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Sample records for continuum intensity distribution

  1. LOGNORMAL INTENSITY DISTRIBUTION OF THE FAR-ULTRAVIOLET CONTINUUM BACKGROUND SHORTWARD OF Ly{alpha}

    SciTech Connect

    Seon, Kwang-Il

    2013-07-20

    The diffuse far-ultraviolet (FUV) continuum radiation 'longward' of Ly{alpha} (1216 A) is well known to correlate with the dust emission at 100 {mu}m. However, it has been claimed that the FUV continuum background 'shortward' of Ly{alpha} shows very weak or no correlation with the 100 {mu}m emission. In this paper, the observational data of the diffuse FUV radiation by the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) are reexamined in order to investigate the correlation between the diffuse FUV radiation shortward of Ly{alpha} and the 100 {mu}m emission. Large fluctuations were confirmed in the linear-linear correlation plots, but good correlations were found in the log-log plots. The large fluctuations in the linear-linear plots, and thus poor correlations, between the FUV and 100 {mu}m intensities were attributed to the lognormal property of the FUV intensity distribution. The standard deviation of the intensity distribution of the FUV radiation shortward of Ly{alpha} was found to be {sigma}{sub logI} = 0.16-0.25. The result is consistent with that obtained not only for the FUV radiation longward of 1216 A but also with the dust column density measurements of various molecular clouds. This implies that most of the diffuse FUV radiation shortward of Ly{alpha} is dust-scattered light in the turbulent interstellar medium. The diffuse FUV data obtained from the Voyager missions were also investigated. However, much wider random fluctuations were found compared with the FUSE data, which is most likely due to the systematic difficulties in data reduction of the Voyager data.

  2. Characterizing the radio continuum emission from intense starburst galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galvin, T. J.; Seymour, N.; Filipović, M. D.; Tothill, N. F. H.; Marvil, J.; Drouart, G.; Symeonidis, M.; Huynh, M. T.

    2016-09-01

    The intrinsic thermal (free-free) and non-thermal (synchrotron) emission components that comprise the radio continuum of galaxies represent unique, dust-free measures of star formation rates (SFR). Such high SFR galaxies will dominate the deepest current and future radio surveys. We disentangle the thermal and non-thermal emission components of the radio continuum of six ultraluminous infrared galaxies (LFIR > 1012.5 L⊙) at redshifts of 0.2 ≤ z ≤ 0.5 and 22 IR selected galaxies. Radio data over a wide frequency range (0.8 < ν < 10 GHz) are fitted with a star-forming galaxy model comprising of thermal and non-thermal components. The luminosities of both radio continuum components are strongly correlated to the 60 μm luminosity across many orders of magnitude (consistent with the far-IR to radio correlation). We demonstrate that the spectral index of the radio continuum spectral energy distribution is a useful proxy for the thermal fraction. We also find that there is an increase in mean and scatter of the thermal fraction with FIR to radio luminosity ratio which could be influenced by different time-scales of the thermal and non-thermal emission mechanisms.

  3. High angular resolution absolute intensity of the solar continuum from 1400 to 1790 A.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brueckner, G. E.; Moe, O. K.

    1972-01-01

    Absolute intensities of the solar UV continuum from 1400 to 1790 A have been measured from rocket spectra taken on August 13, 1970. The spectra had an angular resolution of 2 arc sec by 1 arc min, and the pointing accuracy of the instrument was plus or minus 2 arc sec. This permits us to study the center-to-limb variation of the intensity with a spatial resolution of 2 arc sec. Four positions on the solar disk have been studied corresponding to values of cos theta = 0.12, 0.22, 0.28 and 0.72, where theta is the heliocentric position angle. The measurements give higher values for the intensity than recent photoelectric measurement, but are in good agreement with the intensities of Widing et al.

  4. Quantifying Distributions of the Lyman Continuum Escape Fraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cen, Renyue; Kimm, Taysun

    2015-03-01

    Simulations have indicated that most of the escaped Lyman continuum (LyC) photons escape through a minority of solid angles with near complete transparency, with the remaining majority of the solid angles largely opaque, resulting in a very broad and skewed probability distribution function (PDF) of the escape fraction when viewed at different angles. Thus, the escape fraction of LyC photons of a galaxy observed along a line of sight merely represents the properties of the interstellar medium along that line of sight, which may be an ill-representation of the true escape fraction of the galaxy averaged over its full sky. Here we study how LyC photons escape from galaxies at z=4-6, utilizing high-resolution large-scale cosmological radiation-hydrodynamic simulations. We compute the PDF of the mean escape fraction (< {{f}esc,1D}> ) averaged over mock observational samples, as a function of the sample size, compared to the true mean (if an infinite sample size is used). We find that, when the sample size is small, the apparent mean skews to the low end. For example, for a true mean of 6.7%, an observational sample of (2,10,50) galaxies at z = 4 would have have a 2.5% probability of obtaining the sample mean lower than ≤ft< {{f}esc,1D} \\right> = (0.007%, 1.8%, 4.1%) and a 2.5% probability of obtaining the sample mean greater than (43%, 18%, 11%). Our simulations suggest that at least ∼100 galaxies should be stacked in order to constrain the true escape fraction within 20% uncertainty.

  5. The relationship between the carbon monoxide intensity and the radio continuum emission in spiral galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adler, David S.; Lo, K. Y.; Allen, Ronald J.

    1991-01-01

    The relationship between the velocity-integrated CO emission and the nonthermal radio continuum brightness in the disks of normal spiral galaxies is examined on a variety of length scales. On a global scale, the total CO intensity correlates strongly with the total radio continuum flux density for a sample of 31 galaxies. On scales of about 2 kpc or more in the disk of individual galaxies, it is found that the ratio I(CO)/T(20) remains fairly constant over the entire disk as well as from galaxy to galaxy. For the eight spirals in the sample, the disk-averaged values of I(CO)/T(20) range from 0.6-2.4, with the average over all eight galaxies being 1.3 +/- 0.6. It is concluded that what these various length scales actually trace are differences in the primary heating mechanism of the gas in the beam. The observed relationship between CO and nonthermal radio continuum emission can be explained by assuming that molecular gas in galactic disks is heated primarily by cosmic rays. The observed relationship is used to show that the brightness of synchrotron emission is proportional to n(cr) exp 0.4 - 0.9 in galactic disks.

  6. Absolute continuum intensity diagnostics of a novel large coaxial gridded hollow cathode argon plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Ruilin; Yuan, Chengxun; Li, Hui; Jia, Jieshu; Zhou, Zhong-Xiang; Wu, Jian; Wang, Ying; Wang, Xiaoou

    2016-08-01

    This paper reports a novel coaxial gridded hollow discharge during operation at low pressure (20 Pa-80 Pa) in an argon atmosphere. A homogeneous hollow discharge was observed under different conditions, and the excitation mechanism and the discharge parameters for the hollow cathode plasma were examined at length. An optical emission spectrometry (OES) method, with a special focus on absolute continuum intensity method, was employed to measure the plasma parameters. The Langmuir probe measurement (LPM) was used to verify the OES results. Both provided electron density values (ne) in the order of 1016 m-3 for different plasma settings. Taken together, the results show that the OES method is an effective approach to diagnosing the similar plasma, especially when the LPM is hardly operated.

  7. Aspects of disordered eating continuum in elite high-intensity sports.

    PubMed

    Sundgot-Borgen, J; Torstveit, M K

    2010-10-01

    Dieting is an important risk factor for disordered eating and eating disorders. Disordered eating occurs on a continuum from dieting and restrictive eating, abnormal eating behavior, and finally clinical eating disorders. The prevalence of eating disorders is increased in elite athletes and for this group the cause of starting to diet is related to (a) perception of the paradigm of appearance in the specific sport, (b) perceived performance improvements, and (c) sociocultural pressures for thinness or an "ideal" body. Athletes most at risk for disordered eating are those involved in sports emphasizing a thin body size/shape, a high power-to-weight ratio, and/or sports utilizing weight categories, such as in some high-intensity sports. In addition to dieting, personality factors, pressure to lose weight, frequent weight cycling, early start of sport-specific training, overtraining, injuries, and unfortunate coaching behavior, are important risk factors. To prevent disordered eating and eating disorders, the athletes have to practice healthy eating, and the medical staff of teams and parents must be able to recognize symptoms indicating risk for eating disorders. Coaches and leaders must accept that disordered eating can be a problem in the athletic community and that openness regarding this challenge is important.

  8. Distributed Storage Systems for Data Intensive Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Vazhkudai, Sudharshan S; Butt, Ali R; Ma, Xiaosong

    2012-01-01

    In this chapter, the authors present an overview of the utility of distributed storage systems in supporting modern applications that are increasingly becoming data intensive. Their coverage of distributed storage systems is based on the requirements imposed by data intensive computing and not a mere summary of storage systems. To this end, they delve into several aspects of supporting data-intensive analysis, such as data staging, offloading, checkpointing, and end-user access to terabytes of data, and illustrate the use of novel techniques and methodologies for realizing distributed storage systems therein. The data deluge from scientific experiments, observations, and simulations is affecting all of the aforementioned day-to-day operations in data-intensive computing. Modern distributed storage systems employ techniques that can help improve application performance, alleviate I/O bandwidth bottleneck, mask failures, and improve data availability. They present key guiding principles involved in the construction of such storage systems, associated tradeoffs, design, and architecture, all with an eye toward addressing challenges of data-intensive scientific applications. They highlight the concepts involved using several case studies of state-of-the-art storage systems that are currently available in the data-intensive computing landscape.

  9. Spectrophotometry of Wolf-Rayet stars. I - Continuum energy distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Patrick W.; Brownsberger, Kenneth R.; Conti, Peter S.; Massey, Philip; Vacca, William D.

    1993-01-01

    All available low-resolution IUE spectra are assembled for Galactic, LMC, and SMC W-R stars and are merged with ground-based optical and NIR spectra in order to collate in a systematic fashion the shapes of these energy distributions over the wavelength range 0.1-1 micron. They can be consistently fitted by a power law of the form F(lambda) is approximately equal to lambda exp -alpha over the range 1500-9000 A to derive color excesses E(B-V) and spectral indices by removing the 2175-A interstellar absorption feature. The WN star color excesses derived are found to be in good agreement with those of Schmutz and Vacca (1991) and Koesterke et al. (1991). Significant heterogeneity in spectral index values was generally seen with any given subtype, but the groups consisting of the combined set of Galactic and LMC W-R stars, the separate WN and WC sequences, and the Galactic and LMC W-R stars all showed a striking and consistent Gaussian-like frequency distribution of values.

  10. Statistical modeling of tornado intensity distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dotzek, Nikolai; Grieser, Jürgen; Brooks, Harold E.

    We address the issue to determine an appropriate general functional shape of observed tornado intensity distributions. Recently, it was suggested that in the limit of long and large tornado records, exponential distributions over all positive Fujita or TORRO scale classes would result. Yet, our analysis shows that even for large databases observations contradict the validity of exponential distributions for weak (F0) and violent (F5) tornadoes. We show that observed tornado intensities can be much better described by Weibull distributions, for which an exponential remains a special case. Weibull fits in either v or F scale reproduce the observations significantly better than exponentials. In addition, we suggest to apply the original definition of negative intensity scales down to F-2 and T-4 (corresponding to v=0 m s -1) at least for climatological analyses. Weibull distributions allow for an improved risk assessment of violent tornadoes up to F6, and better estimates of total tornado occurrence, degree of underreporting and existence of subcritical tornadic circulations below damaging intensity. Therefore, our results are relevant for climatologists and risk assessment managers alike.

  11. Modification of the photoelectron angular distribution through laser-induced continuum structure

    SciTech Connect

    Nakajima, Takashi; Buica, Gabriela

    2005-01-01

    We theoretically investigate how the photoelectron angular distribution is altered by the introduction of a dressing laser. The physical mechanism underlying this alteration is the so-called laser-induced continuum structure; namely, a strong dressing laser induces quantum mechanical interference, the degree of which is different for different ionization channels. Therefore the branching ratio into different ionization channels changes as a function of laser detuning, and accordingly the photoelectron angular distribution is altered. After a general argument, we present specific theoretical results for the K atom, which indeed exhibit significant modification of the photoelectron angular distribution.

  12. 14 CFR 25.1389 - Position light distribution and intensities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Position light distribution and intensities... light distribution and intensities. (a) General. The intensities prescribed in this section must be... normal operating voltage of the airplane. The light distribution and intensity of each position...

  13. 14 CFR 29.1389 - Position light distribution and intensities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Position light distribution and intensities... Position light distribution and intensities. (a) General. The intensities prescribed in this section must... source at the normal operating voltage of the rotorcraft. The light distribution and intensity of...

  14. Center-to-limb variation of intensity and polarization in continuum spectra of FGK stars for spherical atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostogryz, N. M.; Milic, I.; Berdyugina, S. V.; Hauschildt, P. H.

    2016-02-01

    Aims: One of the necessary parameters needed for the interpretation of the light curves of transiting exoplanets or eclipsing binary stars (as well as interferometric measurements of a star or microlensing events) is how the intensity and polarization of light changes from the center to the limb of a star. Scattering and absorption processes in the stellar atmosphere affect both the center-to-limb variation of intensity (CLVI) and polarization (CLVP). In this paper, we present a study of the CLVI and CLVP in continuum spectra, taking into consideration the different contributions of scattering and absorption opacity for a variety of spectral type stars with spherical atmospheres. Methods: We solve the radiative transfer equation for polarized light in the presence of a continuum scattering, taking into consideration the spherical model of a stellar atmosphere. To cross-check our results, we developed two independent codes that are based on Feautrier and short characteristics methods, respectively, Results: We calculate the center-to-limb variation of intensity (CLVI) and polarization (CLVP) in continuum for the Phoenix grid of spherical stellar model atmospheres for a range of effective temperatures (4000-7000 K), gravities (log g = 1.0-5.5), and wavelengths (4000-7000 Å), which are tabulated and available at the CDS. In addition, we present several tests of our codes and compare our calculations for the solar atmosphere with published photometric and polarimetric measurements. We also show that our two codes provide similar results in all considered cases. Conclusions: For sub-giant and dwarf stars (log g = 3.0-4.5), the lower gravity and lower effective temperature of a star lead to higher limb polarization of the star. For giant and supergiant stars (log g = 1.0-2.5), the highest effective temperature yields the largest polarization. By decreasing the effective temperature of a star down to 4500-5500 K (depending on log g), the limb polarization decreases and

  15. Continuum kinetic methods for analyzing wave physics and distribution function dynamics in the turbulence dissipation challenge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juno, J.; Hakim, A.; TenBarge, J.; Dorland, W.

    2015-12-01

    We present for the first time results for the turbulence dissipation challenge, with specific focus on the linear wave portion of the challenge, using a variety of continuum kinetic models: hybrid Vlasov-Maxwell, gyrokinetic, and full Vlasov-Maxwell. As one of the goals of the wave problem as it is outlined is to identify how well various models capture linear physics, we compare our results to linear Vlasov and gyrokinetic theory. Preliminary gyrokinetic results match linear theory extremely well due to the geometry of the problem, which eliminates the dominant nonlinearity. With the non-reduced models, we explore how the subdominant nonlinearities manifest and affect the evolution of the turbulence and the energy budget. We also take advantage of employing continuum methods to study the dynamics of the distribution function, with particular emphasis on the full Vlasov results where a basic collision operator has been implemented. As the community prepares for the next stage of the turbulence dissipation challenge, where we hope to do large 3D simulations to inform the next generation of observational missions such as THOR (Turbulence Heating ObserveR), we argue for the consideration of hybrid Vlasov and full Vlasov as candidate models for these critical simulations. With the use of modern numerical algorithms, we demonstrate the competitiveness of our code with traditional particle-in-cell algorithms, with a clear plan for continued improvements and optimizations to further strengthen the code's viability as an option for the next stage of the challenge.

  16. Quantum beat oscillations in the two-color-photoionization continuum of neon and their dependence on the intensity of the ionizing laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Geiseler, Henning; Rottke, Horst; Steinmeyer, Guenter; Sandner, Wolfgang

    2011-09-15

    We investigate quantum beat oscillations in the photoionization continuum of Ne atoms that are photoionized by absorption of two photons via a group of excited bound states using ultrashort extreme ultraviolet and infrared laser pulses. The extreme ultraviolet pulse starts an excited-state wave packet that is photoionized by a high-intensity infrared pulse after a variable time delay. We analyze the continuum quantum beats from this two-step photoionization process and their dependence on the photoelectron kinetic energy. We find a pronounced dependence of the quantum beat amplitudes on the photoelectron kinetic energy. The dependence changes significantly with the applied infrared laser-pulse intensity. The experimental results are in good qualitative agreement with a model calculation that is adapted to the experimental situation. It accounts for the intensity dependence of the quantum beat structure through the coupling of the excited-state wave packet to other bound Ne states induced by the high-intensity infrared laser pulse.

  17. Disparities in the Population Distribution of African American and Non-Hispanic White Smokers along the Quitting Continuum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trinidad, Dennis R.; Xie, Bin; Fagan, Pebbles; Pulvers, Kim; Romero, Devan R.; Blanco, Lyzette; Sakuma, Kari-Lyn K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To examine disparities and changes over time in the population-level distribution of smokers along a cigarette quitting continuum among African American smokers compared with non-Hispanic Whites. Methods: Secondary data analyses of the 1999, 2002, 2005, and 2008 California Tobacco Surveys (CTS). The CTS are large, random-digit-dialed,…

  18. Planck Early Results. XV. Spectral Energy Distributions and Radio Continuum Spectra of Northern Extragalactic Radio Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aatrokoski, J.; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Aller, H. D.; Aller, M. F.; Angelakis, E.; Amaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Balbi, A.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoit, A.; Berdyugin, A.; Bernard, J. P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bhatia, R.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Gehrels, N.

    2011-01-01

    Spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and radio continuum spectra are presented for a northern sample of 104 extragalactic radio sources. based on the Planck Early Release Compact Source Catalogue (ERCSC) and simultaneous multi frequency data. The nine Planck frequencies, from 30 to 857 GHz, are complemented by a set of simultaneous observations ranging from radio to gamma-rays. This is the first extensive frequency coverage in the radio and millimetre domains for an essentially complete sample of extragalactic radio sources, and it shows how the individual shocks, each in their own phase of development, shape the radio spectra as they move in the relativistic jet. The SEDs presented in this paper were fitted with second and third degree polynomials to estimate the frequencies of the synchrotron and inverse Compton (IC) peaks, and the spectral indices of low and high frequency radio data, including the Planck ERCSC data, were calculated. SED modelling methods are discussed, with an emphasis on proper. physical modelling of the synchrotron bump using multiple components. Planck ERCSC data also suggest that the original accelerated electron energy spectrum could be much harder than commonly thought, with power-law index around 1.5 instead of the canonical 2.5. The implications of this are discussed for the acceleration mechanisms effective in blazar shock. Furthermore in many cases the Planck data indicate that gamma-ray emission must originate in the same shocks that produce the radio emission.

  19. Continuum percolation of overlapping disks with a distribution of radii having a power-law tail.

    PubMed

    Sasidevan, V

    2013-08-01

    We study the continuum percolation problem of overlapping disks with a distribution of radii having a power-law tail; the probability that a given disk has a radius between R and R+dR is proportional to R(-(a+1)), where a>2. We show that in the low-density nonpercolating phase, the two-point function shows a power-law decay with distance, even at arbitrarily low densities of the disks, unlike the exponential decay in the usual percolation problem. As in the problem of fluids with long-range interaction, we argue that in our problem, the critical exponents take their short-range values for a>3-η(sr) whereas they depend on a for a<3-η(sr) where η(sr) is the anomalous dimension for the usual percolation problem. The mean-field regime obtained in the fluid problem corresponds to the fully covered regime, a≤2, in the percolation problem. We propose an approximate renormalization scheme to determine the correlation length exponent ν and the percolation threshold. We carry out Monte Carlo simulations and determine the exponent ν as a function of a. The determined values of ν show that it is independent of the parameter a for a>3-η(sr) and is equal to that for the lattice percolation problem, whereas ν varies with a for 2

  20. Numerical evaluation of the intensity transport equation for well-known wavefronts and intensity distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos-García, Manuel; Granados-Agustín, Fermín.; Cornejo-Rodríguez, Alejandro; Estrada-Molina, Amilcar; Avendaño-Alejo, Maximino; Moreno-Oliva, Víctor Iván.

    2013-11-01

    In order to obtain a clearer interpretation of the Intensity Transport Equation (ITE), in this work, we propose an algorithm to solve it for some particular wavefronts and its corresponding intensity distributions. By simulating intensity distributions in some planes, the ITE is turns into a Poisson equation with Neumann boundary conditions. The Poisson equation is solved by means of the iterative algorithm SOR (Simultaneous Over-Relaxation).

  1. Diffuse gamma radiation. [intensity, energy spectrum and spatial distribution from SAS 2 observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, C. E.; Simpson, G. A.; Thompson, D. J.

    1978-01-01

    Results are reported for an investigation of the intensity, energy spectrum, and spatial distribution of the diffuse gamma radiation detected by SAS 2 away from the galactic plane in the energy range above 35 MeV. The gamma-ray data are compared with relevant data obtained at other wavelengths, including 21-cm emission, radio continuum radiation, and the limited UV and radio information on local molecular hydrogen. It is found that there are two quite distinct components to the diffuse radiation, one of which shows a good correlation with the galactic matter distribution and continuum radiation, while the other has a much steeper energy spectrum and appears to be isotropic at least on a coarse scale. The galactic component is interpreted in terms of its implications for both local and more distant regions of the Galaxy. The apparently isotropic radiation is discussed partly with regard to the constraints placed on possible models by the steep energy spectrum, the observed intensity, and an upper limit on the anisotropy.

  2. A comparison of modeled and observed intensity profiles for C2, C3, CN, and the continuum for P/Halley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, Tracy A.; Neff, John S.

    1992-01-01

    Model intensity profiles have been compared with those observed for the C2, C3, CN, and continuum emissions of Comet Halley, in order to constrain the dust and gas parameters. While most of the parameters were consistent with expected values, the lifetimes of C3 and its parent were unexpectedly small. The day:night production rate ratio, which was about 1:1 for the gas, covered the 4:3-1:0 range in the case of the dust.

  3. Predicting the distribution of intensive poultry farming in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Van Boeckel, Thomas P; Thanapongtharm, Weerapong; Robinson, Timothy; D'Aietti, Laura; Gilbert, Marius

    2012-03-01

    Intensification of animal production can be an important factor in the emergence of infectious diseases because changes in production structure influence disease transmission patterns. In 2004 and 2005, Thailand was subject to two highly pathogenic avian influenza epidemic waves and large surveys were conducted of the poultry sector, providing detailed spatial data on various poultry types. This study analysed these data with the aim of establishing the distributions of extensive and intensive poultry farms, based on the number of birds per holder. Once poultry data were disaggregated into these two production systems, they were analysed in relation to anthropogenic factors using simultaneous autoregressive models. Intensive chicken production was clustered around the capital city of Bangkok and close to the main consumption and export centres. Intensively-raised ducks, mainly free-grazing, showed a distinct pattern with the highest densities distributed in a large area located in the floodplain of the Chao Phraya River. Accessibility to Bangkok, the percentage of irrigated areas and human population density were the most important predictors explaining the geographical distribution of intensively-raised poultry. The distribution of extensive poultry showed a higher predictability. Extensive poultry farms were distributed more homogeneously across the country and their distribution was best predicted by human population density.

  4. Protocols and services for distributed data-intensive science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allcock, William; Foster, Ian; Tuecke, Steven; Chervenak, Ann; Kesselman, Carl

    2001-08-01

    We describe work being performed in the Globus project to develop enabling protocols and services for distributed data-intensive science. These services include: * High-performance, secure data transfer protocols based on FTP, plus a range of libraries and tools that use these protocols * Replica catalog services supporting the creation and location of file replicas in distributed systems These components leverage the substantial body of "Grid" services and protocols developed within the Globus project and by its collaborators, and are being used in a number of data-intensive application projects.

  5. A novel method to determine the electron temperature and density from the absolute intensity of line and continuum emission: application to atmospheric microwave induced Ar plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iordanova, E.; Palomares, J. M.; Gamero, A.; Sola, A.; van der Mullen, J. J. A. M.

    2009-08-01

    An absolute intensity measurement (AIM) technique is presented that combines the absolute measurements of the line and the continuum emitted by strongly ionizing argon plasmas. AIM is an iterative combination of the absolute line intensity-collisional radiative model (ALI-CRM) and the absolute continuum intensity (ACI) method. The basis of ALI-CRM is that the excitation temperature T13 determined by the method of ALI is transformed into the electron temperature Te using a CRM. This gives Te as a weak function of electron density ne. The ACI method is based on the absolute value of the continuum radiation and determines the electron density in a way that depends on Te. The iterative combination gives ne and Te. As a case study the AIM method is applied to plasmas created by torche à injection axiale (TIA) at atmospheric pressure and fixed frequency at 2.45 GHz. The standard operating settings are a gas flow of 1 slm and a power of 800 W; the measurements have been performed at a position of 1 mm above the nozzle. With AIM we found an electron temperature of 1.2 eV and electron density values around 1021 m-3. There is not much dependence of these values on the plasma control parameters (power and gas flow). From the error analysis we can conclude that the determination of Te is within 7% and thus rather accurate but comparison with other studies shows strong deviations. The ne determination comes with an error of 40% but is in reasonable agreement with other experimental results.

  6. Vibrational intensity distributions in the photoelectron spectrum of hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, J. L.; Samson, J. A. R.

    1975-01-01

    The intensity distribution over the H2(+) vibrational levels up to a quantum number of 15 was measured for H2 photoelectron spectra at a photon wavelength of 584 A. The data show reasonable agreement with recent calculations only in the quantum number of 0 through 8. The higher levels are populated significantly lower than predicted by theory.

  7. Vibrational intensity distributions in the photoelectron spectrum of hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, J. L.; Samson, J. A. R.

    1976-01-01

    The intensity distribution over the H2(+) vibrational levels up to a vibrational quantum number of 15 has been measured for H2 photoelectron spectra at a photon wavelength of 584 A. The data show reasonable agreement with recent calculations only in the range of vibrational quantum numbers from 0 through 8; the higher levels are populated significantly lower than predicted by theory.

  8. 14 CFR 27.1389 - Position light distribution and intensities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment Lights § 27.1389 Position... normal operating voltage of the rotorcraft. The light distribution and intensity of each position light... the longitudinal axis of the rotorcraft and perpendicular to the plane of symmetry of the...

  9. 14 CFR 27.1389 - Position light distribution and intensities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment Lights § 27.1389 Position... normal operating voltage of the rotorcraft. The light distribution and intensity of each position light... the longitudinal axis of the rotorcraft and perpendicular to the plane of symmetry of the...

  10. Rapid intensification and the bimodal distribution of tropical cyclone intensity

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chia-Ying; Tippett, Michael K.; Sobel, Adam H.; Camargo, Suzana J.

    2016-01-01

    The severity of a tropical cyclone (TC) is often summarized by its lifetime maximum intensity (LMI), and the climatological LMI distribution is a fundamental feature of the climate system. The distinctive bimodality of the LMI distribution means that major storms (LMI >96 kt) are not very rare compared with less intense storms. Rapid intensification (RI) is the dramatic strengthening of a TC in a short time, and is notoriously difficult to forecast or simulate. Here we show that the bimodality of the LMI distribution reflects two types of storms: those that undergo RI during their lifetime (RI storms) and those that do not (non-RI storms). The vast majority (79%) of major storms are RI storms. Few non-RI storms (6%) become major storms. While the importance of RI has been recognized in weather forecasting, our results demonstrate that RI also plays a crucial role in the TC climatology. PMID:26838056

  11. Understanding performance of distributed data-intensive applications.

    PubMed

    Miceli, Christopher; Miceli, Michael; Rodriguez-Milla, Bety; Jha, Shantenu

    2010-09-13

    Grids, clouds and cloud-like infrastructures are capable of supporting a broad range of data-intensive applications. There are interesting and unique performance issues that appear as the volume of data and degree of distribution increases. New scalable data-placement and management techniques, as well as novel approaches to determine the relative placement of data and computational workload, are required. We develop and study a genome sequence matching application that is simple to control and deploy, yet serves as a prototype of a data-intensive application. The application uses a SAGA-based implementation of the All-Pairs pattern. This paper aims to understand some of the factors that influence the performance of this application and the interplay of those factors. We also demonstrate how the SAGA approach can enable data-intensive applications to be extensible and interoperable over a range of infrastructure. This capability enables us to compare and contrast two different approaches for executing distributed data-intensive applications-simple application-level data-placement heuristics versus distributed file systems.

  12. Near field light intensity distribution analysis in bimodal polymer waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzog, T.; Gut, K.

    2015-12-01

    The paper presents analysis of light intensity distribution and sensitivity in differential interferometer based on bimodal polymer waveguide. Key part is analysis of optimal waveguide layer thickness in structure SiO2/SU-8/H2O for maximum bulk refractive index sensitivity. The paper presents new approach to detecting phase difference between modes through registrations only part of energy propagating in the waveguide. Additionally in this paper the analysis of changes in light distribution when energy in modes is not equal were performed.

  13. Does the Field of EBD Need a Distinct Set of "Intensive" Interventions or More Systemic Intensity within a Continuum of Social/Emotional Supports?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Timothy J.

    2016-01-01

    The challenges of educating children and youth with intensive social, emotional, and academic needs have been well documented. Students with emotional/ behavioral disorders (EBD) present a range of daily challenges from low intensity, high frequency chronic behaviors such as poor school attendance, disrespect addressed to adults and peers,…

  14. Subarcsecond Observations of NGC 7538 IRS 1: Continuum Distribution and Dynamics of Molecular Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Lei; Zhao, Jun-Hui; Wright, M. C. H.; Sandell, Göran; Shi, Hui; Wu, Yue-Fang; Brogan, Crystal; Corder, Stuartt

    2013-12-01

    We report new results based on the analysis of the Submillimeter Array (SMA) and Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA) observations of NGC 7538 IRS 1 at 1.3 and 3.4 mm with subarcsecond resolutions. With angular resolutions ~0.''7, the SMA and CARMA observations show that the continuum emission at 1.3 and 3.4 mm from the hyper-compact H II region IRS 1 is dominated by a compact source with a tail-like extended structure to the southwest of IRS 1. With a CARMA B-array image at 1.3 mm convolved to 0.''1, we resolve the hyper-compact H II region into two components: an unresolved hyper-compact core, and a north-south extension with linear sizes of <270 AU and ~2000 AU, respectively. The fine structure observed with CARMA is in good agreement with the previous Very Large Array results at centimeter wavelengths, suggesting that the hyper-compact H II region at the center of IRS 1 is associated with an ionized bipolar outflow. We image the molecular lines OCS(19-18) and CH3CN(12-11) as well as 13CO(2-1) surrounding IRS 1, showing a velocity gradient along the southwest-northeast direction. The spectral line profiles in 13CO(2-1), CO(2-1), and HCN(1-0) observed toward IRS 1 show broad redshifted absorption, providing evidence for gas infall with rates in the range of 3-10 × 10-3 M ⊙ yr-1 inferred from our observations.

  15. Subarcsecond observations of NGC 7538 IRS 1: Continuum distribution and dynamics of molecular gas

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Lei; Shi, Hui; Zhao, Jun-Hui; Wright, M. C. H.; Sandell, Göran; Wu, Yue-Fang; Brogan, Crystal; Corder, Stuartt

    2013-12-10

    We report new results based on the analysis of the Submillimeter Array (SMA) and Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA) observations of NGC 7538 IRS 1 at 1.3 and 3.4 mm with subarcsecond resolutions. With angular resolutions ∼0.''7, the SMA and CARMA observations show that the continuum emission at 1.3 and 3.4 mm from the hyper-compact H II region IRS 1 is dominated by a compact source with a tail-like extended structure to the southwest of IRS 1. With a CARMA B-array image at 1.3 mm convolved to 0.''1, we resolve the hyper-compact H II region into two components: an unresolved hyper-compact core, and a north-south extension with linear sizes of <270 AU and ∼2000 AU, respectively. The fine structure observed with CARMA is in good agreement with the previous Very Large Array results at centimeter wavelengths, suggesting that the hyper-compact H II region at the center of IRS 1 is associated with an ionized bipolar outflow. We image the molecular lines OCS(19-18) and CH{sub 3}CN(12-11) as well as {sup 13}CO(2-1) surrounding IRS 1, showing a velocity gradient along the southwest-northeast direction. The spectral line profiles in {sup 13}CO(2-1), CO(2-1), and HCN(1-0) observed toward IRS 1 show broad redshifted absorption, providing evidence for gas infall with rates in the range of 3-10 × 10{sup –3} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} inferred from our observations.

  16. Stochastic equations for continuum and determination of hydraulic drag coefficients for smooth flat plate and smooth round tube with taking into account intensity and scale of turbulent flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitrenko, Artur V.

    2016-07-01

    The stochastic equations of continuum are used for determining the hydraulic drag coefficients. As a result, the formulas for the hydraulic drag coefficients dependent on the turbulence intensity and scale instead of only on the Reynolds number are proposed for the classic flows of an incompressible fluid along a smooth flat plate and a round smooth tube. It is shown that the new expressions for the classical drag coefficients, which depend only on the Reynolds number, should be obtained from these new general formulas if to use the well-known experimental data for the initial turbulence. It is found that the limitations of classical empirical and semiempirical formulas for the hydraulic drag coefficients and their deviation from the experimental data depend on different parameters of initial fluctuations in the flow for different experiments in a wide range of Reynolds numbers. On the basis of these new dependencies, it is possible to explain that the differences between the experimental results for the fixed Reynolds number are caused by the difference in the values of flow fluctuations for each experiment instead of only due to the systematic error in the processing of experiments. Accordingly, the obtained general dependencies for the smooth flat plate and the smooth round tube can serve as the basis for clarifying the results of experiments and the experimental formulas, which used for continuum flows in different devices.

  17. Photometer for measuring intensity and rhodopsin distributions in intact eyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Theodore P.; Webbers, Jacob P. P.

    1995-09-01

    We describe a photometer that measures light transmitted through excised eyes. The instrument, an ocular transmission photometer, employs sensitive single photon-counting techniques, and its usefulness has been tested by the study of the absorbance of rhodopsin in retinal rod cells in situ. We find that absorbances of rat rods agree well with those predicted by microspectrophotometry without making corrections for cellular mosaics. Additional tests of the ocular transmission photometer show that (a) the instrument is sensitive to subtle differences in rhodopsin absorbance, known to exist in specific locations in the rat retina, and (b) using the rate of rhodopsin bleaching as the measure of intensity, we can determine the intensity distribution at several locations across the rat retina.

  18. Continuum radiation at Uranus

    SciTech Connect

    Kurth, W.S.; Gurnett, D.A. ); Desch, M.D. )

    1990-02-01

    Uranus has proven to be a radio source of remarkable complexity with as many as six distinctly different types of emission. One Uranian radio emission which has thus far escaped attention is an analog of continuum radiation at Earth, Jupiter, and Saturn. The emission is found to be propagating in the ordinary mode in the range of one to a few kHz on the inbound leg of the Voyager 2 encounter, shortly after the magnetopause crossing. The continuum radiation spectrum at Uranus also includes bands with frequencies as high as 12 kHz or greater on both the inbound and outbound legs. The Uranian continuum radiation is notably weak, making it more like that detected at Saturn than the extremely intense Jovian continuum radiation. The Uranian emission shows some evidence for narrow-band components lying in the same frequency regime as the continuum, completing the analogy with the other planets, which also show narrow-band components superimposed on the continuum spectrum. The authors argue that the low intensity of the Uranian continuum is most likely related to the lack of a density cavity within the Uranian magnetosphere that is deep relative to the solar wind plasma density.

  19. On the intensity distribution function of blazed reflective diffraction gratings.

    PubMed

    Casini, R; Nelson, P G

    2014-10-01

    We derive from first principles the expression for the angular/wavelength distribution of the intensity diffracted by a blazed reflective grating, according to a scalar theory of diffraction. We considered the most common case of a groove profile with rectangular apex. Our derivation correctly identifies the geometric parameters of a blazed reflective grating that determine its diffraction efficiency, and fixes an incorrect but commonly adopted expression in the literature. We compare the predictions of this scalar theory with those resulting from a rigorous vector treatment of diffraction from one-dimensional blazed reflective gratings.

  20. Combustion intensity and distribution relation to noise generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plett, E. G.; Leshner, M. D.; Summerfield, M.

    1975-01-01

    Experiments with several different flame holder geometries were conducted to investigate the degree to which combustion roughness can be altered by altering the flame intensity and flame distribution in a ducted combustion system. The effect of admitting primary air through a plane-slotted or a slotted-swirl vane flame holder was compared and the combustion roughness and noise was contrasted with that obtained with a closed front-end perforated can. The slotted front-end burners produced much smoother burning and less noise than the closed front-end can. No advantage was apparent with swirl vs nonswirl when approximately the same inlet flow distribution was maintained. Preheated inlet air provided somewhat smoother combustion as compared with ambient temperature air. The combustion roughness with methyl alcohol was briefly compared with that of isooctane; indications are that it burns more smoothly, but more detailed studies are needed to substantiate these indications.

  1. A Novel Microsensor for Measuring Angular Distribution of Radiative Intensity.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Thomas E; Pilorz, Stuart; Prufert-Bebout, Leslie; Bebout, Brad

    2015-01-01

    This article presents the design, construction and characterization of a novel type of light probe for measuring the angular radiance distribution of light fields. The differential acceptance angle (DAA) probe can resolve the directionality of a light field in environments with steep light gradients, such as microbial mats, without the need to remove, reorient, and reinsert the probe, a clear advantage over prior techniques. The probe consists of an inner irradiance sensor inside a concentric, moveable light-absorbing sheath. The radiative intensity in a specific zenith direction can be calculated by comparing the irradiance onto the sensor at different acceptance angles. We used this probe to measure the angular radiance distribution of two sample light fields, and observed good agreement with a conventional radiance probe. The DAA probe will aid researchers in understanding light transfer physics in dense microbial communities and expedite validation of numerical radiative transfer models for these environments. PMID:25763775

  2. Exploring Macroinvertebrate Species Distributions at Regional and Local Scales across a Sandy Beach Geographic Continuum

    PubMed Central

    Rodil, Iván F.; Compton, Tanya J.; Lastra, Mariano

    2012-01-01

    Exposed sandy beaches are highly dynamic ecosystems where macroinvertebrate species cope with extremely variable environmental conditions. The majority of the beach ecology studies present exposed beaches as physically dominated ecosystems where abiotic factors largely determine the structure and distribution of macrobenthic communities. However, beach species patterns at different scales can be modified by the interaction between different environmental variables, including biotic interactions. In this study, we examined the role of different environmental variables for describing the regional and local scale distributions of common macrobenthic species across 39 beaches along the North coast of Spain. The analyses were carried out using boosted regression trees, a relatively new technique from the field of machine learning. Our study showed that the macroinvertebrate community on exposed beaches is not structured by a single physical factor, but instead by a complex set of drivers including the biotic compound. Thus, at a regional scale the macrobenthic community, in terms of number of species and abundance, was mainly explained by surrogates of food availability, such as chlorophyll a. The results also revealed that the local scale is a feasible way to construct general predictive species-environmental models, since relationships derived from different beaches showed similar responses for most of the species. However, additional information on aspects of beach species distribution can be obtained with large scale models. This study showed that species-environmental models should be validated against changes in spatial extent, and also illustrates the utility of BRTs as a powerful analysis tool for ecology data insight. PMID:22761841

  3. Correlation of the radio continuum intensity with the FIR luminosity and its implication for dust heating sources and physical processes in galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Völk, Heinrich J.; Xu, Cong

    1994-03-01

    The tight correlation between the far-infrared (FIR) luminosities and the radio continuum intensities of late-type galaxies can be shown to be not only a mass-scaling (or ``richness'') effect. It rather depends on intrinsic properties like star-formation rate per unit mass, connecting différent physical processes in a galaxy. While the FIR emission is thermal radiation of dust grains heated by stellar UV and optical light, the radio continuum consists of thermal Bremsstrahlung, and nonthermal synchrotron radiation from relativistic electrons. The dominance of the so-called cool component of the total FIR radiation can be understood by the absorption of non-ionizing UV emission from intermediate massive stars (5-20 M.) which also contribute dominantly to the galaxian supernova rates. The relativistic electrons are therefore generated as a consequence of supernova explosions whose dynamical influence on galaxian gas motions (``turbulence'') in turn affects the generation of the magnetic fields in which the synchrotron emission occurs. Most galaxian disks are optically thick for their own UV emission, ionizing and non-ionizing. Similarly, energetic electrons lose most of their energy by Inverse Compton and synchrotron losses in galaxian disks and their halos. Therefore the independence of morphology, size, color, etc. of the FIR/radio correlation is basically explained by a ``calorimeter theory''. However a residual ``radio-quiet'' FIR emission due to dust-absorbed optical emission from old, low-mass stars appears necessary to explain the non-linearity of the correlation. The abnormal FIR-to-radio ratios of clustered galaxies are interpreted by an active interaction between these galaxies and presumably existing dense intracluster fragments.

  4. Nanoscale shift of the intensity distribution of dipole radiation.

    PubMed

    Shu, Jie; Li, Xin; Arnoldus, Henk F

    2009-02-01

    The energy flow lines (field lines of the Poynting vector) for radiation emitted by a dipole are in general curves, rather than straight lines. For a linear dipole the field lines are straight, but when the dipole moment of a source rotates, the field lines wind numerous times around an axis, which is perpendicular to the plane of rotation, before asymptotically approaching a straight line. We consider an elliptical dipole moment, representing the most general state of oscillation, and this includes the linear dipole as a special case. Due to the spiraling near the source, for the case of a rotating dipole moment, the field lines in the far field are displaced with respect to the outward radial direction, and this leads to a shift of the intensity distribution of the radiation in the far field. This shift is shown to be independent of the distance to the source and, although of nanoscale dimension, should be experimentally observable.

  5. Spatial variability of "Did You Feel It?" intensity data: insights into sampling biases in historical earthquake intensity distributions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hough, Susan E.

    2013-01-01

    Recent parallel development of improved quantitative methods to analyze intensity distributions for historical earthquakes and of web‐based systems for collecting intensity data for modern earthquakes provides an opportunity to reconsider not only important individual historical earthquakes but also the overall characterization of intensity distributions for historical events. The focus of this study is a comparison between intensity distributions of historical earthquakes with those from modern earthquakes for which intensities have been determined by the U.S. Geological Survey “Did You Feel It?” (DYFI) website (see Data and Resources). As an example of a historical earthquake, I focus initially on the 1843 Marked Tree, Arkansas, event. Its magnitude has been previously estimated as 6.0–6.2. I first reevaluate the macroseismic effects of this earthquake, assigning intensities using a traditional approach, and estimate a preferred magnitude of 5.4. Modified Mercalli intensity (MMI) values for the Marked Tree earthquake are higher, on average, than those from the 2011 >Mw 5.8 Mineral, Virginia, earthquake for distances ≤500  km but comparable or lower on average at larger distances, with a smaller overall felt extent. Intensity distributions for other moderate historical earthquakes reveal similar discrepancies; the discrepancy is also even more pronounced using earlier published intensities for the 1843 earthquake. I discuss several hypotheses to explain the discrepancies, including the possibility that intensity values associated with historical earthquakes are commonly inflated due to reporting/sampling biases. A detailed consideration of the DYFI intensity distribution for the Mineral earthquake illustrates how reporting and sampling biases can account for historical earthquake intensity biases as high as two intensity units and for the qualitative difference in intensity distance decays for modern versus historical events. Thus, intensity maps for

  6. 14 CFR 25.1389 - Position light distribution and intensities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... minimum intensities in the horizontal plane, minimum intensities in any vertical plane, and maximum...: (1) Intensities in the horizontal plane. Each intensity in the horizontal plane (the plane containing the longitudinal axis of the airplane and perpendicular to the plane of symmetry of the airplane)...

  7. 14 CFR 29.1389 - Position light distribution and intensities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... terms of minimum intensities in the horizontal plane, minimum intensities in any vertical plane, and... requirements: (1) Intensities in the horizontal plane. Each intensity in the horizontal plane (the plane containing the longitudinal axis of the rotorcraft and perpendicular to the plane of symmetry of...

  8. 14 CFR 29.1389 - Position light distribution and intensities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... terms of minimum intensities in the horizontal plane, minimum intensities in any vertical plane, and... requirements: (1) Intensities in the horizontal plane. Each intensity in the horizontal plane (the plane containing the longitudinal axis of the rotorcraft and perpendicular to the plane of symmetry of...

  9. 14 CFR 27.1389 - Position light distribution and intensities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... minimum intensities in the horizontal plane, minimum intensities in any vertical plane, and maximum...: (1) Intensities in the horizontal plane. Each intensity in the horizontal plane (the plane containing the longitudinal axis of the rotorcraft and perpendicular to the plane of symmetry of the...

  10. 14 CFR 27.1389 - Position light distribution and intensities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... minimum intensities in the horizontal plane, minimum intensities in any vertical plane, and maximum...: (1) Intensities in the horizontal plane. Each intensity in the horizontal plane (the plane containing the longitudinal axis of the rotorcraft and perpendicular to the plane of symmetry of the...

  11. 14 CFR 29.1389 - Position light distribution and intensities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... terms of minimum intensities in the horizontal plane, minimum intensities in any vertical plane, and... requirements: (1) Intensities in the horizontal plane. Each intensity in the horizontal plane (the plane containing the longitudinal axis of the rotorcraft and perpendicular to the plane of symmetry of...

  12. 14 CFR 25.1389 - Position light distribution and intensities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... minimum intensities in the horizontal plane, minimum intensities in any vertical plane, and maximum...: (1) Intensities in the horizontal plane. Each intensity in the horizontal plane (the plane containing the longitudinal axis of the airplane and perpendicular to the plane of symmetry of the airplane)...

  13. 14 CFR 27.1389 - Position light distribution and intensities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... minimum intensities in the horizontal plane, minimum intensities in any vertical plane, and maximum...: (1) Intensities in the horizontal plane. Each intensity in the horizontal plane (the plane containing the longitudinal axis of the rotorcraft and perpendicular to the plane of symmetry of the...

  14. 14 CFR 25.1389 - Position light distribution and intensities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... minimum intensities in the horizontal plane, minimum intensities in any vertical plane, and maximum...: (1) Intensities in the horizontal plane. Each intensity in the horizontal plane (the plane containing the longitudinal axis of the airplane and perpendicular to the plane of symmetry of the airplane)...

  15. 14 CFR 25.1389 - Position light distribution and intensities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... minimum intensities in the horizontal plane, minimum intensities in any vertical plane, and maximum...: (1) Intensities in the horizontal plane. Each intensity in the horizontal plane (the plane containing the longitudinal axis of the airplane and perpendicular to the plane of symmetry of the airplane)...

  16. 14 CFR 29.1389 - Position light distribution and intensities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... terms of minimum intensities in the horizontal plane, minimum intensities in any vertical plane, and... requirements: (1) Intensities in the horizontal plane. Each intensity in the horizontal plane (the plane containing the longitudinal axis of the rotorcraft and perpendicular to the plane of symmetry of...

  17. Can vesicle size distributions predict eruption intensity during volcanic activity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaRue, A.; Baker, D. R.; Polacci, M.; Allard, P.; Sodini, N.

    2013-06-01

    We studied three-dimensional (3-D) vesicle size distributions by X-ray microtomography in scoria collected during the relatively quiescent Phase II of the 2010 eruption at Eyjafjallajökull volcano, Iceland. Our goal was to compare the vesicle size distributions (VSDs) measured in these samples with those found in Stromboli volcano, Italy. Stromboli was chosen because its VSDs are well-characterized and show a correlation with eruption intensity: typical Strombolian activity produces VSDs with power-law exponents near 1, whereas larger and more energetic Vulcanian-type explosions and Plinian eruptions produce VSDs with power-law exponents near 1.5. The hypothesis to be tested was whether or not the samples studied in this work would contain VSDs similar to normal Strombolian products, display higher power-law exponents, or be described by exponential functions. Before making this comparison we tested the hypothesis that the phreatomagmatic nature of the Eyjafjallajökull eruption might have a significant effect on the VSDs. We performed 1 atm bubble-growth experiments in which the samples were inundated with water and compared them to similar, control, experiments without water inundation. No significant differences between the VSDs of the two sets of experiments were found, and the hypothesis is not supported by the experimental evidence; therefore, VSDs of magmatic and phreatomagmatic eruptions can be directly compared. The Phase II Eyjafjallajökull VSDs are described by power law exponents of ~ 0.8, typical of normal Strombolian eruptions. The comparable VSDs and behavior of Phase II of the Eyjafjallajökull 2010 eruption to Stromboli are interpreted to be a reflection of similar conduit systems in both volcanoes that are being constantly fed by the ascent of deep magma that mixes with resident magma at shallow depths. Such behavior implies that continued activity during Phase II of the Eyjafjallajökull eruption could be expected and would have been predicted

  18. Nonlinear continuum growth model of multiscale reliefs as applied to rigorous analysis of multilayer short-wave scattering intensity. I. Gratings

    PubMed Central

    Goray, Leonid; Lubov, Maxim

    2013-01-01

    It is shown that taking into proper account certain terms in the nonlinear continuum equation of thin-film growth makes it applicable to the simulation of the surface of multilayer gratings with large boundary profile heights and/or gradient jumps. The proposed model describes smoothing and displacement of Mo/Si and Al/Zr boundaries of gratings grown on Si substrates with a blazed groove profile by magnetron sputtering and ion-beam deposition. Computer simulation of the growth of multilayer Mo/Si and Al/Zr gratings has been conducted. Absolute diffraction efficiencies of Mo/Si and Al/Zr gratings in the extreme UV range have been found within the framework of boundary integral equations applied to the calculated boundary profiles. It has been demonstrated that the integrated approach to the calculation of boundary profiles and of the intensity of short-wave scattering by multilayer gratings developed here opens up a way to perform studies comparable in accuracy to measurements with synchrotron radiation, at least for known materials and growth techniques. PMID:24046500

  19. Nonlinear continuum growth model of multiscale reliefs as applied to rigorous analysis of multilayer short-wave scattering intensity. I. Gratings.

    PubMed

    Goray, Leonid; Lubov, Maxim

    2013-08-01

    It is shown that taking into proper account certain terms in the nonlinear continuum equation of thin-film growth makes it applicable to the simulation of the surface of multilayer gratings with large boundary profile heights and/or gradient jumps. The proposed model describes smoothing and displacement of Mo/Si and Al/Zr boundaries of gratings grown on Si substrates with a blazed groove profile by magnetron sputtering and ion-beam deposition. Computer simulation of the growth of multilayer Mo/Si and Al/Zr gratings has been conducted. Absolute diffraction efficiencies of Mo/Si and Al/Zr gratings in the extreme UV range have been found within the framework of boundary integral equations applied to the calculated boundary profiles. It has been demonstrated that the integrated approach to the calculation of boundary profiles and of the intensity of short-wave scattering by multilayer gratings developed here opens up a way to perform studies comparable in accuracy to measurements with synchrotron radiation, at least for known materials and growth techniques. PMID:24046500

  20. Truncated Thermal Equilibrium Distribution for Intense Beam Propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Ronald C. Davidson; Hong Qin; Steven M. Lund

    2003-02-26

    An intense charged-particle beam with directed kinetic energy ({lambda}{sub b}-1)m{sub b}c{sup 2} propagates in the z-direction through an applied focusing field with transverse focusing force modeled by F{sub foc} = -{lambda}{sub b}m{sub b}{omega}{sub beta}{sup 2} {perpendicular} x {perpendicular} in the smooth focusing approximation. This paper examines properties of the axisymmetric, truncated thermal equilibrium distribution F(sub)b(r,p perpendicular) = A exp (-H Perpendicular/T perpendicular (sub)b) = (H perpendicular-E(sub)b), where A, T perpendicular (sub)b, and E (sub)b are positive constants, and H perpendicular is the Hamiltonian for transverse particle motion. The equilibrium profiles for beam number density, n(sub)b(r) = * d{sup 2}pF(sub)b(r,p perpendicular), and transverse temperature, T perpendicular (sub)b(r) = * d{sup 2}p(p{sup 2} perpendicular/2 lambda (sbu)bm (sub)b)F(sub)b(r,p perpendicular), are calculated self-consistently including space-charge effects. Several properties of the equilibrium profiles are noteworthy. For example, the beam has a sharp outer edge radius r(sub)b with n(sub)b(r greater than or equal to rb) = 0, where r(sub)b depends on the value of E(sub)b/T (sub)perpendicular(sub)b. In addition, unlike the choice of a semi-Gaussian distribution, F{sup SG}(sub)b = A exp (-p{sup 2}(sub)perpendicular/2lambda(sub)bm(sub)bTperpendicular(sub)b) = (r-r(sub)b), the truncated thermal equilibrium distribution F(sub)b(r,p) depends on (r,p) only through the single-particle constant of the motion Hperpendiuclar and is therefore a true steady-state solution (*/*t = 0) of the nonlinear Vlasov-Maxwell equations.

  1. Distribution of angular momentum transfers from (p , d) and (p , t) reactions in the high excitation energy continuum region of gadolinium nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarlow, Thomas; Beausang, Cornelius; Hughes, Richard; Ross, Timothy; Gell, Kristen; Vyas, Gargi

    2013-10-01

    The structure of even and odd Gd nuclei at low/moderate spins and up to high excitation energies in the vicinity of the N = 90 shape change region have been probed using the (p,t) and (p,d) reactions on even-even targets. The proton beam, at a beam energy of 25 MeV, was provided by the 88-Inch Cyclotron at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Outgoing charged particles, between ~30 and 60 degrees, were detected by the STARS silicon telescope while coincident gamma-rays were detected with the clover Ge detectors of the Liberace Array. The measured angular distributions for outgoing deuterons and tritons are well reproduced by DWBA calculations for discrete low-lying states, whereas at higher excitations of (2 - 9) MeV the angular momentum distribution of the continuum region should be represented by a distribution of L-transfer values. The angular distribution of the continuum region has been investigated in the present work . Weighted linear combinations of calculated (DWBA) angular distributions for L-transfer values of ΔL = 0 to 6 ℏ are compared to the experimental angular distribution in a chi-square minimization technique to find the best fitting distribution of angular momentum transfers in gadolinium nuclei. Preliminary results will be presented.

  2. The use of distributed temperature sensing technology for monitoring wildland fire intensity and distribution.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochoa, C. G.; Cram, D.; Hatch, C. E.; Tyler, S. W.

    2014-12-01

    Distributed temperature sensing (DTS) technology offers a viable alternative for accurately measuring wildland fire intensity and distribution in real time applications. We conducted an experiment to test the use of DTS as an alternative technology to monitor prescribed fire temperatures in real time and across a broad spatial scale. The custom fiber-optic cable consisted of three fiber optic lines buffered by polyamide, copper, and polyvinyl chloride, respectively, each armored in a stainless steel tube backfilled with Nitrogen gas. The 150 m long cable was deployed in three different 20 by 26 m experimental plots of short-grass rangeland in central New Mexico. Cable was arranged to maximize coverage of the experimental plots and allow cross-comparison between two main parallel straight-line sections approximately 8 m apart. A DTS system recorded fire temperatures every three seconds and integrated every one meter. A series of five thermocouples attached to a datalogger were placed at selected locations along the cable and also recorded temperature data every three seconds on each fiber. Results indicate that in general there is good agreement between thermocouple-measured and DTS-measured temperatures. A close match in temperature between DTS and thermocouples was particularly observed during the rising limb but not so much during the decline. The metal armoring of the fiber-optic cable remained hot longer than the thermocouples after the flames had passed. The relatively short-duration, high-intensity, prescribed burn fire in each plot resulted in temperatures reaching up to 450 degrees Celsius. In addition, DTS data allow for illustration of the irregular nature of flame speed and travel path across the rangeland grasses, a phenomenon that was impossible to quantify without the use of this tool. This study adds to the understanding of using DTS as a new alternative tool for better characterizing wildland fire intensity, distribution and travel patterns, and

  3. Continuum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khristianovich, S. A.

    The volume contains a collection of papers dealing with various problems of continuum mechanics which were written by the author at different times during the period 1936-1974. Topics covered include supersonic gas flow, design of Laval nozzles, physical foundations of transonic aerodynamics, theory of short waves, cohesion modulus in the theory of cracks, and deformation of strain-hardening plastic materials.

  4. The Spatial Intensity Distribution of the UV Light in HH Objects. Revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moro-Martin, A.; Noriego-Crespo, A.; Boehm, K.-H.; Raga, A. C.

    1996-01-01

    Simple kinematical bow shock models have successfylly explained many of the observed features in Herbig-Haro objects. It is shown that similar models can be applied to the spatial intensity distribution of the UV lines observed by IUE. Archival IUE spectra have been used for the HH 1, HH 2(H+A'), HH 2(G+B), HH 24A, HH 32A, HH 43(A+B+C), and HH 47A objects where the brightest UV lines (C IV (lambda)1549,Si III(lambda)1891, C III] (lambda)1909, C II] (lambda)2326, MgII (lambda)2799) were studied, as well as the UV continuum (modeled by the hydrogen two-photon contiuum). The quality of the IUE data is rather limited due to the broad point spread function and the low signal-to-noise, and therefore the models were degraded to make them comparable to the observations. The physical parameters used in the models were obtained from previous optical studies and varied accordingly to match the observations, but within the known uncertainties. The objects were modeled by a single bow shock model (i.e., HH 1, HH 24A, HH 32A, and HH 47A) or the superposition of two (i.e., HH 2(H+A') and HH 2(G+B) or more (i.e., HH 43(A+B+C)) of them. The idea was to take into account the complexity of the morphology of these objects, and the contribution to the UV light from diffrent condensations within the IUE aperature.

  5. THE 3-5 {mu}m SPECTRUM OF NGC 1068 AT HIGH ANGULAR RESOLUTION: DISTRIBUTION OF EMISSION AND ABSORPTION FEATURES ACROSS THE NUCLEAR CONTINUUM SOURCE

    SciTech Connect

    Geballe, T. R.; Mason, R. E.; Rodriguez-Ardila, A.; Axon, D. J.

    2009-08-20

    We report moderate resolution 3-5 {mu}m spectroscopy of the nucleus of NGC 1068 obtained at 0.''3 (20 pc) resolution with the spectrograph slit aligned approximately along the ionization cones of the active galactic nucleus. The deconvolved full width at half-maximum of the nuclear continuum source in this direction is 0.''3. Four coronal lines of widely different excitations were detected; the intensity of each peaks near radio knot C, approximately 0.''3 north of the infrared continuum peak, where the radio jet changes direction. Together with the broadened line profiles observed near that location, this suggests that shock ionization is the dominant excitation mechanism of the coronal lines. The depth of the 3.4 {mu}m hydrocarbon absorption is maximum at and just south of the continuum peak, similar to the 10 {mu}m silicate absorption. That and the similar and rapid variations of the optical depths of both features across the nucleus suggest that substantial portions of both arise in a dusty environment just in front of the continuum source(s). A new and tighter limit is set on the column density of CO. Although clumpy models of the dust screen might explain the shallowness of the silicate feature, the presence of the 3.4 {mu}m feature and the absence of CO are strongly reminiscent of Galactic diffuse cloud environments and a consistent explanation for them and the observed silicate feature is found if all three phenomena occur in such an environment, existing as close as 10 pc to the central engine.

  6. Features of electromagnetic radiation time-and-frequency fluctuation intensity distributions from human brain structures.

    PubMed

    Kublanov, V S; Gasilov, V L; Kazakov, Y E

    2000-01-01

    Time-and-frequency fluctuation intensity distributions' analysis is made of the electromagnetic radiation obtained from deep human brain structures. The role of monitoring the distribution changes due to various cerebral circulation disorders is explained.

  7. Software architecture for large scale, distributed, data-intensive systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattmann, Chris A.; Medvidovic, Nenad; Ramirez, Paul M.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents our experience with OODT, a novel software architectual style, and middlware-based implementation for data-intensive systems. To date, OODT has been successfully evaluated in several different science domains including Cancer Research with the National Cancer Institute (NCI), and Planetary Science with NASA's Planetary Data System (PDS).

  8. Numerical characteristics of the intensity distribution for a white organic light-emitting diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Henglong; Li, Wei-Sheng; Huang, Pin-Jui; Hsieh, Meng-Huan

    2015-09-01

    A statistical distribution function capable of numerically characterizing the unique intensity distribution of a planar white organic light-emitting diodes (WOLED) was theoretically investigated by fitting our experimental data obtained by microscopic goniometer (MG) system associated with an energy analyzer to the normal distribution function with amplitude, average, and standard deviation as adjustable parameters. The WOLED is one of the upcoming lighting sources with planar device structure without additional optical components. The intensity characteristic of a lighting source is crucial for practical purpose. The procedure of an optical design usually requires proper numerical tools to satisfy specific application by adjusting parameters. Relatively uniform intensity distribution of a planar lighting source is needed for a specific lighting application such as back-lighting (BL) for liquid-crystal displays (LCD) in which Regular white LED's (WLED) and light-guide plate are assembled as a planar module. Our intensity measurement of a WOLED revealed a unique pattern in which the relative intensities near central area are higher than that near the edge of the emissive area. This unique intensity profile is similar to the feature of Gaussian distribution function. Our preliminary result of applying Gaussian distribution function to numerically characterize the intensity profile of a WOLED suggests that the unique intensity profile can be represented by single distribution function properly.

  9. Absolute intensity calibration of flat-field space-resolved extreme ultraviolet spectrometer using radial profiles of visible and extreme ultraviolet bremsstrahlung continuum emitted from high-density plasmas in Large Helical Device

    SciTech Connect

    Dong Chunfeng; Wang Erhui; Morita, Shigeru; Goto, Motoshi

    2011-11-15

    A precise absolute intensity calibration of a flat-field space-resolved extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectrometer working in wavelength range of 60-400 A is carried out using a new calibration technique based on radial profile measurement of the bremsstrahlung continuum in Large Helical Device. A peaked vertical profile of the EUV bremsstrahlung continuum has been successfully observed in high-density plasmas (n{sub e}{>=} 10{sup 14} cm{sup -3}) with hydrogen ice pellet injection. The absolute calibration can be done by comparing the EUV bremsstrahlung profile with the visible bremsstrahlung profile of which the absolute value has been already calibrated using a standard lamp. The line-integrated profile of measured visible bremsstrahlung continuum is firstly converted into the local emissivity profile by considering a magnetic surface distortion due to the plasma pressure, and the local emissivity profile of EUV bremsstrahlung is secondly calculated by taking into account the electron temperature profile and free-free gaunt factor. The line-integrated profile of the EUV bremsstrahlung continuum is finally calculated from the local emissivity profile in order to compare with measured EUV bremsstrahlung profile. The absolute intensity calibration can be done by comparing measured and calculated EUV bremsstrahlung profiles. The calibration factor is thus obtained as a function of wavelength with excellent accuracy. It is also found in the profile analysis that the grating reflectivity of EUV emissions is constant along the direction perpendicular to the wavelength dispersion. Uncertainties on the calibration factor determined with the present method are discussed including charge-coupled device operation modes.

  10. A theoretical and experimental investigation of sound intensity distribution within a splitter silencer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tam, K. L.; Fahy, F. J.

    1991-12-01

    Results are presented of an investigation into the sound intensity distribution in a ventilation duct splitter silencer subject to plane waves incident in the axial direction, under conditions of zero flow. A theory is developed which accounts for the generation of nonplane fields at the cross-sectional discontinuities of the duct-silencer-duct system. A local reaction model of the splitter material is employed, and analytical solutions and numerical results are presented for the sound intensity distribution within the silencer. Experiments were conducted to measure the distribution of sound intensity in a silencer subject to incident plane waves. The conventional cross-spectral method of measuring sound intensity could not be used because of the practical difficulties in manoeuvring the two-microphone assembly through the narrow air passage and obtaining measurements at positions close to the wall of the splitters. Instead, a modified cross-spectral method was devised which employs only one microphone for measurement. In this method, the transfer functions between the loudspeaker input signal and the microphone output signal were measured at an array of microphone positions within the air passages of the silencer. The divergence equation for sound intensity was employed to infer transverse intensity distributions from the computed axial distribution. Reasonable qualitative agreement is obtained between theoretical and observed sound intensity distribution, but the local reaction model of the splitter is found not to be satisfactory at the lower frequencies.

  11. Numerical research of two-dimension temperature distribution in bio-tissue induced by pulse laser and continuum laser based on FEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Ning; Zhan, Renjun; Cui, Heping

    2013-09-01

    Laser has several advantages, such as strong anti-interference ability, quick speed, high power, agility and precision. It is widely applied in military and medicine fields. When laser acts on human body, biological tissue of human body will appear the phenomenon of ablation and carbonization and solidification. In order to effectively defend excess damage by laser, the thermal effect research of skin tissue should be carried out. The heating rate and thermal damage area should be studied. In the paper, thermal energy production and thermal exchange loss used in living tissue is analyzed. The rule of thermal transfer that is irradiated by high power laser is discussed. The model of two dimensional skin tissues is built. The two dimensional transient temperature distribution generated by laser irradiation in bio-tissue is numerical simulated using finite element method. The temperature change trend generated by pulse laser and continuum laser in different radial length and axial depth bio-tissue are studied respectively. The results show that FEM method can reflect the photothermal conversion of bio-tissue exactly. Temperature is the highest in the local tissue by laser irradiated directly. The highest temperature decreases along with increasing radial length and axial depth. The highest temperature rise generated by pulse laser is more than continuum laser's. The highest temperature generated by pulse laser is not monotone increasing but is oscillation trend. The highest temperature generated by continuum laser is monotone increasing. The temperature rise mainly occurs in exodermis and derma. The temperature rise is not very significant in fat acid lining.

  12. Note: On the wavelength dependence of the intensity calibration factor of extreme ultraviolet spectrometer determined with profile measurement of bremsstrahlung continuum

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, N.; Morita, S.; Dong, C. F.; Goto, M.; Maezawa, H.; Miyauchi, H.

    2015-06-15

    The absolute calibration factor of extreme ultraviolet spectroscopic instrument which has recently been determined from absolute radiation profile measurement of bremsstrahlung continuum has been investigated by comparing the calculated diffraction efficiency of grating. An overall tendency of the wavelength dependence of the calibration factor from 40 Å to 500 Å can be reproduced by that of the grating efficiency, especially the agreement between the measured calibration factor and the calculated grating efficiency has been found to be fairly good for the wavelength range 200 Å-500 Å.

  13. Experimental demonstration of Fourier synthesis of an annular ultrasonic intensity distribution.

    PubMed

    Harrison, G H; Balcer-Kubiczek, E K

    1987-05-01

    Ultrasonic source velocity distributions can be manipulated to provide beam shaping, as demonstrated by much previous work on focussing, side-lobe reduction and the production of Gaussian beam profiles. In principle, other beam profiles can be specified to order using inverse source calculations. We have presented a Fourier optics calculation for the source velocity distribution required to produce a desired distribution in intensity at a given axial distance. In this Paper, we present experimental verification of this approach using a 3.8 cm radius lead metaniobate transducer divided into 10 annuli of equal width, operated at 850 kHz continuous wave. The radiofrequency (RF) voltages supplied to each annulus were adjusted to approximate a source distribution calculated to produce an annular intensity distribution with inner and outer radii of 1.5 and 2.5 cm, respectively, at an axial distance of 30 cm in water. Good experimental verification of predicted intensities was achieved.

  14. The near wall TIRFM measurement of nano-tracer's statistical intensity distribution (SID) and determining the base intensity I0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Xu; LNM Team

    2015-11-01

    The total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM) is an evanescent-wave-based technique for measuring nanoparticle dynamics very close to wall. The intensity of the evanescent wave decays exponentially (i.e. I(z) =I0exp(z/zp)) , which can provide information of the tracer particle position not just parallel but also normal to wall. However, considering the z information is encoded in tracer intensity, it is critical to determine the base intensity I0. In this study, we will first establish a model to describe the statistical intensity distribution (SID) of the nano-tracers observed in the evanescent field inspired by the works of Huang et al. A different function of particle-wall interaction and a term of the influence of the objective focal plane thickness are introduced in the present SID method. Then, TIRFM experiments are performed to measure the histogram of SID. The experimental histogram of SID is then fitted by the theoretical curve to determine I0 which is the only one fit parameter. By near wall velocity measurement, we will show that the SID method has a very high precision in determining I0 and the vertical z position of every nanotracer. Further tests show that the PDF of nano-tracers can reveal more information about how nanoparticles interact with the charged solid wall. This provides a promising method to detect the physical properties near interface.

  15. ENERGY DISTRIBUTION OF TWO-ELECTRON IONIZATION OF HELIUM IN AN INTENSE LASER FIELD.

    SciTech Connect

    LAFON,R.; CHALOUPKA,J.L.; SHEEHY,B.; DIMAURO,L.F.; PAUL,P.M.; AGOSTINI,P.; KULANDER,K.C.

    2000-09-24

    It is well known that a neutral atom interacting with a strong laser field will ionize at sufficiently high intensity even for photon energies well below the ionization threshold. When the required number of photons becomes very large, this process is best described by the suppression of the Coulomb barrier by the laser's oscillating electric field, allowing the electron to tunnel into the continuum. As the laser intensity is increased, more tightly bound electrons may be successively liberated by this mechanism. Such a sequential multiple ionization, long accepted as a reasonable approach to the formidable problem of a multielectron atom interacting nonperturbatively with an intense electromagnetic field, provides fair estimates of the various charge state appearance intensities while the tunneling rates are in excellent agreement with single ionization yields. However, more accurate measurements revealed systematic and very large deviations from the tunneling rates: near appearance intensity under standard experimental conditions, the observed double ion yield is several orders of magnitude larger than predicted by the sequential rate. It soon became clear that electrons could not be considered as independent and that electron-electron correlation had to be taken into account. Dynamic correlations have been considered in several theories. First qualitatively in the shakeoff model; then empirically through the e-2e cross-section in the quantum/classical three-step model (tunnel ionization, acceleration by the oscillating electric field and e-2e recollision with the ion); recently through the so-called intense field many-body-S-matrix theory and a purely empirical model of collective tunnel ionization. The validity of these ideas has been examined using numerical models. The measurement of total ion yields over a dynamic range exceeding ten orders of magnitude, a major breakthrough made possible by the availability of high-repetition rate lasers at the beginning of

  16. The distribution of modified mercalli intensity in the 18 April 1906 San Francisco earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boatwright, J.; Bundock, H.

    2008-01-01

    We analyze Boatwright and Bundock's (2005) modified Mercalli intensity (MMI) map for the 18 April 1906 San Francisco earthquake, reviewing their interpretation of the MMI scale and testing their correlation of 1906 cemetery damage with MMI intensity. We consider in detail four areas of the intensity map where Boatwright and Bundock (2005) added significantly to the intensity descriptions compiled by Lawson (1908). We show that the distribution of off-fault damage in Sonoma County suggests that the rupture velocity approached the P-wave velocity along Tomales Bay. In contrast, the falloff of intensity with distance from the fault appears approximately constant throughout Mendocino County. The intensity in Humboldt County appears somewhat higher than the intensity in Mendocino County, suggesting that the rupture process at the northern end of the rupture was relatively energetic and that there was directivity consistent with a subsonic rupture velocity on the section of the fault south of Shelter Cove. Finally, we show that the intensity sites added in Santa Cruz County change the intensity distribution so that it decreases gradually along the southeastern section of rupture from Corralitos to San Juan Bautista and implies that the stress release on this section of rupture was relatively low.

  17. Static analysis of possible emittance growth of intense charged particle beams with thermal equilibrium distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Kikuchi, Takashi; Horioka, Kazuhiko

    2009-05-15

    Possible emittance growths of intense, nonuniform beams during a transport in a focusing channel are derived as a function of nonlinear field energy and space charge tune depression factors. The nonlinear field energy of the beam with thermal equilibrium distribution is estimated by considering the particle distribution across the cross section of the beam. The results show that the possible emittance growth can be suppressed by keeping the beam particle in thermal equilibrium distribution during the beam transport.

  18. Characterization and reconstruction of planar sources that generate identical intensity distributions in the Fraunhofer zone.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Herrero, R; Mejías, P M

    1981-12-01

    A general explicit form of the correlation functions of all the partially coherent quasi-monochromatic sources that generate identical intensity distributions at the far (Fraunhofer) zone is given. The common characteristic part of all of these correlation functions is pointed out. Also, the possibility is shown for reconstructing (in unique way), from intensity data at the far zone, any source whose correlation function at some region Omega depends on the coordinate difference only.

  19. The influence of diffraction gratings relief noise on the intensity distribution in diffraction orders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolyuchkin, V. V.; Odinokov, S. B.

    2016-08-01

    The method of security hologram quality inspection, in which the relief phase parameters are determined by registering results of the intensity distribution in diffraction orders, is known. The profile of relief as a harmonious distribution is represented. Deviation of the real relief profile from the ideal profile, another words phase relief noise, influence on the accuracy of this method. In the paper, on the assumption of homogeneity of the phase relief noise, the mathematical expressions for evaluating the influence of the phase relief noise on the intensity distribution in the diffraction orders are represented. Parameters of the correlation functions approximation describing the phase relief noise are determined. The dependence of the intensity values from the standard deviation of the phase relief noise is represented.

  20. Sound radiation from an infinite elastic cylinder with dual-wave propagation-intensity distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, C. R.

    1988-01-01

    The radiation of sound from an elastic cylindrical shell filled with fluid and supporting multiwave propagation is studied analytically. Combinations of supersonic and subsonic shell waves are considered. The radiated field is mapped by using acoustic intensity vectors evaluated at various locations. Both time averaged and instantaneous intensity are investigated. The acoustic intensity is seen to vary markedly with axial distance down the cylinder. The effect is shown to be associated with cross terms in the intensity relations, and its magnitude and location to depend upon the relative phase and amplitudes of individual waves. Subsonic shell waves are demonstrated to interact strongly with supersonic shell waves to cause a large modification in the radiated intensity distributions near the shell surface.

  1. Mapping the continuous reciprocal space intensity distribution of X-ray serial crystallography.

    PubMed

    Yefanov, Oleksandr; Gati, Cornelius; Bourenkov, Gleb; Kirian, Richard A; White, Thomas A; Spence, John C H; Chapman, Henry N; Barty, Anton

    2014-07-17

    Serial crystallography using X-ray free-electron lasers enables the collection of tens of thousands of measurements from an equal number of individual crystals, each of which can be smaller than 1 µm in size. This manuscript describes an alternative way of handling diffraction data recorded by serial femtosecond crystallography, by mapping the diffracted intensities into three-dimensional reciprocal space rather than integrating each image in two dimensions as in the classical approach. We call this procedure 'three-dimensional merging'. This procedure retains information about asymmetry in Bragg peaks and diffracted intensities between Bragg spots. This intensity distribution can be used to extract reflection intensities for structure determination and opens up novel avenues for post-refinement, while observed intensity between Bragg peaks and peak asymmetry are of potential use in novel direct phasing strategies.

  2. Mapping the continuous reciprocal space intensity distribution of X-ray serial crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Yefanov, Oleksandr; Gati, Cornelius; Bourenkov, Gleb; Kirian, Richard A.; White, Thomas A.; Spence, John C. H.; Chapman, Henry N.; Barty, Anton

    2014-01-01

    Serial crystallography using X-ray free-electron lasers enables the collection of tens of thousands of measurements from an equal number of individual crystals, each of which can be smaller than 1 µm in size. This manuscript describes an alternative way of handling diffraction data recorded by serial femtosecond crystallography, by mapping the diffracted intensities into three-dimensional reciprocal space rather than integrating each image in two dimensions as in the classical approach. We call this procedure ‘three-dimensional merging’. This procedure retains information about asymmetry in Bragg peaks and diffracted intensities between Bragg spots. This intensity distribution can be used to extract reflection intensities for structure determination and opens up novel avenues for post-refinement, while observed intensity between Bragg peaks and peak asymmetry are of potential use in novel direct phasing strategies. PMID:24914160

  3. HOT ELECTRON ENERGY DISTRIBUTIONS FROM ULTRA-INTENSE LASER SOLID INTERACTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H; Wilks, S C; Kruer, W L; Moon, S; Patel, N; Patel, P K; Shepherd, R; Snavely, R

    2005-12-08

    We present experimental data of electron energy distributions from ultra-intense (>10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}) laser-solid interactions using the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory Vulcan petawatt laser. These measurements were made using a CCD-based magnetic spectrometer. We present details on the distinct effective temperatures that were obtained for a wide variety of targets as a function of laser intensity. It is found that as the intensity increases from 10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2} to 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}, a 0.4 dependence on the laser intensity is found. Between 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2} and 10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2}, a gradual rolling off of temperature with intensity is observed.

  4. Mapping the continuous reciprocal space intensity distribution of X-ray serial crystallography.

    PubMed

    Yefanov, Oleksandr; Gati, Cornelius; Bourenkov, Gleb; Kirian, Richard A; White, Thomas A; Spence, John C H; Chapman, Henry N; Barty, Anton

    2014-07-17

    Serial crystallography using X-ray free-electron lasers enables the collection of tens of thousands of measurements from an equal number of individual crystals, each of which can be smaller than 1 µm in size. This manuscript describes an alternative way of handling diffraction data recorded by serial femtosecond crystallography, by mapping the diffracted intensities into three-dimensional reciprocal space rather than integrating each image in two dimensions as in the classical approach. We call this procedure 'three-dimensional merging'. This procedure retains information about asymmetry in Bragg peaks and diffracted intensities between Bragg spots. This intensity distribution can be used to extract reflection intensities for structure determination and opens up novel avenues for post-refinement, while observed intensity between Bragg peaks and peak asymmetry are of potential use in novel direct phasing strategies. PMID:24914160

  5. Intensity modulation and direct detection quantum key distribution based on quantum noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikuta, Takuya; Inoue, Kyo

    2016-01-01

    Quantum key distribution (QKD) has been studied for achieving perfectly secure cryptography based on quantum mechanics. This paper presents a novel QKD scheme that is based on an intensity-modulation and direct-detection system. Two slightly intensity-modulated pulses are sent from a transmitter, and a receiver determines key bits from the directly detected intensity. We analyzed the system performance for two typical eavesdropping methods, a beam splitting attack and an intercept-resend attack, with an assumption that the transmitting and receiving devices are fully trusted. Our brief analysis showed that short- or middle-range QKD systems are achievable with a simple setup.

  6. A precise Boltzmann distribution law for the fluorescence intensity ratio of two thermally coupled levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Feng; Zhao, Hua; Cai, Wei; Zhang, Zhiguo; Cao, Wenwu

    2016-06-01

    Noncontact monitoring temperature is very important in modern medicine, science, and technologies. The fluorescence intensity ratio (FIR) technique based on the Boltzmann distribution law exhibits excellent application potential, but the observed FIR deviates from the Boltzmann distribution law in the low temperature range. We propose a fluorescence intensity ratio relation FIR* = ηFIR by introducing a quantity η representing thermal population degree, which can be obtained from measured fluorescence decay curves of the upper emitting level. Using Eu3+ as an example, the method is confirmed that the deviated FIR is able to be corrected and return to follow the Boltzmann law.

  7. Light fields with an axially expanded intensity distribution for stable three-dimensional optical trapping.

    PubMed

    Zwick, Susanne; Schaub, Christian; Haist, Tobias; Osten, Wolfgang

    2010-09-13

    We introduce a new kind of light field to improve and simplify the trapping process of axially displaced particles. To this end we employ a light field with an axially expanded intensity distribution, which at the same time enables stable axial trapping. We present simulations of the axial intensity distribution of the novel trapping field and first experimental results, which demonstrate the improvement of the reliability of the axial trapping process. The method can be used to automate trapping of particles that are located outside of the focal plane of the microscope.

  8. Resonance and non-resonance effect of continuum states of 6Li on elastic scattering angular distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez Camacho, A.

    2016-07-01

    CDCC calculations of elastic scattering angular distributions for reactions of the weakly bound projectile 6Li with targets 28Si and 58Ni at energies around the Coulomb barrier are presented. Special emphasis is given to account for the effect of couplings from 6Li resonance states l = 2, J π = 3+, 2+, 1+. Similarly, the effect produced by non-resonant state couplings is studied. The convergent calculations are carried out with global α-target and d-target interactions. The calculated elastic scattering angular distributions are in general in good agreement with the measurements for the systems considered in this work. It is found that the calculations with only resonance states are very similar to that with all couplings (resonance+non-resonance). So, the absence of these states have a strong effect on elastic scattering (non-resonance states calculation). It is shown that the effects increase as the collision energy increases. An interpretation of the strength of the different effects is given in terms of the polarization potentials that emerge from the different couplings.

  9. Second-order Compton-Getting effect on arbitrary intensity distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, C. K.

    1985-01-01

    Theoretical studies of energetic particles in space are often referred to a special frame of reference. To compare theory with experiment, one has to transform the particle distribution from the special frame to the observer's frame, or vice versa. Various methods have been derived to obtain the directional distribution in the comoving frame from the directional fluxes measured on a spacecraft. These methods have become progressively complicated as increasingly detailed directional particle data become available. A set of 2nd order correct formulae for the transformation of an arbitrary differential intensity distribution, expressed as a series of spherical harmonics, between any two frames in constant relative motion is presented. These formulae greatly simplify the complicated procedures currently in use for the determination of the differential intensity distribution in a comoving frame.

  10. Integral-moment analysis of the BATSE gamma-ray burst intensity distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horack, John M.; Emslie, A. Gordon

    1994-01-01

    We have applied the technique of integral-moment analysis to the intensity distribution of the first 260 gamma-ray bursts observed by the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory. This technique provides direct measurement of properties such as the mean, variance, and skewness of the convolved luminosity-number density distribution, as well as associated uncertainties. Using this method, one obtains insight into the nature of the source distributions unavailable through computation of traditional single parameters such as V/V(sub max)). If the luminosity function of the gamma-ray bursts is strongly peaked, giving bursts only a narrow range of luminosities, these results are then direct probes of the radial distribution of sources, regardless of whether the bursts are a local phenomenon, are distributed in a galactic halo, or are at cosmological distances. Accordingly, an integral-moment analysis of the intensity distribution of the gamma-ray bursts provides for the most complete analytic description of the source distribution available from the data, and offers the most comprehensive test of the compatibility of a given hypothesized distribution with observation.

  11. Enhanced Intensity Distribution Analysis of the Rotational-Vibrational Spectrum of HCl

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fetterolf, Monty L.

    2007-01-01

    The use of generated intensity distributions as overlays on the HCl rotational-vibrational FTIR spectrum is presented as an effective method to integrate lab work into the physical chemistry lecture. The overlays that best match the actual HCl spectrum are generated using a pre-exponential factor of 2J+2.

  12. Kilometric Continuum Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, James L.; Boardsen, Scott

    2006-01-01

    Kilometric continuum (KC) is the high frequency component (approximately 100 kHz to approximately 800 kHz) of nonthermal continuum (NTC). Unlike the lower frequency portion of NTC (approximately 5 kHz to approximately 100 kHz) whose source is around the dawn sector, the source of KC occurs at all magnetic local times. The latitudinal beaming of KC as observed by GEOTAIL is, for most events, restricted to plus or minus 15 degrees magnetic latitude. KC has been observed during periods of both low and strong geomagnetic activity, with no significant correlation of wave intensity with K(sub p), index. However statistically the maximum observed frequency of KC emission tends to increase with K(sub p) index, the effect is more pronounced around solar maximum, but is also detected near solar minimum. There is strong evidence that the source region of KC is from the equatorial plasmapause during periods when a portion of the plasmapause moves significantly inwards from its nominal position. Case studies have shown that KC emissions are nearly always associated with plasmaspheric notches, shoulders, and tails. There is a recent focus on trying to understand the banded frequency structure of this emission and its relationship to plasmaspheric density ducts and irregularities in the source region.

  13. Ash Dispersal in Planetary Atmospheres: Continuum vs. Non-continuum Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fagents, S. A.; Baloga, S. M.; Glaze, L. S.

    2013-12-01

    The dispersal of ash from a volcanic vent on any given planet is dictated by particle properties (density, shape, and size distribution), the intensity of the eruptive source, and the characteristics of the planetary environment (atmospheric structure, wind field, and gravity) into which the ash is erupted. Relating observations of potential pyroclastic deposits to source locations and eruption conditions requires a detailed quantitative understanding of the settling rates of individual particles under changing ambient conditions. For atmospheres that are well described by continuum mechanics, the conventional Newtonian description of particle motion allows particle settling velocities to be related to particle characteristics via a drag coefficient. However, under rarefied atmospheric conditions (i.e., on Mars and at high altitude on Earth), non-continuum effects become important for ash-sized particles, and an equation of motion based on statistical mechanics is required for calculating particle motion. We have developed a rigorous new treatment of particle settling under variable atmospheric conditions and applied it to Earth and Mars. When non-continuum effects are important (as dictated by the mean free path of atmospheric gas relative to the particle size), fall velocities are greater than those calculated by continuum mechanics. When continuum conditions (i.e., higher atmospheric densities) are reached during descent, our model switches to a conventional formulation that determines the appropriate drag coefficient as the particle transits varying atmospheric properties. The variation of settling velocity with altitude allows computation of particle trajectories, fall durations and downwind dispersal. Our theoretical and numerical analyses show that several key, competing factors strongly influence the downwind trajectories of ash particles and the extents of the resulting deposits. These factors include: the shape of the particles (non-spherical particles

  14. Reassessment of fission fragment angular distributions from continuum states in the context of transition-state theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaz, Louis C.; Alexander, John M.

    1983-07-01

    Fission angular distributions have been studied for years and have been treated as classic examples of trasitions-state theory. Early work involving composite nuclei of relatively low excitation energy E ∗ (⪅35 MeV) and spin I (⪅25ħ) gave support to theory and delimited interesting properties of the transitions-state nuclei. More recent research on fusion fission and sequential fission after deeply inelastic reactions involves composite nuclei of much higher energies (⪅200 MeV) and spins (⪅100ħ). Extension of the basic ideas developed for low-spin nuclei requires detailed consideration of the role of these high spins and, in particular, the “spin window” for fussion. We have made empirical correlations of cross sections for evaporation residues and fission in order to get a description of this spin window. A systematic reanalysis has been made for fusion fission induced by H, He and heavier ions. Empirical correlations of K 20 (K 20 = {IeffT }/{h̷2}) are presented along with comparisons of Ieff to moments of inertia for saddle-point nuclei from the rotating liquid drop model. This model gives an excellent guide for the intermidiate spin zone (30⪅ I ⪅65), while strong shell and/or pairing effects are evident for excitations less than ⪅35 MeV. Observations of strong anisotropies for very high-spin systems signal the demise of certain approximation commonly made in the theory, and suggestions are made toward this end.

  15. A Network-Aware Distributed Storage Cache for Data Intensive Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Tierney, B.L.; Lee, J.R.; Johnston, W.E.; Crowley, B.; Holding, M.

    1999-12-23

    Modern scientific computing involves organizing, moving, visualizing, and analyzing massive amounts of data at multiple sites around the world. The technologies, the middleware services, and the architectures that are used to build useful high-speed, wide area distributed systems, constitute the field of data intensive computing. In this paper the authors describe an architecture for data intensive applications where they use a high-speed distributed data cache as a common element for all of the sources and sinks of data. This cache-based approach provides standard interfaces to a large, application-oriented, distributed, on-line, transient storage system. They describe their implementation of this cache, how they have made it network aware, and how they do dynamic load balancing based on the current network conditions. They also show large increases in application throughput by access to knowledge of the network conditions.

  16. Effects of land-use intensity on arthropod species abundance distributions in grasslands.

    PubMed

    Simons, Nadja K; Gossner, Martin M; Lewinsohn, Thomas M; Lange, Markus; Türke, Manfred; Weisser, Wolfgang W

    2015-01-01

    As a rule, communities consist of few abundant and many rare species, which is reflected in the characteristic shape of species abundance distributions (SADs). The processes that shape these SADs have been a longstanding problem for ecological research. Although many studies found strong negative effects of increasing land-use intensity on diversity, few reports consider land-use effects on SADs. Arthropods (insects and spiders) were sampled on 142 grassland plots in three regions in Germany, which were managed with different modes (mowing, fertilization and/or grazing) and intensities of land use. We analysed the effect of land use on three parameters characterizing the shape of SADs: abundance decay rate (the steepness of the rank abundance curve, represented by the niche-preemption model parameter), dominance (Berger-Parker dominance) and rarity (Fisher's alpha). Furthermore, we tested the core-satellite hypothesis by comparing the species' rank within the SAD to their distribution over the land-use gradient. When data on Araneae, Cicadina, Coleoptera, Heteroptera and Orthoptera were combined, abundance decay rate increased with combined land-use intensity (including all modes). Among the single land-use modes, increasing fertilization and grazing intensity increased the decay rate of all taxa, while increasing mowing frequency significantly affected the decay rate only in interaction with fertilization. Results of single taxa differed in their details, but all significant interaction effects included fertilization intensity. Dominance generally increased with increasing fertilization and rarity decreased with increasing grazing or mowing intensity, despite small differences among taxa and regions. The majority of species found on <10% of the plots per region were generally rare (<10 individuals), which is in accordance with the core-satellite hypothesis. We found significant differences in the rarity and dominance of species between plots of low and high

  17. Drop size distributions and kinetic energy rates in variable intensity rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assouline, Shmuel

    2016-04-01

    Temporal variability in rainfall intensity reflects on the drop size distribution (DSD), and affects the rainfall kinetic energy during the event. Smith et al. (2009) reported on 1-min interval rainfall intensity and corresponding DSD variability during a storm on the 22/7/06 at Princeton, NJ. They reported also on DSDs characteristics of heavy convective rainfall events during the whole summer. Applying the DSD model of Assouline and Mualem (1997), it is shown that: (a) a similar relationship between the mean drop size and the rainfall intensity characterized the local rainfall at both the seasonal and the single storm scale; (b) using the mean drop size as a scaling factor of the DSD removes the rainfall intensity dependence at the intrastorm scale, providing a powerful tool to deal with temporal variability of rainfall rates during rainfall events. For a storm characterized by a given temporal variability of intensities, three different ways of evaluating kinetic energy per unit mass or time were applied. By comparison to estimates accounting for rainfall temporal variability and related full DSDs, representing the storm by mean intensity and drop diameter tends to overestimate kinetic energy for low intensities and underestimate it for the higher ones. The relative error for the kinetic energy per unit of mass is ±45% and shifts from negative to positive sign for I>25 mm/h. For the kinetic energy per unit of time, the relative error ranges from -100% to +210% and changes sign for I>45 mm/h. When temporal variation of intensity is accounted for but drops are characterized by their mean values instead of the full DSD, kinetic energy is underestimated by 20% on average. Consequently, accounting for temporal variability in rainfall intensity during a storm has a notable impact on the erosive power of the rainfall.

  18. Submillimeter Continuum Observations of Comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jewitt, David

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this proposal was to study the submillimeter continuum emission from comets. The study was based mainly on the exploitation of the world's leading submillimeter telescope, the JCMT (James Clerk Maxwell Telescope) on Mauna Kea. Submillimeter wavelengths provide a unique view of cometary physics for one main reason. The cometary size distribution is such that the scattering cross-section is dominated by small dust grains, while the mass is dominated by the largest particles. Submillimeter continuum radiation samples cometary particles much larger than those sampled by more common observations at shorter (optical and infrared) wavelengths and therefore provides a nearly direct measure of the cometary dust mass.

  19. Tennis Play Intensity Distribution and Relation with Aerobic Fitness in Competitive Players.

    PubMed

    Baiget, Ernest; Fernández-Fernández, Jaime; Iglesias, Xavier; Rodríguez, Ferran A

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study were (i) to describe the relative intensity of simulated tennis play based on the cumulative time spent in three metabolic intensity zones, and (ii) to determine the relationships between this play intensity distribution and the aerobic fitness of a group of competitive players. 20 male players of advanced to elite level (ITN) performed an incremental on-court specific endurance tennis test to exhaustion to determine maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) and the first and second ventilatory thresholds (VT1, VT2). Ventilatory and gas exchange parameters were monitored using a telemetric portable gas analyser (K4 b2, Cosmed, Rome, Italy). Two weeks later the participants played a simulated tennis set against an opponent of similar level. Intensity zones (1: low, 2: moderate, and 3: high) were delimited by the individual VO2 values corresponding to VT1 and VT2, and expressed as percentage of maximum VO2 and heart rate. When expressed relative to VO2max, percentage of playing time in zone 1 (77 ± 25%) was significantly higher (p < 0.001) than in zone 2 (20 ± 21%) and zone 3 (3 ± 5%). Moderate to high positive correlations were found between VT1, VT2 and VO2max, and the percentage of playing time spent in zone 1 (r = 0.68-0.75), as well as low to high inverse correlations between the metabolic variables and the percentage of time spent in zone 2 and 3 (r = -0.49-0.75). Players with better aerobic fitness play at relatively lower intensities. We conclude that players spent more than 75% of the time in their low-intensity zone, with less than 25% of the time spent at moderate to high intensities. Aerobic fitness appears to determine the metabolic intensity that players can sustain throughout the game. PMID:26098638

  20. Tennis Play Intensity Distribution and Relation with Aerobic Fitness in Competitive Players.

    PubMed

    Baiget, Ernest; Fernández-Fernández, Jaime; Iglesias, Xavier; Rodríguez, Ferran A

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study were (i) to describe the relative intensity of simulated tennis play based on the cumulative time spent in three metabolic intensity zones, and (ii) to determine the relationships between this play intensity distribution and the aerobic fitness of a group of competitive players. 20 male players of advanced to elite level (ITN) performed an incremental on-court specific endurance tennis test to exhaustion to determine maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) and the first and second ventilatory thresholds (VT1, VT2). Ventilatory and gas exchange parameters were monitored using a telemetric portable gas analyser (K4 b2, Cosmed, Rome, Italy). Two weeks later the participants played a simulated tennis set against an opponent of similar level. Intensity zones (1: low, 2: moderate, and 3: high) were delimited by the individual VO2 values corresponding to VT1 and VT2, and expressed as percentage of maximum VO2 and heart rate. When expressed relative to VO2max, percentage of playing time in zone 1 (77 ± 25%) was significantly higher (p < 0.001) than in zone 2 (20 ± 21%) and zone 3 (3 ± 5%). Moderate to high positive correlations were found between VT1, VT2 and VO2max, and the percentage of playing time spent in zone 1 (r = 0.68-0.75), as well as low to high inverse correlations between the metabolic variables and the percentage of time spent in zone 2 and 3 (r = -0.49-0.75). Players with better aerobic fitness play at relatively lower intensities. We conclude that players spent more than 75% of the time in their low-intensity zone, with less than 25% of the time spent at moderate to high intensities. Aerobic fitness appears to determine the metabolic intensity that players can sustain throughout the game.

  1. Tennis Play Intensity Distribution and Relation with Aerobic Fitness in Competitive Players

    PubMed Central

    Baiget, Ernest; Fernández-Fernández, Jaime; Iglesias, Xavier; Rodríguez, Ferran A.

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study were (i) to describe the relative intensity of simulated tennis play based on the cumulative time spent in three metabolic intensity zones, and (ii) to determine the relationships between this play intensity distribution and the aerobic fitness of a group of competitive players. 20 male players of advanced to elite level (ITN) performed an incremental on-court specific endurance tennis test to exhaustion to determine maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) and the first and second ventilatory thresholds (VT1, VT2). Ventilatory and gas exchange parameters were monitored using a telemetric portable gas analyser (K4 b2, Cosmed, Rome, Italy). Two weeks later the participants played a simulated tennis set against an opponent of similar level. Intensity zones (1: low, 2: moderate, and 3: high) were delimited by the individual VO2 values corresponding to VT1 and VT2, and expressed as percentage of maximum VO2 and heart rate. When expressed relative to VO2max, percentage of playing time in zone 1 (77 ± 25%) was significantly higher (p < 0.001) than in zone 2 (20 ± 21%) and zone 3 (3 ± 5%). Moderate to high positive correlations were found between VT1, VT2 and VO2max, and the percentage of playing time spent in zone 1 (r = 0.68–0.75), as well as low to high inverse correlations between the metabolic variables and the percentage of time spent in zone 2 and 3 (r = -0.49–0.75). Players with better aerobic fitness play at relatively lower intensities. We conclude that players spent more than 75% of the time in their low-intensity zone, with less than 25% of the time spent at moderate to high intensities. Aerobic fitness appears to determine the metabolic intensity that players can sustain throughout the game. PMID:26098638

  2. Transfrontier macroseismic data exchange in NW Europe: examples of non-circular intensity distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Noten, Koen; Lecocq, Thomas; Hinzen, Klaus-G.; Sira, Christophe; Camelbeeck, Thierry

    2016-04-01

    Macroseismic data acquisition recently received a strong increase in interest due to public crowdsourcing through internet-based inquiries and real-time smartphone applications. Macroseismic analysis of felt earthquakes is important as the perception of people can be used to detect local/regional site effects in areas without instrumentation. We will demonstrate how post-processing macroseismic data improves the quality of real-time intensity evaluation of new events. Instead of using the classic DYFI representation in which internet intensities are averaged per community, we, first, geocoded all individual responses and structure the model area into 100 km2grid cells. Second, the average intensity of all answers within a grid cell is calculated. The resulting macroseismic grid cell distribution shows a less subjective and more homogeneous intensity distribution than the classical irregular community distribution and helps to improve the calculation of intensity attenuation functions. In this presentation, the 'Did You Feel It' (DYFI) macroseismic data of several >M4, e.g. the 2002 ML 4.9 Alsdorf and 2011 ML 4.3 Goch (Germany) and the 2015 ML 4.1 Ramsgate (UK), earthquakes felt in Belgium, Germany, The Netherlands, France, Luxemburg and UK are analysed. Integration of transfrontier DYFI data of the ROB-BNS, KNMI, BCSF and BGS networks results in a particular non-circular, distribution of the macroseismic data in which the felt area for all these examples extends significantly more in E-W than N-S direction. This intensity distribution cannot be explained by geometrical amplitude attenuation alone, but rather illustrates a low-pass filtering effect due to the south-to-north increasing thickness of cover sediments above the London-Brabant Massif. For the studied M4 to M5 earthquakes, the thick sediments attenuate seismic energy at higher frequencies and consequently less people feel the vibrations at the surface. This example of successful macroseismic data exchange

  3. A coordinate transformation method for calculating the 3D light intensity distribution in ICF hohlraum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Zhili; Li, Xiaoyan; Zhao, Kuixia; Chen, Xudong; Chen, Mingyu; Pu, Jixiong

    2016-06-01

    For an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) system, the light intensity distribution in the hohlraum is key to the initial plasma excitation and later laser-plasma interaction process. Based on the concept of coordinate transformation of spatial points and vector, we present a robust method with a detailed procedure that makes the calculation of the three dimensional (3D) light intensity distribution in hohlraum easily. The method is intuitive but powerful enough to solve the complex cases of random number of laser beams with arbitrary polarization states and incidence angles. Its application is exemplified in the Shenguang III Facility (SG-III) that verifies its effectiveness and it is useful for guiding the design of hohlraum structure parameter.

  4. Intensity distribution of the X-ray source for the AXAF VETA-I mirror test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, Ping; Kellogg, Edwin M.; Schwartz, Daniel A.; Shao, Yibo; Fulton, M. A.

    1993-01-01

    Intensity distribution measurements of the X-ray source for the AXAF VETA-I mirror test are reported. During the VETA-I test, microscope pictures were taken for each used anode immediately after it was brought out of the source chamber. The source sizes and the intensity distribution structures are shown. They are compared and shown to agree with the results from pinhole camera measurements. It is demonstrated that under operating conditions characteristic of the VETA-I test, all the source sizes have an FWHM of less than 0.45 mm. For a source of this size at 528 m away, the angular size to VETA is less than 0.17 arcsec, which is small compared to the on-ground VETA angular resolution. These results were crucial for VETA data analysis and for obtaining the on-ground and predicted in-orbit VETA point response function.

  5. Momentum distributions of sequential ionization generated by an intense laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Shvetsov-Shilovski, N. I.; Sayler, A. M.; Rathje, T.; Paulus, G. G.

    2011-03-15

    The relative yield and momentum distributions of all multiply charged atomic ions generated by a short (30 fs) intense (10{sup 14}-5x10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}) laser pulse are investigated using a Monte Carlo simulation. We predict a substantial shift in the maximum (centroid) of the ion-momentum distribution along the laser polarization as a function of the absolute phase. This effect should be experimentally detectable with currently available laser systems even for relatively long pulses, such as 25-30 fs. In addition to the numerical results, we present semianalytical scaling for the position of the maximum.

  6. Intensity distribution of the x ray source for the AXAF VETA-I mirror test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, Ping; Kellogg, Edwin M.; Schwartz, Daniel A.; Shao, Yibo; Fulton, M. Ann

    1992-01-01

    The X-ray generator for the AXAF VETA-I mirror test is an electron impact X-ray source with various anode materials. The source sizes of different anodes and their intensity distributions were measured with a pinhole camera before the VETA-I test. The pinhole camera consists of a 30 micrometers diameter pinhole for imaging the source and a Microchannel Plate Imaging Detector with 25 micrometers FWHM spatial resolution for detecting and recording the image. The camera has a magnification factor of 8.79, which enables measuring the detailed spatial structure of the source. The spot size, the intensity distribution, and the flux level of each source were measured with different operating parameters. During the VETA-I test, microscope pictures were taken for each used anode immediately after it was brought out of the source chamber. The source sizes and the intensity distribution structures are clearly shown in the pictures. They are compared and agree with the results from the pinhole camera measurements. This paper presents the results of the above measurements. The results show that under operating conditions characteristic of the VETA-I test, all the source sizes have a FWHM of less than 0.45 mm. For a source of this size at 528 meters away, the angular size to VETA is less than 0.17 arcsec which is small compared to the on ground VETA angular resolution (0.5 arcsec, required and 0.22 arcsec, measured). Even so, the results show the intensity distributions of the sources have complicated structures. These results were crucial for the VETA data analysis and for obtaining the on ground and predicted in orbit VETA Point Response Function.

  7. The Intensity Distribution for Gamma-Ray Bursts Observed with BATSE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pendleton, Geoffrey N.; Mallozzi, Robert S.; Paciesas, William S.; Briggs, Michael S.; Preece, Robert D.; Koshut, Tom M.; Horack, John M.; Meegan, Charles A.; Fishman, Gerald J.; Hakkila, Jon; Kouveliotou, Cryssa

    1996-01-01

    The intensity distributions of gamma-ray bursts observed by BATSE from 19 April 1991 to 19 September 1994 are presented. For this data set, (V/V(sub max)) is 0.329 +/- 0.011, which is 15.5 sigma away from the value of 0.5 expected for a homogeneous distribution. Standard cosmological model parameters are obtained by fitting the differentially binned peak flux distribution expressed in units of photons cm(exp -2) s(exp -1) in the energy range 50-300 keV. The value of z calculated for a peak flux of 1 photon cm(exp -2) s(exp -1) is 0.8 +/- 0.33. The procedures used to produce the peak flux data and C(sub p)/C(sub lim) data are presented. The differences between the two representations of burst intensity are emphasized so that researchers can determine which type of data is most appropriate for their studies. The sky sensitivity correction as a function of intensity for the peak flux data is also described.

  8. Photoionization branching ratios and vibrational intensity distribution for N2, CO; and CO2 between 53 and 75 nm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samson, J. A. R.; Gardner, J. L.

    1973-01-01

    The probability of radiation producing ions in specific electronic and vibrational levels was documented. For example, when a narrow band-pass of solar ionizing photons is incident on an atmospheric species it is now possible to describe, accurately, how the radiant energy is shared among the various electronic states of the ions produced. The molecules studied were N2, CO, and CO2. These molecules were photoionized by radiation between 53 and 75 nm. The effects of autoionization are discussed and continuum vibrational intensities are tabulated and compared with theoretical Franck-Condon factors where available. The branching ratios and partial cross sections for ionization into various electronic states are tabulated.

  9. Impact of Hydrologic Variability on Nutrient Age Distribution in Intensively Managed Landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, P.; Woo, D. K.

    2014-12-01

    The distribution, concentration, and transport of nutrients in agricultural landscapes are of significant societal concern. Our interests in reactive nitrogen and the nitrogen cycle have shifted from increasing the efficiency of nitrogen delivery to target crop species to decreasing environmental damage caused by intensive agricultural practices. Enhancing the reactive nitrogen use efficiency to increase food production to meet future demand inevitably contributes to an increase in the reactive nitrogen load in the ecosystem, and damaging the environment. However, due to the complexity of the nitrogen cycle, the dynamics of nitrogen in soils and its interactions with ecohydrological processes at the watershed and regional scales are not well understood to enable adequate remedial measures. To unravel the complexity of this dynamics we have developed a model for characterizing the nitrogen age (elapsed time) distribution. The goal of our study is to develop and analyze the dynamics of nitrogen in the context of age and transit times resulting from advection, mixing, and production/destruction processes; evaluate the effects of micro-topographic variability on the nitrogen age distributions; and investigate how the temporal dynamics of the nitrogen age distribution are affected by changes in the variability of climate drivers. Our study is performed for the Upper Sangamon River Basin in the Critical Zone Observatory for Intensively Managed Landscapes (IML-CZO).

  10. Radio continuum observations of new radio halos and relics from the NVSS and WENSS surveys. Relic orientations, cluster X-ray luminosity, and redshift distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Weeren, R. J.; Brüggen, M.; Röttgering, H. J. A.; Hoeft, M.; Nuza, S. E.; Intema, H. T.

    2011-09-01

    Context. Radio halos and relics are diffuse radio sources found in galaxy clusters showing significant substructure at X-ray wavelengths. These sources provide important information about non-thermal processes taking place in the intracluster medium (ICM). Until now only a few dozen relics and halos are known, while models predict that a much larger number of these sources exist. In this paper we present the results of an extensive observing campaign to search for new diffuse radio sources in galaxy clusters. Aims: The aim of the observations is to create a large sample of diffuse radio sources in galaxy clusters that help to understand the formation of radio relics and halos and can be used to probe the physical conditions of the ICM. Methods: We carried out radio continuum observations with the Westerbork Synthese Radio Telescope (WSRT), Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) and Very Large Array (VLA) of clusters with diffuse radio emission visible in NVSS and WENSS survey images. Optical images were taken with the William Herschel and Isaac Newton Telescope (WHT, INT). Results: We discovered 6 new radio relics, including a probable double relic system, and 2 radio halos. In addition, we confirm the presence of diffuse radio emission in four galaxy clusters. By constructing a sample of 35 radio relics we find that relics are mostly found along the major axis of the X-ray emission from the ICM, while their orientation is perpendicular to this axis. We also compared the X-ray luminosity and redshift distributions of clusters with relics to an X-ray selected sample from the NORAS and REFLEX surveys. We find tentative evidence for an increase of the cluster's relic fraction with X-ray luminosity and redshift. The major and minor axis ratio distribution of the ICM for clusters with relics is broader than that of the NORAS-REFLEX sample. Conclusions: The location and orientation of radio relics with respect to the ICM elongation is consistent with the scenario that

  11. Income Disparities and the Global Distribution of Intensively Farmed Chicken and Pigs.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Marius; Conchedda, Giulia; Van Boeckel, Thomas P; Cinardi, Giuseppina; Linard, Catherine; Nicolas, Gaëlle; Thanapongtharm, Weerapong; D'Aietti, Laura; Wint, William; Newman, Scott H; Robinson, Timothy P

    2015-01-01

    The rapid transformation of the livestock sector in recent decades brought concerns on its impact on greenhouse gas emissions, disruptions to nitrogen and phosphorous cycles and on land use change, particularly deforestation for production of feed crops. Animal and human health are increasingly interlinked through emerging infectious diseases, zoonoses, and antimicrobial resistance. In many developing countries, the rapidity of change has also had social impacts with increased risk of marginalisation of smallholder farmers. However, both the impacts and benefits of livestock farming often differ between extensive (backyard farming mostly for home-consumption) and intensive, commercial production systems (larger herd or flock size, higher investments in inputs, a tendency towards market-orientation). A density of 10,000 chickens per km2 has different environmental, epidemiological and societal implications if these birds are raised by 1,000 individual households or in a single industrial unit. Here, we introduce a novel relationship that links the national proportion of extensively raised animals to the gross domestic product (GDP) per capita (in purchasing power parity). This relationship is modelled and used together with the global distribution of rural population to disaggregate existing 10 km resolution global maps of chicken and pig distributions into extensive and intensive systems. Our results highlight countries and regions where extensive and intensive chicken and pig production systems are most important. We discuss the sources of uncertainties, the modelling assumptions and ways in which this approach could be developed to forecast future trajectories of intensification. PMID:26230336

  12. Income Disparities and the Global Distribution of Intensively Farmed Chicken and Pigs.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Marius; Conchedda, Giulia; Van Boeckel, Thomas P; Cinardi, Giuseppina; Linard, Catherine; Nicolas, Gaëlle; Thanapongtharm, Weerapong; D'Aietti, Laura; Wint, William; Newman, Scott H; Robinson, Timothy P

    2015-01-01

    The rapid transformation of the livestock sector in recent decades brought concerns on its impact on greenhouse gas emissions, disruptions to nitrogen and phosphorous cycles and on land use change, particularly deforestation for production of feed crops. Animal and human health are increasingly interlinked through emerging infectious diseases, zoonoses, and antimicrobial resistance. In many developing countries, the rapidity of change has also had social impacts with increased risk of marginalisation of smallholder farmers. However, both the impacts and benefits of livestock farming often differ between extensive (backyard farming mostly for home-consumption) and intensive, commercial production systems (larger herd or flock size, higher investments in inputs, a tendency towards market-orientation). A density of 10,000 chickens per km2 has different environmental, epidemiological and societal implications if these birds are raised by 1,000 individual households or in a single industrial unit. Here, we introduce a novel relationship that links the national proportion of extensively raised animals to the gross domestic product (GDP) per capita (in purchasing power parity). This relationship is modelled and used together with the global distribution of rural population to disaggregate existing 10 km resolution global maps of chicken and pig distributions into extensive and intensive systems. Our results highlight countries and regions where extensive and intensive chicken and pig production systems are most important. We discuss the sources of uncertainties, the modelling assumptions and ways in which this approach could be developed to forecast future trajectories of intensification.

  13. Experimental verification of a model describing the intensity distribution from a single mode optical fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Moro, Erik A; Puckett, Anthony D; Todd, Michael D

    2011-01-24

    The intensity distribution of a transmission from a single mode optical fiber is often approximated using a Gaussian-shaped curve. While this approximation is useful for some applications such as fiber alignment, it does not accurately describe transmission behavior off the axis of propagation. In this paper, another model is presented, which describes the intensity distribution of the transmission from a single mode optical fiber. A simple experimental setup is used to verify the model's accuracy, and agreement between model and experiment is established both on and off the axis of propagation. Displacement sensor designs based on the extrinsic optical lever architecture are presented. The behavior of the transmission off the axis of propagation dictates the performance of sensor architectures where large lateral offsets (25-1500 {micro}m) exist between transmitting and receiving fibers. The practical implications of modeling accuracy over this lateral offset region are discussed as they relate to the development of high-performance intensity modulated optical displacement sensors. In particular, the sensitivity, linearity, resolution, and displacement range of a sensor are functions of the relative positioning of the sensor's transmitting and receiving fibers. Sensor architectures with high combinations of sensitivity and displacement range are discussed. It is concluded that the utility of the accurate model is in its predicative capability and that this research could lead to an improved methodology for high-performance sensor design.

  14. Income Disparities and the Global Distribution of Intensively Farmed Chicken and Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Marius; Conchedda, Giulia; Van Boeckel, Thomas P.; Cinardi, Giuseppina; Linard, Catherine; Nicolas, Gaëlle; Thanapongtharm, Weerapong; D'Aietti, Laura; Wint, William; Newman, Scott H.; Robinson, Timothy P.

    2015-01-01

    The rapid transformation of the livestock sector in recent decades brought concerns on its impact on greenhouse gas emissions, disruptions to nitrogen and phosphorous cycles and on land use change, particularly deforestation for production of feed crops. Animal and human health are increasingly interlinked through emerging infectious diseases, zoonoses, and antimicrobial resistance. In many developing countries, the rapidity of change has also had social impacts with increased risk of marginalisation of smallholder farmers. However, both the impacts and benefits of livestock farming often differ between extensive (backyard farming mostly for home-consumption) and intensive, commercial production systems (larger herd or flock size, higher investments in inputs, a tendency towards market-orientation). A density of 10,000 chickens per km2 has different environmental, epidemiological and societal implications if these birds are raised by 1,000 individual households or in a single industrial unit. Here, we introduce a novel relationship that links the national proportion of extensively raised animals to the gross domestic product (GDP) per capita (in purchasing power parity). This relationship is modelled and used together with the global distribution of rural population to disaggregate existing 10 km resolution global maps of chicken and pig distributions into extensive and intensive systems. Our results highlight countries and regions where extensive and intensive chicken and pig production systems are most important. We discuss the sources of uncertainties, the modelling assumptions and ways in which this approach could be developed to forecast future trajectories of intensification. PMID:26230336

  15. Impacts of Fog Characteristics, Forward Illumination, and Warning Beacon Intensity Distribution on Roadway Hazard Visibility.

    PubMed

    Bullough, John D; Rea, Mark S

    2016-01-01

    Warning beacons are critical for the safety of transportation, construction, and utility workers. These devices need to produce sufficient luminous intensity to be visible without creating glare to drivers. Published standards for the photometric performance of warning beacons do not address their performance in conditions of reduced visibility such as fog. Under such conditions light emitted in directions other than toward approaching drivers can create scattered light that makes workers and other hazards less visible. Simulations of visibility of hazards under varying conditions of fog density, forward vehicle lighting, warning beacon luminous intensity, and intensity distribution were performed to assess their impacts on visual performance by drivers. Each of these factors can influence the ability of drivers to detect and identify workers and hazards along the roadway in work zones. Based on the results, it would be reasonable to specify maximum limits on the luminous intensity of warning beacons in directions that are unlikely to be seen by drivers along the roadway, limits which are not included in published performance specifications.

  16. Impacts of Fog Characteristics, Forward Illumination, and Warning Beacon Intensity Distribution on Roadway Hazard Visibility.

    PubMed

    Bullough, John D; Rea, Mark S

    2016-01-01

    Warning beacons are critical for the safety of transportation, construction, and utility workers. These devices need to produce sufficient luminous intensity to be visible without creating glare to drivers. Published standards for the photometric performance of warning beacons do not address their performance in conditions of reduced visibility such as fog. Under such conditions light emitted in directions other than toward approaching drivers can create scattered light that makes workers and other hazards less visible. Simulations of visibility of hazards under varying conditions of fog density, forward vehicle lighting, warning beacon luminous intensity, and intensity distribution were performed to assess their impacts on visual performance by drivers. Each of these factors can influence the ability of drivers to detect and identify workers and hazards along the roadway in work zones. Based on the results, it would be reasonable to specify maximum limits on the luminous intensity of warning beacons in directions that are unlikely to be seen by drivers along the roadway, limits which are not included in published performance specifications. PMID:27314058

  17. The training intensity distribution among well-trained and elite endurance athletes

    PubMed Central

    Stöggl, Thomas L.; Sperlich, Billy

    2015-01-01

    Researchers have retrospectively analyzed the training intensity distribution (TID) of nationally and internationally competitive athletes in different endurance disciplines to determine the optimal volume and intensity for maximal adaptation. The majority of studies present a “pyramidal” TID with a high proportion of high volume, low intensity training (HVLIT). Some world-class athletes appear to adopt a so-called “polarized” TID (i.e., significant % of HVLIT and high-intensity training) during certain phases of the season. However, emerging prospective randomized controlled studies have demonstrated superior responses of variables related to endurance when applying a polarized TID in well-trained and recreational individuals when compared with a TID that emphasizes HVLIT or threshold training. The aims of the present review are to: (1) summarize the main responses of retrospective and prospective studies exploring TID; (2) provide a systematic overview on TIDs during preparation, pre-competition, and competition phases in different endurance disciplines and performance levels; (3) address whether one TID has demonstrated greater efficacy than another; and (4) highlight research gaps in an effort to direct future scientific studies. PMID:26578968

  18. Impacts of Fog Characteristics, Forward Illumination, and Warning Beacon Intensity Distribution on Roadway Hazard Visibility

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Warning beacons are critical for the safety of transportation, construction, and utility workers. These devices need to produce sufficient luminous intensity to be visible without creating glare to drivers. Published standards for the photometric performance of warning beacons do not address their performance in conditions of reduced visibility such as fog. Under such conditions light emitted in directions other than toward approaching drivers can create scattered light that makes workers and other hazards less visible. Simulations of visibility of hazards under varying conditions of fog density, forward vehicle lighting, warning beacon luminous intensity, and intensity distribution were performed to assess their impacts on visual performance by drivers. Each of these factors can influence the ability of drivers to detect and identify workers and hazards along the roadway in work zones. Based on the results, it would be reasonable to specify maximum limits on the luminous intensity of warning beacons in directions that are unlikely to be seen by drivers along the roadway, limits which are not included in published performance specifications. PMID:27314058

  19. HOT ELECTRON ENERGY DISTRIBUTIONS FROM ULTRA-INTENSE LASER SOLID INTERACTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H; Wilks, S C; Kruer, W; Patel, P; Shepherd, R

    2008-10-08

    Measurements of electron energy distributions from ultra-intense (>10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}) laser-solid interactions using an electron spectrometer are presented. These measurements were performed on the Vulcan petawatt laser at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory and the Callisto laser at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The effective hot electron temperatures (T{sub hot}) have been measured for laser intensities (I{lambda}{sup 2}) from 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2} {micro}m{sup 2} to 10{sup 21} W/cm{sup 2} {micro}m{sup 2} for the first time, and T{sub hot} is found to increase as (I{lambda}{sup 2}){sup 0.34} {+-} 0.4. This scaling agrees well with the empirical scaling published by Beg et al. (1997), and is explained by a simple physical model that gives good agreement with experimental results and particle-in-cell simulations.

  20. The enhanced measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution with two-intensity decoy states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jian-Rong; Zhu, Feng; Zhou, Xing-Yu; Wang, Qin

    2016-09-01

    We put forward a new scheme for implementing the measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution (QKD) with weak coherent source, while using only two different intensities. In the new scheme, we insert a beam splitter and a local detector at both Alice's and Bob's side, and then all the triggering and non-triggering signals could be employed to process parameter estimations, resulting in very precise estimations for the two-single-photon contributions. Besides, we compare its behavior with two other often used methods, i.e., the conventional standard three-intensity decoy-state measurement-device-independent QKD and the passive measurement-device-independent QKD. Through numerical simulations, we demonstrate that our new approach can exhibit outstanding characteristics not only in the secure transmission distance, but also in the final key generation rate.

  1. Continuum radiation in planetary magnetospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurth, W. S.

    1991-01-01

    With the completion of the Voyager tour of the outer planets, radio and plasma wave instruments have executed the first survey of the wave spectra of Earth, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. One of the most notable conclusions of this survey is that there is a great deal of qualitative similarity in both the plasma wave and radio wave spectra from one magnetosphere to the next. In particular, in spite of detailed differences, most of the radio emissions at each of the planets have been tentatively classified into two primary categories. First, the most intense emissions are generally associated with the cyclotron maser instability. Second, a class of weaker emissions can be found at each of the magnetospheres which appears to be the result of conversion from intense electrostatic emissions at the upper hybrid resonance frequency into (primarily) ordinary mode radio emission. It is this second category, often referred to as nonthermal continuum radiation, which we will discuss in this review. We review the characteristics of the continuum spectrum at each of the planets, discuss the source region and direct observations of the generation of the emissions where available, and briefly describe the theories for the generation of the emissions. Over the past few years evidence has increased that the linear mode conversion of electrostatic waves into the ordinary mode can account for at least some of the continuum radiation observed. There is no definitive evidence which precludes the possibility that a nonlinear mechanism may also be important.

  2. Mercury distribution in a mangrove tidal creek affected by intensive shrimp farming.

    PubMed

    Costa, B G B; Soares, T M; Torres, R F; Lacerda, L D

    2013-05-01

    In this study, the Hg distributions in water and sediments from a mangrove creek that receives intensive shrimp farming effluents were determined. The average dissolved and particulate Hg concentrations in the water varied from 3.1 to 9.2 ng L(-1) and from 4.4 to 9.4 ng L(-1), respectively. However, the Hg concentrations in the suspended particulate matter and the bottom sediments varied from 95.4 to 115.7 ng g(-1) and from 1.6 to 10.3 ng g(-1), respectively. A Ward quadratic distance cluster analysis based on the Hg concentrations and hydro- and geochemical parameters (oxygen, salinity, temperature, pH, and organic matter and aluminum content) showed the effects of shrimp farming effluents on the Hg distribution pattern. Furthermore, these results were supported by the Hg distribution in the sediment cores. This study emphasizes the necessity of including Hg as a potential pollutant when monitoring the environmental impacts of intensive shrimp farming.

  3. The Interannual Stability of Cumulative Frequency Distributions for Convective System Size and Intensity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohr, Karen I.; Molinari, John; Thorncroft, Chris D,

    2010-01-01

    The characteristics of convective system populations in West Africa and the western Pacific tropical cyclone basin were analyzed to investigate whether interannual variability in convective activity in tropical continental and oceanic environments is driven by variations in the number of events during the wet season or by favoring large and/or intense convective systems. Convective systems were defined from TRMM data as a cluster of pixels with an 85 GHz polarization-corrected brightness temperature below 255 K and with an area at least 64 km 2. The study database consisted of convective systems in West Africa from May Sep for 1998-2007 and in the western Pacific from May Nov 1998-2007. Annual cumulative frequency distributions for system minimum brightness temperature and system area were constructed for both regions. For both regions, there were no statistically significant differences among the annual curves for system minimum brightness temperature. There were two groups of system area curves, split by the TRMM altitude boost in 2001. Within each set, there was no statistically significant interannual variability. Sub-setting the database revealed some sensitivity in distribution shape to the size of the sampling area, length of sample period, and climate zone. From a regional perspective, the stability of the cumulative frequency distributions implied that the probability that a convective system would attain a particular size or intensity does not change interannually. Variability in the number of convective events appeared to be more important in determining whether a year is wetter or drier than normal.

  4. Effect of Air-Sea coupling on the Frequency Distribution of Intense Tropical Cyclones over the Northwestern Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogata, Tomomichi; Mizuta, Ryo; Adachi, Yukimasa; Murakami, Hiroyuki; Ose, Tomomaki

    2016-04-01

    Effect of air-sea coupling on the frequency distribution of intense tropical cyclones (TCs) over the northwestern Pacific (NWP) region is investigated using an atmosphere and ocean coupled general circulation model (AOGCM). Monthly varying flux adjustment enables AOGCM to simulate both subseasonal air-sea interaction and realistic seasonal to interannual SST variability. The maximum of intense TC distribution around 20-30°N in the AGCM shifts equatorward in the AOGCM due to the air-sea coupling. Hence AOGCM reduces northward intense TC distribution bias seen in AGCM. Over the NWP, AOGCM-simulated SST variability is large around 20-30°N where the warm mixed layer becomes shallower rapidly. Active entrainment from subsurface water over this region causes stronger SST cooling and hence TC intensity decreases. These results suggest that air-sea coupling characterized by subsurface oceanic condition causes more realistic distribution of intense TCs over the NWP.

  5. Effect of air-sea coupling on the frequency distribution of intense tropical cyclones over the northwestern Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogata, Tomomichi; Mizuta, Ryo; Adachi, Yukimasa; Murakami, Hiroyuki; Ose, Tomoaki

    2015-12-01

    Effect of air-sea coupling on the frequency distribution of intense tropical cyclones (TCs) over the northwestern Pacific (NWP) region is investigated using an atmosphere and ocean coupled general circulation model (AOGCM). Monthly varying flux adjustment enables AOGCM to simulate both subseasonal air-sea interaction and realistic seasonal to interannual sea surface temperature (SST) variability. The maximum of intense TC distribution around 20-30°N in the AGCM shifts equatorward in the AOGCM due to the air-sea coupling. Hence, AOGCM reduces northward intense TC distribution bias seen in AGCM. Over the NWP, AOGCM-simulated SST variability is large around 20-30°N where the warm mixed layer becomes shallower rapidly. Active entrainment from subsurface water over this region causes stronger SST cooling, and hence, TC intensity decreases. These results suggest that air-sea coupling characterized by subsurface oceanic condition causes more realistic distribution of intense TCs over the NWP.

  6. Increased Anionic Peptide Distribution and Intensity during Progression and Resolution of Bacterial Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Fales-Williams, Amanda J.; Gallup, Jack M.; Ramírez-Romero, Rafael; Brogden, Kim A.; Ackermann, Mark R.

    2002-01-01

    Anionic peptides (APs) are small anionic antimicrobial peptides composed of 7 aspartic acid residues and are produced in the lungs of humans, sheep, and cattle. Although expression by epithelial cells of some antimicrobial peptides (e.g., β-defensins) of humans and ruminants is increased in response to acute infection, AP expression is not increased during acute infection, which suggests that the expression of the latter peptide is constitutive. In this study, the degree of AP expression during the progression (acute, subacute, and chronic) of bronchopneumonia was determined. Mannheimia (Pasteurella) haemolytica, a known inducer of bovineβ-defensins, was inoculated intrabronchially with a fiber-optic bronchoscope in nine 3-month-old sheep, and tissues were collected at 1, 15, and 45 days postinoculation (p.i.); nine control animals received pyrogen-free saline by the same procedure and were killed at the same time points. In the acute group (1 day p.i.), the lungs had lesions typical of bronchopneumonia and the distribution and intensity of AP immunoreactivity (AP-IR) were similar to those of previous studies (minimal intensity and distribution of AP-IR in bronchiolar epithelial cells). In the subacute group (15 days p.i.), there was prominent hyperplasia of bronchiolar and alveolar epithelial cells, and the chronic group (45 days p.i.) had yet more pronounced hyperplasia. In the subacute and chronic groups, the intensity and distribution of AP-IR in the cytoplasm of hyperplastic bronchiolar and type II alveolar cells were significantly increased compared to those of saline-inoculated and contralateral (noninoculated) lung lobes. Although AP expression appears constitutive, the constitutive production of AP is higher in hyperplastic, less differentiated cells than in fully differentiated, mature cells of the respiratory airways. The increased intensity and distribution of AP-IR in immature (hyperplastic) epithelial cells may be a mechanism by which production of

  7. Numerical ray-tracing approach with laser intensity distribution for LIDAR signal power function computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Guangyuan; Li, Song; Huang, Ke; Li, Zile; Zheng, Guoxing

    2016-10-01

    We have developed a new numerical ray-tracing approach for LIDAR signal power function computation, in which the light round-trip propagation is analyzed by geometrical optics and a simple experiment is employed to acquire the laser intensity distribution. It is relatively more accurate and flexible than previous methods. We emphatically discuss the relationship between the inclined angle and the dynamic range of detector output signal in biaxial LIDAR system. Results indicate that an appropriate negative angle can compress the signal dynamic range. This technique has been successfully proved by comparison with real measurements.

  8. Numerical ray-tracing approach with laser intensity distribution for LIDAR signal power function computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Guangyuan; Li, Song; Huang, Ke; Li, Zile; Zheng, Guoxing

    2016-08-01

    We have developed a new numerical ray-tracing approach for LIDAR signal power function computation, in which the light round-trip propagation is analyzed by geometrical optics and a simple experiment is employed to acquire the laser intensity distribution. It is relatively more accurate and flexible than previous methods. We emphatically discuss the relationship between the inclined angle and the dynamic range of detector output signal in biaxial LIDAR system. Results indicate that an appropriate negative angle can compress the signal dynamic range. This technique has been successfully proved by comparison with real measurements.

  9. Acceleration of Tomo-PIV by estimating the initial volume intensity distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worth, N. A.; Nickels, T. B.

    2008-11-01

    Tomographic particle image velocimetry (Tomo-PIV) is a promising new PIV technique. However, its high computational costs often make time-resolved measurements impractical. In this paper, a new preprocessing method is proposed to estimate the initial volume intensity distribution. This relatively inexpensive “first guess” procedure significantly reduces the computational costs, accelerates solution convergence, and can be used directly to obtain results up to 35 times faster than an iterative reconstruction algorithm (with only a slight accuracy penalty). Reconstruction accuracy is also assessed by examining the errors in recovering velocity fields from artificial data (rather than errors in the particle reconstructions themselves).

  10. Predicting photoemission intensities and angular distributions with real-time density-functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dauth, M.; Kümmel, S.

    2016-02-01

    Photoemission spectroscopy is one of the most frequently used tools for characterizing the electronic structure of condensed matter systems. We discuss a scheme for simulating photoemission from finite systems based on time-dependent density-functional theory. It allows for the first-principles calculation of relative electron binding energies, ionization cross sections, and anisotropy parameters. We extract these photoemission spectroscopy observables from Kohn-Sham orbitals propagated in real time. We demonstrate that the approach is capable of estimating photoemission intensities, i.e., peak heights. It can also reliably predict the angular distribution of photoelectrons. For the example of benzene we contrast calculated angular distribution anisotropy parameters to experimental reference data. Self-interaction free Kohn-Sham theory yields meaningful outer valence single-particle states in the right energetic order. We discuss how to properly choose the complex absorbing potential that is used in the simulations.

  11. Atomic ionization by intense laser pulses of short duration: Photoelectron energy and angular distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Dondera, M.

    2010-11-15

    We introduce an adequate integral representation of the wave function in the asymptotic region, valid for the stage postinteraction between a one-electron atom and a laser pulse of short duration, as a superposition of divergent radial spherical waves. Starting with this representation, we derive analytic expressions for the energy and angular distributions of the photoelectrons and we show their connection with expressions used before in the literature. Using our results, we propose a method to extract the photoelectron distributions from the time dependence of the wave function at large distances. Numerical results illustrating the method are presented for the photoionization of hydrogenlike atoms from the ground state and several excited states by extreme ultraviolet pulses with a central wavelength of 13.3 nm and several intensities around the value I{sub 0}{approx_equal}3.51x10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2}.

  12. Vertical distribution of precipitation particles in Baiu frontal stratiform intense rainfall around Okinawa Island, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oue, M.; Ohigashi, T.; Tsuboki, K.; Nakakita, E.

    2015-06-01

    The vertical distribution of precipitation particles in an intensely precipitating stratiform cloud associated with the Baiu front around Okinawa Island was observed. X-band polarimetric radar, disdrometer, and hydrometeor videosonde data were used to examine the precipitation processes. The cloud top was approximately 12 km above sea level, as convection was depressed while stratiform regions developed near Okinawa Island. In the rain region below 3 km, the mean median volume diameter of the raindrop size distribution (DSD) estimated from the radar variables was 1.55 mm, and the mean normalized intercept parameter was 104.12 mm-1 m-3 with a mean radar reflectivity of 40.5 dBZe. The DSD indicates that the stratiform precipitation was characterized by higher number concentrations of smaller drops than observed previously in convective cells in a Baiu frontal convective precipitation region around Okinawa Island. The DSD also suggests the presence of larger raindrops than in convective cells embedded in a Baiu frontal stratiform precipitation region around Okinawa Island. In the ice region at 5-6 km, just above the melting layer and 6 km below the cloud top, the differential reflectivity and specific differential phase showed positive values, and videosonde measurements revealed that the number concentration of column-, plate-, and capped-column-like crystals (maximum dimensions of ≥0.1 mm) was 112 L-1. The high number concentration of these crystals contributed to the intense stratiform rainfall associated with the Baiu front.

  13. Derivation from first principles of the statistical distribution of the mass peak intensities of MS data.

    PubMed

    Ipsen, Andreas

    2015-02-01

    Despite the widespread use of mass spectrometry (MS) in a broad range of disciplines, the nature of MS data remains very poorly understood, and this places important constraints on the quality of MS data analysis as well as on the effectiveness of MS instrument design. In the following, a procedure for calculating the statistical distribution of the mass peak intensity for MS instruments that use analog-to-digital converters (ADCs) and electron multipliers is presented. It is demonstrated that the physical processes underlying the data-generation process, from the generation of the ions to the signal induced at the detector, and on to the digitization of the resulting voltage pulse, result in data that can be well-approximated by a Gaussian distribution whose mean and variance are determined by physically meaningful instrumental parameters. This allows for a very precise understanding of the signal-to-noise ratio of mass peak intensities and suggests novel ways of improving it. Moreover, it is a prerequisite for being able to address virtually all data analytical problems in downstream analyses in a statistically rigorous manner. The model is validated with experimental data.

  14. The role of precipitation type, intensity, and spatial distribution in source water quality after wildfire

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Murphy, Sheila F.; Writer, Jeffrey H.; McCleskey, R. Blaine; Martin, Deborah A.

    2015-01-01

    Storms following wildfires are known to impair drinking water supplies in the southwestern United States, yet our understanding of the role of precipitation in post-wildfire water quality is far from complete. We quantitatively assessed water-quality impacts of different hydrologic events in the Colorado Front Range and found that for a three-year period, substantial hydrologic and geochemical responses downstream of a burned area were primarily driven by convective storms with a 30 min rainfall intensity >10 mm h−1. These storms, which typically occur several times each year in July–September, are often small in area, short-lived, and highly variable in intensity and geographic distribution. Thus, a rain gage network with high temporal resolution and spatial density, together with high-resolution stream sampling, are required to adequately characterize post-wildfire responses. We measured total suspended sediment, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), nitrate, and manganese concentrations that were 10–156 times higher downstream of a burned area compared to upstream during relatively common (50% annual exceedance probability) rainstorms, and water quality was sufficiently impaired to pose water-treatment concerns. Short-term water-quality impairment was driven primarily by increased surface runoff during higher intensity convective storms that caused erosion in the burned area and transport of sediment and chemical constituents to streams. Annual sediment yields downstream of the burned area were controlled by storm events and subsequent remobilization, whereas DOC yields were closely linked to annual runoff and thus were more dependent on interannual variation in spring runoff. Nitrate yields were highest in the third year post-wildfire. Results from this study quantitatively demonstrate that water quality can be altered for several years after wildfire. Because the southwestern US is prone to wildfires and high-intensity rain storms, the role of storms in post

  15. Interpolating Non-Parametric Distributions of Hourly Rainfall Intensities Using Random Mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosthaf, Tobias; Bárdossy, András; Hörning, Sebastian

    2015-04-01

    The correct spatial interpolation of hourly rainfall intensity distributions is of great importance for stochastical rainfall models. Poorly interpolated distributions may lead to over- or underestimation of rainfall and consequently to wrong estimates of following applications, like hydrological or hydraulic models. By analyzing the spatial relation of empirical rainfall distribution functions, a persistent order of the quantile values over a wide range of non-exceedance probabilities is observed. As the order remains similar, the interpolation weights of quantile values for one certain non-exceedance probability can be applied to the other probabilities. This assumption enables the use of kernel smoothed distribution functions for interpolation purposes. Comparing the order of hourly quantile values over different gauges with the order of their daily quantile values for equal probabilities, results in high correlations. The hourly quantile values also show high correlations with elevation. The incorporation of these two covariates into the interpolation is therefore tested. As only positive interpolation weights for the quantile values assure a monotonically increasing distribution function, the use of geostatistical methods like kriging is problematic. Employing kriging with external drift to incorporate secondary information is not applicable. Nonetheless, it would be fruitful to make use of covariates. To overcome this shortcoming, a new random mixing approach of spatial random fields is applied. Within the mixing process hourly quantile values are considered as equality constraints and correlations with elevation values are included as relationship constraints. To profit from the dependence of daily quantile values, distribution functions of daily gauges are used to set up lower equal and greater equal constraints at their locations. In this way the denser daily gauge network can be included in the interpolation of the hourly distribution functions. The

  16. Periodic amplitude variations in Jovian continuum radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurth, W. S.; Gurnett, D. A.; Scarf, F. L.

    1986-01-01

    An analysis of periodic variations in the amplitude of continuum radiation near 3 kHz trapped in the Jovian magnetosphere shows structure with periods near both five and ten hours. Contrary to a plausible initial idea, the continuum amplitudes are not organized by position of the observer relative to the dense plasma sheet. Instead, there seem to be preferred orientations of system III longitude with respect to the direction to the sun which account for the peaks. This implies a clock-like modulation of the continuum radiation intensity as opposed to a searchlight effect. The importance of the dipole longitude-solar wind alignment to the amplitude of the continuum radiation implies the source region of the radiation is near the magnetopause and may indirectly tie the generation of the radio waves to the clocklike modulation of energetic electron fluxes from Jupiter.

  17. Total Absorption Gamma-ray Spectrometer (TAGS) Intensity Distributions from INL's Gamma-Ray Spectrometry Center

    DOE Data Explorer

    Greenwood, R. E.

    A 252Cf fission-product source and the INL on-line isotope separator were used to supply isotope-separated fission-product nuclides to a total absorption -ray spectrometer. This spectrometer consisted of a large (25.4-cm diameter x 30.5-cm long) NaI(Tl) detector with a 20.3-cm deep axial well in which is placed a 300-mm2 x 1.0-mm Si detector. The spectra from the NaI(Tl) detector are collected both in the singles mode and in coincidence with the B-events detected in the Si detector. Ideally, this detector would sum all the energy of the B- rays in each cascade following the population of daughter level by B- decay, so that the event could be directly associated with a particular daughter level. However, there are losses of energy from attenuation of the rays before they reach the detector, transmission of rays through the detector, escape of secondary photons from Compton scattering, escape of rays through the detector well, internal conversion, etc., and the measured spectra are thus more complicated than the ideal case and the analysis is more complex. Analysis methods have been developed to simulate all of these processes and thus provide a direct measure of the B- intensity distribution as a function of the excitation energy in the daughter nucleus. These data yield more accurate information on the B- distribution than conventional decay-scheme studies for complex decay schemes with large decay energies, because in the latter there are generally many unobserved and observed but unplaced rays. The TAGS data have been analyzed and published [R. E. Greenwood et al., Nucl Instr. and metho. A390(1997)] for 40 fission product-nuclides to determine the B- intensity distributions. [Copied from the TAGS page at http://www.inl.gov/gammaray/spectrometry/tags.shtml]. Those values are listed on this page for quick reference.

  18. Atmosphere-Ocean Coupling Effect on Intense Tropical Cyclone Distribution and its Future Change with 60 km-AOGCM.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Tomomichi; Mizuta, Ryo; Adachi, Yukimasa; Murakami, Hiroyuki; Ose, Tomoaki

    2016-07-15

    Atmosphere-ocean coupling effect on the frequency distribution of tropical cyclones (TCs) and its future change is studied using an atmosphere and ocean coupled general circulation model (AOGCM). In the present climate simulation, the atmosphere-ocean coupling in the AOGCM improves biases in the AGCM such as the poleward shift of the maximum of intense TC distribution in the Northern Hemisphere and too many intense TCs in the Southern Hemisphere. Particularly, subsurface cold water plays a key role to reduce these AGCM biases of intense TC distribution. Besides, the future change of intense TC distribution is significantly different between AOGCM and AGCM despite the same monthly SST. In the north Atlantic, subsurface warming causes larger increase in frequency of intense TCs in AOGCM than that in AGCM. Such subsurface warming in AOGCM also acts to alter large decrease of intense TC in AGCM to no significant change in AOGCM over the southwestern Indian Ocean. These results suggest that atmosphere-ocean coupling characterized by subsurface oceanic structure is responsible for more realistic intense TC distribution in the current climate simulation and gives significant impacts on its future projection.

  19. Atmosphere-Ocean Coupling Effect on Intense Tropical Cyclone Distribution and its Future Change with 60 km-AOGCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogata, Tomomichi; Mizuta, Ryo; Adachi, Yukimasa; Murakami, Hiroyuki; Ose, Tomoaki

    2016-07-01

    Atmosphere-ocean coupling effect on the frequency distribution of tropical cyclones (TCs) and its future change is studied using an atmosphere and ocean coupled general circulation model (AOGCM). In the present climate simulation, the atmosphere-ocean coupling in the AOGCM improves biases in the AGCM such as the poleward shift of the maximum of intense TC distribution in the Northern Hemisphere and too many intense TCs in the Southern Hemisphere. Particularly, subsurface cold water plays a key role to reduce these AGCM biases of intense TC distribution. Besides, the future change of intense TC distribution is significantly different between AOGCM and AGCM despite the same monthly SST. In the north Atlantic, subsurface warming causes larger increase in frequency of intense TCs in AOGCM than that in AGCM. Such subsurface warming in AOGCM also acts to alter large decrease of intense TC in AGCM to no significant change in AOGCM over the southwestern Indian Ocean. These results suggest that atmosphere-ocean coupling characterized by subsurface oceanic structure is responsible for more realistic intense TC distribution in the current climate simulation and gives significant impacts on its future projection.

  20. Atmosphere-Ocean Coupling Effect on Intense Tropical Cyclone Distribution and its Future Change with 60 km-AOGCM

    PubMed Central

    Ogata, Tomomichi; Mizuta, Ryo; Adachi, Yukimasa; Murakami, Hiroyuki; Ose, Tomoaki

    2016-01-01

    Atmosphere-ocean coupling effect on the frequency distribution of tropical cyclones (TCs) and its future change is studied using an atmosphere and ocean coupled general circulation model (AOGCM). In the present climate simulation, the atmosphere-ocean coupling in the AOGCM improves biases in the AGCM such as the poleward shift of the maximum of intense TC distribution in the Northern Hemisphere and too many intense TCs in the Southern Hemisphere. Particularly, subsurface cold water plays a key role to reduce these AGCM biases of intense TC distribution. Besides, the future change of intense TC distribution is significantly different between AOGCM and AGCM despite the same monthly SST. In the north Atlantic, subsurface warming causes larger increase in frequency of intense TCs in AOGCM than that in AGCM. Such subsurface warming in AOGCM also acts to alter large decrease of intense TC in AGCM to no significant change in AOGCM over the southwestern Indian Ocean. These results suggest that atmosphere-ocean coupling characterized by subsurface oceanic structure is responsible for more realistic intense TC distribution in the current climate simulation and gives significant impacts on its future projection. PMID:27418240

  1. Atmosphere-Ocean Coupling Effect on Intense Tropical Cyclone Distribution and its Future Change with 60 km-AOGCM.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Tomomichi; Mizuta, Ryo; Adachi, Yukimasa; Murakami, Hiroyuki; Ose, Tomoaki

    2016-01-01

    Atmosphere-ocean coupling effect on the frequency distribution of tropical cyclones (TCs) and its future change is studied using an atmosphere and ocean coupled general circulation model (AOGCM). In the present climate simulation, the atmosphere-ocean coupling in the AOGCM improves biases in the AGCM such as the poleward shift of the maximum of intense TC distribution in the Northern Hemisphere and too many intense TCs in the Southern Hemisphere. Particularly, subsurface cold water plays a key role to reduce these AGCM biases of intense TC distribution. Besides, the future change of intense TC distribution is significantly different between AOGCM and AGCM despite the same monthly SST. In the north Atlantic, subsurface warming causes larger increase in frequency of intense TCs in AOGCM than that in AGCM. Such subsurface warming in AOGCM also acts to alter large decrease of intense TC in AGCM to no significant change in AOGCM over the southwestern Indian Ocean. These results suggest that atmosphere-ocean coupling characterized by subsurface oceanic structure is responsible for more realistic intense TC distribution in the current climate simulation and gives significant impacts on its future projection. PMID:27418240

  2. Hydrogen Balmer alpha intensity distributions and line profiles from multiple scattering theory using realistic geocoronal models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. E., Jr.; Meier, R. R.; Hodges, R. R., Jr.; Tinsley, B. A.

    1987-01-01

    The H Balmer alpha nightglow is investigated by using Monte Carlo models of asymmetric geocoronal atomic hydrogen distributions as input to a radiative transfer model of solar Lyman-beta radiation in the thermosphere and atmosphere. It is shown that it is essential to include multiple scattering of Lyman-beta radiation in the interpretation of Balmer alpha airglow data. Observations of diurnal variation in the Balmer alpha airglow showing slightly greater intensities in the morning relative to evening are consistent with theory. No evidence is found for anything other than a single sinusoidal diurnal variation of exobase density. Dramatic changes in effective temperature derived from the observed Balmer alpha line profiles are expected on the basis of changing illumination conditions in the thermosphere and exosphere as different regions of the sky are scanned.

  3. Distribution of temperature elevation caused by moving high-intensity focused ultrasound transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jungsoon; Jung, Jihee; Kim, Moojoon; Ha, Kanglyeol; Lee, Eunghwa; Lee, Ilkwon

    2015-07-01

    Ultrasonic thermal treatment for dermatology has been developed using a small high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) transducer. The transducer moves horizontally at a constant while it emits focused ultrasound because the treatment needs a high-temperature area in skin tissue over a wide range of depths. In this paper, a tissue-mimicking phantom made of carrageenan and a thermochromic film were adopted to examine the temperature distribution in the phantom noninvasively when the focused ultrasound was irradiated from the moving transducer. The dependence of the high-temperature area on the irradiated acoustic energy and on the movement interval of the HIFU was analyzed experimentally. The results will be useful in ensuring safety and estimating the remedial value of the treatment.

  4. Evaluation of Dose Distribution in Intensity Modulated Radiosurgery for Lung Cancer under Condition of Respiratory Motion

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Mee Sun; Jeong, Jae-Uk; Nam, Taek-Keun; Ahn, Sung-Ja; Chung, Woong-Ki; Song, Ju-Young

    2016-01-01

    The dose of a real tumor target volume and surrounding organs at risk (OARs) under the effect of respiratory motion was calculated for a lung tumor plan, based on the target volume covering the whole tumor motion range for intensity modulated radiosurgery (IMRS). Two types of IMRS plans based on simulated respiratory motion were designed using humanoid and dynamic phantoms. Delivery quality assurance (DQA) was performed using ArcCHECK and MapCHECK2 for several moving conditions of the tumor and the real dose inside the humanoid phantom was evaluated using the 3DVH program. This evaluated dose in the tumor target and OAR using the 3DVH program was higher than the calculated dose in the plan, and a greater difference was seen for the RapidArc treatment than for the standard intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with fixed gantry angle beams. The results of this study show that for IMRS plans based on target volume, including the whole tumor motion range, tighter constraints of the OAR should be considered in the optimization process. The method devised in this study can be applied effectively to analyze the dose distribution in the real volume of tumor target and OARs in IMRT plans targeting the whole tumor motion range. PMID:27648949

  5. A Distributed Network for Intensive Longitudinal Monitoring in Metastatic Triple-Negative Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Blau, C Anthony; Ramirez, Arturo B; Blau, Sibel; Pritchard, Colin C; Dorschner, Michael O; Schmechel, Stephen C; Martins, Timothy J; Mahen, Elisabeth M; Burton, Kimberly A; Komashko, Vitalina M; Radenbaugh, Amie J; Dougherty, Katy; Thomas, Anju; Miller, Christopher P; Annis, James; Fromm, Jonathan R; Song, Chaozhong; Chang, Elizabeth; Howard, Kellie; Austin, Sharon; Schmidt, Rodney A; Linenberger, Michael L; Becker, Pamela S; Senecal, Francis M; Mecham, Brigham H; Lee, Su-In; Madan, Anup; Ronen, Roy; Dutkowski, Janusz; Heimfeld, Shelly; Wood, Brent L; Stilwell, Jackie L; Kaldjian, Eric P; Haussler, David; Zhu, Jingchun

    2016-01-01

    Accelerating cancer research is expected to require new types of clinical trials. This report describes the Intensive Trial of OMics in Cancer (ITOMIC) and a participant with triple-negative breast cancer metastatic to bone, who had markedly elevated circulating tumor cells (CTCs) that were monitored 48 times over 9 months. A total of 32 researchers from 14 institutions were engaged in the patient's evaluation; 20 researchers had no prior involvement in patient care and 18 were recruited specifically for this patient. Whole-exome sequencing of 3 bone marrow samples demonstrated a novel ROS1 variant that was estimated to be present in most or all tumor cells. After an initial response to cisplatin, a hypothesis of crizotinib sensitivity was disproven. Leukapheresis followed by partial CTC enrichment allowed for the development of a differential high-throughput drug screen and demonstrated sensitivity to investigational BH3-mimetic inhibitors of BCL-2 that could not be tested in the patient because requests to the pharmaceutical sponsors were denied. The number and size of CTC clusters correlated with clinical status and eventually death. Focusing the expertise of a distributed network of investigators on an intensively monitored patient with cancer can generate high-resolution views of the natural history of cancer and suggest new opportunities for therapy. Optimization requires access to investigational drugs. PMID:26733551

  6. A Distributed Network for Intensive Longitudinal Monitoring in Metastatic Triple-Negative Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Blau, C Anthony; Ramirez, Arturo B; Blau, Sibel; Pritchard, Colin C; Dorschner, Michael O; Schmechel, Stephen C; Martins, Timothy J; Mahen, Elisabeth M; Burton, Kimberly A; Komashko, Vitalina M; Radenbaugh, Amie J; Dougherty, Katy; Thomas, Anju; Miller, Christopher P; Annis, James; Fromm, Jonathan R; Song, Chaozhong; Chang, Elizabeth; Howard, Kellie; Austin, Sharon; Schmidt, Rodney A; Linenberger, Michael L; Becker, Pamela S; Senecal, Francis M; Mecham, Brigham H; Lee, Su-In; Madan, Anup; Ronen, Roy; Dutkowski, Janusz; Heimfeld, Shelly; Wood, Brent L; Stilwell, Jackie L; Kaldjian, Eric P; Haussler, David; Zhu, Jingchun

    2016-01-01

    Accelerating cancer research is expected to require new types of clinical trials. This report describes the Intensive Trial of OMics in Cancer (ITOMIC) and a participant with triple-negative breast cancer metastatic to bone, who had markedly elevated circulating tumor cells (CTCs) that were monitored 48 times over 9 months. A total of 32 researchers from 14 institutions were engaged in the patient's evaluation; 20 researchers had no prior involvement in patient care and 18 were recruited specifically for this patient. Whole-exome sequencing of 3 bone marrow samples demonstrated a novel ROS1 variant that was estimated to be present in most or all tumor cells. After an initial response to cisplatin, a hypothesis of crizotinib sensitivity was disproven. Leukapheresis followed by partial CTC enrichment allowed for the development of a differential high-throughput drug screen and demonstrated sensitivity to investigational BH3-mimetic inhibitors of BCL-2 that could not be tested in the patient because requests to the pharmaceutical sponsors were denied. The number and size of CTC clusters correlated with clinical status and eventually death. Focusing the expertise of a distributed network of investigators on an intensively monitored patient with cancer can generate high-resolution views of the natural history of cancer and suggest new opportunities for therapy. Optimization requires access to investigational drugs.

  7. A Distributed Network for Intensive Longitudinal Monitoring in Metastatic Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Blau, C. Anthony; Ramirez, Arturo B.; Blau, Sibel; Pritchard, Colin C.; Dorschner, Michael O.; Schmechel, Stephen C.; Martins, Timothy J.; Mahen, Elisabeth M.; Burton, Kimberly A.; Komashko, Vitalina M.; Radenbaugh, Amie J.; Dougherty, Katy; Thomas, Anju; Miller, Christopher P.; Annis, James; Fromm, Jonathan R.; Song, Chaozhong; Chang, Elizabeth; Howard, Kellie; Austin, Sharon; Schmidt, Rodney A.; Linenberger, Michael L.; Becker, Pamela S.; Senecal, Francis M.; Mecham, Brigham H.; Lee, Su-In; Madan, Anup; Ronen, Roy; Dutkowski, Janusz; Heimfeld, Shelly; Wood, Brent L.; Stilwell, Jackie L.; Kaldjian, Eric P.; Haussler, David; Zhu, Jingchun

    2016-01-01

    Accelerating cancer research is expected to require new types of clinical trials. This report describes the Intensive Trial of OMics in Cancer (ITOMIC) and a participant with triple-negative breast cancer metastatic to bone, who had markedly elevated circulating tumor cells (CTCs) that were monitored 48 times over 9 months. A total of 32 researchers from 14 institutions were engaged in the patient’s evaluation; 20 researchers had no prior involvement in patient care and 18 were recruited specifically for this patient. Whole-exome sequencing of 3 bone marrow samples demonstrated a novel ROS1 variant that was estimated to be present in most or all tumor cells. After an initial response to cisplatin, a hypothesis of crizotinib sensitivity was disproven. Leukapheresis followed by partial CTC enrichment allowed for the development of a differential high-throughput drug screen and demonstrated sensitivity to investigational BH3-mimetic inhibitors of BCL-2 that could not be tested in the patient because requests to the pharmaceutical sponsors were denied. The number and size of CTC clusters correlated with clinical status and eventually death. Focusing the expertise of a distributed network of investigators on an intensively monitored patient with cancer can generate high-resolution views of the natural history of cancer and suggest new opportunities for therapy. Optimization requires access to investigational drugs. PMID:26733551

  8. Evaluation of Dose Distribution in Intensity Modulated Radiosurgery for Lung Cancer under Condition of Respiratory Motion.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Mee Sun; Jeong, Jae-Uk; Nam, Taek-Keun; Ahn, Sung-Ja; Chung, Woong-Ki; Song, Ju-Young

    2016-01-01

    The dose of a real tumor target volume and surrounding organs at risk (OARs) under the effect of respiratory motion was calculated for a lung tumor plan, based on the target volume covering the whole tumor motion range for intensity modulated radiosurgery (IMRS). Two types of IMRS plans based on simulated respiratory motion were designed using humanoid and dynamic phantoms. Delivery quality assurance (DQA) was performed using ArcCHECK and MapCHECK2 for several moving conditions of the tumor and the real dose inside the humanoid phantom was evaluated using the 3DVH program. This evaluated dose in the tumor target and OAR using the 3DVH program was higher than the calculated dose in the plan, and a greater difference was seen for the RapidArc treatment than for the standard intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with fixed gantry angle beams. The results of this study show that for IMRS plans based on target volume, including the whole tumor motion range, tighter constraints of the OAR should be considered in the optimization process. The method devised in this study can be applied effectively to analyze the dose distribution in the real volume of tumor target and OARs in IMRT plans targeting the whole tumor motion range. PMID:27648949

  9. Predicting Distribution and Inter-Annual Variability of Tropical Cyclone Intensity from a Stochastic, Multiple-Linear Regression Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C. Y.; Tippett, M. K.; Sobel, A. H.; Camargo, S. J.

    2014-12-01

    We are working towards the development of a new statistical-dynamical downscaling system to study the influence of climate on tropical cyclones (TCs). The first step is development of an appropriate model for TC intensity as a function of environmental variables. We approach this issue with a stochastic model consisting of a multiple linear regression model (MLR) for 12-hour intensity forecasts as a deterministic component, and a random error generator as a stochastic component. Similar to the operational Statistical Hurricane Intensity Prediction Scheme (SHIPS), MLR relates the surrounding environment to storm intensity, but with only essential predictors calculated from monthly-mean NCEP reanalysis fields (potential intensity, shear, etc.) and from persistence. The deterministic MLR is developed with data from 1981-1999 and tested with data from 2000-2012 for the Atlantic, Eastern North Pacific, Western North Pacific, Indian Ocean, and Southern Hemisphere basins. While the global MLR's skill is comparable to that of the operational statistical models (e.g., SHIPS), the distribution of the predicted maximum intensity from deterministic results has a systematic low bias compared to observations; the deterministic MLR creates almost no storms with intensities greater than 100 kt. The deterministic MLR can be significantly improved by adding the stochastic component, based on the distribution of random forecasting errors from the deterministic model compared to the training data. This stochastic component may be thought of as representing the component of TC intensification that is not linearly related to the environmental variables. We find that in order for the stochastic model to accurately capture the observed distribution of maximum storm intensities, the stochastic component must be auto-correlated across 12-hour time steps. This presentation also includes a detailed discussion of the distributions of other TC-intensity related quantities, as well as the inter

  10. Generation of Initial Kinetic Distributions for Simulation of Long-Pulse Charged Particle Beams with High Space-Charge intensity

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, Steven M.; Kikuchi, Takashi; Davidson, Ronald C.

    2007-04-03

    Self-consistent Vlasov-Poisson simulations of beams with high space-charge intensity often require specification of initial phase-space distributions that reflect properties of a beam that is well adapted to the transport channel--both in terms of low-order rms (envelope) properties as well as the higher-order phase-space structure. Here, we first review broad classes of kinetic distributions commonly in use as initial Vlasov distributions in simulations of unbunched or weakly bunched beams with intense space-charge fields including: the Kapchinskij-Vladimirskij (KV) equilibrium, continuous-focusing equilibria with specific detailed examples, and various non-equilibrium distributions, such as the semi-Gaussian distribution and distributions formed from specified functions of linear-field Courant-Snyder invariants. Important practical details necessary to specify these distributions in terms of usual accelerator inputs are presented in a unified format. Building on this presentation, a new class of approximate initial kinetic distributions are constructed using transformations that preserve linear-focusing single-particle Courant-Snyder invariants to map initial continuous-focusing equilibrium distributions to a form more appropriate for non-continuous focusing channels. Self-consistent particle-in-cell simulations are employed to show that the approximate initial distributions generated in this manner are better adapted to the focusing channels for beams with high space-charge intensity. This improved capability enables simulation applications that more precisely probe intrinsic stability properties and machine performance.

  11. Generation of initial Vlasov distributions for simulation of charged particle beams with high space-charge intensity

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, S M; Kikuchi, T; Davidson, R C

    2007-04-12

    Self-consistent Vlasov simulations of beams with high space-charge intensity often require specification of initial phase-space distributions that reflect properties of a beam that is well adapted to the transport channel, both in terms of low-order rms (envelope) properties as well as the higher-order phase-space structure. Here, we first review broad classes of distributions commonly in use as initial Vlasov distributions in simulations of beams with intense space-charge fields including: the Kapchinskij-Vladimirskij (KV) equilibrium, continuous-focusing equilibria with specific detailed examples, and various non-equilibrium distributions, such as the semi-Gaussian distribution and distributions formed from specified functions of linear-field Courant-Snyder invariants. Important practical details necessary to specify these distributions in terms of usual accelerator inputs are presented in a unified format. Building on this presentation, a new class of approximate initial distributions are constructed using transformations that preserve linear-focusing single-particle Courant-Snyder invariants to map initial continuous-focusing equilibrium distributions to a form more appropriate for non-continuous focusing channels. Self-consistent particle-in-cell simulations are employed to show that the approximate initial distributions generated in this manner are better adapted to the focusing channels for beams with high space-charge intensity. This improved capability enables simulation applications that more precisely probe intrinsic stability properties and machine performance.

  12. Spatial Intensity Distribution Analysis Reveals Abnormal Oligomerization of Proteins in Single Cells.

    PubMed

    Godin, Antoine G; Rappaz, Benjamin; Potvin-Trottier, Laurent; Kennedy, Timothy E; De Koninck, Yves; Wiseman, Paul W

    2015-08-18

    Knowledge of membrane receptor organization is essential for understanding the initial steps in cell signaling and trafficking mechanisms, but quantitative analysis of receptor interactions at the single-cell level and in different cellular compartments has remained highly challenging. To achieve this, we apply a quantitative image analysis technique-spatial intensity distribution analysis (SpIDA)-that can measure fluorescent particle concentrations and oligomerization states within different subcellular compartments in live cells. An important technical challenge faced by fluorescence microscopy-based measurement of oligomerization is the fidelity of receptor labeling. In practice, imperfect labeling biases the distribution of oligomeric states measured within an aggregated system. We extend SpIDA to enable analysis of high-order oligomers from fluorescence microscopy images, by including a probability weighted correction algorithm for nonemitting labels. We demonstrated that this fraction of nonemitting probes could be estimated in single cells using SpIDA measurements on model systems with known oligomerization state. Previously, this artifact was measured using single-step photobleaching. This approach was validated using computer-simulated data and the imperfect labeling was quantified in cells with ion channels of known oligomer subunit count. It was then applied to quantify the oligomerization states in different cell compartments of the proteolipid protein (PLP) expressed in COS-7 cells. Expression of a mutant PLP linked to impaired trafficking resulted in the detection of PLP tetramers that persist in the endoplasmic reticulum, while no difference was measured at the membrane between the distributions of wild-type and mutated PLPs. Our results demonstrate that SpIDA allows measurement of protein oligomerization in different compartments of intact cells, even when fractional mislabeling occurs as well as photobleaching during the imaging process, and

  13. The Aquatic Systems Continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, T. C.

    2004-12-01

    The Aquatic Systems Continuum is a proposed framework for interrelating the physical, chemical, and biological characteristics of aquatic ecosystems. The continuum can be represented by a three-dimensional matrix that relates aquatic ecosystems to their position within hydrologic flow paths (x-axis, a spatial dimension) and their response to climate variability (y-axis). The z-axis describes the structure of biological communities as they relate to the hydrological conditions defined by the x and y axes. The concept is an extension of the Wetland Continuum that was derived from field studies of a prairie pothole wetland complex in North Dakota. At that site, the hydrologic continuum in space is defined by ground-water flow systems. The wetlands are surface-water expressions of larger ground-water watersheds, in which wetlands serve recharge, flow-through, and discharge functions with respect to ground water. The water balance of the wetlands is dominated by precipitation and evaporation. However, the interaction of the wetlands with ground water, although a small part of their water budget, provides the primary control on delivery of major solutes to and from the wetlands. Having monitored these wetlands for more than 25 years, during which time the site had a complete range of climate conditions from drought to deluge, the response of the aquatic communities to a wide variety of climate conditions has been well documented. The Aquatic Systems Continuum extends the model provided by the Wetland Continuum to include rivers and their interaction with ground water. As a result, both ground water and surface water are used to describe terrestrial water flows for all types of aquatic ecosystems. By using the Aquatic Systems Continuum to describe the hydrologic flow paths in all types of terrain, including exchange with atmospheric water, it is possible to design studies, monitoring programs, and management plans for nearly any type of aquatic ecosystem.

  14. Modeling the neutral hydrogen distribution in the post-reionization Universe: intensity mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Villaescusa-Navarro, Francisco; Viel, Matteo; Datta, Kanan K.; Choudhury, T. Roy E-mail: viel@oats.inaf.it E-mail: tirth@ncra.tifr.res.in

    2014-09-01

    We model the distribution of neutral hydrogen (HI) in the post-reionization era and investigate its detectability in 21 cm intensity mapping with future radio telescopes like the Square Kilometer array (SKA). We rely on high resolution hydrodynamical N-body simulations that have a state-of-the-art treatment of the low density photoionized gas in the inter-galactic medium (IGM). The HI is assigned a-posteriori to the gas particles following two different approaches: a halo-based method in which HI is assigned only to gas particles residing within dark matter halos; a particle-based method that assigns HI to all gas particles using a prescription based on the physical properties of the particles. The HI statistical properties are then compared to the observational properties of Damped Lyman-α Absorbers (DLAs) and of lower column density systems and reasonable good agreement is found for all the cases. Among the halo-based method, we further consider two different schemes that aim at reproducing the observed properties of DLAs by distributing HI inside halos: one of this results in a much higher bias for DLAs, in agreement with recent observations, which boosts the 21 cm power spectrum by a factor ∼ 4 with respect to the other recipe. Furthermore, we quantify the contribution of HI in the diffuse IGM to both Ω{sub HI} and the HI power spectrum finding to be subdominant in both cases. We compute the 21 cm power spectrum from the simulated HI distribution and calculate the expected signal for both SKA1-mid and SKA1-low configurations at 2.4 ≤ z ≤ 4. We find that SKA will be able to detect the 21 cm power spectrum, in the non-linear regime, up to k ∼ 1 h/Mpc for SKA1-mid and k ∼ 5 h/Mpc for SKA1-low with 100 hours of observations. We also investigate the perspective of imaging the HI distribution. Our findings indicate that SKA1-low could detect the most massive HI peaks with a signal to noise ratio (SNR) higher than 5 for an observation time of about 1000

  15. A distributed model for slope stability analysis using radar detected rainfall intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leoni, L.; Rossi, G.; Catani, F.

    2009-04-01

    The term shallow landslides is widely used in literature to describe a slope movement of limited size that mainly develops in soils up to a maximum of a few meters. Shallow landslides are usually triggered by heavy rainfall because, as the water starts to infiltrate in the soil, the pore-water pressure increases so that the shear strength of the soil is reduced leading to slope failure. We have developed a distributed hydrological-geotechnical model for the forecasting of the temporal and spatial distribution of shallow landslides to be used as a warning system for civil protection purpose. The model uses radar detected rainfall intensity as the input for the hydrological simulation of the infiltration. Using the rainfall pattern detected by the radar is in fact possible to dynamically control the redistribution of groundwater pressure associated with transient infiltration of rain so as to infer the slope stability of the studied area. The model deals with both saturated and unsaturated conditions taking into account the effect of soil suction when the soil is not completely saturated. Two pilot sites have been chosen to develop and test this model: the Armea basin (Liguria, Italy) and the Ischia Island (Campania, Italy). In recent years several severe rainstorms have occurred in both these areas. In at least two cases these have triggered numerous shallow landslides that have caused victims and damaged roads, buildings and agricultural activities. In its current stage, the basic basin-scale model applied for predicting the probable location of shallow landslides involves several stand-alone components. The solution suggested by Iverson for the Richards equation is used to estimate the transient groundwater pressure head distribution according to radar detected rainfall intensity. A soil depth prediction scheme and a limit-equilibrium infinite slope stability algorithm are used to calculate the distributed factor of safety (FS) at different depths and to record

  16. Real Distribution of the Coronal Green Line Intensity and Modelling Study of Galactic Cosmic Ray Propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gushchina, R. T.; Alania, M. V.; Gil, A.; Iskra, K.; Siluszyk, M.

    2003-07-01

    transport equation of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) has been numerically solved for different qA>0 (1996) and qA<0 (1987) epochs assuming that free path of GCR scattering in the interplanetary space is controlled by the Sun's coronal green line intensity (CGLI). We found some distinctions in the distribution of the expected heliolatitudinal gradients of GCR for two and three dimensional interplanetary magnetic field. INTRODUCTION. modulation of GCR in the interplanetary space is generally determined by four processesdiffusion, convection, drift and energy change of GCR particles due to interaction with the solar wind. The joint effect of all above mentioned processes result the 11year variation of GCR. In papers [1-3] are assumed that the general reason of the 11-year variation of GCR in the energy range more than 1 GeV is different structure of the irregularities of the IMF in the maxima and minima epochs of solar activity (SA) caused the radical changes of the dependence of diffusion coefficient on the rigidity of GCR particles. EXPERIMENTAL DATA AND METHOD OF INVESTIGATION. experimental data of sunspot numbers, sunspots' areas and CGLI (λ = 5303˚) show a considerable changes during the 11-year cycle of SA, while e.g. A the changes of the solar wind velocity are not so noticeable [4, 5]. An attempt to take into account influences of the real distributions of the sunspot's areas and the Sun's CGLI on the modulation of GCR considering delay time of the phenomena in the interplanetary space with respect to the processes on the Sun have been undertaken in papers [6-8]. One of parameters of SA contentiously observed on the Earth is the Sun's CGLI. One can suppose that a modulation of GCR by some means is controlled by the changes of the CGLI; particularly there is assumed that a scattering free path of GCR transport is related with the

  17. Characterization and control of peak intensity distribution at the focus of a spatiotemporally focused femtosecond laser beam.

    PubMed

    He, Fei; Zeng, Bin; Chu, Wei; Ni, Jielei; Sugioka, Koji; Cheng, Ya; Durfee, Charles G

    2014-04-21

    We report on experimental examination of two-photon fluorescence excitation (TPFE) at the focus of a spatially chirped femtosecond laser beam, which reveals an unexpected tilted peak intensity distribution in the focal spot. Our theoretical calculation shows that the tilting of the peak intensity distribution originates from the fact that along the optical axis of objective lens, the spatiotemporally focused pulse reaches its shortest duration exactly at the focal plane. However, when moving away from the optical axis along the direction of spatial chirp of the incident pulse, the pulse reaches its shortest duration either before or after the focal plane, depending on whether the pulse duration is measured above or below the optical axis as well as the sign of the spatial chirp. The tilting of the peak intensity distribution in the focal spot of the spatiotemporally focused femtosecond laser beam can play important roles in applications such as femtosecond laser micromachining and bio-imaging. PMID:24787858

  18. Characterization of the fast electrons distribution produced in a high intensity laser target interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Westover, B.; Chen, C. D.; Patel, P. K.; McLean, H.; Beg, F. N.

    2014-03-15

    Experiments on the Titan laser (∼150 J, 0.7 ps, 2 × 10{sup 20} W cm{sup −2}) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory were carried out in order to study the properties of fast electrons produced by high-intensity, short pulse laser interacting with matter under conditions relevant to Fast Ignition. Bremsstrahlung x-rays produced by these fast electrons were measured by a set of compact filter-stack based x-ray detectors placed at three angles with respect to the target. The measured bremsstrahlung signal allows a characterization of the fast electron beam spectrum, conversion efficiency of laser energy into fast electron kinetic energy and angular distribution. A Monte Carlo code Integrated Tiger Series was used to model the bremsstrahlung signal and infer a laser to fast electron conversion efficiency of 30%, an electron slope temperature of about 2.2 MeV, and a mean divergence angle of 39°. Simulations were also performed with the hybrid transport code ZUMA which includes fields in the target. In this case, a conversion efficiency of laser energy to fast electron energy of 34% and a slope temperature between 1.5 MeV and 4 MeV depending on the angle between the target normal direction and the measuring spectrometer are found. The observed temperature of the bremsstrahlung spectrum, and therefore the inferred electron spectrum are found to be angle dependent.

  19. Solar Intensity Distributing and Convolving Optic (SIDCO) Concept for the CLARREO Reflected Solar Imaging Spectrometer (RSIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, G.; Itt Geospatial Systems Climate Calibration Group

    2010-12-01

    The CLARREO mission has outlined some preliminary requirements for a space based spectrometer to measure visible to near infra-red Earth albedo with a 0.3% absolute accuracy, 0.1%/decade calibration stability and a 10km footprint size at nadir. It is well known that some Earth viewing optics undergo significant degradation at solar wavelengths when in orbit which is not directly detectable using onboard calibration sources. This makes the requirements for CLARREO very challenging, requiring the development of new instrumental concepts in order to meet the goals required. A new type of telescope system is hence proposed that uses raster scan data from the Sun as its primary calibration metric. The 10-5 attenuation necessary for Earth viewing optics to view the Sun directly is achieved using the new concept of a Solar Intensity Distributing and Convolving Optic (SIDCO), whose degradation itself is monitored to very high accuracy and precision. The proposed instrument requires no more moving parts or gimbals than those used on the long running CERES instruments. It also provides redundancy in order to continue benchmark albedo measurements even during the instruments solar calibration periods. Such redundancy also allows continual monitoring of the incoming solar spectrum.

  20. Local influence of south-east France topography and land cover on the distribution and characteristics of intense rainfall cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renard, Florent

    2016-01-01

    The Greater Lyon area is strongly built up, grouping 58 communes and a population of 1.3 million in approximately 500 km2. The flood risk is high as the territory is crossed by two large watercourses and by streams with torrential flow. Floods may also occur in case of runoff after heavy rain or because of a rise in the groundwater level. The whole territory can therefore be affected, and it is necessary to possess in-depth knowledge of the depths, causes and consequences of rainfall to achieve better management of precipitation in urban areas and to reduce flood risk. This study is thus focused on the effects of topography and land cover on the occurrence, intensity and area of intense rainfall cells. They are identified by local radar meteorology (C-band) combined with a processing algorithm running in a geographic information system (GIS) which identified 109,979 weighted mean centres of them in a sample composed of the five most intense rainfall events from 2001 to 2005. First, analysis of spatial distribution at an overall scale is performed, completed by study at a more detailed scale. The results show that the distribution of high-intensity rainfall cells is spread in cluster form. Subsequently, comparison of intense rainfall cells with the topography shows that cell density is closely linked with land slope but that, above all, urbanised zones feature nearly twice as many rainfall cells as farm land or forest, with more intense intensity.

  1. Analytical source-target mapping method for the design of freeform mirrors generating prescribed 2D intensity distributions.

    PubMed

    Doskolovich, Leonid L; Bezus, Evgeni A; Moiseev, Mikhail A; Bykov, Dmitry A; Kazanskiy, Nikolay L

    2016-05-16

    A new source-target mapping for the design of mirrors generating prescribed 2D intensity distributions is proposed. The surface of the mirror implementing the obtained mapping is expressed in an analytical form. Presented simulation results demonstrate high performance of the proposed method. In the case of generation of rectangular and elliptical intensity distributions with angular dimensions from 80° x 20° to 40° x 20°, relative standard error does not exceed 8.5%. The method can be extended to the calculation of refractive optical elements.

  2. Continuum capture in the three-body problem

    SciTech Connect

    Sellin, I A

    1980-01-01

    The three-body problem, especially the problem of electron capture to the continuum in heavy particle collisions is reviewed. Major topics covered include: second born-induced asymmetry in electron capture to the continuum; historical context, links to other tests of atomic scattering theory; experiments characterizing the velocity distribution of ECC electrons; other atomic physics tests of high velocity Born expansions; atom capture; capture by positrons; and pion capture to the continuum. (GHT)

  3. Distribution, prevalence and intensity of Schistosoma bovis infection in cattle in Iringa district, Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Makundi, A E; Kassuku, A A; Maselle, R M; Boa, M E

    1998-02-15

    Monthly abattoir, farms and village surveys were carried out to determine the distribution, prevalence and intensity of Schistosoma bovis infection in cattle in Iringa district in the southern highlands of Tanzania between August 1991 to August 1992. Abattoir surveys were conducted at the Iringa regional abattoir and age, sex, live animal grade and livestock market of origin of each of 342 animals examined were recorded. Five grams of the central part of the jejunum were collected from each animal and schistosome egg counting was carried out after tissue digestion. Nine farms and six villages were randomly selected and age, sex and origin of 501 cattle was recorded. Faecal samples were collected from each animal and quantification of schistosome eggs was carried out by means of the Modified Bell filtration technique. Abattoir surveys revealed S. bovis to be present in 116 out of 342 cattle examined in 10 out of the 12 livestock markets surveyed giving a point prevalence of 34%. A high frequency (70.1%) of low tissue egg counts (< 200 eggs per gram) was observed among the infected animals. The prevalence and intensities of infection observed in the slaughtered cattle were not related to the age-group, sex and grade of the animals. Results from faecal egg counts in nine farms and six villages disclosed that the infection was predominant in four farms (Lulanzi, Igumbiro, Ruaha and Mlolo) and three villages (Itunundu, Ibumu and Lulanzi). Egg counts per gram of faeces (EPGF) at Lulanzi dairy farm revealed a peak egg excretion in 1-3 yr old animals which was followed by a decline in the number of EPGF within the age group of 3- to 9-yr old animals. However, the faecal egg excretion tended to rise again in animals over 9 years old. Deaths of four animals which were preceded by signs of intermittent diarrhea, loss of condition, anaemia and high faecal egg counts was observed at Lulanzi farm. Postmortem examination of the dead animals revealed that they had severe

  4. The geometry of electronically-excited states: Vibronic intensity distributions and bond length changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Dorothy Marie

    2001-12-01

    An exact power series expression has been obtained for the Franck-Condon integral (FCI) in the harmonic approximation. This expression is a function of a parameter Δ where Δ --> 0 as the frequencies of vibration in the two combining electronic states approach equality. These two characteristics, that of a power series in Δ and the fact that Δ --> 0 in certain situations, permit truncation of various functions involving FCI's. Such truncation was performed for the ratio S2v'0'' /S2(v'-1) 0'' , where the S2v'v'' are the FCI's, and the subscripts, in the usual notation, denote the vibrational quantum numbers in the two different electronic states. As a result, two approximations to the S2v'0'' /S2(v'-1) 0'' ratio were obtained: a linear approximation in Δ and a quadratic expression in Δ2. Maps of the Franck-Condon integrals, FCIM's, were found to be very useful. An FCIM is a plot of S2v'0'' (DRe) versus ΔRe for various values of the parameter v'. These FCIM's facilitated a test of the linear and quadratic approximations and led to a precise specification of the ranges of a within which they are valid. They resulted in the concept of a ``Franck-Condon window''. A Franck-Condon window (FCW) is that specific region of the FCIM (i.e., the range of ΔRe) in which the gross (i.e., non-numerical, vibronic intensity) pattern of some vibronic spectrum is represented. The vibrational intensity distributions in 60 different electronic transitions were subjected to Franck-Condon analysis using (i)the linear approximation, (ii)the quadratic approximation, (iii)the FCW approach, and (iv)the best fit to the FCIM. It was found that method (ii), (iii) & (iv) provided excellent agreement with experiment whereas method (i) produced mixed results. The analysis had some incidental benefits: it caused a reassignment of one vibronic spectrum and permitted a choice between two proposed alternative assignments for another vibronic spectrum.

  5. Determination of Stress Intensity Factor Distributions for "Interface" Cracks in Incompressible, Dissimilar Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, C. W.

    1997-01-01

    The present study was undertaken in order to develop test methods and procedures for measuring the variation of the stress intensity factor through the thickness in bimaterial specimens containing cracks within and parallel to the bond line using the frozen stress photoelastic method. Since stress freezing materials are incompressible above critical temperature, and since thick plates are to be employed which tend to produce a state of plane strain near the crack tip, the interface near tip fracture equations reduce to the classic form for homogeneous materials. Moreover, zero thickness interfaces do not exist when materials are bonded together. It was decided early on that it would be important to insure a uniform straight and accurate crack tip region through the thickness of the body to reduce scatter in the SIF distribution through the thickness. It was also observed that rubberlike materials which were desired to be modeled exhibited significant tip blunting prior to crack extension and that some blunting of the tip would provide a more realistic model. It should be noted that, in normal stress freezing photoelastic work, it is considered good practice to avoid utilizing data near bond lines in photoelastic models due to the bond line stresses which inevitably develop when two parts are bonded together. Thus, the present study involves certain exploratory aspects in deviating from standard practice in stress freezing work. With the above ideas in mind, several different test methods were investigated and are described in the following sections and appendices. The geometry selected for the program was a thick, edge cracked specimen containing a bond line.

  6. Impact of Urbanization on Precipitation Distribution and Intensity over Lake Victoria Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudoshava, M.; Semazzi, F. H. M.

    2014-12-01

    In this study, sensitivity simulations on the impact of rapid urbanization over Lake Victoria Basin in East Africa were done using a Regional Climate Model (RegCM4.4-rc29) with the Hostetler lake model activated. The simulations were done for the rainy seasons that is the long rains (March-April-May) and short rains (October-November-December). Africa is projected to have a surge in urbanization with an approximate rate of 590% in 2030 over their 2000 levels. The Northern part of Lake Victoria Basin and some parts of Rwanda and Burundi are amongst the regions with high urbanization projections. Simulations were done with the land cover for 2000 and the projected 2030 urbanization levels. The results showed that increasing the urban fraction over the northern part of the basin modified the physical parameters such as albedo, moisture and surface energy fluxes, aerodynamic roughness and surface emissivity, thereby altering the precipitation distribution, intensity and frequency in the region. The change in the physical parameters gave a response of an average increase in temperature of approximately 2oC over the urbanized region. A strong convergence zone was formed over the urbanized region and thereby accelerating the lake-breeze front towards the urbanized region center. Precipitation in the urbanized region and regions immediate to the area increased by approximately 4mm/day, while drying up the southern (non-urbanized) side of the basin. The drying up of the southern side of the basin could be a result of divergent flow and subsidence that suppresses vertical development of storms.

  7. Teacher Education: A Continuum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Momentum, 1990

    1990-01-01

    This document is a theme issue of the journal "Momentum", devoted to the topic "Teacher Education: A Continuum." It contains 15 articles in the central section and 7 articles in a special section subtitled "The Multicultural Challenge." The following articles on the central theme are presented: (1) "Closing the Gap" concerns fusing the college and…

  8. Extragalactic continuum sources.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valtaoja, E.

    1989-09-01

    As with most other high-frequency radio telescopes, continuum work occupies only a small fraction - currently about 5% - of SEST's total time. The importance of these observations in increasing our understanding of quasars and other extragalactic sources is, however, large.

  9. The Continuum of Listening

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rud, A. G.; Garrison, Jim

    2007-01-01

    The distinction between "apophatic" and "cataphatic" listening is defined and analyzed. "Apophatic" listening is more or less devoid of cognitivist claims, whereas "cataphatic" listening involves cognition and questioning. Many of the papers in this volume are discussed along the continuum determined by these two types of listening.…

  10. Cosmic ray intensity distribution perpendicular to solar equatorial plane at 1 A.U. during 1978-83

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pathak, S. P.; Agrawal, S. P.; Shrivastava, P. K.; Yadav, R. S.

    1985-01-01

    The distribution of cosmic ray intensity perpendicular to solar equatorial plane, was investigated by using its yearly variation with respect to the heliolatitudinal position of the Earth, for the two intervals 1978 to 1980 and 1981 to 1983. The monthly mean values of two high latitude stations along with the solar and geomagnetic indices are used to derive the cosmic ray intensity distribution free from the changes due to variation in solar activity. The correction is found to be significant only during the interval 1976 to 1980. The results indicate a significant linear increase in cosmic ray intensity from north to south of solar equator, contrary to that observed during 1973 to 1975. No symmetrical gradients are found during the period of study, in agreement with earlier results.

  11. Quantum-mechanical analysis of the intensity distribution in spectra of resonant Raman scattering spectra of aqueous solutions of tyrosine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burova, T. G.; Shcherbakov, R. S.

    2016-05-01

    Quantum-mechanical calculations of the intensity distribution in the resonant Raman scattering spectra of aqueous solutions of tyrosine excited by laser radiation with wavelengths of 244, 229, 218, 200, and 193 nm, as well as in the nonresonant Raman scattering spectrum excited at a wavelength of 488 nm, are performed. Satisfactory agreement is achieved between the calculation results and the experimental data. It is shown that the changes in the intensity distribution observed in the spectra with a change in the excitation wavelength from 244 to 193 nm correlate with the determined changes in the contribution made by excited electronic states into the scattering tensor components. It is noted that it is necessary to take into account the Herzberg-Teller effect and that the number of excited electronic states taken into account considerably affects the calculated relative intensities of lines. The possibility of existence of several tyrosine conformers in aqueous solution at room temperature is shown.

  12. Evolution dynamics of charge state distribution in neon interaction with x-ray pulses of variant intensities and durations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Cheng; Zeng, Jiaolong; Yuan, Jianmin

    2015-03-01

    The level population and charge state distribution (CSD) of the neon atomic system interacting with x-ray pulses of variant intensities and durations at a central photon energy of 1110 eV are investigated by solving the time-dependent rate equations. The laser beam has a circular spot size with a Gaussian intensity pattern and the time history of the intensity is represented by Gaussian distribution in time. As an example, the CSD as a function of time is given at different distances from the spot center for an x-ray beam of intensity 1.5 × 1017 W/cm2 and duration 75 fs (fs) for a spot size of 1 μm (full width at half maximum). The final CSD after averaging over the space and time is compared with a recent experiment and good agreement is found between the theory and experiment. Then systematic investigations are carried out to study the evolution of CSD with a wide range of intensity from 1.0 × 1015 W/cm2 to 1.0 × 1019 W/cm2 and duration from 30 fs to 100 fs. The results show that at intensities lower than 1.0 × 1015 W/cm2, the CSD shows a typical physical picture of weak x-ray photoionization of the neutral atomic neon. At higher intensity, i.e., larger than 5.0 × 1016 W/cm2, the dominant ionization stages are Ne7+ and Ne8+, while the fractions of ions in the Ne3+-Ne6+ stages are low for all laser durations and intensities.

  13. Sociospatial distribution of access to facilities for moderate and vigorous intensity physical activity in Scotland by different modes of transport

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background People living in neighbourhoods of lower socioeconomic status have been shown to have higher rates of obesity and a lower likelihood of meeting physical activity recommendations than their more affluent counterparts. This study examines the sociospatial distribution of access to facilities for moderate or vigorous intensity physical activity in Scotland and whether such access differs by the mode of transport available and by Urban Rural Classification. Methods A database of all fixed physical activity facilities was obtained from the national agency for sport in Scotland. Facilities were categorised into light, moderate and vigorous intensity activity groupings before being mapped. Transport networks were created to assess the number of each type of facility accessible from the population weighted centroid of each small area in Scotland on foot, by bicycle, by car and by bus. Multilevel modelling was used to investigate the distribution of the number of accessible facilities by small area deprivation within urban, small town and rural areas separately, adjusting for population size and local authority. Results Prior to adjustment for Urban Rural Classification and local authority, the median number of accessible facilities for moderate or vigorous intensity activity increased with increasing deprivation from the most affluent or second most affluent quintile to the most deprived for all modes of transport. However, after adjustment, the modelling results suggest that those in more affluent areas have significantly higher access to moderate and vigorous intensity facilities by car than those living in more deprived areas. Conclusions The sociospatial distributions of access to facilities for both moderate intensity and vigorous intensity physical activity were similar. However, the results suggest that those living in the most affluent neighbourhoods have poorer access to facilities of either type that can be reached on foot, by bicycle or by bus than

  14. Studies on light intensity distribution inside an open pond photo-bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Ramakant; Sahu, Akhilesh; K K, Vasumathi; M, Premalatha

    2015-08-01

    Light intensity profiles inside an open tank were studied using ANSYS Fluent. Experiments were performed by taking Scenedesmus arcuatus, green microalgae at three different concentrations under actual sunlight conditions. Absorption of light intensity at different depths was measured experimentally. The results generated from CFD simulations were compared with the experimental results and the cornet model. It has been found that there is a good agreement between the light intensity profile obtained from the CFD simulation and that calculated using the Cornet's model. Light intensity profiles at different depths were calculated using CFD simulation by varying the dimensions of the tank. The effect of wall reflectivity, diffuse fraction and scattering phase function on light profile in side open tank are also studied using CFD simulation. PMID:25868715

  15. Studies on light intensity distribution inside an open pond photo-bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Ramakant; Sahu, Akhilesh; K K, Vasumathi; M, Premalatha

    2015-08-01

    Light intensity profiles inside an open tank were studied using ANSYS Fluent. Experiments were performed by taking Scenedesmus arcuatus, green microalgae at three different concentrations under actual sunlight conditions. Absorption of light intensity at different depths was measured experimentally. The results generated from CFD simulations were compared with the experimental results and the cornet model. It has been found that there is a good agreement between the light intensity profile obtained from the CFD simulation and that calculated using the Cornet's model. Light intensity profiles at different depths were calculated using CFD simulation by varying the dimensions of the tank. The effect of wall reflectivity, diffuse fraction and scattering phase function on light profile in side open tank are also studied using CFD simulation.

  16. Intensity distribution and isoseismal maps for the Nisqually, Washington, earthquake of 28 February 2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dewey, James W.; Hopper, Margaret G.; Wald, David J.; Quitoriano, Vincent; Adams, Elizabeth R.

    2002-01-01

    We present isoseismal maps, macroseismic intensities, and community summaries of damage for the MW=6.8 Nisqually, Washington, earthquake of 28 February, 2001. For many communities, two types of macroseismic intensity are assigned, the traditional U.S. Geological Survey Modified Mercalli Intensities (USGS MMI) and a type of intensity newly introduced with this paper, the USGS Reviewed Community Internet Intensity (RCII). For most communities, the RCII is a reviewed version of the Community Internet Intensity (CII) of Wald and others (1999). For some communities, RCII is assigned from such non-CII sources as press reports, engineering reports, and field reconnaissance observations. We summarize differences between procedures used to assign RCII and USGS MMI, and we show that the two types of intensity are nonetheless very similar for the Nisqually earthquake. We do not see evidence for systematic differences between RCII and USGS MMI that would approach one intensity unit, at any level of shaking, but we document a tendency for the RCII to be slightly lower than MMI in regions of low intensity and slightly higher than MMI in regions of high intensity. The highest RCII calculated for the Nisqually earthquake is 7.6, calculated for zip code 98134, which includes the ?south of downtown? (Sodo) area of Seattle and Harbor Island. By comparison, we assigned a traditional USGS MMI 8 to the Sodo area of Seattle. In all, RCII of 6.5 and higher were assigned to 58 zip-code regions. At the lowest intensities, the Nisqually earthquake was felt over an area of approximately 350,000 square km (approximately 135,000 square miles) in Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Montana, and southern British Columbia, Canada. On the basis of macroseismic effects, we infer that shaking in the southern Puget Sound region was somewhat less for the 2001 Nisqually earthquake than for the Puget Sound earthquake of April 13, 1949, which had nearly the same hypocenter and magnitude. Allowing for differences

  17. A Scheduling Algorithm for the Distributed Student Registration System in Transaction-Intensive Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Wenhao

    2011-01-01

    Distributed workflow technology has been widely used in modern education and e-business systems. Distributed web applications have shown cross-domain and cooperative characteristics to meet the need of current distributed workflow applications. In this paper, the author proposes a dynamic and adaptive scheduling algorithm PCSA (Pre-Calculated…

  18. Generalized Kapchinskij-Vladimirskij Distribution and Envelope Equation for High-intensity Beams in a Coupled Transverse Focusing Lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Hong Qin, Moses Chung, and Ronald C. Davidson

    2009-11-20

    In an uncoupled lattice, the Kapchinskij-Vladimirskij (KV) distribution function first analyzed in 1959 is the only known exact solution of the nonlinear Vlasov-Maxwell equations for high- intensity beams including self-fields in a self-consistent manner. The KV solution is generalized here to high-intensity beams in a coupled transverse lattice using the recently developed generalized Courant-Snyder invariant for coupled transverse dynamics. This solution projects to a rotating, pulsating elliptical beam in transverse configuration space, determined by the generalized matrix envelope equation.

  19. Solar radio continuum storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakurai, K.

    1976-01-01

    The paper reviews the current status of research on solar radio continuum emissions from metric to hectometric wave frequencies, emphasizing the role of energetic electrons in the 10-100 keV range in these emissions. It is seen that keV-energy electrons generated in active sunspot groups must be the sources of radio continuum storm emissions for wide frequency bands. These electrons excite plasma oscillations in the medium, which in turn are converted to electromagnetic radiation. The radio noise continuum sources are usually associated with type III burst activity observed above these sources. Although the mechanism for the release of the energetic electrons is not known, it seems they are ejected from storm source regions in association with rapid variation of associated sunspot magnetic fields due to their growth into complex types. To explain some of the observed characteristics, the importance of two-stream instability and the scattering of ambient plasma ions on energetic electron streams is pointed out.

  20. Unexpected spatial intensity distributions and onset timing of solar electron events observed by closely spaced STEREO spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klassen, A.; Dresing, N.; Gómez-Herrero, R.; Heber, B.; Müller-Mellin, R.

    2016-09-01

    We present multi-spacecraft observations of four solar electron events using measurements from the Solar Electron Proton Telescope (SEPT) and the Electron Proton Helium INstrument (EPHIN) on board the STEREO and SOHO spacecraft, respectively, occurring between 11 October 2013 and 1 August 2014, during the approaching superior conjunction period of the two STEREO spacecraft. At this time the longitudinal separation angle between STEREO-A (STA) and STEREO-B (STB) was less than 72°. The parent particle sources (flares) of the four investigated events were situated close to, in between, or to the west of the STEREO's magnetic footpoints. The STEREO measurements revealed a strong difference in electron peak intensities (factor ≤12) showing unexpected intensity distributions at 1 AU, although the two spacecraft had nominally nearly the same angular magnetic footpoint separation from the flaring active region (AR) or their magnetic footpoints were both situated eastwards from the parent particle source. Furthermore, the events detected by the two STEREO imply a strongly unexpected onset timing with respect to each other: the spacecraft magnetically best connected to the flare detected a later arrival of electrons than the other one. This leads us to suggest the concept of a rippled peak intensity distribution at 1 AU formed by narrow peaks (fingers) superposed on a quasi-uniform Gaussian distribution. Additionally, two of the four investigated solar energetic particle (SEP) events show a so-called circumsolar distribution and their characteristics make it plausible to suggest a two-component particle injection scenario forming an unusual, non-uniform intensity distribution at 1 AU.

  1. Reply to comment on 'Tunable three-dimensional intensity distribution by a pure phase-shifting apodizer'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xiumin

    2007-01-01

    I thank Canales et al. very much for their attention to the effect of the phase apodizer, especially for their comment on my paper [Appl. Opt. 44, 4870 (2005)]. I reinvestigated the three-dimensional intensity distribution by a pure phase-shifting apodizer, and the main results on focal shift, focal split, and three intensity distributions are correct. However, the changing principle of the Strehl ratio is wrong, as Canales et al. show in their comment. Here, I show the cause leading to the erroneous result and give the correct dependence of the Strehl ratio on the inner radius and relative waist width. I am very sorry for the incorrect results in the paper.

  2. Inlet turbulence intensity level and cross-stream distribution effects on the heat transfer in plane wall jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adeniji-Fashola, A. A.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of the turbulence intensity level and its cross-stream distribution at the inlet on the numerical prediction of the heat transfer in a two-dimensional turbulent-wall jet was investigated. The investigation was carried out within the framework of the standard kappa-epsilon turbulence model. The predicted Nusselt number showed the influence of the turbulence intensity level and its cross-stream distribution at the inlet to be significant but restricted to the first 15 slot widths from the inlet slot. Beyond this location, all the predictions were observed to collapse onto a single curve which exhibited a maximum over-prediction of about 30 percent when compared with the available experimental data.

  3. Enhancing a Distributed Rainfall Intensity for Flood Analysis within a GIS Framework in an Urban Area (Kajang Flood)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salleh, S. H. M.; Sidek, L. M.

    2016-03-01

    The town of Kajang has experienced major flood events in previous decades since 1970s. Due to Eastern and Western Monsoon seasons in Malaysia, Kajang has potential to face with number of flood events. One of the critical elements in flood analysis is rainfall distribution. Therefore, flood studies need to have an optimum cognition of rainfall distribution as main input. In this study, HEC GeoHMS model was used in GIS (Geographic Information System) for Sungai Jeluh catchment (Kajang) due to estimation (visualization) of distributed rainfall in Kajang. In comparison with conventional methods, which they produced rainfall in lumped mode (e.g. Thiessen’s polygon), HEC GeoHMS visualized and tabulate a full distribution of rainfall for each small part (pixel of map) in a case study. HEC GeoHMS model for Sungai Jeluh has been set up by feeding high resolution of spatial and temporal resolution data (precipitation). Result of this study shows that rainfall by high intensity is distributed near urban area (downtown) in comparison with upstream which involved with less rainfall intensity.

  4. Outer coronal structure and relative intensity distribution observed during the total solar eclipse on March 9, 1997 in Mohe.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qiusha; Zhang, Bairong

    With a simple video-collecting system, the total solar eclipse on March 9, 1997 has been observed by using Panasonic NV-S88OEN video camera in Mohe. After analyzing the yellow (by adding a GG11 filter) and white coronal observation data, the outer coronal structure and relative intensity distribution outside 1.5 Rsun have been found during the solar minima.

  5. The Response Continuum

    SciTech Connect

    Caltagirone, Sergio; Frincke, Deborah A.

    2005-06-17

    Active response is a sequence of actions per- formed speci¯cally to mitigate a detected threat. Response decisions always follow detection: a decision to take `no ac- tion' remains a response decision. However, active response is a complex subject that has received insu±cient formal attention. To facilitate discussion, this paper provides a framework that proposes a common de¯nition, describes the role of response and the major issues surrounding response choices, and ¯nally, provides a model for the process of re- sponse. This provides a common starting point for discus- sion of the full response continuum as an integral part of contemporary computer security.

  6. Initial assessment of the intensity distribution of the 2011 Mw5.8 Mineral, Virginia, earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hough, Susan E.

    2012-01-01

    The intensity data collected by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) "Did You Feel It?" (DYFI) Website (USGS, DYFI; http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/dyfi/events/se/082311a/us/index.html, last accessed Sept 2011) for the Mw5.8 Mineral, Virginia, earthquake, are unprecedented in their spatial richness and geographical extent. More than 133,000 responses were received during the first week following the earthquake. Although intensity data have traditionally been regarded as imprecise and generally suspect (e.g., Hough 2000), there is a growing appreciation for the potential utility of spatially rich, systematically determined DYFI data to address key questions in earthquake ground-motions science (Atkinson and Wald, 2007; Hauksson et al., 2008).

  7. Inferring local competition intensity from patch size distributions: a test using biological soil crusts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bowker, Matthew A.; Maestre, Fernando T.

    2012-01-01

    Dryland vegetation is inherently patchy. This patchiness goes on to impact ecology, hydrology, and biogeochemistry. Recently, researchers have proposed that dryland vegetation patch sizes follow a power law which is due to local plant facilitation. It is unknown what patch size distribution prevails when competition predominates over facilitation, or if such a pattern could be used to detect competition. We investigated this question in an alternative vegetation type, mosses and lichens of biological soil crusts, which exhibit a smaller scale patch-interpatch configuration. This micro-vegetation is characterized by competition for space. We proposed that multiplicative effects of genetics, environment and competition should result in a log-normal patch size distribution. When testing the prevalence of log-normal versus power law patch size distributions, we found that the log-normal was the better distribution in 53% of cases and a reasonable fit in 83%. In contrast, the power law was better in 39% of cases, and in 8% of instances both distributions fit equally well. We further hypothesized that the log-normal distribution parameters would be predictably influenced by competition strength. There was qualitative agreement between one of the distribution's parameters (μ) and a novel intransitive (lacking a 'best' competitor) competition index, suggesting that as intransitivity increases, patch sizes decrease. The correlation of μ with other competition indicators based on spatial segregation of species (the C-score) depended on aridity. In less arid sites, μ was negatively correlated with the C-score (suggesting smaller patches under stronger competition), while positive correlations (suggesting larger patches under stronger competition) were observed at more arid sites. We propose that this is due to an increasing prevalence of competition transitivity as aridity increases. These findings broaden the emerging theory surrounding dryland patch size distributions

  8. Observations of angular distributions of low energy electron intensities over the auroral zones with Ariel 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craven, J. D.; Frank, L. A.

    1975-01-01

    The electron intensities considered are within the energy range from 244 eV to 10.8 keV. The measurements were made at an altitude of about 570 km over the local-evening sector of the auroral zone. Aspects of instrumentation are discussed along with details regarding the observations, energy-time spectrograms, the signature of the plasma sheet, and inverted V events. The initial results reported provide new information concerning auroral acceleration mechanisms.

  9. Variation in habitat use along the freshwater-marine continuum by grey mullet Mugil cephalus at the southern limits of its distribution.

    PubMed

    Górski, K; De Gruijter, C; Tana, R

    2015-10-01

    In this study, habitat use by Mugil cephalus was investigated in the waters of the west coast of the North Island of New Zealand by analysing microchemical composition of otoliths (laser-ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry) obtained from individuals from commercial fish stocks and research surveys. Results of this study show that M. cephalus at the southern limits of its distribution display highly flexible migratory behaviour with extensive use of freshwater and brackish habitats, potentially enabling them to maximize foraging opportunities. Mugil cephalus can tolerate a wide range of salinities and can therefore utilize higher productivity areas, such as estuaries and eutrophic riverine lakes. Finally, M. cephalus populations across a range of climates and latitudes appear to differ in the extent to which they utilize freshwater and brackish habitats, possibly with increasing penetration of fresh waters with increasing latitude. PMID:26377071

  10. Intensity Distribution and Luminosity Function of the Swift Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Xinyu

    2009-05-01

    Using the sample of long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) detected by Swift-BAT before 2007 June, we measure the cumulative distribution of the peak photon fluxes (log N-log P) of the Swift bursts. Compared with the BATSE sample, we find that the two distributions are consistent after correcting the bandpass difference, suggesting that the two instruments sample the same population of bursts. We also compare the log N-log P distributions for subsamples of the Swift bursts and find evidence for a deficit (99.75% confident) of dark bursts without optical counterparts at high peak flux levels, suggesting different redshift or γ-ray luminosity distributions for these bursts. The consistency between the log N-log P distributions for the optically detected bursts with and without redshift measurements indicates that the current sample of the Swift bursts with redshift measurements, although selected heterogeneously, represents a fair sample of the nondark bursts. We calculate the luminosity functions of this sample in two redshift bins (z < 1 and z >= 1), and find that a broken power law is needed to fit the low-redshift bin, where dN/dL vprop L -1.27±0.06 for high luminosities (L peak > 5 × 1048 ergs-1) and dN/dL vprop L -2.3±0.3 for low luminosities, confirming the results of several studies for a population of low-luminosity GRBs.

  11. Formation of a conical distribution and intense ion heating in the presence of hydrogen cyclotron waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuda, H.; Ashour-Abdalla, M.

    1981-07-01

    In the considered investigation, it is assumed that the field aligned currents are responsible for producing electrostatic harmonic cyclotron waves (EHC). Using a one-dimensional simulation model in which the electron velocity distribution is maintained by a constant injection of the initial distribution, it is shown that, in contrast to earlier initial value simulations, EHC waves grow to a large amplitude, resulting in the formation of an anisotropic ion velocity distribution. Both the heating rate and the anisotropy are in reasonable agreement with the quasi-linear theory, taking into account the cyclotron resonance. The results show that the saturation is due to the combined effects of wave induced diffusion in an electron velocity space and the heating of ions perpendicularly. Both these effects reduce the growth rate.

  12. Destructive Vrancea (Romania) Intermediate-Depth Earthquakes: Intensity Distributions and Isoseismals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonjer, K.-P.; Glavcheva, R.; Drumea, A.; Paskaleva, I.; Radulian, M.; Radovanovic, S.; Gribovszki, K.; Weisbrich, W.

    2010-05-01

    The intermediate-depth (70-180 km) earthquakes of the Vrancea (Romania) source zone produce the most significant seismic hazard to Romania and its neighboring countries, in particular to the Republic of Moldova, Ukraine, and Bulgaria. Analyses of the macroseismic data of these events revealed several peculiar effects, which can be summarized as follows: the earthquakes affect very large areas with predominantly NE-SW trending extensions, and, in many cases local and regional geological conditions control the variation of the amplitudes of ground motions to a larger degree than magnitude or distance. An extensive set of macroseismic data is now available for the four major earthquakes of the last century: November 10, 1940 (Mw = 7.7), March 4, 1977 (Mw = 7.4), August 30, 1986 (Mw = 7.2), and May 30, 1990 (Mw = 6.9). This study aims to achieve unified macroseismic data sets of these destructive Vrancea earthquakes. ‘Unified' means the application of a single but common intensity scale to the entire macroseismic field of each earthquake. Partly, site intensities had to be retrieved by tracing back to original investigations or even to the primary raw descriptions, when necessary and available. Concerning the data of the Romanian territory, major efforts were necessary to recover the macroseismic information. Due to the lack of access to original site observations or data-files, the information for every earthquake was retrieved by digitizing the original macroseismic maps compiled by different authors. Since decades the 1940 November earthquake has caused considerable confusion in distinguishing the macroseismic scales, applied by different authors. This paper proposes a way to solve these inconsistencies. Furthermore, we present MSK intensities and the corresponding isoseismals of the March 4, 1977, the August 30, 1986 and the May 30, 1990 Vrancea intermediate-depth earthquakes. They are compiled and analyzed in a unified way over an area, which includes Romania

  13. Investigation on the Influence of Different Laser Beam Intensity Distributions on Keyhole Geometry During Laser Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volpp, J.

    An analytical quasi-static model of the keyhole during laser deep penetration welding is introduced. This model is used to calculate the keyhole geometry depending on spatial laser beam intensity. Keyhole shapes can be found solving the energy and pressure equations. All necessary physical effects like Fresnel and plasma absorption, heat conduction and vaporization are implemented in the model. For evaluation a Gaussian and a top hat beam profile were used. Experimental measurements of the keyhole shape using copper inlays in aluminum base material show good agreement with the results of the modeling.

  14. Classification of knowledge-intensive organizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marquart, Edward J.

    Managing knowledge workers in knowledge-intensive organizations has become important because knowledge itself is emerging as a primary sustainable competitive advantage. This dissertation traces the development of two important items related to knowledge-intensive organizations. First, it documents a careful study of the literature which allows for the construction of a Knowledge-Intensity Continuum. This continuum then forms the basis for the development of a Knowledge-Intensity Assessment survey instrument which allows an organization to be placed along this continuum. A cross-section of research, consulting, and manufacturing organizations was surveyed using this instrument. The findings provided evidence that supports the validity of the Knowledge-Intensity Continuum. Additionally, onsite interviews provided evidence that the Knowledge-Intensity Assessment survey can be used as a tool to locate any organization on this continuum. Using this survey to clearly identify knowledge-intensive organizations will allow for further research into effective management systems for knowledge workers in these organizations.

  15. Occurrence and distribution of livestock concentration areas on intensively managed pastures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Livestock frequently congregate at feeders, shades, or other sites on pastures creating point sources of nutrient runoff. Our objective was to determine the spatial distribution of soil nutrients in livestock concentration areas on pastures and quantify the relationships among the soil nutrient grad...

  16. The global distribution of largest, deepest, and most intense precipitation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chuntao; Zipser, Edward J.

    2015-05-01

    By grouping the contiguous precipitating area detected by the precipitation radar on board the Global Precipitation Mission (GPM) core satellite, snapshots of precipitation systems are summarized as precipitation features (PFs), and their properties are cataloged from 1 year GPM observations. These PFs are categorized by their area and depth and convective intensity based on the 20 and 40 dBZ radar echo tops, respectively. The largest PFs are found mainly over ocean at the mid-high latitudes, especially over southern ocean. The deepest PFs are mainly over tropical land, the West Pacific Warm Pool, and the Great Plains of the United States and Argentina. The most convectively intense PFs are dominant over land regions, including midlatitude and high latitude. The zonal precipitation contribution from extremely large precipitation systems is greater in midlatitude and high latitude than in the tropics. These extreme precipitation systems are rare but contribute significantly to the global precipitation. It is important to include their impacts in global climate models to correctly describe the global water cycle.

  17. A method for estimating the intensity of overdominant selection from the distribution of allele frequencies.

    PubMed Central

    Slatkin, M; Muirhead, C A

    2000-01-01

    A method is proposed for estimating the intensity of overdominant selection scaled by the effective population size, S = 2Ns, from allele frequencies. The method is based on the assumption that, with strong overdominant selection, allele frequencies are nearly at their deterministic equilibrium values and that, to a first approximation, deviations depend only on S. Simulations verify that reasonably accurate estimates of S can be obtained for realistic sample sizes. The method is applied to data from several loci in the major histocompatibility complex (Mhc) in numerous human populations. For alleles distinguished by both serological typing and the sequence of the peptide-binding region, our estimates of S are comparable to those obtained by analysis of DNA sequences in showing that selection is strongest on HLA-B and weaker on HLA-A, HLA-DRB1, and HLA-DQA1. The intensity of selection on HLA-B varied considerably among populations. Two populations, Native American and Inuit, showed an excess rather than a deficiency in homozygosity. Comparable estimates of S were obtained for alleles at Mhc class II loci distinguished by serological reactions (serotyping) and by differences in the amino acid sequences of the peptide-binding region (molecular typing). A comparison of two types of data for DQA1 and DRB1 showed that serotyping led to generally lower estimates of S. PMID:11102400

  18. Continuum Statistics of the Airy2 Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corwin, Ivan; Quastel, Jeremy; Remenik, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    We develop an exact determinantal formula for the probability that the Airy_2 process is bounded by a function g on a finite interval. As an application, we provide a direct proof that {sup({A}2(x)-x^2)} is distributed as a GOE random variable. Both the continuum formula and the GOE result have applications in the study of the end point of an unconstrained directed polymer in a disordered environment. We explain Johansson's (Commun. Math. Phys. 242(1-2):277-329, 2003) observation that the GOE result follows from this polymer interpretation and exact results within that field. In a companion paper (Moreno Flores et al. in Commun. Math. Phys. 2012) these continuum statistics are used to compute the distribution of the endpoint of directed polymers.

  19. Models of Uranium continuum radio emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romig, Joseph H.; Evans, David R.; Sawyer, Constance B.; Schweitzer, Andrea E.; Warwick, James W.

    1987-01-01

    Uranium continuum radio emission detected by the Voyager 2 Planetary Radio Astronomy experiment during the January 1986 encounter is considered. The continuum emissions comprised four components (equatorial emissions, anomaly emissions, strong nightside emissions, and weak nightside emissions) associated with different sources. The equatorial emissions appeared most prominently during the days before closest approach and extended from 40 kHz or below to about 120 kHz. The anomaly emissions were seen about 12 hours before closest approach and extended to about 250 kHz. The agreement found between Miranda's phase and strong radio emission at 20.4 kHz, just after closest approach, suggests intense dynamic activity on the Miranda L shell.

  20. Spatiotemporal dynamics of continuum neural fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bressloff, Paul C.

    2012-01-01

    We survey recent analytical approaches to studying the spatiotemporal dynamics of continuum neural fields. Neural fields model the large-scale dynamics of spatially structured biological neural networks in terms of nonlinear integrodifferential equations whose associated integral kernels represent the spatial distribution of neuronal synaptic connections. They provide an important example of spatially extended excitable systems with nonlocal interactions and exhibit a wide range of spatially coherent dynamics including traveling waves oscillations and Turing-like patterns.

  1. Distribution of intensity for the Westmorland, California, earthquake of April 26, 1981

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnhard, L.M.; Thenhaus, P.C.; Algermissen, Sylvester Theodore

    1982-01-01

    The maximum Modified Mercalli intensity of the April 26, 1981 earthquake located 5 km northwest of Westmorland, California is VII. Twelve buildings in Westmorland were severely damaged with an additional 30 sustaining minor damage. Two brick parapets fell in Calipatria, 14 km northeast of Westmorland and 10 km from the earthquake epicenter. Significant damage in rural areas was restricted to unreinforced, concrete-lined irrigation canals. Liquefaction effects and ground slumping were widespread in rural areas and were the primary causes of road cracking. Preliminary local government estimates of property loss range from one to three million dollars (Imperial Valley Press, 1981). The earthquake was felt over an area of approximately 160,000 km2; about the same felt area of the October 15, 1979 (Reagor and others, 1980), and May 18, 1940 (Ulrich, 1941) Imperial Valley earthquakes.

  2. Ultrasound-modulated optical tomography: direct recovery of elasticity distribution from experimentally measured intensity autocorrelation.

    PubMed

    Mohanan, K P; Nandakumaran, A K; Roy, D; Vasu, R M

    2015-05-01

    Based on an ultrasound-modulated optical tomography experiment, a direct, quantitative recovery of Young's modulus (E) is achieved from the modulation depth (M) in the intensity autocorrelation. The number of detector locations is limited to two in orthogonal directions, reducing the complexity of the data gathering step whilst ensuring against an impoverishment of the measurement, by employing ultrasound frequency as a parameter to vary during data collection. The M and E are related via two partial differential equations. The first one connects M to the amplitude of vibration of the scattering centers in the focal volume and the other, this amplitude to E. A (composite) sensitivity matrix is arrived at mapping the variation of M with that of E and used in a (barely regularized) Gauss-Newton algorithm to iteratively recover E. The reconstruction results showing the variation of E are presented. PMID:26366922

  3. Measurement of Concentration Distribution of Hydrogen Gas Flow by Measuring the Intensity of Raman Scattering Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asahi, Ippei; Ninomiya, Hideki

    An experimental study to visualize and measure the concentration distribution of hydrogen gas flow using the Raman scattering was performed. A Nd:YAG laser of wavelength at 355 nm was used, and the beam pattern was transformed into a rectangle and a sheet beam was formed. The Raman scattered light was observed at a right angle with respect to the laser beam axis using a gated ICCD camera and an interference filter. Shadowgraph images were obtained at the same condition. The Raman scattering light image from atmospheric nitrogen was first acquired and the function of Raman scattering light acquisition and the background light suppression was confirmed. Next, images of the Raman scattering light image and shadowgraph of hydrogen gas discharged from a nozzle into the atmosphere were acquired. The two obtained Raman images were compared and the spatial concentration distribution of the flow of the hydrogen gas at different flow rates was calculated. This method is effective for visualizing the gas flow and measuring the concentration distribution of the Raman active molecules, such as hydrogen gas.

  4. A methodology to study multiple sclerosis (MS) based on distributions of standardized intensities in segmented tissue regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, T.; Udupa, J. K.; Odhner, D.; Mishra, S.; Wu, G.; Schwartz, E.; Ying, G.-S.; Iwanaga, T.; Desiderio, L.; Balcer, L.

    2006-03-01

    This paper presents (1) an improved hierarchical method for segmenting the component tissue regions in fast spin echo T2 and PD images of the brain of Multiple Sclerosis (MS) patients, and (2) a methodology to characterize the disease utilizing the distributions of standardized T2 and PD intensities in the segmented tissue regions. First, the background intensity inhomogeneities are corrected and the intensity scales are standardized for all acquired images. The segmentation method imposes a feedback-like procedure on our previously developed hierarchical brain tissue segmentation method. With gradually simplified patterns in images and stronger evidences, pathological objects are recognized and segmented in an interplay fashion. After the brain parenchymal (BP) mask is generated, an under-estimated gray matter mask (uGM) and an over-estimated white matter mask (oWM) are created. Pure WM (PWM) and lesion (LS) masks are extracted from the all-inclusive oWM mask. By feedback, accurate GM and WM masks are subsequently formed. Finally, partial volume regions of GM and WM as well as Dirty WM (DWM) masks are generated. Intensity histograms and their parameters (peak height, peak location, and 25th, 50th and 75th percentile values) are computed for both T2 and PD images within each tissue region. Tissue volumes are also estimated. Spearman correlation coefficient rank test is then utilized to assess if there exists a trend between clinical states and the image-based parameters. This image analysis method has been applied to a data set consisting of 60 patients with MS and 20 normal controls. LS related parameters and clinical Extended Disability Status Scale (EDSS) scores demonstrate modest correlations. Almost every intensity-based parameter shows statistical difference between normal control and patient groups with a level better than 5%. These results can be utilized to monitor disease progression in MS.

  5. Atmospheric velocity spectral width measurements using the statistical distribution of pulsed CO2 lidar return signal intensities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ancellet, Gerard M.; Menzies, Robert T.; Grant, William B.

    1989-01-01

    A pulsed CO2 lidar with coherent detection has been used to measure the correlation time of backscatter from an ensemble of atmospheric aerosol particles which are illuminated by the pulsed radiation. The correlation time of the backscatter of the return signal, which is directly related to the velocity spectral width, can be used to study the velocity structure constant of atmospheric turbulence and wind shear. Various techniques for correlation time measurement are discussed, and several measurement results are presented for the technique using the information contained in the statistical distribution of a set of lidar return signal intensities.

  6. Extension of the possibilities of a commercial digital camera in detecting spatial intensity distribution of laser radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Konnik, M V; Manykin, Eduard A; Starikov, S N

    2010-06-23

    Performance capabilities of commercial digital cameras are demonstrated by the example of a Canon EOS 400D camera in measuring and detecting spatial distributions of laser radiation intensity. It is shown that software extraction of linear data expands the linear dynamic range of the camera by a factor greater than 10, up to 58 dB. Basic measurement characteristics of the camera are obtained in the regime of linear data extraction: the radiometric function, deviation from linearity, dynamic range, temporal and spatial noises (both dark and those depending on the signal value). The parameters obtained correspond to those of technical measuring cameras. (measurement of laser radiation parameters)

  7. Intensity-modulated linear-frequency-modulated continuous-wave lidar for distributed media: fundamentals of technique.

    PubMed

    Batet, Oscar; Dios, Federico; Comeron, Adolfo; Agishev, Ravil

    2010-06-10

    We analyze the intensity-modulation frequency-modulated continuous-wave (FMCW) technique for lidar remote sensing in the context of its application to distributed media. The goal of the technique is the reproduction of the sounded-medium profile along the emission path. A conceptual analysis is carried out to show the problems the basic version of the method presents for this application. The principal point is the appearance of a bandpass filtering effect, which seems to hinder its use in this context. A modified version of the technique is proposed to overcome this problem. A number of computer simulations confirm the ability of the modified FMCW technique to sound distributed media. PMID:20539357

  8. High-Intensity Radiated Field Fault-Injection Experiment for a Fault-Tolerant Distributed Communication System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yates, Amy M.; Torres-Pomales, Wilfredo; Malekpour, Mahyar R.; Gonzalez, Oscar R.; Gray, W. Steven

    2010-01-01

    Safety-critical distributed flight control systems require robustness in the presence of faults. In general, these systems consist of a number of input/output (I/O) and computation nodes interacting through a fault-tolerant data communication system. The communication system transfers sensor data and control commands and can handle most faults under typical operating conditions. However, the performance of the closed-loop system can be adversely affected as a result of operating in harsh environments. In particular, High-Intensity Radiated Field (HIRF) environments have the potential to cause random fault manifestations in individual avionic components and to generate simultaneous system-wide communication faults that overwhelm existing fault management mechanisms. This paper presents the design of an experiment conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center's HIRF Laboratory to statistically characterize the faults that a HIRF environment can trigger on a single node of a distributed flight control system.

  9. Evaluation of gafchromic EBT film for intensity modulated radiation therapy dose distribution verification

    PubMed Central

    Sankar, A.; Kurup, P. G. Goplakrishna; Murali, V.; Ayyangar, Komanduri M.; Nehru, R. Mothilal; Velmurugan, J.

    2006-01-01

    This work was undertaken with the intention of investigating the possibility of clinical use of commercially available self-developing radiochromic film – Gafchromic EBT film – for IMRT dose verification. The dose response curves were generated for the films using VXR-16 film scanner. The results obtained with EBT films were compared with the results of Kodak EDR2 films. It was found that the EBT film has a linear response between the dose ranges of 0 and 600 cGy. The dose-related characteristics of the EBT film, like post-irradiation color growth with time, film uniformity and effect of scanning orientation, were studied. There is up to 8.6% increase in the color density between 2 and 40 h after irradiation. There was a considerable variation, up to 8.5%, in the film uniformity over its sensitive region. The quantitative difference between calculated and measured dose distributions was analyzed using Gamma index with the tolerance of 3% dose difference and 3 mm distance agreement. EDR2 films showed good and consistent results with the calculated dose distribution, whereas the results obtained using EBT were inconsistent. The variation in the film uniformity limits the use of EBT film for conventional large field IMRT verification. For IMRT of smaller field size (4.5 × 4.5 cm), the results obtained with EBT were comparable with results of EDR2 films. PMID:21206669

  10. Bloodstream infections in intensive care unit patients: distribution and antibiotic resistance of bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Russotto, Vincenzo; Cortegiani, Andrea; Graziano, Giorgio; Saporito, Laura; Raineri, Santi Maurizio; Mammina, Caterina; Giarratano, Antonino

    2015-01-01

    Bloodstream infections (BSIs) are among the leading infections in critically ill patients. The case-fatality rate associated with BSIs in patients admitted to intensive care units (ICUs) reaches 35%–50%. The emergence and diffusion of bacteria with resistance to antibiotics is a global health problem. Multidrug-resistant bacteria were detected in 50.7% of patients with BSIs in a recently published international observational study, with methicillin resistance detected in 48% of Staphylococcus aureus strains, carbapenem resistance detected in 69% of Acinetobacter spp., in 38% of Klebsiella pneumoniae, and in 37% of Pseudomonas spp. Prior hospitalization and antibiotic exposure have been identified as risk factors for infections caused by resistant bacteria in different studies. Patients with BSIs caused by resistant strains showed an increased risk of mortality, which may be explained by a higher incidence of inappropriate empirical therapy in different studies. The molecular genetic characterization of resistant bacteria allows the understanding of the most common mechanisms underlying their resistance and the adoption of surveillance measures. Knowledge of epidemiology, risk factors, mechanisms of resistance, and outcomes of BSIs caused by resistant bacteria may have a major influence on global management of ICU patients. The aim of this review is to provide the clinician an update on BSIs caused by resistant bacteria in ICU patients. PMID:26300651

  11. Continuous Exercise but Not High Intensity Interval Training Improves Fat Distribution in Overweight Adults

    PubMed Central

    Keating, Shelley E.; Machan, Elizabeth A.; O'Connor, Helen T.; Gerofi, James A.; Sainsbury, Amanda; Caterson, Ian D.; Johnson, Nathan A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of high intensity interval training (HIIT) versus continuous aerobic exercise training (CONT) or placebo (PLA) on body composition by randomized controlled design. Methods. Work capacity and body composition (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry) were measured before and after 12 weeks of intervention in 38 previously inactive overweight adults. Results. There was a significant group × time interaction for change in work capacity (P < 0.001), which increased significantly in CONT (23.8 ± 3.0%) and HIIT (22.3 ± 3.5%) but not PLA (3.1 ± 5.0%). There was a near-significant main effect for percentage trunk fat, with trunk fat reducing in CONT by 3.1 ± 1.6% and in PLA by 1.1 ± 0.4%, but not in HIIT (increase of 0.7 ± 1.0%) (P = 0.07). There was a significant reduction in android fat percentage in CONT (2.7 ± 1.3%) and PLA (1.4 ± 0.8%) but not HIIT (increase of 0.8 ± 0.7%) (P = 0.04). Conclusion. These data suggest that HIIT may be advocated as a time-efficient strategy for eliciting comparable fitness benefits to traditional continuous exercise in inactive, overweight adults. However, in this population HIIT does not confer the same benefit to body fat levels as continuous exercise training. PMID:24669314

  12. Coulomb-Boltzmann-Shifted distribution in laser-generated plasmas from 1010 up to 1019 W/cm2 intensities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrisi, L.

    2016-02-01

    The charge production from laser-generated plasmas generates not isotropically ion acceleration in vacuum and with mean kinetic energy proportional to the ion charge state. The ion velocity depends on many factors of which the most important are the plasma temperature, the adiabatic gas expansion in vacuum and the Coulomb acceleration. The ion energy distributions of the emitted ions from the plasma can be well explained by the Coulomb-Boltzmann-Shifted function, with a cut-off limitation at high energy for a wide range of laser intensities. It can be applied for intensities of 1010 W/cm2, when plasma is produced only in the backward direction from thick targets (backward plasma acceleration regime), as well as at intensities of the order of 1019 W/cm2, when plasma is produced in the forward direction from thin targets in target-normal sheath acceleration regime. It loses of validity in radiation pressure acceleration regime, at which ions are emitted near mono-energetically.

  13. Constraints on the Rupture of the October 21, 1868, Hayward Earthquake Determined From the Distribution of Modified Mercalli Intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boatwright, J.; Bundock, H.

    2007-12-01

    The October 21, 1868, Hayward earthquake was the most damaging earthquake to occur in California in the half- century following the 1848 annexation. The earthquake shattered the city centers of Oakland and San Francisco, and cracked brick buildings as far away as Santa Rosa and Gilroy. We have re-evaluated MMI intensites at the 124 sites with damage or felt reports compiled by Toppozada et al. (1981), and added 26 sites where we obtained reports from newspapers and historical narratives. We used the 1878 Thompson and West Atlas of Alameda County to locate most of the specific buildings that were reported as damaged. The resulting ShakeMap interpolates the distribution of intensity along the Hayward fault, and the extent of shaking throughout the greater Bay Area and the San Joaquin Delta. Surprisingly, the highest intensities (MMI 8-9 to 9) are clustered near the middle of the fault rupture, in Hayward, San Leandro, and San Lorenzo. The intensities are lower (MMI 7- 8) at the ends of the fault rupture, in Berkeley and Warm Springs. The lack of strong shaking at either end of the fault rupture makes it hard to discern the rupture direction: the intensities observed at regional distances suggest that the rupture was stronger to the northwest towards Petaluma (MMI 7) and Martinez (MMI 7) than to the southeast towards Calaveras Valley (MMI 6-7) and Gilroy (MMI 6-7). The relatively low intensities in Oakland and Berkeley (MMI 7-8) suggest that the shallow locked zone near Piedmont, which Simpson et al. (2001) infer from the distribution of fault creep, did not rupture in the earthquake. This result appears to contradict Yu and Segall's (1996) conclusion that the fault slipped > 1 m in Berkeley. Given the large proportion of aseismic slip on Hayward fault, both observed geologically at the surface and inferred geodetically at depth, it is natural to propose that the rupture process of the 1868 earthquake comprised a series of disjoint asperity ruptures with variable

  14. Influence of land-use intensity on the spatial distribution of N-cycling microorganisms in grassland soils.

    PubMed

    Keil, Daniel; Meyer, Annabel; Berner, Doreen; Poll, Christian; Schützenmeister, André; Piepho, Hans-Peter; Vlasenko, Anna; Philippot, Laurent; Schloter, Michael; Kandeler, Ellen; Marhan, Sven

    2011-07-01

    A geostatistical approach using replicated grassland sites (10 m × 10 m) was applied to investigate the influence of grassland management, i.e. unfertilized pastures and fertilized mown meadows representing low and high land-use intensity (LUI), on soil biogeochemical properties and spatial distributions of ammonia-oxidizing and denitrifying microorganisms in soil. Spatial autocorrelations of the different N-cycling communities ranged between 1.4 and 7.6 m for ammonia oxidizers and from 0.3 m for nosZ-type denitrifiers to scales >14 m for nirK-type denitrifiers. The spatial heterogeneity of ammonia oxidizers and nirS-type denitrifiers increased in high LUI, but decreased for biogeochemical properties, suggesting that biotic and/or abiotic factors other than those measured are driving the spatial distribution of these microorganisms at the plot scale. Furthermore, ammonia oxidizers (amoA ammonia-oxidizing archaea and amoA ammonia-oxidizing bacteria) and nitrate reducers (napA and narG) showed spatial coexistence, whereas niche partitioning was found between nirK- and nirS-type denitrifiers. Together, our results indicate that spatial analysis is a useful tool to characterize the distribution of different functional microbial guilds with respect to soil biogeochemical properties and land-use management. In addition, spatial analyses allowed us to identify distinct distribution ranges indicating the coexistence or niche partitioning of N-cycling communities in grassland soil.

  15. Dose distribution analysis of physical and dynamic wedges by using an intensity-modulated radiotherapy MatriXX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hae-Kag; Cho, Jae-Hwan; Cho, Dae-chul

    2013-05-01

    This study investigated differences between the physical wedge and the dynamic wedge distributions of radiation by using an intensity-modulated radiotherapy (ImRT) MatriXX. The linear accelerator used X-rays with energy levels of 6 MV and 10 MV to adjust the collimator by motoring the independent jaws (X1, X2, Y1, Y2) for setting wedge angles of 15, 30, 45, and 60 degrees. The collimator field size was set as 10 × 10 cm2 or 20 × 20 cm2 at the maximum dose point. The dose distribution for each wedge had ±5% and ±11% errors for field sizes of 10 × 10 cm2 and 20 × 20 cm2, respectively. The error was greatest at a wedge angle of 45 degrees and was pronounced at the end of the dynamic wedge where Y1 and Y2 met. Consequently, concluded that the dose distributions were similar for both wedges for the field size of a small beam profile. The beam dose was greatly increased at the end of the dynamic wedge. A more precise estimate of the therapeutic dose of radiation for a dynamic wedge that nearly matches that of the physical wedge can be achieved by correcting of the increasing part of the beam dose. The findings imply that a heavy wedge filter should not be used when calculating the isodose distribution and the therapeutic dose.

  16. Anaerobic degradation of solid material: importance of initiation centers for methanogenesis, mixing intensity, and 2D distributed model.

    PubMed

    Vavilin, V A; Angelidaki, I

    2005-01-01

    Batch anaerobic codigestion of municipal household solid waste (MHSW) and digested manure in mesophilic conditions was carried out. The different waste-to-biomass ratios and intensity of mixing were studied theoretically and experimentally. The experiments showed that when organic loading was high, intensive mixing resulted in acidification and failure of the process, while low mixing intensity was crucial for successful digestion. However, when loading was low, mixing intensity had no significant effect on the process. We hypothesized that mixing was preventing establishment of methanogenic zones in the reactor space. The methanogenic zones are important to withstand inhibition due to development of acids formed during acidogenesis. The 2D distributed models of symmetrical cylinder reactor are presented based on the hypothesis of the necessity of a minimum size of methanogenic zones that can propagate and establish a good methanogenic environment. The model showed that at high organic loading rate spatial separation of the initial methanogenic centers from active acidogenic areas is the key factor for efficient conversion of solids to methane. The initial level of methanogenic biomass in the initiation centers is a critical factor for the survival of these centers. At low mixing, most of the initiation methanogenic centers survive and expand over the reactor volume. However, at vigorous mixing the initial methanogenic centers are reduced in size, averaged over the reactor volume, and finally dissipate. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization, large irregular cocci of microorganisms were observed in the case with minimal mixing, while in the case with high stirring mainly dead cells were found. PMID:15540194

  17. Relativistic Continuum Shell Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grineviciute, Janina; Halderson, Dean

    2011-04-01

    The R-matrix formalism of Lane and Thomas has been extended to the relativistic case so that the many-coupled channels problem may be solved for systems in which binary breakup channels satisfy a relative Dirac equation. The formalism was previously applied to the relativistic impulse approximation RIA and now we applied it to Quantum Hadrodynamics QHD in the continuum Tamm-Dancoff approximation TDA with the classical meson fields replaced by one-meson exchange potentials. None of the published QHD parameters provide a decent fit to the 15 N + p elastic cross section. The deficiency is also evident in inability of the QHD parameters with the one meson exchange potentials to reproduce the QHD single particle energies. Results with alternate parameters sets are presented. A. M. Lane and R. G. Thomas, R-Matrix Theory of Nuclear Reactions, Reviews of Modern Physics, 30 (1958) 257

  18. Atomic electron correlations in intense laser fields

    SciTech Connect

    DiMauro, L.F.; Sheehy, B.; Walker, B.; Agostini, P.A.; Kulander, K.C.

    1998-11-01

    This talk examines two distinct cases in strong optical fields where electron correlation plays an important role in the dynamics. In the first example, strong coupling in a two-electron-like system is manifested as an intensity-dependent splitting in the ionized electron energy distribution. This two-electron phenomenon (dubbed continuum-continuum Autler-Townes effect) is analogous to a strongly coupled two-level, one-electron atom but raises some intriguing questions regarding the exact nature of electron-electron correlation. The second case examines the evidence for two-electron ionization in the strong-field tunneling limit. Although their ability to describe the one-electron dynamics has obtained a quantitative level of understanding, a description of the two (multiple) electron ionization remains unclear.

  19. Atomic electron correlations in intense laser fields

    SciTech Connect

    Agostini, P A; DiMauro, L F; Kulander, K; Sheehy, B; Walker, B

    1998-09-03

    Abstract. This talk examines two distinct cases in strong opbical fields where electron correlation plays an important role in the dynamic.s. In the first. example, strong coupling in a two-electron-like system is manifested as an intensity-dependent splitting in the ionized electron energy distribution. This two-electron phenomenon (dubbed continuum-continuum Autler-Townes effect) is analogous to a strongly coupled two- level, one-electron atom but raises some intriguing questions regarding the exact nature of electron-electron correlation. The second case examines the evidence for two-electron ionization in the strong-field tunneling limit. Although our ability to describe the one- electron dynamics has obtained a quantitative level of understanding, a description of the two (multiple) electron ionization remains unc

  20. Quantum-mechanical calculation of the intensity distribution in resonance Raman scattering spectra of isolated skatole and skatole-water complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burova, T. G.; Nurlygayanova, M. H.; Ten, G. N.; Yakovleva, A. A.

    2013-03-01

    The relative intensities of lines in resonance Raman scattering spectra of isolated skatole and skatole-water complex have been calculated quantum mechanically. The influence of the intermolecular interaction on these spectra has been considered. Particular features of the intensity distribution in the resonance Raman scattering spectra of indole and skatole have been compared.

  1. Potential geographic distribution of atmospheric nitrogen deposition from intensive livestock production in North Carolina, USA.

    PubMed

    Costanza, Jennifer K; Marcinko, Sarah E; Goewert, Ann E; Mitchell, Charles E

    2008-07-15

    To examine the consequences of increased spatial aggregation of livestock production facilities, we estimated the annual production of nitrogen in livestock waste in North Carolina, USA, and analyzed the potential distribution of atmospheric nitrogen deposition from confined animal feeding operations ("CAFO") lagoons. North Carolina is a national center for industrial livestock production. Livestock is increasingly being raised in CAFOs, where waste is frequently held, essentially untreated, in open-air lagoons. Reduced nitrogen in lagoons is volatilized as ammonia (NH(3)), transported atmospherically, and deposited to other ecosystems. The Albemarle-Pamlico Sound, NC, is representative of nitrogen-sensitive coastal waters, and is a major component of the second largest estuarine complex in the U.S. We used GIS to model the area of water in the Sound within deposition range of CAFOs. We also evaluated the number of lagoons within deposition range of each 1 km(2) grid cell of the state. We considered multiple scenarios of atmospheric transport by varying distance and directionality. Modeled nitrogen deposition rates were particularly elevated for the Coastal Plain. This pattern matches empirical data, suggesting that observed regional patterns of reduced nitrogen deposition can be largely explained by two factors: limited atmospheric transport distance, and spatial aggregation of CAFOs. Under our medium-distance scenario, a small portion (roughly 22%) of livestock production facilities contributes disproportionately to atmospheric deposition of nitrogen to the Albemarle-Pamlico Sound. Furthermore, we estimated that between 14-37% of the state receives 50% of the state's atmospheric nitrogen deposition from CAFO lagoons. The estimated total emission from livestock is 134,000 t NH(3) yr(-1), 73% of which originates from the Coastal Plain. Stronger waste management and emission standards for CAFOs, particularly those on the Coastal Plain nearest to sensitive water

  2. Measurements of the zenith sky intensity and spectral distribution during the solar eclipse of 12 november 1966 at bage, Brazil, and on an aircraft.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, J W; Silverman, S M

    1971-06-01

    Measurements of the zenith sky intensity and spectral distribution during the solar eclipse of 12 November 1966 at Bage, Brazil, and on an aircraft over the Atlantic are reported. These, together with measurements reported elsewhere from Santa Ines, Peru, and Quehua, Bolivia, are used to define the intensities and changes in spectral distribution during totality and to discuss the dependence of these on such factors as height and terrain.

  3. The Paranoid-Depressive Continuum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Betty J.

    1977-01-01

    Few investigators have attempted to lay a conceptual base for comparative studies of paranoia and depression within a single general framework. The paranoid-depressive continuum is an attempt to develop such a framework. (Author)

  4. Age-related prevalence, intensity and frequency distribution of gastrointestinal helminth infection in urban slum children from Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Bundy, D A; Kan, S P; Rose, R

    1988-01-01

    The gastrointestinal helminth infection status of 1574 children living in a slum area of Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia was assessed by quantitative coprology. Almost two-thirds were infected with Trichuris trichiura, 49.6% with Ascaris lumbricoides, and 5.3% with hookworm. Infection prevalence rose rapidly to a stable asymptote at 7 years of age, and the age-intensity profile was convex with maximal values in the 5-10 year age classes. This pattern was the same for males and females, but differed markedly between different ethnic groups. The frequency distributions of A. lumbricoides and T. trichiura were highly overdispersed (k values were 0.21 and 0.27, respectively), and age-dependent over the 0-8 year age classes. This suggests that the force of infection with these nematodes is lower in infants than in older children.

  5. Correlation of spatial intensity distribution of light reaching the retina and restoration of vision by optogenetic stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shivalingaiah, Shivaranjani; Gu, Ling; Mohanty, Samarendra K.

    2011-03-01

    Stimulation of retinal neuronal cells using optogenetics via use of chanelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) and blue light has opened up a new direction for restoration of vision with respect to treatment of Retinitis pigmentosa (RP). In addition to delivery of ChR2 to specific retinal layer using genetic engineering, threshold level of blue light needs to be delivered onto the retina for generating action potential and successful behavioral outcome. We report measurement of intensity distribution of light reaching the retina of Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) mouse models and compared those results with theoretical simulations of light propagation in eye. The parameters for the stimulating source positioning in front of eye was determined for optimal light delivery to the retina. In contrast to earlier viral method based delivery of ChR2 onto retinal ganglion cells, in-vivo electroporation method was employed for retina-transfection of RP mice. The behavioral improvement in mice with Thy1-ChR2-YFP transfected retina, expressing ChR2 in retinal ganglion cells, was found to correlate with stimulation intensity.

  6. Binomial probability distribution model-based protein identification algorithm for tandem mass spectrometry utilizing peak intensity information.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Chuan-Le; Chen, Xiao-Zhou; Du, Yang-Li; Sun, Xuesong; Zhang, Gong; He, Qing-Yu

    2013-01-01

    Mass spectrometry has become one of the most important technologies in proteomic analysis. Tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) is a major tool for the analysis of peptide mixtures from protein samples. The key step of MS data processing is the identification of peptides from experimental spectra by searching public sequence databases. Although a number of algorithms to identify peptides from MS/MS data have been already proposed, e.g. Sequest, OMSSA, X!Tandem, Mascot, etc., they are mainly based on statistical models considering only peak-matches between experimental and theoretical spectra, but not peak intensity information. Moreover, different algorithms gave different results from the same MS data, implying their probable incompleteness and questionable reproducibility. We developed a novel peptide identification algorithm, ProVerB, based on a binomial probability distribution model of protein tandem mass spectrometry combined with a new scoring function, making full use of peak intensity information and, thus, enhancing the ability of identification. Compared with Mascot, Sequest, and SQID, ProVerB identified significantly more peptides from LC-MS/MS data sets than the current algorithms at 1% False Discovery Rate (FDR) and provided more confident peptide identifications. ProVerB is also compatible with various platforms and experimental data sets, showing its robustness and versatility. The open-source program ProVerB is available at http://bioinformatics.jnu.edu.cn/software/proverb/ .

  7. High-Intensity Running and Plantar-Flexor Fatigability and Plantar-Pressure Distribution in Adolescent Runners

    PubMed Central

    Fourchet, François; Kelly, Luke; Horobeanu, Cosmin; Loepelt, Heiko; Taiar, Redha; Millet, Grégoire

    2015-01-01

    Context: Fatigue-induced alterations in foot mechanics may lead to structural overload and injury. Objectives: To investigate how a high-intensity running exercise to exhaustion modifies ankle plantar-flexor and dorsiflexor strength and fatigability, as well as plantar-pressure distribution in adolescent runners. Design: Controlled laboratory study. Setting: Academy research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Eleven male adolescent distance runners (age = 16.9 ± 2.0 years, height = 170.6 ± 10.9 cm, mass = 54.6 ± 8.6 kg) were tested. Intervention(s): All participants performed an exhausting run on a treadmill. An isokinetic plantar-flexor and dorsiflexor maximal-strength test and a fatigue test were performed before and after the exhausting run. Plantar-pressure distribution was assessed at the beginning and end of the exhausting run. Main Outcome Measure(s): We recorded plantar-flexor and dorsiflexor peak torques and calculated the fatigue index. Plantar-pressure measurements were recorded 1 minute after the start of the run and before exhaustion. Plantar variables (ie, mean area, contact time, mean pressure, relative load) were determined for 9 selected regions. Results: Isokinetic peak torques were similar before and after the run in both muscle groups, whereas the fatigue index increased in plantar flexion (28.1%; P = .01) but not in dorsiflexion. For the whole foot, mean pressure decreased from 1 minute to the end (−3.4%; P = .003); however, mean area (9.5%; P = .005) and relative load (7.2%; P = .009) increased under the medial midfoot, and contact time increased under the central forefoot (8.3%; P = .01) and the lesser toes (8.9%; P = .008). Conclusions: Fatigue resistance in the plantar flexors declined after a high-intensity running bout performed by adolescent male distance runners. This phenomenon was associated with increased loading under the medial arch in the fatigued state but without any excessive pronation. PMID:25531143

  8. The Intraprofessional Continuum and Cleft.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Clyde B

    2016-08-01

    The continuum cleft is a costly and precarious gap that divides professions on the health professions' continuum. It is an interprofessional phenomenon that is encouraged because health care professions protect their members in professional silos and isolate competing professions in professional cysts. This article uses case studies of the allopathic, osteopathic, naturopathic, and chiropractic professions to contemplate the existence, consequences, and possible mitigation of intraprofessional silos, cysts, and clefts. PMID:27574493

  9. Radiation from charges in the continuum limit

    SciTech Connect

    Ianconescu, Reuven

    2013-06-15

    It is known that an accelerating charge radiates according to Larmor formula. On the other hand, any DC current following a curvilinear path, consists of accelerating charges, but in such case the radiated power is 0. The scope of this paper is to analyze and quantify how a system of charges goes from a radiating state to a non radiating state when the charges distribution goes to the continuum limit. Understanding this is important from the theoretical point of view and the results of this work are applicable to particle accelerator, cyclotron and other high energy devices.

  10. Three-dimensional inhomogeneous rain fields: implications for the distribution of intensity and polarization of the microwave thermal radiation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilyushin, Yaroslaw; Kutuza, Boris

    Observations and mapping of the upwelling thermal radiation of the Earth is the very promising remote sensing technique for the global monitoring of the weather and precipitations. For reliable interpretation of the observation data, numerical model of the microwave radiative transfer in the precipitating atmosphere is necessary. In the present work, numerical simulations of thermal microwave radiation in the rain have been performed at three wavelengths (3, 8 and 22 mm). Radiative properties of the rain have been simulated using public accessible T-matrix codes (Mishchenko, Moroz) for non-spherical particles of fixed orientation and realistic raindrop size distributions (Marshall-Palmer) within the range of rain intensity 1-100 mm/h. Thermal radiation of infinite flat slab medium and isolated rain cell of kilometer size has been simulated with finite difference scheme for the vectorial radiative transfer equation (VRTE) in dichroic scattering medium. Principal role of cell structure of the rain field in the formation of angular and spatial distribution of the intensity and polarization of the upwelling thermal radiation has been established. Possible approaches to interpretation of satellite data are also discussed. It is necessary that spatial resolution of microwave radiometers be less than rain cell size. At the present time the resolution is approximately 15 km. It can be considerably improved, for example by two-dimensional synthetic aperture millimeter-wave radiometric interferometer for measuring full-component Stokes vector of emission from hydrometeors. The estimates show that in millimeter band it is possible to develop such equipment with spatial resolution of the order of 1-2 km, which is significantly less than the size of rain cell, with sensitivity 0.3-0.5 K. Under this condition the second Stokes parameter may by successfully measured and may be used for investigation of precipitation regions. Y-shaped phased array antenna is the most promising to

  11. High Intensity Femtosecond XUV Pulse Interactions with Atomic Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffmann, K.; Murphy, B.; Keto, J.; Ditmire, T.

    2009-09-10

    The interactions of large xenon clusters irradiated by intense, femtosecond extreme-ultraviolet pulses at a wavelength of 38 nm have been studied. Using high harmonic generation from a 35 fs near-infrared terawatt laser, clusters have been irradiated by XUV pulses of 10{sup 11} W/cm{sup 2} intensity. Charge states up to Xe{sup 8+} are observed, states well above that produced by single atom illumination, indicating that plasma continuum lowering is important. Furthermore the kinetic energy distribution of the exploding ions is consistent with a quasineutral hydrodynamic expansion, rather than a Coulomb explosion.

  12. Single attosecond pulse generation via continuum wave packet interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shengpeng; Yang, Yujun; Ding, Dajun

    2016-07-01

    A single attosecond pulse generation via continuum-continuum interference is investigated theoretically by exposing a single-electron atom in a femtosecond laser field with the intensity in over-the-barrier ionization regime. We show that the ground state of the atom is depleted in such intense laser field and the high-order harmonics (HHG) via continuum to continuum coherence are generated. In a few-cycle monochromatic laser field (5 fs/800 nm, 1.2×1016 W cm-2), a single attosecond pulse with duration of 49 as is obtained from the HHG. With a two-color laser field combined by 1200 nm (8 fs/7.5×1015 W cm-2) and 800 nm (5 fs/1.0×1016 W cm-2), a shorter single pulse with duration of 29 as can further be produced by changing the relative carrier envelope phase of two laser pulses as a result of controlling the electronic quantum path in the intense electric field. Our results also show that a short single attosecond pulse can be generated in a wide range of the relative carrier envelope phase of the two laser pulses.

  13. Direct reconstruction of the source intensity distribution of a clinical linear accelerator using a maximum likelihood expectation maximization algorithm.

    PubMed

    Papaconstadopoulos, P; Levesque, I R; Maglieri, R; Seuntjens, J

    2016-02-01

    Direct determination of the source intensity distribution of clinical linear accelerators is still a challenging problem for small field beam modeling. Current techniques most often involve special equipment and are difficult to implement in the clinic. In this work we present a maximum-likelihood expectation-maximization (MLEM) approach to the source reconstruction problem utilizing small fields and a simple experimental set-up. The MLEM algorithm iteratively ray-traces photons from the source plane to the exit plane and extracts corrections based on photon fluence profile measurements. The photon fluence profiles were determined by dose profile film measurements in air using a high density thin foil as build-up material and an appropriate point spread function (PSF). The effect of other beam parameters and scatter sources was minimized by using the smallest field size ([Formula: see text] cm(2)). The source occlusion effect was reproduced by estimating the position of the collimating jaws during this process. The method was first benchmarked against simulations for a range of typical accelerator source sizes. The sources were reconstructed with an accuracy better than 0.12 mm in the full width at half maximum (FWHM) to the respective electron sources incident on the target. The estimated jaw positions agreed within 0.2 mm with the expected values. The reconstruction technique was also tested against measurements on a Varian Novalis Tx linear accelerator and compared to a previously commissioned Monte Carlo model. The reconstructed FWHM of the source agreed within 0.03 mm and 0.11 mm to the commissioned electron source in the crossplane and inplane orientations respectively. The impact of the jaw positioning, experimental and PSF uncertainties on the reconstructed source distribution was evaluated with the former presenting the dominant effect.

  14. A catalogue of normalized intensity functions and polarization from a cloud of particles with a size distribution of alpha to the minus 4th power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craven, P. D.; Gary, G. A.

    1972-01-01

    The Mie theory of light scattering by spheres was used to calculate the scattered intensity functions resulting from single scattering in a polydispersed collection of spheres. The distribution used behaves according to the inverse fourth power law; graphs and tables for the angular dependence of the intensity and polarization for this law are given. The effects of the particle size range and the integration increment are investigated.

  15. Lagrangian continuum dynamics in ALEGRA.

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Michael K. W.; Love, Edward

    2007-12-01

    Alegra is an ALE (Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian) multi-material finite element code that emphasizes large deformations and strong shock physics. The Lagrangian continuum dynamics package in Alegra uses a Galerkin finite element spatial discretization and an explicit central-difference stepping method in time. The goal of this report is to describe in detail the characteristics of this algorithm, including the conservation and stability properties. The details provided should help both researchers and analysts understand the underlying theory and numerical implementation of the Alegra continuum hydrodynamics algorithm.

  16. Theoretical analysis of the background intensity distribution in X-ray Birefringence Imaging using synchrotron bending-magnet radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Sutter, John P. Dolbnya, Igor P.; Collins, Stephen P.; Harris, Kenneth D. M.; Edwards-Gau, Gregory R.; Palmer, Benjamin A.

    2015-04-28

    In the recently developed technique of X-ray Birefringence Imaging, molecular orientational order in anisotropic materials is studied by exploiting the birefringence of linearly polarized X-rays with energy close to an absorption edge of an element in the material. In the experimental setup, a vertically deflecting high-resolution double-crystal monochromator is used upstream from the sample to select the appropriate photon energy, and a horizontally deflecting X-ray polarization analyzer, consisting of a perfect single crystal with a Bragg reflection at Bragg angle of approximately 45°, is placed downstream from the sample to measure the resulting rotation of the X-ray polarization. However, if the experiment is performed on a synchrotron bending-magnet beamline, then the elliptical polarization of the X-rays out of the electron orbit plane affects the shape of the output beam. Also, because the monochromator introduces a correlation between vertical position and photon energy to the X-ray beam, the polarization analyzer does not select the entire beam, but instead selects a diagonal stripe, the slope of which depends on the Bragg angles of the monochromator and the polarization analyzer. In the present work, the final background intensity distribution is calculated analytically because the phase space sampling methods normally used in ray traces are too inefficient for this setup. X-ray Birefringence Imaging data measured at the Diamond Light Source beamline B16 agree well with the theory developed here.

  17. [Effects of precipitation intensity on soil organic carbon fractions and their distribution under subtropical forests of South China].

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao-mei; Liu, Ju-xiu; Deng, Qi; Chu, Guo-wei; Zhou, Guo-yi; Zhang, De-qiang

    2010-05-01

    From December 2006 to June 2008, a field experiment was conducted to study the effects of natural precipitation, doubled precipitation, and no precipitation on the soil organic carbon fractions and their distribution under a successional series of monsoon evergreen broad-leaf forest, pine and broad-leaf mixed forest, and pine forest in Dinghushan Mountain of Southern China. Different precipitation treatments had no significant effects on the total organic carbon (TOC) concentration in the same soil layer under the same forest type (P > 0.05). In treatment no precipitation, particulate organic carbon (POC) and light fraction organic carbon (LFOC) were mainly accumulated in surface soil layer (0-10 cm); but in treatments natural precipitation and doubled precipitation, the two fractions were infiltrated to deeper soil layers. Under pine forest, soil readily oxidizable organic carbon (ROC) was significantly higher in treatment no precipitation than in treatments natural precipitation and doubled precipitation (P < 0.05). The percentage of soil POC, ROC, and LFOC to soil TOC was much greater under the forests at early successional stage than at climax stage, suggesting that the forest at early successional stage might not be an ideal place for soil organic carbon storage. Precipitation intensity less affected TOC, but had greater effects on the labile components POC, ROC, and LFOC. PMID:20707103

  18. On the use of computed radiography plates for quality assurance of intensity modulated radiation therapy dose distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Day, R. A.; Sankar, A. P.; Nailon, W. H.; MacLeod, A. S.

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: As traditional film is phased out in most radiotherapy centers, computed radiography (CR) systems are increasingly being purchased as a replacement. CR plates can be used for patient imaging, but may also be used for a variety of quality assurance (QA) purposes and can be calibrated in terms of dose. This study looks at their suitability for verification of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) dose distributions. Methods: A CR plate was calibrated in terms of the relative dose and the stability of response over 1 year was studied. The effect of exposing the CR plate to ambient light and of using different time delays before scanning was quantified. The CR plate was used to verify the relative dose distributions for ten IMRT patients and the results were compared to those obtained using a two dimensional (2D) diode array. Results: Exposing the CR plate to 10 s of ambient light between irradiation (174 cGy) and scanning erased approximately 80% of the signal. Changes in delay time between irradiation and scanning also affected the measurement results. The signal on the plate was found to decay at a rate of approximately 3.6 cGy/min in the first 10 min after irradiation. The use of a CR plate for IMRT patient-specific QA resulted in a significantly lower distance to agreement (DTA) and gamma pass rate than when using a 2D diode array for the measurement. This was primarily due to the over-response of the CR phosphor to low energy scattered radiation. For the IMRT QA using the CR plate, the average gamma pass rate was 97.3%. For the same IMRT QA using a diode array, the average gamma pass rate was 99.7%. The gamma criteria used were 4% dose difference and 4 mm DTA for head and neck treatments and 3% dose difference and 3 mm DTA for prostate treatments. The gamma index tolerance was 1. The lowest 10% of the dose distribution was excluded from all gamma and DTA analyses. Conclusions: Although the authors showed that CR plates can be used for patient

  19. Foundations of data-intensive science: Technology and practice for high throughput, widely distributed, data management and analysis systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, William; Ernst, M.; Dart, E.; Tierney, B.

    2014-04-01

    Today's large-scale science projects involve world-wide collaborations depend on moving massive amounts of data from an instrument to potentially thousands of computing and storage systems at hundreds of collaborating institutions to accomplish their science. This is true for ATLAS and CMS at the LHC, and it is true for the climate sciences, Belle-II at the KEK collider, genome sciences, the SKA radio telescope, and ITER, the international fusion energy experiment. DOE's Office of Science has been collecting science discipline and instrument requirements for network based data management and analysis for more than a decade. As a result of this certain key issues are seen across essentially all science disciplines that rely on the network for significant data transfer, even if the data quantities are modest compared to projects like the LHC experiments. These issues are what this talk will address; to wit: 1. Optical signal transport advances enabling 100 Gb/s circuits that span the globe on optical fiber with each carrying 100 such channels; 2. Network router and switch requirements to support high-speed international data transfer; 3. Data transport (TCP is still the norm) requirements to support high-speed international data transfer (e.g. error-free transmission); 4. Network monitoring and testing techniques and infrastructure to maintain the required error-free operation of the many R&E networks involved in international collaborations; 5. Operating system evolution to support very high-speed network I/O; 6. New network architectures and services in the LAN (campus) and WAN networks to support data-intensive science; 7. Data movement and management techniques and software that can maximize the throughput on the network connections between distributed data handling systems, and; 8. New approaches to widely distributed workflow systems that can support the data movement and analysis required by the science. All of these areas must be addressed to enable large

  20. A hybrid particle/continuum approach for nonequilibrium hypersonic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wen-Lan

    A hybrid particle-continuum computational framework is developed and presented for simulating nonequilibrium hypersonic flows, aimed to be more accurate than conventional continuum methods and faster than particle methods. The frame work consists of the direct simulation Monte Carlo-Information Preservation (DSMC-IP) method coupled with a Navier-Stokes solver. Since the DSMC-IP method provides the macroscopic information at each time step, determination of the continuum fluxes across the interface between the particle and continuum domains becomes straightforward. Buffer and reservoir calls are introduced in the continuum domain and work as an extension of the particle domain. At the end of the particle movement phase, particles in either particle or buffer cells are retained. All simulated particles in the reservoir cells are first deleted for each time, step and re-generated based on the local cell values. The microscopic velocities for the newly generated particles are initialized to the Chapman-Enskog distribution using an acceptance-rejection scheme. Continuum breakdown in a flow is defined as when the continuum solution departs from the particle solution to at least 5%. Numerical investigations show that a Knudsen-number-like parameter can best predict the continuum breakdown in the flows of interest. Numerical experiments of hypersonic flows over a simple blunted cone and a much more complex hollow cylinder/flare are conducted. The solutions for the two geometries considered from the hybrid framework are compared with experimental data and pure particle solutions. Generally speaking, it is concluded that the hybrid approach works quite well. In the blunted cone flow, numerical accuracy is improved when 10 layers of buffer cells are employed and the continuum breakdown cut-off value is set to be 0.03. In the hollow cylinder/flare hybrid simulation, the size of the separation zone near the conjunction of the cylinder and flare is improved from the initial

  1. Population transfer through the continuum

    SciTech Connect

    Nakajima, T.; Elk, M.; Zhang, J.; Lambropoulos, P. Foundation of Research and Technology Hellas, Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser and Department of Physics, University of Crete, P.O. Box 1527, Heraklion 711 10, Crete Department of Physics, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089-0484 )

    1994-08-01

    We show that complete population transfer is not in general possible through continuum intermediate states. We present a formal theoretical argument and supporting numerical results. In addition, the behavior of the system is compared with the well-known [Lambda] system.

  2. Parameter identification in continuum models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Crowley, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    Approximation techniques for use in numerical schemes for estimating spatially varying coefficients in continuum models such as those for Euler-Bernoulli beams are discussed. The techniques are based on quintic spline state approximations and cubic spline parameter approximations. Both theoretical and numerical results are presented. Previously announced in STAR as N83-28934

  3. Parameter identification in continuum models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Crowley, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    Approximation techniques for use in numerical schemes for estimating spatially varying coefficients in continuum models such as those for Euler-Bernoulli beams are discussed. The techniques are based on quintic spline state approximations and cubic spline parameter approximations. Both theoretical and numerical results are presented.

  4. A continuum of care model.

    PubMed

    Godchaux, C W; Travioli, J; Hughes, L A

    1997-11-01

    An interdisciplinary documentation tool provides a composite of all of the planning activities that occur relative to each individual patient and his/her family before discharge. In response to the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organization's mandate, this tool evolved into a "Continuum of Care" model. Now, all disciplines maintain a patient's continuity of care. PMID:9385163

  5. Suicide and the continuum of self-destructive behavior.

    PubMed

    Firestone, R W; Seiden, R H

    1990-03-01

    Suicide and self-destructive behavior are strongly influenced by a negative thought process, referred to here as the "voice." The voice process represents a well-integrated pattern of thoughts, attitudes, and beliefs, antithetical to self and hostile toward others, that is at the core of a patient's self-limitations and self-defeating actions. The voice varies along a continuum of intensity ranging from mild self-criticism to angry self-attacks and even suicidal thoughts. Self-destructive behavior similarly exists on a continuum ranging from self-denial to accident proneness, drug abuse, alcoholism, and other self-defeating behaviors, culminating in actual bodily harm. The two processes, cognitive and behavioral, parallel each other, and suicide represents the acting out of the extreme end of the continuum. The authors provide a chart depicting the levels of increasing suicidal intent along the continuum. The chart identifies specific negative thoughts and injunctions typically reported by persons who attempt suicide, neurotic patients, and "normal" subjects. Understanding where an individual can be placed on the continuum of self-destructive thoughts and actions can assist clinicians in their diagnoses and help pinpoint those students who are more at risk for suicide.

  6. Fault damage zone volume and initial salinity distribution determine intensity of shallow aquifer salinisation in subsurface storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tillner, Elena; Langer, Maria; Kempka, Thomas; Kühn, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Injection of fluids into deep saline aquifers causes a pore pressure increase in the storage formation, and thus displacement of resident brine. Via hydraulically conductive faults, brine may migrate upwards into shallower aquifers and lead to unwanted salinisation of potable groundwater resources. In the present study, we investigated different scenarios for a potential storage site in the Northeast German Basin using a three-dimensional (3-D) regional-scale model that includes four major fault zones. The focus was on assessing the impact of fault length and the effect of a secondary reservoir above the storage formation, as well as model boundary conditions and initial salinity distribution on the potential salinisation of shallow groundwater resources. We employed numerical simulations of brine injection as a representative fluid. Our simulation results demonstrate that the lateral model boundary settings and the effective fault damage zone volume have the greatest influence on pressure build-up and development within the reservoir, and thus intensity and duration of fluid flow through the faults. Higher vertical pressure gradients for short fault segments or a small effective fault damage zone volume result in the highest salinisation potential due to a larger vertical fault height affected by fluid displacement. Consequently, it has a strong impact on the degree of shallow aquifer salinisation, whether a gradient in salinity exists or the saltwater-freshwater interface lies below the fluid displacement depth in the faults. A small effective fault damage zone volume or low fault permeability further extend the duration of fluid flow, which can persist for several tens to hundreds of years, if the reservoir is laterally confined. Laterally open reservoir boundaries, large effective fault damage zone volumes and intermediate reservoirs significantly reduce vertical brine migration and the potential of freshwater salinisation because the origin depth of displaced

  7. Relationship study on land use spatial distribution structure and energy-related carbon emission intensity in different land use types of Guangdong, China, 1996-2008.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yi; Xia, Bin; Yang, Lei

    2013-01-01

    This study attempts to discuss the relationship between land use spatial distribution structure and energy-related carbon emission intensity in Guangdong during 1996-2008. We quantized the spatial distribution structure of five land use types including agricultural land, industrial land, residential and commercial land, traffic land, and other land through applying spatial Lorenz curve and Gini coefficient. Then the corresponding energy-related carbon emissions in each type of land were calculated in the study period. Through building the reasonable regression models, we found that the concentration degree of industrial land is negatively correlated with carbon emission intensity in the long term, whereas the concentration degree is positively correlated with carbon emission intensity in agricultural land, residential and commercial land, traffic land, and other land. The results also indicate that land use spatial distribution structure affects carbon emission intensity more intensively than energy efficiency and production efficiency do. These conclusions provide valuable reference to develop comprehensive policies for energy conservation and carbon emission reduction in a new perspective.

  8. Relationship Study on Land Use Spatial Distribution Structure and Energy-Related Carbon Emission Intensity in Different Land Use Types of Guangdong, China, 1996–2008

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yi; Yang, Lei

    2013-01-01

    This study attempts to discuss the relationship between land use spatial distribution structure and energy-related carbon emission intensity in Guangdong during 1996–2008. We quantized the spatial distribution structure of five land use types including agricultural land, industrial land, residential and commercial land, traffic land, and other land through applying spatial Lorenz curve and Gini coefficient. Then the corresponding energy-related carbon emissions in each type of land were calculated in the study period. Through building the reasonable regression models, we found that the concentration degree of industrial land is negatively correlated with carbon emission intensity in the long term, whereas the concentration degree is positively correlated with carbon emission intensity in agricultural land, residential and commercial land, traffic land, and other land. The results also indicate that land use spatial distribution structure affects carbon emission intensity more intensively than energy efficiency and production efficiency do. These conclusions provide valuable reference to develop comprehensive policies for energy conservation and carbon emission reduction in a new perspective. PMID:23476128

  9. Prediction and Measurement of X-Ray Spectral and Intensity Distributions from Low Energy Electron Impact Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, David L.

    1999-01-01

    In-vacuum electron beam welding is a technology that NASA considered as a joining technique for manufacture of space structures. The interaction of energetic electrons with metal produces x-rays. The radiation exposure to astronauts performing the in-vacuum electron beam welding must be characterized and minimized to insure safe operating conditions. This investigation characterized the x-ray environment due to operation of an in-vacuum electron beam welding tool. NASA, in a joint venture with the Russian Space Agency, was scheduled to perform a series of welding in space experiments on board the United States Space Shuttle. This series of experiments was named the International Space Welding Experiment (ISWE). The hardware associated with the ISWE was leased to NASA, by the Paton Welding Institute (PWI) in Ukraine, for ground based welding experiments in preparation for flight. Two tests were scheduled, using the ISWE electron beam welding tool, to characterize the radiation exposure to an astronaut during the operation of the ISWE. These radiation exposure tests consisted of Thermoluminescence Dosimeters (TLD's) shielded with material currently used by astronauts during Extra Vehicular Activities (EVA) and exposed to x-ray radiation generated by operation of an in-vacuum electron beam welding tool. This investigation was the first known application of TLD's to measure absorbed dose from x-rays of energy less than 10 KeV. The ISWE hardware was returned to Ukraine before the issue of adequate shielding for the astronauts was verified. Therefore, alternate experimental and analytical methods were developed to measure and predict the x-ray spectral and intensity distribution generated by electron impact with metal. These x-ray spectra were used to calculate the absorbed radiation dose to astronauts. These absorbed dose values were compared to TLD measurements obtained during actual operation of the in-vacuum electron beam welding tool. The calculated absorbed dose

  10. JCMTDR: Applications for reducing JCMT continuum data in GSD format

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lightfoot, John F.; Harrison, Paul A.; Meyerdierks, Horst; Jenness, Tim

    2014-06-01

    JCMTDR reduces continuum on-the-fly mapping data obtained with UKT14 or the heterodyne instruments using the IFD on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope. This program reduces archive data and heterodyne beam maps and was distributed as part of the Starlink software collection (ascl:1110.012).

  11. Intensity distributions of enhanced H emission from laser-induced low-pressure He plasma and a suggested He-assisted excitation mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Lie, Zener Sukra; Pardede, Marincan; Hedwig, Rinda; Suliyanti, Maria Margaretha; Steven, Eden; Maliki,; Kurniawan, Koo Hendrik; Ramli, Muliadi; Abdulmadjid, Syahrun Nur; Idris, Nasrullah; Lahna, Kurnia; Kagawa, Kiichiro; Tjia, May On

    2009-08-15

    An experimental study was conducted on the spatial distributions of hydrogen emission intensities from low-pressure plasmas generated by laser ablation of zircaloy-4 and black stone targets in nitrogen and helium ambient gases. In addition to confirming the previously observed intensity enhancement effect in ambient helium gas, the hydrogen and helium emission intensities measured along the plasma expansion direction revealed remarkable extended spatial distributions featuring unexpected maxima near the far end of the plasma where the available shock-wave generated thermal excitation energy should have been significantly reduced. This 'anomalous' feature necessarily implied the presence of an additional excitation process beside the well known shock-wave excitation process which is responsible for the plasma emission of heavy atoms in low-pressure ambient gas. Further analysis of the data led to a suggested physical mechanism explaining the possible contribution of a helium metastable excited state to the unusual phenomenon observed in this experiment.

  12. Differential Complexes in Continuum Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angoshtari, Arzhang; Yavari, Arash

    2015-04-01

    We study some differential complexes in continuum mechanics that involve both symmetric and non-symmetric second-order tensors. In particular, we show that the tensorial analogue of the standard grad-curl-div complex can simultaneously describe the kinematics and the kinetics of motion of a continuum. The relation between this complex and the de Rham complex allows one to readily derive the necessary and sufficient conditions for the compatibility of displacement gradient and the existence of stress functions on non-contractible bodies.We also derive the local compatibility equations in terms of the Green deformation tensor for motions of 2D and 3D bodies, and shells in curved ambient spaces with constant curvatures.

  13. A continuum of misidentification symptoms.

    PubMed

    Sno, H N

    1994-01-01

    A case study of a schizophrenic patient with differing forms of experiences of inappropriate familiarity is described. Reduplicative paramnesia is redefined as a delusion of familiarity related to a reduplication of time, place or person. The author proposes the concept of a continuum of positive and negative misidentification symptoms. The positive pole of the continuum ranges from the minor form of déjà vu experience to reduplicative paramnesia. The negative pole ranges from depersonalisation to nihilistic delusions. Differentiation is based on the severity of the disturbance of reality testing. The argumentation is based on the fact that both déjà vu experiences and depersonalisation occurring in pathological as well as non-pathological conditions are phenomenologically uniform.

  14. Continuum and line emission in Cygnus A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockton, Alan; Ridgway, Susan E.; Lilly, Simon J.

    1994-08-01

    We present the results from (1) imaging observations of Cygnus A in five essentially line-free continuum bands with central wavelengths ranging from 0.34 to 2.1 microns. (2) imaging observations in five narrowband filters centered on the emission lines H beta(O III) lambda5007, H alpha(N II) lambda6583, and (S II) lambda lambda6716, 6731, and (3) deep spectroscopy covering the entire central region of Cyg A. We confirm that the featureless spectrum component is to be identified with the prominent double morphology at the center of Cyg A, but uncertainties in the distribution of the dust in this region tend to limit the accuracy with which we can determine its morphology and spectral-energy distribution (SED). From regions that appear to be least affected by obscuration, we find fv is approximately v-0.1 for this component. This SED could be consistent with free-free emission, a population of young stars, or a quasar continuum scattered by electrons, but probably not with a quasar continuum scattered by dust, which would be bluer. Our spectroscopy places an upper limit on the equivalent width of broad H beta that is well below that of typical quasars, showing that this flat-spectrum component (FSC) is almost certainly not dominated by scattered quasar radiation. Appeals to scattering by hot electrons to smear the scattered broad lines into invisibility appear to fail because the large density scale height of the electrons and the inefficiency of electron scattering should result in smoother and more extensive structure than we observe. Although the relative SED is consistent with free-free emission, the required amount of hot gas violates other observational constraints. At high angular resolution, the apparent morphology of the FSC is spiral-like. Although this impression may be partly due to obscuration, the distribution of the dust itself only serves to reinforce the spiral-like nature of the material with which it is associated. We conclude that the FSC is most

  15. Continuum representations of cellular solids

    SciTech Connect

    Neilsen, M.K.

    1993-09-01

    Cellular materials consist of interconnected struts or plates which form cells. The struts or plates are constructed from a variety of metals, polymers, ceramics and wood products. Cellular materials are often used in impact limiters for shipping containers to protect the contents from accidental impact events. These materials exhibit a variety of complex behavior when subjected to crushing loads. This research focuses on the development of continuum representations of cellular solids that can be used in the finite element analysis of shipping container accidents. A significant portion of this work is the development of a new methodology to relate localized deformations to appropriate constitutive descriptions. This methodology provides the insight needed to select constitutive descriptions for cellular solids that capture the localized deformations that are observed experimentally. Constitutive relations are developed for two different cellular materials, aluminum honeycomb and polyurethane foam. These constitutive relations are based on plasticity and continuum damage theories. Plasticity is used to describe the permanent deformation exhibited by both aluminum honeycomb and polyurethane foam. Continuum damage is needed to capture the change in elastic parameters due to cracking of the polyurethane cell wall materials. The new constitutive description of polyurethane foam is implemented in both static and dynamic finite element codes, and analytical and numerical predictions are compared with available experimental data.

  16. Continuum modelling of granular flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staron, L.; Lagrée, P.-Y.

    2011-10-01

    The continuum modelling of transient granular flows is of primary importance in the context of predicting the behaviour of many natural systems involving granular matter. In this perspective, the granular column collapse experiment provides an interesting benchmark due to its challenging complexity (Lajeunesse et al 2004, Lube et al 2004), and form a trying test for candidate rheological models. In this contribution, we present 2D continuum simulations of granular column collapse using Navier-Stokes solver Gerris (Popinet 2003). The rheology implemented to model the granular media is the so-called μ(I)-rheology, relating the frictional properties and the viscosity of the material to the pressure and shear rate. In addition, discrete simulations using the Contact Dynamics method are performed for systematic comparison between the granular flow dynamics and its continuum counterpart (Staron & Hinch 2005). We find a good agreement, recovering the shape of the flow in the course of time as well as experimental scaling laws for the run-out. A systematic underestimation of the latter is nevertheless observed, and discussed in terms of physical and numerical modeling.

  17. Distribution patterns and sources of metals and PAHs in an intensely urbanized area: The Acerra-Pomigliano-Marigliano conurbation (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albanese, Stefano; Lima, Annamaria; Rezza, Carmela; Ferullo, Giampiero; De Vivo, Benedetto; Chen, Wei; Qi, Shihua

    2014-05-01

    agricultural intensive land use. PAHs distribution pattern showed anomalous values across the whole study area. Especially, Benzo[a]pyrene values exceeds the trigger limits established by the Italian Environmental law (D.Lgs. 152/2006) in most of the analyzed soils and the diagnostic ratios calculated among several PAHs compounds suggested that the biomass burning in the rural sector of the study area could be a relevant source of pollution. The palm oil fuelled power plant in the northern sector of Acerra could not be excluded as a source of PAHs in the environment. [1] Albanese et al (2007) JGE 93, 21-34. [2] Cicchella et al (2008) GEEA 8 (1), 19-29. [3] De Vivo et al (2006) Aracne Editrice, Roma. 324 pp.

  18. 77 FR 45367 - Continuum of Care Homeless Assistance Grant Application; Continuum of Care Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-31

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Continuum of Care Homeless Assistance Grant Application; Continuum of Care Application... subject proposal. Pre-established communities, called Continuums of Care (CoC), will complete the Exhibit 1 of the Continuum of Care Homeless Assistance application which collects data about the...

  19. Overview spectra and axial distribution of spectral line intensities in a high-current vacuum arc with CuCr electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Lisnyak, M.; Pipa, A. V.; Gorchakov, S. E-mail: weltmann@inp-greifswald.de; Iseni, S.; Franke, St.; Khapour, A.; Methling, R.; Weltmann, K.-D. E-mail: weltmann@inp-greifswald.de

    2015-09-28

    Spectroscopic investigations of free-burning vacuum arcs in diffuse mode with CuCr electrodes are presented. The experimental conditions of the investigated arc correspond to the typical system for vacuum circuit breakers. Spectra of six species Cu I, Cu II, Cu III, Cr I, Cr II, and Cr III have been analyzed in the wavelength range 350–810 nm. The axial intensity distributions were found to be strongly dependent on the ionization stage of radiating species. Emission distributions of Cr II and Cu II can be distinguished as well as the distributions of Cr III and Cu III. Information on the axial distribution was used to identify the spectra and for identification of overlapping spectral lines. The overview spectra and some spectral windows recorded with high resolution are presented. Analysis of axial distributions of emitted light, which originates from different ionization states, is presented and discussed.

  20. Instrumental intensity distribution for the Hector Mine, California, and the Chi-Chi, Taiwan, earthquakes: Comparison of two methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sokolov, V.; Wald, D.J.

    2002-01-01

    We compare two methods of seismic-intensity estimation from ground-motion records for the two recent strong earthquakes: the 1999 (M 7.1) Hector Mine, California, and the 1999 (M 7.6) Chi-Chi, Taiwan. The first technique utilizes the peak ground acceleration (PGA) and velocity (PGV), and it is used for rapid generation of the instrumental intensity map in California. The other method is based on the revised relationships between intensity and Fourier amplitude spectrum (FAS). The results of using the methods are compared with independently observed data and between the estimations from the records. For the case of the Hector Mine earthquake, the calculated intensities in general agree with the observed values. For the case of the Chi-Chi earthquake, the areas of maximum calculated intensity correspond to the areas of the greatest damage and highest number of fatalities. However, the FAS method producees higher-intensity values than those of the peak amplitude method. The specific features of ground-motion excitation during the large, shallow, thrust earthquake may be considered a reason for the discrepancy. The use of PGA and PGV is simple; however, the use of FAS provides a natural consideration of site amplification by means of generalized or site-specific spectral ratios. Because the calculation of seismic-intensity maps requires rapid processing of data from a large network, it is very practical to generate a "first-order" map from the recorded peak motions. Then, a "second-order" map may be compiled using an amplitude-spectra method on the basis of available records and numerical modeling of the site-dependent spectra for the regions of sparse station spacing.

  1. Intensity-Stabilized Fast-Scanned Direct Absorption Spectroscopy Instrumentation Based on a Distributed Feedback Laser with Detection Sensitivity down to 4 × 10−6

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Gang; Tan, Wei; Jia, Mengyuan; Hou, Jiajuan; Ma, Weiguang; Dong, Lei; Zhang, Lei; Feng, Xiaoxia; Wu, Xuechun; Yin, Wangbao; Xiao, Liantuan; Axner, Ove; Jia, Suotang

    2016-01-01

    A novel, intensity-stabilized, fast-scanned, direct absorption spectroscopy (IS-FS-DAS) instrumentation, based on a distributed feedback (DFB) diode laser, is developed. A fiber-coupled polarization rotator and a fiber-coupled polarizer are used to stabilize the intensity of the laser, which significantly reduces its relative intensity noise (RIN). The influence of white noise is reduced by fast scanning over the spectral feature (at 1 kHz), followed by averaging. By combining these two noise-reducing techniques, it is demonstrated that direct absorption spectroscopy (DAS) can be swiftly performed down to a limit of detection (LOD) (1σ) of 4 × 10−6, which opens up a number of new applications. PMID:27657082

  2. The Impact of Intrinsic Heavy Quark Distributions in the Proton on New Physics Searches at the High Intensity Frontier

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley; Gardner, Susan; /Kentucky U.

    2012-02-16

    The possibility of an intense proton facility, at 'Project X' or elsewhere, will provide many new opportunities for searches for physics beyond the Standard Model. A Project X can serve a yet broader role in the search for new physics, and in this note we highlight the manner in which thus-enabled studies of the flavor structure of the proton, particularly of its intrinsic heavy quark content, facilitate other direct and indirect searches for new physics. Intrinsic heavy quarks in both light and heavy hadrons play a key role in searches for physics BSM with hadrons - and their study at the Intensity Frontier may prove crucial to establishing its existence.

  3. Space shuttle Ram glow: Implication of NO2 recombination continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swenson, G. R.; Mende, S. B.; Clifton, S.

    1985-09-01

    The ram glow data gathered to data from imaging experiments on space shuttle suggest the glow is a continuum (within 34 angstrom resolution); the continuum shape is such that the peak is near 7000 angstroms decreasing to the blue and red, and the average molecular travel leading to emission after leaving the surface is 20 cm (assuming isotropic scattering from the surface). Emission continuum is rare in molecular systems but the measured spectrum does resemble the laboratory spectrum of NO2 (B) recombination continuum. The thickness of the observed emission is consistent with the NO2 hypothesis given an exit velocity of approx. 2.5 km/sec (1.3 eV) which leaves approx. 3.7 eV of ramming OI energy available for unbonding the recombined NO2 from the surface. The NO2 is formed in a 3-body recombination of OI + NO + m = NO2 + m where OI originates from the atmosphere and NO is chemically formed on the surface from atmospheric NI and OI. The spacecraft surface then acts as the n for the reaction: Evidence exists from orbital mass spectrometer data that the NO and NO2 chemistry described in this process does occur on surfaces of spectrometer orifices in orbit. Surface temperature effects are likely a factor in the NO sticking efficiency and, therefore, glow intensities.

  4. Space shuttle ram glow: Implication of NO2 recombination continuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swenson, G. R.; Mende, S. B.; Clifton, S.

    1985-01-01

    The ram glow data gathered to data from imaging experiments on space shuttle suggest the glow is a continuum (within 34 angstrom resolution); the continuum shape is such that the peak is near 7000 angstroms decreasing to the blue and red, and the average molecular travel leading to emission after leaving the surface is 20 cm (assuming isotropic scattering from the surface). Emission continuum is rare in molecular systems but the measured spectrum does resemble the laboratory spectrum of NO2 (B) recombination continuum. The thickness of the observed emission is consistent with the NO2 hypothesis given an exit velocity of approx. 2.5 km/sec (1.3 eV) which leaves approx. 3.7 eV of ramming OI energy available for unbonding the recombined NO2 from the surface. The NO2 is formed in a 3-body recombination of OI + NO + m = NO2 + m where OI originates from the atmosphere and NO is chemically formed on the surface from atmospheric NI and OI. The spacecraft surface then acts as the n for the reaction: Evidence exists from orbital mass spectrometer data that the NO and NO2 chemistry described in this process does occur on surfaces of spectrometer orifices in orbit. Surface temperature effects are likely a factor in the NO sticking efficiency and, therefore, glow intensities.

  5. Generalized Courant-Snyder Theory and Kapchinskij-Vladimirskij Distribution For High-intensity Beams In A Coupled Transverse Focusing Lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Hong QIn, Ronald Davidson

    2011-07-18

    The Courant-Snyder (CS) theory and the Kapchinskij-Vladimirskij (KV) distribution for high-intensity beams in a uncoupled focusing lattice are generalized to the case of coupled transverse dynamics. The envelope function is generalized to an envelope matrix, and the envelope equation becomes a matrix envelope equation with matrix operations that are non-commutative. In an uncoupled lattice, the KV distribution function, first analyzed in 1959, is the only known exact solution of the nonlinear Vlasov-Maxwell equations for high-intensity beams including self-fields in a self-consistent manner. The KV solution is generalized to high-intensity beams in a coupled transverse lattice using the generalized CS invariant. This solution projects to a rotating, pulsating elliptical beam in transverse configuration space. The fully self-consistent solution reduces the nonlinear Vlasov-Maxwell equations to a nonlinear matrix ordinary differential equation for the envelope matrix, which determines the geometry of the pulsating and rotating beam ellipse. These results provide us with a new theoretical tool to investigate the dynamics of high-intensity beams in a coupled transverse lattice. A strongly coupled lattice, a so-called N-rolling lattice, is studied as an example. It is found that strong coupling does not deteriorate the beam quality. Instead, the coupling induces beam rotation, and reduces beam pulsation.

  6. Generalized Courant-Snyder theory and Kapchinskij-Vladimirskij distribution for high-intensity beams in a coupled transverse focusing lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Qin Hong; Davidson, Ronald C.

    2011-05-15

    The Courant-Snyder (CS) theory and the Kapchinskij-Vladimirskij (KV) distribution for high-intensity beams in an uncoupled focusing lattice are generalized to the case of coupled transverse dynamics. The envelope function is generalized to an envelope matrix, and the envelope equation becomes a matrix envelope equation with matrix operations that are noncommutative. In an uncoupled lattice, the KV distribution function, first analyzed in 1959, is the only known exact solution of the nonlinear Vlasov-Maxwell equations for high-intensity beams including self-fields in a self-consistent manner. The KV solution is generalized to high-intensity beams in a coupled transverse lattice using the generalized CS invariant. This solution projects to a rotating, pulsating elliptical beam in transverse configuration space. The fully self-consistent solution reduces the nonlinear Vlasov-Maxwell equations to a nonlinear matrix ordinary differential equation for the envelope matrix, which determines the geometry of the pulsating and rotating beam ellipse. These results provide us with a new theoretical tool to investigate the dynamics of high-intensity beams in a coupled transverse lattice. A strongly coupled lattice, a so-called N-rolling lattice, is studied as an example. It is found that strong coupling does not deteriorate the beam quality. Instead, the coupling induces beam rotation and reduces beam pulsation.

  7. Continuum Theory of Retroviral Capsids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, T. T.; Bruinsma, R. F.; Gelbart, W. M.

    2006-02-01

    We present a self-assembly phase diagram for the shape of retroviral capsids, based on continuum elasticity theory. The spontaneous curvature of the capsid proteins drives a weakly first-order transition from spherical to spherocylindrical shapes. The conical capsid shape which characterizes the HIV-1 retrovirus is never stable under unconstrained energy minimization. Only under conditions of fixed volume and/or fixed spanning length can the conical shape be a minimum energy structure. Our results indicate that, unlike the capsids of small viruses, retrovirus capsids are not uniquely determined by the molecular structure of the constituent proteins but depend in an essential way on physical constraints present during assembly.

  8. Continuum theory of contractile fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruse, K.; Zumdieck, A.; Jülicher, F.

    2003-12-01

    The generation of contractile forces by living cells often involves linear arrangements of actively interacting polar filaments. We develop a physical description of the dynamics of active fibers based on a general expression for the tension in terms of the filament density and the bundle polarisation. We discuss the long-time behaviour of oriented and of nonpolar fibres, discuss effects of polymerization and depolymerization, and relate this continuum theory to nonlocal descriptions of filament-motor systems. We show that a nonpolar arrangement of filaments suppresses oscillatory instabilities which could be relevant for muscle fibers.

  9. Kinetics and continuum emission of negative atomic ions in partially ionized plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soon, W. H.; Kunc, J. A.

    1991-01-01

    Kinetics and continuum emission of negative ions are studied in stationary atomic hydrogen, nitrogen, and oxygen plasmas. The intensity of the negative-ion emission was found to be neglibible when compared to those of bound-bound and free-bound emission at low and medium particle densities. However, the negative-ion continuum emission can contribute significantly in certain parts of the emission spectrum at high particle densities.

  10. Nuclear rotation in the continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fossez, K.; Nazarewicz, W.; Jaganathen, Y.; Michel, N.; Płoszajczak, M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Atomic nuclei often exhibit collective rotational-like behavior in highly excited states, well above the particle emission threshold. What determines the existence of collective motion in the continuum region is not fully understood. Purpose: In this work, by studying the collective rotation of the positive-parity deformed configurations of the one-neutron halo nucleus 11Be, we assess different mechanisms that stabilize collective behavior beyond the limits of particle stability. Method: To solve a particle-plus-core problem, we employ a nonadiabatic coupled-channel formalism and the Berggren single-particle ensemble, which explicitly contains bound states, narrow resonances, and the scattering continuum. We study the valence-neutron density in the intrinsic rotor frame to assess the validity of the adiabatic approach as the excitation energy increases. Results: We demonstrate that collective rotation of the ground band of 11Be is stabilized by (i) the fact that the ℓ =0 one-neutron decay channel is closed, and (ii) the angular momentum alignment, which increases the parentage of high-ℓ components at high spins; both effects act in concert to decrease decay widths of ground-state band members. This is not the case for higher-lying states of 11Be, where the ℓ =0 neutron-decay channel is open and often dominates. Conclusion: We demonstrate that long-lived collective states can exist at high excitation energy in weakly bound neutron drip-line nuclei such as 11Be.

  11. The infrared continuum spectrum of x ray illuminated molecular gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voit, G. Mark

    1990-01-01

    In starburst galaxies, active galaxies, and the mysterious ultraluminous infrared galaxies, x rays are likely to interact with molecular gas and dust, thereby inducing infrared emission. X ray heated thermal dust will emit the IR continuum, and x ray photoelectrons will excite an IR emission-line spectrum. Here, researchers model the IR continuum emission characteristic of some selected x ray spectral fluxes, in particular the x ray bremsstrahlung characteristic of supernova and stellar wind bubble shocks in dense media and the power law spectra characteristic of active galactic nuclei. These models are part of a larger project to determine the complete IR spectra, lines plus continuum, of x ray sources embedded in molecular gas. They modeled the thermal emission from grains by calculating a grain temperature/size/composition distribution function, f(T,a,Comp.), which accounts for temperature fluctuations by averaging over all grain thermal histories. In determining the grain thermal distribution, researchers account for both direct grain heating (by x ray absorption and subsequent electron energy deposition) and indirect grain heating (by absorption of the UV emission stimulated by non-thermal photo- and Auger electrons in the gas phase). We let the grain size distribution be proportional to a(exp -3.5), and they consider two types of grain composition: graphites, which we assume to be pure carbon, and silicates, which contain all other depleted heavy elements. They derive the grain composition distribution function from solar abundances and interstellar depletion data.

  12. Evidence for the significant role of sea surface temperature distributions over remote tropical oceans in tropical cyclone intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegde, Anitha Kumari; Kawamura, Ryuichi; Kawano, Tetsuya

    2016-07-01

    The role of remote ocean sea surface temperature (SST) in regulating tropical cyclone (TC) characteristics has been examined by performing numerical experiments with a regional scale model. Model simulations have been carried out to simulate typhoon Man-yi (July 2007), in our case study, under a range of SST conditions over the Indian Ocean and the South China Sea. The intensity and track of the cyclone have been systematically changed in sensitivity simulations of cool and warm SSTs over that region, following its peak phase. Warm oceans can substantially reduce the intensification of western North Pacific cyclones, whereas cool oceans can enhance their strength. This is intimately associated with the enhancement/weakening of the moisture supply through the moisture conveyor belt (MCB) in the lower troposphere, from the Indian Ocean and South China Sea into the vicinity of the cyclone center. When the MCB is interrupted over the South China Sea in warm SST occurrences, the large-scale transport of moisture into the cyclone system is significantly reduced, leading to the weakening of the cyclone intensity and to the eastward shift of its track. This study shows that changes in remote tropical ocean SST can also modulate TCs and thus can help in improving the forecasting of TC intensities and tracks.

  13. Changes in intensity and spectral distribution of fluorescence. Effect of light treatment on normal and DCMU-poisoned Anacystis nidulans.

    PubMed

    Papageorgiou, G; Govindjee

    1967-07-01

    The intensity of the "steady-state" fluorescence of "aerobic" Anacystis nidulans is variable under prolonged illumination with orange (590 mmu) or blue (440 mmu) light for both normally photosynthesizing and DCMU-poisoned cells. In general, orange light illumination causes an increase of the fluorescence intensity followed by a decrease, while blue light causes an increase until a steady level is reached. Poisoned Anacystis cells show four to eight times larger changes in fluorescence intensity than the normal cells; the detailed time course of fluorescence changes is also different in poisoned and normal cells. When algae are cooled to -196 degrees C in light, the light-induced changes in the "steady-state" fluorescence disappear in both types of cells. Difference fluorescence spectra, constructed by subtracting the fluorescence spectra taken after 5-15 min of illumination from those after 60-90 min of illumination, show a doublet structure of the difference band with a major peak coinciding with the Anacystis emission maximum (685 mmu) and a minor peak located at about 693 mmu.

  14. A Threshold Continuum for Aeolian Sand Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swann, C.; Ewing, R. C.; Sherman, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    The threshold of motion for aeolian sand transport marks the initial entrainment of sand particles by the force of the wind. This is typically defined and modeled as a singular wind speed for a given grain size and is based on field and laboratory experimental data. However, the definition of threshold varies significantly between these empirical models, largely because the definition is based on visual-observations of initial grain movement. For example, in his seminal experiments, Bagnold defined threshold of motion when he observed that 100% of the bed was in motion. Others have used 50% and lesser values. Differences in threshold models, in turn, result is large errors in predicting the fluxes associated with sand and dust transport. Here we use a wind tunnel and novel sediment trap to capture the fractions of sand in creep, reptation and saltation at Earth and Mars pressures and show that the threshold of motion for aeolian sand transport is best defined as a continuum in which grains progress through stages defined by the proportion of grains in creep and saltation. We propose the use of scale dependent thresholds modeled by distinct probability distribution functions that differentiate the threshold based on micro to macro scale applications. For example, a geologic timescale application corresponds to a threshold when 100% of the bed in motion whereas a sub-second application corresponds to a threshold when a single particle is set in motion. We provide quantitative measurements (number and mode of particle movement) corresponding to visual observations, percent of bed in motion and degrees of transport intermittency for Earth and Mars. Understanding transport as a continuum provides a basis for revaluating sand transport thresholds on Earth, Mars and Titan.

  15. X-ray polarization spectroscopy to study anisotropic velocity distribution of hot electrons produced by an ultra-high-intensity laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inubushi, Y.; Okano, Y.; Nishimura, H.; Cai, H.; Nagatomo, H.; Kai, T.; Kawamura, T.; Batani, D.; Morace, A.; Redaelli, R.; Fourment, C.; Santos, J. J.; Malka, G.; Boscheron, A.; Bonville, O.; Grenier, J.; Canal, Ph.; Lacoste, B.; Lepage, C.; Marmande, L.; Mazataud, E.; Casner, A.; Koenig, M.; Fujioka, S.; Nakamura, T.; Johzaki, T.; Mima, K.

    2010-03-01

    The anisotropy of the hot-electron velocity distribution in ultra-high-intensity laser produced plasma was studied with x-ray polarization spectroscopy using multilayer planar targets including x-ray emission tracer in the middle layer. This measurement serves as a diagnostic for hot-electron transport from the laser-plasma interaction region to the overdense region where drastic changes in the isotropy of the electron velocity distribution are observed. These polarization degrees are consistent with analysis of a three-dimensional polarization spectroscopy model coupled with particle-in-cell simulations. Electron velocity distribution in the underdense region is affected by the electric field of the laser and that in the overdense region becomes wider with increase in the tracer depth. A full-angular spread in the overdense region of 22.4°-2.4+5.4 was obtained from the measured polarization degree.

  16. Sheet beam model for intense space-charge: with application to Debye screening and the distribution of particle oscillation frequencies in a thermal equilibrium beam

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, Steven M.; Friedman, Alex; Bazouin, Guillaume

    2011-01-10

    A one-dimensional Vlasov-Poisson model for sheet beams is reviewed and extended to provide a simple framework for analysis of space-charge effects. Centroid and rms envelope equations including image charge effects are derived and reasonable parameter equivalences with commonly employed 2D transverse models of unbunched beams are established. This sheet beam model is then applied to analyze several problems of fundamental interest. A sheet beam thermal equilibrium distribution in a continuous focusing channel is constructed and shown to have analogous properties to two- d three-dimensional thermal equilibrium models in terms of the equilibrium structure and Deybe screening properties. The simpler formulation for sheet beams is exploited to explicitly calculate the distribution of particle oscillation frequencies within a thermal equilibrium beam. It is shown that as space-charge intensity increases, the frequency distribution becomes broad, suggesting that beams with strong space-charge can have improved stability.

  17. CARPARC - Carina Parkes-ATCA Radio Continuum Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, Kate; Gaensler, Bryan; Voronkov, Maxim; Rathborne, Jill; Garay, Guido; Green, Anne; Robishaw, Timothy; Smith, Nathan; Reiter, Megan

    2011-04-01

    Our plan is to map the entire Carina Nebula over a frequency range of 1-3 GHz in total intensity continuum and in linear polarization with the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA). We will also digitize the existing 1.6-GHz and 2.4-GHz single-dish Parkes datasets so they can serve as zero spacings data for the new ATCA observations. The result will be radio continuum images of the entire Carina Nebula at 1.6-GHz and 2.4-GHz with the highest angular resolution to-date and sensitive enough to detect compact emission associated with massive young stars. We will be able to measure Faraday rotation and depolarisation toward extragalactic radio sources behind the nebula. These new measurements will allow us to make the first determinations of the ordered and turbulent field strengths in the Carina Nebula.

  18. CARPARC - Carina Parkes-ATCA Radio Continuum Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, Kate; Gaensler, Bryan; Voronkov, Maxim; Rathborne, Jill; Burton, Michael; Garay, Guido; Green, Anne; Breen, Shari; Robishaw, Timothy; Smith, Nathan; Reiter, Megan

    2011-10-01

    Our plan is to map the entire Carina Nebula over a frequency range of 1-3 GHz in total intensity continuum and in linear polarization with the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA). We will also digitize the existing 1.6-GHz and 2.4-GHz single-dish Parkes datasets so they can serve as zero spacings data for the new ATCA observations. The result will be radio continuum images of the entire Carina Nebula at 1.6-GHz and 2.4-GHz with the highest angular resolution to-date and sensitive enough to detect compact emission associated with massive young stars. We will be able to measure Faraday rotation and depolarisation toward extragalactic radio sources behind the nebula. These new measurements will allow us to make the first determinations of the ordered and turbulent field strengths in the Carina Nebula.

  19. Formation of a conical distribution and intense ion heating in the presence of hydrogen cyclotron waves. [in earth ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okuda, H.; Ashour-Abdalla, M.

    1981-01-01

    In the considered investigation, it is assumed that the field aligned currents are responsible for producing electrostatic harmonic cyclotron waves (EHC). Using a one-dimensional simulation model in which the electron velocity distribution is maintained by a constant injection of the initial distribution, it is shown that, in contrast to earlier initial value simulations, EHC waves grow to a large amplitude, resulting in the formation of an anisotropic ion velocity distribution. Both the heating rate and the anisotropy are in reasonable agreement with the quasi-linear theory, taking into account the cyclotron resonance. The results show that the saturation is due to the combined effects of wave induced diffusion in an electron velocity space and the heating of ions perpendicularly. Both these effects reduce the growth rate.

  20. Continuum Fitting HST QSO Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tytler, David; Oliversen, Ronald J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Principal Component Analysis (PCA) method which we are using to fit and describe QSO spectra relies upon the fact that QSO continuum are generally very smooth and simple except for emission and absorption lines. To see this we need high signal-to-noise (S/N) spectra of QSOs at low redshift which have relatively few absorption lines in the Lyman-a forest. We need a large number of such spectra to use as the basis set for the PCA analysis which will find the set of principal component spectra which describe the QSO family as a whole. We have found that too few HST spectra have the required S/N and hence we need to supplement them with ground based spectra of QSOs at higher redshift. We have many such spectra and we have been working to make them suitable for this analysis. We have concentrated on this topic since 12/15/01.

  1. Bound states in the continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Chia Wei; Zhen, Bo; Stone, A. Douglas; Joannopoulos, John D.; Soljačić, Marin

    2016-09-01

    Bound states in the continuum (BICs) are waves that remain localized even though they coexist with a continuous spectrum of radiating waves that can carry energy away. Their very existence defies conventional wisdom. Although BICs were first proposed in quantum mechanics, they are a general wave phenomenon and have since been identified in electromagnetic waves, acoustic waves in air, water waves and elastic waves in solids. These states have been studied in a wide range of material systems, such as piezoelectric materials, dielectric photonic crystals, optical waveguides and fibres, quantum dots, graphene and topological insulators. In this Review, we describe recent developments in this field with an emphasis on the physical mechanisms that lead to BICs across seemingly very different materials and types of waves. We also discuss experimental realizations, existing applications and directions for future work.

  2. Dementia: Continuum or Distinct Entity?

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Glenn D.

    2009-01-01

    The latent structure of dementia was examined in a group of 10,775 older adults with indicators derived from a neuropsychological test battery. Subjecting these data to taxometric analysis using mean above minus below a cut (MAMBAC), maximum covariance (MAXCOV), and latent mode factor analysis (L-Mode) produced results more consistent with dementia as a dimensional (lying along a continuum) than categorical (representing a distinct entity) construct. A second study conducted on a group of 2375 21-to-64-year olds produced similar results. These findings denote that dementia, as measured by deficits in episodic memory, attention/concentration, executive function, and language, differs quantitatively rather than qualitatively from the cognitive status of non-demented adults. The implications of these results for classification, assessment, etiology, and prevention are discussed. PMID:20677881

  3. Micropolar continuum in spatial description

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, Elena A.; Vilchevskaya, Elena N.

    2016-11-01

    Within the spatial description, it is customary to refer thermodynamic state quantities to an elementary volume fixed in space containing an ensemble of particles. During its evolution, the elementary volume is occupied by different particles, each having its own mass, tensor of inertia, angular and linear velocities. The aim of the present paper is to answer the question of how to determine the inertial and kinematic characteristics of the elementary volume. In order to model structural transformations due to the consolidation or defragmentation of particles or anisotropic changes, one should consider the fact that the tensor of inertia of the elementary volume may change. This means that an additional constitutive equation must be formulated. The paper suggests kinetic equations for the tensor of inertia of the elementary volume. It also discusses the specificity of the inelastic polar continuum description within the framework of the spatial description.

  4. Waveguide CO{sub 2} laser with a quasi-homogeneous distribution of the output radiation intensity

    SciTech Connect

    Vlasenko, S A; Gurin, O V; Degtyarev, A V; Maslov, Vyacheslav A; Svich, V A; Topkov, A N

    2013-05-31

    An experimental sample of a waveguide CO{sub 2} laser with a quasi-uniform profile of the output radiation intensity is designed on the basis of a waveguide quasi-optical cavity of a new type comprising the generic confocal cavity with a nonuniform mirror and the hollow waveguide with the dimensions satisfying the conditions for self-imaging the quasi-uniform field. The surface of the mirror has the discrete large-scale absorbing nonuniformities. Results of theoretical and experimental investigations of spatial-energy characteristics of the laser in using uniform or amplitude-stepped reflecting mirrors are presented. (lasers)

  5. Electron-pair excitations and the molecular Coulomb continuum

    SciTech Connect

    Colgan, James

    2009-01-01

    Electron-pair excitations in the molecular hydrogen continuum are described by quantizing rotations of the momentum plane of the electron pair about by the pair's relative momentum. A helium-like description of the molecular pi.Joto double ionization is thus extended to higher angular momenta of the electron pair. A simple three-state superposition is found to account surprisingly well for recent observations of noncoplanar electron-pair, molecular-axis angular distributions.

  6. Increased dietary protein and combined high intensity aerobic and resistance exercise improves body fat distribution and cardiovascular risk factors.

    PubMed

    Arciero, Paul J; Gentile, Christopher L; Martin-Pressman, Roger; Ormsbee, Michael J; Everett, Meghan; Zwicky, Lauren; Steele, Christine A

    2006-08-01

    We investigated the effectiveness of two lifestyle modification programs of exercise training and nutritional intake (ad libitum) on improving body composition and disease risk in overweight/obese men and women. Sixty-three subjects were weight matched and assigned to one of three groups for a 12 wk intervention: (1) high-intensity resistance and cardiovascular training and a balanced diet (RC+BD, 40% CHO: 40% PRO; n=27, 16 female/11 male, age = 42 +/- 9 y); (2) moderate-intensity cardiovascular training and a traditional food guide pyramid diet (C+TD, CHO 50 to 55%; PRO 15 to 20%; FAT < 30%; n=19, 10 female/9 male, age = 43 +/- 10 y); and (3) an inactive control group (C, n=17, 5 female/12 male, age 43 +/- 11 y). RC+BD resulted in more favorable changes (P < 0.01) in percent body fat (-15.8% vs. -6.9%) and abdominal fat (-15.6% vs. -7.5%) compared to C+TD and C. Total cholesterol (-13.8%), LDL-cholesterol (-20.8%), and systolic blood pressure (-5.7%) declined (P > 0.05) in RC+BD, whereas C+TD and C remained unchanged. Our results suggest that RC+BD may be more effective than C+TD and C in enhancing body composition and lowering cardiovascular risk in obese individuals. PMID:17136940

  7. Spatial distribution of diuron sorption affinity as affected by soil, terrain and management practices in an intensively managed apple orchard.

    PubMed

    Umali, Beng P; Oliver, Danielle P; Ostendorf, Bertram; Forrester, Sean; Chittleborough, David J; Hutson, John L; Kookana, Rai S

    2012-05-30

    We investigated how the sorption affinity of diuron (3'-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimenthyl-urea), a moderately hydrophobic herbicide, is affected by soil properties, topography and management practices in an intensively managed orchard system. Soil-landscape analysis was carried out in an apple orchard which had a strong texture contrast soil and a landform with relief difference of 50 m. Diuron sorption (K(d)) affinity was successfully predicted (R(2)=0.79; p<0.001) using a mid-infrared - partial least squares model and calibrated against measured data using a conventional batch sorption technique. Soil and terrain properties explained 75% of the variance of diuron K(d) with TOC, pH(w), slope and WI as key variables. Mean diuron K(d) values were also significantly different (p<0.05) between alley and tree line and between the different management zones. Soil in the tree line generally had lower sorption capacity for diuron than soil in the alleys. Younger stands, which were found to have lower TOC than in the older stands, also had lower diuron K(d) values. In intensively managed orchards, sorption affinity of pesticides to soils was not only affected by soil properties and terrain attributes but also by management regime.

  8. Intense electrostatic waves near the upper hybrid resonance frequency. [beyond plasmapause

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurth, W. S.; Craven, J. D.; Frank, L. A.; Gurnett, D. A.

    1979-01-01

    Plasma wave measurements using instruments on the Imp 6 and Hawkeye satellites are utilized in a study of very intense electrostatic waves near the upper hybrid resonance frequency in the region just outside the plasmapause. Studies of these electrostatic disturbances show that the events occur at local times and at magnetic latitudes varying from the equator to 50 deg, and the polarization of these waves is such that the wave electric field vector is oriented perpendicular to the geomagnetic field. In most cases the center frequency of the intense waves corresponds to an (n + 1/2) fg(-) harmonic near the upper hybrid resonance frequency. The hot distribution on function is described for a few events showing temperature anisotropy and a loss cone distribution. A possible mechanism for producing intense waves near the upper hybrid resonance frequency is suggested, and evidence which indicates that the intense electrostatic waves may be a source of nonthermal continuum radiation is given.

  9. Explosion of Xenon Clusters Driven by Intense Femtosecond Pulses of Extreme Ultraviolet Light

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, B. F.; Hoffmann, K.; Belolipetski, A.; Keto, J.; Ditmire, T.

    2008-11-14

    The explosions of large xenon clusters irradiated by intense, femtosecond extreme ultraviolet pulses at a wavelength of 38 nm have been studied. Using high harmonic generation from a 35 fs laser, clusters have been irradiated by extreme ultraviolet pulses at intensity approaching 10{sup 11} W/cm{sup 2}. Charge states up to Xe{sup 8+} are observed, states well above those produced by single atom illumination, indicating that plasma continuum lowering is important. Furthermore, the kinetic energy distribution of the exploding ions is consistent with a quasineutral hydrodynamic expansion, rather than a Coulomb explosion.

  10. EDR: An Energy-Aware Runtime Load Distribution System for Data-Intensive Applications in the Cloud

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Bo; Song, Shuaiwen; Bezakova, Ivona; Cameron, Kirk

    2013-09-23

    Data centers account for a growing percentage of US power consumption. Energy e_ciency is now a first-class design constraint for the data centers that support cloud services. Service providers must distribute their data e_ciently across multiple data centers. This includes creation of data replicas that provide multiple copies of data for e_cient access. However, selecting replicas to maximize performance while minimizing energy waste is an open problem. State of the art replica selection approaches either do not address energy, lack scalability and/or are vulnerable to crashes due to use of a centralized coordinator. Therefore, we propose, develop and evaluate a simple cost-oriented decentralized replica selection system named EDR, implemented with two distributed optimization algorithms

  11. Turbulent fluid motion 3: Basic continuum equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deissler, Robert G.

    1991-01-01

    A derivation of the continuum equations used for the analysis of turbulence is given. These equations include the continuity equation, the Navier-Stokes equations, and the heat transfer or energy equation. An experimental justification for using a continuum approach for the study of turbulence is given.

  12. The Distribution of Cloud to Ground Lightning Strike Intensities and Associated Magnetic Inductance Fields Near the Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Lee; Decker, Ryan

    2005-01-01

    Lightning strike location and peak current are monitored operationally in the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) area by the Cloud to Ground Lightning Surveillance System (CGLSS). The present study compiles ten years worth of CGLSS data into a database of near strikes. Using shuffle launch platform LP39A as a convenient central point, all strikes recorded within a 20-mile radius for the period of record O R ) from January 1, 1993 to December 31,2002 were included in the subset database. Histograms and cumulative probability curves are produced for both strike intensity (peak current, in kA) and the corresponding magnetic inductance fields (in A/m). Results for the full POR have application to launch operations lightning monitoring and post-strike test procedures.

  13. Effect of the Solar UV/EUV Heating on the Intensity and Spatial Distribution of Jupiter's Synchrotron Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kita, Hajime; Misawa, H.; Tsuchiya, F.; Tao, C.; Morioka, A.

    2012-10-01

    Jupiter's synchrotron radiation (JSR) is the emission from relativistic electrons, and it is the most effective probe for remote sensing of Jupiter's radiation belt from the Earth. Recent observations reveal short term variations of JSR with the time scale of days to weeks. Brice and McDonough (1973) proposed that the solar UV/EUV heating for Jupiter's upper atmosphere causes enhancement of total flux density. If such a process occurs at Jupiter, it is also expected that diurnal wind system produces dawn-dusk asymmetry of the JSR brightness distribution. Preceding studies confirmed that the short term variations in total flux density correspond to the solar UV/EUV. However, the effect of solar UV/EUV heating on the brightness distribution has not been confirmed. Hence, the purpose of this study is to confirm the solar UV/EUV heating effect on total flux density and brightness distribution. We made radio imaging analysis using the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) archived data of the Very Large Array (VLA) obtained in 2000, and following results were shown. 1, Total flux density varied corresponding to the solar UV/EUV. 2, Dawn side emission was brighter than dusk side emission almost every day. 3, Variations of the dawn-dusk asymmetry did not correspond to the solar UV/EUV. In order to explain the second result, we estimate the diurnal wind velocity from the observed dawn-dusk ratio by using the model brightness distribution of JSR. Estimated neutral wind velocity is 46+/-11 m/s, which reasonably corresponds to the numerical simulation of Jupiter's upper atmosphere. In order to explain the third result, we examined the effect of the global convection electric field driven by tailward outflow of plasma in Jupiter's magnetosphere. As the result, it is suggested that typical fluctuation of the convection electric field strength was enough to cause the observed variations of the dawn-dusk asymmetry.

  14. Generation of intense 10-ps, 193-nm pulses using simple distributed feedback dye lasers and an ArF(*) amplifier.

    PubMed

    Hatten, D L; Cui, Y; Iii, W T; Mikes, T; Goldhar, J

    1992-11-20

    A pair of holographic distributed feedback dye lasers is used to generate 10-ps pulses at two selected wavelengths that are mixed in a BBO crystal to produce a pulse ~ 10 ps in duration at 193 nm. This seed pulse is subsequently amplified in an ArF(*) excimer laser to an energy of 10-15 mJ with <40 microJ in amplified spontaneous emission. The pulses are nearly transform limited and diffraction limited.

  15. Distribution and respiration of the high-latitude pelagic amphipod Themisto gaudichaudi in the Benguela Current in relation to upwelling intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auel, Holger; Ekau, Werner

    2009-12-01

    The cold and highly productive waters of coastal upwelling areas provide habitats for marine species usually occurring at higher latitudes and allow those species to extend their distribution ranges towards the equator into regions otherwise characterised by warm and oligotrophic sub-tropical waters. The pelagic hyperiid amphipod Themisto gaudichaudi has a circum-Antarctic epipelagic distribution pattern generally south of 35°S and plays an important role in Antarctic food webs as effective link from zooplankton secondary production to higher trophic levels including seabirds and marine mammals. In the cold and productive waters of the Benguela Current coastal upwelling system, the distribution range of the species extents far northward into the subtropics. The present study focuses on the distribution of T. gaudichaudi at the northernmost limit of its range in the Benguela upwelling system in relation to upwelling intensity and hydrographic conditions (sea surface temperature) based on time-series data from 2002 to 2008. Moreover, field data on life-history traits and respiration rates in relation to water temperature are combined to elucidate the environmental and physiological factors limiting the distribution range. Compared to Themisto populations from higher latitudes, the relatively higher water temperatures in the coastal upwelling region lead to higher respiration rates, faster growth, earlier sexual maturity and smaller body size.

  16. Particle Size Distribution of Airborne Microorganisms and Pathogens during an Intense African Dust Event in the Eastern Mediterranean

    PubMed Central

    Polymenakou, Paraskevi N.; Mandalakis, Manolis; Stephanou, Euripides G.; Tselepides, Anastasios

    2008-01-01

    Background The distribution of microorganisms, and especially pathogens, over airborne particles of different sizes has been ignored to a large extent, but it could have significant implications regarding the dispersion of these microorganisms across the planet, thus affecting human health. Objectives We examined the microbial quality of the aerosols over the eastern Mediterranean region during an African storm to determine the size distribution of microorganisms in the air. Methods We used a five-stage cascade impactor for bioaerosol collection in a coastal city on the eastern Mediterranean Sea during a north African dust storm. Bacterial communities associated with aerosol particles of six different size ranges were characterized following molecular culture–independent methods, regardless of the cell culturability (analysis of 16S rRNA genes). Results All 16S rDNA clone libraries were diverse, including sequences commonly found in soil and marine ecosystems. Spore-forming bacteria such as Firmicutes dominated large particle sizes (> 3.3 μm), whereas clones affiliated with Actinobacteria (found commonly in soil) and Bacteroidetes (widely distributed in the environment) gradually increased their abundance in aerosol particles of reduced size (< 3.3 μm). A large portion of the clones detected at respiratory particle sizes (< 3.3 μm) were phylogenetic neighbors to human pathogens that have been linked to several diseases. Conclusions The presence of aerosolized bacteria in small size particles may have significant implications to human health via intercontinental transportation of pathogens. PMID:18335093

  17. Electron-ion continuum-continuum mixing in dissociative recombination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guberman, Steven L.

    1993-01-01

    In recent calculations on the dissociative recombination (DR) of the v=1 vibrational level of the ground state of N2(+), N2(+)(v=1) + e(-) yields N + N, we have observed an important continuun-continuum mixing process involving the open channels on both sides of N2(+)(v=1) + e(-) yields N2(+)(v=0) + e(-). In vibrational relaxation by electron impact (immediately above) the magnitude of the cross section depends upon the strength of the interaction between these continua. In DR of the v=1 ion level, these continua can also interact in the entrance channel, and the mixing can have a profound effect upon the DR cross section from v=1, as we illustrate in this paper. In our theoretical calculations of N2(+) DR using multichannel quantum defect theory (MQDT), the reactants and products in the two above equations are described simultaneously. This allows us to calculate vibrational relaxation and excitation cross sections as well as DR cross sections. In order to understand the mixing described above, we first present a brief review of the prior results for DR of the v=0 level of N2(+).

  18. Continuum lowering - A new perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowley, B. J. B.

    2014-12-01

    What is meant by continuum lowering and ionization potential depression (IPD) in a Coulomb system depends very much upon precisely what question is being asked. It is shown that equilibrium (equation of state) phenomena and non-equilibrium dynamical processes like photoionization are characterized by different values of the IPD. In the former, the ionization potential of an atom embedded in matter is the difference in the free energy of the many-body system between states of thermodynamic equilibrium differing by the ionization state of just one atom. Typically, this energy is less than that required to ionize the same atom in vacuo. Probably, the best known example of this is the IPD given by Stewart and Pyatt (SP). However, it is a common misconception that this formula should apply directly to the energy of a photon causing photoionization, since this is a local adiabatic process that occurs in the absence of a response from the surrounding plasma. To achieve the prescribed final equilibrium state, in general, additional energy, in the form of heat and work, is transferred between the atom and its surroundings. This additional relaxation energy is sufficient to explain the discrepancy between recent spectroscopic measurements of IPD in dense plasmas and the predictions of the SP formula. This paper provides a detailed account of an analytical approach, based on SP, to calculating thermodynamic and spectroscopic (adiabatic) IPDs in multicomponent Coulomb systems of arbitrary coupling strength with Te ≠ Ti. The ramifications for equilibrium Coulomb systems are examined in order to elucidate the roles of the various forms of the IPD and any possible connection with the plasma microfield. The formulation embodies an analytical equation of state (EoS) that is thermodynamically self-consistent, provided that the bound and free electrons are dynamically separable, meaning that the system is not undergoing pressure ionization. Apart from this restriction, the model is

  19. High-order continuum kinetic method for modeling plasma dynamics in phase space

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Vogman, G. V.; Colella, P.; Shumlak, U.

    2014-12-15

    Continuum methods offer a high-fidelity means of simulating plasma kinetics. While computationally intensive, these methods are advantageous because they can be cast in conservation-law form, are not susceptible to noise, and can be implemented using high-order numerical methods. Advances in continuum method capabilities for modeling kinetic phenomena in plasmas require the development of validation tools in higher dimensional phase space and an ability to handle non-cartesian geometries. To that end, a new benchmark for validating Vlasov-Poisson simulations in 3D (x,vx,vy) is presented. The benchmark is based on the Dory-Guest-Harris instability and is successfully used to validate a continuum finite volumemore » algorithm. To address challenges associated with non-cartesian geometries, unique features of cylindrical phase space coordinates are described. Preliminary results of continuum kinetic simulations in 4D (r,z,vr,vz) phase space are presented.« less

  20. An echolocation model for range discrimination of multiple closely spaced objects: Transformation of spectrogram into the reflected intensity distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuo, Ikuo; Kunugiyama, Kenji; Yano, Masafumi

    2004-02-01

    Using frequency-modulated echolocation, bats can discriminate the range of objects with an accuracy of less than a millimeter. However, bats' echolocation mechanism is not well understood. The delay separation of three or more closely spaced objects can be determined through analysis of the echo spectrum. However, delay times cannot be properly correlated with objects using only the echo spectrum because the sequence of delay separations cannot be determined without information on temporal changes in the interference pattern of the echoes. To illustrate this, Gaussian chirplets with a carrier frequency compatible with bat emission sweep rates were used. The delay time for object 1, T1, can be estimated from the echo spectrum around the onset time. The delay time for object 2 is obtained by adding T1 to the delay separation between objects 1 and 2 (extracted from the first appearance of interference effects). Further objects can be located in sequence by this same procedure. This model can determine delay times for three or more closely spaced objects with an accuracy of about 1 μs, when all the objects are located within 30 μs of delay separation. This model is applicable for the range discrimination of objects having different reflected intensities and in a noisy environment (0-dB signal-to-noise ratio) while the cross-correlation method is hard to apply to these problems.

  1. Lattice continuum and diffusional creep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesarovic, Sinisa Dj.

    2016-04-01

    Diffusional creep is characterized by growth/disappearance of lattice planes at the crystal boundaries that serve as sources/sinks of vacancies, and by diffusion of vacancies. The lattice continuum theory developed here represents a natural and intuitive framework for the analysis of diffusion in crystals and lattice growth/loss at the boundaries. The formulation includes the definition of the Lagrangian reference configuration for the newly created lattice, the transport theorem and the definition of the creep rate tensor for a polycrystal as a piecewise uniform, discontinuous field. The values associated with each crystalline grain are related to the normal diffusional flux at grain boundaries. The governing equations for Nabarro-Herring creep are derived with coupled diffusion and elasticity with compositional eigenstrain. Both, bulk diffusional dissipation and boundary dissipation accompanying vacancy nucleation and absorption, are considered, but the latter is found to be negligible. For periodic arrangements of grains, diffusion formally decouples from elasticity but at the cost of a complicated boundary condition. The equilibrium of deviatorically stressed polycrystals is impossible without inclusion of interface energies. The secondary creep rate estimates correspond to the standard Nabarro-Herring model, and the volumetric creep is small. The initial (primary) creep rate is estimated to be much larger than the secondary creep rate.

  2. Additive manufacturing of patient-specific tubular continuum manipulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amanov, Ernar; Nguyen, Thien-Dang; Burgner-Kahrs, Jessica

    2015-03-01

    Tubular continuum robots, which are composed of multiple concentric, precurved, elastic tubes, provide more dexterity than traditional surgical instruments at the same diameter. The tubes can be precurved such that the resulting manipulator fulfills surgical task requirements. Up to now the only material used for the component tubes of those manipulators is NiTi, a super-elastic shape-memory alloy of nickel and titan. NiTi is a cost-intensive material and fabrication processes are complex, requiring (proprietary) technology, e.g. for shape setting. In this paper, we evaluate component tubes made of 3 different thermoplastic materials (PLA, PCL and nylon) using fused filament fabrication technology (3D printing). This enables quick and cost-effective production of custom, patient-specific continuum manipulators, produced on site on demand. Stress-strain and deformation characteristics are evaluated experimentally for 16 fabricated tubes of each thermoplastic with diameters and shapes equivalent to those of NiTi tubes. Tubes made of PCL and nylon exhibit properties comparable to those made of NiTi. We further demonstrate a tubular continuum manipulator composed of 3 nylon tubes in a transnasal, transsphenoidal skull base surgery scenario in vitro.

  3. The role of precipitation size distributions in km-scale NWP simulations of intense precipitation: Evaluation of cloud properties and surface precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Van Weverberg K.; Vogelmann A.; van Lipzig, N. P. M.; Delobbec, L.

    2012-04-01

    We investigate the sensitivity of simulated cloud properties and surface precipitation to assumptions regarding the size distributions of the precipitating hydrometeors in a one-moment bulk microphysics scheme. Three sensitivity experiments were applied to two composites of 15 convective and 15 frontal stratiform intense precipitation events observed in a coastal midlatitude region (Belgium), which were evaluated against satellite-retrieved cloud properties and radar-rain-gauge derived surface precipitation. It is found that the cloud optical thickness distribution was well captured by all experiments, although a significant underestimation of cloudiness occurred in the convective composite. The cloud-top-pressure distribution was improved most by more realistic snow size distributions (including a temperature-dependent intercept parameter and non-spherical snow for the calculation of the slope parameter), due to increased snow depositional growth at high altitudes. Surface precipitation was far less sensitive to whether graupel or hail was chosen as the rimed ice species, as compared to previous idealized experiments. This smaller difference in sensitivity could be explained by the stronger updraught velocities and higher freezing levels in the idealized experiments compared to typical coastal midlatitude environmental conditions.

  4. Bound and continuum vibrational states of the bifluoride anion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Špirko, V.; Šindelka, M.; Shirsat, R. N.; Leszczynski, J.

    2003-07-01

    The energies of the bound vibrational states and energy density spectra of the continuum vibrational states of FHF - are calculated, 'exactly' and 'adiabatically', using a new ab initio (CCSD(T)) potential energy surface. Statistical properties of the bound states are probed in terms of the density of states and nearest neighbor level spacing distributions (NNSD). Importantly, the approximate 'adiabatic' densities coincide nearly quantitatively with their 'exact' counterparts. A quantitative fitting of the NNSDs is achieved with a new empirical modification of the Wigner distribution.

  5. Evaluation of moist processes during intense precipitation in km-scale NWP models using remote sensing and in-situ data: Impact of microphysics size distribution assumptions

    SciTech Connect

    Van Weverberg, K.; van Lipzig, N. P. M.; Delobbe, L.

    2011-02-01

    This study investigates the sensitivity of moist processes and surface precipitation during three extreme precipitation events over Belgium to the representation of rain, snow and hail size distributions in a bulk one-moment microphysics parameterisation scheme. Sensitivities included the use of empirically derived relations to calculate the slope parameter and diagnose the intercept parameter of the exponential snow and rain size distributions and sensitivities to the treatment of hail/graupel. A detailed evaluation of the experiments against various high temporal resolution and spatially distributed observational data was performed to understand how moist processes responded to the implemented size distribution modifications. Net vapor consumption by microphysical processes was found to be unaffected by snow or rain size distribution modifications, while it was reduced replacing formulations for hail by those typical for graupel, mainly due to intense sublimation of graupel. Cloud optical thickness was overestimated in all experiments and all cases, likely due to overestimated snow amounts. The overestimation slightly deteriorated by modifying the rain and snow size distributions due to increased snow depositional growth, while it was reduced by including graupel. The latter was mainly due to enhanced cloud water collection by graupel and reduced snow depositional growth. Radar reflectivity and cloud optical thickness could only be realistically represented by inclusion of graupel during a stratiform case, while hail was found indispensable to simulate the vertical reflectivity profile and the surface precipitation structure. Precipitation amount was not much altered by any of the modifications made and the general overestimation was only decreased slightly during a supercell convective case.

  6. Dynamic brittle material response based on a continuum damage model

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, E.P.

    1994-12-31

    The response of brittle materials to dynamic loads was studied in this investigation based on a continuum damage model. Damage mechanism was selected to be interaction and growth of subscale cracks. Briefly, the cracks are activated by bulk tension and the density of activated cracks are described by a Weibull statistical distribution. The moduli of a cracked solid derived by Budiansky and O`Connell are then used to represent the global material degradation due to subscale cracking. This continuum damage model was originally developed to study rock fragmentation and was modified in the present study to improve on the post-limit structural response. The model was implemented into a transient dynamic explicit finite element code PRONTO 2D and then used for a numerical study involving the sudden stretching of a plate with a centrally located hole. Numerical results characterizing the dynamic responses of the material were presented. The effect of damage on dynamic material behavior was discussed.

  7. Effects of rain intensity, slope gradient and particle size distribution on the relative contributions of splash and wash loads to rain-induced erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoodabadi, Majid; Sajjadi, Sara Arjmand

    2016-01-01

    Soil erosion during rainfall is a complex phenomenon resulting from detachment by raindrop impact and overland flow. The objective of this study is to investigate the transportation rate of splash load (SL) and that of wash load (WL) and their relative contributions to the rain-induced erosion rate affected by rain intensity, slope gradient and particle size distribution. A total of 60 simulation runs were carried out using a detachment tray under simulated rainfall with no inflow. The experiments were done on two soil samples (aggregate sizes finer than 2 and 4.75 mm) from an agricultural land use at different rain intensities (57 and 80 mm h- 1) and varying slope gradients (0.5%, 2.5%, 5%, 10%, and 20%). Under unsteady state conditions, WL showed relatively high dependency on slope gradient, whereas approaching steady state conditions, nearly similar values of WL occurred at different slopes. SL and WL increased with increasing rain intensity and slope gradient, implying the importance of rain-induced erosion on bare agriculture lands especially at steeper slopes. The ratio of WL/SL decreased when slope gradient increased; however, WL increased more significantly than SL as soil aggregates became finer. The result indicates that at all the slope gradients, WL was much larger than SL, indicating that wash load significantly contributes to the rain-induced erosion in the agricultural soil. Furthermore, with increasing slope gradient, the contribution of wash load to rain-induced erosion decreased, while it was greater in the soil containing finer aggregates. Also, with increasing rain intensity at lower slope gradients (< 10%), further increase in splashed materials than that in washed materials occurred, whereas the reverse order was found at steeper slopes (> 10%). The finding of this study revealed that the rain-induced erosion was transport-limited at the gentler slopes, whereas at the steeper slopes, it shifted to detachment-limited conditions.

  8. Probability Distribution Functions of 12CO(J = 1 → 0) Brightness and Integrated Intensity in M51: The PAWS View

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Annie; Meidt, Sharon E.; Schinnerer, Eva; Colombo, Dario; Pety, Jerôme; Leroy, Adam K.; Dobbs, Clare L.; García-Burillo, Santiago; Thompson, Todd A.; Dumas, Gaëlle; Schuster, Karl F.; Kramer, Carsten

    2013-12-01

    We analyze the distribution of CO brightness temperature and integrated intensity in M51 at ~40 pc resolution using new 12CO(J = 1 → 0) data from the Plateau de Bure Arcsecond Whirlpool Survey (PAWS). We present probability distribution functions (PDFs) of the CO emission within the PAWS field of view, which covers the inner ~11 × 7 kpc of M51. We find clear variations in the shape of CO PDFs both within different M51 environments, defined according to dynamical criteria, and among M51 and two nearby low-mass galaxies, M33 and the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Globally, the PDFs for the inner disk of M51 can be represented by narrow lognormal functions that cover ~1-2 orders of magnitude in CO brightness and integrated intensity. The PDFs for M33 and the LMC are narrower and peak at lower CO intensities, consistent with their lower gas surface densities. However, the CO PDFs for different dynamical environments within the PAWS field depart significantly from the shape of the global distribution. The PDFs for the interarm region are approximately lognormal, but in the spiral arms and central region of M51, they exhibit diverse shapes with a significant excess of bright CO emission. The observed environmental dependence on the shape of the CO PDFs is qualitatively consistent with changes that would be expected if molecular gas in the spiral arms is characterized by a larger range of average densities, gas temperatures, and velocity fluctuations, although further work is required to disentangle the relative importance of large-scale dynamical effects versus star formation feedback in regulating these properties. We show that the shape of the CO PDFs for different M51 environments is only weakly related to global properties of the CO emission, e.g., the total CO luminosity, but is strongly correlated with properties of the local giant molecular cloud (GMC) and young stellar cluster populations, including the shape of their mass distributions. For galaxies with

  9. Continuum methods in lattice perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Becher, Thomas G

    2002-11-15

    We show how methods of continuum perturbation theory can be used to simplify perturbative lattice calculations. We use the technique of asymptotic expansions to expand lattice loop integrals around the continuum limit. After the expansion, all nontrivial dependence on momenta and masses is encoded in continuum loop integrals and the only genuine lattice integrals left are tadpole integrals. Using integration-by-parts relations all of these can be expressed in terms of a small number of master integrals. Four master integrals are needed for bosonic one loop integrals, sixteen in QCD with Wilson or staggered fermions.

  10. Patterns of movement for youth within an integrated continuum of residential services

    PubMed Central

    Huefner, Jonathan C.; James, Sigrid; Ringle, Jay; Thompson, Ronald W.; Daly, Daniel L.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined patterns of movement for youth receiving services within a continuum of intensive and restrictive residentially-based programs. Data were collected for 701 completed episodes of care within a three-program residential continuum of care over a 5 year period, and examined time within program, movement between programs, in-program disruptive behavior, and discharge status. Results showed that most youth either remained in a stable placement in the least restrictive of the programs, or followed a pattern of placements that systematically moved them from more restrictive to less restrictive settings. Of note, transitions from more restrictive to less restrictive programs correspond to deescalating levels of problem behavior; and over 80% of the youth were stepped down to either family-based or independent living situations at the time of departure. Findings support the notion that a continuum of intensive residential services can serve the needs of youth with significant emotional and behavioral needs. PMID:24273361

  11. Using New Theory and Experimental Methods to Understand the Relative Controls of Storage, Antecedent Conditions and Precipitation Intensity on Transit Time Distributions through a Sloping Soil Lysimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, M.; Pangle, L. A.; Cardoso, C.; Lora, M.; Wang, Y.; Harman, C. J.; Troch, P. A. A.

    2014-12-01

    Transit time distributions (TTD) are an efficient way of characterizing transport through the complex flow dynamics of a hydrologic system, and can serve as a basis for spatially-integrated solute transport modeling. Recently there has been progress in the development of a theory of time-variable TTDs that captures the effect of temporal variability in the timing of fluxes as well as changes in flow pathways. Furthermore, a new formulation of this theory allows the essential transport properties of a system to be parameterized by a physically meaningful time-variable probability distribution, the Ω function. This distribution determines how the age distribution of water in storage is sampled by the outflow. The form of the Ω function varies if the flow pathways change, but is not determined by the timing of fluxes (unlike the TTD). In this study, we use this theory to characterize transport by transient flows through a homogeneously packed 1 m3 sloping soil lysimeter. The transit time distribution associated with each of four irrigation periods (repeated daily for 24 days) are compared to examine the significance of changes in the Ω function due to variations in total storage, antecedent conditions, and precipitation intensity. We observe both the time-variable TTD and the Ω function experimentally by applying the PERTH method (Harman and Kim, 2014, GRL, 41, 1567-1575). The method allows us to observe multiple overlapping time-variable TTD in controlled experiments using only two conservative tracers. We hypothesize that both the TTD and the Ω function will vary in time, even in this small scale, because water will take different flow pathways depending on the initial state of the lysimeter and irrigation intensity. However, based on primarily modeling, we conjecture that major variability in the Ω function will be limited to a period during and immediately after each irrigation. We anticipate the Ω function is almost time-invariant (or scales simply with

  12. Simulation of future groundwater recharge using a climate model ensemble and SAR-image based soil parameter distributions - A case study in an intensively-used Mediterranean catchment.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Frank; Baghdadi, Nicolas; Blaschek, Michael; Deidda, Roberto; Duttmann, Rainer; La Jeunesse, Isabelle; Sellami, Haykel; Vereecken, Harry; Wendland, Frank

    2016-02-01

    We used observed climate data, an ensemble of four GCM-RCM combinations (global and regional climate models) and the water balance model mGROWA to estimate present and future groundwater recharge for the intensively-used Thau lagoon catchment in southern France. In addition to a highly resolved soil map, soil moisture distributions obtained from SAR-images (Synthetic Aperture Radar) were used to derive the spatial distribution of soil parameters covering the full simulation domain. Doing so helped us to assess the impact of different soil parameter sources on the modelled groundwater recharge levels. Groundwater recharge was simulated in monthly time steps using the ensemble approach and analysed in its spatial and temporal variability. The soil parameters originating from both sources led to very similar groundwater recharge rates, proving that soil parameters derived from SAR images may replace traditionally used soil maps in regions where soil maps are sparse or missing. Additionally, we showed that the variance in different GCM-RCMs influences the projected magnitude of future groundwater recharge change significantly more than the variance in the soil parameter distributions derived from the two different sources. For the period between 1950 and 2100, climate change impacts based on the climate model ensemble indicated that overall groundwater recharge will possibly show a low to moderate decrease in the Thau catchment. However, as no clear trend resulted from the ensemble simulations, reliable recommendations for adapting the regional groundwater management to changed available groundwater volumes could not be derived.

  13. Simulation of future groundwater recharge using a climate model ensemble and SAR-image based soil parameter distributions - A case study in an intensively-used Mediterranean catchment.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Frank; Baghdadi, Nicolas; Blaschek, Michael; Deidda, Roberto; Duttmann, Rainer; La Jeunesse, Isabelle; Sellami, Haykel; Vereecken, Harry; Wendland, Frank

    2016-02-01

    We used observed climate data, an ensemble of four GCM-RCM combinations (global and regional climate models) and the water balance model mGROWA to estimate present and future groundwater recharge for the intensively-used Thau lagoon catchment in southern France. In addition to a highly resolved soil map, soil moisture distributions obtained from SAR-images (Synthetic Aperture Radar) were used to derive the spatial distribution of soil parameters covering the full simulation domain. Doing so helped us to assess the impact of different soil parameter sources on the modelled groundwater recharge levels. Groundwater recharge was simulated in monthly time steps using the ensemble approach and analysed in its spatial and temporal variability. The soil parameters originating from both sources led to very similar groundwater recharge rates, proving that soil parameters derived from SAR images may replace traditionally used soil maps in regions where soil maps are sparse or missing. Additionally, we showed that the variance in different GCM-RCMs influences the projected magnitude of future groundwater recharge change significantly more than the variance in the soil parameter distributions derived from the two different sources. For the period between 1950 and 2100, climate change impacts based on the climate model ensemble indicated that overall groundwater recharge will possibly show a low to moderate decrease in the Thau catchment. However, as no clear trend resulted from the ensemble simulations, reliable recommendations for adapting the regional groundwater management to changed available groundwater volumes could not be derived. PMID:26190446

  14. Characterization of Continuum Coma features in Comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Beatrice E. A.; Samarasinha, Nalin H.; Hergenrother, Carl W.

    2016-10-01

    We will present the results of an analysis of continuum coma features of comets belonging to different dynamical classes at geocentric distances less than 1.5 AU. Our analysis focusses on groundbased visible observations of over a dozen comets. The position angles of the continuum features close to the nucleus, the curvatures, and extents of radial features will be determined, and the dynamics of dust grains will be investigated. We will also use the change in position angles (if relevant) to place constraints on the periodicity of the repeatability of the features. The prevalence of the features in the sunward direction compared to other orientations will be investigated. We will further compare continuum features with CN features when available. This investigation will eventually lead to the discrimination between hemispherical and localized outgassing for the sunward continuum features seen in comets.We acknowledge support from the NASA SSW and PAST programs.

  15. Geometric continuum regularization of quantum field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Halpern, M.B. . Dept. of Physics)

    1989-11-08

    An overview of the continuum regularization program is given. The program is traced from its roots in stochastic quantization, with emphasis on the examples of regularized gauge theory, the regularized general nonlinear sigma model and regularized quantum gravity. In its coordinate-invariant form, the regularization is seen as entirely geometric: only the supermetric on field deformations is regularized, and the prescription provides universal nonperturbative invariant continuum regularization across all quantum field theory. 54 refs.

  16. Effect of external electric field and background illumination on the intensity distribution of optical surface waves in the metal – photorefractive crystal system

    SciTech Connect

    Akhmedzhanov, I M

    2013-11-30

    The influence of the external electric field and background illumination on the intensity distribution of optical photorefractive surface waves at the metal – photorefractive crystal interface has been numerically simulated. The simulation is performed for a strontium – barium niobate (SBN) crystal using the parameters corresponding to the experimental data. The replacement of a real metal with an ideal one and the choice of the corresponding boundary conditions (depending on the wave power) in the numerical simulation have been substantiated. The calculation results have shown good agreement with the previously published experimental data on the effect of background illumination and a significant discrepancy for the data on the effect of the external electric field. It is found that the effect of the external electric field can be significantly enhanced by reducing the optical power of the photorefractive wave to values close to the threshold ones. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  17. Effects of using a continuum representation of discrete fracture networks

    SciTech Connect

    Hull, L.C.; Clemo, T.M.

    1987-01-01

    The substitution of matrix or continuum permeability for discrete fracture permeability in the simulation of complex fracture systems requires a radically different treatment of transport in the matrix. The spatial distribution of pressure is reasonably well described by inclusion of only the major fractures. Transport of tracer and heat, however, depends on a detailed knowledge of fluid velocities. Two factors are involved. First, the velocities are dependent on the active porosity of the system. Because fractures channel flow, the active porosity may be much smaller than the total porosity of the system. Secondly, the distribution of velocities is generally not normally distributed precluding the use of a Gaussian dispersion model. Characterization of the active porosity and velocity distribution are necessary to quantify tracer and heat movement.

  18. Temporal changes in distribution, prevalence and intensity of northern fowl mite (Ornithonyssus sylviarum) parasitism in commercial caged laying hens, with a comprehensive economic analysis of parasite impact.

    PubMed

    Mullens, Bradley A; Owen, Jeb P; Kuney, Douglas R; Szijj, Coralie E; Klingler, Kimberly A

    2009-03-01

    Establishment and spread of Ornithonyssus sylviarum were documented through time on sentinel hens (50 per house of 28,000-30,000 hens) in the first egg production cycle of three large commercial flocks (12 houses) of white leghorn hens. Mites were controlled using acaricide, and the impacts of treatment on mite populations and economic performance were documented. Mite prevalence and intensity increased rapidly and in tandem for 4-8 weeks after infestation. Intensity declined due to immune system involvement, but prevalence remained high, and this would affect mite sampling plan use and development. Early treatment was more effective at controlling mites; 85% of light infestations were eliminated by a pesticide spray (Ravap), versus 24% of heavy infestations. Hens infested later developed lower peak mite intensities, and those mite populations declined more quickly than on hens infested earlier in life. Raw spatial association by distance indices (SADIE), incorporating both the intensity and distribution of mites within a house, were high from week-to-week within a hen house. Once adjusted spatially to reflect variable hen cohorts becoming infested asynchronously, this analysis showed the association index tended to rebound at intervals of 5-6 weeks after the hen immune system first suppressed them. Large, consistent mite differences in one flock (high vs. low infestation levels) showed the economic damage of mite parasitism (assessed by flock indexing) was very high in the initial stages of mite expansion. Unmitigated infestations overall reduced egg production (2.1-4.0%), individual egg weights (0.5-2.2%), and feed conversion efficiency (5.7%), causing a profit reduction of $0.07-0.10 per hen for a 10-week period. Asynchronous infestation patterns among pesticide-treated hens may have contributed to a lack of apparent flock-level economic effects later in the production cycle. Individual egg weights differed with mite loads periodically, but could be either

  19. The Hurricane-Flood-Landslide Continuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Negri, Andrew J.; Burkardt, Nina; Golden, Joseph H.; Halverson, Jeffrey B.; Huffman, George J.; Larsen, Matthew C.; McGinley, John A.; Updike, Randall G.; Verdin, James P.; Wieczorek, Gerald F.

    2005-01-01

    In August 2004, representatives from NOAA, NASA, the USGS, and other government agencies convened in San Juan, Puerto Rim for a workshop to discuss a proposed research project called the Hurricane-Flood-Landslide Continuum (HFLC). The essence of the HFLC is to develop and integrate tools across disciplines to enable the issuance of regional guidance products for floods and landslides associated with major tropical rain systems, with sufficient lead time that local emergency managers can protect vulnerable populations and infrastructure. All three lead agencies are independently developing precipitation-flood-debris flow forecasting technologies, and all have a history of work on natural hazards both domestically and overseas. NOM has the capability to provide tracking and prediction of storm rainfall, trajectory and landfall and is developing flood probability and magnTtude capabilities. The USGS has the capability to evaluate the ambient stability of natural and man-made landforms, to assess landslide susceptibilities for those landforms, and to establish probabilities for initiation of landslides and debris flows. Additionally, the USGS has well-developed operational capacity for real-time monitoring and reporting of streamflow across distributed networks of automated gaging stations (http://water.usgs.gov/waterwatch/). NASA has the capability to provide sophisticated algorithms for satellite remote sensing of precipitation, land use, and in the future, soil moisture. The Workshop sought to initiate discussion among three agencies regarding their specific and highly complimentary capabilities. The fundamental goal of the Workshop was to establish a framework that will leverage the strengths of each agency. Once a prototype system is developed for example, in relatively data-rich Puerto Rim, it could be adapted for use in data-poor, low-infrastructure regions such as the Dominican Republic or Haiti. This paper provides an overview of the Workshop s goals

  20. The inter- and intra-event rain dropsize distribution variability of intense rain events in the Cevennes-Vivarais region, France.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, N.; Hazenberg, P.; Boudevillain, B.; Delrieu, G.; Uijlenhoet, R.

    2009-04-01

    The Cévennes-Vivarais region situated in the southern part of France is prone to heavy and long lasting rainfall events which occasionally lead to severe flashfloods. In order to gain an improved understanding of these severe rainfall events the Cévennes-Vivarais Mediterranean Hydrometeorological Observatory (OHM-CV) has set up a rainfall observation system consisting of a network of three operational weather radars, a dense network of raingauges and a disdrometer situated at a distance of about 57 km from the nearest radar [Delrieu et al., 2005]. The current study extends the DSD analysis results obtained by Chapon et al. (2008) with almost 2.5 years of disdrometer data. For a series of intense rainfall events, Chapon et al. (2008) show that the intra-event characteristics of precipitation has a dominant effect on the Z-R parameterization compared to inter-event variability. The study presented here applies the general scaling for raindrop size distributions as developed by Sempere Torres et al. (1994) which states that the different integral rainfall variables are related by power functions. For heavy rainfall, drop growth and breakup are balanced and a so called equilibrium condition occurs. As a result, characteristic raindrop sizes are constant and the different moments are proportional. Uijlenhoet et al. [2003] found this type of equilibrium conditions for rainfall intensities > 100 mm/h. In case of the Cévennes-Vivarais, analyzing the overall dataset shows that such equilibrium conditions already start to occur for intensities > 50 mm/h. It is relevant for the development of radar rainfall retrieval algorithms to find out how the different DSD properties (such as rain rate and radar reflectivity) are related to each other in such heavy rainfall events and how they change at different temporal aggregation scales and threshold values. The next step considers the volume-scanning radar data and DSD measurements for a selected set of heavy rain events, in

  1. 34 CFR 300.115 - Continuum of alternative placements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Continuum of alternative placements. 300.115 Section... Continuum of alternative placements. (a) Each public agency must ensure that a continuum of alternative... services. (b) The continuum required in paragraph (a) of this section must— (1) Include the...

  2. 34 CFR 300.115 - Continuum of alternative placements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Continuum of alternative placements. 300.115 Section... Continuum of alternative placements. (a) Each public agency must ensure that a continuum of alternative... services. (b) The continuum required in paragraph (a) of this section must— (1) Include the...

  3. Microstructural and continuum evolution modeling of sintering.

    SciTech Connect

    Braginsky, Michael V.; Olevsky, Eugene A.; Johnson, D. Lynn; Tikare, Veena; Garino, Terry J.; Arguello, Jose Guadalupe, Jr.

    2003-12-01

    deformation during. The continuum portion is based on a finite element formulation that allows 3D components to be modeled using SNL's nonlinear large-deformation finite element code, JAS3D. This tool provides a capability to model sintering of complex three-dimensional components. The model was verified by comparing to simulations results published in the literature. The model was validated using experimental results from various laboratory experiments performed by Garino. In addition, the mesoscale simulations were used to study anisotropic shrinkage in aligned, elongated powder compacts. Anisotropic shrinkage occurred in all compacts with aligned, elongated particles. However, the direction of higher shrinkage was in some cases along the direction of elongation and in other cases in the perpendicular direction depending on the details of the powder compact. In compacts of simple-packed, mono-sized, elongated particles, shrinkage was higher in the direction of elongation. In compacts of close-packed, mono-sized, elongated particles and of elongated particles with a size and shape distribution, the shrinkage was lower in the direction of elongation. We also explored the concept of a sintering stress tensor rather than the traditional sintering stress scalar concept for the case of anisotropic shrinkage. A thermodynamic treatment of this is presented. A method to calculate the sintering stress tensor is also presented. A user-friendly code that can simulate microstructural evolution during sintering in 2D and in 3D was developed. This code can run on most UNIX platforms and has a motif-based GUI. The microstructural evolution is shown as the code is running and many of the microstructural features, such as grain size, pore size, the average grain boundary length (in 2D) and area (in 3D), etc. are measured and recorded as a function of time. The overall density as the function of time is also recorded.

  4. Continuum Absorption Coefficient of Atoms and Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armaly, B. F.

    1979-01-01

    The rate of heat transfer to the heat shield of a Jupiter probe has been estimated to be one order of magnitude higher than any previously experienced in an outer space exploration program. More than one-third of this heat load is due to an emission of continuum radiation from atoms and ions. The existing computer code for calculating the continuum contribution to the total load utilizes a modified version of Biberman's approximate method. The continuum radiation absorption cross sections of a C - H - O - N ablation system were examined in detail. The present computer code was evaluated and updated by being compared with available exact and approximate calculations and correlations of experimental data. A detailed calculation procedure, which can be applied to other atomic species, is presented. The approximate correlations can be made to agree with the available exact and experimental data.

  5. Results from the ICOS Fall 2008 intensive campaign for boundary layer height detection and greenhouse gases vertical distribution study at Orleans forest, France.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xueref-Remy, I.; Loaec, S.; Feist, D.; Lavric, J.-V.; Roininen, R.; Romanini, D.; Delmotte, M.; Schmidt, M.; Ramonet, M.; Ciais, P.

    2009-04-01

    An intensive field campaign of three weeks has been carried out in October 2008 in Orléans Forest, France, dedicated 1/ to the assessment of different instrument types for retrieval of the continental boundary layer (CBL) height and 2/ to the study of vertical distribution and diurnal cycle of atmospheric greenhouse gases (GHG). This campaign occured in the framework of ICOS (Integrated Carbon Observing System) which is one of the infrastructures selected in the ESFRI roadmap. ICOS aims at getting a homogeneous and dense network for greenhouse gases monitoring in Europe operating for the next 25 years. Launched in 2008, ICOS is currently in its preliminary phase (until 2012). One current mandatory step is to identify the instrumentation that will be deployed in the stations of the network. All stations will be equiped with GHG analysers, as well as CBL probes to allow calculation of GHG budget in the CBL. During the campaign, one Lidar, one ceilometer and one cloud telemeter have been intercompared for CBL height detection. Radiosoundings have been carried out simultaneously to serve as a reference for this intercomparison. In parallel, GHG (and especially CO2) in-situ measurements have been recorded at four altitude levels on a tall tower (5m, 50m, 100m and 180m), between 100m and 3000m using in-situ and flask sampling instruments onboard a small aircraft, and between the surface and 200m using a probe attached to a captive balloon deployed by Meteo France. We will hereby present ICOS, the test site, the instrumentation and selected results from the intensive campaign.

  6. Impact of intensity-modulated radiation therapy as a boost treatment on the lung-dose distributions for non-small-cell lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Youngmin . E-mail: cymin00@yahoo.co.kr; Kim, Jeung Kee; Lee, Hyung Sik; Hur, Won Joo; Chai, Gyu Young; Kang, Ki Mun

    2005-11-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) as a method of boost radiotherapy after the initial irradiation by the conventional anterior/posterior opposed beams for centrally located non-small-cell lung cancer through the evaluation of dose distributions according to the various boost methods. Methods and Materials: Seven patients with T3 or T4 lung cancer and mediastinal node enlargement who previously received radiotherapy were studied. All patients underwent virtual simulation retrospectively with the previous treatment planning computed tomograms. Initial radiotherapy plans were designed to deliver 40 Gy to the primary tumor and involved nodal regions with the conventional anterior/posterior opposed beams. Two radiation dose levels, 24 and 30 Gy, were used for the boost radiotherapy plans, and four different boost methods (a three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy [3DCRT], five-, seven-, and nine-beam IMRT) were applied to each dose level. The goals of the boost plans were to deliver the prescribed radiation dose to 95% of the planning target volume (PTV) and minimize the volumes of the normal lungs and spinal cord irradiated above their tolerance doses. Dose distributions in the PTVs and lungs, according to the four types of boost plans, were compared in the boost and sum plans, respectively. Results: The percentage of lung volumes irradiated >20 Gy (V20) was reduced significantly in the IMRT boost plans compared with the 3DCRT boost plans at the 24- and 30-Gy dose levels (p 0.007 and 0.0315 respectively). Mean lung doses according to the boost methods were not different in the 24- and 30-Gy boost plans. The conformity indexes (CI) of the IMRT boost plans were lower than those of the 3DCRT plans in the 24- and 30-Gy plans (p = 0.001 in both). For the sum plans, there was no difference of the dose distributions in the PTVs and lungs according to the boost methods. Conclusions: In the boost plans the V20s and CIs were

  7. On the distribution function of the geomagnetic field intensity according to the model of a giant Gaussian process and empirical data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcherbakov, V. P.; Khokhlov, A. V.; Sycheva, N. K.

    2015-09-01

    The quadrature formula is obtained for the distribution function (DF) of the intensity of the geomagnetic field B and the corresponding virtual axial dipole moment VADM in the model of the Giant Gaussian Process (GGP). The predictions of this model are compared, up to a high degree of detail, with the empirical data for the Brunhes Epoch, which are contained in the global databases (GDB) for paleointensity. With a fixed latitude φ, the DFs f B ( B, φ) and f VADM(VADM, φ) are close to Gaussian within the first approximation. At the same time, the global DF f B ( B) has a high coefficient of asymmetry a = 0.35 since the mean of this function is latitude-dependent. In contrast, the global DF f VADM(VADM) has far lower asymmetry a = 0.16, since its mean barely varies with latitude. The comparison between the distribution histograms of VADM according to the PINT GDB data for the Brunhes Epoch and the results calculated by the BGP model shows that the empirical data and the calculations by the GGP model noticeably differ in the interval of the small VADM. Specifically, the histogram based on PINT GDB data shows a significant predominance of these data compared to the model predictions. At the same time, the same data fairly well agree with the GGP model in directions. This contradiction is probably accounted for by the underestimation of the paleointensity values in the experiments by the Thellier method if the rock carries chemical magnetization instead of thermal remanent magnetization. An alternative explanation suggests a short drop in the geomagnetic dynamo power associated with a simultaneous decrease in both the mean value of the axial dipole and in the variances of all the other terms of the spherical expansion of the geomagnetic field (i.e., quadrupole, octupole, and other components).

  8. On The Variability Of MWC 349A: Continuum Versus Hα Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillbrand, Alexander; Strelnitski, V.; Sliski, D.; Walker, G.; Bosworth, B.

    2012-01-01

    We report on a photometric monitoring of MWC 349A with the CCD-equipped Maria Mitchell Observatory's 24-inch telescope in 2009-2011. The goal of the project was to separate the Hα emission line variations from those of the continuum. We present our new method of the line/continuum separation (based on observations with two interference filters of different widths centered on Hα) and the results of the monitoring. Variations of both the red continuum and the Hα emission with amplitudes up to 0.1 magnitude on relatively short time scales (weeks and months) were superimposed on a secular drop of the star's brightness by approximately 0.3 magnitudes during the past 15 years. More recently, we found that the previously suspected periodicity with the period of ca. 240 days was followed by a long (more than a year) interval of virtually constant brightness. In our method of line/continuum separation, random and systematic errors in the outcomes from the two filters create an artificial anti-correlation between the extracted line and continuum intensities. However, considerable anti-correlation was observed even after smoothing the data for periods as long as a month. On shorter time scales, possible intrinsic anti-correlation has been corroborated by separating the emission line from the continuum with two independent filter combinations. If the intrinsic anti-correlation is real, it can be explained by the well-known inverse dependence of the recombination line emissivity on electron temperature, the latter being directly proportional to the ionizing ultraviolet continuum of the star. This project was supported by NSF/REU grant AST-0851892, the Presidential Award for Excellence in Science, Mathematics and Engineering Mentoring and the Nantucket Maria Mitchell Association.

  9. Modal kinematics for multisection continuum arms.

    PubMed

    Godage, Isuru S; Medrano-Cerda, Gustavo A; Branson, David T; Guglielmino, Emanuele; Caldwell, Darwin G

    2015-05-13

    This paper presents a novel spatial kinematic model for multisection continuum arms based on mode shape functions (MSF). Modal methods have been used in many disciplines from finite element methods to structural analysis to approximate complex and nonlinear parametric variations with simple mathematical functions. Given certain constraints and required accuracy, this helps to simplify complex phenomena with numerically efficient implementations leading to fast computations. A successful application of the modal approximation techniques to develop a new modal kinematic model for general variable length multisection continuum arms is discussed. The proposed method solves the limitations associated with previous models and introduces a new approach for readily deriving exact, singularity-free and unique MSF's that simplifies the approach and avoids mode switching. The model is able to simulate spatial bending as well as straight arm motions (i.e., pure elongation/contraction), and introduces inverse position and orientation kinematics for multisection continuum arms. A kinematic decoupling feature, splitting position and orientation inverse kinematics is introduced. This type of decoupling has not been presented for these types of robotic arms before. The model also carefully accounts for physical constraints in the joint space to provide enhanced insight into practical mechanics and impose actuator mechanical limitations onto the kinematics thus generating fully realizable results. The proposed method is easily applicable to a broad spectrum of continuum arm designs.

  10. Modal kinematics for multisection continuum arms.

    PubMed

    Godage, Isuru S; Medrano-Cerda, Gustavo A; Branson, David T; Guglielmino, Emanuele; Caldwell, Darwin G

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents a novel spatial kinematic model for multisection continuum arms based on mode shape functions (MSF). Modal methods have been used in many disciplines from finite element methods to structural analysis to approximate complex and nonlinear parametric variations with simple mathematical functions. Given certain constraints and required accuracy, this helps to simplify complex phenomena with numerically efficient implementations leading to fast computations. A successful application of the modal approximation techniques to develop a new modal kinematic model for general variable length multisection continuum arms is discussed. The proposed method solves the limitations associated with previous models and introduces a new approach for readily deriving exact, singularity-free and unique MSF's that simplifies the approach and avoids mode switching. The model is able to simulate spatial bending as well as straight arm motions (i.e., pure elongation/contraction), and introduces inverse position and orientation kinematics for multisection continuum arms. A kinematic decoupling feature, splitting position and orientation inverse kinematics is introduced. This type of decoupling has not been presented for these types of robotic arms before. The model also carefully accounts for physical constraints in the joint space to provide enhanced insight into practical mechanics and impose actuator mechanical limitations onto the kinematics thus generating fully realizable results. The proposed method is easily applicable to a broad spectrum of continuum arm designs. PMID:25969947

  11. Aims, Modes, and the Continuum of Discourse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beale, Walter H.

    A framework for the study of discourse, based on the analysis of three superordinate features of discourse (asymmetry, hierarchy, and continuum), is proposed in this paper. The paper begins by noting the confusion in terminology that exists in the world of composition pedagogy and theory; pointing to the need for a framework for testing,…

  12. Radio continuum from FU Orionis stars

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, L.F.; Hartmann, L.W.; Chavira, E. Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA Instituto Nacional de Astrofisica, Optica y Electronica, Puebla )

    1990-12-01

    Using the very large array a sensitive search is conducted for 3.6-cm continuum emission toward four FU Orionis objects: FU Ori, V1515 Cyg, V1057 Cyg, and Elias 1-12. V1057 Cyg and Elias 1-12 at the level of about 0.1 mJy is detected. The association of radio continuum emission with these FU Ori objects strengthens a possible relation between FU Ori stars and objects like L 1551 IRS 5 and Z CMa that are also sources of radio continuum emission and have been proposed as post-FU Ori objects. Whether the radio continuum emission is caused by free-free emission from ionized ejecta or if it is optically thin emission from a dusty disk is discussed. It was determined that, in the archives of the Tonantzintla Observatory, a plate taken in 1957 does not show Elias 1-12. This result significantly narrows the time range for the epoch of the outburst of this source to between 1957 and 1965. 38 refs.

  13. Parental Involvement to Parental Engagement: A Continuum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodall, Janet; Montgomery, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    Based on the literature of the field, this article traces a continuum between parental involvement with schools, and parental engagement with children's learning. The article seeks to shed light on an area of confusion; previous research has shown that different stakeholder groups understand "parental engagement" in different ways.…

  14. 3D holography: from discretum to continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonzom, Valentin; Dittrich, Bianca

    2016-03-01

    We study the one-loop partition function of 3D gravity without cosmological constant on the solid torus with arbitrary metric fluctuations on the boundary. To this end we employ the discrete approach of (quantum) Regge calculus. In contrast with similar calculations performed directly in the continuum, we work with a boundary at finite distance from the torus axis. We show that after taking the continuum limit on the boundary — but still keeping finite distance from the torus axis — the one-loop correction is the same as the one recently found in the continuum in Barnich et al. for an asymptotically flat boundary. The discrete approach taken here allows to identify the boundary degrees of freedom which are responsible for the non-trivial structure of the one-loop correction. We therefore calculate also the Hamilton-Jacobi function to quadratic order in the boundary fluctuations both in the discrete set-up and directly in the continuum theory. We identify a dual boundary field theory with a Liouville type coupling to the boundary metric. The discrete set-up allows again to identify the dual field with degrees of freedom associated to radial bulk edges attached to the boundary. Integrating out this dual field reproduces the (boundary diffeomorphism invariant part of the) quadratic order of the Hamilton-Jacobi functional. The considerations here show that bulk boundary dualities might also emerge at finite boundaries and moreover that discrete approaches are helpful in identifying such dualities.

  15. Clinical Integration Managing across the care continuum.

    PubMed

    Karash, Julius A; Larson, Laurie

    2016-06-01

    In the changing world of health care, the traditional boundaries are vanishing and hospitals and others must integrate care within their own organizations, as well as externally, across the care continuum. Here are three approaches to accomplishing just that. PMID:27468454

  16. Interplay of climate and land-use change on transport dynamics of intensively managed landscapes: a catchment travel time distribution analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danesh Yazdi, M.; Foufoula-Georgiou, E.; Karwan, D. L.

    2015-12-01

    Climatic trends and extensive implementation of drainage tiles in poorly drained agricultural lands have left significant fingerprints on the hydrology and water quality of the receiving streams. Tiles were initially designed to increase the crop productivity by removing excess soil moisture and improving field conditions. However, their hydro-ecological consequences have gradually emerged through observations of enhanced rates of nitrate and phosphorus delivered to the streams, as well as altered runoff volumes and timing. The Redwood River Basin (a 1,800 km2 basin located in southwest Minnesota) is an example of such a system where a considerable switch from small grains to row crops has taken place since 1970's, driving intensive tile installation culminating in a doubling of tiled length in the past two decades. Long-term hydrologic analysis of this basin shows that the daily streamflow has increased in all months after the land-use change period, and rising limbs of daily hydrographs exhibit increased dependence on precipitation during May-June. In this study we employ the recently developed theory of time-variant travel time distributions within the storage selection function framework to examine the interplay of climate and land-use change on transport dynamics. Comparison of two periods representing the tiled and untiled conditions demonstrates 18-38 days decrease in the mean travel time due to tile drainage during spring-summer, while almost no change is observed during winter showing an overall cyclic behavior over a year. Statistics of the marginal distributions also show less variability in the mean travel time for the tiled period, probably revealing the response of the more constrained engineered system. Furthermore, the relative impact of the climate and the spatial heterogeneity of the soil properties on the travel times are investigated via numerical experiments performed on nested sub-basins under untiled condition. The simulations suggest that

  17. Continuum modeling of large lattice structures: Status and projections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K.; Mikulas, Martin M., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The status and some recent developments of continuum modeling for large repetitive lattice structures are summarized. Discussion focuses on a number of aspects including definition of an effective substitute continuum; characterization of the continuum model; and the different approaches for generating the properties of the continuum, namely, the constitutive matrix, the matrix of mass densities, and the matrix of thermal coefficients. Also, a simple approach is presented for generating the continuum properties. The approach can be used to generate analytic and/or numerical values of the continuum properties.

  18. Integrated radio continuum spectra of galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Marvil, Joshua; Owen, Frazer; Eilek, Jean

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the spectral shape of the total continuum radiation, between 74 MHz and 5 GHz (400-6 cm in wavelength), for a large sample of bright galaxies. We take advantage of the overlapping survey coverage of the VLA Low-Frequency Sky Survey, the Westerbork Northern Sky Survey, the NRAO VLA Sky Survey, and the Green Bank 6 cm Survey to achieve significantly better resolution, sensitivity, and sample size compared to prior efforts of this nature. For our sample of 250 bright galaxies we measure a mean spectral index, α, of –0.69 between 1.4 and 4.85 GHz, –0.55 between 325 MHz and 1.4 GHz, and –0.45 between 74 and 325 MHz, which amounts to a detection of curvature in the mean spectrum. The magnitude of this curvature is approximately Δα = –0.2 per logarithmic frequency decade when fit with a generalized function having constant curvature. No trend in low-frequency spectral flattening versus galaxy inclination is evident in our data, suggesting that free-free absorption is not a satisfying explanation for the observed curvature. The ratio of thermal to non-thermal emission is estimated through two independent methods: (1) using the IRAS far-IR fluxes and (2) with the value of the total spectral index. Method (1) results in a distribution of 1.4 GHz thermal fractions of 9% ± 3%, which is consistent with previous studies, while method (2) produces a mean 1.4 GHz thermal fraction of 51% with dispersion 26%. The highly implausible values produced by method (2) indicate that the sum of typical power-law thermal and non-thermal components is not a viable model for the total spectral index between 325 and 1.4 GHz. An investigation into relationships between spectral index, infrared-derived quantities, and additional source properties reveals that galaxies with high radio luminosity in our sample are found to have, on average, a flatter radio spectral index, and early types tend to have excess radio emission when compared to the radio-infrared ratio of later

  19. Integrated Radio Continuum Spectra of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marvil, Joshua; Owen, Frazer; Eilek, Jean

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the spectral shape of the total continuum radiation, between 74 MHz and 5 GHz (400-6 cm in wavelength), for a large sample of bright galaxies. We take advantage of the overlapping survey coverage of the VLA Low-Frequency Sky Survey, the Westerbork Northern Sky Survey, the NRAO VLA Sky Survey, and the Green Bank 6 cm Survey to achieve significantly better resolution, sensitivity, and sample size compared to prior efforts of this nature. For our sample of 250 bright galaxies we measure a mean spectral index, α, of -0.69 between 1.4 and 4.85 GHz, -0.55 between 325 MHz and 1.4 GHz, and -0.45 between 74 and 325 MHz, which amounts to a detection of curvature in the mean spectrum. The magnitude of this curvature is approximately Δα = -0.2 per logarithmic frequency decade when fit with a generalized function having constant curvature. No trend in low-frequency spectral flattening versus galaxy inclination is evident in our data, suggesting that free-free absorption is not a satisfying explanation for the observed curvature. The ratio of thermal to non-thermal emission is estimated through two independent methods: (1) using the IRAS far-IR fluxes and (2) with the value of the total spectral index. Method (1) results in a distribution of 1.4 GHz thermal fractions of 9% ± 3%, which is consistent with previous studies, while method (2) produces a mean 1.4 GHz thermal fraction of 51% with dispersion 26%. The highly implausible values produced by method (2) indicate that the sum of typical power-law thermal and non-thermal components is not a viable model for the total spectral index between 325 and 1.4 GHz. An investigation into relationships between spectral index, infrared-derived quantities, and additional source properties reveals that galaxies with high radio luminosity in our sample are found to have, on average, a flatter radio spectral index, and early types tend to have excess radio emission when compared to the radio-infrared ratio of later types

  20. β decay of 6He into the α +d continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfützner, M.; Dominik, W.; Janas, Z.; Mazzocchi, C.; Pomorski, M.; Bezbakh, A. A.; Borge, M. J. G.; Chrapkiewicz, K.; Chudoba, V.; Frederickx, R.; Kamiński, G.; Kowalska, M.; Krupko, S.; Kuich, M.; Kurcewicz, J.; Lis, A. A.; Lund, M. V.; Miernik, K.; Perkowski, J.; Raabe, R.; Randisi, G.; Riisager, K.; Sambi, S.; Tengblad, O.; Wenander, F.

    2015-07-01

    The rare β -decay channel of 6He into the α +d continuum was investigated at the REX-ISOLDE facility. Bunches of postaccelerated 6He ions were implanted into the optical time projection chamber (OTPC), where the decays with emission of charged particles were recorded. This novel technique allowed us to extend the low-energy end of the spectrum down to 150 keV in α +d center of mass, corresponding to a deuteron energy of 100 keV. The branching ratio for this process amounts to [2.78 ±0.07 (stat ) ±0.17 (sys ) ] ×10-6 . The shape of the spectrum is found to be in a good agreement with a three-body model, while the total intensity is about 20% larger than the predicted one.

  1. Gamma radiation and photospheric white-light flare continuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, H. S.; Dwivedi, B. N.

    1982-01-01

    It is noted that recent gamma-ray observations of solar flares have provided a better means for estimating the heating of the solar atmosphere by energetic protons. This type of heating has been suggested as the explanation of the continuum emission of the white-light flare. The effects on the photosphere of high-energy particles capable of producing the intense gamma-ray emission observed in the flare of July 11, 1978, are analyzed. A simple energy-balance argument is used, and hydrogen ionization is taken into account. It is found that energy deposition increases with height for the inferred proton spectra and is not strongly dependent upon the assumed angle of incidence. At the top of the photosphere, the computed energy inputs fall in the range 10-100 ergs/cu cm-s.

  2. Message Control Intensity: Rationale and Preliminary Findings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, L. Edna; And Others

    The discussions of four family-related topics by 85 married couples were recorded and analyzed to test the validity of an expanded version of the relational communication coding system developed by L. Edna Rogers and Richard V. Farace. The expanded version of the system is based on the implicit intensity continuum that underlies the communication…

  3. Dense Heterogeneous Continuum Model of Two-Phase Explosion Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhl, A L; Bell, J B

    2010-04-07

    A heterogeneous continuum model is proposed to describe the dispersion of a dense Aluminum particle cloud in an explosion. Let {alpha}{sub 1} denote the volume fraction occupied by the gas and {alpha}{sub 2} the fraction occupied by the solid, satisfying the volume conservation relation: {alpha}{sub 1} + {alpha}{sub 2} = 1. When the particle phase occupies a non-negligible volume fraction (i.e., {alpha}{sub 2} > 0), additional terms, proportional to {alpha}{sub 2}, appear in the conservation laws for two-phase flows. These include: (i) a particle pressure (due to particle collisions), (ii) a corresponding sound speed (which produces real eigenvalues for the particle phase system), (iii) an Archimedes force induced on the particle phase (by the gas pressure gradient), and (iv) multi-particle drag effects (which enhance the momentum coupling between phases). These effects modify the accelerations and energy distributions in the phases; we call this the Dense Heterogeneous Continuum Model. A characteristics analysis of the Model equations indicates that the system is hyperbolic with real eigenvalues for the gas phase: {l_brace}v{sub 1}, v{sub 1} {+-} {alpha}{sub 1}{r_brace} and for the 'particle gas' phase: {l_brace}v{sub 2}, v{sub 2} {+-}{alpha}{sub 2}{r_brace} and the particles: {l_brace}v{sub 2}{r_brace}, where v{sub i} and {alpha}{sub i} denote the velocity vector and sound speed of phase i. These can be used to construct a high-order Godunov scheme to integrate the conservation laws of a dense heterogeneous continuum.

  4. Quantum Dynamics in Continuum for Proton Transport I: Basic Formulation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Duan; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2012-01-01

    Proton transport is one of the most important and interesting phenomena in living cells. The present work proposes a multiscale/multiphysics model for the understanding of the molecular mechanism of proton transport in transmembrane proteins. We describe proton dynamics quantum mechanically via a density functional approach while implicitly model other solvent ions as a dielectric continuum to reduce the number of degrees of freedom. The densities of all other ions in the solvent are assumed to obey the Boltzmann distribution. The impact of protein molecular structure and its charge polarization on the proton transport is considered explicitly at the atomic level. We formulate a total free energy functional to put proton kinetic and potential energies as well as electrostatic energy of all ions on an equal footing. The variational principle is employed to derive nonlinear governing equations for the proton transport system. Generalized Poisson-Boltzmann equation and Kohn-Sham equation are obtained from the variational framework. Theoretical formulations for the proton density and proton conductance are constructed based on fundamental principles. The molecular surface of the channel protein is utilized to split the discrete protein domain and the continuum solvent domain, and facilitate the multiscale discrete/continuum/quantum descriptions. A number of mathematical algorithms, including the Dirichlet to Neumann mapping, matched interface and boundary method, Gummel iteration, and Krylov space techniques are utilized to implement the proposed model in a computationally efficient manner. The Gramicidin A (GA) channel is used to demonstrate the performance of the proposed proton transport model and validate the efficiency of proposed mathematical algorithms. The electrostatic characteristics of the GA channel is analyzed with a wide range of model parameters. The proton conductances are studied over a number of applied voltages and reference concentrations. A

  5. Influence of temperature fluctuations on continuum spectra of cosmic objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silant'ev, N. A.; Alekseeva, G. A.; Novikov, V. V.

    2012-12-01

    The presence of convective and turbulent motions, and the evolution of magnetic fields give rise to existence of temperature fluctuations in stellar atmospheres, active galactic nuclei and other cosmic objects. We observe the time and surface averaged radiation fluxes from these objects. These fluxes depend on both the mean temperature and averaged temperature fluctuations. The usual photosphere models do not take into account the temperature fluctuations and use only the distribution of the mean temperature into surface layers of stars. We investigate how the temperature fluctuations change the spectra in continuum assuming that the degree of fluctuations (the ratio of mean temperature fluctuation to the mean temperature) is small. We suggest the procedure of calculation of continuum spectra, which takes into account the temperature fluctuations. As a first step one uses the usual model of a photosphere without fluctuations. The observed spectrum is presented as a part depending on mean temperature and the additional part proportional to quadratic value of fluctuation degree. It is shown that for some forms of absorption factor the additional part in Wien's region of spectrum can be evaluated directly from observed spectrum. This part depends on the first and second wavelength derivatives, which can be calculated numerically from the observed spectrum. Our estimates show that the temperature dependence of absorption factors is very important by calculation of continuum spectra corrections. As the examples we present the estimates for a few stars from Pulkovo spectrophotometric catalog and for the Sun. The influence of temperature fluctuations on color indices of observed cosmic objects is also investigated.

  6. Polarizable Atomic Multipole Solutes in a Generalized Kirkwood Continuum.

    PubMed

    Schnieders, Michael J; Ponder, Jay W

    2007-11-01

    The generalized Born (GB) model of continuum electrostatics is an analytic approximation to the Poisson equation useful for predicting the electrostatic component of the solvation free energy for solutes ranging in size from small organic molecules to large macromolecular complexes. This work presents a new continuum electrostatics model based on Kirkwood's analytic result for the electrostatic component of the solvation free energy for a solute with arbitrary charge distribution. Unlike GB, which is limited to monopoles, our generalized Kirkwood (GK) model can treat solute electrostatics represented by any combination of permanent and induced atomic multipole moments of arbitrary degree. Here we apply the GK model to the newly developed Atomic Multipole Optimized Energetics for Biomolecular Applications (AMOEBA) force field, which includes permanent atomic multipoles through the quadrupole and treats polarization via induced dipoles. A derivation of the GK gradient is presented, which enables energy minimization or molecular dynamics of an AMOEBA solute within a GK continuum. For a series of 55 proteins, GK electrostatic solvation free energies are compared to the Polarizable Multipole Poisson-Boltzmann (PMPB) model and yield a mean unsigned relative difference of 0.9%. Additionally, the reaction field of GK compares well to that of the PMPB model, as shown by a mean unsigned relative difference of 2.7% in predicting the total solvated dipole moment for each protein in this test set. The CPU time needed for GK relative to vacuum AMOEBA calculations is approximately a factor of 3, making it suitable for applications that require significant sampling of configuration space.

  7. Block versus continuum deformation in the Western United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, G.; Oppenheimer, D.; Amelung, F.

    1994-01-01

    The relative role of block versus continuum deformation of continental lithosphere is a current subject of debate. Continuous deformation is suggested by distributed seismicity at continental plate margins and by cumulative seismic moment sums which yield slip estimates that are less than estimates from plate motion studies. In contrast, block models are favored by geologic studies of displacement in places like Asia. A problem in this debate is a lack of data from which unequivocal conclusions may be reached. In this paper we apply the techniques of study used in regions such as the Alpine-Himalayan belt to an area with a wealth of instrumental data-the Western United States. By comparing plate rates to seismic moment release rates and assuming a typical seismogenic layer thickness of 15 km it appears that since 1850 about 60% of the Pacific-North America motion across the plate boundary in California and Nevada has occurred seismically and 40% aseismically. The San Francisco Bay area shows similar partitioning between seismic and aseismic deformation, and it can be shown that within the seismogenic depth range aseismic deformation is concentrated near the surface and at depth. In some cases this deformation can be located on creeping surface faults, but elsewhere it is spread over a several kilometer wide zone adjacent to the fault. These superficial creeping deformation zones may be responsible for the palaeomagnetic rotations that have been ascribed elsewhere to the surface expression of continuum deformation in the lithosphere. Our results support the dominant role of non-continuum deformation processes with the implication that deformation localization by strain softening must occur in the lower crust and probably the upper mantle. Our conclusions apply only to the regions where the data are good, and even within the Western United States (i.e., the Basin and Range) deformation styles remain poorly resolved. Nonetheless, we maintain that block motion is the

  8. The type, level, and distribution of microorganisms within the ward environment: a zonal analysis of an intensive care unit and a gastrointestinal surgical ward.

    PubMed

    Moore, Ginny; Muzslay, Monika; Wilson, A Peter R

    2013-05-01

    OBJECTIVE. To investigate the distribution of hospital pathogens within general and critical care ward environments and to determine the most significant bacterial reservoirs within each ward type. DESIGN. Prospective 4-month microbiological survey. SETTING. The intensive care unit (ICU) and gastrointestinal (GI) surgical ward of a London teaching hospital. PATIENTS. Sampling was conducted in and around the bed space of 166 different patients (99 in the ICU and 67 in the GI ward). METHODS. Conventional agar contact methodology was used to sample 123 predetermined sites twice a week for 17 weeks. Sixty-one surfaces were located within the ICU, and 62 were located within the GI ward. Each surface was located within a theoretical zone of increasing distance from the patient. Aerobic colony counts were determined, and confirmatory testing was conducted on all presumptive pathogens. RESULTS. Regardless of ward type, surfaces located closest to the patient, specifically those associated with the bed (side rails, bed control, and call button), were the most heavily contaminated. Elsewhere, the type of surfaces contaminated differed with ward type. In the ICU, bacteria were most likely to be on surfaces that were regularly touched by healthcare workers (e.g., telephones and computer keyboards). In the GI ward, where the patients were mobile, the highest numbers of bacteria (including potential nosocomial pathogens) were on surfaces that were mainly touched by patients, particularly their toilet and shower facilities. CONCLUSIONS. In terms of cleaning, a hospital should not be considered a single entity. Different ward types should be treated as separate environments, and cleaning protocols should be adjusted accordingly.

  9. Comparing simulated wildfire effects to jam distribution and habitat quality in an intermediate-sized stream 10 years after a high intensity fire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, S. L.; Eaton, B. C.

    2013-12-01

    Large wood governs channel morphology and determines the quality and distribution of aquatic habitat in many forested river networks. This is particularly true in streams that contain both key pieces large enough to form morphologically effective jams, as well as smaller mobile wood. In these streams, jams create spawning habitat by retaining sediment, increase rearing and over-wintering habitat by forming pools, and force avulsions which create side channels. To explore the effects of wildfire-induced increases in wood loading on channel morphology and aquatic habitat we have applied the stochastic reach-scale channel simulator (RSCS) to a case study of Fishtrap Creek, an intermediate-sized stream in the interior of British Columbia which experienced a high intensity fire in 2003. As predicted by model simulations, high quality spawning, rearing, and over-wintering habitats, as well as multi-thread channels, are found exclusively in association with wood, while plane-bed morphologies dominate where wood is absent. However, valley confinement and glacial legacy exert an important control on the magnitude of the impacts of the fire-derived wood; where the stream is confined, wood is suspended and morphologically ineffective, while un-confined segments contain high effective wood loads, multi-thread channels, and abundant aquatic habitat. These findings suggest that the morphologic effects of wood are highly dependent on valley geometry, which is in turn dictated by glacial legacy throughout much of North America, and that the impacts of valley confinement on the effectiveness of introduced wood must be considered in future model iterations. Plane bed morphology typical of reaches without large wood present Complex forced pool-riffle morphology typical of reaches with high wood loading

  10. Lack of Osteoradionecrosis of the Mandible After Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Cancer: Likely Contributions of Both Dental Care and Improved Dose Distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-David, Merav A.; Diamante, Maximiliano; Vineberg, Karen A.; Stroup, Cynthia; Murdoch-Kinch, Carol-Anne . E-mail: eisbruch@med.umich.edu

    2007-06-01

    Purpose: To assess the prevalence and dosimetric and clinical predictors of mandibular osteoradionecrosis (ORN) in patients with head and neck cancer who underwent a pretherapy dental evaluation and prophylactic treatment according to a uniform policy and were treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Between 1996 and 2005, all patients with head-and-neck cancer treated with parotid gland-sparing IMRT in prospective studies underwent a dental examination and prophylactic treatment according to a uniform policy that included extractions of high-risk, periodontally involved, and nonrestorable teeth in parts of the mandible expected to receive high radiation doses, fluoride supplements, and the placement of guards aiming to reduce electron backscatter off metal teeth restorations. The IMRT plans included dose constraints for the maximal mandibular doses and reduced mean parotid gland and noninvolved oral cavity doses. A retrospective analysis of Grade 2 or worse (clinical) ORN was performed. Results: A total of 176 patients had a minimal follow-up of 6 months. Of these, 31 (17%) had undergone teeth extractions before RT and 13 (7%) after RT. Of the 176 patients, 75% and 50% had received {>=}65 Gy and {>=}70 Gy to {>=}1% of the mandibular volume, respectively. Falloff across the mandible characterized the dose distributions: the average gradient (in the axial plane containing the maximal mandibular dose) was 11 Gy (range, 1-27 Gy; median, 8 Gy). At a median follow-up of 34 months, no cases of ORN had developed (95% confidence interval, 0-2%). Conclusion: The use of a strict prophylactic dental care policy and IMRT resulted in no case of clinical ORN. In addition to the dosimetric advantages offered by IMRT, meticulous dental prophylactic care is likely an essential factor in reducing ORN risk.

  11. Impact of the number of control points has on isodose distributions in a dynamic multileaf collimator intensity-modulated radiation therapy delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Goraj, Andrew; Boer, Steven F. de

    2012-01-01

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is a powerful technique in planning the delivery of dose. The most common IMRT delivery requires the use of moving multileaf collimators (MLCs) to deliver the requested fluence pattern. A dynamic delivery IMRT field file will contain several control points that are defined MLC shapes at a marked fraction of the delivered monitor units. The size of this file and the fidelity of the deliverable fluence are proportional to the number of control points defined. This study investigates the effect of reducing the number of control points has on the resultant dose distribution quality in complex IMRT in efforts to reduce transfer times, loading times, check sum times and file storage. Analysis was performed with 6 head and neck patients on an Eclipse version 8.5 treatment planning system (Varian, Palo Alto, CA). To ensure the quality of all treatments, Eclipse defines a minimum of 64 and a maximum of 320 control points per subfield (Eclipse Algorithms Reference guide). All 6 patients' plans were calculated with fixed 64, 166, and 320 control points using the sliding window technique. In addition, each plan was calculated in variable mode (Normal mode) in which the planning system determined the required number of control points. Each of the 4 plans for each patient was renormalized to provide the same mean planning target volume (PTV) 70 dose. Dose values for critical and target structures were examined for each patient. When examining the minimum, maximum, and mean doses to all target structures, it was noted that the greatest reduction in target dose coverage caused by reduced number of control points was 0.5%, which occurred for the minimum dose to the PTV56 structure in one plan.' Dose analysis for critical structures showed no clinically significant increase in dose when compared with the 320 control point plan.

  12. 34 CFR 300.115 - Continuum of alternative placements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Continuum of alternative placements. 300.115 Section 300... alternative placements. (a) Each public agency must ensure that a continuum of alternative placements is...) The continuum required in paragraph (a) of this section must— (1) Include the alternative...

  13. Continuum of Collaboration: Little Steps for Little Feet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Gwynn M.

    2013-01-01

    This mini-article outlines a continuum of collaboration for faculty within a department of the same discipline. The goal of illustrating this continuum is showcase different stages of collaboration so that faculty members can assess where they are as a collective and consider steps to collaborate more. The separate points along a continuum of…

  14. A continuum model of transcriptional bursting

    PubMed Central

    Corrigan, Adam M; Tunnacliffe, Edward; Cannon, Danielle; Chubb, Jonathan R

    2016-01-01

    Transcription occurs in stochastic bursts. Early models based upon RNA hybridisation studies suggest bursting dynamics arise from alternating inactive and permissive states. Here we investigate bursting mechanism in live cells by quantitative imaging of actin gene transcription, combined with molecular genetics, stochastic simulation and probabilistic modelling. In contrast to early models, our data indicate a continuum of transcriptional states, with a slowly fluctuating initiation rate converting the gene between different levels of activity, interspersed with extended periods of inactivity. We place an upper limit of 40 s on the lifetime of fluctuations in elongation rate, with initiation rate variations persisting an order of magnitude longer. TATA mutations reduce the accessibility of high activity states, leaving the lifetime of on- and off-states unchanged. A continuum or spectrum of gene states potentially enables a wide dynamic range for cell responses to stimuli. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13051.001 PMID:26896676

  15. Self-consistent continuum solvation for optical absorption of complex molecular systems in solution

    SciTech Connect

    Timrov, Iurii; Biancardi, Alessandro; Andreussi, Oliviero; Marzari, Nicola; Baroni, Stefano

    2015-01-21

    We introduce a new method to compute the optical absorption spectra of complex molecular systems in solution, based on the Liouville approach to time-dependent density-functional perturbation theory and the revised self-consistent continuum solvation model. The former allows one to obtain the absorption spectrum over a whole wide frequency range, using a recently proposed Lanczos-based technique, or selected excitation energies, using the Casida equation, without having to ever compute any unoccupied molecular orbitals. The latter is conceptually similar to the polarizable continuum model and offers the further advantages of allowing an easy computation of atomic forces via the Hellmann-Feynman theorem and a ready implementation in periodic-boundary conditions. The new method has been implemented using pseudopotentials and plane-wave basis sets, benchmarked against polarizable continuum model calculations on 4-aminophthalimide, alizarin, and cyanin and made available through the QUANTUM ESPRESSO distribution of open-source codes.

  16. Self-consistent continuum solvation for optical absorption of complex molecular systems in solution.

    PubMed

    Timrov, Iurii; Andreussi, Oliviero; Biancardi, Alessandro; Marzari, Nicola; Baroni, Stefano

    2015-01-21

    We introduce a new method to compute the optical absorption spectra of complex molecular systems in solution, based on the Liouville approach to time-dependent density-functional perturbation theory and the revised self-consistent continuum solvation model. The former allows one to obtain the absorption spectrum over a whole wide frequency range, using a recently proposed Lanczos-based technique, or selected excitation energies, using the Casida equation, without having to ever compute any unoccupied molecular orbitals. The latter is conceptually similar to the polarizable continuum model and offers the further advantages of allowing an easy computation of atomic forces via the Hellmann-Feynman theorem and a ready implementation in periodic-boundary conditions. The new method has been implemented using pseudopotentials and plane-wave basis sets, benchmarked against polarizable continuum model calculations on 4-aminophthalimide, alizarin, and cyanin and made available through the Quantum ESPRESSO distribution of open-source codes. PMID:25612693

  17. SU-E-T-592: Relationship Between Dose of Distribution and Area of Segment Fields Among Different Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Planning in Cervix Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, R; Wang, Y; Cao, Y; Zhang, R; Shang, K; Chi, Z

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: In premise of uninfluenced to dose distribution of tumor target and organ at risk(OAR) in cervical cancer,area of segment fields was changed to increase efficacy and optimize treatment method by designing different plan of intensity modulated radiotherapy(IMRT). Methods: 12 cases of cervical cancer were confirmed in pathology and treated with step and shoot IMRT. Dose of PTV was 50Gy/25fractions. Every patient was designed 9 treatment plans of IMRT by Pinnacle 8.0m planning system,each plan was used with 9 beams of uniform distribution and fixing incidence direction(200°,240°,280°,320°,0°,40°,80°,120°and 160°respectively),and designed for delivery on Elekta Synergy linear accelerator. All plans were optimized with the direct machine parameter optimization(DMPO) algorithm using the same set of optimization objectives. Number of maximum segment field was defined at 80 and minimum MU in each segment was 5MU,and minimal segment area was 2*1cm{sup 2},2*2cm{sup 2},3*3cm{sup 2},4*4cm{sup 2},5*5cm{sup 2},6*6cm{sup 2},7*7cm{sup 2},8*8cm{sup 2}and 9*9cm{sup 2},respectively.Coverage,homogeneity and conformity of PTV,sparing of OAR, MU and number of segment were compared. Results: In this group, mean volume of PTV was 916.8±228.7 cm{sup 3}. Compared with the area of minimal segment field increased from 2*1cm{sup 2} to 9*9 cm{sup 2},the number of mean MU was decreased from 1405±170 to 490±47 and the number of segment field was reduced from 76±4 to 39±7 respectively(p<0.05). When the limit of minimal segment area was increased from 2*1cm{sup 2} to 7*7 cm{sup 2},dose distribution of PTV,OAR,CI,HI and V{sub 2} {sub 3} were not different (p>0.05),but when the minimal segment area was 8*8 cm{sup 2} and 9*9 cm{sup 2},they were changed compared with 7*7 cm{sup 2} and below(p<0.05). Conclusion: The minimal segment field of IMRT plan designed by Pinnacle 8.0m planning system in cervical carcinoma should be enlarge reasonably and minimal segment area of 7*7 cm

  18. Bipotential continuum models for granular mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goddard, Joe

    2014-03-01

    Most currently popular continuum models for granular media are special cases of a generalized Maxwell fluid model, which describes the evolution of stress and internal variables such as granular particle fraction and fabric,in terms of imposed strain rate. It is shown how such models can be obtained from two scalar potentials, a standard elastic free energy and a ``dissipation potential'' given rigorously by the mathematical theory of Edelen. This allows for a relatively easy derivation of properly invariant continuum models for granular media and fluid-particle suspensions within a thermodynamically consistent framework. The resulting continuum models encompass all the prominent regimes of granular flow, ranging from the quasi-static to rapidly sheared, and are readily extended to include higher-gradient or Cosserat effects. Models involving stress diffusion, such as that proposed recently by Kamrin and Koval (PRL 108 178301), provide an alternative approach that is mentioned in passing. This paper provides a brief overview of a forthcoming review articles by the speaker (The Princeton Companion to Applied Mathematics, and Appl. Mech. Rev.,in the press, 2013).

  19. A Continuum Theory of Thermal Transpiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bielenberg, James; Brenner, Howard

    2003-11-01

    A rational, continuum mechanical description is given for the pressure drop that develops in a closed capillary tube subject to an imposed temperature gradient. This phenomenon, termed thermal transpiration, has been experimentally demonstrated in systems at vanishing Knudsen numbers, yet no purely continuum mechanical description has, until now, been given. Previous hybrid solutions (dating back to Maxwell in 1879) have utilized the classical, incompressible flow equations along with molecularly derived slip boundary conditions. This solution approach will be briefly discussed and shown to be dynamically consistent yet energetically flawed. Subsequently, we will apply a novel reformulation of continuum-mechanics and -thermodynamics, which clearly distinguishes between the Lagrangian (tracer) and the barycentric velocities, to generate a solution for the thermal pressure drop developed in a closed system. Explicitly, the phenomena at hand will be shown to be entirely analogous to Poiseuille flow in tube, albeit with the tacit recognition that the ``flow'' we are speaking of is defined in a dynamic sense rather than in the more traditional, kinematic mass-flux based sense. This solution will be show to be free of ad hoc parameters, consistent with experimental results, and in accordance with classical macroscopic thermodynamics. Beyond its purely scientific importance, this phenomenon may find applications in the emerging area of micro-fluidic pumping.

  20. Polymer Fluid Dynamics: Continuum and Molecular Approaches.

    PubMed

    Bird, R B; Giacomin, A J

    2016-06-01

    To solve problems in polymer fluid dynamics, one needs the equations of continuity, motion, and energy. The last two equations contain the stress tensor and the heat-flux vector for the material. There are two ways to formulate the stress tensor: (a) One can write a continuum expression for the stress tensor in terms of kinematic tensors, or (b) one can select a molecular model that represents the polymer molecule and then develop an expression for the stress tensor from kinetic theory. The advantage of the kinetic theory approach is that one gets information about the relation between the molecular structure of the polymers and the rheological properties. We restrict the discussion primarily to the simplest stress tensor expressions or constitutive equations containing from two to four adjustable parameters, although we do indicate how these formulations may be extended to give more complicated expressions. We also explore how these simplest expressions are recovered as special cases of a more general framework, the Oldroyd 8-constant model. Studying the simplest models allows us to discover which types of empiricisms or molecular models seem to be worth investigating further. We also explore equivalences between continuum and molecular approaches. We restrict the discussion to several types of simple flows, such as shearing flows and extensional flows, which are of greatest importance in industrial operations. Furthermore, if these simple flows cannot be well described by continuum or molecular models, then it is not necessary to lavish time and energy to apply them to more complex flow problems. PMID:27276553

  1. Line and continuum variability in active galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashed, Y. E.; Eckart, A.; Valencia-S., M.; García-Marín, M.; Busch, G.; Zuther, J.; Horrobin, M.; Zhou, H.

    2015-12-01

    We compared optical spectroscopic and photometric data for 18 active galactic nuclei (AGN) galaxies over two to three epochs, with time intervals of typically 5 to 10 yr. We used the multi-object double spectrograph (MODS) at the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) and compared the spectra with data taken from the SDSS data base and the literature. We found variations in the forbidden oxygen lines as well as in the hydrogen recombination lines of these sources. For four of the sources we found that, within the calibration uncertainties, the variations in continuum and line spectra of the sources are very small. We argue that it is mainly the difference in black hole mass between the samples that is responsible for the different degree of continuum variability. In addition, we found that for an otherwise constant accretion rate the total line variability (dominated by the narrow line contributions) reverberates in a similar way to the continuum variability with a dependence ΔLline ∝ (ΔLcont)3/2. Because this dependence is predominantly expressed in the narrow line emission, the implication is that the part of the source that dominates the luminosity in the narrow line region must be very compact, with a diameter of the order of at least 10 light-years. A comparison with data from the literature shows that these findings describe the variability characteristics of a total of 61 broad and narrow line sources.

  2. SYSTEMATIC CONTINUUM ERRORS IN THE Ly{alpha} FOREST AND THE MEASURED TEMPERATURE-DENSITY RELATION

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Khee-Gan

    2012-07-10

    Continuum fitting uncertainties are a major source of error in estimates of the temperature-density relation (usually parameterized as a power-law, T {proportional_to} {Delta}{sup {gamma}-1}) of the intergalactic medium through the flux probability distribution function (PDF) of the Ly{alpha} forest. Using a simple order-of-magnitude calculation, we show that few percent-level systematic errors in the placement of the quasar continuum due to, e.g., a uniform low-absorption Gunn-Peterson component could lead to errors in {gamma} of the order of unity. This is quantified further using a simple semi-analytic model of the Ly{alpha} forest flux PDF. We find that under(over)estimates in the continuum level can lead to a lower (higher) measured value of {gamma}. By fitting models to mock data realizations generated with current observational errors, we find that continuum errors can cause a systematic bias in the estimated temperature-density relation of ({delta}({gamma})) Almost-Equal-To -0.1, while the error is increased to {sigma}{sub {gamma}} Almost-Equal-To 0.2 compared to {sigma}{sub {gamma}} Almost-Equal-To 0.1 in the absence of continuum errors.

  3. Environmental heterogeneity affects the location of modelled communities along the niche–neutrality continuum

    PubMed Central

    Bar-Massada, Avi; Kent, Rafi; Carmel, Yohay

    2014-01-01

    The continuum hypothesis has been proposed as a means to reconcile the contradiction between the niche and neutral theories. While past research has shown that species richness affects the location of communities along the niche–neutrality continuum, there may be extrinsic forces at play as well. We used a spatially explicit continuum model to quantify the effects of environmental heterogeneity, comprising abundance distribution and spatial configuration of resources, on the degree of community neutrality. We found that both components of heterogeneity affect the degree of community neutrality and that species' dispersal characteristics affect the neutrality–heterogeneity relationship. Narrower resource abundance distributions decrease neutrality, while spatial configuration, which is manifested by spatial aggregation of resources, decreases neutrality at higher aggregation levels. In general, the degree of community neutrality was affected by complex interactions among spatial configuration of resources, their abundance distributions and the dispersal characteristics of species in the community. Our results highlight the important yet overlooked role of the environment in dictating the location of communities along the hypothesized niche–neutrality continuum. PMID:24671973

  4. Effective damage zone volume of fault zones and initial salinity distribution determine intensity of shallow aquifer salinization in geological underground utilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langer, M.; Tillner, E.; Kempka, T.; Kühn, M.

    2015-06-01

    Injection of fluids into deep saline aquifers causes a pore pressure increase in the storage formation, and thus displacement of resident brines. Via hydraulically conductive faults, brine may migrate upwards into shallower aquifers, and lead to unwanted salinization of potable groundwater resources. In the present study, we investigated different scenarios for a prospective storage site close to the city of Beeskow in the Northeast German Basin by using a 3-D regional scale model (100 km × 100 km × 1.34 km) that includes four ambient fault zones. The focus was on assessing the impact of fault length and the effect of an overlying secondary reservoir as well as model boundary conditions on the potential salinization of shallow groundwater resources. We employed numerical simulations of brine injection as a representative fluid using the simulator TOUGH2-MP. Our simulation results demonstrate that pressure build-up within the reservoir determines the intensity and duration of fluid flow through the faults, and hence salinization of shallower aquifers. Application of different boundary conditions proved that these have a crucial impact on reservoir fluid displacement. If reservoir boundaries are closed, the fluid migrated upwards into the shallow aquifer, corresponds to the overall injected fluid mass. In that case, a short hydraulically conductive fault length and the presence of an overlying secondary reservoir leads only to retardation in brine displacement up to a factor of five and three, respectively. If the reservoir boundaries are open, salinization is considerably reduced: in the presence of a secondary reservoir, 33% of equivalent brine mass migrates into the shallow aquifer, if all four faults are hydraulically open over their entire length, whereas the displaced equivalent brine mass is only 12% for a single fault of two kilometres length. Taking into account the considered geological boundary conditions, the brine originates in maximum from the upper 4

  5. The Effect of Significant Tumor Reduction on the Dose Distribution in Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Head-And-Neck Cancer: A Case Study

    SciTech Connect

    Mechalakos, James Lee, Nancy; Hunt, Margie; Ling, C. Clifton; Amols, Howard I.

    2009-10-01

    We present a unique case in which a patient with significant tissue loss was monitored for dosimetric changes using weekly cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans. A previously treated nasopharynx patient presented with a large, exophytic, recurrent left neck mass. The patient underwent re-irradiation to 70 Gy using intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with shielding blocks over the spinal cord and brain stem. Weekly CBCT scans were acquired during treatment. Target contours and treatment fields were then transferred from the original treatment planning computed tomography (CT) to the CBCT scans and dose calculations were performed on all CBCT scans and compared to the planning doses. In addition, a 'research' treatment plan was created that assumed the patient had not been previously treated, and the above analysis was repeated. Finally, to remove the effects of setup error, the outer contours of 2 CBCT scans with significant tumor reductions were transferred to the planning scan and dose in the planning scan was recalculated. Planning treatment volume (PTV) decreased 45% during treatment. Spinal cord D05 differed from the planned value by 3.5 {+-} 9.8% (average + standard deviation). Mean dose to the oral cavity and D05 of the mandible differed from the planned value by 0.9 {+-} 2.1% and 0.6 {+-} 1.5%, respectively. Results for the research plan were comparable. Target coverage did not change appreciably (-0.2 {+-} 2.5%). When the planning scan was recalculated with the reduced outer contour from the CBCT, spinal cord D05 decreased slightly due to the reduction in scattered dose. Weekly imaging provided us the unique opportunity to use different methods to examine the dosimetric effects of an unusually large loss of tissue. We did not see that tissue loss alone resulted in a significant effect on the dose delivered to the spinal cord for this case, as most fluctuation was due to setup error. In the IGRT era, delivered dose distributions can be more

  6. A robust, coupled approach for atomistic-continuum simulation.

    SciTech Connect

    Aubry, Sylvie; Webb, Edmund Blackburn, III; Wagner, Gregory John; Klein, Patrick A.; Jones, Reese E.; Zimmerman, Jonathan A.; Bammann, Douglas J.; Hoyt, Jeffrey John; Kimmer, Christopher J.

    2004-09-01

    This report is a collection of documents written by the group members of the Engineering Sciences Research Foundation (ESRF), Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project titled 'A Robust, Coupled Approach to Atomistic-Continuum Simulation'. Presented in this document is the development of a formulation for performing quasistatic, coupled, atomistic-continuum simulation that includes cross terms in the equilibrium equations that arise due to kinematic coupling and corrections used for the calculation of system potential energy to account for continuum elements that overlap regions containing atomic bonds, evaluations of thermo-mechanical continuum quantities calculated within atomistic simulations including measures of stress, temperature and heat flux, calculation used to determine the appropriate spatial and time averaging necessary to enable these atomistically-defined expressions to have the same physical meaning as their continuum counterparts, and a formulation to quantify a continuum 'temperature field', the first step towards constructing a coupled atomistic-continuum approach capable of finite temperature and dynamic analyses.

  7. Exploring morphological correlations among H2CO, 12CO, MSX and continuum mappings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chuan Peng; Esimbek, Jarken; Zhou, Jian Jun; Wu, Gang; Du, Zhi Mao

    2012-01-01

    There are relatively few H2CO mappings of large-area giant molecular cloud (GMCs). H2CO absorption lines are good tracers for low-temperature molecular clouds towards star formation regions. Thus, the aim of the study was to identify H2CO distributions in ambient molecular clouds. We investigated morphologic relations among 6-cm continuum brightness temperature (CBT) data and H2CO (111-110; Nanshan 25-m radio telescope), 12CO (1-0; 1.2-m CfA telescope) and midcourse space experiment (MSX) data, and considered the impact of background components on foreground clouds. We report simultaneous 6-cm H2CO absorption lines and H110 α radio recombination line observations and give several large-area mappings at 4.8 GHz toward W49 (50'×50'), W3 (70'×90'), DR21/W75 (60'×90') and NGC2024/NGC2023 (50'×100') GMCs. By superimposing H2CO and 12CO contours onto the MSX color map, we can compare correlations. The resolution for H2CO, 12CO and MSX data was ˜10', ˜8' and ˜18.3″, respectively. Comparison of H2CO and 12CO contours, 8.28-μm MSX colorscale and CBT data revealed great morphological correlation in the large area, although there are some discrepancies between 12CO and H2CO peaks in small areas. The NGC2024/NGC2023 GMC is a large area of HII regions with a high CBT, but a H2CO cloud to the north is possible against the cosmic microwave background. A statistical diagram shows that 85.21% of H2CO absorption lines are distributed in the intensity range from -1.0 to 0 Jy and the Δ V range from 1.206 to 5 km s-1.

  8. Ram vehicle glow spectrum - Implication of NO2 recombination continuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swenson, G. R.; Mende, S. B.; Clifton, K. S.

    1985-01-01

    An experiment was operated on several Space Shuttle missions to provide spatial and spectral distributions of a ram glow associated with the Orbiter. The most recent data featured resolved spectrum and imagery of the glow with spectroscopic resolution of 34 A FWHM between 4000 and 8000 A. The spectrum of the glow on the Shuttle tail pod could be clearly separated from spectrum of the reflected light from the Orbiter. Analysis and comparison have been performed which strongly suggest the emission originates from recombination continuum of NO2. Both fast recombination (high temperature) and the spectral dependence in lifetime can describe the spectral difference. If the recombined NO2 retains 25 percent of the kinetic energy of the ram OI, the thickness of the glow layer can be explained by the lifetime of NO2 (2B1) recombination emission.

  9. A continuum theory of grain size evolution and damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricard, Y.; Bercovici, D.

    2009-01-01

    Lithospheric shear localization, as occurs in the formation of tectonic plate boundaries, is often associated with diminished grain size (e.g., mylonites). Grain size reduction is typically attributed to dynamic recrystallization; however, theoretical models of shear localization arising from this hypothesis are problematic because (1) they require the simultaneous action of two creep mechanisms (diffusion and dislocation creep) that occur in different deformation regimes (i.e., in grain size stress space) and (2) the grain growth ("healing") laws employed by these models are derived from normal grain growth or coarsening theory, which are valid in the absence of deformation, although the shear localization setting itself requires deformation. Here we present a new first principles grained-continuum theory, which accounts for both coarsening and damage-induced grain size reduction in a monomineralic assemblage undergoing irrecoverable deformation. Damage per se is the generic process for generation of microcracks, defects, dislocations (including recrystallization), subgrains, nuclei, and cataclastic breakdown of grains. The theory contains coupled macroscopic continuum mechanical and grain-scale statistical components. The continuum level of the theory considers standard mass, momentum, and energy conservation, as well as entropy production, on a statistically averaged grained continuum. The grain-scale element of the theory describes both the evolution of the grain size distribution and mechanisms for both continuous grain growth and discontinuous grain fracture and coalescence. The continuous and discontinuous processes of grain size variation are prescribed by nonequilibrium thermodynamics (in particular, the treatment of entropy production provides the phenomenological laws for grain growth and reduction); grain size evolution thus incorporates the free energy differences between grains, including both grain boundary surface energy (which controls coarsening

  10. Missing links in the root-soil organic matter continuum

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, Sarah L.; Iversen, Colleen M

    2009-01-01

    range of soil processes, from the exudation of labile C compounds to the development of fungal associations. For example, Zoe Cardon demonstrated that the root-mediated redistribution of deep soil water to relatively dry shallower soil, increased soil CO{sub 2} efflux and nutrient cycling near the surface in an arid ecosystem. Andrew Kulmatiski also discussed the importance of rooting distribution throughout the soil profile for strategies of water uptake by different species in an African savanna. Later, Julie Jastrow demonstrated that living roots shape soil physical structure by promoting the formation of soil aggregates, which facilitated accrual of SOM in restored grasslands. Taken together, the evidence is compelling that living roots, and organic matter derived from root detritus, are important parts of the continuum of organic matter in the soil. Larger soil organisms (i.e. 50 {micro}m to many cm in body size) play an important role in the root-SOM continuum by grazing on roots and microbes, comminuting organic matter and aggregating soil in fecal pellets. However, litterbag and soil incubation studies necessarily exclude invertebrates, and research on faunal activity and trophic dynamics tends to be independent from research on the biogeochemistry of SOM cycling. Tim Filley used plant-derived biomarkers in invertebrate residues to bridge the gap between larger soil organisms, such as earthworms and beetle larvae, and SOM distribution. He found that larger soil organisms help to stabilize root-derived organic matter in soil aggregates. Similar coupling of biogeochemistry with food web studies could prove fruitful for describing mechanisms that underlie critical ecosystem processes. Despite considerable research efforts, the breadth of the microbial role in the root-SOM continuum remains unresolved. Using advanced pyrosequencing techniques, David Nelson demonstrated the importance of archea as nitrifiers in agricultural systems exposed to elevated [CO{sub 2

  11. Continuum and atomistic modeling of ion partitioning into a peptide nanotube.

    PubMed Central

    Asthagiri, D; Bashford, D

    2002-01-01

    Continuum and atomistic descriptions of the partitioning of ions into a self-assembled (D,L)-octapeptide nanotube, cyclo[-(L-Ala-D-Ala)(4)-], are presented. Perturbation free energy calculations, including Ewald electrostatics, are used to estimate the electrostatic component of the excess free energy of charging Li(+), Na(+), Rb(+), and Cl(minus sign) ions inside the nanotube. The radial density and orientational distribution of water around the ion is calculated for the ion at two different positions inside the tube; it is seen that the calculated distributions are sensitive to the location of the ions. Two different continuum electrostatic models are formulated to describe the ion solvation inside the nanotube. When enhanced orientational structuring of water dipoles is evidenced, explicitly including the first solvation shell as part of the low dielectric nanotube environment provides good agreement with molecular dynamics simulations. When water orientational structuring is as in the reference bulk solvent, we find that treating the first shell water explicitly or as a high dielectric continuum leads to similar results. These results are discussed, and their importance for continuum electrostatic modeling of ion channels are highlighted. PMID:11867436

  12. High-order continuum kinetic method for modeling plasma dynamics in phase space

    SciTech Connect

    Vogman, G. V.; Colella, P.; Shumlak, U.

    2014-12-15

    Continuum methods offer a high-fidelity means of simulating plasma kinetics. While computationally intensive, these methods are advantageous because they can be cast in conservation-law form, are not susceptible to noise, and can be implemented using high-order numerical methods. Advances in continuum method capabilities for modeling kinetic phenomena in plasmas require the development of validation tools in higher dimensional phase space and an ability to handle non-cartesian geometries. To that end, a new benchmark for validating Vlasov-Poisson simulations in 3D (x,vx,vy) is presented. The benchmark is based on the Dory-Guest-Harris instability and is successfully used to validate a continuum finite volume algorithm. To address challenges associated with non-cartesian geometries, unique features of cylindrical phase space coordinates are described. Preliminary results of continuum kinetic simulations in 4D (r,z,vr,vz) phase space are presented.

  13. Interpreting angina: symptoms along a gender continuum

    PubMed Central

    Crea-Arsenio, Mary; Shannon, Harry S; Velianou, James L; Giacomini, Mita

    2016-01-01

    Background ‘Typical’ angina is often used to describe symptoms common among men, while ‘atypical’ angina is used to describe symptoms common among women, despite a higher prevalence of angina among women. This discrepancy is a source of controversy in cardiac care among women. Objectives To redefine angina by (1) qualitatively comparing angina symptoms and experiences in women and men and (2) to propose a more meaningful construct of angina that integrates a more gender-centred approach. Methods Patients were recruited between July and December 2010 from a tertiary cardiac care centre and interviewed immediately prior to their first angiogram. Symptoms were explored through in-depth semi-structured interviews, transcribed verbatim and analysed concurrently using a modified grounded theory approach. Angiographically significant disease was assessed at ≥70% stenosis of a major epicardial vessel. Results Among 31 total patients, 13 men and 14 women had angiograpically significant CAD. Patients describe angina symptoms according to 6 symptomatic subthemes that array along a ‘gender continuum’. Gender-specific symptoms are anchored at each end of the continuum. At the centre of the continuum, are a remarkably large number of symptoms commonly expressed by both men and women. Conclusions The ‘gender continuum’ offers new insights into angina experiences of angiography candidates. Notably, there is more overlap of shared experiences between men and women than conventionally thought. The gender continuum can help researchers and clinicians contextualise patient symptom reports, avoiding the conventional ‘typical’ versus ‘atypical’ distinction that can misrepresent gendered angina experiences. PMID:27158523

  14. Continuum elastic modeling of graphene resonators.

    PubMed

    Atalaya, Juan; Isacsson, Andreas; Kinaret, Jari M

    2008-12-01

    Starting from an atomistic approach, we have derived a hierarchy of successively more simplified continuum elasticity descriptions for modeling the mechanical properties of suspended graphene sheets. We find that already for deflections of the order of 0.5 A a theory that correctly accounts for nonlinearities is necessary and that for many purposes a set of coupled Duffing-type equations may be used to accurately describe the dynamics of graphene membranes. The descriptions are validated by applying them to square graphene-based resonators with clamped edges and studying numerically their mechanical responses. Both static and dynamic responses are treated, and we find good agreement with recent experimental findings. PMID:19367927

  15. Continuum regularization of gauge theory with fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, H.S.

    1987-03-01

    The continuum regularization program is discussed in the case of d-dimensional gauge theory coupled to fermions in an arbitrary representation. Two physically equivalent formulations are given. First, a Grassmann formulation is presented, which is based on the two-noise Langevin equations of Sakita, Ishikawa and Alfaro and Gavela. Second, a non-Grassmann formulation is obtained by regularized integration of the matter fields within the regularized Grassmann system. Explicit perturbation expansions are studied in both formulations, and considerable simplification is found in the integrated non-Grassmann formalism.

  16. Continuum description of avalanches in granular media.

    SciTech Connect

    Aranson, I. S.; Tsimring, L. S.

    2000-12-05

    A continuum theory of partially fluidized granular flows is proposed. The theory is based on a combination of the mass and momentum conservation equations with the order parameter equation which describes the transition between flowing and static components of the granular system. We apply this model to the dynamics of avalanches in chutes. The theory provides a quantitative description of recent observations of granular flows on rough inclined planes (Daerr and Douady 1999): layer bistability, and the transition from triangular avalanches propagating downhill at small inclination angles to balloon-shaped avalanches also propagating uphill for larger angles.

  17. Continuum modeling of clustering of myxobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Cameron W.; Alber, Mark; Tsimring, Lev S.; Aranson, Igor S.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we develop a continuum theory of clustering in ensembles of self-propelled inelastically colliding rods with applications to collective dynamics of common gliding bacteria Myxococcus Xanthus. A multiphase hydrodynamic model that couples densities of oriented and isotropic phases is described. This model is used for the analysis of an instability that leads to spontaneous formation of directionally moving dense clusters within initially dilute isotropic “gas” of myxobacteria. Numerical simulations of this model confirm the existence of stationary dense moving clusters and also elucidate the properties of their collisions. The results are shown to be in a qualitative agreement with experiments. PMID:23712128

  18. Continuum eigenmodes in some linear stellar models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winfield, Christopher J.

    2016-10-01

    We apply parallel approaches in the study of continuous spectra to adiabatic stellar models. We seek continuum eigenmodes for the LAWE formulated as both finite difference and linear differential equations. In particular, we apply methods of Jacobi matrices and methods of subordinancy theory in these respective formulations. We find certain pressure-density conditions which admit positive-measured sets of continuous oscillation spectra under plausible conditions on density and pressure. We arrive at results of unbounded oscillations and computational or, perhaps, dynamic instability.

  19. Review of two 1998 Mathematical Appendices Primary to Continuum Theory: Deflection Scattering and Redshift by a Particle-tied Aether

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osmaston, Miles F.

    My development of Continuum Theory rests importantly on two mathematical treatments and calculations which I wrote in 1994 and were published in 1998 as Appendices A and B to my PIRT V paper presented in London in 1996. In view of their continuing scientific relevance, this contribution to the V9 conference proceedings is a republication of those Appendices, subject to minimal re-editing. Appendix B, presented first, tackles our 1959 finding that the daylight sky brightness distribution at high altitude shows the presence of an additional contribution whose intensity and distribution which, on careful analysis, I identified as having come from a deflection scattering mechanism due to transmission by an (atmospheric) `particle-tied aether'. Appendix A shows that redshift is one of the consequences of such transmission. The parameters involved are then used to analyse the 1968 radio ground-wave caesium clock redshift observations of Sadeh et al and to extrapolate them to the intergalactic transmission paths pertinent to the cosmic redshift as a transmission effect, not a velocity. It finds this to be a reasonable evaluation within observational uncertainties, notably those of density and degree of ionization. In that case, there being no Big Bang, the temperature is precisely known from the CMBR, identified as synchrotron-type radiation from the randomly moving aether along the path, but slightly elevated where the path has traversed a heat-generating cluster.

  20. Induced strains and defect continuum theory: Internal reorganization of load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teisseyre, Roman; Górski, Marek

    2012-02-01

    Induced strains play an important role in mining regions and water dam areas. We consider a mechanism of reorganization of the applied stress load by some changes in rock-body defect distribution caused by human activity. A defect content increases with increasing stress load and related deformations; hence, a relationship could appear between seismic risk and deformation level. Recent progress in the Asymmetric Continuum Theory permits to consider some internal reorganization of the applied load due to internal defect content and distribution; in this paper we consider an increase of internal defect densities due to mining works and the appearance of reorganized internal stress distribution. A generalization of the Peach-Koehler forces acting on the defects makes it possible to define formation of induced strains; a character of resulting strains may essentially differ from the applied load. In the case of an axial load, this approach helps to understand formation of shear or rotational micro-fractures, usually recognized as fragmentation and slip motions.

  1. Continuum robot arms inspired by cephalopods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Ian D.; Dawson, Darren M.; Flash, Tamar; Grasso, Frank W.; Hanlon, Roger T.; Hochner, Binyamin; Kier, William M.; Pagano, Christopher C.; Rahn, Christopher D.; Zhang, Qiming M.

    2005-05-01

    In this paper, we describe our recent results in the development of a new class of soft, continuous backbone ("continuum") robot manipulators. Our work is strongly motivated by the dexterous appendages found in cephalopods, particularly the arms and suckers of octopus, and the arms and tentacles of squid. Our ongoing investigation of these animals reveals interesting and unexpected functional aspects of their structure and behavior. The arrangement and dynamic operation of muscles and connective tissue observed in the arms of a variety of octopus species motivate the underlying design approach for our soft manipulators. These artificial manipulators feature biomimetic actuators, including artificial muscles based on both electro-active polymers (EAP) and pneumatic (McKibben) muscles. They feature a "clean" continuous backbone design, redundant degrees of freedom, and exhibit significant compliance that provides novel operational capacities during environmental interaction and object manipulation. The unusual compliance and redundant degrees of freedom provide strong potential for application to delicate tasks in cluttered and/or unstructured environments. Our aim is to endow these compliant robotic mechanisms with the diverse and dexterous grasping behavior observed in octopuses. To this end, we are conducting fundamental research into the manipulation tactics, sensory biology, and neural control of octopuses. This work in turn leads to novel approaches to motion planning and operator interfaces for the robots. The paper describes the above efforts, along with the results of our development of a series of continuum tentacle-like robots, demonstrating the unique abilities of biologically-inspired design.

  2. Measurements of Continuum Flux in Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotrč, P.; Heinzel, P.; Procházka, O.

    2016-04-01

    A broad-band diagnostics of chromospheric flare plasma needs to analyze spectra covering many spectral lines and various continuum features. The flare spectra are well detected on the background of the solar disk, but the detection of flare line emission from the Sun-as-a-star in optical is much more difficult due to a strong background radiation. When the flare/background radiation contrast is strong enough to be detected, we need a device for measuring the flux from a selected part of the flaring region. Here we present technical demands for such an instrument and its brief description. This device denoted as Image Selector is a post-focus instrument installed at the horizontal solar telescope HSFA2 of the Ondřejov observatory, described by Kotrč (2009). Its core consists of a system of diaphragms, imaging Hα telescope and a fast spectrometer with dispersion of 3 px per Å but with cadency reaching up to 50 frames per second. The first solar flares observed recently by this novel technique provide quite interesting results. Our analysis of the data proves that the described device is sufficiently sensitive to detect variations in the Balmer continuum during solar flares.

  3. Atomistic to continuum modeling of solidification microstructures

    SciTech Connect

    Karma, Alain; Tourret, Damien

    2015-09-26

    We summarize recent advances in modeling of solidification microstructures using computational methods that bridge atomistic to continuum scales. We first discuss progress in atomistic modeling of equilibrium and non-equilibrium solid–liquid interface properties influencing microstructure formation, as well as interface coalescence phenomena influencing the late stages of solidification. The latter is relevant in the context of hot tearing reviewed in the article by M. Rappaz in this issue. We then discuss progress to model microstructures on a continuum scale using phase-field methods. We focus on selected examples in which modeling of 3D cellular and dendritic microstructures has been directly linked to experimental observations. Finally, we discuss a recently introduced coarse-grained dendritic needle network approach to simulate the formation of well-developed dendritic microstructures. The approach reliably bridges the well-separated scales traditionally simulated by phase-field and grain structure models, hence opening new avenues for quantitative modeling of complex intra- and inter-grain dynamical interactions on a grain scale.

  4. Accurate Molecular Polarizabilities Based on Continuum Electrostatics

    PubMed Central

    Truchon, Jean-François; Nicholls, Anthony; Iftimie, Radu I.; Roux, Benoît; Bayly, Christopher I.

    2013-01-01

    A novel approach for representing the intramolecular polarizability as a continuum dielectric is introduced to account for molecular electronic polarization. It is shown, using a finite-difference solution to the Poisson equation, that the Electronic Polarization from Internal Continuum (EPIC) model yields accurate gas-phase molecular polarizability tensors for a test set of 98 challenging molecules composed of heteroaromatics, alkanes and diatomics. The electronic polarization originates from a high intramolecular dielectric that produces polarizabilities consistent with B3LYP/aug-cc-pVTZ and experimental values when surrounded by vacuum dielectric. In contrast to other approaches to model electronic polarization, this simple model avoids the polarizability catastrophe and accurately calculates molecular anisotropy with the use of very few fitted parameters and without resorting to auxiliary sites or anisotropic atomic centers. On average, the unsigned error in the average polarizability and anisotropy compared to B3LYP are 2% and 5%, respectively. The correlation between the polarizability components from B3LYP and this approach lead to a R2 of 0.990 and a slope of 0.999. Even the F2 anisotropy, shown to be a difficult case for existing polarizability models, can be reproduced within 2% error. In addition to providing new parameters for a rapid method directly applicable to the calculation of polarizabilities, this work extends the widely used Poisson equation to areas where accurate molecular polarizabilities matter. PMID:23646034

  5. Atomistic to continuum modeling of solidification microstructures

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Karma, Alain; Tourret, Damien

    2015-09-26

    We summarize recent advances in modeling of solidification microstructures using computational methods that bridge atomistic to continuum scales. We first discuss progress in atomistic modeling of equilibrium and non-equilibrium solid–liquid interface properties influencing microstructure formation, as well as interface coalescence phenomena influencing the late stages of solidification. The latter is relevant in the context of hot tearing reviewed in the article by M. Rappaz in this issue. We then discuss progress to model microstructures on a continuum scale using phase-field methods. We focus on selected examples in which modeling of 3D cellular and dendritic microstructures has been directly linked tomore » experimental observations. Finally, we discuss a recently introduced coarse-grained dendritic needle network approach to simulate the formation of well-developed dendritic microstructures. The approach reliably bridges the well-separated scales traditionally simulated by phase-field and grain structure models, hence opening new avenues for quantitative modeling of complex intra- and inter-grain dynamical interactions on a grain scale.« less

  6. Polarized Continuum Radiation from Stellar Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrington, J. Patrick

    2015-10-01

    Continuum scattering by free electrons can be significant in early type stars, while in late type stars Rayleigh scattering by hydrogen atoms or molecules may be important. Computer programs used to construct models of stellar atmospheres generally treat the scattering of the continuum radiation as isotropic and unpolarized, but this scattering has a dipole angular dependence and will produce polarization. We review an accurate method for evaluating the polarization and limb darkening of the radiation from model stellar atmospheres. We use this method to obtain results for: (i) Late type stars, based on the MARCS code models (Gustafsson et al. 2008), and (ii) Early type stars, based on the NLTE code TLUSTY (Lanz and Hubeny 2003). These results are tabulated at http://www.astro.umd.edu/~jph/Stellar_Polarization.html. While the net polarization vanishes for an unresolved spherical star, this symmetry is broken by rapid rotation or by the masking of part of the star by a binary companion or during the transit of an exoplanet. We give some numerical results for these last cases.

  7. Mid-IR super-continuum generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Mohammed N.; Xia, Chenan; Freeman, Mike J.; Mauricio, Jeremiah; Zakel, Andy; Ke, Kevin; Xu, Zhao; Terry, Fred L., Jr.

    2009-02-01

    A Mid-InfraRed FIber Laser (MIRFIL) has been developed that generates super-continuum covering the spectral range from 0.8 to 4.5 microns with a time-averaged power as high as 10.5W. The MIRFIL is an all-fiber integrated laser with no moving parts and no mode-locked lasers that uses commercial off-the-shelf parts and leverages the mature telecom/fiber optics platform. The MIRFIL power can be easily scaled by changing the repetition rate and modifying the erbium-doped fiber amplifier. Some of the applications using the super-continuum laser will be described in defense, homeland security and healthcare. For example, the MIRFIL is being applied to a catheter-based medical diagnostic system to detect vulnerable plaque, which is responsible for most heart attacks resulting from hardening-of-the-arteries or atherosclerosis. More generally, the MIRFIL can be a platform for selective ablation of lipids without damaging normal protein or smooth muscle tissue.

  8. The Urban Watershed Continuum: Biogeochemistry of Carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaushal, S.; Belt, K.; Smith, C.; Newcomb, K.; Newcomer, T. A.; Smith, R.; Duan, S.; Findlay, S.; Groffman, P. M.; Mayer, P. M.

    2012-12-01

    Urban ecosystems are constantly evolving, and they are expected to change in both space and time. We explore the relationship between infrastructure and ecosystem function relevant to the inorganic and organic carbon cycle along urban watersheds across spatial and temporal dimensions. We provide examples from watersheds of the Baltimore Ecosystem Study Long-Term Ecological (LTER) and Washington D.C. Urban Long-Term Research Area (ULTRA EX) sites with varying land use and contrasting sanitary sewer systems. At a stream and river network scale, there are distinct longitudinal patterns in dissolved inorganic carbon, dissolved organic carbon, and particulate carbon concentrations from suburban headwaters to progressively urbanized receiving waters. There are also distinct changes in stable isotopic signatures of organic carbon and inorganic carbon suggesting shifts in carbon sources and processing throughout urban stream and river networks. Longitudinal patterns appear to be related to in-stream transformations, as suggested by high frequency sensor measurements, mass balances, and diurnal sampling. We suggest that stream and river networks act as "transformers" of watershed nitrogen and phosphorus pollution to increasingly generate carbon throughout the urban watershed continuum via biological processes. Additionally, sources and quality of carbon may vary with watershed inputs from suburban headwaters to progressively urbanized downstream reaches. The role of the urban watershed continuum as a "transporter" and "transformer" of organic matter has important implications for anticipating changes in the forms and reactivity of carbon delivered to receiving waters and coastal zones.

  9. Trends in the Distribution of Teacher Effectiveness in the Intensive Partnerships for Effective Teaching: Progress Report. Working Paper WR-1036-BMGF

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steele, Jennifer L.; Baird, Matthew; Engberg, John; Hunter, Gerald Paul

    2014-01-01

    As part of its effective teaching initiative, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation partnered with three urban school districts across the U.S. and a group of four charter management organizations to undertake a strategic set of human capital reforms. A key objective of the "Intensive Partnerships for Effective Teaching" program was to…

  10. The Non-Stellar Infrared Continuum of Seyfert Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alonso-Herrero, Almudena; Quillen, Alice C.; Simpson, Chris; Efstathiou, Andreas; Ward, Martin J.

    2000-01-01

    JHKL'M (1 - 5 micrometers) imaging of a sample of Seyfert 2 galaxies is presented. We have performed an accurate estimate of the near-infrared non-stellar nuclear fluxes. We confirm that the near-infrared nuclear continuum between 1 and 2.2microns of some Seyfert 2s is dominated by stellar emission, whereas the continuum emission at longer wavelengths (lambda = 3 - 5 micrometers) is almost entirely non-stellar in origin. The non-stellar spectral energy distributions (SED) in the infrared (up to 15 micrometers) of Seyfert galaxies show a variety of shapes, and they are well reproduced with the tapered disk models of Efstathiou & Rowan-Robinson (1995). We have used two models, one including an optically thin cone component found to fit the SED of NGC 1068, and a coneless model. Although our modelling of the SEDs does not allow us to favor either model to account for all the observed SEDs, we find that the viewing angle towards the central source is well constrained by both models. The galaxies in our sample have fitted values of the viewing angle in the range Theta(sub V) = 0 deg - 64 deg, for the assumed model parameters. We have also investigated non-stellar color-color diagrams (L' - M vs. H - M and L' - M vs. H - L'). The colors of the Seyfert galaxies with viewing angles Theta(sub v) less than 30 deg are better reproduced with the cone model. These diagrams provide a good means to separate Seyfert 2s with moderate obscuration (A(sub V) approx. less than 20 mag from hard X-ray observations) from those with high obscuration. The ground-based 4.8 microns and ISO 9.6 microns luminosities are well correlated with the hard X-ray luminosities of Seyfert ls and 2s. These continuum emissions appear as a good indicator of the AGN luminosity, at least in the cases of hard X-ray Compton-thin Seyfert galaxies (N(sub H) less than or = 10(exp 24)/sq cm). We finally stress the finding that some Compton thick galaxies show bright non-stellar emission at 5 microns This suggests

  11. Non-coherent continuum scattering as a line polarization mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Del Pino Alemán, T.; Manso Sainz, R.; Trujillo Bueno, J. E-mail: rsainz@iac.es

    2014-03-20

    Line scattering polarization can be strongly affected by Rayleigh scattering at neutral hydrogen and Thomson scattering at free electrons. Often a depolarization of the continuum results, but the Doppler redistribution produced by the continuum scatterers, which are light (hence, fast), induces more complex interactions between the polarization in spectral lines and in the continuum. Here we formulate and solve the radiative transfer problem of scattering line polarization with non-coherent continuum scattering consistently. The problem is formulated within the spherical tensor representation of atomic and light polarization. The numerical method of solution is a generalization of the Accelerated Lambda Iteration that is applied to both the atomic system and the radiation field. We show that the redistribution of the spectral line radiation due to the non-coherence of the continuum scattering may modify the shape of the emergent fractional linear polarization patterns significantly, even yielding polarization signals above the continuum level in intrinsically unpolarizable lines.

  12. Molecular line contamination in the SCUBA-2 450 and 850 μm continuum data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drabek, E.; Hatchell, J.; Friberg, P.; Richer, J.; Graves, S.; Buckle, J. V.; Nutter, D.; Johnstone, D.; Di Francesco, J.

    2012-10-01

    Observations of the dust emission using millimetre/submillimetre bolometer arrays can be contaminated by molecular line flux, such as flux from 12CO. As the brightest molecular line in the submillimetre, it is important to quantify the contribution of CO flux to the dust continuum bands. Conversion factors were used to convert molecular line integrated intensities to flux detected by bolometer arrays in mJy beam-1. These factors were calculated for 12CO line integrated intensities to the SCUBA-2 850 and 450 μm bands. The conversion factors were then applied to HARP 12CO 3-2 maps of NGC 1333 in the Perseus complex and NGC 2071 and NGC 2024 in the Orion B molecular cloud complex to quantify the respective 12CO flux contribution to the 850 μm dust continuum emission. Sources with high molecular line contamination were analysed in further detail for molecular outflows and heating by nearby stars to determine the cause of the 12CO contribution. The majority of sources had a 12CO 3-2 flux contribution under 20 per cent. However, in regions of molecular outflows, the 12CO can dominate the source dust continuum (up to 79 per cent contamination) with 12CO fluxes reaching ˜68 mJy beam-1.

  13. The radio continuum spectrum of Mira A and Mira B up to submillimeter wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planesas, P.; Alcolea, J.; Bachiller, R.

    2016-02-01

    Aims: We present new measurements of the flux densities at submillimeter wavelengths based on ALMA band 7 (338 GHz, λ0.89 mm) and band 9 (679 GHz, λ0.44 mm) observations to better constrain the origin of the continuum emission of the Mira AB binary system and to check its orbit. Methods: We have measured the Mira A and Mira B continuum in ALMA band 7, with a resolution of ~0.̋31, and for the first time in ALMA band 9, with a resolution of ~0.̋18. We have resolved the binary system at both bands, and derived the continuum spectral index of the stars and their relative position. We also analyzed ALMA Science Verification data obtained in bands 6 and 3. Measurements at centimeter wavelengths obtained by other authors have been included in our study of the spectral energy distribution of the Mira components. Results: The Mira A continuum emission has a spectral index of 1.98 ± 0.04 extending from submillimeter down to centimeter wavelengths. The spectral index of the Mira B continuum emission is 1.93 ± 0.06 at wavelengths ranging from submillimeter to ~3.1 mm, and a shallower spectral index of 1.22 ± 0.09 at longer wavelengths. The high precision relative positions of the A and B components are shown to significantly depart from the current (preliminary) orbit by ~14 mas. Conclusions: The Mira A continuum emission up to submillimeter wavelengths is consistent with that of a radio photosphere surrounding the evolved star for which models predict a spectral index close to 2. The Mira B continuum emission cannot be described with a single ionized component. An extremely compact and dense region around the star can produce the nearly thermal continuum measured in the range λ0.4-3.1 mm, and an inhomogeneous, less dense, and slightly larger ionized envelope could be responsible for the emission at longer wavelengths. Our results illustrate the potential of ALMA for high precision astrometry of binary systems. We have found a significant discrepancy between the ALMA

  14. OBSERVATIONAL STUDY OF THE CONTINUUM AND WATER MASER EMISSION IN THE IRAS 19217+1651 REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez-Esnard, T.; Trinidad, M. A.; Migenes, V. E-mail: trinidad@astro.ugto.mx

    2012-12-20

    We report interferometric observations of the high-mass star-forming region IRAS 19217+1651. We observed the radio continuum (1.3 cm and 3.6 cm) and water maser emission using the Very Large Array (VLA-EVLA) in transition mode (configuration A). Two radio continuum sources were detected at both wavelengths, I19217-A and I19217-B. In addition, 17 maser spots were observed distributed mainly in two groups, M1 and M2, and one isolated maser. This latter could be indicating the relative position of another continuum source which we did not detect. The results indicate that I19217-A appears to be consistent with an ultracompact H II region associated with a zero-age main-sequence B0-type star. Furthermore, the 1.3 cm continuum emission of this source suggests a cometary morphology. In addition, I19217-B appears to be an H II region consisting of at least two stars, which may be contributing to its complex structure. It was also found that the H{sub 2}O masers of the group M1 are apparently associated with the continuum source I19217-A. These are tracing motions which are not gravitationally bound according to their spatial distribution and kinematics. They also seem to be describing outflows in the direction of the elongated cometary region. On the other hand, the second maser group, M2, could be tracing the base of a jet. Finally, infrared data from Spitzer, Midcourse Space Experiment, and IRIS show that IRAS 19217+1651 is embedded inside a large open bubble, like a broken ring, which possibly has affected the morphology of the cometary H II region observed at 1.3 cm.

  15. The 2.3 GHz continuum survey of the GEM project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tello, C.; Villela, T.; Torres, S.; Bersanelli, M.; Smoot, G. F.; Ferreira, I. S.; Cingoz, A.; Lamb, J.; Barbosa, D.; Perez-Becker, D.; Ricciardi, S.; Currivan, J. A.; Platania, P.; Maino, D.

    2013-08-01

    Context. Determining the spectral and spatial characteristics of the radio continuum of our Galaxy is an experimentally challenging endeavour for improving our understanding of the astrophysics of the interstellar medium. This knowledge has also become of paramount significance for cosmology, since Galactic emission is the main source of astrophysical contamination in measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation on large angular scales. Aims: We present a partial-sky survey of the radio continuum at 2.3GHz within the scope of the Galactic Emission Mapping (GEM) project, an observational program conceived and developed to reveal the large-scale properties of Galactic synchrotron radiation through a set of self-consistent surveys of the radio continuum between 408MHz and 10GHz. Methods: The GEM experiment uses a portable and double-shielded 5.5-m radiotelescope in altazimuthal configuration to map 60-degree-wide declination bands from different observational sites by circularly scanning the sky at zenithal angles of 30° from a constantly rotating platform. The observations were accomplished with a total power receiver, whose front-end high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) amplifier was matched directly to a cylindrical horn at the prime focus of the parabolic reflector. The Moon was used to calibrate the antenna temperature scale and the preparation of the map required direct subtraction and destriping algorithms to remove ground contamination as the most significant source of systematic error. Results: We used 484 h of total intensity observations from two locations in Colombia and Brazil to yield 66% sky coverage from to . The observations in Colombia were obtained with a horizontal HPBW of and a vertical HPBW of . The pointing accuracy was and the RMS sensitivity was 11.42 mK. The observations in Brazil were obtained with a horizontal HPBW of and a vertical HPBW of . The pointing accuracy was and the RMS sensitivity was 8.24 mK. The zero

  16. Broadly continuously tunable slot waveguide quantum cascade lasers based on a continuum-to-continuum active region design

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Bo; Zeng, Yong Quan; Liang, Guozhen; Hu, Xiao Nan; Rodriguez, Etienne; Wang, Qi Jie

    2015-09-14

    We report our progress in the development of broadly tunable single-mode slot waveguide quantum cascade lasers based on a continuum-to-continuum active region design. The electroluminescence spectrum of the continuum-to-continuum active region design has a full width at half maximum of 440 cm{sup −1} at center wavelength ∼10 μm at room temperature (300 K). Devices using the optimized slot waveguide structure and the continuum-to-continuum design can be tuned continuously with a lasing emission over 42 cm{sup −1}, from 9.74 to 10.16 μm, at room temperature by using only current tuning scheme, together with a side mode suppression ratio of above 15 dB within the whole tuning range.

  17. Continuum resonance induced electromagnetic torque by a rotating plasma response to static resonant magnetic perturbation field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yueqiang; Connor, J. W.; Cowley, S. C.; Ham, C. J.; Hastie, R. J.; Hender, T. C.

    2012-10-01

    A numerical study is carried out, based on a simple toroidal tokamak equilibrium, to demonstrate the radial re-distribution of the electromagnetic torque density, as a result of a rotating resistive plasma (linear) response to a static resonant magnetic perturbation field. The computed electromagnetic torque peaks at several radial locations even in the presence of a single rational surface, due to resonances between the rotating response, in the plasma frame, and both Alfvén and sound continuum waves. These peaks tend to merge together to form a rather global torque distribution, when the plasma resistivity is large. The continuum resonance induced net electromagnetic torque remains finite even in the limit of an ideal plasma.

  18. Integral Moment Analysis of the BATSE Burst Intensity Distribution: Comments on Two-Population (Local Disk/Halo Plus Extended Halo) Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, B. A.; Hakkila, J.; Vo, V. C.; Meegan, C. A.; Horack, J. M.; Fishman, G. J.; Pendleton, G. N.; Wilson, R. B.; Brock, M. N.; Paciesas, W. S.; Briggs, M. S.

    1994-05-01

    Moment analysis of the gamma-ray burst log(N>Fp) vs. log(Fp) distribution observed by BATSE is used to place additional constraints on Galactic coronal/extended halo source distributions. It is found that the allowed parameter space of such models is smaller than identified previously (Hakkila et al. 1994, Proc. 1993 Hunts. Workshop) due to the more efficient tolerances impose by this technique. This work has been supported by NASA grant NAG8-192.

  19. Radio continuum observations of local star-forming galaxies using the Caltech Continuum Backend on the green bank telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Rabidoux, Katie; Pisano, D. J.; Kepley, Amanda A.; Johnson, Kelsey E.; Balser, Dana S.

    2014-01-01

    We observed radio continuum emission in 27 local (D < 70 Mpc) star-forming galaxies with the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope between 26 GHz and 40 GHz using the Caltech Continuum Backend. We obtained detections for 22 of these galaxies at all four sub-bands and four more marginal detections by taking the average flux across the entire bandwidth. This is the first detection (full or marginal) at these frequencies for 22 of these galaxies. We fit spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for all of the four sub-band detections. For 14 of the galaxies, SEDs were best fit by a combination of thermal free-free and nonthermal synchrotron components. Eight galaxies with four sub-band detections had steep spectra that were only fit by a single nonthermal component. Using these fits, we calculated supernova rates, total number of equivalent O stars, and star formation rates within each ∼23'' beam. For unresolved galaxies, these physical properties characterize the galaxies' recent star formation on a global scale. We confirm that the radio-far-infrared correlation holds for the unresolved galaxies' total 33 GHz flux regardless of their thermal fractions, though the scatter on this correlation is larger than that at 1.4 GHz. In addition, we found that for the unresolved galaxies, there is an inverse relationship between the ratio of 33 GHz flux to total far-infrared flux and the steepness of the galaxy's spectral index between 1.4 GHz and 33 GHz. This relationship could be an indicator of the timescale of the observed episode of star formation.

  20. Forced imbibition in natural porous media: comparison between experiments and continuum models.

    PubMed

    Riaz, Amir; Tang, Guo-Qing; Tchelepi, Hamdi A; Kovscek, Anthony R

    2007-03-01

    A well-characterized set of large-scale laboratory experiments is presented, illustrating forced imbibition displacements in the presence of irreducible wetting phase saturation in a cylindrical, homogeneous Berea sandstone rock. Experiments are designed to operate in the regime of compact microscopic flows and large-scale viscous instability. The distribution of fluid phases during the flow process is visualized by high-resolution computed tomography imaging. Linear stability analysis and high-accuracy numerical simulations are employed to analyze the ability of macroscopic continuum equations to provide a consistent approximation of the displacement process. The validity of the equilibrium relative permeability functions, which form the basis for the continuum model, is fundamentally related to the stability of the displacement process. It is shown that not only is the stable flow regime modeled accurately by existing continuum models, but the onset of instability as well as the initial unstable modes are also determined with reasonable accuracy for unstable flows. However, the continuum model is found to be deficient in the case of fully developed unstable flows.

  1. Modeling stock price dynamics by continuum percolation system and relevant complex systems analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Di; Wang, Jun

    2012-10-01

    The continuum percolation system is developed to model a random stock price process in this work. Recent empirical research has demonstrated various statistical features of stock price changes, the financial model aiming at understanding price fluctuations needs to define a mechanism for the formation of the price, in an attempt to reproduce and explain this set of empirical facts. The continuum percolation model is usually referred to as a random coverage process or a Boolean model, the local interaction or influence among traders is constructed by the continuum percolation, and a cluster of continuum percolation is applied to define the cluster of traders sharing the same opinion about the market. We investigate and analyze the statistical behaviors of normalized returns of the price model by some analysis methods, including power-law tail distribution analysis, chaotic behavior analysis and Zipf analysis. Moreover, we consider the daily returns of Shanghai Stock Exchange Composite Index from January 1997 to July 2011, and the comparisons of return behaviors between the actual data and the simulation data are exhibited.

  2. The hurricane-flood-landslide continuum

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Negri, A.J.; Burkardt, N.; Golden, J.H.; Halverson, J.B.; Huffman, G.J.; Larsen, M.C.; McGinley, J.A.; Updike, R.G.; Verdin, J.P.; Wieczorek, G.F.

    2005-01-01

    In August 2004, representatives from NOAA, NASA, the US Geological Survey (USGS), as well as other government agencies and academic institutions convened in San Juan, Puerto Rico, at a workshop to discuss a proposed research project called the Hurricane-Flood-Landslide Continuum (HFLC). The purpose of the HFLC is to develop and integrate the multidisciplinary tools needed to issue regional guidance products for floods and landslide associated with major tropical rain systems with sufficient lead time that local emergency managers can notify vulnerable populations and protect infrastructure. The workshop sought to initiate discussion among these agencies about their highly complementary capabilities, and to establish a framework to leverage the strengths of each agency. Once a prototype system is developed, it could be adapted for use in regions that have a high frequency of tropical disturbances.

  3. Human Mobility in a Continuum Approach

    PubMed Central

    Simini, Filippo; Maritan, Amos; Néda, Zoltán

    2013-01-01

    Human mobility is investigated using a continuum approach that allows to calculate the probability to observe a trip to any arbitrary region, and the fluxes between any two regions. The considered description offers a general and unified framework, in which previously proposed mobility models like the gravity model, the intervening opportunities model, and the recently introduced radiation model are naturally resulting as special cases. A new form of radiation model is derived and its validity is investigated using observational data offered by commuting trips obtained from the United States census data set, and the mobility fluxes extracted from mobile phone data collected in a western European country. The new modeling paradigm offered by this description suggests that the complex topological features observed in large mobility and transportation networks may be the result of a simple stochastic process taking place on an inhomogeneous landscape. PMID:23555885

  4. Continuum dynamics of elastocapillary coalescence and arrest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Z.; Mahadevan, L.

    2014-04-01

    The surface-tension-driven coalescence of wet hair, nano-pillars and supported lamellae immersed in an evaporating liquid is eventually arrested elastically. To characterize this at a continuum level, we start from a discrete microscopic model of the process and derive a mesoscopic theory that couples the inhomogeneous dynamics of drying to the capillary forcing and elastic bending of the lamellae. Numerical simulations of the resulting partial differential equation capture the primary unstable mode seen in experiments, and the dynamic coalescence of the lamellae into dimers and quadrimers. Our theory also predicts the elastic arrest of the pattern or the separation of lamellar bundles into their constituents as a function of the amount of liquid left at the end of the process.

  5. Continuum mechanics, stresses, currents and electrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Segev, Reuven

    2016-04-28

    The Eulerian approach to continuum mechanics does not make use of a body manifold. Rather, all fields considered are defined on the space, or the space-time, manifolds. Sections of some vector bundle represent generalized velocities which need not be associated with the motion of material points. Using the theories of de Rham currents and generalized sections of vector bundles, we formulate a weak theory of forces and stresses represented by vector-valued currents. Considering generalized velocities represented by differential forms and interpreting such a form as a generalized potential field, we present a weak formulation of pre-metric, p-form electrodynamics as a natural example of the foregoing theory. Finally, it is shown that the assumptions leading to p-form electrodynamics may be replaced by the condition that the force functional is continuous with respect to the flat topology of forms.

  6. The evolution of the quasar continuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elvis, M.

    1992-01-01

    We now have in hand a large data base of Roentgen Satellite (ROSAT), optical, and IR complementary data. We are in the process of obtaining a large amount of the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) data for the same quasar sample. For our complementary sample at high redshifts, where the UV was redshifted into the optical, we have just had approved large amounts of observing time to cover the quasar continuum in the near-IR using the new Near-Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS) array spectrographs. Ten micron, optical, and VLA radio, data also have approved time. An ISO US key program was approved to extend this work into the far-IR, and the launch of ASTRO-D (early in 1993) promises to extend it to higher energy X-rays.

  7. Floquet bound states in the continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longhi, Stefano; Della Valle, Giuseppe

    2013-07-01

    Quantum mechanics predicts that certain stationary potentials can sustain bound states with an energy buried in the continuous spectrum of scattered states, the so-called bound states in the continuum (BIC). Originally regarded as mathematical curiosities, BIC have found an increasing interest in recent years, particularly in quantum and classical transport of matter and optical waves in mesoscopic and photonic systems where the underlying potential can be judiciously tailored. Most of our knowledge of BIC is so far restricted to static potentials. Here we introduce a new kind of BIC, referred to as Floquet BIC, which corresponds to a normalizable Floquet state of a time-periodic Hamiltonian with a quasienergy embedded into the spectrum of Floquet scattered states. We discuss the appearance of Floquet BIC states in a tight-binding lattice model driven by an ac field in the proximity of the dynamic localization regime.

  8. Polymer quantum mechanics and its continuum limit

    SciTech Connect

    Corichi, Alejandro; Vukasinac, Tatjana; Zapata, Jose A.

    2007-08-15

    A rather nonstandard quantum representation of the canonical commutation relations of quantum mechanics systems, known as the polymer representation, has gained some attention in recent years, due to its possible relation with Planck scale physics. In particular, this approach has been followed in a symmetric sector of loop quantum gravity known as loop quantum cosmology. Here we explore different aspects of the relation between the ordinary Schroedinger theory and the polymer description. The paper has two parts. In the first one, we derive the polymer quantum mechanics starting from the ordinary Schroedinger theory and show that the polymer description arises as an appropriate limit. In the second part we consider the continuum limit of this theory, namely, the reverse process in which one starts from the discrete theory and tries to recover back the ordinary Schroedinger quantum mechanics. We consider several examples of interest, including the harmonic oscillator, the free particle, and a simple cosmological model.

  9. Floquet bound states in the continuum

    PubMed Central

    Longhi, Stefano; Valle, Giuseppe Della

    2013-01-01

    Quantum mechanics predicts that certain stationary potentials can sustain bound states with an energy buried in the continuous spectrum of scattered states, the so-called bound states in the continuum (BIC). Originally regarded as mathematical curiosities, BIC have found an increasing interest in recent years, particularly in quantum and classical transport of matter and optical waves in mesoscopic and photonic systems where the underlying potential can be judiciously tailored. Most of our knowledge of BIC is so far restricted to static potentials. Here we introduce a new kind of BIC, referred to as Floquet BIC, which corresponds to a normalizable Floquet state of a time-periodic Hamiltonian with a quasienergy embedded into the spectrum of Floquet scattered states. We discuss the appearance of Floquet BIC states in a tight-binding lattice model driven by an ac field in the proximity of the dynamic localization regime. PMID:23860625

  10. Developments and trends in continuum plasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Richard

    2002-05-01

    Multiscale modeling applied to meso and macro scale continuum calculations is a broad field with a long history. It encompasses hardening relations based on dislocation density, porosity related ductile failure models, crystal plasticity, composite media and numerous other general topics dating back more than half a century. There are also a myriad of more recent activities that can be grouped under this subject heading. Emphasis will be placed on efforts described at the Bodega Bay workshop aimed at bridging length scales rather than focusing on model developments at any particular length scale. Also, areas will be highlighted where additional connections should be possible with available tools; methods exist but need to be exercised; and critical experiments are needed for validation.

  11. A nonlocal continuum model for biological aggregation.

    PubMed

    Topaz, Chad M; Bertozzi, Andrea L; Lewis, Mark A

    2006-10-01

    We construct a continuum model for biological aggregations in which individuals experience long-range social attraction and short-range dispersal. For the case of one spatial dimension, we study the steady states analytically and numerically. There exist strongly nonlinear states with compact support and steep edges that correspond to localized biological aggregations, or clumps. These steady-state clumps are reached through a dynamic coarsening process. In the limit of large population size, the clumps approach a constant density swarm with abrupt edges. We use energy arguments to understand the nonlinear selection of clump solutions, and to predict the internal density in the large population limit. The energy result holds in higher dimensions as well, and is demonstrated via numerical simulations in two dimensions.

  12. Continuum mechanics, stresses, currents and electrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Segev, Reuven

    2016-04-28

    The Eulerian approach to continuum mechanics does not make use of a body manifold. Rather, all fields considered are defined on the space, or the space-time, manifolds. Sections of some vector bundle represent generalized velocities which need not be associated with the motion of material points. Using the theories of de Rham currents and generalized sections of vector bundles, we formulate a weak theory of forces and stresses represented by vector-valued currents. Considering generalized velocities represented by differential forms and interpreting such a form as a generalized potential field, we present a weak formulation of pre-metric, p-form electrodynamics as a natural example of the foregoing theory. Finally, it is shown that the assumptions leading to p-form electrodynamics may be replaced by the condition that the force functional is continuous with respect to the flat topology of forms. PMID:27002071

  13. Space-time as a deformable continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tartaglia, A.; Radicella, N.

    2010-04-01

    Space-time may be thought of as a physical continuum endowed with properties similar to the ones of material threedimensional continua. In this view a non-trivial metric tensor can be considered to be the sum of the Minkowski metric plus an appropriate strain tensor. The global symmetry of the universe can be seen as the effect of a spontaneous strained state due to the presence of a texture defect. Consistently with this approach the Lagrangian of space time is obtained adding to the scalar curvature, acting as a kinetic term, a potential term depending on the strain and modeled on the one of the elasticity theory, extended to four dimensions. The theory is applied to the fit of the luminosity dependence of type Ia supernovae on the redshift. A result is obtained slightly better than the one of the ΛCDM theory.

  14. Hard Ionizing Photons at High Redshift --- A New Method for Measuring the QSO Continuum Shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldwin, Jack

    2006-07-01

    We wish to test and calibrate a new method for measuring the far-UV continuum shapes of AGN. Knowledge of this continuum shape bears on several key questions about the high-redshift universe: What is the shape and intensity of the ionizing background radiation for the IGM, as a function of lookback time? How and at what rate do massive black holes grow at the centers of galaxy halos? How do the chemical abundances in the central regions of massive proto-galaxies evolve with lookback time at redshifts z > 6? A well-established way to measure the far- to near-UV continuum shape of AGN is to compare the intensities of high- and low-ionization emission lines from the gas that is photoionized by that radiation. The highest ionization gas is expected to be in a hard-to-observe hot phase, emitted by gas at nearly a million degrees. There are to date only a few detections of this gas, using x-ray telescopes to measure the L-alpha equivalent emission line from ions such as O VII, Ne IX and Mg XI. Such measurements are only possible for the brightest nearby AGN. We show here that these same ions are expected to also emit other lines in the rest-UV with about the same strength. For high-redshift QSOs, these will be redshifted into the optical region, where they can be studied using the large collecting area of ground-based telescopes. The strengths of these lines will then tie down the far-UV continuum shape of high-redshift AGN. But the method needs to be tested and calibrated by searching for these lines in the observed-UV spectra of the same nearby AGN for which the L-alpha equivalent lines have been detected at x-ray wavelengths. This is only possible using archival HST spectra, as we propose to do here.

  15. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon and mid-infrared continuum emission in a z > 4 submillimeter galaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Riechers, Dominik A.; Pope, Alexandra; Daddi, Emanuele; Elbaz, David; Carilli, Christopher L.; Walter, Fabian; Hodge, Jacqueline; Morrison, Glenn E.; Dickinson, Mark; Dannerbauer, Helmut

    2014-05-01

    We report the detection of 6.2 μm polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and rest-frame 4-7 μm continuum emission in the z = 4.055 submillimeter galaxy GN20, using the Infrared Spectrograph on board the Spitzer Space Telescope. This represents the first detection of PAH emission at z > 4. The strength of the PAH emission feature is consistent with a very high star formation rate of ∼1600 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}. We find that this intense starburst powers at least ∼1/3 of the faint underlying 6 μm continuum emission, with an additional, significant (and perhaps dominant) contribution due to a power-law-like hot dust source, which we interpret to likely be a faint, dust-obscured active galactic nucleus (AGN). The inferred 6 μm AGN continuum luminosity is consistent with a sensitive upper limit on the hard X-ray emission as measured by the Chandra X-Ray Observatory if the previously undetected AGN is Compton-thick. This is in agreement with the finding at optical/infrared wavelengths that the galaxy and its nucleus are heavily dust-obscured. Despite the strong power-law component enhancing the mid-infrared continuum emission, the intense starburst associated with the photon-dominated regions that give rise to the PAH emission appears to dominate the total energy output in the infrared. GN20 is one of the most luminous starburst galaxies known at any redshift, embedded in a rich protocluster of star-forming galaxies. This investigation provides an improved understanding of the energy sources that power such exceptional systems, which represent the extreme end of massive galaxy formation at early cosmic times.

  16. Linearly polarized millimeter and submillimeter continuum emission of Sgr A* constrained by ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hauyu Baobab; Wright, Melvyn C. H.; Zhao, Jun-Hui; Brinkerink, Christiaan D.; Ho, Paul T. P.; Mills, Elisabeth A. C.; Martín, Sergio; Falcke, Heino; Matsushita, Satoki; Martí-Vidal, Ivan

    2016-09-01

    Aims: Our aim is to characterize the polarized continuum emission properties including intensity, polarization position angle, and polarization percentage of Sgr A* at ~100 (3.0 mm), ~230 (1.3 mm), ~345 (0.87 mm), ~500 (0.6 mm), and ~700 GHz (0.43 mm). Methods: We report continuum emission properties of Sgr A* at the above frequency bands, based on the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) observations. We measured flux densities of Sgr A* from ALMA single pointing and mosaic observations. We performed sinusoidal fittings to the observed (XX-YY)/I intensity ratios, to derive the polarization position angles and polarization percentages. Results: We successfully detect polarized continuum emission from all observed frequency bands. We observed lower Stokes I intensity at ~700 GHz than that at ~500 GHz, which suggests that emission at ≳500 GHz is from the optically thin part of a synchrotron emission spectrum. Both the Stokes I intensity and the polarization position angle at our highest observing frequency of ~700 GHz, may vary with time. However, as yet we do not detect variation in the polarization percentage at >500 GHz. The polarization percentage at ~700 GHz is likely lower than that at ~500 GHz. By comparing the ~500 GHz and ~700 GHz observations with the observations at lower frequency bands, we suggest that the intrinsic polarization position angle of Sgr A* varies with time. This paper also reports the measurable polarization properties from the observed calibration quasars. Conclusions: Future simultaneous multi-frequency polarization observations are required to clarify the time and frequency variation of the polarization position angle and polarization percentage.

  17. Continuum beliefs about psychotic symptoms are a valid, unidimensional construct: Construction and validation of a revised continuum beliefs questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Schlier, Björn; Scheunemann, Jakob; Lincoln, Tania M

    2016-07-30

    Growing evidence supports a continuum model of psychosis, with mild psychotic symptoms being frequently experienced by the general population. Moreover, believing in the continuum model correlates with less stigmatization of schizophrenia. This study explores whether continuum beliefs are a valid construct and develops a continuum beliefs scale. First, expert-generated items were reduced to a candidate scale (study 1, n=95). One-dimensionality was tested using confirmatory factor analysis (study 2, n=363). Convergent validity was tested with a previous continuum beliefs scale, essentialist beliefs, and stigmatization (study 2), while self-reported psychotic experiences (i.e. frequency and conviction) served to test discriminant validity (study 3, n=229). A nine item questionnaire that assesses continuum beliefs about schizophrenia symptoms showed acceptable to good psychometric values, high correlations with a previous continuum beliefs scale and small correlations with essentialist beliefs, stereotypes, and desired social distance. No correlations with psychotic experiences were found. Thus, continuum beliefs can be considered a valid construct. The construed CBQ-R asks about symptoms rather than the abstract category "schizophrenia", which may increase understandability of the scale. Validation confirms previous studies and highlights the difference between continuum beliefs and personal psychotic experiences. PMID:27175910

  18. A continuum model for flocking: Obstacle avoidance, equilibrium, and stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mecholsky, Nicholas Alexander

    The modeling and investigation of the dynamics and configurations of animal groups is a subject of growing attention. In this dissertation, we present a partial-differential-equation based continuum model of flocking and use it to investigate several properties of group dynamics and equilibrium. We analyze the reaction of a flock to an obstacle or an attacking predator. We show that the flock response is in the form of density disturbances that resemble Mach cones whose configuration is determined by the anisotropic propagation of waves through the flock. We investigate the effect of a flock 'pressure' and pairwise repulsion on an equilibrium density distribution. We investigate both linear and nonlinear pressures, look at the convergence to a 'cold' (T → 0) equilibrium solution, and find regions of parameter space where different models produce the same equilibrium. Finally, we analyze the stability of an equilibrium density distribution to long-wavelength perturbations. Analytic results for the stability of a constant density solution as well as stability regimes for constant density solutions to the equilibrium equations are presented.

  19. Tracing the Envelopes around Embedded Low-Mass Young Stellar Objects with HCO+ and Millimeter-Continuum Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogerheijde, Michiel R.; van Dishoeck, Ewine F.; Blake, Geoffrey A.; van Langevelde, Huib Jan

    1997-11-01

    The envelopes and disks around embedded low-mass young stellar objects (YSOs) are investigated through millimeter-continuum and HCO+ line emission. Nine sources, selected on the basis of their HCO+ 3-2 emission from an IRAS flux- and color-limited sample of 24 objects, are observed in λ = 3.4 and 2.7 mm continuum emission with the Owens Valley Millimeter Array and in the HCO+ and H13CO+ 4-3, 3-2, and 1-0 transitions at the James Clerk Maxwell and IRAM 30 m telescopes. All nine sources are detected at 3.4 and 2.7 mm in the interferometer beam, with total fluxes between 4 and 200 mJy. The visibilities can be fit with an unresolved (<3") point source and, in about half of the sources, with an extended envelope. The point sources, presumably thermal dust emission from circumstellar disks, typically contribute 30%-75% of the continuum flux observed at 1.1 mm in a 19" beam, assuming a spectral slope of 2.5. The fact that at least two-thirds of our sources show point-source emission indicates that circumstellar disks are established early in the embedded phase. The remainder of the 1.1 mm single-dish flux is attributed to an extended envelope, with a mass of 0.001-0.26 M⊙ within a 19" beam. In HCO+, the J = 1-0 line is seen to trace the surrounding cloud, while the emission from J = 3-2 and 4-3 is concentrated toward the sources. All sources look marginally resolved in these lines, indicative of a power-law brightness distribution. A beam-averaged HCO+ abundance of (1.2 +/- 0.4) × 10-8 with respect to H2 is derived. The 1.1 mm continuum fluxes and HCO+ line intensities of the envelopes correlate well and are modeled with the simple inside-out collapse model of Shu (1977) and with power-law density distributions of slopes p = 1-3. All models provide satisfactory fits to the observations, indicating that HCO+ is an excellent tracer of the envelopes. Of the 15 sources of the original sample that were either undetected in HCO+ 3-2 or too weak to be selected, seven show 1

  20. Radio Continuum Mapping of the Spiral Galaxy NGC 4321

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyman, Scott D.; Weiler, Kurt W.; van Dyk, Schuyler D.; Sramek, Richard A.; Liang, Wenhui

    1994-12-01

    We have combined numerous, short radio continuum observations of the Virgo Cluster spiral galaxy NGC 4321 (M 100) made at 20 and 6 cm with the Very Large Array (VLA) to produce a deep map of the galaxy. These observations were originally taken for monitoring the radio supernova SN 1979C (Weiler et al. 1986, ApJ, 310, 790; 1991, ApJ, 380, 161) and is analogous to our recent work on NGC 6946 (Hyman et al. 1993, BAAS 25, 1322) using observations taken for monitoring SN 1980K. The maps we derive for NGC 4321 are of superior sensitivity (sigma ~ lt 0.05 mJy/beam at 20 cm) and spatial resolution ( ~ 2" at 20 cm) to those previously published by other investigators (e. g., Knapen et al. 1993, ApJ, 416, 563). We present preliminary measurements and analyses of detected thermal and nonthermal sources, including flux densities, spectral indices, and luminosities, particularly for the very strong circumnuclear radio source, known as a site of intense star formation (e. g., Arsenault et al. 1988, A&A, 200, 29). We also make comparisons of our radio maps with existing data at other wavelengths.

  1. Silicon coupled-resonator optical-waveguide-based biosensors using light-scattering pattern recognition with pixelized mode-field-intensity distributions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiawei; Yao, Zhanshi; Lei, Ting; Poon, Andrew W.

    2014-01-01

    Chip-scale, optical microcavity-based biosensors typically employ an ultra-high-quality microcavity and require a precision wavelength-tunable laser for exciting the cavity resonance. For point-of-care applications, however, such a system based on measurements in the spectral domain is prone to equipment noise and not portable. An alternative microcavity-based biosensor that enables a high sensitivity in an equipment-noise-tolerant and potentially portable system is desirable. Here, we demonstrate the proof-of-concept of such a biosensor using a coupled-resonator optical-waveguide (CROW) on a silicon-on-insulator chip. The sensing scheme is based on measurements in the spatial domain, and only requires exciting the CROW at a fixed wavelength and imaging the out-of-plane elastic light-scattering intensity patterns of the CROW. Based on correlating the light-scattering intensity pattern at a probe wavelength with the light-scattering intensity patterns at the CROW eigenstates, we devise a pattern-recognition algorithm that enables the extraction of a refractive index change, Δn, applied upon the CROW upper-cladding from a calibrated set of correlation coefficients. Our experiments using an 8-microring CROW covered by NaCl solutions of different concentrations reveal a Δn of ~1.5 × 10−4 refractive index unit (RIU) and a sensitivity of ~752 RIU−1, with a noise-equivalent detection limit of ~6 × 10−6 RIU. PMID:25519726

  2. Average bit error rate performance analysis of subcarrier intensity modulated MRC and EGC FSO systems with dual branches over M distribution turbulence channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ran-ran; Wang, Ping; Cao, Tian; Guo, Li-xin; Yang, Yintang

    2015-07-01

    Based on the space diversity reception, the binary phase-shift keying (BPSK) modulated free space optical (FSO) system over Málaga (M) fading channels is investigated in detail. Under independently and identically distributed and independently and non-identically distributed dual branches, the analytical average bit error rate (ABER) expressions in terms of H-Fox function for maximal ratio combining (MRC) and equal gain combining (EGC) diversity techniques are derived, respectively, by transforming the modified Bessel function of the second kind into the integral form of Meijer G-function. Monte Carlo (MC) simulation is also provided to verify the accuracy of the presented models.

  3. Continuum Thinking and the Contexts of Personal Information Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huvila, Isto; Eriksen, Jon; Häusner, Eva-Maria; Jansson, Ina-Maria

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Recent personal information management literature has underlined the significance of the contextuality of personal information and its use. The present article discusses the applicability of the records continuum model and its generalisation, continuum thinking, as a theoretical framework for explicating the overlap and evolution of…

  4. PATHWAYS: A Continuum of Reading and Writing Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lovett, Ollie M.

    Developed for use with the PATHWAYS ABE (Adult Basic Education) and Pre-GED (General Educational Development) Curriculum, a scope and sequence of reading and writing skills, or continuum, was designed with tasks of both educator and Indian Adult learner in mind. The continuum introduces individual skills at students' entry proficiency levels and…

  5. Teaching Continuum Mechanics in a Mechanical Engineering Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Yucheng

    2011-01-01

    This paper introduces a graduate course, continuum mechanics, which is designed for and taught to graduate students in a Mechanical Engineering (ME) program. The significance of continuum mechanics in engineering education is demonstrated and the course structure is described. Methods used in teaching this course such as topics, class…

  6. Curriculum Building for the Continuum in Social Welfare Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, Michael J., Ed.; And Others

    During 1970 Florida's University and Community College Systems held a workshop to discuss the idea of a curriculum continuum that would begin at the community college level and extend through the upper levels of graduate work. It was acknowledged that any continuum involving more than 1 level of education should include flexible opportunities for…

  7. Continuum of Counseling Goals: A Framework for Differentiating Counseling Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruce, Paul

    1984-01-01

    Presents counseling goals in a developmental continuum similar in concept to Maslow's hierarchy of needs. Discusses ego development goals, socialization goals, developmental goals, self-esteem goals, and self-realization goals and describes characteristics and implications of the continuum. (JAC)

  8. A Behavioral Continuum: A Look at Personality Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, George; Kirk, Nancy A.

    1985-01-01

    Suggests that narcissistic, borderline, and antisocial personality disorders are not discrete diagnostic categories, but that they lie along a continuum and have in common the dimensions of degree of self-centeredness and degree of differentiation. Presents evidence supporting existence of continuum of behavior rather than discrete diagnostic…

  9. Treatment of continuum in nuclear reactions involving weakly bound systems. A simple model to test different prescriptions describing the coupling to continuum states

    SciTech Connect

    Dasso, C. H.; Vitturi, A.

    2009-03-04

    We exploit a model describing the break-up of weakly-bound nuclei that can be used as a laboratory for testing different prescriptions that have been advanced in the literature to take into account the near-by presence of continuum states. In the model we follow the evolution of a single particle wave function in one dimension, initially bound by a Woods-Saxon type potential and then perturbed by a time- and position-dependent external field. Proper choices of this potential can simulate the effect of the interaction between reaction partners in a nuclear collision. These processes generate inelastic excitation probabilities that--distributed over the bound and continuum states of the system--lead to either a partial or a total fragmentation of the final wave function. The comparison with the exact calculations shows that standard coupled channel descriptions based on discretization of the continuum can be accurate only when a proper choice is made of the number of discrete states, of the energy mesh and of the energy cutoff. This may imply, even in simplified cases, the use of a rather large (and unpracticable) number of channels. The use of a more restricted number of channels may lead to misleading results.

  10. Detection of nonthermal continuum radiation in Saturn's magnetosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Kuth, W.S.; Scarf, F.L.; Sullivan, J.D.; Gurnett, D.A.

    1982-08-01

    A detailed analysis of high resolution wideband data from the Voyager 1 and 2 plasma wave receivers has revealed the presence of heretofore undiscovered nonthermal continuum radiation trapped within the Saturnian magnetosphere. The discovery of Saturnian trapped continuum radiation fills a disturbing void in the Saturnian radio spectrum. On the basis of observations at both the Earth and Jupiter it was expected that continuum radiation should be a pervasive signature of planetary magnetospheres in general. Special processing of the Voyager 1 plasma wave data at Saturn has now confirmed the existence of weak emissions that have a spectrum characteristic of trapped continuum radiation. Similar radiation was also detected by Voyager 2; however, in this case it is not certain that Saturn was the only source. Considerable evidence exists which suggests that Saturn may have been immersed in the Jovian tail during the Voyager 2 encounter, so that Jupiter may provide an additional source of the continuum radiation detected by Voyager 2.

  11. An Optimization-based Atomistic-to-Continuum Coupling Method

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, Derek; Bochev, Pavel B.; Luskin, Mitchell; Shapeev, Alexander V.

    2014-08-21

    In this paper, we present a new optimization-based method for atomistic-to-continuum (AtC) coupling. The main idea is to cast the latter as a constrained optimization problem with virtual Dirichlet controls on the interfaces between the atomistic and continuum subdomains. The optimization objective is to minimize the error between the atomistic and continuum solutions on the overlap between the two subdomains, while the atomistic and continuum force balance equations provide the constraints. Separation, rather then blending of the atomistic and continuum problems, and their subsequent use as constraints in the optimization problem distinguishes our approach from the existing AtC formulations. Finally, we present and analyze the method in the context of a one-dimensional chain of atoms modeled using a linearized two-body potential with next-nearest neighbor interactions.

  12. An Optimization-based Atomistic-to-Continuum Coupling Method

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Olson, Derek; Bochev, Pavel B.; Luskin, Mitchell; Shapeev, Alexander V.

    2014-08-21

    In this paper, we present a new optimization-based method for atomistic-to-continuum (AtC) coupling. The main idea is to cast the latter as a constrained optimization problem with virtual Dirichlet controls on the interfaces between the atomistic and continuum subdomains. The optimization objective is to minimize the error between the atomistic and continuum solutions on the overlap between the two subdomains, while the atomistic and continuum force balance equations provide the constraints. Separation, rather then blending of the atomistic and continuum problems, and their subsequent use as constraints in the optimization problem distinguishes our approach from the existing AtC formulations. Finally,more » we present and analyze the method in the context of a one-dimensional chain of atoms modeled using a linearized two-body potential with next-nearest neighbor interactions.« less

  13. Continuum and molecular-dynamics simulation of nanodroplet collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardia, Raunak; Liang, Zhi; Keblinski, Pawel; Trujillo, Mario F.

    2016-05-01

    The extent to which the continuum treatment holds in binary droplet collisions is examined in the present work by using a continuum-based implicit surface capturing strategy (volume-of-fluid coupled to Navier-Stokes) and a molecular dynamics methodology. The droplet pairs are arranged in a head-on-collision configuration with an initial separation distance of 5.3 nm and a velocity of 3 ms-1. The size of droplets ranges from 10-50 nm. Inspecting the results, the collision process can be described as consisting of two periods: a preimpact phase that ends with the initial contact of both droplets, and a postimpact phase characterized by the merging, deformation, and coalescence of the droplets. The largest difference between the continuum and molecular dynamics (MD) predictions is observed in the preimpact period, where the continuum-based viscous and pressure drag forces significantly overestimate the MD predictions. Due to large value of Knudsen number in the gas (Kngas=1.972 ), this behavior is expected. Besides the differences between continuum and MD, it is also observed that the continuum simulations do not converge for the set of grid sizes considered. This is shown to be directly related to the initial velocity profile and the minute size of the nanodroplets. For instance, for micrometer-size droplets, this numerical sensitivity is not an issue. During the postimpact period, both MD and continuum-based simulations are strikingly similar, with only a moderate difference in the peak kinetic energy recorded during the collision process. With values for the Knudsen number in the liquid (Knliquid=0.01 for D =36 nm ) much closer to the continuum regime, this behavior is expected. The 50 nm droplet case is sufficiently large to be predicted reasonably well with the continuum treatment. However, for droplets smaller than approximately 36 nm, the departure from continuum behavior becomes noticeably pronounced, and becomes drastically different for the 10 nm droplets.

  14. Effect of rainfall intensity and rain drop distribution on runoff and soil erosion on vineyards inter-rows with different soil management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biddoccu, Marcella; Ferraris, Stefano; Pitacco, Andrea; Cavallo, Eugenio

    2015-04-01

    Vineyard is reported as one of the European agricultural crop where the runoff and soil erosion rates are the highest. In sloping vineyards, in particular, primary roles in determining high runoff and soil erosion rates are played by the alignment of vine-rows along the slope, soil cultivation and management, and traffic of machinery. Runoff and soil erosion processes are deeply related to climate, especially to rainfall intensity and precipitation pattern, along with the soil moisture content and soil surface conditions. Most of the European vineyards are grown in the Mediterranean area, where these aspects assume a specific pattern. A study was carried out to evaluate the role of rainfall intensity and raindrop size in generating runoff and soil erosion in vineyards, in relation to soil management. The study was conducted in the 'Tenuta Cannona Experimental Vine and Wine Centre' of Regione Piemonte, located in the Alto Monferrato hilly vine-growing area (NW Italy). Runoff and soil losses caused by natural rainfall events were monitored on two large (1221 m2) vineyard plots in the period May-November 2014. The plots are managed with different inter-row soil management techniques: tillage (T) and controlled grass cover (GC). An optical disdrometer was installed in the plots. Few rainfall events were observed occurred during summer and autumn, before the grape harvest and the execution of new tillage/mulching operation in autumn, triggering runoff events of different magnitude. For example, a summer storm with 1-min rainfall intensity of about 91 mm h-1gave a negligible amount of runoff (less than 1% of rainfall) in both plots . During a later similar rainfall runoff rates achieved 22% of rainfall and sediment yield of 290 kg ha-1 in the CT plot while it was 2% and 7 kg ha-1 in the GC plot. In the GC plot, in summer and early autumn rainfalls, runoff was less than 2% and sediment yield was lower than 10 kg ha-1. The two plots had a different evolution of the soil

  15. MIRO Continuum Calibration for Asteroid Mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Seungwon

    2011-01-01

    MIRO (Microwave Instrument for the Rosetta Orbiter) is a lightweight, uncooled, dual-frequency heterodyne radiometer. The MIRO encountered asteroid Steins in 2008, and during the flyby, MIRO used the Asteroid Mode to measure the emission spectrum of Steins. The Asteroid Mode is one of the seven modes of the MIRO operation, and is designed to increase the length of time that a spectral line is in the MIRO pass-band during a flyby of an object. This software is used to calibrate the continuum measurement of Steins emission power during the asteroid flyby. The MIRO raw measurement data need to be calibrated in order to obtain physically meaningful data. This software calibrates the MIRO raw measurements in digital units to the brightness temperature in Kelvin. The software uses two calibration sequences that are included in the Asteroid Mode. One sequence is at the beginning of the mode, and the other at the end. The first six frames contain the measurement of a cold calibration target, while the last six frames measure a warm calibration target. The targets have known temperatures and are used to provide reference power and gain, which can be used to convert MIRO measurements into brightness temperature. The software was developed to calibrate MIRO continuum measurements from Asteroid Mode. The software determines the relationship between the raw digital unit measured by MIRO and the equivalent brightness temperature by analyzing data from calibration frames. The found relationship is applied to non-calibration frames, which are the measurements of an object of interest such as asteroids and other planetary objects that MIRO encounters during its operation. This software characterizes the gain fluctuations statistically and determines which method to estimate gain between calibration frames. For example, if the fluctuation is lower than a statistically significant level, the averaging method is used to estimate the gain between the calibration frames. If the

  16. Comparison of the dose distribution obtained from dosimetric systems with intensity modulated radiotherapy planning system in the treatment of prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gökçe, M.; Uslu, D. Koçyiǧit; Ertunç, C.; Karalı, T.

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study is to compare Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) plan of prostate cancer patients with different dose verification systems in dosimetric aspects and to compare these systems with each other in terms of reliability, applicability and application time. Dosimetric control processes of IMRT plan of three prostate cancer patients were carried out using thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD), ion chamber (IC) and 2D Array detector systems. The difference between the dose values obtained from the dosimetric systems and treatment planning system (TPS) were found to be about % 5. For the measured (TLD) and calculated (TPS) doses %3 percentage differences were obtained for the points close to center while percentage differences increased at the field edges. It was found that TLD and IC measurements will increase the precision and reliability of the results of 2D Array.

  17. Signature of a strong coupling with the continuum in 11Be + 120Sn scattering at the Coulomb barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acosta, L.; Álvarez, M. A. G.; Andrés, M. V.; Borge, M. J. G.; Cortés, M.; Espino, J. M.; Galaviz, D.; Gómez-Camacho, J.; Maira, A.; Martel, I.; Moro, A. M.; Mukha, I.; Pérez-Bernal, F.; Reillo, E.; Rodríguez, D.; Rusek, K.; Sánchez-Benítez, A. M.; Tengblad, O.

    2009-12-01

    The angular distribution for 11Be + 120Sn quasielastic scattering at E lab = 32 MeV was measured at REX-ISOLDE, CERN. The interpretation of the data in terms of coupled-channel calculations suggests a strong coupling with the p -states lying in the continuum.

  18. Sibling species distributions of the Simulium damnosum complex in the west African Onchocerciasis Control Programme area during the decade 1984-93, following intensive larviciding since 1974.

    PubMed

    Boakye, D A; Back, C; Fiasorgbor, G K; Sib, A P; Coulibaly, Y

    1998-10-01

    During the decade from 1984 to 1993, nine species of the Simulium damnosum complex of blackflies (Diptera: Simuliidae) were identified from the area covered by the Onchocerciasis Control Programme. These were S. damnosum s.s., S. dieguerense, S. konkourense, S. leonense, S. sanctipauli, S. sirbanum, S. soubrense, S. squamosum, and S. yahense. Some of these species were found to consist of two chromosomal variant populations. These were S. konkourense 'Konkouré' and 'Menankaya' forms, S. sanctipauli sensu stricto and 'Djodji' form, S. soubrense 'Chute Milo' and 'Beffa' forms. The distribution of these twelve cytological taxa was assessed in relation to the two main vegetation zones of West Africa (forest and savanna), topography, river size and other factors. The range of each species was influenced by seasonal climatic changes in wind movement and river water level. The most widely distributed species were S. sirbanum and S. damnosum s.s., associated with savanna areas, recorded from all river basins. Simulium dieguerense was restricted mainly to Western Mali on the Rivers Bafing and Bakoye in the Senegal River basin. Simulium squamosum was identified from rivers draining mountainous areas in both the forest and savanna zones. Simulium yahense was found in small permanent rivers along a wide forested band parallel to the coast and was absent from the plains of Togo and Benin. Members of the S. sanctipauli subcomplex had restricted distributions except for S. sanctipauli s.s., which was widespread in large rivers of the forest zone from Sierra Leone to the Volta Lake in Ghana. Simulium soubrense 'Beffa' form occurred in Togo and Benin, S. soubrense 'Chutes Milo' form in Guinea, both 'Konkouré' and 'Menankaya' forms of S. konkourense occurred predominantly in Guinea and S. leonense in Sierra Leone. The relevance of the distribution maps and the importance of the data bank to vector control larvicidal operations are discussed. PMID:9824818

  19. Sibling species distributions of the Simulium damnosum complex in the west African Onchocerciasis Control Programme area during the decade 1984-93, following intensive larviciding since 1974.

    PubMed

    Boakye, D A; Back, C; Fiasorgbor, G K; Sib, A P; Coulibaly, Y

    1998-10-01

    During the decade from 1984 to 1993, nine species of the Simulium damnosum complex of blackflies (Diptera: Simuliidae) were identified from the area covered by the Onchocerciasis Control Programme. These were S. damnosum s.s., S. dieguerense, S. konkourense, S. leonense, S. sanctipauli, S. sirbanum, S. soubrense, S. squamosum, and S. yahense. Some of these species were found to consist of two chromosomal variant populations. These were S. konkourense 'Konkouré' and 'Menankaya' forms, S. sanctipauli sensu stricto and 'Djodji' form, S. soubrense 'Chute Milo' and 'Beffa' forms. The distribution of these twelve cytological taxa was assessed in relation to the two main vegetation zones of West Africa (forest and savanna), topography, river size and other factors. The range of each species was influenced by seasonal climatic changes in wind movement and river water level. The most widely distributed species were S. sirbanum and S. damnosum s.s., associated with savanna areas, recorded from all river basins. Simulium dieguerense was restricted mainly to Western Mali on the Rivers Bafing and Bakoye in the Senegal River basin. Simulium squamosum was identified from rivers draining mountainous areas in both the forest and savanna zones. Simulium yahense was found in small permanent rivers along a wide forested band parallel to the coast and was absent from the plains of Togo and Benin. Members of the S. sanctipauli subcomplex had restricted distributions except for S. sanctipauli s.s., which was widespread in large rivers of the forest zone from Sierra Leone to the Volta Lake in Ghana. Simulium soubrense 'Beffa' form occurred in Togo and Benin, S. soubrense 'Chutes Milo' form in Guinea, both 'Konkouré' and 'Menankaya' forms of S. konkourense occurred predominantly in Guinea and S. leonense in Sierra Leone. The relevance of the distribution maps and the importance of the data bank to vector control larvicidal operations are discussed.

  20. The continuum emission spectrum of Hf 2-2 near the Balmer limit and the ORL versus CEL abundance and temperature discrepancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storey, P. J.; Sochi, Taha

    2014-05-01

    The continuum spectrum of the planetary nebula Hf 2-2 close to the Balmer discontinuity is modelled in the context of the long-standing problem of the abundance and temperature discrepancy found when analysing optical recombination lines and collisionally excited forbidden lines in nebulae. Models are constructed using single and double Maxwell-Boltzmann distributions as well as κ-distributions for the energies of the free electrons. New results for the necessary continuum and line emission coefficients are presented calculated with κ-distributed energies. The best fit to the observed continuum spectrum is found to be a model comprising two components with dramatically different temperatures and with a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution of electron energies. On the basis of a χ2 analysis, this model is strongly favoured over a model with κ-distributed electron energies.

  1. Differentiation of sCJD and vCJD forms by automated analysis of basal ganglia intensity distribution in multisequence MRI of the brain--definition and evaluation of new MRI-based ratios.

    PubMed

    Linguraru, Marius George; Ayache, Nicholas; Bardinet, Eric; Ballester, Miguel Angel González; Galanaud, Damien; Haïk, Stéphane; Faucheux, Baptiste; Hauw, Jean-Jacques; Cozzone, Patrick; Dormont, Didier; Brandel, Jean-Philippe

    2006-08-01

    We present a method for the analysis of basal ganglia (including the thalamus) for accurate detection of human spongiform encephalopathy in multisequence magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain. One common feature of most forms of prion protein diseases is the appearance of hyperintensities in the deep grey matter area of the brain in T2-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) images. We employ T1, T2, and Flair-T2 MR sequences for the detection of intensity deviations in the internal nuclei. First, the MR data are registered to a probabilistic atlas and normalized in intensity. Then smoothing is applied with edge enhancement. The segmentation of hyperintensities is performed using a model of the human visual system. For more accurate results, a priori anatomical data from a segmented atlas are employed to refine the registration and remove false positives. The results are robust over the patient data and in accordance with the clinical ground truth. Our method further allows the quantification of intensity distributions in basal ganglia. The caudate nuclei are highlighted as main areas of diagnosis of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (sCJD), in agreement with the histological data. The algorithm permitted the classification of the intensities of abnormal signals in sCJD patient FLAIR images with a higher hypersignal in caudate nuclei (10/10) and putamen (6/10) than in thalami. Defining normalized MRI measures of the intensity relations between the internal grey nuclei of patients, we robustly differentiate sCJD and variant CJD (vCJD) patients, in an attempt to create an automatic classification tool of human spongiform encephalopathies.

  2. A comparison of approaches in fitting continuum SEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yao; Madlener, David; Wolf, Sebastian; Wang, Hong-Chi

    2013-04-01

    We present a detailed comparison of two approaches, the use of a pre-calculated database and simulated annealing (SA), for fitting the continuum spectral energy distribution (SED) of astrophysical objects whose appearance is dominated by surrounding dust. While pre-calculated databases are commonly used to model SED data, only a few studies to date employed SA due to its unclear accuracy and convergence time for this specific problem. From a methodological point of view, different approaches lead to different fitting quality, demand on computational resources and calculation time. We compare the fitting quality and computational costs of these two approaches for the task of SED fitting to provide a guide to the practitioner to find a compromise between desired accuracy and available resources. To reduce uncertainties inherent to real datasets, we introduce a reference model resembling a typical circumstellar system with 10 free parameters. We derive the SED of the reference model with our code MC3 D at 78 logarithmically distributed wavelengths in the range [0.3 μm, 1.3 mm] and use this setup to simulate SEDs for the database and SA. Our result directly demonstrates the applicability of SA in the field of SED modeling, since the algorithm regularly finds better solutions to the optimization problem than a pre-calculated database. As both methods have advantages and shortcomings, a hybrid approach is preferable. While the database provides an approximate fit and overall probability distributions for all parameters deduced using Bayesian analysis, SA can be used to improve upon the results returned by the model grid.

  3. Continuum Thermodynamics - Part II: Applications and Examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albers, Bettina; Wilmanski, Krzysztof

    The intention by writing Part II of the book on continuum thermodynamics was the deepening of some issues covered in Part I as well as a development of certain skills in dealing with practical problems of oscopic processes. However, the main motivation for this part is the presentation of main facets of thermodynamics which appear when interdisciplinary problems are considered. There are many monographs on the subjects of solid mechanics and thermomechanics, on fluid mechanics and on coupled fields but most of them cover only special problems in great details which are characteristic for the chosen field. It is rather seldom that relations between these fields are discussed. This concerns, for instance, large deformations of the skeleton of porous materials with diffusion (e.g. lungs), couplings of deformable particles with the fluid motion in suspensions, couplings of adsorption processes and chemical reactions in immiscible mixtures with diffusion, various multi-component aspects of the motion, e.g. of avalanches, such as segregation processes, etc...

  4. Modeling continuum of epithelial mesenchymal transition plasticity.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Mousumi; Ghosh, Biswajoy; Anura, Anji; Mitra, Pabitra; Pathak, Tanmaya; Chatterjee, Jyotirmoy

    2016-02-01

    Living systems respond to ambient pathophysiological changes by altering their phenotype, a phenomenon called 'phenotypic plasticity'. This program contains information about adaptive biological dynamism. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is one such process found to be crucial in development, wound healing, and cancer wherein the epithelial cells with restricted migratory potential develop motile functions by acquiring mesenchymal characteristics. In the present study, phase contrast microscopy images of EMT induced HaCaT cells were acquired at 24 h intervals for 96 h. The expression study of relevant pivotal molecules viz. F-actin, vimentin, fibronectin and N-cadherin was carried out to confirm the EMT process. Cells were intuitively categorized into five distinct morphological phenotypes. A population of 500 cells for each temporal point was selected to quantify their frequency of occurrence. The plastic interplay of cell phenotypes from the observations was described as a Markovian process. A model was formulated empirically using simple linear algebra, to depict the possible mechanisms of cellular transformation among the five phenotypes. This work employed qualitative, semi-quantitative and quantitative tools towards illustration and establishment of the EMT continuum. Thus, it provides a newer perspective to understand the embedded plasticity across the EMT spectrum. PMID:26762753

  5. A continuum model of retinal electrical stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joarder, Saiful A.; Abramian, Miganoosh; Suaning, Gregg J.; Lovell, Nigel H.; Dokos, Socrates

    2011-10-01

    A continuum mathematical model of retinal electrical stimulation is described. The model is represented by a passive vitreous domain, a thin layer of active retinal ganglion cell (RGC) tissue adjacent to deeper passive neural layers of the retina, the retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) and choroid thus ending at the sclera. To validate the model, in vitro epiretinal responses to stimuli from 50 µm disk electrodes, arranged in a hexagonal mosaic, were recorded from rabbit retinas. 100 µs/phase anodic-first biphasic current pulses were delivered to the retinal surface in both the mathematical model and experiments. RGC responses were simulated and recorded using extracellular microelectrodes. The model's epiretinal thresholds compared favorably with the in vitro data. In addition, simulations showed that single-return bipolar electrodes recruited a larger area of the retina than twin-return or six-return electrodes arranged in a hexagonal layout in which a central stimulating electrode is surrounded by six, eqi-spaced returns. Simulations were also undertaken to investigate the patterns of RGC activation in an anatomically-accurate model of the retina, as well as RGC activation patterns for subretinal and suprachoroidal bipolar stimulation. This paper was originally submitted for the special issue containing contributions from the Sixth Biennial Research Congress of The Eye and the Chip.

  6. Compact continuum brain model for human electroencephalogram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J. W.; Shin, H.-B.; Robinson, P. A.

    2007-12-01

    A low-dimensional, compact brain model has recently been developed based on physiologically based mean-field continuum formulation of electric activity of the brain. The essential feature of the new compact model is a second order time-delayed differential equation that has physiologically plausible terms, such as rapid corticocortical feedback and delayed feedback via extracortical pathways. Due to its compact form, the model facilitates insight into complex brain dynamics via standard linear and nonlinear techniques. The model successfully reproduces many features of previous models and experiments. For example, experimentally observed typical rhythms of electroencephalogram (EEG) signals are reproduced in a physiologically plausible parameter region. In the nonlinear regime, onsets of seizures, which often develop into limit cycles, are illustrated by modulating model parameters. It is also shown that a hysteresis can occur when the system has multiple attractors. As a further illustration of this approach, power spectra of the model are fitted to those of sleep EEGs of two subjects (one with apnea, the other with narcolepsy). The model parameters obtained from the fittings show good matches with previous literature. Our results suggest that the compact model can provide a theoretical basis for analyzing complex EEG signals.

  7. Continuum regularization of quantum field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Bern, Z.

    1986-04-01

    Possible nonperturbative continuum regularization schemes for quantum field theory are discussed which are based upon the Langevin equation of Parisi and Wu. Breit, Gupta and Zaks made the first proposal for new gauge invariant nonperturbative regularization. The scheme is based on smearing in the ''fifth-time'' of the Langevin equation. An analysis of their stochastic regularization scheme for the case of scalar electrodynamics with the standard covariant gauge fixing is given. Their scheme is shown to preserve the masslessness of the photon and the tensor structure of the photon vacuum polarization at the one-loop level. Although stochastic regularization is viable in one-loop electrodynamics, two difficulties arise which, in general, ruins the scheme. One problem is that the superficial quadratic divergences force a bottomless action for the noise. Another difficulty is that stochastic regularization by fifth-time smearing is incompatible with Zwanziger's gauge fixing, which is the only known nonperturbaive covariant gauge fixing for nonabelian gauge theories. Finally, a successful covariant derivative scheme is discussed which avoids the difficulties encountered with the earlier stochastic regularization by fifth-time smearing. For QCD the regularized formulation is manifestly Lorentz invariant, gauge invariant, ghost free and finite to all orders. A vanishing gluon mass is explicitly verified at one loop. The method is designed to respect relevant symmetries, and is expected to provide suitable regularization for any theory of interest. Hopefully, the scheme will lend itself to nonperturbative analysis. 44 refs., 16 figs.

  8. Continuum percolation of congruent overlapping spherocylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wenxiang; Su, Xianglong; Jiao, Yang

    2016-09-01

    Continuum percolation of randomly orientated congruent overlapping spherocylinders (composed of cylinder of height H with semispheres of diameter D at the ends) with aspect ratio α =H /D in [0 ,∞ ) is studied. The percolation threshold ϕc, percolation transition width Δ, and correlation-length critical exponent ν for spherocylinders with α in [0, 200] are determined with a high degree of accuracy via extensive finite-size scaling analysis. A generalized excluded-volume approximation for percolation threshold with an exponent explicitly depending on both aspect ratio and excluded volume for arbitrary α values in [0 ,∞ ) is proposed and shown to yield accurate predictions of ϕc for an extremely wide range of α in [0, 2000] based on available numerical and experimental data. We find ϕc is a universal monotonic decreasing function of α and is independent of the effective particle size. Our study has implications in percolation theory for nonspherical particles and composite material design.

  9. Second law violations, continuum mechanics, and permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostoja-Starzewski, Martin

    2016-03-01

    The violations of the second law are relevant as the length and/or time scales become very small. The second law then needs to be replaced by the fluctuation theorem and mathematically, the irreversible entropy is a submartingale. First, we discuss the consequences of these results for the axioms of continuum mechanics, arguing in favor of a framework relying on stochastic functionals of energy and entropy. We next determine a Lyapunov function for diffusion-type problems governed by stochastic rather than deterministic functionals of internal energy and entropy, where the random field coefficients of diffusion are not required to satisfy the positive definiteness everywhere. Next, a formulation of micropolar fluid mechanics is developed, accounting for the lack of symmetry of stress tensor on molecular scales. This framework is then applied to employed to show that spontaneous random fluctuations of the microrotation field will arise in Couette—and Poiseuille-type flows in the absence of random (turbulence-like) fluctuations of the classical velocity field. Finally, while the permeability is classically modeled by the Darcy law or its modifications, besides considering the violations of the second law, one also needs to account for the spatial randomness of the channel network, implying a modification of the hierarchy of scale-dependent bounds on the macroscopic property of the network.

  10. Radio continuum properties of young planetary nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerrigone, L.; Umana, G.; Trigilio, C.; Leto, P.; Buemi, C. S.; Hora, J. L.

    2008-10-01

    We have selected a small sample of post-AGB (Asymptotic Giant Branch) stars in transition towards the planetary nebula and present new Very Large Array multi-frequency high-angular resolution radio observations of them. The multi-frequency data are used to create and model the targets' radio continuum spectra, proving that these stars started their evolution as very young planetary nebulae. In the optically thin range, the slopes are compatible with the expected spectral index (-0.1). Two targets (IRAS 18062+2410 and 17423-1755) seem to be optically thick even at high frequency, as observed in a handful of other post-AGB stars in the literature, while a third one (IRAS 20462+3416) shows a possible contribution from cold dust. In IRAS 18062+2410, where we have three observations spanning a period of four years, we detect an increase in its flux density, similar to that observed in CRL 618. High-angular resolution imaging shows bipolar structures that may be due to circumstellar tori, although a different hypothesis (i.e. jets) could also explain the observations. Further observations and monitoring of these sources will enable us to test the current evolutionary models of planetary nebulae.

  11. Continuum Edge Gyrokinetic Theory and Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, X Q; Xiong, Z; Dorr, M R; Hittinger, J A; Bodi, K; Candy, J; Cohen, B I; Cohen, R H; Colella, P; Kerbel, G D; Krasheninnikov, S; Nevins, W M; Qin, H; Rognlien, T D; Snyder, P B; Umansky, M V

    2007-01-09

    The following results are presented from the development and application of TEMPEST, a fully nonlinear (full-f) five dimensional (3d2v) gyrokinetic continuum edge-plasma code. (1) As a test of the interaction of collisions and parallel streaming, TEMPEST is compared with published analytic and numerical results for endloss of particles confined by combined electrostatic and magnetic wells. Good agreement is found over a wide range of collisionality, confining potential, and mirror ratio; and the required velocity space resolution is modest. (2) In a large-aspect-ratio circular geometry, excellent agreement is found for a neoclassical equilibrium with parallel ion flow in the banana regime with zero temperature gradient and radial electric field. (3) The four-dimensional (2d2v) version of the code produces the first self-consistent simulation results of collisionless damping of geodesic acoustic modes and zonal flow (Rosenbluth-Hinton residual) with Boltzmann electrons using a full-f code. The electric field is also found to agree with the standard neoclassical expression for steep density and ion temperature gradients in the banana regime. In divertor geometry, it is found that the endloss of particles and energy induces parallel flow stronger than the core neoclassical predictions in the SOL. (5) Our 5D gyrokinetic formulation yields a set of nonlinear electrostatic gyrokinetic equations that are for both neoclassical and turbulence simulations.

  12. Edge gyrokinetic theory and continuum simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, X. Q.; Xiong, Z.; Dorr, M. R.; Hittinger, J. A.; Bodi, K.; Candy, J.; Cohen, B. I.; Cohen, R. H.; Colella, P.; Kerbel, G. D.; Krasheninnikov, S.; Nevins, W. M.; Qin, H.; Rognlien, T. D.; Snyder, P. B.; Umansky, M. V.

    2007-08-01

    The following results are presented from the development and application of TEMPEST, a fully nonlinear (full-f) five-dimensional (3d2v) gyrokinetic continuum edge-plasma code. (1) As a test of the interaction of collisions and parallel streaming, TEMPEST is compared with published analytic and numerical results for endloss of particles confined by combined electrostatic and magnetic wells. Good agreement is found over a wide range of collisionality, confining potential and mirror ratio, and the required velocity space resolution is modest. (2) In a large-aspect-ratio circular geometry, excellent agreement is found for a neoclassical equilibrium with parallel ion flow in the banana regime with zero temperature gradient and radial electric field. (3) The four-dimensional (2d2v) version of the code produces the first self-consistent simulation results of collisionless damping of geodesic acoustic modes and zonal flow (Rosenbluth-Hinton residual) with Boltzmann electrons using a full-f code. The electric field is also found to agree with the standard neoclassical expression for steep density and ion temperature gradients in the plateau regime. In divertor geometry, it is found that the endloss of particles and energy induces parallel flow stronger than the core neoclassical predictions in the SOL.

  13. Continuum elastic theory of adsorbate vibrational relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Steven P.; Pykhtin, M. V.; Mele, E. J.; Rappe, Andrew M.

    1998-01-01

    An analytical theory is presented for the damping of low-frequency adsorbate vibrations via resonant coupling to the substrate phonons. The system is treated classically, with the substrate modeled as a semi-infinite elastic continuum and the adsorbate overlayer modeled as an array of point masses connected to the surface by harmonic springs. The theory provides a simple expression for the relaxation rate in terms of fundamental parameters of the system: γ=mω¯02/AcρcT, where m is the adsorbate mass, ω¯0 is the measured frequency, Ac is the overlayer unit-cell area, and ρ and cT are the substrate mass density and transverse speed of sound, respectively. This expression is strongly coverage dependent, and predicts relaxation rates in excellent quantitative agreement with available experiments. For a half-monolayer of carbon monoxide on the copper (100) surface, the predicted damping rate of in-plane frustrated translations is 0.50×1012s-1, as compared to the experimental value of (0.43±0.07)×1012s-1. Furthermore it is shown that, for all coverages presently accessible to experiment, adsorbate motions exhibit collective effects which cannot be treated as stemming from isolated oscillators.

  14. Optical continuum generation on a silicon chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalali, Bahram; Boyraz, Ozdal; Koonath, Prakash; Raghunathan, Varun; Indukuri, Tejaswi; Dimitropoulos, Dimitri

    2005-08-01

    Although the Raman effect is nearly two orders of magnitude stronger than the electronic Kerr nonlinearity in silicon, under pulsed operation regime where the pulse width is shorter than the phonon response time, Raman effect is suppressed and Kerr nonlinearity dominates. Continuum generation, made possible by the non-resonant Kerr nonlinearity, offers a technologically and economically appealing path to WDM communication at the inter-chip or intra-chip levels. We have studied this phenomenon experimentally and theoretically. Experimentally, a 2 fold spectral broadening is obtained by launching ~4ps optical pulses with 2.2GW/cm2 peak power into a conventional silicon waveguide. Theoretical calculations, that include the effect of two-photon-absorption, free carrier absorption and refractive index change indicate that up to >30 times spectral broadening is achievable in an optimized device. The broadening is due to self phase modulation and saturates due to two photon absorption. Additionally, we find that free carrier dynamics also contributes to the spectral broadening and cause the overall spectrum to be asymmetric with respect to the pump wavelength.

  15. Heterosexuality/homosexuality: dichotomy or continuum.

    PubMed

    McConaghy, N

    1987-10-01

    A recent reanalysis of Kinsey's data rejected his conclusion that heterosexuality and homosexuality were a continuum. A number of studies have been published over the past decade reporting that 5% or less of adolescents were aware of homosexual feelings, a finding also inconsistent with Kinsey's data. These studies have rejected prenatal hormones and rearing by homosexual parents as influencing sexual orientation. If Kinsey's data are correct and 40% or more of adolescents are aware of homosexual feeling the findings of these studies are invalid. Two replications of an initial study with representative samples of medical students found over 40% of both males and females currently aware of some homosexual feelings, consistent with Kinsey's conclusion. The ratio of reported homosexual to heterosexual feelings correlated with opposite sex-linked behaviors in the male, supporting the validity of the subjects' reports. If subjects representative of other subgroups of the population are investigated with this easily implemented method and report similar data, this theoretically and sociologically significant divergence of belief concerning the incidence of the heterosexual/homosexual balance would be resolved.

  16. Exploration of strong-field multiphoton double ionization, rescattering, and electron angular distribution of He atoms in intense long-wavelength laser fields: The coupled coherent-state approach

    SciTech Connect

    Guo Jing; Liu Xueshen; Chu, Shih-I

    2010-08-15

    We extend the coupled coherent-state (CCS) approach to simulate the strong-field ionization of helium atoms at long wavelengths. This approach uses a basis of trajectories guided by frozen Gaussian coherent states, sampled from a Monte Carlo distribution, as the initial states of the quantum time-dependent Schroedinger equations. The CCS trajectories move over averaged potentials, which can remove the Columbic singularities exactly. The low-energy structure is predicted by our CCS calculation and a ''rescattering'' event is clearly identified in the higher-energy regime. In addition, the nonsequential double ionization is also explored and the rescattering event can be identified as the major mechanism. Finally, we also study the electron angular distribution of helium. It is found that the maximum angle between the electron and electric field directions becomes smaller with increase in the laser intensity and wavelength.

  17. Determining temperature distribution in tissue in the focal plane of the high (>100 W/cm(2)) intensity focused ultrasound beam using phase shift of ultrasound echoes.

    PubMed

    Karwat, Piotr; Kujawska, Tamara; Lewin, Peter A; Secomski, Wojciech; Gambin, Barbara; Litniewski, Jerzy

    2016-02-01

    In therapeutic applications of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) the guidance of the HIFU beam and especially its focal plane is of crucial importance. This guidance is needed to appropriately target the focal plane and hence the whole focal volume inside the tumor tissue prior to thermo-ablative treatment and beginning of tissue necrosis. This is currently done using Magnetic Resonance Imaging that is relatively expensive. In this study an ultrasound method, which calculates the variations of speed of sound in the locally heated tissue volume by analyzing the phase shifts of echo-signals received by an ultrasound scanner from this very volume is presented. To improve spatial resolution of B-mode imaging and minimize the uncertainty of temperature estimation the acoustic signals were transmitted and received by 8 MHz linear phased array employing Synthetic Transmit Aperture (STA) technique. Initially, the validity of the algorithm developed was verified experimentally in a tissue-mimicking phantom heated from 20.6 to 48.6 °C. Subsequently, the method was tested using a pork loin sample heated locally by a 2 MHz pulsed HIFU beam with focal intensity ISATA of 129 W/cm(2). The temperature calibration of 2D maps of changes in the sound velocity induced by heating was performed by comparison of the algorithm-determined changes in the sound velocity with the temperatures measured by thermocouples located in the heated tissue volume. The method developed enabled ultrasound temperature imaging of the heated tissue volume from the very inception of heating with the contrast-to-noise ratio of 3.5-12 dB in the temperature range 21-56 °C. Concurrently performed, conventional B-mode imaging revealed CNR close to zero dB until the temperature reached 50 °C causing necrosis. The data presented suggest that the proposed method could offer an alternative to MRI-guided temperature imaging for prediction of the location and extent of the thermal lesion prior to applying the

  18. Determining temperature distribution in tissue in the focal plane of the high (>100 W/cm(2)) intensity focused ultrasound beam using phase shift of ultrasound echoes.

    PubMed

    Karwat, Piotr; Kujawska, Tamara; Lewin, Peter A; Secomski, Wojciech; Gambin, Barbara; Litniewski, Jerzy

    2016-02-01

    In therapeutic applications of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) the guidance of the HIFU beam and especially its focal plane is of crucial importance. This guidance is needed to appropriately target the focal plane and hence the whole focal volume inside the tumor tissue prior to thermo-ablative treatment and beginning of tissue necrosis. This is currently done using Magnetic Resonance Imaging that is relatively expensive. In this study an ultrasound method, which calculates the variations of speed of sound in the locally heated tissue volume by analyzing the phase shifts of echo-signals received by an ultrasound scanner from this very volume is presented. To improve spatial resolution of B-mode imaging and minimize the uncertainty of temperature estimation the acoustic signals were transmitted and received by 8 MHz linear phased array employing Synthetic Transmit Aperture (STA) technique. Initially, the validity of the algorithm developed was verified experimentally in a tissue-mimicking phantom heated from 20.6 to 48.6 °C. Subsequently, the method was tested using a pork loin sample heated locally by a 2 MHz pulsed HIFU beam with focal intensity ISATA of 129 W/cm(2). The temperature calibration of 2D maps of changes in the sound velocity induced by heating was performed by comparison of the algorithm-determined changes in the sound velocity with the temperatures measured by thermocouples located in the heated tissue volume. The method developed enabled ultrasound temperature imaging of the heated tissue volume from the very inception of heating with the contrast-to-noise ratio of 3.5-12 dB in the temperature range 21-56 °C. Concurrently performed, conventional B-mode imaging revealed CNR close to zero dB until the temperature reached 50 °C causing necrosis. The data presented suggest that the proposed method could offer an alternative to MRI-guided temperature imaging for prediction of the location and extent of the thermal lesion prior to applying the

  19. Hybrid continuum-atomistic approach to model electrokinetics in nanofluidics.

    PubMed

    Amani, Ehsan; Movahed, Saeid

    2016-06-01

    In this study, for the first time, a hybrid continuum-atomistic based model is proposed for electrokinetics, electroosmosis and electrophoresis, through nanochannels. Although continuum based methods are accurate enough to model fluid flow and electric potential in nanofluidics (in dimensions larger than 4 nm), ionic concentration is too low in nanochannels for the continuum assumption to be valid. On the other hand, the non-continuum based approaches are too time-consuming and therefore is limited to simple geometries, in practice. Here, to propose an efficient hybrid continuum-atomistic method of modelling the electrokinetics in nanochannels; the fluid flow and electric potential are computed based on continuum hypothesis coupled with an atomistic Lagrangian approach for the ionic transport. The results of the model are compared to and validated by the results of the molecular dynamics technique for a couple of case studies. Then, the influences of bulk ionic concentration, external electric field, size of nanochannel, and surface electric charge on the electrokinetic flow and ionic mass transfer are investigated, carefully. The hybrid continuum-atomistic method is a promising approach to model more complicated geometries and investigate more details of the electrokinetics in nanofluidics. PMID:27155300

  20. Equivalent-Continuum Modeling With Application to Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odegard, Gregory M.; Gates, Thomas S.; Nicholson, Lee M.; Wise, Kristopher E.

    2002-01-01

    A method has been proposed for developing structure-property relationships of nano-structured materials. This method serves as a link between computational chemistry and solid mechanics by substituting discrete molecular structures with equivalent-continuum models. It has been shown that this substitution may be accomplished by equating the vibrational potential energy of a nano-structured material with the strain energy of representative truss and continuum models. As important examples with direct application to the development and characterization of single-walled carbon nanotubes and the design of nanotube-based devices, the modeling technique has been applied to determine the effective-continuum geometry and bending rigidity of a graphene sheet. A representative volume element of the chemical structure of graphene has been substituted with equivalent-truss and equivalent continuum models. As a result, an effective thickness of the continuum model has been determined. This effective thickness has been shown to be significantly larger than the interatomic spacing of graphite. The effective thickness has been shown to be significantly larger than the inter-planar spacing of graphite. The effective bending rigidity of the equivalent-continuum model of a graphene sheet was determined by equating the vibrational potential energy of the molecular model of a graphene sheet subjected to cylindrical bending with the strain energy of an equivalent continuum plate subjected to cylindrical bending.

  1. Framing Disparities Along the Continuum of Care From Chronic Kidney Disease to Transplantation: Barriers and Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Ladin, Keren; Rodrigue, James R.; Hanto, Douglas W.

    2009-01-01

    Research in renal transplantation continues to document scores of disparities affecting vulnerable populations at various stages along the transplantation process. Given that both biological and environmental determinants contribute significantly to variation, identifying factors underlying an unfairly biased distribution of the disease burden is crucial. Confounded definitions and gaps in understanding causal pathways impede effectiveness of interventions aimed at alleviating disparities. This paper offers an operational definition of disparities in the context of a framework aimed at facilitating interventional research. Utilizing an original framework describing the entire continuum of the transplant process from diagnosis of chronic kidney disease through successful transplant, this paper explores the case of racial disparities, illustrating key factors predicting and perpetuating disparities. Though gaps in current research leave us unable to identify which stages of the transplant pathway adversely affect most people, by identifying key risk factors across the continuum of care, this paper highlights areas suited for targeted interventions and presents recommendations for improvement and future research. PMID:19344460

  2. Evolution of surface deformations of weakly bound nuclei in the continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, J. C.; Zhang, Y. N.; Xu, F. R.

    2013-05-01

    We study weakly bound deformed nuclei based on the coordinate-space Skyrme Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) approach, in which a large box is employed for treating the continuum and large spatial extensions. When the limit of the core-halo deformation decoupling is approached, calculations found an exotic “egg”-like structure consisting of a spherical core plus a prolate halo in 38Ne, in which the near-threshold nonresonant continuum plays an essential role. Generally the halo probability and the decoupling effect in heavy nuclei can be hindered by high level densities around Fermi surfaces. However, deformed halos in medium-mass nuclei are possible as the negative-parity levels are sparse, e.g., in 110Ge. The deformation decoupling has also been demonstrated in pairing density distributions.

  3. Framing disparities along the continuum of care from chronic kidney disease to transplantation: barriers and interventions.

    PubMed

    Ladin, K; Rodrigue, J R; Hanto, D W

    2009-04-01

    Research in renal transplantation continues to document scores of disparities affecting vulnerable populations at various stages along the transplantation process. Given that both biological and environmental determinants contribute significantly to variation, identifying factors underlying an unfairly biased distribution of the disease burden is crucial. Confounded definitions and gaps in understanding causal pathways impede effectiveness of interventions aimed at alleviating disparities. This article offers an operational definition of disparities in the context of a framework aimed at facilitating interventional research. Utilizing an original framework describing the entire continuum of the transplant process from diagnosis of chronic kidney disease through successful transplant, this article explores the case of racial disparities, illustrating key factors predicting and perpetuating disparities. Though gaps in current research leave us unable to identify which stages of the transplant pathway adversely affect most people, by identifying key risk factors across the continuum of care, this article highlights areas suited for targeted interventions and presents recommendations for improvement and future research.

  4. Infant Sensitivity to Distributional Information Can Affect Phonetic Discrimination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maye, Jessica; Werker, Janet F.; Gerken, LouAnn

    2002-01-01

    Familiarized 6- and 8-month-olds with speech sounds from a phonetic continuum, exhibiting a bimodal or unimodal frequency distribution. Found that only infants in the bimodal condition discriminated tokens from the endpoints of the continuum. Results demonstrate that infants are sensitive to the statistical distribution of speech sounds in the…

  5. A continuum damage relation for hydrogen attack cavitation

    SciTech Connect

    Burg, M.W.D. van der; Giessen, E. van der

    1997-07-01

    A continuum damage relation (CDR) is proposed to describe the failure process of hydrogen attack, i.e., grain boundary cavitation of steels under conditions of high temperature and high hydrogen pressure. The cavitation is caused by the chemical reaction of hydrogen with grain boundary carbides forming cavities filled with high pressure methane. The micromechanisms described are the grain boundary cavitation and the dislocation creep of the grains. The CDR is based on two extreme cavitation rate distribution modes. In the first mode, the cavitation rate along the facets is uniform, resulting in a hydrostatic dilatation while the creep deformations remain relatively small. In the second mode, cavitation proceeds predominantly on grain boundary facets transverse to the principal macroscopic stress. This part of the CDR builds on Tvergaard`s constitutive relation for intergranular creep rupture [Tvergaard, V., Acta Metallurgica, 1984, 32, 1977] where the facet cavitation is constrained by creep of the surrounding grains. The mode corresponding to the highest cavitation rate is the active mode. The two-dimensional version of the CDR is verified against detailed finite element analyses of hydrogen attack in planar polycrystalline aggregates. Finally, the generalization to a three-dimensional CDR is discussed.

  6. Demographic inference under the coalescent in a spatial continuum.

    PubMed

    Guindon, Stéphane; Guo, Hongbin; Welch, David

    2016-10-01

    Understanding population dynamics from the analysis of molecular and spatial data requires sound statistical modeling. Current approaches assume that populations are naturally partitioned into discrete demes, thereby failing to be relevant in cases where individuals are scattered on a spatial continuum. Other models predict the formation of increasingly tight clusters of individuals in space, which, again, conflicts with biological evidence. Building on recent theoretical work, we introduce a new genealogy-based inference framework that alleviates these issues. This approach effectively implements a stochastic model in which the distribution of individuals is homogeneous and stationary, thereby providing a relevant null model for the fluctuation of genetic diversity in time and space. Importantly, the spatial density of individuals in a population and their range of dispersal during the course of evolution are two parameters that can be inferred separately with this method. The validity of the new inference framework is confirmed with extensive simulations and the analysis of influenza sequences collected over five seasons in the USA. PMID:27184386

  7. Continuum theory for cluster morphologies of soft colloids.

    PubMed

    Kosmrlj, A; Pauschenwein, G J; Kahl, G; Ziherl, P

    2011-06-01

    We introduce a continuum description of the thermodynamics of colloids with a core-corona architecture. In the case of thick coronas, their overlap can be treated approximately by replacing the exact one-particle density distribution by a suitably shaped step profile, which provides a convenient way of modeling the spherical, columnar, lamellar, and inverted cluster morphologies predicted by numerical simulations and the more involved theories. We use the model to study monodisperse particles with the hard-core/square-shoulder pair interaction as the simplest representatives of the core-corona class. We derive approximate analytical expressions for the enthalpies of the cluster morphologies which offer a clear insight into the mechanisms at work, and we calculate the lattice spacing and the cluster size for all morphologies of the phase sequence as well as the phase-transition pressures. By comparing the results with the exact crystalline minimum-enthalpy configurations, we show that the accuracy of the theory increases with shoulder width. We discuss possible extensions of the theory that could account for the finite-temperature effects.

  8. Verification of continuum drift kinetic equation solvers in NIMROD

    SciTech Connect

    Held, E. D.; Ji, J.-Y.; Kruger, S. E.; Belli, E. A.; Lyons, B. C.

    2015-03-15

    Verification of continuum solutions to the electron and ion drift kinetic equations (DKEs) in NIMROD [C. R. Sovinec et al., J. Comp. Phys. 195, 355 (2004)] is demonstrated through comparison with several neoclassical transport codes, most notably NEO [E. A. Belli and J. Candy, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 54, 015015 (2012)]. The DKE solutions use NIMROD's spatial representation, 2D finite-elements in the poloidal plane and a 1D Fourier expansion in toroidal angle. For 2D velocity space, a novel 1D expansion in finite elements is applied for the pitch angle dependence and a collocation grid is used for the normalized speed coordinate. The full, linearized Coulomb collision operator is kept and shown to be important for obtaining quantitative results. Bootstrap currents, parallel ion flows, and radial particle and heat fluxes show quantitative agreement between NIMROD and NEO for a variety of tokamak equilibria. In addition, velocity space distribution function contours for ions and electrons show nearly identical detailed structure and agree quantitatively. A Θ-centered, implicit time discretization and a block-preconditioned, iterative linear algebra solver provide efficient electron and ion DKE solutions that ultimately will be used to obtain closures for NIMROD's evolving fluid model.

  9. Verification of continuum drift kinetic equation solvers in NIMROD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Held, E. D.; Kruger, S. E.; Ji, J.-Y.; Belli, E. A.; Lyons, B. C.

    2015-03-01

    Verification of continuum solutions to the electron and ion drift kinetic equations (DKEs) in NIMROD [C. R. Sovinec et al., J. Comp. Phys. 195, 355 (2004)] is demonstrated through comparison with several neoclassical transport codes, most notably NEO [E. A. Belli and J. Candy, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 54, 015015 (2012)]. The DKE solutions use NIMROD's spatial representation, 2D finite-elements in the poloidal plane and a 1D Fourier expansion in toroidal angle. For 2D velocity space, a novel 1D expansion in finite elements is applied for the pitch angle dependence and a collocation grid is used for the normalized speed coordinate. The full, linearized Coulomb collision operator is kept and shown to be important for obtaining quantitative results. Bootstrap currents, parallel ion flows, and radial particle and heat fluxes show quantitative agreement between NIMROD and NEO for a variety of tokamak equilibria. In addition, velocity space distribution function contours for ions and electrons show nearly identical detailed structure and agree quantitatively. A Θ-centered, implicit time discretization and a block-preconditioned, iterative linear algebra solver provide efficient electron and ion DKE solutions that ultimately will be used to obtain closures for NIMROD's evolving fluid model.

  10. 77 FR 44653 - Continuum of Care Homeless Assistance Grant Application-Technical Submission

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-30

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Continuum of Care Homeless Assistance Grant Application-- Technical Submission AGENCY... the original Continuum of Care Homeless Assistance Grant Application. DATES: Comments Due Date: August... lists the following information: Title of Proposal: Continuum of Care Homeless Assistance...

  11. 77 FR 23491 - Notice of Submission of Proposed Information Collection to OMB; Continuum of Care Homeless...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-19

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Notice of Submission of Proposed Information Collection to OMB; Continuum of Care Homeless Assistance Grant Application--Continuum of Care Registration AGENCY: Office of the Chief... reporting burden associated with registration requirements that Continuum of Care Homeless Assistance...

  12. A computational model of echolocation: Transformation of spectrogram into the reflected intensity distribution for range discrimination of multiple closely spaced objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuo, Ikuo; Kunugiyama, Kenji; Yano, Masafumi

    2001-05-01

    Using frequency-modulated echolocation, bats can discriminate the range of objects with an accuracy of less than a millimeter. However, the echolocation mechanism is not well understood. The delay separation of three or more closely spaced objects can be determined through analysis of the echo spectrum. However, delay times cannot be properly correlated with objects using only the echo spectrum because the sequence of delay separations cannot be determined without information on temporal changes in the interference pattern of the echoes. To illustrate this, Gaussian chirplets with a carrier frequency compatible with bat emission sweep rates were used. The delay time for object 1, T1, can be estimated from the echo spectrum around the onset time. The delay time for object 2 is obtained by adding T1 to the delay separation between objects 1 and 2 (extracted from the first appearance of interference effects). Further objects can be located in sequence by this same procedure. This model can determine delay times for multiple closely spaced objects with an accuracy of about 1 microsecond, when all the objects are located within 30 microseconds of delay separation. This accuracy is possible even with objects having different reflected intensities and in a noisy environment.

  13. Quantum dynamics in continuum for proton transport—Generalized correlation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Duan; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2012-01-01

    As a key process of many biological reactions such as biological energy transduction or human sensory systems, proton transport has attracted much research attention in biological, biophysical, and mathematical fields. A quantum dynamics in continuum framework has been proposed to study proton permeation through membrane proteins in our earlier work and the present work focuses on the generalized correlation of protons with their environment. Being complementary to electrostatic potentials, generalized correlations consist of proton-proton, proton-ion, proton-protein, and proton-water interactions. In our approach, protons are treated as quantum particles while other components of generalized correlations are described classically and in different levels of approximations upon simulation feasibility and difficulty. Specifically, the membrane protein is modeled as a group of discrete atoms, while ion densities are approximated by Boltzmann distributions, and water molecules are represented as a dielectric continuum. These proton-environment interactions are formulated as convolutions between number densities of species and their corresponding interaction kernels, in which parameters are obtained from experimental data. In the present formulation, generalized correlations are important components in the total Hamiltonian of protons, and thus is seamlessly embedded in the multiscale/multiphysics total variational model of the system. It takes care of non-electrostatic interactions, including the finite size effect, the geometry confinement induced channel barriers, dehydration and hydrogen bond effects, etc. The variational principle or the Euler-Lagrange equation is utilized to minimize the total energy functional, which includes the total Hamiltonian of protons, and obtain a new version of generalized Laplace-Beltrami equation, generalized Poisson-Boltzmann equation and generalized Kohn-Sham equation. A set of numerical algorithms, such as the matched interface and

  14. Quantum dynamics in continuum for proton transport--generalized correlation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Duan; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2012-04-01

    As a key process of many biological reactions such as biological energy transduction or human sensory systems, proton transport has attracted much research attention in biological, biophysical, and mathematical fields. A quantum dynamics in continuum framework has been proposed to study proton permeation through membrane proteins in our earlier work and the present work focuses on the generalized correlation of protons with their environment. Being complementary to electrostatic potentials, generalized correlations consist of proton-proton, proton-ion, proton-protein, and proton-water interactions. In our approach, protons are treated as quantum particles while other components of generalized correlations are described classically and in different levels of approximations upon simulation feasibility and difficulty. Specifically, the membrane protein is modeled as a group of discrete atoms, while ion densities are approximated by Boltzmann distributions, and water molecules are represented as a dielectric continuum. These proton-environment interactions are formulated as convolutions between number densities of species and their corresponding interaction kernels, in which parameters are obtained from experimental data. In the present formulation, generalized correlations are important components in the total Hamiltonian of protons, and thus is seamlessly embedded in the multiscale/multiphysics total variational model of the system. It takes care of non-electrostatic interactions, including the finite size effect, the geometry confinement induced channel barriers, dehydration and hydrogen bond effects, etc. The variational principle or the Euler-Lagrange equation is utilized to minimize the total energy functional, which includes the total Hamiltonian of protons, and obtain a new version of generalized Laplace-Beltrami equation, generalized Poisson-Boltzmann equation and generalized Kohn-Sham equation. A set of numerical algorithms, such as the matched interface and

  15. Quantum dynamics in continuum for proton transport--generalized correlation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Duan; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2012-04-01

    As a key process of many biological reactions such as biological energy transduction or human sensory systems, proton transport has attracted much research attention in biological, biophysical, and mathematical fields. A quantum dynamics in continuum framework has been proposed to study proton permeation through membrane proteins in our earlier work and the present work focuses on the generalized correlation of protons with their environment. Being complementary to electrostatic potentials, generalized correlations consist of proton-proton, proton-ion, proton-protein, and proton-water interactions. In our approach, protons are treated as quantum particles while other components of generalized correlations are described classically and in different levels of approximations upon simulation feasibility and difficulty. Specifically, the membrane protein is modeled as a group of discrete atoms, while ion densities are approximated by Boltzmann distributions, and water molecules are represented as a dielectric continuum. These proton-environment interactions are formulated as convolutions between number densities of species and their corresponding interaction kernels, in which parameters are obtained from experimental data. In the present formulation, generalized correlations are important components in the total Hamiltonian of protons, and thus is seamlessly embedded in the multiscale/multiphysics total variational model of the system. It takes care of non-electrostatic interactions, including the finite size effect, the geometry confinement induced channel barriers, dehydration and hydrogen bond effects, etc. The variational principle or the Euler-Lagrange equation is utilized to minimize the total energy functional, which includes the total Hamiltonian of protons, and obtain a new version of generalized Laplace-Beltrami equation, generalized Poisson-Boltzmann equation and generalized Kohn-Sham equation. A set of numerical algorithms, such as the matched interface and

  16. Quantum dynamics in continuum for proton transport—Generalized correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Duan; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2012-04-01

    As a key process of many biological reactions such as biological energy transduction or human sensory systems, proton transport has attracted much research attention in biological, biophysical, and mathematical fields. A quantum dynamics in continuum framework has been proposed to study proton permeation through membrane proteins in our earlier work and the present work focuses on the generalized correlation of protons with their environment. Being complementary to electrostatic potentials, generalized correlations consist of proton-proton, proton-ion, proton-protein, and proton-water interactions. In our approach, protons are treated as quantum particles while other components of generalized correlations are described classically and in different levels of approximations upon simulation feasibility and difficulty. Specifically, the membrane protein is modeled as a group of discrete atoms, while ion densities are approximated by Boltzmann distributions, and water molecules are represented as a dielectric continuum. These proton-environment interactions are formulated as convolutions between number densities of species and their corresponding interaction kernels, in which parameters are obtained from experimental data. In the present formulation, generalized correlations are important components in the total Hamiltonian of protons, and thus is seamlessly embedded in the multiscale/multiphysics total variational model of the system. It takes care of non-electrostatic interactions, including the finite size effect, the geometry confinement induced channel barriers, dehydration and hydrogen bond effects, etc. The variational principle or the Euler-Lagrange equation is utilized to minimize the total energy functional, which includes the total Hamiltonian of protons, and obtain a new version of generalized Laplace-Beltrami equation, generalized Poisson-Boltzmann equation and generalized Kohn-Sham equation. A set of numerical algorithms, such as the matched interface and

  17. SEACAS Theory Manuals: Part II. Nonlinear Continuum Mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Attaway, S.W.; Laursen, T.A.; Zadoks, R.I.

    1998-09-01

    This report summarizes the key continuum mechanics concepts required for the systematic prescription and numerical solution of finite deformation solid mechanics problems. Topics surveyed include measures of deformation appropriate for media undergoing large deformations, stress measures appropriate for such problems, balance laws and their role in nonlinear continuum mechanics, the role of frame indifference in description of large deformation response, and the extension of these theories to encompass two dimensional idealizations, structural idealizations, and rigid body behavior. There are three companion reports that describe the problem formulation, constitutive modeling, and finite element technology for nonlinear continuum mechanics systems.

  18. The submillimeter radio continuum of Comet P/Brorsen-Metcalf

    SciTech Connect

    Jewitt, D.; Luu, J. MIT, Cambridge, MA )

    1990-12-01

    Observations of Comet P/Brorsen-Metcalf in the submillimeter radio continuum are presented. The observations were taken using the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope on Mauna Kea, and include the first truly submillimeter detection of a comet, and the first submillimeter continuum spectrum. The submillimeter radiation is attributed to thermal emission from a transient population of large grains with a total mass of (1-10) x 10 to the 9th kg. The large grains may be produced by catastrophic failure of part of the refractory mantle on the surface of the cometary nucleus. Models of the submillimeter continuum are discussed. 49 refs.

  19. A simple low-computation-intensity model for approximating the distribution function of a sum of non-identical lognormals for financial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messica, A.

    2016-10-01

    The probability distribution function of a weighted sum of non-identical lognormal random variables is required in various fields of science and engineering and specifically in finance for portfolio management as well as exotic options valuation. Unfortunately, it has no known closed form and therefore has to be approximated. Most of the approximations presented to date are complex as well as complicated for implementation. This paper presents a simple, and easy to implement, approximation method via modified moments matching and a polynomial asymptotic series expansion correction for a central limit theorem of a finite sum. The method results in an intuitively-appealing and computation-efficient approximation for a finite sum of lognormals of at least ten summands and naturally improves as the number of summands increases. The accuracy of the method is tested against the results of Monte Carlo simulationsand also compared against the standard central limit theorem andthe commonly practiced Markowitz' portfolio equations.

  20. Raman intensity and spectra predictions for cylindrical viruses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dykeman, Eric C.; Sankey, Otto F.; Tsen, Kong-Thon

    2007-07-01

    A theoretical framework for predicting low frequency Raman vibrational spectra of viral capsids is presented and applied to the M13 bacteriophage. The method uses a continuum elastic theory for the vibrational modes and a bond-charge polarizability model of an amorphous material to roughly predict the Raman intensities. Comparison is made to experimental results for the M13 bacteriophage virus.

  1. Analysis of dose distribution in organs at risk in patients with prostate cancer treated with the intensity-modulated radiation therapy and arc technique

    PubMed Central

    Biegała, Michał; Hydzik, Adam

    2016-01-01

    This study describes a comparative analysis of treatment plans in 48 patients with prostate cancer treated with ionizing radiation. Each patient was subjected to the intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and arc technique. In each treatment plan, the organs at risk were assessed: the urinary bladder, rectum and heads of the femur, as well as the volume of normal tissue. The following features were compared: treatment time, conformity indices for the planning target volume, mean doses and standard deviation in organs at risk, and organ volumes for each particular dose. The treatment period in the arc technique is 13.7% shorter than in the IMRT technique. Comparing the results of the IMRT and arc techniques (arc vs. IMRT), the mean values were 29.21 ± 12.91 Gy versus 28.36 ± 13.79 Gy for the bladder, 20.36 ± 3.16 Gy versus 18.17 ± 5.11 Gy for the right femoral head, and 18.98 ± 3.28 Gy versus 16.67 ± 5.15 Gy for the left femoral head. For the rectum, lower values were obtained after application of the arc technique, not the IMRT technique: 35.84 ± 12.28 Gy versus 35.90 ± 13.05 Gy. The results indicate that the applied therapy has a statistically significant influence on the volume for a particular dose with regard to the urinary bladder. It is advisable to apply the IMRT technique to patients who need the femur heads and urinary bladder protected by exposing them to low irradiation doses. PMID:27651567

  2. Analysis of dose distribution in organs at risk in patients with prostate cancer treated with the intensity-modulated radiation therapy and arc technique.

    PubMed

    Biegała, Michał; Hydzik, Adam

    2016-01-01

    This study describes a comparative analysis of treatment plans in 48 patients with prostate cancer treated with ionizing radiation. Each patient was subjected to the intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and arc technique. In each treatment plan, the organs at risk were assessed: the urinary bladder, rectum and heads of the femur, as well as the volume of normal tissue. The following features were compared: treatment time, conformity indices for the planning target volume, mean doses and standard deviation in organs at risk, and organ volumes for each particular dose. The treatment period in the arc technique is 13.7% shorter than in the IMRT technique. Comparing the results of the IMRT and arc techniques (arc vs. IMRT), the mean values were 29.21 ± 12.91 Gy versus 28.36 ± 13.79 Gy for the bladder, 20.36 ± 3.16 Gy versus 18.17 ± 5.11 Gy for the right femoral head, and 18.98 ± 3.28 Gy versus 16.67 ± 5.15 Gy for the left femoral head. For the rectum, lower values were obtained after application of the arc technique, not the IMRT technique: 35.84 ± 12.28 Gy versus 35.90 ± 13.05 Gy. The results indicate that the applied therapy has a statistically significant influence on the volume for a particular dose with regard to the urinary bladder. It is advisable to apply the IMRT technique to patients who need the femur heads and urinary bladder protected by exposing them to low irradiation doses. PMID:27651567

  3. Porcine circovirus-2 DNA concentration distinguishes wasting from nonwasting pigs and is correlated with lesion distribution, severity, and nucleocapsid staining intensity.

    PubMed

    Harding, John C S; Baker, Crissie D; Tumber, Anju; McIntosh, Kathleen A; Parker, Sarah E; Middleton, Dorothy M; Hill, Janet E; Ellis, John A; Krakowka, Steven

    2008-05-01

    The emergence of severe porcine circoviral disease in North America is associated with Porcine circovirus-2 genotype b (PCV-2b), which has led to speculation that PCV-2b is more virulent than PCV-2a. The objectives of this study were to 1) correlate the PCV-2 DNA concentration and lesions in wasting (WST) and age-matched healthy (HLTH) pigs from 2 clinically affected farms, and unaffected (UNFCT) pigs from a farm with no prior clinical or diagnostic history of PCVD; and 2) to determine the initial estimates of sensitivity and specificity of PCV-2 quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). PCV-2b was confirmed in all 3 farms. Compared with HLTH pigs, WST pigs demonstrated significantly more prevalent thymic atrophy, failure of normal pulmonary collapse, and ascites (P < 0.017 for all). The HLTH and UNFCT pigs had significantly more pronounced lymphoid germinal centers and proliferative paracortical T-dependent zones, compared with WST pigs (P < 0.017). Across all tissues, PCV-2 DNA concentrations were significantly higher in WST compared with HLTH and UNFCT pigs (P < 0.017 for all). The PCV-2 DNA concentrations were strongly correlated with PCV-2 nucleocapsid staining intensity in lymph node, spleen, Peyer's patches, lung, liver, and kidney (0.60 < or = r < or = 0.84). In the current study, the PCV-2 DNA log10 cutoff concentrations best able to distinguish WST from HLTH and UNFCT pigs were between 7.0 and 8.0 per gram for tissues, and between 4.0 and 5.0 per milliliter for sera. The presence of PCV-2b in UNFCT pigs is evidence that PCV-2b by itself is not sufficient to induce severe disease.

  4. Occurrence, phase distribution and depositional intensity of dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) and its metabolites in air and precipitation of the Pearl River Delta, China.

    PubMed

    Yue, Qiang; Zhang, Kai; Zhang, Bao-Zhong; Li, Shao-Meng; Zeng, Eddy Y

    2011-07-01

    Concentrations of dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) and its metabolites (designated as DDTs, the sum of o,p'- and p,p'-DDT, o,p'- and p,p'-DDE, and o,p'- and p,p'-DDD) in air and precipitation from the Pearl River Delta (PRD) of China were determined. Total concentrations of DDTs in air (gas+particle) and precipitation (dissolved+particle) were 170 ± 120 pg m(-3) and 940 ± 180 pg L(-1) for Dongguan (rural) and 240 ± 120 pg m(-3) and 790 ± 140 pg L(-1) for Shunde (rural), respectively, while they were 1550 ± 640 pg L(-1) in precipitation from Guangzhou (urban). Log-transformed partition coefficients between air and particulate organic matter (log K(oa)(')) of p,p'-DDT, p,p'-DDE, p,p'-DDD, o,p'-DDT, o,p'-DDE, and o,p'-DDD were 9.64 ± 0.58, 10.07 ± 0.56, 9.90 ± 0.76, 10.06 ± 0.66, 10.02 ± 0.72, and 10.13 ± 0.57, respectively; while those between water and particulate organic matter (log K(om)(')) were 6.58 ± 0.66, 6.36 ± 0.53, 6.01 ± 0.62, 6.41 ± 0.42, 5.98 ± 0.76, and 5.95 ± 0.66, respectively. Total washout ratios by bulk rainfalls ranged from 4600 for o,p'-DDT to 54,000 for p,p'-DDT. Estimated average dry particle and wet depositional intensities in the PRD were 2.1 × 10(-6) and 1.6 × 10(-6)gm(-2)y(-1).

  5. Analysis of dose distribution in organs at risk in patients with prostate cancer treated with the intensity-modulated radiation therapy and arc technique

    PubMed Central

    Biegała, Michał; Hydzik, Adam

    2016-01-01

    This study describes a comparative analysis of treatment plans in 48 patients with prostate cancer treated with ionizing radiation. Each patient was subjected to the intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and arc technique. In each treatment plan, the organs at risk were assessed: the urinary bladder, rectum and heads of the femur, as well as the volume of normal tissue. The following features were compared: treatment time, conformity indices for the planning target volume, mean doses and standard deviation in organs at risk, and organ volumes for each particular dose. The treatment period in the arc technique is 13.7% shorter than in the IMRT technique. Comparing the results of the IMRT and arc techniques (arc vs. IMRT), the mean values were 29.21 ± 12.91 Gy versus 28.36 ± 13.79 Gy for the bladder, 20.36 ± 3.16 Gy versus 18.17 ± 5.11 Gy for the right femoral head, and 18.98 ± 3.28 Gy versus 16.67 ± 5.15 Gy for the left femoral head. For the rectum, lower values were obtained after application of the arc technique, not the IMRT technique: 35.84 ± 12.28 Gy versus 35.90 ± 13.05 Gy. The results indicate that the applied therapy has a statistically significant influence on the volume for a particular dose with regard to the urinary bladder. It is advisable to apply the IMRT technique to patients who need the femur heads and urinary bladder protected by exposing them to low irradiation doses.

  6. Continuum dynamics of the formation, migration and dissociation of self-locked dislocation structures on parallel slip planes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yichao; Niu, Xiaohua; Xiang, Yang

    2016-11-01

    In continuum models of dislocations, proper formulations of short-range elastic interactions of dislocations are crucial for capturing various types of dislocation patterns formed in crystalline materials. In this article, the continuum dynamics of straight dislocations distributed on two parallel slip planes is modelled through upscaling the underlying discrete dislocation dynamics. Two continuum velocity field quantities are introduced to facilitate the discrete-to-continuum transition. The first one is the local migration velocity of dislocation ensembles which is found fully independent of the short-range dislocation correlations. The second one is the decoupling velocity of dislocation pairs controlled by a threshold stress value, which is proposed to be the effective flow stress for single slip systems. Compared to the almost ubiquitously adopted Taylor relationship, the derived flow stress formula exhibits two features that are more consistent with the underlying discrete dislocation dynamics: (i) the flow stress increases with the in-plane component of the dislocation density only up to a certain value, hence the derived formula admits a minimum inter-dislocation distance within slip planes; (ii) the flow stress smoothly transits to zero when all dislocations become geometrically necessary dislocations. A regime under which inhomogeneities in dislocation density grow is identified, and is further validated through comparison with discrete dislocation dynamical simulation results. Based on the findings in this article and in our previous works, a general strategy for incorporating short-range dislocation correlations into continuum models of dislocations is proposed.

  7. On the Continuum Representation of Fracture Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, A.; Botros, F.; Reeves, D. M.; Pohll, G.

    2006-12-01

    Discrete Fracture Network (DFN) and Stochastic Continuum (SC) are the two dominant modeling approaches used for simulating of fluid flow and solute transport in fractured media. While the SC approach has several variants, we focus on two methods introduced by Svensson [2001] and McKenna and Reeves [2002] where discrete fracture networks are directly mapped onto a finite-difference grid as grid cell conductivities. These methods combine the merits of each approach; a computationally efficient grid is utilized for the solution of fluid flow, and details of the fracture network are preserved by assigning a permeability contrast between the grid cells representing the rock matrix and fracture cells. In this paper, we focus on several outstanding issues that are associated with SC models: enhanced connectivity between fractures that would otherwise not be in connection in a DFN simulation, the formulation of grid cell conductivity for cells containing multiple fractures, and the influence of grid size. To addresses these issues, both DFN and SC models are used to solve for fluid flow through two-dimensional, randomly generated fracture networks. To minimize connectivity between fractures in the SC model, a percolation algorithm is used to define the hydraulic backbone before fractures are mapped onto a model grid. The effect of grid size is studied by using two different regularly-spaced grids with cell lengths of 1m and 10m. The resultant DFN flow solutions are used as a metric to evaluate different approaches used to assign grid cell conductivity. Results from this study are presented as guidelines for representing fracture networks as grid cell conductivities.

  8. Continuum physics: Correlation and fluctuation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Herskind, B.

    1993-10-01

    It is well known that the main flow of the {gamma}-decay from high spin states passes through the regions of high level density several MeV above the yrast line. Nevertheless, only very limited information about the nuclear structure in this region is available, due to the extremely high complexity of the decay patterns. The new highly efficient {gamma}-spectrometer arrays, GASP, EUROGAM and GAMMASPHERE coming into operation these years, with several orders of magnitude higher selectivity for studying weakly populated states, offers new exiting possibilities also for a much more detailed study of the high spin quasi-continuum. It is of special interest to study the phase transition from the region of discrete regular rotational band structures found close to the yrast line, into the region of damped rotational motion at higher excitation energies and investigate the interactions responsible for the damping phenomena. Some of the first large data-sets to be analyzed are made on residues around e.g. {sup 152}Dy and {sup 168}Yb produced with EUROGAM in Daresbury, UK, in addition to {sup 143}Eu and {sup 182}Pt produced with GASP in Legnaro, Italy. These data-sets will for the first time contain enough counts to allow for a fluctuation analysis of 3-fold coincidence matrixes. The high spatial resolution in a cube of triples make it possible to select transitions from specific configurations using 2 of the detectors and measure the fluctuations caused by the simplicity of feeding the selected configuration by the 3. detector. Thus, weakly mixed structures in the damped region as e.g. superdeformed- or high-K bands are expected to show large fluctuations. Results from these experiments will be discussed.

  9. Continuum and computational modeling of flexoelectricity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Sheng

    , stationary cracks, as well as structures with periodic structures, can be studied consistently with the continuum theory. We also generate predictions of experimental merit and reveal interesting flexoelectric phenomena with potential for application.

  10. Cosmological measurements with forthcoming radio continuum surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raccanelli, Alvise; Zhao, Gong-Bo; Bacon, David J.; Jarvis, Matt J.; Percival, Will J.; Norris, Ray P.; Röttgering, Huub; Abdalla, Filipe B.; Cress, Catherine M.; Kubwimana, Jean-Claude; Lindsay, Sam; Nichol, Robert C.; Santos, Mario G.; Schwarz, Dominik J.

    2012-08-01

    We present forecasts for constraints on cosmological models that can be obtained using the forthcoming radio continuum surveys: the wide surveys with the Low Frequency Array (LOFAR) for radio astronomy, the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP) and the Westerbork Observations of the Deep Apertif Northern Sky (WODAN). We use simulated catalogues that are appropriate to the planned surveys in order to predict measurements obtained with the source autocorrelation, the cross-correlation between radio sources and cosmic microwave background (CMB) maps (the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect), the cross-correlation of radio sources with foreground objects resulting from cosmic magnification, and a joint analysis together with the CMB power spectrum and supernovae (SNe). We show that near-future radio surveys will bring complementary measurements to other experiments, probing different cosmological volumes and having different systematics. Our results show that the unprecedented sky coverage of these surveys combined should provide the most significant measurement yet of the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect. In addition, we show that the use of the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect will significantly tighten the constraints on modified gravity parameters, while the best measurements of dark energy models will come from galaxy autocorrelation function analyses. Using a combination of the Evolutionary Map of the Universe (EMU) and WODAN to provide a full-sky survey, it will be possible to measure the dark energy parameters with an uncertainty of {σ(w0) = 0.05, σ(wa) = 0.12} and the modified gravity parameters {σ(η0) = 0.10, σ(μ0) = 0.05}, assuming Planck CMB+SN (current data) priors. Finally, we show that radio surveys would detect a primordial non-Gaussianity of fNL= 8 at 1σ, and we briefly discuss other promising probes.

  11. COMBIT: protocol of a randomised comparison trial of COMbined modified constraint induced movement therapy and bimanual intensive training with distributed model of standard upper limb rehabilitation in children with congenital hemiplegia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Children with congenital hemiplegia often present with limitations in using their impaired upper limb which impacts on independence in activities of daily living, societal participation and quality of life. Traditional therapy has adopted a bimanual training approach (BIM) and more recently, modified constraint induced movement therapy (mCIMT) has emerged as a promising unimanual approach. Evidence of enhanced neuroplasticity following mCIMT suggests that the sequential application of mCIMT followed by bimanual training may optimise outcomes (Hybrid CIMT). It remains unclear whether more intensely delivered group based interventions (hCIMT) are superior to distributed models of individualised therapy. This study aims to determine the optimal density of upper limb training for children with congenital hemiplegia. Methods and analyses A total of 50 children (25 in each group) with congenital hemiplegia will be recruited to participate in this randomized comparison trial. Children will be matched in pairs at baseline and randomly allocated to receive an intensive block group hybrid model of combined mCIMT followed by intensive bimanual training delivered in a day camp model (COMBiT; total dose 45 hours direct, 10 hours of indirect therapy), or a distributed model of standard occupational therapy and physiotherapy care (SC) over 12 weeks (total 45 hours direct and indirect therapy). Outcomes will be assessed at 13 weeks after commencement, and retention of effects tested at 26 weeks. The primary outcomes will be bimanual coordination and unimanual upper-limb capacity. Secondary outcomes will be participation and quality of life. Advanced brain imaging will assess neurovascular changes in response to treatment. Analysis will follow standard principles for RCTs, using two-group comparisons on all participants on an intention-to-treat basis. Comparisons will be between treatment groups using generalized linear models. Trial registration ACTRN12613000181707

  12. Generalized continuum modeling of scale-dependent crystalline plasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayeur, Jason R.

    The use of metallic material systems (e.g. pure metals, alloys, metal matrix composites) in a wide range of engineering applications from medical devices to electronic components to automobiles continues to motivate the development of improved constitutive models to meet increased performance demands while minimizing cost. Emerging technologies often incorporate materials in which the dominant microstructural features have characteristic dimensions reaching into the submicron and nanometer regime. Metals comprised of such fine microstructures often exhibit unique and size-dependent mechanical response, and classical approaches to constitutive model development at engineering (continuum) scales, being local in nature, are inadequate for describing such behavior. Therefore, traditional modeling frameworks must be augmented and/or reformulated to account for such phenomena. Crystal plasticity constitutive models have proven quite capable of capturing first-order microstructural effects such as grain orientation (elastic/plastic anisotropy), grain morphology, phase distribution, etc. on the deformation behavior of both single and polycrystals, yet suffer from the same limitations as other local continuum theories with regard to capturing scale-dependent mechanical response. This research is focused on the development, numerical implementation, and application of a generalized (nonlocal) theory of single crystal plasticity capable of describing the scale-dependent mechanical response of both single and polycrystalline metals that arises as a result of heterogeneous deformation. This research developed a dislocation-based theory of micropolar single crystal plasticity. The majority of nonlocal crystal plasticity theories are predicated on the connection between gradients of slip and geometrically necessary dislocations. Due to the diversity of existing nonlocal crystal plasticity theories, a review, summary, and comparison of representative model classes is presented in

  13. ISO-SWS spectra of galaxies: Continuum and features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturm, E.; Lutz, D.; Tran, D.; Feuchtgruber, H.; Genzel, R.; Kunze, D.; Moorwood, A. F. M.; Thornley, M. D.

    2000-06-01

    We present an inventory of mid-infrared spectral features detected in high resolution (R ~ 1500) ISO-SWS 2.4-45mu m spectra of the galaxies M 82, NGC 253, Circinus, NGC 1068, and a position in the 30 Doradus region of the Large Magellanic Cloud. We discuss their identifications and highlight possible relations between these features and the physical state of the interstellar medium in galaxies. The spectral features vary considerably from source to source in presence and relative strength. Emission features are largely absent in the intense radiation field close to an AGN. Compared to normal infrared-selected starbursts, they also seem to be weaker in a low metallicity, intensely star forming environment. The large number of features beyond 13mu m is remarkable. Some of the features have - to our knowledge - not been reported before in astronomical objects. In the 5-13mu m region, emission from unidentified infrared bands (UIBs), usually ascribed to aromatic molecules, and apparent silicate absorption dominate the spectrum. The density of features makes it difficult to determine the continuum, particularly in ground-based data of limited wavelength coverage. In fact the apparent depth of the 9.7mu m silicate absorption may be overestimated in the presence of UIB emission, as we demonstrate by comparing the spectrum of M 82 to the (absorption free) spectrum of the reflection nebula NGC 7023. No strong silicate absorption is present in M 82. The (very small grain) dust continuum under the UIB emission in our starburst templates can be modeled by a simple power law, starting at wavelengths between 8 and 9mu m. We find broad H_2O-ice absorption features at 3.0mu m in M 82 and NGC 253. Their optical depths (relative to the visual extinction) indicate that the lines of sight towards these galaxies have similar properties as the line of sight towards the Galactic Center. The active galaxy NGC 1068 exhibits a clearly different spectrum of absorption features, indicating

  14. Mentorship: The Education-Research Continuum

    SciTech Connect

    Correll, D

    2008-05-29

    Mentoring of science students stems naturally from the intertwined link between science education and science research. In fact, the mentoring relationship between a student and a scientist may be thought of analogically as a type of double helix forming the 'DNA' that defines the blueprint for the next generation of scientists. Although this analogy would not meet the rigorous tests commonly used for exploring the natural laws of the universe, the image depicted does capture how creating and sustaining the future science workforce benefits greatly from the continuum between education and research. The path science students pursue from their education careers to their research careers often involves training under an experienced and trusted advisor, i.e., a mentor. For many undergraduate science students, a summer research internship at a DOE National Laboratory is one of the many steps they will take in their Education-Research Continuum. Scientists who choose to be mentors share a commitment for both science education and science research. This commitment is especially evident within the research staff found throughout the Department of Energy's National Laboratories. Research-based internship opportunities within science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) exist at most, if not all, of the Laboratories. Such opportunities for students are helping to create the next generation of highly trained professionals devoted to the task of keeping America at the forefront of scientific innovation. 'The Journal of Undergraduate Research' (JUR) provides undergraduate interns the opportunity to publish their scientific innovation and to share their passion for education and research with fellow students and scientists. The theme of this issue of the JUR (Vol. 8, 2008) is 'Science for All'. Almost 20 years have passed since the American Association for the Advancement of Science published its 1989 report, 'Science for All Americans-Project 2061'. The first

  15. Mega-scale glacial lineations and drumlins: a morphological continuum?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spagnolo, M.; Stokes, C. R.; Clark, C. D.; Dunstone, R. B.

    2012-04-01

    Mega-scale glacial lineations (MSGL) are highly elongate ridges that maintain a parallel conformity over length of 10s of km. Investigation of relict MSGL suggests that they form under fast flowing ice streams. This has now been verified by direct imaging of the bed of Rutford ice stream, West Antarctica. However, the mechanism(s) of MSGL formation is rather poorly understood, although some divergent theories and models have been suggested. Some of these theories have developed from concepts and models initially proposed to explain the formation of another glacial bedform, the drumlin. This would support the idea of a subglacial bedform continuum, i.e. that a distinction amongst related bedforms is artificial because each 'type' of landform gradually evolves into the other and they are the expression of the same fundamental process of formation. To date, very few (if any?) studies have attempted to systematically quantify the morphometric (size and shape) differences and similarities between drumlins and MSGL using a large database. In this paper, we present the result of an extensive analysis of drumlins and MSGL that are found within a single flow-set formed by the Dubawnt lake palaeo-ice stream on the central Canadian Shield. Thousands of MSGL and drumlins have been mapped there for analysis of bedform length, width, elongation, shape (planar asymmetry) and spatial distribution. Results are also compared to other published studies. Altogether, they strongly suggest that the morphometric difference between a 'drumlin' and 'MSGL' is subtle and that, for most variables, the frequency distribution of one landform population largely overlap with that of the other. This supports the idea that the same process might indeed be responsible for the formation of both.

  16. Seismic velocity structure and spatial distribution of reflection intensity off the Boso Peninsula, Central Japan, revealed by an ocean bottom seismographic experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kono, Akihiro; Sato, Toshinori; Shinohara, Masanao; Mochizuki, Kimihiro; Yamada, Tomoaki; Uehira, Kenji; Shinbo, Takashi; Machida, Yuuya; Hino, Ryota; Azuma, Ryosuke

    2016-04-01

    Off the Boso Peninsula, central Japan, where the Sagami Trough is in the south and the Japan Trench is in the east, there is a triple junction where the Pacific plate (PAC), the Philippine Sea plate (PHS) and the Honshu island arc (HIA) meet each other. In this region, the PAC subducts beneath the PHS and the HIA, and the PHS subducts beneath the HIA. Due to the subduction of 2 oceanic plates, numerous seismic events took place in the past. In order to understand these events, it is important to image structure of these plates. Hence, many researchers attempted to reveal the substructure from natural earthquakes and seismic experiments. Because most of the seismometers are placed inland area and the regular seismicity off Boso is inactive, it is difficult to reveal the precise substructure off Boso area using only natural earthquakes. Although several marine seismic experiments using active sources were conducted, vast area remains unclear off Boso Peninsula. In order to improve the situation, a marine seismic experiment, using airgun as an active source, was conducted from 30th July to 4th of August, 2009. The survey line has 216 km length and 20 Ocean Bottom Seismometers (OBSs) were placed on it. We estimated 2-D P-wave velocity structure from the airgun data using the PMDM (Progressive Model Development Method; Sato and Kenett, 2000) and the FAST (First Arrival Seismic Tomography ; Zelt and Barton, 1998). Furthermore, we identified the probable reflection phases from the data and estimated the location of reflectors using Travel time mapping method (Fujie et al. 2006). We found some reflection phases from the data, and the reflectors are located near the region where P-wave velocity is 5.0 km/s. We interpret that the reflectors indicate the plate boundary between the PHS and the HIA. The variation of the intensity of reflection along the upper surface of PHS seems to be consistent with the result from previous reflection seismic experiment conducted by Kimura et

  17. Modelling the Distribution of Forest-Dependent Species in Human-Dominated Landscapes: Patterns for the Pine Marten in Intensively Cultivated Lowlands

    PubMed Central

    Balestrieri, Alessandro; Bogliani, Giuseppe; Boano, Giovanni; Ruiz-González, Aritz; Saino, Nicola; Costa, Stefano; Milanesi, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the “forest-specialist” pine marten Martes martes has been reported to also occur also in largely fragmented, lowland landscapes of north-western Italy. The colonization of such an apparently unsuitable area provided the opportunity for investigating pine marten ecological requirements and predicting its potential south- and eastwards expansion. We collected available pine marten occurrence data in the flood plain of the River Po (N Italy) and relate them to 11 environmental variables by developing nine Species Distribution Models. To account for inter-model variability we used average ensemble predictions (EP). EP predicted a total of 482 suitable patches (8.31% of the total study area) for the pine marten. The main factors driving pine marten occurrence in the western River Po plain were the distance from watercourses and the distance from woods. EP suggested that the pine marten may further expand in the western lowland, whilst the negligible residual wood cover of large areas in the central and eastern plain makes the habitat unsuitable for the pine marten, except for some riparian corridors and the pine wood patches bordering the Adriatic coast. Based on our results, conservation strategies should seek to preserve remnant forest patches and enhance the functional connectivity provided by riparian corridors. PMID:27368056

  18. Modelling the Distribution of Forest-Dependent Species in Human-Dominated Landscapes: Patterns for the Pine Marten in Intensively Cultivated Lowlands.

    PubMed

    Balestrieri, Alessandro; Bogliani, Giuseppe; Boano, Giovanni; Ruiz-González, Aritz; Saino, Nicola; Costa, Stefano; Milanesi, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the "forest-specialist" pine marten Martes martes has been reported to also occur also in largely fragmented, lowland landscapes of north-western Italy. The colonization of such an apparently unsuitable area provided the opportunity for investigating pine marten ecological requirements and predicting its potential south- and eastwards expansion. We collected available pine marten occurrence data in the flood plain of the River Po (N Italy) and relate them to 11 environmental variables by developing nine Species Distribution Models. To account for inter-model variability we used average ensemble predictions (EP). EP predicted a total of 482 suitable patches (8.31% of the total study area) for the pine marten. The main factors driving pine marten occurrence in the western River Po plain were the distance from watercourses and the distance from woods. EP suggested that the pine marten may further expand in the western lowland, whilst the negligible residual wood cover of large areas in the central and eastern plain makes the habitat unsuitable for the pine marten, except for some riparian corridors and the pine wood patches bordering the Adriatic coast. Based on our results, conservation strategies should seek to preserve remnant forest patches and enhance the functional connectivity provided by riparian corridors.

  19. Vasculopathy of Aging and the Revised Cardiovascular Continuum

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Su-A; Park, Jeong Bae; O'Rourke, Michael F.

    2015-01-01

    There have been attempts to explain the process of developments in overt cardiovascular disease, resulting in the presentation of the classic cardiovascular disease continuum and the aging cardiovascular continuum. Although the starting points of these two continua are different, they meet in the midstream of the cycle and reach a consensus at the end of the process. The announcement of the aging cardiovascular continuum made both continua complete, explaining the cardiovascular events in patients without atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease with aging. Impairment of the vascular structure by pulse wave and reflected wave is considered the cause of aortic damage, which influences the development of ischemic heart disease and the development of overt renal disease or cerebrovascular disease. The pathophysiology of vascular aging through pulse wave and its effect on other organs was discussed with Prof. Michael F. O'Rourke who devised the aging cardiovascular continuum. PMID:26587463

  20. Four-body continuum-discretized coupled-channels calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez-Gallardo, M.; Arias, J. M.; Moro, A. M.; Gomez-Camacho, J.; Thompson, I. J.; Tostevin, J. A.

    2009-11-15

    The development of a continuum-bin scheme of discretization for three-body projectiles is necessary for studies of reactions of Borromean nuclei such as {sup 6}He within the continuum-discretized coupled-channels approach. Such a procedure, for constructing bin states on selected continuum energy intervals, is formulated and applied for the first time to reactions of a three-body projectile. The continuum representation uses the eigenchannel expansion of the three-body S matrix. The method is applied to the challenging case of the {sup 6}He+{sup 208}Pb reaction at 22 MeV, where an accurate treatment of both the Coulomb and the nuclear interactions with the target is necessary.