal processing devices with low power consumption. Here it is demonstrated by micromagnetic simulations that the application of a microwave voltage to a nanosized VCMA gate in an ultrathin ferromagnetic nanowire results in the parametric excitation of a propagating spin wave, which could serve as a carrier of information. The frequency of the excited spin wave is twice smaller than the frequency of the applied voltage while its amplitude is limited by 2 mechanisms: (i) the so-called “phase mechanism” described by the Zakharov-L’vov-Starobinets “S-theory” and (ii) the saturation mechanism associated with the nonlinear frequency shift of the excited spin wave. The developed extension of the “S-theory”, which takes into account the second limitation mechanism, allowed us to estimate theoretically the efficiency of the parametric excitation of spin waves by the VCMA effect. PMID:27113392

  5. 1991 IEEE MTT-S International Microwave Symposium and Microwave and Millimeter-Wave Monolithic Circuits Symposium, Boston, MA, June 10-14, 1991, Proceedings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galani, Zvi; Sokolov, Vladimir; Nizko, H. J.

    1991-12-01

    The present conference discusses aperture synthesis concepts for earth remote sensing, MIC bipolar frequency doublers, a planar diode mixer for sub-mm wave applications, an X-band MMIC amplifier with pulse-doped GaAs MESFETs, photoconductive impulse generation and radiation, microwave-optoelectronic interactions in a microstrip ring resonator, and fiber-optic microwave transmission using laser mixing, optoelectronic mixing, and optically pumped mixing. Also discussed are asymmetric multiconductor low-coupling structures for high speed/density digital interconnects, leakage behavior of coplanar waveguides of finite and infinite width, high dielectric constant strip line bandpass filters, perturbation theory's application to toroidal ferrite phase shifters, and a highly sensitive mm-wave quasi-optical FM noise measurement system.

  6. Advanced microwave processing concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Lauf, R.J.; McMillan, A.D.; Paulauskas, F.L.

    1995-05-01

    The purpose of this work is to explore the feasibility of several advanced microwave processing concepts to develop new energy-efficient materials and processes. The project includes two tasks: (1) commercialization of the variable-frequency microwave furnace; and (2) microwave curing of polymer composites. The variable frequency microwave furnace, whose initial conception and design was funded by the AIC Materials Program, will allow us, for the first time, to conduct microwave processing studies over a wide frequency range. This novel design uses a high-power traveling wave tube (TWT) originally developed for electronic warfare. By using this microwave source, one can not only select individual microwave frequencies for particular experiments, but also achieve uniform power densities over a large area by the superposition of many different frequencies. Microwave curing of thermoset resins will be studied because it hold the potential of in-situ curing of continuous-fiber composites for strong, lightweight components. Microwave heating can shorten curing times, provided issues of scaleup, uniformity, and thermal management can be adequately addressed.

  7. Advanced microwave processing concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Lauf, R.J.; McMillan, A.D.; Paulauskas, F.L.

    1997-04-01

    The purpose of this work is to explore the feasibility of several advanced microwave processing concepts to develop new energy-efficient materials and processes. The project includes two tasks: (1) commercialization of the variable-frequency microwave furnace; and (2) microwave curing of polymeric materials. The variable frequency microwave furnace, whose initial conception and design was funded by the AIM Materials Program, allows the authors, for the first time, to conduct microwave processing studies over a wide frequency range. This novel design uses a high-power traveling wave tube (TWT) originally developed for electronic warfare. By using this microwave source, one can not only select individual microwave frequencies for particular experiments, but also achieve uniform power densities over a large area by the superposition of many different frequencies. Microwave curing of various thermoset resins will be studied because it holds the potential of in-situ curing of continuous-fiber composites for strong, lightweight components or in-situ curing of adhesives, including metal-to-metal. Microwave heating can shorten curing times, provided issues of scaleup, uniformity, and thermal management can be adequately addressed.

  8. Laboratory microwave, millimeter wave and far-infrared spectra of dimethyl sulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jabri, A.; Van, V.; Nguyen, H. V. L.; Mouhib, H.; Kwabia Tchana, F.; Manceron, L.; Stahl, W.; Kleiner, I.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Dimethyl sulfide, CH3SCH3 (DMS), is a nonrigid, sulfur-containing molecule whose astronomical detection is considered to be possible in the interstellar medium. Very accurate spectroscopic constants were obtained by a laboratory analysis of rotational microwave and millimeter wave spectra, as well as rotation-torsional far-infrared (FIR) spectra, which can be used to predict transition frequencies for a detection in interstellar sources. Aims: This work aims at the experimental study and theoretical analysis of the ground torsional state and ground torsional band ν15 of DMS in a large spectral range for astrophysical use. Methods: The microwave spectrum was measured in the frequency range 2-40 GHz using two Molecular Beam Fourier Transform MicroWave (MB-FTMW) spectrometers in Aachen, Germany. The millimeter spectrum was recorded in the 50-110 GHz range. The FIR spectrum was measured for the first time at high resolution using the FT spectrometer and the newly built cryogenic cell at the French synchrotron SOLEIL. Results: DMS has two equivalent methyl internal rotors with a barrier height of about 730 cm-1. We performed a fit, using the XIAM and BELGI-Cs-2Tops codes, that contained the new measurements and previous transitions reported in the literature for the ground torsional state νt = 0 (including the four torsional species AA, AE, EA and EE) and for the ground torsional band ν15 = 1 ← 0 (including only the AA species). In the microwave region, we analyzed 584 transitions with J ≤ 30 of the ground torsional state νt = 0 and 18 transitions with J ≤ 5 of the first excited torsional state νt = 1. In the FIR range, 578 transitions belonging to the torsional band ν15 = 1 ← 0 with J ≤ 27 were assigned. Totally, 1180 transitions were included in a global fit with 21 accurately determined parameters. These parameters can be used to produce a reliable line-list for an astrophysical detection of DMS. Full Tables B.1 and C.1, and Table E.1 are

  9. Influence of microwave pre-treatment on sludge solubilization and pilot scale semi-continuous anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Appels, Lise; Houtmeyers, Sofie; Degrève, Jan; Van Impe, Jan; Dewil, Raf

    2013-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion is widely applied for the recovery of energy from waste activated sludge. Pre-treatment methods are of high interest to increase the biodegradability of the sludge and to enhance the digestion efficiency. This paper studies the application of a microwave pre-treatment. An experimental set-up of two pilot scale semi-continuous digesters was used. During a long term experiment, one of the reactors was fed with untreated sludge, while microwave pre-treated sludge (336 kJ/kg sludge) was introduced in the second one. A solid retention time of 20 days was kept during the experiments. (Organic) dry solids, carbohydrates, proteins and volatile fatty acids were monitored during digestion. It was seen that the microwave pre-treatment resulted in an effective solubilization of the organic matter in the sludge. The changes to the sludge composition resulted in an increase in biogas production by 50%, while the methane concentration in both reactors remained stable.

  10. Tunable, continuous-wave Terahertz photomixer sources and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preu, S.; Döhler, G. H.; Malzer, S.; Wang, L. J.; Gossard, A. C.

    2011-03-01

    This review is focused on the latest developments in continuous-wave (CW) photomixing for Terahertz (THz) generation. The first part of the paper explains the limiting factors for operation at high frequencies ˜ 1 THz, namely transit time or lifetime roll-off, antenna (R)-device (C) RC roll-off, current screening and blocking, and heat dissipation. We will present various realizations of both photoconductive and p-i-n diode-based photomixers to overcome these limitations, including perspectives on novel materials for high-power photomixers operating at telecom wavelengths (1550 nm). In addition to the classical approach of feeding current originating from a small semiconductor photomixer device to an antenna (antenna-based emitter, AE), an antennaless approach in which the active area itself radiates (large area emitter, LAE) is discussed in detail. Although we focus on CW photomixing, we briefly discuss recent results for LAEs under pulsed conditions. Record power levels of 1.5 mW average power and conversion efficiencies as high as 2 × 10-3 have been reached, about 2 orders of magnitude higher than those obtained with CW antenna-based emitters. The second part of the paper is devoted to applications for CW photomixers. We begin with a discussion of the development of novel THz optics. Special attention is paid to experiments exploiting the long coherence length of CW photomixers for coherent emission and detection of THz arrays. The long coherence length comes with an unprecedented narrow linewidth. This is of particular interest for spectroscopic applications, the field in which THz research has perhaps the highest impact. We point out that CW spectroscopy systems may potentially be more compact, cheaper, and more accurate than conventional pulsed systems. These features are attributed to telecom-wavelength compatibility, to excellent frequency resolution, and to their huge spectral density. The paper concludes with prototype experiments of THz wireless LAN

  11. Ultrafast millimeter-wave frequency-modulated continuous-wave reflectometry for NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Kubota, S.; Peebles, W. A.; Nguyen, X. V.; Crocker, N. A.; Roquemore, A. L.

    2006-10-15

    The millimeter-wave frequency-modulated continuous-wave (FM-CW) reflectometer on NSTX is a multichannel system providing electron density profile measurements with a frequency coverage of 13-53 GHz [corresponding O-mode density range of (0.21-3.5)x10{sup 13} cm{sup -3}]. Recently, this system has been modified to allow ultrafast full-band sweeps for repetition intervals down to 10 {mu}s. For this system to function as a fluctuation diagnostic it is crucial to eliminate artifacts in the phase derivative caused by nonlinearities in the frequency sweep; we introduce a simple hardware technique for reducing these artifacts to {approx_equal}0.3%. For NSTX, the additional bandwidth ({<=}100 kHz) greatly enhances the capability of the FM-CW reflectometer as a diagnostic for low frequency magnetohydrodynamics instabilities (e.g., internal kinks, resistive wall modes, neoclassical tearing modes, as well as fast-particle driven fishbones and low frequency toroidal Alfven eigenmodes)

  12. Effects of atmospheric turbulence on microwave and millimeter wave satellite communications systems. [attenuation statistics and antenna design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devasirvatham, D. M. J.; Hodge, D. B.

    1981-01-01

    A model of the microwave and millimeter wave link in the presence of atmospheric turbulence is presented with emphasis on satellite communications systems. The analysis is based on standard methods of statistical theory. The results are directly usable by the design engineer.

  13. COMPARATIVE DISINFECTION EFFICIENCY OF PULSED AND CONTINUOUS-WAVE UV IRRADIATION TECHNOLOGIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pulsed UV (PUV) is novel UV irradiation system that is a non-mercury lamp based alternative to currently used continuous-wave systems for water disinfection. To compare the polychromatic PUV irradiation disinfection efficiency with that from continuous wave monochromatic low-pre...

  14. The 4-Day Wave as Observed from the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite Microwave Limb Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, D. R.; Stanford, J. L.; Elson, L. S.; Fishbein, E. F.; Froidevaux, L.; Waters, J. W.

    1997-01-01

    The "4-day wave" is an eastward moving quasi-nondispersive feature with period near 4 days occurring near the winter polar stratopause. This paper presents evidence of the 4-day feature in Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) temperature, geopotential height, and ozone data from the late southern winters of 1992 and 1993. Space-time spectral analyses reveal a double-peaked temperature structure consisting of one peak near the stratopause and another in the lower mesosphere, with an out-of-phase relationship between the two peaks. This double- peaked structure is reminiscent of recent three-dimensional barotropic/baroclinic instability model predictions and is observed here for the first time. The height variation of the 4-day ozone signal is shown to compare well with a linear advective-photochemical tracer model. Negative regions of quasigeostrophic potential vorticity (PV) gradient and positive Eliassen-Palm flux divergence are shown to occur, consistent with instability dynamics playing a role in wave forcing. Spectral analyses of PV derived from MLS geopotential height fields reveal a 4-day signal peaking near the polar stratopause. The three-dimensional structure of the 4-day wave resembles the potential vorticity "charge" concept, wherein a PV anomaly in the atmosphere (analogous to an electrical charge in a dielectric material) induces a geopotential field, a vertically oriented temperature dipole, and circulation about the vertical axis.

  15. Continuous wave terahertz spectroscopy system with stably tunable beat source using optical switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eom, Joo Beom; Kim, Chihoon; Ahn, Jaesung

    2017-01-01

    A tunable beat source has been made using an optical switch module. A stably-tunable beat source for continuous wave terahertz spectroscopy system was implemented by simply connecting 16 coaxial distributed feedback laser diodes to an optical switch. The terahertz frequency was rapidly changed without frequency drifts by changing the optical path. The continuous wave terahertz frequency was tuned from 0.05 to 0.8 THz in steps of 50 GHz or 0.4 nm. We measured continuous wave terahertz waveforms emitted from the photomixers using the switched optical beat source. We also calculated the terahertz frequency peaks by taking fast Fourier transforms of the measured terahertz waveforms. By equipping the implemented tunable beat source with an optical switch, a continuous wave terahertz spectroscopy system was constructed and used to demonstrate the feasibility of continuous wave terahertz spectroscopy for nondestructive tests using the spectra of two type of Si wafers with different resistivity.

  16. Theory of scattering of electromagnetic waves of the microwave range in a turbid medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konstantinov, O. V.; Matveentsev, A. V.

    2013-02-01

    The coefficient of extinction of electromagnetic waves of the microwave range due to their scattering from clusters suspended in an amorphous medium and responsible for turbidity is calculated. Turbidity resembles the case when butter clusters transform water into milk. In the case under investigation, the clusters are conductors (metallic or semiconducting). The extinction coefficient is connected in a familiar way with the cross section of light scattering from an individual cluster. A new formula is derived for the light scattering cross section in the case when damping of oscillations of an electron is due only to spontaneous emission of light quanta. In this case, the resonant scattering cross section for light can be very large. It is shown that this can be observed only in a whisker nanocluster. In addition, the phonon energy on a whisker segment must be higher than the photon energy, which is close to the spacing between the electron energy levels in the cluster.

  17. Electrical properties of bilayer graphene synthesized using surface wave microwave plasma techniques at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Takatoshi; Kato, Hiromitsu; Okigawa, Yuki; Ishihara, Masatou; Hasegawa, Masataka

    2017-01-01

    Bilayer graphene was synthesized at low temperature using surface wave microwave plasma techniques where poly(methyl metacrylate) (PMMA) and methane (CH4) were used as carbon sources. Temperature-dependent Hall effect measurements were carried out in a helium atmosphere. Sheet resistance, sheet carrier density and mobility showed weak temperature dependence for graphene from PMMA, and the highest carrier mobility is 740 cm2 V-1 s-1. For graphene from CH4, tunneling of the domain boundary limited carrier transport. The difference in average domain size was determined by Raman signal maps. In addition, residuals of PMMA were detected on graphene from PMMA. The low sheet resistances of graphene synthesized at a temperature of 280 °C using plasma techniques were explained by the PMMA related residuals rather than the domain sizes.

  18. Fourier transform microwave and millimeter wave spectroscopy of quinazoline, quinoxaline, and phthalazine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNaughton, Don; Godfrey, Peter D.; Jahn, Michaela K.; Dewald, David A.; Grabow, Jens-Uwe

    2011-04-01

    The pure rotational spectra of the bicyclic aromatic nitrogen heterocycle molecules, quinazoline, quinoxaline, and phthalazine, have been recorded and assigned in the region 13-87 GHz. An analysis, guided by ab initio molecular orbital predictions, of frequency-scanned Stark modulated, jet-cooled millimeter wave absorption spectra (48-87 GHz) yielded a preliminary set of rotational and centrifugal distortion constants. Subsequent spectral analysis at higher resolution was carried out with Fourier transform microwave (FT-MW) spectroscopy (13-18 GHz) of a supersonic rotationally cold molecular beam. The high spectral resolution of the FT-MW instrument provided an improved set of rotational and centrifugal distortion constants together with nitrogen quadrupole coupling constants for all three species. Density functional theory calculations at the B3LYP/6-311+G** level of theory closely predict rotational constants and are useful in predicting quadrupole coupling constants and dipole moments for such species.

  19. Fourier transform microwave and millimeter wave spectroscopy of quinazoline, quinoxaline, and phthalazine.

    PubMed

    McNaughton, Don; Godfrey, Peter D; Jahn, Michaela K; Dewald, David A; Grabow, Jens-Uwe

    2011-04-21

    The pure rotational spectra of the bicyclic aromatic nitrogen heterocycle molecules, quinazoline, quinoxaline, and phthalazine, have been recorded and assigned in the region 13-87 GHz. An analysis, guided by ab initio molecular orbital predictions, of frequency-scanned Stark modulated, jet-cooled millimeter wave absorption spectra (48-87 GHz) yielded a preliminary set of rotational and centrifugal distortion constants. Subsequent spectral analysis at higher resolution was carried out with Fourier transform microwave (FT-MW) spectroscopy (13-18 GHz) of a supersonic rotationally cold molecular beam. The high spectral resolution of the FT-MW instrument provided an improved set of rotational and centrifugal distortion constants together with nitrogen quadrupole coupling constants for all three species. Density functional theory calculations at the B3LYP∕6-311+G∗∗ level of theory closely predict rotational constants and are useful in predicting quadrupole coupling constants and dipole moments for such species.

  20. Freak Waves In The Ocean A~é­ We Need Continuous Measurements!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, P.; Teng, C.; Mori, N.

    Freak waves, sometimes also known as rogue waves, are a particular kind of ocean waves that displays a singular, unexpected, and unusually high wave profile with an extraordinarily large and steep trough or crest. The existence of freak waves has be- come widely accepted while it always poses severe hazard to the navy fleets, merchant marines, offshore structures, and virtually all oceanic ventures. Multitudes of seagoing vessels and mariners have encountered freak waves over the years, many had resulted in disasters. The emerging interest in freak waves and the quest to grasp an understand- ing of the phenomenon have inspired numerous theoretical conjectures in recent years. But the practical void of actual field observation on freak waves renders even the well- developed theories remain unverified. Furthermore, the present wave measurement systems, which have been in practice for the last 5 decades, are not at all designed to capture freak waves. We wish therefore to propose and petition to all oceanic scientist and engineers to consider undertaking an unprecedented but technologically feasible practice of making continuous and uninterrupted wave measurements. As freak waves can happen anywhere in the ocean and at anytime, the continuous and uninterrupted measurements at a fixed station would certainly be warranted to document the occur- rence of freak waves, if present, and thus lead to basic realizations of the underlying driving mechanisms.

  1. Continuous spontaneous localization wave function collapse model as a mechanism for the emergence of cosmological asymmetries in inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cañate, Pedro; Pearle, Philip; Sudarsky, Daniel

    2013-05-01

    The inflationary account for the emergence of the seeds of cosmic structure falls short of actually explaining the generation of primordial anisotropies and inhomogeneities. This description starts from a symmetric background, and invokes symmetric dynamics, so it cannot explain asymmetries. To generate asymmetries, we present an application of the continuous spontaneous localization model of wave function collapse in the context of inflation. This modification of quantum dynamics introduces a stochastic nonunitary component to the evolution of the inflaton field perturbations. This leads to passage from a homogeneous and isotropic stage to another, where the quantum uncertainties in the initial state of inflation transmute into the primordial inhomogeneities and anisotropies. We show, by proper choice of the collapse-generating operator, that it is possible to achieve compatibility with the precise observations of the cosmic microwave background radiation.

  2. PROCESS INTENSIFICATION: OXIDATION OF BENZYL ALCOHOL USING A CONTINUOUS ISOTHERMAL REACTOR UNDER MICROWAVE IRRADIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the past two decades, several investigations have been carried out using microwave radiation for performing chemical transformations. These transformations have been largely performed in conventional batch reactors with limited mixing and heat transfer capabilities. The reacti...

  3. Continuous monitoring of the progressive degradation of a liquid composite by means of a noninvasive microwave resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catala-Civera, Jose M.; Canos-Marin, Antoni J.; de los Reyes, E.

    2000-07-01

    Microwave control capabilities have been used to monitor the degradation of polyol, an alcohol composite material commonly used in the footwear industry for polymerization purposes. The liquid flows continuously inside a thin pipe and its desirable properties are altered with time associated to moisture absorption processes. Consequently, variations in the dielectric properties are involved, and they can be detected by permittivity measurements. In this paper, in order to obtain high sensitivity and resolution, a rectangular cavity resonator working at a fixed frequency was designed using as sample holder a rectangular pipe containing the liquid going through. Changes in the liquid modify the original response of the cavity with a non- degraded liquid and these differences have been used to determine the degree of degradation of the material. The final response of the microwave resonator was experimentally validated with measurements in a continuous line.

  4. Subtle Mitsunobu couplings under super-heating: the role of high-throughput continuous flow and microwave strategies.

    PubMed

    Manvar, Atul; Shah, Anamik

    2014-11-07

    Non-conventional heating techniques, high-throughput microwave-assisted synthesis and continuous flow penetrate almost every scientific field. Mitsunobu coupling is a ubiquitous choice for the dehydrative redox condensation of primary or secondary alcohols with (pro)nucleophiles. The aim of this review is to showcase the ease of subtle Mitsunobu coupling under super-heating. Surprisingly, this strategy is rather non-trivial; considering the sensitivity of reagents, Mitsunobu chemistry is typically performed at lower temperatures or under ambient conditions. In view of the absence of any previous work focusing on this topic, the current review considers the utility of super-heating in fragile Mitsunobu reactions. Therefore, we anticipate that this review will also bridge some of the apparent gaps in the extant literature by specifically describing the advances made by non-conventional heating assisted by microwave or continuous flow in one of the most powerful stereochemical transformations.

  5. Continuous-Flow Microwave Synthesis of Metal-Organic Frameworks: A Highly Efficient Method for Large-Scale Production.

    PubMed

    Taddei, Marco; Steitz, Daniel Antti; van Bokhoven, Jeroen Anton; Ranocchiari, Marco

    2016-03-01

    Metal-organic frameworks are having a tremendous impact on novel strategic applications, with prospective employment in industrially relevant processes. The development of such processes is strictly dependent on the ability to generate materials with high yield efficiency and production rate. We report a versatile and highly efficient method for synthesis of metal-organic frameworks in large quantities using continuous flow processing under microwave irradiation. Benchmark materials such as UiO-66, MIL-53(Al), and HKUST-1 were obtained with remarkable mass, space-time yields, and often using stoichiometric amounts of reactants. In the case of UiO-66 and MIL-53(Al), we attained unprecedented space-time yields far greater than those reported previously. All of the syntheses were successfully extended to multi-gram high quality products in a matter of minutes, proving the effectiveness of continuous flow microwave technology for the large scale production of metal-organic frameworks.

  6. [Analysis of triterpenoids in Ganoderma lucidum by microwave-assisted continuous extraction].

    PubMed

    Lu, Yan-fang; An, Jing; Jiang, Ye

    2015-04-01

    For further improving the extraction efficiency of microwave extraction, a microwave-assisted contijuous extraction (MACE) device has been designed and utilized. By contrasting with the traditional methods, the characteristics and extraction efficiency of MACE has also been studied. The method was validated by the analysis of the triterpenoids in Ganoderma lucidum. The extraction conditions of MACE were: using 95% ethanol as solvent, microwave power 200 W and radiation time 14.5 min (5 cycles). The extraction results were subsequently compared with traditional heat reflux extraction ( HRE) , soxhlet extraction (SE), ultrasonic extraction ( UE) as well as the conventional microwave extraction (ME). For triterpenoids, the two methods based on the microwaves (ME and MACE) were in general capable of finishing the extraction in 10, 14.5 min, respectively, while other methods should consume 60 min and even more than 100 min. Additionally, ME can produce comparable extraction results as the classical HRE and higher extraction yield than both SE and UE, however, notably lower extraction yield than MASE. More importantly, the purity of the crud extract by MACE is far better than the other methods. MACE can effectively combine the advantages of microwave extraction and soxhlet extraction, thus enabling a more complete extraction of the analytes of TCMs in comparison with ME. And therefore makes the analytic result more accurate. It provides a novel, high efficient, rapid and reliable pretreatment technique for the analysis of TCMs, and it could potentially be extended to ingredient preparation or extracting techniques of TCMs.

  7. Spin-wave band-pass filters based on yttrium iron garnet films for tunable microwave photonic oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ustinov, A. B.; Drozdovskii, A. V.; Nikitin, A. A.; Kalinikos, B. A.

    2015-12-01

    The paper reports on development of tunable band-pass microwave filters for microwave photonic generators. The filters were fabricated with the use of epitaxial yttrium iron garnet films. Principle of operation of the filters was based on excitation, propagation, and reception of spin waves. In order to obtain narrow pass band, the filtering properties of excitation and reception antennas were exploited. The filters demonstrated insertion losses of 2-3 dB, bandwidth of 25-35 MHz, and tuning range of up to 1.5 GHz in the range 3-7 GHz.

  8. Coherent summation of Ka-band microwave beams produced by sub-gigawatt superradiance backward wave oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharypov, K. A.; El'chaninov, A. A.; Mesyats, G. A.; Pedos, M. S.; Romancheko, I. V.; Rostov, V. V.; Rukin, S. N.; Shpak, V. G.; Shunailov, S. A.; Ul'masculov, M. R.; Yalandin, M. I.

    2013-09-01

    Coherent summation of microwave beams has been demonstrated for two superradiance Ka-band backward wave oscillators producing over 700 MW of power. The explosive emission cathodes of the e-beam injectors were powered by stable splitted voltage pulses produced by an all-solid-state modulator. The voltage fronts were shortened to 300 ps in controlled delay shock-excited ferrite lines. The standard deviation of the phase difference between the microwave pulses was less than 2% of the oscillations period. The power flux density of the summarized radiation was the same as that of a single generator producing an output power of ˜3 GW.

  9. Continuous wavelet transform analysis of acceleration signals measured from a wave buoy.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Laurence Zsu-Hsin; Wu, Li-Chung; Wang, Jong-Hao

    2013-08-19

    Accelerometers, which can be installed inside a floating platform on the sea, are among the most commonly used sensors for operational ocean wave measurements. To examine the non-stationary features of ocean waves, this study was conducted to derive a wavelet spectrum of ocean waves and to synthesize sea surface elevations from vertical acceleration signals of a wave buoy through the continuous wavelet transform theory. The short-time wave features can be revealed by simultaneously examining the wavelet spectrum and the synthetic sea surface elevations. The in situ wave signals were applied to verify the practicality of the wavelet-based algorithm. We confirm that the spectral leakage and the noise at very-low-frequency bins influenced the accuracies of the estimated wavelet spectrum and the synthetic sea surface elevations. The appropriate thresholds of these two factors were explored. To study the short-time wave features from the wave records, the acceleration signals recorded from an accelerometer inside a discus wave buoy are analysed. The results from the wavelet spectrum show the evidence of short-time nonlinear wave events. Our study also reveals that more surface profiles with higher vertical asymmetry can be found from short-time nonlinear wave with stronger harmonic spectral peak. Finally, we conclude that the algorithms of continuous wavelet transform are practical for revealing the short-time wave features of the buoy acceleration signals.

  10. Survival of Listeria monocytogenes, E.coli 0157:H7 and Salmonella spp. on catfish fillets exposed to microwave heating in a continuous mode

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microwave (MW) heating using continuous power output with feedback control and a modified ingredient formulation, may provide better and consistent cooking of foods. Currently, household units with build-in inverter power supply units are available. These new generation microwave ovens provide con...

  11. Efficiency of Artemia cysts removal as a model invasive spore using a continuous microwave system with heat recovery.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, Sundar; Ortego, Jeffrey; Rusch, Kelly A; Boldor, Dorin

    2008-12-15

    A continuous microwave system to treat ballast water inoculated with Artemia salina cysts as a model invasive spore was tested for its efficacy in inactivating the cysts present. The system was tested at two different flow rates (1 and 2 L x min(-1)) and two different power levels (2.5 and 4.5 kW). Temperature profiles indicate that the system could deliver heating loads in excess of 100 degrees C in a uniform and near-instantaneous manner when using a heat recovery system. Except for a power and flow rate combination of 2.5 kW and 2 L x min(-1), complete inactivation of the cysts was observed at all combinations at holding times below 100 s. The microwave treatment was better or equal to the control treatment in inactivating the cysts. Use of heat exchangers increased the power conversion efficiency and the overall efficiency of the treatment system. Cost economics analysis indicates that in the present form of development microwave treatment costs are higher than the existing ballast water treatment methods. Overall, tests results indicated that microwave treatment of ballast water is a promising method that can be used in conjunction with other methods to form an efficient treatment system that can prevent introduction of potentially invasive spore forming species in non-native waters.

  12. Multipath Effects on Phase Measurements with Continuous Terahertz Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordes, A. H.; Albarracin, M. G.; Thomas, D. H.; von der Weid, J. P.

    2016-05-01

    We evaluate the effect of multipath waves on terahertz phase measurements due to multiple reflections between the transmitter antenna and the sample. We show that the phase shift introduced by the sample will be biased by a value which depends on the sample position in the terahertz path. We show how to remove the bias and use the technique in the measurement of the index of refraction of Mylar at 194.4 GHz.

  13. Plasma physics and related challenges of millimeter-wave-to-terahertz and high power microwave generation

    SciTech Connect

    Booske, John H.

    2008-05-15

    Homeland security and military defense technology considerations have stimulated intense interest in mobile, high power sources of millimeter-wave (mmw) to terahertz (THz) regime electromagnetic radiation, from 0.1 to 10 THz. While vacuum electronic sources are a natural choice for high power, the challenges have yet to be completely met for applications including noninvasive sensing of concealed weapons and dangerous agents, high-data-rate communications, high resolution radar, next generation acceleration drivers, and analysis of fluids and condensed matter. The compact size requirements for many of these high frequency sources require miniscule, microfabricated slow wave circuits. This necessitates electron beams with tiny transverse dimensions and potentially very high current densities for adequate gain. Thus, an emerging family of microfabricated, vacuum electronic devices share many of the same plasma physics challenges that are currently confronting 'classic' high power microwave (HPM) generators including long-life bright electron beam sources, intense beam transport, parasitic mode excitation, energetic electron interaction with surfaces, and rf air breakdown at output windows. The contemporary plasma physics and other related issues of compact, high power mmw-to-THz sources are compared and contrasted to those of HPM generation, and future research challenges and opportunities are discussed.

  14. Plasma physics and related challenges of millimeter-wave-to-terahertz and high power microwave generationa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booske, John H.

    2008-05-01

    Homeland security and military defense technology considerations have stimulated intense interest in mobile, high power sources of millimeter-wave (mmw) to terahertz (THz) regime electromagnetic radiation, from 0.1 to 10THz. While vacuum electronic sources are a natural choice for high power, the challenges have yet to be completely met for applications including noninvasive sensing of concealed weapons and dangerous agents, high-data-rate communications, high resolution radar, next generation acceleration drivers, and analysis of fluids and condensed matter. The compact size requirements for many of these high frequency sources require miniscule, microfabricated slow wave circuits. This necessitates electron beams with tiny transverse dimensions and potentially very high current densities for adequate gain. Thus, an emerging family of microfabricated, vacuum electronic devices share many of the same plasma physics challenges that are currently confronting "classic" high power microwave (HPM) generators including long-life bright electron beam sources, intense beam transport, parasitic mode excitation, energetic electron interaction with surfaces, and rf air breakdown at output windows. The contemporary plasma physics and other related issues of compact, high power mmw-to-THz sources are compared and contrasted to those of HPM generation, and future research challenges and opportunities are discussed.

  15. Influence of emission threshold and current increase rate on microwave starting time in relativistic backward wave oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ping; Sun, Jun; Song, Zhimin; Teng, Yan

    2017-01-01

    Explosive emission cathodes (EECs) are widely used in high power microwave generators. This paper researches the influence of the emission threshold and the current increase rate of annular EECs on the microwave starting time of a relativistic backward wave oscillator (RBWO) when the current amplitude is not affected. The results show that a moderate delay in explosive emission, as long as it's not too long and the current increase rate keeps fast enough, won't bring about a corresponding delay in the starting time of microwave, but inversely, may suppress the mode competition and thus expedite the starting process slightly. The current increase rate, however, has more prominent influence on the starting time of the RBWO. A slower current increase rate will delay the time when the beam current reaches the starting current and lead to a longer starting time.

  16. Design of a metamaterial slow wave structure for an O-type high power microwave generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurt, Sabahattin C.; Fuks, Mikhail I.; Prasad, Sarita; Schamiloglu, Edl

    2016-12-01

    We describe a new O-type high power microwave oscillator that uses a metamaterial slow wave structure (MSWS) supporting waves with negative dispersion. The MSWS comprises periodically alternating, oppositely oriented split ring resonators (SRRs) connected to a metal tube where the distance between the rings is much less than a wavelength of the radiation generated. The SRRs provide negative permeability μ . The diameter of the metal tube is such that the generated oscillations are below cutoff for a regular waveguide with the same dimension, thus providing negative permittivity ɛ . A tubular electron beam propagates coaxially through this structure. The interaction space is coupled with the outer coaxial channel through gaps between the SRRs. Radiation is extracted in an endfire manner at the end of the outer channel via a conical horn section. Using particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, it was found that the electron beam in the interaction space forms a sequence of trapped electron bunches by the synchronous operating wave. The output parameters of this oscillator for an applied voltage U = 400 kV, electron beam current I = 4.5 kA, and guide axial magnetic field B = 2 T are radiation power P = 260 MW, radiation frequency f = 1.4 GHz, and electronic efficiency η = 15% when the total SWS length L consisting of 12 split rings is 34.5 cm. The output radiation pattern corresponds to a TE21-like hybrid mode. This article presents details on the simulations of this novel structure and computational and experimental cold tests of a prototype structure in preparation for experimental hot tests.

  17. Microwave and Millimeter Wave Nondestructive Evaluation of the Space Shuttle External Tank Insulating Foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shrestha, S.; Kharkovsky, S.; Zoughi, R.; Hepburn, F

    2005-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Columbia s catastrophic failure has been attributed to a piece of external fuel tank insulating SOFI (Spray On Foam Insulation) foam striking the leading edge of the left wing of the orbiter causing significant damage to some of the protecting heat tiles. The accident emphasizes the growing need to develop effective, robust and life-cycle oriented methods of nondestructive testing and evaluation (NDT&E) of complex conductor-backed insulating foam and protective acreage heat tiles used in the space shuttle fleet and in future multi-launch space vehicles. The insulating SOFI foam is constructed from closed-cell foam. In the microwave regime this foam is in the family of low permittivity and low loss dielectric materials. Near-field microwave and millimeter wave NDT methods were one of the techniques chosen for this purpose. To this end several flat and thick SOFI foam panels, two structurally complex panels similar to the external fuel tank and a "blind" panel were used in this investigation. Several anomalies such as voids and disbonds were embedded in these panels at various locations. The location and properties of the embedded anomalies in the "blind" panel were not disclosed to the investigating team prior to the investigation. Three frequency bands were used in this investigation covering a frequency range of 8-75 GHz. Moreover, the influence of signal polarization was also investigated. Overall the results of this investigation were very promising for detecting the presence of anomalies in different panels covered with relatively thick insulating SOFI foam. Different types of anomalies were detected in foam up to 9 in thick. Many of the anomalies in the more complex panels were also detected. When investigating the blind panel no false positives were detected. Anomalies in between and underneath bolt heads were not easily detected. This paper presents the results of this investigation along with a discussion of the capabilities of the method

  18. Continuous short-wave (radio-frequency) diathermy.

    PubMed

    Goats, G C

    1989-06-01

    Continuous shortwave diathermy is the technique of choice when uniform marked elevation of temperature is required in the deep tissues. This heating can be targeted accurately by using an appropriate applicator positioned correctly. SWD also allows superficial structures to be heated selectively, although for this the various methods of surface heating are usually preferable. Sub-acute or chronic conditions respond best to continuous shortwave diathermy which, when used properly, can be as effective as ultrasound. Acute lesions are better treated with pulsed shortwave diathermy. Continuous shortwave diathermy can help to relieve pain and muscle spasm, resolve inflammatory states and reduce swelling, promote vasodilation, increase the compliance of connective tissue, increase joint range and decrease joint stiffness.

  19. Microwave and Millimeter-Wave Radiometric Studies of Temperature, Water Vapor and Clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Westwater, Edgeworth

    2011-05-06

    The importance of accurate measurements of column amounts of water vapor and cloud liquid has been well documented by scientists within the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. At the North Slope of Alaska (NSA), both microwave radiometers (MWR) and the MWRProfiler (MWRP), been used operationally by ARM for passive retrievals of the quantities: Precipitable Water Vapor (PWV) and Liquid Water Path (LWP). However, it has been convincingly shown that these instruments are inadequate to measure low amounts of PWV and LWP. In the case of water vapor, this is especially important during the Arctic winter, when PWV is frequently less than 2 mm. For low amounts of LWP (< 50 g/m{sup 2}), the MWR and MWRP retrievals have an accuracy that is also not acceptable. To address some of these needs, in March-April 2004, NOAA and ARM conducted the NSA Arctic Winter Radiometric Experiment - Water Vapor Intensive Operational Period at the ARM NSA/Adjacent Arctic Ocean (NSA/AAO) site. After this experiment, the radiometer group at NOAA moved to the Center for Environmental Technology (CET) of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering of the University of Colorado at Boulder. During this 2004 experiment, a total of 220 radiosondes were launched, and radiometric data from 22.235 to 380 GHz were obtained. Primary instruments included the ARM MWR and MWRP, a Global Positioning System (GPS), as well as the CET Ground-based Scanning Radiometer (GSR). We have analyzed data from these instruments to answer several questions of importance to ARM, including: (a) techniques for improved water vapor measurements; (b) improved calibration techniques during cloudy conditions; (c) the spectral response of radiometers to a variety of conditions: clear, liquid, ice, and mixed phase clouds; and (d) forward modeling of microwave and millimeter wave brightness temperatures from 22 to 380 GHz. Many of these results have been published in the open literature. During the third year of

  20. Translation of microwave methodology to continuous flow for the efficient synthesis of diaryl ethers via a base-mediated S(N)Ar reaction.

    PubMed

    Wiles, Charlotte; Watts, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Whilst microwave heating has been widely demonstrated as a synthetically useful tool for rapid reaction screening, a microwave-absorbing solvent is often required in order to achieve efficient reactant heating. In comparison, microreactors can be readily heated and pressurised in order to "super-heat" the reaction mixture, meaning that microwave-transparent solvents can also be employed. To demonstrate the advantages associated with microreaction technology a series of S(N)Ar reactions were performed under continuous flow by following previously developed microwave protocols as a starting point for the investigation. By this approach, an automated microreaction platform (Labtrix(®) S1) was employed for the continuous flow synthesis of diaryl ethers at 195 °C and 25 bar, affording a reduction in reaction time from tens of minutes to 60 s when compared with a stopped-flow microwave reactor.

  1. A Wave-Optics Approach to Paraxial Geometrical Laws Based on Continuity at Boundaries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linares, J.; Nistal, M. C.

    2011-01-01

    We present a derivation of the paraxial geometrical laws starting from a wave-optics approach, in particular by using simple continuity conditions of paraxial spherical waves at boundaries (discontinuities) between optical media. Paraxial geometrical imaging and magnification laws, under refraction and reflection at boundaries, are derived for…

  2. Continuity Conditions on Schrodinger Wave Functions at Discontinuities of the Potential.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branson, David

    1979-01-01

    Several standard arguments which attempt to show that the wave function and its derivative must be continuous across jump discontinuities of the potential are reviewed and their defects discussed. (Author/HM)

  3. Unusual continuous dual absorption peaks in Ca-doped BiFeO3 nanostructures for broadened microwave absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhong-Jun; Hou, Zhi-Ling; Song, Wei-Li; Liu, Xing-Da; Cao, Wen-Qiang; Shao, Xiao-Hong; Cao, Mao-Sheng

    2016-05-01

    Electromagnetic absorption materials have received increasing attention owing to their wide applications in aerospace, communication and the electronics industry, and multiferroic materials with both polarization and magnetic properties are considered promising ceramics for microwave absorption application. However, the insufficient absorption intensity coupled with the narrow effective absorption bandwidth has limited the development of high-performance multiferroic materials for practical microwave absorption. To address such issues, in the present work, we utilize interfacial engineering in BiFeO3 nanoparticles via Ca doping, with the purpose of tailoring the phase boundary. Upon Ca-substitution, the co-existence of both R3c and P4mm phases has been confirmed to massively enhance both dielectric and magnetic properties via manipulating the phase boundary and the destruction of the spiral spin structure. Unlike the commonly reported magnetic/dielectric hybrid microwave absorption composites, Bi0.95Ca0.05FeO3 has been found to deliver unusual continuous dual absorption peaks at a small thickness (1.56 mm), which has remarkably broadened the effective absorption bandwidth (8.7-12.1 GHz). The fundamental mechanisms based on the phase boundary engineering have been discussed, suggesting a novel platform for designing advanced multiferroic materials with wide applications.Electromagnetic absorption materials have received increasing attention owing to their wide applications in aerospace, communication and the electronics industry, and multiferroic materials with both polarization and magnetic properties are considered promising ceramics for microwave absorption application. However, the insufficient absorption intensity coupled with the narrow effective absorption bandwidth has limited the development of high-performance multiferroic materials for practical microwave absorption. To address such issues, in the present work, we utilize interfacial engineering in BiFeO3

  4. Theoretical investigation of a class of new planar transmission lines from microwave and millimeter-wave integrated circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Pang-Cheng; Nguyen, Cam

    1995-10-01

    New planar transmission lines employing multilayer structures are examined for possible applications in microwave and millimeter-wave integrated circuits. Detailed investigations are presented through numerical results calculated using the spectral domain technique. The newly proposed transmission lines have many attractive features such as large impedance ranges, flexibility and the ability to realize complicated, densely packed integrated circuits, as well as miniaturization through the use of thin dielectric layers.

  5. Time reversal of continuous-wave, monochromatic signals in elastic media

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Brian E; Guyer, Robert A; Ulrich, Timothy J; Johnson, Paul A

    2009-01-01

    Experimental observations of spatial focusing of continuous-wave, steady-state elastic waves in a reverberant elastic cavity using time reversal are reported here. Spatially localized focusing is achieved when multiple channels are employed, while a single channel does not yield such focusing. The amplitude of the energy at the focal location increases as the square of the number of channels used, while the amplitude elsewhere in the medium increases proportionally with the number of channels used. The observation is important in the context of imaging in solid laboratory samples as well as problems involving continuous-wave signals in Earth.

  6. Three-Dimensional Simulation of Traveling-Wave Tube Cold-Test Characteristics Using CST MICROWAVE STUDIO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chevalier, Christine T.; Herrmann, Kimberly A.; Kory, Carol L.; Wilson, Jeffrey D.; Cross, Andrew W.; Santana , Samuel

    2003-01-01

    The electromagnetic field simulation software package CST MICROWAVE STUDIO (MWS) was used to compute the cold-test parameters - frequency-phase dispersion, on-axis impedance, and attenuation - for a traveling-wave tube (TWT) slow-wave circuit. The results were compared to experimental data, as well as to results from MAFIA, another three-dimensional simulation code from CST currently used at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). The strong agreement between cold-test parameters simulated with MWS and those measured experimentally demonstrates the potential of this code to reduce the time and cost of TWT development.

  7. The gravitational wave contribution to cosmic microwave background anisotropies and the amplitude of mass fluctuations from COBE results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucchin, Francesco; Matarrese, Sabino; Mollerach, Silvia

    1992-01-01

    A stochastic background of primordial gravitational waves may substantially contribute, via the Sachs-Wolfe effect, to the large-scale cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies recently detected by COBE. This implies a bias in any resulting determination of the primordial amplitude of density fluctuations. We consider the constraints imposed on n is less than 1 ('tilted') power-law fluctuation spectra, taking into account the contribution from both scalar and tensor waves, as predicted by power-law inflation. The gravitational wave contribution to CMB anisotropies generally reduces the required rms level of mass fluctuation, thereby increasing the linear bias parameter, even in models where the spectral index is close to the Harrison-Zel'dovich value n = 1. This 'gravitational wave bias' helps to reconcile the predictions of CDM models with observations on pairwise galaxy velocity dispersion on small scales.

  8. Laboratory measurements of microwave and millimeter-wave properties of planetary atmospheric constituents

    SciTech Connect

    Steffes, P.G.

    1989-01-01

    Accurate data on microwave and millimeter-wave properties of potential planetary atmospheric constituents is critical for the proper interpretation of radio occultation measurements, and of radio astronomical observations of both continuum and spectral line emissions. Such data is also needed to correct for atmospheric effects on radar studies of surface reflectivity. Since the refractive and absorptive properties of atmospheric constituents often vary drastically from theoretically-predicted profiles, especially under the extreme conditions characteristic of the planetary atmosphere, laboratory measurements under simulated planetary conditions are required. This paper reviews the instrumentation and techniques used for laboratory measurement of the refractivity and absorptivity of atmospheric constituents at wavelengths longward of 1 mm, under simulated planetary conditions (temperature, pressure, and broadening gases). Techniques for measuring both gases and condensates are considered. Also reviewed are the relative accuracies of the various techniques. Laboratory measurements are reviewed which have already been made, and additional measurements which are needed for interpretation of data from Venus and the outer planets, are highlighted.

  9. Primordial Gravitational Waves and Rescattered Electromagnetic Radiation in the Cosmic Microwave Background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dong-Hoon; Trippe, Sascha

    2016-10-01

    Understanding the interaction of primordial gravitational waves (GWs) with the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) plasma is important for observational cosmology. In this article, we provide an analysis of an apparently as-yet-overlooked effect. We consider a single free electric charge and suppose that it can be agitated by primordial GWs propagating through the CMB plasma, resulting in periodic, regular motion along particular directions. Light reflected by the charge will be partially polarized, and this will imprint a characteristic pattern on the CMB. We study this effect by considering a simple model in which anisotropic incident electromagnetic (EM) radiation is rescattered by a charge sitting in spacetime perturbed by GWs, and becomes polarized. As the charge is driven to move along particular directions, we calculate its dipole moment to determine the leading-order rescattered EM radiation. The Stokes parameters of the rescattered radiation exhibit a net linear polarization. We investigate how this polarization effect can be schematically represented out of the Stokes parameters. We work out the representations of gradient modes (E-modes) and curl modes (B-modes) to produce polarization maps. Although the polarization effect results from GWs, we find that its representations, the E- and B-modes, do not practically reflect the GW properties such as strain amplitude, frequency, and polarization states.

  10. Robust likelihoods for inflationary gravitational waves from maps of cosmic microwave background polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Switzer, Eric R.; Watts, Duncan J.

    2016-09-01

    The B -mode polarization of the cosmic microwave background provides a unique window into tensor perturbations from inflationary gravitational waves. Survey effects complicate the estimation and description of the power spectrum on the largest angular scales. The pixel-space likelihood yields parameter distributions without the power spectrum as an intermediate step, but it does not have the large suite of tests available to power spectral methods. Searches for primordial B -modes must rigorously reject and rule out contamination. Many forms of contamination vary or are uncorrelated across epochs, frequencies, surveys, or other data treatment subsets. The cross power and the power spectrum of the difference of subset maps provide approaches to reject and isolate excess variance. We develop an analogous joint pixel-space likelihood. Contamination not modeled in the likelihood produces parameter-dependent bias and complicates the interpretation of the difference map. We describe a null test that consistently weights the difference map. Excess variance should either be explicitly modeled in the covariance or be removed through reprocessing the data.

  11. High-performance packaging for monolithic microwave and millimeter-wave integrated circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shalkhauser, K. A.; Li, K.; Shih, Y. C.

    1992-01-01

    Packaging schemes were developed that provide low-loss, hermetic enclosure for advanced monolithic microwave and millimeter-wave integrated circuits (MMICs). The package designs are based on a fused quartz substrate material that offers improved radio frequency (RF) performance through 44 gigahertz (GHz). The small size and weight of the packages make them appropriate for a variety of applications, including phased array antenna systems. Packages were designed in two forms; one for housing a single MMIC chip, the second in the form of a multi-chip phased array module. The single chip array module was developed in three separate sizes, for chips of different geometry and frequency requirements. The phased array module was developed to address packaging directly for antenna applications, and includes transmission line and interconnect structures to support multi-element operation. All packages are fabricated using fused quartz substrate materials. As part of the packaging effort, a test fixture was developed to interface the single chip packages to conventional laboratory instrumentation for characterization of the packaged devices. The package and test fixture designs were both developed in a generic sense, optimizing performance for a wide range of possible applications and devices.

  12. Solar Microwave Drifting Spikes and Solitary Kinetic Alfvén Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, D. J.; Huang, J.; Tang, J. F.; Yan, Y. H.

    2007-08-01

    Mechanisms driving eruptive phenomena and elementary processes occurring at the smallest coherent scales have been outstanding problems in solar physics. In this Letter, a novel kind of fine structures of solar radio bursts, ``solar microwave drifting spikes'' (SMDSs), is reported. Our analysis shows that the SMDSs can be produced by a group of ``solitary kinetic Alfvén waves'' (SKAWs) with small cross-field scales, in which the electrons in the SKAWs are accelerated self-consistently by the SKAW electric fields to tens of keV and trapped within the SKAW potential wells. It is these trapped electrons that trigger the SMDSs. And the frequency drifts of the SMDSs are attributed to the SKAW propagation along the magnetic field. The SKAWs are exact solutions of two-fluid equations for a low-β plasma and have been experimentally verified in the magnetosphere, where they accelerate auroral electrons to several keV. We believe the SMDSs represent a new observational signature of SKAWs in the solar atmosphere.

  13. Controllable microwave three-wave mixing via a single three-level superconducting quantum circuit.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-xi; Sun, Hui-Chen; Peng, Z H; Miranowicz, Adam; Tsai, J S; Nori, Franco

    2014-12-09

    Three-wave mixing in second-order nonlinear optical processes cannot occur in atomic systems due to the electric-dipole selection rules. In contrast, we demonstrate that second-order nonlinear processes can occur in a superconducting quantum circuit (i.e., a superconducting artificial atom) when the inversion symmetry of the potential energy is broken by simply changing the applied magnetic flux. In particular, we show that difference- and sum-frequencies (and second harmonics) can be generated in the microwave regime in a controllable manner by using a single three-level superconducting flux quantum circuit (SFQC). For our proposed parameters, the frequency tunability of this circuit can be achieved in the range of about 17 GHz for the sum-frequency generation, and around 42 GHz (or 26 GHz) for the difference-frequency generation. Our proposal provides a simple method to generate second-order nonlinear processes within current experimental parameters of SFQCs.

  14. A compact micro-wave synthesizer for transportable cold-atom interferometers

    SciTech Connect

    Lautier, J.; Lours, M.; Landragin, A.

    2014-06-15

    We present the realization of a compact micro-wave frequency synthesizer for an atom interferometer based on stimulated Raman transitions, applied to transportable inertial sensing. Our set-up is intended to address the hyperfine transitions of {sup 87}Rb at 6.8 GHz. The prototype is evaluated both in the time and the frequency domain by comparison with state-of-the-art frequency references developed at Laboratoire national de métrologie et d'essais−Systémes de référence temps espace (LNE-SYRTE). In free-running mode, it features a residual phase noise level of −65 dB rad{sup 2} Hz{sup −1} at 10 Hz offset frequency and a white phase noise level in the order of −120 dB rad{sup 2} Hz{sup −1} for Fourier frequencies above 10 kHz. The phase noise effect on the sensitivity of the atomic interferometer is evaluated for diverse values of cycling time, interrogation time, and Raman pulse duration. To our knowledge, the resulting contribution is well below the sensitivity of any demonstrated cold atom inertial sensors based on stimulated Raman transitions. The drastic improvement in terms of size, simplicity, and power consumption paves the way towards field and mobile operations.

  15. The Fourier transform microwave/millimeter-wave spectrum of YOH and YOD (X ˜ 1Σ+)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halfen, D. T.; Keogh, J. P.; Ziurys, L. M.

    2015-08-01

    The rotational spectrum of YOH (X ˜ 1Σ+) and its deuterium analog YOD have been measured using Fourier transform microwave/millimeter-wave (FTMmmW) techniques. This work is the first pure rotational study of this molecule. YOH and YOD were created in the gas phase in a supersonic expansion from a mixture of yttrium vapor, generated by laser-ablation, and H2O, diluted in argon. Three transitions were measured for YOH and two for YOD in the frequency range 15-52 GHz. These data were analyzed using a 1Σ Hamiltonian, and rotational and centrifugal distortion constants were refined. Based on the rotational constants, the r0 bond lengths of YOH were established to be r(Ysbnd O) = 1.949(1) Å and r(Osbnd H) = 0.921(1) Å, in agreement with past optical work. The Ysbnd O bond in YOH is longer than in YO, which has r(Ysbnd O) = 1.790(1) Å. This difference suggests the presence of a single Ysbnd O bond in the hydroxide and a double Ydbnd O bond in the oxide.

  16. Controllable microwave three-wave mixing via a single three-level superconducting quantum circuit

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yu-xi; Sun, Hui-Chen; Peng, Z. H.; Miranowicz, Adam; Tsai, J. S.; Nori, Franco

    2014-01-01

    Three-wave mixing in second-order nonlinear optical processes cannot occur in atomic systems due to the electric-dipole selection rules. In contrast, we demonstrate that second-order nonlinear processes can occur in a superconducting quantum circuit (i.e., a superconducting artificial atom) when the inversion symmetry of the potential energy is broken by simply changing the applied magnetic flux. In particular, we show that difference- and sum-frequencies (and second harmonics) can be generated in the microwave regime in a controllable manner by using a single three-level superconducting flux quantum circuit (SFQC). For our proposed parameters, the frequency tunability of this circuit can be achieved in the range of about 17 GHz for the sum-frequency generation, and around 42 GHz (or 26 GHz) for the difference-frequency generation. Our proposal provides a simple method to generate second-order nonlinear processes within current experimental parameters of SFQCs. PMID:25487352

  17. Laboratory measurements of microwave and millimeter-wave properties of planetary constituents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffes, Paul G.

    1990-01-01

    Accurate data on microwave and millimeter-wave properties of potential planetary atmospheric constituents is critical for the proper interpretation of radio occultation measurements, and of radio astronomical observations of both continuum and spectral line emissions. Such data is also needed to correct for atmospheric effects on radar studies of surface reflectivity. Since the refractive and absorptive properties of atmospheric constituents often vary drastically from theoretically predicted profiles, especially under the extreme conditions characteristic of the planetary atmosphere, laboratory measurements under simulated planetary conditions are required. The instrumentation and techniques used for laboratory measurement of the refractivity and absorptivity of atmospheric constituents at wavelengths longward of 1 mm, under simulated planetary conditions (temperature, pressure, and broadening gases) are reviewed. Techniques for measuring both gases and condensates are considered. Also reviewed are the relative accuracies of the various techniques. Laboratory measurements are reviewed which have already been made, and additional measurements which are needed for interpretation of data from Venus and the outer planets, are highlighted.

  18. The role of pump incoherence in continuous-wave supercontinuum generation.

    PubMed

    Vanholsbeeck, Frédérique; Martin-Lopez, Sonia; González-Herráez, Miguel; Coen, Stéphane

    2005-08-22

    Supercontinuum generation can be achieved in the continuous-wave regime with a few watts of pump power launched into kilometer-long fibers. High power spectral density broadband light sources can be obtained in this way. Using a generalized nonlinear Schrödinger equation model and an ensemble averaging procedure that takes into account the partially-coherent nature of the pump laser, we fully explain for the first time the spectral broadening mechanisms underlying this process. Our simulations and experiments confirm that continuous-wave supercontinuum generation involve Raman soliton dynamics and dispersive waves in a way akin to pulsed supercontinua. The Raman solitons are however generated with a wide distribution of parameters because they originate from the random phase and intensity fluctuations associated with the pump incoherence. This soliton distribution is averaged out by experimental measurements, which explains the remarkable smoothness of experimental continuous-wave supercontinuum spectra.

  19. Unusual continuous dual absorption peaks in Ca-doped BiFeO3 nanostructures for broadened microwave absorption.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhong-Jun; Hou, Zhi-Ling; Song, Wei-Li; Liu, Xing-Da; Cao, Wen-Qiang; Shao, Xiao-Hong; Cao, Mao-Sheng

    2016-05-21

    Electromagnetic absorption materials have received increasing attention owing to their wide applications in aerospace, communication and the electronics industry, and multiferroic materials with both polarization and magnetic properties are considered promising ceramics for microwave absorption application. However, the insufficient absorption intensity coupled with the narrow effective absorption bandwidth has limited the development of high-performance multiferroic materials for practical microwave absorption. To address such issues, in the present work, we utilize interfacial engineering in BiFeO3 nanoparticles via Ca doping, with the purpose of tailoring the phase boundary. Upon Ca-substitution, the co-existence of both R3c and P4mm phases has been confirmed to massively enhance both dielectric and magnetic properties via manipulating the phase boundary and the destruction of the spiral spin structure. Unlike the commonly reported magnetic/dielectric hybrid microwave absorption composites, Bi0.95Ca0.05FeO3 has been found to deliver unusual continuous dual absorption peaks at a small thickness (1.56 mm), which has remarkably broadened the effective absorption bandwidth (8.7-12.1 GHz). The fundamental mechanisms based on the phase boundary engineering have been discussed, suggesting a novel platform for designing advanced multiferroic materials with wide applications.

  20. Advances in nanomaterial-based microwaves and infrared wave-assisted tryptic digestion for ultrafast proteolysis and rapid detection by MALDI-MS.

    PubMed

    Kailasa, Suresh Kumar; Wu, Hui-Fen

    2014-01-01

    The unique physical/chemical properties of nanomaterials have significant impacts in electromagnetic waves (microwave and infrared waves)-assisted tryptic digestion approaches by using them as heat absorbers to expedite digestion and as affinity probes to enrich digested proteins prior to MALDI-MS analysis. We review recent developments in electromagnetic waves (microwaves and infrared waves)-assisted proteolysis using nanomaterials as heat absorbers and as affinity probes for analysis of digested proteins in MALDI-MS. New trends in ultrafast proteolysis (nonphosphoproteins- lysozyme, cytochrome c, myoglobin and bovine serum albumin (BSA); phosphoproteins- α- and β- caseins) using nanomaterials based microwaves and infrared (IR) waves assisted digestion approaches for rapid identification of digested proteins in the MALDI-MS.

  1. NOVEL MICROWAVE FILTER DESIGN TECHNIQUES.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    ELECTROMAGNETIC WAVE FILTERS, MICROWAVE FREQUENCY, PHASE SHIFT CIRCUITS, BANDPASS FILTERS, TUNED CIRCUITS, NETWORKS, IMPEDANCE MATCHING , LOW PASS FILTERS, MULTIPLEXING, MICROWAVE EQUIPMENT, WAVEGUIDE FILTERS, WAVEGUIDE COUPLERS.

  2. Neuronal Networks in Children with Continuous Spikes and Waves during Slow Sleep

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siniatchkin, Michael; Groening, Kristina; Moehring, Jan; Moeller, Friederike; Boor, Rainer; Brodbeck, Verena; Michel, Christoph M.; Rodionov, Roman; Lemieux, Louis; Stephani, Ulrich

    2010-01-01

    Epileptic encephalopathy with continuous spikes and waves during slow sleep is an age-related disorder characterized by the presence of interictal epileptiform discharges during at least greater than 85% of sleep and cognitive deficits associated with this electroencephalography pattern. The pathophysiological mechanisms of continuous spikes and…

  3. Study of a harmonic mode lock stability under external continuous-wave injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semaan, Georges; Komarov, Andrey; Salhi, Mohamed; Sanchez, François

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, we investigate experimentally the effect of an injected continuous external optical laser in a stable passive harmonic mode-locked fiber laser operating in the anomalous dispersion regime. Under specific conditions, the continuous-wave significantly increases the stability of the harmonic mode-locked regime. This occurs for a discrete set of wavelengths and below a critical injected power.

  4. 77 FR 3386 - Export and Reexport License Requirements for Certain Microwave and Millimeter Wave Electronic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-24

    ... mobility transistors and packaged microwave ``monolithic integrated circuits'' power amplifiers that meet... amplifiers that meet certain criteria with respect to frequency range, size and output power. That rule...

  5. Low-power continuous-wave four-wave mixing wavelength conversion in AlGaAs-nanowaveguide microresonators.

    PubMed

    Kultavewuti, Pisek; Pusino, Vincenzo; Sorel, Marc; Stewart Aitchison, J

    2015-07-01

    We experimentally demonstrate enhanced wavelength conversion in a Q∼7500 deeply etched AlGaAs-nanowaveguide microresonator via degenerate continuous-wave four-wave mixing with a pump power of 24 mW. The maximum conversion efficiency is -43  dB and accounts for 12 dB enhancement compared to that of a straight nanowaveguide. The experimental results and theoretical predictions agree very well and show optimized conversion efficiency of -15  dB. This work represents a step toward realizing a fully integrated optical devices for generating new optical frequencies.

  6. A two-stream plasma electron microwave source for high-power millimeter wave generation, phase 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guest, Gareth E.; Dandl, Raphael A.

    1989-03-01

    A novel high power millimeter/microwave source is proposed in which one or more pairs of interpenetrating streams of electrons, flowing through a background plasma in a static magnetic field are used to generate a hot-electron plasma that is confined in a mirror-like magnetic field. Energy stored in the anisotropic, hot-electron plasma is then used to amplify pulses of unstable plasma waves to large amplitude by selective deactivation of mechanisms that stabilize the hot-electron plasma during the energy accumulation phase when the density of hot electrons is rapidly increased through the beam-plasma interaction. The Phase 1 program has yielded a design for an experimental arrangement capable of verifying the key aspects of this novel source concept, as well as a theoretical framework for interpreting the empirical Phase 2 results produced by the experimental device and extrapolating those results to evaluate the suitability of the proposed source to meet the requirements of various high power microwave and millimeter wave defense and industrial applications. The experiments will be carried out in a timely and cost-effective way by employing the AMPHED (a CW magetic mirror) experimental facility at Applied Microwave Plasma Concepts (AMPC).

  7. Inspection Of Spray On Foam Insulation (SOFI) Using and Microwave and Millimeter Wave Synthetic Aperture Focusing and Holography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hepburn, F. L.; Case, J. T.; Zoughi, R.

    2006-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Columbia's catastrophic failure is thought to have been caused by a dislodged piece of external tank spray on foam insulation (SOFI) striking the left wing of the orbiter causing significant damage to some of the reinforced carbon/carbon leading edge wing panels [1]. Microwave and millimeter wave nondestructive evaluation methods have shown great potential for inspecting SOFI for the purpose of detecting anomalies such as small air voids that may cause separation of the SOFI from the external tank during a launch [2,3]. These methods are capable of producing relatively high-resolution images of the interior of SOFI. Although effective, there are some advantages in using synthetic focusing methods as opposed to real focusing methods such as reduced probe size, the ability to determine depth from multiple views, and the ability to slice images due to sufficient range resolution. To this end, synthetic aperture focusing techniques (SAFT) were first pursued for this purpose and later wide-band microwave holography was implemented [4-7]. This paper presents the results of this investigation using frequency domain synthetic aperture focusing technique (FD-SAFT) and wide-band microwave holography methods illustrating their potential capabilities for inspecting the space shuttle's SOFI at millimeter wave frequencies.

  8. Energy of hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic waves with point and continuous spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirota, M.; Fukumoto, Y.

    2008-08-01

    Energy of waves (or eigenmodes) in an ideal fluid and plasma is formulated in the noncanonical Hamiltonian context. By imposing the kinematical constraint on perturbations, the linearized Hamiltonian equation provides a formal definition of wave energy not only for eigenmodes corresponding to point spectra but also for singular ones corresponding to a continuous spectrum. The latter becomes dominant when mean fields have inhomogeneity originating from shear or gradient of the fields. The energy of each wave is represented by the eigenfrequency multiplied by the wave action, which is nothing but the action variable and, moreover, is associated with a derivative of a suitably defined dispersion relation. The sign of the action variable is crucial to the occurrence of Hopf bifurcation in Hamiltonian systems of finite degrees of freedom [M. G. Krein, Dokl. Akad. Nauk SSSR, Ser. A 73, 445 (1950)]. Krein's idea is extended to the case of coalescence between point and continuous spectra.

  9. Continuous leaky-wave scanning using periodically modulated spoof plasmonic waveguide

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Gu Sheng; Ma, Hui Feng; Cai, Ben Geng; Cui, Tie Jun

    2016-01-01

    The plasmonic waveguide made of uniform corrugated metallic strip can support and guide spoof surface plasmon polaritons (SSPPs) with high confinements. Here, we propose periodically-modulated plasmonic waveguide composed of non-uniform corrugated metallic strip to convert SSPPs to radiating waves, in which the main beam of radiations can steer continuously as the frequency changes. To increase the radiation efficiency of the periodically-modulated plasmonic waveguide at the broadside, an asymmetrical plasmonic waveguide is further presented to reduce the reflections and realize continuous leaky-wave scanning. Both numerical simulations and experimental results show that the radiation efficiency can be improved greatly and the main beam of leaky-wave radiations can steer from the backward quadrant to the forward quadrant, passing through the broadside direction, which generally is difficult to be realized by the common leaky-wave antennas. PMID:27404740

  10. Correction of walk-off-induced wavefront distortion for continuous-wave laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Hongxin; Chen, Guozhu; Wu, Yue; Shen, Yong; Liu, Qu

    2016-09-01

    We theoretically and experimentally investigate the wave front distortion in critically phase-matched continuous-wave (CW) second harmonic generation (SHG). Due to the walk-off effect in the nonlinear crystal, the generated second harmonic is extremely elliptical and quite non-Gaussian, which causes a very low matching and coupling efficiency in experiment. Cylindrical lenses and walk-off compensating crystals are adopted to correct distorted wave fronts, and obtain a good TEM00 mode efficiently. Theoretically, we simulate the correction effect of 266-nm laser generated with SHG. The experiment results accord well with the theoretical simulation and an above 80% TEM00 component is obtained for 266-nm continuous-wave laser with a 4.8°-walk-off angle in beta barium borate (BBO) crystal. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 91436103) and Research Programme of National University of Defense Technology, China (Grant No. JC15-02-03).

  11. Wide-Band Airborne Microwave and Millimeter-Wave Radiometers to Provide High-Resolution Wet-Tropospheric Path Delay Corrections for Coastal and Inland Water Altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reising, Steven C.; Kangaslahti, Pekka; Brown, Shannon T.; Tanner, Alan B.; Padmanabhan, Sharmila; Parashare, Chaitali; Montes, Oliver; Dawson, Douglas E.; Gaier, Todd C.; Khayatian, Behrouz; Bosch-Lluis, Xavier; Nelson, Scott P.; Johnson, Thaddeus; Hadel, Victoria; Gilliam, Kyle L.; Razavi, Behzad

    2013-04-01

    Current satellite ocean altimeters include nadir-viewing, co-located 18-34 GHz microwave radiometers to measure wet-tropospheric path delay. Due to the area of the surface instantaneous fields of view (IFOV) at these frequencies, the accuracy of wet path retrievals is substantially degraded near coastlines, and retrievals are not provided over land. Retrievals are flagged as not useful about 40 km from the world's coastlines. A viable approach to improve their capability is to add wide-band millimeter-wave window channels at 90 to 170 GHz, yielding finer spatial resolution for a fixed antenna size. In addition, NASA's Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) mission in formulation (Phase A) is planned for launch in late 2020. The primary objectives of SWOT are to characterize ocean sub-mesoscale processes on 10-km and larger scales in the global oceans, and to measure the global water storage in inland surface water bodies and the flow rate of rivers. Therefore, an important new science objective of SWOT is to transition satellite radar altimetry into the coastal zone. The addition of millimeter-wave channels near 90, 130 and 166 GHz to current Jason-class radiometers is expected to improve retrievals of wet-tropospheric delay in coastal areas and to enhance the potential for over-land retrievals. The Ocean Surface Topography Science Team Meeting recommended in 2012 to add these millimeter-wave channels to the Jason Continuity of Service (CS) mission. To reduce the risks associated with wet-tropospheric path delay correction over coastal areas and fresh water bodies, we are developing an airborne radiometer with 18.7, 23.8 and 34.0 GHz microwave channels, as well as millimeter-wave window channels at 90, 130 and 166 GHz, and temperature sounding above 118 as well as water vapor sounding below 183 GHz for validation of wet-path delay. For nadir-viewing space-borne radiometers with no moving parts, two-point internal calibration sources are necessary, and the

  12. Rotational spectroscopy and three-wave mixing of 4-carvomenthenol: A technical guide to measuring chirality in the microwave regime

    SciTech Connect

    Shubert, V. Alvin; Schmitz, David; Medcraft, Chris; Krin, Anna; Patterson, David; Doyle, John M.; Schnell, Melanie

    2015-06-07

    We apply chirality sensitive microwave three-wave mixing to 4-carvomenthenol, a molecule previously uncharacterized with rotational spectroscopy. We measure its rotational spectrum in the 2-8.5 GHz range and observe three molecular conformers. We describe our method in detail, from the initial step of spectral acquisition and assignment to the final step of determining absolute configuration and enantiomeric excess. Combining fitted rotational constants with dipole moment components derived from quantum chemical calculations, we identify candidate three-wave mixing cycles which were further tested using a double resonance method. Initial optimization of the three-wave mixing signal is done by varying the duration of the second excitation pulse. With known transition dipole matrix elements, absolute configuration can be directly determined from a single measurement.

  13. Symmetric and asymmetric optical multipeak solitons on a continuous wave background in the femtosecond regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chong; Yang, Zhan-Ying; Zhao, Li-Chen; Duan, Liang; Yang, Guangye; Yang, Wen-Li

    2016-10-01

    We study symmetric and asymmetric optical multipeak solitons on a continuous wave background in the femtosecond regime of a single-mode fiber. Key characteristics of such multipeak solitons, such as the formation mechanism, propagation stability, and shape-changing collisions, are revealed in detail. Our results show that this multipeak (symmetric or asymmetric) mode could be regarded as a single pulse formed by a nonlinear superposition of a periodic wave and a single-peak (W-shaped or antidark) soliton. In particular, a phase diagram for different types of nonlinear excitations on a continuous wave background, including the unusual multipeak soliton, the W-shaped soliton, the antidark soliton, the periodic wave, and the known breather rogue wave, is established based on the explicit link between exact solution and modulation instability analysis. Numerical simulations are performed to confirm the propagation stability of the multipeak solitons with symmetric and asymmetric structures. Further, we unveil a remarkable shape-changing feature of asymmetric multipeak solitons. It is interesting that these shape-changing interactions occur not only in the intraspecific collision (soliton mutual collision) but also in the interspecific interaction (soliton-breather interaction). Our results demonstrate that each multipeak soliton exhibits the coexistence of shape change and conservation of the localized energy of a light pulse against the continuous wave background.

  14. Symmetric and asymmetric optical multipeak solitons on a continuous wave background in the femtosecond regime.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chong; Yang, Zhan-Ying; Zhao, Li-Chen; Duan, Liang; Yang, Guangye; Yang, Wen-Li

    2016-10-01

    We study symmetric and asymmetric optical multipeak solitons on a continuous wave background in the femtosecond regime of a single-mode fiber. Key characteristics of such multipeak solitons, such as the formation mechanism, propagation stability, and shape-changing collisions, are revealed in detail. Our results show that this multipeak (symmetric or asymmetric) mode could be regarded as a single pulse formed by a nonlinear superposition of a periodic wave and a single-peak (W-shaped or antidark) soliton. In particular, a phase diagram for different types of nonlinear excitations on a continuous wave background, including the unusual multipeak soliton, the W-shaped soliton, the antidark soliton, the periodic wave, and the known breather rogue wave, is established based on the explicit link between exact solution and modulation instability analysis. Numerical simulations are performed to confirm the propagation stability of the multipeak solitons with symmetric and asymmetric structures. Further, we unveil a remarkable shape-changing feature of asymmetric multipeak solitons. It is interesting that these shape-changing interactions occur not only in the intraspecific collision (soliton mutual collision) but also in the interspecific interaction (soliton-breather interaction). Our results demonstrate that each multipeak soliton exhibits the coexistence of shape change and conservation of the localized energy of a light pulse against the continuous wave background.

  15. Generation of whistler waves by continuous HF heating of the upper ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vartanyan, A.; Milikh, G. M.; Eliasson, B. E.; Sharma, A.; Chang, C.; Parrot, M.; Papadopoulos, K.

    2013-12-01

    We report observations of VLF waves by the DEMETER satellite overflying the HAARP facility during ionospheric heating experiments. The detected VLF waves were in the range 8-17 kHz and coincided with times of continuous heating. The experiments indicate whistler generation due to conversion of artificial lower hybrid waves to whistlers on small scale field-aligned plasma density striations. The observations are compared with theoretical models, taking into account both linear and nonlinear processes. Implications of the mode conversion technique on VLF generation with subsequent injection into the radiation belts to trigger particle precipitation are discussed.

  16. Inspection of Spray on Foam Insulation (SOFI) Using Microwave and Millimeter Wave Synthetic Aperture Focusing and Holography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Case, J. T.; Hepburn, F. L.; Zoughi, R.

    2006-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Columbia s catastrophic failure is thought to have been caused by a dislodged piece of external tank spray on foam insulation (SOFI) striking and significantly damaging the left wing of the orbiter, which may have been due to a flawed section of SOFI. Microwave and millimeter wave nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods have shown great potential detecting anomalies in SOFI such as small air voids using a horn and lens in a (real) focused configuration. Synthetic focusing methods may also be used to detect air voids in SOFI and may additionally offer the ability to locate the defect in three dimensions. To this end, two different methods were investigated; namely, frequency domain synthetic aperture focusing technique (FD-SAFT) and wide-band microwave holography. To illustrate the performance of these methods they were applied to two different SOFI samples. The results of these investigations demonstrate the capabilities of these methods for SOFI inspection.

  17. Continuous-wave optical parametric source for terahertz waves tunable from 1 to 4.5 THz frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kießling, Jens; Buse, Karsten; Vodopyanov, Konstantin L.; Breunig, Ingo

    2014-02-01

    We demonstrate the continuous-wave operation of a cascade that has been successfully applied so far only for picosecond systems: A doubly-resonant optical-parametric oscillator (OPO) based on lithium niobate generates signal and idler waves close to degeneracy. Subsequently, these two light fields are converted to a terahertz wave via difference frequency mixing in an orientation-patterned gallium arsenide crystal placed inside the OPO cavity. Using this scheme, we achieved tunability from 1 to 4:5 THz frequency, a linewidth smaller than 10 MHz, and a Gaussian beam profile. The output power is of the order of tens of μW, with a scalability into the milliwatt regime.

  18. Continuous spike and waves during sleep and electrical status epilepticus in sleep.

    PubMed

    Loddenkemper, Tobias; Fernández, Iván Sánchez; Peters, Jurriaan M

    2011-04-01

    Continuous spike and waves during sleep is an age-related epileptic encephalopathy that presents with neurocognitive regression, seizures, and an EEG pattern of electrical status epilepticus during sleep. Patients usually present around 5 years of age with infrequent nocturnal unilateral motor seizures that progress within 1 to 2 years to a severe epileptic encephalopathy with frequent seizures of different types, marked neurocognitive regression, and an almost continuous spike-wave EEG pattern during slow-wave sleep. The pathophysiology of continuous spike and waves during sleep is not completely understood, but the corticothalamic neuronal network involved in physiologic oscillating patterns of sleep is thought to be switched into a pathologic discharging mode. Early developmental injury and/or genetic predisposition may play a role in the potentiation of age-related hyperexcitability in the immature brain. A better understanding of the mechanisms leading to electrical status epilepticus during sleep may provide additional therapeutic targets that can improve the outcome of seizures, EEG pattern, and cognitive development in patients with continuous spike and waves during sleep.

  19. Forward volume wave microwave envelope solitons in yttrium iron garnet thin films: Peak profiles and multisoliton signatures (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsankov, M. A.; Chen, M.; Patton, C. E.

    1994-05-01

    Microwave envelope solitons have been observed in yttrium iron garnet (YIG) films for different field configurations and surface pinning conditions. Earlier work on magnetostatic forward volume wave (MSFVW) solitons in YIG films has focused on the break from the low power linear dependence of the output pulse peak power Pout on input pulse power Pin,1 or on the evolution of the shape of the microwave pulse envelope with increasing power.2 In this work, both (1) the nonlinear dependence of Pout on Pin and (2) the shape of the output pulses for MSFVW solitons have been examined over a wide range of power levels and pulse widths. The experiments used 7.2-μm-thick single crystal YIG films with unpinned surface spins. A field of 3744 Oe was applied perpendicular to the plane of a 15×2 mm film sample. Microwave pulses at 5.4-6 GHz, with a width τ of 5-50 ns and peak powers up to 3 W, were launched by a microstrip antenna about 5 mm from one end and picked up by a second, parallel antenna about 5 mm from the other end. Data were processed with a microwave transition analyzer operated in a time domain mode. For a given pulse width, the initial break and nonlinear increase in Pout relative to Pin noted in Ref. 1 is followed by a gradual leveling off in Pout at high power. For a given pulse power above soliton threshold, the Pout versus τ profiles show an initial linear increase which is followed by a decrease and an oscillatory response as multiple solitons are formed. These profiles are directly correlated with the formation of a single soliton pulse which evolves into multiple soliton wave packets with increasing either power or pulse length.

  20. Microwaves and Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xia; Huang, Wen-Juan; Chen, Wei-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's diseases (AD) is the most common type of dementia and a neurodegenerative disease that occurs when the nerve cells in the brain die. The cause and treatment of AD remain unknown. However, AD is a disease that affects the brain, an organ that controls behavior. Accordingly, anything that can interact with the brain may affect this organ positively or negatively, thereby protecting or encouraging AD. In this regard, modern life encompasses microwaves for all issues including industrial, communications, medical and domestic tenders, and among all applications, the cell phone wave, which directly exposes the brain, continues to be the most used. Evidence suggests that microwaves may produce various biological effects on the central nervous system (CNS) and many arguments relay the possibility that microwaves may be involved in the pathophysiology of CNS disease, including AD. By contrast, previous studies have reported some beneficial cognitive effects and that microwaves may protect against cognitive impairment in AD. However, although many of the beneficial effects of microwaves are derived from animal models, but can easily be extrapolated to humans, whether microwaves cause AD is an important issue that is to be addressed in the current review. PMID:27698682

  1. Microwaves and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xia; Huang, Wen-Juan; Chen, Wei-Wei

    2016-10-01

    Alzheimer's diseases (AD) is the most common type of dementia and a neurodegenerative disease that occurs when the nerve cells in the brain die. The cause and treatment of AD remain unknown. However, AD is a disease that affects the brain, an organ that controls behavior. Accordingly, anything that can interact with the brain may affect this organ positively or negatively, thereby protecting or encouraging AD. In this regard, modern life encompasses microwaves for all issues including industrial, communications, medical and domestic tenders, and among all applications, the cell phone wave, which directly exposes the brain, continues to be the most used. Evidence suggests that microwaves may produce various biological effects on the central nervous system (CNS) and many arguments relay the possibility that microwaves may be involved in the pathophysiology of CNS disease, including AD. By contrast, previous studies have reported some beneficial cognitive effects and that microwaves may protect against cognitive impairment in AD. However, although many of the beneficial effects of microwaves are derived from animal models, but can easily be extrapolated to humans, whether microwaves cause AD is an important issue that is to be addressed in the current review.

  2. Time-of-Flight Microwave Camera.

    PubMed

    Charvat, Gregory; Temme, Andrew; Feigin, Micha; Raskar, Ramesh

    2015-10-05

    Microwaves can penetrate many obstructions that are opaque at visible wavelengths, however microwave imaging is challenging due to resolution limits associated with relatively small apertures and unrecoverable "stealth" regions due to the specularity of most objects at microwave frequencies. We demonstrate a multispectral time-of-flight microwave imaging system which overcomes these challenges with a large passive aperture to improve lateral resolution, multiple illumination points with a data fusion method to reduce stealth regions, and a frequency modulated continuous wave (FMCW) receiver to achieve depth resolution. The camera captures images with a resolution of 1.5 degrees, multispectral images across the X frequency band (8 GHz-12 GHz), and a time resolution of 200 ps (6 cm optical path in free space). Images are taken of objects in free space as well as behind drywall and plywood. This architecture allows "camera-like" behavior from a microwave imaging system and is practical for imaging everyday objects in the microwave spectrum.

  3. Calculation of s-Wave Resonances by Means of Analytical Continuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horáček, Jiří; Ledvinka, Tomáš; Brožek, Pavel

    2010-09-01

    Calculation of s-wave resonances by means of the analytical continuation in the coupling constant is a difficult problem because the position of the critical bifurcation point is unknown. Here we propose a new variant of the method of analytical continuation which avoids this problem completely. The method is applied to a model case which allows for accurate determination of the input data. It is shown that very precise resonance parameters can be obtained in this way.

  4. Crude Oil Remote Sensing, Characterization and Cleaning with ContinuousWave and Pulsed Lasers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-23

    fiber bundles for the detection and monitoring of the laser -induced oil degradation in pipes.. Both continuous wave (CW) and pulsed lasers are tested...curved surfaces of. We use coherent fiber bundles for the detection and monitoring of the laser -induced oil degradation in pipes.. Both continuous... fibers . Laser evaporated volatile fractions will be removed by air pumps and the condensate may be used for further analyses. Coherent fringe

  5. Microwave and Millimeter Wave Forward Modeling Results from the 2004 North Slope of Alaska Arctic Winter Radiometric Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Westwater, E.R.; Cimini, D.; Klein, M.; Leuski, V.; Mattioli, V.; Gasiewski, A.J.; Dowlatshahi, S.; Liljegren, J.S.; Lesht, B.M.; Shaw, J.A.

    2005-03-18

    The 2004 Arctic Winter Radiometric Experiment was conducted at the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program field site near Barrow, Alaska from March 9 to April 9, 2004. The goals of the experiment were: to study the microwave and millimeter wave radiometric response to water vapor and clouds during cold and dry conditions; to obtain data for forward model studies at frequencies ranging from 22.235 to 400 GHz, to demonstrate new Environmental Technology Laboratory's (ETL) radiometric receiver and calibration technology and to compare both radiometric and in situ measurements of water vapor.

  6. Low-power continuous-wave nonlinear optics in doped silica glass integrated waveguide structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrera, M.; Razzari, L.; Duchesne, D.; Morandotti, R.; Yang, Z.; Liscidini, M.; Sipe, J. E.; Chu, S.; Little, B. E.; Moss, D. J.

    2008-12-01

    Photonic integrated circuits are a key component of future telecommunication networks, where demands for greater bandwidth, network flexibility, and low energy consumption and cost must all be met. The quest for all-optical components has naturally targeted materials with extremely large nonlinearity, including chalcogenide glasses and semiconductors, such as silicon and AlGaAs (ref. 4). However, issues such as immature fabrication technology for chalcogenide glass and high linear and nonlinear losses for semiconductors motivate the search for other materials. Here we present the first demonstration of nonlinear optics in integrated silica-based glass waveguides using continuous-wave light. We demonstrate four-wave mixing, with low (5 mW) continuous-wave pump power at λ = 1,550 nm, in high-index, doped silica glass ring resonators. The low loss, design flexibility and manufacturability of our device are important attributes for low-cost, high-performance, nonlinear all-optical photonic integrated circuits.

  7. Bright squeezed-light generation by a continuous-wave semimonolithic parametric amplifier.

    PubMed

    Schneider, K; Bruckmeier, R; Hansen, H; Schiller, S; Mlynek, J

    1996-09-01

    Continuous-wave amplitude-squeezed light at 1064 nm has been generated with excellent long-term stability by use of a dual-port type I degenerate optical parametric amplifier pumped by a frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser. A seed wave at 1064 nm is resonantly injected through the low-transmission cavity port, whereas the parametrically deamplified and squeezed output wave is extracted from the high-transmission port. Amplitude noise reduction of as much as 4.3 dB is observed directly at an output power of 0.15 mW. Stable noise suppression exceeding 3.8 dB is obtained for several hours by phase locking of the pump wave. The longterm stability and simplicity make this device suitable for sub-shot-noise metrology.

  8. Continuous-variable Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen paradox with traveling-wave second-harmonic generation

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, M.K.

    2004-09-01

    The Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen paradox and quantum entanglement are at the heart of quantum mechanics. Here we show that single-pass traveling-wave second-harmonic generation can be used to demonstrate both entanglement and the paradox with continuous variables that are analogous to the position and momentum of the original proposal.

  9. Continuous-wave 193.4 nm laser with 120 mW output power.

    PubMed

    Sakuma, Jun; Kaneda, Yushi; Oka, Naoya; Ishida, Takayuki; Moriizumi, Koichi; Kusunose, Haruhiko; Furukawa, Yasunori

    2015-12-01

    This Letter describes an all-solid-state continuous-wave, deep-ultraviolet coherent source that generates more than 100 mW of output power at 193.4 nm. The source is based on nonlinear frequency conversion of three single-frequency infrared fiber laser master-oscillator power-amplifier (MOPA) light sources.

  10. Radio frequency interference effects of continuous wave signals on telemetry data, part 2. [Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Low, P. W.

    1979-01-01

    The results of radio frequency interference tests and the derived telemetry bit SNR degradation model, which includes the telemetry data rate and the telemetry data power as independent variables for characterizing the continuous wave interference effects on telemetry data, are presented. The telemetry bit SNR degradation model was implemented in the second version of the Deep Space Interference Prediction software.

  11. Access to small size distributions of nanoparticles by microwave-assisted synthesis. Formation of Ag nanoparticles in aqueous carboxymethylcellulose solutions in batch and continuous-flow reactors.

    PubMed

    Horikoshi, Satoshi; Abe, Hideki; Torigoe, Kanjiro; Abe, Masahiko; Serpone, Nick

    2010-08-01

    This article examines the effect(s) of the 2.45-GHz microwave (MW) radiation in the synthesis of silver nanoparticles in aqueous media by reduction of the diaminesilver(i) complex, [Ag(NH(3))(2)](+), with carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) in both batch-type and continuous-flow reactor systems with a particular emphasis on the characteristics of the microwaves in this process and the size distributions. This microwave thermally-assisted synthesis is compared to a conventional heating (CH) method, both requiring a reaction temperature of 100 degrees C to produce the nanoparticles, in both cases leading to the formation of silver colloids with different size distributions. Reduction of the diaminesilver(i) precursor complex, [Ag(NH(3))(2)](+), by CMC depended on the solution temperature. Cooling the reactor during the heating process driven with 390-Watt microwaves (MW-390W/Cool protocol) yielded silver nanoparticles with sizes spanning the range 1-2 nm. By contrast, the size distribution of Ag nanoparticles with 170-Watt microwaves (no cooling; MW-170W protocol) was in the range 1.4-3.6 nm (average size approximately 3 nm). The overall results suggest the potential for a scale-up process in the microwave-assisted synthesis of nanoparticles. Based on the present data, a flow-through microwave reactor system is herein proposed for the continuous production of silver nanoparticles. The novel flow reactor system (flow rate, 600 mL min(-1)) coupled to 1200-Watt microwave radiation generated silver nanoparticles with a size distribution 0.7-2.8 nm (average size ca. 1.5 nm).

  12. Structural and Microwave Properties of Silica Xerogel Glass-Ceramic Sintered by Sub-millimeter Wave Heating using a Gyrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aripin, H.; Mitsudo, S.; Prima, E. S.; Sudiana, I. N.; Tani, S.; Sako, K.; Fujii, Y.; Saito, T.; Idehara, T.; Sano, S.; Sunendar, B.; Sabchevski, S.

    2012-11-01

    In this paper, we present and discuss experimental results from a microwave sintering of silica glass-ceramics, produced from amorphous silica xerogel extracted from sago waste ash. As a radiation source for a microwave heating a sub-millimeter wave gyrotron (Gyrotron FU CW I) with an output frequency of 300 GHz has been used. The powders of the amorphous silica xerogel have been dry pressed and then sintered at temperatures ranging from 300 °C to 1200 °C. Microwave absorbing properties of the sintered samples were investigated by measuring the dielectric constant, the dielectric loss, and the reflection loss at different frequencies in the interval from 8.2 to 12.4 GHz. Furthermore, the characteristics of the formation process for producing silica glass-ceramics were studied using a Raman Spectroscopy and a Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The results indicate that the samples sintered at 1200 °C are characterized by lower reflection losses and a better transparency due to the formation of a fully crystallized silica glass- ceramic at sufficiently high temperature.

  13. PRIMORDIAL GRAVITATIONAL WAVE DETECTABILITY WITH DEEP SMALL-SKY COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND EXPERIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Farhang, M.; Bond, J. R.; Netterfield, C. B.; Dore, O.

    2013-07-01

    We use the Bayesian estimation on direct T - Q - U cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization maps to forecast errors on the tensor-to-scalar power ratio r, and hence on primordial gravitational waves, as a function of sky coverage f{sub sky}. This map-based likelihood filters the information in the pixel-pixel space into the optimal combinations needed for r detection for cut skies, providing enhanced information over a first-step linear separation into a combination of E, B, and mixed modes, and ignoring the latter. With current computational power and for typical resolutions appropriate for r detection, the large matrix inversions required are accurate and fast. Our simulations explore two classes of experiments, with differing bolometric detector numbers, sensitivities, and observational strategies. One is motivated by a long duration balloon experiment like Spider, with pixel noise {proportional_to}{radical}(f{sub sky}) for a specified observing period. This analysis also applies to ground-based array experiments. We find that, in the absence of systematic effects and foregrounds, an experiment with Spider-like noise concentrating on f{sub sky} {approx} 0.02-0.2 could place a 2{sigma}{sub r} Almost-Equal-To 0.014 boundary ({approx}95% confidence level), which rises to 0.02 with an l-dependent foreground residual left over from an assumed efficient component separation. We contrast this with a Planck-like fixed instrumental noise as f{sub sky} varies, which gives a Galaxy-masked (f{sub sky} = 0.75) 2{sigma}{sub r} Almost-Equal-To 0.015, rising to Almost-Equal-To 0.05 with the foreground residuals. Using as the figure of merit the (marginalized) one-dimensional Shannon entropy of r, taken relative to the first 2003 WMAP CMB-only constraint, gives -2.7 bits from the 2012 WMAP9+ACT+SPT+LSS data, and forecasts of -6 bits from Spider (+ Planck); this compares with up to -11 bits for CMBPol, COrE, and PIXIE post-Planck satellites and -13 bits for a perfectly

  14. Above room temperature continuous wave operation of a broad-area quantum-cascade laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semtsiv, M. P.; Masselink, W. T.

    2016-11-01

    We describe the design and implementation of a broad-area (w ≈ 30 μm) quantum-cascade laser operating in a continuous wave mode up to heat-sink temperatures beyond +100 °C. The room-temperature emission wavelength is 4.6 μm. The temperature gradient in the active region of such a wide laser stripe is essentially perpendicular to the epitaxial layers and the resulting steady-state active region temperature offset scales approximately with the square of the number of cascades. With only 10 cascades in the active region, the threshold electrical power density in the current quantum-cascade laser in the continuous-wave mode is as low as Vth × Ith = 3.8 V × 0.9 kA/cm2 = 3.4 kW/cm2 at room temperature for 2 mm-long two-side high-reflectivity coated laser stripe. A 4 mm-long one-side high-reflectivity coated laser stripe delivers in continuous-wave mode above 0.6 W at +20 °C and above 1.3 W at -27 °C (cooled with a single-stage Peltier element). A 2 mm-long two-side high-reflectivity coated laser stripe demonstrates continuous-wave lasing up to at least +102 °C (375 K). The thermal conductance, Gth, ranges between 235 W/K cm2 and 140 W/K cm2 for temperatures between -33 °C and +102 °C. This demonstration opens the route for continuous-wave power scaling of quantum-cascade lasers via broad-area laser ridges.

  15. Optimizing a microwave gas ion source for continuous-flow accelerator mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    von Reden, K F; Roberts, M L; Burton, J R; Beaupré, S R

    2012-02-01

    A 2.45 GHz microwave ion source coupled with a magnesium charge exchange canal (C × C) has been successfully adapted to a large acceptance radiocarbon accelerator mass spectrometry system at the National Ocean Sciences Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) Facility, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. CO(2) samples from various preparation sources are injected into the source through a glass capillary at 370 μl∕min. Routine system parameters are about 120-140 μA of negative (12)C current after the C × C, leading to about 400 (14)C counts per second for a modern sample and implying a system efficiency of 0.2%. While these parameters already allow us to perform high-quality AMS analyses on large samples, we are working on ways to improve the output of the ion source regarding emittance and efficiency. Modeling calculations suggest modifications in the extraction triode geometry, shape, and size of the plasma chamber could improve emittance and, hence, ion transport efficiency. Results of experimental tests of these modifications are presented.

  16. A fiber-based quasi-continuous-wave quantum key distribution system

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yong; Chen, Yan; Zou, Hongxin; Yuan, Jianmin

    2014-01-01

    We report a fiber-based quasi-continuous-wave (CW) quantum key distribution (QKD) system with continuous variables (CV). This system employs coherent light pulses and time multiplexing to maximally reduce cross talk in the fiber. No-switching detection scheme is adopted to optimize the repetition rate. Information is encoded on the sideband of the pulsed coherent light to fully exploit the continuous wave nature of laser field. With this configuration, high secret key rate can be achieved. For the 50 MHz detected bandwidth in our experiment, when the multidimensional reconciliation protocol is applied, a secret key rate of 187 kb/s can be achieved over 50 km of optical fiber against collective attacks, which have been shown to be asymptotically optimal. Moreover, recently studied loopholes have been fixed in our system. PMID:24691409

  17. First all-sky search for continuous gravitational waves from unknown sources in binary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aasi, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T.; Abernathy, M. R.; Accadia, T.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Alemic, A.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Amariutei, D.; Andersen, M.; Anderson, R.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C.; Areeda, J.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Austin, L.; Aylott, B. E.; Babak, S.; Baker, P. T.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barbet, M.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Bauchrowitz, J.; Bauer, Th. S.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Beker, M. G.; Belczynski, C.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C.; Bergmann, G.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Beyersdorf, P. T.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Biscans, S.; Bitossi, M.; Bizouard, M. A.; Black, E.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, D.; Bloemen, S.; Blom, M.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bogan, C.; Bond, C.; Bondu, F.; Bonelli, L.; Bonnand, R.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Boschi, V.; Bose, Sukanta; Bosi, L.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Bridges, D. O.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brückner, F.; Buchman, S.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Burman, R.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Campsie, P.; Cannon, K. C.; Canuel, B.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Carbognani, F.; Carbone, L.; Caride, S.; Castiglia, A.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Celerier, C.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C.; Cesarini, E.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Chow, J.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, S. S. Y.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C.; Colombini, M.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M.; Conte, A.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cordier, M.; Cornish, N.; Corpuz, A.; Corsi, A.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Dahl, K.; Dal Canton, T.; Damjanic, M.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Dattilo, V.; Daveloza, H.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; Dayanga, T.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dereli, H.; Dergachev, V.; De Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Donath, A.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Dossa, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Dwyer, S.; Eberle, T.; Edo, T.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Endrőczi, G.; Essick, R.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fairhurst, S.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Feldbaum, D.; Feroz, F.; Ferrante, I.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Finn, L. S.; Fiori, I.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fournier, J.-D.; Franco, S.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frede, M.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gair, J.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S.; Garufi, F.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, C.; Gleason, J.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gordon, N.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S.; Goßler, S.; Gouaty, R.; Gräf, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grover, K.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guido, C.; Gushwa, K.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hammer, D.; Hammond, G.; Hanke, M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, J.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Harstad, E. D.; Hart, M.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C.-J.; Haughian, K.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Holt, K.; Hooper, S.; Hopkins, P.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y.; Huerta, E.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh, M.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isogai, T.; Ivanov, A.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacobson, M.; James, E.; Jang, H.; Jaranowski, P.; Ji, Y.; Jiménez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; K, Haris; Kalmus, P.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Karlen, J.; Kasprzack, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, H.; Kawabe, K.; Kawazoe, F.; Kéfélian, F.; Keiser, G. M.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kells, W.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kim, C.; Kim, K.; Kim, N.; Kim, N. G.; Kim, Y.-M.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Klimenko, S.; Kline, J.; Koehlenbeck, S.; Kokeyama, K.; Kondrashov, V.; Koranda, S.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D. B.; Kremin, A.; Kringel, V.; Krishnan, B.; Królak, A.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, A.; Kumar, P.; Kumar, R.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Kwee, P.; Landry, M.; Lantz, B.; Larson, S.; Lasky, P. D.; Lawrie, C.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lebigot, E. O.; Lee, C.-H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Lee, J.; Leonardi, M.; Leong, J. R.; Le Roux, A.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Levine, B.; Lewis, J.; Li, T. G. F.; Libbrecht, K.; Libson, A.; Lin, A. C.; Littenberg, T. B.; Litvine, V.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lockett, V.; Lodhia, D.; Loew, K.; Logue, J.; Lombardi, A. L.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J.; Lubinski, M. J.; Lück, H.; Luijten, E.; Lundgren, A. P.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; Macarthur, J.; Macdonald, E. P.; MacDonald, T.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magana-Sandoval, F.; Mageswaran, M.; Maglione, C.; Mailand, K.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Manca, G. M.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mangini, N.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markosyan, A.; Maros, E.; Marque, J.; Martelli, F.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Martinelli, L.; Martynov, D.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Matzner, R. A.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; Mazzolo, G.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McLin, K.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Mehmet, M.; Meidam, J.; Meinders, M.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Meyers, P.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Milde, S.; Miller, J.; Minenkov, Y.; Mingarelli, C. M. F.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moe, B.; Moesta, P.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morgado, N.; Morriss, S. R.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, C. L.; Mueller, G.; Mukherjee, S.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D.; Murray, P. G.; Mytidis, A.; Nagy, M. F.; Nanda Kumar, D.; Nardecchia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Nayak, R. K.; Necula, V.; Nelemans, G.; Neri, I.; Neri, M.; Newton, G.; Nguyen, T.; Nitz, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E. N.; Nuttall, L. K.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Oppermann, P.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Osthelder, C.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Padilla, C.; Pai, A.; Palashov, O.; Palomba, C.; Pan, H.; Pan, Y.; Pankow, C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoletti, R.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Pedraza, M.; Penn, S.; Perreca, A.; Phelps, M.; Pichot, M.; Pickenpack, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Poeld, J.; Poggiani, R.; Poteomkin, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Premachandra, S.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Privitera, S.; Prix, R.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Qin, J.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E.; Quiroga, G.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Rácz, I.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rajalakshmi, G.; Rakhmanov, M.; Ramet, C.; Ramirez, K.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Re, V.; Read, J.; Reed, C. M.; Regimbau, T.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Rhoades, E.; Ricci, F.; Riles, K.; Robertson, N. A.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rodruck, M.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Romano, R.; Romanov, G.; Romie, J. H.; Rosińska, D.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.; Salemi, F.; Sammut, L.; Sandberg, V.; Sanders, J. R.; Sannibale, V.; Santiago-Prieto, I.; Saracco, E.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Savage, R.; Scheuer, J.; Schilling, R.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schreiber, E.; Schuette, D.; Schutz, B. F.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Shaddock, D.; Shah, S.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaltev, M.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Sidery, T. L.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Simakov, D.; Singer, A.; Singer, L.; Singh, R.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Slutsky, J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, M.; Smith, R. J. E.; Smith-Lefebvre, N. D.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Souradeep, T.; Sperandio, L.; Staley, A.; Stebbins, J.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Stephens, B. C.; Steplewski, S.; Stevenson, S.; Stone, R.; Stops, D.; Strain, K. A.; Straniero, N.; Strigin, S.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Susmithan, S.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B.; Tacca, M.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taylor, R.; ter Braack, A. P. M.; Thirugnanasambandam, M. P.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Tomlinson, C.; Toncelli, A.; Tonelli, M.; Torre, O.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Tse, M.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Urbanek, K.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; Vallisneri, M.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.; van der Putten, S.; van der Sluys, M. V.; van Heijningen, J.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vass, S.; Vasúth, M.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Verkindt, D.; Verma, S. S.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Vincent-Finley, R.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyachanin, S. P.; Wade, A.; Wade, L.; Wade, M.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Ward, R. L.; Was, M.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L.-W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Welborn, T.; Wen, L.; Wessels, P.; West, M.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; White, D. J.; Whiting, B. F.; Wiesner, K.; Wilkinson, C.; Williams, K.; Williams, L.; Williams, R.; Williams, T.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wiseman, A. G.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Worden, J.; Yablon, J.; Yakushin, I.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yang, H.; Yang, Z.; Yoshida, S.; Yvert, M.; ZadroŻny, A.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J.-P.; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, L.; Zhao, C.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zuraw, S.; Zweizig, J.; LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    We present the first results of an all-sky search for continuous gravitational waves from unknown spinning neutron stars in binary systems using LIGO and Virgo data. Using a specially developed analysis program, the TwoSpect algorithm, the search was carried out on data from the sixth LIGO science run and the second and third Virgo science runs. The search covers a range of frequencies from 20 Hz to 520 Hz, a range of orbital periods from 2 to ˜2,254 h and a frequency- and period-dependent range of frequency modulation depths from 0.277 to 100 mHz. This corresponds to a range of projected semimajor axes of the orbit from ˜0.6×10-3 ls to ˜6,500 ls assuming the orbit of the binary is circular. While no plausible candidate gravitational wave events survive the pipeline, upper limits are set on the analyzed data. The most sensitive 95% confidence upper limit obtained on gravitational wave strain is 2.3×10-24 at 217 Hz, assuming the source waves are circularly polarized. Although this search has been optimized for circular binary orbits, the upper limits obtained remain valid for orbital eccentricities as large as 0.9. In addition, upper limits are placed on continuous gravitational wave emission from the low-mass x-ray binary Scorpius X-1 between 20 Hz and 57.25 Hz.

  18. Continuous particle focusing in a waved microchannel using negative dc dielectrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ming; Li, Shunbo; Cao, Wenbin; Li, Weihua; Wen, Weijia; Alici, Gursel

    2012-09-01

    We present a waved microchannel for continuous focusing of microparticles and cells using negative direct current (dc) dielectrophoresis. The waved channel is composed of consecutive s-shaped curved channels in series to generate an electric field gradient required for the dielectrophoretic effect. When particles move electrokinetically through the channel, the experienced negative dielectrophoretic forces alternate directions within two adjacent semicircular microchannels, leading to a focused continuous-flow stream along the channel centerline. Both the experimentally observed and numerically simulated results of the focusing performance are reported, which coincide acceptably in proportion to the specified dimensions (i.e. inlet and outlet of the waved channel). How the applied electric field, particle size and medium concentration affect the performance was studied by focusing polystyrene microparticles of varying sizes. As an application in the field of biology, the focusing of yeast cells in the waved mcirochannel was tested. This waved microchannel shows a great potential for microflow cytometry applications and is expected to be widely used before different processing steps in lab-on-a-chip devices with integrated functions.

  19. Synthesis, growth and characterization of ZnO microtubes using a traveling-wave mode microwave system

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Naser, Qusay A.H.; Zhou, Jian; Wang, Han; Liu, Guizhen; Wang, Lin

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • ZnO microtubes were successfully synthesized within 15 min. • Introducing a design of a traveling-wave mode microwave system. • Growth temperature of ZnO microtubes becomes predominant between 1350 °C and 1400 °C. • ZnO microtube showed a strong ultraviolet and a weak and broad green emission. • ZnO microtube is composed only of ZnO with high crystallinity. - Abstract: Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) investigation reveals that zinc oxide (ZnO) microtubes have been successfully synthesized via a traveling-wave mode microwave system. These products are hexagonal tubular crystals with an average diameter of 60 μm and 250 μm in length, having a well faceted end and side surfaces. The wall thickness of the ZnO tubes is about 3–5 μm. The influence of reaction temperature on the formation of crystalline ZnO hexagonal tubes is studied. Room temperature photoluminescence (PL) spectra have also been examined to explore the optical property which exhibits strong ultraviolet emission at 377.422 nm and a weak and broad green emission band at 587.548 nm. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) show that the product is composed only of ZnO with high crystallinity. The presented synthesis method possesses several advantages, which would be significant to the deeper study and wide applications of ZnO tubes in the future.

  20. Supercontinuum generation using continuous-wave multiwavelength pumping and dispersion management.

    PubMed

    Sylvestre, Thibaut; Vedadi, Armand; Maillotte, Hervé; Vanholsbeeck, Frédérique; Coen, Stéphane

    2006-07-01

    We experimentally demonstrate that continuous-wave supercontinuum generation in optical fibers can be significantly enhanced by using both multiwavelength pumping and dispersion management. We show by detailed spectral analysis that continuum enhancement is achieved mainly through a combination of Raman-assisted modulation instabilities, soliton compression, and dispersive wave generation. With this technique, an 800 nm wide (from 1.2 to 2.0 microm) 2 W supercontinuum source is reported that uses a three-wavelength pump and a dispersion-tailored four-optical fibers arrangement.

  1. Continuous wave operation of quantum cascade lasers with frequency-shifted feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Lyakh, A.; Barron-Jimenez, R.; Dunayevskiy, I.; Go, R.; Tsvid, G.; Patel, C. Kumar N.

    2016-01-15

    Operation of continuous wave quantum cascade lasers with a frequency-shifted feedback provided by an acousto-optic modulator is reported. Measured linewidth of 1.7 cm{sup −1} for these devices, under CW operating conditions, was in a good agreement with predictions of a model based on frequency-shifted feedback seeded by spontaneous emission. Linewidth broadening was observed for short sweep times, consistent with sound wave grating period variation across the illuminated area on the acousto-optic modulator. Standoff detection capability of the AOM-based QCL setup was demonstrated for several solid materials.

  2. Generation of solitary waves from continuous radiation in a nonlinear oppositely directed coupler

    SciTech Connect

    Kazantseva, E V; Maimistov, A I

    2015-12-31

    We consider a nonlinear coupler formed by two tunnelcoupled waveguides, one waveguide being made of a conventional dielectric and the other – of a negative-index material. The possibility of the formation of solitary waves from continuous radiation having a constant intensity is shown provided that the radiation is coupled into the input of a negative-index coupler channel (on the back side of the waveguide system). With increasing intensity of the input light, the speed and amplitude of the generated solitary waves increase and the period of their formation is reduced. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  3. On-line continuous sampling dynamic microwave-assisted extraction coupled with high performance liquid chromatographic separation for the determination of lignans in Wuweizi and naphthoquinones in Zicao.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shiqian; You, Jingyan; Wang, Ying; Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Hanqi

    2012-03-01

    The on-line continuous sampling dynamic microwave-assisted extraction (on-line CSDMAE) coupled with high-performance liquid chromatographic separation and determination of the lignans in Wuweizi and naphthoquinones in Zicao was developed. The extraction, separation and determination of target analytes were simultaneously carried out. The experimental parameters, including type of extraction solvent, microwave extraction power, solvent flow rate, amount of sample and particle size of the sample, were evaluated by the univariate method and orthogonal screening. The detection limits for schisandrin A, schisantherin A, deoxyschizandrin, shikonin and β,β'-dimethylacrylshikonin are 0.86, 0.90, 0.27, 0.42 and 0.92 μg mL⁻¹, respectively. Compared with the conventional extraction methods, such as off-line continuous microwave-assisted extraction, ultrasound-assisted extraction and Soxhlet extraction, the proposed method is quicker and more effective.

  4. Continuous-wave whispering-gallery optical parametric oscillator for high-resolution spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Werner, Christoph S; Buse, Karsten; Breunig, Ingo

    2015-03-01

    We achieve a continuous operation of a whispering gallery optical parametric oscillator by stabilizing the resonator temperature T on the mK level and simultaneously locking the pump frequency to a cavity resonance using the Pound-Drever-Hall technique. The millimeter-sized device converts several mW of a pump wave at 1040 nm wavelength to signal and idler waves around 2000 nm wavelength with more than 50% efficiency. Over 1 h, power and frequency of the signal wave vary by <±1% and by <±25  MHz, respectively. The latter can be tuned over 480 MHz without a mode hop by changing T over 120 mK. In order to prove the suitability for high-resolution spectroscopy, we scan the signal frequency across the resonance of a Fabry-Perot interferometer resolving nicely its 10 MHz linewidth.

  5. Continuous-wave Lyman-alpha generation with solid-state lasers.

    PubMed

    Scheid, Martin; Kolbe, Daniel; Markert, Frank; Hänsch, Theodor W; Walz, Jochen

    2009-07-06

    A coherent continuous-wave Lyman-alpha source based on four-wave sum-frequency mixing in mercury vapor has been realized with solid-state lasers. The third-order nonlinear susceptibility is enhanced by the 6(1)S - 7(1)S two-photon resonance and the near 6(1)S-6(3)P one-photon resonance. The phase matching curve for this four-wave mixing scheme is observed for the first time. In addition we investigate the two-photon enhancement of the Lyman-alpha yield and observe that the maxima of Lyman-alpha generation are shifted compared to the two-photon resonances of the different isotopes.

  6. Microwave determination of location and speed of an object inside a pipe

    DOEpatents

    Sinha, Dipen N.

    2010-12-14

    Apparatus and method are described for measuring the location and speed of an object, such as instrumentation on a movable platform, disposed within a pipe, using continuous-wave, amplitude-modulated microwave radiation.

  7. Stable indications of relic gravitational waves in Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe data and forecasts for the Planck mission

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, W.; Baskaran, D.; Grishchuk, L. P.

    2009-10-15

    The relic gravitational waves are the cleanest probe of the violent times in the very early history of the Universe. They are expected to leave signatures in the observed cosmic microwave background anisotropies. We significantly improved our previous analysis [W. Zhao, D. Baskaran, and L. P. Grishchuk, Phys. Rev. D 79, 023002 (2009)] of the 5-year WMAP TT and TE data at lower multipoles l. This more general analysis returned essentially the same maximum likelihood result (unfortunately, surrounded by large remaining uncertainties): The relic gravitational waves are present and they are responsible for approximately 20% of the temperature quadrupole. We identify and discuss the reasons by which the contribution of gravitational waves can be overlooked in a data analysis. One of the reasons is a misleading reliance on data from very high multipoles l and another a too narrow understanding of the problem as the search for B modes of polarization, rather than the detection of relic gravitational waves with the help of all correlation functions. Our analysis of WMAP5 data has led to the identification of a whole family of models characterized by relatively high values of the likelihood function. Using the Fisher matrix formalism we formulated forecasts for Planck mission in the context of this family of models. We explore in detail various 'optimistic', 'pessimistic', and 'dream case' scenarios. We show that in some circumstances the B-mode detection may be very inconclusive, at the level of signal-to-noise ratio S/N=1.75, whereas a smarter data analysis can reveal the same gravitational wave signal at S/N=6.48. The final result is encouraging. Even under unfavorable conditions in terms of instrumental noises and foregrounds, the relic gravitational waves, if they are characterized by the maximum likelihood parameters that we found from WMAP5 data, will be detected by Planck at the level S/N=3.65.

  8. OPTIMAL STRATEGIES FOR CONTINUOUS GRAVITATIONAL WAVE DETECTION IN PULSAR TIMING ARRAYS

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, J. A.; Siemens, X.; Creighton, J. D. E.

    2012-09-10

    Supermassive black hole binaries (SMBHBs) are expected to emit a continuous gravitational wave signal in the pulsar timing array (PTA) frequency band (10{sup -9} to 10{sup -7} Hz). The development of data analysis techniques aimed at efficient detection and characterization of these signals is critical to the gravitational wave detection effort. In this paper, we leverage methods developed for LIGO continuous wave gravitational searches and explore the use of the F-statistic for such searches in pulsar timing data. Babak and Sesana have used this approach in the context of PTAs to show that one can resolve multiple SMBHB sources in the sky. Our work improves on several aspects of prior continuous wave search methods developed for PTA data analysis. The algorithm is implemented fully in the time domain, which naturally deals with the irregular sampling typical of PTA data and avoids spectral leakage problems associated with frequency domain methods. We take into account the fitting of the timing model and have generalized our approach to deal with both correlated and uncorrelated colored noise sources. We also develop an incoherent detection statistic that maximizes over all pulsar-dependent contributions to the likelihood. To test the effectiveness and sensitivity of our detection statistics, we perform a number of Monte Carlo simulations. We produce sensitivity curves for PTAs of various configurations and outline an implementation of a fully functional data analysis pipeline. Finally, we present a derivation of the likelihood maximized over the gravitational wave phases at the pulsar locations, which results in a vast reduction of the search parameter space.

  9. Analysis of S Wave Propagation Through a Nonlinear Joint with the Continuously Yielding Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Zhen; Sheng, Qian; Leng, Xianlun

    2017-01-01

    Seismic wave propagation through joints that are embedded in a rock mass is a critical issue for aseismic issues of underground rock engineering. Few studies have investigated nonlinear joints with a continuously yielding model. In this paper, a time-domain recursive method (TDRM) for an S wave across a nonlinear Mohr-Coulomb (MC) slip model is extended to a continuously yielding (CY) model. Verification of the TDRM-based results is conducted by comparison with the simulated results via a built-in model of 3DEC code. Using parametric studies, the effect of normal stress level, amplitude of incident wave, initial joint shear stiffness, and joint spacing is discussed and interpreted for engineering applications because a proper in situ stress level (overburden depth) and acceptable quality of surrounding rock mass are beneficial for seismic stability issues of underground rock excavation. Comparison between the results from the MC model and the CY model is presented both for an idealized impulse excitation and a real ground motion record. Compared with the MC model, complex joint behaviors, such as tangential stiffness degradation, normal stress dependence, and the hysteresis effect, that occurred in the wave propagation can be described with the CY model. The MC model seems to underestimate the joint shear displacement in a high normal stress state and in a real ground motion excitation case.

  10. Note: A latched comparator circuit for triggering continuous-wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasheed, Abdur; Curtis, Daniel B.

    2013-06-01

    Continuous-wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy offers several advantages over cavity ring-down spectroscopy with a pulsed laser, such as a higher repetition rate and decreased cost. However, the continuous-wave technique requires a more complicated experimental setup because the laser must be switched off rapidly when the intensity is high in order to observe a ring-down event. This note describes an inexpensive and simple latched comparator circuit that can be used to detect light intensity above a threshold value and send a signal to rapidly steer the beam out of the cavity and initiate a ring-down event. The latch eliminates switching noise by preventing the comparator from switching during the ring-down event.

  11. Methylphenidate and continuous spike and wave during sleep in a child with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

    PubMed

    Sheen, Volney L; Shankar, Maithreyi; Marin-Valencia, Isaac; Bridgemohan, Carolyn H; Torres, Alcy R

    2013-07-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder is the most common neurobehavioral disorder in children and frequently associated with epilepsy. For patients with both conditions, methylphenidate remains a mainstay in the treatment of behavioral problems. Most studies demonstrate that methylphenidate is effective in treating children with well-controlled epilepsy, and that methylphenidate does not increase the risk of having seizures in patients with EEG abnormalities without epilepsy. However, in patients with active seizures, the results are somewhat contradictory. This article presents the case of a young girl with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and behavioral problems on Depakote (valproic acid) who had an abnormal EEG with left centroparietal spikes but no history of electrographic seizures. She experienced a convulsion the day after her first dose of methylphenidate, and repeat EEG demonstrated continuous spike and slow wave during sleep. This case report suggests that children with continuous spike and slow wave during sleep may have a higher risk of developing seizures with methylphenidate treatment.

  12. Frequency-tunable continuous-wave terahertz sources based on GaAs plasmonic photomixers

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Shang-Hua; Jarrahi, Mona

    2015-09-28

    We present frequency-tunable, continuous-wave terahertz sources based on GaAs plasmonic photomixers, which offer high terahertz radiation power levels at 50% radiation duty cycle. The use of plasmonic contact electrodes enhances photomixer quantum efficiency while maintaining its ultrafast operation by concentrating a large number of photocarriers in close proximity to the device contact electrodes. Additionally, the relatively high thermal conductivity and high resistivity of GaAs allow operation under high optical pump power levels and long duty cycles without reaching the thermal breakdown limit of the photomixer. We experimentally demonstrate continuous-wave terahertz radiation with a radiation frequency tuning range of more than 2 THz and a record-high radiation power of 17 μW at 1 THz through plasmonic photomixers fabricated on a low temperature grown GaAs substrate at 50% radiation duty cycle.

  13. [Language and learning disorders in epilepsy with continuous spike-waves during slow sleep].

    PubMed

    Billard-Daudu, C

    2001-01-01

    Efficacy of antiepileptic drugs in children with epilepsy is usually evaluated on the basis of reduction in seizure frequency. However, in a number of cases, the effect of a drug in reducing EEG paroxysmal activity should be considered. This applies particularly to Landau-Kleffner syndrome and to the syndrome of continuous spike-waves during slow sleep. In developmental language disorders, EEG paroxysmal activity is present in almost 30% of the cases. Paroxysmal abnormalities are usually less frequent than what is observed in epilepsy with continuous spike-waves during slow sleep. Pathogenesis remains unknown and the relationship between EEG evolution and language improvement is not as clear as in Landau-Kleffner syndrome.

  14. Low-power continuous-wave generation of visible harmonics in silicon photonic crystal nanocavities.

    PubMed

    Galli, Matteo; Gerace, Dario; Welna, Karl; Krauss, Thomas F; O'Faolain, Liam; Guizzetti, Giorgio; Andreani, Lucio Claudio

    2010-12-06

    We present the first demonstration of frequency conversion by simultaneous second- and third-harmonic generation in a silicon photonic crystal nanocavity using continuous-wave optical excitation. We observe a bright dual wavelength emission in the blue/green (450-525 nm) and red (675-790 nm) visible windows with pump powers as low as few microwatts in the telecom bands, with conversion efficiencies of ∼ 10 (-5) /W and ∼ 10/ W(2) for the second- and third-harmonic, respectively. Scaling behaviors as a function of pump power and cavity quality-factor are demonstrated for both second- and third order processes. Successful comparison of measured and calculated emission patterns indicates that third-harmonic is a bulk effect while second-harmonic is a surface-related effect at the sidewall holes boundaries. Our results are promising for obtaining practical low-power, continuous-wave and widely tunable multiple harmonic generation on a silicon chip.

  15. Epileptic encephalopathy with continuous spike and wave during sleep associated to periventricular leukomalacia.

    PubMed

    De Grandis, Elisa; Mancardi, Maria Margherita; Carelli, Valentina; Carpaneto, Manuela; Morana, Giovanni; Prato, Giulia; Mirabelli-Badenier, Marisol; Pinto, Francesca; Veneselli, Edvige; Baglietto, Maria Giuseppina

    2014-11-01

    Periventricular leukomalacia is the most common type of brain injury in premature infants. Our aim is to describe the frequency and the features of epilepsy in a single-center population of 137 children with periventricular leukomalacia. Forty-two of the 137 (31%) patients presented epilepsy. Twelve percent of these patients presented West syndrome, whereas 19% showed a pattern of continuous spike-waves during slow sleep syndrome. In the latter group, outcome was frequently unfavorable, with a greater number of seizures and more drug resistance. A significant association was found between epilepsy and neonatal seizures, spastic tetraplegia, and mental retardation. Although less common than in other forms of brain injury, epilepsy is nevertheless a significant complication in children with periventricular leukomalacia. The fairly frequent association with continuous spike-waves during slow sleep syndrome deserves particular attention: electroencephalographic sleep monitoring is important in order to provide early treatment and prevent further neurologic deterioration.

  16. Continuous auroral activity related to high speed streams with interplaneraty ALFV&N wave trains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guarnieri, Fernando L.; Tsurutani, Bruce T.; Gonzalez, Walter D.; Kamide, Yosuke; Zhou, Xiaoyan

    2004-01-01

    We discuss a type of intense magnetospheric/auroral activity that is not always substorms: High-Intensity, Long-Duration, Continuous AE Activity (HILDCAA) events, which occur during high speed solar wind streams. The high speed streams contain large-amplitude, nonlinear Alfvtn waves. Analyses of POLAR UV images, demonstrate that the AE increases/AL decreases in HILDCAAs are not always substorm expansion phases (although some substorms may occur). The associated auroral W energy deposition is throughout a continuous (360') auroral oval. During some image intervals, the dayside aurora is the most remarkable feature. Our hypothesis is that solar wind energy transfer from the solar wind to the magnetosphere/ionosphere is primarily directly driven due to the finite wavelength Alfv6n waves and the rapid dBz/dt variability.

  17. Microwave absorbance properties of zirconium–manganese substituted cobalt nanoferrite as electromagnetic (EM) wave absorbers

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Kishwar Rehman, Sarish

    2014-02-01

    Highlights: • Good candidates for EM materials with low reflectivity. • Good candidates for broad bandwidth at microwave frequency. • Microwave absorbing bandwidth was modulated simply by manipulating the Zr–Mn. • Higher the Zr–Mn content, the higher absorption rates for the electromagnetic radiation. • The predicted reflection loss shows that this can be used for thin ferrite absorber. - Abstract: Nanocrystalline Zr–Mn (x) substituted Co ferrite having chemical formula CoFe{sub 2−2x}Zr{sub x}Mn{sub x}O{sub 4} (x = 0.1–0.4) was prepared by co-precipitation technique. Combining properties such as structural, electrical, magnetic and reflection loss characteristics. Crystal structure and surface morphology of the calcined samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). By using two point probe homemade resistivity apparatus to find resistivity of the sample. Electromagnetic (EM) properties are measured through RF impedance/materials analyzer over 1 MHz–3 GHz. The room-temperature dielectric measurements show dispersion behavior with increasing frequency from 100 Hz to 3 MHz. Magnetic properties confirmed relatively strong dependence of saturation magnetization on Zr–Mn composition. Curie temperature is also found to decrease linearly with addition of Zr–Mn. Furthermore, comprehensive analysis of microwave reflection loss (RL) is carried out as a function of substitution, frequency, and thickness. Composition accompanying maximum microwave absorption is suggested.

  18. 77 FR 1017 - Export and Reexport License Requirements for Certain Microwave and Millimeter Wave Electronic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-09

    ... ``monolithic integrated circuits'' power amplifiers that meet certain criteria with respect to frequency range... have uses in military radar systems as well as in civilian radar and telecommunications systems. The U... transistors (HEMT) and packaged microwave ``monolithic integrated circuits'' (MMIC) power amplifiers. The...

  19. Fabrication of novel structures to enhance the performance of microwave, millimeter wave and optical radiators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gbele, Kokou

    full depletion-recovery cycle in the nonequilibrium state. The third part discusses work in the microwave and millimeter wave frequency regimes. A new method to fabricate Luneburg lenses was proposed and demonstrated. This type of lens is well known; it is versatile and has been used for many applications, including high power radars, satellite communications, and remote sensing systems. Because the fabrication of such a lens requires intricate and time consuming processes, we demonstrated the design, fabrication and testing of a Luneburg lens prototype using a 3-D printing rapid prototyping technique both at the X and Ka-V frequency bands. The measured results were in very good agreement with their simulated values. The fabricated X-band lens had a 12 cm diameter and produced a beam having a maximum gain of 20 dB and a beam directivity (half-power beam width (HPBW)) ranging from 12° to 19°). The corresponding Ka-V band lens had a 7 cm diameter; it produced a beam with a HPBW about the same as the X-band lens, but with a maximum gain of more than 20 dB.

  20. Characterization of a Continuous Wave Laser for Resonance Ionization Mass Spectroscopy Analysis in Nuclear Forensics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    elements of concern. While current systems incorporate pulsed lasers for analysis of debris from nuclear detonation , the possibility exists to consider...nuclear detonation . The current approach to ionize uranium and plutonium uses three Ti-Sapphire pulsed lasers capable of a fundamental wavelength...pulsed lasers for analysis of debris from nuclear detonation , the possibility exists to consider using continuous wave, or CW lasers RIMS has the

  1. High performance superconducting radio frequency ingot niobium technology for continuous wave applications

    SciTech Connect

    Dhakal, Pashupati Ciovati, Gianluigi Myneni, Ganapati R.

    2015-12-04

    Future continuous wave (CW) accelerators require the superconducting radio frequency cavities with high quality factor and medium accelerating gradients (≤20 MV/m). Ingot niobium cavities with medium purity fulfill the specifications of both accelerating gradient and high quality factor with simple processing techniques and potential reduction in cost. This contribution reviews the current superconducting radiofrequency research and development and outlines the potential benefits of using ingot niobium technology for CW applications.

  2. Fourier Deconvolution Methods for Resolution Enhancement in Continuous-Wave EPR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Reed, George H; Poyner, Russell R

    2015-01-01

    An overview of resolution enhancement of conventional, field-swept, continuous-wave electron paramagnetic resonance spectra using Fourier transform-based deconvolution methods is presented. Basic steps that are involved in resolution enhancement of calculated spectra using an implementation based on complex discrete Fourier transform algorithms are illustrated. Advantages and limitations of the method are discussed. An application to an experimentally obtained spectrum is provided to illustrate the power of the method for resolving overlapped transitions.

  3. Single-photon-state generation from a continuous-wave nondegenerate optical parametric oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, Anne E. B.; Moelmer, Klaus

    2007-02-15

    We present a theoretical treatment of conditional preparation of one-photon states from a continuous-wave nondegenerate optical parametric oscillator. We obtain an analytical expression for the output state Wigner function, and we maximize the one-photon state fidelity by varying the temporal mode function of the output state. We show that a higher production rate of high fidelity Fock states is obtained if we condition the outcome on dark intervals around trigger photo detection events.

  4. Comparison between pulsed terahertz time-domain imaging and continuous wave terahertz imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpowicz, Nicholas; Zhong, Hua; Xu, Jingzhou; Lin, Kuang-I.; Hwang, Jenn-Shyong; Zhang, X.-C.

    2005-07-01

    We report an evaluation of pulsed terahertz (THz) time-domain measurement and continuous wave (CW) terahertz measurement for non-destructive testing applications. The strengths and limitations of the modalities are explored via the example of the detection of defects in space shuttle foam insulation. It is decided that CW imaging allows for a more compact and simple system, while pulsed measurements yield a broader range of information.

  5. Interlaminar damage of carbon fiber reinforced polymer composite laminate under continuous wave laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yan-Chi; Wu, Chen-Wu; Huang, Yi-Hui; Song, Hong-Wei; Huang, Chen-Guang

    2017-01-01

    The interlaminar damages were investigated on the carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite laminate under laser irradiation. Firstly, the laminated T700/BA9916 composites were exposed to continuous wave laser irradiation. Then, the interface cracking patterns of such composite laminates were examined by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Finally, the Finite Element Analysis (FEA) was performed to compute the interface stress of the laminates under laser irradiation. And the effects of the laser parameters on the interlaminar damage were discussed.

  6. Neuronal networks in children with continuous spikes and waves during slow sleep.

    PubMed

    Siniatchkin, Michael; Groening, Kristina; Moehring, Jan; Moeller, Friederike; Boor, Rainer; Brodbeck, Verena; Michel, Christoph M; Rodionov, Roman; Lemieux, Louis; Stephani, Ulrich

    2010-09-01

    Epileptic encephalopathy with continuous spikes and waves during slow sleep is an age-related disorder characterized by the presence of interictal epileptiform discharges during at least >85% of sleep and cognitive deficits associated with this electroencephalography pattern. The pathophysiological mechanisms of continuous spikes and waves during slow sleep and neuropsychological deficits associated with this condition are still poorly understood. Here, we investigated the haemodynamic changes associated with epileptic activity using simultaneous acquisitions of electroencephalography and functional magnetic resonance imaging in 12 children with symptomatic and cryptogenic continuous spikes and waves during slow sleep. We compared the results of magnetic resonance to electric source analysis carried out using a distributed linear inverse solution at two time points of the averaged epileptic spike. All patients demonstrated highly significant spike-related positive (activations) and negative (deactivations) blood oxygenation-level-dependent changes (P < 0.05, family-wise error corrected). The activations involved bilateral perisylvian region and cingulate gyrus in all cases, bilateral frontal cortex in five, bilateral parietal cortex in one and thalamus in five cases. Electrical source analysis demonstrated a similar involvement of the perisylvian brain regions in all patients, independent of the area of spike generation. The spike-related deactivations were found in structures of the default mode network (precuneus, parietal cortex and medial frontal cortex) in all patients and in caudate nucleus in four. Group analyses emphasized the described individual differences. Despite aetiological heterogeneity, patients with continuous spikes and waves during slow sleep were characterized by activation of the similar neuronal network: perisylvian region, insula and cingulate gyrus. Comparison with the electrical source analysis results suggests that the activations

  7. Improvement of sensitivity in continuous wave near infra-red spectroscopy systems by using silicon photomultipliers

    PubMed Central

    Pagano, Roberto; Libertino, Sebania; Sanfilippo, Delfo; Fallica, Giorgio; Lombardo, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    We experimentally analyze the signal-to-noise ratio of continuous wave (CW) near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) reflectance systems based on light emitting diodes and silicon photomultipliers for high performance low cost NIRS biomedical systems. We show that under suitable experimental conditions such systems exhibit a high SNR, which allows an SDS of 7 cm, to our knowledge the largest ever demonstrated in a CW-NIRs system. PMID:27486551

  8. Generation of surface-wave microwave microplasmas in hollow-core photonic crystal fiber based on a split-ring resonator.

    PubMed

    Vial, Florian; Gadonna, Katell; Debord, Benoît; Delahaye, Frédéric; Amrani, Foued; Leroy, Olivier; Gérôme, Frédéric; Benabid, Fetah

    2016-05-15

    We report on a new and highly compact scheme for the generation and sustainment of microwave-driven plasmas inside the core of an inhibited coupling Kagome hollow-core photonic crystal fiber. The microwave plasma generator consists of a split-ring resonator that efficiently couples the microwave field into the gas-filled fiber. This coupling induces the concomitant generation of a microwave surface wave at the fiber core surround and a stable plasma column confined in the fiber core. The scheme allowed the generation of several centimeters long argon microplasma columns with a very low excitation power threshold. This result represents an important step toward highly compact plasma lasers or plasma-based photonic components.

  9. Decreased oscillation threshold of a continuous-wave OPO using a semiconductor gain mirror.

    PubMed

    Siltanen, Mikael; Leinonen, Tomi; Halonen, Lauri

    2011-09-26

    We have constructed a singly resonant, continuous-wave optical parametric oscillator, where the signal beam resonates and is amplified by a semiconductor gain mirror. The gain mirror can significantly decrease the oscillation threshold compared to an identical system with conventional mirrors. The largest idler beam tuning range reached by changing the pump laser wavelength alone is from 3.6 to 4.7 µm. The single mode output power is limited but can be continuously scanned for at least 220 GHz by adding optical components in the oscillator cavity for increased stability.

  10. Multiple-frequency continuous wave ultrasonic system for accurate distance measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, C. F.; Young, M. S.; Li, Y. C.

    1999-02-01

    A highly accurate multiple-frequency continuous wave ultrasonic range-measuring system for use in air is described. The proposed system uses a method heretofore applied to radio frequency distance measurement but not to air-based ultrasonic systems. The method presented here is based upon the comparative phase shifts generated by three continuous ultrasonic waves of different but closely spaced frequencies. In the test embodiment to confirm concept feasibility, two low cost 40 kHz ultrasonic transducers are set face to face and used to transmit and receive ultrasound. Individual frequencies are transmitted serially, each generating its own phase shift. For any given frequency, the transmitter/receiver distance modulates the phase shift between the transmitted and received signals. Comparison of the phase shifts allows a highly accurate evaluation of target distance. A single-chip microcomputer-based multiple-frequency continuous wave generator and phase detector was designed to record and compute the phase shift information and the resulting distance, which is then sent to either a LCD or a PC. The PC is necessary only for calibration of the system, which can be run independently after calibration. Experiments were conducted to test the performance of the whole system. Experimentally, ranging accuracy was found to be within ±0.05 mm, with a range of over 1.5 m. The main advantages of this ultrasonic range measurement system are high resolution, low cost, narrow bandwidth requirements, and ease of implementation.

  11. Generation of continuous-wave 194 nm laser for mercury ion optical frequency standard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Hongxin; Wu, Yue; Chen, Guozhu; Shen, Yong; Liu, Qu; Precision measurement; atomic clock Team

    2015-05-01

    194 nm continuous-wave (CW) laser is an essential part in mercury ion optical frequency standard. The continuous-wave tunable radiation sources in the deep ultraviolet (DUV) region of the spectrum is also serviceable in high-resolution spectroscopy with many atomic and molecular lines. We introduce a scheme to generate continuous-wave 194 nm radiation with SFM in a Beta Barium Borate (BBO) crystal here. The two source beams are at 718 nm and 266 nm, respectively. Due to the property of BBO, critical phase matching (CPM) is implemented. One bow-tie cavity is used to resonantly enhance the 718 nm beam while the 266 nm makes a single pass, which makes the configuration easy to implement. Considering the walk-off effect in CPM, the cavity mode is designed to be elliptical so that the conversion efficiency can be promoted. Since the 266 nm radiation is generated by a 532 nm laser through SHG in a BBO crystal with a large walk-off angle, the output mode is quite non-Gaussian. To improve mode matching, we shaped the 266 nm beam into Gaussian modes with a cylindrical lens and iris diaphragm. As a result, 2.05 mW 194 nm radiation can be generated. As we know, this is the highest power for 194 nm CW laser using SFM in BBO with just single resonance. The work is supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 91436103 and No. 11204374).

  12. Dynamic acousto-elastic test using continuous probe wave and transient vibration to investigate material nonlinearity.

    PubMed

    Eiras, J N; Vu, Q A; Lott, M; Payá, J; Garnier, V; Payan, C

    2016-07-01

    This study demonstrates the feasibility of the dynamic acousto-elastic effect of a continuous high frequency wave for investigating the material nonlinearity upon transient vibration. The approach is demonstrated on a concrete sample measuring 15×15×60cm(3). Two ultrasonic transducers (emitter and receiver) are placed at its middle span. A continuous high frequency wave of 500kHz propagates through the material and is modulated with a hammer blow. The position of the hammer blow on the sample is configured to promote the first bending mode of vibration. The use of a continuous wave allows discrete time extraction of the nonlinear behavior by a short-time Fourier transform approach, through the simultaneous comparison of a reference non-modulated signal and an impact-modulated signal. The hammer blow results in phase shifts and variations of signal amplitude between reference and perturbed signals, which are driven by the resonant frequency of the sample. Finally, a comprehensive analysis of the relaxation mechanisms (modulus and attenuation recovery) is conducted to untangle the coupled fast and slow hysteretic effects.

  13. Matched Template Signal Processing for Continuous Wave Laser Tracking of Space Debris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raj, S.; Ward, R.; Roberts, L.; Fleddermann, R.; Francis, S.; McClellend, D.; Shaddock, D.; Smith, C.

    2016-09-01

    The build up of space junk in Earth's orbit space is a growing concern as it shares the same orbit as many currently active satellites. As the number of objects increase in these orbits, the likelihood of collisions between satellites and debris will increase [1]. The eventual goal is to be able to maneuver space debris to avoid such collisions. We at SERC aim to accomplish this by using ground based laser facilities that are already being used to track space debris orbit. One potential method to maneuver space debris is using continuous wave lasers and applying photon pressure on the debris and attempt to change the orbit. However most current laser ranging facilities operates using pulsed lasers where a pulse of light is sent out and the time taken for the pulse to return back to the telescope is measured after being reflected by the target. If space debris maneuvering is carried out with a continuous wave laser then two laser sources need to be used for ranging and maneuvering. The aim of this research is to develop a laser ranging system that is compatible with the continuous wave laser; using the same laser source to simultaneously track and maneuver space debris. We aim to accomplish this by modulating the outgoing laser light with pseudo random noise (PRN) codes, time tagging the outgoing light, and utilising a matched filter at the receiver end to extract the various orbital information of the debris.

  14. Batch and continuous flow preparation of Hantzsch 1,4-dihydropyridines under microwave heating and simultaneous real-time monitoring by Raman spectroscopy. An exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Christiaens, Sylvain; Vantyghem, Xavier; Radoiu, Marilena; Vanden Eynde, Jean Jacques

    2014-07-09

    Dialkyl 1,4-dihydro-2,6-dimethylpyridine-3,5-dicarboxylates have been prepared in a batch mode under conventional heating as well as under continuous flow conditions in the Miniflow 200SS, Sairem's microwave-assisted batch and continuous flow equipment. Real-time monitoring of the reactions by Raman spectroscopy enabled to compare both heating modes and to determine (optimized) reaction times.

  15. Application of Near-Field Microwave and Millimeter Wave Nondestructive Testing for Evaluation of Fiber Breakage and Orientation Evaluation in CFRP Composite Patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharkovsky, S.; Zoughi, R.

    2005-04-01

    Near-field microwave and millimeter wave nondestructive testing and evaluation techniques have been successfully used for detecting defects such as disbond and delamination in complex composite structures. This paper presents the results of fiber breakage detection and fiber orientation determination in carbon fiber reinforced polymer patches which are used in aerospace industry and civil infrastructure.

  16. Feasibility of aseptic processing of a low-acid multiphase food product (salsa con queso) using a continuous flow microwave system.

    PubMed

    Kumar, P; Coronel, P; Simunovic, J; Sandeep, K P

    2007-04-01

    Aseptic processing of a low-acid multiphase food product using a continuous flow microwave heating system can combine the advantages of an aseptic process along with those of microwave heating. Dielectric properties of 2 different brands of 1 such product (salsa con queso) were measured under continuous flow conditions at a temperature range of 20 to 130 degrees C. At 915 MHz, the dielectric constant ranged from 58.7 at 20 degrees C to 41.3 at 130 degrees C with dielectric loss factor ranging from 41.0 at 20 degrees C to 145.5 at 130 degrees C. The loss tangent at 915 MHz ranged from 0.61 at 20 degrees C to 3.52 at 130 degrees C. The temperature profiles at the outlet during processing of salsa con queso in a 5-kW microwave unit showed a narrow temperature distribution between the center and the wall of the tube. The study showed the feasibility of aseptic processing of salsa con queso using a continuous flow microwave system.

  17. Reflection of Microwave Pulses From Acoustic Waves: Summary of Experimental and Computational Studies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-31

    Braden Shielding Systems) at the aperture of the antenna . No significant difference can be seen between the two cases. The combination of ferrite tiles...and pyramidal ferrite absorbers that was used provides a broad range of power absorption in the frequency range of the antenna . Therefore, these results...acoustic wave front. 1 2 EXPERIMENTAL SET-UP The guiding wave structure is a TEM half plane antenna , as shown in Figure 1. An electromagnetic wave is

  18. Design and microwave test of an ultrawideband input/output structure for sheet beam travelling wave tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Guoxiang; Wang, Jianxun; Liu, Guo; Yang, Liya; Luo, Yong; Wang, Shafei

    2015-06-01

    Broadband operation is of great importance for the applications of travelling wave tubes such as high-data communication and wideband radar. An input/output (I/O) structure operating with broadband property plays a significant role to achieve these applications. In this paper, a Y-type branch waveguide (YTBW) coupler and its improvements are proposed and utilized to construct an extremely wideband I/O structure to ensure the broadband operation for sheet beam travelling wave tubes (SB-TWTs). Cascaded reflection resonators are utilized to improve the isolation characteristic and transmission efficiency. Furthermore, to minimize the reflectivity of the port connected with the RF circuit, wave-absorbing material (WAM) is loaded in the resonator. Simulation results for the YTBW loaded with WAM predict an excellent performance with a 50.2% relative bandwidth for port reflectivity under -15 dB, transmission up to -1.5 dB, and meanwhile isolation under -20 dB. In addition, the coupler has a relatively compact configuration and the beam tunnel can be widened, which is beneficial for the propagation of the electrons. A Q-band YTBW loaded with two reflection resonators is fabricated and microwave tested. Vector network analyzer (VNA) measured results have an excellent agreement with our simulation, which verify our theoretical analysis and simulation calculation.

  19. Design and microwave test of an ultrawideband input/output structure for sheet beam travelling wave tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Shu, Guoxiang; Wang, Jianxun; Liu, Guo; Yang, Liya; Luo, Yong; Wang, Shafei

    2015-06-15

    Broadband operation is of great importance for the applications of travelling wave tubes such as high-data communication and wideband radar. An input/output (I/O) structure operating with broadband property plays a significant role to achieve these applications. In this paper, a Y-type branch waveguide (YTBW) coupler and its improvements are proposed and utilized to construct an extremely wideband I/O structure to ensure the broadband operation for sheet beam travelling wave tubes (SB-TWTs). Cascaded reflection resonators are utilized to improve the isolation characteristic and transmission efficiency. Furthermore, to minimize the reflectivity of the port connected with the RF circuit, wave-absorbing material (WAM) is loaded in the resonator. Simulation results for the YTBW loaded with WAM predict an excellent performance with a 50.2% relative bandwidth for port reflectivity under −15 dB, transmission up to −1.5 dB, and meanwhile isolation under −20 dB. In addition, the coupler has a relatively compact configuration and the beam tunnel can be widened, which is beneficial for the propagation of the electrons. A Q-band YTBW loaded with two reflection resonators is fabricated and microwave tested. Vector network analyzer (VNA) measured results have an excellent agreement with our simulation, which verify our theoretical analysis and simulation calculation.

  20. Design and microwave test of an ultrawideband input/output structure for sheet beam travelling wave tubes.

    PubMed

    Shu, Guoxiang; Wang, Jianxun; Liu, Guo; Yang, Liya; Luo, Yong; Wang, Shafei

    2015-06-01

    Broadband operation is of great importance for the applications of travelling wave tubes such as high-data communication and wideband radar. An input/output (I/O) structure operating with broadband property plays a significant role to achieve these applications. In this paper, a Y-type branch waveguide (YTBW) coupler and its improvements are proposed and utilized to construct an extremely wideband I/O structure to ensure the broadband operation for sheet beam travelling wave tubes (SB-TWTs). Cascaded reflection resonators are utilized to improve the isolation characteristic and transmission efficiency. Furthermore, to minimize the reflectivity of the port connected with the RF circuit, wave-absorbing material (WAM) is loaded in the resonator. Simulation results for the YTBW loaded with WAM predict an excellent performance with a 50.2% relative bandwidth for port reflectivity under -15 dB, transmission up to -1.5 dB, and meanwhile isolation under -20 dB. In addition, the coupler has a relatively compact configuration and the beam tunnel can be widened, which is beneficial for the propagation of the electrons. A Q-band YTBW loaded with two reflection resonators is fabricated and microwave tested. Vector network analyzer (VNA) measured results have an excellent agreement with our simulation, which verify our theoretical analysis and simulation calculation.

  1. Hearing of microwave pulses by humans and animals: effects, mechanism, and thresholds.

    PubMed

    Lin, James C; Wang, Zhangwei

    2007-06-01

    The hearing of microwave pulses is a unique exception to the airborne or bone-conducted sound energy normally encountered in human auditory perception. The hearing apparatus commonly responds to airborne or bone-conducted acoustic or sound pressure waves in the audible frequency range. But the hearing of microwave pulses involves electromagnetic waves whose frequency ranges from hundreds of MHz to tens of GHz. Since electromagnetic waves (e.g., light) are seen but not heard, the report of auditory perception of microwave pulses was at once astonishing and intriguing. Moreover, it stood in sharp contrast to the responses associated with continuous-wave microwave radiation. Experimental and theoretical studies have shown that the microwave auditory phenomenon does not arise from an interaction of microwave pulses directly with the auditory nerves or neurons along the auditory neurophysiological pathways of the central nervous system. Instead, the microwave pulse, upon absorption by soft tissues in the head, launches a thermoelastic wave of acoustic pressure that travels by bone conduction to the inner ear. There, it activates the cochlear receptors via the same process involved for normal hearing. Aside from tissue heating, microwave auditory effect is the most widely accepted biological effect of microwave radiation with a known mechanism of interaction: the thermoelastic theory. The phenomenon, mechanism, power requirement, pressure amplitude, and auditory thresholds of microwave hearing are discussed in this paper. A specific emphasis is placed on human exposures to wireless communication fields and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) coils.

  2. [Determination of trace lead in traditional Chinese herbal medicine Astragalus by microwave digestion-CTAB enhancing-continual flow ingection hydride generation-ICP-AES].

    PubMed

    Liu, Dong-Lian; Ke, Shao-Ying; Ye, Rong; Ding, Ming-Yu

    2007-11-01

    A new method using microwave digestion technique was developed for the determination of lead in Astragalus by CTAB enhancing-continual flow hydride generation-inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (HG-ICP-AES). The experimental conditions of microwave digestion and hydride generation were optimized. This method shows a linear range of 0.23-800 microg x L(-1) and the correlation coefficient is 0.999 9. It is satisfactory to apply the microwave digestion procedure to the determination of Pb under the optimized conditions. The detection limit of the method is 0.23 microg x L(-1) and the RSD is 1.02%. The recovery obtained is 98.8%-100.1%. The results show that this method is rapid and simple with low environmental contamination and complete digestion of samples.

  3. The Development of Si and SiGe Technologies for Microwave and Millimeter-Wave Integrated Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponchak, George E.; Alterovitz, Samuel A.; Katehi, Linda P. B.; Bhattacharya, Pallab K.

    1997-01-01

    Historically, microwave technology was developed by military and space agencies from around the world to satisfy their unique radar, communication, and science applications. Throughout this development phase, the sole goal was to improve the performance of the microwave circuits and components comprising the systems. For example, power amplifiers with output powers of several watts over broad bandwidths, low noise amplifiers with noise figures as low as 3 dB at 94 GHz, stable oscillators with low noise characteristics and high output power, and electronically steerable antennas were required. In addition, the reliability of the systems had to be increased because of the high monetary and human cost if a failure occurred. To achieve these goals, industry, academia and the government agencies supporting them chose to develop technologies with the greatest possibility of surpassing the state of the art performance. Thus, Si, which was already widely used for digital circuits but had material characteristics that were perceived to limit its high frequency performance, was bypassed for a progression of devices starting with GaAs Metal Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors (MESFETs) and ending with InP Pseudomorphic High Electron Mobility Transistors (PHEMTs). For each new material or device structure, the electron mobility increased, and therefore, the high frequency characteristics of the device were improved. In addition, ultra small geometry lithographic processes were developed to reduce the gate length to 0.1 pm which further increases the cutoff frequency. The resulting devices had excellent performance through the millimeter-wave spectrum.

  4. Millimeter Wave Generation by Relativistic Electron Beams and Microwave- Plasma Interaction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-12-04

    there has been considerable effort in generating powerful microwave radiations by relativistic electron beams. Various devices including gyrotrons ... power high-frequency sources motivates the search for many other novel ways of improving the operation of high harmonic gyrotrons . Further, it is also...either in the CW range or the step range. Destler et al. (1981) showed that the efficiency of a gyrotron operating at higher harmonics can be

  5. Microwave and Millimeter Wave Properties of Vertically-Aligned Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddadi, K.; Tripon-Canseliet, C.; Hivin, Q.; Ducournau, G.; Teo, E.; Coquet, P.; Tay, B. K.; Lepilliet, S.; Avramovic, V.; Chazelas, J.; Decoster, D.

    2016-05-01

    We present the experimental determination of the complex permittivity of vertically aligned single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) films grown on quartz substrates in the microwave regime from 10 MHz up to 67 GHz, with the electrical field perpendicular to the main axis of the carbon nanotubes (CNTs), based on coplanar waveguide transmission line approach together with the measurement of the microwave impedance of top metalized vertically—aligned SWCNTs grown on conductive silicon substrates up to 26 GHz. From coplanar waveguide measurements, we obtain a real part of the permittivity almost equal to unity, which is interpreted in terms of low carbon atom density (3 × 1019 at/cm3) associated with a very low imaginary part of permittivity (<10-3) in the frequency range considered due to a very small perpendicular conductivity. The microwave impedance of a vertically aligned CNTs bundle equivalent to a low resistance reveals a good conductivity (3 S/cm) parallel to the CNTs axis. From these two kinds of data, we experimentally demonstrate the tensor nature of the vertically grown CNTs bundles.

  6. A photonic approach for microwave/millimeter-wave frequency measurement using stimulated brillouin scattering in single mode fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, K.; Sun, X. Q.; Fu, S. N.; Wu, J.; Hong, X. B.; Shum, Perry; Lin, J. T.

    2010-04-01

    A photonic approach for microwave/millimeter-wave (MMW) frequency measurement is proposed and demonstrated based on stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) of a 20-km standard single mode fiber (SSMF). After the MMW signal is modulated to a laser source with two sidebands using optical carrier suppression (OCS) modulation, its frequency can be easily measured by monitoring the SBS-induced amplification with a power meter. Due to the 1-pm resolution of a tunable pump laser source, a frequency measurement range of 1-40 GHz is demonstrated in our experiment with a frequency resolution of 125 MHz. We believe the frequency measurement range can be further extended to satisfy photonic radar front-end processing application.

  7. Reply to ``Comment on `Ramsey spectroscopy, matter-wave interferometry, and the microwave-lensing frequency shift' ''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibble, Kurt

    2015-06-01

    The Comment by Jefferts et al. [Phys. Rev. A 91, 067601 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevA.91.067601] discusses the microwave-lensing frequency shift's possible dependence on the initial wave-packet size and two effects of wall interactions, the frequency shifts that they produce, and the nature of how dressed states are clipped by apertures. I identify conceptual errors in their criticisms, some of which are related to fundamental problems in their lensing treatment [Ashby et al., Phys. Rev. A 91, 033624 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevA.91.033624] for the NIST-F1 and NIST-F2 atomic clocks [K. Gibble, arXiv:1505.00691]. Aside from typesetting errors that they note, the criticisms in the Comment are shown to be incorrect.

  8. Development and Implementation of Nationally Recognized Laboratory for Material Characterization in the Microwave and Millimeter Wave Bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hepburn, Frank L.; Russell, Samuel S.

    2010-01-01

    This report provides a progress update for establishing a laboratory for material characterization in the microwave and millimeter wave bands. During the launch of STS-124 a large area of refractory bricks was liberated from the flame trench built for the exhaust of the solid rocket motors (SRM). The inspection of the liberated area revealed many defects, debonds, corrosion and voids that are a cause for concern relating to the health of the entire flame trench wall. A request for assistance was received for the nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of these anomalies behind the refractory bricks, with the primary interest being a health assessment based on the quality of the brick, epoxy and concrete bond.

  9. Continuous flow through a microwave oven for the large-scale production of biodiesel from waste cooking oil.

    PubMed

    Tangy, Alex; Pulidindi, Indra Neel; Perkas, Nina; Gedanken, Aharon

    2017-01-01

    This report presents a method for producing large quantities of biodiesel from waste cooking oil (WCO). Preliminary studies on optimization of the WCO transesterification process in a continuous-flow microwave reactor are carried out using commercial SrO as a catalyst. The SrO catalyst can be separated and reused for five reaction cycles without loss in activity. Challenges like mass flow and pressure drop constraints need to be surmounted. SrO nanoparticles deposited on millimeter-sized (3-6mm) silica beads (41wt% SrO/SiO2) are prepared and evaluated as a substitute for the SrO catalyst. A WCO conversion value to biodiesel as high as 99.2wt% was achieved with the reactor packed with 15g of 41wt% SrO/SiO2 catalyst in 8.2min with 820mL of feed. Excellent performance of the fixed-bed catalyst without loss in activity for a lifetime of 24.6min converting a feed of 2.46L to FAME was observed.

  10. Structural and optical characterization of CuInS2 quantum dots synthesized by microwave-assisted continuous flow methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzmorris, Robert C.; Oleksak, Richard P.; Zhou, Zheng; Mangum, Benjamin D.; Kurtin, Juanita N.; Herman, Gregory S.

    2015-07-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) have recently been incorporated into consumer displays and lighting technologies. Now that these materials are being produced on industrial scales, it is important to investigate scalable synthetic methods and less toxic materials and chemistries. To achieve these goals, we have synthesized cadmium-free, visible light-emitting QDs using a microwave-assisted continuous flow reactor. After synthesis, the CuInS2 QD cores underwent a near-complete Zn cation exchange reaction in a batch reactor, followed by the growth of a ZnS shell. Analysis of X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and Raman spectroscopy data indicate that the crystal structure changes from CuInS2 (chalcopyrite) to ZnS (zincblende) during the cation exchange reaction. Compositional analysis indicated that the core/shell QDs were 98 % ZnS, with Cu and In present at much lower concentrations. The photoluminescence (PL) peak position was blue shifted for longer cation exchange reactions, and it was found that the ZnS shell was necessary for improved PL stability. The synthesized QDs have a PL down conversion efficiency of 65 % when using a blue LED source.

  11. Dynamic microwave-assisted extraction combined with continuous-flow microextraction for determination of pesticides in vegetables.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lijie; Hu, Mingzhu; Li, Zhanchao; Song, Ying; Yu, Cui; Zhang, Hanqi; Yu, Aimin; Ma, Qiang; Wang, Ziming

    2016-02-01

    A simple, rapid, solventless and cost-effective dynamic microwave-assisted extraction (DMAE) combined with continuous-flow microextraction (CFME) system was firstly assembled and validated for extraction of eight organophosphorus pesticides in vegetables. The method combines the advantages of DMAE and CFME, and extends the application of the single drop microextraction to complex solid samples. The extraction, separation, and enrichment were performed in a single step, which could greatly simplify the operation and reduce the whole pretreatment time. In the developed method, analytes were first extracted from the vegetables using 3% NaCl solution as extraction solvent, then concentrated into microextraction solvent. After extraction, the microextraction solvent containing the enriched analyte was directly analyzed by GC-MS without any filtration or clean-up process. Several parameters affecting the extraction efficiency were investigated and optimized. Real vegetable samples were analyzed, satisfactory recoveries were obtained in the range of 80.7-106.7%, and relative standard deviations were lower than 8.7%.

  12. Directed searches for continuous gravitational waves from spinning neutron stars in binary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meadors, Grant David

    2014-09-01

    Gravitational wave detectors such as the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) seek to observe ripples in space predicted by General Relativity. Black holes, neutron stars, supernovae, the Big Bang and other sources can radiate gravitational waves. Original contributions to the LIGO effort are presented in this thesis: feedforward filtering, directed binary neutron star searches for continuous waves, and scientific outreach and education, as well as advances in quantum optical squeezing. Feedforward filtering removes extraneous noise from servo-controlled instruments. Filtering of the last science run, S6, improves LIGO's astrophysical range (+4.14% H1, +3.60% L1: +12% volume) after subtracting noise from auxiliary length control channels. This thesis shows how filtering enhances the scientific sensitivity of LIGO's data set during and after S6. Techniques for non-stationarity and verifying calibration and integrity may apply to Advanced LIGO. Squeezing is planned for future interferometers to exceed the standard quantum limit on noise from electromagnetic vacuum fluctuations; this thesis discusses the integration of a prototype squeezer at LIGO Hanford Observatory and impact on astrophysical sensitivity. Continuous gravitational waves may be emitted by neutron stars in low-mass X-ray binary systems such as Scorpius X-1. The TwoSpect directed binary search is designed to detect these waves. TwoSpect is the most sensitive of 4 methods in simulated data, projecting an upper limit of 4.23e-25 in strain, given a year-long data set at an Advanced LIGO design sensitivity of 4e-24 Hz. (-1/2). TwoSpect is also used on real S6 data to set 95% confidence upper limits (40 Hz to 2040 Hz) on strain from Scorpius X-1. A millisecond pulsar, X-ray transient J1751-305, is similarly considered. Search enhancements for Advanced LIGO are proposed. Advanced LIGO and fellow interferometers should detect gravitational waves in the coming decade. Methods in these

  13. Monolithic dual-mode distributed feedback semiconductor laser for tunable continuous-wave terahertz generation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Namje; Shin, Jaeheon; Sim, Eundeok; Lee, Chul Wook; Yee, Dae-Su; Jeon, Min Yong; Jang, Yudong; Park, Kyung Hyun

    2009-08-03

    We report on a monolithic dual-mode semiconductor laser operating in the 1550-nm range as a compact optical beat source for tunable continuous-wave (CW) terahertz (THz) generation. It consists of two distributed feedback (DFB) laser sections and one phase section between them. Each wavelength of the two modes can be independently tuned by adjusting currents in micro-heaters which are fabricated on the top of the each DFB section. The continuous tuning of the CW THz emission from Fe(+)-implanted InGaAs photomixers is successfully demonstrated using our dual-mode laser as the excitation source. The CW THz frequency is continuously tuned from 0.17 to 0.49 THz.

  14. Search for continuous gravitational waves: Metric of the multidetector F-statistic

    SciTech Connect

    Prix, Reinhard

    2007-01-15

    We develop a general formalism for the parameter-space metric of the multidetector F-statistic, which is a matched-filtering detection statistic for continuous gravitational waves. We find that there exists a whole family of F-statistic metrics, parametrized by the (unknown) amplitude parameters of the gravitational wave. The multidetector metric is shown to be expressible in terms of noise-weighted averages of single-detector contributions, which implies that the number of templates required to cover the parameter space does not scale with the number of detectors. Contrary to using a longer observation time, combining detectors of similar sensitivity is therefore the computationally cheapest way to improve the sensitivity of coherent wide-parameter searches for continuous gravitational waves. We explicitly compute the F-statistic metric family for signals from isolated spinning neutron stars, and we numerically evaluate the quality of different metric approximations in a Monte Carlo study. The metric predictions are tested against the measured mismatches and we identify regimes in which the local metric is no longer a good description of the parameter-space structure.

  15. Coherently combining data between detectors for all-sky semi-coherent continuous gravitational wave searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goetz, E.; Riles, K.

    2016-04-01

    We present a method for coherently combining short data segments from gravitational-wave detectors to improve the sensitivity of semi-coherent searches for continuous gravitational waves. All-sky searches for continuous gravitational waves from unknown sources are computationally limited. The semi-coherent approach reduces the computational cost by dividing the entire observation timespan into short segments to be analyzed coherently, then combined together incoherently. Semi-coherent analyses that attempt to improve sensitivity by coherently combining data from multiple detectors face a computational challenge in accounting for uncertainties in signal parameters. In this article, we lay out a technique to meet this challenge using summed Fourier transform coefficients. Applying this technique to one all-sky search algorithm called TwoSpect, we confirm that the sensitivity of all-sky, semi-coherent searches can be improved by coherently combining the short data segments, e.g., by up to 42% over a single detector for an all-sky search. For misaligned detectors, however, this improvement requires careful attention when marginalizing over unknown polarization parameters. In addition, care must be taken in correcting for differential detector velocity due to the Earth’s rotation for high signal frequencies and widely separated detectors.

  16. Off-Axis Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy Based on a Continuous-Wave Optical Parametric Oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peltola, Jari; Siltanen, Mikael; Halonen, Lauri; Vainio, Markku

    2011-06-01

    Continuous-wave cavity ring down spectroscopy (cw-CRDS) is a sensitive absorption technique for trace gas analysis. Although it is highly sensitivity and relatively fast, ring down repetition rate and spectral resolution are limited by the cavity free spectral range (FSR). Normally, the injected beam is mode matched to the lowest transverse electro-magnetic mode (TEM00) of the cavity. Light is coupled into the cavity only when standing wave condition is fulfilled. Scanning of the laser without variation of the cavity length leads to transmission comb where recorded ring down times are separated in frequency by the FSR. Recently Romanini et. al. reported an off-axis (OA) CRDS spectrometer operating in the 766 nm region where the FSR of the cavity was reduced by N = 4 times from the original. In this re-entrant condition the cavity length is chosen to provide degeneracy of transverse modes. If the injection is adequately off-axis the beam returns to the starting point after N round trips. This divides the FSR to N group of degenerated modes which are equally frequency-spaced. We present an OA-CRDS spectrometer (N = 4) based on a continuous-wave optical parametric oscillator (cw-OPO) operating in the mid-infrared region (2.75 - 3.45 μm). The measurement of formaldehyde (H_2CO) using an OA-CRDS spectrometer will be presented. J. Courtois, A. K. Mohamed and D. Romanini Opt. Express 18, (5), 1 March 2010.

  17. Experimental imaging research on continuous-wave terahertz in-line digital holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Haochong; Wang, Dayong; Rong, Lu; Wang, Yunxin

    2014-09-01

    The terahertz (THz) imaging is an advanced technique on the basis of the unique characteristics of terahertz radiation. Due to its noncontact, non-invasive and high-resolution capabilities, it has already shown great application prospects in biomedical observation, sample measurement, and quality control. The continuous-wave terahertz in-line digital holography is a combination of terahertz technology and in-line digital holography of which the source is a continuous-wave terahertz laser. Over the past decade, many researchers used different terahertz sources and detectors to undertake experiments. In this paper, the pre-process of the hologram is accomplished after the holograms' recording process because of the negative pixels in the pyroelectric detector and the air vibration caused by the chopper inside the camera. To improve the quality of images, the phase retrieval algorithm is applied to eliminate the twin images. In the experiment, the pin which terahertz wave can't penetrate and the TPX slice carved letters "THz" are chosen for the samples. The amplitude and phase images of samples are obtained and the twin image and noise in the reconstructed images are suppressed. The results validate the feasibility of the terahertz in-line digital holographic imaging technique. This work also shows the terahertz in-line digital holography technique's prospects in materials science and biological samples' detection.

  18. Soliton generation via continuous stokes acoustic self-scattering of hypersonic waves in a paramagnetic crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Bugay, A. N.; Sazonov, S. V.

    2008-08-15

    A new mechanism is proposed for continuous frequency down-conversion of acoustic waves propagating in a paramagnetic crystal at a low temperature in an applied magnetic field. A transverse hypersonic pulse generating a carrier-free longitudinal strain pulse via nonlinear effects is scattered by the generated pulse. This leads to a Stokes shift in the transverse hypersonic wave proportional to its intensity, and both pulses continue to propagate in the form of a mode-locked soliton. As the transverse-pulse frequency is Stokes shifted, its spectrum becomes narrower. This process can be effectively implemented only if the linear group velocity of the transverse hypersonic pulse equals the phase velocity of the longitudinal strain wave. These velocities are renormalized by spin-phonon coupling and can be made equal by adjusting the magnitude of the applied magnetic field. The transverse structure of the soliton depends on the sign of the group velocity dispersion of the transverse component. When the dispersion is positive, planar solitons can develop whose transverse component has a topological defect of dark vortex type and longitudinal component has a hole. In the opposite case, the formation of two-component acoustic 'bullets' or vortices localized in all directions is possible.

  19. Continuous millimeter-wave radiation has no effect on lipid peroxidation in liposomes

    SciTech Connect

    Logani, M.K.; Ziskin, M.C.

    1996-02-01

    The effect of millimeter waves on lipid peroxidation was studied in the presence and absence of melanin. Irradiation of liposomes with continuous millimeter electromagnetic waves at frequencies of 53.6, 61.2 and 78.2 GHz and incident power densities of 10, 1 and 500 mW/cm{sup 2}, respectively, did not show an enhancement in the formation of lipid peroxides compared to unirradiated samples. Liposomes exposed to 254 nm UVC radiation at 0.32 mW/cm{sup 2} and 302 nm UVB radiation at 1.12 mW/cm{sup 2} served as positive controls. No increment in the formation of lipid peroxides was observed when irradiation of liposomes was carried out in the presence of ADP-Fe{sup +3} and EDTA-Fe{sup +3}. Direct irradiation of melanin with millimeter waves did not exhibit an increased formation of superoxide or hydrogen peroxide. The present results indicate that millimeter waves of the above frequencies and intensities do not cause lipid peroxidation in liposomal membranes. 19 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Einstein@Home search for continuous gravitational waves from Cassiopeia A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Sylvia J.; Papa, Maria Alessandra; Eggenstein, Heinz-Bernd; Prix, Reinhard; Wette, Karl; Allen, Bruce; Bock, Oliver; Keitel, David; Krishnan, Badri; Machenschalk, Bernd; Shaltev, Miroslav; Siemens, Xavier

    2016-10-01

    We report the results of a directed search for continuous gravitational-wave emission in a broad frequency range (between 50 and 1000 Hz) from the central compact object of the supernova remnant Cassiopeia A (Cas A). The data come from the sixth science run of LIGO, and the search is performed on the volunteer distributed computing network Einstein@Home. We find no significant signal candidate and set the most constraining upper limits to date on the gravitational-wave emission from Cas A, which beat the indirect age-based upper limit across the entire search range. At 170 Hz (the most sensitive frequency range), we set 90% confidence upper limits on the gravitational-wave amplitude h0 of ˜2.9 ×10-25, roughly twice as constraining as the upper limits from previous searches on Cas A. The upper limits can also be expressed as constraints on the ellipticity of Cas A; with a few reasonable assumptions, we show that at gravitational-wave frequencies greater than 300 Hz we can exclude an ellipticity of ≳10-5.

  1. Evaluation of weld porosity in laser beam seam welds: optimizing continuous wave and square wave modulated processes.

    SciTech Connect

    Ellison, Chad M.; Perricone, Matthew; Faraone, Kevin M. (Honeywell FM&T, Kansas City, MO); Roach, Robert Allen; Norris, Jerome T.

    2007-02-01

    Nd:YAG laser joining is a high energy density (HED) process that can produce high-speed, low-heat input welds with a high depth-to-width aspect ratio. This is optimized by formation of a ''keyhole'' in the weld pool resulting from high vapor pressures associated with laser interaction with the metallic substrate. It is generally accepted that pores form in HED welds due to the instability and frequent collapse of the keyhole. In order to maintain an open keyhole, weld pool forces must be balanced such that vapor pressure and weld pool inertia forces are in equilibrium. Travel speed and laser beam power largely control the way these forces are balanced, as well as welding mode (Continuous Wave or Square Wave) and shielding gas type. A study into the phenomenon of weld pool porosity in 304L stainless steel was conducted to better understand and predict how welding parameters impact the weld pool dynamics that lead to pore formation. This work is intended to aid in development and verification of a finite element computer model of weld pool fluid flow dynamics being developed in parallel efforts and assist in weld development activities for the W76 and future RRW programs.

  2. Terahertz transmission properties of silicon wafers using continuous-wave terahertz spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chihoon; Ahn, Jae Sung; Ji, Taeksoo; Eom, Joo Beom

    2017-04-01

    We present the spectral properties of Si wafers using continuous-wave terahertz (CW-THz) spectroscopy. By using a tunable laser source and a fixed distributed-feedback laser diode (DFB-LD), a stably tunable beat source for CW-THz spectroscopy system can be implemented. THz radiation is generated in the frequency range of 100 GHz–800 GHz by photomixing in a photoconductive antenna. We also measured CW-THz waveforms by changing the beat frequency and confirmed repeatability through repeated measurement. We calculated the peaks of the THz frequency by taking fast Fourier transforms (FFTs) of measured THz waveforms. The feasibility of CW-THz spectroscopy is demonstrated by the THz spectra of Si wafers with different resistivities, mobilities, and carrier concentrations. The results show that Si wafers with a lower resistivity absorb more THz waves. Thus, we expect our CW-THz system to have the advantage of being able to perform fast non-destructive analysis.

  3. Dealing with Instrumental Lines in Searches for Continuous Gravitational Waves in LIGO Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauter, Orion; LIGO-Virgo Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Although the first observing run of Advanced LIGO (O1) gave us two definitive detections of gravitational waves from binary black hole mergers, searches for a continuous-wave (CW) source are computationally very demanding and still ongoing. CW sources are expected to be much weaker, requiring integration of the signal for several months. PowerFlux is one analysis pipeline designed for such searches; in following up outliers, the program uses a loosely coherent algorithm to improve the signal-to-noise ratio and to separate astrophysical signals from instrumental artifacts. Unfortunately, the O1 data has many sharp spectral artifacts (lines) that create spurious outliers in the low-frequency region, 20-135 Hz. The effects of these lines on the PowerFlux analysis will be discussed, along with methods used to mitigate those effects, including a line-cleaning process. Prospects for contending with instrumental line effects in the second observing run (O2) will also be presented.

  4. The Continuous Mutual Evolution of Equatorial Waves and the Quasi-Biennial Oscillation of Zonal Flow in the Equatorial Stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, C.; Cai, M.; Shin, C. S.; Chagnon, J.

    2014-12-01

    The continuous mutual evolution of equatorial waves and the background QBO is demonstrated using daily NCEP-DOE reanalysis for the period from January 1, 1979 to December 31, 2010. Using a novel diagnostic technique, the phase speed, vertical tilting, and form stress of equatorial waves in the stratosphere are obtained continuously on daily basis. The results indicate that on top of a weak-amplitude annual cycle signal, all of these wave properties have a pronounced QBO signal with a downward propagation that evolves continuously together with the background QBO. Our analysis also highlights the potential role of wave-induced form stress in driving the QBO regime change. We find that the dominant waves in the equatorial stratosphere propagate very slowly relative to the ground at all times, implying that their observed intrinsic phase speed evolution follows the background QBO nearly exactly but with opposite sign, as the established theory predicts. By revealing the continuous evolution of the form stress associated with the vertically tilted waves, the new diagnostic method also demonstrates the dominance of eastward-tilted eastward-propagating waves contributing to a deceleration of easterly flow at high altitudes, which causes a downward propagation of the easterly flow signal. Similarly, the dominance of westward-tilted westward-propagating waves acts to reverse westerly flow to easterly flow and causes a downward propagation of westerly flow signal. Our results suggest that in addition to the wave-breaking processes, such continuously alternating downward transfer of westerly and easterly angular momentum by westward-tilted westward-propagating waves and eastward-tilted eastward-propagating waves contributes to the wave-mean flow interaction mechanism for the QBO.

  5. Microwave and Millimeter Wave Testing for the Inspection of the Space Shuttle Spray On Foam Insulation (SOFI) and the Acreage Heat Tiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoughi, R.; Kharkovsky, S.; Hepburn, F. L.

    2006-03-01

    The utility of microwave and millimeter wave nondestructive testing and evaluation (NDT&E) methods, for testing the Space Shuttle's external fuel tank spray on foam insulation (SOFI) and the acreage heat tiles has been investigated during the past two years. Millimeter wave NDE techniques are capable of producing internal images of SOFI. This paper presents the results of testing several diverse panels with embedded voids and debonds at millimeter wave frequencies. Additionally, the results of testing a set of heat tiles are also presented. Finally, the attributes of these methods as well as the advantageous features associated with these systems are also provided.

  6. Microwave and Millimeter Wave Testing for the Inspection of the Space Shuttle Spray on Foam Insulations (SOFI) and the Acreage Heat Tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoughi, R.; Kharkovsky, S.; Hepburn, F. L.

    2005-01-01

    The utility of microwave and millimeter wave nondestructive testing and evaluation (NDT&E) methods, for testing the Space Shuttle's external he1 tank spray on foam insulation (SOFI) and the acreage heat tiles has been investigated during the past two years. Millimeter wave NDE techniques are capable of producing internal images of SOFI. This paper presents the results of testing several diverse panels with embedded voids and debonds at millimeter wave frequencies. Additionally, the results of testing a set of heat tiles are also presented. Finally, the attributes of these methods as well as the advantageous features associated with these systems are also provided.

  7. Continuous-wave self-mode-locked operation of a femtosecond Cr[sup 4+]:YAG laser

    SciTech Connect

    Sennaroglu, A.; Pollock, C.R. ); Nathel, H. )

    1994-03-15

    Continuous-wave self-mode-locked operation of a chromium-doped YAG laser pumped by a continuous-wave Nd:YAG laser at 20 [degree]C is described. We used both regenerative initiation and continuous-wave self-mode-locking techniques to generate nearly transform-limited pulses of 120-fs (FWHM) duration at 1.52 [mu]m. The TEM[sub 00] output power was as high as 360 mW. The output of this femtosecond source was tunable from 1.51 to 1.53 [mu]m.

  8. Environmental assessment for the Satellite Power System (SPS): studies of honey bees exposed to 2. 45 GHz continuous-wave electromagnetic energy

    SciTech Connect

    Gary, N E; Westerdahl, B B

    1980-12-01

    A system for small animal exposure was developed for treating honey bees, Apis mellifera L., in brood and adult stages, with 2.45 GHz continuous wave microwaves at selected power densities and exposure times. Post-treatment brood development was normal and teratological effects were not detected at exposures of 3 to 50 mw/cm/sup 2/ for 30 minutes. Post-treatment survival, longevity, orientation, navigation, and memory of adult bees were also normal after exposures of 3 to 50 mw/cm/sup 2/ for 30 minutes. Post-treatment longevity of confined bees in the laboratory was normal after exposures of 3 to 50 mw/cm/sup 2/ for 24 hours. Thermoregulation of brood nest, foraging activity, brood rearing, and social interaction were not affected by chronic exposure to 1 mw/cm/sup 2/ during 28 days. In dynamic behavioral bioassays the frequency of entry and duration of activity of unrestrained, foraging adult bees was identical in microwave-exposed (5 to 40 mw/cm/sup 2/) areas versus control areas.

  9. Antiresonant ring output-coupled continuous-wave optical parametric oscillator.

    PubMed

    Devi, Kavita; Kumar, S Chaitanya; Esteban-Martin, A; Ebrahim-Zadeh, M

    2012-08-13

    We demonstrate the successful deployment of an antiresonant ring (ARR) interferometer for the attainment of optimum output coupling in a continuous-wave (cw) optical parametric oscillator (OPO). The cw OPO, configured as a singly-resonant oscillator (SRO), is based on a 50-mm-long MgO:PPLN crystal and pumped by cw Ytterbium-fiber laser at 1064 nm, with the ARR interferometer integrated into one arm of the standing-wave cavity. By fine adjustment of the ARR transmission, a continuously variable signal output coupling from 0.8% to 7.3% has been achieved, providing optimum output coupling for signal and optimum power extraction for the idler, at different input pumping levels. The experimental results are compared with theoretical calculations for conventional output-coupled cw SRO, and the study shows that by reducing the insertion loss of the ARR elements, the performance of the ARR-coupled cw SRO can be further enhanced. We also show that the use of the ARR does not lead to any degradation in the cw SRO output beam quality. The proof-of-principle demonstration confirms the effectiveness of the technique for continuous, in situ, and fine control of output coupling in cw OPOs to achieve maximum output power at any arbitrary pumping level above threshold.

  10. Hidden Markov model tracking of continuous gravitational waves from a neutron star with wandering spin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suvorova, S.; Sun, L.; Melatos, A.; Moran, W.; Evans, R. J.

    2016-06-01

    Gravitational wave searches for continuous-wave signals from neutron stars are especially challenging when the star's spin frequency is unknown a priori from electromagnetic observations and wanders stochastically under the action of internal (e.g., superfluid or magnetospheric) or external (e.g., accretion) torques. It is shown that frequency tracking by hidden Markov model (HMM) methods can be combined with existing maximum likelihood coherent matched filters like the F -statistic to surmount some of the challenges raised by spin wandering. Specifically, it is found that, for an isolated, biaxial rotor whose spin frequency walks randomly, HMM tracking of the F -statistic output from coherent segments with duration Tdrift=10 d over a total observation time of Tobs=1 yr can detect signals with wave strains h0>2 ×10-26 at a noise level characteristic of the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (Advanced LIGO). For a biaxial rotor with randomly walking spin in a binary orbit, whose orbital period and semimajor axis are known approximately from electromagnetic observations, HMM tracking of the Bessel-weighted F -statistic output can detect signals with h0>8 ×10-26. An efficient, recursive, HMM solver based on the Viterbi algorithm is demonstrated, which requires ˜103 CPU hours for a typical, broadband (0.5-kHz) search for the low-mass x-ray binary Scorpius X-1, including generation of the relevant F -statistic input. In a "realistic" observational scenario, Viterbi tracking successfully detects 41 out of 50 synthetic signals without spin wandering in stage I of the Scorpius X-1 Mock Data Challenge convened by the LIGO Scientific Collaboration down to a wave strain of h0=1.1 ×10-25, recovering the frequency with a root-mean-square accuracy of ≤4.3 ×10-3 Hz .

  11. Characteristics of ZnO nanostructures synthesized by sonochemical reaction: Effects of continuous and pulse waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widiyastuti, W.; Machmudah, Siti; Kusdianto, Nurtono, Tantular; Winardi, Sugeng

    2015-12-01

    Nanostructured ZnO was synthesized by a sonochemical reaction. Ultrasonic irradiation were set up in continuous, pulse in 3 seconds on and a second off (on:off=3:1), and pulse in 2 seconds on and a second off (on:off=2:1) wave modes for 1.5 hours. The characteristics of particles generated by these modes such as morphology, crystallinity, FTIR, photoluminescence, and photocatalytic activity to degrade methylene blue were compared. Zinc nitrate and ammonia water-based solutions were selected as chemicals without the addition of other surfactants. The morphology of the generated ZnO particles could be tuned from flower-like, needle- or hairy-like, and spherical structures by changing the mode of ultrasonic irradiation from continuous, on:off=3:1, and on:off=2:1 modes, respectively. The generated particles indicated that a wurtzite structure of ZnO in a hexagonal phase was formed. The crystalline sizes of particles generated in continuous, on:off=3:1, and on:off=2:1 modes were 28, 27, 24 nm. A similar position of reduction peak of FTIR in all samples indicated that no differences in particles chemical bonding characteristics. Photoluminescence intensity was also decreased with changes the wave mode from continuous to pulse. Photocatalytic activity was also evaluated resulting in particles synthesized by continuous mode had the highest methylene blue degradation degree following by on:off=3:1, and on:off=2:1 modes.

  12. Characteristics of ZnO nanostructures synthesized by sonochemical reaction: Effects of continuous and pulse waves

    SciTech Connect

    Widiyastuti, W. Machmudah, Siti; Kusdianto,; Nurtono, Tantular; Winardi, Sugeng

    2015-12-29

    Nanostructured ZnO was synthesized by a sonochemical reaction. Ultrasonic irradiation were set up in continuous, pulse in 3 seconds on and a second off (on:off=3:1), and pulse in 2 seconds on and a second off (on:off=2:1) wave modes for 1.5 hours. The characteristics of particles generated by these modes such as morphology, crystallinity, FTIR, photoluminescence, and photocatalytic activity to degrade methylene blue were compared. Zinc nitrate and ammonia water-based solutions were selected as chemicals without the addition of other surfactants. The morphology of the generated ZnO particles could be tuned from flower-like, needle- or hairy-like, and spherical structures by changing the mode of ultrasonic irradiation from continuous, on:off=3:1, and on:off=2:1 modes, respectively. The generated particles indicated that a wurtzite structure of ZnO in a hexagonal phase was formed. The crystalline sizes of particles generated in continuous, on:off=3:1, and on:off=2:1 modes were 28, 27, 24 nm. A similar position of reduction peak of FTIR in all samples indicated that no differences in particles chemical bonding characteristics. Photoluminescence intensity was also decreased with changes the wave mode from continuous to pulse. Photocatalytic activity was also evaluated resulting in particles synthesized by continuous mode had the highest methylene blue degradation degree following by on:off=3:1, and on:off=2:1 modes.

  13. Recent developments in Fresnel zone plate antennas at microwave/millimeter wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiltse, James C.

    1998-10-01

    The Fresnel zone plate antenna is an example of an optical analogy that has been transferred to microwave/millimeter wavelength use. The latter case has seen extensive research and application, and in the past dozen years more than seventy relevant papers have been published on a worldwide basis. These studies have dealt with either lens or reflector designs, and have quantified many parameters, such as gain, antenna patterns, efficiency, bandwidth, and structural options. The most recent designs have dealt with high efficiency or dual band configurations. This report will summarize the many advances of the past few years, and will provide some parametric design tradeoffs.

  14. Influence of gain dynamics on dissipative soliton interaction in the presence of a continuous wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niang, A.; Amrani, F.; Salhi, M.; Leblond, H.; Sanchez, F.

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the effect of the gain dynamics on the motion and interactions of solitons in the frame of a complex Ginzburg-Landau-type model, which accounts for dissipative soliton formation and propagation in a ring fiber laser. It is shown that the gain dynamics modifies the soliton velocity and their interactions. In the presence of an injected continuous wave, an initial crystal of a few solitons gets broken, either into bunches or into individual solitons. Quasielastic collisions analogous to Newton's cradle have been seen. The soliton set may evolve into gas, solitons, or harmonic mode-locked patterns. The time jitter present in the last situation has been considered.

  15. The effect of dispersion on spectral broadening of incoherent continuous-wave light in optical fibers.

    PubMed

    Soh, Daniel B S; Koplow, Jeffrey P; Moore, Sean W; Schroder, Kevin L; Hsu, Wen L

    2010-10-11

    In addition to fiber nonlinearity, fiber dispersion plays a significant role in spectral broadening of incoherent continuous-wave light. In this paper we have performed a numerical analysis of spectral broadening of incoherent light based on a fully stochastic model. Under a wide range of operating conditions, these numerical simulations exhibit striking features such as damped oscillatory spectral broadening (during the initial stages of propagation), and eventual convergence to a stationary, steady state spectral distribution at sufficiently long propagation distances. In this study we analyze the important role of fiber dispersion in such phenomena. We also demonstrate an analytical rate equation expression for spectral broadening.

  16. Determining optical path difference with a frequency-modulated continuous-wave method.

    PubMed

    Song, Ningfang; Lu, Xiangxiang; Li, Wei; Li, Yang; Wang, Yingying; Liu, Jixun; Xu, Xiaobin; Pan, Xiong

    2015-08-01

    A technique for determining the optical path difference (OPD) between two Raman beams using a frequency-modulated continuous-wave method is investigated. This approach greatly facilitates the measurement and adjustment of the OPD when tuning the OPD is essential to minimize the effects of the diode laser's phase noise on Raman lasers. As a demonstration, the frequencies of the beat note with different OPDs are characterized and analyzed. When the measured beat frequency is 0.367 Hz, the OPD between Raman beams is zero. The phase noise of the Raman laser system after implementation of zeroing of the OPD is also measured.

  17. Specifics of short-wavelength generation in a continuous wave fiber optical parametric oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zlobina, E. A.; Mishra, V.; Kablukov, S. I.; Singh, S. P.; Varshney, S. K.; Babin, S. A.

    2016-11-01

    We investigate factors limiting short-wavelength generation and therefore tuning range of the continuous wave all-fiber optical parametric oscillator based on birefringent photonic crystal fiber pumped by a tunable linearly polarized ytterbium-doped fiber laser. Influence of the longitudinal dispersion fluctuations in the fiber on the threshold of the fiber optical parametric oscillators is numerically studied. It is shown that even low fluctuations (<0.5 nm) of the zero dispersion wavelength in 18 m-long fiber result in a significant increase of the threshold at large parametric shifts.

  18. Unravelling the noise: the discrimination of wave function collapse models under time-continuous measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genoni, Marco G.; Duarte, O. S.; Serafini, Alessio

    2016-10-01

    Inspired by the notion that environmental noise is in principle observable, while fundamental noise due to spontaneous localization would not be, we study the estimation of the diffusion parameter induced by wave function collapse models under continuous monitoring of the environment. We take into account finite measurement efficiencies and, in order to quantify the advantage granted by monitoring, we analyse the quantum Fisher information associated with such a diffusion parameter, identify optimal measurements in limiting cases, and assess the performance of such measurements in more realistic conditions.

  19. Mutual Coherence of Two Coupled Multiline Continuous-Wave HF Lasers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-07

    trace of P2(6) single-line fringe pattern. 8 REFERENCES 1. G. E. Palma and W. J . Fader, Proc. Soc. Photo-Opt. Instrum . Eng. 440, 153 (1983). 2. M. B...REPORT SD-TR-88-105 Mutual Coherence of Two Coupled 00 Multiline Continuous-Wave HF Lasers cvD J . M. BERNARD, R. A. CHODZKO, and H. MIRELS...Spencer and W. E. Lamb, Jr., Phys. Rev. A 5, 893 (1972). 3. W. W. Chow, Opt. Lett. 10, 442 (1984). 4. H. Mirels, Appl. Opt. 25, 2130 (1986). 5. D. J

  20. Electrically pumped continuous wave quantum dot lasers epitaxially grown on patterned, on-axis (001) Si

    DOE PAGES

    Norman, Justin; Kennedy, M. J.; Selvidge, Jennifer; ...

    2017-02-14

    High performance III-V lasers at datacom and telecom wavelengths on on-axis (001) Si are needed for scalable datacenter interconnect technologies. We demonstrate electrically injected quantum dot lasers grown on on-axis (001) Si patterned with {111} v-grooves lying in the [110] direction. No additional Ge buffers or substrate miscut was used. The active region consists of five InAs/InGaAs dot-in-a-well layers. Here, we achieve continuous wave lasing with thresholds as low as 36 mA and operation up to 80°C.

  1. Tunable continuous wave single-mode dye laser directly pumped by a diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanska, D.; Suski, M.; Furmann, B.

    2017-04-01

    In this work, a tunable continuous wave single-mode ring dye laser (a modified version of Coherent model CR 699-21), directly optically pumped by an economy-class diode laser, has been set up. The laser was operated on Coumarin 498, and its generation profile covered part of the green spectral region not easily accessible in single-mode operation. The performance of the laser in both broad-band and single-mode operation regimes was studied. It was proved that optical pumping by diode lasers allows one to obtain single-mode operation of dye lasers that is sufficiently stable for high-resolution spectroscopy applications.

  2. Spectral comb mitigation to improve continuous-wave search sensitivity in Advanced LIGO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neunzert, Ansel; LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Searches for continuous gravitational waves, such as those emitted by rapidly spinning non-axisymmetric neutron stars, are degraded by the presence of narrow noise ``lines'' in detector data. These lines either reduce the spectral band available for analysis (if identified as noise and removed) or cause spurious outliers (if unidentified). Many belong to larger structures known as combs: series of evenly-spaced lines which appear across wide frequency ranges. This talk will focus on the challenges of comb identification and mitigation. I will discuss tools and methods for comb analysis, and case studies of comb mitigation at the LIGO Hanford detector site.

  3. Non-Gaussian states from continuous-wave Gaussian light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mølmer, Klaus

    2006-06-01

    We present a general analysis of the state obtained by subjecting a continuous-wave (cw) Gaussian field to non-Gaussian measurements. The generic multimode state of a cw Gaussian field is fully characterized by the time dependent mean values and variances and the two-time covariances of the field quadrature variables. We present a general theory to extract from this information the results of detection and quantum state reduction within specific temporal output modes. The formalism is applied to schemes for heralded production of propagating light pulses with single photon and Schrödinger kitten states from a cw squeezed beam of light.

  4. High performance continuous wave 1.3 μm quantum dot lasers on silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Alan Y. Norman, Justin; Zhang, Chong; Snyder, Andrew; Lubyshev, Dmitri; Fastenau, Joel M.; Liu, Amy W. K.; Gossard, Arthur C.; Bowers, John E.

    2014-01-27

    We demonstrate record performance 1.3 μm InAs quantum dot lasers grown on silicon by molecular beam epitaxy. Ridge waveguide lasers fabricated from the as-grown material achieve room temperature continuous wave thresholds as low as 16 mA, output powers exceeding 176 mW, and lasing up to 119 °C. P-modulation doping of the active region improves T{sub 0} to the range of 100–200 K while maintaining low thresholds and high output powers. Device yield is presented showing repeatable performance across different dies and wafers.

  5. Electrically pumped continuous wave quantum dot lasers epitaxially grown on patterned, on-axis (001) Si.

    PubMed

    Norman, Justin; Kennedy, M J; Selvidge, Jennifer; Li, Qiang; Wan, Yating; Liu, Alan Y; Callahan, Patrick G; Echlin, McLean P; Pollock, Tresa M; Lau, Kei May; Gossard, Arthur C; Bowers, John E

    2017-02-20

    High performance III-V lasers at datacom and telecom wavelengths on on-axis (001) Si are needed for scalable datacenter interconnect technologies. We demonstrate electrically injected quantum dot lasers grown on on-axis (001) Si patterned with {111} v-grooves lying in the [110] direction. No additional Ge buffers or substrate miscut was used. The active region consists of five InAs/InGaAs dot-in-a-well layers. We achieve continuous wave lasing with thresholds as low as 36 mA and operation up to 80°C.

  6. The epileptic syndromes with continuous spikes and waves during slow sleep: definition and management guidelines.

    PubMed

    Van Bogaert, P; Aeby, A; De Borchgrave, V; De Cocq, C; Deprez, M; De Tiège, X; de Tourtchaninoff, M; Dubru, J M; Foulon, M; Ghariani, S; Grisar, T; Legros, B; Ossemann, M; Tugendhaft, P; van Rijckevorsel, K; Verheulpen, D

    2006-06-01

    The authors propose to define the epileptic syndromes with continuous spikes and waves during slow sleep (CSWS) as a cognitive or behavioral impairment acquired during childhood, associated with a strong activation of the interictal epileptiform discharges during NREM sleep--whatever focal or generalized--and not related to another factor than the presence of CSWS. The type of syndrome will be defined according to the neurological and neuropsychological deficit. These syndromes have to be classified among the localization-related epileptic syndromes. Some cases are idiopathic and others are symptomatic. Guidelines for work-up and treatment are proposed.

  7. The pure rotational spectrum of VS (X4Σ-): A combined Fourier transform microwave and millimeter-wave study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adande, G. R.; Ziurys, L. M.

    2013-08-01

    The pure rotational spectrum of the vanadium sulfide radical, VS (X4Σ-), has been measured in the frequency range 5-310 GHz using a combination of millimeter-wave direct absorption and Fourier transform microwave (FTMW) techniques. In the millimeter-wave region, the radical was produced in an AC discharge from the reaction of VCl4, the vanadium donor, and CS2. In the FTMW instrument, the molecule was created in a supersonic jet, coupled with a laser ablation/DC discharge source (DALAS), from a mixture of metal vapor and H2S, heavily diluted in argon. A total of 8 rotational transitions were measured for VS, in which both the quartet fine structure and vanadium hyperfine splittings were resolved. The spectra were analyzed with a Hund’s case (b) Hamiltonian, and rotational, spin-rotation, spin-spin, and hyperfine parameters were determined. The precision of the constants from previous optical studies was refined and, for the first time, the vanadium quadrupole constant, eQq = -7.6 (4.0) MHz, and the third order Fermi contact correction, bS = -0.293 (94) MHz, were established. From the fine structure parameters, the nearby 4Π and 2Σ+ states were estimated to lie ∼6560 cm-1 and ∼7170 cm-1 above the ground state. The hyperfine constants suggest that the bonding in VS is partly ionic, with a significant degree of covalent character.

  8. Microwave generator for scientific and medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surducan, V.; Surducan, E.; Ciupa, R.; Neamtu, C.

    2012-02-01

    Nowadays power microwave radiation is widely used in medical applications as hyperthermia, diathermy or ablation and for scientific applications such as plasma generation, digestion, or as a catalyst in green chemistry. Nevertheless, designing a suitably adapted microwave generator that meets both the scientific and the more restrictive medical criteria remains a difficult task. We present here a simplified approach in designing such a microwave generator, according to the IEC60601 medical standard. The generator, based on a continuous wave (CW) magnetron, is coupled via a TE10 waveguide to feed either a hyperthermia applicator or a reactor chamber. Microwave interactions with the probe (or the tissue) depend strongly on the magnetron's power supply parameters and the impedance match of the entire microwave circuit. Any unmatched elements (magnetron to waveguide, waveguide to applicator, applicator to patient) give rise to a large voltage standing wave ratio (VSWR) which loads the generator with a surplus energy, converted to heat. Extra heating of the magnetron will deteriorate the amplitude of the generated microwave power field. We show here that, by using a proprietary patented temperature sensor sheet, we were able to detect and improve the impedance matching of the microwave circuit.

  9. Distributed feedback laser diode integrated with distributed Bragg reflector for continuous-wave terahertz generation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Namje; Han, Sang-Pil; Ryu, Han-Cheol; Ko, Hyunsung; Park, Jeong-Woo; Lee, Donghun; Jeon, Min Yong; Park, Kyung Hyun

    2012-07-30

    A widely tunable dual mode laser diode with a single cavity structure is demonstrated. This novel device consists of a distributed feedback (DFB) laser diode and distributed Bragg reflector (DBR). Micro-heaters are integrated on the top of each section for continuous and independent wavelength tuning of each mode. By using a single gain medium in the DFB section, an effective common optical cavity and common modes are realized. The laser diode shows a wide tunability of the optical beat frequency, from 0.48 THz to over 2.36 THz. Continuous wave THz radiation is also successfully generated with low-temperature grown InGaAs photomixers from 0.48 GHz to 1.5 THz.

  10. Use of the absolute phase in frequency modulated continuous wave plasma reflectometry

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, G.

    2008-08-15

    In frequency modulated continuous wave reflectometry, used for density profile measurement in fusion plasmas, it is usual to measure the beat frequency between the launched wave and the reflected wave, and from this to calculate the position of the reflecting layer in the plasma. The absolute phase of the beat signal is usually neglected. The reason is that the phase shift between sweeps is usually comparable with or more than 2{pi}, leading to an ambiguity that is impossible to resolve. However, recent observations on the MAST tokamak have shown that, under quiet plasma conditions (this term has to be defined), the phase shift between sweeps is small compared with 2{pi} and the phase ambiguity can be readily resolved. The reflectometer signal is then being analyzed as an interferometer signal would normally be, and there is a substantial improvement in spatial resolution. The method is illustrated by application to small edge localized mode precursor and allows what is believed to be the first quantitative measurement of the displacement of the plasma boundary by such a precursor mode. The errors in both the absolute phase measurement and the more conventional frequency measurement are also estimated.

  11. Correspondence between discrete and continuous models of excitable media: trigger waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernyak, Y. B.; Feldman, A. B.; Cohen, R. J.

    1997-01-01

    We present a theoretical framework for relating continuous partial differential equation (PDE) models of excitable media to discrete cellular automata (CA) models on a randomized lattice. These relations establish a quantitative link between the CA model and the specific physical system under study. We derive expressions for the CA model's plane wave speed, critical curvature, and effective diffusion constant in terms of the model's internal parameters (the interaction radius, excitation threshold, and time step). We then equate these expressions to the corresponding quantities obtained from solution of the PDEs (for a fixed excitability). This yields a set of coupled equations with a unique solution for the required CA parameter values. Here we restrict our analysis to "trigger" wave solutions obtained in the limiting case of a two-dimensional excitable medium with no recovery processes. We tested the correspondence between our CA model and two PDE models (the FitzHugh-Nagumo medium and a medium with a "sawtooth" nonlinear reaction source) and found good agreement with the numerical solutions of the PDEs. Our results suggest that the behavior of trigger waves is actually controlled by a small number of parameters.

  12. First low frequency all-sky search for continuous gravitational wave signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aasi, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Amariutei, D. V.; Andersen, M.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Ashton, G.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Bartlett, J.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Belczynski, C.; Bell, A. S.; Berger, B. K.; Bergman, J.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Birney, R.; Biscans, S.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bojtos, P.; Bond, C.; Bondu, F.; Bonnand, R.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Boschi, V.; Bose, Sukanta; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Branco, V.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D.; Brown, D. D.; Brown, N. M.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Casanueva Diaz, J.; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Celerier, C.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C.; Cerboni Baiardi, L.; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, C.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, S.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C. G.; Colombini, M.; Constancio, M.; Conte, A.; Conti, L.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Canton, T. Dal; Damjanic, M. D.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Darman, N. S.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Daveloza, H. P.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; DeBra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; De Laurentis, M.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dereli, H.; Dergachev, V.; De Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M. C.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Giovanni, M.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dojcinoski, G.; Dolique, V.; Dominguez, E.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S. E.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J. M.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Essick, R. C.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T. M.; Everett, R.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fairhurst, S.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Feldbaum, D.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fournier, J.-D.; Franco, S.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frede, M.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H. A. G.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Garufi, F.; Gatto, A.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Gendre, B.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; Gergely, L. Á.; Germain, V.; Ghosh, A.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gleason, J. R.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gonzalez, J.; Gopakumar, A.; Gordon, N. A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Gosselin, M.; Goßler, S.; Gouaty, R.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greco, G.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grover, K.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guido, C. J.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J. J.; Hall, B. R.; Hall, E. D.; Hammer, D.; Hammond, G.; Haney, M.; Hanke, M. M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M. J.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C.-J.; Haughian, K.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Hennig, J.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Hoelscher-Obermaier, J.; Hofman, D.; Hollitt, S. E.; Holt, K.; Hopkins, P.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Houston, E. A.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.; Huang, S.; Huerta, E. A.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh, M.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Idrisy, A.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Islas, G.; Isler, J. C.; Isogai, T.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacobson, M. B.; Jang, H.; Jaranowski, P.; Jawahar, S.; Ji, Y.; Jiménez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; Haris, K.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Karki, S.; Karlen, J. L.; Kasprzack, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, S.; Kaur, T.; Kawabe, K.; Kawazoe, F.; Kéfélian, F.; Kehl, M. S.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kells, W.; Kerrigan, J.; Key, J. S.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khan, Z.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kijbunchoo, N.; Kim, C.; Kim, K.; Kim, N. G.; Kim, N.; Kim, Y.-M.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Klimenko, S.; Kline, J. T.; Koehlenbeck, S. M.; Kokeyama, K.; Koley, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D. B.; Kringel, V.; Krishnan, B.; Królak, A.; Krueger, C.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, A.; Kumar, P.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Lackey, B. D.; Landry, M.; Lantz, B.; Lasky, P. D.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lebigot, E. O.; Lee, C. H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Lee, J.; Lee, J. P.; Leonardi, M.; Leong, J. R.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Levine, B. M.; Lewis, J. B.; Li, T. G. F.; Libson, A.; Lin, A. C.; Littenberg, T. B.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lockett, V.; Lodhia, D.; Logue, J.; Lombardi, A. L.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J. D.; Lubinski, M. J.; Lück, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Luo, J.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; Macarthur, J.; Macdonald, E. P.; MacDonald, T.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Madden-Fong, D. X.; Magaña-Sandoval, F.; Magee, R. M.; Mageswaran, M.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mangini, N. M.; Mansell, G. L.; Manske, M.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markosyan, A. S.; Maros, E.; Martelli, F.; Martellini, L.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Martynov, D. V.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Mastrogiovanni, S.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; Mazzolo, G.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McWilliams, S. T.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Mehmet, M.; Meidam, J.; Meinders, M.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Merzougui, M.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Messick, C.; Meyers, P. M.; Mezzani, F.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Minenkov, Y.; Ming, J.; Mirshekari, S.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moe, B.; Moggi, A.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Montani, M.; Moore, B. C.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morriss, S. R.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, C. L.; Mueller, G.; Mukherjee, A.; Mukherjee, S.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D. J.; Murray, P. G.; Mytidis, A.; Nagy, M. F.; Nardecchia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Nayak, R. K.; Necula, V.; Nedkova, K.; Nelemans, G.; Neri, M.; Newton, G.; Nguyen, T. T.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nitz, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E. N.; Nuttall, L. K.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Okounkova, M.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, R.; O'Reilly, B.; Ortega, W. E.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ott, C. D.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Padilla, C. T.; Pai, A.; Pai, S. A.; Palamos, J. R.; Palashov, O.; Palomba, C.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, H.; Pan, Y.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Paoletti, F.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H. R.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patrick, Z.; Pedraza, M.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Perreca, A.; Phelps, M.; Piccinni, O.; Pichot, M.; Pickenpack, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Poeld, J. H.; Poggiani, R.; Post, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Predoi, V.; Premachandra, S. S.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prix, R.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Pürrer, M.; Qin, J.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E. A.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Rácz, I.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rakhmanov, M.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Re, V.; Reed, C. M.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Ricci, F.; Riles, K.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rodger, A. S.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V. J.; Romano, J. D.; Romano, R.; Romanov, G.; Romie, J. H.; Rosińska, D.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.; Sachdev, S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Sammut, L.; Sanchez, E.; Sandberg, V.; Sanders, J. R.; Santiago-Prieto, I.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Savage, R.; Sawadsky, A.; Schale, P.; Schilling, R.; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schönbeck, A.; Schreiber, E.; Schuette, D.; Schutz, B. F.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Sellers, D.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Serna, G.; Sevigny, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shaffery, P.; Shah, S.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaltev, M.; Shao, Z.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Sidery, T. L.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Silva, A. D.; Simakov, D.; Singer, A.; Singer, L. P.; Singh, R.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, N. D.; Smith, R. J. E.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Souradeep, T.; Srivastava, A. K.; Staley, A.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B. C.; Steplewski, S.; Stevenson, S. P.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Straniero, N.; Strauss, N. A.; Strigin, S.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, L.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B. L.; Szczepanczyk, M. J.; Tacca, M.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tápai, M.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, R.; Theeg, T.; Thirugnanasambandam, M. P.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, S.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Tomlinson, C.; Tonelli, M.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trifirò, D.; Tringali, M. C.; Tse, M.; Turconi, M.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; Vallisneri, M.; van Bakel, N.; van Beuzekom, M.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; van den Broeck, C.; van der Schaaf, L.; van der Sluys, M. V.; van Heijningen, J.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vardaro, M.; Vass, S.; Vasúth, M.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, M.; Wade, L. E.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L.-W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Welborn, T.; Wen, L.; Weßels, P.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whitcomb, S. E.; White, D. J.; Whiting, B. F.; Williams, K. J.; Williams, L.; Williams, R. D.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M. H.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Worden, J.; Yablon, J.; Yakushin, I.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yvert, M.; ZadroŻny, A.; Zangrando, L.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J.-P.; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zuraw, S. E.; Zweizig, J.; LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration

    2016-02-01

    In this paper we present the results of the first low frequency all-sky search of continuous gravitational wave signals conducted on Virgo VSR2 and VSR4 data. The search covered the full sky, a frequency range between 20 and 128 Hz with a range of spin-down between -1.0 ×10-10 and +1.5 ×10-11 Hz /s , and was based on a hierarchical approach. The starting point was a set of short fast Fourier transforms, of length 8192 s, built from the calibrated strain data. Aggressive data cleaning, in both the time and frequency domains, has been done in order to remove, as much as possible, the effect of disturbances of instrumental origin. On each data set a number of candidates has been selected, using the FrequencyHough transform in an incoherent step. Only coincident candidates among VSR2 and VSR4 have been examined in order to strongly reduce the false alarm probability, and the most significant candidates have been selected. The criteria we have used for candidate selection and for the coincidence step greatly reduce the harmful effect of large instrumental artifacts. Selected candidates have been subject to a follow-up by constructing a new set of longer fast Fourier transforms followed by a further incoherent analysis, still based on the FrequencyHough transform. No evidence for continuous gravitational wave signals was found, and therefore we have set a population-based joint VSR2-VSR4 90% confidence level upper limit on the dimensionless gravitational wave strain in the frequency range between 20 and 128 Hz. This is the first all-sky search for continuous gravitational waves conducted, on data of ground-based interferometric detectors, at frequencies below 50 Hz. We set upper limits in the range between about 1 0-24 and 2 ×10-23 at most frequencies. Our upper limits on signal strain show an improvement of up to a factor of ˜2 with respect to the results of previous all-sky searches at frequencies below 80 Hz.

  13. Continuous-wave mid-infrared photonic crystal light emitters at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Binbin; Qiu, Jijun; Shi, Zhisheng

    2017-01-01

    Mid-infrared photonic crystal enhanced lead-salt light emitters operating under continuous-wave mode at room temperature were investigated in this work. For the device, an active region consisting of 9 pairs of PbSe/Pb0.96Sr0.04Se quantum wells was grown by molecular beam epitaxy method on top of a Si(111) substrate which was initially dry-etched with a two-dimensional photonic crystal structure in a pattern of hexagonal holes. Because of the photonic crystal structure, an optical band gap between 3.49 and 3.58 µm was formed, which matched with the light emission spectrum of the quantum wells at room temperature. As a result, under optical pumping, using a near-infrared continuous-wave semiconductor laser, the device exhibited strong photonic crystal band-edge mode emissions and delivered over 26.5 times higher emission efficiency compared to the one without photonic crystal structure. The output power obtained was up to 7.68 mW (the corresponding power density was 363 mW/cm2), and a maximum quantum efficiency reached to 1.2%. Such photonic crystal emitters can be used as promising light sources for novel miniaturized gas-sensing systems.

  14. Constraints on individual supermassive black hole binaries from pulsar timing array limits on continuous gravitational waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schutz, Katelin; Ma, Chung-Pei

    2016-06-01

    Pulsar timing arrays (PTAs) are placing increasingly stringent constraints on the strain amplitude of continuous gravitational waves emitted by supermassive black hole binaries on subparsec scales. In this paper, we incorporate independent information about the dynamical masses Mbh of supermassive black holes in specific galaxies at known distances and use this additional information to further constrain whether or not those galaxies could host a detectable supermassive black hole binary. We estimate the strain amplitudes from individual binaries as a function of binary mass ratio for two samples of nearby galaxies: (1) those with direct dynamical measurements of Mbh in the literature, and (2) the 116 most massive early-type galaxies (and thus likely hosts of the most massive black holes) within 108 Mpc from the MASSIVE Survey. Our exploratory analysis shows that the current PTA upper limits on continuous waves (as a function of angular position in the sky) can already constrain the mass ratios of hypothetical black hole binaries in many galaxies in our samples. The constraints are stronger for galaxies with larger Mbh and at smaller distances. For the black holes with Mbh ≳ 5 × 109 M⊙ at the centres of NGC 1600, NGC 4889, NGC 4486 (M87), and NGC 4649 (M60), any binary companion in orbit within the PTA frequency bands would have to have a mass ratio of a few per cent or less.

  15. A review on continuous wave functional near-infrared spectroscopy and imaging instrumentation and methodology.

    PubMed

    Scholkmann, Felix; Kleiser, Stefan; Metz, Andreas Jaakko; Zimmermann, Raphael; Mata Pavia, Juan; Wolf, Ursula; Wolf, Martin

    2014-01-15

    This year marks the 20th anniversary of functional near-infrared spectroscopy and imaging (fNIRS/fNIRI). As the vast majority of commercial instruments developed until now are based on continuous wave technology, the aim of this publication is to review the current state of instrumentation and methodology of continuous wave fNIRI. For this purpose we provide an overview of the commercially available instruments and address instrumental aspects such as light sources, detectors and sensor arrangements. Methodological aspects, algorithms to calculate the concentrations of oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin and approaches for data analysis are also reviewed. From the single-location measurements of the early years, instrumentation has progressed to imaging initially in two dimensions (topography) and then three (tomography). The methods of analysis have also changed tremendously, from the simple modified Beer-Lambert law to sophisticated image reconstruction and data analysis methods used today. Due to these advances, fNIRI has become a modality that is widely used in neuroscience research and several manufacturers provide commercial instrumentation. It seems likely that fNIRI will become a clinical tool in the foreseeable future, which will enable diagnosis in single subjects.

  16. Comparison between pulsed and continuous-wave lasers for photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panjehpour, Masoud; Overholt, Bergein F.; Sneed, Rick E.; DeNovo, Robert C.; Petersen, Mark G.

    1993-06-01

    A study was conducted in the normal canine esophagus to compare continuous wave (argon- pumped dye-laser) and pulsed (KTP/532-pumped dye-laser) laser light for photodynamic therapy with PHOTOFRINR. 48 hours post injection, 630 nm laser light was delivered using a 24 mm diameter cylindrical esophageal PDT balloon positioned at either distal or proximal esophagus. A 1.0 cm cylindrical diffuser placed in the center of the balloon delivered 300 J/cm of light at an intensity of 400 mW/cm. Three dogs received continuous wave (CW) light proximally and pulsed light distally. Four dogs received CW light distally and pulsed light proximally. The light dose delivered to the esophageal mucosa was measured using three isotropic probes placed on the balloon wall. Similar mucosal light doses were verified for sites receiving pulsed or CW laser light. Two days after PDT, the severity of the esophageal lesions were evaluated endoscopically, grossly and histologically. While some response variability was observed among different animals, endoscopic examination of the lesions revealed comparable injury from CW and pulsed light in each subject. Based on the gross and histological examination of the lesions, the CW and pulsed laser-induced injuries could not be distinguished.

  17. Microwave and millimeter wave dielectric permittivity and magnetic permeability of epsilon-gallium-iron-oxide nano-powders

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, Liu Afsar, Mohammed N.; Ohkoshi, Shin-ichi

    2015-05-07

    In millimeter wave frequency range, hexagonal ferrites with high uniaxial anisotropic magnetic fields are used as absorbers. These ferrites include M-type barium ferrite (BaFe{sub 12}O{sub 19}) and strontium ferrite (SrFe{sub 12}O{sub 19}), which have natural ferromagnetic resonant frequency range from 40 GHz to 60 GHz. However, the higher frequency range lacks suitable materials that support the higher frequency ferromagnetic resonance. A series of gallium-substituted ε-iron oxides (ε-Ga{sub x}Fe{sub 2−x}O{sub 3}) are synthesized, which have ferromagnetic resonant frequencies appearing over the frequency range of 30 GHz to 150 GHz. The ε-Ga{sub x}Fe{sub 2−x}O{sub 3} is synthesized by the sol-gel method. The particle sizes are observed to be smaller than 100 nm. In this paper, in-waveguide transmission and reflection method and the free space magneto-optical approach have been employed to study these newly developed ε-Ga{sub x}Fe{sub 2−x}O{sub 3} particles in millimeter waves. These techniques enable to obtain precise transmission spectra to determine the dielectric and magnetic properties of both isotropic and anisotropic ferrites in the microwave and millimeter wave frequency range from single set of direct measurements. The complex dielectric permittivity and magnetic permeability spectra of ε-Ga{sub x}Fe{sub 2−x}O{sub 3} are shown in this paper. Strong ferromagnetic resonances at different frequencies determined by the x parameter are found.

  18. Soliton radiation beat analysis of optical pulses generated from two continuous-wave lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zajnulina, M.; Böhm, M.; Blow, K.; Rieznik, A. A.; Giannone, D.; Haynes, R.; Roth, M. M.

    2015-10-01

    We propose a fibre-based approach for generation of optical frequency combs (OFCs) with the aim of calibration of astronomical spectrographs in the low and medium-resolution range. This approach includes two steps: in the first step, an appropriate state of optical pulses is generated and subsequently moulded in the second step delivering the desired OFC. More precisely, the first step is realised by injection of two continuous-wave (CW) lasers into a conventional single-mode fibre, whereas the second step generates a broad OFC by using the optical solitons generated in step one as initial condition. We investigate the conversion of a bichromatic input wave produced by two initial CW lasers into a train of optical solitons, which happens in the fibre used as step one. Especially, we are interested in the soliton content of the pulses created in this fibre. For that, we study different initial conditions (a single cosine-hump, an Akhmediev breather, and a deeply modulated bichromatic wave) by means of soliton radiation beat analysis and compare the results to draw conclusion about the soliton content of the state generated in the first step. In case of a deeply modulated bichromatic wave, we observed the formation of a collective soliton crystal for low input powers and the appearance of separated solitons for high input powers. An intermediate state showing the features of both, the soliton crystal and the separated solitons, turned out to be most suitable for the generation of OFC for the purpose of calibration of astronomical spectrographs.

  19. Impulsively Generated Sausage Waves in Coronal Tubes with Transversally Continuous Structuring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hui; Li, Bo; Chen, Shao-Xia; Xiong, Ming; Guo, Ming-Zhe

    2016-12-01

    The frequency dependence of the longitudinal group speeds of trapped sausage waves plays an important role in determining impulsively generated wave trains, which have often been invoked to account for quasi-periodic signals in coronal loops. We examine how the group speeds ({v}{gr}) depend on angular frequency (ω) for sausage modes in pressureless coronal tubes with continuous transverse density distributions by solving the dispersion relation pertinent to the case where the density inhomogeneity of arbitrary form occurs in a transition layer of arbitrary thickness. We find that in addition to the transverse lengthscale l and density contrast {ρ }{{i}}/{ρ }{{e}}, the group speed behavior also depends on the detailed form of the density inhomogeneity. For parabolic profiles, {v}{gr} always decreases with ω first before increasing again, as happens for the much studied top-hat profiles. For linear profiles, however, the behavior of the ω -{v}{gr} curves is more complex. When {ρ }{{i}}/{ρ }{{e}}≲ 6, the curves become monotonical for large values of l. On the other hand, for higher density contrasts, a local maximum {v}{gr}\\max exists in addition to a local minimum {v}{gr}\\min when coronal tubes are diffuse. With time-dependent computations, we show that the different behavior of group speed curves, the characteristic speeds {v}{gr}\\min and {v}{gr}\\max in particular, is reflected in the temporal evolution and Morlet spectra of impulsively generated wave trains. We conclude that the observed quasi-periodic wave trains not only can be employed to probe such key parameters as density contrasts and profile steepness, but also have the potential to discriminate between the unknown forms of the transverse density distribution.

  20. Soliton radiation beat analysis of optical pulses generated from two continuous-wave lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Zajnulina, M.; Giannone, D.; Haynes, R.; Roth, M. M.; Böhm, M.; Blow, K.; Rieznik, A. A.

    2015-10-15

    We propose a fibre-based approach for generation of optical frequency combs (OFCs) with the aim of calibration of astronomical spectrographs in the low and medium-resolution range. This approach includes two steps: in the first step, an appropriate state of optical pulses is generated and subsequently moulded in the second step delivering the desired OFC. More precisely, the first step is realised by injection of two continuous-wave (CW) lasers into a conventional single-mode fibre, whereas the second step generates a broad OFC by using the optical solitons generated in step one as initial condition. We investigate the conversion of a bichromatic input wave produced by two initial CW lasers into a train of optical solitons, which happens in the fibre used as step one. Especially, we are interested in the soliton content of the pulses created in this fibre. For that, we study different initial conditions (a single cosine-hump, an Akhmediev breather, and a deeply modulated bichromatic wave) by means of soliton radiation beat analysis and compare the results to draw conclusion about the soliton content of the state generated in the first step. In case of a deeply modulated bichromatic wave, we observed the formation of a collective soliton crystal for low input powers and the appearance of separated solitons for high input powers. An intermediate state showing the features of both, the soliton crystal and the separated solitons, turned out to be most suitable for the generation of OFC for the purpose of calibration of astronomical spectrographs.

  1. High speed video shooting with continuous-wave laser illumination in laboratory modeling of wind - wave interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandaurov, Alexander; Troitskaya, Yuliya; Caulliez, Guillemette; Sergeev, Daniil; Vdovin, Maxim

    2014-05-01

    Three examples of usage of high-speed video filming in investigation of wind-wave interaction in laboratory conditions is described. Experiments were carried out at the Wind - wave stratified flume of IAP RAS (length 10 m, cross section of air channel 0.4 x 0.4 m, wind velocity up to 24 m/s) and at the Large Air-Sea Interaction Facility (LASIF) - MIO/Luminy (length 40 m, cross section of air channel 3.2 x 1.6 m, wind velocity up to 10 m/s). A combination of PIV-measurements, optical measurements of water surface form and wave gages were used for detailed investigation of the characteristics of the wind flow over the water surface. The modified PIV-method is based on the use of continuous-wave (CW) laser illumination of the airflow seeded by particles and high-speed video. During the experiments on the Wind - wave stratified flume of IAP RAS Green (532 nm) CW laser with 1.5 Wt output power was used as a source for light sheet. High speed digital camera Videosprint (VS-Fast) was used for taking visualized air flow images with the frame rate 2000 Hz. Velocity air flow field was retrieved by PIV images processing with adaptive cross-correlation method on the curvilinear grid following surface wave profile. The mean wind velocity profiles were retrieved using conditional in phase averaging like in [1]. In the experiments on the LASIF more powerful Argon laser (4 Wt, CW) was used as well as high-speed camera with higher sensitivity and resolution: Optronics Camrecord CR3000x2, frame rate 3571 Hz, frame size 259×1696 px. In both series of experiments spherical 0.02 mm polyamide particles with inertial time 7 ms were used for seeding airflow. New particle seeding system based on utilization of air pressure is capable of injecting 2 g of particles per second for 1.3 - 2.4 s without flow disturbance. Used in LASIF this system provided high particle density on PIV-images. In combination with high-resolution camera it allowed us to obtain momentum fluxes directly from

  2. Comment on ``Ramsey spectroscopy, matter-wave interferometry, and the microwave-lensing frequency shift''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jefferts, S. R.; Heavner, T. P.; Barlow, S. E.; Ashby, N.

    2015-06-01

    The theory of a frequency shift in primary frequency standards due to microwave lensing in Gibble [Phys. Rev. A 90, 015601 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevA.90.015601] contains a number of problems that undermine its validity. Furthermore, because the exposition of the theory has multiple errors and because the shift has never been experimentally observed, we believe this possible shift should not be included as a correction to primary frequency standards contributing to international atomic time. Although the theory may describe the basic mechanisms of a possible frequency shift, we argue it is not possible to use this theory to make reliable corrections to a primary frequency standard at the δ f /f ˜10-16 level.

  3. Microwave and Millimeter Wave Imaging of the Space Shuttle External Fuel Tank Spray on Foam Insulation (SOFI) Using Synthetic Aperture Focusing Techniques (SAFT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Case, J. T.; Robbins, J.; Kharkovsky, S.; Hepburn, F.; Zoughi, R.

    2006-03-01

    The Space Shuttle Columbia's catastrophic failure is thought to have been caused by a dislodged piece of external tank spray on foam insulation (SOFI) striking the left wing of the orbiter causing significant damage to some of the reinforced carbon/carbon leading edge wing panels. Microwave and millimeter wave nondestructive evaluation methods have shown great potential for inspecting SOFI for the purpose of detecting anomalies such as small air voids that may cause separation of the SOFI from the external tank during a launch. These methods are capable of producing relatively high-resolution images of the interior of SOFI particularly when advanced imaging algorithms are incorporated into the overall system. To this end, synthetic aperture focusing techniques (SAFT) are being developed. This paper presents some of the preliminary results of this investigation using SAFT-based methods and microwave holography at relatively low frequencies illustrating their potential capabilities for operation at millimeter wave frequencies.

  4. Microwave and Millimeter Wave Imaging of the Space Shuttle External Fuel Tank Spray on Foam Insulation (SOFI) using Synthetic Aperture Focusing Techniques (SAFT}

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Case, J. T.; Robbins, J.; Kharkivskiy, S.; Hepburn, F.; Zoughi, R.

    2005-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Columbia s catastrophic failure is thought to have been caused by a dislodged piece of external tank spray on foam insulation (SOFI) striking the left wing of the orbiter causing significant damage to some of the reinforced carbodcarbon leading edge wing panels. Microwave and millimeter wave nondestructive evaluation methods have shown great potential for inspecting SOFI for the purpose of detecting anomalies such as small air voids that may cause separation of the SOFI from the external tank during a launch. These methods are capable of producing relatively high-resolution images of the interior of SOFI particularly when advanced imaging algorithms are incorporated into the overall system. To this end, synthetic aperture focusing techniques (SAFT) are being developed. This paper presents some of the preliminary results of this investigation using SAFT-based methods and microwave holography at relatively low frequencies illustrating their potential capabilities for operation at millimeter wave frequencies.

  5. Age-Dependency of Location of Epileptic Foci in "Continuous Spike-and-Waves during Sleep": A Parallel to the Posterior-Anterior Trajectory of Slow Wave Activity.

    PubMed

    Heinzle, Bigna Katrin Bölsterli; Bast, Thomas; Critelli, Hanne; Huber, Reto; Schmitt, Bernhard

    2017-02-01

    Background Epileptic encephalopathy with continuous spike-and-waves during sleep (CSWS) occurs during childhood and is characterized by an activation of spike wave complexes during slow wave sleep. The location of epileptic foci is variable, as is etiology. A relationship between the epileptic focus and age has been shown in various focal epilepsies following a posterior-anterior trajectory, and a link to brain maturation has been proposed.We hypothesize that in CSWS, maximal spike wave activity, corresponding to the epileptic focus, is related to age and shows a posterior-anterior evolution. Findings In a retrospective cross-sectional study on CSWS (22 EEGs of 22 patients aged 3.1-13.5 years), the location of the epileptic focus is related to age and follows a posterior-anterior course. Younger patients are more likely to have posterior foci than older ones. Conclusions We propose that the posterior-anterior trajectory of maximal spike waves in CSWS might reflect maturational changes of maximal expression of sleep slow waves, which follow a comparable course. Epileptic spike waves, that is, "hyper-synchronized slow waves" may occur at the place where the highest and therefore most synchronized slow waves meet brain tissue with an increased susceptibility to synchronization.

  6. Design and development of an ambient-temperature continuously-rotating achromatic half-wave plate for CMB polarization modulation on the POLARBEAR-2 experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Charles A.; Beckman, Shawn; Chinone, Yuji; Goeckner-Wald, Neil; Hazumi, Masashi; Keating, Brian; Kusaka, Akito; Lee, Adrian T.; Matsuda, Frederick; Plambeck, Richard; Suzuki, Aritoki; Takakura, Satoru

    2016-07-01

    We describe the development of an ambient-temperature continuously-rotating half-wave plate (HWP) for study of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) polarization by the POLARBEAR-2 (PB2) experiment. Rapid polarization modulation suppresses 1/f noise due to unpolarized atmospheric turbulence and improves sensitivity to degree-angular-scale CMB fluctuations where the inflationary gravitational wave signal is thought to exist. A HWP modulator rotates the input polarization signal and therefore allows a single polarimeter to measure both linear polarization states, eliminating systematic errors associated with differencing of orthogonal detectors. PB2 projects a 365-mm-diameter focal plane of 7,588 dichroic, 95/150 GHz transition-edge-sensor bolometers onto a 4-degree field of view that scans the sky at 1 degree per second. We find that a 500-mm-diameter ambient-temperature sapphire achromatic HWP rotating at 2 Hz is a suitable polarization modulator for PB2. We present the design considerations for the PB2 HWP, the construction of the HWP optical stack and rotation mechanism, and the performance of the fully-assembled HWP instrument. We conclude with a discussion of HWP polarization modulation for future Simons Array receivers.

  7. Effect of scanning speed on continuous wave laser scribing of metal thin films: theory and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahbazi, AmirHossein; Koohian, Ata; Madanipour, Khosro

    2017-01-01

    In this paper continuous wave laser scribing of the metal thin films have been investigated theoretically and experimentally. A formulation is presented based on parameters like beam power, spot size, scanning speed and fluence thresholds. The role of speed on the transient temperature and tracks width is studied numerically. By using two frameworks of pulsed laser ablation of thin films and laser printing on paper, the relation between ablation width and scanning speed has been derived. Furthermore, various speeds of the focused 450 nm continuous laser diode with an elliptical beam spot applied to a 290 nm copper thin film coated on glass, experimentally. The beam power was 150 mW after spatial filtering. By fitting the theoretical formulation to the experimental data, the threshold fluence and energy were obtained to be 13.2 J mm-2 and 414~μ J respectively. An anticipated theoretical parameter named equilibrium~border was verified experimentally. It shows that in the scribing of the 290 nm copper thin film, at a distance where the intensity reaches about 1/e of its maximum value, the absorbed fluence on the surface is equal to zero. Therefore the application of continuous laser in metal thin film ablation has different mechanism from pulsed laser drilling and beam scanning in printers.

  8. A novel long-wave infrared high resolution continuous zoom lens with uncooled thermal detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Jiaqi; Yu, Kan; Ji, Zijuan

    2016-09-01

    Infrared imaging lens is one of the key components of a video security camera. A novel long-wave infrared continuous zoom lens is developed based on the 640×512 high resolution uncooled infrared thermal detector which can substitute the high cost cooled infrared detector. The zoom lens contains five germanium lens and one chalcogenide glass lens, which working in the wavelength range of 8 12 μm. Its F number range is in 1 1.1 while the focus length is changing from 20 to 120 mm. Based on the zoom lens design theory, the positive lens mechanical compensation structure is used to calculate the optical parameters and optimize the cam zoom curve, which can have a smooth continuous zoom in the range of all focus lengths. The image analysis show that the system has achieved the modulation transfer function (MTF) value above 0.45 which spatial frequency is 30 lp/mm. The spot diagrams RMS radius is less than 6.3μm which is near the diffraction limit. The real test photos indicate that the lens has the advantages of high resolution, large aperture, smooth zoom and stable image plane. Due to the high image quality and low cost, the continuous zoom lens is easily to be fabricated.

  9. Trends in alkali metal hydrosulfides: A combined Fourier transform microwave/millimeter-wave spectroscopic study of KSH (X~1A')

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucchino, M. P.; Sheridan, P. M.; Young, J. P.; Binns, M. K. L.; Ewing, D. W.; Ziurys, L. M.

    2013-12-01

    The pure rotational spectrum of KSH (tilde X1A') has been measured using millimeter-wave direct absorption and Fourier transform microwave (FTMW) techniques. This work is the first gas-phase experimental study of this molecule and includes spectroscopy of KSD as well. In the millimeter-wave system, KSH was synthesized in a DC discharge from a mixture of potassium vapor, H2S, and argon; a discharge-assisted laser ablation source, coupled with a supersonic jet expansion, was used to create the species in the FTMW instrument. Five and three rotational transitions in the range 3-57 GHz were recorded with the FTMW experiment for KSH and KSD, respectively, in the Ka = 0 component; in these data, potassium quadrupole hyperfine structure was observed. Five to six transitions with Ka = 0-5 were measured in the mm-wave region (260-300 GHz) for the two species. The presence of multiple asymmetry components in the mm-wave spectra indicates that KSH has a bent geometry, in analogy to other alkali hydrosulfides. The data were analyzed with an S-reduced asymmetric top Hamiltonian, and rotational, centrifugal distortion, and potassium electric quadrupole coupling constants were determined for both isotopolgues. The r0 geometry for KSH was calculated to be rS-H = 1.357(1) Å, rK-S = 2.806(1) Å, and θM-S-H (°) = 95.0 (1). FTMW measurements were also carried out on LiSH and NaSH; metal electric quadrupole coupling constants were determined for comparison with KSH. In addition, ab initio computations of the structures and vibrational frequencies at the CCSD(T)/6-311++G(3df,2pd) and CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVTZ levels of theory were performed for LiSH, NaSH, and KSH. Overall, experimental and computational data suggest that the metal-ligand bonding in KSH is a combination of electrostatic and covalent forces.

  10. Hierarchical follow-up of outliers in all-sky searches for continuous gravitational waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Sinead; Einstein@Home Team

    2017-01-01

    Rapidly rotating neutron stars are promising sources of continuous gravitational waves for the LIGO and Virgo interferometers. All-sky searches for isolated neutron stars offer the potential to detect gravitational waves from neutron stars which have not been observed electromagnetically. These all-sky searches cover a broad parameter space in frequency and spindown, requiring a huge number of templates in parameter space to avoid having too much distance between a potential signal and the nearest template. The large trials factors result in many outliers due to random noise, and additional outliers are produced by detector artifacts. In this talk, I present a hierarchical approach to processing the results of an all-sky search. This approach is designed so that at each hierarchical stage, the significance of a cell harbouring a real signal will increase, while the significance of a cell that does not contain a signal will not increase. Thus we are sensitive to signals that would otherwise be hidden by the noise background.

  11. Nondestructive measurement of neutral temperature in continuous welded rails by nonlinear ultrasonic guided waves.

    PubMed

    Nucera, Claudio; Lanza di Scalea, Francesco

    2014-11-01

    Modern rail construction uses continuous-welded rail (CWR). The presence of very few joints leads to an increasing concern due to the large longitudinal loads caused by restrained thermal expansion and contraction, following seasonal temperature variations. The knowledge of the current state of thermal stress in the rail or, equivalently, the rail neutral temperature (corresponding to zero net longitudinal force) is a key need within the railroad transportation community in order to properly schedule slow-order mandates and prevent derailments. This paper presents a nondestructive diagnostic system for measurement of the neutral temperature in CWR based on nonlinear ultrasonic guided waves. The theoretical part of the study involved the development of a constitutive model in order to explain the origin of nonlinear effects arising in complex waveguides under constrained thermal expansion. A numerical framework has been implemented to predict internal resonance conditions of nonlinear waves in complex waveguides. This theoretical/numerical phase has led to the development of an experimental prototype (Rail-NT) that was tested both in the laboratory and in the field. The results of these experimental tests are also summarized.

  12. Continuous-wave, two-crystal, singly-resonant optical parametric oscillator: theory and experiment.

    PubMed

    Samanta, G K; Aadhi, A; Ebrahim-Zadeh, M

    2013-04-22

    We present theoretical and experimental study of a continuous-wave, two-crystal, singly-resonant optical parametric oscillator (T-SRO) comprising two identical 30-mm-long crystals of MgO:sPPLT in a four- mirror ring cavity and pumped with two separate pump beams in the green. The idler beam after each crystal is completely out-coupled, while the signal radiation is resonant inside the cavity. Solving the coupled amplitude equations under undepleted pump approximation, we calculate the maximum threshold reduction, parametric gain acceptance bandwidth and closest possible attainable wavelength separation in arbitrary dual-wavelength generation and compare with the experimental results. Although the T-SRO has two identical crystals, the acceptance bandwidth of the device is equal to that of a single-crystal SRO. Due to the division of pump power in two crystals, the T-SRO can handle higher total pump power while lowering crystal damage risk and thermal effects. We also experimentally verify the high power performance of such scheme, providing a total output power of 6.5 W for 16.2 W of green power at 532 nm. We verified coherent energy coupling between the intra-cavity resonant signal waves resulting Raman spectral lines. Based on the T-SRO scheme, we also report a new technique to measure the temperature acceptance bandwidth of the single-pass parametric amplifier across the OPO tuning range.

  13. Continuous micro-vortex-based nanoparticle manipulation via focused surface acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Collins, David J; Ma, Zhichao; Han, Jongyoon; Ai, Ye

    2016-12-20

    Despite increasing demand in the manipulation of nanoscale objects for next generation biological and industrial processes, there is a lack of methods for reliable separation, concentration and purification of nanoscale objects. Acoustic methods have proven their utility in contactless manipulation of microscale objects mainly relying on the acoustic radiation effect, though the influence of acoustic streaming has typically prevented manipulation at smaller length scales. In this work, however, we explicitly take advantage of the strong acoustic streaming in the vicinity of a highly focused, high frequency surface acoustic wave (SAW) beam emanating from a series of focused 6 μm substrate wavelength interdigital transducers patterned on a piezoelectric lithium niobate substrate and actuated with a 633 MHz sinusoidal signal. This streaming field serves to focus fluid streamlines such that incoming particles interact with the acoustic field similarly regardless of their initial starting positions, and results in particle displacements that would not be possible with a travelling acoustic wave force alone. This streaming-induced manipulation of nanoscale particles is maximized with the formation of micro-vortices that extend the width of the microfluidic channel even with the imposition of a lateral flow, occurring when the streaming-induced flow velocities are an order of magnitude larger than the lateral one. We make use of this acoustic streaming to demonstrate the continuous and differential focusing of 100 nm, 300 nm and 500 nm particles.

  14. Detection and localization of continuous gravitational waves with pulsar timing arrays: the role of pulsar terms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, X.-J.; Wen, L.; Xiong, J.; Xu, Y.; Wang, Y.; Mohanty, S. D.; Hobbs, G.; Manchester, R. N.

    2016-09-01

    A pulsar timing array is a Galactic-scale detector of nanohertz gravitational waves (GWs). Its target signals contain two components: the `Earth term' and the `pulsar term' corresponding to GWs incident on the Earth and pulsar, respectively. In this work we present a Frequentist method for the detection and localization of continuous waves that takes into account the pulsar term and is significantly faster than existing methods. We investigate the role of pulsar terms by comparing a full-signal search with an Earth-term-only search for non-evolving black hole binaries. By applying the method to synthetic data sets, we find that (i) a full-signal search can slightly improve the detection probability (by about five per cent); (ii) sky localization is biased if only Earth terms are searched for and the inclusion of pulsar terms is critical to remove such a bias; (iii) in the case of strong detections (with signal-to-noise ratio ≳30), it may be possible to improve pulsar distance estimation through GW measurements.

  15. Theoretical Analysis of a Cascaded Continuous-Wave Optical Parametric Oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lei; Li, Xiao; Xu, Xiaojun; Wang, Hongyan; Jiang, Zongfu

    2013-04-01

    Threshold and conversion efficiency of a cascaded continuous-wave (CW) optical parametric oscillator (OPO) which can obtain CW terahertz (THz) light are analyzed by the plane wave approach. The model predicts experimental results of the first-order cascaded threshold. The theoretically predicted threshold for the backward idler parametric process agrees with the experimental data. Validation with a high-order cascaded parametric process awaits completion of experiments. At a pump wavelength of 1,030 nm and temperature of 120 °C, the threshold intensity of the forward idler parametric process was 2.2-2.4 times that of the backward process when the period length of the MgO:periodically poled lithium niobate crystal was 24-30 μm. The energy efficiency of CW THz light at a cascade order smaller than 6 is 10-5-10-4. Moreover, efficiency of N cascaded processes can be increased by a factor of N compared with that of a single parametric process, which is limited by the Manley-Rowe relationship. To our knowledge, this is the first theoretical treatment of threshold and energy efficiency of a cascaded CW OPO.

  16. A novel continuous cardiac output monitor based on pulse wave transit time.

    PubMed

    Sugo, Yoshihiro; Ukawa, Teiji; Takeda, Sunao; Ishihara, Hironori; Kazama, Tomiei; Takeda, Junzo

    2010-01-01

    Monitoring cardiac output (CO) is important for the management of patient circulation in an operation room (OR) or intensive care unit (ICU). We assumed that the change in pulse wave transit time (PWTT) obtained from an electrocardiogram (ECG) and a pulse oximeter wave is correlated with the change in stroke volume (SV), from which CO is derived. The present study reports the verification of this hypothesis using a hemodynamic analysis theory and animal study. PWTT consists of a pre-ejection period (PEP), the pulse transit time through an elasticity artery (T(1)), and the pulse transit time through peripheral resistance arteries (T(2)). We assumed a consistent negative correlation between PWTT and SV under all conditions of varying circulatory dynamics. The equation for calculating SV from PWTT was derived based on the following procedures. 1. Approximating SV using a linear equation of PWTT. 2. The slope and y-intercept of the above equation were determined under consideration of vessel compliance (SV was divided by Pulse Pressure (PP)), animal type, and the inherent relationship between PP and PWTT. Animal study was performed to verify the above-mentioned assumption. The correlation coefficient of PWTT and SV became r = -0.710 (p 〈 0.001), and a good correlation was admitted. It has been confirmed that accurate continuous CO and SV measurement is only possible by monitoring regular clinical parameters (ECG, SpO2, and NIBP).

  17. In vitro inhibition of lens epithelial cell growth by continuous wave Nd:YAG laser

    SciTech Connect

    Miyake, K.; Iwata, S.; Ando, F.; Daikuzono, N.; Federman, J.L.

    1989-04-01

    Bovine lens epithelial cells were suspended in MEM medium and subjected to continuous wave, low power, pulsed neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Nd:YAG) laser irradiation. The temperature of each suspension was maintained at 36 degrees C. Laser applications ranged from 1 to 10 watts and from 100 to 2000 seconds, but the total dose to each of the epithelial cell suspension was 2000 J. Six to thirty-nine percent of the cells were dead immediately after irradiation. Surviving cells, cultured for 15 days, showed decreased attachment and failed to grow. These preliminary results suggest that the Nd:YAG laser may be used during cataract surgery to prevent subsequent lens epithelial cell proliferation and the resulting vision reduction and glare.

  18. Blood-brain barrier disruption by continuous-wave radio frequency radiation.

    PubMed

    Sirav, Bahriye; Seyhan, Nesrin

    2009-01-01

    The increasing use of cellular phones and the increasing number of associated base stations are becoming a widespread source of non ionizing electromagnetic radiation. Some biological effects are likely to occur even at low-level EM fields. This study was designed to investigate the effects of 900 and 1,800 MHz Continuous Wave Radio Frequency Radiation (CW RFR) on the permeability of Blood Brain Barrier (BBB) of rats. Results have shown that 20 min RFR exposure of 900 and 1,800 MHz induces an effect and increases the permeability of BBB of male rats. There was no change in female rats. The scientific evidence on RFR safety or harm remains inconclusive. More studies are needed to demonstrate the effects of RFR on the permeability of BBB and the mechanisms of that breakdown.

  19. Non-contact physiological signal detection using continuous wave Doppler radar.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Dengyu; He, Tan; Hu, Boping; Li, Ye

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work is to show non-contact physiological signal monitoring system based on continuous-wave (CW) Doppler radar, which is becoming highly attractive in the field of health care monitoring of elderly people. Two radar signal processing methods were introduced in this paper: one to extract respiration and heart rates of a single person and the other to separate mixed respiration signals. To verify the validity of the methods, physiological signal is obtained from stationary human subjects using a CW Doppler radar unit. The sensor operating at 24 GHz is located 0.5 meter away from the subject. The simulation results show that the respiration and heart rates are clearly extracted, and the mixed respiration signals are successfully separated. Finally, reference respiration and heart rate signals are measured by an ECG monitor and compared with the results tracked by the CW Doppler radar monitoring system.

  20. Stimulated Brillouin scattering continuous wave phase conjugation in step-index fiber optics.

    PubMed

    Massey, Steven M; Spring, Justin B; Russell, Timothy H

    2008-07-21

    Continuous wave (CW) stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) phase conjugation in step-index optical fibers was studied experimentally and modeled as a function of fiber length. A phase conjugate fidelity over 80% was measured from SBS in a 40 m fiber using a pinhole technique. Fidelity decreases with fiber length, and a fiber with a numerical aperture (NA) of 0.06 was found to generate good phase conjugation fidelity over longer lengths than a fiber with 0.13 NA. Modeling and experiment support previous work showing the maximum interaction length which yields a high fidelity phase conjugate beam is inversely proportional to the fiber NA(2), but find that fidelity remains high over much longer fiber lengths than previous models calculated. Conditions for SBS beam cleanup in step-index fibers are discussed.

  1. Vertical Aerosol Backscatter Variability from an Airborne Focused Continuous Wave CO2 Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarzembski, Maurice A.; Srivastava, Vandana; Rothermel, Jeffry

    1998-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosol backscatter measurements using a continuous wave focused Doppler lidar at 9.1 micron wavelength were obtained over western North America and the Pacific Ocean during 13 - 26 September, 1995 as part of National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Multi-center Airborne Coherent Atmospheric Wind Sensor (MACAWS) mission on board the NASA DC8 aircraft. Backscatter variability was measured for approximately 52 flight hours, covering equivalent horizontal distance of approximately 25,000 km in the troposphere. Quasi-vertical backscatter profiles were also obtained during various ascents and descents which ranged between approximately 0.1 to 12.0 km altitude. Aerosol haze layers were encountered at different altitudes. Similarities and differences for aerosol loading over land and over ocean were observed. A mid-tropospheric aerosol backscatter background mode was found with modal value approximately 1O(exp -10)/m/sr, consistent with previous airborne and ground-based datasets.

  2. Continuous wave Nd:YAG-BiBO blue laser under direct 869 nm pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, J.; Chu, H.; Wang, L. R.

    2012-03-01

    We report a blue laser at 473 nm generation by intracavity frequency doubling of a continuous wave (CW) laser operation of a 946 nm Nd:YAG laser under in-band diode pumping at 869 nm. An BiBO crystal, cut for critical type I phase matching at room temperature is used for second harmonic generation of the laser. At an incident pump power of 8.6 W, as high as 721 mW of CW output power at 473 nm is achieved. The optical-to-optical conversion efficiency is up to 8.4%, and the fluctuation of the blue output power was better than 3.5% in the given 30 min.

  3. An effective method for designing insensitive resonator of continuous-wave passively mode-locked laser.

    PubMed

    Wen, Qiao; Sun, Liqun; Wang, Yonggang; Zhang, Enyao; Tian, Qian

    2009-05-25

    An effective method for designing the insensitive resonator of a continuous-wave passively mode-locked laser is firstly presented in this paper. This method, using resonator transform circle graphic theory, is both intuitive and reliable. Theoretical results show that the resonator is suitable to obtain highly stable mode locking operation when the following two conditions are fulfilled. First, the transform circle of the terminal mirror opposite the semiconductor saturable absorber mirror (SESAM) propagates through a series of lens (including the thermal lens of the gain medium) and a small transform circle in the image space is obtained, which ensures the small spot size at the SESAM. Second, the resonator transform circles orthogonally (or nearly orthogonally) intersect at the SESAM, which ensures the spot size at the SESAM is insensitive to the external perturbation. The experimental results of the mode locking lasers show good agreement with the theoretical studies very well.

  4. Significant performance enhancement in continuous wave terahertz photomixers based on fractal structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafari, H.; Heidarzadeh, H.; Rostami, A.; Rostami, G.; Dolatyari, M.

    2017-01-01

    A photoconductive fractal antenna significantly improves the performance of photomixing-based continuous wave (CW) terahertz (THz) systems. An analysis has been carried out for the generation of CW-THz radiation by photomixer photoconductive antenna technique. To increase the active area for generation and hence the THz radiation power we used interdigitated electrodes that are coupled with a fractal tree antenna. In this paper, both semiconductor and electromagnetic problems are considered. Here, photomixer devices with Thue-Morse fractal tree antennas in two configurations (narrow and wide) are discussed. This new approach gives better performance, especially in the increasing of THz output power of photomixer devices, when compared with the conventional structures. In addition, applying the interdigitated electrodes improved THz photocurrent, considerably. It produces THz radiation power several times higher than the photomixers with simple gap.

  5. Diode-pumped continuous wave tunable and graphene Q-switched Tm:LSO lasers.

    PubMed

    Feng, T L; Zhao, S Z; Yang, K J; Li, G Q; Li, D C; Zhao, J; Qiao, W C; Hou, J; Yang, Y; He, J L; Zheng, L H; Wang, Q G; Xu, X D; Su, L B; Xu, J

    2013-10-21

    We have investigated the lasing characteristics of Tm:LSO crystal in three operation regimes: continuous wave (CW), wavelength tunable and passive Q-switching based on graphene. In CW regime, a maximum output power of 0.65 W at 2054.9 nm with a slope efficiency of 21% was achieved. With a quartz plate, a broad wavelength tunable range of 145 nm was obtained, corresponding to a FWHM of 100 nm. By using a graphene saturable absorber mirror, the passively Q-switched Tm:LSO laser produced pulses with duration of 7.8 μs at 2030.8 nm under a repetition rate of 7.6 kHz, corresponding to pulse energy of 14.0 μJ.

  6. Maximizing power output from continuous-wave single-frequency fiber amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Ward, Benjamin G

    2015-02-15

    This Letter reports on a method of maximizing the power output from highly saturated cladding-pumped continuous-wave single-frequency fiber amplifiers simultaneously, taking into account the stimulated Brillouin scattering and transverse modal instability thresholds. This results in a design figure of merit depending on the fundamental mode overlap with the doping profile, the peak Brillouin gain coefficient, and the peak mode coupling gain coefficient. This figure of merit is then numerically analyzed for three candidate fiber designs including standard, segmented acoustically tailored, and micro-segmented acoustically tailored photonic-crystal fibers. It is found that each of the latter two fibers should enable a 50% higher output power than standard photonic crystal fiber.

  7. High-power continuous-wave interband cascade lasers with 10 active stages.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mijin; Bewley, William W; Canedy, Chadwick L; Kim, Chul Soo; Merritt, Charles D; Abell, Joshua; Vurgaftman, Igor; Meyer, Jerry R

    2015-04-20

    We report the pulsed and continuous wave (cw) performance of 10-stage interband cascade lasers (ICLs) emitting at both λ ≈3.2 μm and λ ≈3.45 μm. The slope efficiency is higher while the external differential quantum efficiency per stage remains about the same when comparison is made to earlier results for 7-stage ICLs with similar carrier-rebalanced designs. At T = 25°C, an 18-μm-wide ridge with 4.5 mm cavity length and high-reflection/anti-reflection coatings emits up to 464 mW of cw output power with beam quality factor M(2) = 1.9, for higher brightness than has ever been reported previously for an ICL. When the cavity length is reduced to 1 mm, both the 10-stage and 7-stage devices reach 18% cw wallplug efficiency at T = 25°C.

  8. Continuous-wave terahertz digital holographic tomography with a pyroelectric array detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bin; Wang, Dayong; Zhou, Xun; Rong, Lu; Li, Zeyu; Li, Lei; Min, Wan; Huang, Haochong; Wang, Yunxin

    2016-05-01

    Terahertz computed tomography makes use of the penetrability of terahertz radiation and obtains three-dimensional (3-D) object projection data. Continuous-wave terahertz digital holographic tomography with a pyroelectric array detector is presented. Compared with scanning terahertz computed tomography, a pyroelectric array detector can obtain a large quantity of projection data in a short time. To obtain a 3-D image, in-line digital holograms of the object are recorded from various directions and reconstructed to obtain two-dimensional (2-D) projection data; then 2-D cross-sectional images and 3-D images of the internal structure of the object are obtained by the filtered back projection algorithm. The presented system can rapidly reconstruct the 3-D object and reveals the internal 3-D structure of the object. A 3-D reconstruction of a polyethylene straw is presented with a 6% error in retrieved diameter.

  9. Sulfur-doped microstructures formed in silicon using a modulated continuous wave laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayachitula, R.; Brandt, L.; Chilton, M.; Knize, R. J.; Patterson, B. M.

    2013-05-01

    We demonstrate the enhanced optical properties of silicon microstructures formed by irradiation of a silicon surface by a modulated continuous wave (CW) laser beam in the presence of SF6. The microstructures are doped with about 0.6% sulfur, which extends the absorption well below the 1.1 μm bandgap of crystalline silicon and results in a 60% increase in the absorption of infrared radiation. This enhanced absorption as a result of these microstructures has been studied over the past decade in an effort to create high responsivity detectors and night vision goggles and improve the efficiency of solar cells. The enhanced optical absorption data we demonstrate are comparable to observations made in previous studies which were performed using more expensive and complicated laser systems such as regeneratively-amplified femtosecond pulsed laser systems and nanosecond and picosecond pulsed excimer lasers.

  10. Continuous wave two-photon scanning near-field optical microscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Kirsch, A K; Subramaniam, V; Striker, G; Schnetter, C; Arndt-Jovin, D J; Jovin, T M

    1998-01-01

    We have implemented continuous-wave two-photon excitation of near-UV absorbing fluorophores in a scanning near-field optical microscope (SNOM). The 647-nm emission of an Ar-Kr mixed gas laser was used to excite the UV-absorbing DNA dyes DAPI, the bisbenzimidazole Hoechst 33342, and ethidium bromide in a shared aperture SNOM with uncoated fiber tips. Polytene chromosomes of Drosophila melanogaster and the nuclei of 3T3 Balb/c cells labeled with these dyes were readily imaged. The fluorescence intensity showed the expected nonlinear (second order) dependence on the excitation power in the range of 8-180 mW. We measured the fluorescence intensity as a function of the tip-sample displacement in the direction normal to the sample surface in the single- and two-photon excitation modes (SPE, TPE). The fluorescence intensity decayed faster in TPE than in SPE. PMID:9726953

  11. A targeted spectral interpolation algorithm for the detection of continuous gravitational waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Gareth S.; Pitkin, Matthew; Woan, Graham

    2017-01-01

    We present an improved method of targeting continuous gravitational-wave signals in data from the LIGO and Virgo detectors with a higher efficiency than the time-domain Bayesian pipeline used in many previous searches. Our spectral interpolation algorithm, SplInter, removes the intrinsic phase evolution of the signal from source rotation and relative detector motion. We do this in the frequency domain and generate a time series containing only variations in the signal due to the antenna pattern. Although less flexible than the classic heterodyne approach, SplInter allows for rapid analysis of putative signals from isolated (and some binary) pulsars, and efficient follow-up searches for candidate signals generated by other search methods. The computational saving over the heterodyne approach can be many orders of magnitude, up to a factor of around fifty thousand in some cases, with a minimal impact on overall sensitivity for most targets.

  12. Comparison of Continuous Wave, Spin Echo, and Rapid Scan EPR of Irradiated Fused Quartz.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Deborah G; Quine, Richard W; Tseitlin, Mark; Meyer, Virginia; Eaton, Sandra S; Eaton, Gareth R

    2011-09-01

    The E' defect in irradiated fused quartz has spin lattice relaxation times (T(1)) about 100 to 300 μs and spin-spin relaxation times (T(2)) up to about 200 μs, depending on the concentration of defects and other species in the sample. These long relaxation times make it difficult to record an unsaturated continuous wave (CW) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) signal that is free of passage effects. Signals measured at X-band (~9.5 GHz) by three EPR methods: conventional slow-scan field modulated EPR, rapid scan EPR, and pulsed EPR, were compared. To acquire spectra with comparable signal-to-noise, both pulsed and rapid scan EPR require less time than conventional CW EPR. Rapid scan spectroscopy does not require the high power amplifiers that are needed for pulsed EPR. The pulsed spectra, and rapid scan spectra obtained by deconvolution of the experimental data, are free of passage effects.

  13. Continuous-wave and actively Q-switched Nd:LSO crystal lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, S.; Li, D.; Xu, X.; Wang, Z.; Yu, H.; Xu, J.; Chen, L.; Zhao, Y.; Guo, L.; Xu, X.

    2012-04-01

    With a fiber coupled laser diode array as the pump source, Nd-doped Lu2SiO5 (Nd:LSO) crystal lasers at 4F3/2→4I11/2 and 4F3/2→4I13/2 transitions were demonstrated. The active Q-switched dual-wavelength lasers at about 1.08 μm, as well as continuous-wave (CW) and active Q-switched lasers at 1357 nm are reported for the first time, to the best of our knowledge. Considering the small emission cross-sections and long fluorescence lifetime, this material possesses large energy storage ability and excellent Q-switched properties. The special emission wavelength at 1357 nm will have promising applications to be used in many fields, such as THz generation, pumping of Cr3+:LiSAF, repumping of strontium optical clock, laser Doppler velocimeter and distributed fiber sensor.

  14. Low-threshold supercontinuum generation in semiconductor nanoribbons by continuous-wave pumping.

    PubMed

    Gu, Fuxing; Yu, Huakang; Fang, Wei; Tong, Limin

    2012-04-09

    We report the first observation of supercontinuum (SC) generation in single semiconductor nanoribbons (NRs). By launching a continuous wave (CW) 532-nm pump light along a 200-μm-length CdS NR for waveguiding excitation, SC generation is realized with a threshold down to sub-milliwatt level, which is ~3 orders lower compared with previous CW-pumped SC generated in glass fibers. The low threshold is benefitted from the favorable material properties and waveguide geometries including high Raman gains, strong light confinement, more optical guided modes and phonon modes. Our work paves the way to low-threshold nanoscale SC sources and may find widespread applications ranging from spectroscopic analysis and biological imaging to material research.

  15. Continuous Nano-Particle Transport in a Standing Wave Optical Line Trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demergis, Vassili; Florin, Ernst-Ludwig

    2011-03-01

    Since the introduction of the single beam optical trap (SBT) by Ashkin et. al. in 1986, trapping and manipulation of micron-sized particles by optical forces has become instrumental in many areas of research. However, controlled transport of large numbers of particles is difficult using a SBT. Here we introduce a technique for controlled transport that we call an Optical Capillary (OC), named for its ability to strongly confine and continuously transport nanometer-sized particles. The OC, generated by an optical standing wave pattern, is especially strong along the optical axis due to the compensation of the axial scattering force. We utilize the lateral scattering forces to control the transport of particles along a line perpendicular to the optical axis. The measured velocity profiles of single particles in the OC agree with our model predictions.

  16. Interband cascade lasers with >40% continuous-wave wallplug efficiency at cryogenic temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Canedy, C. L.; Kim, C. S.; Merritt, C. D.; Bewley, W. W.; Vurgaftman, I. Meyer, J. R.; Kim, M.

    2015-09-21

    Broad-area 10-stage interband cascade lasers (ICLs) emitting at λ = 3.0–3.2 μm are shown to maintain continuous-wave (cw) wallplug efficiencies exceeding 40% at temperatures up to 125 K, despite having a design optimized for operation at ambient and above. The cw threshold current density at 80 K is only 11 A/cm{sup 2} for a 2 mm cavity with anti-reflection/high-reflection coatings on the two facets. The external differential quantum efficiency for a 1-mm-long cavity with the same coatings is 70% per stage at 80 K, and still above 65% at 150 K. The results demonstrate that at cryogenic temperatures, where free carrier absorption losses are minimized, ICLs can convert electrical to optical energy nearly as efficiently as the best specially designed intersubband-based quantum cascade lasers.

  17. Solutions of kW Continuous-wave All-fiber Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dapeng, Yan; Libo, Li; Xiaoxu, Liu; Dayong, Min

    2011-02-01

    Solutions of kW continuous-wave (CW) all-fiber laser are proposed. In our solutions, master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) configuration is applied. Output power of master oscillator is 10W, and then is amplified to 70W with 1st pre-amplifier and next scaled up to 400W. Finally, 400W fiber laser is used as a basic power unit, and 1000W all-fiber laser can be achieved by means of beam combining with large core double clad fiber (DCF) combiner. In this solution, fiber laser has good stability and reliability for dispersion coupling of pump source and inhibition of photon darkening effect in the fiber. In addition, this solution assures us realize a 1000W all-fiber laser product easily, and the cost is low.

  18. A systematic investigation of reflectance diffuse optical tomography using nonlinear reconstruction methods and continuous wave measurements

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Zhen; Zhang, Jiang; Wang, Xiaodong; Li, Changqing

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a systematic investigation of the reflectance diffuse optical tomography using continuous wave (CW) measurements and nonlinear reconstruction algorithms. We illustrated and suggested how to fine-tune the nonlinear reconstruction methods in order to optimize target localization with depth-adaptive regularizations, reduce boundary noises in the reconstructed images using a logarithm based objective function, improve reconstruction quantification using transport models, and resolve crosstalk problems between absorption and scattering contrasts with the CW reflectance measurements. The upgraded nonlinear reconstruction algorithms were evaluated with a series of numerical and experimental tests, which show the potentials of the proposed approaches for imaging both absorption and scattering contrasts in the deep targets with enhanced image quality. PMID:25401014

  19. Continuous wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy for velocity distribution measurements in plasma

    SciTech Connect

    McCarren, D.; Scime, E.

    2015-10-15

    We report the development of a continuous wave cavity ring-down spectroscopic (CW-CRDS) diagnostic for real-time, in situ measurement of velocity distribution functions of ions and neutral atoms in plasma. This apparatus is less complex than conventional CW-CRDS systems. We provide a detailed description of the CW-CRDS apparatus as well as measurements of argon ions and neutrals in a high-density (10{sup 9} cm{sup −3} < plasma density <10{sup 13} cm{sup −3}) plasma. The CW-CRDS measurements are validated through comparison with laser induced fluorescence measurements of the same absorbing states of the ions and neutrals.

  20. Infrared skin damage thresholds from 1940-nm continuous-wave laser exposures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, Jeffrey W.; Stolarski, David J.; Noojin, Gary D.; Hodnett, Harvey M.; Harbert, Corey A.; Schuster, Kurt J.; Foltz, Michael F.; Kumru, Semih S.; Cain, Clarence P.; Finkeldei, C. J.; Buffington, Gavin D.; Noojin, Isaac D.; Thomas, Robert J.

    2010-11-01

    A series of experiments are conducted in vivo using Yucatan mini-pigs (Sus scrofa domestica) to determine thermal damage thresholds to the skin from 1940-nm continuous-wave thulium fiber laser irradiation. Experiments employ exposure durations from 10 ms to 10 s and beam diameters of approximately 4.8 to 18 mm. Thermal imagery data provide a time-dependent surface temperature response from the laser. A damage endpoint of minimally visible effect is employed to determine threshold for damage at 1 and 24 h postexposure. Predicted thermal response and damage thresholds are compared with a numerical model of optical-thermal interaction. Results are compared with current exposure limits for laser safety. It is concluded that exposure limits should be based on data representative of large-beam exposures, where effects of radial diffusion are minimized for longer-duration damage thresholds.

  1. Five-wave-packet quantum error correction based on continuous-variable cluster entanglement.

    PubMed

    Hao, Shuhong; Su, Xiaolong; Tian, Caixing; Xie, Changde; Peng, Kunchi

    2015-10-26

    Quantum error correction protects the quantum state against noise and decoherence in quantum communication and quantum computation, which enables one to perform fault-torrent quantum information processing. We experimentally demonstrate a quantum error correction scheme with a five-wave-packet code against a single stochastic error, the original theoretical model of which was firstly proposed by S. L. Braunstein and T. A. Walker. Five submodes of a continuous variable cluster entangled state of light are used for five encoding channels. Especially, in our encoding scheme the information of the input state is only distributed on three of the five channels and thus any error appearing in the remained two channels never affects the output state, i.e. the output quantum state is immune from the error in the two channels. The stochastic error on a single channel is corrected for both vacuum and squeezed input states and the achieved fidelities of the output states are beyond the corresponding classical limit.

  2. Targeted search for continuous gravitational waves: Bayesian versus maximum-likelihood statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prix, Reinhard; Krishnan, Badri

    2009-10-01

    We investigate the Bayesian framework for detection of continuous gravitational waves (GWs) in the context of targeted searches, where the phase evolution of the GW signal is assumed to be known, while the four amplitude parameters are unknown. We show that the orthodox maximum-likelihood statistic (known as F-statistic) can be rediscovered as a Bayes factor with an unphysical prior in amplitude parameter space. We introduce an alternative detection statistic ('B-statistic') using the Bayes factor with a more natural amplitude prior, namely an isotropic probability distribution for the orientation of GW sources. Monte Carlo simulations of targeted searches show that the resulting Bayesian B-statistic is more powerful in the Neyman-Pearson sense (i.e., has a higher expected detection probability at equal false-alarm probability) than the frequentist F-statistic.

  3. Time-synchronized continuous wave laser-induced fluorescence on an oscillatory xenon discharge

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, N. A.; Cappelli, M. A.; Hargus, W. A. Jr.

    2012-11-15

    A novel approach to time-synchronizing laser-induced fluorescence measurements to an oscillating current in a 60 Hz xenon discharge lamp using a continuous wave laser is presented. A sample-hold circuit is implemented to separate out signals at different phases along a current cycle, and is followed by a lock-in amplifier to pull out the resulting time-synchronized fluorescence trace from the large background signal. The time evolution of lower state population is derived from the changes in intensity of the fluorescence excitation line shape resulting from laser-induced fluorescence measurements of the 6s{sup Prime }[1/2]{sub 1}{sup 0}-6p{sup Prime }[3/2]{sub 2} xenon atomic transition at {lambda}= 834.68 nm. Results show that the lower state population oscillates at twice the frequency of the discharge current, 120 Hz.

  4. Thickness measurement of tablet coating using continuous-wave terahertz reflection spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devi, Nirmala; Dash, Jyotirmayee; Ray, Shaumik; Pesala, Bala

    2016-02-01

    THz rays have higher penetration depth compared to infrared rays and hence can be effectively used to measure tablet coating thickness. In addition, THz wavelength (1 mm - 0.1 mm) provides an optimal depth resolution for the thickness measurement. This method can be non-invasive and hence ideal for inline quality monitoring. Tablet coating thickness is one of the major parameters of interest in Process Analytical Technology (PAT). In this paper, a reflection mode Continuous Wave (CW) Terahertz (THz) system has been employed to measure the tablet coating thickness. A frequency scan of the sample has been carried out from 0.1 THz to 1.1 THz and the reflection coefficient of the sample is inverse fourier transformed to obtain the tablet thickness. The calculated thickness has also been validated using the optical microscope. Results show that the thickness can be measured with considerable accuracy.

  5. Design and evaluation of a portable continuous-wave NIR topography instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yi; Zhang, Zhili; Liu, Qian; Cao, Chuanhua; Gong, Hui

    2006-09-01

    Near Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) has been widely used to access the brain functional activity non-invasively. A portable, multi-channel, continuous-wave (CW) NIR topography instrument we designed to measure the concentration changes of each hemoglobin species and map cerebral cortex functional activation. The probe of instrument consists of 4 LEDs operating at three-wavelength (735 nm & 805 nm & 850 nm) surrounded with 10 photodiodes mounted on a flexible PCB with the interoptode distance up to 2.88cm. On the basis of the modified Beer-Lambert law, the ratios of optical density changes in a ftilly oxygenated and deoxygenated state are determined by varying blood volume and hemoglobin oxygenation state in model experiment. The average ratios are 0.56. 1.74 and 0.45. Additionally, study on the phantoms is carried out to investigate the penetration depth (13 mm) of the sensor array.

  6. Continuous-wave Cr{sup 2+}:CdS laser

    SciTech Connect

    Kozlovskii, Vladimir I; Korostelin, Yurii V; Landman, Aleksandr I; Podmar'kov, Yu P; Skasyrsky, Yan K; Frolov, M P

    2010-01-31

    Continuous-wave lasing is obtained for the first time in a Cr{sup 2+}:CdS crystal pumped by a thulium fibre laser at 1908 nm. The output power of the laser at 2534 nm achieved 0.81 W with the slope efficiency with respect to the absorbed pump power equal to 52.3%. The parameters of Cr{sup 2+}:CdS and Cr{sup 2+}:CdSe lasers are compared. A Cr{sup 2+}:CdSe crystal generated 1.7 W of cw radiation at 2638 nm with the slope efficiency with respect to the absorbed power equal to 53.4%. (lasers)

  7. Optical phase locking of two infrared continuous wave lasers separated by 100  THz.

    PubMed

    Chiodo, N; Du-Burck, F; Hrabina, J; Lours, M; Chea, E; Acef, O

    2014-05-15

    We report on phase locking of two continuous wave IR laser sources separated by 100 THz emitting around 1029 and 1544 nm, respectively. Our approach uses three independent harmonic generation processes of the IR laser frequencies in periodically poled MgO:LiNbO3 crystals to generate second and third harmonics of those two IR sources. The beat note between the two independent green radiations generated around 515 nm is used to phase lock one IR laser to the other, with tunable radio frequency offset. In this way, the whole setup operates as a mini-frequency comb emitting four intense optical radiations (1544, 1029, 772, and 515 nm), with output powers at least three orders of magnitude higher than the available power from each mode emitted by femtosecond lasers.

  8. Matching of the Continuous Gravitational Wave in an All Sky Search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahay, S. K.

    We investigate the matching of continuous gravitational wave (CGW) signals in an all sky search with reference to Earth based laser interferometric detectors. We consider the source location as the parameters of the signal manifold and templates corresponding to different source locations. It has been found that the matching of signals from locations in the sky that differ in their co-latitude and longitude by π radians decreases with source frequency. We have also made an analysis with the other parameters affecting the symmetries. We observe that it may not be relevant to take care of the symmetries in the sky locations for the search of CGW from the output of LIGO-I, GEO600 and TAMA detectors.

  9. Generation of Shear Alfvén Waves by Repetitive High Power Microwave Pulses Near the Electron Plasma Frequency - A laboratory study of a ``Virtual Antenna''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuhou; Gekelman, Walter; Pribyl, Patrick; van Compernolle, Bart; Papadopoulos, Konstantinos

    2015-11-01

    ELF / ULF waves are important in terrestrial radio communications but difficult to launch using ground-based structures due to their enormous wavelengths. In spite of this generation of such waves by field-aligned ionospheric heating modulation was first demonstrated using the HAARP facility. In the future heaters near the equator will be constructed and laboratory experiments on cross-field wave propagation could be key to the program's success. Here we report a detailed laboratory study conducted on the Large Plasma Device (LaPD) at UCLA. In this experiment, ten rapid pulses of high power microwaves (250 kW X-band) near the plasma frequency were launched transverse to the background field, and were modulated at a variable fraction (0.1-1.0) of fci. Along with bulk electron heating and density modification, the microwave pulses generated a population of fast electrons. The field-aligned current carried by the fast electrons acted as an antenna that radiated shear Alfvén waves. It was demonstrated that a controllable arbitrary frequency (f wave can be generated by this method. The radiation pattern, frequency variation and power dependence of the virtual antenna is also presented. This work is supported by an AFOSR MURI award, and conducted at the Basic Plasma Science Facility at UCLA funded by DoE and NSF.

  10. Transport in Heterostructures and Device in Microwave and Millimeter Wave Regimes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-03-31

    mobility technique, and optical probes of the distribution functions. 5) We will continue the relaxation-time studies of the n- and p-doped high...support of the tasks described above. Tecnology 1) We will continue our investigation of low-temperature-grown semiconductors applied as high...Frankel, J.F. Whitaker, G.A. Mourou, J.A. Valdmanis, and P.M. Smith, 蔴- GHz Electro-optic S-parameter characterization of high electron mobility

  11. Surface Wave Tomography with Spatially Varying Smoothing Based on Continuous Model Regionalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chuanming; Yao, Huajian

    2016-11-01

    Surface wave tomography based on continuous regionalization of model parameters is widely used to invert for 2-D phase or group velocity maps. An inevitable problem is that the distribution of ray paths is far from homogeneous due to the spatially uneven distribution of stations and seismic events, which often affects the spatial resolution of the tomographic model. We present an improved tomographic method with a spatially varying smoothing scheme that is based on the continuous regionalization approach. The smoothness of the inverted model is constrained by the Gaussian a priori model covariance function with spatially varying correlation lengths based on ray path density. In addition, a two-step inversion procedure is used to suppress the effects of data outliers on tomographic models. Both synthetic and real data are used to evaluate this newly developed tomographic algorithm. In the synthetic tests, when the contrived model has different scales of anomalies but with uneven ray path distribution, we compare the performance of our spatially varying smoothing method with the traditional inversion method, and show that the new method is capable of improving the recovery in regions of dense ray sampling. For real data applications, the resulting phase velocity maps of Rayleigh waves in SE Tibet produced using the spatially varying smoothing method show similar features to the results with the traditional method. However, the new results contain more detailed structures and appears to better resolve the amplitude of anomalies. From both synthetic and real data tests we demonstrate that our new approach is useful to achieve spatially varying resolution when used in regions with heterogeneous ray path distribution.

  12. Continuous and multiple waves of emotional responses: Mother's experience with a premature infant

    PubMed Central

    Valizadeh, Laila; Zamanzadeh, Vahid; Mohammadi, Easa; Arzani, Afsaneh

    2014-01-01

    Background: In recent years, there has been a rise in the number of premature births. Mothers of these newborns experience a high degree of stress over time. Since a more comprehensive understanding of this phenomenon can help the healthcare teams in detecting the deficiencies and needs of such newborns’ mothers for a better and more effective intervention, the present study was carried out to describe the mothers’ experiences in the area of premature birth. Materials and Methods: The present study is a qualitative study with a content analysis approach. The data collection process included 15 semi-structured and in-depth interviews with the mothers delivering premature babies during 2012-2013 in the medical educational centers of north and northwest of Iran. A purposive sampling method was used. All the interviews were recorded, typed, and finally analyzed using a qualitative content analysis with a conventional method. Results: Data analysis led to the extraction of continuous and multiple waves of emotional responses in mothers with premature birth. This has been revealed in mothers by the different categories of affective reactions, symptoms of anxiety, and mood disturbances including decline in performance, individual shortcomings, and mental irritation. Conclusions: Mothers’ unpreparedness and unexpected childbirth make them encounter the multiple and continuous waves of emotional responses, which will consequently lead to decline in performance, individual shortcomings, and mental irritation among them. Therefore, in order to prevent the negative and long-term consequences of such reactions, it is recommended that more attention should be given to support these mothers as the main caregivers of such infants. PMID:25183972

  13. Effect of postural stress on left ventricular performance using the continuous-wave Doppler technique.

    PubMed

    Brown, R A; McCormick, K A; Vaitkevicius, P V; Fleg, J L

    1991-09-01

    To evaluate the effect of postural shifts on continuous-wave Doppler indices of left ventricular performance in normal man, we recorded Doppler signals suprasternally in 69 healthy volunteers, ranging in age from 20 to 86 years, in the supine position and 2 min after assumption of sitting and standing postures. All indices decreased progressively with increasing orthostasis: peak acceleration (PKA): 15.6 +/- 4.5 m/s2 to 14.0 +/- 4.0 m/s2 to 13.6 +/- 4.6 m/s2; peak velocity (PKV): 0.64 +/- 0.18 m/s to 0.58 +/- 0.17 m/s to 0.56 +/- 0.17 m/s; stroke distance (SD): 11.4 +/- 3.7 cm to 9.8 +/- 3.4 cm to 8.0 +/- 2.8 cm; SD x heart rate (VIH): 717 +/- 272 cm to 655 +/- 268 cm to 572 +/- 217 cm, from supine to sitting to standing, respectively (p less than 0.001). In contrast heart rate increased modestly from 62.4 +/- 10.0 bpm supine, to 66.9 +/- 12.4 bpm sitting, to 71.3 +/- 9.9 bpm standing (p less than .001). Similar postural changes in Doppler variables were seen in all three age groups (20 to 44 years; 45 to 64 years; and 65 to 86 years). Thus, orthostasis in normal subjects is accompanied by a reduction in all continuous-wave Doppler indices of left ventricular performance, regardless of age.

  14. Surface Wave Tomography with Spatially Varying Smoothing Based on Continuous Model Regionalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chuanming; Yao, Huajian

    2017-03-01

    Surface wave tomography based on continuous regionalization of model parameters is widely used to invert for 2-D phase or group velocity maps. An inevitable problem is that the distribution of ray paths is far from homogeneous due to the spatially uneven distribution of stations and seismic events, which often affects the spatial resolution of the tomographic model. We present an improved tomographic method with a spatially varying smoothing scheme that is based on the continuous regionalization approach. The smoothness of the inverted model is constrained by the Gaussian a priori model covariance function with spatially varying correlation lengths based on ray path density. In addition, a two-step inversion procedure is used to suppress the effects of data outliers on tomographic models. Both synthetic and real data are used to evaluate this newly developed tomographic algorithm. In the synthetic tests, when the contrived model has different scales of anomalies but with uneven ray path distribution, we compare the performance of our spatially varying smoothing method with the traditional inversion method, and show that the new method is capable of improving the recovery in regions of dense ray sampling. For real data applications, the resulting phase velocity maps of Rayleigh waves in SE Tibet produced using the spatially varying smoothing method show similar features to the results with the traditional method. However, the new results contain more detailed structures and appears to better resolve the amplitude of anomalies. From both synthetic and real data tests we demonstrate that our new approach is useful to achieve spatially varying resolution when used in regions with heterogeneous ray path distribution.

  15. Microwave & Magnetic (M2) Proteomics Reveals CNS-Specific Protein Expression Waves that Precede Clinical Symptoms of Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raphael, Itay; Mahesula, Swetha; Purkar, Anjali; Black, David; Catala, Alexis; Gelfond, Jonathon A. L.; Forsthuber, Thomas G.; Haskins, William E.

    2014-09-01

    Central nervous system-specific proteins (CSPs), transported across the damaged blood-brain-barrier (BBB) to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood (serum), might be promising diagnostic, prognostic and predictive protein biomarkers of disease in individual multiple sclerosis (MS) patients because they are not expected to be present at appreciable levels in the circulation of healthy subjects. We hypothesized that microwave & magnetic (M2) proteomics of CSPs in brain tissue might be an effective means to prioritize putative CSP biomarkers for future immunoassays in serum. To test this hypothesis, we used M2 proteomics to longitudinally assess CSP expression in brain tissue from mice during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a mouse model of MS. Confirmation of central nervous system (CNS)-infiltrating inflammatory cell response and CSP expression in serum was achieved with cytokine ELISPOT and ELISA immunoassays, respectively, for selected CSPs. M2 proteomics (and ELISA) revealed characteristic CSP expression waves, including synapsin-1 and α-II-spectrin, which peaked at day 7 in brain tissue (and serum) and preceded clinical EAE symptoms that began at day 10 and peaked at day 20. Moreover, M2 proteomics supports the concept that relatively few CNS-infiltrating inflammatory cells can have a disproportionally large impact on CSP expression prior to clinical manifestation of EAE.

  16. The Characteristics of Columniform Surface Wave Plasma Excited Around a Quartz Rod by 2.45 GHz Microwaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhonghang; Liang, Rongqing; Nagatsu, Masaaki; Chang, Xijiang

    2016-10-01

    A novel surface wave plasma (SWP) source excited with cylindrical Teflon waveguide has been developed in our previous work. The plasma characteristics have been simply studied. In this work, our experimental device has been significantly improved by replacing the Teflon waveguide with a quartz rod, and then better microwave coupling and higher gas purity can be obtained during plasma discharge. The plasma spatial distributions, both in radial and axial directions, have been measured and the effect of gas pressure has been investigated. Plasma density profiles indicate that this plasma source can produce uniform plasma in an axial direction at low pressure, which shows its potential in plasma processing on a curved surface such as an inner tube wall. A simplified circular waveguide model has been used to explain the principle of plasma excitation. The distinguishing features and potential application of this kind of plasma source with a hardware improvement have been shown. supported in part by National Natural Science of Foundation of China (Nos. 11005021, 51177017 and 11175049), the Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research of Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (No. 21110010) and the Fudan University Excellent Doctoral Research Program (985 project) and the Ph.D Programs Foundation of Ministry of Education of China (No. 20120071110031)

  17. A contactless approach for respiratory gating in PET using continuous-wave radar

    SciTech Connect

    Ersepke, Thomas Büther, Florian; Heß, Mirco; Schäfers, Klaus P.

    2015-08-15

    Purpose: Respiratory gating is commonly used to reduce motion artifacts in positron emission tomography (PET). Clinically established methods for respiratory gating in PET require contact to the patient or a direct optical line between the sensor and the patient’s torso and time consuming preparation. In this work, a contactless method for capturing a respiratory signal during PET is presented based on continuous-wave radar. Methods: The proposed method relies on the principle of emitting an electromagnetic wave and detecting the phase shift of the reflected wave, modulated due to the respiratory movement of the patient’s torso. A 24 GHz carrier frequency was chosen allowing wave propagation through plastic and clothing with high reflections at the skin surface. A detector module and signal processing algorithms were developed to extract a quantitative respiratory signal. The sensor was validated using a high precision linear table. During volunteer measurements and [{sup 18}F] FDG PET scans, the radar sensor was positioned inside the scanner bore of a PET/computed tomography scanner. As reference, pressure belt (one volunteer), depth camera-based (two volunteers, two patients), and PET data-driven (six patients) signals were acquired simultaneously and the signal correlation was quantified. Results: The developed system demonstrated a high measurement accuracy for movement detection within the submillimeter range. With the proposed method, small displacements of 25 μm could be detected, not considerably influenced by clothing or blankets. From the patient studies, the extracted respiratory radar signals revealed high correlation (Pearson correlation coefficient) to those derived from the external pressure belt and depth camera signals (r = 0.69–0.99) and moderate correlation to those of the internal data-driven signals (r = 0.53–0.70). In some cases, a cardiac signal could be visualized, due to the representation of the mechanical heart motion on the skin

  18. Contact flexible microstrip applicators (CFMA) in a range from microwaves up to short waves.

    PubMed

    Gelvich, Edward A; Mazokhin, Vladimir N

    2002-09-01

    Contact flexible microstrip applicator (CFMA) is a new light-weight microstrip applicator type for superficial and deep local hyperthermia. Typical specimens are developed for operation at frequencies of 434, 70, 40, and 27 MHz. The main common features of CFMA, namely, their flexibility and light weight, as well as their aperture dimensions slightly depend on the operating frequency. Two antenna types are used in CFMAs: inductive antennas with a radiating plane electrical dipole at microwaves, and coplanar capacitive antennas, providing depression of the normal component of the electrical field in the very high-frequency (VHF) and high-frequency (HF) range. The flexibility of the applicators enables one to conform them with curved surfaces. In a bent state of the applicators there arises a focusing effect of energy deposition in deeper located tissues due to linear polarization of the irradiated electromagnetic (EM) field, inherent in CFMA. All CFMA are integrated with silicon water boluses which serve as a matching element, so as a skin cooling agent. Due to this and to the predominance of the tangential electrical component in the radiated EM field, no fat overheating effects are noticed, as a rule. The aperture of the developed applicators overlap the range 160-630 cm2 providing effective heating field sizes (EFSs) 64-400 cm2, respectively. The most bulky CFMAs with an aperture of (21 x 29) cm2 operating at the frequency of 434 MHz weigh 0.8 kg and 2.5 kg at 27 MHz. Phenomenological analysis of the radiating systems, as well as experimental evaluation of the applicators are presented. CFMAs operating at frequencies of 434 and 40 MHz are used in clinical practice. CFMA at 70 and 27 MHz are subjected to laboratory clinical investigations.

  19. QUaD: A millimeter-wave polarimeter for observation of the cosmic microwave background radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinderks, James R.

    2005-11-01

    This thesis describes the design and performance of the QUaD experiment and presents some of its earliest results. QUaD is a millimeter-wavelength polarimeter designed for observing the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). QUaD was commissioned at the MAPO observatory at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station in the Austral Summer of 2004/2005, achieved first light in Feb 2005, and began science observation in May. QUaD observes the CMB with an array of 31 polarization-sensitive Neutron Transmutation Doped (NTD) germanium bolometers split between two frequency bands centered at 100 and 150 GHz. The telescope is a 2.6 m on-axis Cassegrain design with beam sizes of 6.3' and 4.2' at the two respective observing frequencies. The resolution and scan strategy are optimized to probe the CMB E- mode power spectrum over a multipole range of 100 to 2500. The performance of the system has been characterized with commissioning observations and a high signal-to-noise map of the CMB temperature anisotropy has been made over a ~50 square degree area. CMB polarization anisotropies, only recently detected, promise a wealth of new cosmological information. Their observation complements the many successful temperature anisotropy measurements already performed, confirming our basic understanding of the early universe and leading to tighter constraints on cosmological parameters. Furthermore, polarization observations provide a probe of structure since the last scattering surface and promise unique constraints on inflation through the imprint of relict gravitational radiation.

  20. A direct current rectification scheme for microwave space power conversion using traveling wave electron acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manning, Robert M.

    1993-01-01

    The formation of the Vision-21 conference held three years ago allowed the present author to reflect and speculate on the problem of converting electromagnetic energy to a direct current by essentially reversing the process used in traveling wave tubes that converts energy in the form of a direct current to electromagnetic energy. The idea was to use the electric field of the electromagnetic wave to produce electrons through the field emission process and accelerate these electrons by the same field to produce an electric current across a large potential difference. The acceleration process was that of cyclotron auto-resonance. Since that time, this rather speculative ideas has been developed into a method that shows great promise and for which a patent is pending and a prototype design will be demonstrated in a potential laser power beaming application. From the point of view of the author, a forum such as Vision-21 is becoming an essential component in the rather conservative climate in which our initiatives for space exploration are presently formed. Exchanges such as Vision-21 not only allows us to deviate from the 'by-the-book' approach and rediscover the ability and power in imagination, but provides for the discussion of ideas hitherto considered 'crazy' so that they may be given the change to transcend from the level of eccentricity to applicability.

  1. Study of the effect of NbN on microwave Niobium cavities for gravitational wave detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liccardo, V.; França, E. K.; Aguiar, O. D.; Oliveira, R. M.; Ribeiro, K. L.; Silva, M. M. N. F.

    2016-07-01

    Superconducting reentrant cavities may be used in parametric transducers for resonant-mass gravitational wave detectors. When coupled to a spherical resonant antenna, transducers will monitor its mechanical quadrupolar modes, working as a mass-spring system. In this paper we will investigate the effect of the Niobium Nitride (NbN), produced through plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII), on the quality factor of reentrant Niobium (Nb) cavities. With the PIII surface treatment unloaded electrical Q-factors (Q0) of the order of 105 were obtained in cryogenic conditions. These results indicated a significant increase in the effect of superconductivity after the cavity surfaces have been heavily attacked by a concentrated acid mixture and after suffering successive PIII processes. Q0's ~ 3.0 × 105 at 4.2 K are expected to be obtained using Nb RRR399 with a suitable surface treatment. These cavities, with high Q0, are already installed and being tested in the Gravitational Wave Detector Mario Schenberg. The experimental tests have been carried out at the laboratories of the National Institute for Space Research (INPE).

  2. Continuous-Wave Stimulated Emission Depletion Microscope for Imaging Actin Cytoskeleton in Fixed and Live Cells

    PubMed Central

    Neupane, Bhanu; Jin, Tao; Mellor, Liliana F.; Loboa, Elizabeth G.; Ligler, Frances S.; Wang, Gufeng

    2015-01-01

    Stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy provides a new opportunity to study fine sub-cellular structures and highly dynamic cellular processes, which are challenging to observe using conventional optical microscopy. Using actin as an example, we explored the feasibility of using a continuous wave (CW)-STED microscope to study the fine structure and dynamics in fixed and live cells. Actin plays an important role in cellular processes, whose functioning involves dynamic formation and reorganization of fine structures of actin filaments. Frequently used confocal fluorescence and STED microscopy dyes were employed to image fixed PC-12 cells (dyed with phalloidin- fluorescein isothiocyante) and live rat chondrosarcoma cells (RCS) transfected with actin-green fluorescent protein (GFP). Compared to conventional confocal fluorescence microscopy, CW-STED microscopy shows improved spatial resolution in both fixed and live cells. We were able to monitor cell morphology changes continuously; however, the number of repetitive analyses were limited primarily by the dyes used in these experiments and could be improved with the use of dyes less susceptible to photobleaching. In conclusion, CW-STED may disclose new information for biological systems with a proper characteristic length scale. The challenges of using CW-STED microscopy to study cell structures are discussed. PMID:26393614

  3. High-temperature continuous-wave laser realized in hollow microcavities

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Zhifeng; Zhang, Yuantao; Cui, Xijun; Zhuang, Shiwei; Wu, Bin; Dong, Xin; Zhang, Baolin; Du, Guotong

    2014-01-01

    Recently, an urgent requirement of ultraviolet (UV) semiconductor laser with lower cost and higher performance has motivated our intensive research in zinc oxide (ZnO) material owing to its wide direct band gap and large exciton binding energy. Here, we demonstrate for the first time continuous-wave laser in electrically-pumped hollow polygonal microcavities based on epitaxial ZnO/MgO-core/shell nanowall networks structures, and whispering gallery type resonant modes are responsible for the lasing action. The laser diodes exhibit an ultralow threshold current density (0.27 A/cm2), two or three orders of magnitude smaller than other reported UV-light semiconductor laser diodes to our knowledge. More importantly, the continuous-current-driven diode can achieve lasing up to ~430 K, showing a good temperature tolerance. This study indicates that nano-size injection lasers can be made from epitaxial semiconductor microcavities, which is a considerable advance towards the realization of practical UV coherent light sources, facilitating the existing applications and suggesting new potentials. PMID:25417966

  4. Peregrine rogue wave dynamics in the continuous nonlinear Schrödinger system with parity-time symmetric Kerr nonlinearity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Samit Kumar; Sarma, Amarendra K.

    2016-07-01

    In this work, we have studied the peregrine rogue wave dynamics, with a solitons on finite background (SFB) ansatz, in the recently proposed (Ablowitz and Musslimani, (2013) [31]) continuous nonlinear Schrödinger system with parity-time symmetric Kerr nonlinearity. We have found that the continuous nonlinear Schrödinger system with PT-symmetric nonlinearity also admits Peregrine soliton solution. Motivated by the fact that Peregrine solitons are regarded as prototypical solutions of rogue waves, we have studied Peregrine rogue wave dynamics in the c-PTNLSE model. Upon numerical computation, we observe the appearance of low-intense Kuznetsov-Ma (KM) soliton trains in the absence of transverse shift (unbroken PT-symmetry) and well-localized high-intense Peregrine rogue waves in the presence of transverse shift (broken PT-symmetry) in a definite parametric regime.

  5. Microwave kinetic inductance detector camera development for millimeter-wave astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlaerth, James A.

    This thesis describes my contribution to the design, assembly and testing required for a camera using antenna-coupled Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors (MKIDs). MKIDs are superconducting resonators in which the resonance frequency and quality factor are sensitive measures of Cooper pairs broken by incident radiation. The MKID camera, called the Multicolor Submillimeter Inductance Camera (MUSIC), is built to detect and characterize the physics of dusty submillimeter galaxies, the primary component of the far-infrared background discovered by the COBE satellite. The camera will have 576 pixels sensitive to 4 colors simultaneously in the range of 150--360 GHz. With these bands, combined with shorter wavelength data from instruments on the Spitzer and Herschel far-infrared satellites, we can find the integrated flux from high-redshift dusty galaxies and identify galaxies likely to be at extremely high redshift. We have achieved first light using a demonstration instrument ("DemoCam"), testing two colors, centered at 240 GHz and 350 GHz, in 2007, and demonstrated three-color operation in 2010. In the thesis is discussed the design, testing and optimization of DemoCam, in particular its function in testing several iterations of arrays of antenna-coupled MKID resonators. The arrays tested are 4x4 arrays of two-color antenna pixels, and newer 6x6 arrays of three-color antenna pixels, the latter with a "dark" or uncoupled resonator for each antenna. This testing has been used to explore the physics of the detectors, test which properties maximize the detector signal-to-noise ratio, and to inform the MKID camera's optical design. The goal of this testing is find how to improve sensitivity to minimize Noise Equivalent Power in the presence of large background loads, as in ground-based sub/millimeter astronomy. The DemoCam is shown to reach interesting levels of sensitivity on the sky in three colors (230, 290 and 350 GHz), and to have effective calibration mechanisms

  6. The advanced cosmic microwave explorer - A millimeter-wave telescope and stabilized platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meinhold, P. R.; Chingcuanco, A. O.; Gundersen, J. O.; Schuster, J. A.; Seiffert, M. D.; Lubin, P. M.; Morris, D.; Villela, T.

    1993-01-01

    We have developed and flown a 1 m diameter Gregorian telescope system for measurements of anisotropy in the Cosmic Background Radiation (CBR). The telescope is incorporated in a balloon-borne stabilized platform with arcminute stabilization capability. To date, the system has flown four times and observed from the ground at the South Pole twice. The telescope has used both coherent and incoherent detectors. We describe the development of the telescope, pointing platform, and one of the receivers employed in making measurements of the CBR. Performance of the system during the first flight and operation on the ground at the South Pole are described, and the quality of the South Pole as a millimeter wave observing site is discussed.

  7. PRACTICAL METHODS FOR CONTINUOUS GRAVITATIONAL WAVE DETECTION USING PULSAR TIMING DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, J. A.; Jenet, F. A.; McLaughlin, M. A.

    2012-07-10

    Gravitational waves (GWs) are tiny ripples in the fabric of space time predicted by Einstein's general relativity. Pulsar timing arrays (PTAs) are well poised to detect low-frequency (10{sup -9}-10{sup -7} Hz) GWs in the near future. There has been a significant amount of research into the detection of a stochastic background of GWs from supermassive black hole binaries (SMBHBs). Recent work has shown that single continuous sources standing out above the background may be detectable by PTAs operating at a sensitivity sufficient to detect the stochastic background. The most likely sources of continuous GWs in the pulsar timing frequency band are extremely massive and/or nearby SMBHBs. In this paper we present detection strategies including various forms of matched filtering and power spectral summing. We determine the efficacy and computational cost of such strategies. It is shown that using an optimal matched filter explicitly including the poorly constrained pulsar distances with a grid-based method is computationally infeasible. We show that an Earth-term-matched filter constructed using only the correlated signal terms is robust, computationally viable and highly sensitive to GW signals. We further show that a simple power spectral summing technique is nearly equivalent to the Earth-term-matched filter in terms of the minimum detectable amplitude. Both of these techniques are only a factor of two less sensitive than the computationally unrealizable optimal matched filter. We also show that a pairwise matched filter, taking the pulsar distances into account, is comparable to the optimal matched filter for the single template case and comparable to the Earth-term-matched filter for many search templates. Finally, using simulated data optimal quality, we place a theoretical minimum detectable strain amplitude of h > 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -15} from continuous GWs at frequencies on the order {approx}1/T{sub obs}.

  8. Study on characteristics of diode-pumped continuous-wave tunable and passively Q-switched Tm:SSO laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, T. L.; Zhao, S. Z.; Yang, K. J.; Li, G. Q.; Li, D. C.; Zhao, J.; Qiao, W. C.; Zheng, L. H.; Xu, J.; Wang, Q. G.; Xu, X. D.; Su, L. B.

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, we present a diode-pumped continuous-wave tunable and Q-switched Tm:SSO laser with a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror. In continuous-wave regime, a maximum output power of 340 mW at 1,980.7 nm was obtained. With a quartz plate, wavelength-tunable continuous-wave operation was achieved from 1,922 to 2,020 nm. In Q-switched regime, a maximum output pulse energy of 14.7 μJ under a repetition rate of 800 Hz and a minimum pulse width of 7.6 μs corresponding to a repetition rate of 8.8 kHz around 1,974.4 nm were obtained from the passively Q-switched Tm:SSO laser.

  9. The cause of high-intensity long-duration continuous AE activity (HILDCAAS) - Interplanetary Alfven wave trains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsurutani, Bruce T.; Gonzalez, Walter D.

    1987-01-01

    It is shown that high intensity (AE of greater than 1,000 nT), long duration (T of greater than 2d) continuous auroral activity events are caused by outward (from the sun) propagating interplanetary Alfven wave trains. The Alfven waves are often (but not always) detected several days after major interplanetary events, such as shocks and solar wind density enhancements. Presumably, magnetic reconnection between the southward components of the Alfven wave magnetic fields and magnetospheric fields is the mechanism for transfer of solar wind energy to the magnetosphere.

  10. The use of near-infrared and microwave resonance sensing to monitor a continuous roller compaction process.

    PubMed

    Austin, John; Gupta, Anshu; McDonnell, Ryan; Reklaitis, Gintaras V; Harris, Michael T

    2013-06-01

    Roller compaction is commonly used in the pharmaceutical and nutraceutical industries to increase and narrow the size distribution of a particulate material, making it easier to process. Both the moisture content of the material and the density of the roller compacted ribbon affect the uniformity and physical properties of the resultant granules. Without process analytical technologies, these parameters cannot be determined on-line or in real time. In this study, the more commonly used near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy was compared and contrasted with microwave resonance for the determination of roller-compacted ribbons' envelope density and moisture content. Results indicate that microwave resonance can offer improved accuracy, robustness, and ease-of-use compared with NIR spectroscopy for these property measurements.

  11. Production of Volume Wave Plasma with Internally Mounted Cylindrical Planar Microwave Launcher and Two-Dimensional Field Analysis Using Finite Difference Time Domain Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogino, Akihisa; Naito, Katsutoshi; Terashita, Fumie; Nanko, Shohei; Nagatsu, Masaaki

    2005-02-01

    In this paper, we presented experimental results on the production of volume wave plasma (VWP) using an internally mounted cylindrical planar microwave launcher, for application to novel plasma processings, such as inner wall coating, impurity-free etching or internal sterilization of medical instruments using VWP. It was demonstrated that the ellipsoidal VWP is produced in front of a microwave launcher in He or Ar gas atmosphere. Numerical analyses of microwave fields radiated from a planar launcher have been carried out using the two-dimensional finite difference time domain (FDTD) method to determine the mechanism of VWP production in middle of the chamber. It was shown that the calculation results showed fairly good agreements with the experimental results measured using a dipole antenna probe. The spatial distributions of plasma density and the temperature of VWP were also measured using a double probe. It was found that the electron density is comparable to or slightly less than cutoff density of 7.4 × 1010 cm-3 corresponding to the microwave frequency of fm=2.45 GHz, and that the electron temperature is approximately 6 eV at the plasma center.

  12. Quasi continuous-wave lasing in organic thin-film semiconductors (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanadanayaka, Atula S. D.; Yoshida, Kou; Ribierre, Jean-Charles; Matsushima, Toshinori; Adachi, Chihaya

    2016-09-01

    Since the discovery of organic solid-state lasers, great efforts have been devoted to the development of continuous-wave (cw) lasing in organic materials. However, the operation of organic solid-state lasers under optical cw excitation or pulse excitation at a very high repetition rate (quasi-cw excitation) is extremely challenging. In this work, we have demonstrated quasi-continuous-wave (quasi-cw) surface-emitting lasing in a distributed feedback device which combines a second-order grating with an organic thin film of a host material 4,4'-bis(N-carbazolyl)-1,1'-biphenyl (CBP) blended with an organic laser dye 4,4'-bis[(N-carbazole)styryl]biphenyl (BSBCz). When pumping the device with optical picosecond pulse excitation, the quasi-cw laser operation maintained up to a repetition rate of 8 MHz. The lasing threshold was around 0.25 μJ cm-2 which was almost independent of the repetition rates. For our laser devices, the maximum repetition rate (8 MHz) is the highest ever reported, and the lasing threshold (0.25 μJ cm-2) is the lowest ever reported. These superior quasi-cw lasing characteristics in BSBCz are accomplished by the less generation of triplet excitons via intersystem crossing because a photoluminescence quantum yield of the blend film is nearly 100% and there is no significant spectral overlap between laser and triplet absorption.[1,2] Triplet quenchers, generally used for the fabrication of organic thin-film lasers, were not necessary in our devices because of negligible accumulation of triplet excitons and a small spectral overlap between emission and triplet absorption. Therefore, we believe that BSBCz is the most promising candidate for the first realization of electrically pumped organic laser diodes in terms of optical characteristics. However, electrical characteristics such as charge carrier mobility, charge carrier capture cross section, etc., are also extremely important and will need further investigation and enhancement for realization of

  13. Propagation of microwaves in gradient transmission lines: exactly solvable model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shvartsburg, A. B.; Silin, N. V.

    2015-08-01

    Propagation of microwaves along the transmission line with smoothly continuously distributed capacitance and inductance (gradient transmission line) is considered in the framework of an exactly solvable model. The appearance of strong heterogeneity-induced plasma-like dispersion in gradient transmission line determined by the sizes and shapes of these distributions, is visualized by means of this model. Owing to this dispersion the energy transport in the line discussed can be ensured by both travelling and evanescent microwave modes, characterized by the real and imaginary wave numbers, respectively. The reflectance spectra for microwaves, incident on this heterogeneous transition section located between two homogeneous sections of transmission line are presented, the antireflection properties of this section are demonstrated. The interference of evanescent and anti-evanescent microwave modes is shown to provide the effective weakly attenuated energy transfer in the tunneling regime. The analogy between this microwave system and gradient nano-optical photonic barrier in revealed.

  14. The effect of nonuniform motion on the Doppler spectrum of scattered continuous-wave waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, John E.; Addison, Stephen R.

    2003-04-01

    The Doppler effect is a widely treated phenomena in both radar and sonar for objects undergoing uniform motion. There are many different models (Censor has written a history of the subject) one can use to derive the Doppler effect. The treatment of non-uniform motion is not widely discussed in the literature of radar and sonar. Some authors argue it is negligible, while others refer to work dating back to Kelly in the early sixties. The treatment by Kelly, based on waveform analysis in acoustics, is difficult to justify in electromagnetism. Using the language of waveform analysis it is difficult to determine when approximations are justified by the physics of the waveform interaction and when they aren't. By returning to electromagnetic considerations in the derivation and subsequent analysis, issues associated with the correct physics and proper approximations become transparent. We present a straight forward analysis of the non-uniform Doppler effect based on the relativistic mirror (moving boundary) that is undergoing arbitrary motion. The resultant structure of the scattered waveform provides a simple representation of the effect of non-uniform motion on the scattered waveform that can be more easily analyzed. This work is a continuation of earlier work done by Censor, De Smedt, and Cooper. This analysis is independent of narrow-band assumptions so it is completely general. Non-uniform motion can produce two types of effects associated with the Doppler spectrum, a baseband line that isn't straight and micro-Doppler off of the baseband that produces complicated sideband behavior. Complicated baseband and micro-Doppler are illustrated by using the example of a particular waveform, the continuous wave (CW) which is analyzed for a number of examples of interest to the radar community. Application of this information is then discussed.

  15. Experimental investigation on thermal ablation of carbon-fiber/epoxy composite irradiated by continuous wave laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Minbo; Ma, Zhiliang; Chen, Linzhu; Lin, Xinwei; Zhou, Menglian

    2015-05-01

    The tests of carbon-fiber/epoxy composite laminates, subjected to a tangential gas-flow and 1070 nm continuous wave laser are carried out to acquire the ablation laws of samples on the conditions of different gas-flow. Simultaneously, considered the images from camera of large dynamic range, the damage laws of samples are also obtained for various laser power densities. Experimental results reveal that, without airflow on sample surface, the smoke caused by laser heating can be quickly on fire which causes a burn damage on the surface of samples so that the mass loss is most of all. However, the tangential airflow can remove away the smoke which has a weakening effect on the energy of incidence laser. So the ablation depth has an obvious increase in laser irradiation area. Unlike airflow, nitrogen flow can obviously restrain oxidation ablation on surface so that the ablation damage in laser irradiation area is relatively not severe. On the other hand, as laser power density increases, the mass loss of samples continues to rise but isn't proportional. And the ablation heat with the increase of power density shows a complex change. Below power density of 390 W/cm2, the mass loss mainly depends on the pyrolysis of epoxy while the ablation heat has a gradual decrease. Along with power density increasing but less than 1330 W/cm2 , the oxidation ablation of carbon fibers will be a leading factor and the ablation heat shows a little increase. Above power density of 1330 W/cm2 , the carbon fibers turn up the phenomenon of sublimation. What's more, airflow removed effects will be enhanced in high temperature. In this case, the ablation heat again has a trend of decrease.

  16. Developing a narrow-line laser spectrometer based on a tunable continuous-wave dye laser

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Chun; Lv, Shasha; Bi, Jin; Liu, Fang; Li, Liufeng; Chen, Lisheng

    2014-08-15

    We present the development of a dye-laser-based spectrometer operating at 550–600 nm. The spectrometer will be used to detect an ultra-narrow clock transition ({sup 1}S{sub 0}-{sup 3}P{sub 0}) in an Ytterbium optical lattice clock and perform high-resolution spectroscopy of iodine molecules trapped in the sub-nanometer channels of zeolite crystal (AlPO{sub 4}-11). Two-stage Pound-Drever-Hall frequency stabilization is implemented on the tunable continuous-wave dye laser to obtain a reliable operation and provide stable laser radiations with two different spectral linewidths. In the first-stage frequency locking, a compact home-built intracavity electro-optic modulator is adopted for suppressing fast frequency noise. With an acquisition time of 0.1 s the 670-kHz linewidth of the free-running dye laser is reduced to 2 kHz when locked to a pre-stabilization optical cavity with a finesse of 1170. When the pre-stabilized laser is locked to a high-finesse optical cavity, a linewidth of 1.4 Hz (2 s) is observed and the frequency stability is 3.7 × 10{sup −15} (3 s). We also measure and analyze the individual noise contributions such as those from residual amplitude modulation and electronic noise. The ongoing upgrades include improving long-term frequency stability at time scales from 10 to 100 s and implementing continuous frequency scan across 10 GHz with radio-frequency precision.

  17. Continuous-wave far-infrared ESR spectrometer for high-pressure measurements.

    PubMed

    Náfrádi, Bálint; Gaál, Richárd; Sienkiewicz, Andrzej; Fehér, Titusz; Forró, László

    2008-12-01

    We present a newly-developed microwave probe for performing sensitive high-field/multi-frequency electron spin resonance (ESR) measurements under high hydrostatic pressures. The system consists of a BeCu-made pressure-resistant vessel, which accommodates the investigated sample and a diamond microwave coupling window. The probe's interior is completely filled with a pressure-transmitting fluid. The setup operates in reflection mode and can easily be assembled with a standard oversized microwave circuitry. The probe-head withstands hydrostatic pressures up to 1.6 GPa and interfaces with our home-built quasi-optical high-field ESR facility, operating in a millimeter/submillimeter frequency range of 105-420 GHz and in magnetic fields up to 16 T. The overall performance of the probe was tested, while studying the pressure-induced changes in the spin-relaxation mechanisms of a quasi-1D conducting polymer, KC(60). The preliminary measurements revealed that the probe yields similar signal-to-noise ratio to that of commercially available low-frequency ESR spectrometers. Moreover, by observing the conduction electron spin resonance (CESR) linewidth broadening for KC(60) in an unprecedented microwave frequency range of 210-420 GHz and in the pressure range of up to 1.6 GPa, we demonstrate that a combination of high-pressure ESR probe and high-field/multi-frequency spectrometer allows us to measure the spin relaxation rates in conducting spin systems, like the quasi-1D conductor, KC(60).

  18. Deep drilling of silica glass by continuous-wave laser backside irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidai, Hirofumi; Saito, Namiko; Matsusaka, Souta; Chiba, Akira; Morita, Noboru

    2016-04-01

    We propose a novel method for drilling of silica glass based on the continuous-wave laser backside irradiation (CW-LBI) phenomenon. The method allows drilling to be performed by single-shot irradiation using a CW laser. A spindle-shaped emission is generated in the bulk glass and is then guided to the glass surface, and at the instant that the beam reaches the surface, the glass material is ejected. The glass ejection process occurs for a time of ~250 μs. A hole that is similar in shape to that of the spindle-shaped emission is left. The hole length tended to increase linearly with increasing laser power. The laser power dependence of the spindle-shaped emission propagation velocity is also linear, and the velocity increases with increasing laser power. The hole diameters were smaller in the case where the laser focus position was set on the glass surface, and these diameters increased with increasing defocusing. The maximum hole depth reached more than 5 mm. Through-hole drilling was demonstrated using a 3-mm-thick glass substrate.

  19. A continuous-wave clinotron at 0.26 THz with sheet electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, Hongzhu; He, Zhaochang; Wang, Jianguo; Li, Rong; Zhu, Gang; Chen, Zaigao; liu, Jinsong; Liu, Luwei; Wang, Hao

    2017-03-01

    A high performance continuous-wave (CW) clinotron with a sheet electron beam at 0.26 THz is presented in this paper. The mode selection is discussed by studying the dispersion curve of the high frequency structure, distribution of the electric field, coupling impedance, and particle-in-cell simulation result, showing that the designed clinotron operates in the fundamental mode TM10. The planar comb gratings are fabricated by using the wire electrical discharge machining technology with the processing error less than 0.005 mm. The electron gun can provide the 2.5 mm × 0.14 mm sheet electron beam with a maximum current density of 57 A/cm2 at the CW mode. Experimental results show that the developed clinotron can operate at the fundamental mode TM10 and generate an output power of 820 mW at a frequency of 0.26 THz with a large frequency tuning range from 0.25 THz to 0.262 THz.

  20. Continuous-wave and passively Q-switched Nd:LYSO lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, S. D.; Xu, X. D.; Wang, Z. P.; Li, D. Z.; Yu, H. H.; Xu, J.; Guo, L.; Chen, L. J.; Zhao, Y. G.; Xu, X. G.

    2011-04-01

    Continuous-wave (CW) and passively Q-switched performance of a Nd-doped oyorthosilicate mixing crystal, (Nd0.005Lu0.4975Y0.4975)2SiO5 (Nd:LYSO), were reported. As a result, new dual-wavelength all-solid-state lasers at 1075 and 1079 nm were achieved. When the absorbed pump power was 3.87 W, the CW laser produced 1.1 W output, corresponding to an optical conversion efficiency of 28.4% and a slope efficiency of 32.4%. By using a Cr4+:YAG wafer as the saturable absorber, we achieved Q-switching operation of Nd:LYSO crystal. The maximal average output power, shortest pulse width, largest pulse energy and highest peak power were measured to be 294 mW, 27.5 ns, 34.3 μJ and 1.18 kW, respectively. By difference frequency, these dual-wavelength lasers have potential applications for the generation of a broadband coherent radiation from 0.7-1.3 THz.

  1. Continuous-wave infrared optical nerve stimulation for potential diagnostic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tozburun, Serhat; Cilip, Christopher M.; Lagoda, Gwen A.; Burnett, Arthur L.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2010-09-01

    Optical nerve stimulation using infrared laser radiation has recently been developed as a potential alternative to electrical nerve stimulation. However, recent studies have focused primarily on pulsed delivery of the laser radiation and at relatively low pulse rates. The objective of this study is to demonstrate faster optical stimulation of the prostate cavernous nerves using continuous-wave (cw) infrared laser radiation for potential diagnostic applications. A thulium fiber laser (λ=1870 nm) is used for noncontact optical stimulation of the rat prostate cavernous nerves in vivo. Optical nerve stimulation, as measured by an intracavernous pressure (ICP) response in the penis, is achieved with the laser operating in either cw mode, or with a 5-ms pulse duration at 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, and 100 Hz. Successful optical stimulation is observed to be primarily dependent on a threshold nerve temperature (42 to 45 °C), rather than an incident fluence, as previously reported. cw optical nerve stimulation provides a significantly faster ICP response time using a lower power (and also less expensive) laser than pulsed stimulation. cw optical nerve stimulation may therefore represent an alternative mode of stimulation for intraoperative diagnostic applications where a rapid response is critical, such as identification of the cavernous nerves during prostate cancer surgery.

  2. Ultrasonic transcutaneous energy transfer using a continuous wave 650 kHz Gaussian shaded transmitter.

    PubMed

    Ozeri, Shaul; Shmilovitz, Doron; Singer, Sigmond; Wang, Chua-Chin

    2010-06-01

    This paper proposes ultrasonic transcutaneous energy transfer (UTET) based on a kerfless transmitter with Gaussian radial distribution of its radiating surface velocity. UTET presents an attractive alternative to electromagnetic TET, where a low power transfer density of less than 94 mW/cm(2) is sufficient. The UTET is operated with a continuous wave at 650 kHz and is intended to power devices implanted up to 50mm deep. The transmitter was fabricated using a 15 mm diameter disc shape PZT (Lead Zirconate Titanate) element (C-2 grade, Fujiceramics Corporation Tokyo Japan), in which one surface electrode was partitioned into six equal area electrodes ( approximately 23 mm(2) each) in the shape of six concentric elements. The UTET was experimented using pig muscle tissue, and showed a peak power transfer efficiency of 39.1% at a power level of 100 mW. An efficient (91.8%) power driver for the excitation of the transmitter array, and an efficient rectifier (89%) for the implanted transducer are suggested. To obtain the pressure field shape, the Rayleigh integral has been solved numerically and the results were compared to finite element simulation results. Pressure and power transfer measurements within a test tank further confirm the effectiveness of the proposed UTET.

  3. A fast neuronal signal-sensitive continuous-wave near-infrared imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhongxing; Sun, Bailei; Gong, Hui; Zhang, Lei; Sun, Jinyan; Wang, Bangde; Luo, Qingming

    2012-09-01

    We have developed a continuous-wave near-infrared imaging system to measure fast neuronal signals. We used a simultaneous sampling method with a separate high-speed analog-to-digital converter for each input channel, which provides a much larger point sample in a digital lock-in algorithm, higher temporal resolution, and lower crosstalk among detected channels. Without any analog filter, digital lock-in detection with a large point sample suppresses noise excellently, making the system less complex and offering better flexibility. In addition, using a custom-made collimator, more photons can reach the brain tissue due to the smaller divergence angle. Performance analysis shows high detection sensitivity (on the order of 0.1 pW) and high temporal resolution (˜50 Hz, 48 channels). Simulation experiments show that intensity changes on the order of 0.01% can be resolved by our instrument when averaging over approximately 500 stimuli. In vivo experiments over the motor cortex show that our instrument can detect fast neuronal signals in the human brain.

  4. Optical coherence tomography-guided laser microsurgery for blood coagulation with continuous-wave laser diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Feng-Yu; Tsai, Meng-Tsan; Wang, Zu-Yi; Chi, Chun-Kai; Lee, Cheng-Kuang; Yang, Chih-Hsun; Chan, Ming-Che; Lee, Ya-Ju

    2015-11-01

    Blood coagulation is the clotting and subsequent dissolution of the clot following repair to the damaged tissue. However, inducing blood coagulation is difficult for some patients with homeostasis dysfunction or during surgery. In this study, we proposed a method to develop an integrated system that combines optical coherence tomography (OCT) and laser microsurgery for blood coagulation. Also, an algorithm for positioning of the treatment location from OCT images was developed. With OCT scanning, 2D/3D OCT images and angiography of tissue can be obtained simultaneously, enabling to noninvasively reconstruct the morphological and microvascular structures for real-time monitoring of changes in biological tissues during laser microsurgery. Instead of high-cost pulsed lasers, continuous-wave laser diodes (CW-LDs) with the central wavelengths of 450 nm and 532 nm are used for blood coagulation, corresponding to higher absorption coefficients of oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin. Experimental results showed that the location of laser exposure can be accurately controlled with the proposed approach of imaging-based feedback positioning. Moreover, blood coagulation can be efficiently induced by CW-LDs and the coagulation process can be monitored in real-time with OCT. This technology enables to potentially provide accurate positioning for laser microsurgery and control the laser exposure to avoid extra damage by real-time OCT imaging.

  5. Picosecond pulses from wavelength-swept continuous-wave Fourier domain mode-locked lasers.

    PubMed

    Eigenwillig, Christoph M; Wieser, Wolfgang; Todor, Sebastian; Biedermann, Benjamin R; Klein, Thomas; Jirauschek, Christian; Huber, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Ultrafast lasers have a crucial function in many fields of science; however, up to now, high-energy pulses directly from compact, efficient and low-power semiconductor lasers are not available. Therefore, we introduce a new approach based on temporal compression of the continuous-wave, wavelength-swept output of Fourier domain mode-locked lasers, where a narrowband optical filter is tuned synchronously to the round-trip time of light in a kilometre-long laser cavity. So far, these rapidly swept lasers enabled orders-of-magnitude speed increase in optical coherence tomography. Here we report on the generation of ~60-70 ps pulses at 390 kHz repetition rate. As energy is stored optically in the long-fibre delay line and not as population inversion in the laser-gain medium, high-energy pulses can now be generated directly from a low-power, compact semiconductor-based oscillator. Our theory predicts subpicosecond pulses with this new technique in the future.

  6. Threshold response using modulated continuous wave illumination for multilayer 3D optical data storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saini, A.; Christenson, C. W.; Khattab, T. A.; Wang, R.; Twieg, R. J.; Singer, K. D.

    2017-01-01

    In order to achieve a high capacity 3D optical data storage medium, a nonlinear or threshold writing process is necessary to localize data in the axial dimension. To this end, commercial multilayer discs use thermal ablation of metal films or phase change materials to realize such a threshold process. This paper addresses a threshold writing mechanism relevant to recently reported fluorescence-based data storage in dye-doped co-extruded multilayer films. To gain understanding of the essential physics, single layer spun coat films were used so that the data is easily accessible by analytical techniques. Data were written by attenuating the fluorescence using nanosecond-range exposure times from a 488 nm continuous wave laser overlapping with the single photon absorption spectrum. The threshold writing process was studied over a range of exposure times and intensities, and with different fluorescent dyes. It was found that all of the dyes have a common temperature threshold where fluorescence begins to attenuate, and the physical nature of the thermal process was investigated.

  7. Continuous-wave terahertz by photomixing: applications to gas phase pollutant detection and quantification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hindle, Francis; Cuisset, Arnaud; Bocquet, Robin; Mouret, Gaël

    2008-03-01

    Recent advances in the development of monochromatic continuous-wave terahertz sources suitable for high resolution gas phase spectroscopy and pollution monitoring are reviewed. Details of a source using an ultra fast opto-electronic photomixing element are presented. The construction of a terahertz spectrometer using this source has allowed spectroscopic characterisation and application studies to be completed. Analysis of H 2S and OCS under laboratory conditions are used to demonstrate the spectrometer performance, and the determination of the transition line strengths and pressure self broadening coefficients for pure rotational transitions of OCS. The spectral purity 5 MHz, tunability 0.3 to 3 THz, and long wavelength ≈200 μm of this source have been exploited to identify and quantify numerous chemical species in cigarette smoke. The key advantages of this frequency domain are its high species selectivity and the possibility to make reliable measurements of gas phase samples heavily contaminated by aerosols and particles. To cite this article: F. Hindle et al., C. R. Physique 9 (2008).

  8. Early diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of epilepsy with continuous spikes and waves during slow sleep

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Qiang; Li, Fengtong; Zhong, Hongping

    2015-01-01

    The study is to investigate the importance of early diagnosis and treatment to the prognosis of epilepsy with continuous spikes and waves during slow sleep (CSWS). A total of 8 cases of CSWS children were followed up for 6 months to 4 years. Retrospective analysis of the clinical and electroencephalographic (EEG) characteristics, treatment and prognosis was performed in these 8 cases. Of the 8 cases of CSWS patients, 5 were males and 3 were females. Epilepsy onset ages were from 3 years and 1 month to 10 years and 6 months. Five cases of the patients were with brain lesions while the other 3 cases appeared normally by imaging detection. After treatment with valproic acid, clonazepam, lamotrigine and hormone for 3 months, clinical symptoms and EEG were improved significantly in 7 cases. Two cases relapsed at 6 months after comprehensive treatment. For atypical early performance of CSWS, early diagnosis and regular treatment could improve the condition of children with seizures and effectively inhibit the epileptic activity with good prognosis. PMID:26064309

  9. Continuous-wave stimulated Brillouin spectroscopy in scattering media at 780 nm (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remer, Itay; Billenca, Alberto

    2016-03-01

    Quantitative probing of the mechanical properties of scattering media by Brillouin spectroscopy is an emerging field of research. At present, Brillouin spectrometers typically detect spontaneous Brillouin backscattered signals from the sample using setups that comprise virtually imaged phased arrays (VIPAs) cascaded in cross-axis configuration or heated molecular absorption cells prior to the VIPA. These experimental arrangements are necessary in order to significantly suppress the strong elastic scattering background from the medium. In this talk, we present a different approach for Brillouin spectroscopy of scattering matter based on stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) amplification. Unlike spontaneous Brillouin scattering, SBS amplification does not show elastic scattering background due to the resonant nature of the amplification process, thereby providing excellent spectral contrast. We demonstrate that the use of two continuous-wave distributed feedback lasers at 780 nm in a counter-propagating SBS amplifier geometry is useful for acquiring high signal-to-noise ratio SBS spectra of Intralipid solutions at concentrations that yield up to ~3 scattering events for photons propagating through the sample. Potential applications of SBS spectroscopy in mechanical characterization of thin tissue sections and biopolymers will be discussed.

  10. Tunable Ultrafast Thermal Relaxation in Graphene Measured by Continuous-Wave Photomixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadidi, M. Mehdi; Suess, Ryan J.; Tan, Cheng; Cai, Xinghan; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Sushkov, Andrei B.; Mittendorff, Martin; Hone, James; Drew, H. Dennis; Fuhrer, Michael S.; Murphy, Thomas E.

    2016-12-01

    Hot electron effects in graphene are significant because of graphene's small electronic heat capacity and weak electron-phonon coupling, yet the dynamics and cooling mechanisms of hot electrons in graphene are not completely understood. We describe a novel photocurrent spectroscopy method that uses the mixing of continuous-wave lasers in a graphene photothermal detector to measure the frequency dependence and nonlinearity of hot-electron cooling in graphene as a function of the carrier concentration and temperature. The method offers unparalleled sensitivity to the nonlinearity, and probes the ultrafast cooling of hot carriers with an optical fluence that is orders of magnitude smaller than in conventional time-domain methods, allowing for accurate characterization of electron-phonon cooling near charge neutrality. Our measurements reveal that near the charge neutral point the nonlinear power dependence of the electron cooling is dominated by disorder-assisted collisions, while at higher carrier concentrations conventional momentum-conserving cooling prevails in the nonlinear dependence. The relative contribution of these competing mechanisms can be electrostatically tuned through the application of a gate voltage—an effect that is unique to graphene.

  11. Continuous-wave radar to detect defects within heat exchangers and steam generator tubes.

    SciTech Connect

    Nassersharif, Bahram (New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM); Caffey, Thurlow Washburn Howell; Jedlicka, Russell P.; Garcia, Gabe V. (New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM); Rochau, Gary Eugene

    2003-01-01

    A major cause of failures in heat exchangers and steam generators in nuclear power plants is degradation of the tubes within them. The tube failure is often caused by the development of cracks that begin on the outer surface of the tube and propagate both inwards and laterally. A new technique was researched for detection of defects using a continuous-wave radar method within metal tubing. The experimental program resulted in a completed product development schedule and the design of an experimental apparatus for studying handling of the probe and data acquisition. These tests were completed as far as the prototypical probe performance allowed. The prototype probe design did not have sufficient sensitivity to detect a defect signal using the defined radar technique and did not allow successful completion of all of the project milestones. The best results from the prototype probe could not detect a tube defect using the radar principle. Though a more precision probe may be possible, the cost of design and construction was beyond the scope of the project. This report describes the probe development and the status of the design at the termination of the project.

  12. A comparison between a time domain and continuous wave small animal optical imaging system.

    PubMed

    Keren, S; Gheysens, O; Levin, C S; Gambhir, S S

    2008-01-01

    We present a phantom study to evaluate the performance of the eXplore Optix (Advanced Research Technologies-GE Healthcare), the first commercially available time-domain tomography system for small animal fluorescence imaging, and compare its capabilities with the widely used IVIS 200 (Xenogen Corporation-Caliper) continuous wave planar imaging system. The eXplore Optix, based on point-wise illumination and collection scheme, is found to be a log order more sensitive with significantly higher detection depth and spatial resolution as compared with the wide-area illumination IVIS 200 under the conditions tested. A time-resolved detection system allows the eXplore Optix to measure the arrival time distribution of fluorescence photons. This enables fluorescence lifetime measurement, absorption mapping, and estimation of fluorescent inclusion depth, which in turn is used by a reconstruction algorithm to calculate the volumetric distribution of the fluorophore concentration. An increased acquisition time and lack of ability to image multiple animals simultaneously are the main drawbacks of the eXplore Optix as compared with the IVIS 200.

  13. High power mid-infrared continuous-wave optical parametric oscillator pumped by fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaojun; Li, Xiao; Liu, Lei; Shang, Yaping

    2015-02-01

    3~5μm mid-infrared laser has many important applications, such as gas detection, spectral analysis, remote sensing, medical treatment, and also in the military laser radar, infrared countermine, and so on. Optical parametric oscillator (OPO) is an efficient way to generate laser in this wavelength range, which has attracted the eyes of many people. In this paper, the recent development of mid-infrared OPO is overviewed. Meanwhile, detailed introduction on our recent work is given. Maximum idler output power of 34.2W at center wavelength of 3.35μm was obtained, to our knowledge, which is the new power record of the international public reporting for the continue-wave (CW) mid-infrared OPO. It is worth mentioning that the pump source, the quasi single-frequency (SF) narrow line width fiber laser, was also developed by our groups. According to the current status of research, some solutions is proposed in order to achieve higher power, narrower line width, and compact volume mid-infrared OPO in a wide tunable range.

  14. Optical coherence tomography-guided laser microsurgery for blood coagulation with continuous-wave laser diode.

    PubMed

    Chang, Feng-Yu; Tsai, Meng-Tsan; Wang, Zu-Yi; Chi, Chun-Kai; Lee, Cheng-Kuang; Yang, Chih-Hsun; Chan, Ming-Che; Lee, Ya-Ju

    2015-11-16

    Blood coagulation is the clotting and subsequent dissolution of the clot following repair to the damaged tissue. However, inducing blood coagulation is difficult for some patients with homeostasis dysfunction or during surgery. In this study, we proposed a method to develop an integrated system that combines optical coherence tomography (OCT) and laser microsurgery for blood coagulation. Also, an algorithm for positioning of the treatment location from OCT images was developed. With OCT scanning, 2D/3D OCT images and angiography of tissue can be obtained simultaneously, enabling to noninvasively reconstruct the morphological and microvascular structures for real-time monitoring of changes in biological tissues during laser microsurgery. Instead of high-cost pulsed lasers, continuous-wave laser diodes (CW-LDs) with the central wavelengths of 450 nm and 532 nm are used for blood coagulation, corresponding to higher absorption coefficients of oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin. Experimental results showed that the location of laser exposure can be accurately controlled with the proposed approach of imaging-based feedback positioning. Moreover, blood coagulation can be efficiently induced by CW-LDs and the coagulation process can be monitored in real-time with OCT. This technology enables to potentially provide accurate positioning for laser microsurgery and control the laser exposure to avoid extra damage by real-time OCT imaging.

  15. Study of continuous-wave domain fluorescence diffuse optical tomography for quality control on agricultural produce

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadhira, Vebi; Kurniadi, Deddy; Juliastuti, E.; Sutiswan, Adeline

    2014-03-01

    The importance of monitoring the quality of vegetables and fruits is prosperity by giving a competitive advantage for producer and providing a more healthy food for consumer. Diffuse Optical Tomography (DOT) is offering the possibility to detect the internal defects of the agricultural produce quality. Fluorescence diffuse optical tomography (FDOT) is the development of DOT, offering the possibilities to improve spatial resolution and to contrast image. The purpose of this research is to compare FDOT and DOT in forward analysis with continuous wave approach. The scattering and absorbing parameters of potatoes are used to represent the real condition. The object was illuminated by the NIR source from some positions on the boundary of object. A set of NIR detector are placed on the peripheral position of the object to measure the intensity of propagated or emitted light. In the simulation, we varied a condition of object then we analyzed the sensitivity of forward problem. The result of this study shows that FDOT has a better sensitivity than DOT and a better potential to monitor internal defects of agricultural produce because of the contrast value between optical and fluorescence properties of agricultural produce normal tissue and defects.

  16. Nitinol laser cutting: microstructure and functional properties of femtosecond and continuous wave laser processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biffi, C. A.; Tuissi, A.

    2017-03-01

    Thermal processing can affect the properties of smart materials, and the correct selection of the best manufacturing technology is fundamental for producing high tech smart devices, containing embedded functional properties. In this work cutting of thin superelastic Nitinol plates using a femtosecond (fs) and continuous wave (CW) laser was studied. Diamond shaped elements were cut to characterize the kerf qualitative features; microstructural analysis of the cross sections allowed identification of thermal damage characteristics introduced into the material during the laser processes. A thermally undamaged microstructure was observed for fs laser cutting, while CW was seen to be characterized by a large heat-affected zone. Functional properties were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry and tensile testing of laser cut microelements and of the reference material. It was seen that the martensitic transformation behavior of Nitinol is not affected by fs regime, while cw cutting provokes an effect equivalent to a high temperature thermal treatment in the material surrounding the cutting kerf, degradating the material properties. Finally, tensile testing indicated that superelastic performances were guaranteed by fs regime, while strong reduction of the recoverable strain was detected in the CW processed sample.

  17. A fast neuronal signal-sensitive continuous-wave near-infrared imaging system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhongxing; Sun, Bailei; Gong, Hui; Zhang, Lei; Sun, Jinyan; Wang, Bangde; Luo, Qingming

    2012-09-01

    We have developed a continuous-wave near-infrared imaging system to measure fast neuronal signals. We used a simultaneous sampling method with a separate high-speed analog-to-digital converter for each input channel, which provides a much larger point sample in a digital lock-in algorithm, higher temporal resolution, and lower crosstalk among detected channels. Without any analog filter, digital lock-in detection with a large point sample suppresses noise excellently, making the system less complex and offering better flexibility. In addition, using a custom-made collimator, more photons can reach the brain tissue due to the smaller divergence angle. Performance analysis shows high detection sensitivity (on the order of 0.1 pW) and high temporal resolution (~50 Hz, 48 channels). Simulation experiments show that intensity changes on the order of 0.01% can be resolved by our instrument when averaging over approximately 500 stimuli. In vivo experiments over the motor cortex show that our instrument can detect fast neuronal signals in the human brain.

  18. A range-to-target algorithm for a continuous-wave ground penetrating radar

    SciTech Connect

    Caffey, T.W.

    1998-02-01

    Many geologic situations of interest to oil and gas exploration, and to enhanced recover methods, occur in media whose conductivity is too large to permit the use of pulsed GPRs because of severe dispersion. A continuous-wave radar is not affected by dispersion, and can use the round-trip phase, rather than time, to give an estimate of range. In this paper a range to target algorithms is developed for targets which exhibit a crude hyperbolic phase response. This new algorithm minimizes a difference function over both a 2n {pi}-phase interval and a wavelength interval to provide the range. Only crude initial estimates of the electrical parameters of the host media are required to initiate the algorithm. The furnished range may be the distance to some point within the target rather than to a point upon the illuminated surface because the target is three-dimensional and its electrical parameters can take on any value. This error can be reduced by a sufficiently high operating frequency. Examples are given for a variety of targets, media, range and operating frequency using simulated data.

  19. Study of continuous-wave domain fluorescence diffuse optical tomography for quality control on agricultural produce

    SciTech Connect

    Nadhira, Vebi Kurniadi, Deddy Juliastuti, E. Sutiswan, Adeline

    2014-03-24

    The importance of monitoring the quality of vegetables and fruits is prosperity by giving a competitive advantage for producer and providing a more healthy food for consumer. Diffuse Optical Tomography (DOT) is offering the possibility to detect the internal defects of the agricultural produce quality. Fluorescence diffuse optical tomography (FDOT) is the development of DOT, offering the possibilities to improve spatial resolution and to contrast image. The purpose of this research is to compare FDOT and DOT in forward analysis with continuous wave approach. The scattering and absorbing parameters of potatoes are used to represent the real condition. The object was illuminated by the NIR source from some positions on the boundary of object. A set of NIR detector are placed on the peripheral position of the object to measure the intensity of propagated or emitted light. In the simulation, we varied a condition of object then we analyzed the sensitivity of forward problem. The result of this study shows that FDOT has a better sensitivity than DOT and a better potential to monitor internal defects of agricultural produce because of the contrast value between optical and fluorescence properties of agricultural produce normal tissue and defects.

  20. Robust and efficient 19F heteronuclear dipolar decoupling using refocused continuous-wave rf irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinther, Joachim M.; Khaneja, Navin; Nielsen, Niels Chr.

    2013-01-01

    Refocused continuous wave (rCW) decoupling is presented as an efficient and robust means to obtain well-resolved magic-angle-spinning solid-state NMR spectra of low-γ spins, such as 13C dipolar coupled to fluorine. The rCW decoupling sequences, recently introduced for 1H decoupling, are very robust towards large isotropic and anisotropic shift ranges as often encountered for 19F spins. In rCW decoupling, the so-called refocusing pulses inserted into the CW irradiation eliminate critical residual second- and third-order dipolar coupling and dipolar-coupling against chemical shielding anisotropy cross-terms in the effective Hamiltonian through time-reversal (i.e. refocusing). As important additional assets, the rCW decoupling sequences are robust towards variations in rf amplitudes, operational at low to high spinning speeds, and easy to set-up for optimal performance experimentally. These aspects are demonstrated analytically/numerically and experimentally in comparison to state-of-the-art decoupling sequences such as TPPM, SPINAL-64, and frequency-swept variants of these.